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Sample records for dna structure bonding

  1. Structure of the DNA duplex d(ATTAAT2 with Hoogsteen hydrogen bonds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Acosta-Reyes

    Full Text Available The traditional Watson-Crick base pairs in DNA may occasionally adopt a Hoogsteen conformation, with a different organization of hydrogen bonds. Previous crystal structures have shown that the Hoogsteen conformation is favored in alternating AT sequences of DNA. Here we present new data for a different sequence, d(ATTAAT2, which is also found in the Hoogsteen conformation. Thus we demonstrate that other all-AT sequences of DNA with a different sequence may be found in the Hoogsteen conformation. We conclude that any all-AT sequence might acquire this conformation under appropriate conditions. We also compare the detailed features of DNA in either the Hoogsteen or Watson-Crick conformations.

  2. Structure of cis-[Pt(NH3)(2-picoline)]2+ and DNA adduct and its bonding characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA; Muxin; LIU; Kai; YANG; Zuoyin; CHEN; Guangju

    2004-01-01

    Several methods including molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics, ONIOM that combines quantum chemistry with molecular mechanics and standard quantum chemistry are used to study the configuration and electron structures of an adduct of the DNA segment d(ATACATG*G*TACATA)·d(TATGTACCATGTAT) with cis-[Pt(NH3)(2-Picoline)]2+. The investigation shows that the configuration optimized by ONIOM is similar to that determined by NMR. Strong chemical bonds between Pt of the complex and two N7s of neighboring guanines in the DNA duplex and hydrogen bond between the NH3 of the complex and O6 of a nearby guanine have a large impact on the configuration of the adduct. Chemical bonds, the aforementioned hydrogen bond, and the interaction between a methyl of the complex and a methyl of the base in close proximity are critical for the complex to specifically recognize DNA.

  3. DNA: Structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinden, Richard R.; E. Pearson, Christopher; N. Potaman, Vladimir

    1998-01-01

    for a long period of time before its information is accessed by the cell. Although DNA plays a critical role as an informational storage molecule, it is by no means as unexciting as a computer tape or disk drive. The structure of the DNA described by Watson and Crick in 1953 is a right handed helix of two......This chapter discusses the structure and function of DNA. DNA occupies a critical role in cells, because it is the source of all intrinsic genetic information. Chemically, DNA is a very stable molecule, a characteristic important for a macromolecule that may have to persist in an intact form...... individual antiparallel DNA strands. Hydrogen bonds provide specificity that allows pairing between the complementary bases (A.T and G.C) in opposite strands. Base stacking occurs near the center of the DNA helix and provides a great deal of stability to the helix (in addition to hydrogen bonding). The sugar...

  4. Optimal Investment in Structured Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille; Jørgensen, Peter Løchte

    The paper examines the role of structured bonds in the optimal portfolio of a small retail investor. We consider the typical structured bond essentially repacking an exotic option and a zero coupon bond, i.e. an investment with portfolio insurance. The optimal portfolio is found when the investment...

  5. Optimal Investment in Structured Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille; Jørgensen, Peter Løchte

    The paper examines the role of structured bonds in the optimal portfolio of a small retail investor. We consider the typical structured bond essentially repacking an exotic option and a zero coupon bond, i.e. an investment with portfolio insurance. The optimal portfolio is found when the investment...... opportunities consist of a risky reference fund, a risk-free asset and a structured bond. Key model elements are the trading strategy and utility function of the investor. Our numerical results indicate structured bonds do have basis for consideration in the optimal portfolio. The product holdings...

  6. Optimal Investment in Structured Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille; Jørgensen, Peter Løchte

    2012-01-01

    and consider different utility functions and trading strategies. Our results show that investors should include structured bonds in their optimal portfolio only if they cannot access the index underlying the option directly and only if the products then provide sufficient diversification to compensate......Retail structured products regularly receive much criticism from financial experts but seem to remain popular with investors. This article considers a generic structured product: the principal-protected index-linked note (structured bond), which resembles a portfolio insurance contract. The purpose...

  7. LAMMPS Framework for Dynamic Bonding and an Application Modeling DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    and bond types. When breaking bonds, all angular and dihedral interactions involving broken bonds are removed. The framework allows chemical reactions to be modeled, and use it to simulate a simplistic, coarse-grained DNA model. The resulting DNA dynamics illustrates the power of the present framework....

  8. Nanomaterials. Programmable materials and the nature of the DNA bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew R; Seeman, Nadrian C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2015-02-20

    For over half a century, the biological roles of nucleic acids as catalytic enzymes, intracellular regulatory molecules, and the carriers of genetic information have been studied extensively. More recently, the sequence-specific binding properties of DNA have been exploited to direct the assembly of materials at the nanoscale. Integral to any methodology focused on assembling matter from smaller pieces is the idea that final structures have well-defined spacings, orientations, and stereo-relationships. This requirement can be met by using DNA-based constructs that present oriented nanoscale bonding elements from rigid core units. Here, we draw analogy between such building blocks and the familiar chemical concepts of "bonds" and "valency" and review two distinct but related strategies that have used this design principle in constructing new configurations of matter. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Bonded and Stitched Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Bart F. (Inventor); Dial, William B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of forming a composite structure can include providing a plurality of composite panels of material, each composite panel having a plurality of holes extending through the panel. An adhesive layer is applied to each composite panel and a adjoining layer is applied over the adhesive layer. The method also includes stitching the composite panels, adhesive layer, and adjoining layer together by passing a length of a flexible connecting element into the plurality of holes in the composite panels of material. At least the adhesive layer is cured to bond the composite panels together and thereby form the composite structure.

  10. Metallic bonding and cluster structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, Jose M. [Department of Physics, Lyman Laboratory, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid, (Spain); Beltran, Marcela R. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-360, Mexico Distrito Federal, 01000 Mexico (Mexico); Michaelian, Karo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Mexico Distrito Federal, 01000 Mexico (Mexico); Garzon, Ignacio L. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid, (Spain); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Mexico Distrito Federal, 01000 Mexico (Mexico); Ordejon, Pablo [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona-CSIC, Campus de la U.A.B., 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, (Spain); Sanchez-Portal, Daniel [Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Artacho, Emilio [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid, (Spain)

    2000-02-15

    Knowledge of the structure of clusters is essential to predict many of their physical and chemical properties. Using a many-body semiempirical Gupta potential (to perform global minimizations), and first-principles density functional calculations (to confirm the energy ordering of the local minima), we have recently found [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1600 (1998)] that there are many intermediate-size disordered gold nanoclusters with energy near or below the lowest-energy ordered structure. This is especially surprising because we studied ''magic'' cluster sizes, for which very compact-ordered structures exist. Here, we show how the analysis of the local stress can be used to understand the physical origin of this amorphization. We find that the compact ordered structures, which are very stable for pair potentials, are destabilized by the tendency of metallic bonds to contract at the surface, because of the decreased coordination. The amorphization is also favored by the relatively low energy associated to bondlength and coordination disorder in metals. Although these are very general properties of metallic bonding, we find that they are especially important in the case of gold, and we predict some general trends in the tendency of metallic clusters towards amorphous structures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. Valence-Bond Theory and Chemical Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Douglas J.; Trinajstic, Nenad

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the importance of valence bond theory on the quantum-mechanical theory of chemical structure and the nature of the chemical bond. Described briefly are early VB theory, development of VB theory, modern versions, solid-state applications, models, treatment in textbooks, and flaws in criticisms of valence bond theory. (KR)

  12. The Significance of Multivalent Bonding Motifs and “Bond Order” in DNA-Directed Nanoparticle Crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaner, Ryan V.; Eryazici, Ibrahim; Macfarlane, Robert J.; Brown, Keith A.; Lee, Byeongdu; Nguyen, SonBinh T.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2016-05-18

    Multivalent oligonucleotide-based bonding elements have been synthesized and studied for the assembly and crystallization of gold nanoparticles. Through the use of organic branching points, divalent and trivalent DNA linkers were readily incorporated into the oligonucleotide shells that define DNA-nanoparticles and compared to monovalent linker systems. These multivalent bonding motifs enable the change of "bond strength" between particles and therefore modulate the effective "bond order." In addition, the improved accessibility of strands between neighboring particles, either due to multivalency or modifications to increase strand flexibility, gives rise to superlattices with less strain in the crystallites compared to traditional designs. Furthermore, the increased availability and number of binding modes also provide a new variable that allows previously unobserved crystal structures to be synthesized, as evidenced by the formation of a thorium phosphide superlattice.

  13. Enthalpy-entropy compensation in biomolecular halogen bonds measured in DNA junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Megan; Voth, Andrea Regier; Scholfield, Matthew R; Rummel, Brittany; Sowers, Lawrence C; Ho, P Shing

    2013-07-23

    Interest in noncovalent interactions involving halogens, particularly halogen bonds (X-bonds), has grown dramatically in the past decade, propelled by the use of X-bonding in molecular engineering and drug design. However, it is clear that a complete analysis of the structure-energy relationship must be established in biological systems to fully exploit X-bonds for biomolecular engineering. We present here the first comprehensive experimental study to correlate geometries with their stabilizing potentials for fluorine (F), chlorine (Cl), bromine (Br), or iodine (I) X-bonds in a biological context. For these studies, we determine the single-crystal structures of DNA Holliday junctions containing halogenated uracil bases that compete X-bonds against classic hydrogen bonds (H-bonds), estimate the enthalpic energies of the competing interactions in the crystal system through crystallographic titrations, and compare the enthalpic and entropic energies of bromine and iodine X-bonds in solution by differential scanning calorimetry. The culmination of these studies demonstrates that enthalpic stabilization of X-bonds increases with increasing polarizability from F to Cl to Br to I, which is consistent with the σ-hole theory of X-bonding. Furthermore, an increase in the X-bonding potential is seen to direct the interaction toward a more ideal geometry. However, the entropic contributions to the total free energies must also be considered to determine how each halogen potentially contributes to the overall stability of the interaction. We find that bromine has the optimal balance between enthalpic and entropic energy components, resulting in the lowest free energy for X-bonding in this DNA system. The X-bond formed by iodine is more enthalpically stable, but this comes with an entropic cost, which we attribute to crowding effects. Thus, the overall free energy of an X-bonding interaction balances the stabilizing electrostatic effects of the σ-hole against the competing

  14. Handbook of adhesive bonded structural repair

    CERN Document Server

    Wegman, Raymond F

    1992-01-01

    Provides repair methods for adhesive bonded and composite structures; identifies suitable materials and equipment for repairs; describes damage evaluation criteria and techniques, and methods of inspection before and after repair.

  15. Structures of the Ets Protein DNA-binding Domains of Transcription Factors Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev: DETERMINANTS OF DNA BINDING AND REDOX REGULATION BY DISULFIDE BOND FORMATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christopher D O; Newman, Joseph A; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Allerston, Charles K; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-05-29

    Ets transcription factors, which share the conserved Ets DNA-binding domain, number nearly 30 members in humans and are particularly involved in developmental processes. Their deregulation following changes in expression, transcriptional activity, or by chromosomal translocation plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Ets DNA binding, selectivity, and regulation have been extensively studied; however, questions still arise regarding binding specificity outside the core GGA recognition sequence and the mode of action of Ets post-translational modifications. Here, we report the crystal structures of Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev, alone and in complex with DNA. We identify previously unrecognized features of the protein-DNA interface. Interactions with the DNA backbone account for most of the binding affinity. We describe a highly coordinated network of water molecules acting in base selection upstream of the GGAA core and the structural features that may account for discrimination against methylated cytidine residues. Unexpectedly, all proteins crystallized as disulfide-linked dimers, exhibiting a novel interface (distant to the DNA recognition helix). Homodimers of Etv1, Etv4, and Etv5 could be reduced to monomers, leading to a 40-200-fold increase in DNA binding affinity. Hence, we present the first indication of a redox-dependent regulatory mechanism that may control the activity of this subset of oncogenic Ets transcription factors. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Strong and weak hydrogen bonds in drug–DNA complexes: A statistical analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunil K Panigrahi; Gautam R Desiraju

    2007-06-01

    A statistical analysis of strong and weak hydrogen bonds in the minor groove of DNA was carried out for a set of 70 drug–DNA complexes. The terms `strong’ and `weak’ pertain to the inherent strengths and weakness of the donor and acceptor fragments rather than to any energy considerations. The dataset was extracted from the protein data bank (PDB). The analysis was performed with an in-house software, hydrogen bond analysis tool (HBAT). In addition to strong hydrogen bonds such as O−H···O and N−H···O, the ubiquitous presence of weak hydrogen bonds such as C−H···O is implicated in molecular recognition. On an average, there are 1.4 weak hydrogen bonds for every strong hydrogen bond. For both categories of interaction, the N(3) of purine and the O(2) of pyrimidine are favoured acceptors. Donor multifurcation is common with the donors generally present in the drug molecules, and shared by hydrogen bond acceptors in the minor groove. Bifurcation and trifurcation are most commonly observed. The metrics for strong hydrogen bonds are consistent with established trends. The geometries are variable for weak hydrogen bonds. A database of recognition geometries for 26 literature amidinium-based inhibitors of Human African Trypanosomes (HAT) was generated with a docking study using seven inhibitors which occur in published crystal structures included in the list of 70 complexes mentioned above, and 19 inhibitors for which the drug–DNA complex crystal structures are unknown. The virtual geometries so generated correlate well with published activities for these 26 inhibitors, justifying our assumption that strong and weak hydrogen bonds are optimized in the active site.

  17. Diffusion-bonded beryllium aluminum optical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapes, Thomas F.

    2003-12-01

    Beryllium aluminum material can present significant advantages for optical support structures. A likely advantage of beryllium aluminum compared to aluminum or titanium for such structures is its higher specific stiffness. However, beryllium aluminum material is significantly more expensive than most competing materials. The cost problem with beryllium aluminum is exacerbated if fabrication methods that result in near net shape parts are not used. Near net shape methods result in the least amount of material "thrown away" in the fabrication process. Casting is a primary example of near net shape manufacturing that is appropriate for some optical support structures. Casting aluminum, and other materials as well, is common. Casting of beryllium aluminum is very difficult, however, and has not had significant success. Diffusion bonding - a different approach for achieving near net shape beryllium aluminum optical support structures, was pursued and accomplished. Diffusion bonding is a term used to describe the joining of solid metal pieces under high temperature and pressure, but without melting. Three different optical support structures were designed and built of beryllium aluminum using diffusion bonding. Relatively small solid beryllium aluminum pieces were arranged together and then joined under hot isostatic pressure conditions. The resulting relatively large pressure bonded part was then machined to achieve the final product. Significant cost savings as compared to machining the part from a solid block were realized. Difficulties achieving diffusion bonds in complex joints were experienced and addressed.

  18. Bond Orientational Order, Molecular Motion and Free Energy of High Density DNA Mesophases

    CERN Document Server

    Podgornik, R; Gawrisch, K; Rau, D C; Rupprecht, A; Parsegian, V A

    1995-01-01

    By equilibrating condensed DNA arrays against reservoirs of known osmotic stress and examining them with several structural probes, it has been possible to achieve a detailed thermodynamic and structural characterization of the change between two distinct regions on the liquid crystalline phase digram: a higher-density hexagonally packed region with long-range bond orientational order in the plane perpendicular to the average molecular direction; and a lower-density cholesteric region with fluid-like positional order. X-rays scattering on highly ordered DNA arrays at high density and with the helical axis oriented parallel to the incoming beam showed a six-fold azimuthal modulation of the first order diffraction peak that reflects the macroscopic bond-orientational order. Transition to the less-dense cholesteric phase through osmotically controlled swelling shows the loss of this bond orientational order that had been expected from the change in optical birefringence patterns and that is consistent with a rap...

  19. Electronic structure and bonding in crystalline peroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Königstein, Markus; Sokol, Alexei A.; Catlow, C. Richard A.

    1999-08-01

    Hartree-Fock and density-functional PW91 theories as realized in the CRYSTAL95 code have been applied to investigate the structural and electronic properties of Ba, Sr, and Ca peroxide materials with the calcium carbide crystal structure, results for which are compared with those for the corresponding oxides. Special attention is paid to the stabilization of the peroxide molecular ion O2-2 in the ionic environment provided by the lattice, and to chemical bonding effects. In order to describe the covalent bonding within the O2-2 ion and the polarization of the O- ion in the crystal electrostatic field, it is essential to include an account of the effects of electron correlation. The PW91 density functional has allowed us to reproduce the crystallographic parameters within a 3% error. The chemical bonding within the peroxide molecular ion has a complex nature with a balance between the weak covalent bond of σz type and the strong electrostatic repulsion of the closed-shell electron groups occupying O 2s and O 2px and 2py states. Compression of the peroxide ion in the ionic crystals gives rise to an excessive overlap of the O 2s closed shells of the two O- ions of a peroxide molecular ion O2-2, which in turn determines the antibonding character of the interaction and chemical bonding in the O2-2 molecular ion.

  20. Quantum Confinement in Hydrogen Bond of DNA and RNA

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, da Silva dos; Ricotta, Regina Maria

    2015-01-01

    The hydrogen bond is a fundamental ingredient to stabilize the DNA and RNA macromolecules. The main contribution of this work is to describe quantitatively this interaction as a consequence of the quantum confinement of the hydrogen. The results for the free and confined system are compared with experimental data. The formalism to compute the energy gap of the vibration motion used to identify the spectrum lines is the Variational Method allied to Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics.

  1. Bonding and structure of copper nitrenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundari, Thomas R; Dinescu, Adriana; Kazi, Abul B

    2008-11-03

    Copper nitrenes are of interest as intermediates in the catalytic aziridination of olefins and the amination of C-H bonds. However, despite advances in the isolation and study of late-transition-metal multiply bonded complexes, a bona fide structurally characterized example of a terminal copper nitrene has, to our knowledge, not been reported. In anticipation of such a report, terminal copper nitrenes are studied from a computational perspective. The nitrene complexes studied here are of the form (beta-diketiminate)Cu(NPh). Density functional theory (DFT), complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) electronic structure techniques, and hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods are employed to study such species. While DFT methods indicate that a triplet (S = 1) is the ground state, CASSCF calculations indicate that a singlet (S = 0) is the ground state, with only a small energy gap between the singlet and triplet. Moreover, the ground-state (open-shell) singlet copper nitrene is found to be highly multiconfigurational (i.e., biradical) and to possess a bent geometry about the nitrene nitrogen, contrasting with the linear nitrene geometry of the triplet copper nitrenes. CASSCF calculations also reveal the existence of a closed-shell singlet state with some degree of multiple bonding character for the copper-nitrene bond.

  2. Electronic structure and bonding in hydroxocobalamin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Lizhi; Rulis, Paul; Ching, Wai-Y.; Slouf, Miroslav; Nardin, Giorgio; Randaccio, Lucio

    2005-05-01

    The electronic structure of hydroxocobalamin (OHCbl) has been calculated by a density functional method, using the orthogonalized linear combination of the atomic orbitals method (OLCAO). The X-ray crystal structure has been determined from synchrotron X-ray diffraction data and the geometry determined was used in the calculations. Comparison with the recently reported electronic structures of cyanocobalamin (CNCbl), methylcobalamin (MeCbl) and adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) shows that Mulliken charges ( Q*) and bond orders (BO) vary only on the axial fragment.

  3. Durability of Structural Adhesively Bonded System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    boundary zone at a time interval of At = 60 minutes (i.e. non-linear with strain rate effect solution). Fig. 8.1 Sequence of environmental history cycle...8.2 Sequence of environmental history cycle Nos. 11 and Il, for investigation of hygrothermal behavior of CFRP and adhesiv specimens, representing the... environmental history on the ’eformational behavior of an FRP adherend as part of a bonded structured more information is needed on the HEC and CTE

  4. DNA-inspired hierarchical polymer design: electrostatics and hydrogen bonding in concert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemp, Sean T; Long, Timothy E

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acids and proteins, two of nature's biopolymers, assemble into complex structures to achieve desired biological functions and inspire the design of synthetic macromolecules containing a wide variety of noncovalent interactions including electrostatics and hydrogen bonding. Researchers have incorporated DNA nucleobases into a wide variety of synthetic monomers/polymers achieving stimuli-responsive materials, supramolecular assemblies, and well-controlled macromolecules. Recently, scientists utilized both electrostatics and complementary hydrogen bonding to orthogonally functionalize a polymer backbone through supramolecular assembly. Diverse macromolecules with noncovalent interactions will create materials with properties necessary for biomedical applications.

  5. Positional, reorientational, and bond orientational order in DNA mesophases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorman, V; Podgornik, R; Zeks, B

    2001-11-19

    We investigate the orientational order of transverse polarization vectors of long, stiff polymer molecules and their coupling to bond orientational and positional order in high density mesophases. Homogeneous ordering of transverse polarization vector promotes distortions in the hexatic phase, whereas inhomogeneous ordering precipitates crystallization of the 2D sections with different orientations of the transverse polarization vector on each molecule in the unit cell. We propose possible scenarios for going from the hexatic phase, through the distorted hexatic phase, to the crystalline phase with an orthorhombic unit cell observed experimentally for the case of DNA.

  6. The chemical bond structure and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1992-01-01

    This inspired book by some of the most influential scientists of our time--including six Nobel laureates--chronicles our emerging understanding of the chemical bond through the last nine decades and into the future. From Pauling's early structural work using x-ray and electron diffraction to Zewail's femtosecond lasers that probe molecular dynamics in real time; from Crick's molecular biology to Rich's molecular recognition, this book explores a rich tradition of scientific heritage and accomplishment. The perspectives given by Pauling, Perutz, Rich, Crick, Porter, Polanyi, Herschbach, Zewail,

  7. DNA structure: Yet another avatar?

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, Manju

    1999-01-01

    Everytime the story of DNA structure seems to reach a conclusion, it bounces back to centre stage by appearing in yet another incarnation. The latest avatar to manifest itself is a stretched and overwound form of DNA reported recently by a French group-1, working with single DNA molecules. When a moderately large stretching force (of about 3 pico Newtons) is applied, the DNA molecule apparently becomes highly twisted and extended, but even more amazingly it takes up an inside-out structure in...

  8. LEGO-like DNA Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2012-01-01

    -dimensional (3D) DNA structures by self-assembly of single-stranded DNA “bricks.” The method opens a new route to complex self-assembled (3D) nanostructures that may serve as addressable templates for placing guest molecules with high precision, with possible applications in biophysics, medicine...

  9. Optimisation of the shear stress transfer in structural bonded assemblies using a curved bonded joint geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Chataigner, Sylvain; CARON, Jean François

    2011-01-01

    Structural adhesive bonding is coming into increasing use in civil engineering either for strengthening operations involving the adhesive bonding of external reinforcements or to replace traditional assembly techniques in new structures. However adhesive bonding induces stress concentrations at the edges of the joint, which have been studied by a large number of researchers in order to reduce these phenomena and increase the capacity and service life of the assembly. These studies are all, th...

  10. Through-bond effects in the ternary complexes of thrombin sandwiched by two DNA aptamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Andrea; Russo Krauss, Irene; Parente, Valeria; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Sugimoto, Naoki; Sica, Filomena

    2017-01-01

    Aptamers directed against human thrombin can selectively bind to two different exosites on the protein surface. The simultaneous use of two DNA aptamers, HD1 and HD22, directed to exosite I and exosite II respectively, is a very powerful approach to exploit their combined affinity. Indeed, strategies to link HD1 and HD22 together have been proposed in order to create a single bivalent molecule with an enhanced ability to control thrombin activity. In this work, the crystal structures of two ternary complexes, in which thrombin is sandwiched between two DNA aptamers, are presented and discussed. The structures shed light on the cross talk between the two exosites. The through-bond effects are particularly evident at exosite II, with net consequences on the HD22 structure. Moreover, thermodynamic data on the binding of the two aptamers are also reported and analyzed. PMID:27899589

  11. Through-bond effects in the ternary complexes of thrombin sandwiched by two DNA aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Andrea; Russo Krauss, Irene; Parente, Valeria; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Sugimoto, Naoki; Sica, Filomena

    2017-01-09

    Aptamers directed against human thrombin can selectively bind to two different exosites on the protein surface. The simultaneous use of two DNA aptamers, HD1 and HD22, directed to exosite I and exosite II respectively, is a very powerful approach to exploit their combined affinity. Indeed, strategies to link HD1 and HD22 together have been proposed in order to create a single bivalent molecule with an enhanced ability to control thrombin activity. In this work, the crystal structures of two ternary complexes, in which thrombin is sandwiched between two DNA aptamers, are presented and discussed. The structures shed light on the cross talk between the two exosites. The through-bond effects are particularly evident at exosite II, with net consequences on the HD22 structure. Moreover, thermodynamic data on the binding of the two aptamers are also reported and analyzed. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. DNA Self-Assembly and Computation Studied with a Coarse-grained Dynamic Bonded Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Fellermann, Harold; Rasmussen, Steen

    2012-01-01

    We utilize a coarse-grained directional dynamic bonding DNA model [C. Svaneborg, Comp. Phys. Comm. (In Press DOI:10.1016/j.cpc.2012.03.005)] to study DNA self-assembly and DNA computation. In our DNA model, a single nucleotide is represented by a single interaction site, and complementary sites c...

  13. Adhesive bonding of composite aircraft structures: Challenges and recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelakis, Sp.; Tserpes, K. I.

    2014-01-01

    In this review paper, the challenges and some recent developments of adhesive bonding technology in composite aircraft structures are discussed. The durability of bonded joints is defined and presented for parameters that may influence bonding quality. Presented is also, a numerical design approach for composite joining profiles used to realize adhesive bonding. It is shown that environmental ageing and pre-bond contamination of bonding surfaces may degrade significantly fracture toughness of bonded joints. Moreover, it is obvious that additional research is needed in order to design joining profiles that will enable load transfer through shearing of the bondline. These findings, together with the limited capabilities of existing non-destructive testing techniques, can partially explain the confined use of adhesive bonding in primary composite aircraft structural parts.

  14. The electronic structure and chemical bonding of vitamin B12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurmaev, E. Z.; Moewes, A.; Ouyang, L.; Randaccio, L.; Rulis, P.; Ching, W. Y.; Bach, M.; Neumann, M.

    2003-05-01

    The electronic structure and chemical bonding of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) and B12-derivative (methylcobalamin) are studied by means of X-ray emission (XES) and photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy. The obtained results are compared with ab initio electronic structure calculations using the orthogonalized linear combination of the atomic orbital method (OLCAO). We show that the chemical bonding in vitamin B12 is characterized by the strong Co-C bond and relatively weak axial Co-N bond. It is further confirmed that the Co-C bond in cyanocobalamin is stronger than that of methylcobalamin resulting in their different biological activity.

  15. Studies on Hydrogen Bonding Network Structures of Konjac Glucomannan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Jie; SUN Yu-Jing; YANG You-Hui; CHEN Yuan-Yuan; CHEN Yi-Qing; SUN Yuan-Ming

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the hydrogen bonding network models of konjac glucomannan (KGM) are predicted in the approach of molecular dynamics (MD). These models have been proved by experiments whose results are consistent with those from simulation.The results show that the hydrogen bonding network structures of KGM are stable and the key linking points of hydrogen bonding network are at the O(6) and O(2) positions on KGM ring. Moreover, acety1 has significant influence on hydrogen bonding network and hydrogen bonding network structures are more stable after deacetylation.

  16. Gap measurement and bond strength of five selected adhesive systems bonded to tooth structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabzadeh, F; Gage, J P; Young, W G; Shahabi, S; Swenson, S M

    1998-06-01

    The ability of a restorative material to bond and seal the interface with tooth structure is perhaps the most significant factor in determining resistance to marginal caries. Thus, the quality and durability of marginal seal and bond strength are major considerations in the selection of restorative materials. The purpose of this study was to compare the bond strength and marginal discrepancies of five adhesive systems: All-Bond 2, Clearfil Liner Bond, KB 200, ProBond and AELITE Bond. Twenty-five buccal and 25 lingual cavities were prepared in 25 caries-free extracted molar teeth, giving 10 cavities for each of the 5 adhesive systems. All teeth were restored with the resin composite Pertac Hybrid, or PRISMA Total Performance Hybrid with their appropriate adhesive systems. After restoration, the teeth were thermocycled, were stained with a 1.5% aqueous solution of a procion dye (reactive orange 14) and sectioned coronally with a saw microtome. Three sections of 200 microns thickness were prepared from each restoration which were then examined microscopically to measure marginal gap widths using a confocal tandem microscope. Shear bond strength measurements were carried out on the dentine bond using a universal testing machine. The All-Bond 2 adhesive system was found to have higher shear bond strength and to have the least gap width at the cementodentinal margin.

  17. Complex DNA structures and structures of DNA complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chazin, W.J.; Carlstroem, G.; Shiow-Meei Chen; Miick, S.; Gomez-Paloma, L.; Smith, J.; Rydzewski, J. [Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Complex DNA structures (for example, triplexes, quadruplexes, junctions) and DNA-ligand complexes are more difficult to study by NMR than standard DNA duplexes are because they have high molecular weights, show nonstandard or distorted local conformations, and exhibit large resonance linewidths and severe {sup 1}H spectral overlap. These systems also tend to have limited solubility and may require specialized solution conditions to maintain favorable spectral characteristics, which adds to the spectroscopic difficulties. Furthermore, with more atoms in the system, both assignment and structure calculation become more challenging. In this article, we focus on demonstrating the current status of NMR studies of such systems and the limitations to further progress; we also indicate in what ways isotopic enrichment can be useful.

  18. Measurement and theory of hydrogen bonding contribution to isosteric DNA base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakshoor, Omid; Wheeler, Steven E; Houk, K N; Kool, Eric T

    2012-02-15

    We address the recent debate surrounding the ability of 2,4-difluorotoluene (F), a low-polarity mimic of thymine (T), to form a hydrogen-bonded complex with adenine in DNA. The hydrogen bonding ability of F has been characterized as small to zero in various experimental studies, and moderate to small in computational studies. However, recent X-ray crystallographic studies of difluorotoluene in DNA/RNA have indicated, based on interatomic distances, possible hydrogen bonding interactions between F and natural bases in nucleic acid duplexes and in a DNA polymerase active site. Since F is widely used to measure electrostatic contributions to pairing and replication, it is important to quantify the impact of this isostere on DNA stability. Here, we studied the pairing stability and selectivity of this compound and a closely related variant, dichlorotoluene deoxyriboside (L), in DNA, using both experimental and computational approaches. We measured the thermodynamics of duplex formation in three sequence contexts and with all possible pairing partners by thermal melting studies using the van't Hoff approach, and for selected cases by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Experimental results showed that internal F-A pairing in DNA is destabilizing by 3.8 kcal/mol (van't Hoff, 37 °C) as compared with T-A pairing. At the end of a duplex, base-base interactions are considerably smaller; however, the net F-A interaction remains repulsive while T-A pairing is attractive. As for selectivity, F is found to be slightly selective for adenine over C, G, T by 0.5 kcal mol, as compared with thymine's selectivity of 2.4 kcal/mol. Interestingly, dichlorotoluene in DNA is slightly less destabilizing and slightly more selective than F, despite the lack of strongly electronegative fluorine atoms. Experimental data were complemented by computational results, evaluated at the M06-2X/6-31+G(d) and MP2/cc-pVTZ levels of theory. These computations suggest that the pairing energy of F to A

  19. Cytosolic disulfide bond formation in cells infected with large nucleocytoplasmic DNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Motti; Fass, Deborah

    2010-10-01

    Proteins that have evolved to contain stabilizing disulfide bonds generally fold in a membrane-delimited compartment in the cell [i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS)]. These compartments contain sulfhydryl oxidase enzymes that catalyze the pairing and oxidation of cysteine residues. In contrast, most proteins in a healthy cytosol are maintained in reduced form through surveillance by NADPH-dependent reductases and the lack of sulfhydryl oxidases. Nevertheless, one of the core functionalities that unify the broad and diverse set of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) is the ability to catalyze disulfide formation in the cytosol. The substrates of this activity are proteins that contribute to the assembly, structure, and infectivity of the virions. If the last common ancestor of NCLDVs was present during eukaryogenesis as has been proposed, it is interesting to speculate that viral disulfide bond formation pathways may have predated oxidative protein folding in intracellular organelles.

  20. DNA-scaffolded nanoparticle structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoegberg, Bjoern; Olin, Haakan [Department of Engineering Physics and Mathematics, Mid Sweden University, SE-851 70 Sundsvall, Sweden (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    DNA self-assembly is a powerful route to the production of very small, complex structures. When used in combination with nanoparticles it is likely to become a key technology in the production of nanoelectronics in the future. Previously, demonstrated nanoparticle assemblies have mainly been periodic and highly symmetric arrays, unsuited as building blocks for any complex circuits. With the invention of DNA-scaffolded origami reported earlier this year (Rothemund P W K 2006 Nature 440 (7082) 297-302), a new route to complex nanostructures using DNA has been opened. Here, we give a short review of the field and present the current status of our experiments were DNA origami is used in conjunction with nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles are functionalized with thiolated single stranded DNA. Strands that are complementary to the gold particle strands can be positioned on the self-assembled DNA-structure in arbitrary patterns. This property should allow an accurate positioning of the particles by letting them hybridize on the lattice. We report on our recent experiments on this system and discuss open problems and future applications.

  1. Mean bond-length variation in crystal structures: a bond-valence approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Ferdinando

    2014-08-01

    The distortion theorem of the bond-valence theory predicts that the mean bond length 〈D〉 increases with increasing deviation of the individual bond lengths from their mean value according to the equation 〈D〉 = (D' + ΔD), where D' is the length found in a polyhedron having equivalent bonds and ΔD is the bond distortion. For a given atom, D' is expected to be similar from one structure to another, whereas 〈D〉 should vary as a function of ΔD. However, in several crystal structures 〈D〉 significantly varies without any relevant contribution from ΔD. In accordance with bond-valence theory, 〈D〉 variation is described here by a new equation: 〈D〉 = (DRU + ΔDtop + ΔDiso + ΔDaniso + ΔDelec), where DRU is a constant related to the type of cation and coordination environment, ΔDtop is the topological distortion related to the way the atoms are linked, ΔDiso is an isotropic effect of compression (or stretching) in the bonds produced by steric strain and represents the same increase (or decrease) in all the bond lengths in the coordination sphere, ΔDaniso is the distortion produced by compression and stretching of bonds in the same coordination sphere, ΔDelec is the distortion produced by electronic effects. If present, ΔDelec can be combined with ΔDaniso because they lead to the same kind of distortions in line with the distortion theorem. Each D-index, in the new equation, corresponds to an algebraic expression containing experimental and theoretical bond valences. On the basis of this study, the ΔD index defined in bond valence theory is a result of both the bond topology and the distortion theorem (ΔD = ΔDtop + ΔDaniso + ΔDelec), and D' is a result of the compression, or stretching, of bonds (D' = DRU + ΔDiso). The deficiencies present in the bond-valence theory in explaining mean bond-length variations can therefore be overcome, and the observed variations of 〈D〉 in crystal structures can be

  2. Laser Surface Preparation and Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical prebonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  3. Hydrogen bond disruption in DNA base pairs from (14)C transmutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Michel; Carter, Damien J; Uberuaga, Blas P; Stanek, Christopher R; Mancera, Ricardo L; Marks, Nigel A

    2014-09-04

    Recent ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have shown that radioactive carbon does not normally fragment DNA bases when it decays. Motivated by this finding, density functional theory and Bader analysis have been used to quantify the effect of C → N transmutation on hydrogen bonding in DNA base pairs. We find that (14)C decay has the potential to significantly alter hydrogen bonds in a variety of ways including direct proton shuttling (thymine and cytosine), thermally activated proton shuttling (guanine), and hydrogen bond breaking (cytosine). Transmutation substantially modifies both the absolute and relative strengths of the hydrogen bonding pattern, and in two instances (adenine and cytosine), the density at the critical point indicates development of mild covalent character. Since hydrogen bonding is an important component of Watson-Crick pairing, these (14)C-induced modifications, while infrequent, may trigger errors in DNA transcription and replication.

  4. Probing Electron-Induced Bond Cleavage at the Single-Molecule Level Using DNA Origami Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Adrian Clemens; Bald, Ilko; Rotaru, Alexandru

    2012-01-01

    Low-energy electrons (LEEs) play an important role in nanolithography, atmospheric chemistry, and DNA radiation damage. Previously, the cleavage of specific chemical bonds triggered by LEEs has been demonstrated in a variety of small organic molecules such as halogenated benzenes and DNA nucleoba......Low-energy electrons (LEEs) play an important role in nanolithography, atmospheric chemistry, and DNA radiation damage. Previously, the cleavage of specific chemical bonds triggered by LEEs has been demonstrated in a variety of small organic molecules such as halogenated benzenes and DNA...

  5. Structural Complexity of DNA Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yuan Liou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern bioinformatics, finding an efficient way to allocate sequence fragments with biological functions is an important issue. This paper presents a structural approach based on context-free grammars extracted from original DNA or protein sequences. This approach is radically different from all those statistical methods. Furthermore, this approach is compared with a topological entropy-based method for consistency and difference of the complexity results.

  6. Unconventional N-H…N Hydrogen Bonds Involving Proline Backbone Nitrogen in Protein Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, R N V Krishna; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2016-05-10

    Contrary to DNA double-helical structures, hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) involving nitrogen as the acceptor are not common in protein structures. We systematically searched N-H…N H-bonds in two different sets of protein structures. Data set I consists of neutron diffraction and ultrahigh-resolution x-ray structures (0.9 Å resolution or better) and the hydrogen atom positions in these structures were determined experimentally. Data set II contains structures determined using x-ray diffraction (resolution ≤ 1.8 Å) and the positions of hydrogen atoms were generated using a computational method. We identified 114 and 14,347 potential N-H…N H-bonds from these two data sets, respectively, and 56-66% of these were of the Ni+1-Hi+1…Ni type, with Ni being the proline backbone nitrogen. To further understand the nature of such unusual contacts, we performed quantum chemical calculations on the model compound N-acetyl-L-proline-N-methylamide (Ace-Pro-NMe) with coordinates taken from the experimentally determined structures. A potential energy profile generated by varying the ψ dihedral angle in Ace-Pro-NMe indicates that the conformation with the N-H…N H-bond is the most stable. An analysis of H-bond-forming proline residues reveals that more than 30% of the proline carbonyl groups are also involved in n → π(∗) interactions with the carbonyl carbon of the preceding residue. Natural bond orbital analyses demonstrate that the strength of N-H…N H-bonds is less than half of that observed for a conventional H-bond. This study clearly establishes the H-bonding capability of proline nitrogen and its prevalence in protein structures. We found many proteins with multiple instances of H-bond-forming prolines. With more than 15% of all proline residues participating in N-H…N H-bonds, we suggest a new, to our knowledge, structural role for proline in providing stability to loops and capping regions of secondary structures in proteins.

  7. Structural basis of human transcription factor Sry-related box 17 binding to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nana; Jiang, Wei; Gao, Hai; Cheng, Zhong; Qian, Huolian; Si, Shuyi; Xie, Yong

    2013-04-01

    Sry-related box (Sox) transcription factors share a conserved high-mobility-group box domain (HMG-domain) that binds DNA in the minor groove and bends DNA for further assembly of transcriptional machineries. During organogenesis, each member of the Sox family triggers a specific cell lineage differentiation, indicating that their interactions with DNA are different from each other. Therefore, investigating structural rearrangement of each Sox transcription factor HMG-domain upon binding to DNA would help to elucidate the distinctive molecular mechanism by which they interact with DNA. Previous studies have determined the crystal structures of Sox2 HMG-domain/DNA, Sox4 HMGdomain/ DNA, Sox9 HMG-domain/DNA and Sox17 HMG-domain/DNA complexes. However, major gaps remain in the structural information on the Sox transcription factor HMG-domains. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human Sox17 HMG-domain alone at 2.4 A resolution. Comparing this structure and the structure of the mouse Sox17 HMGdomain/ DNA complex provides structural understanding of the mechanism of Sox17 binding to DNA. Specifically, after electrostatic interactions attract Sox17 to DNA, Asn73, Ser99, and Trp106 form hydrogen bonds with DNA, Arg70, Lys80, Arg83, His94, and Asn95 on Sox17 undergo conformational changes and form hydrogen bonds with DNA, contributing to the electrostatic interaction between Sox17 and DNA.

  8. The helical structure of DNA facilitates binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Otto G.; Mahmutovic, Anel; Marklund, Emil; Elf, Johan

    2016-09-01

    The helical structure of DNA imposes constraints on the rate of diffusion-limited protein binding. Here we solve the reaction-diffusion equations for DNA-like geometries and extend with simulations when necessary. We find that the helical structure can make binding to the DNA more than twice as fast compared to a case where DNA would be reactive only along one side. We also find that this rate advantage remains when the contributions from steric constraints and rotational diffusion of the DNA-binding protein are included. Furthermore, we find that the association rate is insensitive to changes in the steric constraints on the DNA in the helix geometry, while it is much more dependent on the steric constraints on the DNA-binding protein. We conclude that the helical structure of DNA facilitates the nonspecific binding of transcription factors and structural DNA-binding proteins in general.

  9. Structure and bonding in some organotitanium and related compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinstra, Jabik Dominicus

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis investigations on the structure and chemical bonding in some organometallic compounds of transition metals with few d electrons are described. Structural studies involve the X-ray diffraction analyses of two titanium compounds. Theoretical studies deal with the electronic structure of

  10. The Term Structure of Credit Spreads on Euro Corporate Bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Landschoot, A.

    2003-01-01

    Although there is a broad literature on structural credit risk models, there has been little empirical testing of these models.In this paper we examine the term structure of credit spreads on euro corporate bonds and the empirical validation of structural credit risk models.The latter provide a fram

  11. Fibonacci Sequence and Supramolecular Structure of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabalkin, I P; Grigor'eva, E Yu; Gudkova, M V; Shabalkin, P I

    2016-05-01

    We proposed a new model of supramolecular DNA structure. Similar to the previously developed by us model of primary DNA structure [11-15], 3D structure of DNA molecule is assembled in accordance to a mathematic rule known as Fibonacci sequence. Unlike primary DNA structure, supramolecular 3D structure is assembled from complex moieties including a regular tetrahedron and a regular octahedron consisting of monomers, elements of the primary DNA structure. The moieties of the supramolecular DNA structure forming fragments of regular spatial lattice are bound via linker (joint) sequences of the DNA chain. The lattice perceives and transmits information signals over a considerable distance without acoustic aberrations. Linker sequences expand conformational space between lattice segments allowing their sliding relative to each other under the action of external forces. In this case, sliding is provided by stretching of the stacked linker sequences.

  12. A novel DNA computing model based on RecA-mediated triple-stranded DNA structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Gang; Zhang Shemin; Dong Yafei; Xu Jin

    2007-01-01

    The field of DNA computing emerged in 1994 after Adleman's paper was published. Henceforth, a few scholars solved some noted NP-complete problems in this way. And all these methods of DNA computing are based on conventional Watson-Crick hydrogen bond of doublehelical DNA molecule. In this paper, we show that the triple-stranded DNA structure mediated by RecA protein can be used for solving computational problems. Sequence-specific recognition of double-stranded DNA by oligonucleotide-directed triple helix (triplex) formation is used to carry out the algorithm. We present procedure for the 3-vertex-colorability problems. In our proposed procedure, it is suggested that it is possible to solve more complicated problems with more variables by this model.

  13. Interface Fracture in Adhesively Bonded Shell Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2007-01-01

    Two methods for the prediction of crack propagation through the interface of adhesively bonded shells are discussed. One is based on a fracture mechanics approach; the other is based on a cohesive zone approach. Attention is focussed on predicting the shape of the crack front and the critical...... stress required to propagate the crack under quasi-static conditions. The fracture mechanical model is theoretically sound and it is accurate and numerically stable. The cohesive zone model has some advantages over the fracture mechanics based model. It is easier to generalise the cohesive zone model...... to take into account effects such as plastic deformation in the adhering shells, and to take into account effects of large local curvatures of the interface crack front. The comparison shows a convergence of the results based on the cohesive zone model towards the results based on a fracture mechanics...

  14. Bonding, structure and solid-state chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Ladd, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This book is aimed at undergraduate students in both chemistry and those degree subjects in which chemistry forms a significant part. It does not reflect any particular academic year, and so finds a place during the normal span of degree studies in the physical sciences. An A-level standard in science and mathematics is presumed; additional mathematical treatments are discussed in Appendices. An introductory first chapter leads into the main subject matter, which is treated through four chapters in terms of the principle bonding forces of cohesion in the solid state; a further chapter discusses nanosize materials. Important applications of the study topics are interspersed at appropriate points within the text. Each chapter is provided with a set of problems of varying degrees of difficulty, so as to assist the reader in gaining a facility with the subject matter and its applications. The problems are supplemented by detailed tutorial solutions, some of which present additional relevant material that indicate...

  15. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical pre-bonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  16. Structure of adsorbed monolayers. The surface chemical bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, G.A.; Bent, B.E.

    1984-06-01

    This paper attempts to provide a summary of what has been learned about the structure of adsorbed monolayers and about the surface chemical bond from molecular surface science. While the surface chemical bond is less well understood than bonding of molecules in the gas phase or in the solid state, our knowledge of its properties is rapidly accumulating. The information obtained also has great impact on many surface science based technologies, including heterogeneous catalysis and electronic devices. It is hoped that much of the information obtained from studies at solid-gas interfaces can be correlated with molecular behavior at solid-liquid interfaces. 31 references, 42 figures, 1 table.

  17. Adhesion to tooth structure mediated by contemporary bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangel, Ivan; Ellis, Thomas H; Sacher, Edward

    2007-07-01

    Given the enormity of the field of adhesion and the number of commercial products available, the discipline of modern adhesive dentistry can be daunting with respect to materials and techniques. This article organizes contemporary bonding practice and materials around an understanding of the fundamentals of adhesion to tooth structure. In providing this context, adhesive development, bonding systems, and their appropriate use are better understood. The end result is the better practice of adhesive dentistry.

  18. Bonded structure application for aircraft. Kokuki ni okeru secchaku gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, O. (Japan Airlines Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-01-05

    Adhesives play an important role in a technology of the aircraft structure for which lightness and strength are required. The paper explains the present situation of bonding technology employed for aircraft, the honeycomb structure, production of composite materials and the related problems. Advantages and purposes of employing adhesives as substitutes for fasteners like screws, rivets, etc. are as follows: decreases in stress concentration, weight reduction, smoothing of surfaces, improvement of acoustic fatigue by adhesives flexibility, prevention of gas-liquid leakage. Epoxide adhesives are mainly used for aircraft. Together with tear straps, which are metal-metal bonded to the rear fuselage plate of aircraft, and waffle doublers, an aluminium honeycomb sandwich structure, whose weight is 1/7 of an aluminium plate same in rigidity, is used in such parts of aircraft as spoilers, outer plates of flaps, etc. The problem of the bonded structure is detachment. Therefore, how to prevent, discover and repair it is most important. 3 figs.

  19. Left-handed DNA crossovers. Implications for DNA-DNA recognition and structural alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timsit, Y; Shatzky-Schwartz, M; Shakked, Z

    1999-02-01

    The close approach of DNA segments participates in many biological functions including DNA condensation and DNA processing. Previous crystallographic studies have shown that B-DNA self-fitting by mutual groove-backbone interaction produces right-handed DNA crossovers. These structures have opened new perspectives on the role of close DNA-DNA interactions in the architecture and activity the DNA molecule. In the present study, the analysis of the crystal packing of two B-DNA decamer duplexes d(CCIIICCCGG) and d(CCGCCGGCGG) reveals the existence of new modes of DNA crossing. Symmetric left-handed crossovers are produced by mutual fitting of DNA grooves at the crossing point. New sequence patterns contribute to stabilize longitudinal fitting of the sugar-phosphate backbone into the major groove. In addition, the close approach of DNA segments greatly influences the DNA conformation in a sequence dependent manner. This study provides new insights into the role of DNA sequence and structure in DNA-DNA recognition. In providing detailed molecular views of DNA crossovers of opposite chirality, this study can also help to elucidate the role of symmetry and chirality in the recognition of complex DNA structures by protein dimers or tetramers, such as topoisomerase II and recombinase enzymes. These results are discussed in the context of the possible relationships between DNA condensation and DNA processing.

  20. Ultrafast Photodynamics in Diverse DNA Structures from A-tracts to Z-DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Bern

    2009-03-01

    The vulnerability of the genome to UV photodamage has sustained interest in excited electronic states in DNA for over 50 years. Progress in understanding the nature and dynamics of electronic excitations in DNA has accelerated rapidly thanks in part to ultrafast spectroscopy. Most excitations in single DNA bases decay nonradiatively in hundreds of femtoseconds. Surprisingly, much longer-lived excited states are observed in femtosecond pump-probe experiments on single- and double-stranded DNAs. Localized charge transfer states are prominent in runs of adenine bases (A tracts). DNA is polymorphic and can adopt a range of structures beyond the iconic B-form double helix. The effect of helix conformation on excited-state dynamics has been studied in a double-stranded oligonucleotide that can be switched between B- and Z-forms. Experiments on G quadruplex structures and on i-motif DNA reveal that these forms have significantly slower relaxation than B-DNA. By altering π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding, structure profoundly affects the complex photoprocesses observed in DNA.

  1. Understanding metallic bonding: Structure, process and interaction by Rasch analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Oon, Pey-Tee

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of 3006 Year 10-12 students on their understandings of metallic bonding. The instrument was developed based on Chi's ontological categories of scientific concepts and students' understanding of metallic bonding as reported in the literature. The instrument has two parts. Part one probed into students' understanding of metallic bonding as (a) a submicro structure of metals, (b) a process in which individual metal atoms lose their outermost shell electrons to form a 'sea of electrons' and octet metal cations or (c) an all-directional electrostatic force between delocalized electrons and metal cations, that is, an interaction. Part two assessed students' explanation of malleability of metals, for example (a) as a submicro structural rearrangement of metal atoms/cations or (b) based on all-directional electrostatic force. The instrument was validated by the Rasch Model. Psychometric assessment showed that the instrument possessed reasonably good properties of measurement. Results revealed that it was reliable and valid for measuring students' understanding of metallic bonding. Analysis revealed that the structure, process and interaction understandings were unidimensional and in an increasing order of difficulty. Implications for the teaching of metallic bonding, particular through the use of diagrams, critiques and model-based learning, are discussed.

  2. Hydrogen-Bonding Capability of a Templating Difluorotoluene Nucleotide Residue in an RB69 DNA Polymerase Ternary Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Shuangluo; Konigsberg, William H.; Wang, Jimin (Yale)

    2011-08-29

    Results obtained using 2,4-difluorotoluene nucleobase (dF) as a nonpolar thymine isostere by Kool and colleagues challenged the Watson-Crick dogma that hydrogen bonds between complementary bases are an absolute requirement for accurate DNA replication. Here, we report crystal structure of an RB69 DNA polymerase L561A/S565G/Y567A triple mutant ternary complex with a templating dF opposite dTTP at 1.8 {angstrom}-resolution. In this structure, direct hydrogen bonds were observed between: (i) dF and the incoming dTTP, (ii) dF and residue G568 of the polymerase, and (iii) dF and ordered water molecules surrounding the nascent base pair. Therefore, this structure provides evidence that a templating dF can form novel hydrogen bonds with the incoming dTTP and with the enzyme that differ from those formed with a templating dT.

  3. Thermoplastic polymeric adhesive for structural bonding applications for orthopaedic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devanathan, D.; King, R.; Swarts, D.; Lin, S. [Zimmer, Inc., Warsaw, IN (United States); Ramani, K.; Tagle, J. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1994-12-31

    The orthopaedics industry has witnessed tremendous growth in recent years primarily due to the introduction of high performance, porous coated implants. These devices have eliminated the need for the use of bone cement for in vivo implant fixation, replacing it with the ingrowth of bone into the porous surfaces. The metallurgical bonding processes used for attaching the porous to the implant body introduce some undesirable effect i.e., the reduction of the fatigue strength of the implant due to the ``notches`` created and also due to the high temperature exposure during the sintering operations. This paper describes the development of a thermoplastic polymeric adhesive based structural bonding technique. The high performance polymeric adhesive is fully characterized with respect to its intended application. The design of the porous layer is optimized to achieve a reliable bond to the implant. A thermal heating/cooling process was developed to control the final polymer morphology. Static and fatigue tests were conducted to fully characterize the adhesive bond strength. A ring shear test method was developed to determine the shear strength of the bond interface. Besides the characterization of the adhesive bond, the joints will be analyzed using finite element models. The correlation between the analytical models and the

  4. A bouquet of DNA structures: Emerging diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahima Kaushik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Structural polymorphism of DNA has constantly been evolving from the time of illustration of the double helical model of DNA by Watson and Crick. A variety of non-canonical DNA structures have constantly been documented across the globe. DNA attracted worldwide attention as a carrier of genetic information. In addition to the classical Watson–Crick duplex, DNA can actually adopt diverse structures during its active participation in cellular processes like replication, transcription, recombination and repair. Structures like hairpin, cruciform, triplex, G-triplex, quadruplex, i-motif and other alternative non-canonical DNA structures have been studied at length and have also shown their in vivo occurrence. This review mainly focuses on non-canonical structures adopted by DNA oligonucleotides which have certain prerequisites for their formation in terms of sequence, its length, number and orientation of strands along with varied solution conditions. This conformational polymorphism of DNA might be the basis of different functional properties of a specific set of DNA sequences, further giving some insights for various extremely complicated biological phenomena. Many of these structures have already shown their linkages with diseases like cancer and genetic disorders, hence making them an extremely striking target for structure-specific drug designing and therapeutic applications.

  5. Imaging DNA Structure by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, Alice L B; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a microscopy technique that uses a sharp probe to trace a sample surface at nanometre resolution. For biological applications, one of its key advantages is its ability to visualize substructure of single molecules and molecular complexes in an aqueous environment. Here, we describe the application of AFM to determine superstructure and secondary structure of surface-bound DNA. The method is also readily applicable to probe DNA-DNA interactions and DNA-protein complexes.

  6. Structure and mechanism for DNA lesion recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Yang

    2008-01-01

    A fundamental question in DNA repair is how a lesion is detected when embedded in millions to billions of normal base pairs. Extensive structural and functional studies reveal atomic details of DNA repair protein and nucleic acid interactions. This review summarizes seemingly diverse structural motifs used in lesion recognition and suggests a general mechanism to recognize DNA lesion by the poor base stacking. After initial recognition of this shared struc-tural feature of lesions, different DNA repair pathways use unique verification mechanisms to ensure correct lesion identification and removal.

  7. Change in hydrogen bonding structures of a hydrogel with dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naohara, Ryo; Narita, Kentaro; Ikeda-Fukazawa, Tomoko

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of structural changes in polymer network and water during dehydration, X-ray diffraction of poly-N,N-dimethylacrylamide (PDMAA) hydrogels was measured. The variation process in the individual structures of water and PDMAA were analyzed by decomposition of the diffraction patterns to separate the respective contributions. The results show that the short-range structures of PDMAA expand during dehydration, whereas the network structure as a whole shrinks. The average length of the hydrogen bonds between water molecules increases with the process. The present results provide a direct evidence of the structural changes of water and polymer in the hydrogel during dehydration.

  8. Structural organization of DNA in chlorella viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Wulfmeyer

    Full Text Available Chlorella viruses have icosahedral capsids with an internal membrane enclosing their large dsDNA genomes and associated proteins. Their genomes are packaged in the particles with a predicted DNA density of ca. 0.2 bp nm(-3. Occasionally infection of an algal cell by an individual particle fails and the viral DNA is dynamically ejected from the capsid. This shows that the release of the DNA generates a force, which can aid in the transfer of the genome into the host in a successful infection. Imaging of ejected viral DNA indicates that it is intimately associated with proteins in a periodic fashion. The bulk of the protein particles detected by atomic force microscopy have a size of ∼60 kDa and two proteins (A278L and A282L of about this size are among 6 basic putative DNA binding proteins found in a proteomic analysis of DNA binding proteins packaged in the virion. A combination of fluorescence images of ejected DNA and a bioinformatics analysis of the DNA reveal periodic patterns in the viral DNA. The periodic distribution of GC rich regions in the genome provides potential binding sites for basic proteins. This DNA/protein aggregation could be responsible for the periodic concentration of fluorescently labeled DNA observed in ejected viral DNA. Collectively the data indicate that the large chlorella viruses have a DNA packaging strategy that differs from bacteriophages; it involves proteins and share similarities to that of chromatin structure in eukaryotes.

  9. Sufficient minimal model for DNA denaturation: Integration of harmonic scalar elasticity and bond energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit Raj; Granek, Rony

    2016-10-14

    We study DNA denaturation by integrating elasticity - as described by the Gaussian network model - with bond binding energies, distinguishing between different base pairs and stacking energies. We use exact calculation, within the model, of the Helmholtz free-energy of any partial denaturation state, which implies that the entropy of all formed "bubbles" ("loops") is accounted for. Considering base pair bond removal single events, the bond designated for opening is chosen by minimizing the free-energy difference for the process, over all remaining base pair bonds. Despite of its great simplicity, for several known DNA sequences our results are in accord with available theoretical and experimental studies. Moreover, we report free-energy profiles along the denaturation pathway, which allow to detect stable or meta-stable partial denaturation states, composed of bubble, as local free-energy minima separated by barriers. Our approach allows to study very long DNA strands with commonly available computational power, as we demonstrate for a few random sequences in the range 200-800 base-pairs. For the latter, we also elucidate the self-averaging property of the system. Implications for the well known breathing dynamics of DNA are elucidated.

  10. Hydrogen bonding versus stacking stabilization by modified nucleobases incorporated in PNA. DNA duplexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sen, Anjana; Nielsen, Peter E

    2009-01-01

    The effects of incorporation of the modified nucleobases, 2,6-diaminopurine (D) (substituting for adenine) and 7-chloro-1,8-naphthyridin-2-(1H)-one (bicyclic thymine, bT) (substituting for thymine), that stabilize PNA.DNA duplex formation by increasing hydrogen bonding and/or base pair stacking...

  11. Sufficient minimal model for DNA denaturation: Integration of harmonic scalar elasticity and bond energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit Raj; Granek, Rony

    2016-10-01

    We study DNA denaturation by integrating elasticity — as described by the Gaussian network model — with bond binding energies, distinguishing between different base pairs and stacking energies. We use exact calculation, within the model, of the Helmholtz free-energy of any partial denaturation state, which implies that the entropy of all formed "bubbles" ("loops") is accounted for. Considering base pair bond removal single events, the bond designated for opening is chosen by minimizing the free-energy difference for the process, over all remaining base pair bonds. Despite of its great simplicity, for several known DNA sequences our results are in accord with available theoretical and experimental studies. Moreover, we report free-energy profiles along the denaturation pathway, which allow to detect stable or meta-stable partial denaturation states, composed of bubble, as local free-energy minima separated by barriers. Our approach allows to study very long DNA strands with commonly available computational power, as we demonstrate for a few random sequences in the range 200-800 base-pairs. For the latter, we also elucidate the self-averaging property of the system. Implications for the well known breathing dynamics of DNA are elucidated.

  12. Flexible DNA bending in HU-DNA cocrystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinger, Kerren K; Lemberg, Kathryn M; Zhang, Ying; Rice, Phoebe A

    2003-07-15

    HU and IHF are members of a family of prokaryotic proteins that interact with the DNA minor groove in a sequence-specific (IHF) or non-specific (HU) manner to induce and/or stabilize DNA bending. HU plays architectural roles in replication initiation, transcription regulation and site-specific recombination, and is associated with bacterial nucleoids. Cocrystal structures of Anabaena HU bound to DNA (1P71, 1P78, 1P51) reveal that while underlying proline intercalation and asymmetric charge neutralization mechanisms of DNA bending are similar for IHF and HU, HU stabilizes different DNA bend angles ( approximately 105-140 degrees ). The two bend angles within a single HU complex are not coplanar, and the resulting dihedral angle is consistent with negative supercoiling. Comparison of HU-DNA and IHF-DNA structures suggests that sharper bending is correlated with longer DNA binding sites and smaller dihedral angles. An HU-induced bend may be better modeled as a hinge, not a rigid bend. The ability to induce or stabilize varying bend angles is consistent with HU's role as an architectural cofactor in many different systems that may require differing geometries.

  13. Connecting DNA origami structures using the biotin- streptavidin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    This work made use of the strong interaction between biotin and streptavidin to connect designed DNA ... DNA as a building material for the construction of devices ..... Chemomechanical Machine Driven by Ligand–Receptor Bonding.

  14. Character and Structure of Hydrogen Bonding in Liquid Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinghua; Luo, Yi; Augustsson, Andreas; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Sathe, Conny; Agren, Hans; Siegbahn, Hans; Nordgren, Joseph

    2003-03-01

    Pauling stated in the 50s that electron sharing between water molecules results in a covalency in the hydrogen bond. Many attempts have been made in the past to verify PaulingÂ's prediction, but without much success due to the limitation of experimental access to the electronic structure of liquids. We reported the first X-ray emission spectra of liquid water. X-ray emission is a direct probe of the local electronic structure of complex systems. Our experimental and theoretical studies on liquid water provide clear evidence that an electron sharing takes place between water molecules. Such a sharing mainly involves the so-called 3a1 orbital, which is a mixing of oxygen 2p and hydrogen 2s atomic orbitals. The outermost "lone pair" orbital (1b_1), however, hardly shows any change upon solvation, which is in contradiction with the normal definition of so-called coordinate-covalent bonding (also called donor-acceptor or Lewis acid-base bonding). Moreover, the X-ray emission spectra of liquid water nicely show the origin for the increasing of dipole moment in liquid water, and they have also been used to separately determine a particular structure with broken hydrogen bonding.

