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Sample records for dna structure bonding

  1. Structure of the DNA duplex d(ATTAAT2 with Hoogsteen hydrogen bonds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Acosta-Reyes

    Full Text Available The traditional Watson-Crick base pairs in DNA may occasionally adopt a Hoogsteen conformation, with a different organization of hydrogen bonds. Previous crystal structures have shown that the Hoogsteen conformation is favored in alternating AT sequences of DNA. Here we present new data for a different sequence, d(ATTAAT2, which is also found in the Hoogsteen conformation. Thus we demonstrate that other all-AT sequences of DNA with a different sequence may be found in the Hoogsteen conformation. We conclude that any all-AT sequence might acquire this conformation under appropriate conditions. We also compare the detailed features of DNA in either the Hoogsteen or Watson-Crick conformations.

  2. Binding branched and linear DNA structures: From isolated clusters to fully bonded gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Castanon, J.; Bomboi, F.; Sciortino, F.

    2018-01-01

    The proper design of DNA sequences allows for the formation of well-defined supramolecular units with controlled interactions via a consecution of self-assembling processes. Here, we benefit from the controlled DNA self-assembly to experimentally realize particles with well-defined valence, namely, tetravalent nanostars (A) and bivalent chains (B). We specifically focus on the case in which A particles can only bind to B particles, via appropriately designed sticky-end sequences. Hence AA and BB bonds are not allowed. Such a binary mixture system reproduces with DNA-based particles the physics of poly-functional condensation, with an exquisite control over the bonding process, tuned by the ratio, r, between B and A units and by the temperature, T. We report dynamic light scattering experiments in a window of Ts ranging from 10 °C to 55 °C and an interval of r around the percolation transition to quantify the decay of the density correlation for the different cases. At low T, when all possible bonds are formed, the system behaves as a fully bonded network, as a percolating gel, and as a cluster fluid depending on the selected r.

  3. Optimal Investment in Structured Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille; Jørgensen, Peter Løchte

    The paper examines the role of structured bonds in the optimal portfolio of a small retail investor. We consider the typical structured bond essentially repacking an exotic option and a zero coupon bond, i.e. an investment with portfolio insurance. The optimal portfolio is found when the investment...

  4. Optimal Investment in Structured Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille; Jørgensen, Peter Løchte

    2012-01-01

    of the article is to provide possible explanations for the puzzle of why small retail investors hold structured bonds. The investment universe consists of a stock index, a risk-free bank account, and a structured bond containing an option written on another index. We apply expected utility maximization...

  5. LAMMPS Framework for Dynamic Bonding and an Application Modeling DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    and bond types. When breaking bonds, all angular and dihedral interactions involving broken bonds are removed. The framework allows chemical reactions to be modeled, and use it to simulate a simplistic, coarse-grained DNA model. The resulting DNA dynamics illustrates the power of the present framework....

  6. Substituent Effects on Hydrogen Bonds in DNA : A Kohn-Sham DFT Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias

    2006-01-01

    In this Chapter, we discuss how the hydrogen bonds in Watson-Crick base pairs can be tuned both structurally and in terms of bond strength by exposing the DNA bases to different kinds of substitutions: (1) substitution in the X-H Y hydrogen bonding moiety, (2) remote substitution, i.e., introducing

  7. Structure and bonding in clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.

    1991-10-01

    We review here the recent progress made in the understanding of the electronic and atomic structure of small clusters of s-p bonded materials using the density functional molecular dynamics technique within the local density approximation. Starting with a brief description of the method, results are presented for alkali metal clusters, clusters of divalent metals such as Mg and Be which show a transition from van der Waals or weak chemical bonding to metallic behaviour as the cluster size grows and clusters of Al, Sn and Sb. In the case of semiconductors, we discuss results for Si, Ge and GaAs clusters. Clusters of other materials such as P, C, S, and Se are also briefly discussed. From these and other available results we suggest the possibility of unique structures for the magic clusters. (author). 69 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  8. DNA: Structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinden, Richard R.; E. Pearson, Christopher; N. Potaman, Vladimir

    1998-01-01

    This chapter discusses the structure and function of DNA. DNA occupies a critical role in cells, because it is the source of all intrinsic genetic information. Chemically, DNA is a very stable molecule, a characteristic important for a macromolecule that may have to persist in an intact form...

  9. The adhesive bonding of beryllium structural components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullerton-Batten, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    Where service conditions permit, adhesive bonding is a highly recommendable, reliable means of joining beryllium structural parts. Several important programs have successfully used adhesive bonding for joining structural and non-structural beryllium components. Adhesive bonding minimizes stress concentrations associated with other joining techniques and considerably improves fatigue resistance. In addition, no degradation of base metal properties occur. In many instances, structural joints can be fabricated more cheaply by adhesive bonding or in combination with adhesive bonding than by any other method used alone. An evaluation program on structural adhesive bonding of beryllium sheet components is described. A suitable surface pretreatment for beryllium adherends prior to bonding is given. Tensile shear strength and fatigue properties of FM 1000 and FM 123-5 adhesive bonded joints are reviewed and compared with data obtained from riveted joints of similar geometry. (author)

  10. Unexpected Hydration of a Triple Bond During DNA Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fatthalla, Maha I.; Pedersen, Erik B.

    2016-01-01

    acidic conditions, polarizes the triple bond in the intercalator and this makes hydration of the triple bond possible during the DNA synthesis and an oligonucleotide with 1-(indol-3-yl)-2-(pyren-1-yl)ethanone as the intercalator is formed. Insertion of the unhydrated and hydrated linker systems gave...

  11. Manufacturing study of beryllium bonded structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, M.; Hirai, S.; Kikuchi, K.; Oda, Y.; Shimizu, K.

    2004-01-01

    Manufacturing study has been conducted on Be-bonded structures employed in the first-wall panel of the blanket system for the ITER. For Be tiles bonded to the Cu-Cr-Zr alloy heat sink with stainless-steel cooling pipes, a one-axis hot press with two heating process has been used to bond the three materials. First, Cu-alloy and SS materials are bonded diffusively. Then, Be tiles are bonded to the pre-bonded structure under 20 MPa and at 560 degree C. An Al-Si base interlayer has been used to bond Be to the Cu-Alloy. Because of the limited heat processes using a conventional hot press, the manufacturing cost can be minimized. Using the above bonding techniques, a partial mockup of a blanket first-wall panel with 16 Be tiles (with 50 mm in size) has been successfully manufactured. (author)

  12. Handbook of adhesive bonded structural repair

    CERN Document Server

    Wegman, Raymond F

    1992-01-01

    Provides repair methods for adhesive bonded and composite structures; identifies suitable materials and equipment for repairs; describes damage evaluation criteria and techniques, and methods of inspection before and after repair.

  13. Quantum confinement in hydrogen bond of DNA and RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Santos, C S; Filho, E Drigo; Ricotta, R M

    2015-01-01

    The hydrogen bond is a fundamental ingredient to stabilize the DNA and RNA macromolecules. The main contribution of this work is to describe quantitatively this interaction as a consequence of the quantum confinement of the hydrogen. The results for the free and confined system are compared with experimental data. The formalism to compute the energy gap of the vibration motion used to identify the spectrum lines is the Variational Method allied to Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics. (papert)

  14. Modulating nanoparticle superlattice structure using proteins with tunable bond distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMillan, Janet R.; Brodin, Jeffrey D.; Millan, Jaime A.; Lee, Byeongdu; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we investigate the use of proteins with tunable DNA modification distributions to modulate nanoparticle superlattice structure. Using Beta-galactosidase (βgal) as a model system, we have employed the orthogonal chemical reactivities of surface amines and thiols to synthesize protein-DNA conjugates with 36 evenly distributed or 8 specifically positioned oligonucleotides. When assembled into crystalline superlattices with AuNPs, we find that the distribution of DNA modifications modulates the favored structure: βgal with uniformly distributed DNA bonding elements results in body-centered cubic crystals, whereas DNA functionalization of cysteines results in AB 2 packing. We probe the role of protein oligonucleotide number and conjugate size on this observation, which revealed the importance of oligonucleotide distribution and number in this observed assembly behavior. These results indicate that proteins with defined DNA-modification patterns are powerful tools to control the nanoparticle superlattices architecture, and establish the importance of oligonucleotide distribution in the assembly behavior of protein-DNA conjugates.

  15. Metal-mediated DNA base pairing: alternatives to hydrogen-bonded Watson-Crick base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezawa, Yusuke; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2012-12-18

    With its capacity to store and transfer the genetic information within a sequence of monomers, DNA forms its central role in chemical evolution through replication and amplification. This elegant behavior is largely based on highly specific molecular recognition between nucleobases through the specific hydrogen bonds in the Watson-Crick base pairing system. While the native base pairs have been amazingly sophisticated through the long history of evolution, synthetic chemists have devoted considerable efforts to create alternative base pairing systems in recent decades. Most of these new systems were designed based on the shape complementarity of the pairs or the rearrangement of hydrogen-bonding patterns. We wondered whether metal coordination could serve as an alternative driving force for DNA base pairing and why hydrogen bonding was selected on Earth in the course of molecular evolution. Therefore, we envisioned an alternative design strategy: we replaced hydrogen bonding with another important scheme in biological systems, metal-coordination bonding. In this Account, we provide an overview of the chemistry of metal-mediated base pairing including basic concepts, molecular design, characteristic structures and properties, and possible applications of DNA-based molecular systems. We describe several examples of artificial metal-mediated base pairs, such as Cu(2+)-mediated hydroxypyridone base pair, H-Cu(2+)-H (where H denotes a hydroxypyridone-bearing nucleoside), developed by us and other researchers. To design the metallo-base pairs we carefully chose appropriate combinations of ligand-bearing nucleosides and metal ions. As expected from their stronger bonding through metal coordination, DNA duplexes possessing metallo-base pairs exhibited higher thermal stability than natural hydrogen-bonded DNAs. Furthermore, we could also use metal-mediated base pairs to construct or induce other high-order structures. These features could lead to metal-responsive functional

  16. Altered minor-groove hydrogen bonds in DNA block transcription elongation by T7 RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasova, Marina; Goeldi, Silvan; Meyer, Fabian; Hanawalt, Philip C; Spivak, Graciela; Sturla, Shana J

    2015-05-26

    DNA transcription depends upon the highly efficient and selective function of RNA polymerases (RNAPs). Modifications in the template DNA can impact the progression of RNA synthesis, and a number of DNA adducts, as well as abasic sites, arrest or stall transcription. Nonetheless, data are needed to understand why certain modifications to the structure of DNA bases stall RNA polymerases while others are efficiently bypassed. In this study, we evaluate the impact that alterations in dNTP/rNTP base-pair geometry have on transcription. T7 RNA polymerase was used to study transcription over modified purines and pyrimidines with altered H-bonding capacities. The results suggest that introducing wobble base-pairs into the DNA:RNA heteroduplex interferes with transcriptional elongation and stalls RNA polymerase. However, transcriptional stalling is not observed if mismatched base-pairs do not H-bond. Together, these studies show that RNAP is able to discriminate mismatches resulting in wobble base-pairs, and suggest that, in cases of modifications with minor steric impact, DNA:RNA heteroduplex geometry could serve as a controlling factor for initiating transcription-coupled DNA repair. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. DNA-inspired hierarchical polymer design: electrostatics and hydrogen bonding in concert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemp, Sean T; Long, Timothy E

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acids and proteins, two of nature's biopolymers, assemble into complex structures to achieve desired biological functions and inspire the design of synthetic macromolecules containing a wide variety of noncovalent interactions including electrostatics and hydrogen bonding. Researchers have incorporated DNA nucleobases into a wide variety of synthetic monomers/polymers achieving stimuli-responsive materials, supramolecular assemblies, and well-controlled macromolecules. Recently, scientists utilized both electrostatics and complementary hydrogen bonding to orthogonally functionalize a polymer backbone through supramolecular assembly. Diverse macromolecules with noncovalent interactions will create materials with properties necessary for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Bonding and structure of copper nitrenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundari, Thomas R; Dinescu, Adriana; Kazi, Abul B

    2008-11-03

    Copper nitrenes are of interest as intermediates in the catalytic aziridination of olefins and the amination of C-H bonds. However, despite advances in the isolation and study of late-transition-metal multiply bonded complexes, a bona fide structurally characterized example of a terminal copper nitrene has, to our knowledge, not been reported. In anticipation of such a report, terminal copper nitrenes are studied from a computational perspective. The nitrene complexes studied here are of the form (beta-diketiminate)Cu(NPh). Density functional theory (DFT), complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) electronic structure techniques, and hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods are employed to study such species. While DFT methods indicate that a triplet (S = 1) is the ground state, CASSCF calculations indicate that a singlet (S = 0) is the ground state, with only a small energy gap between the singlet and triplet. Moreover, the ground-state (open-shell) singlet copper nitrene is found to be highly multiconfigurational (i.e., biradical) and to possess a bent geometry about the nitrene nitrogen, contrasting with the linear nitrene geometry of the triplet copper nitrenes. CASSCF calculations also reveal the existence of a closed-shell singlet state with some degree of multiple bonding character for the copper-nitrene bond.

  19. Structure phenomena in the bond zone of explosively bonded plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livne, Z.

    1979-12-01

    In the bond areas of couples of explosively bonded plates, there are often zones, generally designated as ''molten pockets'', which have undergone melting and solidification. The object of the present study was to investigate molten pockets, which have a decisive effect on bond quality. The experimental samples for the study were chosen in consideration of the mutual behaviour of the plates constituting the couples, according to their equilibrium phase diagrams. To facilitate the investigation, large plates were bonded under conditions that enabled to to obtain wavy bond zones that included relatively large molten pockets. To clarify the complex nature of molten pockets and their surroundings, a wide variety of methods were employed. It was found that the shape and composition of molten pockets largely depend upon the mechanism of formation of both the bond wave and the molten pockets. It was also found that the composition of molten pockets is not homogeneous, which is manifest in the modification of the composition of the pockets, the solidification morphology, the phases, which have been identified by X-ray diffraction, and the bond strenght and hardness. Moreover, the different solidification morphologies revealed by metallography were found to depend upon the types of plates bonded, the bonding conditions and the location of pockets in the wavy interface. For molten pockets, cooling rates of 10 4 to 10 5 (degC/sec) have been deduced from interdendritic spacing, and found to be in good agreement with calculations after a mathematical model. It seems that the fast cooling rates and the steep temperature gradients are at the origin of the particular solidification phenomena observed in molten pockets

  20. LEGO-like DNA Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2012-01-01

    -dimensional (3D) DNA structures by self-assembly of single-stranded DNA “bricks.” The method opens a new route to complex self-assembled (3D) nanostructures that may serve as addressable templates for placing guest molecules with high precision, with possible applications in biophysics, medicine...

  1. DNA Self-Assembly and Computation Studied with a Coarse-grained Dynamic Bonded Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Fellermann, Harold; Rasmussen, Steen

    2012-01-01

    We utilize a coarse-grained directional dynamic bonding DNA model [C. Svaneborg, Comp. Phys. Comm. (In Press DOI:10.1016/j.cpc.2012.03.005)] to study DNA self-assembly and DNA computation. In our DNA model, a single nucleotide is represented by a single interaction site, and complementary sites can...

  2. Solvent effects on hydrogen bonds in Watson-Crick, mismatched, and modified DNA base pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poater, Jordi; Swart, Marcel; Guerra, Celia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias

    2012-01-01

    We have theoretically analyzed a complete series of Watson–Crick and mismatched DNA base pairs, both in gas phase and in solution. Solvation causes a weakening and lengthening of the hydrogen bonds between the DNA bases because of the stabilization of the lone pairs involved in these bonds. We have

  3. Performance of various density functionals for the hydrogen bonds in DNA base pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijst, T.; Fonseca Guerra, C.; Swart, M.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the performance of seven popular density functionals (B3LYP, BLYP, BP86, mPW, OPBE, PBE, PW91) for describing the geometry and stability of the hydrogen bonds in DNA base pairs. For the gas-phase situation, the hydrogen-bond lengths and strengths in the DNA pairs have been

  4. Structure and bonding in gold compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parish, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in chemical applications of 197 Au Moessbauer spectroscopy are reviewed. For gold(I) and gold(III), systematic variations in isomer shift and quadrupole splitting are seen as the ligands are changed; the effects of change in coordination number of the gold atoms are also systematic. Data for gold(II) systems involving gold-gold bonds lie between those for corresponding gold(I) and gold(III) materials, showing a small increase in isomer shift and a larger increase in quadrupole splitting as the oxidation state decreases; these trends are explained in terms of the structures. Data for mixed-metal cluster compounds are much more sensitive to structural effects than in homonuclear clusters. Both sets of data show systematic changes with increase in the number of metal atoms to which the gold atom is bound. The connectivity also influences the recoil-free fraction. (orig.)

  5. Measurement and Theory of Hydrogen Bonding Contribution to Isosteric DNA Base Pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Khakshoor, Omid; Wheeler, Steven E.; Houk, K. N.; Kool, Eric T.

    2012-01-01

    We address the recent debate surrounding the ability of 2,4-difluorotoluene (F), a low-polarity mimic of thymine (T), to form a hydrogen-bonded complex with adenine in DNA. The hydrogen bonding ability of F has been characterized as small to zero in various experimental studies, and moderate to small in computational studies. However, recent X-ray crystallographic studies of difluorotoluene in DNA/RNA have indicated, based on interatomic distances, possible hydrogen bonding interactions betwe...

  6. Experimental studies on the nature of bonding of DNA/bipyridyl-(ethylenediamine)platinum(II) and DNA/netropsin complexes in solution and oriented wet-spun films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, R. L.; Szabo, A.; Lee, S. A.; Rupprecht, A.

    2002-03-01

    The stability of complexes of NaDNA with bipyridyl-(ethylenediamine)platinum(II) (abbreviated [(bipy)Pt(en)]) and with netropsin has been studied using two techniques: (i) ultraviolet melting experiments were done on NaDNA/[(bipy)Pt(en)], showing that the [(bipy)Pt(en)] ligand stabilizes the DNA double helix structure; and (ii) swelling measurements (via optical microscopy) as a function of relative humidity were done on wet-spun oriented films of NaDNA/[(bipy)Pt(en)] and of NaDNA/netropsin. The swelling data shows that an irreversible transition of the films occurs at high relative humidity, first for the NaDNA/netropsin, then for pure NaDNA, and lastly for the NaDNA/[(bipy)Pt(en)]. These results are indicative that the [(bipy)Pt(en)] complex stabilizes the intermolecular bonds which mediate the film swelling characteristics. A model is suggested for the binding of [(bipy)Pt(en)] to DNA to explain why the swelling experiments show this ligand as increasing the intermolecular bond strength between the DNA double helices, while netropsin decreases this degree of stabilization.

  7. Complex DNA structures and structures of DNA complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chazin, W.J.; Carlstroem, G.; Shiow-Meei Chen; Miick, S.; Gomez-Paloma, L.; Smith, J.; Rydzewski, J.

    1994-01-01

    Complex DNA structures (for example, triplexes, quadruplexes, junctions) and DNA-ligand complexes are more difficult to study by NMR than standard DNA duplexes are because they have high molecular weights, show nonstandard or distorted local conformations, and exhibit large resonance linewidths and severe 1 H spectral overlap. These systems also tend to have limited solubility and may require specialized solution conditions to maintain favorable spectral characteristics, which adds to the spectroscopic difficulties. Furthermore, with more atoms in the system, both assignment and structure calculation become more challenging. In this article, we focus on demonstrating the current status of NMR studies of such systems and the limitations to further progress; we also indicate in what ways isotopic enrichment can be useful

  8. Complex DNA structures and structures of DNA complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chazin, W.J.; Carlstroem, G.; Shiow-Meei Chen; Miick, S.; Gomez-Paloma, L.; Smith, J.; Rydzewski, J. [Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Complex DNA structures (for example, triplexes, quadruplexes, junctions) and DNA-ligand complexes are more difficult to study by NMR than standard DNA duplexes are because they have high molecular weights, show nonstandard or distorted local conformations, and exhibit large resonance linewidths and severe {sup 1}H spectral overlap. These systems also tend to have limited solubility and may require specialized solution conditions to maintain favorable spectral characteristics, which adds to the spectroscopic difficulties. Furthermore, with more atoms in the system, both assignment and structure calculation become more challenging. In this article, we focus on demonstrating the current status of NMR studies of such systems and the limitations to further progress; we also indicate in what ways isotopic enrichment can be useful.

  9. DNA-scaffolded nanoparticle structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoegberg, Bjoern; Olin, Haakan [Department of Engineering Physics and Mathematics, Mid Sweden University, SE-851 70 Sundsvall, Sweden (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    DNA self-assembly is a powerful route to the production of very small, complex structures. When used in combination with nanoparticles it is likely to become a key technology in the production of nanoelectronics in the future. Previously, demonstrated nanoparticle assemblies have mainly been periodic and highly symmetric arrays, unsuited as building blocks for any complex circuits. With the invention of DNA-scaffolded origami reported earlier this year (Rothemund P W K 2006 Nature 440 (7082) 297-302), a new route to complex nanostructures using DNA has been opened. Here, we give a short review of the field and present the current status of our experiments were DNA origami is used in conjunction with nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles are functionalized with thiolated single stranded DNA. Strands that are complementary to the gold particle strands can be positioned on the self-assembled DNA-structure in arbitrary patterns. This property should allow an accurate positioning of the particles by letting them hybridize on the lattice. We report on our recent experiments on this system and discuss open problems and future applications.

  10. DNA-scaffolded nanoparticle structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegberg, Bjoern; Olin, Haakan

    2007-01-01

    DNA self-assembly is a powerful route to the production of very small, complex structures. When used in combination with nanoparticles it is likely to become a key technology in the production of nanoelectronics in the future. Previously, demonstrated nanoparticle assemblies have mainly been periodic and highly symmetric arrays, unsuited as building blocks for any complex circuits. With the invention of DNA-scaffolded origami reported earlier this year (Rothemund P W K 2006 Nature 440 (7082) 297-302), a new route to complex nanostructures using DNA has been opened. Here, we give a short review of the field and present the current status of our experiments were DNA origami is used in conjunction with nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles are functionalized with thiolated single stranded DNA. Strands that are complementary to the gold particle strands can be positioned on the self-assembled DNA-structure in arbitrary patterns. This property should allow an accurate positioning of the particles by letting them hybridize on the lattice. We report on our recent experiments on this system and discuss open problems and future applications

  11. Measurement and theory of hydrogen bonding contribution to isosteric DNA base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakshoor, Omid; Wheeler, Steven E; Houk, K N; Kool, Eric T

    2012-02-15

    We address the recent debate surrounding the ability of 2,4-difluorotoluene (F), a low-polarity mimic of thymine (T), to form a hydrogen-bonded complex with adenine in DNA. The hydrogen bonding ability of F has been characterized as small to zero in various experimental studies, and moderate to small in computational studies. However, recent X-ray crystallographic studies of difluorotoluene in DNA/RNA have indicated, based on interatomic distances, possible hydrogen bonding interactions between F and natural bases in nucleic acid duplexes and in a DNA polymerase active site. Since F is widely used to measure electrostatic contributions to pairing and replication, it is important to quantify the impact of this isostere on DNA stability. Here, we studied the pairing stability and selectivity of this compound and a closely related variant, dichlorotoluene deoxyriboside (L), in DNA, using both experimental and computational approaches. We measured the thermodynamics of duplex formation in three sequence contexts and with all possible pairing partners by thermal melting studies using the van't Hoff approach, and for selected cases by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Experimental results showed that internal F-A pairing in DNA is destabilizing by 3.8 kcal/mol (van't Hoff, 37 °C) as compared with T-A pairing. At the end of a duplex, base-base interactions are considerably smaller; however, the net F-A interaction remains repulsive while T-A pairing is attractive. As for selectivity, F is found to be slightly selective for adenine over C, G, T by 0.5 kcal mol, as compared with thymine's selectivity of 2.4 kcal/mol. Interestingly, dichlorotoluene in DNA is slightly less destabilizing and slightly more selective than F, despite the lack of strongly electronegative fluorine atoms. Experimental data were complemented by computational results, evaluated at the M06-2X/6-31+G(d) and MP2/cc-pVTZ levels of theory. These computations suggest that the pairing energy of F to A

  12. Bond portfolio's duration and investment term-structure management problem

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Daobai

    2006-01-01

    In the considered bond market, there are N zero-coupon bonds transacted continuously, which will mature at equally spaced dates. A duration of bond portfolios under stochastic interest rate model is introduced, which provides a measurement for the interest rate risk. Then we consider an optimal bond investment term-structure management problem using this duration as a performance index, and with the short-term interest rate process satisfying some stochastic differential ...

  13. Strong and weak hydrogen bonds in drug–DNA complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The dataset was extracted from the protein data bank (PDB). The analysis was performed with an in-house software, hydrogen bond analysis tool (HBAT). In addition to strong hydrogen bonds such as O−H···O and N−H···O, the ubiquitous presence of weak hydrogen bonds such as C−H···O is implicated in molecular ...

  14. Hydrogen bond disruption in DNA base pairs from (14)C transmutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Michel; Carter, Damien J; Uberuaga, Blas P; Stanek, Christopher R; Mancera, Ricardo L; Marks, Nigel A

    2014-09-04

    Recent ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have shown that radioactive carbon does not normally fragment DNA bases when it decays. Motivated by this finding, density functional theory and Bader analysis have been used to quantify the effect of C → N transmutation on hydrogen bonding in DNA base pairs. We find that (14)C decay has the potential to significantly alter hydrogen bonds in a variety of ways including direct proton shuttling (thymine and cytosine), thermally activated proton shuttling (guanine), and hydrogen bond breaking (cytosine). Transmutation substantially modifies both the absolute and relative strengths of the hydrogen bonding pattern, and in two instances (adenine and cytosine), the density at the critical point indicates development of mild covalent character. Since hydrogen bonding is an important component of Watson-Crick pairing, these (14)C-induced modifications, while infrequent, may trigger errors in DNA transcription and replication.

  15. 75 FR 50772 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland... information collection requirement concerning the: Importation Bond Structure. This request for comment is...

  16. Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds : Nature and role in DNA replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogen bonds in DNA Watson–Crick base pairs have long been considered predominantly electrostatic phenomena. In this chapter, we show with state-of-the-art calculations that this is not true and that electrostatic interactions and covalent contributions in these hydrogen bonds are in fact of

  17. Probing Electron-Induced Bond Cleavage at the Single-Molecule Level Using DNA Origami Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Adrian Clemens; Bald, Ilko; Rotaru, Alexandru

    2012-01-01

    Low-energy electrons (LEEs) play an important role in nanolithography, atmospheric chemistry, and DNA radiation damage. Previously, the cleavage of specific chemical bonds triggered by LEEs has been demonstrated in a variety of small organic molecules such as halogenated benzenes and DNA nucleoba...

  18. The helical structure of DNA facilitates binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Otto G; Mahmutovic, Anel; Marklund, Emil; Elf, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The helical structure of DNA imposes constraints on the rate of diffusion-limited protein binding. Here we solve the reaction–diffusion equations for DNA-like geometries and extend with simulations when necessary. We find that the helical structure can make binding to the DNA more than twice as fast compared to a case where DNA would be reactive only along one side. We also find that this rate advantage remains when the contributions from steric constraints and rotational diffusion of the DNA-binding protein are included. Furthermore, we find that the association rate is insensitive to changes in the steric constraints on the DNA in the helix geometry, while it is much more dependent on the steric constraints on the DNA-binding protein. We conclude that the helical structure of DNA facilitates the nonspecific binding of transcription factors and structural DNA-binding proteins in general. (paper)

  19. Interface Fracture in Adhesively Bonded Shell Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2008-01-01

    Two methods for the prediction of crack propagation through the interface of adhesively bonded shells are discussed. One is based on a fracture mechanics approach; the other is based on a cohesive zone approach. Attention is focussed on predicting the shape of the crack front and the critical...

  20. Structure and chemical bond characteristics of LaB6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Lina; Ma Ning; Liu Fengli

    2009-01-01

    The structure and chemical bond characteristics of LaB 6 have been achieved by means of the density functional theory using the state-of-the-art full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FPLAPW) method, which are implemented within the EXCITING code. The results show our optimized lattice constant a (4.158 A), parameter z (0.1981) and bulk modulus B (170.4 GPa) are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data. Electron localization function (ELF) shows the La-La bond mainly is ionic bond, La-B bond is between ionic and covalent bond while the covalent bond between the nearest neighbor B atoms (B2 and B3) is a little stronger than that between the nearer neighbor B atoms (B1 and B4).

  1. Molecular dynamics study of some non-hydrogen-bonding base pair DNA strands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Rakesh K.; Ojha, Rajendra P.; Tiwari, Gargi; Pandey, Vishnudatt; Mall, Vijaysree

    2018-05-01

    In order to elucidate the structural activity of hydrophobic modified DNA, the DMMO2-D5SICS, base pair is introduced as a constituent in different set of 12-mer and 14-mer DNA sequences for the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in explicit water solvent. AMBER 14 force field was employed for each set of duplex during the 200ns production-dynamics simulation in orthogonal-box-water solvent by the Particle-Mesh-Ewald (PME) method in infinite periodic boundary conditions (PBC) to determine conformational parameters of the complex. The force-field parameters of modified base-pair were calculated by Gaussian-code using Hartree-Fock /ab-initio methodology. RMSD Results reveal that the conformation of the duplex is sequence dependent and the binding energy of the complex depends on the position of the modified base-pair in the nucleic acid strand. We found that non-bonding energy had a significant contribution to stabilising such type of duplex in comparison to electrostatic energy. The distortion produced within strands by such type of base-pair was local and destabilised the duplex integrity near to substitution, moreover the binding energy of duplex depends on the position of substitution of hydrophobic base-pair and the DNA sequence and strongly supports the corresponding experimental study.

  2. NMR scalar couplings across Watson–Crick base pair hydrogen bonds in DNA observed by transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervushin, Konstantin; Ono, Akira; Fernández, César; Szyperski, Thomas; Kainosho, Masatsune; Wüthrich, Kurt

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the NMR observation of 15N—15N and 1H—15N scalar couplings across the hydrogen bonds in Watson–Crick base pairs in a DNA duplex, hJNN and hJHN. These couplings represent new parameters of interest for both structural studies of DNA and theoretical investigations into the nature of the hydrogen bonds. Two dimensional [15N,1H]-transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) with a 15N-labeled 14-mer DNA duplex was used to measure hJNN, which is in the range 6–7 Hz, and the two-dimensional hJNN-correlation-[15N,1H]-TROSY experiment was used to correlate the chemical shifts of pairs of hydrogen bond-related 15N spins and to observe, for the first time, hJHN scalar couplings, with values in the range 2–3.6 Hz. TROSY-based studies of scalar couplings across hydrogen bonds should be applicable for large molecular sizes, including protein-bound nucleic acids. PMID:9826668

  3. Estimation of strength in different extra Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds in DNA double helices through quantum chemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, D; Bhattacharyya, D

    2006-10-15

    It was shown earlier, from database analysis, model building studies, and molecular dynamics simulations that formation of cross-strand bifurcated or Extra Watson-Crick hydrogen (EWC) bonds between successive base pairs may lead to extra rigidity to DNA double helices of certain sequences. The strengths of these hydrogen bonds are debatable, however, as they do not have standard linear geometry criterion. We have therefore carried out detailed ab initio quantum chemical studies using RHF/6-31G(2d,2p) and B3LYP/6-31G(2p,2d) basis sets to determine strengths of several bent hydrogen bonds with different donor and acceptors. Interaction energy calculations, corrected for the basis set superposition errors, suggest that N-H...O type bent EWC hydrogen bonds are possible along same strands or across the strands between successive base pairs, leading to significant stability (ca. 4-9 kcal/mol). The N-H...N and C-H...O type interactions, however, are not so stabilizing. Hence, consideration of EWC N-H...O H-bonds can lead to a better understanding of DNA sequence directed structural features. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Precise stacking and bonding technology for RDDS structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higo, T; Toge, N.; Suzuki, T.

    2000-01-01

    The X-band accelerating structures called RDDS1 (Rounded Dumped Detuned Structure) for the linear collider have been developed. The main body of RDDS1 was successfully fabricated in Japan (KEK, IHI). We established basic fabrication techniques through the development of prototype structures including RDDS1. The precise stacking and bonding technologies for RDDS structure are presented in this paper. (author)

  5. Probing the DNA Structural Requirements for Facilitated Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    DNA glycosylases perform a genome-wide search to locate damaged nucleotides among a great excess of undamaged nucleotides. Many glycosylases are capable of facilitated diffusion, whereby multiple sites along the DNA are sampled during a single binding encounter. Electrostatic interactions between positively charged amino acids and the negatively charged phosphate backbone are crucial for facilitated diffusion, but the extent to which diffusing proteins rely on the double-helical structure DNA is not known. Kinetic assays were used to probe the DNA searching mechanism of human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) and to test the extent to which diffusion requires B-form duplex DNA. Although AAG excises εA lesions from single-stranded DNA, it is not processive on single-stranded DNA because dissociation is faster than N-glycosidic bond cleavage. However, the AAG complex with single-stranded DNA is sufficiently stable to allow for DNA annealing when a complementary strand is added. This observation provides evidence of nonspecific association of AAG with single-stranded DNA. Single-strand gaps, bubbles, and bent structures do not impede the search by AAG. Instead, these flexible or bent structures lead to the capture of a nearby site of damage that is more efficient than that of a continuous B-form duplex. The ability of AAG to negotiate these helix discontinuities is inconsistent with a sliding mode of diffusion but can be readily explained by a hopping mode that involves microscopic dissociation and reassociation. These experiments provide evidence of relatively long-range hops that allow a searching protein to navigate around DNA binding proteins that would serve as obstacles to a sliding protein. PMID:25495964

  6. Mechanical properties along interfaces of bonded structures in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.H.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    Proper assessment of the mechanical properties along interfaces of bonded structures currently used in many fusion reactor designs is essential to compare the different fabrication techniques. A Mechanical Properties Microprobe (MPM) was used to measure hardness and Young's modules along the interfaces of Be/Cu bonded structure. The MPM was able to distinguish different fabrication techniques by a direct measurement of the hardness, Young's modules, and H/E 2 which reflects the ability of deformation of the interfacial region

  7. The Term Structure of Credit Spreads on Euro Corporate Bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Landschoot, A.

    2003-01-01

    Although there is a broad literature on structural credit risk models, there has been little empirical testing of these models.In this paper we examine the term structure of credit spreads on euro corporate bonds and the empirical validation of structural credit risk models.The latter provide a

  8. Bonding, structure and solid-state chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Ladd, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This book is aimed at undergraduate students in both chemistry and those degree subjects in which chemistry forms a significant part. It does not reflect any particular academic year, and so finds a place during the normal span of degree studies in the physical sciences. An A-level standard in science and mathematics is presumed; additional mathematical treatments are discussed in Appendices. An introductory first chapter leads into the main subject matter, which is treated through four chapters in terms of the principle bonding forces of cohesion in the solid state; a further chapter discusses nanosize materials. Important applications of the study topics are interspersed at appropriate points within the text. Each chapter is provided with a set of problems of varying degrees of difficulty, so as to assist the reader in gaining a facility with the subject matter and its applications. The problems are supplemented by detailed tutorial solutions, some of which present additional relevant material that indicate...

  9. Structure of adsorbed monolayers. The surface chemical bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somorjai, G.A.; Bent, B.E.

    1984-06-01

    This paper attempts to provide a summary of what has been learned about the structure of adsorbed monolayers and about the surface chemical bond from molecular surface science. While the surface chemical bond is less well understood than bonding of molecules in the gas phase or in the solid state, our knowledge of its properties is rapidly accumulating. The information obtained also has great impact on many surface science based technologies, including heterogeneous catalysis and electronic devices. It is hoped that much of the information obtained from studies at solid-gas interfaces can be correlated with molecular behavior at solid-liquid interfaces. 31 references, 42 figures, 1 table

  10. A bouquet of DNA structures: Emerging diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Mahima; Kaushik, Shikha; Roy, Kapil; Singh, Anju; Mahendru, Swati; Kumar, Mohan; Chaudhary, Swati; Ahmed, Saami; Kukreti, Shrikant

    2016-03-01

    Structural polymorphism of DNA has constantly been evolving from the time of illustration of the double helical model of DNA by Watson and Crick. A variety of non-canonical DNA structures have constantly been documented across the globe. DNA attracted worldwide attention as a carrier of genetic information. In addition to the classical Watson-Crick duplex, DNA can actually adopt diverse structures during its active participation in cellular processes like replication, transcription, recombination and repair. Structures like hairpin, cruciform, triplex, G-triplex, quadruplex, i-motif and other alternative non-canonical DNA structures have been studied at length and have also shown their in vivo occurrence. This review mainly focuses on non-canonical structures adopted by DNA oligonucleotides which have certain prerequisites for their formation in terms of sequence, its length, number and orientation of strands along with varied solution conditions. This conformational polymorphism of DNA might be the basis of different functional properties of a specific set of DNA sequences, further giving some insights for various extremely complicated biological phenomena. Many of these structures have already shown their linkages with diseases like cancer and genetic disorders, hence making them an extremely striking target for structure-specific drug designing and therapeutic applications.

  11. A bouquet of DNA structures: Emerging diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahima Kaushik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Structural polymorphism of DNA has constantly been evolving from the time of illustration of the double helical model of DNA by Watson and Crick. A variety of non-canonical DNA structures have constantly been documented across the globe. DNA attracted worldwide attention as a carrier of genetic information. In addition to the classical Watson–Crick duplex, DNA can actually adopt diverse structures during its active participation in cellular processes like replication, transcription, recombination and repair. Structures like hairpin, cruciform, triplex, G-triplex, quadruplex, i-motif and other alternative non-canonical DNA structures have been studied at length and have also shown their in vivo occurrence. This review mainly focuses on non-canonical structures adopted by DNA oligonucleotides which have certain prerequisites for their formation in terms of sequence, its length, number and orientation of strands along with varied solution conditions. This conformational polymorphism of DNA might be the basis of different functional properties of a specific set of DNA sequences, further giving some insights for various extremely complicated biological phenomena. Many of these structures have already shown their linkages with diseases like cancer and genetic disorders, hence making them an extremely striking target for structure-specific drug designing and therapeutic applications.

  12. Structural organization of DNA in chlorella viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Wulfmeyer

    Full Text Available Chlorella viruses have icosahedral capsids with an internal membrane enclosing their large dsDNA genomes and associated proteins. Their genomes are packaged in the particles with a predicted DNA density of ca. 0.2 bp nm(-3. Occasionally infection of an algal cell by an individual particle fails and the viral DNA is dynamically ejected from the capsid. This shows that the release of the DNA generates a force, which can aid in the transfer of the genome into the host in a successful infection. Imaging of ejected viral DNA indicates that it is intimately associated with proteins in a periodic fashion. The bulk of the protein particles detected by atomic force microscopy have a size of ∼60 kDa and two proteins (A278L and A282L of about this size are among 6 basic putative DNA binding proteins found in a proteomic analysis of DNA binding proteins packaged in the virion. A combination of fluorescence images of ejected DNA and a bioinformatics analysis of the DNA reveal periodic patterns in the viral DNA. The periodic distribution of GC rich regions in the genome provides potential binding sites for basic proteins. This DNA/protein aggregation could be responsible for the periodic concentration of fluorescently labeled DNA observed in ejected viral DNA. Collectively the data indicate that the large chlorella viruses have a DNA packaging strategy that differs from bacteriophages; it involves proteins and share similarities to that of chromatin structure in eukaryotes.

  13. Electronic structure and interatomic bonding in Al10V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahnatek, M; Krajci, M; Hafner, J

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of ab initio calculations we analysed the electron density distribution in the elementary cell of the compound Al 10 V. We found covalent bonding between certain atoms. The Al-V bonds of enhanced covalency are linked into -Al-V-Al-V- chains that extend over the whole crystal. The chains intersect at each V site and together form a Kagome network of corner-sharing tetrahedra. The large voids of this network are filled by Z 16 Friauf polyhedra consisting of Al atoms only. The skeleton of the Friauf polyhedron has the form of a truncated tetrahedron and consists of 12 strongly bonded Al atoms. These Al-Al bonds also have covalent character. The bonding is dominated by sp 2 hybridization. The centre of the Friauf polyhedron may be empty or occupied by an Al atom. The thermodynamic stability of the phase is investigated. The Al 21 V 2 phase with occupied voids is at low temperatures less stable than Al 10 V. The Al 10 V structure can be considered as a special case of the Al 18 Cr 2 Mg 3 structural class. We have found the same picture of bonding as we report here for Al 10 V for several other aluminium-rich alloys belonging to the Al 18 Cr 2 Mg 3 structural class also

  14. Hydrogen-Bonding Capability of a Templating Difluorotoluene Nucleotide Residue in an RB69 DNA Polymerase Ternary Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Shuangluo; Konigsberg, William H.; Wang, Jimin (Yale)

    2011-08-29

    Results obtained using 2,4-difluorotoluene nucleobase (dF) as a nonpolar thymine isostere by Kool and colleagues challenged the Watson-Crick dogma that hydrogen bonds between complementary bases are an absolute requirement for accurate DNA replication. Here, we report crystal structure of an RB69 DNA polymerase L561A/S565G/Y567A triple mutant ternary complex with a templating dF opposite dTTP at 1.8 {angstrom}-resolution. In this structure, direct hydrogen bonds were observed between: (i) dF and the incoming dTTP, (ii) dF and residue G568 of the polymerase, and (iii) dF and ordered water molecules surrounding the nascent base pair. Therefore, this structure provides evidence that a templating dF can form novel hydrogen bonds with the incoming dTTP and with the enzyme that differ from those formed with a templating dT.

  15. Durability properties for adhesively bonded structural aerospace applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, D.K.; Davis, G.D.; McNamara, D.K.; Shah, T.K.; Desai, A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the importance of good bond durability of adhesively joined aerospace components which has been recognized for many years. Military and civilian aircraft are exposed to harsh environments in addition to severe thermal and stress cycles during their service lives. Moisture is responsible for the majority of bond failures in the field. The presence of surface contaminants (e.g., fluoride, silicones) and the non-neutral pH of poor rinse water are common causes of adhesion problems in production environments. Honeycomb panels, stringer skins, doubler plates and core cowl assemblies are bonded joint structures that are subject to environmental- or contaminant-induced debonding. The identification and characterization of the causes of such bond failures leads to improved production quality, yield and cost reduction

  16. A systematic structural study of halogen bonding versus hydrogen bonding within competitive supramolecular systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christer B. Aakeröy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As halogen bonds gain prevalence in supramolecular synthesis and materials chemistry, it has become necessary to examine more closely how such interactions compete with or complement hydrogen bonds whenever both are present within the same system. As hydrogen and halogen bonds have several fundamental features in common, it is often difficult to predict which will be the primary interaction in a supramolecular system, especially as they have comparable strength and geometric requirements. To address this challenge, a series of molecules containing both hydrogen- and halogen-bond donors were co-crystallized with various monotopic, ditopic symmetric and ditopic asymmetric acceptor molecules. The outcome of each reaction was examined using IR spectroscopy and, whenever possible, single-crystal X-ray diffraction. 24 crystal structures were obtained and subsequently analyzed, and the synthon preferences of the competing hydrogen- and halogen-bond donors were rationalized against a background of calculated molecular electrostatic potential values. It has been shown that readily accessible electrostatic potentials can offer useful practical guidelines for predicting the most likely primary synthons in these co-crystals as long as the potential differences are weighted appropriately.

  17. Microfluidic DNA microarrays in PMMA chips: streamlined fabrication via simultaneous DNA immobilization and bonding activation by brief UV exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabourin, David; Petersen, J; Snakenborg, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    This report presents and describes a simple and scalable method for producing functional DNA microarrays within enclosed polymeric, PMMA, microfluidic devices. Brief (30 s) exposure to UV simultaneously immobilized poly(T)poly(C)-tagged DNA probes to the surface of unmodified PMMA and activated...... the surface for bonding below the glass transition temperature of the bulk PMMA. Functionality and validation of the enclosed PMMA microarrays was demonstrated as 18 patients were correctly genotyped for all eight mutation sites in the HBB gene interrogated. The fabrication process therefore produced probes...... with desired hybridization properties and sufficient bonding between PMMA layers to allow construction of microfluidic devices. The streamlined fabrication method is suited to the production of low-cost microfluidic microarray-based diagnostic devices and, as such, is equally applicable to the development...

  18. Computational applications of DNA structural scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, P.; Chauvin, Y.; Brunak, Søren

    1998-01-01

    that these scales provide an alternative or complementary compact representation of DNA sequences. As an example, we construct a strand-invariant representation of DNA sequences. The scales can also be used to analyze and discover new DNA structural patterns, especially in combination with hidden Markov models......Studies several different physical scales associated with the structural features of DNA sequences from a computational standpoint, including dinucleotide scales, such as base stacking energy and propeller twist, and trinucleotide scales, such as bendability and nucleosome positioning. We show...

  19. Solution structure of the luzopeptin-DNA complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Patel, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    The luzopeptin-d(C-A-T-G) complex (1 drug/duplex) has been generated in aqueous solution and its structure characterized by a combined application of two-dimensional NMR experiments and molecular dynamics calculations. Once equivalent of luzopeptin binds to the self-complementary tetranucleotide duplex with the 2-fold symmetry of the antitumor agent and the DNA oligomer retained on complex formation. The authors have assigned the exchangeable and nonexchangeable proton resonances of luzopeptin and the d(C-A-T-G) duplex in the complex and identified the intermolecular proton-proton NOEs that define the alignment of the antitumor agent at its binding site in duplex DNA. The analysis was greatly aided by a large number of intermolecular NOEs involving exchangeable protons on both the luzopeptin and the DNA in the complex. The formation of cis peptide bonds for luzopeptin in the complex results in an increased separation of the long sides of the rectangular cyclic depsipeptide backbone and reorients in the glycine amide proton so that it can form an intermolecular hydrogen bond with the 2-carbonyl of T3 in the complex. This observation explains, in part, the requirement for Watson-Crick A·T pairs to be sandwiched between the quinolines at the bisintercalation site in the luzopeptin-DNA complex. The NMR studies on the luzopeptin-d(C-A-T-G) complex unequivocally establish that antitumor agents can undergo conformational transitions on complex formation with DNA, and it is the conformation of the drug in the complex that should serve as the starting point for drug design studies. The above structural details on the solution structure of the luzopeptin-DNA complex also explain the sequence selectivity of luzopeptin for bisintercalation at d(C-A)·d(T-G) steps in the d(C-A-T-G) duplex in solution

  20. DNA base dimers are stabilized by hydrogen-bonding interactions including non-Watson-Crick pairing near graphite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Akshaya; Jagota, Anand; Mittal, Jeetain

    2012-10-11

    Single- and double-stranded DNA are increasingly being paired with surfaces and nanoparticles for numerous applications, such as sensing, imaging, and drug delivery. Unlike the majority of DNA structures in bulk that are stabilized by canonical Watson-Crick pairing between Ade-Thy and Gua-Cyt, those adsorbed on surfaces are often stabilized by noncanonical base pairing, quartet formation, and base-surface stacking. Not much is known about these kinds of interactions. To build an understanding of the role of non-Watson-Crick pairing on DNA behavior near surfaces, one requires basic information on DNA base pair stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions. All-atom molecular simulations of DNA bases in two cases--in bulk water and strongly adsorbed on a graphite surface--are conducted to study the relative strengths of stacking and hydrogen bond interactions for each of the 10 possible combinations of base pairs. The key information obtained from these simulations is the free energy as a function of distance between two bases in a pair. We find that stacking interactions exert the dominant influence on the stability of DNA base pairs in bulk water as expected. The strength of stability for these stacking interactions is found to decrease in the order Gua-Gua > Ade-Gua > Ade-Ade > Gua-Thy > Gua-Cyt > Ade-Thy > Ade-Cyt > Thy-Thy > Cyt-Thy > Cyt-Cyt. On the other hand, mutual interactions of surface-adsorbed base pairs are stabilized mostly by hydrogen-bonding interactions in the order Gua-Cyt > Ade-Gua > Ade-Thy > Ade-Ade > Cyt-Thy > Gua-Gua > Cyt-Cyt > Ade-Cyt > Thy-Thy > Gua-Thy. Interestingly, several non-Watson-Crick base pairings, which are commonly ignored, have similar stabilization free energies due to interbase hydrogen bonding as Watson-Crick pairs. This clearly highlights the importance of non-Watson-Crick base pairing in the development of secondary structures of oligonucleotides near surfaces.

  1. Self-assembled DNA Structures for Nanoconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hao; Yin, Peng; Park, Sung Ha; Li, Hanying; Feng, Liping; Guan, Xiaoju; Liu, Dage; Reif, John H.; LaBean, Thomas H.

    2004-09-01

    In recent years, a number of research groups have begun developing nanofabrication methods based on DNA self-assembly. Here we review our recent experimental progress to utilize novel DNA nanostructures for self-assembly as well as for templates in the fabrication of functional nano-patterned materials. We have prototyped a new DNA nanostructure known as a cross structure. This nanostructure has a 4-fold symmetry which promotes its self-assembly into tetragonal 2D lattices. We have utilized the tetragonal 2D lattices as templates for highly conductive metallic nanowires and periodic 2D protein nano-arrays. We have constructed and characterized a DNA nanotube, a new self-assembling superstructure composed of DNA tiles. We have also demonstrated an aperiodic DNA lattice composed of DNA tiles assembled around a long scaffold strand; the system translates information encoded in the scaffold strand into a specific and reprogrammable barcode pattern. We have achieved metallic nanoparticle linear arrays templated on self-assembled 1D DNA arrays. We have designed and demonstrated a 2-state DNA lattice, which displays expand/contract motion switched by DNA nanoactuators. We have also achieved an autonomous DNA motor executing unidirectional motion along a linear DNA track.

  2. Electrotransfection of Polyamine Folded DNA Origami Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Aradhana; Krishnan, Swati; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2016-10-12

    DNA origami structures are artificial molecular nanostructures in which DNA double helices are forced into a closely packed configuration by a multitude of DNA strand crossovers. We show that three different types of origami structures (a flat sheet, a hollow tube, and a compact origami block) can be formed in magnesium-free buffer solutions containing low (origami folding is proportional to the DNA concentration. At excessive amounts, the structures aggregate and precipitate. In contrast to origami structures formed in conventional buffers, the resulting structures are stable in the presence of high electric field pulses, such as those commonly used for electrotransfection experiments. We demonstrate that spermidine-stabilized structures are stable in cell lysate and can be delivered into mammalian cells via electroporation.

  3. Thermal shock problems of bonded structure for plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibui, M.; Kuroda, T.; Kubota, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal shock tests have been performed on W(Re)/Cu and Mo/Cu duplex structures with a particular emphasis on two failure modes: failure on the heated surface and failure near the bonding interface. The results indicate that failure of the duplex structure largely depends on the constraint of thermal strain on the heated surface and on the ductility changes of armour materials. Rapid debonding of the bonding interface may be attributed to the yielding of armour materials. This leads to a residual bending deformation when the armour cools down. Arguments are also presented in this paper on two parameter characterization of the failure of armour materials and on stress distribution near the free edge of the bonding interface. (orig.)

  4. Structure and mechanism of human DNA polymerase [eta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biertümpfel, Christian; Zhao, Ye; Kondo, Yuji; Ramón-Maiques, Santiago; Gregory, Mark; Lee, Jae Young; Masutani, Chikahide; Lehmann, Alan R.; Hanaoka, Fumio; Yang, Wei (Sussex); (NIH); (Gakushuin); (Osaka)

    2010-11-03

    The variant form of the human syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XPV) is caused by a deficiency in DNA polymerase {eta} (Pol{eta}), a DNA polymerase that enables replication through ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers. Here we report high-resolution crystal structures of human Pol{eta} at four consecutive steps during DNA synthesis through cis-syn cyclobutane thymine dimers. Pol{eta} acts like a 'molecular splint' to stabilize damaged DNA in a normal B-form conformation. An enlarged active site accommodates the thymine dimer with excellent stereochemistry for two-metal ion catalysis. Two residues conserved among Pol{eta} orthologues form specific hydrogen bonds with the lesion and the incoming nucleotide to assist translesion synthesis. On the basis of the structures, eight Pol{eta} missense mutations causing XPV can be rationalized as undermining the molecular splint or perturbing the active-site alignment. The structures also provide an insight into the role of Pol{eta} in replicating through D loop and DNA fragile sites.

  5. Photolysis of phosphodiester bonds in plasmid DNA by high intensity UV laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croke, D.T.; Blau, Werner; OhUigin, Colm; Kelly, J.M.; McConnell, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The cleavage of phosphodiester bonds in DNA exposed to high intensity UV laser pulses in aerated aqueous solution has been investigated using a krypton fluoride excimer laser (248 nm) and bacterial plasmid DNA. The dependence of strand breakage on fluence and intensity has been studied in detail and shows that the process is non-linear with respect to intensity. The relationship between the quantum yield for strand breakage and intensity shows that the strand breakage reaction involves two-photon excitation of DNA bases. The quantum yield rises with intensity from a lower value of 7 x 10 -5 until a maximum value of 4.5 x 10 -4 is attained at intensities of 10 11 W m -2 and above. This value is approximately fifty-fold higher than the quantum yield for strand breakage induced by exposure to low density UV irradiation (254 nm, 12 W m -2 ). DNA sequencing experiments have shown that strand breakage occurs by the specific cleavage of the phosphodiester bond which lies immediately 3' to guanine residues in the DNA, leaving some alkali-labile remnant attached to the terminal phosphate. A mechanism for DNA strand breakage which involves the generation of guanine radical cations is proposed. (author)

  6. 75 FR 68809 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs And Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland... collection: 1651-0050. SUMMARY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) of the Department of Homeland...

  7. Effects of ion concentration on the hydrogen bonded structure of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Effects of ion concentration on the hydrogen bonded structure of water in the vicinity of ions in aqueous NaCl solutions. A NAG. 1. , D CHAKRABORTY and A CHANDRA*. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016. 1. Present address: Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering,.

  8. DNA polymerase catalysis in the absence of Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapova, Olga; Chan, Chikio; DeLucia, Angela M.; Helquist, Sandra A.; Kool, Eric T.; Grindley, Nigel D. F.; Joyce, Catherine M.

    2008-01-01

    We report the first pre-steady-state kinetic studies of DNA replication in the absence of hydrogen bonds. We have used nonpolar nucleotide analogues that mimic the shape of a Watson-Crick base pair in order to investigate the kinetic consequences of a lack of hydrogen bonds in the polymerase reaction catalyzed by the Klenow fragment of DNA Polymerase I from Escherichia coli. With a thymine isostere lacking hydrogen bonding ability in the nascent pair, the efficiency (kpol/Kd) of the polymerase reaction is decreased by 30-fold, affecting ground state (Kd) and transition state (kpol) approximately equally. When both thymine and adenine analogues in the nascent pair lack hydrogen bonding ability, the efficiency of the polymerase reaction is decreased by about 1000-fold, with most the decrease attributable to the transition state. Reactions using nonpolar analogues at the primer terminal base pair demonstrated the requirement for a hydrogen bond between the polymerase and the minor groove of the primer-terminal base. The R668A mutation of Klenow fragment abolished this requirement, identifying R668 as the probable hydrogen bond donor. Detailed examination of the kinetic data suggested that Klenow fragment has an extremely low tolerance of even minor deviations of the analogue base pairs from ideal Watson-Crick geometry. Consistent with this idea, some analogue pairings were better tolerated by Klenow fragment mutants having more spacious active sites. By contrast, the Y-family polymerase Dbh was much less sensitive to changes in base pair dimensions, and more dependent on hydrogen bonding between base-paired partners. PMID:16411765

  9. Structure and weak hydrogen bonds in liquid acetaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordeiro Maria A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to investigate the structure and hydrogen bonds formation in liquid acetaldehyde. An all atom model for the acetaldehyde have been optimized in the present work. Theoretical values obtained for heat of vaporisation and density of the liquid are in good agreement with experimental data. Graphics of radial distribution function indicate a well structured liquid compared to other similar dipolar organic liquids. Molecular mechanics minimization in gas phase leads to a trimer of very stable structure. The geometry of this complex is in very good agreement with the rdf. The shortest site-site correlation is between oxygen and the carbonyl hydrogen, suggesting that this correlation play a important role in the liquid structure and properties. The OxxxH average distance and the C-HxxxO angle obtained are characteristic of weak hydrogen bonds.

  10. Structure and function of DNA polymerase μ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takuro; Maezawa, So

    2013-01-01

    DNA polymerases are enzymes playing the central role in DNA metabolism, including DNA replication, DNA repair and recombination. DNA polymerase μ (pol μ DNA polymerase λ (pol λ) and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase (TdT) in X family DNA polymerases function in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is the predonmiant repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). NHEJ involves enzymes that capture both ends of the broken DNA strand, bring them together in a synaptic DNA-protein complex, and repair the DSB. Pol μ and pol λ fill in the gaps at the junction to maintain the genomic integrity. TdT synthesizes N region at the junction during V(D)J recombination and promotes diversity of immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor gene. Among these three polymerases, the regulatory mechanisms of pol μ remain rather unclear. We have approached the mechanism of pol μ from both sides of structure and cellular dynamics. Here, we propose some new insights into pol μ and the probable NHEJ model including our findings. (author)

  11. Bond-Valence Constraints on Liquid Water Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickmore, Barry R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Brown, I. David; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2009-01-01

    The recent controversy about the structure of liquid water pits a new model involving water molecules in relatively stable rings-and-chains structures against the standard model that posits water molecules in distorted tetrahedral coordination. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations 'both classical and ab initio' almost uniformly support the standard model, but since none of them can yet reproduce all the anomalous properties of water, they leave room for doubt. We argue that it is possible to evaluate these simulations by testing them against their adherence to the bond-valence model, a well known, and quantitatively accurate, empirical summary of the behavior of atoms in the bonded networks of inorganic solids. Here we use the results of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of ice, water, and several solvated aqueous species to show that the valence sum rule (the first axiom of the bond-valence model,) is followed in both solid and liquid bond networks. We then test MD simulations of water, employing several popular potential models, against this criterion and the experimental O-O radial distribution function. It appears that most of those tested cannot satisfy both criteria well, except TIP4P and TIP5P. If the valence sum rule really can be applied to simulated liquid structures, then it follows that the bonding behaviors of atoms in liquids are in some ways identical to those in solids. We support this interpretation by showing that the simulations produce O-H-O geometries completely consistent with the range of geometries available in solids, and the distributions of instantaneous valence sums reaching the atoms in both the ice and liquid water simulations are essentially identical. Taken together, this is powerful evidence in favor of the standard distorted tetrahedral model of liquid water structure

  12. Covalent Bonding of Pyrrolobenzodiazepines (PBDs) to Terminal Guanine Residues within Duplex and Hairpin DNA Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantaj, Julia; Jackson, Paul J. M.; Karu, Kersti; Rahman, Khondaker M.; Thurston, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Pyrrolobenzodiazepines (PBDs) are covalent-binding DNA-interactive agents with growing importance as payloads in Antibody Drug Conjugates (ADCs). Until now, PBDs were thought to covalently bond to C2-NH2 groups of guanines in the DNA-minor groove across a three-base-pair recognition sequence. Using HPLC/MS methodology with designed hairpin and duplex oligonucleotides, we have now demonstrated that the PBD Dimer SJG-136 and the C8-conjugated PBD Monomer GWL-78 can covalently bond to a terminal guanine of DNA, with the PBD skeleton spanning only two base pairs. Control experiments with the non-C8-conjugated anthramycin along with molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the C8-substituent of a PBD Monomer, or one-half of a PBD Dimer, may provide stability for the adduct. This observation highlights the importance of PBD C8-substituents, and also suggests that PBDs may bind to terminal guanines within stretches of DNA in cells, thus representing a potentially novel mechanism of action at the end of DNA strand breaks. PMID:27055050

  13. Correlation of bistranded clustered abasic DNA lesion processing with structural and dynamic DNA helix distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignon, Emmanuelle; Gattuso, Hugo; Morell, Christophe; Dehez, François; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Monari, Antonio; Dumont, Elise

    2016-01-01

    Clustered apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP; abasic) DNA lesions produced by ionizing radiation are by far more cytotoxic than isolated AP lesion entities. The structure and dynamics of a series of seven 23-bp oligonucleotides featuring simple bistranded clustered damage sites, comprising of two AP sites, zero, one, three or five bases 3′ or 5′ apart from each other, were investigated through 400 ns explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. They provide representative structures of synthetically engineered multiply damage sites-containing oligonucleotides whose repair was investigated experimentally (Nucl. Acids Res. 2004, 32:5609-5620; Nucl. Acids Res. 2002, 30: 2800–2808). The inspection of extrahelical positioning of the AP sites, bulge and non Watson–Crick hydrogen bonding corroborates the experimental measurements of repair efficiencies by bacterial or human AP endonucleases Nfo and APE1, respectively. This study provides unprecedented knowledge into the structure and dynamics of clustered abasic DNA lesions, notably rationalizing the non-symmetry with respect to 3′ to 5′ position. In addition, it provides strong mechanistic insights and basis for future studies on the effects of clustered DNA damage on the recognition and processing of these lesions by bacterial or human DNA repair enzymes specialized in the processing of such lesions. PMID:27587587

  14. Strengthening of Concrete Structures with cement based bonded composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Blanksvärd, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Polymers). The method is very efficient and has achieved world wide attention. However, there are some drawbacks with the use of epoxy, e.g. working environment, compatibility and permeability. Substituting the epoxy adherent with a cement based bonding agent will render a strengthening system...... with improved working environment and better compatibility to the base concrete structure. This study gives an overview of different cement based systems, all with very promising results for structural upgrading. Studied parameters are structural retrofit for bending, shear and confinement. It is concluded...

  15. Fuel cell system with separating structure bonded to electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Richard Scott; Gudlavalleti, Sauri; Quek, Shu Ching; Hasz, Wayne Charles; Powers, James Daniel

    2010-09-28

    A fuel cell assembly comprises a separating structure configured for separating a first reactant and a second reactant wherein the separating structure has an opening therein. The fuel cell assembly further comprises a fuel cell comprising a first electrode, a second electrode, and an electrolyte interposed between the first and second electrodes, and a passage configured to introduce the second reactant to the second electrode. The electrolyte is bonded to the separating structure with the first electrode being situated within the opening, and the second electrode being situated within the passage.