  15. Interface Structure and Atomic Bonding Characteristics in Silicon Nitride Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, A; Idrobo, J C; Cinibulk, M K; Kisielowski, C; Browning, N D; Ritchie, R O

    2004-10-12

    This investigation examines the interface atomic structure and bonding characteristics in an advanced ceramic, obtaining new and unique experimental information that will help to understand and improve the properties of ceramics. Unique direct atomic resolution images have been obtained that illustrate how a range of rare-earth atoms bond to the interface between the intergranular phase and the matrix grains in an advanced silicon nitride ceramic. It has been found that each rare-earth atom bonds to the interface at a different location, depending on atom size, electronic configuration and the presence of oxygen at the interface. This is the key factor to understanding the origin of the mechanical properties in these ceramics and will enable precise tailoring in the future to critically improve the materials performance in wide-ranging applications.

  16. Methods for Using Durable Adhesively Bonded Joints for Sandwich Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III (Inventor); Lundgren, Eric C. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems, methods, and apparatus for increasing durability of adhesively bonded joints in a sandwich structure. Such systems, methods, and apparatus includes an first face sheet and an second face sheet as well as an insert structure, the insert structure having a first insert face sheet, a second insert face sheet, and an insert core material. In addition, sandwich core material is arranged between the first face sheet and the second face sheet. A primary bondline may be coupled to the face sheet(s) and the splice. Further, systems, methods, and apparatus of the present disclosure advantageously reduce the load, provide a redundant path, reduce structural fatigue, and/or increase fatigue life.

  17. Optimized Reaction Conditions for Amide Bond Formation in DNA-Encoded Combinatorial Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yizhou; Gabriele, Elena; Samain, Florent; Favalli, Nicholas; Sladojevich, Filippo; Scheuermann, Jörg; Neri, Dario

    2016-08-08

    DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries are increasingly being used as tools for the discovery of small organic binding molecules to proteins of biological or pharmaceutical interest. In the majority of cases, synthetic procedures for the formation of DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries incorporate at least one step of amide bond formation between amino-modified DNA and a carboxylic acid. We investigated reaction conditions and established a methodology by using 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide, 1-hydroxy-7-azabenzotriazole and N,N'-diisopropylethylamine (EDC/HOAt/DIPEA) in combination, which provided conversions greater than 75% for 423/543 (78%) of the carboxylic acids tested. These reaction conditions were efficient with a variety of primary and secondary amines, as well as with various types of amino-modified oligonucleotides. The reaction conditions, which also worked efficiently over a broad range of DNA concentrations and reaction scales, should facilitate the synthesis of novel DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries.

  18. Computational applications of DNA structural scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, P.; Chauvin, Y.; Brunak, Søren

    1998-01-01

    Studies several different physical scales associated with the structural features of DNA sequences from a computational standpoint, including dinucleotide scales, such as base stacking energy and propeller twist, and trinucleotide scales, such as bendability and nucleosome positioning. We show...... that these scales provide an alternative or complementary compact representation of DNA sequences. As an example, we construct a strand-invariant representation of DNA sequences. The scales can also be used to analyze and discover new DNA structural patterns, especially in combination with hidden Markov models...

  19. Structure-Induced Covalent Bonding in Al-Li Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Kazuki; Ishii, Yasushi

    2010-06-01

    Formation mechanism of a deep pseudogap in the electronic density of states of the Al-Li Bergman and Zintl compounds is discussed with an emphasis on the differences among isostructural Al-Mg compounds. Since Li scatters electrons very weakly in comparison with Al and Mg, the potential landscape for electrons in Al-Li compounds is not that of the entire close-packed structure but that of the Al sublattice, which is a rather porous network like the diamond lattice. The porous network structure realized by the chemical decoration of close-packed structures enhances the covalent nature of electronic structures, hence the deep pseudogap in the electronic density of states. A concept of structure-induced covalent bonding in a network realized by the chemical decoration of close-packed structures may provide a novel picture in the electronic structures of complex intermetallic compounds.

  20. Strengthening of Concrete Structures with cement based bonded composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Blanksvärd, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Polymers). The method is very efficient and has achieved world wide attention. However, there are some drawbacks with the use of epoxy, e.g. working environment, compatibility and permeability. Substituting the epoxy adherent with a cement based bonding agent will render a strengthening system...... with improved working environment and better compatibility to the base concrete structure. This study gives an overview of different cement based systems, all with very promising results for structural upgrading. Studied parameters are structural retrofit for bending, shear and confinement. It is concluded...

  1. Crystal structure of a DNA catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Salvatierra, Almudena; Wawrzyniak-Turek, Katarzyna; Steuerwald, Ulrich; Höbartner, Claudia; Pena, Vladimir

    2016-01-14

    Catalysis in biology is restricted to RNA (ribozymes) and protein enzymes, but synthetic biomolecular catalysts can also be made of DNA (deoxyribozymes) or synthetic genetic polymers. In vitro selection from synthetic random DNA libraries identified DNA catalysts for various chemical reactions beyond RNA backbone cleavage. DNA-catalysed reactions include RNA and DNA ligation in various topologies, hydrolytic cleavage and photorepair of DNA, as well as reactions of peptides and small molecules. In spite of comprehensive biochemical studies of DNA catalysts for two decades, fundamental mechanistic understanding of their function is lacking in the absence of three-dimensional models at atomic resolution. Early attempts to solve the crystal structure of an RNA-cleaving deoxyribozyme resulted in a catalytically irrelevant nucleic acid fold. Here we report the crystal structure of the RNA-ligating deoxyribozyme 9DB1 (ref. 14) at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure captures the ligation reaction in the post-catalytic state, revealing a compact folding unit stabilized by numerous tertiary interactions, and an unanticipated organization of the catalytic centre. Structure-guided mutagenesis provided insights into the basis for regioselectivity of the ligation reaction and allowed remarkable manipulation of substrate recognition and reaction rate. Moreover, the structure highlights how the specific properties of deoxyribose are reflected in the backbone conformation of the DNA catalyst, in support of its intricate three-dimensional organization. The structural principles underlying the catalytic ability of DNA elucidate differences and similarities in DNA versus RNA catalysts, which is relevant for comprehending the privileged position of folded RNA in the prebiotic world and in current organisms.

  2. Estimating Structural Models of Corporate Bond Prices in Indonesian Corporations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenny Suardi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This  paper  applies  the  maximum  likelihood  (ML  approaches  to  implementing  the structural  model  of  corporate  bond,  as  suggested  by  Li  and  Wong  (2008,  in  Indonesian corporations.  Two  structural  models,  extended  Merton  and  Longstaff  &  Schwartz  (LS models,  are  used  in  determining  these  prices,  yields,  yield  spreads  and  probabilities  of default. ML estimation is used to determine the volatility of irm value. Since irm value is unobserved variable, Duan (1994 suggested that the irst step of ML estimation is to derive the likelihood function for equity as the option on the irm value. The second step is to ind parameters such as the drift and volatility of irm value, that maximizing this function. The irm value itself is extracted by equating the pricing formula to the observed equity prices. Equity,  total  liabilities,  bond  prices  data  and  the  irm's  parameters  (irm  value,  volatility of irm value, and default barrier are substituted to extended Merton and LS bond pricing formula in order to valuate the corporate bond.These models are implemented to a sample of 24 bond prices in Indonesian corporation during  period  of  2001-2005,  based  on  criteria  of  Eom,  Helwege  and  Huang  (2004.  The equity  and  bond  prices  data  were  obtained  from  Indonesia  Stock  Exchange  for  irms  that issued equity and provided regular inancial statement within this period. The result shows that both models, in average, underestimate the bond prices and overestimate the yields and yield spread. ";} // -->activate javascript

  3. Damage tolerance of bonded composite aircraft repairs for metallic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Randal John

    This thesis describes the development and validation of methods for damage tolerance substantiation of bonded composite repairs applied to cracked plates. This technology is used to repair metal aircraft structures, offering improvements in fatigue life, cost, manufacturability, and inspectability when compared to riveted repairs. The work focuses on the effects of plate thickness and bending on repair life, and covers fundamental aspects of fracture and fatigue of cracked plates and bonded joints. This project falls under the UBC Bonded Composite Repair Program, which has the goal of certification and widespread use of bonded repairs in civilian air transportation. This thesis analyses the plate thickness and transverse stress effects on fracture of repaired plates and the related problem of induced geometrically nonlinear bending in unbalanced (single-sided) repairs. The author begins by developing a classification scheme for assigning repair damage tolerance substantiation requirements based upon stress-based adhesive fracture/fatigue criteria and the residual strength of the original structure. The governing equations for bending of cracked plates are then reformulated and line-spring models are developed for linear and nonlinear coupled bending and extension of reinforced cracks. The line-spring models were used to correct the Wang and Rose energy method for the determination of the long-crack limit stress intensity, and to develop a new interpolation model for repaired cracks of arbitrary length. The analysis was validated using finite element models and data from mechanical tests performed on hybrid bonded joints and repair specimens that are representative of an in-service repair. This work will allow designers to evaluate the damage tolerance of the repaired plate, the adhesive, and the composite patch, which is an airworthiness requirement under FAR (Federal Aviation Regulations) 25.571. The thesis concludes by assessing the remaining barriers to

  4. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds: From temperature-driven proton transfer in molecular crystals to denaturation of DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mark Johnson

    2008-11-01

    We have combined neutron scattering and a range of numerical simulations to study hydrogen bonds in condensed matter. Two examples from a recent thesis will be presented. The first concerns proton transfer with increasing temperature in short inter-molecular hydrogen bonds [1,2]. These bonds have unique physical and chemical properties and are thought to play a fundamental role in processes like enzymatic catalysis. By combining elastic and inelastic neutron scattering results with ab initio, lattice dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations, low frequency lattice modes are identified which modulate the potential energy surface of the hydrogen bond proton and drive proton transfer. The second example concerns base-pair opening in DNA which is the fundamental physical process underlying biological processes like denaturation and transcription. We have used an emprical force field and a large scale, all-atom phonon calculation to gain insight into the base-pair opening modes and the apparent `energy gap' between the accepted frequencies for these modes (∼ 100 cm-1 or ∼ 140 K) and the temperature of the biological processes (room temperature to 100° C) [3]. Inelastic neutron scattering spectra on aligned, highly crystalline DNA samples, produced at the ILL, provide the reference data for evaluating the precision of these simulation results.

  5. The Pauling 3-Electron Bond: A Recommendation for the Use of the Linnett Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcourt, Richard D.

    1985-01-01

    Recommends the Linnett structure IV (as in VIII for molecular oxygen) for future use when a valence-bond structure for a Pauling 3-electron bond is required. Examples are provided to illustrate why this recommendation is made. (JN)

  6. Interplay between Peptide Bond Geometrical Parameters in Nonglobular Structural Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Esposito

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several investigations performed in the last two decades have unveiled that geometrical parameters of protein backbone show a remarkable variability. Although these studies have provided interesting insights into one of the basic aspects of protein structure, they have been conducted on globular and water-soluble proteins. We report here a detailed analysis of backbone geometrical parameters in nonglobular proteins/peptides. We considered membrane proteins and two distinct fibrous systems (amyloid-forming and collagen-like peptides. Present data show that in these systems the local conformation plays a major role in dictating the amplitude of the bond angle N-Cα-C and the propensity of the peptide bond to adopt planar/nonplanar states. Since the trends detected here are in line with the concept of the mutual influence of local geometry and conformation previously established for globular and water-soluble proteins, our analysis demonstrates that the interplay of backbone geometrical parameters is an intrinsic and general property of protein/peptide structures that is preserved also in nonglobular contexts. For amyloid-forming peptides significant distortions of the N-Cα-C bond angle, indicative of sterical hidden strain, may occur in correspondence with side chain interdigitation. The correlation between the dihedral angles Δω/ψ in collagen-like models may have interesting implications for triple helix stability.

  7. Statistical analysis of structural determinants for protein-DNA-binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Rosario I; Guo, Jun-Tao

    2016-08-01

    DNA-binding proteins play critical roles in biological processes including gene expression, DNA packaging and DNA repair. They bind to DNA target sequences with different degrees of binding specificity, ranging from highly specific (HS) to nonspecific (NS). Alterations of DNA-binding specificity, due to either genetic variation or somatic mutations, can lead to various diseases. In this study, a comparative analysis of protein-DNA complex structures was carried out to investigate the structural features that contribute to binding specificity. Protein-DNA complexes were grouped into three general classes based on degrees of binding specificity: HS, multispecific (MS), and NS. Our results show a clear trend of structural features among the three classes, including amino acid binding propensities, simple and complex hydrogen bonds, major/minor groove and base contacts, and DNA shape. We found that aspartate is enriched in HS DNA binding proteins and predominately binds to a cytosine through a single hydrogen bond or two consecutive cytosines through bidentate hydrogen bonds. Aromatic residues, histidine and tyrosine, are highly enriched in the HS and MS groups and may contribute to specific binding through different mechanisms. To further investigate the role of protein flexibility in specific protein-DNA recognition, we analyzed the conformational changes between the bound and unbound states of DNA-binding proteins and structural variations. The results indicate that HS and MS DNA-binding domains have larger conformational changes upon DNA-binding and larger degree of flexibility in both bound and unbound states. Proteins 2016; 84:1147-1161. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Elastic constants for superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded sandwich structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    Formulae and the associated graphs are presented for contrasting the effective elastic constants for a superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded (SPF/DB) corrugated sandwich core and a honeycomb sandwich core. The results used in the comparison of the structural properties of the two types of sandwich cores are under conditions of equal sandwich density. It was found that the stiffness in the thickness direction of the optimum SPF/DB corrugated core (i.e., triangular truss core) was lower than that of the honeycomb core, and that the former had higher transverse shear stiffness than the latter.

  9. Surface Monitoring of CFRP Structures for Adhesive Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Rodolfo; Palmieri, Frank L.; Yost, William T.; Connell, John W.; Fitz-Gerald, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of composite materials requires reliable monitoring and detection of surface contaminants to assure robust and durable bonded structures. Surface treatment and effective monitoring prior to bonding is essential in order to obtain a surface free from contaminants that may degrade structural performance. Two techniques which monitor the effectiveness of the laser surface treatment of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) materials are being investigated: laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and optically stimulated electron emission (OSEE). The applicability of LIBS to detect silicone contaminants on CFRP composites is studied using 35 ns Nd:YAG laser pulses at 355 nm with a pulse energy of 45 mJ. The LIBS regime in which pulse energies are < 100 mJ is referred to as mLIBS. CFRP surfaces were contaminated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a major component of silicone based mold release agents. The presence of PDMS is found by inspecting the Si I emission line at 288.2 nm. Untreated CFRP samples and CFRP contaminated with PDMS were tested. The PDMS areal density ranged from 0.36 Â+/- 0.04 to 0.51 Â+/- 0.16 mg/cm2. The results demonstrate the successful detection of PDMS on CFRP using mLIBS. In addition, OSEE was used to measure CFRP surface cleanliness pre- and post-treatment by laser ablation on specimens contaminated with PDMS coatings from 8 nm to 1311 nm in thickness. The results showed a significant increase in the OSEE photocurrent after laser surface treatment.

  10. Structural Transitions in Supercoiled Stretched DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    v, Croquette

    1998-03-01

    Using magnetic micromanipulation techniques [Strick 96]( uc(T.R.) Strick, J.-F. Allemand, D. Bensimon, A. Bensimon) and uc(V.) Croquette, "The elasticity of a single supercoiled DNA molecule", Science, 271, 1835 (1996)., we have studied the mechanical properties (force versus extension) of single DNA molecules under a wide range of torsional stresses (supercoiling). We show that unwinding the DNA double helix leads to a phase separation between regular B-DNA and denaturation bubbles. The fraction of denatured molecule increases linearly with the degree of unwinding, beginning at a value of 1% unwinding. We have confirmed this denatured state by hybridization of homologous single-stranded DNA probes and by a chemical attack of the exposed bases. Surprisingly, when we overwind the molecule, the elasticity curves we obtain may also be interpreted by the coexistence of two phases, B-DNA and a new phase which we note P-DNA. The fraction of this new phase increases smoothly with overwinding, beginning at 3 % and continuing up to 300 %. Our results indicate that this new phase is four times more twisted that the standard B-DNA and is 1.75 times longer. Although the structure of this phase is not yet known, such a high twisting can only be attained if the sugar-phosphate backbones of the two strands are twisted closely while the bases are expelled outside of the molecule's core, in a structure reminiscent of the one proposed by Pauling. Indeed we have shown that this new phase is sensitive to chemical attack whereas the B-DNA is not. This new phase begins to appear on a molecule overwound by 3 % and stretched by a force of 5 pN, conditions typically encountered in vivo during gene transcription. This new phase may thus play a biological role biophysique-ADN>(for more details).

  11. Structure and bonding in crystalline cesium uranyl tetrachloride under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Hussien H; Pertierra, Pilar; Salvadó, Miguel A; Izquierdo-Ruiz, F; Recio, J M

    2016-07-21

    A thorough investigation of pressure effects on the structural properties of crystalline cesium uranyl chloride was performed by means of first-principles calculations within the density functional theory framework. Total energies, equilibrium geometries and vibrational frequencies were computed at selected pressures up to 50 GPa. Zero pressure results present good agreement with available experimental and theoretical data. Our calculated equation of state parameters reveal that Cs2UO2Cl4 is a high compressible material, similar to other ionic compounds with cesium cations, and displays a structural anisotropic behavior guided by the uranyl moiety. An unexpected variation of the U-O bond length, dUO, is detected as pressure is applied. It leads to a dUO-stretching frequency relationship that cannot be described by the traditional Badger's rule. Interestingly enough, it can be explained in terms of a change in the main factor controlling dUO. At low pressure, the charge transferred to the uranyl cation induces an increase of the bond length and a red shift of the stretching frequencies, whereas it is the mechanical effect of the applied pressure above 10 GPa that is the dominant factor that leads to a shortening of dUO and a blue shift of the stretching frequencies.

  12. Incorporation of nucleoside probes opposite O⁶-methylguanine by Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA polymerase Dpo4: importance of hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stornetta, Alessia; Angelov, Todor; Guengerich, F Peter; Sturla, Shana J

    2013-09-02

    O⁶-Methylguanine (O⁶-MeG) is a mutagenic DNA lesion, arising from the action of methylating agents on guanine (G) in DNA. Dpo4, an archaeal low-fidelity Y-family DNA polymerase involved in translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), is a model for studying how human Y-family polymerases bypass DNA adducts. Previous work showed that Dpo4-mediated dTTP incorporation is favored opposite O⁶-MeG rather than opposite G. However, factors influencing the preference of Dpo4 to incorporate dTTP opposite O⁶-MeG are not fully defined. In this study, we investigated the influence of structural features of incoming dNTPs on their enzymatic incorporation opposite O⁶-MeG in a DNA template. To this end, we utilized a new fluorescence-based primer extension assay to evaluate the incorporation efficiency of a panel of synthetic dNTPs opposite G or O⁶-MeG by Dpo4. In single-dNTP primer extension studies, the synthetic dNTPs were preferentially incorporated opposite G, relative to O⁶-MeG. Moreover, pyrimidine-based dNTPs were generally better incorporated than purine-based syn-conformation dNTPs. The results suggest that hydrophobicity of the incoming dNTP appears to have little influence on the process of nucleotide selection by Dpo4, with hydrogen bonding capacity being a major influence. Additionally, modifications at the C2-position of dCTP increase the selectivity for incorporation opposite O⁶-MeG without a significant loss of efficiency.

  13. Structures, energies and bonding in neutral and charged Li microclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes, Diana; Kirk, Steven Robert; Jenkins, Samantha; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2012-09-01

    Structural and chemical properties of charged and neutral Lithium microclusters are investigated for [Formula: see text]. A total of 18 quantum conformational spaces are randomly walked to produce candidate structures for local minima. Very rich potential energy surfaces are produced, with the largest structural complexity predicted for anionic clusters. Analysis of the electron charge distributions using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) predicts major stabilizing roles of Non-nuclear attractors (NNAs) via NNA···Li interactions with virtually no direct Li···Li interactions, except in the least stable configurations. A transition in behavior for clusters containing more than seven nuclei is observed by using the recently introduced quantum topology to determine in a quantum mechanically consistent fashion the number of spatial dimensions each cluster has. We experiment with a novel scheme for extracting persistent structural motifs with increase in cluster size. The new structural motifs correlate well with the energetic stability, particularly in highlighting the least stable structures. Quantifying the degree of covalent character in Lithium bonding independently agrees with the observation in the transition in cluster behavior for lithium clusters containing more than seven nuclei. Good correlation with available experimental data is obtained for all properties reported in this work.

  14. The structure of DNA by direct imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Marini, Monica

    2015-08-28

    The structure of DNA was determined in 1953 by x-ray fiber diffraction. Several attempts have been made to obtain a direct image of DNA with alternative techniques. The direct image is intended to allow a quantitative evaluation of all relevant characteristic lengths present in a molecule. A direct image of DNA, which is different from diffraction in the reciprocal space, is difficult to obtain for two main reasons: the intrinsic very low contrast of the elements that form the molecule and the difficulty of preparing the sample while preserving its pristine shape and size. We show that through a preparation procedure compatible with the DNA physiological conditions, a direct image of a single suspended DNA molecule can be obtained. In the image, all relevant lengths of A-form DNA are measurable. A high-resolution transmission electron microscope that operates at 80 keV with an ultimate resolution of 1.5 Å was used for this experiment. Direct imaging of a single molecule can be used as a method to address biological problems that require knowledge at the single-molecule level, given that the average information obtained by x-ray diffraction of crystals or fibers is not sufficient for detailed structure determination, or when crystals cannot be obtained from biological molecules or are not sufficient in understanding multiple protein configurations.

  15. CTAB enhancement of FRET in DNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Taeseok; Takahashi, Tsukasa; Kim, Sejung; Heller, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    The effect of cetyl-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) on enhancing the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two dye-conjugated DNA strands was studied using fluorescence emission spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS). For hybridized DNA where one strand is conjugated with a TAMRA donor and the other with a TexasRed acceptor, increasing the concentration of CTAB changes the fluorescence emission properties and improves the FRET transfer efficiency through changes in the polarity of the solvent, neutralization of the DNA backbone and micelle formation. For the DNA FRET system without CTAB, the DNA hybridization leads to contact quenching between TAMRA donor and TexasRed acceptor producing reduced donor emission and only a small increase in acceptor emission. At 50 µM CTAB, however, the sheathing and neutralization of the dye-conjugated dsDNA structure significantly reduces quenching by DNA bases and dye interactions, producing a large increase in FRET efficiency, which is almost four fold higher than without CTAB.

  16. Structural Transitions in Topologically Constrained DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leger, J.; Romano, G.; Sarkar, A.; Robert, J.; Bourdieu, L.; Chatenay, D.; Marko, J. F.

    2000-03-01

    We propose a theoretical explanation for results of recent single molecule micromanipulation experiments (Leger et al, PRL 83, 1066, 1999) on double-stranded DNA with fixed linking number. The topological constraint leads to novel structural transitions, including a shift of the usual 60 pN B-form to S-form transition force plateau up to a force of 100 pN when linking is fixed at zero. Our model needs five distinct states to explain the four different observed transitions. The various constant-force plateaus observed for different fixed values of linking correspond to a mixture of different pairs of states, weighted to satisfy the topological constraint. Our model allows us to conclude that sufficiently overtwisted DNA (positive linkage number) undergoes a transition from B-form DNA to a mixture of S-form and P-form DNA at a force plateau near 45 pN, and then to homogeneous P-form DNA at a force plateau near 110 pN. A similar two-step transition occurs for undertwisted DNA, and by analysing the twisting necessary to produce pure S-form DNA we conclude that the S-state has helix repeat of 38 bp. Support from the Whitaker Foundation, the NSF, the ACS-PRF and Research Corporation is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Structural DNA nanotechnology for intelligent drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jie; Liu, Huajie; Su, Shao; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei; Fan, Chunhai

    2014-11-01

    Drug delivery carriers have been popularly employed to improve solubility, stability, and efficacy of chemical and biomolecular drugs. Despite the rapid progress in this field, it remains a great challenge to develop an ideal carrier with minimal cytotoxicity, high biocompatibility and intelligence for targeted controlled release. The emergence of DNA nanotechnology offers unprecedented opportunities in this regard. Due to the unparalleled self-recognition properties of DNA molecules, it is possible to create numerous artificial DNA nanostructures with well-defined structures and DNA nanodevices with precisely controlled motions. More importantly, recent studies have proven that DNA nanostructures possess greater permeability to the membrane barrier of cells, which pave the way to developing new drug delivery carriers with nucleic acids, are summarized. In this Concept, recent advances on the design and fabrication of both static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, and the use of these nanostructures for the delivery of various types of drugs, are highlighted. It is also demonstrated that dynamic DNA nanostructures provide the required intelligence to realize logically controlled drug release.

  18. On structural health monitoring of aircraft adhesively bonded repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlopoulou, Sofia

    The recent interest in life extension of ageing aircraft and the need to address the repair challenges in the new age composite ones, led to the investigation of new repair methodologies such as adhesively bonded repair patches. The present thesis focuses on structural health monitoring aspects of the repairs, evaluating their performance with guided ultrasonic waves aiming to develop a monitoring strategy which would eliminate unscheduled maintenance and unnecessary inspection costs. To address the complex nature of the wave propagation phenomena, a finite element based model identified the existing challenges by exploring the interaction of the excitation waves with different levels of damage. The damage sensitivity of the first anti-symmetric mode was numerically investigated. An external bonded patch and a scarf repair, were further tested in static and dynamic loadings, and their performance was monitored with Lamb waves, excited by surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers.. The response was processed by means of advanced pattern recognition and data dimension reduction techniques such as novelty detection and principal component analysis. An optimisation of these tools enabled an accurate damage detection under complex conditions. The phenomena of mode isolation and precise arrival time determination under a noisy environment and the problem of inadequate training data were investigated and solved through appropriate transducer arrangements and advanced signal processing respectively. The applicability of the established techniques was demonstrated on an aluminium repaired helicopter tail stabilizer. Each case study utilised alternative non-destructive techniques for validation such as 3D digital image correlation, X-ray radiography and thermography. Finally a feature selection strategy was developed through the analysis of the instantaneous properties of guided waves for damage detection purposes..

  19. Enhanced H-bonding and pi-stacking in DNA: a potent duplex-stabilizing and mismatch sensing nucleobase analogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Chenguang; Dallmann, Andre; Marafini, Pietro;

    2014-01-01

    X-pyrene is a new nucleic acid duplex stabilizing cytosine analogue that combines enhanced pi-stacking, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions to greatly increase the stability of bulged DNA duplexes and DNA/RNA hybrids. X-pyrene is highly selective for guanine as a partner and duplex...... analogue for use in a variety of biological applications....

  20. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S; Griffor, Matt

    2009-11-01

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD(+)-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  1. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD[superscript +]-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S.; Griffor, Matt; Pfizer

    2010-09-17

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3''-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD{sup +}-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  2. In vitro comparison of the shear bond strength of amalgam to tooth structure using two bonding agents--lutting glass ionomer and 4-META.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheela K; Sudeep P; Hegde V; Francis R; Bhat K

    1998-01-01

    Bonding dental amalgam to tooth structure using 4-META has become an accepted clinical procedure. Glass ionomer cements possess the ability to bind to tooth structure as well as to the components of dental amalgam. The present in vitro study evaluates the shear bond strength of amalgam to tooth structure using luting glass ionomer as a bond mediating agent, and compares with that obtained using 4-META. Results indicate that it is possible to bond amalgam to tooth structure using a thin layer ...

  3. In vitro comparison of the shear bond strength of amalgam to tooth structure using two bonding agents--lutting glass ionomer and 4-META.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheela, K; Sudeep, P T; Hegde, V; Francis, R F; Bhat, K S; Sundeep, P T

    1998-01-01

    Bonding dental amalgam to tooth structure using 4-META has become an accepted clinical procedure. Glass ionomer cements possess the ability to bind to tooth structure as well as to the components of dental amalgam. The present in vitro study evaluates the shear bond strength of amalgam to tooth structure using luting glass ionomer as a bond mediating agent, and compares with that obtained using 4-META. Results indicate that it is possible to bond amalgam to tooth structure using a thin layer of glass ionomer cement. The shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement mediated bond is significant and may be adequate for clinical application.

  4. Structural DNA Nanotechnology: From Design to Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Norton

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The exploitation of DNA for the production of nanoscale architectures presents a young yet paradigm breaking approach, which addresses many of the barriers to the self-assembly of small molecules into highly-ordered nanostructures via construct addressability. There are two major methods to construct DNA nanostructures, and in the current review we will discuss the principles and some examples of applications of both the tile-based and DNA origami methods. The tile-based approach is an older method that provides a good tool to construct small and simple structures, usually with multiply repeated domains. In contrast, the origami method, at this time, would appear to be more appropriate for the construction of bigger, more sophisticated and exactly defined structures.

  5. Hydrogen bonding and multiphonon structure in copper pyrazine coordination polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S; Cao, J; Musfeldt, J L; Conner, M M; McConnell, A C; Southerland, H I; Manson, J L; Schlueter, J A; Phillips, M D; Turnbull, M M; Landee, C P

    2007-10-15

    We report a systematic investigation of the temperature-dependent infrared vibrational spectra of a family of chemically related coordination polymer magnets based upon bridging bifluoride (HF(2)-) and terminal fluoride (F-) ligands in copper pyrazine complexes including Cu(HF(2))(pyz)(2)BF(4), Cu(HF(2))(pyz)(2)ClO(4), and CuF(2)(H(2)O)(2)(pyz). We compare our results with several one- and two-dimensional prototype materials including Cu(pyz)(NO(3))(2) and Cu(pyz)(2)(ClO(4))(2). Unusual low-temperature hydrogen bonding, local structural transitions associated with stronger low-temperature hydrogen bonding, and striking multiphonon effects that derive from coupling of an infrared-active fundamental with strong Raman-active modes of the pyrazine building-block molecule are observed. On the basis of the spectroscopic evidence, these interactions are ubiquitous to this family of coordination polymers and may work to stabilize long-range magnetic ordering at low temperature. Similar interactions are likely to be present in other molecule-based magnets.

  6. Nanoscale Structure and Elasticity of Pillared DNA Nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Himanshu; Seeman, Nadrian C; Maiti, Prabal K

    2016-01-01

    We present an atomistic model of pillared DNA nanotubes (DNTs) and their elastic properties which will facilitate further studies of these nanotubes in several important nanotechnological and biological applications. In particular, we introduce a computational design to create an atomistic model of a 6-helix DNT (6HB) along with its two variants, 6HB flanked symmetrically by two double helical DNA pillars (6HB+2) and 6HB flanked symmetrically by three double helical DNA pillars (6HB+3). Analysis of 200 ns all-atom simulation trajectories in the presence of explicit water and ions shows that these structures are stable and well behaved in all three geometries. Hydrogen bonding is well maintained for all variants of 6HB DNTs. We calculate the persistence length of these nanotubes from their equilibrium bend angle distributions. The values of persistence length are ~10 {\\mu}m, which is 2 orders of magnitude larger than that of dsDNA. We also find a gradual increase of persistence length with an increasing number...

  7. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry as a Tool for the Structural Characterization of Peptides Bearing Intramolecular Disulfide Bond(s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massonnet, Philippe; Haler, Jean R. N.; Upert, Gregory; Degueldre, Michel; Morsa, Denis; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Mourier, Gilles; Gilles, Nicolas; Quinton, Loïc; De Pauw, Edwin

    2016-10-01

    Disulfide bonds are post-translationnal modifications that can be crucial for the stability and the biological activities of natural peptides. Considering the importance of these disulfide bond-containing peptides, the development of new techniques in order to characterize these modifications is of great interest. For this purpose, collision cross cections (CCS) of a large data set of 118 peptides (displaying various sequences) bearing zero, one, two, or three disulfide bond(s) have been measured in this study at different charge states using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. From an experimental point of view, CCS differences (ΔCCS) between peptides bearing various numbers of disulfide bonds and peptides having no disulfide bonds have been calculated. The ΔCCS calculations have also been applied to peptides bearing two disulfide bonds but different cysteine connectivities (Cys1-Cys2/Cys3-Cys4; Cys1-Cys3/Cys2-Cys4; Cys1-Cys4/Cys2-Cys3). The effect of the replacement of a proton by a potassium adduct on a peptidic structure has also been investigated.

  8. Structure and Bonding in Small Neutral Alkali-Halide Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Aguado, A; López, J M; Alonso, J A

    1997-01-01

    The structural and bonding properties of small neutral alkali-halide clusters (AX)n, with n less than or equal to 10, A=Li, Na, K, Rb and X=F, Cl, Br, I, are studied using the ab initio Perturbed Ion (aiPI) model and a restricted structural relaxation criterion. A trend of competition between rock-salt and hexagonal ring-like isomers is found and discussed in terms of the relative ionic sizes. The main conclusion is that an approximate value of r_C/r_A=0.5 (where r_C and r_A are the cationic and anionic radii) separates the hexagonal from the rock-salt structures. The classical electrostatic part of the total energy at the equilibrium geometry is enough to explain these trends. The magic numbers in the size range studied are n= 4, 6 and 9, and these are universal since they occur for all alkali-halides and do not depend on the specific ground state geometry. Instead those numbers allow for the formation of compact clusters. Full geometrical relaxations are considered for (LiF)n (n=3-7) and (AX)_3 clusters, an...

  9. Uniform Free-Energy Profiles of the P-O Bond Formation and Cleavage Reactions Catalyzed by DNA Polymerases β and λ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klvaňa, Martin; Bren, Urban; Florián, Jan

    2016-12-29

    Human X-family DNA polymerases β (Polβ) and λ (Polλ) catalyze the nucleotidyl-transfer reaction in the base excision repair pathway of the cellular DNA damage response. Using empirical valence bond and free-energy perturbation simulations, we explore the feasibility of various mechanisms for the deprotonation of the 3'-OH group of the primer DNA strand, and the subsequent formation and cleavage of P-O bonds in four Polβ, two truncated Polλ (tPolλ), and two tPolλ Loop1 mutant (tPolλΔL1) systems differing in the initial X-ray crystal structure and nascent base pair. The average calculated activation free energies of 14, 18, and 22 kcal mol(-1) for Polβ, tPolλ, and tPolλΔL1, respectively, reproduce the trend in the observed catalytic rate constants. The most feasible reaction pathway consists of two successive steps: specific base (SB) proton transfer followed by rate-limiting concerted formation and cleavage of the P-O bonds. We identify linear free-energy relationships (LFERs) which show that the differences in the overall activation and reaction free energies among the eight studied systems are determined by the reaction free energy of the SB proton transfer. We discuss the implications of the LFERs and suggest pKa of the 3'-OH group as a predictor of the catalytic rate of X-family DNA polymerases.

  10. Hydrogen bonding in oxalic acid and its complexes: A database study of neutron structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Chitra; Amit Das; R R Choudhury; M Ramanadham; R Chidambaram

    2004-08-01

    The basic result of carboxylic group that the oxygen atom of the –OH never seems to be a hydrogen bond acceptor is violated in the cases, namely urea oxalic acid and bis urea oxalic acid complexes, where the hydroxyl oxygen atom is an acceptor of a weak N–H... O hydrogen bond. The parameters of this hydrogen bond, respectively in these structures are: hydrogen acceptor distance 2.110 Å and 2.127 Å and the bending angle at hydrogen, 165.6° and 165.8°. The bond strength around the hydroxyl oxygen is close to 1.91 valence units, indicating that it has hardly any strength left to form hydrogen bonds. These two structures being highly planar, force the formation of this hydrogen bond. As oxalic acid is the common moiety, the structures of the two polymorphs, -oxalic acid and -oxalic acid, also were looked into in terms of hydrogen bonding and packing.

  11. Adsorption structure and bonding of trimesic acid on Cu(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanninen, L.; Jokinen, N.; Ali-Löytty, H.; Jussila, P.; Lahtonen, K.; Hirsimäki, M.; Valden, M.; Kuzmin, M.; Pärna, R.; Nõmmiste, E.

    2011-12-01

    Combining scanning tunneling microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation, we have studied the adsorption and growth of trimesic acid (TMA, 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid, C6H3(COOH)3) on Cu(100) in a wide range of coverages (from submonolayer to multilayer ones) at room temperature and after subsequent annealing. A series of coverage-dependent TMA structures, transitions between these structures, and their properties are characterized, demonstrating the interplay between the bonding, orientation, and deprotonation reaction of adsorbed species. In particular, it is shown that the degree of deprotonation in TMA overlayers depends on the amount of deposited molecules non-monotonously, and that such behavior is well consistent with the formation mechanism proposed for the TMA/Cu(100) system. The results provide a good platform for further understanding of non-covalent interactions and self-assembly phenomena underlying the growth of supramolecular nanoassemblies of aromatic carboxylic (benzenecarboxylic) acids on metallic substrates.

  12. Caul and method for bonding and curing intricate composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willden, Kurtis S. (Inventor); Goodno, Kenneth N. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The invention disclosed here is a method for forming and curing an intricate structure of criss-crossing composite stringers and frames that are bonded to a skin panel. A structure constructed in accordance with the invention would be well-suited for use as a portion of an aircraft fuselage, a boat hull, or the like. The method is preferably practiced by applying uncured composite stringers to an uncured composite sheet panel. This is followed by placing cured frames crosswise over the stringers. The frames have openings at the locations where they intersect with the stringers which enables the frames to come into direct contact with the skin along most of their length. During the forming and curing process, the stringers are covered with a plurality of cauls, and the entire assembly of skin panel, stringers, frames and cauls is subjected to a vacuum bagging and curing process. The cauls serve to maintain both part shape and to control the flow of resin within the stringers as they are cured. Further, they probably eliminate the need for intermediate protective materials between the vacuum bag and the stringers.

  13. Modeling DNA structure and processes through animation and kinesthetic visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Christine

    There have been many studies regarding the effectiveness of visual aids that go beyond that of static illustrations. Many of these have been concentrated on the effectiveness of visual aids such as animations and models or even non-traditional visual aid activities like role-playing activities. This study focuses on the effectiveness of three different types of visual aids: models, animation, and a role-playing activity. Students used a modeling kit made of Styrofoam balls and toothpicks to construct nucleotides and then bond nucleotides together to form DNA. Next, students created their own animation to depict the processes of DNA replication, transcription, and translation. Finally, students worked in teams to build proteins while acting out the process of translation. Students were given a pre- and post-test that measured their knowledge and comprehension of the four topics mentioned above. Results show that there was a significant gain in the post-test scores when compared to the pre-test scores. This indicates that the incorporated visual aids were effective methods for teaching DNA structure and processes.

  14. The discovery of the structure of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, G. L.

    2003-04-01

    On 25 April 1953, Nature published a letter by Francis Crick and James Watson, at the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, proposing a structure for DNA. This letter marked the beginning of a revolution in biology. Besides Crick and Watson, two other scientists, Rosalind Franklin and Maurice Wilkins, played key roles in the discovery. After sketching the early careers of the four scientists, the present article gives an account of the physics and chemistry involved in the discovery, and the events leading up to it.

  15. Crystal Structure of a Replicative DNA Polymerase Bound to the Oxidized Guanine Lesion Guanidinohydantoin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, Pierre; Ye, Yu; Wallace, Susan S.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; Doubli, Sylvie (Vermont); (Utah)

    2010-04-12

    The oxidation of guanine generates one of the most common DNA lesions, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG). The further oxidation of 8-oxoG can produce either guanidinohydantoin (Gh) in duplex DNA or spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) in nucleosides and ssDNA. Although Gh can be a strong block for replicative DNA polymerases such as RB69 DNA polymerase, this lesion is also mutagenic: DNA polymerases bypass Gh by preferentially incorporating a purine with a slight preference for adenine, which results in G {center_dot} C {yields} T {center_dot} A or G {center_dot} C {yields} C {center_dot} G transversions. The 2.15 {angstrom} crystal structure of the replicative RB69 DNA polymerase in complex with DNA containing Gh reveals that Gh is extrahelical and rotated toward the major groove. In this conformation Gh is no longer in position to serve as a templating base for the incorporation of an incoming nucleotide. This work also constitutes the first crystallographic structure of Gh, which is stabilized in the R configuration in the two polymerase/DNA complexes present in the crystal asymmetric unit. In contrast to 8-oxoG, Gh is found in a high syn conformation in the DNA duplex and therefore presents the same hydrogen bond donor and acceptor pattern as thymine, which explains the propensity of DNA polymerases to incorporate a purine opposite Gh when bypass occurs.

  16. Structural changes of linear DNA molecules induced by cisplatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhiguo, E-mail: cn.zguoliu@yahoo.com [State Engineering Laboratory of Bio-Resource Eco-Utilization, Harbin 150040 (China); Engineering Research Center of Forest Bio-preparation, Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Key Laboratory of Forest Plant Ecology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Liu, Ruisi; Zhou, Zhen; Zu, Yuangang; Xu, Fengjie [State Engineering Laboratory of Bio-Resource Eco-Utilization, Harbin 150040 (China); Engineering Research Center of Forest Bio-preparation, Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Key Laboratory of Forest Plant Ecology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Interaction between long DNA molecules and activated cisplatin is believed to be crucial to anticancer activity. However, the exact structural changes of long DNA molecules induced by cisplatin are still not very clear. In this study, structural changes of long linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) induced by activated cisplatin have been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results indicated that long DNA molecules gradually formed network structures, beads-on-string structures and their large aggregates. Electrostatic and coordination interactions were considered as the main driving forces producing these novel structures. An interesting finding in this study is the beads-on-string structures. Moreover, it is worth noting that the beads-on-string structures were linked into the networks, which can be ascribed to the strong DNA–DNA interactions. This study expands our knowledge of the interactions between DNA molecules and cisplatin. - Highlights: • We investigate structural changes of dsDNA and ssDNA induced by cisplatin. • AFM results indicated long dsDNA formed network, beads-on-string and aggregates. • ssDNA can form very similar structures as those of long linear dsDNA. • A possible formation process of theses novel structure is proposed.

  17. Structural characteristics of oligomeric DNA strands adsorbed onto single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxbury, Daniel; Jagota, Anand; Mittal, Jeetain

    2013-01-10

    The single-stranded DNA to single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) hybrid continues to attract significant interest as an exemplary biological molecule-nanomaterial conjugate. In addition to their many biomedical uses, such as in vivo sensing and delivery of molecular cargo, DNA-SWCNT hybrids enable the sorting of SWCNTs according to their chirality. Current experimental methods have fallen short of identifying the actual structural ensemble of DNA adsorbed onto SWCNTs that enables and controls several of these phenomena. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been a useful tool for studying the structure of these hybrid molecules. In recent studies, using replica exchange MD (REMD) simulation we have shown that novel secondary structures emerge and that these structures are DNA-sequence and SWCNT-type dependent. Here, we use REMD to investigate in detail the structural characteristics of two DNA-SWCNT recognition pairs: (TAT)(4)-(6,5)-SWCNT, i.e., DNA sequence TATTATTATTAT bound to the (6,5) chirality SWCNT, and (CCG)(2)CC-(8,7)-SWCNT as well as off-recognition pairs (TAT)(4)-(8,7)-SWCNT and (CCG)(2)CC-(6,5)-SWCNT. From a structural clustering analysis, dominant equilibrium structures are identified and show a right-handed self-stitched motif for (TAT)(4)-(6,5) in contrast to a left-handed β-barrel for (CCG)(2)CC-(8,7). Additionally, characteristics such as DNA end-to-end distance, solvent accessible SWCNT surface area, DNA hydrogen bonding between bases, and DNA dihedral distributions have been probed in detail as a function of the number of DNA strands adsorbed onto the nanotube. We find that the DNA structures adsorbed onto a nanotube are also stabilized by significant numbers of non-Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds (intrastrand and interstrand) in addition to π-π stacking between DNA bases and nanotube surface and Watson-Crick pairs. Finally, we provide a summary of DNA structures observed for various DNA-SWCNT hybrids as a preliminary set of motifs that may be

  18. Structural studies on ligand–DNA systems: A robust approach in drug design

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surat Kumar; Prateek Pandya; Kumud Pandav; Surendra P Gupta; Arun Chopra

    2012-07-01

    Molecular docking, molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics and relaxation matrix simulation protocols have been extensively used to generate the structural details of ligand–receptor complexes in order to understand the binding interactions between the two entities. Experimental methods like NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography are known to provide structural information about ligand–receptor complexes. In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and molecular docking have also been utilized to decode the phenomenon of the ligand–DNA interactions, with good correlation between experimental and computational results. The DNA binding affinity was demonstrated by analysing fluorescence spectral data. Structural rigidity of DNA upon ligand binding was identified by CD spectroscopy. Docking is carried out using the DNA-Dock program which results in the binding affinity data along with structural information like interatomic distances and H-bonding, etc. The complete structural analyses of various drug–DNA complexes have afforded results that indicate a specific DNA binding pattern of these ligands. It also exhibited that certain structural features of ligands can make a ligand to be AT- or GC-specific. It was also demonstrated that changing specificity from AT base pairs to GC base pairs further improved the DNA topoisomerase inhibiting activity in certain ligands. Thus, a specific molecular recognition signature encrypted in the structure of ligand can be decoded and can be effectively employed in designing more potent antiviral and antitumour agents.

  19. Development of structural health monitoring systems for composite bonded repairs on aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, Stephen C.; Powlesland, Ian G.; Moss, Scott D.; Konak, Michael J.; van der Velden, Stephen P.; Stade, Bryan; Baker, Alan A.

    2001-08-01

    The application of bonded composite patches to repair or reinforce defective metallic structures is becoming recognized as a very effective versatile repair procedure for many types of problems. Immediate applications of bonded patches are in the fields of repair of cracking, localized reinforcement after removal of corrosion damage and for reduction of fatigue strain. However, bonded repairs to critical components are generally limited due to certification concerns. For certification and management of repairs to critical structure, the Smart Patch approach may be an acceptable solution from the airworthiness prospective and be cost effective for the operator and may even allow some relaxation of the certification requirements. In the most basic form of the Smart Patch in-situ sensors can be used as the nerve system to monitor in service the structural condition (health or well-being) of the patch system and the status of the remaining damage in the parent structure. This application would also allow the operator to move away from current costly time-based maintenance procedures toward real-time health condition monitoring of the bonded repair and the repaired structure. TO this end a stand-alone data logger device, for the real-time health monitoring of bonded repaired systems, which is in close proximity to sensors on a repair is being developed. The instrumentation will measure, process and store sensor measurements during flight and then allow this data to be up-loaded, after the flight, onto a PC, via remote (wireless) data access. This paper describes two in-situ health monitoring systems which will be used on a composite bonded patch applied to an F/A-18. The two systems being developed consists of a piezoelectric (PVDF) film-based and a conventional electrical-resistance foil strain gauge-based sensing system. The latter system uses a primary cell (Lithium- based battery) as the power source, which should enable an operating life of 1-2 years. The patch

  20. Effect of copper-sulphur bond on the DNA photo-cleavage activity of 2-(methylthio)ethylpyridine-2-carbaldimine copper(II) complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tarkeshwar Gupta; Ashis K Patra; Shanta Dhar; Munirathinam Nethaji; Akhil R Chakravarty

    2005-03-01

    The binding and photo-induced DNA cleavage activity of a binary complex [CuL2](ClO4)2 (1) and the in situ generated ternary complexes [CuLB](ClO4)2 from 1 (B: 1,10-phenanthroline, phen, 2; dipyrido[3,2-: 2',3'-]quinoxaline, dpq, 3) are studied, where L is a N2S-donor tridentate Schiff base 2-(methylthio)ethylpyridine-2-carbaldimine. Complex 1, structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction study, has six-coordinate meridional geometry showing CuN4S2 coordination. The Cu-N bond lengths are in the range of 1.968(3) to 2.158(4) Å. The Cu-S bond lengths of 2.599(2) and 2.705(2) Å are significantly long indicating weak covalent interaction between copper and sulphur atoms. The thiomethyl groups are cis to each other giving S-Cu-S angle of 75.82(5)°. The Cu-N(pyridyl) bond distances are longer than the Cu-N(imine) bonds. The complexes are redox active and display a quasi-reversible cyclic voltammetric response assignable to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple near 0.0 V vs SCE in DMF-Tris buffer (1 : 4 /) using 0.1 M KCl as supporting electrolyte. Electronic spectra of the complexes show a - band in the range 630 to 700 nm in DMF along with higher energy charge transfer bands. While complex 1 is a poor binder to DNA, the ternary complexes show good DNA binding propensity. The photo-nuclease activity of 1-3 is studied using UV and visible wavelengths. The DNA cleavage activity at 365 nm follows the order: 3 > 2 > 1. The cleavage reaction involves the formation of singlet oxygen as the reactive species in a type-II process.

  1. The N(2)-Furfuryl-deoxyguanosine Adduct Does Not Alter the Structure of B-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodke, Pratibha P; Gore, Kiran R; Harikrishna, S; Samanta, Biswajit; Kottur, Jithesh; Nair, Deepak T; Pradeepkumar, P I

    2016-01-15

    N(2)-Furfuryl-deoxyguanosine (fdG) is carcinogenic DNA adduct that originates from furfuryl alcohol. It is also a stable structural mimic of the damage induced by the nitrofurazone family of antibiotics. For the structural and functional studies of this model N(2)-dG adduct, reliable and rapid access to fdG-modified DNAs are warranted. Toward this end, here we report the synthesis of fdG-modified DNAs using phosphoramidite chemistry involving only three steps. The functional integrity of the modified DNA has been verified by primer extension studies with DNA polymerases I and IV from E. coli. Introduction of fdG into a DNA duplex decreases the Tm by ∼1.6 °C/modification. Molecular dynamics simulations of a DNA duplex bearing the fdG adduct revealed that though the overall B-DNA structure is maintained, this lesion can disrupt W-C H-bonding, stacking interactions, and minor groove hydrations to some extent at the modified site, and these effects lead to slight variations in the local base pair parameters. Overall, our studies show that fdG is tolerated at the minor groove of the DNA to a better extent compared with other bulky DNA damages, and this property will make it difficult for the DNA repair pathways to detect this adduct.

  2. Structure and bonding of second-row hydrides

    OpenAIRE

    Blinder, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The atomic orbitals, hybridization and chemical bonding of the most common hydrides of boron, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen are described. This can be very instructive for beginning students in chemistry and chemical physics.

  3. Flexibility of the genetic code with respect to DNA structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baisnée, P. F.; Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren

    2001-01-01

    Motivation. The primary function of DNA is to carry genetic information through the genetic code. DNA, however, contains a variety of other signals related, for instance, to reading frame, codon bias, pairwise codon bias, splice sites and transcription regulation, nucleosome positioning and DNA...... structure. Here we study the relationship between the genetic code and DNA structure and address two questions. First, to which degree does the degeneracy of the genetic code and the acceptable amino acid substitution patterns allow for the superimposition of DNA structural signals to protein coding...... sequences? Second, is the origin or evolution of the genetic code likely to have been constrained by DNA structure? Results. We develop an index for code flexibility with respect to DNA structure. Using five different di- or tri-nucleotide models of sequence-dependent DNA structure, we show...

  4. Analysis of Structural Flexibility of Damaged DNA Using Thiol-Tethered Oligonucleotide Duplexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Fujita

    Full Text Available Bent structures are formed in DNA by the binding of small molecules or proteins. We developed a chemical method to detect bent DNA structures. Oligonucleotide duplexes in which two mercaptoalkyl groups were attached to the positions facing each other across the major groove were prepared. When the duplex contained the cisplatin adduct, which was proved to induce static helix bending, interstrand disulfide bond formation under an oxygen atmosphere was detected by HPLC analyses, but not in the non-adducted duplex, when the two thiol-tethered nucleosides were separated by six base pairs. When the insert was five and seven base pairs, the disulfide bond was formed and was not formed, respectively, regardless of the cisplatin adduct formation. The same reaction was observed in the duplexes containing an abasic site analog and the (6–4 photoproduct. Compared with the cisplatin case, the disulfide bond formation was slower in these duplexes, but the reaction rate was nearly independent of the linker length. These results indicate that dynamic structural changes of the abasic site- and (6–4 photoproduct-containing duplexes could be detected by our method. It is strongly suggested that the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein, which specifically binds these duplexes and functions at the first step of global-genome nucleotide excision repair, recognizes the easily bendable nature of damaged DNA.

  5. Triple oxygen isotope systematics of structurally bonded water in gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwartz, Daniel; Surma, Jakub; Voigt, Claudia; Assonov, Sergey; Staubwasser, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The triple oxygen isotopic composition of gypsum mother water (gmw) is recorded in structurally bonded water in gypsum (gsbw). Respective fractionation factors have been determined experimentally for 18O/16O and 17O/16O. By taking previous experiments into account we suggest using 18αgsbw-gmw = 1.0037; 17αgsbw-gmw = 1.00195 and θgsbw-gmw = 0.5285 as fractionation factors in triple oxygen isotope space. Recent gypsum was sampled from a series of 10 ponds located in the Salar de Llamara in the Atacama Desert, Chile. Total dissolved solids (TDS) in these ponds show a gradual increase from 23 g/l to 182 g/l that is accompanied by an increase in pond water 18O/16O. Gsbw falls on a parallel curve to the ambient water from the saline ponds. The offset is mainly due to the equilibrium fractionation between gsbw and gmw. However, gsbw represents a time integrated signal biased towards times of strong evaporation, hence the estimated gmw comprises elevated 18O/16O compositions when compared to pond water samples taken on site. Gypsum precipitation is associated with algae mats in the ponds with lower salinity. No evidence for respective vital effects on the triple oxygen isotopic composition of gypsum hydration water is observed, nor are such effects expected. In principle, the array of δ18Ogsbw vs. 17Oexcess can be used to: (1) provide information on the degree of evaporation during gypsum formation; (2) estimate pristine meteoric water compositions; and (3) estimate local relative humidity which is the controlling parameter of the slope of the array for simple hydrological situations. In our case study, local mining activities may have decreased deep groundwater recharge, causing a recent change of the local hydrology.

  6. Time-dependent density functional theory study on the electronic excited-state geometric structure, infrared spectra, and hydrogen bonding of a doubly hydrogen-bonded complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yufang; Ding, Junxia; Liu, Ruiqiong; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng

    2009-12-01

    The geometric structures and infrared (IR) spectra in the electronically excited state of a novel doubly hydrogen-bonded complex formed by fluorenone and alcohols, which has been observed by IR spectra in experimental study, are investigated by the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method. The geometric structures and IR spectra in both ground state and the S(1) state of this doubly hydrogen-bonded FN-2MeOH complex are calculated using the DFT and TDDFT methods, respectively. Two intermolecular hydrogen bonds are formed between FN and methanol molecules in the doubly hydrogen-bonded FN-2MeOH complex. Moreover, the formation of the second intermolecular hydrogen bond can make the first intermolecular hydrogen bond become slightly weak. Furthermore, it is confirmed that the spectral shoulder at around 1700 cm(-1) observed in the IR spectra should be assigned as the doubly hydrogen-bonded FN-2MeOH complex from our calculated results. The electronic excited-state hydrogen bonding dynamics is also studied by monitoring some vibraitonal modes related to the formation of hydrogen bonds in different electronic states. As a result, both the two intermolecular hydrogen bonds are significantly strengthened in the S(1) state of the doubly hydrogen-bonded FN-2MeOH complex. The hydrogen bond strengthening in the electronically excited state is similar to the previous study on the singly hydrogen-bonded FN-MeOH complex and play important role on the photophysics of fluorenone in solutions.

  7. Enhancement of POD for Structural Health Monitoring of Bonded Repaired Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    wing structure. The work discussed in this paper shall address the issues relating to the detection of this type of sub-surface crack in an aluminium ...lower wing skin fatigue crack repair (DSTO Scientific Publications, 1997) [7] C. Harding, G. Hugo and S. Bowles, Model- assisted probability of...sensor durability, sensor bond durability and environmental effects on this stress wave based methodology. For example, the effects of operational

  8. Interface structure of Be/DSCu diffusion bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, T.; Iwadachi, T. [NGK Insulators Ltd., Nagoya (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium is used as plasma facing components of the first wall on ITER. Dispersion-Strengthened Copper (DSCu) is used as heat sink material by joining to Be because DSCu has high thermal conductivity and strength. In this study, Be/DSCu diffusion bonding tests using the interlayer of Al, Ni, Nb, Ti, Zr and Be-Cu alloy have been conducted to choose the suitable interlayer materials. As a result of the shear strength tests, Be/DSCu joints by using Be-Cu alloy interlayer showed the strength of about 200 MPa. Diffusion bonding tests using Be-Cu alloy interlayer or no interlayer (direct bonding) at the range of temperature from 600degC to 850degC have been conducted to identify the effect of bonding temperature and time on interface formation and strength. The thickness of diffusion layer was proportional to a square root of bonding time by diffusion controlled process. The shear strength is controlled by the formation of intermetallic layer at Be side. (author)

  9. Anaerobic DNA cleavage in red light by dicopper(II) complexes on disulphide bond activation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debojyoti Lahiri; Ritankar Majumdar; Ashis K Patra; Akhil R Chakravarty

    2010-05-01

    Binuclear complexes [Cu(-RSSR)]2 (1) and [M2(-PDS)(H2O)]2 (M = Cu(II), 2; Fe(II), 3), where H2RSSR is a reduced Schiff base derived from 2-(thioethyl)salicylaldimine having a disulphide moiety and H2PDS is derived from dimerization of D-penicillamine, have been prepared, structurally characterized, and their photo-induced DNA cleavage activity studied. The crystal structure of 1 shows the complex as a discrete binuclear species with each metal in a CuN2O2 square-planar geometry (Cu…Cu, 6.420 Å). The tetradentate RSSR2- acts as a bridging ligand. The sulphur atoms in the disulphide unit do not interact with the metal ions. Complexes 1-3 do not show any DNA cleavage activity in darkness. The copper(II) complexes exhibit chemical nuclease activity in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid. Cleavage of supercoiled DNA has been observed in UV-A light of 365 nm for 1 and red light of 647.1 nm for both 1 and 2 in air. Mechanistic data reveal the involvement of the disulphide unit as photosensitizer generating hydroxyl radicals ($^{\\bullet}$OH) as the reactive species. Photo-induced DNA cleavage in red light seems to involve sulphide radicals in a type-I process and hydroxyl radicals. The dicopper(II) complexes show significant anaerobic photo-induced DNA cleavage activity in red light under argon following type-I pathway without involving any reactive oxygen species.

  10. The structure and intermolecular forces of DNA condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2016-03-18

    Spontaneous assembly of DNA molecules into compact structures is ubiquitous in biological systems. Experiment has shown that polycations can turn electrostatic self-repulsion of DNA into attraction, yet the physical mechanism of DNA condensation has remained elusive. Here, we report the results of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations that elucidated the microscopic structure of dense DNA assemblies and the physics of interactions that makes such assemblies possible. Reproducing the setup of the DNA condensation experiments, we measured the internal pressure of DNA arrays as a function of the DNA-DNA distance, showing a quantitative agreement between the results of our simulations and the experimental data. Analysis of the MD trajectories determined the DNA-DNA force in a DNA condensate to be pairwise, the DNA condensation to be driven by electrostatics of polycations and not hydration, and the concentration of bridging cations, not adsorbed cations, to determine the magnitude and the sign of the DNA-DNA force. Finally, our simulations quantitatively characterized the orientational correlations of DNA in DNA arrays as well as diffusive motion of DNA and cations.

  11. A DNA Structure-Based Bionic Wavelet Transform and Its Application to DNA Sequence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequence analysis is of great significance for increasing our understanding of genomic functions. An important task facing us is the exploration of hidden structural information stored in the DNA sequence. This paper introduces a DNA structure-based adaptive wavelet transform (WT – the bionic wavelet transform (BWT – for DNA sequence analysis. The symbolic DNA sequence can be separated into four channels of indicator sequences. An adaptive symbol-to-number mapping, determined from the structural feature of the DNA sequence, was introduced into WT. It can adjust the weight value of each channel to maximise the useful energy distribution of the whole BWT output. The performance of the proposed BWT was examined by analysing synthetic and real DNA sequences. Results show that BWT performs better than traditional WT in presenting greater energy distribution. This new BWT method should be useful for the detection of the latent structural features in future DNA sequence analysis.

  12. 3D-DART: a DNA structure modelling server

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, M.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing interest in structural studies of DNA by both experimental and computational approaches. Often, 3D-structural models of DNA are required, for instance, to serve as templates for homology modeling, as starting structures for macro-molecular docking or as scaffold for NMR structure

  13. Tetrel Bonds in Infinite Molecular Chains by Electronic Structure Theory and Their Role for Crystal Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Janine; Dronskowski, Richard

    2017-02-16

    Intermolecular bonds play a crucial role in the rational design of crystal structures, dubbed crystal engineering. The relatively new term tetrel bonds (TBs) describes a long-known type of such interactions presently in the focus of quantum chemical cluster calculations. Here, we energetically explore the strengths and cooperativity of these interactions in infinite chains, a possible arrangement of such tetrel bonds in extended crystals, by periodic density functional theory. In the chains, the TBs are amplified due to cooperativity by up to 60%. Moreover, we computationally take apart crystals stabilized by infinite tetrel-bonded chains and assess the importance of the TBs for the crystal stabilization. Tetrel bonds can amount to 70% of the overall interaction energy within some crystals, and they can also be energetically decisive for the taken crystal structure; their individual strengths also compete with the collective packing within the crystal structures.

  14. Structural Transitions of a Twisted and Stretched DNA Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, J. F.; Romano, G.; Sarkar, A.; Robert, J.; Bourdieu, L.; Chatenay, D.; Marko, J. F.

    1999-08-01

    We report results of a micromanipulation study of single double-helical DNA molecules at forces up to 150 pN. Depending on whether the DNA winding is allowed to relax, or held fixed, qualitatively different structural transitions are observed. By studying the transitions as a function of winding the different DNA structures underlying them are characterized; this allows us to report the first estimate of S-DNA helicity. A model is introduced to describe these transitions; in addition to B-DNA, we find that four DNA states are needed to describe the experiments.

  15. Laser ablation assisted adhesive bonding of automotive structural composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeman, R.G.; Paulauskas, F.L.; Warren, C.D.

    1999-07-03

    Laser ablation has been evaluated as a surface pretreatment prior to adhesive bonding. In prior experimental work, it was observed that when adhesively bonded, composite, single lap shear samples fail, the fracture often occurs at either the adhesive/adherend interface or in the resin rich surface layer of the composite. These two areas represent the weakest portion of the joint. Laser ablation pretreatment generates areas where the resin on the composite surface is selectively removed leaving behind exposed reinforcing fibers which are the major load bearing members of the composite. In a subsequent adhesive bonding operation, this allows portions of the fibers to be encapsulated in the adhesive while other portions of the fiber remain in the composite resin. This type of pretreatment permits fibers to bridge and reinforce the interface between adhesive and adherend. A secondary benefit is the removal of surface contaminantes by pyrolysis. Microscopic observation of laser ablated surfaces indicates a prominent, fiber rich area. Results of the mechanical evaluation indicated that the lap shear strength for laser ablated samples was significantly higher than specimens with no pretreatment or with solvent cleaning only, but were slightly lower than specimens that were mechanically roughened and cleaned with solvents prior to bonding.

  16. Pair copula constructions to determine the dependence structure of Treasury bond yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Brutti Righi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We estimated the dependence structure of US Treasury bonds through a pair copula construction. As a result, we verified that the variability of the yields decreases with a longer time of maturity of the bond. The yields presented strong dependence with past values, strongly positive bivariate associations between the daily variations, and prevalence of the Student's t copula in the relationships between the bonds. Furthermore, in tail associations, we identified relevant values in most of the relationships, which highlights the importance of risk management in the context of bonds diversification.

  17. Photodiodes integration on a suspended ridge structure VOA using 2-step flip-chip bonding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seon Hoon; Kim, Tae Un; Ki, Hyun Chul; Kim, Doo Gun; Kim, Hwe Jong; Lim, Jung Woon; Lee, Dong Yeol; Park, Chul Hee

    2015-01-01

    In this works, we have demonstrated a VOA integrated with mPDs, based on silica-on-silicon PLC and flip-chip bonding technologies. The suspended ridge structure was applied to reduce the power consumption. It achieves the attenuation of 30dB in open loop operation with the power consumption of below 30W. We have applied two-step flipchip bonding method using passive alignment to perform high density multi-chip integration on a VOA with eutectic AuSn solder bumps. The average bonding strength of the two-step flip-chip bonding method was about 90gf.

  18. Recognition of Local DNA Structures by p53 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brázda, Václav; Coufal, Jan

    2017-02-10

    p53 plays critical roles in regulating cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and metabolism and is commonly mutated in human cancer. These roles are achieved by interaction with other proteins, but particularly by interaction with DNA. As a transcription factor, p53 is well known to bind consensus target sequences in linear B-DNA. Recent findings indicate that p53 binds with higher affinity to target sequences that form cruciform DNA structure. Moreover, p53 binds very tightly to non-B DNA structures and local DNA structures are increasingly recognized to influence the activity of wild-type and mutant p53. Apart from cruciform structures, p53 binds to quadruplex DNA, triplex DNA, DNA loops, bulged DNA and hemicatenane DNA. In this review, we describe local DNA structures and summarize information about interactions of p53 with these structural DNA motifs. These recent data provide important insights into the complexity of the p53 pathway and the functional consequences of wild-type and mutant p53 activation in normal and tumor cells.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA structure in the Arabian Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Amero, Khaled K; Larruga, José M; Cabrera, Vicente M; González, Ana M

    2008-02-12

    Two potential migratory routes followed by modern humans to colonize Eurasia from Africa have been proposed. These are the two natural passageways that connect both continents: the northern route through the Sinai Peninsula and the southern route across the Bab al Mandab strait. Recent archaeological and genetic evidence have favored a unique southern coastal route. Under this scenario, the study of the population genetic structure of the Arabian Peninsula, the first step out of Africa, to search for primary genetic links between Africa and Eurasia, is crucial. The haploid and maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule has been the most used genetic marker to identify and to relate lineages with clear geographic origins, as the African Ls and the Eurasian M and N that have a common root with the Africans L3. To assess the role of the Arabian Peninsula in the southern route, we genetically analyzed 553 Saudi Arabs using partial (546) and complete mtDNA (7) sequencing, and compared the lineages obtained with those present in Africa, the Near East, central, east and southeast Asia and Australasia. The results showed that the Arabian Peninsula has received substantial gene flow from Africa (20%), detected by the presence of L, M1 and U6 lineages; that an 18% of the Arabian Peninsula lineages have a clear eastern provenance, mainly represented by U lineages; but also by Indian M lineages and rare M links with Central Asia, Indonesia and even Australia. However, the bulk (62%) of the Arabian lineages has a Northern source. Although there is evidence of Neolithic and more recent expansions in the Arabian Peninsula, mainly detected by (preHV)1 and J1b lineages, the lack of primitive autochthonous M and N sequences, suggests that this area has been more a receptor of human migrations, including historic ones, from Africa, India, Indonesia and even Australia, than a demographic expansion center along the proposed southern coastal route.

  20. Mitochondrial DNA structure in the Arabian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabrera Vicente M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two potential migratory routes followed by modern humans to colonize Eurasia from Africa have been proposed. These are the two natural passageways that connect both continents: the northern route through the Sinai Peninsula and the southern route across the Bab al Mandab strait. Recent archaeological and genetic evidence have favored a unique southern coastal route. Under this scenario, the study of the population genetic structure of the Arabian Peninsula, the first step out of Africa, to search for primary genetic links between Africa and Eurasia, is crucial. The haploid and maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA molecule has been the most used genetic marker to identify and to relate lineages with clear geographic origins, as the African Ls and the Eurasian M and N that have a common root with the Africans L3. Results To assess the role of the Arabian Peninsula in the southern route, we genetically analyzed 553 Saudi Arabs using partial (546 and complete mtDNA (7 sequencing, and compared the lineages obtained with those present in Africa, the Near East, central, east and southeast Asia and Australasia. The results showed that the Arabian Peninsula has received substantial gene flow from Africa (20%, detected by the presence of L, M1 and U6 lineages; that an 18% of the Arabian Peninsula lineages have a clear eastern provenance, mainly represented by U lineages; but also by Indian M lineages and rare M links with Central Asia, Indonesia and even Australia. However, the bulk (62% of the Arabian lineages has a Northern source. Conclusion Although there is evidence of Neolithic and more recent expansions in the Arabian Peninsula, mainly detected by (preHV1 and J1b lineages, the lack of primitive autochthonous M and N sequences, suggests that this area has been more a receptor of human migrations, including historic ones, from Africa, India, Indonesia and even Australia, than a demographic expansion center along the

  1. Investigation of Highly Designable Dented Structures in HP Model with Hydrogen Bond Energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; HUANG Shengyou; YU Tao; ZOU Xianwu

    2007-01-01

    Some highly designable protein structures have dented on the surface of their native structures, and are not full compactly folded. According to hydrophobic-polar (HP) model the most designable structures are full compactly folded. To investigate the designability of the dented structures, we introduce the hydrogen bond energy in the secondary structures by using the secondary-structure-favored HP model proposed by Ou-yang etc. The result shows that the average designability increases with the strength of the hydrogen bond. The designabilities of the structures with same dented shape increase exponentially with the number of secondary structure sites. The dented structures can have the highest designabilities for a certain value of hydrogen bond energy density.

  2. The coefficient of bond thermal expansion measured by extended x-ray absorption fine structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornasini, P; Grisenti, R

    2014-10-28

    The bond thermal expansion is in principle different from the lattice expansion and can be measured by correlation sensitive probes such as extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and diffuse scattering. The temperature dependence of the coefficient α(bond)(T) of bond thermal expansion has been obtained from EXAFS for CdTe and for Cu. A coefficient α(tens)(T) of negative expansion due to tension effects has been calculated from the comparison of bond and lattice expansions. Negative lattice expansion is present in temperature intervals where α(bond) prevails over α(tens); this real-space approach is complementary but not equivalent to the Grüneisen theory. The relevance of taking into account the asymmetry of the nearest-neighbours distribution of distances in order to get reliable bond expansion values and the physical meaning of the third cumulant are thoroughly discussed.

  3. Development of a Nonchromate Structural Adhesive Bond Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Prevent corrosion of base metal • Applied to porous anodized surface • Overcoated with non- inhibited epoxy adhesive • High adhesive bond strength...primers •Long-running surveillance of chromate-free alternatives by UTC companies shows weak corrosion inhibition • (A) strontium chromate... corrosion inhibiter achieved Electrokinetic Confirmation of Active Inhibition in Coatings 7 Schematic of defect production and samples for salt

  4. Double hydrogen bond mediating self-assembly structure of cyanides on metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongping; Xiang, Feifei; Lu, Yan; Wei, Sheng; Li, Chao; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Lacheng; Wang, Li

    2016-10-01

    Cyanides with different numbers of -C≡N, 1,2,4,5-Tetracyanobenzene (TCNB) and 2,3-Dicyanonaphthalene (2,3-DCN) deposited on Ag(111) and Ag(110) surfaces, have been investigated by room temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (RTSTM), respectively. High resolution STM images show double hydrogen bond is the main driving force to form variety of self-assembly structures, indicating the double hydrogen bond affects the electron distribution of cyanides and leads to a more stable structure with lower energy. In addition, the difference between Ag(111) and Ag(110) surfaces in their lattice structure induces a bigger assembly structural change of 2,3-DCN than that of 1,2,4,5-TCNB, which confirms the fact that the opposite double hydrogen bond formation formed by 1,2,4,5-TCNB is more stable than the neighboring double hydrogen bond formation formed by molecule 2,3-DCN.

  5. Recognizing molecular patterns by machine learning: an agnostic structural definition of the hydrogen bond

    CERN Document Server

    Gasparotto, Piero

    2014-01-01

    The concept of chemical bonding can ultimately be seen as a rationalization of the recurring structural patterns observed in molecules and solids. Chemical intuition is nothing but the ability to recognize and predict such patterns, and how they transform into one another. Here we discuss how to use a computer to identify atomic patterns automatically, so as to provide an algorithmic definition of a bond based solely on structural information. We concentrate in particular on hydrogen bonding -- a central concept to our understanding of the physical chemistry of water, biological systems and many technologically important materials. Since the hydrogen bond is a somewhat fuzzy entity that covers a broad range of energies and distances, many different criteria have been proposed and used over the years, based either on sophisticate electronic structure calculations followed by an energy decomposition analysis, or on somewhat arbitrary choices of a range of structural parameters that is deemed to correspond to a ...

  6. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Hattar

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Regardless of their clinical simplicity, the self-adhesive resin cements examined in this study exhibit limited bond performance to tooth structures; therefore, these cements must be used with caution.

  7. Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper for linear collider accelerator structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Elmer

    2001-05-01

    -step joining method is proposed for fabricating the NLC structures. The structure would be assembled with pure silver braze inserts using a self-aligning step joint design, then the assembly would be vacuum diffusion bonded at 700 °C and 3.45 MPa pressure to seal the critical inner portion of the assembly. Finally, during the same furnace cycle, the temperature would be increased to 800 °C in order to react the silver with the copper to form a liquid braze alloy that would join and seal the outer portion of the cells together.

  8. Hands on Group Work Paper Model for Teaching DNA Structure, Central Dogma and Recombinant DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altiparmak, Melek; Nakiboglu Tezer, Mahmure

    2009-01-01

    Understanding life on a molecular level is greatly enhanced when students are given the opportunity to visualize the molecules. Especially understanding DNA structure and function is essential for understanding key concepts of molecular biology such as DNA, central dogma and the manipulation of DNA. Researches have shown that undergraduate…

  9. Tetrahedron-structured DNA and functional oligonucleotide for construction of an electrochemical DNA-based biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Nan-Nan; Tang, Chun-Xia; He, Xi-Wen; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2011-07-21

    Tetrahedron-structured DNA (ts-DNA) in combination with a functionalized oligonucleotide was used to develop a "turn-on" biosensor for Hg(2+) ions. The ts-DNA provided an improved sensitivity and was used to block the active sites.

  10. Detecting the bonding state of explosive welding structures based on EEMD and sensitive IMF time entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Yue; Zhang, Zhousuo; Liu, Qiang; Cheng, Wei; Yuan, Feichen

    2014-07-01

    With the increasing application of explosive welding structures in many engineering fields, interface bonding state detection has become more and more significant to avoid catastrophic accidents. However, the complexity of the interface bonding state makes this task challenging. In this paper, a new method based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and sensitive intrinsic mode function (IMF) time entropy is proposed for this task. As a self-adaptive non-stationary signal analysis method, EEMD can decompose a complicated signal into a set of IMFs with truly physical meaning, which is beneficial to allocate the structural vibration response signal containing a wealth of bonding state information to certain IMFs. Then, the time entropies of these IMFs are calculated to quantitatively assess the bonding state of the explosive welding structure. However, the IMF time entropies have different sensitivities to the bonding state. Therefore, the most sensitive IMF time entropy is selected based on a distance evaluation technique to detect the bonding state of explosive welding structures. The proposed method is applied to bonding state detection of explosive welding pipes in three cases, and the results demonstrate its effectiveness.

  11. DNA triplex structures in neurodegenerative disorder, Friedreich's ataxia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moganty R Rajeswari

    2012-07-01

    It is now established that a small fraction of genomic DNA does adopt the non-canonical B-DNA structure or ‘unusual’ DNA structure. The unusual DNA structures like DNA-hairpin, cruciform, Z-DNA, triplex and tetraplex are represented as hotspots of chromosomal breaks, homologous recombination and gross chromosomal rearrangements since they are prone to the structural alterations. Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA), the autosomal recessive degenerative disorder of nervous and muscles tissue, is caused by the massive expansion of (GAA) repeats that occur in the first intron of Frataxin gene X25 on chromosome 9q13-q21.1. The purine strand of the DNA in the expanded (GAA) repeat region folds back to form the (R∙R*Y) type of triplex, which further inhibits the frataxin gene expression, and this clearly suggests that the shape of DNA is the determining factor in the cellular function. FRDA is the only disease known so far to be associated with DNA triplex. Structural characterization of GAA-containing DNA triplexes using some simple biophysical methods like UV melting, UV absorption, circular dichroic spectroscopy and electrophoretic mobility shift assay are discussed. Further, the clinical aspects and genetic analysis of FRDA patients who carry (GAA) repeat expansions are presented. The potential of some small molecules that do not favour the DNA triplex formation as therapeutics for FRDA are also briefly discussed.

  12. Evidences for Cooperative Resonance-Assisted Hydrogen Bonds in Protein Secondary Structure Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Deng, Geng; Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Xu, Jing; Ashraf, Hamad; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2016-11-01

    Cooperative behaviors of the hydrogen bonding networks in proteins have been discovered for a long time. The structural origin of this cooperativity, however, is still under debate. Here we report a new investigation combining excess infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory calculation on peptide analogs, represented by N-methylformamide (NMF) and N-methylacetamide (NMA). Interestingly, addition of the strong hydrogen bond acceptor, dimethyl sulfoxide, to the pure analogs caused opposite effects, namely red- and blue-shift of the N-H stretching infrared absorption in NMF and NMA, respectively. The contradiction can be reconciled by the marked lowering of the energy levels of the self-associates between NMA molecules due to a cooperative effect of the hydrogen bonds. On the contrary, NMF molecules cannot form long-chain cooperative hydrogen bonds because they tend to form dimers. Even more interestingly, we found excellent linear relationships between changes on bond orders of N-H/N-C/C = O and the hydrogen bond energy gains upon the formation of hydrogen bonding multimers in NMA, suggesting strongly that the cooperativity originates from resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds. Our findings provide insights on the structures of proteins and may also shed lights on the rational design of novel molecular recognition systems.

  13. Combing genomic DNA for structural and functional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurra, Catherine; Bensimon, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Molecular combing is a process whereby single DNA molecules bind by their extremities to a silanised surface and are then uniformly stretched and aligned by a receding air/water interface (1). This method, with a high resolution ranging from a few kilobases to megabases, has many applications in the field of molecular cytogenetics, allowing structural and functional analysis at the genome level. Here we describe protocols for preparing DNA for combing and for the use of fluorescent hybridisation (FH) applied to combed DNA to conduct physical mapping or genomic structural analysis. We also present the methodology for visualising and studying DNA replication using combed DNA.

  14. Temperature and Magnetic Field Driven Modifications in the I-V Features of Gold-DNA-Gold Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Mahmoudi Khatir

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of Metal-DNA-Metal (MDM structure-based high sensitivity sensors from DNA micro-and nanoarray strands is a key issue in their development. The tunable semiconducting response of DNA in the presence of external electromagnetic and thermal fields is a gift for molecular electronics. The impact of temperatures (25–55 °C and magnetic fields (0–1200 mT on the current-voltage (I-V features of Au-DNA-Au (GDG structures with an optimum gap of 10 μm is reported. The I-V characteristics acquired in the presence and absence of magnetic fields demonstrated the semiconducting diode nature of DNA in GDG structures with high temperature sensitivity. The saturation current in the absence of magnetic field was found to increase sharply with the increase of temperature up to 45 °C and decrease rapidly thereafter. This increase was attributed to the temperature-assisted conversion of double bonds into single bond in DNA structures. Furthermore, the potential barrier height and Richardson constant for all the structures increased steadily with the increase of external magnetic field irrespective of temperature variations. Our observation on magnetic field and temperature sensitivity of I-V response in GDG sandwiches may contribute towards the development of DNA-based magnetic sensors.

  15. Infrared spectral evidence and DFT calculations of hydrogen-bonding and molecular structures of acetogenins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Sabrina; Silva, Fabiano B.; Silva, Arnaldo F.; Scarminio, Ieda S.; Bruns, Roy E.

    2017-02-01

    FTIR spectra have been measured for 31 different five component - simplex centroid design solvent mixture extracts of shaded and sun-exposed Annonaceous leaves harvested in all four seasons. The spectral frequencies are characteristic of anonnaceous acetogenins known to be a major component of these leaves. Osbnd H stretching spectral bands in the 3100-3600 cm-1 region provide evidence of notable intensity changes for the shaded and sun-exposed leaves. Chemometric principal component analysis involving 264 spectra show that shaded samples tend to have more intense Osbnd H stretching bands than those grown in the sun. B3LYP density functional calculations indicate significant Osbnd H stretching band changes in this region owing to hydrogen bond formation. Weak Osbnd H intensity enhancements, around 40 km mol-1, occur when an Osbnd H group forms a hydrogen bond with the oxygen atom of an adjacent tetrahydrofuran ring oxygen atom. Much more intense enhancements, 400-500 km mol-1, are predicted to occur for acetogenins with two tetrahydrofuran rings for which the Osbnd H group hydrogen bonds with its fartherest removed tetrahydrofuran ring oxygen. Whereas weak or moderate H-bond stretching intensities are obtained for acetogenins with slightly bent carbon chain structures the strongest hydrogen bond intensities are calculated for molecules with a 45° V-type backbone structure. These important structural modifications as well as significant changes in bond lengths and angles owing to hydrogen bonding are detailed.

  16. Kinetics of T3-DNA Ligase-Catalyzed Phosphodiester Bond Formation Measured Using the α-Hemolysin Nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cherie S; Riedl, Jan; Fleming, Aaron M; Burrows, Cynthia J; White, Henry S

    2016-12-27

    The latch region of the wild-type α-hemolysin (α-HL) protein channel can be used to distinguish single base modifications in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) via ion channel measurements upon electrophoretic capture of dsDNA in the vestibule of α-HL. Herein, we investigated the use of the latch region to detect a nick in the phosphodiester DNA backbone. The presence of a nick in the phosphodiester backbone of one strand of the duplex results in a significant increase in both the blockade current and noise level relative to the intact duplex. Differentiation between the nicked and intact duplexes based on blockade current or noise, with near baseline resolution, allows real-time monitoring of the rate of T3-DNA ligase-catalyzed phosphodiester bond formation. Under low ionic strength conditions containing divalent cations and a molecular crowding agent (75 mg mL(-1) PEG), the rate of enzyme-catalyzed reaction in the bulk solution was continuously monitored by electrophoretically capturing reaction substrate or product dsDNA in the α-HL protein channel vestibule. Enzyme kinetic results obtained from the nanopore experiments match those from gel electrophoresis under the same reaction conditions, indicating the α-HL nanopore measurement provides a viable approach for monitoring enzymatic DNA repair activity.

  17. Regulation of eukaryotic DNA replication and nuclear structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUJIARUI

    1999-01-01

    In eukaryote,nuclear structure is a key component for the functions of eukaryotic cells.More and more evidences show that the nuclear structure plays important role in regulating DNA replication.The nuclear structure provides a physical barrier for the replication licensing,participates in the decision where DNA replication initiates,and organizes replication proteins as replication factory for DNA replication.Through these works,new concepts on the regulation of DNA replication have emerged,which will be discussed in this minireview.

  18. Chromatin structure and DNA damage repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinant Christoffel

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The integrity of the genome is continuously challenged by both endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. These damaging agents can induce a wide variety of lesions in the DNA, such as double strand breaks, single strand breaks, oxidative lesions and pyrimidine dimers. The cell has evolved intricate DNA damage response mechanisms to counteract the genotoxic effects of these lesions. The two main features of the DNA damage response mechanisms are cell-cycle checkpoint activation and, at the heart of the response, DNA repair. For both damage signalling and repair, chromatin remodelling is most likely a prerequisite. Here, we discuss current knowledge on chromatin remodelling with respect to the cellular response to DNA damage, with emphasis on the response to lesions resolved by nucleotide excision repair. We will discuss the role of histone modifications as well as their displacement or exchange in nucleotide excision repair and make a comparison with their requirement in transcription and double strand break repair.

  19. A STUDY OF TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT VALENCE BOND STRUCTURE OF TITANIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.B. Li; Y.Q. Xie; Y.Z. Nie; H.J. Peng; H.J. Tao; F.X. Yu

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of energy and shape method for the determination of the valence bond (VB) structures of crystal, the valence bond structure of titanium is redetermined at room temperature and calculated in the whole temperature range of 0-1943K. The outer shell electronic distribution of Ti is ec2.9907 .(sc0.4980 + dc2.4927) ef1.0093 in crystal. The temperature dependences of the VB structures of hcp and bcc phases are the same. The VB structures of hcp and bcc phases monotonically increase or decrease with the increase in temperature, but show discontinuous changes at the phase-transformation temperature 1155K.

  20. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology. Volume XLVII, Part 1. Structures of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    The proceedings for the 47th Annual Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology are presented. This symposium focused on the Structure of DNA. Topics presented covered research in the handedness of DNA, conformational analysis, chemically modified DNA, chemical synthesis of DNA, DNA-protein interactions, DNA within nucleosomes, DNA methylation, DNA replication, gyrases and topoisomerases, recombining and mutating DNA, transcription of DNA and its regulation, the organization of genes along DNA, repetitive DNA and pseudogenes, and origins of replication, centromeres, and teleomeres.

  1. A Paper Model of DNA Structure and Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigismondi, Linda A.

    1989-01-01

    A paper model which is designed to give students a hands-on experience during lecture and blackboard instruction on DNA structure is provided. A list of materials, paper patterns, and procedures for using the models to teach DNA structure and replication are given. (CW)

  2. Tertiary structure-based protein classification by virtual-bond-angles series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bin; HE Hong-bo; LI Yi-bing; XIONG Gui-lin

    2005-01-01

    Structure-based protein classification can be based on the similarities in primary, second or tertiary structures of proteins. A method using virtual-bond-angles series that transformed the protein space configuration into a sequence was used for the classification of three-dimensional structures of proteins. By transforming the main chains formed by Cα atoms of proteins into sequences, the series of virtual-bond-angles corresponding to the tertiary structure of the proteins were constructed. Then a distance-based hierarchical clustering method similar to Ward method was introduced to classify these virtual-bond-angles series of proteins. 200 files of protein structures were selected from Brookheaven protein data bank, and 11 clusters were classified.

  3. Correlation of structural order, anomalous density, and hydrogen bonding network of liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Dibyendu; Mohan, S; Ghosh, S K; Choudhury, Niharendu

    2013-07-25

    We use extensive molecular dynamics simulations employing different state-of-the-art force fields to find a common framework for comparing structural orders and density anomalies as obtained from different water models. It is found that the average number of hydrogen bonds correlates well with various order parameters as well as the temperature of maximum densities across the different models, unifying apparently disparate results from different models and emphasizing the importance of hydrogen bonding in determining anomalous properties and the structure of water. A deeper insight into the hydrogen bond network of water reveals that the solvation shell of a water molecule can be defined by considering only those neighbors that are hydrogen-bonded to it. On the basis of this view, the origin of the appearance of a non-tetrahedral peak at a higher temperature in the distribution of tetrahedral order parameters has been explained. It is found that a neighbor that is hydrogen-bonded to the central molecule is tetrahedrally coordinated even at higher temperatures. The non-tetrahedral peak at a higher temperature arises due to the strained orientation of the neighbors that are non-hydrogen-bonded to the central molecule. With the new definition of the solvation shell, liquid water can be viewed as an instantaneously changing random hydrogen-bonded network consisting of differently coordinated hydrogen-bonded molecules with their distinct solvation shells. The variation of the composition of these hydrogen-bonded molecules against temperature accounts for the density anomaly without introducing the concept of large-scale structural polyamorphism in water.

  4. Influence of contamination on resin bond strength to nano-structured alumina-coated zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanchuan; Kocjan, Andraz; Lehmann, Frank; Kosmac, Tomaz; Kern, Matthias

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of contamination and subsequent cleaning on the bond strength and durability of an adhesive resin to nano-structured alumina-coated zirconia ceramic. Zirconia ceramic disks were coated with nano-structured alumina, utilizing the hydrolysis of aluminum nitride powder. After immersion in saliva or the use of a silicone disclosing agent, specimens were cleaned with phosphoric acid etching or with tap water rinsing only. Uncontaminated specimens served as controls. Plexiglas tubes filled with composite resin were bonded with a phosphate monomer [10-methacryloxydecyl-dihydrogenphosphate (MDP)]-containing resin (Panavia 21). Subgroups of eight specimens each were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C, either for 3 d without thermal cycling (TC) or for 150 d with 37,500 thermal cycles from 5 to 55 degrees C. The tensile bond strength (TBS) was determined using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2 mm min(-1). The topography of the debonded surface was scrutinized for fractographic features, utilizing both optical and scanning electron microscopy. The TBS to uncontaminated nano-structured alumina-coated zirconia ceramic was durable, while contamination significantly reduced the TBS. Phosphoric acid cleaning was effective in removal of saliva contamination from the coated bonding surface but was not effective in removal of the silicone disclosing agent. Nano-structured alumina coating improves resin bonding to zirconia ceramic and eliminates the need for air-abrasion before bonding.

  5. Origins, structures, and functions of circulating DNA in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, A R; El Messaoudi, S; Gahan, P B; Anker, P; Stroun, M

    2016-09-01

    While various clinical applications especially in oncology are now in progress such as diagnosis, prognosis, therapy monitoring, or patient follow-up, the determination of structural characteristics of cell-free circulating DNA (cirDNA) are still being researched. Nevertheless, some specific structures have been identified and cirDNA has been shown to be composed of many "kinds." This structural description goes hand-in-hand with the mechanisms of its origins such as apoptosis, necrosis, active release, phagocytosis, and exocytose. There are multiple structural forms of cirDNA depending upon the mechanism of release: particulate structures (exosomes, microparticles, apoptotic bodies) or macromolecular structures (nucleosomes, virtosomes/proteolipidonucleic acid complexes, DNA traps, links with serum proteins or to the cell-free membrane parts). In addition, cirDNA concerns both nuclear and/or mitochondrial DNA with both species exhibiting different structural characteristics that potentially reveal different forms of biological stability or diagnostic significance. This review focuses on the origins, structures and functional aspects that are paradoxically less well described in the literature while numerous reviews are directed to the clinical application of cirDNA. Differentiation of the various structures and better knowledge of the fate of cirDNA would considerably expand the diagnostic power of cirDNA analysis especially with regard to the patient follow-up enlarging the scope of personalized medicine. A better understanding of the subsequent fate of cirDNA would also help in deciphering its functional aspects such as their capacity for either genometastasis or their pro-inflammatory and immunological effects.

  6. Charting the Structure and Energetics of Packaged DNA in Bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiangyun; Rau, Donald C.; Parsegian, V. Adrian; Fang, Li Tai; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2009-03-01

    Many bacterial viruses resort to pressure in order to infect bacteria, e.g., lambda phage stores its dsDNA genome at surprisingly high pressure and then uses this pressure to drive delivery of the genome. We report on a biophysical interrogation of the DNA configuration and pressure in lambda phage by combining structural and thermodynamic measurements with theoretical modeling. Changes in DNA organization in the capsid are monitored using solution small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). We vary the DNA-DNA repulsion and DNA bending contributions to the capsid pressure by changing salt concentrations and packaged length, and augment SAXS data with osmotic stress measurements to elicit the evolving structure and energetics of the packaged DNA.

  7. A Study of Bond of Structural Timber and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongtaeg LEE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The increase of well-being culture of problem related to environmental depletion of resource is not the growing interest in timber the natural material of construction markets. Also, the perception for historic preservation has been increased in respond to heightened interest. However, it is fairly difficult for architectural properties to maintain their durability because it was made by timber construction. Preventing traditional structure from damage and structural performance reduction is paramount in maintenance problem. A number of studies of reinforced method have been conducted in order to solve such a problem. In this paper, external bonded reinforcement and near-surface mounted was used as a way to reinforce timber structure’s durability. Bond strength for specimens with different bond length was investigated. As a result showed, maximum bond strength in bond length 300 mm from all method, was found to be not increased of bond strength over the certain bond length.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9702

  8. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Hattar; Hatamleh, Muhanad M.; Faleh Sawair; Mohammad Al-Rabab’ah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the strength of the bond between newly introduced self-adhesive resin cements and tooth structures (i.e., enamel and dentin). Methods: Three self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2, RelyX Unicem, seT SDI) were tested. Cylindrical-shaped cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were bonded to enamel and dentin. Test specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. The shear bond strength (SBS) was tested in a Zwick Roll testing machine. Results w...

  9. Bonding preference of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen in niobium-based rock-salt structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Akira; Takei, Takahiro; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Wada, Satoshi; Magome, Eisuke; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2013-09-03

    Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are essential components in solid-state materials. However, understanding their preference on the bonding to metals has not been straightforward. Here, niobium carbide, nitride, and oxide with simple rock-salt-based structures were analyzed by first-principles calculations and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. We found that an increase in the atomic number from carbon to oxygen formed fewer and shorter bonds to metals with better hybridization of atomic orbitals. This can provide a simple guiding principle for understanding the bonding and designing carbides, nitrides, oxides, and mixed-anion compounds.

  10. Structure and bonding properties of Y doped ∑37grain boundary in alumina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ya-Bin; Zhang Gang; Liu Ming-Jie; Chen Xiang-Long; Chen Jun

    2009-01-01

    The microscopic structures and the bonding properties of Y-doped and undoped (0118)/[0441]/180° (∑37) grain boundaries in alumina are investigated by using ab initio method. The formation energy of grain boundary and the segregation energy of Yto grain boundary are acquired. Electronic structures, potential distributions, bond orders and effective charges of Y-doped and undoped ∑37 GB systems are calculated. Our results reveal that the higher strength Y-O bond than Al-O bond is ascribed to the hybridization of Y(4p, 3d) with O(2s). Meanwhile, dopant Y also causes a change in potential distribution in the grain boundary region, thereby further affecting the transport property of ceramic alumina.

  11. Microfluidic DNA microarrays in PMMA chips: streamlined fabrication via simultaneous DNA immobilization and bonding activation by brief UV exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabourin, David; Petersen, J; Snakenborg, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    This report presents and describes a simple and scalable method for producing functional DNA microarrays within enclosed polymeric, PMMA, microfluidic devices. Brief (30 s) exposure to UV simultaneously immobilized poly(T)poly(C)-tagged DNA probes to the surface of unmodified PMMA and activated t...

  12. Microfluidic DNA microarrays in PMMA chips: streamlined fabrication via simultaneous DNA immobilization and bonding activation by brief UV exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabourin, David; Petersen, J; Snakenborg, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    This report presents and describes a simple and scalable method for producing functional DNA microarrays within enclosed polymeric, PMMA, microfluidic devices. Brief (30 s) exposure to UV simultaneously immobilized poly(T)poly(C)-tagged DNA probes to the surface of unmodified PMMA and activated t...

  13. Controlling Function and Structure with DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, the research on three different topics will be described. The overall area of the research is DNA nanotechnology, and the first chapter is therefore an introduction to DNA, and its advantages as a building material. The first research topic is the development of a new method...... investigated on a two dimensional DNA origami platform. This was done by incorporating functional groups on the surface of the origami, and reacting these with biotin analogues carrying the complementary functional groups. Successful reactions could then be observed using atomic force microscopy after addition...... of the protein streptavidin. While the implementation of chemical functionalities on origami can be achieved during automated DNA synthesis, this is laborious and costly. In a separate research project we aimed at improving the accessibility by applying an enzymatic labelling method. We demonstrated that the DNA...

  14. Fine Structure of Hydrogen Bond in Cholic Acid Revealed by 2DIR Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on cryogenic FT-IR spectroscopic studies of hydrogen bonds in cholic acid, two-dimensional FT-IR spectroscopy was applied to enhance our understanding of the hydrogen bonds of cholic acid. Fine spectral structures were revealed by asynchronous 2D FT-IR spectra. The co-relationship among various bands was discussed according to the synchronous 2D FT-IR spectrum.

  15. Estimating the Term Structure With a Semiparametric Bayesian Hierarchical Model: An Application to Corporate Bonds1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Marcelo, Alejandro; Ensor, Katherine B.; Rosner, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    The term structure of interest rates is used to price defaultable bonds and credit derivatives, as well as to infer the quality of bonds for risk management purposes. We introduce a model that jointly estimates term structures by means of a Bayesian hierarchical model with a prior probability model based on Dirichlet process mixtures. The modeling methodology borrows strength across term structures for purposes of estimation. The main advantage of our framework is its ability to produce reliable estimators at the company level even when there are only a few bonds per company. After describing the proposed model, we discuss an empirical application in which the term structure of 197 individual companies is estimated. The sample of 197 consists of 143 companies with only one or two bonds. In-sample and out-of-sample tests are used to quantify the improvement in accuracy that results from approximating the term structure of corporate bonds with estimators by company rather than by credit rating, the latter being a popular choice in the financial literature. A complete description of a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) scheme for the proposed model is available as Supplementary Material. PMID:21765566

  16. Recognizing molecular patterns by machine learning: An agnostic structural definition of the hydrogen bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparotto, Piero; Ceriotti, Michele, E-mail: michele.ceriotti@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Computational Science and Modeling, and National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials MARVEL, IMX, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-11-07

    The concept of chemical bonding can ultimately be seen as a rationalization of the recurring structural patterns observed in molecules and solids. Chemical intuition is nothing but the ability to recognize and predict such patterns, and how they transform into one another. Here, we discuss how to use a computer to identify atomic patterns automatically, so as to provide an algorithmic definition of a bond based solely on structural information. We concentrate in particular on hydrogen bonding – a central concept to our understanding of the physical chemistry of water, biological systems, and many technologically important materials. Since the hydrogen bond is a somewhat fuzzy entity that covers a broad range of energies and distances, many different criteria have been proposed and used over the years, based either on sophisticate electronic structure calculations followed by an energy decomposition analysis, or on somewhat arbitrary choices of a range of structural parameters that is deemed to correspond to a hydrogen-bonded configuration. We introduce here a definition that is univocal, unbiased, and adaptive, based on our machine-learning analysis of an atomistic simulation. The strategy we propose could be easily adapted to similar scenarios, where one has to recognize or classify structural patterns in a material or chemical compound.

  17. Hydrogen bonding properties and intermediate structure of N-(2-carboxyphenyl)salicylidenimine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligtenbarg, Alette G.J.; Hage, Ronald; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Ben L.

    1999-01-01

    The hydrogen bonding properties, the nature of the tautomeric structure and dimerization of N-(2-carboxyphenyl)salicylidenimine 1 has been studied. The crystal and molecular structure of 1 has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. This compound forms a dimer in the solid stat

  18. Confocal scanning laser microscopic study of the RDX defect structure in deformed polymer-bonded explosives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Bouma, R.H.B.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of an explosion-driven deformation on the defect structure in RDX crystals embedded in a polymer-bonded explosive was investigated by means of confocal scanning laser microscopy. The images were compared to the defect structure in the as-received RDX grades, embedded

  19. Observed and predicted hydrogen bond motifs in crystal structures of hydantoins, dihydrouracils and uracils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz-Cabeza, A.J.; Schwalbe, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    A survey of crystal structures containing hydantoin, dihydrouracil and uracil derivatives in the Cambridge Structural Database revealed four main types of hydrogen bond motifs when derivatives with extra substituents able to interfere with the main motif are excluded. All these molecules contain two

  20. Bonded repair of composite aircraft structures: A review of scientific challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katnam, K. B.; Da Silva, L. F. M.; Young, T. M.

    2013-08-01

    Advanced composite materials have gained popularity in high-performance structural designs such as aerospace applications that require lightweight components with superior mechanical properties in order to perform in demanding service conditions as well as provide energy efficiency. However, one of the major challenges that the aerospace industry faces with advanced composites - because of their inherent complex damage behaviour - is structural repair. Composite materials are primarily damaged by mechanical loads and/or environmental conditions. If material damage is not extensive, structural repair is the only feasible solution as replacing the entire component is not cost-effective in many cases. Bonded composite repairs (e.g. scarf patches) are generally preferred as they provide enhanced stress transfer mechanisms, joint efficiencies and aerodynamic performance. With an increased usage of advanced composites in primary and secondary aerospace structural components, it is thus essential to have robust, reliable and repeatable structural bonded repair procedures to restore damaged composite components. But structural bonded repairs, especially with primary structures, pose several scientific challenges with the current existing repair technologies. In this regard, the area of structural bonded repair of composites is broadly reviewed - starting from damage assessment to automation - to identify current scientific challenges and future opportunities.

  1. Molecular recognition of naphthalene diimide ligands by telomeric quadruplex-DNA: the importance of the protonation state and mediated hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinello, A; Barone, G; Grunenberg, J

    2016-01-28

    In depth Monte Carlo conformational scans in combination with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and electronic structure calculations were applied in order to study the molecular recognition process between tetrasubstituted naphthalene diimide (ND) guests and G-quadruplex (G4) DNA receptors. ND guests are a promising class of telomere stabilizers due to which they are used in novel anticancer therapeutics. Though several ND guests have been studied experimentally in the past, the protonation state under physiological conditions is still unclear. Based on chemical intuition, in the case of N-methyl-piperazine substitution, different protonation states are possible and might play a crucial role in the molecular recognition process by G4-DNA. Depending on the proton concentration, different nitrogen atoms of the N-methyl-piperazine might (or might not) be protonated. This fact was considered in our simulation in terms of a case by case analysis, since the process of molecular recognition is determined by possible donor or acceptor positions. The results of our simulations show that the electrostatic interactions between the ND ligands and the G4 receptor are maximized in the case of the protonation of the terminal nitrogen atoms, forming compact ND G4 complexes inside the grooves. The influence of different protonation states in terms of the ability to form hydrogen bonds with the sugar-phosphate backbone, as well as the importance of mediated vs. direct hydrogen bonding, was analyzed in detail by MD and relaxed force constant (compliance constant) simulations.

  2. A Structural Bisulfite Assay to Identify DNA Cruciforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Matthew; Hennig, Lars

    2016-09-06

    In the half century since the discovery of the double-helix structure of DNA, it has become increasingly clear that DNA functionality is based on much more than its sequence in a double-helical structure. Further advances have highlighted the importance of additional aspects of DNA structure: its packaging in the higher order chromatin structure, positioning of nucleosomes along the DNA, and the occurrence of non-helical DNA structures. Of these, the latter has been problematic to prove empirically. Here, we describe a method that uses non-denaturing bisulfite sequencing on isolated Arabidopsis thaliana nuclei to determine the location of cytosines positioned outside the double helix as a result of non-B-form DNA structures. We couple this with computational methods and S1 nuclease digest to reliably identify stable, non-B-form, cruciform structures. This enables us to identify a palindrome in the promoter of FLOWERING LOCUS T that forms a stable non-B-form structure. The stronger conservation of the ability to form a non-helical secondary structure than of the sequence suggests that this structure is biologically relevant.

  3. Boron-Boron One-Electron Sigma Bonds versus B-X-B Bridged Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusevska, Elena; Montero-Campillo, M Merced; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel

    2016-09-12

    The existence of one-electron B-B σ bonds, for two different sets of compounds, was investigated by analyzing their electron density with different tools, namely QTAIM, ELF, NCIPLOT, and NBO approaches. Our results indicate that although the generic label "one-electron sigma bond" is often used in the literature, the nature of these bonds varies considerably, or they even do not exist. The [B2 X6 ](-) radical anions give place to true covalent one-electron σ bonds, the stronger the more electronegative is the X substituent. When both boron atoms are substituents in a rigid aromatic moiety, such as naphthalene, to yield 1,8-disubstituted derivatives, two kinds of equilibrium structures are found, those also stabilized through a one-electron σ bond (X=OH, F, Cl, CN) and those stabilized by the formation of B-X-B bridges (X=H, OMe). These 1,8-BX2 naphthalene derivatives can be considered as analogues of 1,8-NX2 naphthalene proton sponges. While the latter are able to stabilize a proton between the two basic sites, the former are able to stabilize an electron between the two electron-deficient B atoms. Interestingly, when all the H atoms attached to B are substituted by phenyl groups no one-electron σ bonds B-B bonds are formed, due to the dispersion of the unpaired electron in the aromatic substituents.

  4. Synthesis and structural characterization of piperazino-modified DNA that favours hybridization towards DNA over RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Joan; Bryld, Torsten; Lindegaard, Dorthe

    2011-01-01

    We report the synthesis of two C4'-modified DNA analogues and characterize their structural impact on dsDNA duplexes. The 4'-C-piperazinomethyl modification stabilizes dsDNA by up to 5°C per incorporation. Extension of the modification with a butanoyl-linked pyrene increases the dsDNA stabilization...... modifications are tolerated in DNA:RNA hybrids but leave their melting temperatures virtually unaffected. Fluorescence data indicate that the pyrene moiety is residing outside the helix. The available data suggest that the DNA discrimination is due to (i) the positive charge of the piperazino ring having...... to a maximum of 9°C per incorporation. Using fluorescence, ultraviolet and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we show that the stabilization is achieved by pyrene intercalation in the dsDNA duplex. The pyrene moiety is not restricted to one intercalation site but rather switches between multiple...

  5. Structural DNA Nanotechnology: State of the Art and Future Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades DNA has emerged as an exceptional molecular building block for nanoconstruction due to its predictable conformation and programmable intra- and intermolecular Watson–Crick base-pairing interactions. A variety of convenient design rules and reliable assembly methods have been developed to engineer DNA nanostructures of increasing complexity. The ability to create designer DNA architectures with accurate spatial control has allowed researchers to explore novel applications in many directions, such as directed material assembly, structural biology, biocatalysis, DNA computing, nanorobotics, disease diagnosis, and drug delivery. This Perspective discusses the state of the art in the field of structural DNA nanotechnology and presents some of the challenges and opportunities that exist in DNA-based molecular design and programming. PMID:25029570

  6. Single Hydrogen Bond Donation from Flavin N5 to Proximal Asparagine Ensures FAD Reduction in DNA Photolyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya, I M Mahaputra; Domratcheva, Tatiana; Iwata, Tatsuya; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Kandori, Hideki

    2016-04-06

    The spread of the absorbance of the stable FADH(•) radical (300-700 nm) allows CPD photolyase to highly efficiently form FADH(-), making it functional for DNA repair. In this study, FTIR spectroscopy detected a strong hydrogen bond, from FAD N5-H to the carbonyl group of the Asn378 side chain, that is modulated by the redox state of FAD. The observed characteristic frequency shifts were reproduced in quantum-mechanical models of the flavin binding site, which were then employed to elucidate redox tuning governed by Asn378. We demonstrate that enhanced hydrogen bonding of the Asn378 side chain with the FADH(•) radical increases thermodynamic stabilization of the radical state, and further ensures kinetic stabilization and accumulation of the fully reduced FADH(-) state.

  7. System integration and demonstration of adhesive bonded high temperature aluminum alloys for aerospace structure, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Anthony; Laakso, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive bonding materials and processes were evaluated for assembly of future high-temperature aluminum alloy structural components such as may be used in high-speed civil transport aircraft and space launch vehicles. A number of candidate high-temperature adhesives were selected and screening tests were conducted using single lap shear specimens. The selected adhesives were then used to bond sandwich (titanium core) test specimens, adhesive toughness test specimens, and isothermally aged lap shear specimens. Moderate-to-high lap shear strengths were obtained from bonded high-temperature aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced (SiC(sub p)) aluminum specimens. Shear strengths typically exceeded 3500 to 4000 lb/in(sup 2) and flatwise tensile strengths exceeded 750 lb/in(sup 2) even at elevated temperatures (300 F) using a bismaleimide adhesive. All faceskin-to-core bonds displayed excellent tear strength. The existing production phosphoric acid anodize surface preparation process developed at Boeing was used, and gave good performance with all of the aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced aluminum alloys investigated. The results of this program support using bonded assemblies of high-temperature aluminum components in applications where bonding is often used (e.g., secondary structures and tear stoppers).

  8. Effects of Novel Structure Bonding Materials on Properties of Aeronautical Acrylic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Zhisheng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Novel structure bonding materials, J-351 epoxy adhesive film with low curing temperature and liquid modified acrylate SY-50s adhesive were chosen and characterized. The effects of adhesives on the mechanical properties of acrylic were studied. The results reveal that both adhesives have excellent bonding properties to acrylic. The stress-solvent crazing value of J-351 is higher than that of SY-50s. With the application of adhesive on the surface, mechanical properties of acrylic are declined. Casting acrylic shows more drastic decline than that of oriented acrylic. Through the characterization of fracture surface, we find that fracture of tensile sample derives from the side with adhesive. Mechanical properties of acrylic are more sensitive to SY-50s, because the liquid adhesive presents integrate bonding interface with acrylic. The interface between J-351 and acrylic is clear, making acrylic insensitive to J-351 film. Edge attachment strength of samples bonded with J-351 are higher than that of samples bonded with SY-50s due to the effects of adhesives on acrylic. J-351 epoxy adhesive film presents preferable application performance in the structure bonding of aeronautical acrylic.

  9. After the electronic field: structure, bonding, and the first hyperpolarizability of HArF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Heng-Qing; Zhong, Rong-Lin; Kan, Yu-He; Sun, Shi-Ling; Zhang, Min; Xu, Hong-Liang; Su, Zhong-Min

    2013-04-30

    In this work, we add different strength of external electric field (E(ext)) along molecule axis (Z-axis) to investigate the electric field induced effect on HArF structure. The H-Ar bond is the shortest at E(ext) = -189 × 10(-4) and the Ar-F bond show shortest value at E(ext) = 185 × 10(-4) au. Furthermore, the wiberg bond index analyses show that with the variation of HArF structure, the covalent bond H-Ar shows downtrend (ranging from 0.79 to 0.69) and ionic bond Ar-F shows uptrend (ranging from 0.04 to 0.17). Interestingly, the natural bond orbital analyses show that the charges of F atom range from -0.961 to -0.771 and the charges of H atoms range from 0.402 to 0.246. Due to weakened charge transfer, the first hyperpolarizability (β(tot)) can be modulated from 4078 to 1087 au. On the other hand, make our results more useful to experimentalists, the frequency-dependent first hyperpolarizabilities were investigated by the coupled perturbed Hartree-Fork method. We hope that this work may offer a new idea for application of noble-gas hydrides.

  10. Molecular structure and intramolecular hydrogen bonding in 2-hydroxybenzophenones: A theoretical study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mansoureh Zahedi-Tabrizi; Sayyed Faramarz Tayyari; Farideh Badalkhani-Khamseh; Reihaneh Ghomi; Fatemeh Afshar-Qahremani

    2014-07-01

    The intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IHB) in a series of 3-, 4- and 5-substituted 2-hydroxybenzophenone (HBP) is studied using density functional theory calculations. All calculations are performed at the B3LYP level, using 6-311++G∗∗ basis set. To understand the substitution effects on the nature of IHB and the electronic structure of the chelated ring system, the vibrational frequencies, 1H chemical shift, topological parameters, natural bond orders and natural charges over atoms involved in the chelated ring of HBP and its derivatives were calculated. TheWiberg bond indices and the natural charges over atoms involved in the chelated ring have been computed using the natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The computations were further complemented with an atoms-in-molecules (AIM) topological analysis to characterize the nature of the IHB in the considered molecules. Several correlations between geometrical parameters, 1H NMR chemical shift and topological parameters with the IHB strength are obtained.

  11. Glass-silicon anodic bonding for the reduction of structural distortion; Yugami no sukunai yokyoku setsugo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoji, Y.; Minami, K.; Esashi, M. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    1995-11-20

    Glass-silicon anodic bonding has been used for the fabrication of silicon micro sensors. A structural distortion during the anodic bonding process is sometimes observed and leads to the difficulty in fabricating the sensors with narrow gaps. It is considered that the distortion is mainly caused by not only the deference of thermal expansion coefficient between glass and silicon but also the structural change with the movement of ions in glass plate. This paper describes the experimental results which shows the effects of the bonding temperature and the movement of the positive ion in glass plate. It is also demonstrated that the structural distortion can be reduced by using a thick glass plate having high rigidity. 6 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Effect of hardening methods of moulding sands with water glass on structure of bonding bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stachowicz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Research on influence of hardening methods on structure of bonding bridges in moulding sands with sodium water glass is presented.Moulding sands with addition of 2.5 % of binder with molar module 2.0 were hardened with CO2 and dried in traditional way or hardenedwith microwaves. It was proved that the hardening method affects structure of bonding bridges, correlating with properties of the hardened moulding sands. It was found that strength of the moulding sands hardened with microwaves for 4 min is very close to that measured after traditional drying at 110 °C for 120 min. So, application of microwave hardening ensures significant shortening of the process time to the value comparable with CO2 hardening but guaranteeing over 10-fold increase of mechanical properties. Analysis of SEM images of hardened moulding sands permitted explaining differences in quality parameters of moulding sands by connecting them with structure of the created bonding bridges.

  13. Enhanced Binding of a Non-hydrogen Bond Ligand to DNA by Introducing an Apurine/Apyrimidine Site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Yong; NIU Zhenjiang; CHEN Jianrong; ZHANG Liangke

    2009-01-01

    Intercalators are well known for their DNA binding specificity by inserting between base pairs, whereas the binding event occurring to apurine/apyrimidine site (AP site)-containing DNA for this type of noncovalent interac-tion is still not highlighted although AP site is frequently in vivo produced in living cells. Here proflavine (PF) as an example is used to investigate the binding specificity of the AP site in DNA for a non-hydrogen bond iigand. Ex-perimental results indicate that the AP site should be the preferential binding site for PE The intrinsic binding con-stant of PF for the AP site is one order of magnitude greater than that occurring for PF intercalation. Additionally, the thermostability of the AP site-containing DNA is significantly increased after PF binding. The PF bound to the AP site should adopt a specific binding orientation distinguishable from that by which PF intercalated into base pairs. The results obtained here should be very useful for judging biochemical and biophysical effectiveness of small molecules based on their different binding behavior to DNA.

  14. Bond breaks of nucleotides by dissociative electron transfer of nonequilibrium prehydrated electrons: a new molecular mechanism for reductive DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Rong; Nguyen, Jenny; Lu, Qing-Bin

    2009-08-19

    DNA damage is a central mechanism in the pathogenesis and treatment of human diseases, notably cancer. Little is known about reductive DNA damage in causing genetic mutations during oncogenesis and killing cancer cells during radiotherapy. The prehydrated electron (e(-)(pre)) has the highest yield among all the radicals generated in cells during ionizing radiation and has subpicosecond lifetimes (10(-13) s) and energies below 0 eV, but its role in DNA damage is unknown. In this work, our real-time measurements by femtosecond time-resolved laser spectroscopy have revealed that while adenine and cytosine can effectively trap an e(-)(pre) to form stable anions, thymidine and especially guanine are highly susceptible to dissociative electron transfer of e(-)(pre), leading to bond dissociation in DNA. Our finding demonstrates a dissociative electron transfer pathway for reductive DNA damage that might be related to various diseases such as cancer and stroke. Moreover, this finding challenges the conventional notion that damage to the genome is mainly induced by the oxidizing OH* radical and might eventually lead to improved radiotherapy of cancer and radioprotection of humans.

  15. A Novel DNA Binding Mechanism for maf Basic Region-Leucine Zipper Factors Inferred from a MafA-DNA Complex Structure and Binding Specificities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xun; Guanga, Gerald P; Wan, Cheng; Rose, Robert B [Z; (W Elec.); (NCSU)

    2012-11-13

    MafA is a proto-oncoprotein and is critical for insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Maf proteins belong to the AP1 superfamily of basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. Residues in the basic helix and an ancillary N-terminal domain, the Extended Homology Region (EHR), endow maf proteins with unique DNA binding properties: binding a 13 bp consensus site consisting of a core AP1 site (TGACTCA) flanked by TGC sequences and binding DNA stably as monomers. To further characterize maf DNA binding, we determined the structure of a MafA–DNA complex. MafA forms base-specific hydrogen bonds with the flanking G–5C–4 and central C0/G0 bases, but not with the core-TGA bases. However, in vitro binding studies utilizing a pulse–chase electrophoretic mobility shift assay protocol revealed that mutating either the core-TGA or flanking-TGC bases dramatically increases the binding off rate. Comparing the known maf structures, we propose that DNA binding specificity results from positioning the basic helix through unique phosphate contacts. The EHR does not contact DNA directly but stabilizes DNA binding by contacting the basic helix. Collectively, these results suggest a novel multistep DNA binding process involving a conformational change from contacting the core-TGA to contacting the flanking-TGC bases.

  16. Bond slip detection of concrete-encased composite structure using shear wave based active sensing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lei; Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Kong, Qingzhao; Huo, Linsheng; Lim, Ing; Li, Mo; Song, Gangbing

    2015-12-01

    Concrete-encased composite structure exhibits improved strength, ductility and fire resistance compared to traditional reinforced concrete, by incorporating the advantages of both steel and concrete materials. A major drawback of this type of structure is the bond slip introduced between steel and concrete, which directly reduces the load capacity of the structure. In this paper, an active sensing approach using shear waves to provide monitoring and early warning of the development of bond slip in the concrete-encased composite structure is proposed. A specimen of concrete-encased composite structure was investigated. In this active sensing approach, shear mode smart aggregates (SAs) embedded in the concrete act as actuators and generate desired shear stress waves. Distributed piezoceramic transducers installed in the cavities of steel plates act as sensors and detect the wave response from shear mode SAs. Bond slip acts as a form of stress relief and attenuates the wave propagation energy. Experimental results from the time domain analysis clearly indicate that the amplitudes of received signal by lead zirconate titanate sensors decreased when bond slip occurred. In addition, a wavelet packet-based analysis was developed to compute the received signal energy values, which can be used to determine the initiation and development of bond slip in concrete-encased composite structure. In order to establish the validity of the proposed method, a 3D finite element analysis of the concrete-steel bond model is further performed with the aid of the commercial finite element package, Abaqus, and the numerical results are compared with the results obtained in experimental study.

  17. Lightning Protection and Structural Bonding for the B2 Test Stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinard, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    With the privatization of the space industry, NASA has entered a new era. To explore deeper parts of the solar system, NASA is developing a new spacecraft, the Space Launch System (SLS), capable of reaching these destinations, such as an asteroid or Mars. However, the test stand that is capable of testing the stage has been unused for many years. In addition to the updating/repair of the stand, more steel is being added to fully support the SLS. With all these modifications, the lightning protection system must be brought up to code to assure the protection of all personnel and assets. Structural bonding is a part of the lightning protection system. The focus of this project was to assure proper structural bonding. To begin, all relevant technical standards and the construction specifications were reviewed. This included both the specifications for the lightning protection and for general construction. The drawings were reviewed as well. From the drawings, bolted structural joints were reviewed to determine whether bonding was necessary. Several bolted joints were determined to need bonding according to the notes in the drawings. This exceeds the industry standards. The bolted joints are an electrically continuous joint. During tests, the stand experiences heavy vibration that may weaken the continuity of the bolted joint. Therefore, the secondary bonding is implemented to ensure that the structural joint has low resistance. If the structural joint has a high resistance because of corrosion, a potential gradient can occur that can cause a side flash. Damage, injury, or death can occur from a side flash so they are to be prevented. A list of the identified structural joints was compiled and sent to the contractor to be bonded. That covers the scope of this project.

  18. Structural Rigidity of Paranemic (PX) and Juxtapose (JX) DNA Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Santosh, Mogurampelly; 10.1016/j.bpj.2011.08.007

    2011-01-01

    Crossover motifs are integral components for designing DNA based nanostructures and nanomechanical devices due to their enhanced rigidity compared to the normal B-DNA. Although the structural rigidity of the double helix B-DNA has been investigated extensively using both experimental and theoretical tools, to date there is no quantitative information about structural rigidity and the mechanical strength of parallel crossover DNA motifs. We have used fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent to get the force-extension curve of parallel DNA nanostructures to characterize their mechanical rigidity. In the presence of mono-valent Na+ ions, we find that the stretch modulus (\\gamma_1) of the paranemic crossover (PX) and its topo-isomer JX DNA structure is significantly higher (~ 30%) compared to normal B-DNA of the same sequence and length. However, this is in contrast to the original expectation that these motifs are almost twice rigid compared to the double-stranded B-DNA. When the DNA mo...

  19. Structural features of DNA interaction with caffeine and theophylline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafisi, Shohreh; Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali; Varavipour, Maryam

    2008-03-01

    Caffeine and theophylline are strong antioxidants that prevent DNA damage. The anticancer and antiviral activities of these natural products are implicated in their mechanism of actions. However, there has been no information on the interactions of these xanthine derivatives with individual DNA at molecular level. The aim of this study was to examine the stability and structural features of calf-thymus DNA complexes with caffeine and theophylline in aqueous solution, using constant DNA concentration (6.25 mM) and various caffeine or theophylline/DNA(P) ratios of 1/80, 1/40, 1/20, 1/10, 1/5, 1/2 and 1/1. FTIR, UV-visible spectroscopic methods were used to determine the ligand external binding modes, the binding constant and the stability of caffeine, theophylline-DNA complexes in aqueous solution. Spectroscopic evidence showed that the complexation of caffeine and theophylline with DNA occurred via G-C and A-T and PO 2 group with overall binding constants of K(caffeine-DNA) = 9.7 × 10 3 M -1 and K(theophylline-DNA) = 1.7 × 10 4 M -1. The affinity of ligand-DNA binding is in the order of theophylline > caffeine. A partial B to A-DNA transition occurs upon caffeine and theophylline complexation.

  20. The effect of DNA supercoiling on nucleosome structure and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbel, Tabea; Langowski, Jörg

    2015-02-18

    Nucleosomes have to open to allow access to DNA in transcription, replication, and DNA damage repair. Changes in DNA torsional strain (e.g. during transcription elongation) influence the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA. Here we investigated the effect of DNA supercoiling-induced torsional strain on nucleosome structure and stability by scanning force microscopy (SFM) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Nucleosomes were reconstituted onto 2.7 kb DNA plasmids with varying superhelical densities. The SFM results show a clear dependence of the amount of DNA wrapped around the nucleosome core on the strength and type of supercoiling. Negative supercoiling led to smaller nucleosome opening angles as compared to relaxed or positively supercoiled DNA. FCS experiments show that nucleosomes reconstituted on negatively superhelical DNA are more resistant to salt-induced destabilization, as seen by reduced H2A-H2B dimer eviction from the nucleosome. Our results show that changes in DNA topology, e.g. during transcription elongation, affect the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA.

  1. Effect of hardening methods of moulding sands with water glass on structure of bonding bridges

    OpenAIRE

    Stachowicz, M.; K. Granat; Nowak, D.

    2010-01-01

    Research on influence of hardening methods on structure of bonding bridges in moulding sands with sodium water glass is presented.Moulding sands with addition of 2.5 % of binder with molar module 2.0 were hardened with CO2 and dried in traditional way or hardenedwith microwaves. It was proved that the hardening method affects structure of bonding bridges, correlating with properties of the hardened moulding sands. It was found that strength of the moulding sands hardened with microwaves for 4...

  2. Green coloration of Co-doped ZnO explained from structural refinement and bond considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudon, M; Toulemonde, O; Demourgues, A

    2007-12-24

    ZnO doped with Co2+ has been prepared by a Pechini process and investigated in terms of crystallographic structure and UV-visible properties. We emphasize for the first time a splitting of the ZnO band gap in two "sub-band gaps" (never clearly mentioned until now) which is fully interpreted basing on the iono-covalent nature of the O-Zn bonds. An anticipative approach of the potential structure relaxations was discussed from exchanged effective charge per bond calculated with the purely ionic Brown and Altermatt model.

  3. Electronic structure and chemical bonding of Li4Pt3Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, S. F.; Pöttgen, R.; Al Alam, A. F.; Ouaini, N.