  16. Self Diagnostic Adhesive for Bonded Joints in Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    validated under the fatigue /dynamic loading condition. 3) Both SEM (Spectral Element Modeling) and FEM (Finite Element Modeling) simulation of the...between input voltage and output charge provide the real and imaginary impedance as illustrated in Figure 3. (a) Adhesive + plate (ΩS) PZT (ΩP...3 m m 0.45mm Adhesive 3.18mm dia. PZT disc (0.25mm thick) 8 Self-Diagnostic Adhesive for Bonded Joints in Aircraft Structures

  17. Estimating Structural Models of Corporate Bond Prices in Indonesian Corporations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenny Suardi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This  paper  applies  the  maximum  likelihood  (ML  approaches  to  implementing  the structural  model  of  corporate  bond,  as  suggested  by  Li  and  Wong  (2008,  in  Indonesian corporations.  Two  structural  models,  extended  Merton  and  Longstaff  &  Schwartz  (LS models,  are  used  in  determining  these  prices,  yields,  yield  spreads  and  probabilities  of default. ML estimation is used to determine the volatility of irm value. Since irm value is unobserved variable, Duan (1994 suggested that the irst step of ML estimation is to derive the likelihood function for equity as the option on the irm value. The second step is to ind parameters such as the drift and volatility of irm value, that maximizing this function. The irm value itself is extracted by equating the pricing formula to the observed equity prices. Equity,  total  liabilities,  bond  prices  data  and  the  irm's  parameters  (irm  value,  volatility of irm value, and default barrier are substituted to extended Merton and LS bond pricing formula in order to valuate the corporate bond.These models are implemented to a sample of 24 bond prices in Indonesian corporation during  period  of  2001-2005,  based  on  criteria  of  Eom,  Helwege  and  Huang  (2004.  The equity  and  bond  prices  data  were  obtained  from  Indonesia  Stock  Exchange  for  irms  that issued equity and provided regular inancial statement within this period. The result shows that both models, in average, underestimate the bond prices and overestimate the yields and yield spread. ";} // -->activate javascript

  18. Structural Transitions in Supercoiled Stretched DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    v, Croquette

    1998-03-01

    Using magnetic micromanipulation techniques [Strick 96]( uc(T.R.) Strick, J.-F. Allemand, D. Bensimon, A. Bensimon) and uc(V.) Croquette, "The elasticity of a single supercoiled DNA molecule", Science, 271, 1835 (1996)., we have studied the mechanical properties (force versus extension) of single DNA molecules under a wide range of torsional stresses (supercoiling). We show that unwinding the DNA double helix leads to a phase separation between regular B-DNA and denaturation bubbles. The fraction of denatured molecule increases linearly with the degree of unwinding, beginning at a value of 1% unwinding. We have confirmed this denatured state by hybridization of homologous single-stranded DNA probes and by a chemical attack of the exposed bases. Surprisingly, when we overwind the molecule, the elasticity curves we obtain may also be interpreted by the coexistence of two phases, B-DNA and a new phase which we note P-DNA. The fraction of this new phase increases smoothly with overwinding, beginning at 3 % and continuing up to 300 %. Our results indicate that this new phase is four times more twisted that the standard B-DNA and is 1.75 times longer. Although the structure of this phase is not yet known, such a high twisting can only be attained if the sugar-phosphate backbones of the two strands are twisted closely while the bases are expelled outside of the molecule's core, in a structure reminiscent of the one proposed by Pauling. Indeed we have shown that this new phase is sensitive to chemical attack whereas the B-DNA is not. This new phase begins to appear on a molecule overwound by 3 % and stretched by a force of 5 pN, conditions typically encountered in vivo during gene transcription. This new phase may thus play a biological role (for more details).

  19. Interplay between Peptide Bond Geometrical Parameters in Nonglobular Structural Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Esposito

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several investigations performed in the last two decades have unveiled that geometrical parameters of protein backbone show a remarkable variability. Although these studies have provided interesting insights into one of the basic aspects of protein structure, they have been conducted on globular and water-soluble proteins. We report here a detailed analysis of backbone geometrical parameters in nonglobular proteins/peptides. We considered membrane proteins and two distinct fibrous systems (amyloid-forming and collagen-like peptides. Present data show that in these systems the local conformation plays a major role in dictating the amplitude of the bond angle N-Cα-C and the propensity of the peptide bond to adopt planar/nonplanar states. Since the trends detected here are in line with the concept of the mutual influence of local geometry and conformation previously established for globular and water-soluble proteins, our analysis demonstrates that the interplay of backbone geometrical parameters is an intrinsic and general property of protein/peptide structures that is preserved also in nonglobular contexts. For amyloid-forming peptides significant distortions of the N-Cα-C bond angle, indicative of sterical hidden strain, may occur in correspondence with side chain interdigitation. The correlation between the dihedral angles Δω/ψ in collagen-like models may have interesting implications for triple helix stability.

  20. Interplay between peptide bond geometrical parameters in nonglobular structural contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Luciana; Balasco, Nicole; De Simone, Alfonso; Berisio, Rita; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Several investigations performed in the last two decades have unveiled that geometrical parameters of protein backbone show a remarkable variability. Although these studies have provided interesting insights into one of the basic aspects of protein structure, they have been conducted on globular and water-soluble proteins. We report here a detailed analysis of backbone geometrical parameters in nonglobular proteins/peptides. We considered membrane proteins and two distinct fibrous systems (amyloid-forming and collagen-like peptides). Present data show that in these systems the local conformation plays a major role in dictating the amplitude of the bond angle N-C(α)-C and the propensity of the peptide bond to adopt planar/nonplanar states. Since the trends detected here are in line with the concept of the mutual influence of local geometry and conformation previously established for globular and water-soluble proteins, our analysis demonstrates that the interplay of backbone geometrical parameters is an intrinsic and general property of protein/peptide structures that is preserved also in nonglobular contexts. For amyloid-forming peptides significant distortions of the N-C(α)-C bond angle, indicative of sterical hidden strain, may occur in correspondence with side chain interdigitation. The correlation between the dihedral angles Δω/ψ in collagen-like models may have interesting implications for triple helix stability.

  1. Transcription initiation complex structures elucidate DNA opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaschka, C; Hantsche, M; Dienemann, C; Burzinski, C; Plitzko, J; Cramer, P

    2016-05-19

    Transcription of eukaryotic protein-coding genes begins with assembly of the RNA polymerase (Pol) II initiation complex and promoter DNA opening. Here we report cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of yeast initiation complexes containing closed and open DNA at resolutions of 8.8 Å and 3.6 Å, respectively. DNA is positioned and retained over the Pol II cleft by a network of interactions between the TATA-box-binding protein TBP and transcription factors TFIIA, TFIIB, TFIIE, and TFIIF. DNA opening occurs around the tip of the Pol II clamp and the TFIIE 'extended winged helix' domain, and can occur in the absence of TFIIH. Loading of the DNA template strand into the active centre may be facilitated by movements of obstructing protein elements triggered by allosteric binding of the TFIIE 'E-ribbon' domain. The results suggest a unified model for transcription initiation with a key event, the trapping of open promoter DNA by extended protein-protein and protein-DNA contacts.

  2. The structure of DNA by direct imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Marini, Monica; Falqui, Andrea; Moretti, Manola; Limongi, Tania; Allione, Marco; Genovese, Alessandro; Lopatin, Sergei; Tirinato, Luca; Das, Gobind; Torre, Bruno; Giugni, Andrea; Gentile, Francesco; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2015-01-01

    The structure of DNA was determined in 1953 by x-ray fiber diffraction. Several attempts have been made to obtain a direct image of DNA with alternative techniques. The direct image is intended to allow a quantitative evaluation of all relevant characteristic lengths present in a molecule. A direct image of DNA, which is different from diffraction in the reciprocal space, is difficult to obtain for two main reasons: the intrinsic very low contrast of the elements that form the molecule and the difficulty of preparing the sample while preserving its pristine shape and size. We show that through a preparation procedure compatible with the DNA physiological conditions, a direct image of a single suspended DNA molecule can be obtained. In the image, all relevant lengths of A-form DNA are measurable. A high-resolution transmission electron microscope that operates at 80 keV with an ultimate resolution of 1.5 Å was used for this experiment. Direct imaging of a single molecule can be used as a method to address biological problems that require knowledge at the single-molecule level, given that the average information obtained by x-ray diffraction of crystals or fibers is not sufficient for detailed structure determination, or when crystals cannot be obtained from biological molecules or are not sufficient in understanding multiple protein configurations.

  3. The structure of DNA by direct imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Marini, Monica

    2015-08-28

    The structure of DNA was determined in 1953 by x-ray fiber diffraction. Several attempts have been made to obtain a direct image of DNA with alternative techniques. The direct image is intended to allow a quantitative evaluation of all relevant characteristic lengths present in a molecule. A direct image of DNA, which is different from diffraction in the reciprocal space, is difficult to obtain for two main reasons: the intrinsic very low contrast of the elements that form the molecule and the difficulty of preparing the sample while preserving its pristine shape and size. We show that through a preparation procedure compatible with the DNA physiological conditions, a direct image of a single suspended DNA molecule can be obtained. In the image, all relevant lengths of A-form DNA are measurable. A high-resolution transmission electron microscope that operates at 80 keV with an ultimate resolution of 1.5 Å was used for this experiment. Direct imaging of a single molecule can be used as a method to address biological problems that require knowledge at the single-molecule level, given that the average information obtained by x-ray diffraction of crystals or fibers is not sufficient for detailed structure determination, or when crystals cannot be obtained from biological molecules or are not sufficient in understanding multiple protein configurations.

  4. A structural bond strength model for glass durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Xiangdong; Metzger, T.B.

    1996-01-01

    A glass durability model, structural bond strength (SBS) model was developed to correlate glass durability with its composition. This model assumes that the strengths of the bonds between cations and oxygens and the structural roles of the individual elements in the glass arc the predominant factors controlling the composition dependence of the chemical durability of glasses. The structural roles of oxides in glass are classified as network formers, network breakers, and intermediates. The structural roles of the oxides depend upon glass composition and the redox state of oxides. Al 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 , and B 2 O 3 are assigned as network formers only when there are sufficient alkalis to bind with these oxides. CaO can also improve durability by sharing non-bridging oxygen with alkalis, relieving SiO 2 from alkalis. The percolation phenomenon in glass is also taken into account. The SBS model is applied to correlate the 7-day product consistency test durability of 42 low-level waste glasses with their composition with an R 2 of 0.87, which is better than 0.81 obtained with an eight-coefficient empirical first-order mixture model on the same data set

  5. Structure of DNA toroids and electrostatic attraction of DNA duplexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherstvy, A G

    2005-01-01

    DNA-DNA electrostatic attraction is considered as the driving force for the formation of DNA toroids in the presence of DNA condensing cations. This attraction comes from the DNA helical charge distribution and favours hexagonal toroidal cross-sections. The latter is in agreement with recent cryo-electron microscopy studies on DNA condensed with cobalt hexammine. We treat the DNA-DNA interactions within the modern theory of electrostatic interaction between helical macromolecules. The size and thickness of the toroids is calculated within a simple model; other models of stability of DNA toroids are discussed and compared

  6. Structural DNA Nanotechnology: From Design to Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Norton

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The exploitation of DNA for the production of nanoscale architectures presents a young yet paradigm breaking approach, which addresses many of the barriers to the self-assembly of small molecules into highly-ordered nanostructures via construct addressability. There are two major methods to construct DNA nanostructures, and in the current review we will discuss the principles and some examples of applications of both the tile-based and DNA origami methods. The tile-based approach is an older method that provides a good tool to construct small and simple structures, usually with multiply repeated domains. In contrast, the origami method, at this time, would appear to be more appropriate for the construction of bigger, more sophisticated and exactly defined structures.

  7. Structural DNA Nanotechnology: From Design to Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadegan, Reza M.; Norton, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    The exploitation of DNA for the production of nanoscale architectures presents a young yet paradigm breaking approach, which addresses many of the barriers to the self-assembly of small molecules into highly-ordered nanostructures via construct addressability. There are two major methods to construct DNA nanostructures, and in the current review we will discuss the principles and some examples of applications of both the tile-based and DNA origami methods. The tile-based approach is an older method that provides a good tool to construct small and simple structures, usually with multiply repeated domains. In contrast, the origami method, at this time, would appear to be more appropriate for the construction of bigger, more sophisticated and exactly defined structures. PMID:22837684

  8. Structural DNA nanotechnology: from design to applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadegan, Reza M; Norton, Michael L

    2012-01-01

    The exploitation of DNA for the production of nanoscale architectures presents a young yet paradigm breaking approach, which addresses many of the barriers to the self-assembly of small molecules into highly-ordered nanostructures via construct addressability. There are two major methods to construct DNA nanostructures, and in the current review we will discuss the principles and some examples of applications of both the tile-based and DNA origami methods. The tile-based approach is an older method that provides a good tool to construct small and simple structures, usually with multiply repeated domains. In contrast, the origami method, at this time, would appear to be more appropriate for the construction of bigger, more sophisticated and exactly defined structures.

  9. DNA Structures on Silicon and Diamond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pop, Simona D.; Hinrichs, Karsten; Wenmackers, Sylvia; Cobet, Christoph; Esser, Norbert; Zahn, Dietrich R.T.; Hinrichs, Karsten; Eichhorn, Klaus-Jochen

    2014-01-01

    In the design of DNA-based hybrid devices, it is essential to have knowledge of the structural, electronic and optical properties of these biomolecular films. Spectroscopic ellipsometry is a powerful technique to probe and asses these properties. In this chapter, we review its application to

  10. Structure-Energy Relationships of Halogen Bonds in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholfield, Matthew R; Ford, Melissa Coates; Carlsson, Anna-Carin C; Butta, Hawera; Mehl, Ryan A; Ho, P Shing

    2017-06-06

    The structures and stabilities of proteins are defined by a series of weak noncovalent electrostatic, van der Waals, and hydrogen bond (HB) interactions. In this study, we have designed and engineered halogen bonds (XBs) site-specifically to study their structure-energy relationship in a model protein, T4 lysozyme. The evidence for XBs is the displacement of the aromatic side chain toward an oxygen acceptor, at distances that are equal to or less than the sums of their respective van der Waals radii, when the hydroxyl substituent of the wild-type tyrosine is replaced by a halogen. In addition, thermal melting studies show that the iodine XB rescues the stabilization energy from an otherwise destabilizing substitution (at an equivalent noninteracting site), indicating that the interaction is also present in solution. Quantum chemical calculations show that the XB complements an HB at this site and that solvent structure must also be considered in trying to design molecular interactions such as XBs into biological systems. A bromine substitution also shows displacement of the side chain, but the distances and geometries do not indicate formation of an XB. Thus, we have dissected the contributions from various noncovalent interactions of halogens introduced into proteins, to drive the application of XBs, particularly in biomolecular design.

  11. Strand breaks and alkali-labile bonds induced by ultraviolet light in DNA with 5-bromouracil in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasin, F; Hutchinson, F

    1978-01-01

    Supercircular gamma phage DNA with 10 bromouracils/100 thymine bases, irradiated with 313 nm light in Tris buffer and sedimented on alkaline and neutral gradients, showed 4.6 alkali-labile bonds per true single-strand break, in agreement with Hewitt and Marburger (1975 Photochem. Photobiol. 21:413). The same DNA irradiated in Escherichia coli host cells showed about the same number of breaks in alkaline gradients for equal fluence, but only 0.5 alkali-labile bond per true break. Similarly, E. coli DNA with bromouracil irradiated in the cells showed only 10--20% more breaks when denatured with 0.1 M NaOH than under neutral conditions with 9 M sodium perchlorate at 50 degrees C. These results show that true single-strand breaks occur more frequently than alkali-labile bonds after ultraviolet irradiation of DNA containing bromouracil in cells. PMID:367462

  12. Buckling analysis of SMA bonded sandwich structure – using FEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katariya, Pankaj V.; Das, Arijit; Panda, Subrata K.

    2018-03-01

    Thermal buckling strength of smart sandwich composite structure (bonded with shape memory alloy; SMA) examined numerically via a higher-order finite element model in association with marching technique. The excess geometrical distortion of the structure under the elevated environment modeled through Green’s strain function whereas the material nonlinearity counted with the help of marching method. The system responses are computed numerically by solving the generalized eigenvalue equations via a customized MATLAB code. The comprehensive behaviour of the current finite element solutions (minimum buckling load parameter) is established by solving the adequate number of numerical examples including the given input parameter. The current numerical model is extended further to check the influence of various structural parameter of the sandwich panel on the buckling temperature including the SMA effect and reported in details.

  13. DNA mimic proteins: functions, structures, and bioinformatic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao-Ching; Ho, Chun-Han; Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Yang, Jinn-Moon; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2014-05-13

    DNA mimic proteins have DNA-like negative surface charge distributions, and they function by occupying the DNA binding sites of DNA binding proteins to prevent these sites from being accessed by DNA. DNA mimic proteins control the activities of a variety of DNA binding proteins and are involved in a wide range of cellular mechanisms such as chromatin assembly, DNA repair, transcription regulation, and gene recombination. However, the sequences and structures of DNA mimic proteins are diverse, making them difficult to predict by bioinformatic search. To date, only a few DNA mimic proteins have been reported. These DNA mimics were not found by searching for functional motifs in their sequences but were revealed only by structural analysis of their charge distribution. This review highlights the biological roles and structures of 16 reported DNA mimic proteins. We also discuss approaches that might be used to discover new DNA mimic proteins.

  14. Unusual hydrogen bonding patterns in AF [aminofluorene] and AAF [acetylaminofluorene] modified DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broyde, S.; Hingerty, B.E.; Shapiro, R.; Norman, D.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; New York Univ., NY; Columbia Univ., New York, NY

    1989-01-01

    New structures are presented for AF and AAF modified DNAs that place the carcinogen in the minor groove of a B-DNA helix. These structures employ non-Watson-Crick base pairing schemes with syn guanine at the modification site. 32 refs., 9 figs

  15. Structural basis for the inhibition of human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) by 3,N4-ethenocytosine-containing DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingaraju, Gondichatnahalli M; Davis, C Ainsley; Setser, Jeremy W; Samson, Leona D; Drennan, Catherine L

    2011-04-15

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, generated by neutrophils and macrophages in chronically inflamed tissues, readily damage DNA, producing a variety of potentially genotoxic etheno base lesions; such inflammation-related DNA damage is now known to contribute to carcinogenesis. Although the human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) can specifically bind DNA containing either 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (εA) lesions or 3,N(4)-ethenocytosine (εC) lesions, it can only excise εA lesions. AAG binds very tightly to DNA containing εC lesions, forming an abortive protein-DNA complex; such binding not only shields εC from repair by other enzymes but also inhibits AAG from acting on other DNA lesions. To understand the structural basis for inhibition, we have characterized the binding of AAG to DNA containing εC lesions and have solved a crystal structure of AAG bound to a DNA duplex containing the εC lesion. This study provides the first structure of a DNA glycosylase in complex with an inhibitory base lesion that is induced endogenously and that is also induced upon exposure to environmental agents such as vinyl chloride. We identify the primary cause of inhibition as a failure to activate the nucleotide base as an efficient leaving group and demonstrate that the higher binding affinity of AAG for εC versus εA is achieved through formation of an additional hydrogen bond between Asn-169 in the active site pocket and the O(2) of εC. This structure provides the basis for the design of AAG inhibitors currently being sought as an adjuvant for cancer chemotherapy.

  16. Structure, vibrations, and hydrogen bond parameters of dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawinkowski, S.; Eilmes, J.; Waluk, J.

    2010-07-01

    Geometry and vibrational structure of dibenzo[ b, i][1,4,8,11]tetraaza[14]annulene (TAA) have been studied using infrared and Raman spectroscopy combined with quantum-chemical calculations. The assignments were proposed for 106 out of the total of 108 TAA vibrations, based on comparison of the theoretical predictions with the experimental data obtained for the parent molecule and its isotopomer in which the NH protons were replaced by deuterons. Reassignments were suggesteded for the NH stretching and out-of-plane vibrations. The values of the parameters of the intramolecular NH⋯N hydrogen bonds were analysed in comparison with the corresponding data for porphyrin and porphycene, molecules with the same structural motif, a cavity composed of four nitrogen atoms and two inner protons. Both experiment and calculations suggest that the molecule of TAA is not planar and is present in a trans tautomeric form, with the protons located on the opposite nitrogen atoms.

  17. Anomalous H/D isotope effect in hydrogen bonded systems: H-bonded cyclic structures and transfers of protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marechal, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The systematic H/D substitution is a precious tool to obtain information on the dynamics of H-bonds. It is particularly useful in IR spectroscopy where H-bonds are at the origin of particularly intense and specific bands and where the particularly great value for the m D /m H ratio ensures strongly marked effects. In most H-bonded systems the effects of these substitutions are normal, in the sense that they are at the origin of bands having intensities, centers (of intensity) and widths smaller in D-bonds by a factor close to √2 as compared to H-bonds. In some systems as carboxylic acid dimers, however, anomalous ratios of intensities are found upon such a substitution. Their origin is still obscure. Experimental results suggest that such anomalous ratios have much to do with the cyclic structure of these systems. It leads to stressing an important property of H-bonded cyclic structures which is that they seem necessary for having transfers of protons between molecules through H-bonds in a neutral aqueous medium (p H =7) at room temperature. The mechanism of such transfers of protons is still poorly known, but these transfers are now suspected to play a fundamental role in such widespread reactions as hydrolysis, peptide synthesis, etc... which may make them soon appear as being a crucial basic mechanism for reactivity of aqueous systems, particularly biological systems

  18. Impact of Heterogeneity and Lattice Bond Strength on DNA Triangle Crystal Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Evi; Praetorius, Florian; de Oliveira Mann, Carina C; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Dietz, Hendrik

    2016-09-07

    One key goal of DNA nanotechnology is the bottom-up construction of macroscopic crystalline materials. Beyond applications in fields such as photonics or plasmonics, DNA-based crystal matrices could possibly facilitate the diffraction-based structural analysis of guest molecules. Seeman and co-workers reported in 2009 the first designed crystal matrices based on a 38 kDa DNA triangle that was composed of seven chains. The crystal lattice was stabilized, unprecedentedly, by Watson-Crick base pairing. However, 3D crystallization of larger designed DNA objects that include more chains such as DNA origami remains an unsolved problem. Larger objects would offer more degrees of freedom and design options with respect to tailoring lattice geometry and for positioning other objects within a crystal lattice. The greater rigidity of multilayer DNA origami could also positively influence the diffractive properties of crystals composed of such particles. Here, we rationally explore the role of heterogeneity and Watson-Crick interaction strengths in crystal growth using 40 variants of the original DNA triangle as model multichain objects. Crystal growth of the triangle was remarkably robust despite massive chemical, geometrical, and thermodynamical sample heterogeneity that we introduced, but the crystal growth sensitively depended on the sequences of base pairs next to the Watson-Crick sticky ends of the triangle. Our results point to weak lattice interactions and high concentrations as decisive factors for achieving productive crystallization, while sample heterogeneity and impurities played a minor role.

  19. Structure, bonding and energetics of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of Science Education and Research (NISER), Bhubaneswar, 751 005 India .... out with Gaussian software with the default conver- .... with Multiwfn software.67 The FBO bond order has ... free energy ( G) of bond dissociation are given in.

  20. Electronic structure and chemical bond in technetium dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klyagina, A.P.; Fursova, V.D.; Levin, A.A.; Gutsev, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    DV-X α method is used to study electron structure and peculiarities of chemical bond in Tc 2 and Tc 2 2+ dimers. Electron state characteristics are calculated in the basis of numerical Hartree-Fock functions for d 6 s 1 - and d 5 s 2 -configurations of Tc atom and for Tc 2 2+ ion d 5 s 1 -configuration. Disposition order for valence MO in Tc and Tc 2 2+ calculated for the given configurations is presented. It is shown that quinary bond with π u 4 dσ g 2 σ g 4 sσ g 2 δ u 2 configuration corresponds to the ground state of Tc 2 molecule. In Tc 2 some weakening of binding for π- and δ-orbitals and strengthening of total σ-binding in comparison with Mo 2 takes place. In Tc + and Tc 2+ MO composition is slightly changed, but a shift of 2σ-MO relatively MO consisting of d-AO is occured

  1. Modeling DNA structure and processes through animation and kinesthetic visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Christine

    There have been many studies regarding the effectiveness of visual aids that go beyond that of static illustrations. Many of these have been concentrated on the effectiveness of visual aids such as animations and models or even non-traditional visual aid activities like role-playing activities. This study focuses on the effectiveness of three different types of visual aids: models, animation, and a role-playing activity. Students used a modeling kit made of Styrofoam balls and toothpicks to construct nucleotides and then bond nucleotides together to form DNA. Next, students created their own animation to depict the processes of DNA replication, transcription, and translation. Finally, students worked in teams to build proteins while acting out the process of translation. Students were given a pre- and post-test that measured their knowledge and comprehension of the four topics mentioned above. Results show that there was a significant gain in the post-test scores when compared to the pre-test scores. This indicates that the incorporated visual aids were effective methods for teaching DNA structure and processes.

  2. The discovery of the structure of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, G. L.

    2003-04-01

    On 25 April 1953, Nature published a letter by Francis Crick and James Watson, at the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, proposing a structure for DNA. This letter marked the beginning of a revolution in biology. Besides Crick and Watson, two other scientists, Rosalind Franklin and Maurice Wilkins, played key roles in the discovery. After sketching the early careers of the four scientists, the present article gives an account of the physics and chemistry involved in the discovery, and the events leading up to it.

  3. Structural aspects of DNA in its replication and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, S.; Pal, B.C.; Foote, R.S.; Bates, R.C.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Snow, E.T.; Wobbe, C.R.; Morse, C.C.; Snyder, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    The research objective of this laboratory is to investigate the structure of DNA, the mechanism of DNA replication and its regulation, and the mechanism and role of repair of the altered DNA in the expression of heritable changes. This research has two broad aims, namely investigation of (a) the regulation of DNA replication in mammals, using parvovirus DNA as a model system and (b) the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis induced by simple alkylating mutagens

  4. Hydrogen-bond coordination in organic crystal structures: statistics, predictions and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galek, Peter T A; Chisholm, James A; Pidcock, Elna; Wood, Peter A

    2014-02-01

    Statistical models to predict the number of hydrogen bonds that might be formed by any donor or acceptor atom in a crystal structure have been derived using organic structures in the Cambridge Structural Database. This hydrogen-bond coordination behaviour has been uniquely defined for more than 70 unique atom types, and has led to the development of a methodology to construct hypothetical hydrogen-bond arrangements. Comparing the constructed hydrogen-bond arrangements with known crystal structures shows promise in the assessment of structural stability, and some initial examples of industrially relevant polymorphs, co-crystals and hydrates are described.

  5. Connecting DNA Origami Structures Using the Biotin-Streptavidin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This work made use of the strong interaction between biotin and streptavidin to connect designed DNA origami structures. The caDNAno software was used to design a 6 layer 3D origami cross-like structure. Selected DNA strands at the engineered attachment sites on the DNA origami structure were biotinylated.

  6. Computational and Empirical Trans-hydrogen Bond Deuterium Isotope Shifts Suggest that N1-N3 A:U Hydrogen Bonds of RNA are Shorter than those of A:T Hydrogen Bonds of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong-Ick; Manalo, Marlon N.; Perez, Lisa M.; LiWang, Andy

    2006-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations of isolated Watson-Crick A:U and A:T base pairs predict that adenine 13 C2 trans-hydrogen bond deuterium isotope shifts due to isotopic substitution at the pyrimidine H3, 2h Δ 13 C2, are sensitive to the hydrogen-bond distance between the N1 of adenine and the N3 of uracil or thymine, which supports the notion that 2h Δ 13 C2 is sensitive to hydrogen-bond strength. Calculated 2h Δ 13 C2 values at a given N1-N3 distance are the same for isolated A:U and A:T base pairs. Replacing uridine residues in RNA with 5-methyl uridine and substituting deoxythymidines in DNA with deoxyuridines do not statistically shift empirical 2h Δ 13 C2 values. Thus, we show experimentally and computationally that the C7 methyl group of thymine has no measurable affect on 2h Δ 13 C2 values. Furthermore, 2h Δ 13 C2 values of modified and unmodified RNA are more negative than those of modified and unmodified DNA, which supports our hypothesis that RNA hydrogen bonds are stronger than those of DNA. It is also shown here that 2h Δ 13 C2 is context dependent and that this dependence is similar for RNA and DNA

  7. Synthesis and structural characterization of piperazino-modified DNA that favours hybridization towards DNA over RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Joan; Bryld, Torsten; Lindegaard, Dorthe

    2011-01-01

    We report the synthesis of two C4'-modified DNA analogues and characterize their structural impact on dsDNA duplexes. The 4'-C-piperazinomethyl modification stabilizes dsDNA by up to 5°C per incorporation. Extension of the modification with a butanoyl-linked pyrene increases the dsDNA stabilizati...

  8. From structure to mechanism—understanding initiation of DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Alberto; Barbon, Marta; Noguchi, Yasunori; Reuter, L. Maximilian; Schneider, Sarah; Speck, Christian

    2017-01-01

    DNA replication results in the doubling of the genome prior to cell division. This process requires the assembly of 50 or more protein factors into a replication fork. Here, we review recent structural and biochemical insights that start to explain how specific proteins recognize DNA replication origins, load the replicative helicase on DNA, unwind DNA, synthesize new DNA strands, and reassemble chromatin. We focus on the minichromosome maintenance (MCM2–7) proteins, which form the core of the eukaryotic replication fork, as this complex undergoes major structural rearrangements in order to engage with DNA, regulate its DNA-unwinding activity, and maintain genome stability. PMID:28717046

  9. Flexibility of the genetic code with respect to DNA structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baisnée, P. F.; Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren

    2001-01-01

    Motivation. The primary function of DNA is to carry genetic information through the genetic code. DNA, however, contains a variety of other signals related, for instance, to reading frame, codon bias, pairwise codon bias, splice sites and transcription regulation, nucleosome positioning and DNA...... structure. Here we study the relationship between the genetic code and DNA structure and address two questions. First, to which degree does the degeneracy of the genetic code and the acceptable amino acid substitution patterns allow for the superimposition of DNA structural signals to protein coding...... sequences? Second, is the origin or evolution of the genetic code likely to have been constrained by DNA structure? Results. We develop an index for code flexibility with respect to DNA structure. Using five different di- or tri-nucleotide models of sequence-dependent DNA structure, we show...

  10. Connecting DNA origami structures using the biotin- streptavidin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    carbon nanotubes on DNA origami. In order to reconfigure DNA origami pliers, Kuzuya (Kuzuya et al.,. 2011) and colleagues used the strong binding biotin- streptavidin interaction. All these researchers made use of the biotin- streptavidin interaction to functionalize the DNA strand or. DNA origami structures. In this work, we ...

  11. Bonding and structure in dense multi-component molecular mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Edmund R; Ticknor, Christopher; Bethkenhagen, Mandy; Hamel, Sebastien; Redmer, Ronald; Kress, Joel D; Collins, Lee A

    2015-10-28

    We have performed finite-temperature density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations on dense methane, ammonia, and water mixtures (CH4:NH3:H2O) for various compositions and temperatures (2000 K ≤ T ≤ 10,000 K) that span a set of possible conditions in the interiors of ice-giant exoplanets. The equation-of-state, pair distribution functions, and bond autocorrelation functions (BACF) were used to probe the structure and dynamics of these complex fluids. In particular, an improvement to the choice of the cutoff in the BACF was developed that allowed analysis refinements for density and temperature effects. We note the relative changes in the nature of these systems engendered by variations in the concentration ratios. A basic tenet emerges from all these comparisons that varying the relative amounts of the three heavy components (C,N,O) can effect considerable changes in the nature of the fluid and may in turn have ramifications for the structure and composition of various planetary layers.

  12. Contrasting bonding behavior of thiol molecules on carbon fullerene structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixteco-Sanchez, J.C.; Guirado-Lopez, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed semiempirical as well as ab initio density-functional theory (DFT) calculations at T=0 to analyze the equilibrium configurations and electronic properties of spheroidal C 60 as well as of cylindrical armchair (5,5) and (8,8) fullerenes passivated with SCH 3 and S(CH 2 ) 2 CH 3 thiols. Our structural results reveal that the lowest-energy configurations of the adsorbates strongly depend on their chain length and on the structure of the underlying substrate. In the low-coverage regime, both SCH 3 and S(CH 2 ) 2 CH 3 molecules prefer to organize into a molecular cluster on one side of the C 60 surface, providing thus a less protective organic coating for the carbon structure. However, with increasing the number of adsorbed thiols, a transition to a more uniform distribution is obtained, which actually takes place for six and eight adsorbed molecules when using S(CH 2 ) 2 CH 3 and SCH 3 chains, respectively. In contrast, for the tubelike arrangements at the low-coverage regime, a quasi-one-dimensional zigzag organization of the adsorbates along the tubes is always preferred. The sulfur-fullerene bond is considerably strong and is at the origin of outward and lateral displacements of the carbon atoms, leading to the stabilization of three-membered rings on the surface (spheroidal structures) as well as to sizable nonuniform radial deformations (cylindrical configurations). The electronic spectrum of our thiol-passivated fullerenes shows strong variations in the energy difference between the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals as a function of the number and distribution of adsorbed thiols, opening thus the possibility to manipulate the transport properties of these compounds by means of selective adsorption mechanisms

  13. Analysis of Structural Flexibility of Damaged DNA Using Thiol-Tethered Oligonucleotide Duplexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Fujita

    Full Text Available Bent structures are formed in DNA by the binding of small molecules or proteins. We developed a chemical method to detect bent DNA structures. Oligonucleotide duplexes in which two mercaptoalkyl groups were attached to the positions facing each other across the major groove were prepared. When the duplex contained the cisplatin adduct, which was proved to induce static helix bending, interstrand disulfide bond formation under an oxygen atmosphere was detected by HPLC analyses, but not in the non-adducted duplex, when the two thiol-tethered nucleosides were separated by six base pairs. When the insert was five and seven base pairs, the disulfide bond was formed and was not formed, respectively, regardless of the cisplatin adduct formation. The same reaction was observed in the duplexes containing an abasic site analog and the (6–4 photoproduct. Compared with the cisplatin case, the disulfide bond formation was slower in these duplexes, but the reaction rate was nearly independent of the linker length. These results indicate that dynamic structural changes of the abasic site- and (6–4 photoproduct-containing duplexes could be detected by our method. It is strongly suggested that the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein, which specifically binds these duplexes and functions at the first step of global-genome nucleotide excision repair, recognizes the easily bendable nature of damaged DNA.

  14. Are the hydrogen bonds of RNA (.U) stronger than those of DNA (A.T)? A quantum mechanics study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pérez, A.; Šponer, Jiří; Jurečka, Petr; Hobza, Pavel; Luque, Javier F.; Orozco, Modesto

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 17 (2005), s. 5062-5066 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : density functional calculations * DNA * hydrogen bonds Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.907, year: 2005

  15. Mg2+ in the major groove modulates B-DNA structure and dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Guéroult

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of Mg(2+ bound to the DNA major groove on DNA structure and dynamics. The analysis of a comprehensive dataset of B-DNA crystallographic structures shows that divalent cations are preferentially located in the DNA major groove where they interact with successive bases of (A/GpG and the phosphate group of 5'-CpA or TpG. Based on this knowledge, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on a DNA oligomer without or with Mg(2+ close to an ApG step. These simulations showed that the hydrated Mg(2+ forms a stable intra-strand cross-link between the two purines in solution. ApG generates an electrostatic potential in the major groove that is particularly attractive for cations; its intrinsic conformation is well-adapted to the formation of water-mediated hydrogen bonds with Mg(2+. The binding of Mg(2+ modulates the behavior of the 5'-neighboring step by increasing the BII (ε-ζ>0° population of its phosphate group. Additional electrostatic interactions between the 5'-phosphate group and Mg(2+ strengthen both the DNA-cation binding and the BII character of the 5'-step. Cation binding in the major groove may therefore locally influence the DNA conformational landscape, suggesting a possible avenue for better understanding how strong DNA distortions can be stabilized in protein-DNA complexes.

  16. A DNA Structure-Based Bionic Wavelet Transform and Its Application to DNA Sequence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequence analysis is of great significance for increasing our understanding of genomic functions. An important task facing us is the exploration of hidden structural information stored in the DNA sequence. This paper introduces a DNA structure-based adaptive wavelet transform (WT – the bionic wavelet transform (BWT – for DNA sequence analysis. The symbolic DNA sequence can be separated into four channels of indicator sequences. An adaptive symbol-to-number mapping, determined from the structural feature of the DNA sequence, was introduced into WT. It can adjust the weight value of each channel to maximise the useful energy distribution of the whole BWT output. The performance of the proposed BWT was examined by analysing synthetic and real DNA sequences. Results show that BWT performs better than traditional WT in presenting greater energy distribution. This new BWT method should be useful for the detection of the latent structural features in future DNA sequence analysis.

  17. 3D-DART: a DNA structure modelling server

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, M.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing interest in structural studies of DNA by both experimental and computational approaches. Often, 3D-structural models of DNA are required, for instance, to serve as templates for homology modeling, as starting structures for macro-molecular docking or as scaffold for NMR structure

  18. Mitochondrial DNA structure in the Arabian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabrera Vicente M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two potential migratory routes followed by modern humans to colonize Eurasia from Africa have been proposed. These are the two natural passageways that connect both continents: the northern route through the Sinai Peninsula and the southern route across the Bab al Mandab strait. Recent archaeological and genetic evidence have favored a unique southern coastal route. Under this scenario, the study of the population genetic structure of the Arabian Peninsula, the first step out of Africa, to search for primary genetic links between Africa and Eurasia, is crucial. The haploid and maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA molecule has been the most used genetic marker to identify and to relate lineages with clear geographic origins, as the African Ls and the Eurasian M and N that have a common root with the Africans L3. Results To assess the role of the Arabian Peninsula in the southern route, we genetically analyzed 553 Saudi Arabs using partial (546 and complete mtDNA (7 sequencing, and compared the lineages obtained with those present in Africa, the Near East, central, east and southeast Asia and Australasia. The results showed that the Arabian Peninsula has received substantial gene flow from Africa (20%, detected by the presence of L, M1 and U6 lineages; that an 18% of the Arabian Peninsula lineages have a clear eastern provenance, mainly represented by U lineages; but also by Indian M lineages and rare M links with Central Asia, Indonesia and even Australia. However, the bulk (62% of the Arabian lineages has a Northern source. Conclusion Although there is evidence of Neolithic and more recent expansions in the Arabian Peninsula, mainly detected by (preHV1 and J1b lineages, the lack of primitive autochthonous M and N sequences, suggests that this area has been more a receptor of human migrations, including historic ones, from Africa, India, Indonesia and even Australia, than a demographic expansion center along the

  19. Effects of dimethyl sulfoxide on the hydrogen bonding structure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar 751 013, India e-mail: .... molecules are modeled by the 4-site P2 model of Luzar and Chandler9 which ..... lifetime of hydrogen bond acceptance by carbonyl oxy-.

  20. Structural, vibrational and bonding properties of hydro-nitrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Strength of secondary bonds is approximately one tenth ... are weaker, they play significant role in determining the stability of ... actions play major role in crystal binding, physical ... ties of HZA using vdW-TS method at ambient as well.

  1. Human DNA primase uses Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds to distinguish between correct and incorrect nucleoside triphosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Chad L; Zivkovic, Aleksandra; Engels, Joachim W; Kuchta, Robert D

    2004-09-28

    Human DNA primase synthesizes short RNA primers that DNA polymerase alpha further elongates. Primase readily misincorporates the natural NTPs and will generate a wide variety of mismatches. In contrast, primase exhibited a remarkable resistance to polymerizing NTPs containing unnatural bases. This included bases whose shape was almost identical to the natural bases (4-aminobenzimidazole and 4,6-difluorobenzimidazole), bases shaped very differently than a natural base [e.g., 5- and 6-(trifluoromethyl)benzimidazole], bases much more hydrophobic than a natural base [e.g., 4- and 7-(trifluoromethyl)benzimidazole], bases of similar hydrophobicity as a natural base but with the Watson-Crick hydrogen-bonding groups in unusual positions (7-beta-D-guanine), and bases capable of forming only one Watson-Crick hydrogen bond with the template base (purine and 4-aminobenzimidazole). Primase only polymerized NTP analogues containing bases capable of forming hydrogen bonds between the equivalent of both N-1 and the exocyclic group at C-6 of a purine NTP (2-fluoroadenine, 2-chloroadenine, 3-deazaadenine, and hypoxanthine) and N-3 and the exocyclic group at C-4 of a pyrimidine. These data indicate that human primase requires the formation of Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds in order to polymerize a NTP, a situation very different than what is observed with some DNA polymerases. The implications of these results with respect to current theories of how polymerases discriminate between right and wrong (d)NTPs are discussed.

  2. Binding of the antitumor drug nogalamycin and its derivatives to DNA: Structural comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Yi-Gui; Liaw, Yen-Chywan; Robinson, H.; Wang, A. H.-J.

    1990-01-01

    The three-dimensional molecular structures of the complexes between a novel antitumor drug nogalamycin and its derivative U-58872 with a modified DNA hexamer d[m 5 CGT(pS)Am 5 CG] have been determined at 1.7- and 1.8-angstrom resolution, respectively, by X-ray diffraction analyses. Both structures (in space group P6 1 ) have been refined with constrained refinement procedure to final R factors of 0.208 (3386 reflections) and 0.196 (2143 reflections). In both complexes, two nogalamycins bind to the DNA hexamer double helix in a 2:1 ratio with the elongated aglycon chromophore intercalated between the CpG steps at both ends of the helix. The aglycon chromophore spans across the GC Watson-Crick base pairs with its nogalose lying in the minor groove and the aminoglucose lying in the major groove of the distorted B-DNA double helix. Most of the sugars remain in the C2'-endo pucker family, except three deoxycytidine residues (terminal C1, C7, and internal C5). All nucleotides are in the anti conformation. Specific hydrogen bonds are found in the complex between the drug and guanine-cytosine bases in both grooves of the helix. One hydroxyl group of the aminoglucose donates a hydrogen bond to the N7 of guanine, while the other receives a hydrogen bond from the N4 amino group of cytosine. The orientation of these two hydrogen bonds suggests that nogalamycin prefers a GC base pair with its aglycon chromophore intercalating at the 5'-side of a guanine (between NpG), or at the 3'-side of a cytosine (between CpN) with the sugars pointing toward the GC base pair. The binding of nogalamycin to DNA requires that the base pairs in DNA open up transiently to allow the bulky sugars to go through, suggesting that nogalamycin prefers GC sequences embedded in a stretch of AT sequences

  3. Triple oxygen isotope systematics of structurally bonded water in gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwartz, Daniel; Surma, Jakub; Voigt, Claudia; Assonov, Sergey; Staubwasser, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The triple oxygen isotopic composition of gypsum mother water (gmw) is recorded in structurally bonded water in gypsum (gsbw). Respective fractionation factors have been determined experimentally for 18O/16O and 17O/16O. By taking previous experiments into account we suggest using 18αgsbw-gmw = 1.0037; 17αgsbw-gmw = 1.00195 and θgsbw-gmw = 0.5285 as fractionation factors in triple oxygen isotope space. Recent gypsum was sampled from a series of 10 ponds located in the Salar de Llamara in the Atacama Desert, Chile. Total dissolved solids (TDS) in these ponds show a gradual increase from 23 g/l to 182 g/l that is accompanied by an increase in pond water 18O/16O. Gsbw falls on a parallel curve to the ambient water from the saline ponds. The offset is mainly due to the equilibrium fractionation between gsbw and gmw. However, gsbw represents a time integrated signal biased towards times of strong evaporation, hence the estimated gmw comprises elevated 18O/16O compositions when compared to pond water samples taken on site. Gypsum precipitation is associated with algae mats in the ponds with lower salinity. No evidence for respective vital effects on the triple oxygen isotopic composition of gypsum hydration water is observed, nor are such effects expected. In principle, the array of δ18Ogsbw vs. 17Oexcess can be used to: (1) provide information on the degree of evaporation during gypsum formation; (2) estimate pristine meteoric water compositions; and (3) estimate local relative humidity which is the controlling parameter of the slope of the array for simple hydrological situations. In our case study, local mining activities may have decreased deep groundwater recharge, causing a recent change of the local hydrology.

  4. Structure and dynamics of double helical DNA in torsion angle hyperspace: a molecular mechanics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkar, Aditi; Ghosh, Indira; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2010-04-01

    Analysis of the conformational space populated by the torsion angles and the correlation between the conformational energy and the sequence of DNA are important for fully understanding DNA structure and function. Presence of seven variable torsion angles about single covalent bonds in DNA main chain puts a big challenge for such analysis. We have carried out restrained energy minimization studies for four representative dinucleosides, namely d(ApA):d(TpT), d(CpG):d(CpG), d(GpC):d(GpC) and d(CpA):d(TpG) to determine the energy hyperspace of DNA in context to the values of the torsion angles and the structural properties of the DNA conformations populating the favorable regions of this energy hyperspace. The torsion angles were manipulated by constraining their values at the reference points and then performing energy minimization. The energy minima obtained on the potential energy contour plots mostly correspond to the conformations populated in crystal structures of DNA. Some novel favorable conformations that are not present in crystal structure data are also found. The plots also suggest few low energy routes for conformational transitions or the associated energy barrier heights. Analyses of base pairing and stacking possibility reveal structural changes accompanying these transitions as well as the flexibility of different base steps towards variations in different torsion angles.

  5. Electronic structure imperfections and chemical bonding at graphene interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Brian Joseph

    nanomaterial with lateral dimensions in the hundreds of microns if not larger, with a corresponding atomic vertical thickness poses significant difficulties. Graphene's unique structure is dominated by surface area or potentially hybridized interfaces; consequently, the true realization of this remarkable nanomaterial in device constructs relies on engineering graphene interfaces at the surface in order to controllably mold the electronic structure. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and the transmission mode analogue scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) are particularly useful tools to study the unoccupied states of graphene and graphene interfaces. In addition, polarized NEXAFS and STXM studies provide information on surface orientation, bond sterics, and the extent of substrate alignment before and after interfacial hybridization. The work presented in this dissertation is fundamentally informed by NEXAFS and STXM measurements on graphene/metal, graphene/dielectric, and graphene/organic interfaces. We start with a general review of the electronic structure of freestanding graphene and graphene interfaces in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, we investigate freestanding single-layer graphene via STXM and NEXAFS demonstrating that electronic structure heterogeneities from synthesis and processing are ubiquitous in 2-dimensional graphene. We show the mapping of discrete charge transfer regions as a result of doped impurities that decorate the surfaces of graphene and that transfer processing imparts local electronic corrugations or ripples. In corroboration with density functional theory, definitive assignments to the spectral features, global steric orientations of the localized domains, and quantitative charge transfer schemes are evidenced. In the following chapters, we deliberately (Chapter 3) incorporate substitutional nitrogen into reduced graphene oxide to induce C--N charge redistribution and improve global conductivity, (Chapter 4

  6. Hands on Group Work Paper Model for Teaching DNA Structure, Central Dogma and Recombinant DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altiparmak, Melek; Nakiboglu Tezer, Mahmure

    2009-01-01

    Understanding life on a molecular level is greatly enhanced when students are given the opportunity to visualize the molecules. Especially understanding DNA structure and function is essential for understanding key concepts of molecular biology such as DNA, central dogma and the manipulation of DNA. Researches have shown that undergraduate…

  7. Some features of borophosphatic catalysts structure with silicate bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubasov, A.A.; Kitaev, L.E.; Topchieva, K.V.; Gonchakova, N.N.

    1979-01-01

    The structure of borophosphatic catalysts is studied using the method of IR-spectroscopy. Silica gel and diatomite brick were used as a binding (carriers). To clarify the character of the carrier effect on borophosphate structure obtained were boric and phosphoric acid spectra, covered in the quantity of 10 weight % on SiO 2 , and also industrial catalyst H 3 PO 4 /SiO 2 of hydratation with higher P 2 O 5 content. At calcination of sample 10% H 3 BO 3 /SiO 2 in vacuum 932 cm -1 strip intensity increased with the temperature rise and that can be referred to B-O-Si vibrations. In the area of fundamental vibrations P-O and Si-O spectrum of the 10% H 3 PO 4 /SiO 2 sample, subjected to heating up to 600 deg C in the air, differed but slightly from the initial SiO 2 spectrum. In the spectrum of the sample with higher P 2 O 5 content after thermovapor treatment at 300 deg C in the frequency range of 500-800 cm -1 strips were detected, which testified to the phosphoric acid interaction with silica gel. The state of adsorbed water can be judged by the change of 1630 cm -1 strip optical density in the course of step thermovacuum borophosphate treatment. It was found that water was removed from the sample surface in the range of 200-300 deg C. Thus, at borophosphate catalysts calcination which contains SiO 2 , interaction took place between borophosphate and bind components accompanied by B-O-Si and P-O-Si bonds formation. Water removal from these catalyst surfaces took place at lower temperature as compared to individual borophosphate, which testified to certain release of electron acceptor properties as a result of the bind component introduction. Thus, the bind component introduction not only increases mechanical strength and hydrolytic stability of borophosphates but results in their surface modification

  8. Interface structure of Be/DSCu diffusion bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, T.; Iwadachi, T. [NGK Insulators Ltd., Nagoya (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium is used as plasma facing components of the first wall on ITER. Dispersion-Strengthened Copper (DSCu) is used as heat sink material by joining to Be because DSCu has high thermal conductivity and strength. In this study, Be/DSCu diffusion bonding tests using the interlayer of Al, Ni, Nb, Ti, Zr and Be-Cu alloy have been conducted to choose the suitable interlayer materials. As a result of the shear strength tests, Be/DSCu joints by using Be-Cu alloy interlayer showed the strength of about 200 MPa. Diffusion bonding tests using Be-Cu alloy interlayer or no interlayer (direct bonding) at the range of temperature from 600degC to 850degC have been conducted to identify the effect of bonding temperature and time on interface formation and strength. The thickness of diffusion layer was proportional to a square root of bonding time by diffusion controlled process. The shear strength is controlled by the formation of intermetallic layer at Be side. (author)

  9. Differential Deformability of the DNA Minor Groove and Altered BI/BII Backbone Conformational Equilibrium by the Monovalent Ions Li+, Na+, K+ and Rb+ via Water-Mediated Hydrogen Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported the differential impact of the monovalent cations Li+, Na+, K+ and Rb+ on DNA conformational properties. These were identified from variations in the calculated solution-state X-ray DNA spectra as a function of the ion type in the solvation buffer in MD simulations using our recently developed polarizable force field based on the classical Drude oscillator. Changes in the DNA structure were found to mainly involve variations in the minor groove width. Because minor groove dimensions vary significantly in protein-DNA complexes and have been shown to play a critical role in both specific and nonspecific DNA readout, understanding the origins of the observed differential DNA modulation by the first-group monovalent ions is of great biological importance. In the present study we show that the primary microscopic mechanism for the phenomenon is the formation of the water-mediated hydrogen bonds between solvated cations located inside the minor groove and simultaneously to two DNA strands, a process whose intensity and impact on DNA structure depends on both the type of the ion and DNA sequence. Additionally, it is shown that formation of such ion-DNA hydrogen bond complexes appreciably modulates the conformation of the backbone by increasing the population of the BII substate. Notably, the differential impact of the ions on DNA conformational behavior is only predicted by the Drude polarizable model for DNA, with virtually no effect observed from MD simulations utilizing the additive CHARMM36 model. Analysis of dipole moments of the water shows the Drude SWM4 model to possess high sensitivity to changes in the local environment, which indicates the important role of electronic polarization in the salt-dependent conformational properties. This also suggests that inclusion of polarization effects is required to model even relatively simple biological systems such as DNA in various ionic solutions. PMID:26575937

  10. Bond slip model for the simulation of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casanova, A.; Jason, L.; Davenne, L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new finite element approach to model the steel-concrete bond effects. This model proposes to relate steel, represented by truss elements, with the surrounding concrete in the case where the two meshes are not necessary coincident. The theoretical formulation is described and the model is applied on a reinforced concrete tie. A characteristic stress distribution is observed, related to the transfer of bond forces from steel to concrete. The results of this simulation are compared with a computation in which a perfect relation between steel and concrete is supposed. It clearly shows how the introduction of the bond model can improve the description of the cracking process (finite number of cracks). (authors)

  11. Crystal structure of the Msx-1 homeodomain/DNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovde, S; Abate-Shen, C; Geiger, J H

    2001-10-09

    The Msx-1 homeodomain protein plays a crucial role in craniofacial, limb, and nervous system development. Homeodomain DNA-binding domains are comprised of 60 amino acids that show a high degree of evolutionary conservation. We have determined the structure of the Msx-1 homeodomain complexed to DNA at 2.2 A resolution. The structure has an unusually well-ordered N-terminal arm with a unique trajectory across the minor groove of the DNA. DNA specificity conferred by bases flanking the core TAAT sequence is explained by well ordered water-mediated interactions at Q50. Most interactions seen at the TAAT sequence are typical of the interactions seen in other homeodomain structures. Comparison of the Msx-1-HD structure to all other high resolution HD-DNA complex structures indicate a remarkably well-conserved sphere of hydration between the DNA and protein in these complexes.

  12. Structural Transformation of Wireframe DNA Origami via DNA Polymerase Assisted Gap-Filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nayan P; Matthies, Michael; Joffroy, Bastian; Schmidt, Thorsten L

    2018-03-27

    The programmability of DNA enables constructing nanostructures with almost any arbitrary shape, which can be decorated with many functional materials. Moreover, dynamic structures can be realized such as molecular motors and walkers. In this work, we have explored the possibility to synthesize the complementary sequences to single-stranded gap regions in the DNA origami scaffold cost effectively by a DNA polymerase rather than by a DNA synthesizer. For this purpose, four different wireframe DNA origami structures were designed to have single-stranded gap regions. This reduced the number of staple strands needed to determine the shape and size of the final structure after gap filling. For this, several DNA polymerases and single-stranded binding (SSB) proteins were tested, with T4 DNA polymerase being the best fit. The structures could be folded in as little as 6 min, and the subsequent optimized gap-filling reaction was completed in less than 3 min. The introduction of flexible gap regions results in fully collapsed or partially bent structures due to entropic spring effects. Finally, we demonstrated structural transformations of such deformed wireframe DNA origami structures with DNA polymerases including the expansion of collapsed structures and the straightening of curved tubes. We anticipate that this approach will become a powerful tool to build DNA wireframe structures more material-efficiently, and to quickly prototype and test new wireframe designs that can be expanded, rigidified, or mechanically switched. Mechanical force generation and structural transitions will enable applications in structural DNA nanotechnology, plasmonics, or single-molecule biophysics.

  13. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology. Volume XLVII, Part 1. Structures of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The proceedings for the 47th Annual Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology are presented. This symposium focused on the Structure of DNA. Topics presented covered research in the handedness of DNA, conformational analysis, chemically modified DNA, chemical synthesis of DNA, DNA-protein interactions, DNA within nucleosomes, DNA methylation, DNA replication, gyrases and topoisomerases, recombining and mutating DNA, transcription of DNA and its regulation, the organization of genes along DNA, repetitive DNA and pseudogenes, and origins of replication, centromeres, and teleomeres

  14. Deuterium isotope effects and fractionation factors of hydrogen-bonded A:T base pairs of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakonakis, Ioannis; Salazar, Miguel; Kang, Mijeong; Dunbar, Kim R.; Li Wang, Andy C.

    2003-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects and fractionation factors of N1...H3-N3 hydrogen bonded Watson-Crick A:T base pairs of two DNA dodecamers are presented here. Specifically, two-bond deuterium isotope effects on the chemical shifts of 13 C2 and 13 C4, 2 Δ 13 C2 and 2 Δ 13 C4, and equilibrium deuterium/protium fractionation factors of H3, Φ, were measured and seen to correlate with the chemical shift of the corresponding imino proton, δ H3 . Downfield-shifted imino protons associated with larger values of 2 Δ 13 C2 and 2 Δ 13 C4 and smaller Φ values, which together suggested that the effective H3-N3 vibrational potentials were more anharmonic in the stronger hydrogen bonds of these DNA molecules. We anticipate that 2 Δ 13 C2, 2 Δ 13 C4 and Φ values can be useful gauges of hydrogen bond strength of A:T base pairs

  15. Temperature and Magnetic Field Driven Modifications in the I-V Features of Gold-DNA-Gold Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Mahmoudi Khatir

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of Metal-DNA-Metal (MDM structure-based high sensitivity sensors from DNA micro-and nanoarray strands is a key issue in their development. The tunable semiconducting response of DNA in the presence of external electromagnetic and thermal fields is a gift for molecular electronics. The impact of temperatures (25–55 °C and magnetic fields (0–1200 mT on the current-voltage (I-V features of Au-DNA-Au (GDG structures with an optimum gap of 10 μm is reported. The I-V characteristics acquired in the presence and absence of magnetic fields demonstrated the semiconducting diode nature of DNA in GDG structures with high temperature sensitivity. The saturation current in the absence of magnetic field was found to increase sharply with the increase of temperature up to 45 °C and decrease rapidly thereafter. This increase was attributed to the temperature-assisted conversion of double bonds into single bond in DNA structures. Furthermore, the potential barrier height and Richardson constant for all the structures increased steadily with the increase of external magnetic field irrespective of temperature variations. Our observation on magnetic field and temperature sensitivity of I-V response in GDG sandwiches may contribute towards the development of DNA-based magnetic sensors.

  16. Measurement of average continuous-time structure of a bond and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The expected continuous-time structure of a bond and bond's interest rate risk in an investment settings was studied. We determined the expected number of years an investor or manager will wait until the stock comes to maturity. The expected principal amount to be paid back per stock at time 't' was determined, while ...

  17. Effects of interface edge configuration on residual stress in the bonded structures for a divertor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, K.; Nagata, K.; Shibui, M.; Tachikawa, N.; Araki, M.

    1998-01-01

    Residual stresses in the interface region, that developed at the cool down during the brazing, were evaluated for several bonded structures to assess the mechanical strength of the bonded interface, using thermoelasto-plastic stress analysis. Normal stress components of the residual stresses around the interface edge of graphite-copper (C-Cu) bonded structures were compared for three types of bonded features such as flat-type, monoblock-type and saddle-type. The saddle-type structure was found to be favorable for its relatively low residual stress, easy fabrication accuracy on bonded interface and armor replacement. Residual stresses around the interface edge in three armor materials/copper bonded structures for a divertor plate were also examined for the C-Cu, tungsten-copper (W-Cu) and molybdenum alloy-copper (TZM-Cu), varying the interface wedge angle from 45 to 135 . An optimal bonded configuration for the least value of residual stress was found to have a wedge angle of 45 for the C-Cu, and 135 for both the W-Cu and TZM-Cu bonded ones. (orig.)

  18. Pair copula constructions to determine the dependence structure of Treasury bond yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Brutti Righi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We estimated the dependence structure of US Treasury bonds through a pair copula construction. As a result, we verified that the variability of the yields decreases with a longer time of maturity of the bond. The yields presented strong dependence with past values, strongly positive bivariate associations between the daily variations, and prevalence of the Student's t copula in the relationships between the bonds. Furthermore, in tail associations, we identified relevant values in most of the relationships, which highlights the importance of risk management in the context of bonds diversification.

  19. Structural and electrostatic regularities in interactions of homeodomains with operator DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirgadze, Yu.N.; Ivanov, V.V.; Polozov, R.V.; Zheltukhin, E.I.; Sivozhelezov, V.S.

    2008-01-01

    Interfaces of five DNA-homeodomain complexes, selected by similarity of structures and patterns of contacting residues, were compared. The long-range stage of the recognition process was characterized by electrostatic potentials about 5 Angstroem away from molecular surfaces of both protein and DNA. For proteins, clear positive potential is displayed only at the side contacting DNA, while grooves of DNA display a strong negative potential. Thus, one functional role of electrostatics is guiding the protein into the DNA major groove. At the close-range stage, neutralization of the phosphate charges by positively charged residues is necessary for decreasing the strong electrostatic potential of DNA, allowing nucleotide bases to participate in formation of protein-DNA atomic contacts in the interface. The protein's recognizing α-helix was shown to form both invariant and variable contacts with DNA by means of the certain specific side groups, with water molecules participating in some of the contacts. The invariant contacts included the highly specific Asn-Ade hydrogen bonds, nonpolar contacts of hydrophobic amino acids serving as barriers for fixing the protein on DNA, and interface water molecule cluster providing local mobility necessary for the dissociation of the protein-DNA complex. One of the water molecules is invariant and located at the center of the interface. Invariant contacts of the proteins are mostly formed with the TAAT motive of promoter DNA's forward strand. They distinguish the homeodomain family from other DNA-binding proteins. Variable contacts are formed with the reverse strand and are responsible for the binding specificity within the homeodomain family

  20. The pseudohydrogen bond structures between 2-F-epoxy-butane and three kinds of bimolecular

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yanzhi; Yuan Kun; Lu Lingling; Zhu Yuancheng; Dong Xiaoning

    2012-01-01

    The weak intermolecular interactions between 2-F-epoxy-butane and Iminazole, Thiazole and Oxazole were theoretically discussed by using density functional B3LYP (Becke, three-parameter, Lee- Yang-Parr)/6-311++G ** and HF (Hartree Fock)/6-311++G ** methods. The results showed that both the N…H conventional hydrogen bond and C-F…H-C pseudohydrogen bond (PHB) structures are coexisting in the three complexes. The weak intermolecular interactions energies indicate the relative stabilities of the three complexes are proportionable. The calculated results showed that the stretch vibrational frequency of C-H bond (electronic acceptor) presents blue shift, but that of C-F bond, which is intensely related to F group (electronic donor), presents red shift. Electron density topological properties demonstrates that the covalent and ionic characteristics of the C-F…H-C pseudohydrogen bond are proportional to that of convention hydrogen bond. (authors)

  1. From bifluorenylidene dianion to dibenzo[g,p]chrysene dianion: sensitivity of anisotropy changes to bonding structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shenhar, R.; Beust, R.; Hagen, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of the C-26 series having similar bonding structure yield dianions upon reduction with lithium metal. Anisotropy changes, revealed from an advanced charge distribution analysis performed on these dianions, show a correlation to the bonding structure...

  2. Structure of human DNA polymerase iota and the mechanism of DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, A V; Kulbachinskiy, A V

    2012-06-01

    Cellular DNA polymerases belong to several families and carry out different functions. Highly accurate replicative DNA polymerases play the major role in cell genome replication. A number of new specialized DNA polymerases were discovered at the turn of XX-XXI centuries and have been intensively studied during the last decade. Due to the special structure of the active site, these enzymes efficiently perform synthesis on damaged DNA but are characterized by low fidelity. Human DNA polymerase iota (Pol ι) belongs to the Y-family of specialized DNA polymerases and is one of the most error-prone enzymes involved in DNA synthesis. In contrast to other DNA polymerases, Pol ι is able to use noncanonical Hoogsteen interactions for nucleotide base pairing. This allows it to incorporate nucleotides opposite various lesions in the DNA template that impair Watson-Crick interactions. Based on the data of X-ray structural analysis of Pol ι in complexes with various DNA templates and dNTP substrates, we consider the structural peculiarities of the Pol ι active site and discuss possible mechanisms that ensure the unique behavior of the enzyme on damaged and undamaged DNA.

  3. Sensitivity of hydrogen bonds of DNA and RNA to hydration, as gauged by 1JNH measurements in ethanol-water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manalo, Marlon N.; Kong Xiangming; LiWang, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond lengths of nucleic acids are (1) longer in DNA than in RNA, and (2) sequence dependent. The physicochemical basis for these variations in hydrogen-bond lengths is unknown, however. Here, the notion that hydration plays a significant role in nucleic acid hydrogen-bond lengths is tested. Watson-Crick N1...N3 hydrogen-bond lengths of several DNA and RNA duplexes are gauged using imino 1 J NH measurements, and ethanol is used as a cosolvent to lower water activity. We find that 1 J NH values of DNA and RNA become less negative with added ethanol, which suggests that mild dehydration reduces hydrogen-bond lengths even as the overall thermal stabilities of these duplexes decrease. The 1 J NH of DNA are increased in 8 mol% ethanol to those of RNA in water, which suggests that the greater hydration of DNA plays a significant role in its longer hydrogen bonds. The data also suggest that ethanol-induced dehydration is greater for the more hydrated G:C base pairs and thereby results in greater hydrogen-bond shortening than for the less hydrated A:T/U base pairs of DNA and RNA

  4. From structure to mechanism-understanding initiation of DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Alberto; Barbon, Marta; Noguchi, Yasunori; Reuter, L Maximilian; Schneider, Sarah; Speck, Christian

    2017-06-01

    DNA replication results in the doubling of the genome prior to cell division. This process requires the assembly of 50 or more protein factors into a replication fork. Here, we review recent structural and biochemical insights that start to explain how specific proteins recognize DNA replication origins, load the replicative helicase on DNA, unwind DNA, synthesize new DNA strands, and reassemble chromatin. We focus on the minichromosome maintenance (MCM2-7) proteins, which form the core of the eukaryotic replication fork, as this complex undergoes major structural rearrangements in order to engage with DNA, regulate its DNA-unwinding activity, and maintain genome stability. © 2017 Riera et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. A Paper Model of DNA Structure and Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigismondi, Linda A.

    1989-01-01

    A paper model which is designed to give students a hands-on experience during lecture and blackboard instruction on DNA structure is provided. A list of materials, paper patterns, and procedures for using the models to teach DNA structure and replication are given. (CW)

  6. Controlling Function and Structure with DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    and ideas are presented. The second research topic concerns our contributions to the field of DNA origami. This includes investigations of single molecule reactions on a DNA origami platform. The reaction between an amine and an activated ester, as well as the Huisgen-Meldal-Sharpless reaction were...... investigated on a two dimensional DNA origami platform. This was done by incorporating functional groups on the surface of the origami, and reacting these with biotin analogues carrying the complementary functional groups. Successful reactions could then be observed using atomic force microscopy after addition...... of the protein streptavidin. While the implementation of chemical functionalities on origami can be achieved during automated DNA synthesis, this is laborious and costly. In a separate research project we aimed at improving the accessibility by applying an enzymatic labelling method. We demonstrated that the DNA...

  7. Spectral entropy criteria for structural segmentation in genomic DNA sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chechetkin, V.R.; Lobzin, V.V.

    2004-01-01

    The spectral entropy is calculated with Fourier structure factors and characterizes the level of structural ordering in a sequence of symbols. It may efficiently be applied to the assessment and reconstruction of the modular structure in genomic DNA sequences. We present the relevant spectral entropy criteria for the local and non-local structural segmentation in DNA sequences. The results are illustrated with the model examples and analysis of intervening exon-intron segments in the protein-coding regions

  8. Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper for linear collider accelerator structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Elmer

    2001-05-01

    -step joining method is proposed for fabricating the NLC structures. The structure would be assembled with pure silver braze inserts using a self-aligning step joint design, then the assembly would be vacuum diffusion bonded at 700 °C and 3.45 MPa pressure to seal the critical inner portion of the assembly. Finally, during the same furnace cycle, the temperature would be increased to 800 °C in order to react the silver with the copper to form a liquid braze alloy that would join and seal the outer portion of the cells together.

  9. DNA Recognition by the DNA Primase of Bacteriophage T7: A Structure Function Study of the Zinc-Binding Domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akabayov, B.; Lee, S.; Akabayov, S.; Rekhi, S.; Zhu, B.; Richardson, C.

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis of oligoribonucleotide primers for lagging-strand DNA synthesis in the DNA replication system of bacteriophage T7 is catalyzed by the primase domain of the gene 4 helicase-primase. The primase consists of a zinc-binding domain (ZBD) and an RNA polymerase (RPD) domain. The ZBD is responsible for recognition of a specific sequence in the ssDNA template whereas catalytic activity resides in the RPD. The ZBD contains a zinc ion coordinated with four cysteine residues. We have examined the ligation state of the zinc ion by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and biochemical analysis of genetically altered primases. The ZBD of primase engaged in catalysis exhibits considerable asymmetry in coordination to zinc, as evidenced by a gradual increase in electron density of the zinc together with elongation of the zinc-sulfur bonds. Both wild-type primase and primase reconstituted from purified ZBD and RPD have a similar electronic change in the level of the zinc ion as well as the configuration of the ZBD. Single amino acid replacements in the ZBD (H33A and C36S) result in the loss of both zinc binding and its structural integrity. Thus the zinc in the ZBD may act as a charge modulation indicator for the surrounding sulfur atoms necessary for recognition of specific DNA sequences.

  10. Protein-based polymers that bond to DNA : design of virus-like particles and supramolecular nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez Garcia, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis it is demonstrated that it is possible to use Protein-based Polymers (PbPs) as synthetic binders of DNA (or any other negatively charged polyelectrolyte). The PbPs co-assemble with their DNA templates to form highly organized virus-like particles and supramolecular structures. A

  11. Activator Protein-1: redox switch controlling structure and DNA-binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhou; Machius, Mischa; Nestler, Eric J; Rudenko, Gabby

    2017-11-02

    The transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1), binds to cognate DNA under redox control; yet, the underlying mechanism has remained enigmatic. A series of crystal structures of the AP-1 FosB/JunD bZIP domains reveal ordered DNA-binding regions in both FosB and JunD even in absence DNA. However, while JunD is competent to bind DNA, the FosB bZIP domain must undergo a large conformational rearrangement that is controlled by a 'redox switch' centered on an inter-molecular disulfide bond. Solution studies confirm that FosB/JunD cannot undergo structural transition and bind DNA when the redox-switch is in the 'OFF' state, and show that the mid-point redox potential of the redox switch affords it sensitivity to cellular redox homeostasis. The molecular and structural studies presented here thus reveal the mechanism underlying redox-regulation of AP-1 Fos/Jun transcription factors and provide structural insight for therapeutic interventions targeting AP-1 proteins. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Activator Protein-1: redox switch controlling structure and DNA-binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Zhou; Machius, Mischa; Nestler, Eric J.; Rudenko, Gabby (Texas-MED); (Icahn)

    2017-09-07

    The transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1), binds to cognate DNA under redox control; yet, the underlying mechanism has remained enigmatic. A series of crystal structures of the AP-1 FosB/JunD bZIP domains reveal ordered DNA-binding regions in both FosB and JunD even in absence DNA. However, while JunD is competent to bind DNA, the FosB bZIP domain must undergo a large conformational rearrangement that is controlled by a ‘redox switch’ centered on an inter-molecular disulfide bond. Solution studies confirm that FosB/JunD cannot undergo structural transition and bind DNA when the redox-switch is in the ‘OFF’ state, and show that the mid-point redox potential of the redox switch affords it sensitivity to cellular redox homeostasis. The molecular and structural studies presented here thus reveal the mechanism underlying redox-regulation of AP-1 Fos/Jun transcription factors and provide structural insight for therapeutic interventions targeting AP-1 proteins.

  13. Calibration of short rate term structure models from bid-ask coupon bond prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Gonçalves, Erika; Gzyl, Henryk; Mayoral, Silvia

    2018-02-01

    In this work we use the method of maximum entropy in the mean to provide a model free, non-parametric methodology that uses only market data to provide the prices of the zero coupon bonds, and then, a term structure of the short rates. The data used consists of the prices of the bid-ask ranges of a few coupon bonds quoted in the market. The prices of the zero coupon bonds obtained in the first stage, are then used as input to solve a recursive set of equations to determine a binomial recombinant model of the short term structure of the interest rates.

  14. Phylogenetic and structural analysis of centromeric DNA and kinetochore proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Meraldi, Patrick; McAinsh, Andrew D; Rheinbay, Esther; Sorger, Peter K

    2006-01-01

    Background: Kinetochores are large multi-protein structures that assemble on centromeric DNA (CEN DNA) and mediate the binding of chromosomes to microtubules. Comprising 125 base-pairs of CEN DNA and 70 or more protein components, Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinetochores are among the best understood. In contrast, most fungal, plant and animal cells assemble kinetochores on CENs that are longer and more complex, raising the question of whether kinetochore architecture has been conserved through ...

  15. Molecular recognition of naphthalene diimide ligands by telomeric quadruplex-DNA: the importance of the protonation state and mediated hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinello, A; Barone, G; Grunenberg, J

    2016-01-28

    In depth Monte Carlo conformational scans in combination with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and electronic structure calculations were applied in order to study the molecular recognition process between tetrasubstituted naphthalene diimide (ND) guests and G-quadruplex (G4) DNA receptors. ND guests are a promising class of telomere stabilizers due to which they are used in novel anticancer therapeutics. Though several ND guests have been studied experimentally in the past, the protonation state under physiological conditions is still unclear. Based on chemical intuition, in the case of N-methyl-piperazine substitution, different protonation states are possible and might play a crucial role in the molecular recognition process by G4-DNA. Depending on the proton concentration, different nitrogen atoms of the N-methyl-piperazine might (or might not) be protonated. This fact was considered in our simulation in terms of a case by case analysis, since the process of molecular recognition is determined by possible donor or acceptor positions. The results of our simulations show that the electrostatic interactions between the ND ligands and the G4 receptor are maximized in the case of the protonation of the terminal nitrogen atoms, forming compact ND G4 complexes inside the grooves. The influence of different protonation states in terms of the ability to form hydrogen bonds with the sugar-phosphate backbone, as well as the importance of mediated vs. direct hydrogen bonding, was analyzed in detail by MD and relaxed force constant (compliance constant) simulations.

  16. High-fidelity in vivo replication of DNA base shape mimics without Watson–Crick hydrogen bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, James C.; Henderson, Paul T.; Helquist, Sandra A.; Morales, Juan C.; Essigmann, John M.; Kool, Eric T.

    2003-01-01

    We report studies testing the importance of Watson–Crick hydrogen bonding, base-pair geometry, and steric effects during DNA replication in living bacterial cells. Nonpolar DNA base shape mimics of thymine and adenine (abbreviated F and Q, respectively) were introduced into Escherichia coli by insertion into a phage genome followed by transfection of the vector into bacteria. Genetic assays showed that these two base mimics were bypassed with moderate to high efficiency in the cells and with very high efficiency under damage-response (SOS induction) conditions. Under both sets of conditions, the T-shape mimic (F) encoded genetic information in the bacteria as if it were thymine, directing incorporation of adenine opposite it with high fidelity. Similarly, the A mimic (Q) directed incorporation of thymine opposite itself with high fidelity. The data establish that Watson–Crick hydrogen bonding is not necessary for high-fidelity replication of a base pair in vivo. The results suggest that recognition of DNA base shape alone serves as the most powerful determinant of fidelity during transfer of genetic information in a living organism. PMID:12676985

  17. Organization of the BcgI restriction-modification protein for the cleavage of eight phosphodiester bonds in DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel M.; Marshall, Jacqueline J. T.; Jacklin, Alistair J.; Retter, Susan E.; Halford, Stephen E.; Sobott, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Type IIB restriction-modification systems, such as BcgI, feature a single protein with both endonuclease and methyltransferase activities. Type IIB nucleases require two recognition sites and cut both strands on both sides of their unmodified sites. BcgI cuts all eight target phosphodiester bonds before dissociation. The BcgI protein contains A and B polypeptides in a 2:1 ratio: A has one catalytic centre for each activity; B recognizes the DNA. We show here that BcgI is organized as A2B protomers, with B at its centre, but that these protomers self-associate to assemblies containing several A2B units. Moreover, like the well known FokI nuclease, BcgI bound to its site has to recruit additional protomers before it can cut DNA. DNA-bound BcgI can alternatively be activated by excess A subunits, much like the activation of FokI by its catalytic domain. Eight A subunits, each with one centre for nuclease activity, are presumably needed to cut the eight bonds cleaved by BcgI. Its nuclease reaction may thus involve two A2B units, each bound to a recognition site, with two more A2B units bridging the complexes by protein–protein interactions between the nuclease domains. PMID:23147005

  18. Structure determination of uracil-DNA N-glycosylase from Deinococcus radiodurans in complex with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Hege Lynum; Johnson, Kenneth A; McVey, Colin E; Leiros, Ingar; Moe, Elin

    2015-10-01

    Uracil-DNA N-glycosylase (UNG) is a DNA-repair enzyme in the base-excision repair (BER) pathway which removes uracil from DNA. Here, the crystal structure of UNG from the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans (DrUNG) in complex with DNA is reported at a resolution of 1.35 Å. Prior to the crystallization experiments, the affinity between DrUNG and different DNA oligonucleotides was tested by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). As a result of this analysis, two 16 nt double-stranded DNAs were chosen for the co-crystallization experiments, one of which (16 nt AU) resulted in well diffracting crystals. The DNA in the co-crystal structure contained an abasic site (substrate product) flipped into the active site of the enzyme, with no uracil in the active-site pocket. Despite the high resolution, it was not possible to fit all of the terminal nucleotides of the DNA complex into electron density owing to disorder caused by a lack of stabilizing interactions. However, the DNA which was in contact with the enzyme, close to the active site, was well ordered and allowed detailed analysis of the enzyme-DNA interaction. The complex revealed that the interaction between DrUNG and DNA is similar to that in the previously determined crystal structure of human UNG (hUNG) in complex with DNA [Slupphaug et al. (1996). Nature (London), 384, 87-92]. Substitutions in a (here defined) variable part of the leucine loop result in a shorter loop (eight residues instead of nine) in DrUNG compared with hUNG; regardless of this, it seems to fulfil its role and generate a stabilizing force with the minor groove upon flipping out of the damaged base into the active site. The structure also provides a rationale for the previously observed high catalytic efficiency of DrUNG caused by high substrate affinity by demonstrating an increased number of long-range electrostatic interactions between the enzyme and the DNA. Interestingly, specific interactions between residues

  19. cDNA structure, genomic organization and expression patterns of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Visfatin was a newly identified adipocytokine, which was involved in various physiologic and pathologic processes of organisms. The cDNA structure, genomic organization and expression patterns of silver Prussian carp visfatin were described in this report. The silver Prussian carp visfatin cDNA cloned from the liver was ...

  20. A Study of Bond of Structural Timber and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongtaeg LEE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The increase of well-being culture of problem related to environmental depletion of resource is not the growing interest in timber the natural material of construction markets. Also, the perception for historic preservation has been increased in respond to heightened interest. However, it is fairly difficult for architectural properties to maintain their durability because it was made by timber construction. Preventing traditional structure from damage and structural performance reduction is paramount in maintenance problem. A number of studies of reinforced method have been conducted in order to solve such a problem. In this paper, external bonded reinforcement and near-surface mounted was used as a way to reinforce timber structure’s durability. Bond strength for specimens with different bond length was investigated. As a result showed, maximum bond strength in bond length 300 mm from all method, was found to be not increased of bond strength over the certain bond length.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9702

  1. Effect of pressure on the solution structure and hydrogen bond properties of aqueous N-methylacetamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, Rahul; Paul, Sandip

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NMA molecules are associated mostly through their hydrophobic methyl groups. ► High pressure reduces association propensity causing dispersion of these moieties. ► Orientational polarization of vicinal water molecules near O and H atoms of NMA. ► NMA prefers to be a H-bond acceptor rather than a donor in interaction with water. ► Energy of these hydrogen bonds reduces slightly at high pressure. -- Abstract: Effects of high pressure on hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions are investigated by employing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of aqueous N-methylacetamide (NMA) solutions. Such systems are of interest mainly because high pressure causes protein denaturation and NMA is a computationally effective model to understand the atomic-level picture of pressure-induced structural transitions of protein. Simulations are performed for five different pressure values ranging from 1 atm to 8000 atm. We find that NMA molecules are associated mostly through their hydrophobic methyl groups and high pressure reduces this association propensity, causing dispersion of these moieties. At high pressure, structural void decreases and the packing efficiency of water molecules around NMA molecules increases. Hydrogen bond properties calculations show favorable NMA–NMA hydrogen bonds as compared to those of NMA–water hydrogen bonds and preference of NMA to be a hydrogen bond acceptor rather than a donor in interaction with water.

  2. Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I can disrupt G-quadruplex structures during DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Yuan; Hou, Xi-Miao; Fan, San-Hong; Rety, Stephane; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Xi, Xu-Guang

    2017-12-01

    Non-canonical four-stranded G-quadruplex (G4) DNA structures can form in G-rich sequences that are widely distributed throughout the genome. The presence of G4 structures can impair DNA replication by hindering the progress of replicative polymerases (Pols), and failure to resolve these structures can lead to genetic instability. In the present study, we combined different approaches to address the question of whether and how Escherichia coli Pol I resolves G4 obstacles during DNA replication and/or repair. We found that E. coli Pol I-catalyzed DNA synthesis could be arrested by G4 structures at low protein concentrations and the degree of inhibition was strongly dependent on the stability of the G4 structures. Interestingly, at high protein concentrations, E. coli Pol I was able to overcome some kinds of G4 obstacles without the involvement of other molecules and could achieve complete replication of G4 DNA. Mechanistic studies suggested that multiple Pol I proteins might be implicated in G4 unfolding, and the disruption of G4 structures requires energy derived from dNTP hydrolysis. The present work not only reveals an unrealized function of E. coli Pol I, but also presents a possible mechanism by which G4 structures can be resolved during DNA replication and/or repair in E. coli. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. Dynamics of water around the complex structures formed between the KH domains of far upstream element binding protein and single-stranded DNA molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy, E-mail: sanjoy@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in [Molecular Modeling Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2015-07-28

    Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) binding proteins specifically bind to the single-stranded regions of the DNA and protect it from premature annealing, thereby stabilizing the DNA structure. We have carried out atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the aqueous solutions of two DNA binding K homology (KH) domains (KH3 and KH4) of the far upstream element binding protein complexed with two short ss-DNA segments. Attempts have been made to explore the influence of the formation of such complex structures on the microscopic dynamics and hydrogen bond properties of the interfacial water molecules. It is found that the water molecules involved in bridging the ss-DNA segments and the protein domains form a highly constrained thin layer with extremely retarded mobility. These water molecules play important roles in freezing the conformational oscillations of the ss-DNA oligomers and thereby forming rigid complex structures. Further, it is demonstrated that the effect of complexation on the slow long-time relaxations of hydrogen bonds at the interface is correlated with hindered motions of the surrounding water molecules. Importantly, it is observed that the highly restricted motions of the water molecules bridging the protein and the DNA components in the complexed forms originate from more frequent hydrogen bond reformations.

  4. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Boughlala, Z.; Guerra, C.F.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas?phase Cl?X and [HCl?X]+ complexes for X+=?H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+, using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl? and HCl for the various cations. The Cl?X bond becomes longer and weaker along X+?=?H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+. Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence ...

  5. NMR studies of DNA structures in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinkel, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    This thesis describes the conformational analysis of some polynucleotides in aqueous solution. A new graphical method is presented as an aid in the pseudorotational analysis of the sugar rings in DNA by means of sums of proton-proton coupling constants. (Auth.)

  6. DNA triplex structures in neurodegenerative disorder, Friedreich's ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... clearly suggests that the shape of DNA is the determining factor in the cellular function. FRDA is the only ..... SCA VII. CAG. 4–35. 28–35. 37 –200. SBMA. CAG. 15–31. –. 40–62 ... production of Frataxin (Babcock et al. 1997).

  7. DNA complexes with Ni nanoparticles: structural and functional properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatarinova, Olga N.; Smirnov, Igor P. [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine of the Federal Medical-Biological Agency of the Russian Federation (Russian Federation); Safenkova, Irina V. [A.N. Bach Institute of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Varizhuk, Anna M.; Pozmogova, Galina E., E-mail: pozmge@gmail.com [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine of the Federal Medical-Biological Agency of the Russian Federation (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-15

    Supramolecular complexes of biopolymers based on magnetic nanoparticles play an important role in creation of biosensors, implementation of theragnostic and gene therapeutic methods and biosafety evaluation. We investigated the impact of DNA interactions with nanoparticles of nickel (nNi) on the integrity and functionality of DNA. Data obtained by mass spectrometry, electrophoresis, TEM and AFM microscopy techniques, bacterial transformation, and real-time PCR provide evidence that ssDNA and plasmid DNA (pDNA) efficiently form complexes with nNi. AFM data suggest that the complexes are necklace-type structures, in which nanoparticles are randomly distributed along the DNA chains, rather than highly entangled clot-type structures. After desorption, observed DNA characteristics in bioanalytical and biological systems remain unchanged. Only supercoiled pDNA was nicked, but remained, as well as a plasmid-nNi complex, active in expression vector assays. These results are very important for creation of new methods of DNA immobilization and controlled manipulation.

  8. DNA complexes with Ni nanoparticles: structural and functional properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatarinova, Olga N.; Smirnov, Igor P.; Safenkova, Irina V.; Varizhuk, Anna M.; Pozmogova, Galina E.

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular complexes of biopolymers based on magnetic nanoparticles play an important role in creation of biosensors, implementation of theragnostic and gene therapeutic methods and biosafety evaluation. We investigated the impact of DNA interactions with nanoparticles of nickel (nNi) on the integrity and functionality of DNA. Data obtained by mass spectrometry, electrophoresis, TEM and AFM microscopy techniques, bacterial transformation, and real-time PCR provide evidence that ssDNA and plasmid DNA (pDNA) efficiently form complexes with nNi. AFM data suggest that the complexes are necklace-type structures, in which nanoparticles are randomly distributed along the DNA chains, rather than highly entangled clot-type structures. After desorption, observed DNA characteristics in bioanalytical and biological systems remain unchanged. Only supercoiled pDNA was nicked, but remained, as well as a plasmid–nNi complex, active in expression vector assays. These results are very important for creation of new methods of DNA immobilization and controlled manipulation.

  9. Using Bonding Enamel-Coated Steel Fixtures to Produce More Durable Brick/Masonry Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Initial tests with enameled metal straps cracked all the test cylinders and straps would not pull out BUILDING STRONG® New Strong Durable Ties...BUILDING STRONG® Using Bonding Enamel -Coated Steel Fixtures to Produce More Durable Brick/Masonry Structures Principal Investigator: Steven C...COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Using Bonding Enamel -Coated Steel Fixtures to Produce More Durable Brick/Masonry

  10. DNA-modified electrodes (Ⅶ)——Preparation and characterization of DNA-bonded and DNA-adsorbed SAM/Au electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆琪; 庞代文; 胡深; 程介克; 蔡雄伟; 施财辉; 毛秉伟; 戴鸿平

    1999-01-01

    Two kinds of DNA-modified electrodes were prepared by covalent and adsorptive immobilization of DNA onto self-assembled monolayers of 2, 2’-dithiodiethanol on gold electrodes and characterized by cyclic voltammetry, Xray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. The results suggest that the methods are satisfactory for the immobilization of DNA on electrodes.

  11. Enhanced structural stability of DNA origami nanostructures by graphene encapsulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matković, Aleksandar; Vasić, Borislav; Pešić, Jelena; Gajić, Radoš; Prinz, Julia; Bald, Ilko; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that a single-layer graphene replicates the shape of DNA origami nanostructures very well. It can be employed as a protective layer for the enhancement of structural stability of DNA origami nanostructures. Using the AFM based manipulation, we show that the normal force required to damage graphene encapsulated DNA origami nanostructures is over an order of magnitude greater than for the unprotected ones. In addition, we show that graphene encapsulation offers protection to the DNA origami nanostructures against prolonged exposure to deionized water, and multiple immersions. Through these results we demonstrate that graphene encapsulated DNA origami nanostructures are strong enough to sustain various solution phase processing, lithography and transfer steps, thus extending the limits of DNA-mediated bottom-up fabrication. (paper)

  12. Structural DNA Nanotechnology: Artificial Nanostructures for Biomedical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yonggang; Castro, Carlos; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2018-04-04

    Structural DNA nanotechnology utilizes synthetic or biologic DNA as designer molecules for the self-assembly of artificial nanostructures. The field is founded upon the specific interactions between DNA molecules, known as Watson-Crick base pairing. After decades of active pursuit, DNA has demonstrated unprecedented versatility in constructing artificial nanostructures with significant complexity and programmability. The nanostructures could be either static, with well-controlled physicochemical properties, or dynamic, with the ability to reconfigure upon external stimuli. Researchers have devoted considerable effort to exploring the usability of DNA nanostructures in biomedical research. We review the basic design methods for fabricating both static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, along with their biomedical applications in fields such as biosensing, bioimaging, and drug delivery. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Biomedical Engineering Volume 20 is June 4, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  13. Unveiling DNA structural properties of promoter regions of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aditya Kumar

    Unveiling DNA structural properties of promoter regions of prokaryotic transcriptome and their role in gene expression. Aditya Kumar. Assistant Professor. Molecular Biology & Biotechnology. Tezpur University. Tezpur – 784028, Assam ...

  14. Influence of crystallography and bonding on the structure and migration of irrational interphase boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaronson, H. I.

    2006-03-01

    Interphase boundary structure developed during precipitation from solid solution and during massive transformations is considered in diverse alloy systems in the presence of differences in stacking sequence across interphase boundaries. Linear misfit compensating defects, including misfit dislocations, structural disconnections, and misfit disconnections, are present over a wide range of crystallographie when both phases have metallic bonding. Misfit dislocations have also been observed when both phases have covalent bonding ( e.g., US: β US2 by Sole and van der Walt). These defects are also found when one phase is ionic and the other is metallic (Nb∶Al2O3 by Rühle et al.), albeit when the latter is formed by vapor deposition. However, when bonding is metallic in one phase but significantly covalent in the other, the structure of the interphase boundary appears to depend upon the strength of the covalent bonding relative to that in the metallically bonded phase. When this difference is large, growth can take place as if it were occurring at a free surface, resulting in orientation relationships that are irrational and conjugate habit planes that are ill matched ( e.g., ZrN: α Zr-N by Li et al. and Xe(solid):Al-Xe by Kishida and Yamaguchi). At lower levels of bonding directionality and strength, crystallography is again irrational, but now edge-to-edge-based low-energy structures can replace linear misfit compensating defects (γm:TiAl:αTi-Al by Reynolds et al.). In the perhaps still smaller difference case of Widmanstätten cementite precipitated from austenite, one orientation relationship yields plates with linear misfit compensating defects at their broad faces whereas another (presumably nucleated at different types of site) produces laths with poorly defined shapes and interfacial structures. Hence, Hume-Rothery-type bonding considerations can markedly affect interphase boundary structure and thus the mechanisms, kinetics, and morphology of growth.

  15. Theoretical study of relativistic effects in the electronic structure and chemical bonding of UF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoe, Jun; Takeuchi, Kazuo; Sekine, Rika; Nakamatsu, Hirohide; Mukoyama, Takeshi; Adachi, Hirohiko.

    1992-01-01

    We have performed the relativistic molecular orbital calculation for the ground state of UF 6 , using the discrete-variational Dirac-Slater method (DV-DS), in order to elucidate the relativistic effects in the electronic structure and chemical bonding. Compared with the electronic structure calculated by the non-relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater (DV-X α )MO method, not only the direct relativistic effects (spin-orbit splitting etc), but also the indirect effect due to the change in screening core potential charge are shown to be important in the MO level structure. From the U-F bond overlap population analysis, we found that the U-F bond formation can be explained only by the DV-DS, not by the DV-X α . The calculated electronic structure in valence energy region (-20-OeV) and excitation energies in UV region are in agreement with experiments. (author)

  16. NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of the replication initiator protein DnaA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemmer, David E.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Rosalind; Yokota, Hisao; Wemmer, David E.

    2007-08-07

    DnaA is an essential component in the initiation of bacterial chromosomal replication. DnaA binds to a series of 9 base pair repeats leading to oligomerization, recruitment of the DnaBC helicase, and the assembly of the replication fork machinery. The structure of the N-terminal domain (residues 1-100) of DnaA from Mycoplasma genitalium was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The backbone r.m.s.d. for the first 86 residues was 0.6 +/- 0.2 Angstrom based on 742 NOE, 50 hydrogen bond, 46 backbone angle, and 88 residual dipolar coupling restraints. Ultracentrifugation studies revealed that the domain is monomeric in solution. Features on the protein surface include a hydrophobic cleft flanked by several negative residues on one side, and positive residues on the other. A negatively charged ridge is present on the opposite face of the protein. These surfaces may be important sites of interaction with other proteins involved in the replication process. Together, the structure and NMR assignments should facilitate the design of new experiments to probe the protein-protein interactions essential for the initiation of DNA replication.

  17. Recognizing molecular patterns by machine learning: An agnostic structural definition of the hydrogen bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparotto, Piero; Ceriotti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The concept of chemical bonding can ultimately be seen as a rationalization of the recurring structural patterns observed in molecules and solids. Chemical intuition is nothing but the ability to recognize and predict such patterns, and how they transform into one another. Here, we discuss how to use a computer to identify atomic patterns automatically, so as to provide an algorithmic definition of a bond based solely on structural information. We concentrate in particular on hydrogen bonding – a central concept to our understanding of the physical chemistry of water, biological systems, and many technologically important materials. Since the hydrogen bond is a somewhat fuzzy entity that covers a broad range of energies and distances, many different criteria have been proposed and used over the years, based either on sophisticate electronic structure calculations followed by an energy decomposition analysis, or on somewhat arbitrary choices of a range of structural parameters that is deemed to correspond to a hydrogen-bonded configuration. We introduce here a definition that is univocal, unbiased, and adaptive, based on our machine-learning analysis of an atomistic simulation. The strategy we propose could be easily adapted to similar scenarios, where one has to recognize or classify structural patterns in a material or chemical compound

  18. Recognizing molecular patterns by machine learning: An agnostic structural definition of the hydrogen bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparotto, Piero; Ceriotti, Michele, E-mail: michele.ceriotti@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Computational Science and Modeling, and National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials MARVEL, IMX, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-11-07

    The concept of chemical bonding can ultimately be seen as a rationalization of the recurring structural patterns observed in molecules and solids. Chemical intuition is nothing but the ability to recognize and predict such patterns, and how they transform into one another. Here, we discuss how to use a computer to identify atomic patterns automatically, so as to provide an algorithmic definition of a bond based solely on structural information. We concentrate in particular on hydrogen bonding – a central concept to our understanding of the physical chemistry of water, biological systems, and many technologically important materials. Since the hydrogen bond is a somewhat fuzzy entity that covers a broad range of energies and distances, many different criteria have been proposed and used over the years, based either on sophisticate electronic structure calculations followed by an energy decomposition analysis, or on somewhat arbitrary choices of a range of structural parameters that is deemed to correspond to a hydrogen-bonded configuration. We introduce here a definition that is univocal, unbiased, and adaptive, based on our machine-learning analysis of an atomistic simulation. The strategy we propose could be easily adapted to similar scenarios, where one has to recognize or classify structural patterns in a material or chemical compound.

  19. Recognizing molecular patterns by machine learning: An agnostic structural definition of the hydrogen bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparotto, Piero; Ceriotti, Michele

    2014-11-01

    The concept of chemical bonding can ultimately be seen as a rationalization of the recurring structural patterns observed in molecules and solids. Chemical intuition is nothing but the ability to recognize and predict such patterns, and how they transform into one another. Here, we discuss how to use a computer to identify atomic patterns automatically, so as to provide an algorithmic definition of a bond based solely on structural information. We concentrate in particular on hydrogen bonding - a central concept to our understanding of the physical chemistry of water, biological systems, and many technologically important materials. Since the hydrogen bond is a somewhat fuzzy entity that covers a broad range of energies and distances, many different criteria have been proposed and used over the years, based either on sophisticate electronic structure calculations followed by an energy decomposition analysis, or on somewhat arbitrary choices of a range of structural parameters that is deemed to correspond to a hydrogen-bonded configuration. We introduce here a definition that is univocal, unbiased, and adaptive, based on our machine-learning analysis of an atomistic simulation. The strategy we propose could be easily adapted to similar scenarios, where one has to recognize or classify structural patterns in a material or chemical compound.

  20. Estimating the Term Structure With a Semiparametric Bayesian Hierarchical Model: An Application to Corporate Bonds1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Marcelo, Alejandro; Ensor, Katherine B.; Rosner, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    The term structure of interest rates is used to price defaultable bonds and credit derivatives, as well as to infer the quality of bonds for risk management purposes. We introduce a model that jointly estimates term structures by means of a Bayesian hierarchical model with a prior probability model based on Dirichlet process mixtures. The modeling methodology borrows strength across term structures for purposes of estimation. The main advantage of our framework is its ability to produce reliable estimators at the company level even when there are only a few bonds per company. After describing the proposed model, we discuss an empirical application in which the term structure of 197 individual companies is estimated. The sample of 197 consists of 143 companies with only one or two bonds. In-sample and out-of-sample tests are used to quantify the improvement in accuracy that results from approximating the term structure of corporate bonds with estimators by company rather than by credit rating, the latter being a popular choice in the financial literature. A complete description of a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) scheme for the proposed model is available as Supplementary Material. PMID:21765566

  1. Electronic structure and bonding in the ternary silicide YNiSi3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Gi Hong; Kang, Dae Bok

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the electronic structure and bonding in the ternary silicide YNiSi 3 is made, using extended Hueckel tight-binding calculations. The YNiSi 3 structure consists of Ni-capped Si 2 dimer layers and Si zigzag chains. Significant bonding interactions are present between the silicon atoms in the structure. The oxidation state formalism of (Y 3+ )(Ni 0 )(Si 3 ) 3- for YNiSi 3 constitutes a good starting point to describe its electronic structure. Si atoms receive electrons form the most electropositive Y in YNiSi 3 , and Ni 3d and Si 3p states dominate below the Fermi level. There is an interesting electron balance between the two Si and Ni sublattices. Since the π orbitals in the Si chain and the Ni d and s block levels are almost completely occupied, the charge balance for YNiSi 3 can be rewritten as (Y 3+ )(Ni 2- )(Si 2- )(Si-Si) + , making the Si 2 layers oxidized. These results suggest that the Si zigzag chain contains single bonds and the Si 2 double layer possesses single bonds within a dimer with a partial double bond character. Stronger Si-Si and Ni-Si bonding interactions are important for giving stability to the structure, while essentially no metal-metal bonding exists at all. The 2D metallic behavior of this compound is due to the Si-Si interaction leading to dispersion of the several Si 2 π bands crossing the Fermi level in the plane perpendicular to the crystallographic b axis

  2. Hydrogen bonding properties and intermediate structure of N-(2-carboxyphenyl)salicylidenimine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligtenbarg, Alette G.J.; Hage, Ronald; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Ben L.

    1999-01-01

    The hydrogen bonding properties, the nature of the tautomeric structure and dimerization of N-(2-carboxyphenyl)salicylidenimine 1 has been studied. The crystal and molecular structure of 1 has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. This compound forms a dimer in the solid

  3. Effect of spin polarization on the structural properties and bond ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ties such as structural, hardness, Young modulus and frac- ture toughness ... measurements showed that hardness ranged between 14.5 and 19GPa ... the relative binding forces, is a useful fundamental property. ..... strength [36,39]. Zhang et ...

  4. DNA and bone structure preservation in medieval human skeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson-Thomas, Yvette M; Norton, Andrew L; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J; Florencio-Silva, Rinaldo; Ali, Nadir; Elmrghni, Samir; Gil, Cristiane D; Sasso, Gisela R S; Dixon, Ronald A; Nader, Helena B

    2015-06-01

    Morphological and ultrastructural data from archaeological human bones are scarce, particularly data that have been correlated with information on the preservation of molecules such as DNA. Here we examine the bone structure of macroscopically well-preserved medieval human skeletons by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry, and the quantity and quality of DNA extracted from these skeletons. DNA technology has been increasingly used for analyzing physical evidence in archaeological forensics; however, the isolation of ancient DNA is difficult since it is highly degraded, extraction yields are low and the co-extraction of PCR inhibitors is a problem. We adapted and optimised a method that is frequently used for isolating DNA from modern samples, Chelex(®) 100 (Bio-Rad) extraction, for isolating DNA from archaeological human bones and teeth. The isolated DNA was analysed by real-time PCR using primers targeting the sex determining region on the Y chromosome (SRY) and STR typing using the AmpFlSTR(®) Identifiler PCR Amplification kit. Our results clearly show the preservation of bone matrix in medieval bones and the presence of intact osteocytes with well preserved encapsulated nuclei. In addition, we show how effective Chelex(®) 100 is for isolating ancient DNA from archaeological bones and teeth. This optimised method is suitable for STR typing using kits aimed specifically at degraded and difficult DNA templates since amplicons of up to 250bp were successfully amplified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Novel Structure Bonding Materials on Properties of Aeronautical Acrylic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Zhisheng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Novel structure bonding materials, J-351 epoxy adhesive film with low curing temperature and liquid modified acrylate SY-50s adhesive were chosen and characterized. The effects of adhesives on the mechanical properties of acrylic were studied. The results reveal that both adhesives have excellent bonding properties to acrylic. The stress-solvent crazing value of J-351 is higher than that of SY-50s. With the application of adhesive on the surface, mechanical properties of acrylic are declined. Casting acrylic shows more drastic decline than that of oriented acrylic. Through the characterization of fracture surface, we find that fracture of tensile sample derives from the side with adhesive. Mechanical properties of acrylic are more sensitive to SY-50s, because the liquid adhesive presents integrate bonding interface with acrylic. The interface between J-351 and acrylic is clear, making acrylic insensitive to J-351 film. Edge attachment strength of samples bonded with J-351 are higher than that of samples bonded with SY-50s due to the effects of adhesives on acrylic. J-351 epoxy adhesive film presents preferable application performance in the structure bonding of aeronautical acrylic.

  6. The structure and dynamics of the Fe-CO bond in myoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, Carme

    2003-01-01

    This paper is a review of our recent work on the structure and dynamics of the Fe-CO bond in carbonmonoxy myoglobin (MbCO), performed using density functional theory, Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approaches. The results of these investigations have served to shed light onto one of the long standing questions in myoglobin research: whether the protein discriminates the CO ligand with respect to O 2 by distorting the FeCO bond. The calculations show that both in the gas phase and in the protein the Fe-CO bond is essentially linear and therefore exclude the hypothesis that the CO in MbCO is sterically hindered. In contrast, hydrogen bonding between the O 2 ligand and the His64 residue easily explains the protein discrimination for CO

  7. Hydrogen bond indices and tertiary structure of yeast tRNA sup(Phe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giambiagi, M.S. de; Giambiagi, M.; Esquivel, D.M.S.

    1982-01-01

    The rigidity and stability of the tertiary structure of yeast tRNA sup(Phe) is related to a bond index employed in an IEHT calculation. The index permits a quantitative estimate of the electronic cloud along the hydrogen bond, having thus an appealing physical meaning. The results indicate that Hoogsteen-type bonds have, as expected, greater electronic population than Watson-Crick type ones. Other non-Watson-Crick pairings, the wobble pair and G 15 -C 48 , exhibit high values of the index for the NH...O bond. In the triples, the electronic density of the hydrogen bridges does not weaken, comparing it with the one of the pairs involved. Contour density maps are shown and dipolar moments of pairs and triples are qualitatively discussed. (Author) [pt

  8. Watson-Crick base pairs with thiocarbonyl groups: How sulfur changes the hydrogen bonds in DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonseca Guerra, C.; Baerends, E.J.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2008-01-01

    We have theoretically analyzed mimics of Watson-Crick AT and GC base pairs in which N-H•••O hydrogen bonds are replaced by N-H•••S, using the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of density functional theory at BP86/TZ2P level. The general effect of the above substitutions is an elongation and a

  9. Strong and weak hydrogen bonds in drug–DNA complexes: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    minor groove-binding interactions are electrostatic, van der Waals, hydrophobic ... the protein data bank (PDB) and the nucleic acid data bank. (NDB) (Berman et al ... is defined as an interaction X–H···A wherein a hydrogen atom forms a bond ...

  10. Hydrogen Bonding in DNA Base Pairs: Reconciliation of Theory and Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonseca Guerra, C.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.; Snijders, J.G.; Baerends, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    Up till now, there has been a significant disagreement between theory and experiment regarding hydrogen bond lengths in Watson - Crick base pairs. To investigate the possible sources of this discrepancy, we have studied numerous model systems for adenine - thymine (AT) and guanine - cytosine (GC)

  11. Effect of hardening methods of moulding sands with water glass on structure of bonding bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stachowicz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Research on influence of hardening methods on structure of bonding bridges in moulding sands with sodium water glass is presented.Moulding sands with addition of 2.5 % of binder with molar module 2.0 were hardened with CO2 and dried in traditional way or hardenedwith microwaves. It was proved that the hardening method affects structure of bonding bridges, correlating with properties of the hardened moulding sands. It was found that strength of the moulding sands hardened with microwaves for 4 min is very close to that measured after traditional drying at 110 °C for 120 min. So, application of microwave hardening ensures significant shortening of the process time to the value comparable with CO2 hardening but guaranteeing over 10-fold increase of mechanical properties. Analysis of SEM images of hardened moulding sands permitted explaining differences in quality parameters of moulding sands by connecting them with structure of the created bonding bridges.

  12. Computer-aided design of DNA origami structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selnihhin, Denis; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth

    2015-01-01

    The DNA origami method enables the creation of complex nanoscale objects that can be used to organize molecular components and to function as reconfigurable mechanical devices. Of relevance to synthetic biology, DNA origami structures can be delivered to cells where they can perform complicated sense-and-act tasks, and can be used as scaffolds to organize enzymes for enhanced synthesis. The design of DNA origami structures is a complicated matter and is most efficiently done using dedicated software packages. This chapter describes a procedure for designing DNA origami structures using a combination of state-of-the-art software tools. First, we introduce the basic method for calculating crossover positions between DNA helices and the standard crossover patterns for flat, square, and honeycomb DNA origami lattices. Second, we provide a step-by-step tutorial for the design of a simple DNA origami biosensor device, from schematic idea to blueprint creation and to 3D modeling and animation, and explain how careful modeling can facilitate later experimentation in the laboratory.

  13. DNA viewed as an out-of-equilibrium structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provata, A.; Nicolis, C.; Nicolis, G.

    2014-05-01

    The complexity of the primary structure of human DNA is explored using methods from nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, dynamical systems theory, and information theory. A collection of statistical analyses is performed on the DNA data and the results are compared with sequences derived from different stochastic processes. The use of χ2 tests shows that DNA can not be described as a low order Markov chain of order up to r =6. Although detailed balance seems to hold at the level of a binary alphabet, it fails when all four base pairs are considered, suggesting spatial asymmetry and irreversibility. Furthermore, the block entropy does not increase linearly with the block size, reflecting the long-range nature of the correlations in the human genomic sequences. To probe locally the spatial structure of the chain, we study the exit distances from a specific symbol, the distribution of recurrence distances, and the Hurst exponent, all of which show power law tails and long-range characteristics. These results suggest that human DNA can be viewed as a nonequilibrium structure maintained in its state through interactions with a constantly changing environment. Based solely on the exit distance distribution accounting for the nonequilibrium statistics and using the Monte Carlo rejection sampling method, we construct a model DNA sequence. This method allows us to keep both long- and short-range statistical characteristics of the native DNA data. The model sequence presents the same characteristic exponents as the natural DNA but fails to capture spatial correlations and point-to-point details.

  14. DNA viewed as an out-of-equilibrium structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provata, A; Nicolis, C; Nicolis, G

    2014-05-01

    The complexity of the primary structure of human DNA is explored using methods from nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, dynamical systems theory, and information theory. A collection of statistical analyses is performed on the DNA data and the results are compared with sequences derived from different stochastic processes. The use of χ^{2} tests shows that DNA can not be described as a low order Markov chain of order up to r=6. Although detailed balance seems to hold at the level of a binary alphabet, it fails when all four base pairs are considered, suggesting spatial asymmetry and irreversibility. Furthermore, the block entropy does not increase linearly with the block size, reflecting the long-range nature of the correlations in the human genomic sequences. To probe locally the spatial structure of the chain, we study the exit distances from a specific symbol, the distribution of recurrence distances, and the Hurst exponent, all of which show power law tails and long-range characteristics. These results suggest that human DNA can be viewed as a nonequilibrium structure maintained in its state through interactions with a constantly changing environment. Based solely on the exit distance distribution accounting for the nonequilibrium statistics and using the Monte Carlo rejection sampling method, we construct a model DNA sequence. This method allows us to keep both long- and short-range statistical characteristics of the native DNA data. The model sequence presents the same characteristic exponents as the natural DNA but fails to capture spatial correlations and point-to-point details.

  15. Cooperativity of halogen, chalcogen, and pnictogen bonds in infinite molecular chains by electronic structure theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Janine; Deringer, Volker L; Dronskowski, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Halogen bonds (XBs) are intriguing noncovalent interactions that are frequently being exploited for crystal engineering. Recently, similar bonding mechanisms have been proposed for adjacent main-group elements, and noncovalent "chalcogen bonds" and "pnictogen bonds" have been identified in crystal structures. A fundamental question, largely unresolved thus far, is how XBs and related contacts interact with each other in crystals; similar to hydrogen bonding, one might expect "cooperativity" (bonds amplifying each other), but evidence has been sparse. Here, we explore the crucial step from gas-phase oligomers to truly infinite chains by means of quantum chemical computations. A periodic density functional theory (DFT) framework allows us to address polymeric chains of molecules avoiding the dreaded "cluster effects" as well as the arbitrariness of defining a "large enough" cluster. We focus on three types of molecular chains that we cut from crystal structures; furthermore, we explore reasonable substitutional variants in silico. We find evidence of cooperativity in chains of halogen cyanides and also in similar chalcogen- and pnictogen-bonded systems; the bonds, in the most extreme cases, are amplified through cooperative effects by 79% (I···N), 90% (Te···N), and 103% (Sb···N). Two experimentally known organic crystals, albeit with similar atomic connectivity and XB characteristics, show signs of cooperativity in one case but not in another. Finally, no cooperativity is observed in alternating halogen/acetone and halogen/1,4-dioxane chains; in fact, these XBs weaken each other by up to 26% compared to the respective gas-phase dimers.

  16. Structure of DNA-Functionalized Dendrimer Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Mattaparthi Venkata Satish; Maiti, Prabal K

    2012-01-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to reveal the characteristic features of ethylenediamine (EDA) cored protonated poly amido amine (PAMAM) dendrimers of generation 3 (G3) and 4 (G4) that are functionalized with single stranded DNAs (ssDNAs). The four ssDNA strands that are attached via alkythiolate [-S (CH2)6-] linker molecule to the free amine groups on the surface of the PAMAM dendrimers observed to undergo a rapid conformational change during the 25 ns long sim...

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed structural differences among WRKY domain-DNA interaction in barley (Hordeum vulgare).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Bharati; Grover, Abhinav; Sharma, Pradeep

    2018-02-12

    The WRKY transcription factors are a class of DNA-binding proteins involved in diverse plant processes play critical roles in response to abiotic and biotic stresses. Genome-wide divergence analysis of WRKY gene family in Hordeum vulgare provided a framework for molecular evolution and functional roles. So far, the crystal structure of WRKY from barley has not been resolved; moreover, knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of WRKY domain is pre-requisites for exploring the protein-DNA recognition mechanisms. Homology modelling based approach was used to generate structures for WRKY DNA binding domain (DBD) and its variants using AtWRKY1 as a template. Finally, the stability and conformational changes of the generated model in unbound and bound form was examined through atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for 100 ns time period. In this study, we investigated the comparative binding pattern of WRKY domain and its variants with W-box cis-regulatory element using molecular docking and dynamics (MD) simulations assays. The atomic insight into WRKY domain exhibited significant variation in the intermolecular hydrogen bonding pattern, leading to the structural anomalies in the variant type and differences in the DNA-binding specificities. Based on the MD analysis, residual contribution and interaction contour, wild-type WRKY (HvWRKY46) were found to interact with DNA through highly conserved heptapeptide in the pre- and post-MD simulated complexes, whereas heptapeptide interaction with DNA was missing in variants (I and II) in post-MD complexes. Consequently, through principal component analysis, wild-type WRKY was also found to be more stable by obscuring a reduced conformational space than the variant I (HvWRKY34). Lastly, high binding free energy for wild-type and variant II allowed us to conclude that wild-type WRKY-DNA complex was more stable relative to variants I. The results of our study revealed complete dynamic and structural information

  18. Coulombic Interaction in Finnish Middle School Chemistry: A Systemic Perspective on Students' Conceptual Structure of Chemical Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joki, Jarkko; Lavonen, Jari; Juuti, Kalle; Aksela, Maija

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design a novel and holistic way to teach chemical bonding at the middle school level according to research on the teaching and learning of bonding. A further aim was to investigate high achieving middle school students' conceptual structures concerning chemical bonding by using a systemic perspective. Students in one…

  19. Interplay between Peptide Bond Geometrical Parameters in Nonglobular Structural Contexts

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, Luciana; Balasco, Nicole; De Simone, Alfonso; Berisio, Rita; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Several investigations performed in the last two decades have unveiled that geometrical parameters of protein backbone show a remarkable variability. Although these studies have provided interesting insights into one of the basic aspects of protein structure, they have been conducted on globular and water-soluble proteins. We report here a detailed analysis of backbone geometrical parameters in nonglobular proteins/peptides. We considered membrane proteins and two distinct fibrous systems (am...

  20. Structure, Bonding and Surface Chemistry of Metal Oxide Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-23

    an electrospray ionization time-of-flight (ESI-TOF) mass spectrometer to the lab (PerSeptive Biosystems Mariner), which provides a different...with this Project Faculty: Professor Michael A. Duncan (one month summer salary) Prof. Heather Abbott -Lyons, summer visiting faculty and...Distribution approved for public release. 4. H. L. Abbott , A. D. Brathwaite and M. A. Duncan, "Infrared spectroscopy and structures of mass-selected

  1. Dielectrophoresis of gold nanoparticles conjugated to DNA origami structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Henning-Knechtel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA nanostructures are promising construction materials to bridge the gap between self-assembly of functional molecules and conventional top-down fabrication methods in nanotechnology. Their positioning onto specific locations of a microstructured substrate is an important task towards this aim. Here we study manipulation and positioning of pristine and of gold nanoparticle-conjugated tubular DNA origami structures using ac dielectrophoresis. The dielectrophoretic behavior was investigated employing fluorescence microscopy. For the pristine origami, a significant dielectrophoretic response was found to take place in the megahertz range, whereas, due to the higher polarizability of the metallic nanoparticles, the nanoparticle/DNA hybrid structures required a lower electrical field strength and frequency for a comparable trapping at the edges of the electrode structure. The nanoparticle conjugation additionally resulted in a remarkable alteration of the DNA structure arrangement. The growth of linear, chain-like structures in between electrodes at applied frequencies in the megahertz range was observed. The long-range chain formation is caused by a local, gold nanoparticle-induced field concentration along the DNA nanostructures, which in turn, creates dielectrophoretic forces that enable the observed self-alignment of the hybrid structures.

  2. CMD: A Database to Store the Bonding States of Cysteine Motifs with Secondary Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Bostan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational approaches to the disulphide bonding state and its connectivity pattern prediction are based on various descriptors. One descriptor is the amino acid sequence motifs flanking the cysteine residue motifs. Despite the existence of disulphide bonding information in many databases and applications, there is no complete reference and motif query available at the moment. Cysteine motif database (CMD is the first online resource that stores all cysteine residues, their flanking motifs with their secondary structure, and propensity values assignment derived from the laboratory data. We extracted more than 3 million cysteine motifs from PDB and UniProt data, annotated with secondary structure assignment, propensity value assignment, and frequency of occurrence and coefficiency of their bonding status. Removal of redundancies generated 15875 unique flanking motifs that are always bonded and 41577 unique patterns that are always nonbonded. Queries are based on the protein ID, FASTA sequence, sequence motif, and secondary structure individually or in batch format using the provided APIs that allow remote users to query our database via third party software and/or high throughput screening/querying. The CMD offers extensive information about the bonded, free cysteine residues, and their motifs that allows in-depth characterization of the sequence motif composition.

  3. Ab initio calculations of the electronic structure and bonding characteristics of LaB6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Faruque M.; Riley, Daniel P.; Murch, Graeme E.

    2005-01-01

    Lanthanum hexaboride (LaB 6 , NIST SRM-660a) is widely used as a standard reference material for calibrating the line position and line shape parameters of powder diffraction instruments. The accuracy of this calibration technique is highly dependent on how completely the reference material is characterized. Critical to x-ray diffraction, this understanding must include the valence of the La atomic position, which in turn will influence the x-ray form factor (f) and hence the diffracted intensities. The electronic structure and bonding properties of LaB 6 have been investigated using ab initio plane-wave pseudopotential total energy calculations. The electronic properties and atomic bonding characteristics were analyzed by estimating the energy band structure and the density of states around the Fermi energy level. The calculated energy band structure is consistent with previously reported experimental findings; de Haas-van Alphen and two-dimensional angular correlation of electron-positron annihilation radiation. In addition, the bond strengths and types of atomic bonds in the LaB 6 compound were estimated by analyzing the Mulliken charge density population. The calculated result revealed the coexistence of covalent, ionic, and metallic bonding in the LaB 6 system and partially explains its high efficiency as a thermionic emitter

  4. Structure reactivity relationship in the reaction of DNA guanyl radicals with hydroxybenzoates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Trinh T.; Tang, Vicky J.; Aguilera, Joseph A. [Department of Radiology University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0610 (United States); Milligan, Jamie R., E-mail: jmilligan@ucsd.ed [Department of Radiology University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0610 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    In DNA, guanine bases are the sites from which electrons are most easily removed. As a result of hole migration to this stable location on guanine, guanyl radicals are major intermediates in DNA damage produced by the direct effect of ionizing radiation (ionization of the DNA itself and not through the intermediacy of water radicals). We have modeled this process by employing gamma irradiation in the presence of thiocyanate ions, a method which also produces single electron oxidized guanyl radicals in plasmid DNA in aqueous solution. The stable products formed in DNA from these radicals are detected as strand breaks after incubation with the FPG protein. When a phenolic compound is present in the solution during gamma irradiation, the formation of guanyl radical species is decreased by electron donation from the phenol to the guanyl radical. We have quantified the rate of this reaction for four different phenolic compounds bearing carboxylate substituents as proton acceptors. A comparison of the rates of these reactions with the redox strengths of the phenolic compounds reveals that salicylate reacts ca. 10-fold faster than its structural analogs. This observation is consistent with a reaction mechanism involving a proton coupled electron transfer, because intra-molecular transfer of a proton from the phenolic hydroxyl group to the carboxylate group is possible only in salicylate, and is favored by the strong 6-membered ring intra-molecular hydrogen bond in this compound.

  5. Selective bond cleavage in potassium collisions with pyrimidine bases of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Diogo; Ferreira da Silva, Filipe; García, Gustavo; Limão-Vieira, Paulo

    2013-01-11

    Electron transfer in alkali-molecule collisions to gas phase thymine and uracil yielding H- formation is selectively controlled in the energy range between 5.3 and 66.1 eV. By tuning the collision energy, electron transfer from the alkali to partly deuterated thymine, methylated thymine at the N1 and methylated uracil at the N3 positions, H- loss proceeds not only through the breaking of the (C-H) against (N-H) bonds but also through N1 against N3 sites. Such selectivity, as far as bond and site are concerned, is here reported for the first time by electron transfer induced dissociation experiments in alkali-molecule collisions.

  6. Structures of DNA containing psoralen crosslink and thymine dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.; Pearlman, D.A.; Holbrook, S.R.; Pirkle, D.

    1985-01-01

    UV irradiation by itself or in conjunction with other chemicals can cause covalent damages to DNA in living cells. To overcome the detrimental effect of DNA damage, cells developed a repair mechanism by which damaged DNA is repaired. In the absence of such repair, cell malfunction or cell death can occur. Two most studied radiation-induced DNA damage are thymine dimer formation by UV irradiation and psoralen crosslink by combination of psoralens and UV: In the former, two adjacent thymine bases on a strand of DNA are fused by forming cyclobutane ring, and in the latter, one pyrimidine on one DNA strand is crosslinked to another pyrimidine on the other strand via a psoralen. The authors' objective is to deduce the structure of DNA segment which contains a psoralen crosslink or a thymine dimer using the combination of results of X-ray crystallographic studies, molecular model building, and energy minimization. These structural features may be important for understanding the biological effects of such damages and for the recognition by the repair enzymes

  7. Structural improvement of strengthened deck panels with externally bonded plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Jongsung; Oh, Hongseob

    2005-01-01

    Concrete bridge decks require eventual replacement and rehabilitation due to decreasing load-carrying capacity. This paper compares different strengthening design procedures that improve the usability and structural performance of bridge decks. The failure characteristics of bridge decks strengthened with various materials such as carbon fiber sheet, glass fiber sheet, steel plate, and grid CFRP and GFRP are analyzed, and the theoretical load-carrying capacities are evaluated using traditional beam and yield line theory, and punching shear analysis. The strengthening materials increase the punching shear strength of the deck and change the failure mode of the strengthened panel

  8. Ionothermal Synthesis, Structure, and Bonding of the Catena -Heteropolycation 1 ∞ [Sb 2 Se 2 ] +

    KAUST Repository

    Groh, Matthias F.

    2015-01-26

    The reaction of antimony and selenium in the Lewis-acidic ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetrachloridoaluminate, [BMIm]Cl•4.7AlCl3, yielded dark-red crystals of [Sb2Se2]AlCl4. The formation starts above 160 ° C; at about 190 ° C, irreversible decomposition takes place. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic space group P 1¯ with a = 919.39(2) pm, b = 1137.92(3) pm, c = 1152.30(3) pm, α = 68.047(1)° , β = 78.115(1)° , γ = 72.530(1)° , and Z = 4. The structure is similar to that of [Sb2Te2]AlCl4 but has only half the number of crystallographically independent atoms. Polycationic chains 1∞ [Sb2Se2]+ form a pseudo-hexagonal arrangement along [011¯] ], which is interlaced by tetrahedral AlCl4 - groups. The catena-heteropolycation 1∞ [Sb2Se2]+ is a sequence of three different four-membered [Sb2Se2 ] rings. The chemical bonding scheme, established from the topological analysis of the real-space bonding indicator ELI-D, includes significantly polar covalent bonding in four-member rings withinthepolycation.Theringsareconnectedintoaninfinitechainbyhomonuclear non-polar Sb-Sb bonds and highly polar Sb-Se bonds. Half of the selenium atoms are three-bonded.

  9. Quantum mechanical electronic structure calculation reveals orientation dependence of hydrogen bond energy in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Abhisek; Datta, Saumen

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen bond plays a unique role in governing macromolecular interactions with exquisite specificity. These interactions govern the fundamental biological processes like protein folding, enzymatic catalysis, molecular recognition. Despite extensive research work, till date there is no proper report available about the hydrogen bond's energy surface with respect to its geometric parameters, directly derived from proteins. Herein, we have deciphered the potential energy landscape of hydrogen bond directly from the macromolecular coordinates obtained from Protein Data Bank using quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations. The findings unravel the hydrogen bonding energies of proteins in parametric space. These data can be used to understand the energies of such directional interactions involved in biological molecules. Quantitative characterization has also been performed using Shannon entropic calculations for atoms participating in hydrogen bond. Collectively, our results constitute an improved way of understanding hydrogen bond energies in case of proteins and complement the knowledge-based potential. Proteins 2017; 85:1046-1055. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Electronic structure, bonding and chemisorption in metallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Problems that can arise during the cycling steps for a hydride storage system usually involve events at surfaces. Chemisorption and reaction processes can be affected by small amounts of contaminants that may act as catalytic poisons. The nature of the poisoning process can vary greatly for the different metals and alloys that form hydrides. A unifying concept is offered, which satisfactorily correlates many of the properties of transition-metal, rare-earth and actinide hydrides. The metallic hydrides can be differentiated on the basis of electronegativity, metallic radius (valence) and electronic structure. For those systems where there are d (transition metals) or f (early actinides) electrons near the Fermi level a broad range of chemical and catalytic behaviors are found, depending on bandwidth and energy. The more electropositive metals (rare-earths, actinides, transition metals with d > 5) dissolve hydrogen and form hydrides by an electronically somewhat different process, and as a class tend to adsorb electrophobic molecules. The net charge-transfer in either situation is subtle; however, the small differences are responsible for many of the observed structural, chemical, and catalytic properties in these hydride systems

  11. The Cold Shock Domain of YB-1 Segregates RNA from DNA by Non-Bonded Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Kljashtorny

    Full Text Available The human YB-1 protein plays multiple cellular roles, of which many are dictated by its binding to RNA and DNA through its Cold Shock Domain (CSD. Using molecular dynamics simulation approaches validated by experimental assays, the YB1 CSD was found to interact with nucleic acids in a sequence-dependent manner and with a higher affinity for RNA than DNA. The binding properties of the YB1 CSD were close to those observed for the related bacterial Cold Shock Proteins (CSP, albeit some differences in sequence specificity. The results provide insights in the molecular mechanisms whereby YB-1 interacts with nucleic acids.