    2012-07-01

    The electronic structure of rhombohedral Li4Pt3Si (space group R32) is examined from ab initio with an assessment of the properties of chemical bonding relating to the presence of different Li and Pt Wyckoff sites. The structure with totally de-intercalated Li keeps the characteristics of the pristine compound with a reduction of the volume albeit with less cohesive energy. The binding energies of Li point to different bonding intensities according to their different Wyckoff sites and indicate the possibility of delithiation.

  4. Bond-slip detection of concrete-encased composite structure using electro-mechanical impedance technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yabin; Li, Dongsheng; Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Kong, Qingzhao; Lim, Ing; Song, Gangbing

    2016-09-01

    Concrete-encased composite structure is a type of structure that takes the advantages of both steel and concrete materials, showing improved strength, ductility, and fire resistance compared to traditional reinforced concrete structures. The interface between concrete and steel profiles governs the interaction between these two materials under loading, however, debonding damage between these two materials may lead to severe degradation of the load transferring capacity which will affect the structural performance significantly. In this paper, the electro-mechanical impedance (EMI) technique using piezoceramic transducers was experimentally investigated to detect the bond-slip occurrence of the concrete-encased composite structure. The root-mean-square deviation is used to quantify the variations of the impedance signatures due to the presence of the bond-slip damage. In order to verify the validity of the proposed method, finite element model analysis was performed to simulate the behavior of concrete-steel debonding based on a 3D finite element concrete-steel bond model. The computed impedance signatures from the numerical results are compared with the results obtained from the experimental study, and both the numerical and experimental studies verify the proposed EMI method to detect bond slip of a concrete-encased composite structure.

  5. Structure, bonding, and possible superhardness of CrB4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Haiyang; Wang, Jiaqi; Chen, Xing-Qiu; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi; Lazar, Petr; Podloucky, Raimund; Kolmogorov, Aleksey N.

    2012-04-01

    By electron and x-ray diffraction we establish that the CrB4 compound discovered over 40 years ago crystallizes in the oP10 (Pnnm) structure, in disagreement with previous experiments but in agreement with a recent first-principles prediction. The 3D boron network in this structure is a distorted version of the rigid carbon sp3 network proposed recently for the high-pressure C4 allotrope. Our systematic density functional theory analysis of the electronic, structural, and elastic properties in ten related transition metal TMB4 tetraborides (TM = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe and Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc) identifies CrB4 as the prime candidate to be a superhard material. In particular, the compound's calculated weakest shear and tensile stresses exceed 50 GPa, and its Vickers hardness is estimated to be 48 GPa. We compare the reported and estimated Vickers hardness for notable (super)hard materials and find that the CrB4 calculated value is exceptionally high for a material synthesizable under standard ambient-pressure conditions.

  6. Structure and Bonding Investigation of Plutonium Peroxocarbonate Complexes Using Cerium Surrogates and Electronic Structure Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, Lucas E.; Corbey, Jordan F.; Gendron, Frédéric; Autschbach, Jochen; McNamara, Bruce K.; Ziegelgruber, Kate L.; Arrigo, Leah M.; Peper, Shane M.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2016-12-29

    Herein, we report the synthesis and structural characterization of K8[(CO3)3Pu]2(µ-η2-η2-O2)2•12H2O. This is the second plutonium-containing addition to the previously studied alkali metal peroxo-carbonate series M8[(CO3)3A]2(µ-η2-η2-O2)2•xH2O (M = alkali metal; A = Ce or Pu; x = 8, 10, 12 or 18), for which only the M = Na analog has been previously reported when A = Pu. The previously reported crystal structure for Na8[(CO3)3Pu]2(µ-η2-η2-O2)2•12H2O is not isomorphous with its known Ce analogue. However, a new synthetic route to these M8[(CO3)3A]2(µ-η2-η2-O2)2•12H2O complexes, described below, has produced crystals of Na8[(CO3)3Ce]2(µ-η2-η2-O2)2•12H2O that are isomorphous with the previously reported Pu analogue. Via this synthetic method, the M = Na, K, Rb, and Cs salts of M8[(CO3)3Ce]2(µ-η2-η2-O2)2•xH2O have also been synthesized for systematic structural comparison with each other and the available Pu analogues using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The cerium salts in particular demonstrate subtle differences in the peroxide bond lengths which correlate to Raman shifts for the peroxide Op–Op stretch (Op = the oxygen atoms of the peroxide bridges) with each of the cations studied: Na+ (1.492(3) Å /847 cm-1), Rb+ (1.471(1) Å /854 cm-1), Cs+ (1.474(1) Å /859 cm-1), and K+ (1.468(6) Å, 870 cm-1). The trends observed in the M–Op and Op–Op bond distances appear to relate to supermolecular interactions between the neighboring cations.

  7. Dynamics of water around the complex structures formed between the KH domains of far upstream element binding protein and single-stranded DNA molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy, E-mail: sanjoy@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in [Molecular Modeling Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2015-07-28

    Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) binding proteins specifically bind to the single-stranded regions of the DNA and protect it from premature annealing, thereby stabilizing the DNA structure. We have carried out atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the aqueous solutions of two DNA binding K homology (KH) domains (KH3 and KH4) of the far upstream element binding protein complexed with two short ss-DNA segments. Attempts have been made to explore the influence of the formation of such complex structures on the microscopic dynamics and hydrogen bond properties of the interfacial water molecules. It is found that the water molecules involved in bridging the ss-DNA segments and the protein domains form a highly constrained thin layer with extremely retarded mobility. These water molecules play important roles in freezing the conformational oscillations of the ss-DNA oligomers and thereby forming rigid complex structures. Further, it is demonstrated that the effect of complexation on the slow long-time relaxations of hydrogen bonds at the interface is correlated with hindered motions of the surrounding water molecules. Importantly, it is observed that the highly restricted motions of the water molecules bridging the protein and the DNA components in the complexed forms originate from more frequent hydrogen bond reformations.

  8. Ab initio calculations of the electronic structure and bonding characteristics of LaB6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Faruque M.; Riley, Daniel P.; Murch, Graeme E.

    2005-12-01

    Lanthanum hexaboride ( LaB6 , NIST SRM-660a) is widely used as a standard reference material for calibrating the line position and line shape parameters of powder diffraction instruments. The accuracy of this calibration technique is highly dependent on how completely the reference material is characterized. Critical to x-ray diffraction, this understanding must include the valence of the La atomic position, which in turn will influence the x-ray form factor (f) and hence the diffracted intensities. The electronic structure and bonding properties of LaB6 have been investigated using ab initio plane-wave pseudopotential total energy calculations. The electronic properties and atomic bonding characteristics were analyzed by estimating the energy band structure and the density of states around the Fermi energy level. The calculated energy band structure is consistent with previously reported experimental findings; de Haas-van Alphen and two-dimensional angular correlation of electron-positron annihilation radiation. In addition, the bond strengths and types of atomic bonds in the LaB6 compound were estimated by analyzing the Mulliken charge density population. The calculated result revealed the coexistence of covalent, ionic, and metallic bonding in the LaB6 system and partially explains its high efficiency as a thermionic emitter.

  9. Theoretical study on Fe-Al clusters:geometric structure,bonding law and electronic structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shougang; YIN Yansheng; WANG Daoping; LU Yao

    2004-01-01

    Structures of the small Fe-Al clusters with different atom proportion are calculated using the B3LYP method in density functional theory (DFT). Calculated results show that the Al atoms lose electrons easily while the Fe atoms capture electrons easily. The most stable geometry is the bonding between Fe and Fe atoms and between Fe and Al atoms with the largest possibility, and the cluster stability law with the same atom proportion accords with the change of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy and the entropy of cluster system. Moreover, the electronic structure study of the ground-state Fe3Al and Fe2CrAl clusters shows that the substitution of Cr atom for the Fe atom located at the next neighboring site of Al atom reduces localized electrons not only between Al atom and the next neighboring Cr atom, but also between Al atom and the nearest neighboring Fe atom. Although the substitution increases the plasticity and the magnetism of intermetallic compound, the stability of the system slightly decreases. Our theoretical results agree well with the experimental results.

  10. Synthesis of 2,6-diaminopyridine substituted -oxoketene ,-acetals: Crystal structure and hydrogen bonding interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Okram Mukherjee Singh; Laishram Ronibala Devi; Neeladri Das

    2013-09-01

    Polyaza -oxoketene ,-acetals can exist as either enamino or imino tautomeric forms. Based on the spectroscopic data and structural analysis of one of the ,-acetals, the stereochemistry was unambiguously assigned as an all--configuration. The crystal structure confirms the enamino structure and shows extensive use of C-H…X (X = N, O, and S) weak hydrogen bonding interactions, thereby generating a 3-dimensional network in solid state.

  11. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Electronic structure and bonding properties in layered ternary carbide Ti3SiC2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanchun; Sun, Zhimei

    2000-07-01

    Ab initio calculations based on the density-functional pseudopotential approach have been used to study the electronic structure and chemical bonding in layered machinable Ti3SiC2 ceramic. The calculations reveal that all three types of bonding - metallic, covalent and ionic - contribute to the bonding in Ti3SiC2. The high electric conductivity is attributed to the metallic bonding parallel to the basal plane and the high modulus and high melting point are attributed to the strong Ti-C-Ti-C-Ti covalent bond chains in the structure.

  12. Structure of a left-handed DNA G-quadruplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wan Jun; Heddi, Brahim; Schmitt, Emmanuelle; Lim, Kah Wai; Mechulam, Yves; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2015-03-03

    Aside from the well-known double helix, DNA can also adopt an alternative four-stranded structure known as G-quadruplex. Implications of such a structure in cellular processes, as well as its therapeutic and diagnostic applications, have been reported. The G-quadruplex structure is highly polymorphic, but so far, only right-handed helical forms have been observed. Here we present the NMR solution and X-ray crystal structures of a left-handed DNA G-quadruplex. The structure displays unprecedented features that can be exploited as unique recognition elements.

  13. Quantum mechanical electronic structure calculation reveals orientation dependence of hydrogen bond energy in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Abhisek; Datta, Saumen

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen bond plays a unique role in governing macromolecular interactions with exquisite specificity. These interactions govern the fundamental biological processes like protein folding, enzymatic catalysis, molecular recognition. Despite extensive research work, till date there is no proper report available about the hydrogen bond's energy surface with respect to its geometric parameters, directly derived from proteins. Herein, we have deciphered the potential energy landscape of hydrogen bond directly from the macromolecular coordinates obtained from Protein Data Bank using quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations. The findings unravel the hydrogen bonding energies of proteins in parametric space. These data can be used to understand the energies of such directional interactions involved in biological molecules. Quantitative characterization has also been performed using Shannon entropic calculations for atoms participating in hydrogen bond. Collectively, our results constitute an improved way of understanding hydrogen bond energies in case of proteins and complement the knowledge-based potential. Proteins 2017; 85:1046-1055. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Ionothermal Synthesis, Structure, and Bonding of the Catena -Heteropolycation 1 ∞ [Sb 2 Se 2 ] +

    KAUST Repository

    Groh, Matthias F.

    2015-01-26

    The reaction of antimony and selenium in the Lewis-acidic ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetrachloridoaluminate, [BMIm]Cl•4.7AlCl3, yielded dark-red crystals of [Sb2Se2]AlCl4. The formation starts above 160 ° C; at about 190 ° C, irreversible decomposition takes place. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic space group P 1¯ with a = 919.39(2) pm, b = 1137.92(3) pm, c = 1152.30(3) pm, α = 68.047(1)° , β = 78.115(1)° , γ = 72.530(1)° , and Z = 4. The structure is similar to that of [Sb2Te2]AlCl4 but has only half the number of crystallographically independent atoms. Polycationic chains 1∞ [Sb2Se2]+ form a pseudo-hexagonal arrangement along [011¯] ], which is interlaced by tetrahedral AlCl4 - groups. The catena-heteropolycation 1∞ [Sb2Se2]+ is a sequence of three different four-membered [Sb2Se2 ] rings. The chemical bonding scheme, established from the topological analysis of the real-space bonding indicator ELI-D, includes significantly polar covalent bonding in four-member rings withinthepolycation.Theringsareconnectedintoaninfinitechainbyhomonuclear non-polar Sb-Sb bonds and highly polar Sb-Se bonds. Half of the selenium atoms are three-bonded.

  15. Crystal structures and hydrogen bonding in the morpholinium salts of four phenoxyacetic acid analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Smith

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The anhydrous salts morpholinium (tetrahydro-2-H-1,4-oxazin-4-ium phenoxyacetate, C4H10NO+·C8H7O3−, (I, morpholinium (4-fluorophenoxyacetate, C4H10NO+·C8H6 FO3−, (II, and isomeric morpholinium (3,5-dichlorophenoxyacetate (3,5-D, (III, and morpholinium (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D, C4H10NO+·C8H5Cl2O3−, (IV, have been determined and their hydrogen-bonded structures are described. In the crystals of (I, (III and (IV, one of the the aminium H atoms is involved in a three-centre asymmetric cation–anion N—H...O,O′ R12(4 hydrogen-bonding interaction with the two carboxyl O-atom acceptors of the anion. With the structure of (II, the primary N—H...O interaction is linear. In the structures of (I, (II and (III, the second N—H...Ocarboxyl hydrogen bond generates one-dimensional chain structures extending in all cases along [100]. With (IV, the ion pairs are linked though inversion-related N—H...O hydrogen bonds [graph set R42(8], giving a cyclic heterotetrameric structure.

  16. DNA-modified electrodes (Ⅶ)——Preparation and characterization of DNA-bonded and DNA-adsorbed SAM/Au electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆琪; 庞代文; 胡深; 程介克; 蔡雄伟; 施财辉; 毛秉伟; 戴鸿平

    1999-01-01

    Two kinds of DNA-modified electrodes were prepared by covalent and adsorptive immobilization of DNA onto self-assembled monolayers of 2, 2’-dithiodiethanol on gold electrodes and characterized by cyclic voltammetry, Xray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. The results suggest that the methods are satisfactory for the immobilization of DNA on electrodes.

  17. Enhanced structural stability of DNA origami nanostructures by graphene encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matković, Aleksandar; Vasić, Borislav; Pešić, Jelena; Prinz, Julia; Bald, Ilko; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.; Gajić, Radoš

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that a single-layer graphene replicates the shape of DNA origami nanostructures very well. It can be employed as a protective layer for the enhancement of structural stability of DNA origami nanostructures. Using the AFM based manipulation, we show that the normal force required to damage graphene encapsulated DNA origami nanostructures is over an order of magnitude greater than for the unprotected ones. In addition, we show that graphene encapsulation offers protection to the DNA origami nanostructures against prolonged exposure to deionized water, and multiple immersions. Through these results we demonstrate that graphene encapsulated DNA origami nanostructures are strong enough to sustain various solution phase processing, lithography and transfer steps, thus extending the limits of DNA-mediated bottom-up fabrication.

  18. Mechanism of homologous recombination from the RecA-ssDNA/dsDNA structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhucheng; Yang, Haijuan; Pavletich, Nikola P [HHMI

    2008-07-08

    The RecA family of ATPases mediates homologous recombination, a reaction essential for maintaining genomic integrity and for generating genetic diversity. RecA, ATP and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) form a helical filament that binds to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), searches for homology, and then catalyses the exchange of the complementary strand, producing a new heteroduplex. Here we have solved the crystal structures of the Escherichia coli RecA-ssDNA and RecA-heteroduplex filaments. They show that ssDNA and ATP bind to RecA-RecA interfaces cooperatively, explaining the ATP dependency of DNA binding. The ATP {gamma}-phosphate is sensed across the RecA-RecA interface by two lysine residues that also stimulate ATP hydrolysis, providing a mechanism for DNA release. The DNA is underwound and stretched globally, but locally it adopts a B-DNA-like conformation that restricts the homology search to Watson-Crick-type base pairing. The complementary strand interacts primarily through base pairing, making heteroduplex formation strictly dependent on complementarity. The underwound, stretched filament conformation probably evolved to destabilize the donor duplex, freeing the complementary strand for homology sampling.

  19. FANCJ promotes DNA synthesis through G-quadruplex structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castillo Bosch, Pau; Segura-Bayona, Sandra; Koole, Wouter; van Heteren, Jane T; Dewar, James M; Tijsterman, Marcel; Knipscheer, Puck

    2014-01-01

    Our genome contains many G-rich sequences, which have the propensity to fold into stable secondary DNA structures called G4 or G-quadruplex structures. These structures have been implicated in cellular processes such as gene regulation and telomere maintenance. However, G4 sequences are prone to mut

  20. First-Principles Analysis on π-bonded Chain Structure on Several Polytypes of SiC Surfaces: Importance of Stacking Sequence on Energetics and Electronic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Tomoaki; Tajima, Nobuo; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Ohno, Takahisa

    2017-09-01

    Using first principles calculations based on a density functional theory, the energetics and electronic properties of a (2 × 1) π-bonded chain structure in several polytypes of SiC surfaces are discussed with special attention to the stacking sequence of SiC bilayers. We found that the stacking sequence of the topmost two SiC bilayers plays a decisive role for the stability and electronic structures of the π-bonded chain structure. We showed that the homo-elemental bonds in π-bonded chain structures cause alterations in the electronic structures of both the Si- and C-faces. The energetics of π-bonded chain structures on other group IV and IV-IV compound semiconductors were also investigated. We also showed that the buckling structure in the monolayer honeycomb lattice reflects the buckling of the topmost two atoms in the π-bonded chain structure observed in Si(111) and Ge(111).

  1. Replication, checkpoint suppression and structure of centromeric DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Francesco; Falbo, Lucia; Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2016-11-01

    Human centromeres contain large amounts of repetitive DNA sequences known as α satellite DNA, which can be difficult to replicate and whose functional role is unclear. Recently, we have characterized protein composition, structural organization and checkpoint response to stalled replication forks of centromeric chromatin reconstituted in Xenopus laevis egg extract. We showed that centromeric DNA has high affinity for SMC2-4 subunits of condensins and for CENP-A, it is enriched for DNA repair factors and suppresses the ATR checkpoint to ensure its efficient replication. We also showed that centromeric chromatin forms condensins enriched and topologically constrained DNA loops, which likely contribute to the overall structure of the centromere. These findings have important implications on how chromosomes are organized and genome stability is maintained in mammalian cells.

  2. Structural basis for sequence specific DNA binding and protein dimerization of HOXA13.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghong Zhang

    Full Text Available The homeobox gene (HOXA13 codes for a transcription factor protein that binds to AT-rich DNA sequences and controls expression of genes during embryonic morphogenesis. Here we present the NMR structure of HOXA13 homeodomain (A13DBD bound to an 11-mer DNA duplex. A13DBD forms a dimer that binds to DNA with a dissociation constant of 7.5 nM. The A13DBD/DNA complex has a molar mass of 35 kDa consistent with two molecules of DNA bound at both ends of the A13DBD dimer. A13DBD contains an N-terminal arm (residues 324 - 329 that binds in the DNA minor groove, and a C-terminal helix (residues 362 - 382 that contacts the ATAA nucleotide sequence in the major groove. The N370 side-chain forms hydrogen bonds with the purine base of A5* (base paired with T5. Side-chain methyl groups of V373 form hydrophobic contacts with the pyrimidine methyl groups of T5, T6* and T7*, responsible for recognition of TAA in the DNA core. I366 makes similar methyl contacts with T3* and T4*. Mutants (I366A, N370A and V373G all have decreased DNA binding and transcriptional activity. Exposed protein residues (R337, K343, and F344 make intermolecular contacts at the protein dimer interface. The mutation F344A weakens protein dimerization and lowers transcriptional activity by 76%. We conclude that the non-conserved residue, V373 is critical for structurally recognizing TAA in the major groove, and that HOXA13 dimerization is required to activate transcription of target genes.

  3. Reduced glutathione and procaine hydrochloride protect the nucleoprotein structure of boar spermatozoa during freeze-thawing by stabilising disulfide bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeste, Marc; Flores, Eva; Estrada, Efrén; Bonet, Sergi; Rigau, Teresa; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan E

    2013-01-01

    One important change the head of boar spermatozoa during freeze-thawing is the destabilisation of its nucleoprotein structure due to a disruption of disulfide bonds. With the aim of better understanding these changes in frozen-thawed spermatozoa, two agents, namely reduced glutathione (GSH) and procaine hydrochloride (ProHCl), were added at different concentrations to the freezing media at different concentrations and combinations over the range 1-2mM. Then, 30 and 240 min after thawing, cysteine-free residue levels of boar sperm nucleoproteins, DNA fragmentation and other sperm functional parameters were evaluated. Both GSH and ProHCl, at final concentrations of 2mM, induced a significant (Psperm head disulfide bonds 30 and 240 min after thawing compared with the frozen-thawed control. This effect was accompanied by a significant (Psperm peroxide levels, motility patterns and plasma membrane integrity. In conclusion, the results show that both GSH and ProHCl have a stabilising effect on the nucleoprotein structure of frozen-thawed spermatozoa, although only GSH exerts an appreciable effect on sperm viability.

  4. Bond strength between stell-concrete and between concretes with different ages in structural rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. DORIA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIn inspections of buildings, it is common to find structures that, well before reaching its useful life longer require repairs and reinforcements. This study examined the bond strength between concrete of different ages and between steel and concrete, focusing on the recovery of reinforced concrete structures. To analyze the bond between concrete of different ages, trials with specimens receiving three different types of treatments at the interface between the concrete were performed: brushing; brushing and mortar equal to concrete of substrate and brushing and epoxy layer. Indirect tensile tests and oblique and vertical shear tests at the interface were made . The bond stress between steel and concrete was evaluated by pull out test under the conditions of the bar inserted in the still fresh concrete and when inserted in the hardened concrete with epoxy. Results showed increased bond strength by indirect tensile stress of 15% and 37%; 4% and 12% for the adherence test by oblique shear, and 108% and 178%, for the testing of vertical shear, respectively, for the specimens whose interfaces have received, in addition to brushing, layer of mortar and epoxy bridge, compared to those who received only brushing. Insignificant loss (about 0.52% of bond stress was noticed for pull out test of steel bar when compared with test results of the specimens that had steel bar inserted in the concrete in the hardened state with epoxy adhesion bridge, with those who had inserted steel bar in fresh concrete.

  5. The crystal structure of a replicative hexameric helicase DnaC and its complex with single-stranded DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Yu-Hua; Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Chen, Wei-Ti; Huang, Cheng-Yang; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng

    2008-01-01

    DNA helicases are motor proteins that play essential roles in DNA replication, repair and recombination. In the replicative hexameric helicase, the fundamental reaction is the unwinding of duplex DNA; however, our understanding of this function remains vague due to insufficient structural information. Here, we report two crystal structures of the DnaB-family replicative helicase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkDnaC) in the apo-form and bound to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The GkDnaC–...

  6. Chromatin structure of adenovirus DNA throughout infection

    OpenAIRE

    Giberson, Andrea N.; Davidson, Adam R.; Parks, Robin J.

    2011-01-01

    For more than half a century, researchers have studied the basic biology of Adenovirus (Ad), unraveling the subtle, yet profound, interactions between the virus and the host. These studies have uncovered previously unknown proteins and pathways crucial for normal cell function that the virus manipulates to achieve optimal virus replication and gene expression. In the infecting virion, the viral DNA is tightly condensed in a virally encoded protamine-like protein which must be remodeled within...

  7. Reactivity of disulfide bonds is markedly affected by structure and environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karimi, Maryam; Ignasiak, Marta T; Chan, Bun

    2016-01-01

    Disulfide bonds play a key role in stabilizing protein structures, with disruption strongly associated with loss of protein function and activity. Previous data have suggested that disulfides show only modest reactivity with oxidants. In the current study, we report kinetic data indicating...

  8. Phase transition in triglycine family of hydrogen bonded ferroelectrics: An interpretation based on structural studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R R Choudhury; R Chitra; P U Sastry; Amit Das; M Ramanadham

    2004-07-01

    Using the crystal structure, a comprehensive interpretation of the origin of ferroelectricity in the hydrogen bonded triglycine family of crystals is given. Our detailed analysis showed that the instability of nitrogen double well potential plays a driving role in the mechanism of the ferroelectric transitions in these crystals.

  9. The effect of RDX crystal defect structure on mechanical response of a polymer-bonded explosive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, R.H.B.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der

    2016-01-01

    An explosive composition, derived from AFX-757, was systematically varied by using three different qualities of Class I RDX. The effect of internal defect structure of the RDX crystal on the shock sensitivity of a polymer bonded explosive is generally accepted (Doherty and Watt, 2008). Here the

  10. Conformational influence of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl group: crystal structures of DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, M.; Usman, N.; Rich, A.

    1993-01-01

    We have crystallized three double-helical DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes and determined their structures by X-ray crystallography at resolutions between 2 and 2.25 A. The two self-complementary duplexes [r(G)d(CGTATACGC)]2 and [d(GCGT)r(A)d(TACGC)]2, as well as the Okazaki fragment d(GGGTATACGC).r(GCG)d(TATACCC), were found to adopt A-type conformations. The crystal structures are non-isomorphous, and the crystallographic environments for the three chimeras are different. A number of intramolecular interactions of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl groups contribute to the stabilization of the A-conformation. Hydrogen bonds between 2'-hydroxyls and 5'-oxygens or phosphate oxygens, in addition to the previously observed hydrogen bonds to 1'-oxygens of adjacent riboses and deoxyriboses, are observed in the DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes. The crystalline chimeric duplexes do not show a transition between the DNA A- and B-conformations. CD spectra suggest that the Okazaki fragment assumes an A-conformation in solution as well. In this molecule the three RNA residues may therefore lock the complete decamer in the A-conformation. Crystals of an all-DNA strand with the same sequence as the self-complementary chimeras show a morphology which is different from those of the chimera crystals. Moreover, the oligonucleotide does not match any of the sequence characteristics of DNAs usually adopting the A-conformation in the crystalline state (e.g., octamers with short alternating stretches of purines and pyrimidines). In DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes, it is therefore possible that a single RNA residue can drive the conformational equilibrium toward the A-conformation.

  11. Triplet repeat DNA structures and human genetic disease: dynamic mutations from dynamic DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richard R Sinden; Vladimir N Potaman; Elena A Oussatcheva; Christopher E Pearson; Yuri L Lyubchenko; Luda S Shlyakhtenko

    2002-02-01

    Fourteen genetic neurodegenerative diseases and three fragile sites have been associated with the expansion of (CTG)n•(CAG)n, (CGG)n•(CCG)n, or (GAA)n•(TTC)n repeat tracts. Different models have been proposed for the expansion of triplet repeats, most of which presume the formation of alternative DNA structures in repeat tracts. One of the most likely structures, slipped strand DNA, may stably and reproducibly form within triplet repeat sequences. The propensity to form slipped strand DNA is proportional to the length and homogeneity of the repeat tract. The remarkable stability of slipped strand DNA may, in part, be due to loop-loop interactions facilitated by the sequence complementarity of the loops and the dynamic structure of three-way junctions formed at the loop-outs.

  12. Structure of nanoscale truncated octahedral DNA cages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto; Juul, Sissel; Jørgensen, Hanne Laerke

    2010-01-01

    . The structures assemble with a high efficiency in a one-step procedure, compared to previously published structures of similar complexity. The structures of the cages were determined by small-angle X-ray scattering. With increasing linker length, there is a systematic increase of the cage size and decrease...

  13. DNA minicircles clarify the specific role of DNA structure on retroviral integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasi, Marco; Mornico, Damien; Volant, Stevenn; Juchet, Anna; Batisse, Julien; Bouchier, Christiane; Parissi, Vincent; Ruff, Marc; Lavery, Richard; Lavigne, Marc

    2016-09-19

    Chromatin regulates the selectivity of retroviral integration into the genome of infected cells. At the nucleosome level, both histones and DNA structure are involved in this regulation. We propose a strategy that allows to specifically study a single factor: the DNA distortion induced by the nucleosome. This strategy relies on mimicking this distortion using DNA minicircles (MCs) having a fixed rotational orientation of DNA curvature, coupled with atomic-resolution modeling. Contrasting MCs with linear DNA fragments having identical sequences enabled us to analyze the impact of DNA distortion on the efficiency and selectivity of integration. We observed a global enhancement of HIV-1 integration in MCs and an enrichment of integration sites in the outward-facing DNA major grooves. Both of these changes are favored by LEDGF/p75, revealing a new, histone-independent role of this integration cofactor. PFV integration is also enhanced in MCs, but is not associated with a periodic redistribution of integration sites, thus highlighting its distinct catalytic properties. MCs help to separate the roles of target DNA structure, histone modifications and integrase (IN) cofactors during retroviral integration and to reveal IN-specific regulation mechanisms.

  14. Structure and operation of the DNA-translocating type I DNA restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennaway, Christopher K; Taylor, James E; Song, Chun Feng; Potrzebowski, Wojciech; Nicholson, William; White, John H; Swiderska, Anna; Obarska-Kosinska, Agnieszka; Callow, Philip; Cooper, Laurie P; Roberts, Gareth A; Artero, Jean-Baptiste; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Trinick, John; Kneale, G Geoff; Dryden, David T F

    2012-01-01

    Type I DNA restriction/modification (RM) enzymes are molecular machines found in the majority of bacterial species. Their early discovery paved the way for the development of genetic engineering. They control (restrict) the influx of foreign DNA via horizontal gene transfer into the bacterium while maintaining sequence-specific methylation (modification) of host DNA. The endonuclease reaction of these enzymes on unmethylated DNA is preceded by bidirectional translocation of thousands of base pairs of DNA toward the enzyme. We present the structures of two type I RM enzymes, EcoKI and EcoR124I, derived using electron microscopy (EM), small-angle scattering (neutron and X-ray), and detailed molecular modeling. DNA binding triggers a large contraction of the open form of the enzyme to a compact form. The path followed by DNA through the complexes is revealed by using a DNA mimic anti-restriction protein. The structures reveal an evolutionary link between type I RM enzymes and type II RM enzymes.

  15. Bond-length analysis of the omega structure in Ti,Zr,Hf and their alloys: experimental data, new correlations and implications for chemical bonding models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grad, G.B.; Benites, G.M. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche; Aurelio, G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Comahue, 8300, Neuquen (Argentina); Fernandez Guillermet, A. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    1999-12-15

    An analysis is performed of the experimental information on the key interatomic distances (IDs) of the AlB{sub 2} type structure, the so-called omega ({omega}) phase in Ti and Zr, as well as in Ti-V and Zr-Nb alloys. Various remarkable correlations are found between these IDs and standard measures of the atomic size, and with Pauling's bond-lengths. These observations are discussed in the light of the phenomenological bonding pictures of the {omega} structure, and with our recent ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of this phase. (orig.)

  16. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into C-P Bond Hydrolysis by Phosphonoacetate Hydrolase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Borisova, Svetlana A.; Metcalf, William W.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Nair, Satish K. (UIUC)

    2011-12-22

    Bacteria have evolved pathways to metabolize phosphonates as a nutrient source for phosphorus. In Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021, 2-aminoethylphosphonate is catabolized to phosphonoacetate, which is converted to acetate and inorganic phosphate by phosphonoacetate hydrolase (PhnA). Here we present detailed biochemical and structural characterization of PhnA that provides insights into the mechanism of C-P bond cleavage. The 1.35 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure reveals a catalytic core similar to those of alkaline phosphatases and nucleotide pyrophosphatases but with notable differences, such as a longer metal-metal distance. Detailed structure-guided analysis of active site residues and four additional cocrystal structures with phosphonoacetate substrate, acetate, phosphonoformate inhibitor, and a covalently bound transition state mimic provide insight into active site features that may facilitate cleavage of the C-P bond. These studies expand upon the array of reactions that can be catalyzed by enzymes of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily.

  17. Code domains in tandem repetitive DNA sequence structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, P

    1992-10-01

    Traditionally, many people doing research in molecular biology attribute coding properties to a given DNA sequence if this sequence contains an open reading frame for translation into a sequence of amino acids. This protein coding capability of DNA was detected about 30 years ago. The underlying genetic code is highly conserved and present in every biological species studied so far. Today, it is obvious that DNA has a much larger coding potential for other important tasks. Apart from coding for specific RNA molecules such as rRNA, snRNA and tRNA molecules, specific structural and sequence patterns of the DNA chain itself express distinct codes for the regulation and expression of its genetic activity. A chromatin code has been defined for phasing of the histone-octamer protein complex in the nucleosome. A translation frame code has been shown to exist that determines correct triplet counting at the ribosome during protein synthesis. A loop code seems to organize the single stranded interaction of the nascent RNA chain with proteins during the splicing process, and a splicing code phases successive 5' and 3' splicing sites. Most of these DNA codes are not exclusively based on the primary DNA sequence itself, but also seem to include specific features of the corresponding higher order structures. Based on the view that these various DNA codes are genetically instructive for specific molecular interactions or processes, important in the nucleus during interphase and during cell division, the coding capability of tandem repetitive DNA sequences has recently been reconsidered.

  18. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology. Volume XLVII, Part 2. Structures of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    This is Volume 2 of the proceedings of the 1982 Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. The volume contains papers on DNA methylation, DNA replication, gene recombination, organization of genes along DNA, molecular structure and enzymology of DNA.

  19. Structural and functional interaction between the human DNA repair proteins DNA ligase IV and XRCC4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Peï-Yu; Frit, Philippe; Meesala, SriLakshmi; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Modesti, Mauro; Andres, Sara N; Huang, Ying; Sekiguchi, JoAnn; Calsou, Patrick; Salles, Bernard; Junop, Murray S

    2009-06-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining represents the major pathway used by human cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks. It relies on the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to reseal DNA strands. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of human XRCC4 bound to the carboxy-terminal tandem BRCT repeat of DNA ligase IV. The structure differs from the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae complex and reveals an extensive DNA ligase IV binding interface formed by a helix-loop-helix structure within the inter-BRCT linker region, as well as significant interactions involving the second BRCT domain, which induces a kink in the tail region of XRCC4. We further demonstrate that interaction with the second BRCT domain of DNA ligase IV is necessary for stable binding to XRCC4 in cells, as well as to achieve efficient dominant-negative effects resulting in radiosensitization after ectopic overexpression of DNA ligase IV fragments in human fibroblasts. Together our findings provide unanticipated insight for understanding the physical and functional architecture of the nonhomologous end-joining ligation complex.

  20. Structural and Functional Interaction Between the Human DNA Repair Proteins DNA ligase IV and XRCC4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, P.; Meesala, S; Dauvillier, S; Modesti, M; Andres, S; Huang, Y; Sekiguchi, J; Calsou, P; Salles, B; Junop, M

    2009-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining represents the major pathway used by human cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks. It relies on the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to reseal DNA strands. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of human XRCC4 bound to the carboxy-terminal tandem BRCT repeat of DNA ligase IV. The structure differs from the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae complex and reveals an extensive DNA ligase IV binding interface formed by a helix-loop-helix structure within the inter-BRCT linker region, as well as significant interactions involving the second BRCT domain, which induces a kink in the tail region of XRCC4. We further demonstrate that interaction with the second BRCT domain of DNA ligase IV is necessary for stable binding to XRCC4 in cells, as well as to achieve efficient dominant-negative effects resulting in radiosensitization after ectopic overexpression of DNA ligase IV fragments in human fibroblasts. Together our findings provide unanticipated insight for understanding the physical and functional architecture of the nonhomologous end-joining ligation complex.

  1. DNA and bone structure preservation in medieval human skeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson-Thomas, Yvette M; Norton, Andrew L; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J; Florencio-Silva, Rinaldo; Ali, Nadir; Elmrghni, Samir; Gil, Cristiane D; Sasso, Gisela R S; Dixon, Ronald A; Nader, Helena B

    2015-06-01

    Morphological and ultrastructural data from archaeological human bones are scarce, particularly data that have been correlated with information on the preservation of molecules such as DNA. Here we examine the bone structure of macroscopically well-preserved medieval human skeletons by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry, and the quantity and quality of DNA extracted from these skeletons. DNA technology has been increasingly used for analyzing physical evidence in archaeological forensics; however, the isolation of ancient DNA is difficult since it is highly degraded, extraction yields are low and the co-extraction of PCR inhibitors is a problem. We adapted and optimised a method that is frequently used for isolating DNA from modern samples, Chelex(®) 100 (Bio-Rad) extraction, for isolating DNA from archaeological human bones and teeth. The isolated DNA was analysed by real-time PCR using primers targeting the sex determining region on the Y chromosome (SRY) and STR typing using the AmpFlSTR(®) Identifiler PCR Amplification kit. Our results clearly show the preservation of bone matrix in medieval bones and the presence of intact osteocytes with well preserved encapsulated nuclei. In addition, we show how effective Chelex(®) 100 is for isolating ancient DNA from archaeological bones and teeth. This optimised method is suitable for STR typing using kits aimed specifically at degraded and difficult DNA templates since amplicons of up to 250bp were successfully amplified.

  2. Rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics: Structure-bonding-property relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, M. K. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding property relationships. The work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe13-xSix system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn{sub 13}-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides Re2-xFe4Si14-y and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi2: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb3Zn3.6Al7.4: Partially ordered structure of Tb3Zn3.6Al7.4 compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn39(CrxAl1-x)81

  3. Rare-Earth Transition-Metal Intermetallics: Structure-bonding-Property Relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Mi-Kyung [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Our explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding-property relationships. Our work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe13-xSix system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn13-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides RE2-xFe4Si14-y and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi2: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb3Zn3.6Al7.4: Partially ordered structure of Tb3.6Zn13-xAl7.4 compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn39(CrxAl1-x

  4. Computer-aided design of DNA origami structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selnihhin, Denis; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth

    2015-01-01

    The DNA origami method enables the creation of complex nanoscale objects that can be used to organize molecular components and to function as reconfigurable mechanical devices. Of relevance to synthetic biology, DNA origami structures can be delivered to cells where they can perform complicated sense-and-act tasks, and can be used as scaffolds to organize enzymes for enhanced synthesis. The design of DNA origami structures is a complicated matter and is most efficiently done using dedicated software packages. This chapter describes a procedure for designing DNA origami structures using a combination of state-of-the-art software tools. First, we introduce the basic method for calculating crossover positions between DNA helices and the standard crossover patterns for flat, square, and honeycomb DNA origami lattices. Second, we provide a step-by-step tutorial for the design of a simple DNA origami biosensor device, from schematic idea to blueprint creation and to 3D modeling and animation, and explain how careful modeling can facilitate later experimentation in the laboratory.

  5. A simple motif for protein recognition in DNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landt, Stephen G; Ramirez, Alejandro; Daugherty, Matthew D; Frankel, Alan D

    2005-09-02

    DNA in a single-stranded form (ssDNA) exists transiently within the cell and comprises the telomeres of linear chromosomes and the genomes of some DNA viruses. As with RNA, in the single-stranded state, some DNA sequences are able to fold into complex secondary and tertiary structures that may be recognized by proteins and participate in gene regulation. To better understand how such DNA elements might fold and interact with proteins, and to compare recognition features to those of a structured RNA, we used in vitro selection to identify ssDNAs that bind an RNA-binding peptide from the HIV Rev protein with high affinity and specificity. The large majority of selected binders contain a non-Watson-Crick G.T base-pair and an adjacent C:G base-pair and both are essential for binding. This GT motif can be presented in different DNA contexts, including a nearly perfect duplex and a branched three-helix structure, and appears to be recognized in large part by arginine residues separated by one turn of an alpha-helix. Interestingly, a very similar GT motif is necessary also for protein binding and function of a well-characterized model ssDNA regulatory element from the proenkephalin promoter.

  6. The Effect of RDX Crystal Defect Structure on Mechanical Response of a Polymer-Bonded Explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-09

    deformation [a] R. H. B. Bouma Department Process Instrumentation and Design TNO, Organisation for Applied Scientific Research P.O. Box 6012 2600 JA, Delft, The...DOI: 10.1002/prep.201500222 The Effect of RDX Crystal Defect Structure on Mechanical Response of a Polymer-Bonded Explosive Richard H. B. Bouma[a...systematically varied by using three different qualities of Class I RDX. The effect of internal defect structure of the RDX crystal on the shock

  7. Catastrophe Bonds. From Structure to Strategy – A Cluster Analysis at European Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura-Gabriela CONSTANTIN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As a core activity and discipline of corporate management and corporate governance, risk management is, especially nowadays, a central part in pursuing the sustainable development desiderates, both from the perspective of the firm and of the society as a whole.Considering the negative impact natural catastrophes have on the companies’ and countries’ competitiveness, the development of sustainable financial products that make a contribution to transferring the risk and allocating the capital in case of disasters stands for a continual preoccupation, especially for the (reinsurance industry, while the study of catastrophe bonds – insurance-linked securities – is of interest in the specialized literature. In this context, the scope of the present research is to expand the empirical studies within this field while examining the link between the structure of the catastrophe bonds and the risk management approach employed while accessing the capital markets through this transactions.The methodology entailed clustering a selection of transactions developed by European cedents based on the size of each issue and correlating the results with an innovative score, developed to encompass several important catastrophe bonds structural components.The findings reflect that the general structural elements of the financial transactions reflect closely the corporate approach regarding the innovative risk intermediation instruments for the examined catastrophe bonds deals. The outcomes also emphasize, as expected, that companies with a stronger presence on this market seem to have a more sophisticated risk management approach.

  8. Interfacial crystalline structures in injection over-molded polypropylene and bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bowen; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Genjie; Guo, Shaoyun; Huang, Jian

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes interfacial crystalline structures found in injection overmolded polypropylene components and the relationship of these structures to bond strength between the components. The combined effects of the development of hierarchical gradient structures and the particular thermomechanical environment near the interface on the interfacial crystalline structures were investigated in detail by PLM, SEM, DSC, WAXD, and infrared dichroism spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that during molding there was competitive formation of interfacial crystalline structures consisted of "shish-kebab" layer (SKL) and a transcrystalline layers (TCL). Variation in shear stress (controlled by injection pressure and injection speed) plays an important role in the formation of the SKL. The formation of TCL is influenced by the thermal environment, namely melt temperature and mold temperature. Increasing within certain limits, interfacial temperature and the thermal gradient near the interface promotes β-iPP growth. The relationship between interfacial crystalline structures and interfacial bond strength was established by lap shear measurement. The interfacial bond strength is improved by enhancing the formation of TCL, but reduced if SKL predominates.

  9. First-principles study of structural and bonding properties of vanadium carbide and niobium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, K. B.; Paliwal, U.

    2009-11-01

    An ab initio linear combination of atomic orbitals method founded on density functional theory is applied to study the structural and bonding properties of vanadium carbide and niobium carbide. We present structural properties, namely, first-principles total energies, equilibrium lattice constants, bulk moduli and their pressure derivatives, together with the x-ray structure factors. Two generalized correction schemes—P86 and PW92—are applied to treat correlation. P86 gives a favourable ground state compared with the PW92. The computed equilibrium lattice constants and bulk moduli of the two compounds are compared with available experimental data. The x-ray structure factors for a few reflection planes are also reported. Comparison with experiment could be done only for niobium carbide. More refined measurements on x-ray structure factors for both compounds are required. We also present the autocorrelation functions derived from the ground-state momentum density. The electronic behaviour and bonding properties are discussed in terms of absolute and anisotropies in the directional autocorrelation functions. Our findings on structural and bonding parameters are well in accordance with the experimental data.

  10. First-principles study of structural and bonding properties of vanadium carbide and niobium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, K B; Paliwal, U [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M L Sukhadia University, Udaipur - 313001 (India)], E-mail: k_joshi@yahoo.com

    2009-11-15

    An ab initio linear combination of atomic orbitals method founded on density functional theory is applied to study the structural and bonding properties of vanadium carbide and niobium carbide. We present structural properties, namely, first-principles total energies, equilibrium lattice constants, bulk moduli and their pressure derivatives, together with the x-ray structure factors. Two generalized correction schemes-P86 and PW92-are applied to treat correlation. P86 gives a favourable ground state compared with the PW92. The computed equilibrium lattice constants and bulk moduli of the two compounds are compared with available experimental data. The x-ray structure factors for a few reflection planes are also reported. Comparison with experiment could be done only for niobium carbide. More refined measurements on x-ray structure factors for both compounds are required. We also present the autocorrelation functions derived from the ground-state momentum density. The electronic behaviour and bonding properties are discussed in terms of absolute and anisotropies in the directional autocorrelation functions. Our findings on structural and bonding parameters are well in accordance with the experimental data.

  11. Effect of adhesive on molten pool structure and penetration in laser weld bonding of magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L. M.; Ren, D. X.

    2010-09-01

    Laser weld bonding (LWB) is a new hybrid technique that combines adhesive bonding with laser seam welding together, and can achieve higher joint strength than adhesive bonding or laser welding individually. Some new physical phenomena have been observed in this welding method, and the phenomena are different from the normal laser welding process, such as a remarkable deeper penetration in LWB than that in laser welding direct (LWD). The adhesive-induced gas can influence the molten pool structure in front of the keyhole, so that less energy is required for laser keyhole through the upper sheet; thus, higher laser power density can interact with the lower sheet, leading to deeper penetration. Simulation comparison experiments are set to indirectly verify these conclusions above.

  12. Molecular Structure and Bonding in Plutonium Carbides: A Theoretical Study of PuC3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molpeceres, Germán; Rayón, Víctor M; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2016-04-14

    The most relevant species of plutonium tricarbide were characterized using theoretical methods. The global minimum is predicted to be a fan structure where the plutonium atom is bonded to a quasi-linear C3 unit. A rhombic isomer, shown to be a bicyclic species with transannular C-C bonding, lies about 39 kJ/mol above the fan isomer. A linear PuCCC isomer and a three-membered ring CPuC2 isomer were found to be higher in energy (150 and 195 kJ/mol, respectively, above the predicted global minimum). The possible processes for the formation of these species are discussed, and the IR spectra were predicted to help in possible experimental detection. The nature of the Pu-C interaction has been analyzed in terms of a topological analysis of the electronic density, showing that Pu-C bonding is essentially ionic with a certain degree of covalent character.

  13. Microstructure and hardness of HIP-bonded regions in F82H blanket structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, K.; Wakai, E.; Ando, M.; Sawai, T.; Nakamura, K.; Takeuchi, H.; Iwabuchi, A.

    2002-12-01

    Metallurgical examinations and hardness measurements were performed at hot isostatic pressing (HIP)-bonded regions in blanket structures made from F82H alloy in order to investigate the HIP-bondability and the influence on the microstructure due to the HIP and heat treatments which would correspond to the fabrication of an actual blanket. The metallurgical examination showed that the HIP-bonded interfaces were sufficiently diffusion-bonded without significant defects, i.e. voids and/or exfoliations, although grain coarsening was observed at a part of the HIP interfaces. Hardness was nearly equal in the coarsening region and a region without coarsening, but about a 10 Hv increase was found in a boundary in between the regions with and without coarsening. Microcrystallized grains were observed in a region about ˜6 μm from HIP interfaces, and the hardness increased by about 0.2 GPa in the region.

  14. Love Waves in Layered Graded Composite Structures with Imperfectly Bonded Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Theoretical analysis and numerical calculations of Love wave propagation in layered graded composites with imperfectly bonded interface are described in this paper. On the basis of WKB method, the approximate analytic solutions for Love waves are obtained. By the interface shear spring model, the dispersion relations for Love waves in layered graded composite structures with rigid, slip, and imperfectly bonded interfaces are given, and the effects of the interface conditions on the phase velocities of Love waves in SiC/Al layered graded composites are discussed. Numerical analysis shows that the phase velocity decreases when the defined flexibility parameter is greater. For the general imperfectly bonded interface, the phase velocity changes in the range of the velocities for the rigid and slip interface conditions.

  15. Structure-based analysis of HU-DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinger, Kerren K; Rice, Phoebe A

    2007-01-26

    HU and IHF are prokaryotic proteins that induce very large bends in DNA. They are present in high concentrations in the bacterial nucleoid and aid in chromosomal compaction. They also function as regulatory cofactors in many processes, such as site-specific recombination and the initiation of replication and transcription. HU and IHF have become paradigms for understanding DNA bending and indirect readout of sequence. While IHF shows significant sequence specificity, HU binds preferentially to certain damaged or distorted DNAs. However, none of the structurally diverse HU substrates previously studied in vitro is identical with the distorted substrates in the recently published Anabaena HU(AHU)-DNA cocrystal structures. Here, we report binding affinities for AHU and the DNA in the cocrystal structures. The binding free energies for formation of these AHU-DNA complexes range from approximately 10-14.5 kcal/mol, representing K(d) values in the nanomolar to low picomolar range, and a maximum stabilization of at least approximately 6.3 kcal/mol relative to complexes with undistorted, non-specific DNA. We investigated IHF binding and found that appropriate structural distortions can greatly enhance its affinity. On the basis of the coupling of structural and relevant binding data, we estimate the amount of conformational strain in an IHF-mediated DNA kink that is relieved by a nick (at least 0.76 kcal/mol) and pinpoint the location of the strain. We show that AHU has a sequence preference for an A+T-rich region in the center of its DNA-binding site, correlating with an unusually narrow minor groove. This is similar to sequence preferences shown by the eukaryotic nucleosome.

  16. Structure-based Analysis to Hu-DNA Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinger,K.; Rice, P.

    2007-01-01

    HU and IHF are prokaryotic proteins that induce very large bends in DNA. They are present in high concentrations in the bacterial nucleoid and aid in chromosomal compaction. They also function as regulatory cofactors in many processes, such as site-specific recombination and the initiation of replication and transcription. HU and IHF have become paradigms for understanding DNA bending and indirect readout of sequence. While IHF shows significant sequence specificity, HU binds preferentially to certain damaged or distorted DNAs. However, none of the structurally diverse HU substrates previously studied in vitro is identical with the distorted substrates in the recently published Anabaena HU(AHU)-DNA cocrystal structures. Here, we report binding affinities for AHU and the DNA in the cocrystal structures. The binding free energies for formation of these AHU-DNA complexes range from 10-14.5 kcal/mol, representing K{sub d} values in the nanomolar to low picomolar range, and a maximum stabilization of at least 6.3 kcal/mol relative to complexes with undistorted, non-specific DNA. We investigated IHF binding and found that appropriate structural distortions can greatly enhance its affinity. On the basis of the coupling of structural and relevant binding data, we estimate the amount of conformational strain in an IHF-mediated DNA kink that is relieved by a nick (at least 0.76 kcal/mol) and pinpoint the location of the strain. We show that AHU has a sequence preference for an A+T-rich region in the center of its DNA-binding site, correlating with an unusually narrow minor groove. This is similar to sequence preferences shown by the eukaryotic nucleosome.

  17. Nucleosome DNA sequence structure of isochores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifonov Edward N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Significant differences in G+C content between different isochore types suggest that the nucleosome positioning patterns in DNA of the isochores should be different as well. Results Extraction of the patterns from the isochore DNA sequences by Shannon N-gram extension reveals that while the general motif YRRRRRYYYYYR is characteristic for all isochore types, the dominant positioning patterns of the isochores vary between TAAAAATTTTTA and CGGGGGCCCCCG due to the large differences in G+C composition. This is observed in human, mouse and chicken isochores, demonstrating that the variations of the positioning patterns are largely G+C dependent rather than species-specific. The species-specificity of nucleosome positioning patterns is revealed by dinucleotide periodicity analyses in isochore sequences. While human sequences are showing CG periodicity, chicken isochores display AG (CT periodicity. Mouse isochores show very weak CG periodicity only. Conclusions Nucleosome positioning pattern as revealed by Shannon N-gram extension is strongly dependent on G+C content and different in different isochores. Species-specificity of the pattern is subtle. It is reflected in the choice of preferentially periodical dinucleotides.

  18. Sequential bond energies and structures of the Cr+·(N2), n =1−4

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jamal N Dawoud

    2014-11-01

    DFT calculations, with an effective core potential for the chromium ion and large polarized basis set functions have been used to calculate the sequential bond dissociation energies of the Cr+·(N2) (n = 1—4) complexes. A linear configuration was obtained for the Cr+·N2 and Cr+·(N2)2 complexes with sequential bond dissociation energies of 14.6 and 16.4 kcal mol-1, respectively. For the Cr+·(N2)3 and Cr+·(N2)4 complexes, distorted trigonal pyramidal and tetrahedral geometries were optimized with sequential bond dissociation energies of 6.5 and 5.5 kcal mol-1, respectively. - back-donation in side-on approach of the Cr+·N2 leads to the formation of a tilted structure with the Cr+ ion in central position. The di-ligated complex exhibits the strongest bond dissociation energy among these four Cr+·(N2) (n = 1—4) complexes since it has the largest Cr+—N bond order.

  19. Evolution in the structural and bonding properties of Aluminum-Lithium clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Chacko, S; Paranjape, V V

    2003-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the geometry, energetics, electronic structure and bonding in various Al-Li clusters viz. Al_nLi_n (n=1-11), Al_2^-, Al_2^{2-}, Al_2Li, Al_2Li^-, and Al_6Li_8 using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics method within the framework of density functional theory. The growth patterns in these cluster are found to be divided in two broad categories: the first consisting of a quinted roof of Al_2Li_2 (n=2-4) and the second consisting of a pentagonal ring (n=7-9). A covalent bonding between Al-Li in Al_2Li_2 is seen, whereas, in larger clusters, it is ionic. A three dimensional growth of the Al cluster in Al_4^{2-}, Al_5Li_5, and Al_6Li_8 leads to a transition from localized to delocalized bonding. In clusters with more than six Al atoms, the eigenvalue spectrum is divided into two groups: a lower group of jellium-like states and a higher group of localized bonds arising out of p complex. Thus, a mixture of localized, delocalized, and ionic bonding is seen in these clusters. Finally, w...

  20. Structural and vibrational spectral studies on hydrogen bonded salts: 4-chloroanilinium maleate and nitrate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Anitha; M Gunasekaran; S Suresh Kumar; S Athimoolam

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, proton transfer from nitric and maleic acids to amine group (4-chloroaniline) led to hydrogen bonded crystals of 4-chloroanilinium maleate (4CAM) and 4-chloroanilinium nitrate (4CAN) which are investigated by the experimental and theoretical approaches. The molecular structures of these two compounds were optimized with the Density Functional Theory (DFT) using B3LYP function and the Hartree-Fock (HF) level with a6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Geometrical parameters of the molecules were also analyzed along with their intermolecular hydrogen bond, which tailors the ions. These analyses show that present molecules are stabilized through the N–H· · · O and O–H· · · O hydrogen bonds. The vibrational modes were computed by quantum chemical methods. Further, these modes are investigated by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopy in the range of 4000–400 cm−1. The optimized molecular geometry and computed vibrational spectra are compared with experimental results, which show significant agreement. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was carried out to interpret hyperconjucative interaction and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). This analysis gives the precise insight into the nature of H-bond interactions. The chemical hardness, electronegativity and chemical potential of the molecules were determined by HOMO–LUMO plot. The frontier molecular orbitals have small band gap value, which signify the possible biological/pharmaceutical activity of the compounds.

  1. Dielectrophoresis of gold nanoparticles conjugated to DNA origami structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Matthew; Lakatos, Mathias; Heerwig, Andreas; Ostermaier, Frieder; Haufe, Nora

    2016-01-01

    Summary DNA nanostructures are promising construction materials to bridge the gap between self-assembly of functional molecules and conventional top-down fabrication methods in nanotechnology. Their positioning onto specific locations of a microstructured substrate is an important task towards this aim. Here we study manipulation and positioning of pristine and of gold nanoparticle-conjugated tubular DNA origami structures using ac dielectrophoresis. The dielectrophoretic behavior was investigated employing fluorescence microscopy. For the pristine origami, a significant dielectrophoretic response was found to take place in the megahertz range, whereas, due to the higher polarizability of the metallic nanoparticles, the nanoparticle/DNA hybrid structures required a lower electrical field strength and frequency for a comparable trapping at the edges of the electrode structure. The nanoparticle conjugation additionally resulted in a remarkable alteration of the DNA structure arrangement. The growth of linear, chain-like structures in between electrodes at applied frequencies in the megahertz range was observed. The long-range chain formation is caused by a local, gold nanoparticle-induced field concentration along the DNA nanostructures, which in turn, creates dielectrophoretic forces that enable the observed self-alignment of the hybrid structures. PMID:27547612

  2. Structure and conformational dynamics of scaffolded DNA origami nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Keyao; Bricker, William P; Ratanalert, Sakul; Bathe, Mark

    2017-06-20

    Synthetic DNA is a highly programmable nanoscale material that can be designed to self-assemble into 3D structures that are fully determined by underlying Watson-Crick base pairing. The double crossover (DX) design motif has demonstrated versatility in synthesizing arbitrary DNA nanoparticles on the 5-100 nm scale for diverse applications in biotechnology. Prior computational investigations of these assemblies include all-atom and coarse-grained modeling, but modeling their conformational dynamics remains challenging due to their long relaxation times and associated computational cost. We apply all-atom molecular dynamics and coarse-grained finite element modeling to DX-based nanoparticles to elucidate their fine-scale and global conformational structure and dynamics. We use our coarse-grained model with a set of secondary structural motifs to predict the equilibrium solution structures of 45 DX-based DNA origami nanoparticles including a tetrahedron, octahedron, icosahedron, cuboctahedron and reinforced cube. Coarse-grained models are compared with 3D cryo-electron microscopy density maps for these five DNA nanoparticles and with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for the tetrahedron and octahedron. Our results elucidate non-intuitive atomic-level structural details of DX-based DNA nanoparticles, and offer a general framework for efficient computational prediction of global and local structural and mechanical properties of DX-based assemblies that are inaccessible to all-atom based models alone. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Dielectrophoresis of gold nanoparticles conjugated to DNA origami structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning-Knechtel, Anja; Wiens, Matthew; Lakatos, Mathias; Heerwig, Andreas; Ostermaier, Frieder; Haufe, Nora; Mertig, Michael

    2016-01-01

    DNA nanostructures are promising construction materials to bridge the gap between self-assembly of functional molecules and conventional top-down fabrication methods in nanotechnology. Their positioning onto specific locations of a microstructured substrate is an important task towards this aim. Here we study manipulation and positioning of pristine and of gold nanoparticle-conjugated tubular DNA origami structures using ac dielectrophoresis. The dielectrophoretic behavior was investigated employing fluorescence microscopy. For the pristine origami, a significant dielectrophoretic response was found to take place in the megahertz range, whereas, due to the higher polarizability of the metallic nanoparticles, the nanoparticle/DNA hybrid structures required a lower electrical field strength and frequency for a comparable trapping at the edges of the electrode structure. The nanoparticle conjugation additionally resulted in a remarkable alteration of the DNA structure arrangement. The growth of linear, chain-like structures in between electrodes at applied frequencies in the megahertz range was observed. The long-range chain formation is caused by a local, gold nanoparticle-induced field concentration along the DNA nanostructures, which in turn, creates dielectrophoretic forces that enable the observed self-alignment of the hybrid structures.

  4. Dielectrophoresis of gold nanoparticles conjugated to DNA origami structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Henning-Knechtel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA nanostructures are promising construction materials to bridge the gap between self-assembly of functional molecules and conventional top-down fabrication methods in nanotechnology. Their positioning onto specific locations of a microstructured substrate is an important task towards this aim. Here we study manipulation and positioning of pristine and of gold nanoparticle-conjugated tubular DNA origami structures using ac dielectrophoresis. The dielectrophoretic behavior was investigated employing fluorescence microscopy. For the pristine origami, a significant dielectrophoretic response was found to take place in the megahertz range, whereas, due to the higher polarizability of the metallic nanoparticles, the nanoparticle/DNA hybrid structures required a lower electrical field strength and frequency for a comparable trapping at the edges of the electrode structure. The nanoparticle conjugation additionally resulted in a remarkable alteration of the DNA structure arrangement. The growth of linear, chain-like structures in between electrodes at applied frequencies in the megahertz range was observed. The long-range chain formation is caused by a local, gold nanoparticle-induced field concentration along the DNA nanostructures, which in turn, creates dielectrophoretic forces that enable the observed self-alignment of the hybrid structures.

  5. Systems, Apparatuses, and Methods for Using Durable Adhesively Bonded Joints for Sandwich Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, III, Stanley S. (Inventor); Lundgren, Eric C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems, methods, and apparatus for increasing durability of adhesively bonded joints in a sandwich structure. Such systems, methods, and apparatus includes an first face sheet and an second face sheet as well as an insert structure, the insert structure having a first insert face sheet, a second insert face sheet, and an insert core material. In addition, sandwich core material is arranged between the first face sheet and the second face sheet. A primary bondline may be coupled to the face sheet(s) and the splice. Further, systems, methods, and apparatus of the present disclosure advantageously reduce the load, provide a redundant path, reduce structural fatigue, and/or increase fatigue life.

  6. The significant role of the intermolecular CH⋯O/N hydrogen bonds in governing the biologically important pairs of the DNA and RNA modified bases: a comprehensive theoretical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Yurenko, Yevgen P; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-01-01

    contribution of the CH⋯O and CH⋯N H-bonds into the base pairs stability varies from 3.0/4.2 to 35.1/31.2% and from 3.0/4.3 to 44.4/46.5% at the DFT/MP2 levels of theory, accordingly. Energy decomposition analysis performed for all base pairs involving canonical and modified nucleobases defines the electrostatic attraction and Pauli repulsion as dominant stabilizing forces in all complexes. This observation was additionally confirmed by the results of the QTAIM delocalization indexes analysis. The studies reported here advance our understanding of the biological role of the weak CH⋯O/N H-bonds, that dictates the requirements for the structural and dynamical similarity of the canonical and mismatched pairs with Watson-Crick (WC) geometry, which facilitates their enzymatic incorporation into the DNA double helix during DNA replication. Thus, these H-bonds in the base pairs with WC geometry may be also considered as "the last drop" at the transmission of the electronic signal that launches the chemical incorporation of the incoming nucleoside triphosphate into DNA.

  7. A theoretical study of molecular structure, optical properties and bond activation of energetic compound FOX-7 under intense electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xin; Wei, Yuan; Lv, Li; Wu, Deyin; Yang, Mingli

    2017-02-01

    Molecular structure, vibrational and electronic absorption spectra, chemical reactivity of energetic compound FOX-7, one of the most widely used explosives, were studied computationally in presence of an electrostatic field of 0.01-0.05 a.u. The Csbnd N bond, which usually triggers the decomposition of FOX-7, is shortened/elongated under a parallel/antiparallel field. The Csbnd N bond activation energy varies with the external electric field, decreasing remarkably with the field strength in regardless of the field direction. This is attributed to two aspects: the bond weakening by the field parallel to the Csbnd N bond and the stabilization effect on the transition-state structure by the field antiparallel to the bond. The variations in the structure and property of FOX-7 under the electric fields were further analyzed with its distributional polarizability, which is dependent on the charge transfer characteristics through the Csbnd N bond.

  8. A structurally variable hinged tetrahedron framework from DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David M; Schüller, Verena; Forthmann, Carsten; Schreiber, Robert; Tinnefeld, Philip; Liedl, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Nanometer-sized polyhedral wire-frame objects hold a wide range of potential applications both as structural scaffolds as well as a basis for synthetic nanocontainers. The utilization of DNA as basic building blocks for such structures allows the exploitation of bottom-up self-assembly in order to achieve molecular programmability through the pairing of complementary bases. In this work, we report on a hollow but rigid tetrahedron framework of 75 nm strut length constructed with the DNA origami method. Flexible hinges at each of their four joints provide a means for structural variability of the object. Through the opening of gaps along the struts, four variants can be created as confirmed by both gel electrophoresis and direct imaging techniques. The intrinsic site addressability provided by this technique allows the unique targeted attachment of dye and/or linker molecules at any point on the structure's surface, which we prove through the superresolution fluorescence microscopy technique DNA PAINT.

  9. The Cold Shock Domain of YB-1 Segregates RNA from DNA by Non-Bonded Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Kljashtorny

    Full Text Available The human YB-1 protein plays multiple cellular roles, of which many are dictated by its binding to RNA and DNA through its Cold Shock Domain (CSD. Using molecular dynamics simulation approaches validated by experimental assays, the YB1 CSD was found to interact with nucleic acids in a sequence-dependent manner and with a higher affinity for RNA than DNA. The binding properties of the YB1 CSD were close to those observed for the related bacterial Cold Shock Proteins (CSP, albeit some differences in sequence specificity. The results provide insights in the molecular mechanisms whereby YB-1 interacts with nucleic acids.

  10. YNi and its hydrides: Phase stabilities, electronic structures and chemical bonding properties from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matar, S.F., E-mail: matar@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France); Nakhl, M. [Universite Libanaise, Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique des Materiaux LCPM, Fanar (Lebanon); Al Alam, A.F.; Ouaini, N. [Universite Saint-Esprit de Kaslik, Faculte des Sciences et de Genie Informatique, Jounieh (Lebanon); Chevalier, B. [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France)

    2010-11-25

    Graphical abstract: Base centered orthorhombic YNiH{sub X} structure. For x = 3, only H1 and H2 are present. Highest hydrogen content YNiH{sub 4} is obtained when H3 are added. - Abstract: Within density functional theory, establishing the equations of states of YNi in two different controversial structures in the literature, leads to determine the orthorhombic FeB-type as the ground state one with small energy difference. For YNiH{sub 3} and YNiH{sub 4} hydrides crystallizing in the orthorhombic CrB-type structure the geometry optimization and the ab initio determination of the H atomic positions show that the stability of hydrogen decreases from the tri- to the tetra- hydride. New states brought by hydrogen within the valence band lead to its broadening and to enhanced localization of metal density of states. The chemical bonding analysis shows a preferential Ni-H bonding versus Y-H.

  11. Catastrophe Bonds Structures at European Level – A Cluster Analysis Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadotti Loris Lino Maria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims at examining several characteristics of the catastrophe bonds (CB market by focusing on emblematic transactions with the objective of stressing the choices of the European-based (reinsurance groups in terms of the CB tranches structure. For the purpose of highlighting the common individualities regarding the configuration of the catastrophe bonds, there are recognized homogenous groups in terms of covered perils and size of the each CB tranche, while emphasizing some stringent aspects linked to their trigger mechanism (like the basis risk, their rating, or tenor. The research identifies several profiles regarding the structural characteristics of the CB during the entire analysed period (1999-2014 and the main periods of development of the market. Accommodating categorical and continuous data, the structural patterns are determined and analysed by applying the two-step cluster methodology.

  12. Crystal structure and hydrogen-bonding patterns in 5-fluorocytosinium picrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marimuthu Mohana

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the crystal structure of the title compound, 5-fluorocytosinium picrate, C4H5FN3O+·C6H2N3O7−, one N heteroatom of the 5-fluorocytosine (5FC ring is protonated. The 5FC ring forms a dihedral angle of 19.97 (11° with the ring of the picrate (PA− anion. In the crystal, the 5FC+ cation interacts with the PA− anion through three-centre N—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming two conjoined rings having R21(6 and R12(6 motifs, and is extended by N—H...O hydrogen bonds and C—H...O interactions into a two-dimensional sheet structure lying parallel to (001. Also present in the crystal structure are weak C—F...π interactions.

  13. Optimum metallic-bond scheme: Theoretical study ofgeometric structures for ground-state sodium clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏长荣; 李家明

    2002-01-01

    We present an optimum metallic-bond scheme to study the geometric structures of sodium clusters Nan (n≤15) systematically by combining the characteristics of metallic bonds and the first principle molecular dynamics simulation. The scheme provides an optimum way to examine almost all stable structures of sodium clusters and to determine their ground state structures. It is interesting to note that for the larger sodium clusters (13≤n≤15), there are some plane-like substructures on their surfaces, which resemble the fragments of the (110) plane with the highest atomic area density in the bulk bcc sodium crystal. We also propose a possible way to understand the formation of large icosahedral sodium clusters (1500<n<22000).

  14. Variability of DNA structure and protein-nucleic acid reconginition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shestopalova A. V.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Revealing molecular mechanisms of sequence-specific recognition of DNA by proteins is one of the key tasks of biology. The current review presents the results of statistical analysis of the structural databases obtained by different scientific groups studying the conformational features of free and protein-bound DNA fragments that could be used for clarifying the mechanisms of protein-nucleic acid recognition. The analysis of the published data allowed us to make the following generalizations. The ability of DNA double helix to adopt alternative conformations, including the ones of sugarphosphate backbone, is an intrinsic characteristic of certain DNA sequences. Such conformational transitions are the potential sources of formation of unique geometry of the dinucleotide steps and/or individual nucleotides and lead to alteration of base stacking and/or changes of the assessable surface area of atoms, and can be the criteria of recognition of DNA by protein as well. Changes in the physical properties that depend on the DNA structure, i. e. the polar/unpolar profile and electrostatic potential of the grooves, can also be used by protein for DNA readout.

  15. Solution structure and activity of the synthetic four-disulfide bond Mediterranean mussel defensin (MGD-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y S; Mitta, G; Chavanieu, A; Calas, B; Sanchez, J F; Roch, P; Aumelas, A

    2000-11-28

    MGD-1 is a 39-residue defensin-like peptide isolated from the edible Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis. This peptide is characterized by the presence of four disulfide bonds. We report here its solid-phase synthesis and an easy way to improve the yield of the four native disulfide bonds. Synthetic and native MGD-1 display similar antibacterial activity, suggesting that the hydroxylation of Trp28 observed in native MGD-1 is not involved in the antimicrobial effect. The three-dimensional solution structure of MGD-1 has been established using (1)H NMR and mainly consists of a helical part (Asn7-Ser16) and two antiparallel beta-strands (Arg20-Cys25 and Cys33-Arg37), together giving rise to the common cystine-stabilized alpha-beta motif frequently observed in scorpion toxins. In MGD-1, the cystine-stabilized alpha-beta motif is stabilized by four disulfide bonds (Cys4-Cys25, Cys10-Cys33, Cys14-Cys35, and Cys21-Cys38), instead of by the three disulfide bonds commonly found in arthropod defensins. Except for the Cys21-Cys38 disulfide bond which is solvent-exposed, the three others belong to the particularly hydrophobic core of the highly constrained structure. Moreover, the C4-P5 amide bond in the cis conformation characterizes the MGD-1 structure. MGD-1 and insect defensin A possess similar bactericidal anti-Gram-positive activity, suggesting that the fourth disulfide bond of MGD-1 is not essential for the biological activity. In agreement with the general features of antibacterial peptides, the MGD-1 and defensin A structures display a typical distribution of positively charged and hydrophobic side chains. The positively charged residues of MGD-1 are located in three clusters. For these two defensin peptides isolated from insects and mollusks, it appears that the rather well conserved location of certain positively charged residues and of the large hydrophobic cluster are enough to generate the bactericidal potency and the Gram-positive specificity.

  16. DNA-Based Photonic Bandgap Structures and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-29

    Genes to Machines: DNA Nanomechanical Devices, Trends in Biochemical Sciences 30, 119-125 (2005). 4. N.C. Seeman. Structural DNA Nanotechnology: An... kpc ≥ ω , k becomes purely real.. If the dispersion relation just given is written as =++ 22)( kpkak 1ε 2)( c ω , it resembles that for modes in a...waveguide. By analogy, the frequency region for which 1ε 22)( kpc < ω will be referred to as cutoff. IV. APPLICATIONS The presence of molecules

  17. Bond-orientational analysis of hard-disk and hard-sphere structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil Kumar, V; Kumaran, V

    2006-05-28

    We report the bond-orientational analysis results for the thermodynamic, random, and homogeneously sheared inelastic structures of hard-disks and hard-spheres. The thermodynamic structures show a sharp rise in the order across the freezing transition. The random structures show the absence of crystallization. The homogeneously sheared structures get ordered at a packing fraction higher than the thermodynamic freezing packing fraction, due to the suppression of crystal nucleation. On shear ordering, strings of close-packed hard-disks in two dimensions and close-packed layers of hard-spheres in three dimensions, oriented along the velocity direction, slide past each other. Such a flow creates a considerable amount of fourfold order in two dimensions and body-centered-tetragonal (bct) structure in three dimensions. These transitions are the flow analogs of the martensitic transformations occurring in metals due to the stresses induced by a rapid quench. In hard-disk structures, using the bond-orientational analysis we show the presence of fourfold order. In sheared inelastic hard-sphere structures, even though the global bond-orientational analysis shows that the system is highly ordered, a third-order rotational invariant analysis shows that only about 40% of the spheres have face-centered-cubic (fcc) order, even in the dense and near-elastic limits, clearly indicating the coexistence of multiple crystalline orders. When layers of close-packed spheres slide past each other, in addition to the bct structure, the hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) structure is formed due to the random stacking faults. Using the Honeycutt-Andersen pair analysis and an analysis based on the 14-faceted polyhedra having six quadrilateral and eight hexagonal faces, we show the presence of bct and hcp signatures in shear ordered inelastic hard-spheres. Thus, our analysis shows that the dense sheared inelastic hard-spheres have a mixture of fcc, bct, and hcp structures.

  18. Structural characterization of PTX3 disulfide bond network and its multimeric status in cumulus matrix organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inforzato, Antonio; Rivieccio, Vincenzo; Morreale, Antonio P; Bastone, Antonio; Salustri, Antonietta; Scarchilli, Laura; Verdoliva, Antonio; Vincenti, Silvia; Gallo, Grazia; Chiapparino, Caterina; Pacello, Lucrezia; Nucera, Eleonora; Serlupi-Crescenzi, Ottaviano; Day, Anthony J; Bottazzi, Barbara; Mantovani, Alberto; De Santis, Rita; Salvatori, Giovanni

    2008-04-11

    PTX3 is an acute phase glycoprotein that plays key roles in resistance to certain pathogens and in female fertility. PTX3 exerts its functions by interacting with a number of structurally unrelated molecules, a capacity that is likely to rely on its complex multimeric structure stabilized by interchain disulfide bonds. In this study, PAGE analyses performed under both native and denaturing conditions indicated that human recombinant PTX3 is mainly composed of covalently linked octamers. The network of disulfide bonds supporting this octameric assembly was resolved by mass spectrometry and Cys to Ser site-directed mutagenesis. Here we report that cysteine residues at positions 47, 49, and 103 in the N-terminal domain form three symmetric interchain disulfide bonds stabilizing four protein subunits in a tetrameric arrangement. Additional interchain disulfide bonds formed by the C-terminal domain cysteines Cys(317) and Cys(318) are responsible for linking the PTX3 tetramers into octamers. We also identified three intrachain disulfide bonds within the C-terminal domain that we used as structural constraints to build a new three-dimensional model for this domain. Previously it has been shown that PTX3 is a key component of the cumulus oophorus extracellular matrix, which forms around the oocyte prior to ovulation, because cumuli from PTX3(-/-) mice show defective matrix organization. Recombinant PTX3 is able to restore the normal phenotype ex vivo in cumuli from PTX3(-/-) mice. Here we demonstrate that PTX3 Cys to Ser mutants, mainly assembled into tetramers, exhibited wild type rescue activity, whereas a mutant, predominantly composed of dimers, had impaired functionality. These findings indicate that protein oligomerization is essential for PTX3 activity within the cumulus matrix and implicate PTX3 tetramers as the functional molecular units required for cumulus matrix organization and stabilization.

  19. Quasi-Monolithic Structures for Spaceflight Using Hydroxide-Catalysis Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Alix; Thorpe, J. Ira; Miner, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Future space-based missions will take measurements of the universe with unprecedented results. To do this, these missions will require materials and bonding techniques with ever-increasing stability in order to make their measurements. As an example, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) will detect and observe gravitational waves in the 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz frequency range with strain sensitivities on the order of 10(exp -21) at its most sensitive frequency. To make these measurements, critical components such as the optical bench or telescope support structure, will need to have path-length stabilities of better than 1 pm/(square root)Hz. The baseline construction method for the LISA optical bench is to affix fused silica optical components to a Zerodur baseplate using hydroxide-catalysis bonding (HCB). HCB is a recently developed technique that allows the bonding of glasses, some metals, and silicon carbide with significant strength and stability with a bond thickness of less than a few micrometers. In addition, a wide range of surface profiles can be bonded using only a small amount of hydroxide solution. These characteristics make HCB ideal for adhering optical components in complex optical systems. In addition to being used to construct the LISA optical bench, the HCB technique shows great promise for constructing other structures such as hollow retroreflectors to be used for lunar laser ranging, or a visible nulling coronograph to be used for exo-planet detection. Here we present construction techniques that could be used to make an optical bench, hollow retroreflector, nulling coronograph, or other quasi-monolithic structures using HCB. In addition, we present dimensional stability results of an optical bench that was made using HCB, as well as HCB strength measurements.

  20. Crystal Structure And Magnetic Property of the Complex of Hydrogen-bonded Two-dimensional Layer Copper(Ⅱ) Acrylate with Trimethyl Phosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ Copper carboxylate complexes play an important role in catalysing the enzymatic activities[1-4], and the phosphate has an especial use in DNA recognition[5]. Indeed the report about copper carboxylate complexes with phosphate ligands is rare. A chain structure supramolecule [Cu2(CH2CH-COO)4(H2O)2]n has been reported recently[6], in which a Cu2(CH2CH-COO)4(H2O)2 unit is linked by four O(water)-H...O(carboxyl) hydrogen bonds with two adjacent units(Fig.1). In this work a layer structure complex {Cu2(CH2CH-COO)4(H2O)2[OP(OCH3)3]}n was synthesized by means of hydrogen-bonded assembly approach between complex [Cu2(CH2CH-COO)4(H2O)2]n with trimethyl phosphate(TMP).

  1. Structure and Function Study of Phi29 DNA packaging motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Huaming

    A powerful nanomotor is employed by the tailed dsDNA virus to package the genome into a preformed protein shell during the process of replication. The bacteriophage phi29 is an excellent model for investigating the viral DNA packaging mechanism. The phi29 DNA packaging motor is composed of three ring structures: the dodecameric connector ring, the hexameric pRNA ring and the hexameric ATPase gp16 ring. The connector is the central hub for the DNA to enter and to exit. There are four positively charged lysine rings scattered inside the highly negatively charged connector channel. It is speculated that these positive charged lysine rings may play active roles during DNA packaging in many models. To test this prevalent view, the basic lysine residues were mutated to neutral alanines and the pH environment was altered. Amazingly, the results were beyond expectation. Neither the DNA translocation nor the one-way traffic property of the channel were measurably influenced by the alteration of the charge of lysine residues when the basic lysine residues mutated to neutral alanines or the pH environment changed to acid or basic. The ATPase or the terminase is the central part of the viral DNA packaging motor. The phi29 ATPase is highly hydrophobic and tends to aggregate in solution. A green fluorescent protein tag (eGFP) fused to the N-terminus of gp16 enhanced its solubility and stability. The eGFP-gp16 showed similar activity to wild type gp16 and was easily detected by fluorescent instruments. The interaction between eGFP-gp16 and DNA in the various conditions were investigated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, FRET and sucrose gradient. gamma-S-ATP dramatically increased gp16 binding affinity to DNA and ATP, ADP, phosphate could release gp16 from gp16-DNA-gamma-S-ATP complex. The sliding of gp16 out of the gp16-DNA-gamma-S-ATP complex could be blocked by addition of Steptavidin to ends of dsDNA which is conjugated with biotins. Also, we found that six eGFP-gp16

  2. Structure and Chemical Bond of Thermoelectric Ce-Co-Sb Skutterudites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The correlations among composition,structure,chemical bond and thermoelectric property of skutterudites CoSb3 and CeCo5Fe3Sb12 have been studied by using density function and discrete variation (DFT-DVM) method.Three models for this study were proposed and calculated by which the "rattling" pattern was described.Model 1 is with Ce in the center,model 2 is with Ce away the center and near to Sb,and model 3 is also with Ce away the center but near to Fe.The calculated results show that in model 3,the ionic bond is the strongest,but the covalent bond is the weakest.Due to the different changes between ionic and covalent bond,there is less difference in the stability among the models 1,2 and 3.Therefore,these different models can exist at the same time,or can translate from one to another more easily.In other words,the "rattling" pattern has taken place.Unfilled model of CoSb3,without Ce and Fe,is called model 4.The covalent bond of Co-Sb or Fe-Sb in models 1,2 and 3 is weaker than that of Co-Sb in model 4,as some electrical cloud of Sb takes part in the covalent bond of Ce-Sb in the filled models.The result is consistent with the experimental result that the thermal conductivity of CeCo5Fe3Sb12 is lower than that of CoSb3,and the thermoelectric property of CeCo5Fe3Sb12 is superior to that of CoSb3.

  3. DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuanchen; Yang, Zhongqiang; Liu, Dongsheng

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Most biological processes happen at the nanometer scale, and understanding the energy transformations and material transportation mechanisms within living organisms has proved challenging. To better understand the secrets of life, researchers have investigated artificial molecular motors and devices over the past decade because such systems can mimic certain biological processes. DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures is one system that has played an important role in these investigations. In this Account, we summarize recent advances in functional DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures. The i-motif is a DNA quadruplex that occurs as four stretches of cytosine repeat sequences form C·CH(+) base pairs, and their stabilization requires slightly acidic conditions. This unique property has produced the first DNA molecular motor driven by pH changes. The motor is reliable, and studies show that it is capable of millisecond running speeds, comparable to the speed of natural protein motors. With careful design, the output of these types of motors was combined to drive micrometer-sized cantilevers bend. Using established DNA nanostructure assembly and functionalization methods, researchers can easily integrate the motor within other DNA assembled structures and functional units, producing DNA molecular devices with new functions such as suprahydrophobic/suprahydrophilic smart surfaces that switch, intelligent nanopores triggered by pH changes, molecular logic gates, and DNA nanosprings. Recently, researchers have produced motors driven by light and electricity, which have allowed DNA motors to be integrated within silicon-based nanodevices. Moreover, some devices based on i-motif structures have proven useful for investigating processes within living cells. The pH-responsiveness of the i-motif structure also provides a way to control the stepwise assembly of DNA nanostructures. In addition, because of the stability of the i-motif, this

  4. Crystal structure of four-stranded Oxytricha telomeric DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, C.; Zhang, X.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.; Rich, A.

    1992-01-01

    The sequence d(GGGGTTTTGGGG) from the 3' overhang of the Oxytricha telomere has been crystallized and its three-dimensional structure solved to 2.5 A resolution. The oligonucleotide forms hairpins, two of which join to make a four-stranded helical structure with the loops containing four thymine residues at either end. The guanine residues are held together by cyclic hydrogen bonding and an ion is located in the centre. The four guanine residues in each segment have a glycosyl conformation that alternates between anti and syn. There are two four-stranded molecules in the asymmetric unit showing that the structure has some intrinsic flexibility.

  5. Heteromolecular metal–organic interfaces: Electronic and structural fingerprints of chemical bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadtmüller, Benjamin; Schröder, Sonja [Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-3), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) – Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Kumpf, Christian, E-mail: c.kumpf@fz-juelich.de [Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-3), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) – Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • We present a study of molecular donor–acceptor blends adsorbed on Ag(1 1 1). • Geometric and electronic structure of blends and pristine phases are compared. • The surface bonding of the acceptor is strengthened, that of the donor weakened. • But counter intuitively, the acceptor (donor) bond length becomes larger (smaller). • This contradiction is resolved by a model based on charge transfer via the surface. - Abstract: Beside the fact that they attract highest interest in the field of organic electronics, heteromolecular structures adsorbed on metal surfaces, in particular donor–acceptor blends, became a popular field in fundamental science, possibly since some surprising and unexpected behaviors were found for such systems. One is the apparent breaking of a rather fundamental rule in chemistry, namely that stronger chemical bonds go along with shorter bond lengths, as it is, e.g., well-known for the sequence from single to triple bonds. In this review we summarize the results of heteromolecular monolayer structures adsorbed on Ag(1 1 1), which – regarding this rule – behave in a counterintuitive way. The charge acceptor moves away from the substrate while its electronic structure indicates a stronger chemical interaction, indicated by a shift of the formerly lowest unoccupied molecular orbital toward higher binding energies. The donor behaves in the opposite way, it gives away charge, hence, electronically the bonding to the surface becomes weaker, but at the same time it also approaches the surface. It looks as if the concordant link between electronic and geometric structure was broken. But both effects can be explained by a substrate-mediated charge transfer from the donor to the acceptor. The charge reorganization going along with this transfer is responsible for both, the lifting-up of the acceptor molecule and the filling of its LUMO, and also for the reversed effects at the donor molecules. In the end, both molecules

  6. Structural modification of covalent-bonded networks: on some methodological resolutions for binary chalcogenide glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, M; Shpotyuk, Ya; Shpotyuk, O, E-mail: shpotyukmy@yahoo.com [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 212, Stryjska str., Lviv, 79031 (Ukraine)

    2011-04-01

    New methodology to estimate efficiency of externally-induced structural modification in chalcogenide glasses is developed. This approach is grounded on the assumption that externally-induced structural modification is fully associated with destruction-polymerization transformations, which reveal themselves as local misbalances in covalent bond distribution, normal atomic coordination and intrinsic electrical fields. The input of each of these components into the total value of structural modification efficiency was probed for quasibinary (As{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub 100-x}(Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub x} ChG.

  7. DNA-Tile Structures Induce Ionic Currents through Lipid Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göpfrich, Kerstin; Zettl, Thomas; Meijering, Anna E C; Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Kocabey, Samet; Liedl, Tim; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2015-05-13

    Self-assembled DNA nanostructures have been used to create man-made transmembrane channels in lipid bilayers. Here, we present a DNA-tile structure with a nominal subnanometer channel and cholesterol-tags for membrane anchoring. With an outer diameter of 5 nm and a molecular weight of 45 kDa, the dimensions of our synthetic nanostructure are comparable to biological ion channels. Because of its simple design, the structure self-assembles within a minute, making its creation scalable for applications in biology. Ionic current recordings demonstrate that the tile structures enable ion conduction through lipid bilayers and show gating and voltage-switching behavior. By demonstrating the design of DNA-based membrane channels with openings much smaller than that of the archetypical six-helix bundle, our work showcases their versatility inspired by the rich diversity of natural membrane components.

  8. Spectroscopy Study on Crystal Structure of Ce(NO3)3(phen)2 and Interactions of Ce(NO3)3(phen)2 with DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Ruiding; Lin Qiuyue; Huang Wei; Yu Qingsen

    2005-01-01

    The absorption, fluorescence and Raman spectra of Ce(NO3)3(phen)2 complex were assigned and the crystal structure of the complex was studied. Meanwhile the interactions between Ce(NO3)3(phen)2 and DNA were studied by spectrum methods. As DNA was added, it is found that both the UV absorption bands of Ce(NO3)3(phen)2 and the SERS bands of Ce(NO3)3(phen)2 weaken evidently, while the fluorescence intensity of Ce(NO3)3(phen)2 enhance dramatically. The complex compete against EB on the reaction with DNA. It is indicated by this spectrum methods that there are strong interactions between Ce(NO3)3(phen)2 and DNA, and the bond mode is intercalation. The bond constant of the complex with DNA is determined to be 1.7×105.

  9. NDT evaluation of long-term bond durability of CFRP-structural systems applied to RC highway bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Kenneth C.

    2016-06-01

    The long-term durability of CFRP structural systems applied to reinforced-concrete (RC) highway bridges is a function of the system bond behavior over time. The sustained structural load performance of strengthened bridges depends on the carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates remaining 100 % bonded to concrete bridge members. Periodic testing of the CFRP-concrete bond condition is necessary to sustain load performance. The objective of this paper is to present a non-destructive testing (NDT) method designed to evaluate the bond condition and long-term durability of CFRP laminate (plate) systems applied to RC highway bridges. Using the impact-echo principle, a mobile mechanical device using light impact hammers moving along the length of a bonded CFRP plate produces unique acoustic frequencies which are a function of existing CFRP plate-concrete bond conditions. The purpose of this method is to test and locate CFRP plates de-bonded from bridge structural members to identify associated deterioration in bridge load performance. Laboratory tests of this NDT device on a CFRP plate bonded to concrete with staged voids (de-laminations) produced different frequencies for bonded and de-bonded areas of the plate. The spectra (bands) of frequencies obtained in these tests show a correlation to the CFRP-concrete bond condition and identify bonded and de-bonded areas of the plate. The results of these tests indicate that this NDT impact machine, with design improvements, can potentially provide bridge engineers a means to rapidly evaluate long lengths of CFRP laminates applied to multiple highway bridges within a national transportation infrastructure.

  10. Frequent side chain methyl carbon-oxygen hydrogen bonding in proteins revealed by computational and stereochemical analysis of neutron structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesselman, Joseph D; Horowitz, Scott; Brooks, Charles L; Trievel, Raymond C

    2015-03-01

    The propensity of backbone Cα atoms to engage in carbon-oxygen (CH · · · O) hydrogen bonding is well-appreciated in protein structure, but side chain CH · · · O hydrogen bonding remains largely uncharacterized. The extent to which side chain methyl groups in proteins participate in CH · · · O hydrogen bonding is examined through a survey of neutron crystal structures, quantum chemistry calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations. Using these approaches, methyl groups were observed to form stabilizing CH · · · O hydrogen bonds within protein structure that are maintained through protein dynamics and participate in correlated motion. Collectively, these findings illustrate that side chain methyl CH · · · O hydrogen bonding contributes to the energetics of protein structure and folding.

  11. Electron emission degradation of nano-structured sp2-bonded amorphous carbon films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Zhan-Ling; Wang Chang-Qing; Jia Yu; Zhang Bing-Lin; Yao Ning

    2007-01-01

    The initial field electron emission degradation behaviour of original nano-structured sp2-bonded amorphous carbon films has been observed.which can be attributed to the increase of the work function of the film in the field emission process analysed using a Fowler-Nordheim plot.The possible re.on for the change of work function is suggested to be the desorption of hydrogen from the original hydrogen termination film surface due to field emission current-induced local heating.For the explanation of the emission degradation behaviour of the nano-structured sp2-bonded amorphous carbon film,a cluster model with a series of graphite(0001) basal surfaces has been presented,and the theoretical calculations have been performed to investigate work functions of graphite(0001) surfaces with different hydrogen atom and ion chemisorption sites by using first principles method based on density functional theory-local density approximation.

  12. Polymorphic crystal structures of an all-AT DNA dodecamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Reyes, Francisco J; Subirana, Juan A; Pous, Joan; Sánchez-Giraldo, Raquel; Condom, Núria; Baldini, Roberto; Malinina, Lucy; Campos, J Lourdes

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we explore the influence of different solvents and ions on the crystallization behavior of an all-AT dodecamer d(AATAAATTTATT)2 In all cases, the oligonucleotides are found as continuous columns of stacked duplexes. The spatial organization of such columns is variable; consequently we have obtained seven different crystal forms. The duplexes can be made to crystallize in either parallel or crossed columns. Such versatility in the formation of a variety of crystal forms is characteristic for this sequence. It had not been previously reported for any other sequence. In all cases, the oligonucleotide duplexes have been found to crystallize in the B form. The crystallization conditions determine the organization of the crystal, although no clear local interactions have been detected. Mg(2+) and Ni(2+) can be used in order to obtain compact crossed structures. DNA-DNA interactions in the crystals of our all-AT duplexes present crossovers which are different from those previously reported for mixed sequence oligonucleotides. Our results demonstrate that changes in the ionic atmosphere and the crystallization solvent have a strong influence on the DNA-DNA interactions. Similar ionic changes will certainly influence the biological activity of DNA. Modulation of the crystal structure by ions should also be explored in DNA crystal engineering. Liquid crystals with a peculiar macroscopic shape have also been observed.

  13. Superplastic Forming and Diffusion Bonding for Sandwich Structure of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenbo HAN; Kaifeng ZHANG; Guofeng WANG; Xiaojun ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Superplastic forming and diffusion bonding (SPF/DB) is a well-established process for the manufacture of components almost exclusively from Ti-6Al-4V sheet material. The sandwich structure of Ti-6Al-4V alloy is investigated. The effects of the microstructure on the SPF/DB process were discussed. The microstructure at the interfaces and the distribution of thickness were researched.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA structure in the Arabian Peninsula

    OpenAIRE

    Cabrera Vicente M; Larruga José M; Abu-Amero Khaled K; González Ana M

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Two potential migratory routes followed by modern humans to colonize Eurasia from Africa have been proposed. These are the two natural passageways that connect both continents: the northern route through the Sinai Peninsula and the southern route across the Bab al Mandab strait. Recent archaeological and genetic evidence have favored a unique southern coastal route. Under this scenario, the study of the population genetic structure of the Arabian Peninsula, the first step ...

  15. Torsion Property of the Structure Bonded Aluminum Foam Due to Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang G.W.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An aluminum foam added with foaming agent, is classified into an open-cell type for heat transfer and a closed-cell type for shock absorption. This study investigates the characteristic on the torsion of aluminum foam for a closed-cell type under impact. The fracture characteristics are investigated through the composite of five types of aluminum foam (the thicknesses of 25, 35, 45, 55 and 65 mm, when applying the torsional moment of impact energy on the junction of a porous structure attached by an adhesive. When applying the impact energy of 100, 200 and 300J, the aluminum foams with thicknesses of 25 mm and 35 mm broke off under all conditions. For the energy over 200J, aluminums thicker than 55 mm continued to be attached. Furthermore, the aluminum specimens with thicknesses of 55 mm and 65 mm that were attached with more than 30% of bonding interface remained, proving that they could maintain bonding interface against impact energy. By comparing the data based on the analysis and test result, an increase in the thickness of specimen leads to the plastic deformation as the stress at the top and bottom of bonding interface moves to the middle by spreading the stress horizontally. Based on this fracture characteristic, this study can provide the data on the destruction and separation of bonding interface and may contribute to the safety design.

  16. Influence of 5f electrons on structure and bonding in the actinide-hydrogen intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Complexa phases form for the Th + H and U + H systems that are found with no other metals. In the Pa + H system, simple bcc C15 Laves and A15 phases can form, dependent on temperature and composition. The phase transformations appear to b magnetically driven, as a resutl of the decoupling of the metallic 5f electron bonding that occurs during hydriding; the C15 phases contain two kinds of Pa atoms-the one sublattice being still fully f-bonded and the other magnetic. This is a unique situation in solid state physics which defies a valence description. A similar situation obtains for A15 ..beta.. - UH/sub 3/ structure. The parent metals themselves exhibit electronegativities not unlike those of the mid-3d transition metals (e.g., Fe) because the valence electrons re tied up in metallic bonding. However, under the driving force for hydriding, the lattices can open up, decoupling the f-bonding and inducing magnetism. The systems then aggressively form very stable hydrides typical of highly-electropositive metals. Beyond uranium the trivalent metallic state is favored and rare-earth-like hydrides are found for Np + H and Pu + H. Nevertheless, the solid-state and transport properties are markedly different than for the rare-earth hydrides, showing that the latent influence of the 5f electrons is still strong.

  17. Electronic Structure and Chemical Bond of Ti3SiC2 and Adding Al Element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Xinmin; LU Ning; MEI Bingchu

    2006-01-01

    The relation among electronic structure, chemical bond and property of Ti3SiC2 and Al-doped was studied by density function and discrete variation (DFT-DVM) method. When Al element is added into Ti3SiC2, there is a less difference of ionic bond, which does not play a leading role to influent the properties. After adding Al, the covalent bond of Al and the near Ti becomes somewhat weaker, but the covalent bond of Al and the Si in the same layer is obviously stronger than that of Si and Si before adding. Therefore, in preparation of Ti3SiC2, adding a proper quantity of Al can promote the formation of Ti3SiC2. The density of state shows that there is a mixed conductor character in both of Ti3SiC2 and adding Al element. Ti3SiC2 is with more tendencies to form a semiconductor. The total density of state near Fermi lever after adding Al is larger than that before adding, so the electric conductivity may increase after adding Al.

  18. Dinuclear Complexes Formed by Hydrogen Bonds: Synthesis, Structure and Magnetic and Electrochemical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granelli, Matteo; Downward, Alan M; Huber, Robin; Guénée, Laure; Besnard, Céline; Krämer, Karl W; Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia; Thompson, Laurence K; Williams, Alan F

    2017-05-23

    The synthesis is reported of a series of homo- and hetero-dinuclear octahedral complexes of the ligand 1, 1,2-bis(1-methyl-benzimidazol-2-yl) ethanol, where the two metal centres are linked by hydrogen bonds between coordinated alcohols and coordinated alkoxides. Homonuclear divalent M(II) M(II) , mixed-valent M(II) M(III) and heteronuclear M(II) M'(III) species are prepared. The complexes have been characterised by X-ray crystallography and show unusually short O⋅⋅⋅O distances for the hydrogen bonds. Magnetic measurements show the hydrogen-bond bridges can lead to ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic coupling. The electrochemistry of the dinuclear species is significantly different from the mononuclear systems: the latter show irreversible waves in cyclic voltammograms as a result of the need to couple proton and electron transfer. The dinuclear species, in contrast, show reversible waves, which are attributed to rapid intramolecular proton transfer facilitated by the hydrogen-bonded structure. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Relationships among the structural topology, bond strength, and mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kai-Hsin; Tsou, Nien-Ti; Kang, Dun-Yen

    2015-10-21

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (AlSiNTs) using a multiscale computational method and then conducted a comparison with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). By comparing the potential energy estimated from molecular and macroscopic material mechanics, we were able to model the chemical bonds as beam elements for the nanoscale continuum modeling. This method allowed for simulated mechanical tests (tensile, bending, and torsion) with minimum computational resources for deducing their Young's modulus and shear modulus. The proposed approach also enabled the creation of hypothetical nanotubes to elucidate the relative contributions of bond strength and nanotube structural topology to overall nanotube mechanical strength. Our results indicated that it is the structural topology rather than bond strength that dominates the mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Finally, we investigated the relationship between the structural topology and the mechanical properties by analyzing the von Mises stress distribution in the nanotubes. The proposed methodology proved effective in rationalizing differences in the mechanical properties of AlSiNTs and SWCNTs. Furthermore, this approach could be applied to the exploration of new high-strength nanotube materials.

  20. Structure and Hydrogen Bonding of Water in Polyacrylate Gels: Effects of Polymer Hydrophilicity and Water Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Sriramvignesh; Khabaz, Fardin; Godbole, Rutvik V; Hedden, Ronald C; Khare, Rajesh

    2015-12-10

    The ability to tune the hydrophilicity of polyacrylate copolymers by altering their composition makes these materials attractive candidates for membranes used to separate alcohol-water mixtures. The separation behavior of these polyacrylate membranes is governed by a complex interplay of factors such as water and alcohol concentrations, water structure in the membrane, polymer hydrophilicity, and temperature. We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the effect of polymer hydrophilicity and water concentration on the structure and dynamics of water molecules in the polymer matrix. Samples of poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA), poly(2-hydroxyethyl acrylate) (PHEA), and a 50/50 copolymer of BA and HEA were synthesized in laboratory, and their properties were measured. Model structures of these systems were validated by comparing the simulated values of their volumetric properties with the experimental values. Molecular simulations of polyacrylate gels swollen in water and ethanol mixtures showed that water exhibits very different affinities toward the different (carbonyl, alkoxy, and hydroxyl) functional groups of the polymers. Water molecules are well dispersed in the system at low concentrations and predominantly form hydrogen bonds with the polymer. However, water forms large clusters at high concentrations along with the predominant formation of water-water hydrogen bonds and the acceleration of hydrogen bond dynamics.

  1. Structural basis for a novel mechanism of DNA bridging and alignment in eukaryotic DSB DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouge, Jérôme; Rosario, Sandrine; Romain, Félix; Poitevin, Frédéric; Béguin, Pierre; Delarue, Marc

    2015-04-15

    Eukaryotic DNA polymerase mu of the PolX family can promote the association of the two 3'-protruding ends of a DNA double-strand break (DSB) being repaired (DNA synapsis) even in the absence of the core non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) machinery. Here, we show that terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase (TdT), a closely related PolX involved in V(D)J recombination, has the same property. We solved its crystal structure with an annealed DNA synapsis containing one micro-homology (MH) base pair and one nascent base pair. This structure reveals how the N-terminal domain and Loop 1 of Tdt cooperate for bridging the two DNA ends, providing a templating base in trans and limiting the MH search region to only two base pairs. A network of ordered water molecules is proposed to assist the incorporation of any nucleotide independently of the in trans templating base. These data are consistent with a recent model that explains the statistics of sequences synthesized in vivo by Tdt based solely on this dinucleotide step. Site-directed mutagenesis and functional tests suggest that this structural model is also valid for Pol mu during NHEJ.

  2. Insights into the Structures of DNA Damaged by Hydroxyl Radical: Crystal Structures of DNA Duplexes Containing 5-Formyluracil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Tsunoda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyl radicals are potent mutagens that attack DNA to form various base and ribose derivatives. One of the major damaged thymine derivatives is 5-formyluracil (fU, which induces pyrimidine transition during replication. In order to establish the structural basis for such mutagenesis, the crystal structures of two kinds of DNA d(CGCGRATfUCGCG with R = A/G have been determined by X-ray crystallography. The fU residues form a Watson-Crick-type pair with A and two types of pairs (wobble and reversed wobble with G, the latter being a new type of base pair between ionized thymine base and guanine base. In silico structural modeling suggests that the DNA polymerase can accept the reversed wobble pair with G, as well as the Watson-Crick pair with A.

  3. Hydrogen-bonding structure and dynamics of aqueous carbonate species from car-parrinello molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P Padma; Kalinichev, Andrey G; Kirkpatrick, R James

    2009-01-22

    A comprehensive Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CP-MD) study of aqueous solutions of carbonic acid (H(2)CO(3)), bicarbonate (HCO(3)(-)), carbonate (CO(3)(2-)), and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) provides new quantitative insight into the structural and dynamic aspects of the hydrogen-bonding environments for these important aqueous species and their effects on the structure, H-bonding, and dynamical behavior of the surrounding water molecules. The hydration structures of the different carbonate species depend on their ability to accept and donate H-bonds with H(2)O. The H-bonds donated by the C-O-H sites of the carbonate species to water molecules are generally stronger and longer-lived than those accepted by these sites from water molecules. The structural relaxation among the water molecules is dominated by diffusional (translational) motion of H(2)O, whereas the H-bond reorganization is dominated by the librational motion of the water molecules and the carbonate species. The rates of structural relaxation of the H(2)O molecules and the rates of H-bond reorganization among them are slower in systems containing carbonate species, consistent with previous studies of simple salt solutions. The strengths and lifetimes of H-bonds involving the carbonate species positively correlate with the total negative charge on the species. H-bond donation from H(2)O to CO(2) is weak, but the presence of CO(2) noticeably affects the structure and structural relaxation of the surrounding H-bonding network leading to generally stronger H-bonds and slower relaxation rates, the behavior typical of a hydrophobic solute.

  4. Effect of DNA groove binder distamycin A upon chromatin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parijat Majumder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Distamycin A is a prototype minor groove binder, which binds to B-form DNA, preferentially at A/T rich sites. Extensive work in the past few decades has characterized the binding at the level of double stranded DNA. However, effect of the same on physiological DNA, i.e. DNA complexed in chromatin, has not been well studied. Here we elucidate from a structural perspective, the interaction of distamycin with soluble chromatin, isolated from Sprague-Dawley rat. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Chromatin is a hierarchical assemblage of DNA and protein. Therefore, in order to characterize the interaction of the same with distamycin, we have classified the system into various levels, according to the requirements of the method adopted, and the information to be obtained. Isothermal titration calorimetry has been employed to characterize the binding at the levels of chromatin, chromatosome and chromosomal DNA. Thermodynamic parameters obtained thereof, identify enthalpy as the driving force for the association, with comparable binding affinity and free energy for chromatin and chromosomal DNA. Reaction enthalpies at different temperatures were utilized to evaluate the change in specific heat capacity (ΔCp, which, in turn, indicated a possible binding associated structural change. Ligand induced structural alterations have been monitored by two complementary methods--dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. They indicate compaction of chromatin. Using transmission electron microscopy, we have visualized the effect of distamycin upon chromatin architecture at di- and trinucleosome levels. Our results elucidate the simultaneous involvement of linker bending and internucleosomal angle contraction in compaction process induced by distamycin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We summarize here, for the first time, the thermodynamic parameters for the interaction of distamycin with soluble chromatin, and elucidate its effect on

  5. Hybrid density functional study of the structural, bonding, and electronic properties of bismuth vanadate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Kyoung E.; Hwang, Gyeong S.

    2012-10-01

    The structure and property prediction of metal oxides can significantly be improved by incorporating exact Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange into density functional theory (DFT), which is the so-called hybrid DFT. We explored the impact of HF exchange inclusion on the predicted structural, bonding, and electronic properties of bismuth vanadate (BiVO4), with particular attention to the difference between its monoclinic and tetragonal scheelite phases. The applied exchange-correlation (xc) functionals include the gradient corrected Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) and the PBE-HF hybrid functionals with HF exchange amounts of 10%, 25%, and 50%. We find that the PBE-HF25% yields a monoclinic structure in very close agreement with the experimentally determined structure, while the PBE-HF50% tends to overestimate the monoclinic distortion and the PBE/PBE-HF10% can hardly identify a distinct monoclinic configuration at ambient conditions. Electronic structure analysis reveals that the increasing monoclinic distortion with the amount of HF exchange is related to the enhancement of hybridization between Bi 6s-O 2p antibonding states and unoccupied Bi 6p states. The bonding mechanisms and band structures of the monoclinic and tetragonal phases of BiVO4 were also investigated, and we discuss how the predictions are sensitive to the xc functional choice.

  6. Determination of Hydrogen Bond Structure in Water versus Aprotic Environments To Test the Relationship Between Length and Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigala, Paul A.; Ruben, Eliza A.; Liu, Corey W.; Piccoli, Paula M. B.; Hohenstein, Edward G.; Martinez, Todd J.; Schultz, Arthur J.; Herschiag, Daniel

    2015-05-06

    Hydrogen bonds profoundly influence the architecture and activity of biological macromolecules. Deep appreciation of hydrogen bond contributions to biomolecular function thus requires a detailed understanding of hydrogen bond structure and energetics and the relationship between these properties. Hydrogen bond formation energies (Delta G(f)) are enormously more favorable in aprotic solvents than in water, and two classes of contributing factors have been proposed to explain this energetic difference, focusing respectively on the isolated and hydrogen-bonded species: (I) water stabilizes the dissociated donor and acceptor groups much better than aprotic solvents, thereby reducing the driving force for hydrogen bond formation; and (II) water lengthens hydrogen bonds compared to aprotic environments, thereby decreasing the potential energy within the hydrogen bond. Each model has been proposed to provide a dominant contribution to Delta G(f), but incisive tests that distinguish the importance of these contributions are lacking. Here we directly test the structural basis of model II. Neutron crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and quantum mechanical calculations demonstrate that O-H center dot center dot center dot O hydrogen bonds in crystals, chloroform, acetone, and water have nearly identical lengths and very similar potential energy surfaces despite Delta G(f) differences >8 kcal/mol across these solvents. These results rule out a substantial contribution from solvent-dependent differences in hydrogen bond structure and potential energy after association (model II) and thus support the conclusion that differences in hydrogen bond Delta G(f) are predominantly determined by solvent interactions with the dissociated groups (model I). These findings advance our understanding of universal hydrogen-bonding interactions and have important implications for biology and engineering.

  7. Na-induced bonding and bond-length changes for CO on Pt(111): A near-edge x-ray-absorption fine-structure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sette, F.; Stoehr, J.; Kollin, E.B.; Dwyer, D.J.; Gland, J.L.; Robbins, J.L.; Johnson, A.L.

    1985-03-04

    Near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure studies above the C and O K edges for CO on Pt(111) reveal a 4-eV shift of the sigma shape resonance when Na(0.2 monolayer) is coabsorbed. This allows determination of a Na-induced (0.12 +- 0.03)-A expansion of the C-O bond. Na does not affect the vertical molecular orientation on the surface. Reduction and broadening of the 1s..-->..2..pi..( resonance and the CO bond lengthening in the presence of Na signifies substantially increased metal to CO backbonding.

  8. Structure-based approach to the prediction of disulfide bonds in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Noeris K; Adzhigirey, Matvey; Sherman, Woody; Pearlman, David A

    2014-10-01

    Protein engineering remains an area of growing importance in pharmaceutical and biotechnology research. Stabilization of a folded protein conformation is a frequent goal in projects that deal with affinity optimization, enzyme design, protein construct design, and reducing the size of functional proteins. Indeed, it can be desirable to assess and improve protein stability in order to avoid liabilities such as aggregation, degradation, and immunogenic response that may arise during development. One way to stabilize a protein is through the introduction of disulfide bonds. Here, we describe a method to predict pairs of protein residues that can be mutated to form a disulfide bond. We combine a physics-based approach that incorporates implicit solvent molecular mechanics with a knowledge-based approach. We first assign relative weights to the terms that comprise our scoring function using a genetic algorithm applied to a set of 75 wild-type structures that each contains a disulfide bond. The method is then tested on a separate set of 13 engineered proteins comprising 15 artificial stabilizing disulfides introduced via site-directed mutagenesis. We find that the native disulfide in the wild-type proteins is scored well, on average (within the top 6% of the reasonable pairs of residues that could form a disulfide bond) while 6 out of the 15 artificial stabilizing disulfides scored within the top 13% of ranked predictions. Overall, this suggests that the physics-based approach presented here can be useful for triaging possible pairs of mutations for disulfide bond formation to improve protein stability.

  9. Intramolecular hydrogen bond, molecular structure and vibrational assignment of tetra-acetylethane. A density functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raissi, Heidar; Nowroozi, Alireza; Mohammdi, Reza; Hakimi, Mohammad

    2006-11-01

    The intramolecular hydrogen bond, molecular structure and vibrational frequencies of tetra-acetylethane have been investigated by means of high-level density functional theory (DFT) methods with most popular basis sets. Fourier transform infrared and Fourier transform Raman spectra of this compound and its deuterated analogue were recorded in the regions 400-4000 cm(-1) and 40-4000 cm(-1), respectively. The calculated geometrical parameters of tetra-acetylethane were compared to the experimental results of this compound and its parent molecule (acetylacetone), obtained from X-ray diffraction. The O...O distance in tetra-acetylethane, about 2.424A, suggests that the hydrogen bond in this compound is stronger than acetylacetone. This conclusion is well supported by the NMR proton chemical shifts and O-H stretching mode at 2626 cm(-1). Furthermore, the calculated hydrogen bond energy in the title compound is 17.22 kcal/mol, which is greater than the acetylacetone value. On the other hand, the results of theoretical calculations show that the bulky substitution in alpha-position of acetylacetone results in an increase of the conjugation of pi electrons in the chelate ring. Finally, we applied the atoms in molecules (AIM) theory and natural bond orbital method (NBO) for detail analyzing the hydrogen bond in tetra-acetylethane and acetylacetone. These results are in agreement with the vibrational spectra interpretation and quantum chemical calculation results. Also, the conformations of methyl groups with respect to the plane of the molecule and with respect to each other were investigated.

  10. On correlation between protein secondary structure, backbone bond angles, and side-chain orientations

    CERN Document Server

    Lundgren, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the fine structure of the sp3 hybridized covalent bond geometry that governs the tetrahedral architecture around the central C$_\\alpha$ carbon of a protein backbone, and for this we develop new visualization techniques to analyze high resolution X-ray structures in Protein Data Bank. We observe that there is a correlation between the deformations of the ideal tetrahedral symmetry and the local secondary structure of the protein. We propose a universal coarse grained energy function to describe the ensuing side-chain geometry in terms of the C$_\\beta$ carbon orientations. The energy function can model the side-chain geometry with a sub-atomic precision. As an example we construct the C$_\\alpha$-C$_\\beta$ structure of HP35 chicken villin headpiece. We obtain a configuration that deviates less than 0.4 \\.A in root-mean-square distance from the experimental X-ray structure.

  11. Sulfur bonding in MoS2 and Co-Mo-S structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byskov, Line Sjolte; Hammer, Bjørk; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1997-01-01

    The structure and bonding in small MoS2 structures with and without Co is studied theoretically using self-consistent density functional theory with a non-local exchange-correlation energy. The structures model the catalysts used extensively in hydrotreating. We study in detail the structure...... and binding energies as a function of the amount of sulfur. The calculations show that extensive reconstructions occur at the two types of MoS2 edges where the sulfur dimerizes and occupies non-lattice positions. These structures are shown to be in good agreement with available experimental data. We also...... study the energy required to form sulfur vacancies, which are believed to be the active sites for many hydrotreating reactions. The presence of Co atoms at the edges is shown to lead to a significant lowering of the metal-sulfur binding energy. This imposes an increase in the concentration of active...

  12. Investigation of the adhesive bonding technology for the insulator structure of EAST neutral beam injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiang-Long; Li, Jun; Hu, Chun-Dong; Xie, Ya-Hong; Jing, Hao

    2014-07-01

    A key issue on the development of EAST ion source was the junction design of insulator structure, which consists of three insulators and four supporting flanges of electrode grid. Because the ion source is installed on the vertical plane, the insulator structure has to withstand large bending and shear stress due to the gravity of whole ion source. Through a mechanical analysis, it was calculated that the maximum bending normal stress was 0.34 MPa and shear stress was 0.23 MPa on the insulator structure. Due to the advantages of simplicity and high strength, the adhesive bonding technology was applied to the junction of insulator structure. A tensile testing campaign of different junction designs between insulator and supporting flange was performed, and a junction design of stainless steel and fiber enhanced epoxy resin with epoxy adhesive was determined. The insulator structure based on the determined design can satisfy both the requirements of high-voltage holding and mechanical strength.

  13. DNA structure in human RNA polymerase II promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Baldi, Pierre; Chauvin, Yves

    1998-01-01

    the high-bendability regions position nucleosomes at the downstream end of the transcriptional start point, and consider the possibility of interaction between histone-like TAFs and this area. We also propose the use of this structural signature in computational promoter-finding algorithms.......The fact that DNA three-dimensional structure is important for transcriptional regulation begs the question of whether eukaryotic promoters contain general structural features independently of what genes they control. We present an analysis of a large set of human RNA polymerase II promoters...... with a very low level of sequence similarity. The sequences, which include both TATA-containing and TATA-less promoters, are aligned by hidden Markov models. Using three different models of sequence-derived DNA bendability, the aligned promoters display a common structural profile with bendability being low...

  14. DNA Origami Rotaxanes: Tailored Synthesis and Controlled Structure Switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, John T; Akhuetie-Oni, Benjamin O; Zhang, Zhao; Lin, Chenxiang

    2016-09-12

    Mechanically interlocked supramolecular assemblies are appealing building blocks for creating functional nanodevices. Herein, we describe the multistep assembly of large DNA origami rotaxanes that are capable of programmable structural switching. We validated the topology and structural integrity of these rotaxanes by analyzing the intermediate and final products of various assembly routes by electrophoresis and electron microscopy. We further analyzed two structure-switching behaviors of our rotaxanes, which are both mediated by DNA hybridization. In the first mechanism, the translational motion of the macrocycle can be triggered or halted at either terminus. In the second mechanism, the macrocycle can be elongated after completion of the rotaxane assembly, giving rise to a unique structure that is otherwise difficult to access.

  15. DNA Catenation Maintains Structure of Human Metaphase Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    L. V. Bauer, David; Marie, Rodolphe; Rasmussen, Kristian Hagsted

    2012-01-01

    Mitotic chromosome structure is pivotal to cell division but difficult to observe in fine detail using conventional methods. DNA catenation has been implicated in both sister chromatid cohesion and chromosome condensation, but has never been observed directly. We have used a lab-on-a-chip...

  16. DNA structural elements required for ERCC1-XPF endonuclease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.L. de Laat (Wouter); E. Appeldoorn (Esther); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe heterodimeric complex ERCC1-XPF is a structure-specific endonuclease responsible for the 5' incision during mammalian nucleotide excision repair (NER). Additionally, ERCC1-XPF is thought to function in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links and, by analogy to the

  17. Structural and thermotropic peculiarities of hydrogen-bonded liquid crystals confined in mesoporous molecular sieves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnatyuk, I.; Gavrilko, T.; Yaroshchuk, O.; Holovina, N.; Shcherban, N.; Baran, J.; Drozd, M.

    2016-12-01

    The phase behaviour and structural organization of hydrogen-bonded liquid crystals were investigated under confinement to mesoporous molecular sieves. As such liquid crystalline compounds, 4-hexylbenzoic and 4-butylcyclohexanecarboxylic acids with different head group structure and alkyl chain length where selected and filled in the AlMCM-41 sieves. With FTIR spectroscopy it was found that some part of incorporated acid molecules, presumably located in the inner space of the AlMCM-41 pores, is in undissociated form of open dimers or chain associates and thus shows spectroscopic features characteristic to the bulk-like species. The other FTIR spectra components indicate strong interaction of the incorporated monomeric molecules with the pore surface. Two specific mechanisms are shown to be involved in molecular interactions at the interface: (1) deprotonation of monomeric acid molecules on the pore surface with formation of COO- carboxylate ions and (2) bonding of these ions to the pore surface by a coordinated bond R-COO-…Al+ with Lewis acid sites. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed that these near-surface processes lead to complete suppression of mesomorphic properties of the studied acids under confinement to nanopores.

  18. Molecular structure of hydrazoic acid with hydrogen-bonded tetramers in nearly planar layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Jürgen; Göbel, Michael; Krumm, Burkhard; Martin, Franz; Medvedyev, Sergey; Oehlinger, Gilbert; Steemann, Franz Xaver; Troyan, Ivan; Klapötke, Thomas M; Eremets, Mikhail I

    2011-08-10

    Hydrazoic acid (HN(3))--potentially explosive, highly toxic, and very hygroscopic--is the simplest covalent azide and contains 97.7 wt % nitrogen. Although its molecular structure was established decades ago, its crystal structure has now been solved by X-ray diffraction for the first time. Molecules of HN(3) are connected to each other by hydrogen bonds in nearly planar layers parallel to (001) with stacking sequence A, B, ... The layer distance, at 2.950(1) Å, is shorter than that in 2H-graphite [3.355(2) Å]. The hydrogen bonds N-H···N are of great interest, since the azido group consists of three homonuclear atoms with identical electronegativity, but different formal charges. These hydrogen bonds are bifurcated into moderate ones with ≈2.0 Å and into weak ones with ≈2.6 Å. The moderate ones build up tetramers (HN(3))(4) in a nearly planar net of eight-membered rings. To the best of our knowledge, such a network of tetramers of a simple molecule is unique.

  19. Electronic structure and chemical bonding in LaIrSi-type intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matar, Samir F. [Bordeaux Univ., Pessac (France). CNRS; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie; Nakhl, Michel [Univ. Libanaise, Fanar (Lebanon). Ecole Doctorale Sciences et Technologies

    2017-05-01

    The cubic LaIrSi type has 23 representatives in aluminides, gallides, silicides, germanides, phosphides, and arsenides, all with a valence electron count of 16 or 17. The striking structural motif is a three-dimensional network of the transition metal (T) and p element (X) atoms with TX{sub 3/3} respectively XT{sub 3/3} coordination. Alkaline earth or rare earth atoms fill cavities within the polyanionic [TX]{sup δ-} networks. The present work presents a detailed theoretical study of chemical bonding in LaIrSi-type representatives, exemplarily for CaPtSi, BaIrP, BaAuGa, LaIrSi, CeRhSi, and CeIrSi. DFT-GGA-based electronic structure calculations show weakly metallic compounds with itinerant small magnitude DOSs at E{sub F} except for CeRhSi whose large Ce DOS at E{sub F} leads to a finite magnetization on Ce (0.73 μ{sub B}) and induced small moments of opposite sign on Rh and Si in a ferromagnetic ground state. The chemical bonding analyses show dominant bonding within the [TX]{sup δ-} polyanionic networks. Charge transfer magnitudes were found in accordance with the course of the electronegativites of the chemical constituents.

  20. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  1. Left-handed Z-DNA: structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, A.; Rich, A.

    1999-01-01

    Z-DNA is a high energy conformer of B-DNA that forms in vivo during transcription as a result of torsional strain generated by a moving polymerase. An understanding of the biological role of Z-DNA has advanced with the discovery that the RNA editing enzyme double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase type I (ADAR1) has motifs specific for the Z-DNA conformation. Editing by ADAR1 requires a double-stranded RNA substrate. In the cases known, the substrate is formed by folding an intron back onto the exon that is targeted for modification. The use of introns to direct processing of exons requires that editing occurs before splicing. Recognition of Z-DNA by ADAR1 may allow editing of nascent transcripts to be initiated immediately after transcription, ensuring that editing and splicing are performed in the correct sequence. Structural characterization of the Z-DNA binding domain indicates that it belongs to the winged helix-turn-helix class of proteins and is similar to the globular domain of histone-H5.

  2. Lightning protection guidelines and test data for adhesively bonded aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryzby, J. E.; Plumer, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The highly competitive marketplace and increasing cost of energy has motivated manufacturers of general aviation aircraft to utilize composite materials and metal-to-metal bonding in place of conventional fasteners and rivets to reduce weight, obtain smoother outside surfaces and reduce drag. The purpose of this program is protection of these new structures from hazardous lightning effects. The program began with a survey of advance-technology materials and fabrication methods under consideration for future designs. Sub-element specimens were subjected to simulated lightning voltages and currents. Measurements of bond line voltages, electrical sparking, and mechanical strength degradation were made to comprise a data base of electrical properties for new technology materials and basic structural configurations. The second hase of the program involved tests on full scale wing structures which contained integral fuel tanks and which were representative of examples of new technology structures and fuel systems. The purpose of these tests was to provide a comparison between full scale structural measurements and those obtained from the sub-element specimens.

  3. Electronic Structures and Chemical Bonds of Cobaltite and Ni-Doped

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Xinmin; XING Xueling; ZHU Lei

    2005-01-01

    The relation among electronic structure, chemical bond and thermoelectric property of Ca3 Co2 O6 and Ni-doped was studied by density function theory and discrete variation method(DFT-DVM). The results indicate that the highest valence band (HVB) and the lowest conduction band(LCB) are mainly attributed to Co3 d, Ni3 d and O2 p atomic orbitals. The property of a semiconductor is shown from the gap between HVB and LCB. The gap of Ni-doped one is less than that of Ca3 Co2 O6. The non-metal bond or ceramic characteristic of Ni-doped one is weaker than that of Ca3 Co2 O6, but the metal characteristics of Ni-doped one are stronger than those of Ca3 Co2O6. The thermoelectric property should be improved by adding Ni element into the system of Ca3 Co2 O6.