  12. Structural similarities in DNA packaging and delivery apparatuses in Herpesvirus and dsDNA bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixon, Frazer J; Schmid, Michael F

    2014-04-01

    Structural information can inform our understanding of virus origins and evolution. The herpesviruses and tailed bacteriophages constitute two large families of dsDNA viruses which infect vertebrates and prokaryotes respectively. A relationship between these disparate groups was initially suggested by similarities in their capsid assembly and DNA packaging strategies. This relationship has now been confirmed by a range of studies that have revealed common structural features in their capsid proteins, and similar organizations and sequence conservation in their DNA packaging machinery and maturational proteases. This concentration of conserved traits in proteins involved in essential and primordial capsid/packaging functions is evidence that these structures are derived from an ancient, common ancestor and is in sharp contrast to the lack of such evidence for other virus functions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Electronic structure and chemical bond of high Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the band structure calculations for the compound Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 are discussed and compared to those obtained for YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 . An analysis of the contribution of the densities of states at the different atomic sites shows that the states at the Fermi energy. E F , have a strong bidimensional character due to the CuO 2 planes. Moreover, for the bismuth compound, the contribution of the Bi-O planes at E F is substantial. The elements Y and Ba in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 , Ca and Sr in Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 act essentially as electron donors, the corresponding densities of states at E F are very small. An analysis of the electronic charge at the different atomic sites is presented. The respective roles of the CuO 2 planes. Cu-O chains and Bi-O planes on the electronic properties at the Fermi level are discussed [fr

  14. Suspended DNA structural characterization by TEM diffraction

    KAUST Repository

    Marini, Monica

    2017-12-01

    In this work, micro-fabrication, super-hydrophobic properties and a physiologically compatible preparation step are combined and tailored to obtain background free biological samples to be investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) diffraction technique. The validation was performed evaluating a well-known parameter such as the DNA interbases value. The diffraction spacing measured is in good agreement with those obtained by HRTEM direct metrology and by traditional X-Ray diffraction. This approach addresses single molecule studies in a simplified and reproducible straightforward way with respect to more conventional and widely used techniques. In addition, it overcomes the need of long and elaborated samples preparations: the sample is in its physiological environment and the HRTEM data acquisition occurs without any background interference, coating, staining or additional manipulation. The congruence in the results reported in this paper makes the application of this approach extremely promising towards those molecules for which crystallization remains a hurdle, such as cell membrane proteins and fibrillar proteins.

  15. Suspended DNA structural characterization by TEM diffraction

    KAUST Repository

    Marini, Monica; Allione, Marco; Lopatin, Sergei; Moretti, Manola; Giugni, Andrea; Torre, Bruno; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, micro-fabrication, super-hydrophobic properties and a physiologically compatible preparation step are combined and tailored to obtain background free biological samples to be investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) diffraction technique. The validation was performed evaluating a well-known parameter such as the DNA interbases value. The diffraction spacing measured is in good agreement with those obtained by HRTEM direct metrology and by traditional X-Ray diffraction. This approach addresses single molecule studies in a simplified and reproducible straightforward way with respect to more conventional and widely used techniques. In addition, it overcomes the need of long and elaborated samples preparations: the sample is in its physiological environment and the HRTEM data acquisition occurs without any background interference, coating, staining or additional manipulation. The congruence in the results reported in this paper makes the application of this approach extremely promising towards those molecules for which crystallization remains a hurdle, such as cell membrane proteins and fibrillar proteins.

  16. Control of structural isomerism in noncovalent hydrogen-bonded assemblies using peripheral chiral information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.J.; Jolliffe, K.A.; Hulst, A.J.R.L.; Timmerman, P.; Reinhoudt, David

    2000-01-01

    The results of a systematic study of the structural isomerism in more than 30 noncovalent hydrogen-bonded assemblies are described. These dynamic assemblies, composed of three calix[4]arene dimelamines and six barbiturates/cyanurates, can be present in three isomeric forms with either D3, C3h, or Cs

  17. Covalent-bond stabilization of the Si(111)-(3 1 -1 1)-Pb structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumpf, C.; Nielsen, M.; Feidenhans'l, R.

    2001-01-01

    by codeposition of Pb and Sn. Our surface X-ray diffraction measurements prove that the alloy structure is closely related to the low-temperature reconstruction. The interatomic distances reveal the nature of the chemical bonding in the surface layer and provide insight into the mechanism stabilizing...

  18. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boughlala, Z.; Guerra, C.F.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas-phase Cl X and [HCl X](+) complexes for X+ = H+, CH3+, Li+, and Na+, using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl- and HCl for the various

  19. DNA structure in human RNA polymerase II promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Baldi, Pierre; Chauvin, Yves

    1998-01-01

    with a very low level of sequence similarity. The sequences, which include both TATA-containing and TATA-less promoters, are aligned by hidden Markov models. Using three different models of sequence-derived DNA bendability, the aligned promoters display a common structural profile with bendability being low...... protein in a manner reminiscent of DNA in a nucleosome. This notion is further supported by the finding that the periodic bendability is caused mainly by the complementary triplet pairs CAG/CTG and GGC/GCC, which previously have been found to correlate with nucleosome positioning. We present models where......The fact that DNA three-dimensional structure is important for transcriptional regulation begs the question of whether eukaryotic promoters contain general structural features independently of what genes they control. We present an analysis of a large set of human RNA polymerase II promoters...

  20. Chemical Bonding in Solids. On the Generalization of the Concept of Bond Order and Valence for Infinite Periodical Structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ponec, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 114, 1-3 (2005), s. 208-212 ISSN 1432-881X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : bonding in solids * bond order * valence Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.179, year: 2005

  1. Principles of DNA architectonics: design of DNA-based nanoobjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradova, O A; Pyshnyi, D V

    2012-01-01

    The methods of preparation of monomeric DNA blocks that serve as key building units for the construction of complex DNA objects are described. Examples are given of the formation of DNA blocks based on native and modified oligonucleotide components using hydrogen bonding and nucleic acid-specific types of bonding and also some affinity interactions with RNA, proteins, ligands. The static discrete and periodic two- and three-dimensional DNA objects reported to date are described systematically. Methods used to prove the structures of DNA objects and the prospects for practical application of nanostructures based on DNA and its analogues in biology, medicine and biophysics are considered. The bibliography includes 195 references.

  2. Structure of a stacked anthraquinone–DNA complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luchi, Daniela; Usón, Isabel; Wright, Glenford; Gouyette, Catherine; Subirana, Juan A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of the telomeric sequence d(UBrAGG) interacting with an anthraquinone derivative has been solved by MAD. In all previously studied complexes of intercalating drugs, the drug is usually sandwiched between two DNA base pairs. Instead, the present structure looks like a crystal of stacked anthraquinone molecules in which isolated base pairs are intercalated. Unusual base pairs are present in the structure, such as G·G and A·UBr reverse Watson–Crick base pairs. PMID:20823516

  3. Role of the bond defect for structural transformations between crystalline and amorphous silicon: A molecular-dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, D. M.; Weber, B.; Gaertner, K.

    2000-01-01

    The relation between the bond defect, which is a topological defect, and structural transformations between crystalline and amorphous silicon, is studied by molecular-dynamics simulations. The investigation of 1-keV boron implantation into crystalline silicon proves that the bond defect can also be generated directly by collisional-induced bond switching in addition to its formation by incomplete recombination of primary defects. This supports the assumption that the bond defect may play an important role in the amorphization process of silicon by light ions. The analysis of the interface between (001) silicon and amorphous silicon shows that there are two typical defect configurations at the interface which result from two different orientations of the bond defect with respect to the interface. Thus the bond defect appears to be a characteristic structural feature of the interface. Moreover, annealing results indicate that the bond defect acts as a growth site for interface-mediated crystallization

  4. Water's Interfacial Hydrogen Bonding Structure Reveals the Effective Strength of Surface-Water Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sucheol; Willard, Adam P

    2018-06-05

    We combine all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with a mean field model of interfacial hydrogen bonding to analyze the effect of surface-water interactions on the structural and energetic properties of the liquid water interface. We show that the molecular structure of water at a weakly interacting ( i.e., hydrophobic) surface is resistant to change unless the strength of surface-water interactions are above a certain threshold. We find that below this threshold water's interfacial structure is homogeneous and insensitive to the details of the disordered surface, however, above this threshold water's interfacial structure is heterogeneous. Despite this heterogeneity, we demonstrate that the equilibrium distribution of molecular orientations can be used to quantify the energetic component of the surface-water interactions that contribute specifically to modifying the interfacial hydrogen bonding network. We identify this specific energetic component as a new measure of hydrophilicity, which we refer to as the intrinsic hydropathy.

  5. Insights into the Electronic Structure of Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide from Generalized Valence Bond Theory: Bonding in O3 and SO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Tyler Y; Lindquist, Beth A; Dunning, Thom H

    2015-07-16

    There are many well-known differences in the physical and chemical properties of ozone (O3) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). O3 has longer and weaker bonds than O2, whereas SO2 has shorter and stronger bonds than SO. The O-O2 bond is dramatically weaker than the O-SO bond, and the singlet-triplet gap in SO2 is more than double that in O3. In addition, O3 is a very reactive species, while SO2 is far less so. These disparities have been attributed to variations in the amount of diradical character in the two molecules. In this work, we use generalized valence bond (GVB) theory to characterize the electronic structure of ozone and sulfur dioxide, showing O3 does indeed possess significant diradical character, whereas SO2 is effectively a closed shell molecule. The GVB results provide critical insights into the genesis of the observed difference in these two isoelectronic species. SO2 possesses a recoupled pair bond dyad in the a"(π) system, resulting in SO double bonds. The π system of O3, on the other hand, has a lone pair on the central oxygen atom plus a pair of electrons in orbitals on the terminal oxygen atoms that give rise to a relatively weak π interaction.

  6. Rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics: Structure-bonding-property relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, M. K. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding property relationships. The work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe13-xSix system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn{sub 13}-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides Re2-xFe4Si14-y and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi2: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb3Zn3.6Al7.4: Partially ordered structure of Tb3Zn3.6Al7.4 compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn39(CrxAl1-x)81

  7. Rare-Earth Transition-Metal Intermetallics: Structure-bonding-Property Relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Mi-Kyung [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Our explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding-property relationships. Our work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe13-xSix system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn13-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides RE2-xFe4Si14-y and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi2: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb3Zn3.6Al7.4: Partially ordered structure of Tb3.6Zn13-xAl7.4 compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn39(CrxAl1-x

  8. The structure of betaxolol studied by infrared spectroscopy and natural bond orbital theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canotilho, João; Castro, Ricardo A E

    2010-08-01

    Betaxolol is a selective beta(1) receptor blocker used in the treatment of hypertension and glaucoma. A study of the betaxolol structure based on infrared spectroscopy and natural bond orbital (NBO) theory is the main aim of the present research. FTIR spectra of the solid betaxolol were recorded in the region from 4000 to 400cm(-1), in the temperature range between 25 and -170 degrees C. For spectral interpretation, spectrum of the deuterated betaxolol and the theoretical vibrational spectra of the conformer present in the solid obtained at the B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory, were used. Further insight into the structure was provided by natural bond orbital theory. NBO analysis of the conformer, before and after optimization, was carried out at the same level of theory referred above. Vibrational modes involved in hydrogen bond in the stretching and bending region were used in the estimation of the enthalpy using empirical correlations between enthalpy and the frequency shift that occurs as a result of the establishment of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. A detailed study of the structure of betaxolol and of its intermolecular interactions was obtained from the combination spectroscopy and NBO theory. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Catastrophe Bonds. From Structure to Strategy – A Cluster Analysis at European Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura-Gabriela CONSTANTIN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As a core activity and discipline of corporate management and corporate governance, risk management is, especially nowadays, a central part in pursuing the sustainable development desiderates, both from the perspective of the firm and of the society as a whole.Considering the negative impact natural catastrophes have on the companies’ and countries’ competitiveness, the development of sustainable financial products that make a contribution to transferring the risk and allocating the capital in case of disasters stands for a continual preoccupation, especially for the (reinsurance industry, while the study of catastrophe bonds – insurance-linked securities – is of interest in the specialized literature. In this context, the scope of the present research is to expand the empirical studies within this field while examining the link between the structure of the catastrophe bonds and the risk management approach employed while accessing the capital markets through this transactions.The methodology entailed clustering a selection of transactions developed by European cedents based on the size of each issue and correlating the results with an innovative score, developed to encompass several important catastrophe bonds structural components.The findings reflect that the general structural elements of the financial transactions reflect closely the corporate approach regarding the innovative risk intermediation instruments for the examined catastrophe bonds deals. The outcomes also emphasize, as expected, that companies with a stronger presence on this market seem to have a more sophisticated risk management approach.

  10. Structures and the Hydrogen Bonding Abilities of Estrogens Studied by Supersonic Jet/laser Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Fumiya; Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Ebata, Takayuki

    2013-06-01

    Estrone, estradiol, estriol are known as endogenous estrogen which have the same steroidal frame with different substituent, leading to difference of physiological activity upon the formation of hydrogen bond with estrogen receptor. In the present study, structures of estrogens and their hydrated clusters in a supersonic jet have been studied by various laser spectroscopic techniques and density functional theory calculation to study how the difference of substituents affects their hydrogen bonding ability. Infrared spectra in the OH stretching region indicate a formation of intramolecular hydrogen-bond in estriol, which may lead to weaker physiological activity among the three estrogens. We also measured electronic and infrared spectra of 1:1 hydrated clusters of estrogen. The results show a switch of stable hydration site from the phenolic OH group to the five member ring by substituting one more OH group.

  11. DNA secondary structures: stability and function of G-quadruplex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochman, Matthew L.; Paeschke, Katrin; Zakian, Virginia A.

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the canonical double helix, DNA can fold into various other inter- and intramolecular secondary structures. Although many such structures were long thought to be in vitro artefacts, bioinformatics demonstrates that DNA sequences capable of forming these structures are conserved throughout evolution, suggesting the existence of non-B-form DNA in vivo. In addition, genes whose products promote formation or resolution of these structures are found in diverse organisms, and a growing body of work suggests that the resolution of DNA secondary structures is critical for genome integrity. This Review focuses on emerging evidence relating to the characteristics of G-quadruplex structures and the possible influence of such structures on genomic stability and cellular processes, such as transcription. PMID:23032257

  12. Interfacial crystalline structures in injection over-molded polypropylene and bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bowen; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Genjie; Guo, Shaoyun; Huang, Jian

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes interfacial crystalline structures found in injection overmolded polypropylene components and the relationship of these structures to bond strength between the components. The combined effects of the development of hierarchical gradient structures and the particular thermomechanical environment near the interface on the interfacial crystalline structures were investigated in detail by PLM, SEM, DSC, WAXD, and infrared dichroism spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that during molding there was competitive formation of interfacial crystalline structures consisted of "shish-kebab" layer (SKL) and a transcrystalline layers (TCL). Variation in shear stress (controlled by injection pressure and injection speed) plays an important role in the formation of the SKL. The formation of TCL is influenced by the thermal environment, namely melt temperature and mold temperature. Increasing within certain limits, interfacial temperature and the thermal gradient near the interface promotes β-iPP growth. The relationship between interfacial crystalline structures and interfacial bond strength was established by lap shear measurement. The interfacial bond strength is improved by enhancing the formation of TCL, but reduced if SKL predominates.

  13. Insights into the Structures of DNA Damaged by Hydroxyl Radical: Crystal Structures of DNA Duplexes Containing 5-Formyluracil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Tsunoda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyl radicals are potent mutagens that attack DNA to form various base and ribose derivatives. One of the major damaged thymine derivatives is 5-formyluracil (fU, which induces pyrimidine transition during replication. In order to establish the structural basis for such mutagenesis, the crystal structures of two kinds of DNA d(CGCGRATfUCGCG with R = A/G have been determined by X-ray crystallography. The fU residues form a Watson-Crick-type pair with A and two types of pairs (wobble and reversed wobble with G, the latter being a new type of base pair between ionized thymine base and guanine base. In silico structural modeling suggests that the DNA polymerase can accept the reversed wobble pair with G, as well as the Watson-Crick pair with A.

  14. A DFT study of cyclopropane adsorption on Pt(1 1 1). Electronic structure and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germán, E.; López-Corral, I.; Pirillo, S.; Juan, A.; Brizuela, G.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption of cyclopropane (c-C 3 H 6 ) on Pt(1 1 1) by means of the density functional theory (DFT). We have investigated the preferential adsorption geometry, considering different adsorption sites and bonding configurations for the molecular adsorbate. We have also computed the electronic structure and bonding interactions by means of density of states (DOS), crystal orbital overlap population (OPDOS), and overlap population (OP) analysis. Our results show a small preference for Bridge and Top adsorption sites with the cyclopropane ring parallel to the surface. Pt-C equilibrium distance is ∼3.5 Å and a weak bond is formed during adsorption. The main bonding interaction comes from the Pt-H overlap population. Pt 5p z orbitals play an important role in the bonding between c-C 3 H 6 and the surface. We have found that Van der Waals (vdW) corrections to the energies improve the adsorption values without changing the preferential site geometries.

  15. Manufacturing study of Be, W and CFC bonded structures for plasma-facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, M.; Hirai, S.; Kikuchi, K.; Oda, Y.; Shimizu, K.

    2004-01-01

    A manufacturing study has been conducted for Be, W, and CFC bonded structures employed in plasma-facing components for the ITER. For Be tiles bonded to the Cu-Cr-Zr alloy heat sink with stainless-steel cooling pipes, a one-axis hot press with two heating processes has been used to bond the three materials. An Al-Si base interlayer has been used to bond Be to the Cu-alloy. The heating processes have been selected to match the required heat treatment conditions for the Cu-alloy. Because of the limited heat processes using a conventional hot press, the manufacturing cost can be minimized. For both the W and CFC tiles, the materials have been brazed at the same time to the Cu-alloy. Ni-Cu-Mn and Cu-Ti brazing materials have been used for the W and CFC tiles, respectively. Using the above bonding techniques, partial mockups of a blanket first-wall panel and divertor target have been successfully manufactured

  16. Manufacturing study of Be, W and CFC bonded structures for plasma-facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, M.; Hirai, S.; Kikuchi, K.; Oda, Y.; Shimizu, K.

    2004-08-01

    A manufacturing study has been conducted for Be, W, and CFC bonded structures employed in plasma-facing components for the ITER. For Be tiles bonded to the Cu-Cr-Zr alloy heat sink with stainless-steel cooling pipes, a one-axis hot press with two heating processes has been used to bond the three materials. An Al-Si base interlayer has been used to bond Be to the Cu-alloy. The heating processes have been selected to match the required heat treatment conditions for the Cu-alloy. Because of the limited heat processes using a conventional hot press, the manufacturing cost can be minimized. For both the W and CFC tiles, the materials have been brazed at the same time to the Cu-alloy. Ni-Cu-Mn and Cu-Ti brazing materials have been used for the W and CFC tiles, respectively. Using the above bonding techniques, partial mockups of a blanket first-wall panel and divertor target have been successfully manufactured.

  17. Crystal structure, vibrational spectra and DFT studies of hydrogen bonded 1,2,4-triazolium hydrogenselenate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V.; Thirunarayanan, S.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2017-10-01

    The new hydrogen bonded molecular complex 1,2,4-triazolium hydrogenselenate (THS) is prepared by the reaction of 1H-1,2,4-triazole and selenic acid. This complex is stabilised by N-H⋯O and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonding and electrostatic attractive forces between 1H and 1,2,4-triazolium cations and hydrogen selenate anions. The XRD studies revealed that intermolecular proton transfer occur from selenic acid to 1H-1,2,4-triazole molecule, results in the formation of 1,2,4-triazolium hydrogenselenate which contains 1,2,4-triazolium cations and hydrogenselenate anions. The molecular structure of THS crystal has also been optimised by using Density Functional Theory (DFT) using B3LYP/cc-pVTZ and B3LYP/6-311++G** methods in order to find the whole characteristics of the molecular complex. The theoretical structural parameters such as bond length, bond angle and dihedral angle determined by DFT methods are well agreed with the XRD parameters. The atomic charges and thermodynamic properties are also calculated and analysed. The energies of frontier molecular orbitals HOMO, LUMO, HOMO-1, LUMO+1 and LUMO-HUMO energy gap are calculated to understand the kinetic stability and chemical reactivity of the molecular complex. The natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) has been performed in order to study the intramolecular bonding interactions and delocalisation of electrons. These intra molecular charge transfer may induce biological activities such as antimicrobials, antiinflammatory, antifungal etc. The complete vibrational assignments of THS have been performed by using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra.

  18. Electron-Poor Polar Intermetallics: Complex Structures, Novel Clusters, and Intriguing Bonding with Pronounced Electron Delocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qisheng; Miller, Gordon J

    2018-01-16

    Intermetallic compounds represent an extensive pool of candidates for energy related applications stemming from magnetic, electric, optic, caloric, and catalytic properties. The discovery of novel intermetallic compounds can enhance understanding of the chemical principles that govern structural stability and chemical bonding as well as finding new applications. Valence electron-poor polar intermetallics with valence electron concentrations (VECs) between 2.0 and 3.0 e - /atom show a plethora of unprecedented and fascinating structural motifs and bonding features. Therefore, establishing simple structure-bonding-property relationships is especially challenging for this compound class because commonly accepted valence electron counting rules are inappropriate. During our efforts to find quasicrystals and crystalline approximants by valence electron tuning near 2.0 e - /atom, we observed that compositions close to those of quasicrystals are exceptional sources for unprecedented valence electron-poor polar intermetallics, e.g., Ca 4 Au 10 In 3 containing (Au 10 In 3 ) wavy layers, Li 14.7 Mg 36.8 Cu 21.5 Ga 66 adopting a type IV clathrate framework, and Sc 4 Mg x Cu 15-x Ga 7.5 that is incommensurately modulated. In particular, exploratory syntheses of AAu 3 T (A = Ca, Sr, Ba and T = Ge, Sn) phases led to interesting bonding features for Au, such as columns, layers, and lonsdaleite-type tetrahedral frameworks. Overall, the breadth of Au-rich polar intermetallics originates, in part, from significant relativistics effect on the valence electrons of Au, effects which result in greater 6s/5d orbital mixing, a small effective metallic radius, and an enhanced Mulliken electronegativity, all leading to ultimate enhanced binding with nearly all metals including itself. Two other successful strategies to mine electron-poor polar intermetallics include lithiation and "cation-rich" phases. Along these lines, we have studied lithiated Zn-rich compounds in which structural

  19. Interplay of DNA repair with transcription: from structures to mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaconescu, Alexandra M; Artsimovitch, Irina; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2012-12-01

    Many DNA transactions are crucial for maintaining genomic integrity and faithful transfer of genetic information but remain poorly understood. An example is the interplay between nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription, also known as transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR). Discovered decades ago, the mechanisms for TCR have remained elusive, not in small part due to the scarcity of structural studies of key players. Here we summarize recent structural information on NER/TCR factors, focusing on bacterial systems, and integrate it with existing genetic, biochemical, and biophysical data to delineate the mechanisms at play. We also review emerging, alternative modalities for recruitment of NER proteins to DNA lesions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sulfur bonding in MoS2 and Co-Mo-S structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byskov, Line Sjolte; Hammer, Bjørk; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1997-01-01

    The structure and bonding in small MoS2 structures with and without Co is studied theoretically using self-consistent density functional theory with a non-local exchange-correlation energy. The structures model the catalysts used extensively in hydrotreating. We study in detail the structure...... study the energy required to form sulfur vacancies, which are believed to be the active sites for many hydrotreating reactions. The presence of Co atoms at the edges is shown to lead to a significant lowering of the metal-sulfur binding energy. This imposes an increase in the concentration of active...

  1. A theoretical study of molecular structure, optical properties and bond activation of energetic compound FOX-7 under intense electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xin; Wei, Yuan; Lv, Li; Wu, Deyin; Yang, Mingli

    2017-02-01

    Molecular structure, vibrational and electronic absorption spectra, chemical reactivity of energetic compound FOX-7, one of the most widely used explosives, were studied computationally in presence of an electrostatic field of 0.01-0.05 a.u. The Csbnd N bond, which usually triggers the decomposition of FOX-7, is shortened/elongated under a parallel/antiparallel field. The Csbnd N bond activation energy varies with the external electric field, decreasing remarkably with the field strength in regardless of the field direction. This is attributed to two aspects: the bond weakening by the field parallel to the Csbnd N bond and the stabilization effect on the transition-state structure by the field antiparallel to the bond. The variations in the structure and property of FOX-7 under the electric fields were further analyzed with its distributional polarizability, which is dependent on the charge transfer characteristics through the Csbnd N bond.

  2. Relating structural parameters to leachability in a glass-bonded ceramic waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, S. M.; Johnson, S. G.; Moschetti, T. L.

    1998-01-01

    Lattice parameters for a crystalline material can be obtained by several methods, notably by analyzing x-ray powder diffraction patterns. By utilizing a computer program to fit a pattern, one can follow the evolution or subtle changes in a structure of a crystalline species in different environments. This work involves such a study for an essential component of the ceramic waste form that is under development at Argonne National Laboratory. Zeolite 4A and zeolite 5A are used to produce two different types of waste forms: a glass-bonded sodalite and a glass-bonded zeolite, respectively. Changes in structure during production of the waste forms are discussed. Specific salt-loadings in the sodalite waste form are related to relative peak intensities of certain reflections in the XRD patterns. Structural parameters for the final waste forms will also be given and related to leachability under standard conditions

  3. YNi and its hydrides: Phase stabilities, electronic structures and chemical bonding properties from first principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matar, S.F.; Nakhl, M.; Al Alam, A.F.; Ouaini, N.; Chevalier, B.

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Base centered orthorhombic YNiH X structure. For x = 3, only H1 and H2 are present. Highest hydrogen content YNiH 4 is obtained when H3 are added. - Abstract: Within density functional theory, establishing the equations of states of YNi in two different controversial structures in the literature, leads to determine the orthorhombic FeB-type as the ground state one with small energy difference. For YNiH 3 and YNiH 4 hydrides crystallizing in the orthorhombic CrB-type structure the geometry optimization and the ab initio determination of the H atomic positions show that the stability of hydrogen decreases from the tri- to the tetra- hydride. New states brought by hydrogen within the valence band lead to its broadening and to enhanced localization of metal density of states. The chemical bonding analysis shows a preferential Ni-H bonding versus Y-H.

  4. YNi and its hydrides: Phase stabilities, electronic structures and chemical bonding properties from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matar, S.F., E-mail: matar@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France); Nakhl, M. [Universite Libanaise, Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique des Materiaux LCPM, Fanar (Lebanon); Al Alam, A.F.; Ouaini, N. [Universite Saint-Esprit de Kaslik, Faculte des Sciences et de Genie Informatique, Jounieh (Lebanon); Chevalier, B. [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France)

    2010-11-25

    Graphical abstract: Base centered orthorhombic YNiH{sub X} structure. For x = 3, only H1 and H2 are present. Highest hydrogen content YNiH{sub 4} is obtained when H3 are added. - Abstract: Within density functional theory, establishing the equations of states of YNi in two different controversial structures in the literature, leads to determine the orthorhombic FeB-type as the ground state one with small energy difference. For YNiH{sub 3} and YNiH{sub 4} hydrides crystallizing in the orthorhombic CrB-type structure the geometry optimization and the ab initio determination of the H atomic positions show that the stability of hydrogen decreases from the tri- to the tetra- hydride. New states brought by hydrogen within the valence band lead to its broadening and to enhanced localization of metal density of states. The chemical bonding analysis shows a preferential Ni-H bonding versus Y-H.

  5. Mechanism of the Glycosidic Bond Cleavage of Mismatched Thymine in Human Thymine DNA Glycosylase Revealed by Classical Molecular Dynamics and Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaan, Natalia; Crehuet, Ramon; Imhof, Petra

    2015-09-24

    Base excision of mismatched or damaged nucleotides catalyzed by glycosylase enzymes is the first step of the base excision repair system, a machinery preserving the integrity of DNA. Thymine DNA glycosylase recognizes and removes mismatched thymine by cleaving the C1'-N1 bond between the base and the sugar ring. Our quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations of this reaction in human thymine DNA glycosylase reveal a requirement for a positive charge in the active site to facilitate C1'-N1 bond scission: protonation of His151 significantly lowers the free energy barrier for C1'-N1 bond dissociation compared to the situation with neutral His151. Shuttling a proton from His151 to the thymine base further reduces the activation free energy for glycosidic bond cleavage. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of the H151A mutant suggest that the mutation to the smaller, neutral, residue increases the water accessibility of the thymine base, rendering direct proton transfer from the bulk feasible. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations of the glycosidic bond cleavage reaction in the H151A mutant show that the activation free energy is slightly lower than in the wild-type enzyme, explaining the experimentally observed higher reaction rates in this mutant.

  6. DNA Catenation Maintains Structure of Human Metaphase Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    L. V. Bauer, David; Marie, Rodolphe; Rasmussen, Kristian Hagsted

    2012-01-01

    Mitotic chromosome structure is pivotal to cell division but difficult to observe in fine detail using conventional methods. DNA catenation has been implicated in both sister chromatid cohesion and chromosome condensation, but has never been observed directly. We have used a lab-on-a-chip microfl...

  7. Multiscale properties of DNA primary structure: cross-scale correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altajskij, M.V.; Ivanov, V.V.; Polozov, R.V.

    2000-01-01

    Cross-scale correlations of wavelet coefficients of the DNA coding sequences are calculated and compared to that of the generated random sequence of the same length. The coding sequences are shown to have strong correlation between large and small scale structures, while random sequences have not

  8. DNA nanotubes for NMR structure determination of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellot, Gaëtan; McClintock, Mark A; Chou, James J; Shih, William M

    2013-04-01

    Finding a way to determine the structures of integral membrane proteins using solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has proved to be challenging. A residual-dipolar-coupling-based refinement approach can be used to resolve the structure of membrane proteins up to 40 kDa in size, but to do this you need a weak-alignment medium that is detergent-resistant and it has thus far been difficult to obtain such a medium suitable for weak alignment of membrane proteins. We describe here a protocol for robust, large-scale synthesis of detergent-resistant DNA nanotubes that can be assembled into dilute liquid crystals for application as weak-alignment media in solution NMR structure determination of membrane proteins in detergent micelles. The DNA nanotubes are heterodimers of 400-nm-long six-helix bundles, each self-assembled from a M13-based p7308 scaffold strand and >170 short oligonucleotide staple strands. Compatibility with proteins bearing considerable positive charge as well as modulation of molecular alignment, toward collection of linearly independent restraints, can be introduced by reducing the negative charge of DNA nanotubes using counter ions and small DNA-binding molecules. This detergent-resistant liquid-crystal medium offers a number of properties conducive for membrane protein alignment, including high-yield production, thermal stability, buffer compatibility and structural programmability. Production of sufficient nanotubes for four or five NMR experiments can be completed in 1 week by a single individual.

  9. Triplet repeat DNA structures and human genetic disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laboratory of DNA Structure and Mutagenesis, Center for Genome Research, Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A&M University System Health Sciences Center, 2121 West Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030-3303, USA; Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Genetics, 555 University Avenue, Elm Wing, ...

  10. Triplet repeat DNA structures and human genetic disease: dynamic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    formed at the loop-outs. [Sinden R R, Potaman V N, Oussatcheva E A, Pearson C E, Lyubchenko Y L and Shlyakhtenko L S 2002 Triplet repeat DNA structures .... 36–39. 40–121 Huntingtin/polyglutamine expansion. Spinocerebellar ataxia 1. SCA1. 6p23. (CAG)n. 6–44. –. 39–82 (pure) Ataxin-1/polyglutamine expansion.

  11. Integration of Multiplexed Microfluidic Electrokinetic Concentrators with a Morpholino Microarray via Reversible Surface Bonding for Enhanced DNA Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Diogo; Wei, Xi; Levicky, Rastislav; Song, Yong-Ak

    2016-04-05

    We describe a microfluidic concentration device to accelerate the surface hybridization reaction between DNA and morpholinos (MOs) for enhanced detection. The microfluidic concentrator comprises a single polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel onto which an ion-selective layer of conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) ( PSS) was directly printed and then reversibly surface bonded onto a morpholino microarray for hybridization. Using this electrokinetic trapping concentrator, we could achieve a maximum concentration factor of ∼800 for DNA and a limit of detection of 10 nM within 15 min. In terms of the detection speed, it enabled faster hybridization by around 10-fold when compared to conventional diffusion-based hybridization. A significant advantage of our approach is that the fabrication of the microfluidic concentrator is completely decoupled from the microarray; by eliminating the need to deposit an ion-selective layer on the microarray surface prior to device integration, interfacing between both modules, the PDMS chip for electrokinetic concentration and the substrate for DNA sensing are easier and applicable to any microarray platform. Furthermore, this fabrication strategy facilitates a multiplexing of concentrators. We have demonstrated the proof-of-concept for multiplexing by building a device with 5 parallel concentrators connected to a single inlet/outlet and applying it to parallel concentration and hybridization. Such device yielded similar concentration and hybridization efficiency compared to that of a single-channel device without adding any complexity to the fabrication and setup. These results demonstrate that our concentrator concept can be applied to the development of a highly multiplexed concentrator-enhanced microarray detection system for either genetic analysis or other diagnostic assays.

  12. Structural characterization of PTX3 disulfide bond network and its multimeric status in cumulus matrix organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inforzato, Antonio; Rivieccio, Vincenzo; Morreale, Antonio P; Bastone, Antonio; Salustri, Antonietta; Scarchilli, Laura; Verdoliva, Antonio; Vincenti, Silvia; Gallo, Grazia; Chiapparino, Caterina; Pacello, Lucrezia; Nucera, Eleonora; Serlupi-Crescenzi, Ottaviano; Day, Anthony J; Bottazzi, Barbara; Mantovani, Alberto; De Santis, Rita; Salvatori, Giovanni

    2008-04-11

    PTX3 is an acute phase glycoprotein that plays key roles in resistance to certain pathogens and in female fertility. PTX3 exerts its functions by interacting with a number of structurally unrelated molecules, a capacity that is likely to rely on its complex multimeric structure stabilized by interchain disulfide bonds. In this study, PAGE analyses performed under both native and denaturing conditions indicated that human recombinant PTX3 is mainly composed of covalently linked octamers. The network of disulfide bonds supporting this octameric assembly was resolved by mass spectrometry and Cys to Ser site-directed mutagenesis. Here we report that cysteine residues at positions 47, 49, and 103 in the N-terminal domain form three symmetric interchain disulfide bonds stabilizing four protein subunits in a tetrameric arrangement. Additional interchain disulfide bonds formed by the C-terminal domain cysteines Cys(317) and Cys(318) are responsible for linking the PTX3 tetramers into octamers. We also identified three intrachain disulfide bonds within the C-terminal domain that we used as structural constraints to build a new three-dimensional model for this domain. Previously it has been shown that PTX3 is a key component of the cumulus oophorus extracellular matrix, which forms around the oocyte prior to ovulation, because cumuli from PTX3(-/-) mice show defective matrix organization. Recombinant PTX3 is able to restore the normal phenotype ex vivo in cumuli from PTX3(-/-) mice. Here we demonstrate that PTX3 Cys to Ser mutants, mainly assembled into tetramers, exhibited wild type rescue activity, whereas a mutant, predominantly composed of dimers, had impaired functionality. These findings indicate that protein oligomerization is essential for PTX3 activity within the cumulus matrix and implicate PTX3 tetramers as the functional molecular units required for cumulus matrix organization and stabilization.

  13. Structural properties of replication origins in yeast DNA sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Xiaoqin; Zeng Jia; Yan Hong

    2008-01-01

    Sequence-dependent DNA flexibility is an important structural property originating from the DNA 3D structure. In this paper, we investigate the DNA flexibility of the budding yeast (S. Cerevisiae) replication origins on a genome-wide scale using flexibility parameters from two different models, the trinucleotide and the tetranucleotide models. Based on analyzing average flexibility profiles of 270 replication origins, we find that yeast replication origins are significantly rigid compared with their surrounding genomic regions. To further understand the highly distinctive property of replication origins, we compare the flexibility patterns between yeast replication origins and promoters, and find that they both contain significantly rigid DNAs. Our results suggest that DNA flexibility is an important factor that helps proteins recognize and bind the target sites in order to initiate DNA replication. Inspired by the role of the rigid region in promoters, we speculate that the rigid replication origins may facilitate binding of proteins, including the origin recognition complex (ORC), Cdc6, Cdt1 and the MCM2-7 complex

  14. Bond-orientational analysis of hard-disk and hard-sphere structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil Kumar, V; Kumaran, V

    2006-05-28

    We report the bond-orientational analysis results for the thermodynamic, random, and homogeneously sheared inelastic structures of hard-disks and hard-spheres. The thermodynamic structures show a sharp rise in the order across the freezing transition. The random structures show the absence of crystallization. The homogeneously sheared structures get ordered at a packing fraction higher than the thermodynamic freezing packing fraction, due to the suppression of crystal nucleation. On shear ordering, strings of close-packed hard-disks in two dimensions and close-packed layers of hard-spheres in three dimensions, oriented along the velocity direction, slide past each other. Such a flow creates a considerable amount of fourfold order in two dimensions and body-centered-tetragonal (bct) structure in three dimensions. These transitions are the flow analogs of the martensitic transformations occurring in metals due to the stresses induced by a rapid quench. In hard-disk structures, using the bond-orientational analysis we show the presence of fourfold order. In sheared inelastic hard-sphere structures, even though the global bond-orientational analysis shows that the system is highly ordered, a third-order rotational invariant analysis shows that only about 40% of the spheres have face-centered-cubic (fcc) order, even in the dense and near-elastic limits, clearly indicating the coexistence of multiple crystalline orders. When layers of close-packed spheres slide past each other, in addition to the bct structure, the hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) structure is formed due to the random stacking faults. Using the Honeycutt-Andersen pair analysis and an analysis based on the 14-faceted polyhedra having six quadrilateral and eight hexagonal faces, we show the presence of bct and hcp signatures in shear ordered inelastic hard-spheres. Thus, our analysis shows that the dense sheared inelastic hard-spheres have a mixture of fcc, bct, and hcp structures.

  15. Structure-function relationships of new lipids designed for DNA transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Matthias; Heinze, Martin; Wölk, Christian; Funari, Sergio S; Dobner, Bodo; Möhwald, Helmuth; Brezesinski, Gerald

    2011-08-22

    Cationic liposome/DNA complexes can be used as nonviral vectors for direct delivery of DNA-based biopharmaceuticals to damaged cells and tissues. To obtain more effective and safer liposome-based gene transfection systems, two cationic lipids with identical head groups but different chain structures are investigated with respect to their in vitro gene-transfer activity, their cell-damaging characteristics, and their physicochemical properties. The gene-transfer activities of the two lipids are very different. Differential scanning calorimetry and synchrotron small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering give valuable structural insight. A subgel-like structure with high packing density and high phase-transition temperature from gel to liquid-crystalline state are found for lipid 7 (N'-2-[(2,6-diamino-1-oxohexyl)amino]ethyl-2,N-bis(hexadecyl)propanediamide) containing two saturated chains. Additionally, an ordered head-group lattice based on formation of a hydrogen-bond network is present. In contrast, lipid 8 (N'-2-[(2,6-diamino-1-oxohexyl)amino]ethyl-2-hexadecyl-N-[(9Z)-octadec-9-enyl]propanediamide) with one unsaturated and one saturated chain shows a lower phase-transition temperature and a reduced packing density. These properties enhance incorporation of the helper lipid cholesterol needed for gene transfection. Both lipids, either pure or in mixtures with cholesterol, form lamellar phases, which are preserved after addition of DNA. However, the system separates into phases containing DNA and phases without DNA. On increasing the temperature, DNA is released and only a lipid phase without intercalated DNA strands is observed. The conversion temperatures are very different in the two systems studied. The important parameter seems to be the charge density of the lipid membranes, which is a result of different solubility of cholesterol in the two lipid membranes. Therefore, different binding affinities of the DNA to the lipid mixtures are achieved. Copyright © 2011

  16. Structure and Chemical Bond of Thermoelectric Ce-Co-Sb Skutterudites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The correlations among composition,structure,chemical bond and thermoelectric property of skutterudites CoSb3 and CeCo5Fe3Sb12 have been studied by using density function and discrete variation (DFT-DVM) method.Three models for this study were proposed and calculated by which the "rattling" pattern was described.Model 1 is with Ce in the center,model 2 is with Ce away the center and near to Sb,and model 3 is also with Ce away the center but near to Fe.The calculated results show that in model 3,the ionic bond is the strongest,but the covalent bond is the weakest.Due to the different changes between ionic and covalent bond,there is less difference in the stability among the models 1,2 and 3.Therefore,these different models can exist at the same time,or can translate from one to another more easily.In other words,the "rattling" pattern has taken place.Unfilled model of CoSb3,without Ce and Fe,is called model 4.The covalent bond of Co-Sb or Fe-Sb in models 1,2 and 3 is weaker than that of Co-Sb in model 4,as some electrical cloud of Sb takes part in the covalent bond of Ce-Sb in the filled models.The result is consistent with the experimental result that the thermal conductivity of CeCo5Fe3Sb12 is lower than that of CoSb3,and the thermoelectric property of CeCo5Fe3Sb12 is superior to that of CoSb3.

  17. The birth and development of the DNA theory of inheritance: sixty years since the discovery of the structure of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portin, Petter

    2014-04-01

    The development of the DNA theory of inheritance culminated in the publication of the molecular structure of DNA 60 years ago. This paper describes this development, beginning with the discovery of DNA as a chemical substance by Friedrich Miescher in 1869, followed by its basic chemical analysis and demonstration of its participation in the structure of chromosomes. Subsequently it was discovered by Oswald Avery in 1944 that DNA was the genetic material, and then Erwin Chargaff showed that the proportions of the bases included in the structure of DNA followed a certain law. These findings, in association with the biophysical studies of Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin with Raymond Gosling, led James Watson and Francis Crick to the discovery of the double-helical structure of DNA in 1953. The paper ends with a short description of the development of the DNA theory of inheritance after the discovery of the double helix.

  18. Sequence-specific activation of the DNA sensor cGAS by Y-form DNA structures as found in primary HIV-1 cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzner, Anna-Maria; Hagmann, Cristina Amparo; Goldeck, Marion; Wolter, Steven; Kübler, Kirsten; Wittmann, Sabine; Gramberg, Thomas; Andreeva, Liudmila; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Mertens, Christina; Zillinger, Thomas; Jin, Tengchuan; Xiao, Tsan Sam; Bartok, Eva; Coch, Christoph; Ackermann, Damian; Hornung, Veit; Ludwig, Janos; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther; Schlee, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Cytosolic DNA that emerges during infection with a retrovirus or DNA virus triggers antiviral type I interferon responses. So far, only double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) over 40 base pairs (bp) in length has been considered immunostimulatory. Here we found that unpaired DNA nucleotides flanking short base-paired DNA stretches, as in stem-loop structures of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) derived from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), activated the type I interferon-inducing DNA sensor cGAS in a sequence-dependent manner. DNA structures containing unpaired guanosines flanking short (12- to 20-bp) dsDNA (Y-form DNA) were highly stimulatory and specifically enhanced the enzymatic activity of cGAS. Furthermore, we found that primary HIV-1 reverse transcripts represented the predominant viral cytosolic DNA species during early infection of macrophages and that these ssDNAs were highly immunostimulatory. Collectively, our study identifies unpaired guanosines in Y-form DNA as a highly active, minimal cGAS recognition motif that enables detection of HIV-1 ssDNA.

  19. Heteromolecular metal–organic interfaces: Electronic and structural fingerprints of chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadtmüller, Benjamin; Schröder, Sonja; Kumpf, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a study of molecular donor–acceptor blends adsorbed on Ag(1 1 1). • Geometric and electronic structure of blends and pristine phases are compared. • The surface bonding of the acceptor is strengthened, that of the donor weakened. • But counter intuitively, the acceptor (donor) bond length becomes larger (smaller). • This contradiction is resolved by a model based on charge transfer via the surface. - Abstract: Beside the fact that they attract highest interest in the field of organic electronics, heteromolecular structures adsorbed on metal surfaces, in particular donor–acceptor blends, became a popular field in fundamental science, possibly since some surprising and unexpected behaviors were found for such systems. One is the apparent breaking of a rather fundamental rule in chemistry, namely that stronger chemical bonds go along with shorter bond lengths, as it is, e.g., well-known for the sequence from single to triple bonds. In this review we summarize the results of heteromolecular monolayer structures adsorbed on Ag(1 1 1), which – regarding this rule – behave in a counterintuitive way. The charge acceptor moves away from the substrate while its electronic structure indicates a stronger chemical interaction, indicated by a shift of the formerly lowest unoccupied molecular orbital toward higher binding energies. The donor behaves in the opposite way, it gives away charge, hence, electronically the bonding to the surface becomes weaker, but at the same time it also approaches the surface. It looks as if the concordant link between electronic and geometric structure was broken. But both effects can be explained by a substrate-mediated charge transfer from the donor to the acceptor. The charge reorganization going along with this transfer is responsible for both, the lifting-up of the acceptor molecule and the filling of its LUMO, and also for the reversed effects at the donor molecules. In the end, both molecules

  20. Structural modification of covalent-bonded networks: on some methodological resolutions for binary chalcogenide glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, M; Shpotyuk, Ya; Shpotyuk, O, E-mail: shpotyukmy@yahoo.com [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 212, Stryjska str., Lviv, 79031 (Ukraine)

    2011-04-01

    New methodology to estimate efficiency of externally-induced structural modification in chalcogenide glasses is developed. This approach is grounded on the assumption that externally-induced structural modification is fully associated with destruction-polymerization transformations, which reveal themselves as local misbalances in covalent bond distribution, normal atomic coordination and intrinsic electrical fields. The input of each of these components into the total value of structural modification efficiency was probed for quasibinary (As{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub 100-x}(Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub x} ChG.

  1. Structural modification of covalent-bonded networks: on some methodological resolutions for binary chalcogenide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, M; Shpotyuk, Ya; Shpotyuk, O

    2011-01-01

    New methodology to estimate efficiency of externally-induced structural modification in chalcogenide glasses is developed. This approach is grounded on the assumption that externally-induced structural modification is fully associated with destruction-polymerization transformations, which reveal themselves as local misbalances in covalent bond distribution, normal atomic coordination and intrinsic electrical fields. The input of each of these components into the total value of structural modification efficiency was probed for quasibinary (As 2 S 3 ) 100-x (Sb 2 S 3 ) x ChG.

  2. Crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein clusters assembled on to damaged DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miggiano, R.; Perugino, G.; Ciaramella, M.; Serpe, M.; Rejman, Dominik; Páv, Ondřej; Pohl, Radek; Garavaglia, S.; Lahiri, S.; Rizzi, M.; Rossi, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 473, č. 2 (2016), s. 123-133 ISSN 0264-6021 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 241587 - SYSTEMTB Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA repair * DNA-binding protein * Mycobacterium tuberculosis * O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase * co-operativity * crystal structure Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.797, year: 2016

  3. Importance of interlayer H bonding structure to the stability of layered minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Michele; Soltis, Jennifer A.; Wittman, Rick S.; Smith, Frances N.; Chatterjee, Sayandev; Zhang, Xin; Ilton, Eugene S.; Buck, Edgar C.

    2017-10-16

    The exact atomic structures of layered minerals have been difficult to characterize because the layers often possess out-of-plane hydrogen atoms that cannot be detected by many analytical techniques. However, the ordering of these bonds are thought to play a fundamental role in the structural stability and solubility of layered minerals. We report a new strategy of using the intense radiation field of a focused electron beam to probe the effect of differences in hydrogen bonding networks on mineral solubility while simultaneously imaging the dissolution behavior in real time via liquid cell electron microscopy. We show the loss in hydrogens from interlayers of boehmite (γ-AlOOH) resulted in 2D nanosheets exfoliating from the bulk that subsequently and rapidly dissolved. However gibbsite (γ-Al(OH)3), with its higher concentration of OH terminating groups, was more accommodating to the deprotonation and stable under the beam.

  4. Influence of 5f electrons on structure and bonding in the actinide-hydrogen intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Complexa phases form for the Th + H and U + H systems that are found with no other metals. In the Pa + H system, simple bcc C15 Laves and A15 phases can form, dependent on temperature and composition. The phase transformations appear to b magnetically driven, as a resutl of the decoupling of the metallic 5f electron bonding that occurs during hydriding; the C15 phases contain two kinds of Pa atoms-the one sublattice being still fully f-bonded and the other magnetic. This is a unique situation in solid state physics which defies a valence description. A similar situation obtains for A15 β - UH 3 structure. The parent metals themselves exhibit electronegativities not unlike those of the mid-3d transition metals (e.g., Fe) because the valence electrons re tied up in metallic bonding. However, under the driving force for hydriding, the lattices can open up, decoupling the f-bonding and inducing magnetism. The systems then aggressively form very stable hydrides typical of highly-electropositive metals. Beyond uranium the trivalent metallic state is favored and rare-earth-like hydrides are found for Np + H and Pu + H. Nevertheless, the solid-state and transport properties are markedly different than for the rare-earth hydrides, showing that the latent influence of the 5f electrons is still strong

  5. Torsion Property of the Structure Bonded Aluminum Foam Due to Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang G.W.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An aluminum foam added with foaming agent, is classified into an open-cell type for heat transfer and a closed-cell type for shock absorption. This study investigates the characteristic on the torsion of aluminum foam for a closed-cell type under impact. The fracture characteristics are investigated through the composite of five types of aluminum foam (the thicknesses of 25, 35, 45, 55 and 65 mm, when applying the torsional moment of impact energy on the junction of a porous structure attached by an adhesive. When applying the impact energy of 100, 200 and 300J, the aluminum foams with thicknesses of 25 mm and 35 mm broke off under all conditions. For the energy over 200J, aluminums thicker than 55 mm continued to be attached. Furthermore, the aluminum specimens with thicknesses of 55 mm and 65 mm that were attached with more than 30% of bonding interface remained, proving that they could maintain bonding interface against impact energy. By comparing the data based on the analysis and test result, an increase in the thickness of specimen leads to the plastic deformation as the stress at the top and bottom of bonding interface moves to the middle by spreading the stress horizontally. Based on this fracture characteristic, this study can provide the data on the destruction and separation of bonding interface and may contribute to the safety design.

  6. Electronic Structure and Chemical Bond of Ti3SiC2 and Adding Al Element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Xinmin; LU Ning; MEI Bingchu

    2006-01-01

    The relation among electronic structure, chemical bond and property of Ti3SiC2 and Al-doped was studied by density function and discrete variation (DFT-DVM) method. When Al element is added into Ti3SiC2, there is a less difference of ionic bond, which does not play a leading role to influent the properties. After adding Al, the covalent bond of Al and the near Ti becomes somewhat weaker, but the covalent bond of Al and the Si in the same layer is obviously stronger than that of Si and Si before adding. Therefore, in preparation of Ti3SiC2, adding a proper quantity of Al can promote the formation of Ti3SiC2. The density of state shows that there is a mixed conductor character in both of Ti3SiC2 and adding Al element. Ti3SiC2 is with more tendencies to form a semiconductor. The total density of state near Fermi lever after adding Al is larger than that before adding, so the electric conductivity may increase after adding Al.

  7. Excited state hydrogen bonding fluorescent probe: Role of structure and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Debarati, E-mail: debaratidey07@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Vidyasagar College, 39 Sankar Ghosh Lane, Kolkata 700006 (India); Sarangi, Manas Kumar [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Ray, Angana; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay [Computational Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Maity, Dilip Kumar [Department of Chemistry, University College of Science and Technology, 92 A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)

    2016-05-15

    An environment sensitive fluorescent probe, 11-benzoyl-dibenzo[a,c]phenazine (BDBPZ), has been synthesized and characterized that acts via excited state hydrogen bonding (ESHB). On interaction with hydrogen bond donating solvents the fluorescence intensity of BDBPZ increases abruptly with a concomitant bathochromic shift. The extent of fluorescence increment and the red-shift of λ{sub max} depend on hydrogen bond donating ability of the solvent associated. ESHB restricts the free rotation of the benzoyl group and hence blocks the non-radiative deactivation pathway. BDBPZ forms an exciplex with organic amine in nonpolar medium that readily disappears on increasing the polarity of the solvent. In polar environment the fluorescence of both the free molecule and excited state hydrogen bonded species are quenched on addition of amine unlike its parent dibenzo[a,c]phenazine (DBPZ), that remains very much inaccessible towards the solvent as well as quencher molecules due to its structure. This newly synthesized derivative BDBPZ is much more interactive due to the benzoyl group that is flanked outside the skeletal aromatic rings of DBPZ, which helps to sense the environment properly and thus shows better ESHB capacity than DBPZ.

  8. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2016-06-01

    We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas-phase Cl-X and [HCl-X](+) complexes for X(+)= H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+), using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl(-) and HCl for the various cations. The Cl-X bond becomes longer and weaker along X(+) = H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+). Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence of solvent) alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) and how this compares with and differs from those of the proton affinity (PA) and methyl cation affinity (MCA). Our analyses are based on Kohn-Sham molecular orbital (KS-MO) theory in combination with a quantitative energy decomposition analysis (EDA) that pinpoints the importance of the different features in the bonding mechanism. Orbital overlap appears to play an important role in determining the trend in cation affinities.

  9. Syntheses, characterizations and crystal structures of three new organically templated or organically bonded zinc selenates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Meiling; Mao Jianggao; Song Junling

    2004-01-01

    Three new organically templated or organically bonded zinc selenates, namely, {H 2 bipy}Zn(SeO 4 ) 2 (H 2 O) 2 1 (bipy=4,4'-bipyridine), {H 2 pip}{Zn(SeO 4 ) 2 (H 2 O) 4 }·2H 2 O 2 (pip=piprazine), and Zn(SeO 4 )(phen)(H 2 O) 2 3 (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) have been synthesized by hydrothermal reactions. The structure of compound 1 features a 1D chain composed of [Zn(SeO 4 ) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ] 2- anions. Compound 2 has a 2D layer structure built from {Zn(SeO 4 ) 2 (H 2 O) 4 } 2- anions that are cross-linked by doubly protonated piperazine cations via N-H···O hydrogen bonds. The structure of compound 3 contains a 1D chain of Zn(SeO 4 )(phen)(H 2 O) 2 , such chains are further interlinked by hydrogen bonds and π···π interactions to form a layer. The different roles the templates played have also been discussed

  10. Structure of eight molecular salts assembled from noncovalent bonding between carboxylic acids, imidazole, and benzimidazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shouwen; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Hui; Wen, Xianhong; Li, Minghui; Wang, Daqi

    2015-09-01

    Eight organic salts of imidazole/benzimidazole have been prepared with carboxylic acids as 2-methyl-2-phenoxypropanoic acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, 5-nitrosalicylic acid, isophthalic acid, 4-nitro-phthalic acid, and 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. The eight crystalline forms reported are proton-transfer compounds of which the crystals and compounds were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. These structures adopted hetero supramolecular synthons, with the most common R22(7) motif observed at salts 2, 3, 5, 6 and 8. Analysis of the crystal packing of 1-8 suggests that there are extensive strong Nsbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) between acid and imidazolyl components in all of the salts. Except the classical hydrogen bonding interactions, the secondary propagating interactions also play important roles in structure extension. This variety, coupled with the varying geometries and number of acidic groups of the acids utilized, has led to the creation of eight supramolecular arrays with 1D-3D structure. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is analyzed. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the Nsbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds between acids and imidazole/benzimidazole are sufficient to bring about the formation of organic salts.

  11. Relationships among the structural topology, bond strength, and mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kai-Hsin; Tsou, Nien-Ti; Kang, Dun-Yen

    2015-10-21

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (AlSiNTs) using a multiscale computational method and then conducted a comparison with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). By comparing the potential energy estimated from molecular and macroscopic material mechanics, we were able to model the chemical bonds as beam elements for the nanoscale continuum modeling. This method allowed for simulated mechanical tests (tensile, bending, and torsion) with minimum computational resources for deducing their Young's modulus and shear modulus. The proposed approach also enabled the creation of hypothetical nanotubes to elucidate the relative contributions of bond strength and nanotube structural topology to overall nanotube mechanical strength. Our results indicated that it is the structural topology rather than bond strength that dominates the mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Finally, we investigated the relationship between the structural topology and the mechanical properties by analyzing the von Mises stress distribution in the nanotubes. The proposed methodology proved effective in rationalizing differences in the mechanical properties of AlSiNTs and SWCNTs. Furthermore, this approach could be applied to the exploration of new high-strength nanotube materials.

  12. Annealing effect on spin density of broken bonds and on the structure of amorphous germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukhan'ko, F.N.; Okunev, V.D.; Samojlenko, Z.A.

    1989-01-01

    Dependence of volumetric spin density of broken bonds in a-Ge films, produced by cathode sputtering in argon, on the annealing temperature is investigated by ESR method. The film structure is controlled by the X-ray method. Two ESR lines with g=2.019 and g=2.003, their intensities changing non-monotonously with annealing temperature are observed. The line with g=2.019 is typical of only amorphous germanium state, and the line with g=2.003 is preserved after film crystallization. Under comparison of results with structural data a conclusion is made that the observed lines in ESR spectra are linked with broken bonds in peripheral regions of two types of clusters. The line with g=2.003 is conditioned by broken bonds in the peripheral cluster regions with standard cubic atom packing and the line with g=2.019 is linked with clusters of hexagonal type which is not typical of crystalline germanium standard structure

  13. Molecular mechanics of DNA bricks: in situ structure, mechanical properties and ionic conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slone, Scott Michael; Li, Chen-Yu; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Yoo, Jejoong

    2016-01-01

    The DNA bricks method exploits self-assembly of short DNA fragments to produce custom three-dimensional objects with subnanometer precision. In contrast to DNA origami, the DNA brick method permits a variety of different structures to be realized using the same library of DNA strands. As a consequence of their design, however, assembled DNA brick structures have fewer interhelical connections in comparison to equivalent DNA origami structures. Although the overall shape of the DNA brick objects has been characterized and found to conform to the features of the target designs, the microscopic properties of DNA brick objects remain yet to be determined. Here, we use the all-atom molecular dynamics method to directly compare the structure, mechanical properties and ionic conductivity of DNA brick and DNA origami structures different only by internal connectivity of their consistituent DNA strands. In comparison to equivalent DNA origami structures, the DNA brick structures are found to be less rigid and less dense and have a larger cross-section area normal to the DNA helix direction. At the microscopic level, the junction in the DNA brick structures are found to be right-handed, similar to the structure of individual Holliday junctions (HJ) in solution, which contrasts with the left-handed structure of HJ in DNA origami. Subject to external electric field, a DNA brick plate is more leaky to ions than an equivalent DNA origami plate because of its lower density and larger cross-section area. Overall, our results indicate that the structures produced by the DNA brick method are fairly similar in their overall appearance to those created by the DNA origami method but are more compliant when subject to external forces, which likely is a consequence of their single crossover design. (paper)

  14. Can Parental Bonding Be Assessed in Children? Factor Structure and Factorial Invariance of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) between Adults and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaousis, Ioannis; Mascha, Katerina; Giovazolias, Theodoros

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the factorial structure of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) in the Greek population. Using confirmatory factor analysis different proposed models of the basic dimensions of PBI were evaluated. The results indicated that Kendler's three-factor (i.e. care, protectiveness and authoritarianism) solution was found to be more…

  15. Electronic structure, elasticity, bonding features and mechanical behaviour of zinc intermetallics: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatima, Bushra, E-mail: bushrafatima25@gmail.com; Acharya, Nikita; Sanyal, Sankar P. [Department of Physics, Barkatullah University, Bhopal, 462026 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The structural stability, electronic structure, elastic and mechanical properties of TiZn and ZrZn intermetallics have been studied using ab-initio full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within generalized gradient approximation for exchange and correlation potentials. The various structural parameters, such as lattice constant (a{sub 0}), bulk modulus (B), and its pressure derivative (B’) are analysed and compared. The investigation of elastic constants affirm that both TiZn and ZrZn are elastically stable in CsCl (B{sub 2} phase) structure. The electronic structures have been analysed quantitatively from the band structure which reveals the metallic nature of these compounds. To better illustrate the nature of bonding and charge transfer, we have also studied the Fermi surfaces. The three well known criterion of ductility namely Pugh’s rule, Cauchy’s pressure and Frantsevich rule elucidate the ductile nature of these compounds.

  16. Magnetophoresis of flexible DNA-based dumbbell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, B.; Ghai, R.; Dimitrov, K.

    2008-02-01

    Controlled movement and manipulation of magnetic micro- and nanostructures using magnetic forces can give rise to important applications in biomedecine, diagnostics, and immunology. We report controlled magnetophoresis and stretching, in aqueous solution, of a DNA-based dumbbell structure containing magnetic and diamagnetic microspheres. The velocity and stretching of the dumbbell were experimentally measured and correlated with a theoretical model based on the forces acting on individual magnetic beads or the entire dumbbell structures. The results show that precise and predictable manipulation of dumbbell structures is achievable and can potentially be applied to immunomagnetic cell separators.