  4. Hydrogen bonding in thiobenzamide synthon and its Cadmium complex: Crystal structure and Hirshfeld analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    INES RIGANE; SIWAR WALHA; ABDELHAMID BEN SALAH

    2016-09-01

    The thiobenzamid TBA and its Cd(II) complex, dichlorothiobenzamidecadmium(II) [Cd(TBA)Cl₂] complex has been synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV–Vis spectroscopy. The crystal and molecular structure of TBA and [Cd(TBA)Cl₂] were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The molecular arrangement in the crystal structure of TBA can be described on the basis of supramolecular dimeric synthons built up by four independent TBA molecules stacked via N-H. . .S hydrogen bonds. The 3D Hirshfeld surfaces and the associated 2D fingerprint plots were investigated for intermolecular interactions. The N-H. . .S hydrogen bond percentages were estimated to be 23.1%, 22.9%, 30.6% and 27.3% of Hirshfeld surfaces area respectively for each TBA molecule. Synthons are associated through C–H. . . π interactions at percentage of 33.8%, 38.2%, 24.3% and 19.4% to result in 3D network. The dichlorothiobenzamide cadmium(II) complex bonded by sulfur atom of thiobenzamide shows a double chain of distorted octahedra around the cadmium atoms running along the a axis and the packing is stabilized by intra- and inter-chain hydrogen bonding interactions of the type N–H. . .Cl and aromatic π. . .π stacking interactions between ring centroids at 21.8% and 7.6% of the Hirshfeld surface area, respectively. The decomposition of the complex to cadmium sulfide has been investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  5. Using SAR and QSAR analysis to model the activity and structure of the quinolone-DNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente, B; Leclerc, F; Cedergren, R

    1996-01-01

    A set of 78 quinolone derivatives were used in a structure-activity study to identify structural features correlating with antibacterial activity. Distinct combinations of functional properties were identified for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. 3-D Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies identified specific hydrophobic, topologic and electronic properties of the molecules for both in vitro and in vivo activities. From these results, a three-dimensional model of a DNA-quinolone complex was built using molecular modeling techniques. It was based on the intercalation of quinolone into the double helix of DNA. We conclude that the intercalation model is consistent with most available data on the structure of the quinolone complex. This predicted structure is stabilized by the binding of magnesium ion with the sp2 oxygens present in quinolone, a phosphate and a purine base of the DNA. Substituents R1 and R7 are predicted to make hydrophobic interactions in the major and minor groove of DNA, respectively. R7 could also form hydrogen bonds with amino groups of guanines and the aspartic acid residue at position 87 in DNA gyrase subunit A.

  6. The fabrication of microfluidic structures by means of full-wafer adhesive bonding using a poly(dimethylsiloxane) catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samel, Björn; Kamruzzaman Chowdhury, M.; Stemme, Göran

    2007-08-01

    In this work, we present the use of a PDMS (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) curing-agent as the intermediate layer for adhesive full-wafer bonding suitable for fabrication of microfluidic structures. The curing-agent of the two-component silicone rubber (Sylgard 184) is spin coated on a substrate, brought into contact with another PDMS layer and heat cured to create an irreversible seal which is as strong as or even stronger than plasma-assisted PDMS bonding. The maximum bond strength is measured to 800 kPa when bonding together PDMS and silicon. The applicability of the new PDMS adhesive bonding method is verified by means of fabricating microfluidic structures. Using this method allows for wafer-level bonding of PDMS to various materials such as PDMS, glass or silicon and more importantly to selectively bond different layers by using a patterned adhesive bonding technique. Moreover, precise alignment of the structural layers is facilitated since curing is initiated upon heat which is an advantage when fabricating multilayer microfluidic devices.

  7. Structural and Functional Regulation of DNA: Geometry, Topology and Methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auclair, C.

    The work of Rosalind Franklin, then Watson and Crick [1], established the architecture of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA), carrier of all genetic information. The idea that DNA was structurally organised in the form of a double helix comprising two antiparallel and complementary polymer chains was one of the great scientific discoveries of the twentieth century. It revealed not only the way in which genetic information is stored, but also the mechanism by which the genetic code is read, and the way this code can be faultlessly copied from one cell to another during cell division.

  8. Crystal structure determination of anti-DNA Fab A52.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanfield, Robyn L; Eilat, Dan

    2014-08-01

    A52 is a murine monoclonal antibody isolated from autoimmune New Zealand Black/New Zealand White F1 mice that recognizes single and double stranded DNA. This mouse strain spontaneously develops systemic lupus erythematosus-like symptoms and has served as a model for that disease for many years. The 1.62 Å crystal structure of the A52 Fab fragment reveals an H3 complementarity determining region with four closely spaced arginine residues, creating a positively charged surface to accommodate bound DNA.

  9. The birth and development of the DNA theory of inheritance: sixty years since the discovery of the structure of DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Petter Portin

    2014-04-01

    The development of the DNA theory of inheritance culminated in the publication of the molecular structure of DNA 60 years ago. This paper describes this development, beginning with the discovery of DNA as a chemical substance by Friedrich Miescher in 1869, followed by its basic chemical analysis and demonstration of its participation in the structure of chromosomes. Subsequently it was discovered by Oswald Avery in 1944 that DNA was the genetic material, and then Erwin Chargaff showed that the proportions of the bases included in the structure of DNA followed a certain law. These findings, in association with the biophysical studies of Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin with Raymond Gosling, led James Watson and Francis Crick to the discovery of the double-helical structure of DNA in 1953. The paper ends with a short description of the development of the DNA theory of inheritance after the discovery of the double helix.

  10. The birth and development of the DNA theory of inheritance: sixty years since the discovery of the structure of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portin, Petter

    2014-04-01

    The development of the DNA theory of inheritance culminated in the publication of the molecular structure of DNA 60 years ago. This paper describes this development, beginning with the discovery of DNA as a chemical substance by Friedrich Miescher in 1869, followed by its basic chemical analysis and demonstration of its participation in the structure of chromosomes. Subsequently it was discovered by Oswald Avery in 1944 that DNA was the genetic material, and then Erwin Chargaff showed that the proportions of the bases included in the structure of DNA followed a certain law. These findings, in association with the biophysical studies of Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin with Raymond Gosling, led James Watson and Francis Crick to the discovery of the double-helical structure of DNA in 1953. The paper ends with a short description of the development of the DNA theory of inheritance after the discovery of the double helix.

  11. Structural, intramolecular hydrogen bonding and vibrational studies on 3-amino-4-methoxy benzamide using density functional theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G SUBHAPRIYA; S KALYANARAMAN; S GANDHIMATHI; N SURUMBARKUZHALI; V KRISHNAKUMAR

    2017-02-01

    An extensive theoretical study on the molecular structure and vibrational analysis of 3-amino-4-methoxy benzamide (3A4MBA) was undertaken using density functional theoretical (DFT) method. The possibility of formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonding was identified from structural parameter analysis andconfirmed with the natural bond orbital (NBO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and natural charge analysis. The harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity (HOMA) index elucidated the impact of hydrogen bonding in the ring. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding energy has been calculated from topological study. The lowwavenumber vibrational modes obtained from experimental FT-Raman spectrum also supported the presence of hydrogen bonding. Bands are assigned for vibrational frequencies using DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory.

  12. Structural, intramolecular hydrogen bonding and vibrational studies on 3-amino-4-methoxy benzamide using density functional theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G SUBHAPRIYA; S KALYANARAMAN; S GANDHIMATHI; N SURUMBARKUZHALI; V KRISHNAKUMAR

    2017-02-01

    An extensive theoretical study on the molecular structure and vibrational analysis of 3-amino-4- methoxy benzamide (3A4MBA) was undertaken using density functional theoretical (DFT) method. The possibility of formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonding was identified from structural parameter analysis and confirmed with the natural bond orbital (NBO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and natural charge analysis. The harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity (HOMA) index elucidated the impact of hydrogen bonding in the ring. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding energy has been calculated from topological study. The lowwavenumber vibrational modes obtained from experimental FT-Raman spectrum also supported the presence of hydrogen bonding. Bands are assigned for vibrational frequencies using DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory.

  13. Selection acts on DNA secondary structures to decrease transcriptional mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Hoede

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Single-stranded DNA is more subject to mutation than double stranded. During transcription, DNA is transiently single stranded and therefore subject to higher mutagenesis. However, if local intra-strand secondary structures are formed, some bases will be paired and therefore less sensitive to mutation than unpaired bases. Using complete genome sequences of Escherichia coli, we show that local intra-strand secondary structures can, as a consequence, be used to define an index of transcription-driven mutability. At gene level, we show that natural selection has favoured a reduced transcription-driven mutagenesis via the higher than expected frequency of occurrence of intra-strand secondary structures. Such selection is stronger in highly expressed genes and suggests a sequence-dependent way to control mutation rates and a novel form of selection affecting the evolution of synonymous mutations.

  14. Structural Dynamics and Mechanochemical Coupling in DNA Gyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Aakash; Parente, Angelica C; Bryant, Zev

    2016-05-08

    Gyrase is a molecular motor that harnesses the free energy of ATP hydrolysis to perform mechanical work on DNA. The enzyme specifically introduces negative supercoiling in a process that must coordinate fuel consumption with DNA cleavage and religation and with numerous conformational changes in both the protein and DNA components of a large nucleoprotein complex. Here we present a current understanding of mechanochemical coupling in this essential molecular machine, with a focus on recent diverse biophysical approaches that have revealed details of molecular architectures, new conformational intermediates, structural transitions modulated by ATP binding, and the influence of mechanics on motor function. Recent single-molecule assays have also illuminated the reciprocal relationships between supercoiling and transcription, an illustration of mechanical interactions between gyrase and other molecular machines at the heart of chromosomal biology.

  15. Thermographic inspection of bond defects in Fiber Reinforced Polymer applied to masonry structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, N.; Aiello, M. A.; Capozzoli, L.; Vasanelli, E.

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays, externally bonded Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) are extensively used for strengthening and repairing masonry and reinforced concrete existing structures; they have had a rapid spread in the area of rehabilitation for their many advantages over other conventional repair systems, such as lightweight, excellent corrosion and fatigue resistance, high strength, etc. FRP systems applied to masonry or concrete structures are typically installed using a wet-layup technique.The method is susceptible to cause flaws or defects in the bond between the FRP system and the substrate, which may reduce the effectiveness of the reinforcing systems and the correct transfer of load from the structure to the composite. Thus it is of primary importance to detect the presence of defects and to quantify their extension in order to eventually provide correct repair measurements. The IR thermography has been cited by the several guidelines as a good mean to qualitatively evaluate the presence of installation defects and to monitor the reinforcing system with time.The method is non-destructive and does not require contact with the composite or other means except air to detect the reinforcement. Some works in the literature have been published on this topic. Most of the researches aim at using the IR thermography technique to characterize quantitatively the defects in terms of depth, extension and type in order to have an experimental database on defect typology to evaluate the long term performances of the reinforcing system. Nevertheless, most of the works in the literature concerns with FRP applied to concrete structures without considering the case of masonry structures. In the present research artificial bond defects between FRP and the masonry substrate have been reproduced in laboratory and the IR multi temporal thermography technique has been used to detect them. Thermographic analysis has been carried out on two wall samples having limited dimensions (100 x 70 cm) both

  16. Sequence-specific activation of the DNA sensor cGAS by Y-form DNA structures as found in primary HIV-1 cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzner, Anna-Maria; Hagmann, Cristina Amparo; Goldeck, Marion; Wolter, Steven; Kübler, Kirsten; Wittmann, Sabine; Gramberg, Thomas; Andreeva, Liudmila; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Mertens, Christina; Zillinger, Thomas; Jin, Tengchuan; Xiao, Tsan Sam; Bartok, Eva; Coch, Christoph; Ackermann, Damian; Hornung, Veit; Ludwig, Janos; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther; Schlee, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Cytosolic DNA that emerges during infection with a retrovirus or DNA virus triggers antiviral type I interferon responses. So far, only double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) over 40 base pairs (bp) in length has been considered immunostimulatory. Here we found that unpaired DNA nucleotides flanking short base-paired DNA stretches, as in stem-loop structures of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) derived from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), activated the type I interferon-inducing DNA sensor cGAS in a sequence-dependent manner. DNA structures containing unpaired guanosines flanking short (12- to 20-bp) dsDNA (Y-form DNA) were highly stimulatory and specifically enhanced the enzymatic activity of cGAS. Furthermore, we found that primary HIV-1 reverse transcripts represented the predominant viral cytosolic DNA species during early infection of macrophages and that these ssDNAs were highly immunostimulatory. Collectively, our study identifies unpaired guanosines in Y-form DNA as a highly active, minimal cGAS recognition motif that enables detection of HIV-1 ssDNA.

  17. Towards Rational Design Method for Strengthening of Concrete Structures by External Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furuuchi H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many infrastructures need to be repaired or strengthened due to various reasons, such as unexpected deterioration and changes in performance requirement. This paper presents the following recent achievements by the authors’ group on design method for flexural strengthening of concrete structures by external bonding; (i fracture characteristics of interface between substrate concrete and cementitious overlay, (ii crack spacing of flexural strengthened beams, which affects debonding strength, (iii strengths of intermediate crack (IC debonding and end peeling, (iv strength of concrete cover separation, and (v effectiveness of strengthening by external bonding. A unified approach for flexural strengthening by steel plate, fiber reinforced polymer lami¬nate and cementitious overlay, for both intermediate crack (IC debonding, including end peeling, and concrete cover separation is pre¬sented with consideration of crack spacing in the streng¬thened members. Appropriate interfacial rough¬¬¬ness to achieve efficient interface bond property is clari¬fied and the concept of effectiveness of strengthen¬ing is proposed for better strengthening design.

  18. Bonding characteristics, thermal expansibility, and compressibility of RXO(4) (R = rare earths, X = P, As) within monazite and zircon structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huaiyong; Zhang, Siyuan; Zhou, Shihong; Cao, Xueqiang

    2009-05-18

    Systematically theoretical research was performed on the monazite- and zircon-structure RXO(4) (R = Sc, Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu; X = P, As) series by using the chemical bond theory of dielectric description. The chemical bond properties of R-O and X-O bonds were presented. In the zircon phase, the covalency fractions of X-O bonds increased in the order of V-O < As-O < P-O, which was in accordance with the ionic radii and electronegative trends, and the covalency fractions of R-O bonds varied slightly due to the lanthanide contraction. While in the monazite phase, both R-O and X-O bonds were divided into two groups by their covalency fractions. The contributions from the bond to the lattice energy, linear thermal expansion coefficient (LTEC), and bulk modulus were explored. The X-O bonds with short bond lengths and high chemical valence made greater contributions to the lattice energy and performed nearly rigidly during the deformation. A regular variation of lattice energy, LTEC, and bulk modulus with the ionic radii of the lanthanides was observed in both monazite and zircon phases.

  19. Patterns of DNA structural polymorphism and their evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, M A; Elgin, S C

    1984-01-01

    The pattern of sites within purified DNA that are highly susceptible to double-stranded cleavage by micrococcal nuclease has been analyzed in the vicinity of over 20 genes from widely separated loci in Drosophila. These genes have uniformly exhibited a distinctive organization of cleavage sites such that at early times of digestion major sites are observed in the spacer regions surrounding the genes, but not within the protein coding regions themselves. Examples examined include Drosophila genes for heat-shock proteins, cytoplasmic actin, ribosomal protein 49, alcohol dehydrogenase, Sgs 4 glue protein, and other developmentally regulated transcripts, a human beta-globin gene, and mouse alpha 3-globin pseudogene. It seems probable that this gene/spacer pattern will be a general one in the genomes of eucaryotes, but not in the genomes of procaryotes, since neither pBR322 nor phage lambda DNA display such a pattern. One observes a nonrandom spacing of strong cleavage sites in Drosophila DNA, with the most frequent intervals being 195 bp and 411 bp. Such a pattern of variation in DNA structure may have evolved to facilitate the packaging of eucaryotic DNA into chromatin.

  20. Communication: Origin of the contributions to DNA structure in phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Christopher G; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2013-02-21

    Cryo electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data of the interior of phages show ordering of the interior DNA that has been interpreted as a nearly perfectly ordered polymer. We show surface-induced correlations, excluded volume, and electrostatic forces are sufficient to predict most of the major features of the current structural data for DNA packaged within viral capsids without additional ordering due to elastic bending forces for the polymer. Current models assume highly-ordered, even spooled, hexagonally packed conformations based on interpretation of cryo-EM density maps. We show herein that the surface induced packing of short (6mer), unconnected DNA polymer segments is the only necessary ingredient in creating ringed densities consistent with experimental density maps. This implies the ensemble of possible conformations of polymeric DNA within the capsid that are consistent with cryo-EM data may be much larger than implied by traditional interpretations where such rings can only result from highly-ordered spool-like conformations. This opens the possibility of a more disordered, entropically-driven view of phage packaging thermodynamics. We also show the electrostatics of the DNA contributes a large portion of the internal hydrostatic and osmotic pressures of a phage virion, suggesting that nonlinear elastic anomalies might reduce the overall elastic bending enthalpy of more disordered conformations to have allowable free energies.

  1. Chemical Reasoning Based on an Invariance Property: Bond and Lone Pair Pictures in Quantum Structural Formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Alia

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemists use one set of orbitals when comparing to a structural formula, hybridized AOs or NBOs for example, and another for reasoning in terms of frontier orbitals, MOs usually. Chemical arguments can frequently be made in terms of energy and/or electron density without the consideration of orbitals at all. All orbital representations, orthogonal or not, within a given function space are related by linear transformation. Chemical arguments based on orbitals are really energy or electron density arguments; orbitals are linked to these observables through the use of operators. The Valency Interaction Formula, VIF, offers a system of chemical reasoning based on the invariance of observables from one orbital representation to another. VIF pictures have been defined as one-electron density and Hamiltonian operators. These pictures are classified in a chemically meaningful way by use of linear transformations applied to them in the form of two pictorial rules and the invariance of the number of doubly, singly, and unoccupied orbitals or bonding, nonbonding, and antibonding orbitals under these transformations. The compatibility of the VIF method with the bond pair – lone pair language of Lewis is demonstrated. Different electron lone pair representations are related by the pictorial rules and have stability understood in terms of Walsh’s rules. Symmetries of conjugated ring systems are related to their electronic state by simple mathematical formulas. Description of lone pairs in conjugated systems is based on the strength and sign of orbital interactions around the ring. Simple models for bonding in copper clusters are tested, and the bonding of O2 to Fe(II in hemoglobin is described. Arguments made are supported by HF, B3LYP, and MP2 computations.

  2. Effect of phytic acid etchant on the structural stability of demineralized dentine and dentine bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Kalyan; Islam, Md Sofiqul; Nassar, Mohannad; Hiraishi, Noriko; Otsuki, Masayuki; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Tagami, Junji

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the effect of phytic acid (IP6) in stabilizing the morphology of dentine collagen network and resin-dentine bonding. Dentine beams were fully demineralized with 10% phosphoric acid (PA) or 1% IP6 (pH 1.2). PA-demineralized beams were divided into three groups: (a) no further treatment (control), (b) treatment with 5% glutaraldehyde (GA) for 1 h and (c) treatment with 1% IP6 (pH 7) for 1 h. IP6-demineralized beams received no further treatment. The beams were then subjected to ultimate tensile strength (UTS) testing. Dentine micromorphology evaluation was performed using a field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). Dentine disks were etched with 35% PA for 15 s or 1% IP6 for 30s. PA-etched dentine disks were divided into three groups as (a), (b) and (c) as for UTS testing, but the treatment with GA or IP6 was done in 1min. For microtensile bond strength (µTBS) testing, flat dentine surfaces etched with PA or IP6 were blot-dried (wet dentine) or air-dried for 10s (dry dentine) and bonded with an etch-and-rinse adhesive followed by composite build-up. IP6-demineralized dentine showed significantly higher UTS, when compared to PA-demineralized dentine. GA and IP6 significantly improved UTS of PA-demineralized dentine. FE-SEM observation revealed that dentine collagen network was preserved by GA and IP6. No significant difference in µTBS was found between the wet and dry IP6-etched dentine groups. IP6 etching showed a structural stabilizing effect on demineralized dentine matrix and produced good resin-dentine bonding, regardless of dentine moistness or dryness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular mechanics of DNA bricks: in situ structure, mechanical properties and ionic conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slone, Scott Michael; Li, Chen-Yu; Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2016-05-01

    The DNA bricks method exploits self-assembly of short DNA fragments to produce custom three-dimensional objects with subnanometer precision. In contrast to DNA origami, the DNA brick method permits a variety of different structures to be realized using the same library of DNA strands. As a consequence of their design, however, assembled DNA brick structures have fewer interhelical connections in comparison to equivalent DNA origami structures. Although the overall shape of the DNA brick objects has been characterized and found to conform to the features of the target designs, the microscopic properties of DNA brick objects remain yet to be determined. Here, we use the all-atom molecular dynamics method to directly compare the structure, mechanical properties and ionic conductivity of DNA brick and DNA origami structures different only by internal connectivity of their consistituent DNA strands. In comparison to equivalent DNA origami structures, the DNA brick structures are found to be less rigid and less dense and have a larger cross-section area normal to the DNA helix direction. At the microscopic level, the junction in the DNA brick structures are found to be right-handed, similar to the structure of individual Holliday junctions (HJ) in solution, which contrasts with the left-handed structure of HJ in DNA origami. Subject to external electric field, a DNA brick plate is more leaky to ions than an equivalent DNA origami plate because of its lower density and larger cross-section area. Overall, our results indicate that the structures produced by the DNA brick method are fairly similar in their overall appearance to those created by the DNA origami method but are more compliant when subject to external forces, which likely is a consequence of their single crossover design.

  4. A Structurally Variable Hinged Tetrahedron Framework from DNA Origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David M.; Schüller, Verena; Forthmann, Carsten; Schreiber, Robert; Tinnefeld, Philip; Liedl, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Nanometer-sized polyhedral wire-frame objects hold a wide range of potential applications both as structural scaffolds as well as a basis for synthetic nanocontainers. The utilization of DNA as basic building blocks for such structures allows the exploitation of bottom-up self-assembly in order to achieve molecular programmability through the pairing of complementary bases. In this work, we report on a hollow but rigid tetrahedron framework of 75 nm strut length constructed with the DNA origami method. Flexible hinges at each of their four joints provide a means for structural variability of the object. Through the opening of gaps along the struts, four variants can be created as confirmed by both gel electrophoresis and direct imaging techniques. The intrinsic site addressability provided by this technique allows the unique targeted attachment of dye and/or linker molecules at any point on the structure's surface, which we prove through the superresolution fluorescence microscopy technique DNA PAINT. PMID:21941629

  5. A Structurally Variable Hinged Tetrahedron Framework from DNA Origami

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanometer-sized polyhedral wire-frame objects hold a wide range of potential applications both as structural scaffolds as well as a basis for synthetic nanocontainers. The utilization of DNA as basic building blocks for such structures allows the exploitation of bottom-up self-assembly in order to achieve molecular programmability through the pairing of complementary bases. In this work, we report on a hollow but rigid tetrahedron framework of 75 nm strut length constructed with the DNA origami method. Flexible hinges at each of their four joints provide a means for structural variability of the object. Through the opening of gaps along the struts, four variants can be created as confirmed by both gel electrophoresis and direct imaging techniques. The intrinsic site addressability provided by this technique allows the unique targeted attachment of dye and/or linker molecules at any point on the structure's surface, which we prove through the superresolution fluorescence microscopy technique DNA PAINT.

  6. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeated DNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  7. Thermodynamic and structural insights into CSL-DNA complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, David R.; Kovall, Rhett A. (UCIN-MED)

    2010-10-28

    The Notch pathway is an intercellular signaling mechanism that plays important roles in cell fates decisions throughout the developing and adult organism. Extracellular complexation of Notch receptors with ligands ultimately results in changes in gene expression, which is regulated by the nuclear effector of the pathway, CSL (C-promoter binding factor 1 (CBF-1), suppressor of hairless (Su(H)), lin-12 and glp-1 (Lag-1)). CSL is a DNA binding protein that is involved in both repression and activation of transcription from genes that are responsive to Notch signaling. One well-characterized Notch target gene is hairy and enhancer of split-1 (HES-1), which is regulated by a promoter element consisting of two CSL binding sites oriented in a head-to-head arrangement. Although previous studies have identified in vivo and consensus binding sites for CSL, and crystal structures of these complexes have been determined, to date, a quantitative description of the energetics that underlie CSL-DNA binding is unknown. Here, we provide a thermodynamic and structural analysis of the interaction between CSL and the two individual sites that comprise the HES-1 promoter element. Our comprehensive studies that analyze binding as a function of temperature, salt, and pH reveal moderate, but distinct, differences in the affinities of CSL for the two HES-1 binding sites. Similarly, our structural results indicate that overall CSL binds both DNA sites in a similar manner; however, minor changes are observed in both the conformation of CSL and DNA. Taken together, our results provide a quantitative and biophysical basis for understanding how CSL interacts with DNA sites in vivo.

  8. Synthesis, spectral, crystal structure, thermal behavior, antimicrobial and DNA cleavage potential of two octahedral cadmium complexes: a supramolecular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazerozohori, M; Musavi, S A; Masoudiasl, A; Naghiha, A; Dusek, M; Kucerakova, M

    2015-02-25

    Two new cadmium(II) complexes with the formula of CdL2(NCS)2 and CdL2(N3)2 (in which L is 2,2-dimethyl-N,N'-bis-(3-phenyl-allylidene)-propane-1,3-diamine) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity measurements, FT/IR, UV-Visible, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra and X-ray studies. The crystal structure analysis of CdL2(NCS)2 indicated that it crystallizes in orthorhombic system with space group of Pbca. Two Schiff base ligands are bonded to cadmium(II) ion as N2-donor chelate. Coordination geometry around the cadmium ion was found to be partially distorted octahedron. The Cd-Nimine bond distances are found in the range of 2.363(2)-2.427(2)Å while the Cd-Nisothiocyanate bond distances are 2.287(2)Å and 2.310(2)Å. The existence of C-H⋯π and C-H⋯S interactions in the CdL2(NCS)2 crystal leads to a supramolecular structure in its network. Then cadmium complexes were screened in vitro for their antibacterial and antifungal activities against two Gram-negative and two Gram-positive bacteria and also against Candida albicans as a fungus. Moreover, the compounds were subjected for DNA-cleavage potential by gel electrophoresis method. Finally thermo-gravimetric analysis of the complexes was applied for thermal behavior studies and then some thermo-kinetics activation parameters were evaluated.

  9. Synthesis, spectral, crystal structure, thermal behavior, antimicrobial and DNA cleavage potential of two octahedral cadmium complexes: A supramolecular structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazerozohori, M.; Musavi, S. A.; Masoudiasl, A.; Naghiha, A.; Dusek, M.; Kucerakova, M.

    2015-02-01

    Two new cadmium(II) complexes with the formula of CdL2(NCS)2 and CdL2(N3)2 (in which L is 2,2-dimethyl-N,N‧-bis-(3-phenyl-allylidene)-propane-1,3-diamine) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity measurements, FT/IR, UV-Visible, 1H and 13C NMR spectra and X-ray studies. The crystal structure analysis of CdL2(NCS)2 indicated that it crystallizes in orthorhombic system with space group of Pbca. Two Schiff base ligands are bonded to cadmium(II) ion as N2-donor chelate. Coordination geometry around the cadmium ion was found to be partially distorted octahedron. The Cd-Nimine bond distances are found in the range of 2.363(2)-2.427(2) Å while the Cd-Nisothiocyanate bond distances are 2.287(2) Å and 2.310(2) Å. The existence of C-H⋯π and C-H⋯S interactions in the CdL2(NCS)2 crystal leads to a supramolecular structure in its network. Then cadmium complexes were screened in vitro for their antibacterial and antifungal activities against two Gram-negative and two Gram-positive bacteria and also against Candida albicans as a fungus. Moreover, the compounds were subjected for DNA-cleavage potential by gel electrophoresis method. Finally thermo-gravimetric analysis of the complexes was applied for thermal behavior studies and then some thermo-kinetics activation parameters were evaluated.

  10. Susceptibilities to DNA Structural Transitions within Eukaryotic Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhabinskaya, Dina; Benham, Craig; Madden, Sally

    2012-02-01

    We analyze the competitive transitions to alternate secondary DNA structures in a negatively supercoiled DNA molecule of kilobase length and specified base sequence. We use statistical mechanics to calculate the competition among all regions within the sequence that are susceptible to transitions to alternate structures. We use an approximate numerical method since the calculation of an exact partition function is numerically cumbersome for DNA molecules of lengths longer than hundreds of base pairs. This method yields accurate results in reasonable computational times. We implement algorithms that calculate the competition between transitions to denatured states and to Z-form DNA. We analyze these transitions near the transcription start sites (TSS) of a set of eukaryotic genes. We find an enhancement of Z-forming regions upstream of the TSS and a depletion of denatured regions around the start sites. We confirm that these finding are statistically significant by comparing our results to a set of randomized genes with preserved base composition at each position relative to the gene start sites. When we study the correlation of these transitions in orthologous mouse and human genes we find a clear evolutionary conservation of both types of transitions around the TSS.

  11. Hydrogen and coordination bonding supramolecular structures of trimesic acid on Cu(110).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classen, Thomas; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Wang, Yeliang; Chopra, Rishav; Virojanadara, Chariya; Starke, Ulrich; Costantini, Giovanni; Fratesi, Guido; Fabris, Stefano; de Gironcoli, Stefano; Baroni, Stefano; Haq, Sam; Raval, Rasmita; Kern, Klaus

    2007-12-13

    The adsorption of trimesic acid (TMA) on Cu(110) has been studied in the temperature range between 130 and 550 K and for coverages up to one monolayer. We combine scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to produce a detailed adsorption phase diagram for the TMA/Cu(110) system as a function of the molecular coverage and the substrate temperature. We identify a quite complex set of adsorption phases, which are determined by the interplay between the extent of deprotonation, the intermolecular bonding, and the overall energy minimization. For temperatures up to 280 K, TMA molecules are only partly deprotonated and form hydrogen-bonded structures, which locally exhibit organizational chirality. Above this threshold, the molecules deprotonate completely and form supramolecular metal-organic structures with Cu substrate adatoms. These structures exist in the form of single and double coordination chains, with the molecular coverage driving distinct phase transitions.

  12. The FORMAMIDE_2-H_2O Complex: Structure and Hydrogen Bond Cooperative Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Susana; Pinacho, Pablo; Lopez, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The adduct formamide_2-H_20 has been detected in a supersonic expansion and its rotational spectra in the 5-13 GHz frequency region characterized by narrow-band molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (MB-FTMW). The spectrum shows the hyperfine structure due to the presence of two 14N-nuclei. This hyperfine structure has been analyzed and the determined quadrupole coupling constants together with the rotational constants have been a key for the identification of the adduct structure on the light of ab initio computations. The rotational parameters are consistent with the formation of a three body cycle thanks to the double proton acceptor/proton donor character of both formamide and water. The low value of the planar moment of inertia Pcc indicates that the heavy atom skeleton of the cluster is essentially planar. A detailed analysis of the results reveals the subtle effects of hydrogen bond cooperative effects in this system.

  13. Structural bonding-breakage constitutive model for natural unsaturated clayey soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guo-Qing; Zhao, Cheng-Gang; Qin, Xiao-Ming

    2010-12-01

    The natural clayey soils are usually structural and unsaturated, which makes their mechanical properties quite different from the remolded saturated soils. A structural constitutive model is proposed to simulate the bonding-breakage micro-mechanism. In this model, the unsaturated soil element is divided into a cementation element and a friction element according to the binary medium theory, and the stress-strain coordination for these two elements is obtained. The cementation element is regarded as elastic, whereas the friction element is regarded as elastoplastic which can be described with the Gallipoli's model. The theoretical formulation is verified with the comparative experiments of isotropic compressions on the saturated and unsaturated structural soils. Parametric analyses of the effects of damage variables on the model predictions are further carried out, which show that breakage deformation of natural clayey soils increases with the rising amount of initial defects.

  14. Raman spectroscopic characterization of the core-rim structure in reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannotti, Phillip; Subhash, Ghatu, E-mail: subhash@ufl.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Zheng, James Q.; Halls, Virginia [Program Executive Office—Soldier Protection and Individual Equipment, US Army, Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060 (United States); Karandikar, Prashant G.; Salamone, S.; Aghajanian, Michael K. [M-Cubed Technologies, Inc., Newark, Delaware 19711 (United States)

    2015-01-26

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the microstructure of reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics. Compositional and structural gradation in the silicon-doped boron carbide phase (rim), which develops around the parent boron carbide region (core) due to the reaction between silicon and boron carbide, was evaluated using changes in Raman peak position and intensity. Peak shifting and intensity variation from the core to the rim region was attributed to changes in the boron carbide crystal structure based on experimental Raman observations and ab initio calculations reported in literature. The results were consistent with compositional analysis determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The Raman analysis revealed the substitution of silicon atoms first into the linear 3-atom chain, and then into icosahedral units of the boron carbide structure. Thus, micro-Raman spectroscopy provided a non-destructive means of identifying the preferential positions of Si atoms in the boron carbide lattice.

  15. Refinement of the solution structure of a branched DNA three-way junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouporov, I V; Leontis, N B

    1995-01-01

    We have refined the structure of the DNA Three-Way Junction complex, TWJ-TC, described in the companion paper by quantitative analysis of two 2D NOESY spectra (mixing times 60 and 200 ms) obtained in D2O solution. NOESY crosspeak intensities extracted from these spectra were used in two kinds of refinement procedure: 1) distance-restrained energy minimization (EM) and molecular dynamics (MD) and 2) full relaxation matrix back calculation refinement. The global geometry of the refined model is very similar to that of a published, preliminary model (Leontis, 1993). Two of the helical arms of the junction are stacked. These are Helix 1, defined by basepairs S1-G1/S3-C12 through S1-C5/S3-G8 and Helix 2, which comprises basepairs S1-C6/S2-G5 through S1-G10/S2-G1. The third helical arm (Helix 3), comprised of basepairs S2-C6/S3-G5 through S2-C10/S3-G1 extends almost perpendicularly from the axis defined by Helices 1 and 2. The bases S1-C5 and S1-C6 of Strand 1 are continuously stacked across the junction region. The conformation of this strand is close to that of B-form DNA along its entire length, including the S1-C5 to S1-C6 dinucleotide step at the junction. The two unpaired bases S3-T6 and S3-C7 lie outside of the junction along the minor groove of Helix 1 and largely exposed to solvent. Analysis of the refined structure reveals that the glycosidic bond of S3-T6 exists in the syn conformation, allowing the methyl group of this residue to contact the hydrophobic surface of the minor groove of Helix 1, at S3-G11. The helical parameters of the three helical arms of the structure exhibit only weak deviations from typical values for right-handed B-form DNA. Unusual dihedral angles are only observed for the sugarphosphate backbone joining the "hinge" residues, S2-G5 and S2-C6, and S3-G5 through S3-G8. The glycosidic bond of S3-G8also lies within the syn range, allowing favorable Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions with Si -C5. The stability of this structure was checked

  16. The crystal structure of sulfamethoxazole, interaction with DNA, DFT calculation, and molecular docking studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dipankar; Sahu, Nilima; Roy, Suman; Dutta, Paramita; Mondal, Sudipa; Torres, Elena L.; Sinha, Chittaranjan

    2015-02-01

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) [4-amino-N-(5-methyl-1,2-oxazol-3-yl)benzenesulfonamide] is structurally established by single crystal X-ray diffraction measurement. The crystal packing shows H-bonded 2D polymer through N(7)sbnd H(7A)---O(2), N(7)sbnd H(7B)---O(3), N(1)sbnd H(1)---N(2), C(5)sbnd H(5)---O(3)sbnd S(1) and N(7)sbnd (H7A)---O(2)sbnd S(1). Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time Dependent-DFT (TD-DFT) computations of optimized structure of SMX determine the electronic structure and has explained the electronic spectral transitions. The interaction of SMX with CT-DNA has been studied by absorption spectroscopy and the binding constant (Kb) is 4.37 × 104 M-1. The in silico test of SMX with DHPS from Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae helps to understand drug metabolism and accounts the drug-molecule interactions. The molecular docking of SMX-DNA also helps to predict the interaction feature.

  17. The crystal structure of sulfamethoxazole, interaction with DNA, DFT calculation, and molecular docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dipankar; Sahu, Nilima; Roy, Suman; Dutta, Paramita; Mondal, Sudipa; Torres, Elena L; Sinha, Chittaranjan

    2015-02-25

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) [4-amino-N-(5-methyl-1,2-oxazol-3-yl)benzenesulfonamide] is structurally established by single crystal X-ray diffraction measurement. The crystal packing shows H-bonded 2D polymer through N(7)-H(7A)-O(2), N(7)-H(7B)-O(3), N(1)-H(1)-N(2), C(5)-H(5)-O(3)-S(1) and N(7)-(H7A)-O(2)-S(1). Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time Dependent-DFT (TD-DFT) computations of optimized structure of SMX determine the electronic structure and has explained the electronic spectral transitions. The interaction of SMX with CT-DNA has been studied by absorption spectroscopy and the binding constant (Kb) is 4.37×10(4)M(-1). The in silico test of SMX with DHPS from Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae helps to understand drug metabolism and accounts the drug-molecule interactions. The molecular docking of SMX-DNA also helps to predict the interaction feature.

  18. Structure of an 'open' clamp type II topoisomerase-DNA complex provides a mechanism for DNA capture and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laponogov, Ivan; Veselkov, Dennis A; Crevel, Isabelle M-T; Pan, Xiao-Su; Fisher, L Mark; Sanderson, Mark R

    2013-11-01

    Type II topoisomerases regulate DNA supercoiling and chromosome segregation. They act as ATP-operated clamps that capture a DNA duplex and pass it through a transient DNA break in a second DNA segment via the sequential opening and closure of ATPase-, G-DNA- and C-gates. Here, we present the first 'open clamp' structures of a 3-gate topoisomerase II-DNA complex, the seminal complex engaged in DNA recognition and capture. A high-resolution structure was solved for a (full-length ParE-ParC55)2 dimer of Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV bound to two DNA molecules: a closed DNA gate in a B-A-B form double-helical conformation and a second B-form duplex associated with closed C-gate helices at a novel site neighbouring the catalytically important β-pinwheel DNA-binding domain. The protein N gate is present in an 'arms-wide-open' state with the undimerized N-terminal ParE ATPase domains connected to TOPRIM domains via a flexible joint and folded back allowing ready access both for gate and transported DNA segments and cleavage-stabilizing antibacterial drugs. The structure shows the molecular conformations of all three gates at 3.7 Å, the highest resolution achieved for the full complex to date, and illuminates the mechanism of DNA capture and transport by a type II topoisomerase.

  19. Radiation damage to DNA: The importance of track structure

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, M A

    1999-01-01

    A wide variety of biological effects are induced by ionizing radiation, from cell death to mutations and carcinogenesis. The biological effectiveness is found to vary not only with the absorbed dose but also with the type of radiation and its energy, i.e., with the nature of radiation tracks. An overview is presented of some of the biological experiments using different qualities of radiation, which when compared with Monte Carlo track structure studies, have highlighted the importance of the localized spatial properties of stochastic energy deposition on the nanometer scale at or near DNA. The track structure leads to clustering of damage which may include DNA breaks, base damage etc., the complexity of the cluster and therefore its biological repairability varying with radiation type. The ability of individual tracks to produce clustered damage, and the subsequent biological response are important in the assessment of the risk associated with low-level human exposure. Recent experiments have also shown that...

  20. Chemical bonding and electronic-structure in MAX phases as viewed by X-ray spectroscopy and density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Martin; Mattesini, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    This is a critical review of MAX-phase carbides and nitrides from an electronic-structure and chemical bonding perspective. This large group of nanolaminated materials is of great scientific and technological interest and exhibit a combination of metallic and ceramic features. These properties are related to the special crystal structure and bonding characteristics with alternating strong M-C bonds in high-density MC slabs, and relatively weak M-A bonds between the slabs. Here, we review the trend and relationship between the chemical bonding, conductivity, elastic and magnetic properties of the MAX phases in comparison to the parent binary MX compounds with the underlying electronic structure probed by polarized X-ray spectroscopy. Spectroscopic studies constitute important tests of the results of state-of-the-art electronic structure density functional theory that is extensively discussed and are generally consistent. By replacing the elements on the M, A, or X-sites in the crystal structure, the corresponding changes in the conductivity, elasticity, magnetism and other materials properties makes it possible to tailor the characteristics of this class of materials by controlling the strengths of their chemical bonds.

  1. Effects of Piezoelectric (PZT) Sensor Bonding and the Characteristics of the Host Structure on Impedance Based Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalloh, Abdul

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of certain factors on the impedance signal in structural health monitoring. These factors were: the quality of the bond between the sensor and the host structure, and the characteristics of the host structure, such as geometry, mass, and material properties. This work was carried out to answer a set of questions, related to these factors, that were developed by the project team. The project team was comprised of Dr. Doug Ramers and Dr. Abdul Jalloh of the Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, Mr. Arnaldo Colon- Perez, a student intern from the University of Puerto Rico of Turabo, and Mr. John Lassiter and Mr. Bob Engberg of the Structural and Dynamics Test Group at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This study was based on a review of the literature on structural health monitoring to investigate the factors referred to above because there was not enough time to plan and conduct the appropriate tests at MSFC during the tenure of the Summer Faculty Fellowship Program project members. The surveyed literature documents works on structural health monitoring that were based on laboratory tests that were conducted using bolted trusses and other civil engineering type structures for the most part. These are not the typical types of structures used in designing and building NASA s space vehicles and systems. It was therefore recommended that tests be conducted using NASA type structures, such as pressure vessels, to validate the observations made in this report.

  2. Structure of a bacterial quorum-sensing transcription factor complexed with pheromone and DNA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R.; Pappas, T.; Brace, J.; Miller, P.; Oulmassov, T.; Molyneaux, J.; Anderson, J.; Bashkin, J.; Winans, S.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division; Cornell Univ.; Monsanto Co.

    2002-06-27

    Many proteobacteria are able to monitor their population densities through the release of pheromones known as N-acylhomoserine lactones. At high population densities, these pheromones elicit diverse responses that include bioluminescence, biofilm formation, production of antimicrobials, DNA exchange, pathogenesis and symbiosis1. Many of these regulatory systems require a pheromone-dependent transcription factor similar to the LuxR protein of Vibrio fischeri. Here we present the structure of a LuxR-type protein. TraR of Agrobacterium tumefaciens was solved at 1.66 A as a complex with the pheromone N-3-oxooctanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (OOHL) and its TraR DNA-binding site. The amino-terminal domain of TraR is an {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich that binds OOHL, whereas the carboxy-terminal domain contains a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif. The TraR dimer displays a two-fold symmetry axis in each domain; however, these two axes of symmetry are at an approximately 90 degree angle, resulting in a pronounced overall asymmetry of the complex. The pheromone lies fully embedded within the protein with virtually no solvent contact, and makes numerous hydrophobic contacts with the protein as well as four hydrogen bonds: three direct and one water-mediated.

  3. Structural basis for bacterial transcription-coupled DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaconescu, Alexandra M; Chambers, Anna L; Smith, Abigail J; Nickels, Bryce E; Hochschild, Ann; Savery, Nigel J; Darst, Seth A

    2006-02-10

    Coupling of transcription and DNA repair in bacteria is mediated by transcription-repair coupling factor (TRCF, the product of the mfd gene), which removes transcription elongation complexes stalled at DNA lesions and recruits the nucleotide excision repair machinery to the site. Here we describe the 3.2 A-resolution X-ray crystal structure of Escherichia coli TRCF. The structure consists of a compact arrangement of eight domains, including a translocation module similar to the SF2 ATPase RecG, and a region of structural similarity to UvrB. Biochemical and genetic experiments establish that another domain with structural similarity to the Tudor-like domain of the transcription elongation factor NusG plays a critical role in TRCF/RNA polymerase interactions. Comparison with the translocation module of RecG as well as other structural features indicate that TRCF function involves large-scale conformational changes. These data, along with a structural model for the interaction of TRCF with the transcription elongation complex, provide mechanistic insights into TRCF function.

  4. Impact of chromatin structures on DNA processing for genomic analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Teytelman

    Full Text Available Chromatin has an impact on recombination, repair, replication, and evolution of DNA. Here we report that chromatin structure also affects laboratory DNA manipulation in ways that distort the results of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments. We initially discovered this effect at the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HMR locus, where we found that silenced chromatin was refractory to shearing, relative to euchromatin. Using input samples from ChIP-Seq studies, we detected a similar bias throughout the heterochromatic portions of the yeast genome. We also observed significant chromatin-related effects at telomeres, protein binding sites, and genes, reflected in the variation of input-Seq coverage. Experimental tests of candidate regions showed that chromatin influenced shearing at some loci, and that chromatin could also lead to enriched or depleted DNA levels in prepared samples, independently of shearing effects. Our results suggested that assays relying on immunoprecipitation of chromatin will be biased by intrinsic differences between regions packaged into different chromatin structures - biases which have been largely ignored to date. These results established the pervasiveness of this bias genome-wide, and suggested that this bias can be used to detect differences in chromatin structures across the genome.

  5. Probing the Structure of DNA Aptamers with a Classic Heterocycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Reid Bishop

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA aptamers are synthetic, single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides selectedby SELEX methods for their binding with specific ligands. Here we present ethidiumbinding results for three related DNA aptamers (PDB code: 1OLD, 1DB6, and 2ARGthat bind L-argininamide (L-Arm. The ligand bound form of each aptamer's structurehas been reported and each are found to be composed primarily of two domainsconsisting of a stem helical region and a loop domain that forms a binding pocket for thecognate ligand. Previous thermodynamic experiments demonstrated that the DNAaptamer 1OLD undergoes a large conformational ordering upon binding to L-Arm. Herewe extend those linkage binding studies by examining the binding of the heterocyclicintercalator ethidium to each of the three aptamers by fluorescence and absorptionspectrophotometric titrations. Our results reveal that ethidium binds to each aptamer with∆Go's in the range of -8.7 to -9.4 kcal/mol. The stoichiometry of binding is 2:1 for eachaptamer and is quantitatively diminished in the presence of L-Arm as is the overallfluorescence intensity of ethidium. Together, these results demonstrate that a portion ofthe bound ethidium is excluded from the aptamer in the presence of a saturating amountof L-Arm. These results demonstrate the utility of ethidium and related compounds forthe probing of non-conventional DNA structures and reveal an interesting fundamentalthermodynamic linkage in DNA aptamers. Results are discussed in the context of thethermodynamic stability and structure of each of the aptamers examined.

  6. Confinement effects upon the separation of structural transitions in linear systems with restricted bond fluctuation ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koci, Tomas; Bachmann, Michael

    2015-10-01

    By means of advanced parallel replica-exchange Monte Carlo methods we examine the influence of elasticity and confinement on the structural transitions of linear systems with restricted bonded interaction. For this purpose, we adopt a model for coarse-grained flexible polymers of finite length in the dilute regime. Hyperphase diagrams are constructed using energy-dependent canonical quantities to demonstrate the effects of the changes in the range of the confined interaction on the liquid and solid structural phases. With increasing bonded interaction range we observe the disappearance of the liquid phase and the fusion of the gas-liquid (or Θ) and the liquid-solid transitions. One of the most remarkable features, the liquid-gas transition, changes from second to first order if the confined interaction range exceeds a threshold that separates polymeric from nonpolymeric systems. The notoriously difficult sampling of the entropically suppressed conformations in the region of very strong first-order transitions is improved by using multiple Gaussian modified ensembles.

  7. Gypsum bonded investment for micro-structure casting of ZnAl4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Chuang; Li Bangsheng; Ren Mingxing; Fu Hengzhi

    2010-01-01

    The effects of sintering temperature on the surface roughness of gypsum bonded investments were investigated to find the appropriate sintering temperature applied for micro-investment casting. The surface roughness tests were carried out at sintering temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1,000 ℃for investment compounds mixed from calcium sulphate α-hemihydrate and quartz powder (wt.%, 6:4; 5:5, 4:6, 3:7). In this experiment, each investment compound was prepared by pouring the investment materials into a plastic bottle with the good surface roughness (Ra ~0.2 urn). DTA-TG curves were measured using a thermal analyzer to investigate the difference of surface roughness at different temperatures. The results show that the surface roughness of gypsum bonded investment is temperature sensitive. The preheating temperature of the mold should be up to 600 ℃, but not over 700 ℃, and the investment compound with 60 % plaster and 40 % quartz powder is applicable for preparing the micro-structures. The micro-structures with 100 Mm diameter were produced in the present studies. The results show that the surface roughness of the casting is only Ra ~0.51 urn, slightly rougher than that of the investment mold.

  8. Structural insights into complete metal ion coordination from ternary complexes of B family RB69 DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shuangluo; Wang, Mina; Blaha, Gregor; Konigsberg, William H; Wang, Jimin

    2011-10-25

    We have captured a preinsertion ternary complex of RB69 DNA polymerase (RB69pol) containing the 3' hydroxyl group at the terminus of an extendable primer (ptO3') and a nonhydrolyzable 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-α,β-substituted triphosphate, dUpXpp, where X is either NH or CH(2), opposite a complementary templating dA nucleotide residue. Here we report four structures of these complexes formed by three different RB69pol variants with catalytically inert Ca(2+) and four other structures with catalytically competent Mn(2+) or Mg(2+). These structures provide new insights into why the complete divalent metal-ion coordination complexes at the A and B sites are required for nucleotidyl transfer. They show that the metal ion in the A site brings ptO3' close to the α-phosphorus atom (Pα) of the incoming dNTP to enable phosphodiester bond formation through simultaneous coordination of both ptO3' and the nonbridging Sp oxygen of the dNTP's α-phosphate. The coordination bond length of metal ion A as well as its ionic radius determines how close ptO3' can approach Pα. These variables are expected to affect the rate of bond formation. The metal ion in the B site brings the pyrophosphate product close enough to Pα to enable pyrophosphorolysis and assist in the departure of the pyrophosphate. In these dUpXpp-containing complexes, ptO3' occupies the vertex of a distorted metal ion A coordination octahedron. When ptO3' is placed at the vertex of an undistorted, idealized metal ion A octahedron, it is within bond formation distance to Pα. This geometric relationship appears to be conserved among DNA polymerases of known structure.

  9. Synthesis, solid-state structure, and bonding analysis of a homoleptic beryllium azide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naglav, Dominik; Tobey, Briac; Lyhs, Benjamin; Roemer, Beate; Blaeser, Dieter; Woelper, Christoph; Jansen, Georg; Schulz, Stephan [Faculty of Chemistry and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (Cenide), Duisburg-Essen Univ., Essen (Germany)

    2017-07-10

    [Ph{sub 4}P]{sub 2}[Be(N{sub 3}){sub 4}] (1) and [PNP]{sub 2}[Be(N{sub 3}){sub 4}] (2; PNP=Ph{sub 3}PNPPh{sub 3}) were synthesized by reacting Be(N{sub 3}){sub 2} with [Ph{sub 4}P]N{sub 3} and [PNP]N{sub 3}. Compound 1 represents the first structurally characterized homoleptic beryllium azide. The electronic structure and bonding situation in the tetraazidoberyllate dianion [Be(N{sub 3}){sub 4}]{sup 2-} were investigated by quantum-chemical calculations (NPA, ELF, LOL). (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, W.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 {angstrom} Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 {angstrom}, 500 {angstrom}, and 300 {angstrom} per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 {angstrom}/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 {angstrom}/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study.

  11. A self-diagnostic adhesive for monitoring bonded joints in aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yitao; Li, Yu-hung; Kopsaftopoulos, Fotis; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2016-04-01

    Bondline integrity is still one of the most critical concerns in the design of aircraft structures up to date. Due to the lack of confidence on the integrity of the bondline both during fabrication and service, the industry standards and regulations still require assembling the composite using conventional fasteners. Furthermore, current state-of-the-art non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques are incapable of offering mature solutions on the issue of bondline integrity monitoring. Therefore, the objective of this work is the development of an intelligent adhesive film with integrated micro-sensors for monitoring the integrity of the bondline interface. The proposed method makes use of an electromechanical-impedance (EMI) based method, which is a rapidly evolving approach within the SHM family. Furthermore, an innovative screen-printing technique to fabricate piezoelectric ceramic sensors with minimal thickness has been developed at Stanford. The approach presented in this study is based on the use of (i) micro screen-printed piezoelectric sensors integrated into adhesive leaving a minimal footprint on the material, (ii) numerical and analytical modeling of the EMI spectrum of the adhesive bondline, (iii) novel diagnostic algorithms for monitoring the bondline integrity based on advanced signal processing techniques, and (iv) the experimental assessment via prototype adhesively bonded structures in static (varying loads) and dynamic (fatigue) environments. The proposed method will provide a huge confidence on the use of bonded joints for aerospace structures and lead to a paradigm change in their design by enabling enormous weight savings while maximizing the economic and performance efficiency.

  12. Crystal structure of yeast DNA polymerase ε catalytic domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinku Jain

    Full Text Available DNA polymerase ε (Polε is a multi-subunit polymerase that contributes to genomic stability via its roles in leading strand replication and the repair of damaged DNA. Here we report the ternary structure of the Polε catalytic subunit (Pol2 bound to a nascent G:C base pair (Pol2G:C. Pol2G:C has a typical B-family polymerase fold and embraces the template-primer duplex with the palm, fingers, thumb and exonuclease domains. The overall arrangement of domains is similar to the structure of Pol2T:A reported recently, but there are notable differences in their polymerase and exonuclease active sites. In particular, we observe Ca2+ ions at both positions A and B in the polymerase active site and also observe a Ca2+ at position B of the exonuclease site. We find that the contacts to the nascent G:C base pair in the Pol2G:C structure are maintained in the Pol2T:A structure and reflect the comparable fidelity of Pol2 for nascent purine-pyrimidine and pyrimidine-purine base pairs. We note that unlike that of Pol3, the shape of the nascent base pair binding pocket in Pol2 is modulated from the major grove side by the presence of Tyr431. Together with Pol2T:A, our results provide a framework for understanding the structural basis of high fidelity DNA synthesis by Pol2.

  13. Enzyme-adenylate structure of a bacterial ATP-dependent DNA ligase with a minimized DNA-binding surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Adele; Rothweiler, Ulli; Leiros, Hanna Kirsti Schrøder

    2014-11-01

    DNA ligases are a structurally diverse class of enzymes which share a common catalytic core and seal breaks in the phosphodiester backbone of double-stranded DNA via an adenylated intermediate. Here, the structure and activity of a recombinantly produced ATP-dependent DNA ligase from the bacterium Psychromonas sp. strain SP041 is described. This minimal-type ligase, like its close homologues, is able to ligate singly nicked double-stranded DNA with high efficiency and to join cohesive-ended and blunt-ended substrates to a more limited extent. The 1.65 Å resolution crystal structure of the enzyme-adenylate complex reveals no unstructured loops or segments, and suggests that this enzyme binds the DNA without requiring full encirclement of the DNA duplex. This is in contrast to previously characterized minimal DNA ligases from viruses, which use flexible loop regions for DNA interaction. The Psychromonas sp. enzyme is the first structure available for the minimal type of bacterial DNA ligases and is the smallest DNA ligase to be crystallized to date.

  14. Postpartum Bonding Disorder: Factor Structure, Validity, Reliability and a Model Comparison of the Postnatal Bonding Questionnaire in Japanese Mothers of Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko Ohashi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Negative attitudes of mothers towards their infant is conceptualized as postpartum bonding disorder, which leads to serious health problems in perinatal health care. However, its measurement still remains to be standardized. Our aim was to examine and confirm the psychometric properties of the Postnatal Bonding Questionnaire (PBQ in Japanese mothers. We distributed a set of questionnaires to community mothers and studied 392 mothers who returned the questionnaires at 1 month after childbirth. Our model was compared with three other models derived from previous studies. In a randomly halved sample, an exploratory factor analysis yielded a three-factor structure: Anger and Restrictedness, Lack of Affection, and Rejection and Fear. This factor structure was cross-validated by a confirmatory factor analysis using the other halved sample. The three subscales showed satisfactory internal consistency. The three PBQ subscale scores were correlated with depression and psychological abuse scores. Their test–retest reliability between day 5 and 1 month after childbirth was measured by intraclass correlation coefficients between 0.76 and 0.83. The Akaike Information Criteria of our model was better than the original four-factor model of Brockington. The present study indicates that the PBQ is a reliable and valid measure of bonding difficulties of Japanese mothers with neonates.

  15. Postpartum Bonding Disorder: Factor Structure, Validity, Reliability and a Model Comparison of the Postnatal Bonding Questionnaire in Japanese Mothers of Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Yukiko; Kitamura, Toshinori; Sakanashi, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoko

    2016-08-02

    Negative attitudes of mothers towards their infant is conceptualized as postpartum bonding disorder, which leads to serious health problems in perinatal health care. However, its measurement still remains to be standardized. Our aim was to examine and confirm the psychometric properties of the Postnatal Bonding Questionnaire (PBQ) in Japanese mothers. We distributed a set of questionnaires to community mothers and studied 392 mothers who returned the questionnaires at 1 month after childbirth. Our model was compared with three other models derived from previous studies. In a randomly halved sample, an exploratory factor analysis yielded a three-factor structure: Anger and Restrictedness, Lack of Affection, and Rejection and Fear. This factor structure was cross-validated by a confirmatory factor analysis using the other halved sample. The three subscales showed satisfactory internal consistency. The three PBQ subscale scores were correlated with depression and psychological abuse scores. Their test-retest reliability between day 5 and 1 month after childbirth was measured by intraclass correlation coefficients between 0.76 and 0.83. The Akaike Information Criteria of our model was better than the original four-factor model of Brockington. The present study indicates that the PBQ is a reliable and valid measure of bonding difficulties of Japanese mothers with neonates.

  16. Atomic Structures of Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) and its Reduced Form with Bond Lengths Based on Additivity of Atomic Radii

    CERN Document Server

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown recently that chemical bond lengths, in general, like those in the components of nucleic acids, caffeine related compounds, all essential amino acids, methane, benzene, graphene and fullerene are sums of the radii of adjacent atoms constituting the bond. Earlier, the crystal ionic distances in all alkali halides and lengths of many partially ionic bonds were also accounted for by the additivity of ionic as well as covalent radii. Here, the atomic structures of riboflavin and its reduced form are presented based on the additivity of the same set of atomic radii as for other biological molecules.

  17. Complementary method to locate atomic coordinates by combined searching method of structure-sensitive indexes based on bond valence method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋振; 刘小浪; 何丽珠; 夏志国; 刘泉林

    2015-01-01

    Bond valence method illustrates the relation between valence and length of a particular bond type. This theory has been used to predict structure information, but the effect is very limited. In this paper, two indexes, i.e., global instability index (GII) and bond strain index (BSI), are adopted as a judgment of a search-match program for prediction. The results show that with GII and BSI combined as judgment, the predicted atom positions are very close to real ones. The mechanism and validity of this searching program are also discussed. The GII&BSI distribution contour map reveals that the predicted function is a reflection of exponential feature of bond valence formula. This combined searching method may be integrated with other structure-determination method, and may be helpful in refining and testifying light atom positions.

  18. Structural biology of disease-associated repetitive DNA sequences and protein-DNA complexes involved in DNA damage and repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, G.; Santhana Mariappan, S.V.; Chen, X.; Catasti, P.; Silks, L.A. III; Moyzis, R.K.; Bradbury, E.M.; Garcia, A.E.

    1997-07-01

    This project is aimed at formulating the sequence-structure-function correlations of various microsatellites in the human (and other eukaryotic) genomes. Here the authors have been able to develop and apply structure biology tools to understand the following: the molecular mechanism of length polymorphism microsatellites; the molecular mechanism by which the microsatellites in the noncoding regions alter the regulation of the associated gene; and finally, the molecular mechanism by which the expansion of these microsatellites impairs gene expression and causes the disease. Their multidisciplinary structural biology approach is quantitative and can be applied to all coding and noncoding DNA sequences associated with any gene. Both NIH and DOE are interested in developing quantitative tools for understanding the function of various human genes for prevention against diseases caused by genetic and environmental effects.

  19. Solution structure of a DNA complex with the fluorescent bis-intercalator TOTO determined by NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielmann, H.P.; Wemmer, D.E.; Jacobsen, J.P. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-07-11

    We have used two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy to determine the solution structure of the DNA oligonucleotide d(5{prime}-CGCTAGCG-3{prime}){sub 2} complexed with the bis-intercalating dye 1,1{prime}-(4,4,8,8-tetramethyl-4,8-diazaundecamethylene)bis[4-(3-methyl-2,3-dihydrobenzo-1,3-thiazolyl-2-methylidene)qui nonlinium] tetraiodide (TOTO). The determination of the structure was based on total relaxation matrix analysis of the NOESY cross-peak intensities using the program MARDIGRAS. Improved procedures to consider the experimental {open_quotes}noise{close_quotes} in NOESY spectra during these calculations have been employed. The NOE-derived distance restraints were applied in restrained molecular dynamics calculations. Twenty final structures each were generated for the TOTO complex from both A-form and B-form dsDNA starting structures. The root-mean-square (rms) deviation of the coordinates for the 40 structures of the complex was 1.45{angstrom}. The local DNA structure is distorted in the complex. The helix is unwound by 60{degrees} and has an overall helical repeat of 12 base pairs, caused by bis-intercalation of TOTO. The poly(propylenamine) linker chain is located in the minor groove of dsDNA. Calculations indicate that the benzothiazole ring system is twisted relative to the quinoline in the uncomplexed TOTO molecule. The site selectivity of TOTO for the CTAG{center_dot}CTAG site is explained by its ability to adapt to the base pair propeller twist of dsDNA to optimize stacking and the hydrophobic interaction between the thymidine methyl group and the benzothiazole ring. There is a 3000-fold fluorescence enhancement upon binding of TOTO to dsDNA. Rotation about the cyanine methine bonds is possible in free TOTO, allowing relaxation nonradiatively. 44 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Exploring non-covalent interactions in guanine- and xanthine-based model DNA quadruplex structures: a comprehensive quantum chemical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurenko, Yevgen P; Novotný, Jan; Sklenář, Vladimir; Marek, Radek

    2014-02-07

    The study aimed to cast light on the structure and internal energetics of guanine- and xanthine-based model DNA quadruplexes and the physico-chemical nature of the non-covalent interactions involved. Several independent approaches were used for this purpose: DFT-D3 calculations, Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules, Natural Bond Orbital Analysis, Energy Decomposition Analysis, Compliance Constant Theory, and Non-Covalent Interaction Analysis. The results point to an excellent degree of structural and energetic compatibility between the two types of model quadruplexes. This fact stems from both the structural features (close values of van der Waals volumes, pore radii, geometrical parameters of the H-bonds) and the energetic characteristics (comparable values of the energies of formation). It was established that hydrogen bonding makes the greatest (∼50%) contribution to the internal stability of the DNA quadruplexes, whereas the aromatic base stacking and ion coordination terms are commensurable and account for the rest. Energy decomposition analysis performed for guanine (Gua) and xanthine (Xan) quartets B4 and higher-order structures consisting of two or three stacked quartets indicates that whereas Gua structures benefit from a high degree of H-bond cooperativity, Xan models are characterized by a more favorable and cooperative π-π stacking. The results of electron density topological analysis show that Na(+)/K(+) ion coordination deeply affects the network of non-covalent interactions in Gua models due to the change in the twist angle between the stacked tetrads. For Xan models, ion coordination makes tetrads in stacks more planar without changing the twist angle. Therefore, the presence of the ion seems to be essential for the formation of planar stacks in Xan-based DNA quadruplexes. Detailed study of the nature of ion-base coordination suggests that this interaction has a partially covalent character and cannot be considered as purely electrostatic

  1. DFT Study of the Structure, Reactivity, Natural Bond OrbitalandHyperpolarizabilityofThiazoleAzoDyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman I. Osman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The structure, reactivity, natural bond orbital (NBO, linear and nonlinear optical (NLO properties of three thiazole azo dyes (A, B and C were monitored by applying B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP and ωB97XD functionals with 6-311++G** and aug-cc-pvdz basis sets. The geometrical parameters,dipolemoments,HOMO-LUMO(highestoccupiedmolecularorbital,lowestunoccupied molecular orbital energy gaps, absorption wavelengths and total hyperpolarizabilities were investigated in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 chloroform (CHCl3, dichloromethane (CH2Cl2 and dimethlysulphoxide (DMSO. The donor methoxyphenyl group deviates from planarity with the thiazole azo moiety by ca. 38◦; while the acceptor dicyanovinyl, indandione and dicyanovinylindanone groups diverge by ca. 6◦. The HOMOs for the three dyes are identical. They spread over the methoxyphenyl donor moiety, the thiazole and benzene rings as π-bonding orbitals. The LUMOs are shaped up by the nature of the acceptor moieties. The LUMOs of the A, B and C dyes extend over the indandione, malononitrile and dicyanovinylindanone acceptor moieties, respectively, as π-antibonding orbitals. The HOMO-LUMO splittings showed that Dye C is much more reactive than dyes A and B. Compared to dyes A and B, Dye C yielded a longer maximum absorption wavelength because of the stabilization of its LUMOs relative to those of the other two. The three dyes show solvatochromism accompanied by significant increases in hyperpolarizability. The enhancement of the total hyperpolarizability of C compared to those of AandBisduetothecumulativeactionofthelongπ-conjugationoftheindanoneringandthestronger electron-withdrawingabilityofthedicyanovinylmoietythatformthedicyanovinylindanoneacceptor group. These findings are facilitated by a natural bond orbital (NBO technique. The very high total hyperpolarizabilities of the three dyes define their potent nonlinear optical (NLO behaviour.

  2. ``PROTON Sponges": a Rigid Organic Scaffold to Reveal the Quantum Structure of the Intramolecular Proton Bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deblase, Andrew F.; Johnson, Mark A.; Scerba, Michael T.; Bloom, Steven; Lectka, Thomas; Dudding, Travis

    2012-06-01

    Spectroscopic analysis of systems containing charged hydrogen bonds (e.g. the Zundel ion, {H}5{O}2+) in a vibrationally cold regime is useful in decongesting numerous anharmonic features common to room temperature measurements.[Roscioli, J. R.; et. al. Science 2007] This approach has been extended to conjugate acids of the ``Proton Sponge" family of organic compounds, which contain strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds between proton donor (D) and acceptor (A) groups at the 1- and 8-positions. By performing {H}_2/{D}_2 vibrational predissociation spectroscopy on cryogenically cooled ions, we explore how the proximity and spatial orientation of D and A moieties relates to the spectroscopic signature of the shared proton. In the cases studied ({D = Me2N-H+; A = OH, O(C=O)Ph}), we observe strong anharmonic couplings between the shared proton and dark states that persist at these cryogenic temperatures. This leads to intense NH stretching features throughout the nominal CH stretching region (2800-3000 {cm}-1). Isotopic substitution has verified that the oscillator strength of these broad features is driven by NH stretching. Furthermore, the study of A = O(C=O)Ph has provided a spectroscopic snapshot of the shared proton at work as an active catalytic moiety fostering ester hydrolysis by first order acylium fission ({AAC1}). This is apparent by the high frequency carbonyl stretch at 1792 {cm}-1, which is a consequence of the strong hydrogen bond to the ether-ester oxygen atom. Thus, these ``Proton Sponges" are useful model systems that unearth the quantum structure and reactivity of shared proton interactions in organic compounds.

  3. Structure and Bonding in Nickel-Thiolate-Iodine Charge-Transfer Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Norman; Steinfeld, Gunther; Lozan, Vasile; Naumov, Sergej; Flyunt, Roman; Abel, Bernd; Kersting, Berthold

    2017-02-16

    The dinuclear nickel complexes [Ni2 L(μ-O2 CR)](ClO4 ) [R=Me (4), R=OMe (6)], where L(2-) is a 24-membered macrocyclic N6 S2 ligand, react readily with excess I2 in MeCN solution at 4 °C to form stable mono-(I2 ) and bis-(I2 ) charge-transfer (CT) adducts of the type [Ni2 L(μ-O2 CR)(I2 )n ](+) (n=1 or 2) containing linear RS-I-I linkages. Three new CT compounds, namely, [Ni2 L(OAc)(I2 )](I2 )(I3 ) (5), [Ni2 L(O2 COMe)(I2 )](I5 )⋅MeCN (7⋅MeCN), and [Ni2 L(O2 COMe)(I2 )2 ](I5 )⋅MeCN (8⋅MeCN) as well as the triiodide salt [Ni2 L(OAc)](I3 ) (9) were synthesized and fully characterized. A common feature of the CT adducts is a polyiodide matrix, which surrounds the individual complex molecules, stabilized by secondary I⋅⋅⋅I interactions with the CT linkages. The scatter in both the RS-I (2.6 to 3.0 Å) and the I-I bond lengths (2.7 to 3.0 Å) is indicative of both a variable strength of the RS(-) →I2 bond and a varying degree of charge transfer. An analysis of the structural parameters was undertaken accompanied by DFT calculations to quantify the donating ability of the bridging thiolate functions and to shed more light on the bonding in this rare sort of charge-transfer complexes. The stability of the CT complexes and the results of preliminary transport measurements are also reported.

  4. A Single-Molecule Study on the Structural Damage of Ultraviolet Radiated DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Chun Ke

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The structural damage of double-stranded DNA under UV radiation was examined using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. Compared to undamaged DNA, the diffusion coefficient of λ-DNA was significantly increased with 12 min or 20 min of radiation but remained unchanged for 40 min of exposure possibly due to strand crosslinking. The structural damage of DNA was further examined using transmission electron microscopy which revealed kinks and sharp bends along the DNA backbone.

  5. Adhesives in Building--Lamination of Structural Timber Beams, Bonding of Cementitious Materials, Bonding of Gypsum Drywall Construction. Proceedings of a Conference of the Building Research Institute, Division of Engineering and Industrial Research (Spring 1960).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    The role of adhesives in building design is discussed. Three major areas are as follows--(1) lamination of structural timber beams, (2) bonding of cementitious materials, and (3) bonding of gypsum drywall construction. Topical coverage includes--(1) structural lamination today, (2) adhesives in use today, (3) new adhesives needed, (4) production…

  6. Synthesis, structure and bonding of hexaphenyl thorium(IV): observation of a non-octahedral structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrick, Elizabeth A; Hrobárik, Peter; Seaman, Lani A; Wu, Guang; Hayton, Trevor W

    2016-01-14

    We report herein the synthesis of the first structurally characterized homoleptic actinide aryl complexes, [Li(DME)3]2[Th(C6H5)6] (1) and [Li(THF)(12-crown-4)]2[Th(C6H5)6] (2), which feature an anion possessing a regular octahedral (1) or a severely distorted octahedral (2) geometry. The solid-state structure of 2 suggests the presence of pseudo-agostic ortho C-H···Th interactions, which arise from σ(C-H) → Th(5f) donation. The non-octahedral structure is also favoured in solution at low temperatures.

  7. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  8. Model identification for DNA sequence-structure relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Stephen Dwyer; Chiu, Anita; Chizeck, Howard Jay

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the use of algebraic state-space models for the sequence dependent properties of DNA. By considering the DNA sequence as an input signal, rather than using an all atom physical model, computational efficiency is achieved. A challenge in deriving this type of model is obtaining its structure and estimating its parameters. Here we present two candidate model structures for the sequence dependent structural property Slide and a method of encoding the models so that a recursive least squares algorithm can be applied for parameter estimation. These models are based on the assumption that the value of Slide at a base-step is determined by the surrounding tetranucleotide sequence. The first model takes the four bases individually as inputs and has a median root mean square deviation of 0.90 A. The second model takes the four bases pairwise and has a median root mean square deviation of 0.88 A. These values indicate that the accuracy of these models is within the useful range for structure prediction. Performance is comparable to published predictions of a more physically derived model, at significantly less computational cost.

  9. Non-B DNA Secondary Structures and Their Resolution by RecQ Helicases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the canonical B-form structure first described by Watson and Crick, DNA can adopt a number of alternative structures. These non-B-form DNA secondary structures form spontaneously on tracts of repeat sequences that are abundant in genomes. In addition, structured forms of DNA with intrastrand pairing may arise on single-stranded DNA produced transiently during various cellular processes. Such secondary structures have a range of biological functions but also induce genetic instability. Increasing evidence suggests that genomic instabilities induced by non-B DNA secondary structures result in predisposition to diseases. Secondary DNA structures also represent a new class of molecular targets for DNA-interactive compounds that might be useful for targeting telomeres and transcriptional control. The equilibrium between the duplex DNA and formation of multistranded non-B-form structures is partly dependent upon the helicases that unwind (resolve these alternate DNA structures. With special focus on tetraplex, triplex, and cruciform, this paper summarizes the incidence of non-B DNA structures and their association with genomic instability and emphasizes the roles of RecQ-like DNA helicases in genome maintenance by resolution of DNA secondary structures. In future, RecQ helicases are anticipated to be additional molecular targets for cancer chemotherapeutics.

  10. Electric and magnetic properties computed for valence bond structures: is there a link between pauling resonance energy and ring current?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havenith, Remco W A

    2006-04-28

    To establish the link between the aromaticity descriptors based on the Pauling resonance energy and the molecular properties, the electric (polarizability) and magnetic (magnetizability) field response properties have been calculated using the valence bond approach for various molecules and their individual Kekulé resonance structures. The results show that there is no direct relationship between the Pauling resonance energy and the properties; the response properties are weighted averages of the properties of the individual structures. According to the aromaticity criteria based on molecular properties, one-structure benzene would be aromatic; thus, concerning molecular properties, spin-coupled bonds do not behave like localized bonds in Lewis structures, with which they are usually associated.

  11. X-ray photoelectron spectra structure and chemical bonding in AmO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis was done of the X-ray photoelectron spectra structure in the binding energy range of 0 eV to ~35 eV for americium dioxide (AmO2 valence electrons. The binding energies and structure of the core electronic shells (~35 eV-1250 eV, as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the Am63O216 and AmO8 (D4h cluster reflecting Am close environment in AmO2 were taken into account. The experimental data show that the many-body effects and the multiplet splitting contribute to the spectral structure much less than the effects of formation of the outer (0-~15 eV binding energy and the inner (~15 eV-~35 eV binding energy valence molecular orbitals. The filled Am 5f electronic states were shown to form in the AmO2 valence band. The Am 6p electrons participate in formation of both the inner and the outer valence molecular orbitals (bands. The filled Am 6p3/2 and the O 2s electronic shells were found to make the largest contributions to the formation of the inner valence molecular orbitals. Contributions of electrons from different molecular orbitals to the chemical bond in the AmO8 cluster were evaluated. Composition and sequence order of molecular orbitals in the binding energy range 0-~35 eV in AmO2 were established. The experimental and theoretical data allowed a quantitative scheme of molecular orbitals for AmO2, which is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in americium dioxide and the interpretation of other X-ray spectra of AmO2.

  12. Hydrogen Bonding and Multiphonon Structure in One- and Two-Dimensional Polymeric Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musfeldt, J. L.; Brown, S.; Cao, J.; Conner, M. M.; McConnell, A. C.; Southerland, H. I.; Manson, J. L.; Schlueter, J. A.; Phillips, M. D.; Turnbull, M. M.; Landee, C. P.

    2007-03-01

    We report a systematic investigation of the temperature dependent infrared vibrational spectra of a family of chemically related coordination polymeric magnets based upon two different bridging anions, fluoride (F^-) and bifluoride (HF2^-), in copper-pyrazine complexes including Cu(HF2)(pyz)2BF4, Cu(HF2)(pyz)2ClO4, and CuF2(H2O)(pyz)). We compare our results with several one- and two-dimensional prototype materials including Cu(NO3)2(pyz) and Cu(ClO4)(pyz) 2. Unusual low temperature hydrogen bonding, local structural transitions associated with stronger low-temperature hydrogen bonding, and striking multiphonon effects that derive from coupling of an infrared-active fundamental with strong Raman-active modes of the pyrazine building-block molecule are observed. Based on the spectroscopic evidence, these interactions are common to this family of coordination polymers and work to stabilize the low temperature magnetic state. Similar interactions are likely to be present in other molecule-based magnets.

  13. Synthesis and structures of two supramolecular complexes constructed via hydrogen bond linking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Two supramolecular complexes,[Ni(rac-L)]3[CrO4]2[ClO4]2-4H2O (1) and [meso-H2L]0.5[VO3]-0.16H2O (2) (L= 5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetra-decane),have been prepared in an aqueous solu-tion,and detected by elemental analysis,IR,TG,and single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Com-pound 1 shows a one-dimensional hexagonal prism formed by the hydrogen bonding interactions between the secondary amines of rac-L and CrO42-anion/water molecules. Compound 2 displays a three-dimensional structure constructed by the hydrogen bond linking the helical chains of [VO3]nn-to the secondary amines of meso-L to generate 1D hexagon-shaped channels,and the channels are oc-cupied by guest water molecules.

  14. Full-Scale Structural and NDI Validation Tests of Bonded Composite Doublers for Commercial Aircraft Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1999-02-01

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. Most of the concerns surrounding composite doubler technology pertain to long-term survivability, especially in the presence of non-optimum installations, and the validation of appropriate inspection procedures. This report focuses on a series of full-scale structural and nondestructive inspection (NDI) tests that were conducted to investigate the performance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Full-scale tests were conducted on fuselage panels cut from retired aircraft. These full-scale tests studied stress reductions, crack mitigation, and load transfer capabilities of composite doublers using simulated flight conditions of cabin pressure and axial stress. Also, structures which modeled key aspects of aircraft structure repairs were subjected to extreme tension, shear and bending loads to examine the composite laminate's resistance to disbond and delamination flaws. Several of the structures were loaded to failure in order to determine doubler design margins. Nondestructive inspections were conducted throughout the test series in order to validate appropriate techniques on actual aircraft structure. The test results showed that a properly designed and installed composite doubler is able to enhance fatigue life, transfer load away from damaged structure, and avoid the introduction of new stress risers (i.e. eliminate global reduction in the fatigue life of the structure). Comparisons with test data obtained prior to the doubler installation revealed that stresses in the parent material can be reduced 30%--60% through the use of the composite doubler. Tests to failure demonstrated that the bondline is able to transfer plastic strains into the doubler and that

  15. Heterogeneous dynamics in DNA site discrimination by the structurally homologous DNA-binding domains of ETS-family transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gaofei; Tolic, Ana; Bashkin, James K; Poon, Gregory M K

    2015-04-30

    The ETS family of transcription factors exemplifies current uncertainty in how eukaryotic genetic regulators with overlapping DNA sequence preferences achieve target site specificity. PU.1 and Ets-1 represent archetypes for studying site discrimination by ETS proteins because their DNA-binding domains are the most divergent in sequence, yet they share remarkably superimposable DNA-bound structures. To gain insight into the contrasting thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA recognition by these two proteins, we investigated the structure and dynamics of site discrimination by their DNA-binding domains. Electrophoretic mobilities of complexes formed by the two homologs with circularly permuted binding sites showed significant dynamic differences only for DNA complexes of PU.1. Free solution measurements by dynamic light scattering showed PU.1 to be more dynamic than Ets-1; moreover, dynamic changes are strongly coupled to site discrimination by PU.1, but not Ets-1. Interrogation of the protein/DNA interface by DNA footprinting showed similar accessibility to dimethyl sulfate for PU.1/DNA and Ets-1/DNA complexes, indicating that the dynamics of PU.1/DNA complexes reside primarily outside that interface. An information-based analysis of the two homologs' binding motifs suggests a role for dynamic coupling in PU.1's ability to enforce a more stringent sequence preference than Ets-1 and its proximal sequence homologs. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Understanding boron through size-selected clusters: structure, chemical bonding, and fluxionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeeva, Alina P; Popov, Ivan A; Piazza, Zachary A; Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Boldyrev, Alexander I

    2014-04-15

    Boron is an interesting element with unusual polymorphism. While three-dimensional (3D) structural motifs are prevalent in bulk boron, atomic boron clusters are found to have planar or quasi-planar structures, stabilized by localized two-center-two-electron (2c-2e) σ bonds on the periphery and delocalized multicenter-two-electron (nc-2e) bonds in both σ and π frameworks. Electron delocalization is a result of boron's electron deficiency and leads to fluxional behavior, which has been observed in B13(+) and B19(-). A unique capability of the in-plane rotation of the inner atoms against the periphery of the cluster in a chosen direction by employing circularly polarized infrared radiation has been suggested. Such fluxional behaviors in boron clusters are interesting and have been proposed as molecular Wankel motors. The concepts of aromaticity and antiaromaticity have been extended beyond organic chemistry to planar boron clusters. The validity of these concepts in understanding the electronic structures of boron clusters is evident in the striking similarities of the π-systems of planar boron clusters to those of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, naphthalene, coronene, anthracene, or phenanthrene. Chemical bonding models developed for boron clusters not only allowed the rationalization of the stability of boron clusters but also lead to the design of novel metal-centered boron wheels with a record-setting planar coordination number of 10. The unprecedented highly coordinated borometallic molecular wheels provide insights into the interactions between transition metals and boron and expand the frontier of boron chemistry. Another interesting feature discovered through cluster studies is boron transmutation. Even though it is well-known that B(-), formed by adding one electron to boron, is isoelectronic to carbon, cluster studies have considerably expanded the possibilities of new structures and new materials using the B(-)/C analogy. It is

  17. Understanding Boron through Size-Selected Clusters: Structure, Chemical Bonding, and Fluxionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergeeva, Alina P.; Popov, Ivan A.; Piazza, Zachary A.; Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Wang, Lai S.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2014-04-15

    Conspectus Boron is an interesting element with unusual polymorphism. While three-dimensional (3D) structural motifs are prevalent in bulk boron, atomic boron clusters are found to have planar or quasi-planar structures, stabilized by localized two-center–two-electron (2c–2e) σ bonds on the periphery and delocalized multicenter–two-electron (nc–2e) bonds in both σ and π frameworks. Electron delocalization is a result of boron’s electron deficiency and leads to fluxional behavior, which has been observed in B13+ and B19–. A unique capability of the in-plane rotation of the inner atoms against the periphery of the cluster in a chosen direction by employing circularly polarized infrared radiation has been suggested. Such fluxional behaviors in boron clusters are interesting and have been proposed as molecular Wankel motors. The concepts of aromaticity and antiaromaticity have been extended beyond organic chemistry to planar boron clusters. The validity of these concepts in understanding the electronic structures of boron clusters is evident in the striking similarities of the π-systems of planar boron clusters to those of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, naphthalene, coronene, anthracene, or phenanthrene. Chemical bonding models developed for boron clusters not only allowed the rationalization of the stability of boron clusters but also lead to the design of novel metal-centered boron wheels with a record-setting planar coordination number of 10. The unprecedented highly coordinated borometallic molecular wheels provide insights into the interactions between transition metals and boron and expand the frontier of boron chemistry. Another interesting feature discovered through cluster studies is boron transmutation. Even though it is well-known that B–, formed by adding one electron to boron, is isoelectronic to carbon, cluster studies have considerably expanded the possibilities of new structures and new materials using the B

  18. At least 10% shorter C-H bonds in cryogenic protein crystal structures than in current AMBER forcefields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2015-03-06

    High resolution protein crystal structures resolved with X-ray diffraction data at cryogenic temperature are commonly used as experimental data to refine forcefields and evaluate protein folding simulations. However, it has been unclear hitherto whether the C-H bond lengths in cryogenic protein structures are significantly different from those defined in forcefields to affect protein folding simulations. This article reports the finding that the C-H bonds in high resolution cryogenic protein structures are 10-14% shorter than those defined in current AMBER forcefields, according to 3709 C-H bonds in the cryogenic protein structures with resolutions of 0.62-0.79 Å. Also, 20 all-atom, isothermal-isobaric, 0.5-μs molecular dynamics simulations showed that chignolin folded from a fully-extended backbone formation to the native β-hairpin conformation in the simulations using AMBER forcefield FF12SB at 300 K with an aggregated native state population including standard error of 10 ± 4%. However, the aggregated native state population with standard error reduced to 3 ± 2% in the same simulations except that C-H bonds were shortened by 10-14%. Furthermore, the aggregated native state populations with standard errors increased to 35 ± 3% and 26 ± 3% when using FF12MC, which is based on AMBER forcefield FF99, with and without the shortened C-H bonds, respectively. These results show that the 10-14% bond length differences can significantly affect protein folding simulations and suggest that re-parameterization of C-H bonds according to the cryogenic structures could improve the ability of a forcefield to fold proteins in molecular dynamics simulations. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Structures, Bonding, and One-Bond B-N and B-H Spin-Spin Coupling Constants for a Series of Neutral and Anionic Five-Membered Rings Containing BN Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez, Manuel; Mó, Otilia; Alkorta, Ibon; Del Bene, Janet E

    2008-11-11

    The structures and bonding of a series of five-membered rings with BN bonds CxNyBzH5 (x + y + z = 5) and their most stable deprotonated anions CxNyBzH4(-) as well as anionic rings CxNyBzH5(-) have been investigated at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The great majority of these rings present BN bond orders close to that found in borazine, suggesting that there is substantial electron delocalization in these rings. This observation is also supported by both NBO and ELF analyses. Ab initio equation-of-motion coupled-cluster singles and doubles (EOM-CCSD) calculations have also been performed to obtain the (15)N-(11)B and (1)H-(11)B spin-spin coupling constants. For neutral systems, the former range from -10 to -35 Hz, thereby bracketing the value of (1)J(B-N) for borazine, which is -29 Hz. (1)J(B-N) spans an even greater range in the anions, from -3 to -36 Hz. The absolute value of (1)J(B-N) decreases upon deprotonation if coupling involves the deprotonated nitrogen or a boron atom bonded to the deprotonated N. (1)J(B-H) always decreases upon nitrogen deprotonation.

  20. Investigation of structure and hydrogen bonding of superhydrous phase B (HT) under pressure using first-principles density functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poswal, H. K.; Sharma, Surinder M.; Sikka, S. K.

    2010-03-01

    High-pressure behaviour of superhydrous phase B (high temperature; HT) of Mg10Si3O14(OH)4 (Shy B) is investigated with the help of density functional theory-based first-principles calculations. In addition to the lattice parameters and equation of state, we use these calculations to determine the positional parameters of atoms as a function of pressure. Our results show that the compression induced structural changes involve cooperative distortions in the full geometry of the hydrogen bonds. The bond-bending mechanism proposed by Hofmeister et al. (Vibrational spectra of dense hydrous magnesium silicates at high pressure: Importance of the hydrogen bond angle, Am. Miner. 84 (1999), pp. 454-464) for hydrogen bonds to relieve the heightened repulsion due to short H- - -H contacts is not found to be effective in Shy B. The calculated O-H bond contraction is consistent with the observed blue shift in the stretching frequency of the hydrogen bond. These results establish that one can use first-principles calculations to obtain reliable insights into the pressure-induced bonding changes of complex minerals.

  1. Identification of structure-activity relationships from screening a structurally compact DNA-encoded chemical library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzini, Raphael M; Ekblad, Torun; Zhong, Nan; Wichert, Moreno; Decurtins, Willy; Nauer, Angela; Zimmermann, Mauro; Samain, Florent; Scheuermann, Jörg; Brown, Peter J; Hall, Jonathan; Gräslund, Susanne; Schüler, Herwig; Neri, Dario

    2015-03-23

    Methods for the rapid and inexpensive discovery of hit compounds are essential for pharmaceutical research and DNA-encoded chemical libraries represent promising tools for this purpose. We here report on the design and synthesis of DAL-100K, a DNA-encoded chemical library containing 103 200 structurally compact compounds. Affinity screening experiments and DNA-sequencing analysis provided ligands with nanomolar affinities to several proteins, including prostate-specific membrane antigen and tankyrase 1. Correlations of sequence counts with binding affinities and potencies of enzyme inhibition were observed and enabled the identification of structural features critical for activity. These results indicate that libraries of this type represent a useful source of small-molecule binders for target proteins of pharmaceutical interest and information on structural features important for binding. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Crystal structure and chemical bonding of the high-temperature phase of AgN3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Carsten L; Dinnebier, Robert; Wedig, Ulrich; Jansen, Martin

    2007-02-05

    The crystal structure of silver azide (AgN3) in its high-temperature (HT) modification was determined from X-ray powder diffraction data, recorded at T = 170 degrees C and was further refined by the Rietveld method. The structure is monoclinic (P21/c (No. 14), a = 6.0756(2) A, b = 6.1663(2) A, c = 6.5729(2) A, beta = 114.19(0) degrees, V = 224.62(14) A3, Z = 4) and consists of two-dimensional Ag and N containing layers in which the silver atoms are coordinated by four nitrogen atoms exhibiting a distorted square coordination environment. These sheets are linked together by weaker perpendicular Ag-N contacts, thus forming a 4 + 2 coordination geometry around the silver atoms. The phase transition has been characterized by DTA, DSC, and measurement of the density, as well as of the ionic conductivity. Both, the room-temperature and the HT phase are electrically insulating. This fact is getting support by DFT band structure calculations within the generalized gradient approximation, using the PBE functional. On the basis of the DFT band structure, the bonding characteristics of both phases are essentially the same. Finally, the implication of the existence of a low-symmetry HT-phase in a crystalline explosive concerning decomposition mechanisms is discussed.

  3. Crystal Structure and Chemical Bonding of the High-Temperature Phase of AgN3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt,C.; Dinnebier, R.; Wedig, U.; Jansen, M.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of silver azide (AgN{sub 3}) in its high-temperature (HT) modification was determined from X-ray powder diffraction data, recorded at T = 170 {sup o}C and was further refined by the Rietveld method. The structure is monoclinic (P2{sub 1}lc (No. 14), a = 6.0756(2) {angstrom}, b = 6.1663(2) {angstrom}, c = 6.5729(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 114.19(0){sup o}, V = 224.62(14) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 4) and consists of two-dimensional Ag and N containing layers in which the silver atoms are coordinated by four nitrogen atoms exhibiting a distorted square coordination environment. These sheets are linked together by weaker perpendicular Ag-N contacts, thus forming a 4 + 2 coordination geometry around the silver atoms. The phase transition has been characterized by DTA, DSC, and measurement of the density, as well as of the ionic conductivity. Both, the room-temperature and the HT phase are electrically insulating. This fact is getting support by DFT band structure calculations within the generalized gradient approximation, using the PBE functional. On the basis of the DFT band structure, the bonding characteristics of both phases are essentially the same. Finally, the implication of the existence of a low-symmetry HT-phase in a crystalline explosive concerning decomposition mechanisms is discussed.

  4. Structural transition, dielectric and bonding properties of BeCN2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Hui-Yang; Gao, Fa-Ming; Zhang, Jing-Wu; Li, Zhi-Ping

    2011-01-01

    By means of first principle total energy calculations, this paper studies the structural transition, elastic, mechanical, dielectric and electronic properties of BeCN2. The calculations in total energy indicate that under ambient condition, the orthorhombic BeSiN2-type BeCN2 (space group Pna21) is a more favoured structure than the tetragonal chalcopyritetype one (space group I-42d). The results of elastic properties reveal that BeCN2 in both orthorhombic and tetragonal structure has higher bulk and shear moduli and smaller Poisson's ratio. The calculated Vicker hardness of tetragonal phase is 36.8 GPa, indicating a hard material. The analyses of electronic structure and electron density difference demonstrate that these excellent mechanical properties are attributed to the stronger covalent-bonding of CN4 and BeN4 subunits in BeCN2 crystal. Also, the orthorhombic BeCN2 phase is found to be a transparent semiconductor material with the calculated direct band gap of about 5.56 eV, superior to the indirect band gap of diamond and c-BN. Moreover, it also calculates Born effective charges and dielectric constants of BeCN2. These results suggest that BeCN2 may have some useful applications as optoelectronic, optical window and wear resistant materials.

  5. Near-atomic structural model for bacterial DNA replication initiation complex and its functional insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Masahiro; Noguchi, Yasunori; Sakiyama, Yukari; Kawakami, Hironori; Katayama, Tsutomu; Takada, Shoji

    2016-12-13

    Upon DNA replication initiation in Escherichia coli, the initiator protein DnaA forms higher-order complexes with the chromosomal origin oriC and a DNA-bending protein IHF. Although tertiary structures of DnaA and IHF have previously been elucidated, dynamic structures of oriC-DnaA-IHF complexes remain unknown. Here, combining computer simulations with biochemical assays, we obtained models at almost-atomic resolution for the central part of the oriC-DnaA-IHF complex. This complex can be divided into three subcomplexes; the left and right subcomplexes include pentameric DnaA bound in a head-to-tail manner and the middle subcomplex contains only a single DnaA. In the left and right subcomplexes, DnaA ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) domain III formed helices with specific structural differences in interdomain orientations, provoking a bend in the bound DNA. In the left subcomplex a continuous DnaA chain exists, including insertion of IHF into the DNA looping, consistent with the DNA unwinding function of the complex. The intervening spaces in those subcomplexes are crucial for DNA unwinding and loading of DnaB helicases. Taken together, this model provides a reasonable near-atomic level structural solution of the initiation complex, including the dynamic conformations and spatial arrangements of DnaA subcomplexes.

  6. Effects of Metal Ions on Conductivity and Structure of Single DNA Molecule in Different Environmental Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Ruixin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We design a novel nano-gap electrode to measure the current of DNA molecule, by which the current–voltage characteristics of individual native DNA, Ag-DNA and Ni-DNA molecules are obtained, respectively. The results show that the voltage gap of Ag- and Ni-DNA is higher than that of native DNA, and the conductance is lower than native DNA in neutral environment. The structure transition from B- to Z-DNA is observed in the presence of high concentrations of nickel ions and Ag-DNA appears chaos state by STM image and U-V spectra characterization. But in alkaline environment, the conductance of Ni-DNA rises and the voltage gap decreases with the increasing of nickel ion concentration denotes that the conductive ability of Ni-DNA is higher than that of native DNA.

  7. Hypothetical planar and nanotubular crystalline structures with five interatomic bonds of Kepler nets type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey I. Kochaev

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of metastable existence of planar and non-chiral nanotubular crystalline lattices in the form of Kepler nets of 34324, 3342, and 346 types (the notations are given in Schläfly symbols, using ab initio calculations, has researched. Atoms of P, As, Sb, Bi from 15th group and atoms of S, Se, Te from 16th group of the periodic table were taken into consideration. The lengths of interatomic bonds corresponding to the steadiest states for such were determined. We found that among these new composed structures crystals encountered strong elastic properties. Besides, some of them can possess pyroelectric and piezoelectric properties. Our results can be used for nanoelectronics and nanoelectromechanical devices designing.

  8. Low-frequency features of the ultrasound echo from an adhesively bonded layer-substrate structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaomin; LI Mingxuan; MAO Jie; LIAN Guoxuan

    2005-01-01

    The low-frequency features of the ultrasound reflection spectra from the structure of a single layer on a substrate bonded by a thin adhesive layer are theoretically studied; the low-frequency here means the frequency of the interrogating ultrasonic wave is less than the quart-wavelength resonance frequency of the adhesive layer. The possibility of the inversion of the thickness and the evaluation of the cohesion strength of the adhesive layer from the resonance frequency shifts of the layered system is indicated. An analytic solution to the nonlinear equation satisfied by the resonance frequency is presented by Taylor expansion method showing satisfactory agreement with the numerical results by Newton iterative method. The results indicate larger range for application than the traditional spring model for the thin adhesive layer. In a much lower frequency range the thin adhesive layer may be regarded to be a spring.

  9. Stability of Complex Biomolecular Structures: Vander Waals, Hydrogen Bond Cooperativity, and Nuclear Quantum Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Mariana; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Biomolecules are complex systems stabilized by a delicate balance of weak interactions, making it important to assess all energetic contributions in an accurate manner. However, it is a priori unclear which contributions make more of an impact. Here, we examine stacked polyglutamine (polyQ) strands, a peptide repeat often found in amyloid aggregates. We investigate the role of hydrogen bond (HB) cooperativity, van der Waals (vdW) dispersion interactions, and quantum contributions to free energies, including anharmonicities through density functional theory and ab initio path integral simulations. Of these various factors, we find that the largest impact on structural stabilization comes from vdW interactions. HB cooperativity is the second largest contribution as the size of the stacked chain grows. Competing nuclear quantum effects make the net quantum contribution small but very sensitive to anharmonicities, vdW, and the number of HBs. Our results suggest that a reliable treatment of these systems can only ...

  10. Probing the bonding and structures of metal-organic radicals with zero energy electrons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG DongSheng

    2012-01-01

    Metal-organic radicals are reactive and transient because of the existence of unpaired valence electrons,and thus the characterization of these open-shell systems is challenging.In our work,the radicals are synthesized by the reaction of bare metal atoms and organic ligands in a laser-vaporization supersonic molecular beam source and characterized with pulsed-field ionization zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy.The molecular beam ZEKE technique routinely yields sub-meV spectral resolution and is a powerful means to study the molecular bonding and structures.This account presents several examples of single-photon ZEKE spectroscopic applications in determining metal binding modes and molecular conformations.

  11. Electronic structure of planar-quasicycled organic molecules with intramolecular hydrogen bond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXEI N. PANKRATOV

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available By means of the HF/6-311G(d,p method, the electronic structure of the series of organic molecules, among which are malonaldehyde, acetylacetone, thiomalonaldehyde,’the derivatives of aniline 2-XC6H4NH2, phenol 2-XC6H4OH, benzenethiol 2-XC6H4SH (X = CHO, COOH, COO-, NO, NO2, OH, OCH3, SH, SCH3, F, Cl, Br, 8-hydroxyquinoline, 8-mercaptoquinoline, tropolone, has been studied. The intramolecular hydrogen bond (IHB has been established to lead to a local electron redistribution in quasicycle, and primarily to the electron density transfer between the direct IHB participants – from the hydrogen atom toward the proton-aceptor atom. On forming the IHB of the S–H···O type, the electron density in general decreases on the sulphohydryl hydrogen atom and increases on the sulphur atom.

  12. Structural Basis for Error-free Replication of Oxidatively Damaged DNA by Yeast DNA Polymerase eta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T Silverstein; R Jain; R Johnson; L Prakash; S Prakash; A Aggarwal

    2011-12-31

    7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) adducts are formed frequently by the attack of oxygen-free radicals on DNA. They are among the most mutagenic lesions in cells because of their dual coding potential, where, in addition to normal base-pairing of 8-oxoG(anti) with dCTP, 8-oxoG in the syn conformation can base pair with dATP, causing G to T transversions. We provide here for the first time a structural basis for the error-free replication of 8-oxoG lesions by yeast DNA polymerase {eta} (Pol{eta}). We show that the open active site cleft of Pol{eta} can accommodate an 8-oxoG lesion in the anti conformation with only minimal changes to the polymerase and the bound DNA: at both the insertion and post-insertion steps of lesion bypass. Importantly, the active site geometry remains the same as in the undamaged complex and provides a basis for the ability of Pol to prevent the mutagenic replication of 8-oxoG lesions in cells.

  13. Agarose Gel Electrophoresis Reveals Structural Fluidity of a Phage T3 DNA Packaging Intermediate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serwer, Philip; Wright, Elena T.

    2012-01-01

    We find a new aspect of DNA packaging-associated structural fluidity for phage T3 capsids. The procedure is (1) glutaraldehyde cross-linking of in vivo DNA packaging intermediates for stabilization of structure and then (2) determining of effective radius by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis (2d-AGE). The intermediates are capsids with incompletely packaged DNA (ipDNA) and without an external DNA segment; these intermediates are called ipDNA-capsids. We initially increase production of ipDNA-capsids by raising NaCl concentration during in vivo DNA packaging. By 2d-AGE, we find a new state of contracted shell for some particles of one previously identified ipDNA-capsid. The contracted shell-state is found when ipDNA length/mature DNA length (F) is above 0.17, but not at lower F. Some contracted-shell ipDNA-capsids have the phage tail; others do not. The contracted-shell ipDNA-capsids are explained by premature DNA maturation cleavage that makes accessible a contracted-shell intermediate of a cycle of the T3 DNA packaging motor. The analysis of ipDNA-capsids, rather than intermediates with uncleaved DNA, provides a simplifying strategy for a complete biochemical analysis of in vivo DNA packaging. PMID:22222979

  14. Microsolvation of methylmercury: structures, energies, bonding and NMR constants ((199)Hg, (13)C and (17)O).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez, Edison; Maldonado, Alejandro F; Aucar, Gustavo A; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2016-01-21

    Hartree-Fock (HF) and second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations within the scalar and full relativistic frames were carried out in order to determine the equilibrium geometries and interaction energies between cationic methylmercury (CH3Hg(+)) and up to three water molecules. A total of nine structures were obtained. Bonding properties were analyzed using the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). The analyses of the topology of electron densities reveal that all structures exhibit a partially covalent HgO interaction between methylmercury and one water molecule. Consideration of additional water molecules suggests that they solvate the (CH3HgOH2)(+) unit. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants σ((199)Hg), σ((13)C) and σ((17)O), as well as indirect spin-spin coupling constants J((199)Hg-(13)C), J((199)Hg-(17)O) and J((13)C-(17)O), were calculated for each one of the geometries. Thermodynamic stability and the values of NMR constants correlate with the ability of the system to directly coordinate oxygen atoms of water molecules to the mercury atom in methylmercury and with the formation of hydrogen bonds among solvating water molecules. Relativistic effects account for 11% on σ((13)C) and 14% on σ((17)O), which is due to the presence of Hg (heavy atom on light atom, HALA effect), while the relativistic effects on σ((199)Hg) are close to 50% (heavy atom on heavy atom itself, HAHA effect). J-coupling constants are highly influenced by relativity when mercury is involved as in J((199)Hg-(13)C) and J((199)Hg-(17)O). On the other hand, our results show that the values of NMR constants for carbon and oxygen, atoms which are connected through mercury (C-HgO), are highly correlated and are greatly influenced by the presence of water molecules. Water molecules introduce additional electronic effects to the relativistic effects due to the mercury atom.

  15. Rapid bonding of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to various stereolithographically (STL) structurable epoxy resins using photochemically cross-linked intermediary siloxane layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Elisabeth; Neumann, Christiane; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Länge, Kerstin; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a fast, low cost bonding technology for combining rigid epoxy components with soft membranes made out of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Both materials are commonly used for microfluidic prototyping. Epoxy resins are often applied when rigid channels are required, that will not deform if exposed to high pressure. PDMS, on the other hand, is a flexible material, which allows integration of membrane valves on the chip. However, the integration of pressure driven components, such as membrane valves and pumps, into a completely flexible device leads to pressure losses. In order to build up pressure driven components with maximum energy efficiency a combination of rigid guiding channels and flexible membranes would be advisable. Stereolithographic (STL) structuring would be an ideal fabrication technique for this purpose, because complex 3D-channels structures can easily be fabricated using this technology. Unfortunately, the STL epoxies cannot be bonded using common bonding techniques. For this reason we propose two UV-light based silanization techniques that enable plasma induced bonding of epoxy components. The entire process including silanization and corona discharge bonding can be carried out within half an hour. Average bond strengths up to 350 kPa (depending on the silane) were determined in ISO-conform tensile testing. The applicability of both techniques for microfluidic applications was proven by hydrolytic stability testing lasting more than 40 hours.

  16. Bonding Ni-Cr alloy to tooth structure with adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penugonda, B; Scherer, W; Cooper, H; Kokoletsos, N; Koifman, V

    1992-01-01

    This study was to determine the shear bond strengths of Ni-Cr alloy to Ni-Cr alloy (Group I), Ni-Cr alloy to enamel (Group II), and Ni-Cr alloy to dentin (Group III) using Imperva Dual, DC Metabond, All-Bond, Geristore, and Panavia. All bonded specimens were thermocycled 2000 x (5 degrees C-55 degrees C) after 24 hours and subjected to shear bond testing on a Universal Instron Testing Machine. In all groups of the study, Imperva Dual and CB Metabond had significantly (p bond values than Panavia.

  17. Effects of dimethyl sulfoxide on the hydrogen bonding structure and dynamics of aqueous N-methylacetamide solution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    APRAMITA CHAND; SNEHASIS CHOWDHURI

    2016-06-01

    Effects of dimethyl-sulfoxide (DMSO) on the hydrogen bonding structure and dynamics in aqueousN-methylacetamide (NMA) solution are investigated by classical molecular dynamics simulations. Themodifications of structure and interaction between water and NMA in presence of DMSO molecules are calculatedby various site-site radial distribution functions and average interaction energies between these speciesin the solution. It is observed that the aqueous peptide hydrogen bond interaction is relatively stronger withincreasing concentration of DMSO, whereas methyl-methyl interaction between NMA and DMSO decreasessignificantly. The DMSO molecule prefers to interact with amide-hydrogen of NMA even at lower DMSO concentration.The lifetimes and structural-relaxation times of NMA-water, water-water and DMSO-water hydrogenbonds are found to increase with increasing DMSO concentration in the solution. The slower translationaland rotational dynamics of NMA is observed in concentrated DMSO solution due to formation of strongerinter-species hydrogen bonds in the solution.

  18. Holliday junction-containing DNA structures persist in cells lacking Sgs1 or Top3 following exposure to DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mankouri, Hocine W; Ashton, Thomas M; Hickson, Ian D

    2011-01-01

    The Sgs1-Rmi1-Top3 "dissolvasome" is required for the maintenance of genome stability and has been implicated in the processing of various types of DNA structures arising during DNA replication. Previous investigations have revealed that unprocessed (X-shaped) homologous recombination repair (HRR......) intermediates persist when S-phase is perturbed by using methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with impaired Sgs1 or Top3. However, the precise nature of these persistent DNA structures remains poorly characterized. Here, we report that ectopic expression of either of two heterologous...... and structurally unrelated Holliday junction (HJ) resolvases, Escherichia coli RusA or human GEN1(1-527), promotes the removal of these X-structures in vivo. Moreover, other types of DNA replication intermediates, including stalled replication forks and non-HRR-dependent X-structures, are refractory to RusA or GEN...

  19. Monogamy, strongly bonded groups, and the evolution of human social structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapais, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Human social evolution has most often been treated in a piecemeal fashion, with studies focusing on the evolution of specific components of human society such as pair-bonding, cooperative hunting, male provisioning, grandmothering, cooperative breeding, food sharing, male competition, male violence, sexual coercion, territoriality, and between-group conflicts. Evolutionary models about any one of those components are usually concerned with two categories of questions, one relating to the origins of the component and the other to its impact on the evolution of human cognition and social life. Remarkably few studies have been concerned with the evolution of the entity that integrates all components, the human social system itself. That social system has as its core feature human social structure, which I define here as the common denominator of all human societies in terms of group composition, mating system, residence patterns, and kinship structures. The paucity of information on the evolution of human social structure poses substantial problems because that information is useful, if not essential, to assess both the origins and impact of any particular aspect of human society.

  20. Construction of DNA logic gates utilizing a H+/Ag+ induced i-motif structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunhua; Sun, Hongxia; Xiang, Junfeng; Chen, Hongbo; Yang, Qianfan; Guan, Aijiao; Li, Qian; Yu, Lijia; Tang, Yalin

    2014-12-18

    A simple technology to construct diverse DNA logic gates (OR and INHIBIT) has been designed utilizing a H(+) and/or Ag(+) induced i-motif structure. The logic gates are easily controlled and also show a real time response towards inputs. The research provides a new insight for designing DNA logic gates using an i-motif DNA structure.

  1. Structural Basis for the Versatile and Methylation-Dependent Binding of CTCF to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Wang, Dongxue; Horton, John R; Zhang, Xing; Corces, Victor G; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2017-06-01

    The multidomain CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), containing a tandem array of 11 zinc fingers (ZFs), modulates the three-dimensional organization of chromatin. We crystallized the human CTCF DNA-binding domain in complex with a known CTCF-binding site. While ZF2 does not make sequence-specific contacts, each finger of ZF3-7 contacts three bases of the 15-bp consensus sequence. Each conserved nucleotide makes base-specific hydrogen bonds with a particular residue. Most of the variable base pairs within the core sequence also engage in interactions with the protein. These interactions compensate for deviations from the consensus sequence, allowing CTCF to adapt to sequence variations. CTCF is sensitive to cytosine methylation at position 2, but insensitive at position 12 of the 15-bp core sequence. These differences can be rationalized structurally. Although included in crystallizations, ZF10 and ZF11 are not visible, while ZF8 and ZF9 span the backbone of the DNA duplex, conferring no sequence specificity but adding to overall binding stability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural analysis of the dnaA and dnaN genes of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, H; Kimura, M; Nagata, T; Sakakibara, Y

    1984-05-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the entire region containing the Escherichia coli dnaA and dnaN genes was determined. Base substitutions by such mutations as dnaA46, dnaA167, dnaN59, and dnaN806 were also identified. Analyses of coding frames, the mutational base substitutions, and other data indicate that dnaN follows dnaA, both have the same orientation, and are separated by only 4 bp. The deduced amino acid sequence specifies Mrs and isoelectric points consistent with those of the previously identified gene products. The transcriptional initiation site of the dnaA gene was assigned by analysis of in vitro RNA products. Examination of the intercistronic sequence and analysis of in vitro transcription supported the notion that the dnaA and dnaN genes constitute a single operon.

  3. Organizing DNA origami tiles into larger structures using preformed scaffold frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2011-07-13

    Structural DNA nanotechnology utilizes DNA molecules as programmable information-coding polymers to create higher order structures at the nanometer scale. An important milestone in structural DNA nanotechnology was the development of scaffolded DNA origami in which a long single-stranded viral genome (scaffold strand) is folded into arbitrary shapes by hundreds of short synthetic oligonucleotides (staple strands). The achievable dimensions of the DNA origami tile units are currently limited by the length of the scaffold strand. Here we demonstrate a strategy referred to as "superorigami" or "origami of origami" to scale up DNA origami technology. First, this method uses a collection of bridge strands to prefold a single-stranded DNA scaffold into a loose framework. Subsequently, preformed individual DNA origami tiles are directed onto the loose framework so that each origami tile serves as a large staple. Using this strategy, we demonstrate the ability to organize DNA origami nanostructures into larger spatially addressable architectures.

  4. Fructosylation induced structural changes in mammalian DNA examined by biophysical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Asif; Arif, Zarina; Alam, Khursheed

    2017-03-01

    Glycosylation of DNA, proteins, lipids, etc. by reducing sugars, can lead to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). These products may accumulate and involve in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, contributing to tissue injury via several mechanisms. In this study, fructosylation of calf thymus dsDNA was carried out with varying concentrations of fructose. The neo-structure of fructosylated-DNA was studied by various biophysical techniques and morphological characterization. Fructosylated-DNA showed hyperchromicity, increase in fluorescence intensity and decrease in melting temperature. The CD signal of modified-DNA shifted in the direction of higher wavelength indicative of structural changes in DNA. FTIR results indicated shift in specific band positions in fructosylated-DNA. Morphological characterization of fructosylated-DNA exhibited strand breakage and aggregation. The results suggest that the structure and conformation of DNA may be altered under high concentrations of fructose.

  5. Structures of a CRISPR-Cas9 R-loop complex primed for DNA cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fuguo; Taylor, David W; Chen, Janice S; Kornfeld, Jack E; Zhou, Kaihong; Thompson, Aubri J; Nogales, Eva; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-02-19

    Bacterial adaptive immunity and genome engineering involving the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-associated (Cas) protein Cas9 begin with RNA-guided DNA unwinding to form an RNA-DNA hybrid and a displaced DNA strand inside the protein. The role of this R-loop structure in positioning each DNA strand for cleavage by the two Cas9 nuclease domains is unknown. We determine molecular structures of the catalytically active Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 R-loop that show the displaced DNA strand located near the RuvC nuclease domain active site. These protein-DNA interactions, in turn, position the HNH nuclease domain adjacent to the target DNA strand cleavage site in a conformation essential for concerted DNA cutting. Cas9 bends the DNA helix by 30°, providing the structural distortion needed for R-loop formation.

  6. Engineering the Structure and Properties of DNA-Nanoparticle Superstructures Using Polyvalent Counterions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Leo Y T; Song, Fayi; Chan, Warren C W

    2016-04-06

    DNA assembly of nanoparticles is a powerful approach to control their properties and prototype new materials. However, the structure and properties of DNA-assembled nanoparticles are labile and sensitive to interactions with counterions, which vary with processing and application environment. Here we show that substituting polyamines in place of elemental counterions significantly enhanced the structural rigidity and plasmonic properties of DNA-assembled metal nanoparticles. These effects arose from the ability of polyamines to condense DNA and cross-link DNA-coated nanoparticles. We further used polyamine wrapped DNA nanostructures as structural templates to seed the growth of polymer multilayers via layer-by-layer assembly, and controlled the degree of DNA condensation, plasmon coupling efficiency, and material responsiveness to environmental stimuli by varying polyelectrolyte composition. These results highlight counterion engineering as a versatile strategy to tailor the properties of DNA-nanoparticle assemblies for various applications, and should be applicable to other classes of DNA nanostructures.

  7. Stretched and overwound DNA forms a Pauling-like structure with exposed bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, J F; Bensimon, D; Lavery, R; Croquette, V

    1998-11-24

    We investigate structural transitions within a single stretched and supercoiled DNA molecule. With negative supercoiling, for a stretching force >0.3 pN, we observe the coexistence of B-DNA and denatured DNA from sigma approximately -0.015 down to sigma = -1. Surprisingly, for positively supercoiled DNA (sigma > +0.037) stretched by 3 pN, we observe a similar coexistence of B-DNA and a new, highly twisted structure. Experimental data and molecular modeling suggest that this structure has approximately 2.62 bases per turn and an extension 75% larger than B-DNA. This structure has tightly interwound phosphate backbones and exposed bases in common with Pauling's early DNA structure [Pauling, L. & Corey, R. B. (1953), Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 39, 84-97] and an unusual structure proposed for the Pf1 bacteriophage [Liu, D. J. & Day, L. A. (1994) Science 265, 671-674].

  8. High-resolution crystal structures of protein helices reconciled with three-centered hydrogen bonds and multipole electrostatics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kuster

    Full Text Available Theoretical and experimental evidence for non-linear hydrogen bonds in protein helices is ubiquitous. In particular, amide three-centered hydrogen bonds are common features of helices in high-resolution crystal structures of proteins. These high-resolution structures (1.0 to 1.5 Å nominal crystallographic resolution position backbone atoms without significant bias from modeling constraints and identify Φ = -62°, ψ = -43 as the consensus backbone torsional angles of protein helices. These torsional angles preserve the atomic positions of α-β carbons of the classic Pauling α-helix while allowing the amide carbonyls to form bifurcated hydrogen bonds as first suggested by Némethy et al. in 1967. Molecular dynamics simulations of a capped 12-residue oligoalanine in water with AMOEBA (Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Applications, a second-generation force field that includes multipole electrostatics and polarizability, reproduces the experimentally observed high-resolution helical conformation and correctly reorients the amide-bond carbonyls into bifurcated hydrogen bonds. This simple modification of backbone torsional angles reconciles experimental and theoretical views to provide a unified view of amide three-centered hydrogen bonds as crucial components of protein helices. The reason why they have been overlooked by structural biologists depends on the small crankshaft-like changes in orientation of the amide bond that allows maintenance of the overall helical parameters (helix pitch (p and residues per turn (n. The Pauling 3.6(13 α-helix fits the high-resolution experimental data with the minor exception of the amide-carbonyl electron density, but the previously associated backbone torsional angles (Φ, Ψ needed slight modification to be reconciled with three-atom centered H-bonds and multipole electrostatics. Thus, a new standard helix, the 3.6(13/10-, Némethy- or N-helix, is proposed. Due to the use of

  9. High-resolution crystal structures of protein helices reconciled with three-centered hydrogen bonds and multipole electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Daniel J; Liu, Chengyu; Fang, Zheng; Ponder, Jay W; Marshall, Garland R

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental evidence for non-linear hydrogen bonds in protein helices is ubiquitous. In particular, amide three-centered hydrogen bonds are common features of helices in high-resolution crystal structures of proteins. These high-resolution structures (1.0 to 1.5 Å nominal crystallographic resolution) position backbone atoms without significant bias from modeling constraints and identify Φ = -62°, ψ = -43 as the consensus backbone torsional angles of protein helices. These torsional angles preserve the atomic positions of α-β carbons of the classic Pauling α-helix while allowing the amide carbonyls to form bifurcated hydrogen bonds as first suggested by Némethy et al. in 1967. Molecular dynamics simulations of a capped 12-residue oligoalanine in water with AMOEBA (Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Applications), a second-generation force field that includes multipole electrostatics and polarizability, reproduces the experimentally observed high-resolution helical conformation and correctly reorients the amide-bond carbonyls into bifurcated hydrogen bonds. This simple modification of backbone torsional angles reconciles experimental and theoretical views to provide a unified view of amide three-centered hydrogen bonds as crucial components of protein helices. The reason why they have been overlooked by structural biologists depends on the small crankshaft-like changes in orientation of the amide bond that allows maintenance of the overall helical parameters (helix pitch (p) and residues per turn (n)). The Pauling 3.6(13) α-helix fits the high-resolution experimental data with the minor exception of the amide-carbonyl electron density, but the previously associated backbone torsional angles (Φ, Ψ) needed slight modification to be reconciled with three-atom centered H-bonds and multipole electrostatics. Thus, a new standard helix, the 3.6(13/10)-, Némethy- or N-helix, is proposed. Due to the use of constraints from

  10. Double-bridge bonding of aluminium and hydrogen in the crystal structure of gamma-AlH3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yartys, Volodymyr A; Denys, Roman V; Maehlen, Jan Petter; Frommen, Christoph; Fichtner, Maximilian; Bulychev, Boris M; Emerich, Hermann

    2007-02-19

    Aluminum trihydride (alane) is one of the most promising among the prospective solid hydrogen-storage materials, with a high gravimetric and volumetric density of hydrogen. In the present work, the alane, crystallizing in the gamma-AlH3 polymorphic modification, was synthesized and then structurally characterized by means of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. This study revealed that gamma-AlH3 crystallizes with an orthorhombic unit cell (space group Pnnm, a = 5.3806(1) A, b = 7.3555(2) A, c = 5.77509(5) A). The crystal structure of gamma-AlH3 contains two types of AlH6 octahedra as the building blocks. The Al-H bond distances in the structure vary in the range of 1.66-1.79 A. A prominent feature of the crystal structure is the formation of the bifurcated double-bridge bonds, Al-2H-Al, in addition to the normal bridge bonds, Al-H-Al. This former feature has not been previously reported for Al-containing hydrides so far. The geometry of the double-bridge bond shows formation of short Al-Al (2.606 A) and Al-H (1.68-1.70 A) bonds compared to the Al-Al distances in Al metal (2.86 A) and Al-H distances for Al atoms involved in the formation of normal bridge bonds (1.769-1.784 A). The crystal structure of gamma-AlH3 contains large cavities between the AlH6 octahedra. As a consequence, the density is 11% less than for alpha-AlH3.

  11. Statistically significant dependence of the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation on secondary structure and amino acid sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leitner Dietmar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A reliable prediction of the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation would be a useful tool for many protein structure calculation methods. We have analyzed the Protein Data Bank and show that the combined use of sequential and structural information has a predictive value for the assessment of the cis versus trans peptide bond conformation of Xaa-Pro within proteins. For the analysis of the data sets different statistical methods such as the calculation of the Chou-Fasman parameters and occurrence matrices were used. Furthermore we analyzed the relationship between the relative solvent accessibility and the relative occurrence of prolines in the cis and in the trans conformation. Results One of the main results of the statistical investigations is the ranking of the secondary structure and sequence information with respect to the prediction of the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation. We observed a significant impact of secondary structure information on the occurrence of the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation, while the sequence information of amino acids neighboring proline is of little predictive value for the conformation of this bond. Conclusion In this work, we present an extensive analysis of the occurrence of the cis and trans proline conformation in proteins. Based on the data set, we derived patterns and rules for a possible prediction of the proline conformation. Upon adoption of the Chou-Fasman parameters, we are able to derive statistically relevant correlations between the secondary structure of amino acid fragments and the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation.

  12. In situ structure and dynamics of DNA origami determined through molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2013-12-10

    The DNA origami method permits folding of long single-stranded DNA into complex 3D structures with subnanometer precision. Transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and recently cryo-EM tomography have been used to characterize the properties of such DNA origami objects, however their microscopic structures and dynamics have remained unknown. Here, we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations that characterized the structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects in unprecedented microscopic detail. When simulated in an aqueous environment, the structures of DNA origami objects depart from their idealized targets as a result of steric, electrostatic, and solvent-mediated forces. Whereas the global structural features of such relaxed conformations conform to the target designs, local deformations are abundant and vary in magnitude along the structures. In contrast to their free-solution conformation, the Holliday junctions in the DNA origami structures adopt a left-handed antiparallel conformation. We find the DNA origami structures undergo considerable temporal fluctuations on both local and global scales. Analysis of such structural fluctuations reveals the local mechanical properties of the DNA origami objects. The lattice type of the structures considerably affects global mechanical properties such as bending rigidity. Our study demonstrates the potential of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to play a considerable role in future development of the DNA origami field by providing accurate, quantitative assessment of local and global structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects.

  13. Structure-function studies of an unusual 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II (AlkA) from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Elin; Hall, David R; Leiros, Ingar; Monsen, Vivi Talstad; Timmins, Joanna; McSweeney, Sean

    2012-06-01

    3-Methyladenine DNA glycosylase II (AlkA) is a DNA-repair enzyme that removes alkylated bases in DNA via the base-excision repair (BER) pathway. The enzyme belongs to the helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) superfamily of DNA glycosylases and possesses broad substrate specificity. In the genome of Deinococcus radiodurans, two genes encoding putative AlkA have been identified (Dr_2074 and Dr_2584). Dr_2074 is a homologue of human AlkA (MPG or AAG) and Dr_2584 is a homologue of bacterial AlkAs. Here, the three-dimensional structure of Dr_2584 (DrAlkA2) is presented and compared with the previously determined structure of Escherichia coli AlkA (EcAlkA). The results show that the enzyme consists of two helical-bundle domains separated by a wide DNA-binding cleft and contains an HhH motif. Overall, the protein fold is similar to the two helical-bundle domains of EcAlkA, while the third N-terminal mixed α/β domain observed in EcAlkA is absent. Substrate-specificity analyses show that DrAlkA2, like EcAlkA, is able to remove both 3-methyladenine (3meA) and 7-methylguanine (7meG) from DNA; however, the enzyme possesses no activity towards 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (ℇA) and hypoxanthine (Hx). In addition, it shows activity towards the AlkB dioxygenase substrates 3-methylcytosine (3meC) and 1-methyladenine (1meA). Thus, the enzyme seems to preferentially repair methylated bases with weakened N-glycosidic bonds; this is an unusual specificity for a bacterial AlkA protein and is probably dictated by a combination of the wide DNA-binding cleft and a highly accessible specificity pocket.

  14. Influence of Copper Oxidation State on the Bonding and Electronic Structure of Cobalt-Copper Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenhart, Reed J.; Carlson, Rebecca K.; Clouston, Laura J.; Young, Jr., Victor G.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Bill, Eckhard; Gagliardi, Laura; Lu, Connie C. (UC); (UMM); (MXPL)

    2016-03-04

    Heterobimetallic complexes that pair cobalt and copper were synthesized and characterized by a suite of physical methods, including X-ray diffraction, X-ray anomalous scattering, cyclic voltammetry, magnetometry, electronic absorption spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance, and quantum chemical methods. Both Cu(II) and Cu(I) reagents were independently added to a Co(II) metalloligand to provide (py3tren)CoCuCl (1-Cl) and (py3tren)CoCu(CH3CN) (2-CH3CN), respectively, where py3tren is the triply deprotonated form of N,N,N-tris(2-(2-pyridylamino)ethyl)amine. Complex 2-CH3CN can lose the acetonitrile ligand to generate a coordination polymer consistent with the formula “(py3tren)CoCu” (2). One-electron chemical oxidation of 2-CH3CN with AgOTf generated (py3tren)CoCuOTf (1-OTf). The Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox couple for 1-OTf and 2-CH3CN is reversible at -0.56 and -0.33 V vs Fc+/Fc, respectively. The copper oxidation state impacts the electronic structure of the heterobimetallic core, as well as the nature of the Co–Cu interaction. Quantum chemical calculations showed modest electron delocalization in the (CoCu)+4 state via a Co–Cu σ bond that is weakened by partial population of the Co–Cu σ antibonding orbital. By contrast, no covalent Co–Cu bonding is predicted for the (CoCu)+3 analogue, and the d-electrons are fully localized at individual metals.