  17. Structure of DNA damaged by UV and psoralen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung-hou Kim; Tomic, M.T.; Wemmer, D.E.; Pearlman, D.; Holbrook, S.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have used NMR methods to determine a three-dimensional model of an 8 base-pair DNA fragment cross-linked with psoralen. The duplex form of the self-complementary deoxyribonucleotide d-GGGTACCC, contains a psoralen cross-linkable site at the center of the duplex. The cross-link was formed by UV irradiation of a mixture of the purified DNA octamer and 4'-(aminomethyl)-4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen (AMT). Structural information was obtained using one and two-dimensional NMR techniques. Two-dimensional NOE experiments were used to assign the spectrum and estimate distances for many pairs of protons in the cross-linked DNA. Structural parameters obtained are qualitatively consistent with a previously proposed model for kinked and unwound cross-linked B-form DNA derived from crystallography and molecular modeling. The NMR derived model has a 53 degree bend into the major groove occuring primarily at the site of drug addition, and a 56 degree unwinding spanning the 8 base pair duplex. (author)

  18. Susceptibilities to DNA Structural Transitions within Eukaryotic Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhabinskaya, Dina; Benham, Craig; Madden, Sally

    2012-02-01

    We analyze the competitive transitions to alternate secondary DNA structures in a negatively supercoiled DNA molecule of kilobase length and specified base sequence. We use statistical mechanics to calculate the competition among all regions within the sequence that are susceptible to transitions to alternate structures. We use an approximate numerical method since the calculation of an exact partition function is numerically cumbersome for DNA molecules of lengths longer than hundreds of base pairs. This method yields accurate results in reasonable computational times. We implement algorithms that calculate the competition between transitions to denatured states and to Z-form DNA. We analyze these transitions near the transcription start sites (TSS) of a set of eukaryotic genes. We find an enhancement of Z-forming regions upstream of the TSS and a depletion of denatured regions around the start sites. We confirm that these finding are statistically significant by comparing our results to a set of randomized genes with preserved base composition at each position relative to the gene start sites. When we study the correlation of these transitions in orthologous mouse and human genes we find a clear evolutionary conservation of both types of transitions around the TSS.

  19. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeated DNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  20. A Structurally Variable Hinged Tetrahedron Framework from DNA Origami

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanometer-sized polyhedral wire-frame objects hold a wide range of potential applications both as structural scaffolds as well as a basis for synthetic nanocontainers. The utilization of DNA as basic building blocks for such structures allows the exploitation of bottom-up self-assembly in order to achieve molecular programmability through the pairing of complementary bases. In this work, we report on a hollow but rigid tetrahedron framework of 75 nm strut length constructed with the DNA origami method. Flexible hinges at each of their four joints provide a means for structural variability of the object. Through the opening of gaps along the struts, four variants can be created as confirmed by both gel electrophoresis and direct imaging techniques. The intrinsic site addressability provided by this technique allows the unique targeted attachment of dye and/or linker molecules at any point on the structure's surface, which we prove through the superresolution fluorescence microscopy technique DNA PAINT.

  1. Determination of Hydrogen Bond Structure in Water versus Aprotic Environments To Test the Relationship Between Length and Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigala, Paul A; Ruben, Eliza A; Liu, Corey W; Piccoli, Paula M B; Hohenstein, Edward G; Martínez, Todd J; Schultz, Arthur J; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-05-06

    Hydrogen bonds profoundly influence the architecture and activity of biological macromolecules. Deep appreciation of hydrogen bond contributions to biomolecular function thus requires a detailed understanding of hydrogen bond structure and energetics and the relationship between these properties. Hydrogen bond formation energies (ΔGf) are enormously more favorable in aprotic solvents than in water, and two classes of contributing factors have been proposed to explain this energetic difference, focusing respectively on the isolated and hydrogen-bonded species: (I) water stabilizes the dissociated donor and acceptor groups much better than aprotic solvents, thereby reducing the driving force for hydrogen bond formation; and (II) water lengthens hydrogen bonds compared to aprotic environments, thereby decreasing the potential energy within the hydrogen bond. Each model has been proposed to provide a dominant contribution to ΔGf, but incisive tests that distinguish the importance of these contributions are lacking. Here we directly test the structural basis of model II. Neutron crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and quantum mechanical calculations demonstrate that O-H···O hydrogen bonds in crystals, chloroform, acetone, and water have nearly identical lengths and very similar potential energy surfaces despite ΔGf differences >8 kcal/mol across these solvents. These results rule out a substantial contribution from solvent-dependent differences in hydrogen bond structure and potential energy after association (model II) and thus support the conclusion that differences in hydrogen bond ΔGf are predominantly determined by solvent interactions with the dissociated groups (model I). These findings advance our understanding of universal hydrogen-bonding interactions and have important implications for biology and engineering.

  2. Tunable smart digital structure (SDS) to modularly assemble soft actuators with layered adhesive bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hu; Dong, Erbao; Xu, Min; Xia, Qirong; Liu, Shuai; Li, Weihua; Yang, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Many shape memory alloy (SMA)-based soft actuators have specific composite structures and manufacture processes, and are therefore unique. However, these exclusive characteristics limit their capabilities and applications, so in this article a soft and smart digital structure (SDS) is proposed that acts like a modular unit to assemble soft actuators by a layered adhesive bonding process. The SDS is a fully soft structure that encapsulates a digital skeleton consisting of four groups of parallel and independently actuated SMA wires capable of outputting a four-channel tunable force. The layered adhesive bonding process modularly bonds several SDSs with an elastic backbone to fabricate a layered soft actuator where the elastic backbone is used to recover the SDSs in a cooling process using the SMA wires. Two kinds of SDS-based soft actuators were modularly assembled, an actuator, SDS-I, with a two-dimensional reciprocal motion, and an actuator, SDS-II, capable of bi-directional reciprocal motion. The thermodynamics and phase transformation modeling of the SDS-based actuator were analyzed. Several extensional soft actuators were also assembled by bonding the SDS with an anomalous elastic backbone or modularly assembling the SDS-Is and SDS-IIs. These modularly assembled soft actuators delivered more output channels and a complicated motion, e.g., an actinomorphic soft actuator with four SDS-Is jumps in a series of hierarchical heights and directional movement by tuning the input channels of the SDSs. This result showed that the SDS can modularly assemble multifarious soft actuators with diverse capabilities, steerability and tunable outputs.

  3. Steel-concrete bond model for the simulation of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mang, Chetra

    2015-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structure behavior can be extremely complex in the case of exceeding the cracking threshold. The composite characteristics of reinforced concrete structure should be finely presented especially in the distribution stress zone between steel-concrete at their interface. In order to compute the industrial structures, a perfect relation hypothesis between steel and concrete is supposed in which the complex phenomenon of the two-material relation is not taken into account. On the other hand, this perfect relation is unable to predict the significant disorders, the repartition, and the distribution of the cracks, which is directly linked to the steel. In literature, several numerical methods are proposed in order to finely study the concrete-steel bond behavior, but these methods give many difficulties in computing complex structures in 3D. With the results obtained in the thesis framework of Torre-Casanova (2012), the new concrete-steel bond model has been developed to improve performances (iteration numbers and computational time) and the representation (cyclic behavior) of the initial one. The new model has been verified with analytical solution of steel-concrete tie and validated with the experimental results. The new model is equally tested with the structural scale to compute the shear wall behavior in the French national project (CEOS.fr) under monotonic load. Because of the numerical difficulty in post-processing the crack opening in the complex crack formation, a new crack opening method is also developed. This method consists of using the discontinuity of relative displacement to detect the crack position or using the slip sign change between concrete-steel. The simulation-experiment comparison gives validation of not only the new concrete-steel bond model but also the new crack post-processing method. Finally, the cyclic behavior of the bond law with the non-reduced envelope is adopted and integrated in the new bond model in order to take

  4. Ba3NbAs3O: synthesis, crystal structure, Raman spectroscopy and bonding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monconduit, L.; Tillard, M.; Favier, F.; Belin, C.

    1999-01-01

    The crystal structure of Ba 3 NbAs 3 O has been solved by crystal X-ray analysis (CAD-4 automatic diffractometer, Mo Kα radiation). The compound crystallizes in space group Pnma, a=6.724(2), b=11.100(2), c=13.462(3) A, V=1004.7(4) A 3 , Z=4. The structure has been refined to R1=0.0343 for 964 independent reflections, it can be described as packing of nearly tetrahedral NbAs 3 O 6- anions, their coordination by Ba 2+ cations forming interconnected trigonal prisms. The chemical bonding has been analyzed by MO calculations and Raman spectroscopy. (orig.)

  5. Synthesis, solid-state structure, and bonding analysis of a homoleptic beryllium azide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naglav, Dominik; Tobey, Briac; Lyhs, Benjamin; Roemer, Beate; Blaeser, Dieter; Woelper, Christoph; Jansen, Georg; Schulz, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    [Ph 4 P] 2 [Be(N 3 ) 4 ] (1) and [PNP] 2 [Be(N 3 ) 4 ] (2; PNP=Ph 3 PNPPh 3 ) were synthesized by reacting Be(N 3 ) 2 with [Ph 4 P]N 3 and [PNP]N 3 . Compound 1 represents the first structurally characterized homoleptic beryllium azide. The electronic structure and bonding situation in the tetraazidoberyllate dianion [Be(N 3 ) 4 ] 2- were investigated by quantum-chemical calculations (NPA, ELF, LOL). (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Synthesis, Solid-State Structure, and Bonding Analysis of a Homoleptic Beryllium Azide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naglav, Dominik; Tobey, Briac; Lyhs, Benjamin; Römer, Beate; Bläser, Dieter; Wölper, Christoph; Jansen, Georg; Schulz, Stephan

    2017-07-10

    [Ph 4 P] 2 [Be(N 3 ) 4 ] (1) and [PNP] 2 [Be(N 3 ) 4 ] (2; PNP=Ph 3 PNPPh 3 ) were synthesized by reacting Be(N 3 ) 2 with [Ph 4 P]N 3 and [PNP]N 3 . Compound 1 represents the first structurally characterized homoleptic beryllium azide. The electronic structure and bonding situation in the tetraazidoberyllate dianion [Be(N 3 ) 4 ] 2- were investigated by quantum-chemical calculations (NPA, ELF, LOL). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. 6-Thioguanine alters the structure and stability of duplex DNA and inhibits quadruplex DNA formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marathias, V M; Sawicki, M J; Bolton, P H

    1999-07-15

    The ability to chemically synthesize biomolecules has opened up the opportunity to observe changes in structure and activity that occur upon single atom substitution. In favorable cases this can provide information about the roles of individual atoms. The substitution of 6-thioguanine (6SG) for guanine is a potentially very useful single atom substitution as 6SG has optical, photocrosslinking, metal ion binding and other properties of potential utility. In addition, 6-mercaptopurine is a clinically important pro-drug that is activated by conversion into 6SG by cells. The results presented here indicate that the presence of 6SG blocks the formation of quadruplex DNA. The presence of 6SG alters the structure and lowers the thermal stability of duplex DNA, but duplex DNA can be formed in the presence of 6SG. These results indicate that some of the cytotoxic activity of 6SG may be due to disruption of the quadruplex structures formed by telomere and other DNAs. This additional mode of action is consistent with the delayed onset of cytotoxicity.

  8. Radiation damage to DNA: The importance of track structure

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, M A

    1999-01-01

    A wide variety of biological effects are induced by ionizing radiation, from cell death to mutations and carcinogenesis. The biological effectiveness is found to vary not only with the absorbed dose but also with the type of radiation and its energy, i.e., with the nature of radiation tracks. An overview is presented of some of the biological experiments using different qualities of radiation, which when compared with Monte Carlo track structure studies, have highlighted the importance of the localized spatial properties of stochastic energy deposition on the nanometer scale at or near DNA. The track structure leads to clustering of damage which may include DNA breaks, base damage etc., the complexity of the cluster and therefore its biological repairability varying with radiation type. The ability of individual tracks to produce clustered damage, and the subsequent biological response are important in the assessment of the risk associated with low-level human exposure. Recent experiments have also shown that...

  9. Effect of chemisorption structure on the interfacial bonding characteristics of graphene-polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Cheng; Xue Qingzhong; Xia Dan; Ma Ming

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the chemical functionalization of graphene on the interfacial bonding characteristics between graphene and polymer was investigated using molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations. In this study, three chemical functionalization, (a) phenyl groups, (b) -C 6 H 13 and(c) -C 2 H 4 (C 2 H 5 ) 2 , which have the same number of carbon atoms, were chosen to investigate the influence of the structure of functionalized groups on the bonding energy and shear stress in the graphene-polyethylene (PE) composites. Our simulations indicated that, the interfacial bonding energy between the graphene modified by -C 6 H 13 groups and PE matrix has the strongest enhancement, but the shear force between the graphene modified by -C 2 H 4 (C 2 H 5 ) 2 groups and PE matrix is the strongest in the graphene-polymer composites. Therefore, the suitable structure of chemical groups to the graphene surface may be an effective way to significantly improve the load transfer between the graphene and polymer when graphene is used to produce nanocomposites.

  10. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  11. Non-destructive testing of bonded structures for plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Nuclear Systems Engineering Department, Konan 2-16-5, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8215 (Japan)]. E-mail: masanori_onozuka@mhi.co.jp; Kikuchi, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Nuclear Systems Engineering Department, Konan 2-16-5, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8215 (Japan); Kirihigashi, A. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Nuclear Systems Engineering Department, Konan 2-16-5, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8215 (Japan); Oda, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Nuclear Systems Engineering Department, Konan 2-16-5, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8215 (Japan); Shimizu, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Nuclear Systems Engineering Department, Konan 2-16-5, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8215 (Japan)

    2005-11-15

    A preliminary investigation has been conducted to examine the applicability of the ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection technique for bonded structures in plasma facing components. In this study, existing UT probes have been used. Three test samples to simulate the blanket first-wall panel were fabricated. Artificial defects were applied along the diffusively bonded interfaces of the samples. Three types of UT probes have been tested. A vertical UT probe with 10 MHz, and a phased-array UT probe with 5 MHz, were used to detect defects between the Cu-alloy plates, and between the Cu-alloy plate and the stainless-steel (SS) block. The test results show that defects as small as 2 mm in size could be detected at a signal versus noise (S/N) ratio of more than 2. To detect defects along the SS pipes, a beam-focused-type UT probe with 20 MHz, has been applied. It was found that defects as small as 1 mm were identified at an S/N ratio of more than 2. While the results of the tested techniques were good, optimization of the probe systems is required before it can be concluded that such methods are most applicable for use on the bonded structures.

  12. Electronic structure and chemical bonding in LaIrSi-type intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matar, Samir F. [Bordeaux Univ., Pessac (France). CNRS; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie; Nakhl, Michel [Univ. Libanaise, Fanar (Lebanon). Ecole Doctorale Sciences et Technologies

    2017-05-01

    The cubic LaIrSi type has 23 representatives in aluminides, gallides, silicides, germanides, phosphides, and arsenides, all with a valence electron count of 16 or 17. The striking structural motif is a three-dimensional network of the transition metal (T) and p element (X) atoms with TX{sub 3/3} respectively XT{sub 3/3} coordination. Alkaline earth or rare earth atoms fill cavities within the polyanionic [TX]{sup δ-} networks. The present work presents a detailed theoretical study of chemical bonding in LaIrSi-type representatives, exemplarily for CaPtSi, BaIrP, BaAuGa, LaIrSi, CeRhSi, and CeIrSi. DFT-GGA-based electronic structure calculations show weakly metallic compounds with itinerant small magnitude DOSs at E{sub F} except for CeRhSi whose large Ce DOS at E{sub F} leads to a finite magnetization on Ce (0.73 μ{sub B}) and induced small moments of opposite sign on Rh and Si in a ferromagnetic ground state. The chemical bonding analyses show dominant bonding within the [TX]{sup δ-} polyanionic networks. Charge transfer magnitudes were found in accordance with the course of the electronegativites of the chemical constituents.

  13. Bond particle model for semiconductor melts and its application to liquid structure germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrante, A.; Tosi, M.P.

    1988-08-01

    A simple type of liquid state model is proposed to describe on a primitive level the melt of an elemental group IV semiconductor as a mixture of atoms and bond particles. The latter, on increase of a coupling strength parameter becomes increasingly localized between pairs of atoms up to local tetrahedral coordination of atoms by bond particles. Angular interatomic correlations are built into the model as bond particle localization grows, even though the bare interactions between the components of the liquid are formally described solely in terms of central pair potentials. The model is solved for liquid structure by standard integral equation techniques of liquid state theory and by Monte Carlo simulation, for values of the parameters which are appropriate to liquid germanium down to strongly supercooled states. The calculated liquid structure is compared with the results of diffraction experiments on liquid germanium near freezing and discussed in relation to diffraction data on amorphous germanium. The model suggests simple melting criteria for elemental and polar semiconductors, which are empirically verified. (author). 25 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs

  14. Correlation between protein secondary structure, backbone bond angles, and side-chain orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Martin; Niemi, Antti J.

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the fine structure of the sp3 hybridized covalent bond geometry that governs the tetrahedral architecture around the central Cα carbon of a protein backbone, and for this we develop new visualization techniques to analyze high-resolution x-ray structures in the Protein Data Bank. We observe that there is a correlation between the deformations of the ideal tetrahedral symmetry and the local secondary structure of the protein. We propose a universal coarse-grained energy function to describe the ensuing side-chain geometry in terms of the Cβ carbon orientations. The energy function can model the side-chain geometry with a subatomic precision. As an example we construct the Cα-Cβ structure of HP35 chicken villin headpiece. We obtain a configuration that deviates less than 0.4 Å in root-mean-square distance from the experimental x-ray structure.

  15. Spectroscopic Tools for Quantitative Studies of DNA Structure and Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preus, Søren

    The main objective of this thesis is to develop quantitative fluorescence-based, spectroscopic tools for probing the 3D structure and dynamics of DNA and RNA. The thesis is founded on six peer-reviewed papers covering mainly the development, characterization and use of fluorescent nucleobase...... analogues. In addition, four software packages is presented for the simulation and quantitative analysis of time-resolved and steady-state UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence experiments....

  16. Electric field gradient and electronic structure of linear-bonded halide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, D.E.; Guenzburger, D.J.R.; Jansen, H.B.

    1983-01-01

    The importance of covalent metal-ligand interactions in determining hyperfine fields and energy-level structure of MX 2 linear-bonded halide compounds has been studied, using the self-consistent local density molecular orbital approach. Results for FeCl 2 , FeBr 2 and EuCl 2 obtained using the Discrete Variational Method with numerical basis sets are presented. The high spin configuration for the iron compounds, first predicted by Berkowitz, et al., is verified; a successful comparison with gas phase photoelectron spectra is made. Variation of the predicted electric field gradient with bond length R is found to be rapid; the need for an EXAFS measurement of R for the matrix isolated species and experimental determination of the spin of the EFG is seen to be crucial for more accurate determinations of the sub(57) Fe quadrupole moment. (Author) [pt

  17. Probing the Structure of DNA Aptamers with a Classic Heterocycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Reid Bishop

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA aptamers are synthetic, single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides selectedby SELEX methods for their binding with specific ligands. Here we present ethidiumbinding results for three related DNA aptamers (PDB code: 1OLD, 1DB6, and 2ARGthat bind L-argininamide (L-Arm. The ligand bound form of each aptamer's structurehas been reported and each are found to be composed primarily of two domainsconsisting of a stem helical region and a loop domain that forms a binding pocket for thecognate ligand. Previous thermodynamic experiments demonstrated that the DNAaptamer 1OLD undergoes a large conformational ordering upon binding to L-Arm. Herewe extend those linkage binding studies by examining the binding of the heterocyclicintercalator ethidium to each of the three aptamers by fluorescence and absorptionspectrophotometric titrations. Our results reveal that ethidium binds to each aptamer with∆Go's in the range of -8.7 to -9.4 kcal/mol. The stoichiometry of binding is 2:1 for eachaptamer and is quantitatively diminished in the presence of L-Arm as is the overallfluorescence intensity of ethidium. Together, these results demonstrate that a portion ofthe bound ethidium is excluded from the aptamer in the presence of a saturating amountof L-Arm. These results demonstrate the utility of ethidium and related compounds forthe probing of non-conventional DNA structures and reveal an interesting fundamentalthermodynamic linkage in DNA aptamers. Results are discussed in the context of thethermodynamic stability and structure of each of the aptamers examined.

  18. Detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in diffusion bonding of steel hollow structural components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Laboratoire de Mecanique des Contacts et des Structures (LaMCoS), INSA Lyon, 20 Avenue des Sciences, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Li, H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Li, M.Q., E-mail: zc9997242256@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Graphical abstract: This study focused on the detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in diffusion bonding of steel hollow structural component. A special surface with regular patterns was processed to be joined so as to observe the extent of surface asperity deformation under different applied bonding pressures. Fracture surface characteristic combined with surface roughness profiles distinctly revealed the enhanced surface asperity deformation as the applied pressure increases. The influence of surface asperity deformation mechanism on joint formation was analyzed: (a) surface asperity deformation not only directly expanded the interfacial contact areas, but also released deformation heat and caused defects, indirectly accelerating atomic diffusion, then benefits to void shrinkage; (b) surface asperity deformation readily introduced stored energy difference between two opposite sides of interface grain boundary, resulting in strain induced interface grain boundary migration. In addition, the influence of void on interface grain boundary migration was analyzed in detail. - Highlights: • A high quality hollow structural component has been fabricated by diffusion bonding. • Surface asperity deformation not only expands the interfacial contact areas, but also causes deformation heat and defects to improve the atomic diffusion. • Surface asperity deformation introduces the stored energy difference between the two opposite sides of interface grain boundary, leading to strain induced interface grain boundary migration. • The void exerts a dragging force on the interface grain boundary to retard or stop interface grain boundary migration. - Abstract: This study focused on the detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in similar diffusion bonding as well as on the fabrication of high quality martensitic stainless steel hollow structural components. A special surface with regular patterns was processed to be joined so as to

  19. Influence of thermodynamically unfavorable secondary structures on DNA hybridization kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Hiroaki; Kitajima, Tetsuro

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Nucleic acid secondary structure plays an important role in nucleic acid–nucleic acid recognition/hybridization processes, and is also a vital consideration in DNA nanotechnology. Although the influence of stable secondary structures on hybridization kinetics has been characterized, unstable secondary structures, which show positive ΔG° with self-folding, can also form, and their effects have not been systematically investigated. Such thermodynamically unfavorable secondary structures should not be ignored in DNA hybridization kinetics, especially under isothermal conditions. Here, we report that positive ΔG° secondary structures can change the hybridization rate by two-orders of magnitude, despite the fact that their hybridization obeyed second-order reaction kinetics. The temperature dependence of hybridization rates showed non-Arrhenius behavior; thus, their hybridization is considered to be nucleation limited. We derived a model describing how ΔG° positive secondary structures affect hybridization kinetics in stopped-flow experiments with 47 pairs of oligonucleotides. The calculated hybridization rates, which were based on the model, quantitatively agreed with the experimental rate constant. PMID:29220504

  20. General method of preparation of uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled DNA fragments for NMR analysis of DNA structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rene, Brigitte; Masliah, Gregoire; Zargarian, Loussine; Mauffret, Olivier; Fermandjian, Serge

    2006-01-01

    Summary 13 C, 15 N labeling of biomolecules allows easier assignments of NMR resonances and provides a larger number of NMR parameters, which greatly improves the quality of DNA structures. However, there is no general DNA-labeling procedure, like those employed for proteins and RNAs. Here, we describe a general and widely applicable approach designed for preparation of isotopically labeled DNA fragments that can be used for NMR studies. The procedure is based on the PCR amplification of oligonucleotides in the presence of labeled deoxynucleotides triphosphates. It allows great flexibility thanks to insertion of a short DNA sequence (linker) between two repeats of DNA sequence to study. Size and sequence of the linker are designed as to create restriction sites at the junctions with DNA of interest. DNA duplex with desired sequence and size is released upon enzymatic digestion of the PCR product. The suitability of the procedure is validated through the preparation of two biological relevant DNA fragments

  1. Bond dimension witnesses and the structure of homogeneous matrix product states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Navascues

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available For the past twenty years, Matrix Product States (MPS have been widely used in solid state physics to approximate the ground state of one-dimensional spin chains. In this paper, we study homogeneous MPS (hMPS, or MPS constructed via site-independent tensors and a boundary condition. Exploiting a connection with the theory of matrix algebras, we derive two structural properties shared by all hMPS, namely: a there exist local operators which annihilate all hMPS of a given bond dimension; and b there exist local operators which, when applied over any hMPS of a given bond dimension, decouple (cut the particles where they act from the spin chain while at the same time join (glue the two loose ends back again into a hMPS. Armed with these tools, we show how to systematically derive `bond dimension witnesses', or 2-local operators whose expectation value allows us to lower bound the bond dimension of the underlying hMPS. We extend some of these results to the ansatz of Projected Entangled Pairs States (PEPS. As a bonus, we use our insight on the structure of hMPS to: a derive some theoretical limitations on the use of hMPS and hPEPS for ground state energy computations; b show how to decrease the complexity and boost the speed of convergence of the semidefinite programming hierarchies described in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 020501 (2015] for the characterization of finite-dimensional quantum correlations.

  2. Structure of s - p bonded metal clusters with 8, 20 and 40 valence electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.

    1992-10-01

    From studies on some clusters of metals and semiconductors, there appear some similarities in the structure of clusters with a given number of atoms and having the number of valence electrons corresponding to a shell closing. Here we present results of the atomic and electronic structure of a few other clusters with 20 and 40 valence electrons, namely Sb 4 , Sn 5 and Sb 8 using the density functional molecular dynamics method. We suggest that the similarities in the structure and deviation from them may help to understand bonding characteristics in clusters and its evolution to bulk behaviour. Our results on Sb 8 cluster are preliminary but indicate that above room temperature its structure is two weakly interacting tetrahedra which is in general agreement with the observation of predominently antimony tetramers at T > 300 K. (author). 16 refs, 2 figs

  3. Reconstruction of the spatial dependence of dielectric and geometrical properties of adhesively bonded structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, C; Hayward, D; Mulholland, A J; McKee, S; Pethrick, R A

    2005-01-01

    An inverse problem motivated by the nondestructive testing of adhesively bonded structures used in the aircraft industry is studied. Using transmission line theory, a model is developed which, when supplied with electrical and geometrical parameters, accurately predicts the reflection coefficient associated with such structures. Particular attention is paid to modelling the connection between the structures and the equipment used to measure the reflection coefficient. The inverse problem is then studied and an optimization approach employed to recover these electrical and geometrical parameters from experimentally obtained data. In particular the approach focuses on the recovery of spatially varying geometrical parameters as this is paramount to the successful reconstruction of electrical parameters. Reconstructions of structure geometry using this method are found to be in close agreement with experimental observations

  4. Chromatin structure influence the sensitivity of DNA to ionizing radiation induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin acts as a natural hindrance in DNA-damage recognition, repair and recovery. Histone and their variants undergo differential post-translational modification(s) and regulate chromatin structure to facilitate DNA damage response (DDR). During the presentation we will discuss the importance of chromatin organization and histone modification(s) during IR-induced DNA damage response in human liver cells. Our data shows G1-phase specific decrease of H3 serine10 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage is coupled with chromatin compaction in repair phase of DDR. The loss of H3Ser10P during DNA damage shows an inverse correlation with gain of γH2AX from a same mono-nucleosome in a dose-dependent manner. The loss of H3Ser10P is a universal phenomenon as it is independent of origin of cell lines and nature of genotoxic agents in G1 phase cells. The reversible reduction of H3Ser10P is mediated by opposing activities of phosphatase, MKP1 and kinase, MSK1 of the MAP kinase pathway. The present study suggests distinct reversible histone marks are associated with G1-phase of cell cycle and plays a critical role in chromatin organization which may facilitate differential sensitivity against radiation. Thus, the study raises the possibility of combinatorial modulation of H3Ser10P and histone acetylation with specific inhibitors to target the radio-resistant cancer cells in G1-phase and thus may serve as promising targets for cancer therapy. (author)

  5. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Chemical-Bonding Analysis of BaZn(NCN2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex J. Corkett

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The ternary carbodiimide BaZn(NCN2 was prepared by a solid-state metathesis reaction between BaF2, ZnF2, and Li2NCN in a 1:1:2 molar ratio, and its crystal structure was determined from Rietveld refinement of X-ray data. BaZn(NCN2 represents the aristotype of the LiBa2Al(NCN4 structure which is unique to carbodiimide/cyanamide chemistry and is well regarded as being constructed from ZnN4 tetrahedra, sharing edges and vertices through NCN2− units to form corrugated layers with Ba2+ in the interlayer voids. Structural anomalies in the shape of the cyanamide units are addressed via IR spectrometry and DFT calculations, which suggest the presence of slightly bent N=C=N2− carbodiimide units with C2v symmetry. Moreover, chemical-bonding analysis within the framework of crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP reveals striking similarities between the bonding interactions in BaZn(NCN2 and SrZn(NCN2 despite their contrasting crystal structures. BaZn(NCN2 is only the second example of a ternary post-transition metal carbodiimide, and its realization paves the way for the preparation of analogues featuring divalent transition metals at the tetrahedral Zn2+ site.

  6. Thermographic inspection of bond defects in Fiber Reinforced Polymer applied to masonry structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, N.; Aiello, M. A.; Capozzoli, L.; Vasanelli, E.

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays, externally bonded Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) are extensively used for strengthening and repairing masonry and reinforced concrete existing structures; they have had a rapid spread in the area of rehabilitation for their many advantages over other conventional repair systems, such as lightweight, excellent corrosion and fatigue resistance, high strength, etc. FRP systems applied to masonry or concrete structures are typically installed using a wet-layup technique.The method is susceptible to cause flaws or defects in the bond between the FRP system and the substrate, which may reduce the effectiveness of the reinforcing systems and the correct transfer of load from the structure to the composite. Thus it is of primary importance to detect the presence of defects and to quantify their extension in order to eventually provide correct repair measurements. The IR thermography has been cited by the several guidelines as a good mean to qualitatively evaluate the presence of installation defects and to monitor the reinforcing system with time.The method is non-destructive and does not require contact with the composite or other means except air to detect the reinforcement. Some works in the literature have been published on this topic. Most of the researches aim at using the IR thermography technique to characterize quantitatively the defects in terms of depth, extension and type in order to have an experimental database on defect typology to evaluate the long term performances of the reinforcing system. Nevertheless, most of the works in the literature concerns with FRP applied to concrete structures without considering the case of masonry structures. In the present research artificial bond defects between FRP and the masonry substrate have been reproduced in laboratory and the IR multi temporal thermography technique has been used to detect them. Thermographic analysis has been carried out on two wall samples having limited dimensions (100 x 70 cm) both

  7. Towards Rational Design Method for Strengthening of Concrete Structures by External Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furuuchi H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many infrastructures need to be repaired or strengthened due to various reasons, such as unexpected deterioration and changes in performance requirement. This paper presents the following recent achievements by the authors’ group on design method for flexural strengthening of concrete structures by external bonding; (i fracture characteristics of interface between substrate concrete and cementitious overlay, (ii crack spacing of flexural strengthened beams, which affects debonding strength, (iii strengths of intermediate crack (IC debonding and end peeling, (iv strength of concrete cover separation, and (v effectiveness of strengthening by external bonding. A unified approach for flexural strengthening by steel plate, fiber reinforced polymer lami¬nate and cementitious overlay, for both intermediate crack (IC debonding, including end peeling, and concrete cover separation is pre¬sented with consideration of crack spacing in the streng¬thened members. Appropriate interfacial rough¬¬¬ness to achieve efficient interface bond property is clari¬fied and the concept of effectiveness of strengthen¬ing is proposed for better strengthening design.

  8. Formation of III–V-on-insulator structures on Si by direct wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Masafumi; Iida, Ryo; Ikku, Yuki; Kim, Sanghyeon; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi; Takagi, Hideki; Yasuda, Tetsuji; Yamada, Hisashi; Ichikawa, Osamu; Fukuhara, Noboru; Hata, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the formation of III–V-compound-semiconductors-on-insulator (III–V-OI) structures with thin buried oxide (BOX) layers on Si wafers by using developed direct wafer bonding (DWB). In order to realize III–V-OI MOSFETs with ultrathin body and extremely thin body (ETB) InGaAs-OI channel layers and ultrathin BOX layers, we have developed an electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) O 2 plasma-assisted DWB process with ECR sputtered SiO 2 BOX layers and a DWB process based on atomic-layer-deposition Al 2 O 3 (ALD-Al 2 O 3 ) BOX layers. It is essential to suppress micro-void generation during wafer bonding process to achieve excellent wafer bonding. We have found that major causes of micro-void generation in DWB processes with ECR-SiO 2 and ALD-Al 2 O 3 BOX layers are desorption of Ar and H 2 O gas, respectively. In order to suppress micro-void generation in the ECR-SiO 2 BOX layers, it is effective to introduce the outgas process before bonding wafers. On the other hand, it is a possible solution for suppressing micro-void generation in the ALD-Al 2 O 3 BOX layers to increase the deposition temperature of the ALD-Al 2 O 3 BOX layers. It is also another possible solution to deposit ALD-Al 2 O 3 BOX layers on thermally oxidized SiO 2 layers, which can absorb the desorption gas from ALD-Al 2 O 3 BOX layers. (invited paper)

  9. Non-B DNA Secondary Structures and Their Resolution by RecQ Helicases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the canonical B-form structure first described by Watson and Crick, DNA can adopt a number of alternative structures. These non-B-form DNA secondary structures form spontaneously on tracts of repeat sequences that are abundant in genomes. In addition, structured forms of DNA with intrastrand pairing may arise on single-stranded DNA produced transiently during various cellular processes. Such secondary structures have a range of biological functions but also induce genetic instability. Increasing evidence suggests that genomic instabilities induced by non-B DNA secondary structures result in predisposition to diseases. Secondary DNA structures also represent a new class of molecular targets for DNA-interactive compounds that might be useful for targeting telomeres and transcriptional control. The equilibrium between the duplex DNA and formation of multistranded non-B-form structures is partly dependent upon the helicases that unwind (resolve these alternate DNA structures. With special focus on tetraplex, triplex, and cruciform, this paper summarizes the incidence of non-B DNA structures and their association with genomic instability and emphasizes the roles of RecQ-like DNA helicases in genome maintenance by resolution of DNA secondary structures. In future, RecQ helicases are anticipated to be additional molecular targets for cancer chemotherapeutics.

  10. Crystal structure of metallo DNA duplex containing consecutive Watson-Crick-like T-Hg(II)-T base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Jiro; Yamada, Tom; Hirose, Chika; Okamoto, Itaru; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Ono, Akira

    2014-02-24

    The metallo DNA duplex containing mercury-mediated T-T base pairs is an attractive biomacromolecular nanomaterial which can be applied to nanodevices such as ion sensors. Reported herein is the first crystal structure of a B-form DNA duplex containing two consecutive T-Hg(II)-T base pairs. The Hg(II) ion occupies the center between two T residues. The N3-Hg(II) bond distance is 2.0 Å. The relatively short Hg(II)-Hg(II) distance (3.3 Å) observed in consecutive T-Hg(II)-T base pairs suggests that the metallophilic attraction could exist between them and may stabilize the B-form double helix. To support this, the DNA duplex is largely distorted and adopts an unusual nonhelical conformation in the absence of Hg(II). The structure of the metallo DNA duplex itself and the Hg(II)-induced structural switching from the nonhelical form to the B-form provide the basis for structure-based design of metal-conjugated nucleic acid nanomaterials. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Hydrogen-bonded structure in highly concentrated aqueous LiBr solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imano, Masahiro; Kameda, Yasuo; Usuki, Takeshi; Uemura, Osamu

    2001-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements were carried out for H/D isotopically substituted aqueous 10, 25 and 33 mol% LiBr solutions in order to obtain structural information on the intermolecular hydrogen bonds among water molecules in highly concentrated aqueous solutions. Observed scattering cross sections for D 2 O (99.9 % D), 0 H 2 O(35.9 % D) and 0-2 H 2 O(68.0 % D) solutions were combined to deduce partial structure factors, a HH (Q), a XH (Q) and a XX (Q) (X: O, Br and Li). The least squares fitting analysis was applied to the observed partial structure factors to determine the nearest neighbor interatomic distance, root-mean-square amplitude and coordination number. Intermolecular distances, r OH =1.91(1) A, r HH =2.38(1) A and r OO =3.02(1) A, between the nearest neighbor water molecules, were obtained for the 10 mol% LiBr solution. On the other hand, the intermolecular O···H interaction was found to almost disappear in concentrated 25 and 33 mol% LiBr solutions. The result implies that the hydrogen-bonded network is completely broken in highly concentrated aqueous LiBr solutions. (author)

  12. Nonuniform Internal Structure of Fibrin Fibers: Protein Density and Bond Density Strongly Decrease with Increasing Diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The major structural component of a blood clot is a meshwork of fibrin fibers. It has long been thought that the internal structure of fibrin fibers is homogeneous; that is, the protein density and the bond density between protofibrils are uniform and do not depend on fiber diameter. We performed experiments to investigate the internal structure of fibrin fibers. We formed fibrin fibers with fluorescently labeled fibrinogen and determined the light intensity of a fiber, I, as a function of fiber diameter, D. The intensity and, thus, the total number of fibrin molecules in a cross-section scaled as D1.4. This means that the protein density (fibrin per cross-sectional area, ρp, is not homogeneous but instead strongly decreases with fiber diameter as D-0.6. Thinner fibers are denser than thicker fibers. We also determined Young’s modulus, Y, as a function of fiber diameter. Y decreased strongly with increasing D; Y scaled as D-1.5. This implies that the bond density, ρb, also scales as D-1.5. Thinner fibers are stiffer than thicker fibers. Our data suggest that fibrin fibers have a dense, well-connected core and a sparse, loosely connected periphery. In contrast, electrospun fibrinogen fibers, used as a control, have a homogeneous cross-section.

  13. Precession technique and electron diffractometry as new tools for crystal structure analysis and chemical bonding determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avilov, A.; Kuligin, K.; Nicolopoulos, S.; Nickolskiy, M.; Boulahya, K.; Portillo, J.; Lepeshov, G.; Sobolev, B.; Collette, J.P.; Martin, N.; Robins, A.C.; Fischione, P.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a new fast electron diffractometer working with high dynamic range and linearity for crystal structure determinations. Electron diffraction (ED) patterns can be scanned serially in front of a Faraday cage detector; the total measurement time for several hundred ED reflections can be tens of seconds having high statistical accuracy for all measured intensities (1-2%). This new tool can be installed to any type of TEM without any column modification and is linked to a specially developed electron beam precession 'Spinning Star' system. Precession of the electron beam (Vincent-Midgley technique) reduces dynamical effects allowing also use of accurate intensities for crystal structure analysis. We describe the technical characteristics of this new tool together with the first experimental results. Accurate measurement of electron diffraction intensities by electron diffractometer opens new possibilities not only for revealing unknown structures, but also for electrostatic potential determination and chemical bonding investigation. As an example, we present detailed atomic bonding information of CaF 2 as revealed for the first time by precise electron diffractometry

  14. Effect of pH on the Structure and DNA Binding of the FOXP2 Forkhead Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blane, Ashleigh; Fanucchi, Sylvia

    2015-06-30

    Forkhead box P2 (FOXP2) is a transcription factor expressed in cardiovascular, intestinal, and neural tissues during embryonic development and is implicated in language development. FOXP2 like other FOX proteins contains a DNA binding domain known as the forkhead domain (FHD). The FHD interacts with DNA by inserting helix 3 into the major groove. One of these DNA-protein interactions is a direct hydrogen bond that is formed with His554. FOXP2 is localized in the nuclear compartment that has a pH of 7.5. Histidine contains an imidazole side chain in which the amino group typically has a pKa of ~6.5. It seems possible that pH fluctuations around 6.5 may result in changes in the protonation state of His554 and thus the ability of the FOXP2 FHD to bind DNA. To investigate the effect of pH on the FHD, both the structure and the binding affinity were studied in the pH range of 5-9. This was done in the presence and absence of DNA. The structure was assessed using size exclusion chromatography, far-UV circular dichroism, and intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence. The results indicated that while pH did not affect the secondary structure in the presence or absence of DNA, the tertiary structure was pH sensitive and the protein was less compact at low pH. Furthermore, the presence of DNA caused the protein to become more compact at low pH and also had the potential to increase the dimerization propensity. Fluorescence anisotropy was used to investigate the effect of pH on the FOXP2 FHD DNA binding affinity. It was found that pH had a direct effect on binding affinity. This was attributed to the altered hydrogen bonding patterns upon protonation or deprotonation of His554. These results could implicate pH as a means of regulating transcription by the FOXP2 FHD, which may also have repercussions for the behavior of this protein in cancer cells.

  15. Agarose Gel Electrophoresis Reveals Structural Fluidity of a Phage T3 DNA Packaging Intermediate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serwer, Philip; Wright, Elena T.

    2012-01-01

    We find a new aspect of DNA packaging-associated structural fluidity for phage T3 capsids. The procedure is (1) glutaraldehyde cross-linking of in vivo DNA packaging intermediates for stabilization of structure and then (2) determining of effective radius by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis (2d-AGE). The intermediates are capsids with incompletely packaged DNA (ipDNA) and without an external DNA segment; these intermediates are called ipDNA-capsids. We initially increase production of ipDNA-capsids by raising NaCl concentration during in vivo DNA packaging. By 2d-AGE, we find a new state of contracted shell for some particles of one previously identified ipDNA-capsid. The contracted shell-state is found when ipDNA length/mature DNA length (F) is above 0.17, but not at lower F. Some contracted-shell ipDNA-capsids have the phage tail; others do not. The contracted-shell ipDNA-capsids are explained by premature DNA maturation cleavage that makes accessible a contracted-shell intermediate of a cycle of the T3 DNA packaging motor. The analysis of ipDNA-capsids, rather than intermediates with uncleaved DNA, provides a simplifying strategy for a complete biochemical analysis of in vivo DNA packaging. PMID:22222979

  16. Agarose gel electrophoresis reveals structural fluidity of a phage T3 DNA packaging intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serwer, Philip; Wright, Elena T

    2012-01-01

    We find a new aspect of DNA packaging-associated structural fluidity for phage T3 capsids. The procedure is (i) glutaraldehyde cross-linking of in vivo DNA packaging intermediates for the stabilization of structure and then (ii) determining effective radius by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis (2D-AGE). The intermediates are capsids with incompletely packaged DNA (ipDNA) and without an external DNA segment; these intermediates are called ipDNA-capsids. We initially increase the production of ipDNA-capsids by raising NaCl concentration during in vivo DNA packaging. By 2D-AGE, we find a new state of contracted shell for some particles of one previously identified ipDNA-capsid. The contracted shell-state is found when the ipDNA length/mature DNA length (F) is above 0.17, but not at lower F. Some contracted-shell ipDNA-capsids have the phage tail; others do not. The contracted-shell ipDNA-capsids are explained by premature DNA maturation cleavage that makes accessible a contracted-shell intermediate of a cycle of the T3 DNA packaging motor. The analysis of ipDNA-capsids, rather than intermediates with uncleaved DNA, provides a simplifying strategy for a complete biochemical analysis of in vivo DNA packaging. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Luminescent lanthanide complexes with 4-acetamidobenzoate: Synthesis, supramolecular assembly via hydrogen bonds, crystal structures and photoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Xia; Fan Jun; Wang Zhihong; Zheng Shengrun; Tan Jingbo; Zhang Weiguang

    2011-01-01

    Four new luminescent complexes, namely, [Eu(aba) 2 (NO 3 )(C 2 H 5 OH) 2 ] (1), [Eu(aba) 3 (H 2 O) 2 ].0.5 (4, 4'-bpy).2H 2 O (2), [Eu 2 (aba) 4 (2, 2'-bpy) 2 (NO 3 ) 2 ].4H 2 O (3) and [Tb 2 (aba) 4 (phen) 2 (NO 3 ) 2 ].2C 2 H 5 OH (4) were obtained by treating Ln(NO 3 ) 3 .6H 2 O and 4-acetamidobenzoic acid (Haba) with different coligands (4, 4'-bpy=4, 4'-bipyridine, 2, 2'-bpy=2, 2'-bipyridine, and phen=1, 10-phenanthroline). They exhibit 1D chains (1-2) and dimeric structures (3-4), respectively. This structural variation is mainly attributed to the change of coligands and various coordination modes of aba molecules. Moreover, the coordination units are further connected via hydrogen bonds to form 2D even 3D supramolecular networks. These complexes show characteristic emissions in the visible region at room temperature. In addition, thermal behaviors of four complexes have been investigated under air atmosphere. The relationship between the structures and physical properties has been discussed. - Graphical abstract: Structure variation of four complexes is attributed to the change of coligands and various coordination modes of aba molecules. Moreover, they show characteristic emissions in the visible region. Highlights: → Auxiliary ligands have played the crucial roles on the structures of the resulting complexes. → Isolated structure units are further assembled via H-bonds to form supramolecular networks. → These solid-state complexes exhibit strong, characteristic emissions in the visible region.

  18. Crystal and molecular structures of sixteen charge-assisted hydrogen bond-mediated diisopropylammonium salts from different carboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhihao; Hu, Kaikai; Jin, Shouwen; Ding, Aihua; Wang, Yining; Dong, Lingfeng; Gao, Xingjun; Wang, Daqi

    2017-10-01

    salts were also reported. And their structural and supramolecular aspects are fully analyzed. The result reveals that among the sixteen investigated crystals the NH groups in the diisopropylamine are protonated when the carboxylic acids are deprotonated, and the crystal packing is interpreted in terms of the strong charge-assisted Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond formation between the ammonium and the deprotonated COOH groups. Except the Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond, the Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) were also found at the salts 6, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, and 16. Further analysis of the crystal packing of the salts indicated that a different family of additional CHsbnd O/CH2sbnd O/CH3sbnd O, CH-π/CH3-π, CH3-Cπ, N-π, and π-π associations contribute to the stabilization and expansion of the total structures. For the coexistence of the various weak interactions these structures adopted homo or hetero supramolecular synthons or both.

  19. Effects of Piezoelectric (PZT) Sensor Bonding and the Characteristics of the Host Structure on Impedance Based Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalloh, Abdul

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of certain factors on the impedance signal in structural health monitoring. These factors were: the quality of the bond between the sensor and the host structure, and the characteristics of the host structure, such as geometry, mass, and material properties. This work was carried out to answer a set of questions, related to these factors, that were developed by the project team. The project team was comprised of Dr. Doug Ramers and Dr. Abdul Jalloh of the Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, Mr. Arnaldo Colon- Perez, a student intern from the University of Puerto Rico of Turabo, and Mr. John Lassiter and Mr. Bob Engberg of the Structural and Dynamics Test Group at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This study was based on a review of the literature on structural health monitoring to investigate the factors referred to above because there was not enough time to plan and conduct the appropriate tests at MSFC during the tenure of the Summer Faculty Fellowship Program project members. The surveyed literature documents works on structural health monitoring that were based on laboratory tests that were conducted using bolted trusses and other civil engineering type structures for the most part. These are not the typical types of structures used in designing and building NASA s space vehicles and systems. It was therefore recommended that tests be conducted using NASA type structures, such as pressure vessels, to validate the observations made in this report.

  20. Cations form sequence selective motifs within DNA grooves via a combination of cation-pi and ion-dipole/hydrogen bond interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mikaela; Dunlap, Tori; Dourlain, Elizabeth; Grant, Bryce; McFail-Isom, Lori

    2013-01-01

    The fine conformational subtleties of DNA structure modulate many fundamental cellular processes including gene activation/repression, cellular division, and DNA repair. Most of these cellular processes rely on the conformational heterogeneity of specific DNA sequences. Factors including those structural characteristics inherent in the particular base sequence as well as those induced through interaction with solvent components combine to produce fine DNA structural variation including helical flexibility and conformation. Cation-pi interactions between solvent cations or their first hydration shell waters and the faces of DNA bases form sequence selectively and contribute to DNA structural heterogeneity. In this paper, we detect and characterize the binding patterns found in cation-pi interactions between solvent cations and DNA bases in a set of high resolution x-ray crystal structures. Specifically, we found that monovalent cations (Tl⁺) and the polarized first hydration shell waters of divalent cations (Mg²⁺, Ca²⁺) form cation-pi interactions with DNA bases stabilizing unstacked conformations. When these cation-pi interactions are combined with electrostatic interactions a pattern of specific binding motifs is formed within the grooves.

  1. Crystal structure and chemical bonding analysis of BaPtCd{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulo, Fakhili [Department of Chemical Education, Sriwijaya University, Inderalaya 30662, South Sumatra (Indonesia); Koehler, Juergen [Max Planck Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    The new ternary intermetallic phase, BaPtCd{sub 2}, was synthesized by solid-state reaction from direct combination of the elements in a stoichiometric mixture. The reaction was done at 850 C for 15 h, followed by an equilibration at 600 C for 4 d. The crystal structure was determined by X-ray diffraction method on a single crystal. BaPtCd{sub 2} is isotypic to MgCuAl{sub 2} and crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Cmcm [a = 4.467(2), b = 11.143(4), c = 8.240(3) Aa, V = 410.2(3) Aa{sup 3}, and Z = 4]. Barium atoms are linked together forming zigzag chains. Cadmium atoms are bonded to each other forming six-membered rings of platinum centered boat and anti-boat conformations. BaPtCd{sub 2} contains 16 electrons per formula unit and belongs to the electron poorest compounds with MgCuAl{sub 2} type structure. Calculations based on the linear muffin-tin orbitals method in the atomic spheres approximation show that significant bonding states in BaPtCd{sub 2} are unoccupied. (Copyright copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. At least 10% shorter C–H bonds in cryogenic protein crystal structures than in current AMBER forcefields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Yuan-Ping, E-mail: pang@mayo.edu

    2015-03-06

    High resolution protein crystal structures resolved with X-ray diffraction data at cryogenic temperature are commonly used as experimental data to refine forcefields and evaluate protein folding simulations. However, it has been unclear hitherto whether the C–H bond lengths in cryogenic protein structures are significantly different from those defined in forcefields to affect protein folding simulations. This article reports the finding that the C–H bonds in high resolution cryogenic protein structures are 10–14% shorter than those defined in current AMBER forcefields, according to 3709 C–H bonds in the cryogenic protein structures with resolutions of 0.62–0.79 Å. Also, 20 all-atom, isothermal–isobaric, 0.5-μs molecular dynamics simulations showed that chignolin folded from a fully-extended backbone formation to the native β-hairpin conformation in the simulations using AMBER forcefield FF12SB at 300 K with an aggregated native state population including standard error of 10 ± 4%. However, the aggregated native state population with standard error reduced to 3 ± 2% in the same simulations except that C–H bonds were shortened by 10–14%. Furthermore, the aggregated native state populations with standard errors increased to 35 ± 3% and 26 ± 3% when using FF12MC, which is based on AMBER forcefield FF99, with and without the shortened C–H bonds, respectively. These results show that the 10–14% bond length differences can significantly affect protein folding simulations and suggest that re-parameterization of C–H bonds according to the cryogenic structures could improve the ability of a forcefield to fold proteins in molecular dynamics simulations. - Highlights: • Cryogenic crystal structures are commonly used in computational studies of proteins. • C–H bonds in the cryogenic structures are shorter than those defined in forcefields. • A survey of 3709 C–H bonds shows that the cryogenic bonds are 10–14% shorter. • The

  3. Redox-sensitive structural change in the A-domain of HMGB1 and its implication for the binding to cisplatin modified DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jing; Tochio, Naoya; Takeuchi, Aya; Uewaki, Jun-ichi; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Tate, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The structure of the oxidized A-domain of human HMGB1 was solved. •Phe38 ring was flipped in the oxidized structure from that in the reduced form. •The flipped ring disables the intercalation into the cisplatinated lesions. •The functionally relevant redox-dependent structural change was described. -- Abstract: HMGB1 (high-mobility group B1) is a ubiquitously expressed bifunctional protein that acts as a nuclear protein in cells and also as an inflammatory mediator in the extracellular space. HMGB1 changes its functions according to the redox states in both intra- and extra-cellular environments. Two cysteines, Cys23 and Cys45, in the A-domain of HMGB1 form a disulfide bond under oxidative conditions. The A-domain with the disulfide bond shows reduced affinity to cisplatin modified DNA. We have solved the oxidized A-domain structure by NMR. In the structure, Phe38 has a flipped ring orientation from that found in the reduced form; the phenyl ring in the reduced form intercalates into the platinated lesion in DNA. The phenyl ring orientation in the oxidized form is stabilized through intramolecular hydrophobic contacts. The reorientation of the Phe38 ring by the disulfide bond in the A-domain may explain the reduced HMGB1 binding affinity towards cisplatinated DNA

  4. Local electronic and geometrical structures of hydrogen-bonded complexes studied by soft X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The hydrogen bond is one of the most important forms of intermolecular interactions. It occurs in all-important components of life. However, the electronic structures of hydrogen-bonded complexes in liquid phases have long been difficult to determine due to the lack of proper experimental techniques. In this talk, a recent joint theoretical and experimental effort to understand hydrogen bonding in liquid water and alcohol/water mixtures using synchrotron radiation based soft-X-ray spectroscopy will be presented. The complexity of the liquid systems has made it impossible to interpret the spectra with physical intuition alone. Theoretical simulations have thus played an essential role in understanding the spectra and providing valuable insights on the local geometrical and electronic structures of these liquids. Our study sheds light on a 40-year controversy over what kinds of molecular structures are formed in pure liquid methanol. It also suggests an explanation for the well-known puzzle of why alcohol and water do not mix completely: the system must balance nature's tendency toward greater disorder (entropy) with the molecules' tendency to form hydrogen bonds. The observation of electron sharing and broken hydrogen bonding local structures in liquid water will be presented. The possible use of X-ray spectroscopy to determinate the local arrangements of hydrogen-bonded nanostructures will also been discussed

  5. Synthesis, solid-state structure, and bonding analysis of a homoleptic beryllium azide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naglav, Dominik; Tobey, Briac; Lyhs, Benjamin; Roemer, Beate; Blaeser, Dieter; Woelper, Christoph; Jansen, Georg; Schulz, Stephan [Faculty of Chemistry and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (Cenide), Duisburg-Essen Univ., Essen (Germany)

    2017-07-10

    [Ph{sub 4}P]{sub 2}[Be(N{sub 3}){sub 4}] (1) and [PNP]{sub 2}[Be(N{sub 3}){sub 4}] (2; PNP=Ph{sub 3}PNPPh{sub 3}) were synthesized by reacting Be(N{sub 3}){sub 2} with [Ph{sub 4}P]N{sub 3} and [PNP]N{sub 3}. Compound 1 represents the first structurally characterized homoleptic beryllium azide. The electronic structure and bonding situation in the tetraazidoberyllate dianion [Be(N{sub 3}){sub 4}]{sup 2-} were investigated by quantum-chemical calculations (NPA, ELF, LOL). (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Hydrogen-bonded co-crystal structure of benzoic acid and zwitterionic l-proline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M. Chesna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The title compound [systematic name: benzoic acid–pyrrolidin-1-ium-2-carboxylate (1/1], C7H6O2·C5H9NO2, is an example of the application of non-centrosymmetric co-crystallization for the growth of a crystal containing a typically centrosymmetric component in a chiral space group. It co-crystallizes in the space group P212121 and contains benzoic acid and l-proline in equal proportions. The crystal structure exhibits chains of l-proline zwitterions capped by benzoic acid molecules which form a C(5[R33(11] hydrogen-bonded network along [100]. The crystal structure is examined and compared to that of a similar co-crystal containing l-proline zwitterions and 4-aminobenzoic acid.

  7. Postpartum Bonding Disorder: Factor Structure, Validity, Reliability and a Model Comparison of the Postnatal Bonding Questionnaire in Japanese Mothers of Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko Ohashi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Negative attitudes of mothers towards their infant is conceptualized as postpartum bonding disorder, which leads to serious health problems in perinatal health care. However, its measurement still remains to be standardized. Our aim was to examine and confirm the psychometric properties of the Postnatal Bonding Questionnaire (PBQ in Japanese mothers. We distributed a set of questionnaires to community mothers and studied 392 mothers who returned the questionnaires at 1 month after childbirth. Our model was compared with three other models derived from previous studies. In a randomly halved sample, an exploratory factor analysis yielded a three-factor structure: Anger and Restrictedness, Lack of Affection, and Rejection and Fear. This factor structure was cross-validated by a confirmatory factor analysis using the other halved sample. The three subscales showed satisfactory internal consistency. The three PBQ subscale scores were correlated with depression and psychological abuse scores. Their test–retest reliability between day 5 and 1 month after childbirth was measured by intraclass correlation coefficients between 0.76 and 0.83. The Akaike Information Criteria of our model was better than the original four-factor model of Brockington. The present study indicates that the PBQ is a reliable and valid measure of bonding difficulties of Japanese mothers with neonates.

  8. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowlton, W.B.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 angstrom Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 angstrom, 500 angstrom, and 300 angstrom per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 angstrom/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 angstrom/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study

  9. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, W.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 {angstrom} Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 {angstrom}, 500 {angstrom}, and 300 {angstrom} per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 {angstrom}/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 {angstrom}/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study.

  10. A self-diagnostic adhesive for monitoring bonded joints in aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yitao; Li, Yu-hung; Kopsaftopoulos, Fotis; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2016-04-01

    Bondline integrity is still one of the most critical concerns in the design of aircraft structures up to date. Due to the lack of confidence on the integrity of the bondline both during fabrication and service, the industry standards and regulations still require assembling the composite using conventional fasteners. Furthermore, current state-of-the-art non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques are incapable of offering mature solutions on the issue of bondline integrity monitoring. Therefore, the objective of this work is the development of an intelligent adhesive film with integrated micro-sensors for monitoring the integrity of the bondline interface. The proposed method makes use of an electromechanical-impedance (EMI) based method, which is a rapidly evolving approach within the SHM family. Furthermore, an innovative screen-printing technique to fabricate piezoelectric ceramic sensors with minimal thickness has been developed at Stanford. The approach presented in this study is based on the use of (i) micro screen-printed piezoelectric sensors integrated into adhesive leaving a minimal footprint on the material, (ii) numerical and analytical modeling of the EMI spectrum of the adhesive bondline, (iii) novel diagnostic algorithms for monitoring the bondline integrity based on advanced signal processing techniques, and (iv) the experimental assessment via prototype adhesively bonded structures in static (varying loads) and dynamic (fatigue) environments. The proposed method will provide a huge confidence on the use of bonded joints for aerospace structures and lead to a paradigm change in their design by enabling enormous weight savings while maximizing the economic and performance efficiency.

  11. Radiation damage to DNA: The importance of track structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    A wide variety of biological effects are induced by ionizing radiation, from cell death to mutations and carcinogenesis. The biological effectiveness is found to vary not only with the absorbed dose but also with the type of radiation and its energy, i.e., with the nature of radiation tracks. An overview is presented of some of the biological experiments using different qualities of radiation, which when compared with Monte Carlo track structure studies, have highlighted the importance of the localized spatial properties of stochastic energy deposition on the nanometer scale at or near DNA. The track structure leads to clustering of damage which may include DNA breaks, base damage etc., the complexity of the cluster and therefore its biological repairability varying with radiation type. The ability of individual tracks to produce clustered damage, and the subsequent biological response are important in the assessment of the risk associated with low-level human exposure. Recent experiments have also shown that biological response to radiation is not always restricted to the 'hit' cell but can sometimes be induced in 'un-hit' cells near by

  12. DFT Study of the Structure, Reactivity, Natural Bond Orbital and Hyperpolarizability of Thiazole Azo Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman I. Osman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The structure, reactivity, natural bond orbital (NBO, linear and nonlinear optical (NLO properties of three thiazole azo dyes (A, B and C were monitored by applying B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP and ωB97XD functionals with 6-311++G** and aug-cc-pvdz basis sets. The geometrical parameters,dipolemoments,HOMO-LUMO(highest occupied molecular orbital,lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy gaps, absorption wavelengths and total hyperpolarizabilities were investigated in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 chloroform (CHCl3, dichloromethane (CH2Cl2 and dimethlysulphoxide (DMSO. The donor methoxyphenyl group deviates from planarity with the thiazole azo moiety by ca. 38◦; while the acceptor dicyanovinyl, indandione and dicyanovinylindanone groups diverge by ca. 6◦. The HOMOs for the three dyes are identical. They spread over the methoxyphenyl donor moiety, the thiazole and benzene rings as π-bonding orbitals. The LUMOs are shaped up by the nature of the acceptor moieties. The LUMOs of the A, B and C dyes extend over the indandione, malononitrile and dicyanovinylindanone acceptor moieties, respectively, as π-antibonding orbitals. The HOMO-LUMO splittings showed that Dye C is much more reactive than dyes A and B. Compared to dyes A and B, Dye C yielded a longer maximum absorption wavelength because of the stabilization of its LUMOs relative to those of the other two. The three dyes show solvatochromism accompanied by significant increases in hyperpolarizability. The enhancement of the total hyperpolarizability of C compared to those of A and B is due to the cumulative action of the long π-conjugation of the indanone ring and the stronger electron-withdrawing ability of the dicyanovinyl moiety that form the dicyanovinylindanone acceptor group. These findings are facilitated by a natural bond orbital (NBO technique. The very high total hyperpolarizabilities of the three dyes define their potent nonlinear optical (NLO behaviour.

  13. A Comprehensive Analysis in Terms of Molecule-Intrinsic, Quasi-Atomic Orbitals. III. The Covalent Bonding Structure of Urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Aaron C; Schmidt, Michael W; Gordon, Mark S; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2015-10-15

    The analysis of molecular electron density matrices in terms of quasi-atomic orbitals, which was developed in previous investigations, is quantitatively exemplified by a detailed application to the urea molecule. The analysis is found to identify strong and weak covalent bonding interactions as well as intramolecular charge transfers. It yields a qualitative as well as quantitative ab initio description of the bonding structure of this molecule, which raises questions regarding some traditional rationalizations.

  14. Peculiarities of structure of rare earth β-diketonates and carboxylates with mostly ionic type of bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'mina, N.P.; Martynenko, L.I.

    1996-01-01

    X-ray diffraction data on β-diketonates and carboxylates of rare earths (3) have been analyzed. Essential features of the compounds structure have been formulated. It is shown that in the compounds mentioned irregular distortions of chelate cycles over the length and angles of bonds are observed, there is no regularity in the ratios of metal-ligand bridge and chelate bond lengths both in the series of compounds of different composition and inside one compound. 2 refs

  15. Adhesives in Building--Lamination of Structural Timber Beams, Bonding of Cementitious Materials, Bonding of Gypsum Drywall Construction. Proceedings of a Conference of the Building Research Institute, Division of Engineering and Industrial Research (Spring 1960).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    The role of adhesives in building design is discussed. Three major areas are as follows--(1) lamination of structural timber beams, (2) bonding of cementitious materials, and (3) bonding of gypsum drywall construction. Topical coverage includes--(1) structural lamination today, (2) adhesives in use today, (3) new adhesives needed, (4) production…

  16. Structure of the Cpf1 endonuclease R-loop complex after target DNA cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stella, Stefano; Alcón, Pablo; Montoya, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    involved in DNA unwinding to form a CRISPR RNA (crRNA)-DNA hybrid and a displaced DNA strand. The protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) is recognized by the PAM-interacting domain. The loop-lysine helix-loop motif in this domain contains three conserved lysine residues that are inserted in a dentate manner...... and the crRNA-DNA hybrid, avoiding DNA re-annealing. Mutations in key residues reveal a mechanism linking the PAM and DNA nuclease sites. Analysis of the Cpf1 structures proposes a singular working model of RNA-guided DNA cleavage, suggesting new avenues for redesign of Cpf1....

  17. The influence of size and structure of metal orthodontic bracket base on bond strength on tooth enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The factors which may influence the bond strength of the applied orthodontic brackets on the tooth surface are the size and structure of the bracket base. Objective. The aim of the paper was to investigate the influence of size and shape of different types of brackets on bond strength on the enamel and analyze the remaining quality of adhesive material on the tooth surface after debonding of orthodontic brackets (adhesive remnant index - ARI. Methods. In this study, three types of metal brackets of different sizes and shapes of Dentaurum manufacturer were used (Utratrimm, Equilibrium 2, Discovery, Dentaurum, Inspringen, Germany. The brackets were applied onto the middle part of the anatomic crowns of buccal surfaces of 30 premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons. In addition, the pre-treatment of teeth by 37% orthophosphoric acid and adhesive material System1+ (Dentaurum, Germany were used. Results. The mean value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Discovery type after debonding was 8.67±0.32 MPa, while the value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Equilibrium 2 type amounted to 8.62±0.22 MPa. The value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Ultratrimm type after debonding was 8.22±0.49 MPa. There were no statistical differences in the values of bond strength regarding all three groups of the investigated orthodontic brackets (F=4.56; p<0.05. Conclusion. The base size and design of metal orthodontic brackets did not play a significant role in bond strength, while the values of ARI index were identical in all three investigated groups.

  18. In situ structure and dynamics of DNA origami determined through molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2013-12-10

    The DNA origami method permits folding of long single-stranded DNA into complex 3D structures with subnanometer precision. Transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and recently cryo-EM tomography have been used to characterize the properties of such DNA origami objects, however their microscopic structures and dynamics have remained unknown. Here, we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations that characterized the structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects in unprecedented microscopic detail. When simulated in an aqueous environment, the structures of DNA origami objects depart from their idealized targets as a result of steric, electrostatic, and solvent-mediated forces. Whereas the global structural features of such relaxed conformations conform to the target designs, local deformations are abundant and vary in magnitude along the structures. In contrast to their free-solution conformation, the Holliday junctions in the DNA origami structures adopt a left-handed antiparallel conformation. We find the DNA origami structures undergo considerable temporal fluctuations on both local and global scales. Analysis of such structural fluctuations reveals the local mechanical properties of the DNA origami objects. The lattice type of the structures considerably affects global mechanical properties such as bending rigidity. Our study demonstrates the potential of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to play a considerable role in future development of the DNA origami field by providing accurate, quantitative assessment of local and global structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects.

  19. Dna2 nuclease-helicase structure, mechanism and regulation by Rpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chun; Pourmal, Sergei; Pavletich, Nikola P

    2015-11-02

    The Dna2 nuclease-helicase maintains genomic integrity by processing DNA double-strand breaks, Okazaki fragments and stalled replication forks. Dna2 requires ssDNA ends, and is dependent on the ssDNA-binding protein Rpa, which controls cleavage polarity. Here we present the 2.3 Å structure of intact mouse Dna2 bound to a 15-nucleotide ssDNA. The nuclease active site is embedded in a long, narrow tunnel through which the DNA has to thread. The helicase domain is required for DNA binding but not threading. We also present the structure of a flexibly-tethered Dna2-Rpa interaction that recruits Dna2 to Rpa-coated DNA. We establish that a second Dna2-Rpa interaction is mutually exclusive with Rpa-DNA interactions and mediates the displacement of Rpa from ssDNA. This interaction occurs at the nuclease tunnel entrance and the 5' end of the Rpa-DNA complex. Hence, it only displaces Rpa from the 5' but not 3' end, explaining how Rpa regulates cleavage polarity.

  20. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO 2 (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO 2+x . Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  1. Review of research on the hygrothermal environmental durability of structural adhesively bonded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao HAN

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, structural adhesive bonding technology has been widely used in many industrial fields, with many advantages over traditional mechanical connection methods, such as riveting, welding and bolt connection. Due to the adhesive characteristics of polymer materials, the environmental durability of adhesive joint becomes the key problems in engineering structure connection feasibility and long-term service reliability. On the basis of the review of the research of the hot-humid environmental durability of structural adhesive joints, the effects of temperature, moisture and coupled condition on the structural mechanical behaviour are discussed, introducing the published research progress and results both at home and abroad. The prospects are provided: the future research work can be combined with a variety of observation scales of environmental aging test and numerical simulation method, delve into sub hygroscopic, creep, thermal expansion and hygroscopic expansion aging behavior, such as the environment of model prediction method simulation in more than a variety of mechanical performance degradation behavior of coupling conditions, and provide more reliable theoretical modeling and experimental data for engineering design and application of cementing structure.

  2. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  3. X-ray photoelectron spectra structure and chemical bonding in AmO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis was done of the X-ray photoelectron spectra structure in the binding energy range of 0 eV to ~35 eV for americium dioxide (AmO2 valence electrons. The binding energies and structure of the core electronic shells (~35 eV-1250 eV, as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the Am63O216 and AmO8 (D4h cluster reflecting Am close environment in AmO2 were taken into account. The experimental data show that the many-body effects and the multiplet splitting contribute to the spectral structure much less than the effects of formation of the outer (0-~15 eV binding energy and the inner (~15 eV-~35 eV binding energy valence molecular orbitals. The filled Am 5f electronic states were shown to form in the AmO2 valence band. The Am 6p electrons participate in formation of both the inner and the outer valence molecular orbitals (bands. The filled Am 6p3/2 and the O 2s electronic shells were found to make the largest contributions to the formation of the inner valence molecular orbitals. Contributions of electrons from different molecular orbitals to the chemical bond in the AmO8 cluster were evaluated. Composition and sequence order of molecular orbitals in the binding energy range 0-~35 eV in AmO2 were established. The experimental and theoretical data allowed a quantitative scheme of molecular orbitals for AmO2, which is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in americium dioxide and the interpretation of other X-ray spectra of AmO2.

  4. Superplastic Forming/Adhesive Bonding of Aluminum (SPF/AB) Multi-Sheet Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, John A. (Technical Monitor); Will, Jeff D.; Cotton, James D.

    2003-01-01

    A significant fraction of airframe structure consists of stiffened panels that are costly and difficult to fabricate. This program explored a potentially lower-cost processing route for producing such panels. The alternative process sought to apply concurrent superplastic forming and adhesive bonding of aluminum alloy sheets. Processing conditions were chosen to balance adequate superplasticity of the alloy with thermal stability of the adhesive. As a first objective, an air-quenchable, superplastic aluminum-lithium alloy and a low-volatile content, low-viscosity adhesive with compatible forming/curing cycles were identified. A four-sheet forming pack was assembled which consisted of a welded two-sheet core separated from the face sheets by a layer of adhesive. Despite some preliminary success, of over 30 forming trials none was completely successful. The main problem was inadequate superplasticity in the heat-affected zones of the rib welds, which generally fractured prior to completion of the forming cycle. The welds are a necessary component in producing internal ribs by the 'four-sheet' process. Other challenges, such as surface preparation and adhesive bonding, were adequately solved. But without the larger issue of tearing at the weld locations, complex panel fabrication by SPF/AB does not appear viable.

  5. A Persian version of the parental bonding instrument: factor structure and psychometric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Behnaz; Parker, Gordon

    2015-02-28

    The Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) is a widely used self-report measure for quantifying key parenting styles as perceived by the child during its first 16 years. While its development study identified two key parental dimensions, subsequent studies have variably confirmed those two or argued for one or more additional parental constructs. We developed a Persian translation of the PBI and administered it to a sample of 340 high school students. The construct validity of the Persian PBI was examined by Exploratory Factor Analysis while Confirmatory Factor Analysis was used to identify the most adequate model. Analyses of the Persian PBI favored a four-factor model for both parental forms. The Persian PBI has a factorial structure consistent with constructs identified in western cultures, as well as high internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Multivariate analyses indicated significant differences between boys and girls across some factors. The PBI appears an acceptable and appropriate measure for quantifying parent-child bonding in Iranian samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Structure of a force-conveying cadherin bond essential for inner-ear mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomayor, Marcos; Weihofen, Wilhelm A; Gaudet, Rachelle; Corey, David P

    2012-12-06

    Hearing and balance use hair cells in the inner ear to transform mechanical stimuli into electrical signals. Mechanical force from sound waves or head movements is conveyed to hair-cell transduction channels by tip links, fine filaments formed by two atypical cadherins known as protocadherin 15 and cadherin 23 (refs 4, 5). These two proteins are involved in inherited deafness and feature long extracellular domains that interact tip-to-tip in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. However, the molecular architecture of this complex is unknown. Here we combine crystallography, molecular dynamics simulations and binding experiments to characterize the protocadherin 15-cadherin 23 bond. We find a unique cadherin interaction mechanism, in which the two most amino-terminal cadherin repeats (extracellular cadherin repeats 1 and 2) of each protein interact to form an overlapped, antiparallel heterodimer. Simulations predict that this tip-link bond is mechanically strong enough to resist forces in hair cells. In addition, the complex is shown to become unstable in response to Ca(2+) removal owing to increased flexure of Ca(2+)-free cadherin repeats. Finally, we use structures and biochemical measurements to study the molecular mechanisms by which deafness mutations disrupt tip-link function. Overall, our results shed light on the molecular mechanics of hair-cell sensory transduction and on new interaction mechanisms for cadherins, a large protein family implicated in tissue and organ morphogenesis, neural connectivity and cancer.

  7. Holliday junction-containing DNA structures persist in cells lacking Sgs1 or Top3 following exposure to DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mankouri, Hocine W; Ashton, Thomas M; Hickson, Ian D

    2011-01-01

    The Sgs1-Rmi1-Top3 "dissolvasome" is required for the maintenance of genome stability and has been implicated in the processing of various types of DNA structures arising during DNA replication. Previous investigations have revealed that unprocessed (X-shaped) homologous recombination repair (HRR...... structures arising in Sgs1-deficient strains are eliminated when Sgs1 is reactivated in vivo. We propose that HJ resolvases and Sgs1-Top3-Rmi1 comprise two independent processes to deal with HJ-containing DNA intermediates arising during HRR in S-phase....

  8. Hydrogen bonded 1D-3D supramolecular structures from Benzylamine and organic acidic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xingjun; Li, XiaoLiang; Jin, Shouwen; Hu, Kaikai; Guo, Jianzhong; Guo, Ming; Xu, Weiqiang; Wang, Daqi

    2018-03-01

    Cocrystallization of the commonly available organic amine, benzylamine, with a series of organic acids afforded a total of seven organic salts with the compositions: (benzylamine)2: (p-nitrophenol)2: (H2O) (1) [(HL)2+⋯(npl-)2⋯(H2O), npl- = p-nitrophenolate], (benzylamine): (4-tert-butylbenzoic acid) (2) [(HL+)⋯(tba-), tba- = 4-tert-butylbenzoate], (benzylamine): (3,4-dichlorobenzoic acid) (3) [(HL+)⋯dcba-), dcba- = 3,4-dichlorobenzoate], (benzylamine): (2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid) (4) [(HL+)⋯(dhba-), dhba- = 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate], (benzylamine): (2-bromo-but-2-enedioic acid) (5) [(HL+)⋯(Hbba-), Hbba- = 2-bromo-hydrogenbut-2-enedioate], (benzylamine): (2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid) (6) [(HL+)⋯(Hpdc-), Hpdc- = 2,6-pyridine hydrogendicarboxylate], and (benzylamine)2: (3-nitrophthalic acid): 2(H2O) (7) [(HL+)2⋯(npa2-)⋯(H2O)2, npa2- = 3-nitrophthalate]. The seven salts have been characterised by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, and elemental analysis, and the melting points of all the salts were also reported. And their structural and supramolecular aspects are fully analyzed. The results reveal that among the seven investigated crystals the NH2 in the benzylamine are protonated when the organic acids are deprotonated, and the crystal packing is interpreted in terms of the strong charge-assisted Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond between the NH3+ and deprotonated acidic groups. Except the Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond, the Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) were also found at the salts 1, 4, 5, 6, and 7. Further analysis of the crystal packing of the salts indicated that a different family of additional CHsbnd O/CH2sbnd O, CH-π/CH2-π, Cπ-Cπ, Osbnd O, O-Cπ, O-π, and Cl-π associations also contribute to the stabilization and expansion of the total high-dimensional framework structures. For the coexistence of the various weak nonbonding interactions, these structures adopted a variety of

  9. COGNAC: a web server for searching and annotating hydrogen-bonded base interactions in RNA three-dimensional structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Hamdani, Hazrina Yusof; Nadzirin, Nurul; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan; Willett, Peter; Artymiuk, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen bonds are crucial factors that stabilize a complex ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecule's three-dimensional (3D) structure. Minute conformational changes can result in variations in the hydrogen bond interactions in a particular structure. Furthermore, networks of hydrogen bonds, especially those found in tight clusters, may be important elements in structure stabilization or function and can therefore be regarded as potential tertiary motifs. In this paper, we describe a graph theoretical algorithm implemented as a web server that is able to search for unbroken networks of hydrogen-bonded base interactions and thus provide an accounting of such interactions in RNA 3D structures. This server, COGNAC (COnnection tables Graphs for Nucleic ACids), is also able to compare the hydrogen bond networks between two structures and from such annotations enable the mapping of atomic level differences that may have resulted from conformational changes due to mutations or binding events. The COGNAC server can be accessed at http://mfrlab.org/grafss/cognac. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Full-Scale Structural and NDI Validation Tests of Bonded Composite Doublers for Commercial Aircraft Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1999-02-01

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. Most of the concerns surrounding composite doubler technology pertain to long-term survivability, especially in the presence of non-optimum installations, and the validation of appropriate inspection procedures. This report focuses on a series of full-scale structural and nondestructive inspection (NDI) tests that were conducted to investigate the performance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Full-scale tests were conducted on fuselage panels cut from retired aircraft. These full-scale tests studied stress reductions, crack mitigation, and load transfer capabilities of composite doublers using simulated flight conditions of cabin pressure and axial stress. Also, structures which modeled key aspects of aircraft structure repairs were subjected to extreme tension, shear and bending loads to examine the composite laminate's resistance to disbond and delamination flaws. Several of the structures were loaded to failure in order to determine doubler design margins. Nondestructive inspections were conducted throughout the test series in order to validate appropriate techniques on actual aircraft structure. The test results showed that a properly designed and installed composite doubler is able to enhance fatigue life, transfer load away from damaged structure, and avoid the introduction of new stress risers (i.e. eliminate global reduction in the fatigue life of the structure). Comparisons with test data obtained prior to the doubler installation revealed that stresses in the parent material can be reduced 30%--60% through the use of the composite doubler. Tests to failure demonstrated that the bondline is able to transfer plastic strains into the doubler and that

  11. Understanding Boron through Size-Selected Clusters: Structure, Chemical Bonding, and Fluxionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergeeva, Alina P.; Popov, Ivan A.; Piazza, Zachary A.; Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Wang, Lai S.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2014-04-15

    Conspectus Boron is an interesting element with unusual polymorphism. While three-dimensional (3D) structural motifs are prevalent in bulk boron, atomic boron clusters are found to have planar or quasi-planar structures, stabilized by localized two-center–two-electron (2c–2e) σ bonds on the periphery and delocalized multicenter–two-electron (nc–2e) bonds in both σ and π frameworks. Electron delocalization is a result of boron’s electron deficiency and leads to fluxional behavior, which has been observed in B13+ and B19–. A unique capability of the in-plane rotation of the inner atoms against the periphery of the cluster in a chosen direction by employing circularly polarized infrared radiation has been suggested. Such fluxional behaviors in boron clusters are interesting and have been proposed as molecular Wankel motors. The concepts of aromaticity and antiaromaticity have been extended beyond organic chemistry to planar boron clusters. The validity of these concepts in understanding the electronic structures of boron clusters is evident in the striking similarities of the π-systems of planar boron clusters to those of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, naphthalene, coronene, anthracene, or phenanthrene. Chemical bonding models developed for boron clusters not only allowed the rationalization of the stability of boron clusters but also lead to the design of novel metal-centered boron wheels with a record-setting planar coordination number of 10. The unprecedented highly coordinated borometallic molecular wheels provide insights into the interactions between transition metals and boron and expand the frontier of boron chemistry. Another interesting feature discovered through cluster studies is boron transmutation. Even though it is well-known that B–, formed by adding one electron to boron, is isoelectronic to carbon, cluster studies have considerably expanded the possibilities of new structures and new materials using the B

  12. Bond length variation in Zn substituted NiO studied from extended X-ray absorption fine structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S. D.; Poswal, A. K.; Kamal, C.; Rajput, Parasmani; Chakrabarti, Aparna; Jha, S. N.; Ganguli, Tapas

    2017-06-01

    Bond length behavior for Zn substituted NiO is determined through extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements performed at ambient conditions. We report bond length value of 2.11±0.01 Å for Zn-O of rock salt (RS) symmetry, when Zn is doped in RS NiO. Bond length for Zn substituted NiO RS ternary solid solutions shows relaxed behavior for Zn-O bond, while it shows un-relaxed behavior for Ni-O bond. These observations are further supported by first-principles calculations. It is also inferred that Zn sublattice remains nearly unchanged with increase in lattice parameter. On the other hand, Ni sublattice dilates for Zn compositions up to 20% to accommodate increase in the lattice parameter. However, for Zn compositions more than 20%, it does not further dilate. It has been attributed to the large disorder that is incorporated in the system at and beyond 20% of Zn incorporation in the cubic RS lattice of ternary solid solutions. For these large percentages of Zn incorporation, the Ni and the Zn atoms re-arrange themselves microscopically about the same nominal bond length rather than systematically increase in magnitude to minimize the energy of the system. This results in an increase in the Debye-Waller factor with increase in the Zn concentration rather than a systematic increase in the bond lengths.

  13. Intracellular Delivery of a Planar DNA Origami Structure by the Transferrin-Receptor Internalization Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaffert, David Henning; Okholm, Anders Hauge; Sørensen, Rasmus Schøler

    2016-01-01

    DNA origami provides rapid access to easily functionalized, nanometer-sized structures making it an intriguing platform for the development of defined drug delivery and sensor systems. Low cellular uptake of DNA nanostructures is a major obstacle in the development of DNA-based delivery platforms....... Herein, significant strong increase in cellular uptake in an established cancer cell line by modifying a planar DNA origami structure with the iron transport protein transferrin (Tf) is demonstrated. A variable number of Tf molecules are coupled to the origami structure using a DNA-directed, site...... on the origami surface....

  14. Diffusion bonding of transition structures for integral aluminium-fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hehl, A. von [IWT - Stiftung Institut fuer Werkstofftechnik, Hauptabteilung Werkstofftechnik, Bremen (Germany); Syassen, F. [Airbus Operations GmbH, Metal Technology, Bremen (Germany); Schimanski, K.

    2012-04-15

    Components in hybrid design become more and more important in terms of their lightweight potential. In this context the demand for weight saving in aerospace leads to increasing numbers of applications of fibre composites for primary structural components. In consequence the use of FRP-metal compounds is necessary. Within the investigations of the researcher group ''Schwarz Silber'' (FOR 1224) founded by the DFG (German Research Foundation) material optimised interface structures for advanced CFRP-aluminium compounds are currently being studied. Within their work the researcher group focussed on three concepts realizing the transition structures: the usage of wires (titanium), foils (titanium) and fibres (glass fibre) as transition elements between CFRP and aluminium. For the connection of the aluminium sheet and the transition element die-casting and laser beam welding are basically used. As a possible alternative to the both liquid phase processes a feasibility study haven been done focussing the solid state processes diffusion bonding. The experimental results show the high potential of this process in view of the transferable loads for integral transition structures. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Awareness of the Installation the Lightning Protection System (LPS by Using Structural Bonding Method in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rahim Mustaqqim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural Bonding Method (SBM is one type of Lightning Protection System (LPS, design to protect human, structures, contents inside structures, electrical equipment, transmission lines and other from the lightning flash. Besides, SBM is a standard LPS that comply with technical standards or codes of practice or called as conventional Lightning Protection System. In order to know the level of the Awareness of the Installation LPS by using SBM in the building among Civil Engineering Consultants, conducting survey need to be done. This paper presents the Research Design and Research Strategy in conducting the survey. It is explaining about the way before conducting the survey which are determine the population of sample (Consultant Company at Northern Region Area, samples of respondents (Civil Engineer at Consultant Office with the number of sample is 40, data collecting process, structure of the questionnaire form and the way in analysis the data. After the analysis the data, the result of the level of awareness in the Installation of LPS by using SBM are consider as moderate level.

  16. Ultrasonic techniques for repair of aircraft structures with bonded composite patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. H.; Senapati, N.; Francini, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    This is a paper on a research and development project to demonstrate a novel ultrasonic process for the field application of boron/epoxy (B/Ep) patches for repair of aircraft structures. The first phase of the project was on process optimization and testing to develop the most practical ultrasonic processing techniques. Accelerated testing and aging behavior of precured B/Ep patches, which were ultrasonically bonded to simulated B-52 wing panel assemblies, were performed by conducting flight-by-flight spectrum loading fatigue tests. The spectrum represented 2340 missions/flights or 30 years of service. The effects of steady-state applied temperature and prior exposure of the B/Ep composite patches were evaluated. Representative experimental results of this phase of the project are presented.

  17. Low-frequency features of the ultrasound echo from an adhesively bonded layer-substrate structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaomin; LI Mingxuan; MAO Jie; LIAN Guoxuan

    2005-01-01

    The low-frequency features of the ultrasound reflection spectra from the structure of a single layer on a substrate bonded by a thin adhesive layer are theoretically studied; the low-frequency here means the frequency of the interrogating ultrasonic wave is less than the quart-wavelength resonance frequency of the adhesive layer. The possibility of the inversion of the thickness and the evaluation of the cohesion strength of the adhesive layer from the resonance frequency shifts of the layered system is indicated. An analytic solution to the nonlinear equation satisfied by the resonance frequency is presented by Taylor expansion method showing satisfactory agreement with the numerical results by Newton iterative method. The results indicate larger range for application than the traditional spring model for the thin adhesive layer. In a much lower frequency range the thin adhesive layer may be regarded to be a spring.

  18. Hypothetical planar and nanotubular crystalline structures with five interatomic bonds of Kepler nets type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey I. Kochaev

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of metastable existence of planar and non-chiral nanotubular crystalline lattices in the form of Kepler nets of 34324, 3342, and 346 types (the notations are given in Schläfly symbols, using ab initio calculations, has researched. Atoms of P, As, Sb, Bi from 15th group and atoms of S, Se, Te from 16th group of the periodic table were taken into consideration. The lengths of interatomic bonds corresponding to the steadiest states for such were determined. We found that among these new composed structures crystals encountered strong elastic properties. Besides, some of them can possess pyroelectric and piezoelectric properties. Our results can be used for nanoelectronics and nanoelectromechanical devices designing.

  19. Microsolvation of methylmercury: structures, energies, bonding and NMR constants ((199)Hg, (13)C and (17)O).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez, Edison; Maldonado, Alejandro F; Aucar, Gustavo A; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2016-01-21

    Hartree-Fock (HF) and second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations within the scalar and full relativistic frames were carried out in order to determine the equilibrium geometries and interaction energies between cationic methylmercury (CH3Hg(+)) and up to three water molecules. A total of nine structures were obtained. Bonding properties were analyzed using the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). The analyses of the topology of electron densities reveal that all structures exhibit a partially covalent HgO interaction between methylmercury and one water molecule. Consideration of additional water molecules suggests that they solvate the (CH3HgOH2)(+) unit. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants σ((199)Hg), σ((13)C) and σ((17)O), as well as indirect spin-spin coupling constants J((199)Hg-(13)C), J((199)Hg-(17)O) and J((13)C-(17)O), were calculated for each one of the geometries. Thermodynamic stability and the values of NMR constants correlate with the ability of the system to directly coordinate oxygen atoms of water molecules to the mercury atom in methylmercury and with the formation of hydrogen bonds among solvating water molecules. Relativistic effects account for 11% on σ((13)C) and 14% on σ((17)O), which is due to the presence of Hg (heavy atom on light atom, HALA effect), while the relativistic effects on σ((199)Hg) are close to 50% (heavy atom on heavy atom itself, HAHA effect). J-coupling constants are highly influenced by relativity when mercury is involved as in J((199)Hg-(13)C) and J((199)Hg-(17)O). On the other hand, our results show that the values of NMR constants for carbon and oxygen, atoms which are connected through mercury (C-HgO), are highly correlated and are greatly influenced by the presence of water molecules. Water molecules introduce additional electronic effects to the relativistic effects due to the mercury atom.

  20. DNA origami structures as calibration standards for nanometrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korpelainen, Virpi; Seppä, Jeremias; Lassila, Antti; Linko, Veikko; Kostiainen, Mauri A

    2017-01-01

    In this work we have studied the feasibility of DNA origami nanostructures as dimensional calibration standards for atomic force microscopes (AFMs) at the nanometre scale. The stability of the structures and repeatability of the measurement have been studied, and the applicability for calibration is discussed. A cross-like Seeman tile (ST) was selected for the studies and it was found suitable for repeatable calibration of AFMs. The height of the first height step of the ST was 2.0 nm. Expanded standard uncertainty (k   =  2) of the measurement U c was 0.2 nm. The width of the ST was 88 nm and width of its arm was 28 nm with U c   =  3 nm. In addition, prepared dry samples were found out to be stable at least for 12 months. (paper)

  1. Mo-Mo Quintuple Bond is Highly Reactive in H-H, C-H, and O-H σ-Bond Cleavages Because of the Polarized Electronic Structure in Transition State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2017-04-03

    The recently reported high reactivity of the Mo-Mo quintuple bond of Mo 2 (N ∧ N) 2 (1) {N ∧ N = μ-κ 2 -CH[N(2,6-iPr 2 C 6 H 3 )] 2 } in the H-H σ-bond cleavage was investigated. DFT calculations disclosed that the H-H σ-bond cleavage by 1 occurs with nearly no barrier to afford the cis-dihydride species followed by cis-trans isomerization to form the trans-dihydride product, which is consistent with the experimental result. The O-H and C-H bond cleavages by 1 were computationally predicted to occur with moderate (ΔG° ⧧ = 9.0 kcal/mol) and acceptable activation energies (ΔG° ⧧ = 22.5 kcal/mol), respectively, suggesting that the Mo-Mo quintuple bond can be applied to various σ-bond cleavages. In these σ-bond cleavage reactions, the charge-transfer (CT Mo→XH ) from the Mo-Mo quintuple bond to the X-H (X = H, C, or O) bond and that (CT XH→Mo ) from the X-H bond to the Mo-Mo bond play crucial roles. Though the HOMO (dδ-MO) of 1 is at lower energy and the LUMO + 2 (dδ*-MO) of 1 is at higher energy than those of RhCl(PMe 3 ) 2 (LUMO and LUMO + 1 of 1 are not frontier MO), the H-H σ-bond cleavage by 1 more easily occurs than that by the Rh complex. Hence, the frontier MO energies are not the reason for the high reactivity of 1. The high reactivity of 1 arises from the polarization of dδ-type MOs of the Mo-Mo quintuple bond in the transition state. Such a polarized electronic structure enhances the bonding overlap between the dδ-MO of the Mo-Mo bond and the σ*-antibonding MO of the X-H bond to facilitate the CT Mo→XH and reduce the exchange repulsion between the Mo-Mo bond and the X-H bond. This polarized electronic structure of the transition state is similar to that of a frustrated Lewis pair. The easy polarization of the dδ-type MOs is one of the advantages of the metal-metal multiple bond, because such polarization is impossible in the mononuclear metal complex.

  2. Studies of Single Biomolecules, DNA Conformational Dynamics, and Protein Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-11

    Nucleotide Base pairs Hydrogen bonds FIG. 1: Ladder structure of DNA showing the Watson - Crick bonding of the bases A, T, G, and C which are suspended by a...protected against unwanted action of chemicals and proteins. The three-dimensional structure of DNA is the famed Watson - Crick double-helix, the equilibrium...quantitative analysis [88]. [1] A. Kornberg and T. A. Baker, DNA Replication (W. H. Freeman, New York, 1992). [2] J. D. Watson and F. H. C. Crick

  3. Density functional theory study of the structural and bonding mechanism of molecular oxygen (O2) with C3Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Saroj K.; Behera, C.; Sahu, Sridhar

    2018-07-01

    The investigations of pure and heteroatom doped carbon clusters have created great interest because of their enormous prospective applications in various research zones, for example, optoelectronics, semiconductors, material science, energy storage devices, astro-science and so on. In this article, the interaction of molecular oxygen (O2) with C3Si has explored within a density functional theory (DFT). Different possible types of structure for C3SiO2 have collected. Among five different kinds of structure, the structure-1a, 1A1 is more energetically stable. The nature of the bonding of O2 and C3Si, in C3SiO2 has been studied by using Bader's topological analysis of the electron charge density distribution ρ(r) , Laplacian ∇2 ρ(r) and total energy density H(r) at the bond critical points (BCPs) of the structures within the framework of the atoms in molecules theory (AIM). The bonding mechanism of O2 and C3Si in C3SiO2 prompts to the fundamental understanding of the interaction of C3Si with oxygen molecule. It is interesting to note that, two types of bonding mechanism are established in same C3SiO2 system such as (i) shared-kind interactions (ii) closed-shell interactions. From various kinds of structure, Csbnd C bonds in all structures are shown as shared-kind interactions whereas Csbnd Si, Osbnd O bonds are classified as closed-shell type interactions with a certain degree of covalent character.

  4. Monogamy, strongly bonded groups, and the evolution of human social structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapais, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Human social evolution has most often been treated in a piecemeal fashion, with studies focusing on the evolution of specific components of human society such as pair-bonding, cooperative hunting, male provisioning, grandmothering, cooperative breeding, food sharing, male competition, male violence, sexual coercion, territoriality, and between-group conflicts. Evolutionary models about any one of those components are usually concerned with two categories of questions, one relating to the origins of the component and the other to its impact on the evolution of human cognition and social life. Remarkably few studies have been concerned with the evolution of the entity that integrates all components, the human social system itself. That social system has as its core feature human social structure, which I define here as the common denominator of all human societies in terms of group composition, mating system, residence patterns, and kinship structures. The paucity of information on the evolution of human social structure poses substantial problems because that information is useful, if not essential, to assess both the origins and impact of any particular aspect of human society. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Structural basis for IL-1α recognition by a modified DNA aptamer that specifically inhibits IL-1α signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gelinas, Amy D.; von Carlowitz, Ira; Janjic, Nebojsa; Pyle, Anna Marie (Yale); (SomaLogic)

    2017-10-09

    IL-1α is an essential cytokine that contributes to inflammatory responses and is implicated in various forms of pathogenesis and cancer. Here we report a naphthyl modified DNA aptamer that specifically binds IL-1α and inhibits its signaling pathway. By solving the crystal structure of the IL-1α/aptamer, we provide a high-resolution structure of this critical cytokine and we reveal its functional interaction interface with high-affinity ligands. The non-helical aptamer, which represents a highly compact nucleic acid structure, contains a wealth of new conformational features, including an unknown form of G-quadruplex. The IL-1α/aptamer interface is composed of unusual polar and hydrophobic elements, along with an elaborate hydrogen bonding network that is mediated by sodium ion. IL-1α uses the same interface to interact with both the aptamer and its cognate receptor IL-1RI, thereby suggesting a novel route to immunomodulatory therapeutics.

  6. Crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein clusters assembled on to damaged DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miggiano, Riccardo; Perugino, Giuseppe; Ciaramella, Maria; Serpe, Mario; Rejman, Dominik; Páv, Ondřej; Pohl, Radek; Garavaglia, Silvia; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rizzi, Menico; Rossi, Franca

    2016-01-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MtOGT) contributes to protect the bacterial GC-rich genome against the pro-mutagenic potential of O(6)-methylated guanine in DNA. Several strains of M. tuberculosis found worldwide encode a point-mutated O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (OGT) variant (MtOGT-R37L), which displays an arginine-to-leucine substitution at position 37 of the poorly functionally characterized N-terminal domain of the protein. Although the impact of this mutation on the MtOGT activity has not yet been proved in vivo, we previously demonstrated that a recombinant MtOGT-R37L variant performs a suboptimal alkylated-DNA repair in vitro, suggesting a direct role for the Arg(37)-bearing region in catalysis. The crystal structure of MtOGT complexed with modified DNA solved in the present study reveals details of the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions occurring during alkylated-DNA binding, and the protein capability also to host unmodified bases inside the active site, in a fully extrahelical conformation. Our data provide the first experimental picture at the atomic level of a possible mode of assembling three adjacent MtOGT monomers on the same monoalkylated dsDNA molecule, and disclose the conformational flexibility of discrete regions of MtOGT, including the Arg(37)-bearing random coil. This peculiar structural plasticity of MtOGT could be instrumental to proper protein clustering at damaged DNA sites, as well as to protein-DNA complexes disassembling on repair. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of novel caged DNA alkylating agents bearing 3,4-epoxypiperidine structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Yuji; Kodama, Tetsuya; Miyashita, Kazuyuki; Imanishi, Takeshi; Obika, Satoshi

    2012-07-14

    Previously, we reported that the 3,4-epoxypiperidine structure, whose design was based on the active site of DNA alkylating antitumor antibiotics, azinomycins A and B, possesses prominent DNA cleavage activity. In this report, novel caged DNA alkylating agents, which were designed to be activated by UV irradiation, were synthesized by the introduction of four photo-labile protecting groups to a 3,4-epoxypiperidine derivative. The DNA cleavage activity and cytotoxicity of the caged DNA alkylating agents were examined under UV irradiation. Four caged DNA alkylating agents showed various degrees of bioactivity depending on the photosensitivity of the protecting groups.

  8. High-resolution crystal structures of protein helices reconciled with three-centered hydrogen bonds and multipole electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Daniel J; Liu, Chengyu; Fang, Zheng; Ponder, Jay W; Marshall, Garland R

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental evidence for non-linear hydrogen bonds in protein helices is ubiquitous. In particular, amide three-centered hydrogen bonds are common features of helices in high-resolution crystal structures of proteins. These high-resolution structures (1.0 to 1.5 Å nominal crystallographic resolution) position backbone atoms without significant bias from modeling constraints and identify Φ = -62°, ψ = -43 as the consensus backbone torsional angles of protein helices. These torsional angles preserve the atomic positions of α-β carbons of the classic Pauling α-helix while allowing the amide carbonyls to form bifurcated hydrogen bonds as first suggested by Némethy et al. in 1967. Molecular dynamics simulations of a capped 12-residue oligoalanine in water with AMOEBA (Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Applications), a second-generation force field that includes multipole electrostatics and polarizability, reproduces the experimentally observed high-resolution helical conformation and correctly reorients the amide-bond carbonyls into bifurcated hydrogen bonds. This simple modification of backbone torsional angles reconciles experimental and theoretical views to provide a unified view of amide three-centered hydrogen bonds as crucial components of protein helices. The reason why they have been overlooked by structural biologists depends on the small crankshaft-like changes in orientation of the amide bond that allows maintenance of the overall helical parameters (helix pitch (p) and residues per turn (n)). The Pauling 3.6(13) α-helix fits the high-resolution experimental data with the minor exception of the amide-carbonyl electron density, but the previously associated backbone torsional angles (Φ, Ψ) needed slight modification to be reconciled with three-atom centered H-bonds and multipole electrostatics. Thus, a new standard helix, the 3.6(13/10)-, Némethy- or N-helix, is proposed. Due to the use of constraints from

  9. Underwound DNA under Tension: Structure, Elasticity, and Sequence-Dependent Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinin, Maxim Y.; Forth, Scott; Marko, John F.; Wang, Michelle D.

    2011-09-01

    DNA melting under torsion plays an important role in a wide variety of cellular processes. In the present Letter, we have investigated DNA melting at the single-molecule level using an angular optical trap. By directly measuring force, extension, torque, and angle of DNA, we determined the structural and elastic parameters of torsionally melted DNA. Our data reveal that under moderate forces, the melted DNA assumes a left-handed structure as opposed to an open bubble conformation and is highly torsionally compliant. We have also discovered that at low forces melted DNA properties are highly dependent on DNA sequence. These results provide a more comprehensive picture of the global DNA force-torque phase diagram.

  10. Statistically significant dependence of the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation on secondary structure and amino acid sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leitner Dietmar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A reliable prediction of the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation would be a useful tool for many protein structure calculation methods. We have analyzed the Protein Data Bank and show that the combined use of sequential and structural information has a predictive value for the assessment of the cis versus trans peptide bond conformation of Xaa-Pro within proteins. For the analysis of the data sets different statistical methods such as the calculation of the Chou-Fasman parameters and occurrence matrices were used. Furthermore we analyzed the relationship between the relative solvent accessibility and the relative occurrence of prolines in the cis and in the trans conformation. Results One of the main results of the statistical investigations is the ranking of the secondary structure and sequence information with respect to the prediction of the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation. We observed a significant impact of secondary structure information on the occurrence of the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation, while the sequence information of amino acids neighboring proline is of little predictive value for the conformation of this bond. Conclusion In this work, we present an extensive analysis of the occurrence of the cis and trans proline conformation in proteins. Based on the data set, we derived patterns and rules for a possible prediction of the proline conformation. Upon adoption of the Chou-Fasman parameters, we are able to derive statistically relevant correlations between the secondary structure of amino acid fragments and the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation.

  11. A new structural framework for integrating replication protein A into DNA processing machinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosey, Chris; Yan, Chunli; Tsutakawa, Susan; Heller, William; Rambo, Robert; Tainer, John; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Chazin, Walter

    2013-01-17

    By coupling the protection and organization of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) with recruitment and alignment of DNA processing factors, replication protein A (RPA) lies at the heart of dynamic multi-protein DNA processing machinery. Nevertheless, how RPA coordinates biochemical functions of its eight domains remains unknown. We examined the structural biochemistry of RPA's DNA-binding activity, combining small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the architecture of RPA's DNA-binding core. The scattering data reveal compaction promoted by DNA binding; DNA-free RPA exists in an ensemble of states with inter-domain mobility and becomes progressively more condensed and less dynamic on binding ssDNA. Our results contrast with previous models proposing RPA initially binds ssDNA in a condensed state and becomes more extended as it fully engages the substrate. Moreover, the consensus view that RPA engages ssDNA in initial, intermediate and final stages conflicts with our data revealing that RPA undergoes two (not three) transitions as it binds ssDNA with no evidence for a discrete intermediate state. These results form a framework for understanding how RPA integrates the ssDNA substrate into DNA processing machinery, provides substrate access to its binding partners and promotes the progression and selection of DNA processing pathways.

  12. Evaluation of Fluorescent Analogs of Deoxycytidine for Monitoring DNA Transitions from Duplex to Functional Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogini P. Bhavsar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Topological variants of single-strand DNA (ssDNA structures, referred to as “functional DNA,” have been detected in regulatory regions of many genes and are thought to affect gene expression. Two fluorescent analogs of deoxycytidine, Pyrrolo-dC (PdC and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tC∘, can be incorporated into DNA. Here, we describe spectroscopic studies of both analogs to determine fluorescent properties that report on structural transitions from double-strand DNA (dsDNA to ssDNA, a common pathway in the transition to functional DNA structures. We obtained fluorescence-detected circular dichroism (FDCD spectra, steady-state fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence lifetimes of the fluorophores in DNA. Our results show that PdC is advantageous in fluorescence lifetime studies because of a distinct ~2 ns change between paired and unpaired bases. However, tC∘ is a better probe for FDCD experiments that report on the helical structure of DNA surrounding the fluorophore. Both fluorophores provide complementary data to measure DNA structural transitions.

  13. Unique structural modulation of a non-native substrate by cochaperone DnaJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Satyam; Kumar, Vignesh; Jayaraj, Gopal Gunanathan; Maiti, Souvik; Mapa, Koyeli

    2013-02-12

    The role of bacterial DnaJ protein as a cochaperone of DnaK is strongly appreciated. Although DnaJ unaccompanied by DnaK can bind unfolded as well as native substrate proteins, its role as an individual chaperone remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that DnaJ binds a model non-native substrate with a low nanomolar dissociation constant and, more importantly, modulates the structure of its non-native state. The structural modulation achieved by DnaJ is different compared to that achieved by the DnaK-DnaJ complex. The nature of structural modulation exerted by DnaJ is suggestive of a unique unfolding activity on the non-native substrate by the chaperone. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the zinc binding motif along with the C-terminal substrate binding domain of DnaJ is necessary and sufficient for binding and the subsequent binding-induced structural alterations of the non-native substrate. We hypothesize that this hitherto unknown structural alteration of non-native states by DnaJ might be important for its chaperoning activity by removing kinetic traps of the folding intermediates.

  14. Crystal structure and bonding characteristics of In-doped β-Zn4Sb3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Dingguo; Zhao, Wenyu; Cheng, Sudan; Wei, Ping; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Qingjie

    2012-01-01

    The effects of indium impurity on the crystal structure and bonding characteristics of In-doped β-Zn 4 Sb 3 were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XRD Rietveld refinement indicates that the indium impurity preferentially substitutes one of Sb atoms in Sb–Sb dimer at the 12c Sb(2) site and simultaneously leads to the increase of Zn occupancy. The observations of binding energy shift and a new valence state in Sb 3d core-level XPS spectra can be attributed to the charge transfer from In and Zn to Sb. As a result, more electropositive Zn atoms are needed to maintain the charge balance. The reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity is ascribed to the formation of the asymmetric Sb–In bond, resulting in much low lattice thermal conductivity of 0.49 W −1 K −1 of Zn 4 Sb 2.96 In 0.04 . - Graphical abstract: The indium impurity substitutes one of Sb atoms in Sb–Sb dimer, resulting the charge transfer from In to Sb, which leads to the binding energy of Sb 3d core level XPS spectra shift to low value. Highlights: ► The indium impurity preferentially substitutes one of Sb atoms in Sb–Sb dimer at the 12c Sb(2) site. ► The occupancy of Zn increases by the In substitution for Sb, whereas that of Sb keeps constant. ► The binding energy of Sb 3d shifts to low value. ► The charge transfer occurs from In and Zn to Sb.

  15. Valence electron structure and bonding features of RuB2 and OSB2: The empirical electron theory calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The valence electron structure (VES) of RuB2 and OsB2 were calculated by the empirical electron theory (EET) of solids and molecules and compared with the results derived from the first-principles calculations. The distributions of covalent electrons in different bonds indicate that B-B and B-Me have remarkably covalent bonding characters. Lattice electrons cruising around Me-Me layers are found to have great influences on electronic conductivity and high temperature plasticity. The ultra-high values of elastic constant Cn in the two compounds originate from close-packed covalent bonding along the c axis. Uneven bond strengths and distributions of covalent bonds, especially for B-Afe bonds, yield significant anisotropy. Low ratios of lattice electrons to covalent electrons suggest the intrinsic embrittlement in crystals. The fact that the calculated cohesive energies well agree with experimental results demonstrates the good suitability of the EET calculations in estimating cohesive energy for transition-metal borides.

  16. Bond Performance and Structural Characterization of Polysaccharide Wood Adhesive Made from Konjac Glucomannan/Chitosan/Polyvinyl Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Gu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The bond performance and bonding mechanism were evaluated for a Konjac glucomannan (KGM, Chitosan (CS, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH blended wood adhesive. An optimized experimental strategy was used to investigate the effects of the formula parameters of adhesives on the bonding strength of plywood using a Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology (RSM. The microstructure of the blended adhesives was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. An optimum bonding strength (3.42 ± 0.31 MPa was achieved with concentrations of KGM, CS, and 10% PVOH of 2.3%, 2.3%, and 5.0%, respectively. There was strong hydrogen bonding between the KGM, CS, and 10% PVOH adhesives and the interface. SEM observations indicated that the blended adhesive exhibited a net-like structure that increased the overall bonding strength. These results provided the scientific basis for the continual development of environmentally friendly wood adhesives and the improvement of processing conditions.

  17. Knot soliton in DNA and geometric structure of its free-energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Shi, Xuguang

    2018-03-01

    In general, the geometric structure of DNA is characterized using an elastic rod model. The Landau model provides us a new theory to study the geometric structure of DNA. By using the decomposition of the arc unit in the helical axis of DNA, we find that the free-energy density of DNA is similar to the free-energy density of a two-condensate superconductor. By using the φ-mapping topological current theory, the torus knot soliton hidden in DNA is demonstrated. We show the relation between the geometric structure and free-energy density of DNA and the Frenet equations in differential geometry theory are considered. Therefore, the free-energy density of DNA can be expressed by the curvature and torsion of the helical axis.

  18. Effect of different surface treatments on bond strength, surface and microscopic structure of zirconia ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab R. El-Shrkawy

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: (1 Surface treatments of Y-TZP ceramic together with MDP primer and silane-coupling agent application improve the bond strength to resin cement. (2 Plasma-Silica coating and plasma-oxygen treatment, both are valuable methods that improve the bond strength of resin cement to Y-TZP ceramic. (3 Silica coating by plasma technology provides durable bond strength and can be a promising alternative pretreatment before silane application to enhance bonding with zirconia ceramic. (4 Tetragonal-monoclinic phase transformation had occurred in Y-TZP samples received both types of plasma treatment.

  19. Persistent and heritable structural damage induced in heterochromatic DNA from rat liver by N-nitrosodimethylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, E.J.; Stewart, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis, by benzoylated DEAE-cellulose chromatography, has been made of structural change in eu- and heterochromatic DNA from rat liver following administration of the carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine. Either hepatic DNA was prelabeled with [ 3 H]thymidine administered 2-3 weeks before injection of the carcinogen or the labeled precursor was given during regenerative hyperplasia in rats treated earlier with N-nitrosodimethylamine. Following phenol extraction of either whole liver homogenate or nuclease-fractionated eu- and heterochromatin, carcinogen-modified DNA was examined by stepwise or caffeine gradient elution from benzoylated DEAE-cellulose. In whole DNA, nitrosamine-induced single-stranded character was maximal 4-24 h after treatment, declining rapidly thereafter; gradient elution of these DNA preparations also provided short-term evidence of structural change. Caffeine gradient chromatography suggested short-term nitrosamine-induced structural change in euchromatic DNA, while increased binding of heterochromatic DNA was evident for up to 3 months after carcinogen treatment. Preparations of newly synthesized heterochromatic DNA from animals subjected to hepatectomy up to 2 months after carcinogen treatment provided evidence of heritable structural damage. Carcinogen-induced binding of heterochromatic DNA to benzoylated DEAE-cellulose was indicative of specific structural lesions whose affinity equalled that of single-stranded DNA up to 1.0 kilobase in length. The data suggest that structural lesions in heterochromatin, which may be a consequence of incomplete repair, are preferentially degraded by endogenous nuclease(s)

  20. DFT modeling of the electronic and magnetic structures and chemical bonding properties of intermetallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Alam, A.F.

    2009-06-01

    This thesis presents an ab initio study of several classes of intermetallics and their hydrides. These compounds are interesting from both a fundamental and an applied points of view. To achieve this aim two complementary methods, constructed within the DFT, were chosen: (i) pseudo potential based VASP for geometry optimization, structural investigations and electron localization mapping (ELF), and (ii) all-electrons ASW method for a detailed description of the electronic structure, chemical bonding properties following different schemes as well as quantities depending on core electrons such as the hyperfine field. A special interest is given with respect to the interplay between magneto-volume and chemical interactions (metal-H) effects within the following hydrided systems: binary Laves (e.g. ScFe 2 ) and Haucke (e.g. LaNi 5 ) phases on one hand, and ternary cerium based (e.g. CeRhSn) and uranium based (e.g. U 2 Ni 2 Sn) alloys on the other hand. (author)

  1. Change of hydrogen bonding structure in ionic liquid mixtures by anion type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Seoncheol; Kim, Doseok

    2018-05-01

    Ionic liquid mixtures have gained attention as a way of tuning material properties continuously with composition changes. For some mixture systems, physicochemical properties such as excess molar volume have been found to be significantly different from the value expected by linear interpolation, but the origin of this deviation is not well understood yet. The microstructure of the mixture, which can range from an ideal mixture of two initial consisting ionic liquids to a different structure from those of pure materials, has been suggested as the origin of the observed deviation. The structures of several different ionic liquid mixtures are studied by IR spectroscopy to confirm this suggestion, as a particular IR absorption band (νC(2)-D) for the moiety participating in the hydrogen bonding changes sensitively with the change of the anion in the ionic liquid. The absorbance of νC(2)-D changes proportionally with the composition, and a relatively small excess molar volume is observed for the mixtures containing an electronegative halide anion. By contrast, the absorbance changes nonlinearly, and the excess molar volumes are larger for the mixtures of which one of the anions has multiple interaction sites.

  2. Open chain or chemically bonded structure of H2O4: The hydroperoxyl radical dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, G.; Lee, T.J.; Schaefer, H.F. III; Bartlett, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The straight chain isomer H--O--O--O--O--H of H 2 O 4 is of considerable current interest in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. Ab initio quantum mechanical methods have been used to study the geometrical structure, energetics, and vibrational frequencies of this species. Double zeta (DZ) and double zeta plus polarization (DZ+P) basis sets have been used in this theoretical study, the latter designated O(9s5p1d/4s2p1d), H(4s1p/2s1p). These basis sets have been employed in conjunction with self--consistent field (SCF)= and configuration interaction (CI) methods, including variationally up to 470 935 configurations. For the straight chain isomer, stationary points of symmetry C/sub 2h/, C/sub i/, and C 1 have been identified, and correspond to Hessian indices 3,1, and 0, respectively. The equilibrium geometry, having no elements of symmetry at all, is relatively unique. The highest level of theory (unlinked cluster corrected DZ+P CI) predicts the straight chain structure of H 2 O 4 to lie slightly lower in total energy than the cyclic two-hydrogen bond isomer

  3. β-Boomerang Antimicrobial and Antiendotoxic Peptides: Lipidation and Disulfide Bond Effects on Activity and Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanram, Harini; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2014-04-21

    Drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and endotoxin- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammations are among some of the most  prominent health issues globally. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are eminent molecules that can kill drug-resistant strains and neutralize LPS toxicity. LPS, the outer layer of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria safeguards cell integrity against hydrophobic compounds, including antibiotics and AMPs. Apart from maintaining structural integrity, LPS, when released into the blood stream, also induces inflammatory pathways leading to septic shock. In previous works, we have reported the de novo design of a set of 12-amino acid long cationic/hydrophobic peptides for LPS binding and activity. These peptides adopt β-boomerang like conformations in complex with LPS. Structure-activity studies demonstrated some critical features of the β-boomerang scaffold that may be utilized for the further development of potent analogs. In this work, β-boomerang lipopeptides were designed and structure-activity correlation studies were carried out. These lipopeptides were homo-dimerized through a disulfide bridge to stabilize conformations and for improved activity. The designed peptides exhibited potent antibacterial activity and efficiently neutralized LPS toxicity under in vitro assays. NMR structure of C4YI13C in aqueous solution demonstrated the conserved folding of the lipopeptide with a boomerang aromatic lock stabilized with disulfide bond at the C-terminus and acylation at the N-terminus. These lipo-peptides displaying bacterial sterilization and low hemolytic activity may be useful for future applications as antimicrobial and antiendotoxin molecules.

  4. β-Boomerang Antimicrobial and Antiendotoxic Peptides: Lipidation and Disulfide Bond Effects on Activity and Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harini Mohanram

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and endotoxin- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS-mediated inflammations are among some of the most  prominent health issues globally. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are eminent molecules that can kill drug-resistant strains and neutralize LPS toxicity. LPS, the outer layer of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria safeguards cell integrity against hydrophobic compounds, including antibiotics and AMPs. Apart from maintaining structural integrity, LPS, when released into the blood stream, also induces inflammatory pathways leading to septic shock. In previous works, we have reported the de novo design of a set of 12-amino acid long cationic/hydrophobic peptides for LPS binding and activity. These peptides adopt β-boomerang like conformations in complex with LPS. Structure-activity studies demonstrated some critical features of the β-boomerang scaffold that may be utilized for the further development of potent analogs. In this work, β-boomerang lipopeptides were designed and structure-activity correlation studies were carried out. These lipopeptides were homo-dimerized through a disulfide bridge to stabilize conformations and for improved activity. The designed peptides exhibited potent antibacterial activity and efficiently neutralized LPS toxicity under in vitro assays. NMR structure of C4YI13C in aqueous solution demonstrated the conserved folding of the lipopeptide with a boomerang aromatic lock stabilized with disulfide bond at the C-terminus and acylation at the N-terminus. These lipo-peptides displaying bacterial sterilization and low hemolytic activity may be useful for future applications as antimicrobial and antiendotoxin molecules.

  5. Effect of Reaction Temperature on Structure, Appearance and Bonding Type of Functionalized Graphene Oxide Modified P-Phenylene Diamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Juan Sun

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, graphene oxides with different functionalization degrees were prepared by a facile one-step hydrothermal reflux method at various reaction temperatures using graphene oxide (GO as starting material and p-phenylenediamine (PPD as the modifier. The effects of reaction temperature on structure, appearance and bonding type of the obtained materials were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results showed that when the reaction temperature was 10–70 °C, the GO reacted with PPD through non-covalent ionic bonds (–COO−H3+N–R and hydrogen bonds (C–OH…H2N–X. When the reaction temperature reached 90 °C, the GO was functionalized with PPD through covalent bonds of C–N. The crystal structure of products became more ordered and regular, and the interlayer spacing (d value and surface roughness increased as the temperature increased. Furthermore, the results suggested that PPD was grafted on the surface of GO through covalent bonding by first attacking the carboxyl groups and then the epoxy groups of GO.

  6. Nonlinear effects at volume charge polarization and calculation of the structure radiation changes in the crystals with hydrogen bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonkonogov, M.P.; Medvedev, V.Ya.

    2003-01-01

    The formulas for volume charge distribution, complex permittivity, static dielectric constant for the crystals with hydrogen bonds are proposed. With help of the formulas the structure defect concentration, relaxation energy of relaxators were calculated for important electronic and optoelectronic materials as mica, KDP and DKDP crystals, gypsum, talk

  7. Substituent-directed structural and physicochemical controls of diruthenium catecholate complexes with ligand-unsupported Ru-Ru bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho-Chol; Mochizuki, Katsunori; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2005-05-30

    A family of diruthenium complexes with ligand-unsupported Ru-Ru bonds has been systematically synthesized, and their crystal structures and physical properties have been examined. A simple, useful reaction between Ru2(OAc)4Cl (OAc- = acetate) and catechol derivatives in the presence of bases afforded a variety of diruthenium complexes, generally formulated as [Na(n){Ru2(R4Cat)4}] (n = 2 or 3; R4 = -F4, -Cl4, -Br4, -H4, -3,5-di-t-Bu, and -3,6-di-t-Bu; Cat(2-) = catecholate). The most characteristic feature of the complexes is the formation of short ligand-unsupported Ru-Ru bonds (2.140-2.273 A). These comprehensive studies were carried out to evaluate the effects of the oxidation states and the substituents governing the molecular structures and physicochemical properties. The Ru-Ru bond distances, rotational conformations, and bending structures of the complexes were successfully varied. The results presented in this manuscript clearly demonstrate that the complexes with ligand-unsupported Ru-Ru bonds can sensitively respond to redox reactions and ligand substituents on the basis of the greater degree of freedom in their molecular structures.

  8. Electronic Structure Properties and a Bonding Model of Thermoelectric Half-Heusler and Boride Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Jack William

    Half-Heusler alloys MNiSn and MCoSb (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) and layered boride intermetallics with structure types YCrB4 and Er 3CrB7 were designed, synthesized, and characterized. The thermoelectric properties of these two classes of alloys were measured from room temperature to 1100 K with the intent of indirectly studying their electronic structure properties and gauging not only their suitability but that of related alloys for high temperature thermoelectric power generation. In the case of the half-Heusler alloys, transition metals were substituted to both the M and Ni/Co sites to study the resultant modifications of the d-orbital-rich portion of the electronic structure near the Fermi energy. This modification and subsequent pinning of the Fermi energy within the gap is discussed herein in terms of first principles electronic structure calculations from the literature. In the half-Heusler alloys, it was found that substitution of transition metals invariably led to a decrease in the thermopower, while the resistivity typically maintained its semiconducting trend. On the other hand, Sn doping in MCoSb type alloys -- a dopant that has been known for some time to be efficient -- was shown to result in high ZT at temperatures in excess of 1000 K. Moreover, the band gaps of the transition metal-doped alloys measured in this work offer insight into the discrepancy between the predicted and measured band gaps in the undoped parent compositions. In the case of the layered boride alloys, on the other hand, few electronic calculations have been published, thus prompting the generalization of a well-known electron counting rule -- which is typically used to study molecular organometallics, boranes, and metallocenes -- to predict the trends in the densities of states of crystalline solids that possess the requisite deltahedral bonding geometry. In accordance with these generalized electronic counting rules, alloys of the form RMB4 (R = Y, Gd, Ho; M = Cr, Mo, W) were measured to

  9. Strengthening of structurally damaged wide shallow RC beams using externally bonded CFRP plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeh A. Al-Zaid

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete wide shallow beams (WSBs are commonly used in the joist flooring systems. The structural behavior of WSBs strengthened with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP reinforcement was studied on isolated beams and as part of full-scale building. The effect of structural damage on the performance of WSBs flexurally strengthened with CFRP plates was investigated and presented in this paper. Eight full-scale WSBs were tested under four-point bending up to failure. Seven beams were strengthened with CFRP plates bonded to the soffit of the beams and one beam was unstrengthened serving as control. Prior to strengthening, the beams were subjected to different levels of damaging by preloading to 30-95% of the beams' flexural capacity. One beam was fully damaged by preloading to failure and repaired before strengthening by replacing the crushed concrete. The data showed that the pre-damaged strengthened beams exhibited ultimate capacities up to 8% lower than those of the undamaged strengthened beams. However, the load carrying capacities of pre-damaged strengthened beams were more than those predicted by ACI 440 design guide, fib Bulletin 14, and JSCE design recommendations. Both fib Bulletin 14 and JSCE design recommendations gave very conservative predictions with average ratios of experimental to predicted ultimate capacity of 2.02 and 2.35, respectively. More accurate predictions were obtained by ACI 440 design guide as the corresponding ratio was 1.24. These results indicate that strong confidence and reliability can be placed in applying CFRP strengthening to structurally damaged WSBs.

  10. Syntheses, structures and characterizations of three novel vanadium selenites with organically bonded copper/nickel complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Cheng; Kong, Fang; Mao, Jiang-Gao

    2016-06-01

    A series of vanadium selenites covalently bonded with metal-organic complex, namely, Ni(2,2-bipy)2V2O4(SeO3)2 (1), Cu(2,2-bipy)V2O4(SeO3)2·0.5H2O (2) and Cu2(2,2-bipy)2V5O12(SeO3)2 (3) (2,2-bipy=2,2-bipyridine) have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. They exhibit three different structural dimensions, from 0D cluster, 1D chain to 2D layer. Compound 1 features a 0D {Ni(2,2-bipy)2V2O4(SeO3)2}2 dimeric cluster composed of two {Ni(2,2-bipy)2}2+ moieties connected by the {V4O8(SeO3)4}4- cluster. Compound 2 shows a 1D {Cu(2,2-bipy)V2O4(SeO3)2}n chain in which the {Cu2(2,2-bipy)2}4+ moieties are bridged by the {V4O8(SeO3)4}4- clusters. Compound 3 displays a 2D structure consisted of mixed valence vanadium selenites layers {VIVVV4SeIV2O18}n4- and {Cu(2,2-bipy)}2+ complex moieties. The adjacent layers are further interconnected via π-π interactions between the 2,2-bipy ligands exhibiting an interesting 3D supramolecular architecture. Both compound 1 and 2 contain a new {V4O8(SeO3)4}4- cluster and compound 3 exhibits the first 2D vanadate polyhedral layer in vanadium selenites/tellurites with organic moieties.

  11. Synthesis, structure, DNA binding and anticancer activity of mixed ligand ruthenium(II) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilewska, Agnieszka; Masternak, Joanna; Kazimierczuk, Katarzyna; Trynda, Justyna; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Barszcz, Barbara

    2018-03-01

    In order to obtain a potential chemotherapeutic which is not affected on the normal BALB/3T3 cell line, a new arene ruthenium(II) complex {[RuCl(L1)(η6-p-cymene)]PF6}2 · H2O has been synthesized by a direct reaction of precursor, [{(η6-p-cymene)Ru(μ-Cl)}2Cl2], with N,N-chelating ligand (L1 - 2,2‧-bis(4,5-dimethylimidazole). The compound has been fully characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, IR, UV-Vis and 1H, 13C NMR spectroscopies. X-ray analysis have confirmed that the compound crystallized in the monoclinic group Cc as an inversion twin. The asymmetric unit contains two symmetrically independent cationic complexes [RuCl(L1)(η6-p-cymene)]+ whose charge is balanced by two PF6- counterions. The shape of each cationic coordination polyhedral can be described as a distorted dodecahedron and shows a typical piano-stool geometry. In addition, an analysis of the crystal structure and the Hirshfeld surface analysis were used to detect and visualize important hydrogen bonds and intermolecular interaction. Moreover, the antiproliferative behavior of the obtained complex was assayed against three human cells: MV-4-11, LoVo, MCF-7 and BALB/3T3 - normal mice fibroblast cells. To predict a binding mode, a potential interaction of ruthenium complex with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been explored using UV absorption and circular dichroism (CD).

  12. Distinct structural features of TFAM drive mitochondrial DNA packaging versus transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Huu B; Lovely, Geoffrey A; Phillips, Rob; Chan, David C

    2014-01-01

    TFAM (transcription factor A, mitochondrial) is a DNA-binding protein that activates transcription at the two major promoters of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)--the light strand promoter (LSP) and the heavy strand promoter 1 (HSP1). Equally important, it coats and packages the mitochondrial genome. TFAM has been shown to impose a U-turn on LSP DNA; however, whether this distortion is relevant at other sites is unknown. Here we present crystal structures of TFAM bound to HSP1 and to nonspecific DNA. In both, TFAM similarly distorts the DNA into a U-turn. Yet, TFAM binds to HSP1 in the opposite orientation from LSP explaining why transcription from LSP requires DNA bending, whereas transcription at HSP1 does not. Moreover, the crystal structures reveal dimerization of DNA-bound TFAM. This dimerization is dispensable for DNA bending and transcriptional activation but is important in DNA compaction. We propose that TFAM dimerization enhances mitochondrial DNA compaction by promoting looping of the DNA.

  13. Structure and partitioning of bacterial DNA: determined by a balance of competion and expansion forces?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldringh, C. L.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Westerhoff, H. V.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms that determine chromosome structure and chromosome partitioning in bacteria are largely unknown. Here we discuss two hypotheses: (i) the structure of the Escherichia coli nucleoid is determined by DNA binding proteins and DNA supercoiling, representing a compaction force on the one...

  14. Structural and magnetic properties of Ba2LuMoO6: a valence bond glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coomer, Fiona C; Cussen, Edmund J

    2013-02-27

    We report here the synthesis of the site ordered double perovskite Ba(2)LuMoO(6). Rietveld refinement of room temperature powder x-ray diffraction measurements indicates that it crystallizes in the cubic space group Fm3m, with a = 8.3265(1) Å. Powder neutron diffraction data indicate that, unusually, this cubic symmetry is maintained down to 2 K, with [Formula: see text], Mo(5+) ions situated on the frustrated face-centred cubic lattice. Despite dc-susceptibility measurements showing Curie-Weiss behaviour with strong antiferromagnetic interactions at T ≥ 200 K, there is no evidence of long range magnetic ordering at 2 K. At T ≤ 50 K, susceptibility measurements indicate a loss in moment to ∼18% of the expected value, and there is a corresponding loss in the magnitude of the magnetic exchange. The structural and magnetic properties of this compound are compared with the related compound Ba(2)YMoO(6), which is a valence bond glass.

  15. SIBLING BONDING AND OTHER VALUE STRUCTURES IN THE ERIHIYA OF SILANG, CAVITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosella Moya-Torrecampo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The erihiya is a genre of folklore in Silang, Cavite that relates to both folk speech and to practices. I hope to present an initial, working definition and description of the concept from the point of view of the Silang folks, beginning with the exploration of the lexical variations in form and meaning of the word itself, especially as its local definition as speech that is part of folk wisdom connotes ‘heritage,’ whereas its definition as a Spanish loan word is ‘heresy.’ Using a Structuralist approach, the discussion will analyze the significance of the erihiya within the social formation it exists in. The erihiya of Silang are reflective of values that center on kinship systems based on the binary relations between and among Self/others, others being defined as those including family, neighbors, friends, strangers, enemies, the old, the young, males, females, etc. The erihiya, in so defining the roles of these participants in the social formation, make the oppositions between good and bad, life and death, near and far, familiar and strange, indigenous and colonial come to play. Among examples presented, the erihiya for sibling bonding which is indigenous and still practiced by members of the social group is given value as it concretizes how kinship structures are established, maintained, and valued in local Silang society.

  16. Structures, Bonding, and Energetics of Potential Triatomic Circumstellar Molecules Containing Group 15 and 16 Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Walter E; Agarwal, Jay; Schaefer, Henry F

    2015-12-03

    The recent discovery of PN in the oxygen-rich shell of the supergiant star VY Canis Majoris points to the formation of several triatomic molecules involving oxygen, nitrogen, and phosphorus; these are also intriguing targets for main-group synthetic inorganic chemistry. In this research, high-level ab initio electronic structure computations were conducted on the potential circumstellar molecule OPN and several of its heavier group 15 and 16 congeners (SPN, SePN, TePN, OPP, OPAs, and OPSb). For each congener, four isomers were examined. Optimized geometries were obtained with coupled cluster theory [CCSD(T)] using large Dunning basis sets [aug-cc-pVQZ, aug-cc-pV(Q+d)Z, and aug-cc-pVQZ-PP], and relative energies were determined at the complete basis set limit of CCSDT(Q) from focal point analyses. The linear phosphorus-centered molecules were consistently the lowest in energy of the group 15 congeners by at least 6 kcal mol(-1), resulting from double-triple and single-double bond resonances within the molecule. The linear nitrogen-centered molecules were consistently the lowest in energy of the group 16 congeners by at least 5 kcal mol(-1), due to the electronegative central nitrogen atom encouraging electron delocalization throughout the molecule. For OPN, OPP, and SPN, anharmonic vibrational frequencies and vibrationally corrected rotational constants are predicted; good agreement with available experimental data is observed.

  17. Revealing the Interface Structure and Bonding Mechanism of Coupling Agent Treated WPC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiuping Rao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the interfacial optimisation of wood plastic composites (WPC based on recycled wood flour and polyethylene by employing maleated and silane coupling agents. The effect of the incorporation of the coupling agents on the variation of chemical structure of the composites were investigated by Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR and Solid state 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR analyses. The results revealed the chemical reactions that occurred between the coupling agents and raw materials, which thus contributed to the enhancement of compatibility and interfacial adhesion between the constituents of WPC. NMR results also indicated that there existed the transformation of crystalline cellulose to an amorphous state during the coupling agent treatments, reflecting the inferior resonance of crystalline carbohydrates. Fluorescence Microscope (FM and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM analyses showed the improvements of wood particle dispersion and wettability, compatibility of the constituents, and resin penetration, and impregnation of the composites after the coupling agent treatments. The optimised interface of the composites was attributed to interdiffusion, electrostatic adhesion, chemical reactions, and mechanical interlocking bonding mechanisms.

  18. Tensile strength of structural concrete repaired with hi-bond polymer modified mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaskheli, G.B.

    2009-01-01

    Repair of cracks in concrete is often required to save the concrete structures. Appearance of crack in concrete is bound with the tensile strength of concrete. Recently a cement factory in Sindh has launched a HBPMM (Hi-Bond Polymer Modified Mortar) that can be used as a concrete repairing material instead of normal OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement). It is needed to investigate its performance compared to that of OPC. In total 144 concrete cylinders (150x300mm) having strength of 3000 and 5000 psi were manufactured. These cylinders were then splitted by using a UTM (Universal Testing Machine) and their actual tensile strength was obtained. The concrete cylinders were then repaired with different applications of HBPMM and arc. The repaired samples were again splitted at different curing ages (3, 7 and 28 days) and their tensile strength after repair was obtained. The results show that the concrete cylinders repaired with HBPMM could give better tensile strength than that repaired with arc, the tensile strength of concrete cylinders after repair could increase with increase in the application of repairing material i.e. HBPMM or OPC and with curing time, and HBPMM could remain more effective in case of rich mix concrete than that of normal mix concrete. (author)

  19. DNA barcode detects high genetic structure within neotropical bird species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Sendra Tavares

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Towards lower latitudes the number of recognized species is not only higher, but also phylogeographic subdivision within species is more pronounced. Moreover, new genetically isolated populations are often described in recent phylogenies of Neotropical birds suggesting that the number of species in the region is underestimated. Previous COI barcoding of Argentinean bird species showed more complex patterns of regional divergence in the Neotropical than in the North American avifauna. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here we analyzed 1,431 samples from 561 different species to extend the Neotropical bird barcode survey to lower latitudes, and detected even higher geographic structure within species than reported previously. About 93% (520 of the species were identified correctly from their DNA barcodes. The remaining 41 species were not monophyletic in their COI sequences because they shared barcode sequences with closely related species (N = 21 or contained very divergent clusters suggestive of putative new species embedded within the gene tree (N = 20. Deep intraspecific divergences overlapping with among-species differences were detected in 48 species, often with samples from large geographic areas and several including multiple subspecies. This strong population genetic structure often coincided with breaks between different ecoregions or areas of endemism. CONCLUSIONS: The taxonomic uncertainty associated with the high incidence of non-monophyletic species and discovery of putative species obscures studies of historical patterns of species diversification in the Neotropical region. We showed that COI barcodes are a valuable tool to indicate which taxa would benefit from more extensive taxonomic revisions with multilocus approaches. Moreover, our results support hypotheses that the megadiversity of birds in the region is associated with multiple geographic processes starting well before the Quaternary and extending to more recent

  20. Study of the structure and chemical bonding of crystalline Ge_4Sb_2Te_7 using first principle calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Janpreet; Singh, Satvinder; Tripathi, S. K.; Singh, Gurinder; Kaura, Aman

    2016-01-01

    The atomic arrangements and chemical bonding of stable Ge_4Sb_2Te_7 (GeTe rich), a phase-change material, have been investigated by means of ab initio total energy calculations. To study the atomic arrangement, GeTe block is considered into -TeSbTeSbTe- block and -Te-Te- layer in the stacking I and II respectively. The stacking I is energetically more stable than the stacking II. The reason for more stability of the stacking I has been explained. The chemical bonding has been studied with the electronic charge density distribution around the atomic bonds. The quantity of electronic charge loosed or gained by atoms has been calculated using the Bader charge analysis. The metallic character has been studied using band structures calculations. The band gap for the stacking I and II is 0.463 and 0.219 eV respectively.

  1. Structural Characterization of N-Alkylated Twisted Amides: Consequences for Amide Bond Resonance and N-C Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Feng; Lalancette, Roger; Szostak, Michal

    2016-04-11

    Herein, we describe the first structural characterization of N-alkylated twisted amides prepared directly by N-alkylation of the corresponding non-planar lactams. This study provides the first experimental evidence that N-alkylation results in a dramatic increase of non-planarity around the amide N-C(O) bond. Moreover, we report a rare example of a molecular wire supported by the same amide C=O-Ag bonds. Reactivity studies demonstrate rapid nucleophilic addition to the N-C(O) moiety of N-alkylated amides, indicating the lack of n(N) to π*(C=O) conjugation. Most crucially, we demonstrate that N-alkylation activates the otherwise unreactive amide bond towards σ N-C cleavage by switchable coordination. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Cyclen-based double-tailed lipids for DNA delivery: Synthesis and the effect of linking group structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Mei; Chang, De-Chun; Zhang, Ji; Liu, Yan-Hong; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2015-09-01

    The gene transfection efficiency (TE) of cationic lipids is largely influenced by the lipid structure. Six novel 1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane (cyclen)-based cationic lipids L1-L6, which contain double oleyl as hydrophobic tails, were designed and synthesized. The difference between these lipids is their diverse backbone. Liposomes prepared by the lipids and DOPE showed good DNA affinity, and full DNA condensation could be achieved at N/P of 4 to form lipoplexes with proper size and zeta-potentials for gene transfection. Structure-activity relationship of these lipids as non-viral gene delivery vectors was investigated. It was found that minor backbone structural variations, including linking group and the structural symmetry would affect the TE. The diethylenetriamine derived lipid L4 containing amide linking bonds gave the best TE, which was several times higher than commercially available transfection reagent lipofectamine 2000. Besides, these lipids exhibited low cytotoxicity, suggesting their good biocompatibility. Results reveal that such type of cationic lipids might be promising non-viral gene vectors, and also afford us clues for the design of novel vectors with higher TE and biocompatibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Modification of DNA radiolysis by DNA-binding proteins: Structural aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidkova, M.; Stisova, V.; Goffinont, S.; Gillard, N.; Castaing, B.; Spotheim-Maurizot, M.

    2006-01-01

    Formation of specific complexes between proteins and their cognate DNA modulates the yields and the location of radiation damage on both partners of the complex. The radiolysis of DNA-protein complexes is studied for: (1) the Escherichia coli lactose operator-repressor complex, (2) the complex between DNA bearing an analogue of an abasic site and the repair protein Fpg of Lactococcus lactis. Experimental patterns of DNA damages are presented and compared to predicted damage distribution obtained using an improved version of the stochastic model RADACK. The same method is used for predicting the location of damages on the proteins. At doses lower than a threshold that depends on the system, proteins protect their specific binding site on DNA while at high doses, the studied complexes are disrupted mainly through protein damage. The loss of binding ability is the functional consequence of the amino-acids modification by OH . radicals. Many of the most probably damaged amino acids are essential for the DNA-protein interaction and within a complex are protected by DNA. (authors)

  4. Damage prognosis of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of unmanned aerial vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gobbato, Maurizio [UCSD; Conte, Joel [UCSD; Kosmatke, John [UCSD; Oliver, Joseph A [UCSD

    2009-01-01

    The extensive use of lightweight advanced composite materials in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) drastically increases the sensitivity to both fatigue- and impact-induced damage of their critical structural components (e.g., wings and tail stabilizers) during service life. The spar-to-skin adhesive joints are considered one of the most fatigue sensitive subcomponents of a lightweight UAV composite wing with damage progressively evolving from the wing root. This paper presents a comprehensive probabilistic methodology for predicting the remaining service life of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of UAVs. Non-destructive evaluation techniques and Bayesian inference are used to (i) assess the current state of damage of the system and, (ii) update the probability distribution of the damage extent at various locations. A probabilistic model for future loads and a mechanics-based damage model are then used to stochastically propagate damage through the joint. Combined local (e.g., exceedance of a critical damage size) and global (e.g.. flutter instability) failure criteria are finally used to compute the probability of component failure at future times. The applicability and the partial validation of the proposed methodology are then briefly discussed by analyzing the debonding propagation, along a pre-defined adhesive interface, in a simply supported laminated composite beam with solid rectangular cross section, subjected to a concentrated load applied at mid-span. A specially developed Eliler-Bernoulli beam finite element with interlaminar slip along the damageable interface is used in combination with a cohesive zone model to study the fatigue-induced degradation in the adhesive material. The preliminary numerical results presented are promising for the future validation of the methodology.

  5. Several new phases in RE-Mg-Ge systems (RE = rare earth metal) - syntheses, structures, and chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suen, Nian-Tzu; Bobev, Svilen

    2012-01-01

    Reported are the synthesis and structural characterization of Ce_5Mg_8Ge_8 (its own structure type), CeMg_2_-_xGe_2_+_x (BaAl_4-type structure), RE_4Mg_7Ge_6 (RE = Ce-Nd, Sm; La_4Mg_7Ge_6-type structure), and RE_4Mg_5Ge_6 (RE = Ce, Pr; Tm_4Zn_5Ge_6-type structure). The structures of these compounds have been established by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction. These compounds are closely related to each other not only in their chemical compositions but also in their structures. A common structural feature of all are MgGe_4 tetrahedra, which are connected by corner- and/or edge-sharing into complex polyanionic frameworks with the rare-earth metal atoms filling the ''empty'' space. The structures are compared to known types of structures, and we have investigated the chemical bonding in Ce_5Mg_8Ge_8 with electronic structure calculations, which were carried out by the tight-bonding linear muffin-tin orbital (TB-LMTO) method. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Radical bonding: structure and stability of bis(phenalenyl) complexes of divalent metals from across the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciun, Smaranda; Donald, Kelling J

    2009-07-06

    We examine the bonding possibilities of the bis(phenalenyl) MP(2) sandwich complexes of the divalent metals M = Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Zn, Cd, and Hg, at the B3LYP level of theory. The outcome is an extraordinarily diverse class of low symmetry bis(phenalenyl)metal complexes in which bonding preferences and binding enthalpies differ dramatically. The lowest energy group 2 metal MP(2) complexes include an intriguing eta(1),eta(3) BeP(2) structure, and bent eta(6),eta(6) systems for M = Ca, Sr, and Ba. The group 12 bis(phenalenyl) complexes are thermodynamically unstable eta(1),eta(1) slip-sandwich structures. To better understand changes in the structural preferences going from the (eta(6),eta(6)) group 2 to the (eta(1),eta(1)) group 12 complexes, we explored the bonding in the bis(phenalenyl) complexes of transition metals with stable +2 oxidations states between Ca and Zn in period 4. The computed binding enthalpies are large and negative for nearly all of the minimum energy bis(phenalenyl) complexes of the group 2 and the transition metals; they are tiny for MgP(2), and are quite positive for the group 12 systems. The structural preferences and stability of the complexes is a subtle negotiation of several influences: the (un)availability of (n - 1)d and np, orbitals for bonding, the cost of the rehybridization at carbon sites in the phenalenyl rings in preparation for bonding to the metals, and the (P---P) interaction between the phenalenyl radicals.

  7. Characterization of Structural and Configurational Properties of DNA by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meroni, Alice; Lazzaro, Federico; Muzi-Falconi, Marco; Podestà, Alessandro

    2018-01-01

    We describe a method to extract quantitative information on DNA structural and configurational properties from high-resolution topographic maps recorded by atomic force microscopy (AFM). DNA molecules are deposited on mica surfaces from an aqueous solution, carefully dehydrated, and imaged in air in Tapping Mode. Upon extraction of the spatial coordinates of the DNA backbones from AFM images, several parameters characterizing DNA structure and configuration can be calculated. Here, we explain how to obtain the distribution of contour lengths, end-to-end distances, and gyration radii. This modular protocol can be also used to characterize other statistical parameters from AFM topographies.

  8. Diffusion Bonded CVC SiC for Large UVOIR Telescope Mirrors and Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trex proposes to demonstrate a novel ceramic joining technology (solid state bonding) for CVC SiC® that allows "seamless" joining of smaller, easily manufactured,...

  9. Change in local atomic and chemical bonding structures of Ge2Sb2Te5 alloys by isothermal heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Woo-Sik; Cho, Sung-June; Lee, Hyun-Yong

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we report evaluation of the atomic-scale phase transformation characteristics in one of the most comprehensively utilized phase change materials today, Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 thin film. The phase transformation of Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 thin film from amorphous to hexagonal structure via fcc structure was confirmed by XRD measurements. The approximate values of optical energy gap are 0.72 and 0.50 eV, with slopes (B 1/2 ) in the extended absorption region of 5.3 x 10 5 and 10 x 10 5 cm -1 ·eV -1 for the amorphous and fcc-crystalline structures, respectively. In addition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed strengthening of the Te-Te bond as well as weakening of the Ge-Te bond during the amorphous-to-crystalline transition. This trend was also observed in extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis where the Ge metallic bond lengths in the amorphous, fcc, and hexagonal structures were 0.262, 0.280, and 0.290 nm

  10. Bonding structure and mechanical properties of B-C-N thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition at different laser fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.B.; Xiao, J.L.; Shen, Q.; Zhang, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Boron carbon nitride (B-C-N) thin films have been grown by pulsed laser deposition under different laser fluences changing from 1.0 to 3.0 J/cm"2. The influence of laser fluence on microstructure, bonding structure, and mechanical properties of the films was studied, so as to explore the possibility of improving their mechanical properties by controlling bonding structure. The bonding structure identified by FT-IR and XPS indicated the coexistence of B-N, B-C, N-C and N=C bonds in the films, suggesting the formation of a ternary B-C-N hybridization. There is a clear evolution of bonding structure in the B-C-N films with the increasing of laser fluence. The variation of the mechanical properties as a function of laser fluence was also in accordance with the evolution of B-C and sp"3 N-C bonds whereas contrary to that of sp"2 B-N and N=C bonds. The hardness and modulus reached the maximum value of 33.7 GPa and 256 GPa, respectively, at a laser fluence of 3.0 J/cm"2, where the B-C-N thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition possessed the highest intensity of B-C and N-C bonds and the lowest fraction of B-N and N=C bonds. - Highlights: • Improvement of mechanical property by controlling bonding structure is explored. • A clear evolution of bonding structure with the increasing of laser fluence • Variation of property is in accordance with the evolution of B−C and N−C bonds.

  11. Combining crystallography and EPR: crystal and solution structures of the multidomain cochaperone DnaJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barends, Thomas R. M., E-mail: thomas.barends@mpimf-heidelberg.mpg.de [MPI for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Brosi, Richard W. W. [Freie Universitat Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Steinmetz, Andrea; Scherer, Anna; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Eschenbach, Jessica; Lorenz, Thorsten [MPI for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Seidel, Ralf [MPI for Molecular Physiology, Dortmund (Germany); Shoeman, Robert L.; Zimmermann, Sabine [MPI for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Bittl, Robert [Freie Universitat Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Schlichting, Ilme; Reinstein, Jochen [MPI for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal part of T. thermophilus DnaJ unexpectedly showed an ordered GF domain and guided the design of a construct enabling the first structure determination of a complete DnaJ cochaperone molecule. By combining the crystal structures with spin-labelling EPR and cross-linking in solution, a dynamic view of this flexible molecule was developed. Hsp70 chaperones assist in a large variety of protein-folding processes in the cell. Crucial for these activities is the regulation of Hsp70 by Hsp40 cochaperones. DnaJ, the bacterial homologue of Hsp40, stimulates ATP hydrolysis by DnaK (Hsp70) and thus mediates capture of substrate protein, but is also known to possess chaperone activity of its own. The first structure of a complete functional dimeric DnaJ was determined and the mobility of its individual domains in solution was investigated. Crystal structures of the complete molecular cochaperone DnaJ from Thermus thermophilus comprising the J, GF and C-terminal domains and of the J and GF domains alone showed an ordered GF domain interacting with the J domain. Structure-based EPR spin-labelling studies as well as cross-linking results showed the existence of multiple states of DnaJ in solution with different arrangements of the various domains, which has implications for the function of DnaJ.

  12. Selective Preference of Parallel DNA Triplexes Is Due to the Disruption of Hoogsteen Hydrogen Bonds Caused by the Severe Nonisostericity between the G*GC and T*AT Triplets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunaseelan Goldsmith

    Full Text Available Implications of DNA, RNA and RNA.DNA hybrid triplexes in diverse biological functions, diseases and therapeutic applications call for a thorough understanding of their structure-function relationships. Despite exhaustive studies mechanistic rationale for the discriminatory preference of parallel DNA triplexes with G*GC & T*AT triplets still remains elusive. Here, we show that the highest nonisostericity between the G*GC & T*AT triplets imposes extensive stereochemical rearrangements contributing to context dependent triplex destabilisation through selective disruption of Hoogsteen scheme of hydrogen bonds. MD simulations of nineteen DNA triplexes with an assortment of sequence milieu reveal for the first time fresh insights into the nature and extent of destabilization from a single (non-overlapping, double (overlapping and multiple pairs of nonisosteric base triplets (NIBTs. It is found that a solitary pair of NIBTs, feasible either at a G*GC/T*AT or T*AT/G*GC triplex junction, does not impinge significantly on triplex stability. But two overlapping pairs of NIBTs resulting from either a T*AT or a G*GC interruption disrupt Hoogsteen pair to a noncanonical mismatch destabilizing the triplex by ~10 to 14 kcal/mol, implying that their frequent incidence in multiples, especially, in short sequences could even hinder triplex formation. The results provide (i an unambiguous and generalised mechanistic rationale for the discriminatory trait of parallel triplexes, including those studied experimentally (ii clarity for the prevalence of antiparallel triplexes and (iii comprehensive perspectives on the sequence dependent influence of nonisosteric base triplets useful in the rational design of TFO's against potential triplex target sites.

  13. Intracellular Delivery of a Planar DNA Origami Structure by the Transferrin-Receptor Internalization Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffert, David H; Okholm, Anders H; Sørensen, Rasmus S; Nielsen, Jesper S; Tørring, Thomas; Rosen, Christian B; Kodal, Anne Louise B; Mortensen, Michael R; Gothelf, Kurt V; Kjems, Jørgen

    2016-05-01

    DNA origami provides rapid access to easily functionalized, nanometer-sized structures making it an intriguing platform for the development of defined drug delivery and sensor systems. Low cellular uptake of DNA nanostructures is a major obstacle in the development of DNA-based delivery platforms. Herein, significant strong increase in cellular uptake in an established cancer cell line by modifying a planar DNA origami structure with the iron transport protein transferrin (Tf) is demonstrated. A variable number of Tf molecules are coupled to the origami structure using a DNA-directed, site-selective labeling technique to retain ligand functionality. A combination of confocal fluorescence microscopy and quantitative (qPCR) techniques shows up to 22-fold increased cytoplasmic uptake compared to unmodified structures and with an efficiency that correlates to the number of transferrin molecules on the origami surface. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Polarization Selectivity of Artificial Anisotropic Structures Based on DNA-Like Helices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semchenko, I. V.; Khakhomov, S. A.; Balmakov, A. P.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, 2D and 3D structures of different symmetries can be formed from DNA molecules. The electromagnetic properties of this new natural chiral material can be changed by metalizing DNA. Spatial structures of this type can be used in nanotechnology to prepare metamaterials for the far-UV region. It is shown by the example of an octahedron and a cube composed of DNA-like helices that these structures may exhibit polarization selectivity to electromagnetic radiation. In addition, it is suggested that the effect of the polarization selectivity of DNA-like artificial structures may also occur in the soft X-ray region for all living organisms in nature due to the universal DNA form.

  15. bipyridine host: Synthesis, X-ray structure, DNA cleavage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (III) complex is soluble in all the common solvents like methanol, acetonitrile, water, etc. The IR spectrum ... tion at room temperature.28 ESI-Mass spectral analysis of the cobalt ... hydrogen bond and forms a polymeric cationic chain through a ...

  16. Two independent hydrogen bonded complexes of bis(1-piperidiniumacetate) hydrochloride in crystal and in the PM3 optimized structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dega-Szafran, Z.; Petryna, M.; Dutkiewicz, G.; Kosturkiewicz, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Bis(1-piperidiniumacetate) hydrochloride, (PAA) 2 H · Cl + , has been synthesized and its structure solved by X-ray diffraction. The crystals belong to the triclinic system with two symmetrically independent hydrogen bonded complexes, denoted A and B, at two different inversion centers. The compound crystallizes in the space group P1 with a = 8.559(1), b = 9.625(1), c = 11.441(1) A, α = 74.85(1) o , β = 68.22(1) o , γ 84.10(1) o , Z = 2, R = 0.036. Each complex consists of two 1-piperidiniumacetate moieties. Four 1-piperidiniumacetates, as zwitterions, are held together by a network of hydrogen bonds of the types O...H...O (2.462(3) and 2.463(3) A), N-H...O (2.755(2) A) and N-H...Cl (3.167(2) A). Both N-H atoms in a complex A interact with chlorine anions. A number of weak C-H...Cl contacts stabilize the three-dimensional crystal structure. In the isolated molecule of (PAA) 2 H · Cl + optimized by the PM3 method, there also are two independent hydrogen bonded complexes. In complex A the natural form of 1-piperidineacetic acid interacts with its anionic form, while in complex B the 1-piperidiniumacetic acid, as a cation, forms a hydrogen bond with its zwitterionic form. FTIR spectrum of bis(1-piperidiniumacetate) hydrochloride has been analysed and discussed. (author)

  17. Hydrogen bonding strength of diblock copolymers affects the self-assembled structures with octa-functionalized phenol POSS nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Syuan; Yu, Chia-Yu; Lin, Yung-Chih; Kuo, Shiao-Wei

    2016-02-28

    In this study, the influence of the functional groups by the diblock copolymers of poly(styrene-b-4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP), poly(styrene-b-2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP), and poly(styrene-b-methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) on their blends with octa-functionalized phenol polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (OP-POSS) nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated. The relative hydrogen bonding strengths in these blends follow the order PS-b-P4VP/OP-POSS > PS-b-P2VP/OP-POSS > PS-b-PMMA/OP-POSS based on the Kwei equation from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analyses. Small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopic analyses show that the morphologies of the self-assembly structures are strongly dependent on the hydrogen bonding strength at relatively higher OP-POSS content. The PS-b-P4VP/OP-POSS hybrid complex system with the strongest hydrogen bonds shows the order-order transition from lamellae to cylinders and finally to body-centered cubic spheres upon increasing OP-POSS content. However, PS-b-P2VP/OP-POSS and PS-b-PMMA/OP-POSS hybrid complex systems, having relatively weaker hydrogen bonds, transformed from lamellae to cylinder structures at lower OP-POSS content (50 wt%).

  18. Crystal structure and hydrogen bonding in N-(1-deoxy-β-d-fructopyranos-1-yl-2-aminoisobutyric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeri V. Mossine

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, alternatively called d-fructose-2-aminoisobutyric acid (FruAib, C10H19NO7, (I, crystallizes exclusively in the β-pyranose form, with two conformationally non-equivalent molecules [(IA and (IB] in the asymmetric unit. In solution, FruAib establishes an equilibrium, with 75.6% of the population consisting of β-pyranose, 10.4% β-furanose, 10.1% α-furanose, 3.0% α-pyranose and <0.7% the acyclic forms. The carbohydrate ring in (I has the normal 2C5 chair conformation and the amino acid portion is in the zwitterion form. Bond lengths and valence angles compare well with the average values from related pyranose structures. All carboxyl, hydroxy and ammonium groups are involved in hydrogen bonding and form a three-dimensional network of infinite chains that are connected through homodromic rings and short chains. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds bridge the amino acid and sugar portions in both molecules. A comparative Hirshfeld surfaces analysis of FruAib and four other sugar–amino acids suggests an increasing role of intramolecular heteroatom interactions in crystal structures with an increasing proportion of C—H bonds.

  19. Nuclear and chromatin structures and their influence on the radiosensitivity of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleinick, N.L.; Chiu, S.-M.

    1994-01-01

    Among the factors contributing to the distribution of DNA damage within irradiated mammalian cell nuclei are the interactions of DNA with nuclear proteins and the formation of multi-molecular chromatin structures. Studies on the manipulation of chromatin structures of isolated nuclei are summarised. The majority of chromatin within the nucleus of living cells is tightly compacted into nucleosomal superhelices and other higher order structures which have a limited ability to be damaged by radiation. The treatment of isolated nuclei with hypotonic buffers causes a decondensation of these structures and markedly sensitises the DNA to radiation, while retaining the majority of the chromosomal proteins. On the other hand, treatment of nuclei with hypertonic buffers strips the DNA of specific classes of nuclear proteins, destroying chromatin structure, and this procedure also enhances the sensitivity of the DNA to radiation. The various expanded chromatin structures are models for the structure of the minor fraction of DNA which is decondensed in preparation for transcription or replication. The combined results indicate that the majority of nuclear DNA is protected by histones and other nuclear proteins from radiation damage, partially as a result of the limited accessibility of the condensed structures to hydroxyl radical and partially as a result of the scavenging of radicals by the proteins. (Author)

  20. [Structural organization of 5S ribosomal DNA of Rosa rugosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynkevych, Iu O; Volkov, R A

    2014-01-01

    In order to clarify molecular organization of the genomic region encoding 5S rRNA in diploid species Rosa rugosa several 5S rDNA repeated units were cloned and sequenced. Analysis of the obtained sequences revealed that only one length variant of 5S rDNA repeated units, which contains intact promoter elements in the intergenic spacer region (IGS) and appears to be transcriptionally active is present in the genome. Additionally, a limited number of 5S rDNA pseudogenes lacking a portion of coding sequence and the complete IGS was detected. A high level of sequence similarity (from 93.7 to 97.5%) between the IGS of major 5S rDNA variants of East Asian R. rugosa and North American R. nitida was found indicating comparatively recent divergence of these species.

  1. Assembly and microscopic characterization of DNA origami structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheible, Max; Jungmann, Ralf; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2012-01-01

    DNA origami is a revolutionary method for the assembly of molecular nanostructures from DNA with precisely defined dimensions and with an unprecedented yield. This can be utilized to arrange nanoscale components such as proteins or nanoparticles into pre-defined patterns. For applications it will now be of interest to arrange such components into functional complexes and study their geometry-dependent interactions. While commonly DNA nanostructures are characterized by atomic force microscopy or electron microscopy, these techniques often lack the time-resolution to study dynamic processes. It is therefore of considerable interest to also apply fluorescence microscopic techniques to DNA nanostructures. Of particular importance here is the utilization of novel super-resolved microscopy methods that enable imaging beyond the classical diffraction limit.

  2. The accuracy of molecular bond lengths computed by multireference electronic structure methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, Ron; Kedziora, Gary S.; Lischka, Hans; Shavitt, Isaiah; Mueller, Thomas; Szalay, Peter G.; Kallay, Mihaly; Seth, Michael

    2008-01-01

    We compare experimental R e values with computed R e values for 20 molecules using three multireference electronic structure methods, MCSCF, MR-SDCI, and MR-AQCC. Three correlation-consistent orbital basis sets are used, along with complete basis set extrapolations, for all of the molecules. These data complement those computed previously with single-reference methods. Several trends are observed. The SCF R e values tend to be shorter than the experimental values, and the MCSCF values tend to be longer than the experimental values. We attribute these trends to the ionic contamination of the SCF wave function and to the corresponding systematic distortion of the potential energy curve. For the individual bonds, the MR-SDCI R e values tend to be shorter than the MR-AQCC values, which in turn tend to be shorter than the MCSCF values. Compared to the previous single-reference results, the MCSCF values are roughly comparable to the MP4 and CCSD methods, which are more accurate than might be expected due to the fact that these MCSCF wave functions include no extra-valence electron correlation effects. This suggests that static valence correlation effects, such as near-degeneracies and the ability to dissociate correctly to neutral fragments, play an important role in determining the shape of the potential energy surface, even near equilibrium structures. The MR-SDCI and MR-AQCC methods predict R e values with an accuracy comparable to, or better than, the best single-reference methods (MP4, CCSD, and CCSD(T)), despite the fact that triple and higher excitations into the extra-valence orbital space are included in the single-reference methods but are absent in the multireference wave functions. The computed R e values using the multireference methods tend to be smooth and monotonic with basis set improvement. The molecular structures are optimized using analytic energy gradients, and the timings for these calculations show the practical advantage of using variational wave

  3. The accuracy of molecular bond lengths computed by multireference electronic structure methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, Ron [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: shepard@tcg.anl.gov; Kedziora, Gary S. [High Performance Technologies Inc., 2435 5th Street, WPAFB, OH 45433 (United States); Lischka, Hans [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 17, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Shavitt, Isaiah [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 600 S. Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Mueller, Thomas [Juelich Supercomputer Centre, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Szalay, Peter G. [Laboratory for Theoretical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Eoetvoes Lorand University, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Kallay, Mihaly [Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, P.O. Box 91, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary); Seth, Michael [Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive, N.W., Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2008-06-16

    We compare experimental R{sub e} values with computed R{sub e} values for 20 molecules using three multireference electronic structure methods, MCSCF, MR-SDCI, and MR-AQCC. Three correlation-consistent orbital basis sets are used, along with complete basis set extrapolations, for all of the molecules. These data complement those computed previously with single-reference methods. Several trends are observed. The SCF R{sub e} values tend to be shorter than the experimental values, and the MCSCF values tend to be longer than the experimental values. We attribute these trends to the ionic contamination of the SCF wave function and to the corresponding systematic distortion of the potential energy curve. For the individual bonds, the MR-SDCI R{sub e} values tend to be shorter than the MR-AQCC values, which in turn tend to be shorter than the MCSCF values. Compared to the previous single-reference results, the MCSCF values are roughly comparable to the MP4 and CCSD methods, which are more accurate than might be expected due to the fact that these MCSCF wave functions include no extra-valence electron correlation effects. This suggests that static valence correlation effects, such as near-degeneracies and the ability to dissociate correctly to neutral fragments, play an important role in determining the shape of the potential energy surface, even near equilibrium structures. The MR-SDCI and MR-AQCC methods predict R{sub e} values with an accuracy comparable to, or better than, the best single-reference methods (MP4, CCSD, and CCSD(T)), despite the fact that triple and higher excitations into the extra-valence orbital space are included in the single-reference methods but are absent in the multireference wave functions. The computed R{sub e} values using the multireference methods tend to be smooth and monotonic with basis set improvement. The molecular structures are optimized using analytic energy gradients, and the timings for these calculations show the practical

  4. Stability and recovery of DNA origami structure with cation concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yang; Liu, Ting; Xu, Yan; Zhu, Shanshan; Zhu, Jun; Ye, Kai; Huang, Guang; Dannong, He

    2018-01-01

    We synthesized triangular and rectangular DNA origami nanostructures and investigated the stability and recovery of them under low cation concentration. Our results demonstrated that the origami nanostructures would melt when incubated in low cation concentration, and recover whilst kept in the concentration for less than 10 min. However, extending the incubation time would lead to irreversible melting. Our results show the possibility of application of DNA origami nanostructures for things such as a sensor for cation concentration response, etc.

  5. Chip-package nano-structured copper and nickel interconnections with metallic and polymeric bonding interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ankur

    developed to address the IC packaging requirements beyond the ITRS projections and to introduce innovative design and fabrication concepts that will further advance the performance of the chip, the package, and the system board. The nano-structured interconnect technology simultaneously packages all the ICs intact in wafer form with quantum jump in the number of interconnections with the lowest electrical parasitics. The intrinsic properties of nano materials also enable several orders of magnitude higher interconnect densities with the best mechanical properties for the highest reliability and yet provide higher current and heat transfer densities. Nano-structured interconnects provides the ability to assemble the packaged parts on the system board without the use of underfill materials and to enable advanced analog/digital testing, reliability testing, and burn-in at wafer level. This thesis investigates the electrical and mechanical performance of nanostructured interconnections through modeling and test vehicle fabrication. The analytical models evaluate the performance improvements over solder and compliant interconnections. Test vehicles with nano-interconnections were fabricated using low cost electro-deposition techniques and assembled with various bonding interfaces. Interconnections were fabricated at 200 micron pitch to compare with the existing solder joints and at 50 micron pitch to demonstrate fabrication processes at fine pitches. Experimental and modeling results show that the proposed nano-interconnections could enhance the reliability and potentially meet all the system performance requirements for the emerging micro/nano-systems.

  6. Structural basis for sequence-specific recognition of DNA by TAL effectors

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Dong

    2012-01-05

    TAL (transcription activator-like) effectors, secreted by phytopathogenic bacteria, recognize host DNA sequences through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each repeat comprises 33 to 35 conserved amino acids and targets a specific base pair by using two hypervariable residues [known as repeat variable diresidues (RVDs)] at positions 12 and 13. Here, we report the crystal structures of an 11.5-repeat TAL effector in both DNA-free and DNA-bound states. Each TAL repeat comprises two helices connected by a short RVD-containing loop. The 11.5 repeats form a right-handed, superhelical structure that tracks along the sense strand of DNA duplex, with RVDs contacting the major groove. The 12th residue stabilizes the RVD loop, whereas the 13th residue makes a base-specific contact. Understanding DNA recognition by TAL effectors may facilitate rational design of DNA-binding proteins with biotechnological applications.

  7. High-Throughput Analysis of T-DNA Location and Structure Using Sequence Capture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichi Inagaki

    Full Text Available Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of plants with T-DNA is used both to introduce transgenes and for mutagenesis. Conventional approaches used to identify the genomic location and the structure of the inserted T-DNA are laborious and high-throughput methods using next-generation sequencing are being developed to address these problems. Here, we present a cost-effective approach that uses sequence capture targeted to the T-DNA borders to select genomic DNA fragments containing T-DNA-genome junctions, followed by Illumina sequencing to determine the location and junction structure of T-DNA insertions. Multiple probes can be mixed so that transgenic lines transformed with different T-DNA types can be processed simultaneously, using a simple, index-based pooling approach. We also developed a simple bioinformatic tool to find sequence read pairs that span the junction between the genome and T-DNA or any foreign DNA. We analyzed 29 transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, each containing inserts from 4 different T-DNA vectors. We determined the location of T-DNA insertions in 22 lines, 4 of which carried multiple insertion sites. Additionally, our analysis uncovered a high frequency of unconventional and complex T-DNA insertions, highlighting the needs for high-throughput methods for T-DNA localization and structural characterization. Transgene insertion events have to be fully characterized prior to use as commercial products. Our method greatly facilitates the first step of this characterization of transgenic plants by providing an efficient screen for the selection of promising lines.

  8. High-Throughput Analysis of T-DNA Location and Structure Using Sequence Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Soichi; Henry, Isabelle M; Lieberman, Meric C; Comai, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of plants with T-DNA is used both to introduce transgenes and for mutagenesis. Conventional approaches used to identify the genomic location and the structure of the inserted T-DNA are laborious and high-throughput methods using next-generation sequencing are being developed to address these problems. Here, we present a cost-effective approach that uses sequence capture targeted to the T-DNA borders to select genomic DNA fragments containing T-DNA-genome junctions, followed by Illumina sequencing to determine the location and junction structure of T-DNA insertions. Multiple probes can be mixed so that transgenic lines transformed with different T-DNA types can be processed simultaneously, using a simple, index-based pooling approach. We also developed a simple bioinformatic tool to find sequence read pairs that span the junction between the genome and T-DNA or any foreign DNA. We analyzed 29 transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, each containing inserts from 4 different T-DNA vectors. We determined the location of T-DNA insertions in 22 lines, 4 of which carried multiple insertion sites. Additionally, our analysis uncovered a high frequency of unconventional and complex T-DNA insertions, highlighting the needs for high-throughput methods for T-DNA localization and structural characterization. Transgene insertion events have to be fully characterized prior to use as commercial products. Our method greatly facilitates the first step of this characterization of transgenic plants by providing an efficient screen for the selection of promising lines.

  9. Structural stability of DNA origami nanostructures in the presence of chaotropic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Krainer, Georg; Grundmeier, Guido; Schlierf, Michael; Keller, Adrian

    2016-05-21

    DNA origami represent powerful platforms for single-molecule investigations of biomolecular processes. The required structural integrity of the DNA origami may, however, pose significant limitations regarding their applicability, for instance in protein folding studies that require strongly denaturing conditions. Here, we therefore report a detailed study on the stability of 2D DNA origami triangles in the presence of the strong chaotropic denaturing agents urea and guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) and its dependence on concentration and temperature. At room temperature, the DNA origami triangles are stable up to at least 24 h in both denaturants at concentrations as high as 6 M. At elevated temperatures, however, structural stability is governed by variations in the melting temperature of the individual staple strands. Therefore, the global melting temperature of the DNA origami does not represent an accurate measure of their structural stability. Although GdmCl has a stronger effect on the global melting temperature, its attack results in less structural damage than observed for urea under equivalent conditions. This enhanced structural stability most likely originates from the ionic nature of GdmCl. By rational design of the arrangement and lengths of the individual staple strands used for the folding of a particular shape, however, the structural stability of DNA origami may be enhanced even further to meet individual experimental requirements. Overall, their high stability renders DNA origami promising platforms for biomolecular studies in the presence of chaotropic agents, including single-molecule protein folding or structural switching.

  10. A self-consistent MoD-WM/MM structural refinement method: characterization of hydrogen bonding in the orytricha nova G-1uar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Newcomer, Micharel B [YALE UNIV; Raggin, Christina M [YALE UNIV; Gascon, Jose A [YALE UNIV; Loria, J Patrick [YALE UNIV; Batista, Victor S [YALE UNIV

    2008-01-01

    This paper generalizes the MoD-QM/MM hybrid method, developed for ab initio computations of protein electrostatic potentials [Gasc6n, l.A.; Leung, S.S.F.; Batista, E.R.; Batista, V.S. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2006,2, 175-186], as a practical algorithm for structural refinement of extended systems. The computational protocol involves a space-domain decomposition scheme for the formal fragmentation of extended systems into smaller, partially overlapping, molecular domains and the iterative self-consistent energy minimization of the constituent domains by relaxation of their geometry and electronic structure. The method accounts for mutual polarization of the molecular domains, modeled as Quantum-Mechanical (QM) layers embedded in the otherwise classical Molecular-Mechanics (MM) environment according to QM/MM hybrid methods. The method is applied to the description of benchmark models systems that allow for direct comparisons with full QM calculations, and subsequently applied to the structural characterization of the DNA Oxytricha nova Guanine quadruplex (G4). The resulting MoD-QM/MM structural model of the DNA G4 is compared to recently reported highresolution X-ray diffraction and NMR models, and partially validated by direct comparisons between {sup 1}H NMR chemical shifts that are highly sensitive to hydrogen-bonding and stacking interactions and the corresponding theoretical values obtained at the density functional theory DFT QM/MM (BH&H/6-31 G*:Amber) level in conjunction with the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method for the ab initio self consistent-field (SCF) calculation of NMR chemical shifts.

  11. Graphical linking of MO multicenter bond index and VB structures. II-5-c rings and 6-c heterocyclic rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollini, Carlos Guido; Giambiagi, Mario; Giambiagi, Myriam Segre de; Figueiredo, Aloysio Paiva de

    2001-02-01

    Through the graphical method proposed it is possible to set a link between an MO multicenter bond index and VB structures. The value of the index depends on the order of the atoms involved if they are more than three. For 5-c rings three basic structures are required; the eventually different values are 12. Unlike the 6-c case it may happen that different pairs of basic structures are used to build the same polygon. For the 6-c rings including heteroatoms the original degeneracy of benzene splits leading eventually to 60 different I ring values. (author)

  12. Ab initio study of electron-ion structure factors in binary liquids with different types of chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevets, Ivan; Bryk, Taras

    2014-01-01

    Electron-ion structure factors, calculated in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, are reported for several binary liquids with different kinds of chemical bonding: metallic liquid alloy Bi–Pb, molten salt RbF, and liquid water. We derive analytical expressions for the long-wavelength asymptotes of the partial electron-ion structure factors of binary systems and show that the analytical results are in good agreement with the ab initio simulation data. The long-wavelength behaviour of the total charge structure factors for the three binary liquids is discussed

  13. Graphical linking of MO multicenter bond index and VB structures. II-5-c rings and 6-c heterocyclic rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bollini, C G; Giambiagi, M

    2001-01-01

    Through the graphical method proposed it is possible to set a link between an MO multicenter bond index and VB structures. The value of the index depends on the order of the atoms involved if they are more than three. For 5-c rings three basic structures are required; the eventually different values are 12. Unlike the 6-c case it may happen that different pairs of basic structures are used to build the same polygon. For the 6-c rings including heteroatoms the original degeneracy of benzene splits leading eventually to 60 different I sub r sub i sub n sub g values.

  14. Genetics, structure, and prevalence of FP967 (CDC Triffid) T-DNA in flax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lester; Hammerlindl, Joseph; Babic, Vivijan; McLeod, Jamille; Sharpe, Andrew; Matsalla, Chad; Bekkaoui, Faouzi; Marquess, Leigh; Booker, Helen M

    2015-01-01

    The detection of T-DNA from a genetically modified flaxseed line (FP967, formally CDC Triffid) in a shipment of Canadian flaxseed exported to Europe resulted in a large decrease in the amount of flax planted in Canada. The Canadian flaxseed industry undertook major changes to ensure the removal of FP967 from the supply chain. This study aimed to resolve the genetics and structure of the FP967 transfer DNA (T-DNA). The FP967 T-DNA is thought to be inserted in at single genomic locus. The junction between the T-DNA and genomic DNA consisted of two inverted Right Borders with no Left Border (LB) flanking genomic DNA sequences recovered. This information was used to develop an event-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay. This assay and an existing assay specific to the T-DNA construct were used to determine the genetics and prevalence of the FP967 T-DNA. These data supported the hypothesis that the T-DNA is present at a single location in the genome. The FP967 T-DNA is present at a low level (between 0.01 and 0.1%) in breeder seed lots from 2009 and 2010. None of the 11,000 and 16,000 lines selected for advancement through the Flax Breeding Program in 2010 and 2011, respectively, tested positive for the FP967 T-DNA, however. Most of the FP967 T-DNA sequence was resolved via PCR cloning and next generation sequencing. A 3,720 bp duplication of an internal portion of the T-DNA (including a Right Border) was discovered between the flanking genomic DNA and the LB. An event-specific assay, SAT2-LB, was developed for the junction between this repeat and the LB.

  15. Effect of confinement on bond strength of hot-dip galvanized lap splices in concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhran, Mazen

    2004-01-01

    Galvanizing the reinforcing steel is one of the methods used to protect bars against corrosion. Galvanizing is a hot dip process where the reinforcing bars are immersed in an aqueous pre flux solution of zinc ammonium chloride at a controlled temperature between 840 and 850 degrees F. In 2001, a research program was started at AUB to evaluate experimentally the effect of hot dip galvanizing on the bond capacity of tension lap splices anchored in full-scale beam specimens designed to fail in bond splitting mode. The test results indicated that the use of galvanized bars had a negligible effect on bond strength of reinforcement in normal strength. However, galvanizing caused an average of 20 percent decrease in bond strength of reinforcement in high strength concrete. The primary objective of research reported in this thesis, is the need to find a solution to eliminate the bond reduction of galvanized bars in high strength concrete. It is significant to evaluate the positive effect of the addition of transverse reinforcement in the splice region. The hypothesis to be tested is that such transverse reinforcement will insure uniform bond stress distribution over the entire splice region, thus mobilizing all bar lugs along the splice in the stress transfer mechanism between the bar and the surrounding concrete. Such mechanism might reduce the significant decrease in bond strength in high strength concrete due to galvanizing. To achieve this objective, eighteen full-scale beam specimens were tested in positive bending. Each beam was reinforced with bars spliced in a constant moment region at midspam. The splice length was chosen in such a way that the beams failed in bond splitting of the concrete cover in the splice region. The main variables were type of coating (black or galvanized bars), bar size (20, 25 and 32 mm), and amount of transverse reinforcement in the splice region (0, 2 or 4 stirrups). The test results indicated that confinement did not have a significant

  16. Weld-bonding: a very well adapted joining technique to decrease the weight of steel structures; Le soudo-collage: une technique d'assemblage performante pour alleger les structures en acier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charbonnet, Ph.; Clad, A.; Di Fant-Jaeckels, H.; Thirion, J.L. [Usinor RD, 92 - Puteaux (France)

    2000-04-01

    The association of spot welding and adhesive bonding, named weld-bonding, is a steel joining technique which increasingly interests car manufacturers. Nevertheless, weld-bonding is not at present used extensively by them due to a lack of data related to the performance of this technique. Studies carried out by Usinor have succeeded in demonstrating that weld-bonding is a very well adapted joining technique to decrease the weight of steel structures. (author)

  17. Investigating the structural impacts of I64T and P311S mutations in APE1-DNA complex: a molecular dynamics approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C George Priya Doss

    Full Text Available Elucidating the molecular dynamic behavior of Protein-DNA complex upon mutation is crucial in current genomics. Molecular dynamics approach reveals the changes on incorporation of variants that dictate the structure and function of Protein-DNA complexes. Deleterious mutations in APE1 protein modify the physicochemical property of amino acids that affect the protein stability and dynamic behavior. Further, these mutations disrupt the binding sites and prohibit the protein to form complexes with its interacting DNA.In this study, we developed a rapid and cost-effective method to analyze variants in APE1 gene that are associated with disease susceptibility and evaluated their impacts on APE1-DNA complex dynamic behavior. Initially, two different in silico approaches were used to identify deleterious variants in APE1 gene. Deleterious scores that overlap in these approaches were taken in concern and based on it, two nsSNPs with IDs rs61730854 (I64T and rs1803120 (P311S were taken further for structural analysis.Different parameters such as RMSD, RMSF, salt bridge, H-bonds and SASA applied in Molecular dynamic study reveals that predicted deleterious variants I64T and P311S alters the structure as well as affect the stability of APE1-DNA interacting functions. This study addresses such new methods for validating functional polymorphisms of human APE1 which is critically involved in causing deficit in repair capacity, which in turn leads to genetic instability and carcinogenesis.

  18. Crystal Structures of DNA-Whirly Complexes and Their Role in Arabidopsis Organelle Genome Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappadocia, Laurent; Maréchal, Alexandre; Parent, Jean-Sébastien; Lepage, Étienne; Sygusch, Jurgen; Brisson, Normand (Montreal)

    2010-09-07

    DNA double-strand breaks are highly detrimental to all organisms and need to be quickly and accurately repaired. Although several proteins are known to maintain plastid and mitochondrial genome stability in plants, little is known about the mechanisms of DNA repair in these organelles and the roles of specific proteins. Here, using ciprofloxacin as a DNA damaging agent specific to the organelles, we show that plastids and mitochondria can repair DNA double-strand breaks through an error-prone pathway similar to the microhomology-mediated break-induced replication observed in humans, yeast, and bacteria. This pathway is negatively regulated by the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding proteins from the Whirly family, thus indicating that these proteins could contribute to the accurate repair of plant organelle genomes. To understand the role of Whirly proteins in this process, we solved the crystal structures of several Whirly-DNA complexes. These reveal a nonsequence-specific ssDNA binding mechanism in which DNA is stabilized between domains of adjacent subunits and rendered unavailable for duplex formation and/or protein interactions. Our results suggest a model in which the binding of Whirly proteins to ssDNA would favor accurate repair of DNA double-strand breaks over an error-prone microhomology-mediated break-induced replication repair pathway.

  19. Syntheses, structures and characterizations of three novel vanadium selenites with organically bonded copper/nickel complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Cheng; Kong, Fang; Mao, Jiang-Gao

    2016-01-01

    A series of vanadium selenites covalently bonded with metal-organic complex, namely, Ni(2,2-bipy) 2 V 2 O 4 (SeO 3 ) 2 (1), Cu(2,2-bipy)V 2 O 4 (SeO 3 ) 2 ·0.5H 2 O (2) and Cu 2 (2,2-bipy) 2 V 5 O 12 (SeO 3 ) 2 (3) (2,2-bipy=2,2-bipyridine) have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. They exhibit three different structural dimensions, from 0D cluster, 1D chain to 2D layer. Compound 1 features a 0D {Ni(2,2-bipy) 2 V 2 O 4 (SeO 3 ) 2 } 2 dimeric cluster composed of two {Ni(2,2-bipy) 2 } 2+ moieties connected by the {V 4 O 8 (SeO 3 ) 4 } 4- cluster. Compound 2 shows a 1D {Cu(2,2-bipy)V 2 O 4 (SeO 3 ) 2 } n chain in which the {Cu 2 (2,2-bipy) 2 } 4+ moieties are bridged by the {V 4 O 8 (SeO 3 ) 4 } 4− clusters. Compound 3 displays a 2D structure consisted of mixed valence vanadium selenites layers {V IV V V 4 Se IV 2 O 18 } n 4− and {Cu(2,2-bipy)} 2+ complex moieties. The adjacent layers are further interconnected via π-π interactions between the 2,2-bipy ligands exhibiting an interesting 3D supramolecular architecture. Both compound 1 and 2 contain a new {V 4 O 8 (SeO 3 ) 4 } 4− cluster and compound 3 exhibits the first 2D vanadate polyhedral layer in vanadium selenites/tellurites with organic moieties. - Graphical abstract: We got three new vanadium selenites with organically linked copper/nickel complex, namely, Ni(2,2-bipy) 2 V 2 O 4 (SeO 3 ) 2 (1), Cu(2,2-bipy)V 2 O 4 (SeO 3 ) 2 ·0.5H 2 O (2) and Cu 2 (2,2-bipy) 2 V 5 O 12 (SeO 3 ) 2 (3) by hydrothermally syntheses. They display three different structural dimensions, from 0D cluster, to 1D chain and 2D layer. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Three new compounds display three different structural dimensions, from 0D cluster, to 1D chain and 2D layer. • The Tetranuclear {V 4 O 8 (SeO 3 ) 4 } 4− cluster and the vanadate {V 5 O 17 } n 2D layer are observed firstly. • Optical Properties and Magnetic Properties of three compounds are reported.

  20. Syntheses, structures and characterizations of three novel vanadium selenites with organically bonded copper/nickel complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Cheng [College of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Kong, Fang [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Mao, Jiang-Gao, E-mail: mjg@fjirsm.ac.cn [College of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

    2016-06-15

    A series of vanadium selenites covalently bonded with metal-organic complex, namely, Ni(2,2-bipy){sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 4}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2} (1), Cu(2,2-bipy)V{sub 2}O{sub 4}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}·0.5H{sub 2}O (2) and Cu{sub 2}(2,2-bipy){sub 2}V{sub 5}O{sub 12}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2} (3) (2,2-bipy=2,2-bipyridine) have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. They exhibit three different structural dimensions, from 0D cluster, 1D chain to 2D layer. Compound 1 features a 0D {Ni(2,2-bipy)_2V_2O_4(SeO_3)_2}{sub 2} dimeric cluster composed of two {Ni(2,2-bipy)_2}{sup 2+} moieties connected by the {V_4O_8(SeO_3)_4}{sup 4-} cluster. Compound 2 shows a 1D {Cu(2,2-bipy)V_2O_4(SeO_3)_2}{sub n} chain in which the {Cu_2(2,2-bipy)_2}{sup 4+} moieties are bridged by the {V_4O_8(SeO_3)_4}{sup 4−} clusters. Compound 3 displays a 2D structure consisted of mixed valence vanadium selenites layers {V"I"VV"V_4Se"I"V_2O_1_8}{sub n}{sup 4−} and {Cu(2,2-bipy)}{sup 2+} complex moieties. The adjacent layers are further interconnected via π-π interactions between the 2,2-bipy ligands exhibiting an interesting 3D supramolecular architecture. Both compound 1 and 2 contain a new {V_4O_8(SeO_3)_4}{sup 4−} cluster and compound 3 exhibits the first 2D vanadate polyhedral layer in vanadium selenites/tellurites with organic moieties. - Graphical abstract: We got three new vanadium selenites with organically linked copper/nickel complex, namely, Ni(2,2-bipy){sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 4}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2} (1), Cu(2,2-bipy)V{sub 2}O{sub 4}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}·0.5H{sub 2}O (2) and Cu{sub 2}(2,2-bipy){sub 2}V{sub 5}O{sub 12}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2} (3) by hydrothermally syntheses. They display three different structural dimensions, from 0D cluster, to 1D chain and 2D layer. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Three new compounds display three different structural dimensions, from 0D cluster, to 1D chain and 2D layer. • The Tetranuclear {V_4O_8(SeO_3)_4}{sup 4−} cluster and the vanadate {V

  1. From bifluorenylidene dianion to dibenzo[g,p]chrysene dianion: sensitivity of anisotropy changes to bonding structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shenhar, R.; Beust, R.; Hagen, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    of the dianions. Electron counting and orbital considerations rationalize this correlation in terms of aromatic/anti-aromatic behaviour that is mixed into the character of the aromatic PAH upon reduction. Predictions made regarding relative stability based on this correlation were successfully tested against......Five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of the C-26 series having similar bonding structure yield dianions upon reduction with lithium metal. Anisotropy changes, revealed from an advanced charge distribution analysis performed on these dianions, show a correlation to the bonding structure...... calculation and experiment. The anisotropy change is suggested as a valid index for the reduction-induced change in the aromatic character of PAHs, which is applicable for both aromatic and anti-aromatic changes....

  2. Evolution of the structure and hydrogen bonding configuration in annealed hydrogenated a-Si/a-Ge multilayers and layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigeri, C.; Nasi, L.; Serenyi, M.; Khanh, N.Q.; Csik, A.; Szekrenyes, Zs.; Kamaras, K.

    2012-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Among the present available renewable energy sources, energy harvesting from sunlight by means of photovoltaic cells is the most attractive one. In order to win over the traditional energy resources both efficiency and cost effectiveness of photovoltaic conversion must be optimized as far as possible. Efficiency is basically improved by the use of multijunction cells containing semiconductors with different band-gap. In this respect, the III-V compounds guarantee the highest efficiency, up to 41.6 %, but they are quite expensive. The latter drawback also affects other compounds like CdTe and CuIn 1-x Ga x Se 2 (CIGS). Si based solar devices have lower efficiency but are much more cost effective. They can use either crystalline or amorphous Si thin layers or Si nanoparticles. As to the thin films, amorphous Si (a-Si) is preferred to crystalline Si as it has a wider band-gap (1.7 instead of 1.1 eV) thus harvesting a larger portion of solar energy. A tandem cell is formed by using a-SiGe which has a smaller band-gap tunable between 1.1 and 1.7 eV depending on the Ge content. The best value should be 1.4 eV since the material properties seem to degrade below this value whilst the photo-conductivity drops after light soaking if the band gap exceeds 1.4 eV. A key issue of amorphous Si, Ge and SiGe is the high density of defects in the band-gap mostly due to dangling bonds whose density is particularly high (even up to 5 x10 19 cm -3 ) since the lattice is significantly disordered with distorted bond angles and lengths. This increases the probability of rupture of the Si-Si (Ge-Ge) bonds, i.e., formation of dangling bonds. Owing to the fact that hydrogen with its single electron structure can close the dangling bonds, their density can be reduced even by 4 orders of magnitude by doping with hydrogen. However, H is unstable in the host lattice. In fact, several findings showed its evolution from the thin layer upon annealing and that

  3. Recognition of damaged DNA by Escherichia coli Fpg protein: insights from structural and kinetic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Douglas, Kenneth T.; Nevinsky, Georgy A.

    2003-01-01

    Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg) excises oxidized purines from damaged DNA. The recent determination of the three-dimensional structure of the covalent complex of DNA with Escherichia coli Fpg, obtained by reducing the Schiff base intermediate formed during the reaction [Gilboa et al., J. Biol. Chem. 277 (2002) 19811] has revealed a number of potential specific and non-specific interactions between Fpg and DNA. We analyze the structural data for Fpg in the light of the kinetic and thermodynamic data obtained by the method of stepwise increase in ligand complexity to estimate relative contributions of individual nucleotide units of lesion-containing DNA to its total affinity for this enzyme [Ishchenko et al., Biochemistry 41 (2002) 7540]. Stopped-flow kinetic analysis that has allowed the dissection of Fpg catalysis in time [Fedorova et al., Biochemistry 41 (2002) 1520] is also correlated with the structural data

  4. DNA degradation by bleomycin: evidence for 2'R-proton abstraction and for C-O bond cleavage accompanying base propenal formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajmera, S.; Wu, J.C.; Worth, L. Jr.; Rabow, L.E.; Stubbe, J.; Kozarich, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Reaction of poly(dA-[2'S- 3 H]dU) with activated bleomycin yields [ 3 H] uracil propenal that completely retains the tritium label. In contrast, the authors have previously shown that reaction of poly(dA-[2'R- 3 H]dU) with activated bleomycin affords unlabeled uracil propenal. They have also prepared both cis- and trans-thymine propenals by chemical synthesis and have observed that the trans isomer is the exclusive product of the bleomycin reaction. Moreover, the cis isomer was found to be stable to the conditions of bleomycin-induced DNA degradation. Taken together, these results establish that the formation of trans-uracil propenal occurs via an anti-elimination mechanism with the stereospecific abstraction of the 2R proton. The question of phosphodiester bond cleavage during base propenal formation has also been addressed by the analysis of the fate of oxygen-18 in poly(dA-[3'- 18 O]dT) upon reaction with activated bleomycin. The 5'-monophosphate oligonucleotide ends produced from thymine propenal formation have been converted to inorganic phosphate by the action of alkaline phosphatase, and the phosphate has been analyzed for 18 O content by 31 P NMR spectroscopy. The oxygen-18 is retained in the inorganic phosphate, establishing that the formation of thymine propenal by activated bleomycin proceeds with C-O bond cleavage at the 3-position

  5. Intramolecular CH···O hydrogen bonds in the AI and BI DNA-like conformers of canonical nucleosides and their Watson-Crick pairs. Quantum chemical and AIM analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurenko, Yevgen P; Zhurakivsky, Roman O; Samijlenko, Svitlana P; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this work is to cast some light on the H-bonds in double-stranded DNA in its AI and BI forms. For this purpose, we have performed the MP2 and DFT quantum chemical calculations of the canonical nucleoside conformers, relative to the AI and BI DNA forms, and their Watson-Crick pairs, which were regarded as the simplest models of the double-stranded DNA. Based on the atoms-in-molecules analysis (AIM), five types of the CH···O hydrogen bonds, involving bases and sugar, were detected numerically from 1 to 3 per a conformer: C2'H···O5', C1'H···O2, C6H···O5', C8H···O5', and C6H···O4'. The energy values of H-bonds occupy the range of 2.3-5.6 kcal/mol, surely exceeding the kT value (0.62 kcal/mol). The nucleoside CH···O hydrogen bonds appeared to "survive" turns of bases against the sugar, sometimes in rather large ranges of the angle values, pertinent to certain conformations, which points out to the source of the DNA lability, necessary for the conformational adaptation in processes of its functioning. The calculation of the interactions in the dA·T nucleoside pair gives evidence, that additionally to the N6H···O4 and N1···N3H canonical H-bonds, between the bases adenine and thymine the third one (C2H···O2) is formed, which, though being rather weak (about 1 kcal/mol), satisfies the AIM criteria of H-bonding and may be classified as a true H-bond. The total energy of all the CH···O nontraditional intramolecular H-bonds in DNA nucleoside pairs appeared to be commensurable with the energy of H-bonds between the bases in Watson-Crick pairs, which implies their possible important role in the DNA shaping.

  6. Enhancing prospective chemistry teachers cognitive structures in the topics of bonding and hybridization by internet-assisted chemistry applications

    OpenAIRE

    Özge Özyalçın Oskay, Sinem Dinçol

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of internet-assisted chemistry applications on prospective chemistry teachers’ cognitive structures in the topics of bonding and hybridization. The sample of the study consisted of 36 prospective chemistry teachers attending Hacettepe University, Faculty of Education, the Department of Chemistry Education in 2010-2011 academic year and taking Basic Chemistry I lesson. In the study, students were separated into experimental and control gr...

  7. Intra-/Intermolecular Bifurcated Chalcogen Bonding in Crystal Structure of Thiazole/Thiadiazole Derived Binuclear (DiaminocarbenePdII Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Mikherdov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The coupling of cis-[PdCl2(CNXyl2] (Xyl = 2,6-Me2C6H3 with 4-phenylthiazol-2-amine in molar ratio 2:3 at RT in CH2Cl2 leads to binuclear (diaminocarbenePdII complex 3c. The complex was characterized by HRESI+-MS, 1H NMR spectroscopy, and its structure was elucidated by single-crystal XRD. Inspection of the XRD data for 3c and for three relevant earlier obtained thiazole/thiadiazole derived binuclear diaminocarbene complexes (3a EYOVIZ; 3b: EYOWAS; 3d: EYOVOF suggests that the structures of all these species exhibit intra-/intermolecular bifurcated chalcogen bonding (BCB. The obtained data indicate the presence of intramolecular S•••Cl chalcogen bonds in all of the structures, whereas varying of substituent in the 4th and 5th positions of the thiazaheterocyclic fragment leads to changes of the intermolecular chalcogen bonding type, viz. S•••π in 3a,b, S•••S in 3c, and S•••O in 3d. At the same time, the change of heterocyclic system (from 1,3-thiazole to 1,3,4-thiadiazole does not affect the pattern of non-covalent interactions. Presence of such intermolecular chalcogen bonding leads to the formation of one-dimensional (1D polymeric chains (for 3a,b, dimeric associates (for 3c, or the fixation of an acetone molecule in the hollow between two diaminocarbene complexes (for 3d in the solid state. The Hirshfeld surface analysis for the studied X-ray structures estimated the contributions of intermolecular chalcogen bonds in crystal packing of 3a–d: S•••π (3a: 2.4%; 3b: 2.4%, S•••S (3c: less 1%, S•••O (3d: less 1%. The additionally performed DFT calculations, followed by the topological analysis of the electron density distribution within the framework of Bader’s theory (AIM method, confirm the presence of intra-/intermolecular BCB S•••Cl/S•••S in dimer of 3c taken as a model system (solid state geometry. The AIM analysis demonstrates the presence of appropriate bond critical points for these

  8. Structural and functional analyses of DNA-sensing and immune activation by human cGAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kazuki; Ishii, Ryohei; Goto, Eiji; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Tokunaga, Fuminori; Nureki, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    The detection of cytosolic DNA, derived from pathogens or host cells, by cytosolic receptors is essential for appropriate host immune responses. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a newly identified cytosolic DNA receptor that produces cyclic GMP-AMP, which activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING), resulting in TBK1-IRF3 pathway activation followed by the production of type I interferons. Here we report the crystal structure of human cGAS. The structure revealed that a cluster of lysine and arginine residues forms the positively charged DNA binding surface of human cGAS, which is important for the STING-dependent immune activation. A structural comparison with other previously determined cGASs and our functional analyses suggested that a conserved zinc finger motif and a leucine residue on the DNA binding surface are crucial for the DNA-specific immune response of human cGAS, consistent with previous work. These structural features properly orient the DNA binding to cGAS, which is critical for DNA-induced cGAS activation and STING-dependent immune activation. Furthermore, we showed that the cGAS-induced activation of STING also involves the activation of the NF-κB and IRF3 pathways. Our results indicated that cGAS is a DNA sensor that efficiently activates the host immune system by inducing two distinct pathways.

  9. Structural and functional analyses of DNA-sensing and immune activation by human cGAS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Kato

    Full Text Available The detection of cytosolic DNA, derived from pathogens or host cells, by cytosolic receptors is essential for appropriate host immune responses. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS is a newly identified cytosolic DNA receptor that produces cyclic GMP-AMP, which activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING, resulting in TBK1-IRF3 pathway activation followed by the production of type I interferons. Here we report the crystal structure of human cGAS. The structure revealed that a cluster of lysine and arginine residues forms the positively charged DNA binding surface of human cGAS, which is important for the STING-dependent immune activation. A structural comparison with other previously determined cGASs and our functional analyses suggested that a conserved zinc finger motif and a leucine residue on the DNA binding surface are crucial for the DNA-specific immune response of human cGAS, consistent with previous work. These structural features properly orient the DNA binding to cGAS, which is critical for DNA-induced cGAS activation and STING-dependent immune activation. Furthermore, we showed that the cGAS-induced activation of STING also involves the activation of the NF-κB and IRF3 pathways. Our results indicated that cGAS is a DNA sensor that efficiently activates the host immune system by inducing two distinct pathways.

  10. Tertiary Structures of the Escherichia coli and Human Chromosome 21 Molecules of DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzálek, Petr; Kypr, Jaroslav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 283, č. 1 (2001), s. 219-223 ISSN 0006-291X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5004802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : DNA crystal structures * phosphorus atom representation * genomic DNA molecules Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.946, year: 2001

  11. Structure and decoy-mediated inhibition of the SOX18/Prox1-DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Miriam; Prokoph, Nina; Girbig, Mathias; Wang, Xuecong; Huang, Yong-Heng; Srivastava, Yogesh; Hou, Linlin; Narasimhan, Kamesh; Kolatkar, Prasanna R; Francois, Mathias; Jauch, Ralf

    2016-05-05

    The transcription factor (TF) SOX18 drives lymphatic vessel development in both embryogenesis and tumour-induced neo-lymphangiogenesis. Genetic disruption of Sox18 in a mouse model protects from tumour metastasis and established the SOX18 protein as a molecular target. Here, we report the crystal structure of the SOX18 DNA binding high-mobility group (HMG) box bound to a DNA element regulating Prox1 transcription. The crystals diffracted to 1.75Å presenting the highest resolution structure of a SOX/DNA complex presently available revealing water structure, structural adjustments at the DNA contact interface and non-canonical conformations of the DNA backbone. To explore alternatives to challenging small molecule approaches for targeting the DNA-binding activity of SOX18, we designed a set of five decoys based on modified Prox1-DNA. Four decoys potently inhibited DNA binding of SOX18 in vitro and did not interact with non-SOX TFs. Serum stability, nuclease resistance and thermal denaturation assays demonstrated that a decoy circularized with a hexaethylene glycol linker and terminal phosphorothioate modifications is most stable. This SOX decoy also interfered with the expression of a luciferase reporter under control of a SOX18-dependent VCAM1 promoter in COS7 cells. Collectively, we propose SOX decoys as potential strategy for inhibiting SOX18 activity to disrupt tumour-induced neo-lymphangiogenesis. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Structural basis for the cooperative DNA recognition by Smad4 MH1 dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburajendran, Nithya; Jauch, Ralf; Tan, Clara Yueh Zhen; Narasimhan, Kamesh; Kolatkar, Prasanna R.

    2011-01-01

    Smad proteins form multimeric complexes consisting of the ‘common partner’ Smad4 and receptor regulated R-Smads on clustered DNA binding sites. Deciphering how pathway specific Smad complexes multimerize on DNA to regulate gene expression is critical for a better understanding of the cis-regulatory logic of TGF-β and BMP signaling. To this end, we solved the crystal structure of the dimeric Smad4 MH1 domain bound to a palindromic Smad binding element. Surprisingly, the Smad4 MH1 forms a constitutive dimer on the SBE DNA without exhibiting any direct protein–protein interactions suggesting a DNA mediated indirect readout mechanism. However, the R-Smads Smad1, Smad2 and Smad3 homodimerize with substantially decreased efficiency despite pronounced structural similarities to Smad4. Therefore, intricate variations in the DNA structure induced by different Smads and/or variant energetic profiles likely contribute to their propensity to dimerize on DNA. Indeed, competitive binding assays revealed that the Smad4/R-Smad heterodimers predominate under equilibrium conditions while R-Smad homodimers are least favored. Together, we present the structural basis for DNA recognition by Smad4 and demonstrate that Smad4 constitutively homo- and heterodimerizes on DNA in contrast to its R-Smad partner proteins by a mechanism independent of direct protein contacts. PMID:21724602

  13. X-Ray Diffraction and the Discovery of the Structure of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouse, David T.

    2007-01-01

    A method is described for teaching the analysis of X-ray diffraction of DNA through a series of steps utilizing the original methods used by James Watson, Francis Crick, Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin. The X-ray diffraction pattern led to the conclusion of the basic helical structure of DNA and its dimensions while basic chemical principles…

  14. DNA Structure and Supercoiling: Ribbons and a Yo-Yo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, J. David

    2011-01-01

    The double-helical structure of DNA is a pop cultural icon. Images of the DNA molecule appear in newspapers, popular journals, and advertisements. In addition to scientific instrument sales, the aura surrounding the central molecule of life has been used to sell everything from perfume to beverages and is the inspiration of items ranging from…

  15. A computational approach for the annotation of hydrogen-bonded base interactions in crystallographic structures of the ribozymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamdani, Hazrina Yusof, E-mail: hazrina@mfrlab.org [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi (Malaysia); Advanced Medical and Dental Institute, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Bertam, Kepala Batas (Malaysia); Artymiuk, Peter J., E-mail: p.artymiuk@sheffield.ac.uk [Dept. of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Firth Court, University of Sheffield, S10 T2N Sheffield (United Kingdom); Firdaus-Raih, Mohd, E-mail: firdaus@mfrlab.org [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    A fundamental understanding of the atomic level interactions in ribonucleic acid (RNA) and how they contribute towards RNA architecture is an important knowledge platform to develop through the discovery of motifs from simple arrangements base pairs, to more complex arrangements such as triples and larger patterns involving non-standard interactions. The network of hydrogen bond interactions is important in connecting bases to form potential tertiary motifs. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of automated methods for annotating RNA 3D structures based on hydrogen bond interactions. COnnection tables Graphs for Nucleic ACids (COGNAC) is automated annotation system using graph theoretical approaches that has been developed for the identification of RNA 3D motifs. This program searches for patterns in the unbroken networks of hydrogen bonds for RNA structures and capable of annotating base pairs and higher-order base interactions, which ranges from triples to sextuples. COGNAC was able to discover 22 out of 32 quadruples occurrences of the Haloarcula marismortui large ribosomal subunit (PDB ID: 1FFK) and two out of three occurrences of quintuple interaction reported by the non-canonical interactions in RNA (NCIR) database. These and several other interactions of interest will be discussed in this paper. These examples demonstrate that the COGNAC program can serve as an automated annotation system that can be used to annotate conserved base-base interactions and could be added as additional information to established RNA secondary structure prediction methods.

  16. A computational approach for the annotation of hydrogen-bonded base interactions in crystallographic structures of the ribozymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdani, Hazrina Yusof; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of the atomic level interactions in ribonucleic acid (RNA) and how they contribute towards RNA architecture is an important knowledge platform to develop through the discovery of motifs from simple arrangements base pairs, to more complex arrangements such as triples and larger patterns involving non-standard interactions. The network of hydrogen bond interactions is important in connecting bases to form potential tertiary motifs. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of automated methods for annotating RNA 3D structures based on hydrogen bond interactions. COnnection tables Graphs for Nucleic ACids (COGNAC) is automated annotation system using graph theoretical approaches that has been developed for the identification of RNA 3D motifs. This program searches for patterns in the unbroken networks of hydrogen bonds for RNA structures and capable of annotating base pairs and higher-order base interactions, which ranges from triples to sextuples. COGNAC was able to discover 22 out of 32 quadruples occurrences of the Haloarcula marismortui large ribosomal subunit (PDB ID: 1FFK) and two out of three occurrences of quintuple interaction reported by the non-canonical interactions in RNA (NCIR) database. These and several other interactions of interest will be discussed in this paper. These examples demonstrate that the COGNAC program can serve as an automated annotation system that can be used to annotate conserved base-base interactions and could be added as additional information to established RNA secondary structure prediction methods

  17. A Reference-Free and Non-Contact Method for Detecting and Imaging Damage in Adhesive-Bonded Structures Using Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timotius Yonathan Sunarsa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Adhesive bonded structures have been widely used in aerospace, automobile, and marine industries. Due to the complex nature of the failure mechanisms of bonded structures, cost-effective and reliable damage detection is crucial for these industries. Most of the common damage detection methods are not adequately sensitive to the presence of weakened bonding. This paper presents an experimental and analytical method for the in-situ detection of damage in adhesive-bonded structures. The method is fully non-contact, using air-coupled ultrasonic transducers (ACT for ultrasonic wave generation and sensing. The uniqueness of the proposed method relies on accurate detection and localization of weakened bonding in complex adhesive bonded structures. The specimens tested in this study are parts of real-world structures with critical and complex damage types, provided by Hyundai Heavy Industries® and IKTS Fraunhofer®. Various transmitter and receiver configurations, including through transmission, pitch-catch scanning, and probe holder angles, were attempted, and the obtained results were analyzed. The method examines the time-of-flight of the ultrasonic waves over a target inspection area, and the spatial variation of the time-of-flight information was examined to visualize and locate damage. The proposed method works without relying on reference data obtained from the pristine condition of the target specimen. Aluminum bonded plates and triplex adhesive layers with debonding and weakened bonding were used to examine the effectiveness of the method.

  18. Local stability perturbation in DNA structure induced by chain discontinuities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorcano, J.L.; Mingot, F.; Davila, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    The thermal dependence of parameter ''h'' (number of base pairs broken near to internucleotide breaks) is studied. At 25degC, 0,2 M Na + and pH 7, the ''h'' value is about 12. Far from DNA melting temperature, ''h'' is not dependent upon ionic strength and it depends very little on temperature. This behavior suggests a non cooperative, entropically driven chain unzipping from terminals. Near melting temperature, ''h'' shows a thermal dependence asymptotic to Tm, and correlated with DNA composition. It seems to correspond to the cooperative denaturation. ''h'' values have been calculated from double and single break probabilities evaluated from hydrodynamically determined molecular weight distributions. (author)

  19. AID-induced decrease in topoisomerase 1 induces DNA structural alteration and DNA cleavage for class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Maki; Aida, Masatoshi; Nagaoka, Hitoshi; Begum, Nasim A; Kitawaki, Yoko; Nakata, Mikiyo; Stanlie, Andre; Doi, Tomomitsu; Kato, Lucia; Okazaki, Il-mi; Shinkura, Reiko; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Kinoshita, Kazuo; Honjo, Tasuku

    2009-12-29

    To initiate class switch recombination (CSR) activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) induces staggered nick cleavage in the S region, which lies 5' to each Ig constant region gene and is rich in palindromic sequences. Topoisomerase 1 (Top1) controls the supercoiling of DNA by nicking, rotating, and religating one strand of DNA. Curiously, Top1 reduction or AID overexpression causes the genomic instability. Here, we report that the inactivation of Top1 by its specific inhibitor camptothecin drastically blocked both the S region cleavage and CSR, indicating that Top1 is responsible for the S region cleavage in CSR. Surprisingly, AID expression suppressed Top1 mRNA translation and reduced its protein level. In addition, the decrease in the Top1 protein by RNA-mediated knockdown augmented the AID-dependent S region cleavage, as well as CSR. Furthermore, Top1 reduction altered DNA structure of the Smu region. Taken together, AID-induced Top1 reduction alters S region DNA structure probably to non-B form, on which Top1 can introduce nicks but cannot religate, resulting in S region cleavage.

  20. Structural basis for proficient incorporation of dTTP opposite O6-methylguanine by human DNA polymerase iota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Matthew G; Choi, Jeong-Yun; Egli, Martin; Guengerich, F Peter

    2010-12-24

    O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)-methylG) is highly mutagenic and is commonly found in DNA exposed to methylating agents, even physiological ones (e.g. S-adenosylmethionine). The efficiency of a truncated, catalytic DNA polymerase ι core enzyme was determined for nucleoside triphosphate incorporation opposite O(6)-methylG, using steady-state kinetic analyses. The results presented here corroborate previous work from this laboratory using full-length pol ι, which showed that dTTP incorporation occurs with high efficiency opposite O(6)-methylG. Misincorporation of dTTP opposite O(6)-methylG occurred with ∼6-fold higher efficiency than incorporation of dCTP. Crystal structures of the truncated form of pol ι with O(6)-methylG as the template base and incoming dCTP or dTTP were solved and showed that O(6)-methylG is rotated into the syn conformation in the pol ι active site and that dTTP misincorporation by pol ι is the result of Hoogsteen base pairing with the adduct. Both dCTP and dTTP base paired with the Hoogsteen edge of O(6)-methylG. A single, short hydrogen bond formed between the N3 atom of dTTP and the N7 atom of O(6)-methylG. Protonation of the N3 atom of dCTP and bifurcation of the N3 hydrogen between the N7 and O(6) atoms of O(6)-methylG allow base pairing of the lesion with dCTP. We conclude that differences in the Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding between nucleotides is the main factor in the preferential selectivity of dTTP opposite O(6)-methylG by human pol ι, in contrast to the mispairing modes observed previously for O(6)-methylG in the structures of the model DNA polymerases Sulfolobus solfataricus Dpo4 and Bacillus stearothermophilus DNA polymerase I.

  1. Structure solution of DNA-binding proteins and complexes with ARCIMBOLDO libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pröpper, Kevin [University of Göttingen, (Germany); Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC), (Spain); Meindl, Kathrin; Sammito, Massimo [Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC), (Spain); Dittrich, Birger; Sheldrick, George M. [University of Göttingen, (Germany); Pohl, Ehmke, E-mail: ehmke.pohl@durham.ac.uk [Durham University, (United Kingdom); Usón, Isabel, E-mail: ehmke.pohl@durham.ac.uk [Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC), (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), (Spain); University of Göttingen, (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    The structure solution of DNA-binding protein structures and complexes based on the combination of location of DNA-binding protein motif fragments with density modification in a multi-solution frame is described. Protein–DNA interactions play a major role in all aspects of genetic activity within an organism, such as transcription, packaging, rearrangement, replication and repair. The molecular detail of protein–DNA interactions can be best visualized through crystallography, and structures emphasizing insight into the principles of binding and base-sequence recognition are essential to understanding the subtleties of the underlying mechanisms. An increasing number of high-quality DNA-binding protein structure determinations have been witnessed despite the fact that the crystallographic particularities of nucleic acids tend to pose specific challenges to methods primarily developed for proteins. Crystallographic structure solution of protein–DNA complexes therefore remains a challenging area that is in need of optimized experimental and computational methods. The potential of the structure-solution program ARCIMBOLDO for the solution of protein–DNA complexes has therefore been assessed. The method is based on the combination of locating small, very accurate fragments using the program Phaser and density modification with the program SHELXE. Whereas for typical proteins main-chain α-helices provide the ideal, almost ubiquitous, small fragments to start searches, in the case of DNA complexes the binding motifs and DNA double helix constitute suitable search fragments. The aim of this work is to provide an effective library of search fragments as well as to determine the optimal ARCIMBOLDO strategy for the solution of this class of structures.

  2. A DNA Origami Mechanical Device for the Regulation of Microcosmic Structural Rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Neng; Hong, Zhouping; Wang, Huading; Fu, Xin; Zhang, Ziyue; Li, Chao; Xia, Han; Fang, Yan; Li, Maoteng; Zhan, Yi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2017-11-01

    DNA origami makes it feasible to fabricate a tremendous number of DNA nanostructures with various geometries, dimensions, and functionalities. Moreover, an increasing amount of research on DNA nanostructures is focused on biological and biomedical applications. Here, the reversible regulation of microcosmic structural rigidity is accomplished using a DNA origami device in vitro. The designed DNA origami monomer is composed of an internal central axis and an external sliding tube. Due to the external tube sliding, the device transforms between flexible and rigid states. By transporting the device into the liposome, the conformational change of the origami device induces a structural change in the liposome. The results obtained demonstrate that the programmed DNA origami device can be applied to regulate the microcosmic structural rigidity of liposomes. Because microcosmic structural rigidity is important to cell proliferation and function, the results obtained potentially provide a foundation for the regulation of cell microcosmic structural rigidity using DNA nanostructures. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Effect of 8-Oxoguanine on DNA Structure and Deformability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dršata, Tomáš; Kara, M.; Zacharias, M.; Lankaš, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 39 (2013), s. 11617-11622 ISSN 1520-6106 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular-dynamics simulations * B-DNA * glycosylase MutM Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.377, year: 2013

  4. The effect of higher order chromatin structure on DNA damage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, L.S.; Warters, R.L.; Higashikubo, R.

    1985-01-01

    Alterations in chromatin structure are thought to play an important role in various radiobiological end points, i.e., DNA damage, DNA damage repair and cell survival. The authors use here the isoleucine deprivation technique to decondense higher order chromatin structure and asses X-ray induced DNA damage, DNA damage repair and cell survival on cells with decondensed chromatin as compared to controls. This chromatin decondensation manifests itself as a 30 fold decrease in nuclear area occupied by heterochromatin, an increased rate of Micrococcal nuclease digestion, 15% increased ethidium bromide intercalation and an altered binding capacity of Hl histone. These chromatin/nuclear changes do not affect X-ray induced DNA damage as measured by the alkaline elution technique or cell survival but slows DNA damage repair by 2 fold. Therefore, even though the chromatin appears more accessible to DNA damage and repair processes, these particular nuclear changes do not affect the DNA damaging effects of X-rays and in addition, repair is not enhanced by the ''relaxed'' state of chromatin. It is proposed that the altered metabolic state of isoleucine deprived cells provides a less efficient system for the repair of X-ray induced DNA damage

  5. Accurate first-principles structures and energies of diversely bonded systems from an efficient density functional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianwei; Remsing, Richard C; Zhang, Yubo; Sun, Zhaoru; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Peng, Haowei; Yang, Zenghui; Paul, Arpita; Waghmare, Umesh; Wu, Xifan; Klein, Michael L; Perdew, John P

    2016-09-01

    One atom or molecule binds to another through various types of bond, the strengths of which range from several meV to several eV. Although some computational methods can provide accurate descriptions of all bond types, those methods are not efficient enough for many studies (for example, large systems, ab initio molecular dynamics and high-throughput searches for functional materials). Here, we show that the recently developed non-empirical strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) within the density functional theory framework predicts accurate geometries and energies of diversely bonded molecules and materials (including covalent, metallic, ionic, hydrogen and van der Waals bonds). This represents a significant improvement at comparable efficiency over its predecessors, the GGAs that currently dominate materials computation. Often, SCAN matches or improves on the accuracy of a computationally expensive hybrid functional, at almost-GGA cost. SCAN is therefore expected to have a broad impact on chemistry and materials science.

  6. Enhancing structural integrity of adhesive bonds through pulsed laser surface micro-machining

    KAUST Repository

    Diaz, Edwin Hernandez

    2015-01-01

    of different kinds of heterogeneous surface properties that may replicate this behavior and the mechanisms at work. In order to do this, we used pulsed laser ablation on copper substrates (CuZn40) aiming to increase adhesion for bonding. A Yb-fiber laser

  7. Time and frequency structure of causal correlation networks in the China bond market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongxing; Yan, Yan; Chen, Xiaosong

    2017-07-01

    There are more than eight hundred interest rates published in the China bond market every day. Identifying the benchmark interest rates that have broad influences on most other interest rates is a major concern for economists. In this paper, a multi-variable Granger causality test is developed and applied to construct a directed network of interest rates, whose important nodes, regarded as key interest rates, are evaluated with CheiRank scores. The results indicate that repo rates are the benchmark of short-term rates, the central bank bill rates are in the core position of mid-term interest rates network, and treasury bond rates lead the long-term bond rates. The evolution of benchmark interest rates from 2008 to 2014 is also studied, and it is found that SHIBOR has generally become the benchmark interest rate in China. In the frequency domain we identify the properties of information flows between interest rates, and the result confirms the existence of market segmentation in the China bond market.

  8. Effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, vibrational analysis and molecular structure of 4-chlorobenzothioamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çırak, Çağrı; Sert, Yusuf; Ucun, Fatih

    2013-09-01

    In the present work, the experimental and theoretical vibrational spectra of 4-chlorobenzothioamide were investigated. The FT-IR (400-4000 cm-1) and μ-Raman spectra (100-4000 cm-1) of 4-chlorobenzothioamide in the solid phase were recorded. The geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles), vibrational frequencies, Infrared and Raman intensities of the title molecule in the ground state were calculated using ab initio Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (B3LYP) methods with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set for the first time. The optimized geometric parameters and the theoretical vibrational frequencies were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data and with the results found in the literature. The vibrational frequencies were assigned based on the potential energy distribution using the VEDA 4 program. The dimeric form of 4-chlorobenzothioamide was also simulated to evaluate the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the vibrational frequencies. It was observed that the Nsbnd H stretching modes shifted to lower frequencies, while the in-plane and out-of-plane bending modes shifted to higher frequencies due to the intermolecular Nsbnd H⋯S hydrogen bond. Also, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies and diagrams were presented.

  9. Effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, vibrational analysis and molecular structure of a biomolecule: 5-Hydroxymethyluracil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çırak, Çağrı; Sert, Yusuf; Ucun, Fatih

    2014-06-01

    In the present work, the experimental and theoretical vibrational spectra of 5-hydroxymethyluracil were investigated. The FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) spectrum of the molecule in the solid phase was recorded. The geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles), vibrational frequencies, Infrared intensities of the title molecule in the ground state were calculated using density functional B3LYP and M06-2X methods with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set for the first time. The optimized geometric parameters and theoretical vibrational frequencies were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data, and with the results found in the literature. The vibrational frequencies were assigned based on the potential energy distribution using the VEDA 4 program. The dimeric form of 5-hydroxymethyluracil molecule was also simulated to evaluate the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on its vibrational frequencies. It was observed that the Nsbnd H stretching modes shifted to lower frequencies, while its in-plane and out-of-plane bending modes shifted to higher frequencies due to the intermolecular Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond. Also, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies and diagrams were presented.

  10. Covalent Bonding of Chlorogenic Acid Induces Structural Modifications on Sunflower Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karefyllakis, D.; Salakou, Stavroula; Bitter, J.H.; Goot, van der A.J.; Nikiforidis, K.

    2018-01-01

    Proteins and phenols coexist in the confined space of plant cells leading to reactions between them, which result in new covalently bonded complex molecules. This kind of reactions has been widely observed during storage and processing of plant materials. However, the nature of the new complex

  11. A study of the linear free energy model for DNA structures using the generalized Hamiltonian formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavari, M., E-mail: yavari@iaukashan.ac.ir [Islamic Azad University, Kashan Branch (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    We generalize the results of Nesterenko [13, 14] and Gogilidze and Surovtsev [15] for DNA structures. Using the generalized Hamiltonian formalism, we investigate solutions of the equilibrium shape equations for the linear free energy model.

  12. Assembly and structural analysis of a covalently closed nano-scale DNA cage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Félicie Faucon; Knudsen, Bjarne; Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto De

    2008-01-01

    for investigations of DNA-interacting enzymes. More recently, strategies for synthesis of more complex two-dimensional (2D) and 3D DNA structures have emerged. However, the building of such structures is still in progress and more experiences from different research groups and different fields of expertise...... be described as a nano-scale DNA cage, Hence, in theory it could hold proteins or other bio-molecules to enable their investigation in certain harmful environments or even allow their organization into higher order structures...... The inherent properties of DNA as a stable polymer with unique affinity for partner molecules determined by the specific Watson-Crick base pairing makes it an ideal component in self-assembling structures. This has been exploited for decades in the design of a variety of artificial substrates...

  13. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, DNA binding and Nuclease activity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    s12039-016-1125-x. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, DNA binding and Nuclease activity of lanthanide(III) complexes of 2-benzoylpyridine acetylhydrazone. KARREDDULA RAJA, AKKILI SUSEELAMMA and KATREDDI HUSSAIN REDDY. ∗.

  14. Introducing improved structural properties and salt dependence into a coarse-grained model of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snodin, Benedict E. K., E-mail: benedict.snodin@chem.ox.ac.uk; Mosayebi, Majid; Schreck, John S.; Romano, Flavio; Doye, Jonathan P. K., E-mail: jonathan.doye@chem.ox.ac.uk [Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Randisi, Ferdinando [Life Sciences Interface Doctoral Training Center, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom); Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Šulc, Petr [Center for Studies in Physics and Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Ouldridge, Thomas E. [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College, 180 Queen’s Gate, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Tsukanov, Roman; Nir, Eyal [Department of Chemistry and the Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel); Louis, Ard A. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-21

    We introduce an extended version of oxDNA, a coarse-grained model of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) designed to capture the thermodynamic, structural, and mechanical properties of single- and double-stranded DNA. By including explicit major and minor grooves and by slightly modifying the coaxial stacking and backbone-backbone interactions, we improve the ability of the model to treat large (kilobase-pair) structures, such as DNA origami, which are sensitive to these geometric features. Further, we extend the model, which was previously parameterised to just one salt concentration ([Na{sup +}] = 0.5M), so that it can be used for a range of salt concentrations including those corresponding to physiological conditions. Finally, we use new experimental data to parameterise the oxDNA potential so that consecutive adenine bases stack with a different strength to consecutive thymine bases, a feature which allows a more accurate treatment of systems where the flexibility of single-stranded regions is important. We illustrate the new possibilities opened up by the updated model, oxDNA2, by presenting results from simulations of the structure of large DNA objects and by using the model to investigate some salt-dependent properties of DNA.

  15. Introducing improved structural properties and salt dependence into a coarse-grained model of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snodin, Benedict E. K.; Mosayebi, Majid; Schreck, John S.; Romano, Flavio; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Randisi, Ferdinando; Šulc, Petr; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Tsukanov, Roman; Nir, Eyal; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an extended version of oxDNA, a coarse-grained model of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) designed to capture the thermodynamic, structural, and mechanical properties of single- and double-stranded DNA. By including explicit major and minor grooves and by slightly modifying the coaxial stacking and backbone-backbone interactions, we improve the ability of the model to treat large (kilobase-pair) structures, such as DNA origami, which are sensitive to these geometric features. Further, we extend the model, which was previously parameterised to just one salt concentration ([Na + ] = 0.5M), so that it can be used for a range of salt concentrations including those corresponding to physiological conditions. Finally, we use new experimental data to parameterise the oxDNA potential so that consecutive adenine bases stack with a different strength to consecutive thymine bases, a feature which allows a more accurate treatment of systems where the flexibility of single-stranded regions is important. We illustrate the new possibilities opened up by the updated model, oxDNA2, by presenting results from simulations of the structure of large DNA objects and by using the model to investigate some salt-dependent properties of DNA

  16. Distinct Mechanisms of Nuclease-Directed DNA-Structure-Induced Genetic Instability in Cancer Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junhua; Wang, Guliang; Del Mundo, Imee M; McKinney, Jennifer A; Lu, Xiuli; Bacolla, Albino; Boulware, Stephen B; Zhang, Changsheng; Zhang, Haihua; Ren, Pengyu; Freudenreich, Catherine H; Vasquez, Karen M

    2018-01-30

    Sequences with the capacity to adopt alternative DNA structures have been implicated in cancer etiology; however, the mechanisms are unclear. For example, H-DNA-forming sequences within oncogenes have been shown to stimulate genetic instability in mammals. Here, we report that H-DNA-forming sequences are enriched at translocation breakpoints in human cancer genomes, further implicating them in cancer etiology. H-DNA-induced mutations were suppressed in human cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair nucleases, ERCC1-XPF and XPG, but were stimulated in cells deficient in FEN1, a replication-related endonuclease. Further, we found that these nucleases cleaved H-DNA conformations, and the interactions of modeled H-DNA with ERCC1-XPF, XPG, and FEN1 proteins were explored at the sub-molecular level. The results suggest mechanisms of genetic instability triggered by H-DNA through distinct structure-specific, cleavage-based replication-independent and replication-dependent pathways, providing critical evidence for a role of the DNA structure itself in the etiology of cancer and other human diseases. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydrogen-bonding effects on film structure and photoelectrochemical properties of porphyrin and fullerene composites on nanostructured TiO 2 electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kira, Aiko; Tanaka, Masanobu; Umeyama, Tomokazu; Matano, Yoshihiro; Yoshimoto, Naoki; Zhang, Yi; Ye, Shen; Lehtivuori, Heli; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen-bonding effects on film structures and photophysical, photoelectrochemical, and photovoltaic properties have been examined in mixed films of porphyrin and fullerene composites with and without hydrogen bonding on nanostructured TiO2 electrodes. The nanostructured TiO2 electrodes modified

  18. Last stop on the road to repair: structure of E. coli DNA ligase bound to nicked DNA-adenylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakumar, Jayakrishnan; Nair, Pravin A; Shuman, Stewart

    2007-04-27

    NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases (LigA) are ubiquitous in bacteria and essential for growth. Their distinctive substrate specificity and domain organization vis-a-vis human ATP-dependent ligases make them outstanding targets for anti-infective drug discovery. We report here the 2.3 A crystal structure of Escherichia coli LigA bound to an adenylylated nick, which captures LigA in a state poised for strand closure and reveals the basis for nick recognition. LigA envelopes the DNA within a protein clamp. Large protein domain movements and remodeling of the active site orchestrate progression through the three chemical steps of the ligation reaction. The structure inspires a strategy for inhibitor design.

  19. Perturbations in DNA structure upon interaction with porphyrins revealed by chemical probes, DNA footprinting and molecular modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, K G; Neidle, S

    1995-06-01

    The interactions of several porphyrins with a 74 base-pair DNA sequence have been examined by footprinting and chemical protection methods. Tetra-(4-N-methyl-(pyridyl)) porphyrin (TMPy), two of its metal complexes and tetra-(4-trimethylanilinium) porphyrin (TMAP) bind to closely similar AT-rich sequences. The three TMPy ligands produce modest changes in DNA structure and base accessibility on binding, in contrast to the large-scale conformational changes observed with TMAP. Molecular modelling studies have been performed on TMPy and TMAP bound in the AT-rich minor groove of an oligonucleotide. These have shown that significant structural change is needed to accommodate the bulky trimethyl substituent groups of TMAP, in contrast to the facile minor groove fit of TMPy.

  20. RDNAnalyzer: A tool for DNA secondary structure prediction and sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Shehzadi, Abida; Nadeem, Shahid; Husnain, Tayyab

    2012-01-01

    RDNAnalyzer is an innovative computer based tool designed for DNA secondary structure prediction and sequence analysis. It can randomly generate the DNA sequence or user can upload the sequences of their own interest in RAW format. It uses and extends the Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm and has various application for the sequence analysis. It predicts the DNA secondary structure and base pairings. It also provides the tools for routinely performed sequence analysis by the biological scientists such as DNA replication, reverse compliment generation, transcription, translation, sequence specific information as total number of nucleotide bases, ATGC base contents along with their respective percentages and sequence cleaner. RDNAnalyzer is a unique tool developed in Microsoft Visual Studio 2008 using Microsoft Visual C# and Windows Presentation Foundation and provides user friendly environment for sequence analysis. It is freely available. http://www.cemb.edu.pk/sw.html RDNAnalyzer - Random DNA Analyser, GUI - Graphical user interface, XAML - Extensible Application Markup Language.

  1. Structure and dynamics of a [1:1] drug-DNA complex: Analysis of 2D NMR data using molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, R.H.; Sarma, M.H.; Umemoto, K.

    1990-01-01

    1D/2D NMR studies are reported for a [1:1] complex of d(GA 4 T 4 C) 2 and Dst2 (an analogue of distamycin A). Full- Matrix NOESY Simulations, Molecular Mechanics and Molecular Dynamics Calculations are performed to analyze the NMR data. Results show that drug-DNA complex formation is driven by static features like H-bonding and steric interactions in the minor-groove of DNA. As a consequence of drug binding, a non-linear oscillatory mode is activated. In this mode the molecule samples equilibrium structural states of difference degrees of bending. It is noted that these structures belong to three distinctly different energy wells that satisfy the same NMR data. 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  2. A DNA Structural Alphabet Distinguishes Structural Features of DNA Bound to Regulatory Proteins and in the Nucleosome Core Particle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schneider, Bohdan; Bozikova, Paulina; Čech, P.; Svozil, D.; Černý, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 278. ISSN 2073-4425 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) EF16_013/0001777 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : DNA * DNA-protein recognition * transcription factors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 3.600, year: 2016

  3. DHX9 helicase is involved in preventing genomic instability induced by alternatively structured DNA in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aklank; Bacolla, Albino; Del Mundo, Imee M; Zhao, Junhua; Wang, Guliang; Vasquez, Karen M

    2013-12-01

    Sequences that have the capacity to adopt alternative (i.e. non-B) DNA structures in the human genome have been implicated in stimulating genomic instability. Previously, we found that a naturally occurring intra-molecular triplex (H-DNA) caused genetic instability in mammals largely in the form of DNA double-strand breaks. Thus, it is of interest to determine the mechanism(s) involved in processing H-DNA. Recently, we demonstrated that human DHX9 helicase preferentially unwinds inter-molecular triplex DNA in vitro. Herein, we used a mutation-reporter system containing H-DNA to examine the relevance of DHX9 activity on naturally occurring H-DNA structures in human cells. We found that H-DNA significantly increased mutagenesis in small-interfering siRNA-treated, DHX9-depleted cells, affecting mostly deletions. Moreover, DHX9 associated with H-DNA in the context of supercoiled plasmids. To further investigate the role of DHX9 in the recognition/processing of H-DNA, we performed binding assays in vitro and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in U2OS cells. DHX9 recognized H-DNA, as evidenced by its binding to the H-DNA structure and enrichment at the H-DNA region compared with a control region in human cells. These composite data implicate DHX9 in processing H-DNA structures in vivo and support its role in the overall maintenance of genomic stability at sites of alternatively structured DNA.

  4. Structural Analysis of DNA Interactions with Magnesium Ion Studied by Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    S. Ponkumar; P. Duraisamy; N. Iyandurai

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: In the present study, FT Raman spectroscopy had been used to extend our knowledge about Magnesium ion - DNA interactions at various volume ratios (1:50, 1:20, 1:10 and 1:5). Approach: The analysis of FT Raman data supported the existence of structural specificities in the interaction and also the stability of DNA secondary structure. Results: Results from the Raman spectra clearly indicate that the interaction of Magnesium ion with DNA is mainly through the phosphate groups...

  5. The Hydrogen Bonded Structures of Two 5-Bromobarbituric Acids and Analysis of Unequal C5–X and C5–X′ Bond Lengths (X = X′ = F, Cl, Br or Me in 5,5-Disubstituted Barbituric Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gelbrich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the methanol hemisolvate of 5,5-dibromobarbituric acid (1MH displays an H-bonded layer structure which is based on N–H∙∙∙O=C, N–H∙∙∙O(MeOH and (MeOHO–H∙∙∙O interactions. The barbiturate molecules form an H-bonded substructure which has the fes topology. 5,5′-Methanediylbis(5-bromobarbituric acid 2, obtained from a solution of 5,5-dibromobarbituric acid in nitromethane, displays a N–H···O=C bonded framework of the sxd type. The conformation of the pyridmidine ring and the lengths of the ring substituent bonds C5–X and C5–X′ in crystal forms of 5,5-dibromobarbituric acid and three closely related analogues (X = X′ = Br, Cl, F, Me have been investigated. In each case, a conformation close to a C5-endo envelope is correlated with a significant lengthening of the axial C5–X′ in comparison to the equatorial C5–X bond. Isolated molecule geometry optimizations at different levels of theory confirm that the C5-endo envelope is the global conformational energy minimum of 5,5-dihalogenbarbituric acids. The relative lengthening of the axial bond is therefore interpreted as an inherent feature of the preferred envelope conformation of the pyrimidine ring, which minimizes repulsive interactions between the axial substituent and pyrimidine ring atoms.

  6. Direct AFM observation of an opening event of a DNA cuboid constructed via a prism structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Masayuki; Hidaka, Kumi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2011-04-07

    A cuboid structure was constructed using a DNA origami design based on a square prism structure. The structure was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering. The real-time opening event of the cuboid was directly observed by high-speed AFM.

  7. WRN Exonuclease Structure, Molecular Mechanism, and DNA EndProcessing Role

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Yannone, Steven M.; Holden, Lauren G.; Hitomi, Chiharu; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Han, Seungil; Cooper, PriscillaK.; Chen, David J.; Tainer, John A.

    2006-02-15

    WRN is unique among the five human RecQ DNA helicases by having a functional exonuclease domain (WRN-exo) and being defective in the premature aging and cancer-related disorder Werner syndrome. Here, we characterize WRN-exo crystal structures, biochemical activity and participation in DNA end-joining. Metal ion complex structures, active site mutations and activity assays reveal a two-metal-ion mediated nuclease mechanism. The DNA end-binding Ku70/80 complex specifically stimulates WRN-exo activity, and structure-based mutational inactivation of WRN-exo alters DNA end-joining in human cells. We furthermore establish structural and biochemical similarities of WRN-exo to DnaQ family replicative proofreading exonucleases, with WRN-specific adaptations consistent with dsDNA specificity and functionally important conformational changes. These results indicate WRN-exo is a human DnaQ family member and support analogous proof-reading activities that are stimulated by Ku70/80 with implications for WRN functions in age related pathologies and maintenance of genomic integrity.

  8. At the intersection of non-coding transcription, DNA repair, chromatin structure, and cellular senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke eOhsawa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well accepted that non-coding RNAs play a critical role in regulating gene expression. Recent paradigm-setting studies are now revealing that non-coding RNAs, other than microRNAs, also play intriguing roles in the maintenance of chromatin structure, in the DNA damage response, and in adult human stem cell aging. In this review, we will discuss the complex inter-dependent relationships among non-coding RNA transcription, maintenance of genomic stability, chromatin structure and adult stem cell senescence. DNA damage-induced non-coding RNAs transcribed in the vicinity of the DNA break regulate recruitment of the DNA damage machinery and DNA repair efficiency. We will discuss the correlation between non-coding RNAs and DNA damage repair efficiency and the potential role of changing chromatin structures around double-strand break sites. On the other hand, induction of non-coding RNA transcription from the repetitive Alu elements occurs during human stem cell aging and hinders efficient DNA repair causing entry into senescence. We will discuss how this fine balance between transcription and genomic instability may be regulated by the dramatic changes to chromatin structure that accompany cellular senescence.

  9. Insights into the Electronic Structure of Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide from Generalized Valence Bond Theory: Addition of Hydrogen Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Beth A; Takeshita, Tyler Y; Dunning, Thom H

    2016-05-05

    Ozone (O3) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are valence isoelectronic species, yet their properties and reactivities differ dramatically. In particular, O3 is highly reactive, whereas SO2 is chemically relatively stable. In this paper, we investigate serial addition of hydrogen atoms to both the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2 and to the central atom of these species. It is well-known that the terminal atoms of O3 are much more amenable to bond formation than those of SO2. We show that the differences in the electronic structure of the π systems in the parent triatomic species account for the differences in the addition of hydrogen atoms to the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2. Further, we find that the π system in SO2, which is a recoupled pair bond dyad, facilitates the addition of hydrogen atoms to the sulfur atom, resulting in stable HSO2 and H2SO2 species.

  10. The electronic structure and bonding of a H-H pair in the vicinity of a BCC Fe bulk vacancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan, A.; Pistonesi, C.; Brizuela, G. [Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahia Blanca (Argentina). Departamento de Fisica; Garcia, A.J. [Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahia Blanca (Argentina). Departamento de Ciencias de la Computacion

    2003-09-01

    The H-Fe interaction near a bcc Fe vacancy is analysed using a semi-empirical theoretical method. Calculations were performed using a Fe{sub 86} cluster with a vacancy. Hydrogen atoms are positioned in their local energy minima configurations. Changes in the electronic structure of Fe atoms near a vacancy were analysed for the system without H, with one H and with two H atoms. Fe atoms surrounding the vacancy weaken their bond when hydrogen is present. This is due to the formation of H-Fe bonds. Hydrogen influences only its nearest-neighbour Fe atoms. The H-H interaction was also analysed. For H-H distance of 0.82 Angstrom an H-H association is formed, while H-Fe interaction and Fe-Fe weakening is markedly reduced, when compared with other H-H interactions. (author)

  11. Enhancing prospective chemistry teachers cognitive structures in the topics of bonding and hybridization by internet-assisted chemistry applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özge Özyalçın Oskay, Sinem Dinçol

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of internet-assisted chemistry applications on prospective chemistry teachers’ cognitive structures in the topics of bonding and hybridization. The sample of the study consisted of 36 prospective chemistry teachers attending Hacettepe University, Faculty of Education, the Department of Chemistry Education in 2010-2011 academic year and taking Basic Chemistry I lesson. In the study, students were separated into experimental and control groups according to their pre-cognitive structures. Students were requested to answer two open ended questions. Answers by each student were gathered and evaluated by flow map method. “Bonding and hybridization” topics were taught to control group with traditional teaching method and to experimental group besides traditional method internet-assisted applications were conducted. The same open-ended questions were given to both groups and their cognitive structures were examined once more. The differences between control and experimental groups’ cognitive structures were examined. A significant difference was identified in favour of experimental group (p<0, 05. The mean score of the Experimental group was X=19.94, and the mean score of the Control group was X=13.88. In addition, subsequent to internet assisted chemistry applications differences in terms of concepts and descriptions in prospective chemistry teachers’ in experimental and control group cognitive structure have been determined. When post flow maps of prospective chemistry teachers in experimental group, on whom internet assisted chemistry applications were made, are formed, it has been determined that there are more statements about hybridization, hybridization types, molecule geometry and bond angles compared to control grou

  12. Structure-based design of a disulfide-linked oligomeric form of the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen DNA-binding domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    With the aim of forming the ‘lock-washer’ conformation of the origin-binding domain of SV40 large T antigen in solution, using structure-based analysis an intermolecular disulfide bridge was engineered into the origin-binding domain to generate higher order oligomers in solution. The 1.7 Å resolution structure shows that the mutant forms a spiral in the crystal and has the de novo disulfide bond at the protein interface, although structural rearrangements at the interface are observed relative to the wild type. The modular multifunctional protein large T antigen (T-ag) from simian virus 40 orchestrates many of the events needed for replication of the viral double-stranded DNA genome. This protein assembles into single and double hexamers on specific DNA sequences located at the origin of replication. This complicated process begins when the origin-binding domain of large T antigen (T-ag ODB) binds the GAGGC sequences in the central region (site II) of the viral origin of replication. While many of the functions of purified T-ag OBD can be studied in isolation, it is primarily monomeric in solution and cannot assemble into hexamers. To overcome this limitation, the possibility of engineering intermolecular disulfide bonds in the origin-binding domain which could oligomerize in solution was investigated. A recent crystal structure of the wild-type T-ag OBD showed that this domain forms a left-handed spiral in the crystal with six subunits per turn. Therefore, we analyzed the protein interface of this structure and identified two residues that could potentially support an intermolecular disulfide bond if changed to cysteines. SDS–PAGE analysis established that the mutant T-ag OBD formed higher oligomeric products in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structure of the engineered disulfide-linked T-ag OBD is reported, which establishes that oligomerization took place in the expected manner

  13. Recognition of Local DNA Structures by p53 Protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázda, Václav; Coufal, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2017), č. článku 375. E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-21855S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : tumor-suppressor protein * c-terminal domain * non-b dna Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 3.226, year: 2016

  14. Structural studies of the 5'-phenazinium-tethered matched and G-A-mismatched DNA duplexes by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltseva, T; Sandström, A; Ivanova, I M; Sergeyev, D S; Zarytova, V F; Chattopadhyaya, J

    1993-05-01

    The mechanism through which modified oligo-DNA analogues act as antisense repressors at the transcriptional and translational level of gene expression is based on the information content in the nucleotide sequence which is determined by the specific base pairing. The efficiency of such action is largely determined by the stability of the duplex formed between the oligonucleotide reagent and the target sequence and also by the mismatched base pairing, such as G-A, that occurs during replication or recombination. We herein report that the phenazinium (Pzn)-tethered matched duplex p(d(TGTTTGGC)):(Pzn)-p(d(CCAAACA)) (III) (Tm = 50 degrees C) has a much larger stability than the parent matched duplex p(d(TGTTTGGC)):p(d(CCAAACA)) (I) (Tm = 30 degrees C). On the other hand, the Pzn-tethered G-A-mismatched duplex p(d(TGTTTGGC)):(Pzn)-p(d(ACAAACA)) (IV) (Tm = 34 degrees C) is only slightly more stable than its parent mismatched duplex p(d(TGTTTGGC)):p(d(ACAAACA)) (Tm = 25 degrees C). A detailed 500 MHz NMR study and constrained MD refinements of NMR-derived structures have been undertaken for the DNA duplexes (I), (II), (III) and (IV) in order to understand the structural basis of stabilization of Pzn-tethered matched DNA duplex (delta Tm = 20 degrees C) compared to mismatched duplex (delta Tm = 9 degrees C). Assignment of the 1H-NMR (500 MHz) spectra of the duplexes has been carried out by 2D NOESY, HOHAHA and DQF-COSY experiments. The torsion angles have been extracted from the J-coupling constants obtained by simulation of most of the DQF-COSY cross-peaks using program SMART. The solution structure of the duplexes were assessed by an iterative hybride relaxation matrix method (MORASS) combined with NOESY distances and torsion angles restrained molecular dynamics (MD) using program Amber 4.0. The standard Amber 4.0 force-field parameters were used for the oligonucleotide in conjunction with the new parameters for Pzn residue which was obtained by full geometry

  15. Synthesis, Structure and Spectroscopy of Two Structurally Related Hydrogen Bonded Compounds in the dpma/HClO4 System; dpma (dimethylphosphorylmethanamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido J. Reiss

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The new phosphine oxide compound, (dimethylphosphorylmethanaminium perchlorate, dpmaHClO4 (1, was synthesized by the reaction of (dimethylphosphoryl methanamine (dpma with concentrated perchloric acid. (Dimethylphosphorylmethanaminium perchlorate (dimethylphosphorylmethanamine solvate, dpmaHClO4•dpma (2 was obtained by the slow evaporation of an equimolar methanolic solution of 1 and dpma at room temperature. For both compounds, single-crystal X-ray structures, IR and Raman spectra are reported. The assignment of the spectroscopic data were supported by quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G(2d,p level of theory. In 1, the dpmaH cations form polymeric, polar double-strands along [010] by head to tail connections via N–H∙∙∙O hydrogen bonds. The perchlorate anions are located between these strands attached by one medium strong and two weaker un-bifurcated hydrogen bonds (monoclinic, centrosymmetric space group C2/c, a = 17.8796(5 Å, b = 5.66867(14 Å, c = 17.0106(5 Å, β = 104.788(3°, V = 1666.9(1 Å3, Z = 8, T = 293 K, R(F [I > 2σ(I] = 0.0391, wR(F2 [all] = 0.1113. In 2, besides the N–H∙∙∙O hydrogen bonds, medium strong N–H∙∙∙N hydrogen bonds are present. One dpmaH cation and the neutral dpma molecule are connected head to tail by two N–H∙∙∙O hydrogen bonds forming a monocationic cyclic unit. These cyclic units are further connected by N–H∙∙∙O and N–H∙∙∙N hydrogen bonds forming polymeric, polar double-strands along [001]. The perchlorate anions fill the gaps between these strands, and each [ClO4]− anion is weakly connected to the NH2 group by one N–H∙∙∙O hydrogen bond (orthorhombic, non-centrosymmetric space group Pca21 (No. 29, a = 18.5821(5 Å, b = 11.4320(3 Å, c = 6.89400(17 Å, V = 1464.50(6 Å3, Z = 4, T = 100 K, R(F [I > 2σ(I] = 0.0234, wR(F2 [all] = 0.0575. Both structures are structurally related, and their commonalities are discussed in terms of a graph

  16. Aryl-NHC-group 13 trimethyl complexes: structural, stability and bonding insights

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Melissa M.

    2016-12-14

    Treatment of aromatic N-substituted N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) with trimethyl-gallium and -indium yielded the new Lewis acid-base adducts, IMes·GaMe3 (1), SIMes·GaMe3 (2), IPr·GaMe3 (3), SIPr·GaMe3 (4), IMes·InMe3 (5), SIMes·InMe3 (6), IPr·InMe3 (7), and SIPr·InMe3 (8), with all complexes being identified by X-ray diffraction, IR, and multinuclear NMR analyses. Complex stability was found to be largely dependent on the nature of the constituent NHC ligands. Percent buried volume (%VBur) and topographic steric map analyses were employed to quantify and elucidate the observed trends. Additionally, a detailed bond snapping energy (BSE) decomposition analysis focusing on both steric and orbital interactions of the M-NHC bond (M = Al, Ga and In) has been performed.

  17. Aryl-NHC-group 13 trimethyl complexes: structural, stability and bonding insights

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Melissa M.; Gill, Arran M.; Yunpeng, Lu; Yongxin, Li; Ganguly, Rakesh; Falivene, Laura; Garcí a, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of aromatic N-substituted N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) with trimethyl-gallium and -indium yielded the new Lewis acid-base adducts, IMes·GaMe3 (1), SIMes·GaMe3 (2), IPr·GaMe3 (3), SIPr·GaMe3 (4), IMes·InMe3 (5), SIMes·InMe3 (6), IPr·InMe3 (7), and SIPr·InMe3 (8), with all complexes being identified by X-ray diffraction, IR, and multinuclear NMR analyses. Complex stability was found to be largely dependent on the nature of the constituent NHC ligands. Percent buried volume (%VBur) and topographic steric map analyses were employed to quantify and elucidate the observed trends. Additionally, a detailed bond snapping energy (BSE) decomposition analysis focusing on both steric and orbital interactions of the M-NHC bond (M = Al, Ga and In) has been performed.

  18. Hydrogen-bonding interactions in thiosemicarbazones of carboxylic acids: Structure of 2-ketobutyric acid thiosemicarbazone hemihydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonawane, P.; Chikate, R.; Kumbhar, A.; Padhye, S.; Doedens, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    2-Thiosemicarbazonobutanoic acid hemihydrate, C 5 H 9 N 3 O 2 S.0.5H 2 O, M r =184.22, triclinic, Panti 1, a=8.163(2), b=8.868(2), c=12.438(2) A, α=72.99(2), β=79.47(2), γ=84.06(2)deg, V=845.3(3) A 3 , Z=4, D x =1.447 Mg m -3 , λ(Mo Kα)=0.71073 A, μ=0.332 mm -1 , F(000)=392, T=296 K, R=0.038 for 3830 independent reflections with I>3σ(I). Three hydrogen bonds link the two crystallographically independent molecules in a pairwise fashion. The two molecules both have E configurations about each C-N and N-N bond, but differ by nearly 180deg in the orientation of the -COOH group. (orig.)

  19. Structure, stability and electrochromic properties of polyaniline film covalently bonded to indium tin oxide substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenzhi, E-mail: zhangwz@xatu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Photoelectric Functional Materials and Devices of Shaanxi Province, School of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Xi’an Technological University, Xi’an 710021 (China); Ju, Wenxing; Wu, Xinming; Wang, Yan; Wang, Qiguan; Zhou, Hongwei; Wang, Sumin [Key Laboratory for Photoelectric Functional Materials and Devices of Shaanxi Province, School of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Xi’an Technological University, Xi’an 710021 (China); Hu, Chenglong [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Chemical Materials and Devices of Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Jianghan University, Wuhan 430056 (China)

    2016-03-30

    Graphical abstract: A chemical bonding approach was proposed to prepare the PANI film covalently bonded to ITO substrate and the film exhibited high electrochemical activities and stability compared with that obtained by conventional film-forming approach. - Highlights: • The PANI film covalently bonded to ITO substrate was prepared using ABPA as modifier. • The oxidative potentials of the obtained PANI film were decreased. • The obtained PANI film exhibits high electrochemical activities and stability. - Abstract: Indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate was modified with 4-aminobenzylphosphonic acid (ABPA), and then the polyaniline (PANI) film covalently bonded to ITO substrate was prepared by the chemical oxidation polymerization. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements demonstrated that chemical binding was formed between PANI and ABPA-modified ITO surface, and the maximum thickness of PANI layer is about 30 nm. The adhesive strength of PANI film on ITO substrate was tested by sonication. It was found that the film formed on the modified ITO exhibited a much better stability than that on bare one. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and UV–vis spectroscopy measurements indicated that the oxidative potentials of PANI film on ABPA-modified ITO substrate were decreased and the film exhibited high electrochemical activities. Moreover, the optical contrast increased from 0.58 for PANI film (without ultrasound) to 1.06 for PANI film (after ultrasound for 60 min), which had an over 83% enhancement. The coloration time was 20.8 s, while the bleaching time was 19.5 s. The increase of electrochromic switching time was due to the lower ion diffusion coefficient of the large cation of (C{sub 4}H{sub 9}){sub 4}N{sup +} under the positive and negative potentials as comparison with the small Li{sup +} ion.

  20. Low cycle fatigue lifetime of HIP bonded Bi-metallic first wall structures of fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Toshihisa; Sato, Satoshi; Furuya, Kazuyuki; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Enoeda, Mikio; Takatsu, Hideyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Hashimoto, Toshiyuki; Kitamura, Kazunori

    1998-10-01

    A HIP bonded bi-metallic panel composed of a dispersion strengthened copper (DSCu) layer and type 316L stainless steel (SS316L) cooling pipes is the reference design of the ITER first wall. To examine the fatigue lifetime of the first wall panel under cyclic mechanical loads, low cycle fatigue tests of HIP bonded bi-metallic specimens made of SS316L and DSCu were conducted with the stress ratio of -1.0 and five nominal strain range conditions ranging from 0.2 to 1.0%. Elasto-plastic analysis has also been conducted to evaluate local strain ranges under the nominal strains applied. Initial cracks were observed at the inner surface of the SS316L cooling pipes for all of the specimens tested, which was confirmed by the elasto-plastic analysis that the maximum strains of the test specimens were developed at the same locations. It was found that the HIP bonded bi-metallic test specimens had a fatigue lifetime longer than that of the SS316L raw material obtained by round bar specimens. Similarly, the fatigue lifetime of the DSCu/SS316L HIP interface was also longer than the round bar test results for the HIP joints. From these results, it has been confirmed that the bi-metallic first wall panel with built-in cooling pipes made by HIP bonding has a sufficient fatigue lifetime in comparison with the raw fatigue data of the materials, which also suggests that the fatigue lifetime evaluation has an adequate margin against fracture if it follows the design fatigue curve based on the material fatigue data. (author)