  15. The Synthesis, Structures, and Chemical Properties of Macrocyclic Ligands Covalently Bonded into Layered Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clearfield, Abraham [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2014-11-01

    In this part of the proposal we have concentrated on the surface functionalization of α-zirconium phosphate of composition Zr(O3POH)2•H2O. It is a layered compound that can be prepared as particles as small as 30 nm to single crystals in the range of cm. This compound is an ion exchanger with a capacity of 6.64 meq per gram. It finds use as a catalyst, proton conductor, sensors, biosensors, in kidney dialysis and drug delivery. By functionalizing the surface additional uses are contemplated as will be described. The layers consist of the metal, with 4+ charge, that is positioned slightly above and below the mean layer plane and bridged by three of the four phosphate oxygens. The remaining POH groups point into the interlayer space creating double rows of POH groups but single arrays on the surface layers. The surface groups are reactive and we were able to bond silanes, isocyanates, epoxides, acrylates ` and phosphates to the surface POH groups. The layers are easily exfoliated or filled with ions by ion exchange or molecules by intercalation reactions. Highlights of our work include, in addition to direct functionalization of the surfaces, replacement of the protons on the surface with ions of different charge. This allows us to bond phosphates, biophosphates, phosphonic acids and alcohols to the surface. By variation of the ion charge of the ions that replace the surface protons, different surface structures are obtained. We have already shown that polymer fillers, catalysts and Janus particles may be prepared. The combination of surface functionalization with the ability to insert molecules and ions between the layers allow for a rich development of numerous useful other applications as well as nano-surface chemistry.

  16. π-Bonded dithiolene complexes: synthesis, molecular structures, electrochemical behavior, and density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damas, Aurélie; Chamoreau, Lise-Marie; Cooksy, Andrew L; Jutand, Anny; Amouri, Hani

    2013-02-04

    The synthesis and X-ray molecular structure of the first metal-stabilized o-dithiobenzoquinone [Cp*Ir-o-(η(4)-C(6)H(4)S(2))] (2) are described. The presence of the metal stabilizes this elusive intermediate by π coordination and increases the nucleophilic character of the sulfur atoms. Indeed, the π-bonded dithiolene complex 2 was found to react with the organometallic solvated species [Cp*M(acetone)(3)][OTf](2) (M = Rh, Ir) to give a unique class of binuclear dithiolene compounds [Cp*Ir(C(6)H(4)S(2))MCp*][OTf](2) [M = Rh (3), Ir (4)] in which the elusive dithiolene η-C(6)H(4)S(2) acts as a bridging ligand toward the two Cp*M moieties. The electrochemical behavior of all complexes was investigated and provided us with valuable information about their redox properties. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on the π-bonded dithiobenzoquinone ligand and related bimetallic systems show that the presence of Cp*M at the arene system of the dithiolene ligand increases the stability compared to the known monomeric species [Cp*Ir-o-(C(6)H(4)S(2)-κ(2)-S,S)] and enables these complexes Cp*Ir(C(6)H(4)S(2))MCp*][OTf](2) (3 and 4) to act as electron reservoirs. Time-dependent DFT calculations also predict the qualitative trends in the experimental UV-vis spectra and indicate that the strongest transitions arise from ligand-metal charge transfer involving primarily the HOMO-1 and LUMO. All of these compounds were fully characterized and identified by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. These results illustrate the first examples describing the coordination chemistry of the elusive o-dithiobenzoquinone to yield bimetallic complexes with an o-benzodithiolene ligand. These compounds might have important applications in the area of molecular materials.

  17. Electronic structure, bonding, spectra, and linear and nonlinear electric properties of Ti@C28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skwara, Bartłomiej; Góra, Robert W; Zaleśny, Robert; Lipkowski, Paweł; Bartkowiak, Wojciech; Reis, Heribert; Papadopoulos, Manthos G; Luis, Josep M; Kirtman, Bernard

    2011-09-22

    The potential energy surface (PES) of Ti@C(28) has been revisited, and the stationary points have been carefully characterized. In particular, the C(2v) symmetry structure considered previously turns out to be a transition state lying 2.3 kcal/mol above the ground state of C(3v) symmetry at the MP2/6-31G(d) level. A large binding energy of 181.3 kcal/mol is found at the ROMP2/6-31G(d) level. Topological analysis of the generalized Ti@C(28) density reveals four bond paths between Ti and carbon atoms of the host. The character of all four contacts corresponds to a partially covalent closed shell interaction. UV-vis, IR, and Raman spectra are calculated and compared with C(28)H(4). The dipole moment and the static electronic and double harmonic vibrational (hyper)polarizabilities have been obtained. Distortion of the fullerene cage due to encapsulation leads to nonzero diagonal components of the electronic first hyperpolarizability β, and to an increase in the diagonal components of the electronic polarizability α and second hyperpolarizability γ. However, introduction of the Ti atom causes a comparable or larger reduction in most cases due to localized bonding interactions. At the double harmonic level, the average vibrational β is much larger than its electronic counterpart, but the opposite is true for α and for the contribution to γ that has been calculated. There is also a very large anharmonic (nuclear relaxation) contribution to β which results from a shallow PES with four minima separated by very low barriers. Thus, the vibrational γ (and α) may, likewise, become much larger when anharmonicity is taken into account. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  18. Valence XPS structure and chemical bond in Cs2UO2Cl4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis was done of the valence electrons X-ray photoelectron spectra structure in the binding energy (BE range of 0 eV to ~35 eV for crystalline dicaesium tetrachloro-dioxouranium (VI (Cs2UO2Cl4. This compound contains the uranyl group UO2. The BE and structure of the core electronic shells (~35 eV-1250 eV, as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the UO2Cl4(D4h cluster reflecting U close environment in Cs2UO2Cl4 were taken into account. The experimental data show that many-body effects due to the presence of cesium and chlorine contribute to the outer valence (0-~15 eV BE spectral structure much less than to the inner valence (~15 eV-~35 eV BE one. The filled U5f electronic states were theoretically calculated and experimentally confirmed to be present in the valence band of Cs2UO2Cl4. It corroborates the suggestion on the direct participation of the U5f electrons in the chemical bond. Electrons of the U6p atomic orbitals participate in formation of both the inner (IVMO and the outer (OVMO valence molecular orbitals (bands. The filled U6p and the O2s, Cl3s electronic shells were found to make the largest contributions to the IVMO formation. The molecular orbitals composition and the sequence order in the binding energy range 0 eV-~35 eV in the UO2Cl4 cluster were established. The experimental and theoretical data allowed a quantitative molecular orbitals scheme for the UO2Cl4 cluster in the BE range 0-~35 eV, which is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in Cs2UO2Cl4 and the interpretation of other X-ray spectra of Cs2UO2Cl4. The contributions to the chemical binding for the UO2Cl4 cluster were evaluated to be: the OVMO contribution - 76%, and the IVMO contribution - 24 %.

  19. Composite resin bond strength to tooth structure treated with an erbium,chromium:YSGG-laser-powered hydrokinetic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sean; Caputo, Angelo A.; Rizoiu, Ioana-Mihaela; Eversole, Lewis R.

    1998-04-01

    Er;YAG and Er,Cr;YSGG Lasers that emit in the near red wave lengths cut both enamel and dentine. Dental preparations are often restored with composite resins that bond to enamel. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the shear strength of composite resin bonded to tooth structure cut by an Er,Cr;YSGG powered hydrokinetic system (HKS), (Millennium SystemTM, BioLase Technology, Inc, San Clemente, CA) as compared to surfaces cut with a carbide bur. Extracted human molars devoid of caries and restorations were treated with both systems, with and without acid etching. Shear bond strengths (SBS) for composite resin adherence to these surfaces were measured and compared. There was no significant difference between bur and HKS prepared surfaces in the etched enamel group. The SBS for composite bonded to nonetched enamel was significantly higher with the HKS treatment compared with the bur cut surfaces. There were no significant differences between acid etched bur cut and non etched HKS enamel surfaces. Bonded to nonetched dentin was found to be higher for bur cut surfaces. It is concluded that the Er,Cr;YSGG hydrokinetic system produces surface characteristics that allow for adequate bonding of composite resin to both etched and nonetched enamel.

  20. Phase reaction of Au/Sn solder bonding for GaN-based vertical structure light emitting diodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Au/Sn solder bonding on Si substrates was used to fabricate the GaN-based vertical structure light emitting diodes (VSLEDs). The phase reaction of Au/Sn solder under different bonding conditions was investigated by the measurement of electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD), and the characteristics of VSLED were analyzed by scanning acoustic microscope (SAM), Raman scattering, current-voltage (I-V) and light output-current (L-I) curves. After the bonding process, horizontal stripes of Au/Sn phase (δ phase) and Au5Sn phase (ζ phase) were redirected to vertical stripes, and δ phase tended to move to the solder joint. Sn interstitial diffusion led to the distribution of δ phase and voids in Au/Sn solder, which could be seen in SAM and SEM images. Vertical distribution of the δ phase and ζ phase with proper voids in the Au/Sn bonding layer showed the best bonding quality. Good bonding quality led to little shift of the E2-high mode of Raman spectra peak in GaN after laser lift off (LLO). It also caused more light extraction and forward bias reduction to 2.9 V at 20 mA.

  1. Valence electron structure and bonding features of RuB2 and OSB2: The empirical electron theory calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The valence electron structure (VES) of RuB2 and OsB2 were calculated by the empirical electron theory (EET) of solids and molecules and compared with the results derived from the first-principles calculations. The distributions of covalent electrons in different bonds indicate that B-B and B-Me have remarkably covalent bonding characters. Lattice electrons cruising around Me-Me layers are found to have great influences on electronic conductivity and high temperature plasticity. The ultra-high values of elastic constant Cn in the two compounds originate from close-packed covalent bonding along the c axis. Uneven bond strengths and distributions of covalent bonds, especially for B-Afe bonds, yield significant anisotropy. Low ratios of lattice electrons to covalent electrons suggest the intrinsic embrittlement in crystals. The fact that the calculated cohesive energies well agree with experimental results demonstrates the good suitability of the EET calculations in estimating cohesive energy for transition-metal borides.

  2. Cooperative intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded motif in the structure of 2:2 complex of TBD with 4-nitrocatechol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, S. W.; Naumov, P.; Chantrapromma, S.; Raj, S. S. S.; Fun, H.-K.; Ibrahim, A. R.; Wojciechowski, G.; Brzezinski, B.

    2001-07-01

    In the crystal of the 2:2 complex of 1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene with 4-nitrocatechol the proton from 1-hydroxyl group of 4-nitrocatechol moiety is transferred to TBD to form ion-pair; two adjacent ion-pairs are linked across a center of inversion. The structure exhibits a cooperative, intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded motif. The hydrogen bonds are relatively long and, and they display only minor proton polarizability. The structure of the complex is retained in chloroform solution, as shown by FT-IR and 1H NMR measurement; in acetonitrile, the compound partially dissociates. The partial dissociation is implied by the presence of free cations, and also by that of the (O⋯H⋯O) - hydrogen bonds formed between two mono-deprotonated 4-nitrocatechol molecules.

  3. Atomic Force Microscopy Studies on DNA Structural Changes Induced by Vincristine Sulfate and Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Zeng, Hu; Xie, Jianming; Ba, Long; Gao, Xiang; Lu, Zuhong

    2004-04-01

    We report that atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies on structural variations of a linear plasmid DNA interact with various concentrations of vincristine sulfate and aspirin. The different binding images show that vincrinstine sulfate binding DNA chains caused some loops and cleavages of the DNA fragments, whereas aspirin interaction caused the width changes and conformational transition of the DNA fragments. Two different DNA structural alternations could be explained by the different mechanisms of the interactions with these two components. Our work indicates that the AFM is a powerful tool in studying the interaction between DNA and small molecules.

  4. Synthesis, crystal structure, bonding, and properties of (Ba6O)(OsN3)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Carsten L; Wedig, Ulrich; Dinnebier, Robert; Jansen, Martin

    2008-11-13

    The new barium nitridoosmate oxide (Ba(6)O)(OsN(3))(2) was prepared by reacting elemental barium and osmium (3:1) in nitrogen at 815-830 degrees C. The crystal structure of (Ba(6)O)(OsN(3))(2) as determined by laboratory powder X-ray diffraction (R3, No 148: a = b = 8.112(1) A, c = 17.390(1) A, V = 991.0(1) A(3), Z = 3), consists of sheets of trigonal OsN(3) units and trigonal-antiprismatic Ba(6)O groups, and is structurally related to the "313 nitrides" AE(3)MN(3) (AE = Ca, Sr, Ba, M = V-Co, Ga). Density functional calculations, using a hybrid functional, likewise indicate the existence of oxygen in the Ba(6) polyhedra. The oxidation state 4+ of osmium is confirmed, both by the calculations and by XPS measurements. The bonding properties of the OsN(3)(5-) units are analyzed and compared to the Raman spectrum. The compound is paramagnetic from room temperature down to T = 10 K. Between room temperature and 100 K it obeys the Curie-Weiss law (mu = 1.68 mu(B)). (Ba(6)O)(OsN(3))(2) is semiconducting with a good electronic conductivity at room temperature (8.74x10(-2) ohms(-1) cm(-1)). Below 142 K the temperature dependence of the conductivity resembles that of a variable-range hopping mechanism.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA paradox: sex-specific genetic structure in a marine mussel--despite maternal inheritance and passive dispersal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teske, Peter R; Papadopoulos, Isabelle; Barker, Nigel P; McQuaid, Christopher D

    2012-01-01

    When genetic structure is identified using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but no structure is identified using biparentally-inherited nuclear DNA, the discordance is often attributed to differences in dispersal potential between the sexes...

  6. Effect of different surface treatments on bond strength, surface and microscopic structure of zirconia ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab R. El-Shrkawy

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: (1 Surface treatments of Y-TZP ceramic together with MDP primer and silane-coupling agent application improve the bond strength to resin cement. (2 Plasma-Silica coating and plasma-oxygen treatment, both are valuable methods that improve the bond strength of resin cement to Y-TZP ceramic. (3 Silica coating by plasma technology provides durable bond strength and can be a promising alternative pretreatment before silane application to enhance bonding with zirconia ceramic. (4 Tetragonal-monoclinic phase transformation had occurred in Y-TZP samples received both types of plasma treatment.

  7. Locking covalent organic frameworks with hydrogen bonds: general and remarkable effects on crystalline structure, physical properties, and photochemical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiong; Addicoat, Matthew; Jin, Enquan; Zhai, Lipeng; Xu, Hong; Huang, Ning; Guo, Zhaoqi; Liu, Lili; Irle, Stephan; Jiang, Donglin

    2015-03-11

    A series of two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks (2D COFs) locked with intralayer hydrogen-bonding (H-bonding) interactions were synthesized. The H-bonding interaction sites were located on the edge units of the imine-linked tetragonal porphyrin COFs, and the contents of the H-bonding sites in the COFs were synthetically tuned using a three-component condensation system. The intralayer H-bonding interactions suppress the torsion of the edge units and lock the tetragonal sheets in a planar conformation. This planarization enhances the interlayer interactions and triggers extended π-cloud delocalization over the 2D sheets. Upon AA stacking, the resulting COFs with layered 2D sheets amplify these effects and strongly affect the physical properties of the material, including improving their crystallinity, enhancing their porosity, increasing their light-harvesting capability, reducing their band gap, and enhancing their photocatalytic activity toward the generation of singlet oxygen. These remarkable effects on the structure and properties of the material were observed for both freebase and metalloporphyin COFs. These results imply that exploration of supramolecular ensembles would open a new approach to the structural and functional design of COFs.

  8. Intracellular Delivery of a Planar DNA Origami Structure by the Transferrin-Receptor Internalization Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaffert, David Henning; Okholm, Anders Hauge; Sørensen, Rasmus Schøler;

    2016-01-01

    DNA origami provides rapid access to easily functionalized, nanometer-sized structures making it an intriguing platform for the development of defined drug delivery and sensor systems. Low cellular uptake of DNA nanostructures is a major obstacle in the development of DNA-based delivery platforms....... Herein, significant strong increase in cellular uptake in an established cancer cell line by modifying a planar DNA origami structure with the iron transport protein transferrin (Tf) is demonstrated. A variable number of Tf molecules are coupled to the origami structure using a DNA-directed, site...... on the origami surface....

  9. Electronic structure and chemical bond nature in Cs2PuO2Cl4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis of dicaesiumtetrachlorodioxoplutonate (Cs2PuO2Cl4 single crystal was done in the binding energy range 0-~35 eV on the basis of binding energies and structure of the core electronic shells (~35 eV-1250 eV, as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the PuO2Cl4 (D4h. This cluster reflects Pu close environment in Cs2PuO2Cl4 containing the plutonyl group PuO2. The many-body effects due to the presence of cesium and chlorine were shown to contribute to the outer valence (0-~15 eV binding energy spectral structure much less than to the inner valence (~15 eV- ~35 eV binding energy one. The filled Pu 5f electronic states were theoretically calculated and experimentally con- firmed to present in the valence band of Cs2PuO2Cl4. It corroborates the suggestion on the direct participation of the Pu 5f electrons in the chemical bond. The Pu 6p atomic orbitals were shown to participate in formation of both the inner and the outer valence molecular orbitals (bands, while the filled Pu 6p and O 2s, Cl 3s electronic shells were found to take the largest part in formation of the inner valence molecular orbitals. The composition of molecular orbitals and the sequence order in the binding energy range 0-~35 eV in Cs2PuO2Cl4 were established. The quantitative scheme of molecular orbitals for Cs2PuO2Cl4 in the binding energy range 0-~15 eV was built on the basis of the experimental and theoretical data. It is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in Cs2PuO2Cl4 and the interpretation of other X-ray spectra of Cs2PuO2Cl4. The contributions to the chemical binding for the PuO2Cl4 cluster were evaluated to be: the contribution of the outer valence molecular orbitals -66 %, the contribution of the inner valence molecular orbitals -34 %.

  10. The structure of a DnaA/HobA complex from Helicobacter pylori provides insight into regulation of DNA replication in bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Natrajan, Ganesh; Noirot-Gros, Marie Francoise; Zawilak-Pawlik, Anna; Kapp, Ulrike; Terradot, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial DNA replication requires DnaA, an AAA+ ATPase that initiates replication at a specific chromosome region, oriC, and is regulated by species-specific regulators that directly bind DnaA. HobA is a DnaA binding protein, recently identified as an essential regulator of DNA replication in Helicobacter pylori. We report the crystal structure of HobA in complex with domains I and II of DnaA (DnaAI–II) from H. pylori, the first structure of DnaA bound to one of its regulators. Biochemical c...

  11. Structural basis of human PCNA sliding on DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    de March, Matteo; Merino, Nekane; Barrera-Vilarmau, Susana; Crehuet, Ramon; Onesti, Silvia; Blanco, Francisco J.; de Biasio, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Sliding clamps encircle DNA and tether polymerases and other factors to the genomic template. However, the molecular mechanism of clamp sliding on DNA is unknown. Using crystallography, NMR and molecular dynamics simulations, here we show that the human clamp PCNA recognizes DNA through a double patch of basic residues within the ring channel, arranged in a right-hand spiral that matches the pitch of B-DNA. We propose that PCNA slides by tracking the DNA backbone via a `cogwheel' mechanism based on short-lived polar interactions, which keep the orientation of the clamp invariant relative to DNA. Mutation of residues at the PCNA-DNA interface has been shown to impair the initiation of DNA synthesis by polymerase δ (pol δ). Therefore, our findings suggest that a clamp correctly oriented on DNA is necessary for the assembly of a replication-competent PCNA-pol δ holoenzyme.

  12. Crystal Structure and Interaction with DNA of [Ni(phen)(mal)(H2O)2]·3H2O

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO En-Jun; CHEN Mao-Sheng; YU Ying; SUN Ya-Guang

    2007-01-01

    A new complex [Ni(phen)(mal)(H2O)2]·3H2O (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline,mal2-= malonic acid) has been synthesized by the reaction of nickel nitrate,phen and malonic acid.EA,IR spectra and X-ray single-crystal diffraction were carried out to determine the composition and crystal structure of the title complex.Crystal data:monoclinic system,space group P2/c,a =8.937(3),b = 12.163(5),c = 9.725(3)(A),β = 119.36°,C15H19N2O9Ni,Mr= 430.03,Z = 2,F(000) =446,V = 921.3 (A)3,Dc = 1.550 g/cm3,μ = 1.104 mm-1,-10≤h≤ 10,-12≤k≤ 14,-11 ≤l≤7,R =0.0261 and wR = 0.0609 for 4376 (Rint = 0.0203) independent reflections and 1631 observed ones (I> 2σ(I)).Ni(Ⅱ) exhibits an octahedral coordination geometry,with hydrogen bonds and π-π interactions stabilizing the whole structure.UV spectrum of the complex interacting with protamine DNA indicates that the title compound interacts with DNA via insertion mode with bonding constant Kb of 1.11 × 104.

  13. Bond energies and structures of ammonia-sulfuric acid positive cluster ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froyd, Karl D; Lovejoy, Edward R

    2012-06-21

    New particle formation in the atmosphere is initiated by nucleation of gas-phase species. The small molecular clusters that act as seeds for new particles are stabilized by the incorporation of an ion. Ion-induced nucleation of molecular cluster ions containing sulfuric acid generates new particles in the background troposphere. The addition of a proton-accepting species to sulfuric acid cluster ions can further stabilize them and may promote nucleation under a wider range of conditions. To understand and accurately predict atmospheric nucleation, the stabilities of each molecular cluster within a chemical family must be known. We present the first comprehensive measurements of the ammonia-sulfuric acid positive ion cluster system NH(4)(+)(NH(3))(n)(H(2)SO(4))(s). Enthalpies and entropies of individual growth steps within this system were measured using either an ion flow reactor-mass spectrometer system under equilibrium conditions or by thermal decomposition of clusters in an ion trap mass spectrometer. Low level ab initio structural calculations provided inputs to a master equation model to determine bond energies from thermal decomposition measurements. Optimized ab initio structures for clusters up through n = 3, s = 3 are reported. Upon addition of ammonia and sulfuric acid pairs, internal proton transfer generates multiple NH(4)(+) and HSO(4)(-) ions within the clusters. These multiple-ion structures are up to 50 kcal mol(-1) more stable than corresponding isomers that retain neutral NH(3) and H(2)SO(4) species. The lowest energy n = s clusters are composed entirely of ions. The addition of acid-base pairs to the core NH(4)(+) ion generates nanocrystals that begin to resemble the ammonium bisulfate bulk crystal starting with the smallest n = s cluster, NH(4)(+)(NH(3))(1)(H(2)SO(4))(1). In the absence of water, this cluster ion system nucleates spontaneously for conditions that encompass most of the free troposphere.

  14. Electronic structure contribution to hydrogen bonding interaction of a water dimer

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Bo; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen bond (H-bond) covalency has recently been observed in ice and liquid water, while the penetrating molecular orbitals (MOs) in the H-bond region of most typical water dimer system, (H2O)2, have also been discovered. However, obtaining the quantitative contribution of these MOs to the H-bond interaction is still problematic. In this work, we introduced the orbital-resolved electron density projected integral (EDPI) along the H-bond to approach this problem. The calculations show that, surprisingly, the electronic occupied orbital (HOMO-4) of (H2O)2 accounts for about 40% of the electron density at the bond critical point. Moreover, the charge transfer analysis visualizes the electron accumulating effect of the orbital interaction within the H-bond between water molecules, supporting its covalent-like character. Our work expands the classical understanding of H-bond with specific contributions from certain MOs, and will also advance further research into such covalency and offer quantitative electronic ...

  15. DNA origami structures as calibration standards for nanometrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpelainen, Virpi; Linko, Veikko; Seppä, Jeremias; Lassila, Antti; Kostiainen, Mauri A.

    2017-03-01

    In this work we have studied the feasibility of DNA origami nanostructures as dimensional calibration standards for atomic force microscopes (AFMs) at the nanometre scale. The stability of the structures and repeatability of the measurement have been studied, and the applicability for calibration is discussed. A cross-like Seeman tile (ST) was selected for the studies and it was found suitable for repeatable calibration of AFMs. The height of the first height step of the ST was 2.0 nm. Expanded standard uncertainty (k  =  2) of the measurement U c was 0.2 nm. The width of the ST was 88 nm and width of its arm was 28 nm with U c   =  3 nm. In addition, prepared dry samples were found out to be stable at least for 12 months.

  16. Influence of Fabric Geometrical Structure on Bonding of the Fabric Reinforced Cement Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Qiao-zhen

    2007-01-01

    Influence of fabric geometrical parameters,including the number of filling yams per 10 cm, yarntwist and fiber type, on bonding of the fabric reinforcedcement composites is studied by fabric pull-out test andSEM microstructure analysis. The results show that thebonding strength increase with the increase of the numberof filling yams per 10 cm in the range of this study. Butthe influence of fabric count on the interfacial bonding isdual and there is a critical value. The twist of yarns hasa little effect on the bending strength and interfacialbonding behaves of nylon fabric reinforced cementcomposites. There is an optimum twist range. Withinthis range, the bonding strength increase slowly with theincrease of yarn twist. Beyond this range, it is versus.The bonding strength is strongly affected by the fabriccharacter. The bonding between the nylon fiber fabricand cement is good; that of between glass fiber fabric andcement is moderate and that of between the carbon fiberfabric and cement is poor.

  17. The Effect of Steel Corrosion on Bond Strength in Concrete Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Cong-qi; KOU Xin-jian

    2005-01-01

    The effect of steel corrosion on the behavior of bond between steel and the surrounding concrete was in vestigated. Pullout tests were carried out to demonstrate bond stress-slip response for reinforcing steel bars of a series of corrosion level. Specimens either confined or unconfined were investigated for evaluation of the effect of confinement on bond strength and failure mode. Also, the tests were analyzed using nonlinear finite element analysis. It was shown that for both confined and unconfined steel bars, bond strength generally decreases as the corrosion level increases when corrosion level is relatively high. Confinement was demonstrated to provide excellent means to conteract bond loss for corroded reinforcing steel bars. It was shown that unconfined specimens generally split at a small slip with a large crack width and result in splitting failure while confined specimens contribute to a small crack width and generally cause a pullout failure. The analysis results agree reasonably well with the experiments.

  18. Structural basis of Prospero-DNA interaction: implications for transcription regulation in developing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Mohammad S; Matthews, Brian W

    2005-04-01

    The crystal structure of a complex between the novel homeodomain of the neural transcription factor Prospero and DNA shows that the invariant residues Lys1290, Asn1294, and Asp1297 make specific contacts with the noncanonical DNA binding site. The overall structure includes the homeodomain and the adjacent Prospero domain and confirms that they act as a single structural unit, a Homeo-Prospero domain. The Prospero domain facilitates the proper alignment of the protein on the DNA. Knowledge of the structure reconciles two different DNA sequences that have been proposed as transcriptional targets for Prospero. As in the apo structure, the C terminus of the Prospero domain shields a short helix within the homeodomain that includes a nuclear export signal (NES). The structural results suggest that exposure of the NES is not coupled directly to DNA binding. We propose a DNA recognition mechanism specific to Prospero-type homeodomains in developing cells.

  19. β-Sheet 13C Structuring Shifts Appear only at the H-bonded Sites of Hairpins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Irene; Stewart, James M.; Scian, Michele; Kier, Brandon L.

    2011-01-01

    The 13C chemical shifts measured for designed β hairpins indicate that the structuring shifts (upfield for Cα and C′, downfield for Cβ) previously reported as diagnostic for β structuring in protein appear only at the H-bonded strand residues. The resulting periodicity of structuring shift magnitudes is not, however, a consequence of H-bonding status; rather, it reflects a previously unrecognized alternation in the backbone torsion angles of β strands. This feature of hairpins is also likely to be present in proteins. The study provides reference values for the expectation shifts for 13C sites in β structures that should prove useful in the characterization of the folding equilibria of β sheet models. PMID:21214243

  20. Spectroscopic and structural studies on the interaction of an anticancer β-carboline alkaloid, harmine with GC and AT specific DNA oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shweta; Yadav, Monika; Gupta, Surendra P; Pandav, Kumud; Kumar, Surat

    2016-12-25

    Harmine, a tricyclic β-carboline alkaloid possesses anticancer properties. Thus, its binding studies with DNA are considerably important because mechanism of action of anticancer drug involves DNA binding. On the other hand, the DNA binding study is also useful in drug designing and synthesis of new compounds with enhanced biological properties. Hence, the binding of harmine with sequence specific DNA oligonucleotides has been studied using various biophysical techniques i.e. absorption, fluorescence and molecular docking techniques. UV absorption study, Fluorescence quenching and Iodide quenching experiments revealed intercalation type of binding of harmine with short sequence specific DNA oligonucleotides. Fluorescence and absorption studies also concluded binding constants of harmine with GC rich DNA sequence in the order of 10(5) M(-1) while with AT rich sequences it was in the order of 10(3) M(-1) which clearly indicated that harmine showed greater intercalation with GC rich sequences as compared to AT rich sequences. From thermodynamic studies, it was concluded that harmine-DNA complex formation was spontaneous, exothermic and energetically favorable process. Molecular docking studies confirmed that harmine intercalates between the base pairs of DNA structure but energetically prefers intercalation between GC base pairs. Molecular docking studies and the calculated thermodynamic parameters, i.e. Gibbs free energy (ΔG), Enthalpy change (ΔH) and Entropy change (ΔS) indicated that H-bonds, van der Waals interactions and hydrophobic interactions play a major role in the binding of harmine to DNA oligomers.

  1. SIBLING BONDING AND OTHER VALUE STRUCTURES IN THE ERIHIYA OF SILANG, CAVITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosella Moya-Torrecampo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The erihiya is a genre of folklore in Silang, Cavite that relates to both folk speech and to practices. I hope to present an initial, working definition and description of the concept from the point of view of the Silang folks, beginning with the exploration of the lexical variations in form and meaning of the word itself, especially as its local definition as speech that is part of folk wisdom connotes ‘heritage,’ whereas its definition as a Spanish loan word is ‘heresy.’ Using a Structuralist approach, the discussion will analyze the significance of the erihiya within the social formation it exists in. The erihiya of Silang are reflective of values that center on kinship systems based on the binary relations between and among Self/others, others being defined as those including family, neighbors, friends, strangers, enemies, the old, the young, males, females, etc. The erihiya, in so defining the roles of these participants in the social formation, make the oppositions between good and bad, life and death, near and far, familiar and strange, indigenous and colonial come to play. Among examples presented, the erihiya for sibling bonding which is indigenous and still practiced by members of the social group is given value as it concretizes how kinship structures are established, maintained, and valued in local Silang society.

  2. Snake venom disintegrins: novel dimeric disintegrins and structural diversification by disulphide bond engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvete, Juan J; Moreno-Murciano, M Paz; Theakston, R David G; Kisiel, Dariusz G; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary

    2003-01-01

    We report the isolation and amino acid sequences of six novel dimeric disintegrins from the venoms of Vipera lebetina obtusa (VLO), V. berus (VB), V. ammodytes (VA), Echis ocellatus (EO) and Echis multisquamatus (EMS). Disintegrins VLO4, VB7, VA6 and EO4 displayed the RGD motif and inhibited the adhesion of K562 cells, expressing the integrin alpha5beta1 to immobilized fibronectin. A second group of dimeric disintegrins (VLO5 and EO5) had MLD and VGD motifs in their subunits and blocked the adhesion of the alpha4beta1 integrin to vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 with high selectivity. On the other hand, disintegrin EMS11 inhibited both alpha5beta1 and alpha4beta1 integrins with almost the same degree of specificity. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of the dimeric disintegrins with those of other disintegrins by multiple-sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis, in conjunction with current biochemical and genetic data, supports the view that the different disintegrin subfamilies evolved from a common ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-like) scaffold and that structural diversification occurred through disulphide bond engineering. PMID:12667142

  3. Thymine- and Adenine-Functionalized Polystyrene Form Self-Assembled Structures through Multiple Complementary Hydrogen Bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shian Wu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the self-assembly of two homopolymers of the same molecular weight, but containing complementary nucleobases. After employing nitroxide-mediated radical polymerization to synthesize poly(vinylbenzyl chloride, we converted the polymer into poly(vinylbenzyl azide through a reaction with NaN3 and then performed click chemistry with propargyl thymine and propargyl adenine to yield the homopolymers, poly(vinylbenzyl triazolylmethyl methylthymine (PVBT and poly(vinylbenzyl triazolylmethyl methyladenine (PVBA, respectively. This PVBT/PVBA blend system exhibited a single glass transition temperature over the entire range of compositions, indicative of a miscible phase arising from the formation of multiple strong complementary hydrogen bonds between the thymine and adenine groups of PVBT and PVBA, respectively; Fourier transform infrared and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirmed the presence of these noncovalent interactions. In addition, dynamic rheology, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy provided evidence for the formation of supramolecular network structures in these binary PVBT/PVBA blend systems.

  4. Crystal structure of the shrimp proliferating cell nuclear antigen: structural complementarity with WSSV DNA polymerase PIP-box.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus S Carrasco-Miranda

    Full Text Available DNA replication requires processivity factors that allow replicative DNA polymerases to extend long stretches of DNA. Some DNA viruses encode their own replicative DNA polymerase, such as the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV that infects decapod crustaceans but still require host replication accessory factors. We have determined by X-ray diffraction the three-dimensional structure of the Pacific white leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (LvPCNA. This protein is a member of the sliding clamp family of proteins, that binds DNA replication and DNA repair proteins through a motif called PIP-box (PCNA-Interacting Protein. The crystal structure of LvPCNA was refined to a resolution of 3 Å, and allowed us to determine the trimeric protein assembly and details of the interactions between PCNA and the DNA. To address the possible interaction between LvPCNA and the viral DNA polymerase, we docked a theoretical model of a PIP-box peptide from the WSSV DNA polymerase within LvPCNA crystal structure. The theoretical model depicts a feasible model of interaction between both proteins. The crystal structure of shrimp PCNA allows us to further understand the mechanisms of DNA replication processivity factors in non-model systems.

  5. An Estimation Method of a Constitutive-law for the Rod Model of DNA using Discrete-Structure Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Hinkle, Adam R; Palanthandalam-Madapusi, Harish J

    2009-01-01

    The continuum-rod model has emerged as an efficient tool to describe the long-length-scale structural-deformations of DNA which are critical to understanding the nature of many biological processes such as gene expression. However, a significant challenge in continuum-mechanics-based modeling of DNA is to estimate its constitutive law, which follows from its interatomic bond-stiffness. Experiments and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have suggested that the constitutive law is nonlinear and non-homogeneous (sequence-dependent) along the length of DNA. In this paper, we present an estimation method and a validation study using discrete-structure simulations. We consider a simple cantilever-rod with an artificially constructed, discrete lattice-structure which gives rise to a constitutive law. Large deformations are then simulated. An effective constitutive-law is estimated from these deformations using inverse methods. Finally, we test the estimated law by employing it in the continuum rod-model an...

  6. The role of disulfide bond formation in the structural transition observed in the intermediate filaments of developing hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce Fraser, R D; Parry, David A D

    2012-10-01

    Hair keratin is a composite structure in which intermediate filaments (IF) are embedded in a protein matrix. During the early stages of development in the hair follicle the redox potential is such that the cysteine residues in the IF are maintained in a reduced form. However, at a late stage of development the redox potential changes to produce an oxidizing environment and the IF undergo a structural transition involving both molecular slippage and radial compaction. In our earlier study the changes in the molecular parameters were estimated from knowledge of the sites of artificially induced crosslinks, and it was noted that the changes in these parameters realigned many of the cysteine residues to positions more favorable to disulfide bond formation. As the energy involved in the formation of disulfide bonds is much greater than that of hydrogen bonds or van der Waals interactions the structural transition is likely to be dominated by the requirement that the bonded cysteine residues occur at closely equivalent axial positions. This criterion was used in the present study to obtain more precise values for the molecular parameters in the oxidized fiber than has hitherto been possible. A comparison of the sequences of hair keratins and epidermal keratins suggests that the slippage observed in trichocyte IF during keratinization does not occur in epidermal IF. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure of the 2-Aminopurine-Cytosine Base Pair Formed in the Polymerase Active Site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA Polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reha-Krantz, Linda J.; Hariharan, Chithra; Subuddhi, Usharani; Xia, Shuangluo; Zhao, Chao; Beckman, Jeff; Christian, Thomas; Konigsberg, William (Yale); (Alberta)

    2011-11-21

    The adenine base analogue 2-aminopurine (2AP) is a potent base substitution mutagen in prokaryotes because of its enhanceed ability to form a mutagenic base pair with an incoming dCTP. Despite more than 50 years of research, the structure of the 2AP-C base pair remains unclear. We report the structure of the 2AP-dCTP base pair formed within the polymerase active site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA polymerase. A modified wobble 2AP-C base pair was detected with one H-bond between N1 of 2AP and a proton from the C4 amino group of cytosine and an apparent bifurcated H-bond between a proton on the 2-amino group of 2-aminopurine and the ring N3 and O2 atoms of cytosine. Interestingly, a primer-terminal region rich in AT base pairs, compared to GC base pairs, facilitated dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. We propose that the increased flexibility of the nucleotide binding pocket formed in the Y567A-DNA polymerase and increased 'breathing' at the primer-terminal junction of A+T-rich DNA facilitate dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. Thus, interactions between DNA polymerase residues with a dynamic primer-terminal junction play a role in determining base selectivity within the polymerase active site of RB69 DNA polymerase.

  8. Structural Characterization of N-Alkylated Twisted Amides: Consequences for Amide Bond Resonance and N-C Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Feng; Lalancette, Roger; Szostak, Michal

    2016-04-11

    Herein, we describe the first structural characterization of N-alkylated twisted amides prepared directly by N-alkylation of the corresponding non-planar lactams. This study provides the first experimental evidence that N-alkylation results in a dramatic increase of non-planarity around the amide N-C(O) bond. Moreover, we report a rare example of a molecular wire supported by the same amide C=O-Ag bonds. Reactivity studies demonstrate rapid nucleophilic addition to the N-C(O) moiety of N-alkylated amides, indicating the lack of n(N) to π*(C=O) conjugation. Most crucially, we demonstrate that N-alkylation activates the otherwise unreactive amide bond towards σ N-C cleavage by switchable coordination.

  9. Hydrogen-bonded porous coordination polymers: structural transformation, sorption properties, and particle size from kinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Kazuhiro; Saito, Kazuya; Kitagawa, Susumu; Kita, Hidetoshi

    2006-12-20

    Three new coordination polymers, [CoCl2(4-pmna)2]n (1), {[Co(NCS)2(4-pmna)2].2Me2CO}n (2 superset 2Me2CO), and {[Co(4-pmna)2(H2O)2](NO3)2.2CH3OH}n (3 superset 2H2O.2MeOH) (4-pmna = N-(pyridin-4-ylmethyl)nicotinamide), have been synthesized and characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The cobalt(II) atoms are bridged by 4-pmna ligands in all three compounds to form double-stranded one-dimensional "repeated rhomboid-type" chains with rectangular-shaped cavities. In 1, each chain slips and obstructs the neighboring cavities so that there are no guest-incorporated pores. Both 2 superset 2Me2CO and 3 superset 2H2O.2MeOH do not have such a staggered arrangement and have pores that can be filled with a guest molecule. Compound 3 superset 2H2O.2MeOH traps guest molecules with multiple hydrogen bonds and shows a reversible structural rearrangement during adsorption and desorption. The new crystalline compound, 3, is stabilized by forming hydrogen bonds with the amide moieties of the 4-pmna ligands and was characterized using infrared spectroscopy. The clathration enthalpy of the reaction 3 + 2H2O(l) + 2MeOH(l) 3 superset 2H2O.2MeOH (approximately 35 kJ/mol) was estimated from differential scanning calorimetry data by considering the vaporization enthalpies of H2O and MeOH. The desorption process of 3 superset 2H2O.2MeOH --> 3 follows a single zero-order reaction mechanism under isothermal conditions. The activation energy of ca. 100 kJ/mol was obtained by plotting the logarithm of the reaction time for the same reacted fraction versus the reciprocal of the temperature. Moreover, the distribution of the one-dimensional channels in 3 superset 2H2O.2MeOH was estimated using the observation that the reaction rate is directly proportional to the total sectional area.

  10. The effect of graded glass-zirconia structure on the bond between core and veneer in layered zirconia restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruoyu; Sun, Ting; Zhang, Yanli; Zhang, Yaokun; Jiang, Danyu; Shao, Longquan

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a graded glass-zirconia structure can strengthen the core-veneer bond in layered zirconia materials. A graded glass-zirconia structure was fabricated by infiltrating glass compositions developed in our laboratory into a presintered yttria tetrahedral zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) substrate by the action of capillary forces. The wettability of the infiltrated glass and Y-TZP substrate was investigated by the sessile drop technique. The microstructures of the graded glass-zirconia structure were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The phase structure characterization in the graded glass-zirconia structure were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The elastic modulus and hardness of the graded glass-zirconia structure were evaluated from nanoindentations. Further, the shear bond strength (SBS) of the graded glass-zirconia structure and veneering porcelain was also evaluated. SEM images confirmed the formation of the graded glass-zirconia structure. Glass frits wet the Y-TZP substrate at 1200 °C with a contact angle of 43.2°. Only a small amount of t-m transformation was observed in as-infiltrated Y-TZP specimens. Nanoindentation studies of the glass-zirconia graded structure showed that the elastic modulus and hardness of the surface glass layer were higher than those of the dense Y-TZP layer. The mean SBS values for the graded glass-zirconia structure and veneering porcelain (24.35 ± 0.40 MPa) were statistically higher than those of zirconia and veneering porcelain (9.22 ± 0.20 MPa) (Pglass-zirconia structure can be fabricated by the glass infiltration/densification technique, and this structure exhibits a strong core-veneer bond. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Neonatal handling alters the structure of maternal behavior and affects mother-pup bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, A R; de Azevedo, M S; de Souza, M A; Lutz, M L; Alves, M B; Izquierdo, I; Cammarota, M; Silveira, P P; Lucion, A B

    2014-05-15

    During early life, a mother and her pups establish a very close relationship, and the olfactory learning of the nest odor is very important for the bond formation. The olfactory bulb (OB) is a structure that plays a fundamental role in the olfactory learning (OL) mechanism that also involves maternal behavior (licking and contact). We hypothesized that handling the pups would alter the structure of the maternal behavior, affect OL, and alter mother-pup relationships. Moreover, changes in the cyclic AMP-response element binding protein phosphorylation (CREB) and neurotrophic factors could be a part of the mechanism of these changes. This study aimed to analyze the effects of neonatal handling, 1 min per day from postpartum day 1 to 10 (PPD 1 to PPD 10), on the maternal behavior and pups' preference for the nest odor in a Y maze (PPD 11). We also tested CREB's phosphorylation and BDNF signaling in the OB of the pups (PPD 7) by Western blot analysis. The results showed that handling alters mother-pups interaction by decreasing mother-pups contact and changing the temporal pattern of all components of the maternal behavior especially the daily licking and nest-building. We found sex-dependent changes in the nest odor preference, CREB and BDNF levels in pups OB. Male pups were more affected by alterations in the licking pattern, and female pups were more affected by changes in the mother-pup contact (the time spent outside the nest and nursing). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Damage prognosis of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of unmanned aerial vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gobbato, Maurizio [UCSD; Conte, Joel [UCSD; Kosmatke, John [UCSD; Oliver, Joseph A [UCSD

    2009-01-01

    The extensive use of lightweight advanced composite materials in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) drastically increases the sensitivity to both fatigue- and impact-induced damage of their critical structural components (e.g., wings and tail stabilizers) during service life. The spar-to-skin adhesive joints are considered one of the most fatigue sensitive subcomponents of a lightweight UAV composite wing with damage progressively evolving from the wing root. This paper presents a comprehensive probabilistic methodology for predicting the remaining service life of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of UAVs. Non-destructive evaluation techniques and Bayesian inference are used to (i) assess the current state of damage of the system and, (ii) update the probability distribution of the damage extent at various locations. A probabilistic model for future loads and a mechanics-based damage model are then used to stochastically propagate damage through the joint. Combined local (e.g., exceedance of a critical damage size) and global (e.g.. flutter instability) failure criteria are finally used to compute the probability of component failure at future times. The applicability and the partial validation of the proposed methodology are then briefly discussed by analyzing the debonding propagation, along a pre-defined adhesive interface, in a simply supported laminated composite beam with solid rectangular cross section, subjected to a concentrated load applied at mid-span. A specially developed Eliler-Bernoulli beam finite element with interlaminar slip along the damageable interface is used in combination with a cohesive zone model to study the fatigue-induced degradation in the adhesive material. The preliminary numerical results presented are promising for the future validation of the methodology.

  13. Crystal structures and 77Se NMR spectra of molybdenum(IV) areneselenolates having intramolecular NH...Se hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Taka-Aki; Taniuchi, Kaku; Lee, Keonil; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Ueyama, Norikazu; Nakamura, Akira

    2006-11-13

    Salts of the monooxomolybdenum(IV,V) areneselenolates having intramolecular NH...Se hydrogen bonds, [Mo(IV)O(Se-2-RCONHC6H4)4]2- (R = t-Bu, CH3, CF3) and [Mo(V)O(Se-2-t-BuCONHC6H4)4]-, were synthesized and characterized by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), 77Se NMR, electron spin resonance (ESR), UV-visible spectra, X-ray analysis, and electrochemical measurements. 77Se-1H correlated spectroscopy (COSY) indicated a significant correlation between amide 1H and selenolate 77Se atoms through an NH...Se hydrogen bond with 1J(77Se-1H) = 5.4 Hz coupling. The hydrogen bonds contribute to the positive shift in the Mo(V)/Mo(IV) redox potential. In the crystal structure of (PPh4)2[Mo(IV)O(Se-2-CH3CONHC6H4)4], an NH...O=Mo hydrogen bond was found. Ab inito calculations support the presence of intramolecular NH...O=Mo and NH...Se hydrogen bonds.

  14. Structure, stability, and spectroscopic properties of H-bonded complexes of HOSO and CH3SO with H2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesar, Antonija; Tušar, Simona

    2014-09-11

    Quantum chemical calculations have been carried out to investigate the structure and stability of 1:1 and 1:2 HOSO-water and CH3SO-water complexes. All of the geometries have been optimized at the DFT and at the CCSD levels of theory using 6-311++G(2df,2pd) and aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets, respectively. The energetics of the hydrogen-bonded complexes are reported at G4 and CBS-QB3 levels of theory. A general characteristic future of the minimum-energy structure complexes is cyclic double H bonding for 1:1 complexes and cyclic triple H bonding for 1:2 complexes. Calculations predict relative large binding energies of 8.2 and 16.8 kcal mol(-1) for 1:1 and 1:2 HOSO-water complexes, respectively, at the CBS-QB3 level of theory. CH3SO-water complexes have somewhat lower stability; the binding energy of 3.8 kcal mol(-1) for the 1:1 CH3SO-water complex increases to 9.5 kcal mol(-1) for the 1:2 complex. The calculated shifts in vibrational frequencies due to complex formation show that the frequencies and intensities of H-bonded OH stretching regions are most affected by complex formation. The large frequency shift is mainly oriented to these OH bonds involved in H-bonding interactions. Vertical electronic excitation energies and the corresponding oscillator strengths have been calculated for the representative radical-water complexes using the TDDFT method and aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. No significant excitation energy difference was observed between the low-lying electronic states of either HOSO within the HOSO-water complexes or CH3SO within the CH3SO-water 1:1 complexes.

  15. Radical bonding: structure and stability of bis(phenalenyl) complexes of divalent metals from across the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciun, Smaranda; Donald, Kelling J

    2009-07-06

    We examine the bonding possibilities of the bis(phenalenyl) MP(2) sandwich complexes of the divalent metals M = Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Zn, Cd, and Hg, at the B3LYP level of theory. The outcome is an extraordinarily diverse class of low symmetry bis(phenalenyl)metal complexes in which bonding preferences and binding enthalpies differ dramatically. The lowest energy group 2 metal MP(2) complexes include an intriguing eta(1),eta(3) BeP(2) structure, and bent eta(6),eta(6) systems for M = Ca, Sr, and Ba. The group 12 bis(phenalenyl) complexes are thermodynamically unstable eta(1),eta(1) slip-sandwich structures. To better understand changes in the structural preferences going from the (eta(6),eta(6)) group 2 to the (eta(1),eta(1)) group 12 complexes, we explored the bonding in the bis(phenalenyl) complexes of transition metals with stable +2 oxidations states between Ca and Zn in period 4. The computed binding enthalpies are large and negative for nearly all of the minimum energy bis(phenalenyl) complexes of the group 2 and the transition metals; they are tiny for MgP(2), and are quite positive for the group 12 systems. The structural preferences and stability of the complexes is a subtle negotiation of several influences: the (un)availability of (n - 1)d and np, orbitals for bonding, the cost of the rehybridization at carbon sites in the phenalenyl rings in preparation for bonding to the metals, and the (P---P) interaction between the phenalenyl radicals.

  16. Atomic force microscopy studies on circular DNA structural changes by vincristine and aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhongdang; Cao, Lili; Zhu, Dan; Lu, Zuhong

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, we have presented materials and methods to study the interaction between DNA and small molecule drugs by AFM. The detailed AFM imaging of the circular DNA after incubation with -various concentrations of vincristine and aspirin have been demonstrated. The immobilization of DNA fragments on mica surface as well as the force between tip and sample plays an important role for successful imaging of DNA-drug complexes. How to quantitatively describe the conformations and structures of circular DNA molecules and their changes is also introduced. Our work indicates that the AFM is a powerful tool in studying the interaction between DNA and small molecules.

  17. Unique structural modulation of a non-native substrate by cochaperone DnaJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Satyam; Kumar, Vignesh; Jayaraj, Gopal Gunanathan; Maiti, Souvik; Mapa, Koyeli

    2013-02-12

    The role of bacterial DnaJ protein as a cochaperone of DnaK is strongly appreciated. Although DnaJ unaccompanied by DnaK can bind unfolded as well as native substrate proteins, its role as an individual chaperone remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that DnaJ binds a model non-native substrate with a low nanomolar dissociation constant and, more importantly, modulates the structure of its non-native state. The structural modulation achieved by DnaJ is different compared to that achieved by the DnaK-DnaJ complex. The nature of structural modulation exerted by DnaJ is suggestive of a unique unfolding activity on the non-native substrate by the chaperone. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the zinc binding motif along with the C-terminal substrate binding domain of DnaJ is necessary and sufficient for binding and the subsequent binding-induced structural alterations of the non-native substrate. We hypothesize that this hitherto unknown structural alteration of non-native states by DnaJ might be important for its chaperoning activity by removing kinetic traps of the folding intermediates.

  18. Evaluation of Fluorescent Analogs of Deoxycytidine for Monitoring DNA Transitions from Duplex to Functional Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogini P. Bhavsar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Topological variants of single-strand DNA (ssDNA structures, referred to as “functional DNA,” have been detected in regulatory regions of many genes and are thought to affect gene expression. Two fluorescent analogs of deoxycytidine, Pyrrolo-dC (PdC and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tC∘, can be incorporated into DNA. Here, we describe spectroscopic studies of both analogs to determine fluorescent properties that report on structural transitions from double-strand DNA (dsDNA to ssDNA, a common pathway in the transition to functional DNA structures. We obtained fluorescence-detected circular dichroism (FDCD spectra, steady-state fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence lifetimes of the fluorophores in DNA. Our results show that PdC is advantageous in fluorescence lifetime studies because of a distinct ~2 ns change between paired and unpaired bases. However, tC∘ is a better probe for FDCD experiments that report on the helical structure of DNA surrounding the fluorophore. Both fluorophores provide complementary data to measure DNA structural transitions.

  19. From Structure-Function Analyses to Protein Engineering for Practical Applications of DNA Ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Maiko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Nishida, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    DNA ligases are indispensable in all living cells and ubiquitous in all organs. DNA ligases are broadly utilized in molecular biology research fields, such as genetic engineering and DNA sequencing technologies. Here we review the utilization of DNA ligases in a variety of in vitro gene manipulations, developed over the past several decades. During this period, fewer protein engineering attempts for DNA ligases have been made, as compared to those for DNA polymerases. We summarize the recent progress in the elucidation of the DNA ligation mechanisms obtained from the tertiary structures solved thus far, in each step of the ligation reaction scheme. We also present some examples of engineered DNA ligases, developed from the viewpoint of their three-dimensional structures.

  20. From Structure-Function Analyses to Protein Engineering for Practical Applications of DNA Ligase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko Tanabe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA ligases are indispensable in all living cells and ubiquitous in all organs. DNA ligases are broadly utilized in molecular biology research fields, such as genetic engineering and DNA sequencing technologies. Here we review the utilization of DNA ligases in a variety of in vitro gene manipulations, developed over the past several decades. During this period, fewer protein engineering attempts for DNA ligases have been made, as compared to those for DNA polymerases. We summarize the recent progress in the elucidation of the DNA ligation mechanisms obtained from the tertiary structures solved thus far, in each step of the ligation reaction scheme. We also present some examples of engineered DNA ligases, developed from the viewpoint of their three-dimensional structures.

  1. NMR solution structure of the bicoid homeodomain bound to DNA and molecular dynamics simulations of the homeodomain/DNA complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird-Titus, Jamie M.

    The homeodomain is a common DNA recognition motif consisting of three helices and an N-terminal arm that serves as a valuable model for exploring the basis of specific DNA recognition by proteins. Recognition of specific DNA sites, loosely defined by a TAAT core, is dependent on the side-chains of key amino acids in the N-terminal arm and the third "recognition" helix of the homeodomain. While much is known about homeodomain/DNA recognition, key questions concerning the role of individual amino acids and the extent of side-chain, DNA, and water dynamics during recognition remain, often focusing on the dynamic role of position 50 during recognition of the two bases immediately 3' to the 5'-TAAT-3'/3'-ATTA-5' core (ATTANN). The Bicoid homeodomain provides an interesting model system for addressing these and other questions, serving as the only known homeodomain that has a dual role in both transcriptional (DNA-binding) and translational (RNA-binding) control, discriminating between these two functions by a single amino acid, arginine 54. To add to the understanding of both general protein/DNA recognition and to the specific function of the Bicoid transcription factor homeodomain, we have determined the solution structure of the Bicoid homeodomain bound to the consensus duplex B-DNA binding site 5'-TAATCC-3'/3'-ATTAGG-5'. Our structure indicates that the Bicoid homeodomain exhibits variation from other homeodomain structures at the end of helix I, and NMR resonance line broadening of the K50 and R54 side-chains, consistent with side-chain motion and supportive of the adaptive-recognition theory of protein/DNA interactions.

  2. Analysis of local bond-orientational order for liquid gallium at ambient pressure: Two types of cluster structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin-Yuan; Tang, Ping-Han; Wu, Ten-Ming

    2016-07-14

    In terms of the local bond-orientational order (LBOO) parameters, a cluster approach to analyze local structures of simple liquids was developed. In this approach, a cluster is defined as a combination of neighboring seeds having at least nb local-orientational bonds and their nearest neighbors, and a cluster ensemble is a collection of clusters with a specified nb and number of seeds ns. This cluster analysis was applied to investigate the microscopic structures of liquid Ga at ambient pressure (AP). The liquid structures studied were generated through ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. By scrutinizing the static structure factors (SSFs) of cluster ensembles with different combinations of nb and ns, we found that liquid Ga at AP contained two types of cluster structures, one characterized by sixfold orientational symmetry and the other showing fourfold orientational symmetry. The SSFs of cluster structures with sixfold orientational symmetry were akin to the SSF of a hard-sphere fluid. On the contrary, the SSFs of cluster structures showing fourfold orientational symmetry behaved similarly as the anomalous SSF of liquid Ga at AP, which is well known for exhibiting a high-q shoulder. The local structures of a highly LBOO cluster whose SSF displayed a high-q shoulder were found to be more similar to the structure of β-Ga than those of other solid phases of Ga. More generally, the cluster structures showing fourfold orientational symmetry have an inclination to resemble more to β-Ga.

  3. A new structural framework for integrating replication protein A into DNA processing machinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosey, Chris; Yan, Chunli; Tsutakawa, Susan; Heller, William; Rambo, Robert; Tainer, John; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Chazin, Walter

    2013-01-17

    By coupling the protection and organization of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) with recruitment and alignment of DNA processing factors, replication protein A (RPA) lies at the heart of dynamic multi-protein DNA processing machinery. Nevertheless, how RPA coordinates biochemical functions of its eight domains remains unknown. We examined the structural biochemistry of RPA's DNA-binding activity, combining small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the architecture of RPA's DNA-binding core. The scattering data reveal compaction promoted by DNA binding; DNA-free RPA exists in an ensemble of states with inter-domain mobility and becomes progressively more condensed and less dynamic on binding ssDNA. Our results contrast with previous models proposing RPA initially binds ssDNA in a condensed state and becomes more extended as it fully engages the substrate. Moreover, the consensus view that RPA engages ssDNA in initial, intermediate and final stages conflicts with our data revealing that RPA undergoes two (not three) transitions as it binds ssDNA with no evidence for a discrete intermediate state. These results form a framework for understanding how RPA integrates the ssDNA substrate into DNA processing machinery, provides substrate access to its binding partners and promotes the progression and selection of DNA processing pathways.

  4. Structures of apo IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains: effect of loop L1 on DNA binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Ioannes, Pablo; Escalante, Carlos R.; Aggarwal, Aneel K. (VCU); (Mount Sinai Hospital)

    2013-11-20

    Interferon regulatory factors IRF-3 and IRF-7 are transcription factors essential in the activation of interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene in response to viral infections. Although, both proteins recognize the same consensus IRF binding site AANNGAAA, they have distinct DNA binding preferences for sites in vivo. The X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains (DBDs) bound to IFN-{beta} promoter elements revealed flexibility in the loops (L1-L3) and the residues that make contacts with the target sequence. To characterize the conformational changes that occur on DNA binding and how they differ between IRF family members, we have solved the X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DBDs in the absence of DNA. We found that loop L1, carrying the conserved histidine that interacts with the DNA minor groove, is disordered in apo IRF-3 but is ordered in apo IRF-7. This is reflected in differences in DNA binding affinities when the conserved histidine in loop L1 is mutated to alanine in the two proteins. The stability of loop L1 in IRF-7 derives from a unique combination of hydrophobic residues that pack against the protein core. Together, our data show that differences in flexibility of loop L1 are an important determinant of differential IRF-DNA binding.

  5. The Crystal Structure of TAL Effector PthXo1 Bound to Its DNA Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mak, Amanda Nga-Sze; Bradley, Philip; Cernadas, Raul A.; Bogdanove, Adam J.; Stoddard, Barry L. (FHCRC); (Iowa State)

    2012-02-10

    DNA recognition by TAL effectors is mediated by tandem repeats, each 33 to 35 residues in length, that specify nucleotides via unique repeat-variable diresidues (RVDs). The crystal structure of PthXo1 bound to its DNA target was determined by high-throughput computational structure prediction and validated by heavy-atom derivatization. Each repeat forms a left-handed, two-helix bundle that presents an RVD-containing loop to the DNA. The repeats self-associate to form a right-handed superhelix wrapped around the DNA major groove. The first RVD residue forms a stabilizing contact with the protein backbone, while the second makes a base-specific contact to the DNA sense strand. Two degenerate amino-terminal repeats also interact with the DNA. Containing several RVDs and noncanonical associations, the structure illustrates the basis of TAL effector-DNA recognition.

  6. Electronic conduction of poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA in SWNT/DNA/SWNT structure

    OpenAIRE

    S. A. Ketabi; A. Ahmadi Fouladi; N. Shahtahmasebi

    2008-01-01

      In this work, using a tight-binding Hamiltonian model, a generalized Greens function method and Löwdins partitioning techniques, some of the significant properties of the conductance of poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA molecule in SWNT/DNA/SWNT structure are numerically investigated. In Fishbone model, we consider DNA as a planar molecule which contains M cells and 3 further sites (one base pair site and two backbone sites) in each cell sandwiched between two semi-infinite single-walled carbon nanotub...

  7. Oxide layer dissolution in Si/SiO{sub x}/Si wafer bonded structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pippel, E.; Werner, P.; Goesele, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany); Vdovin, V. [Institute for Chemical Problems of Microelectronics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute of Rare Metals Giredmet, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zakharov, N.

    2009-10-15

    The evolution of the interfaces of hydrophilic-bonded Si wafers and the corresponding low-angle twist boundary have been analysed in relation to thermal annealing and their relative crystallographic orientation. Two orientation relationships were investigated: Si<001>/Si<001> and Si<001>/Si<110>, where the interfaces are separated by thin native SiO2 layers. The interfaces were analysed by TEM and STEM/EELS. It is found that the decomposition rate of the intermediate oxide layer and the formation of a Si-Si bonded interface depend very much on the lattice mismatch and on the twist angle. The velocity of the dissolution of the thin oxide layers and the formation of Si-Si bonds at the bonding interface depend on the orientation relations of the corresponding wafers. The processes of interface fusion and the dissolution of oxide layer are discussed. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Interfacial structure of steel-Al-28Pb bonding plate with semisolid rolling-casting method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 杜云慧; 刘汉武; 曾大本; 崔建忠; 巴立民

    2004-01-01

    Fe-Al compound at the interface of steel-mushy Al-28Pb bonding plate was studied quantitatively. The relationship between ratio of Fe-Al compound at interface and bonding parameters such as preheating temperature of steel plate, solid volume fraction of Al-28Pb slurry and rolling speed, was established by artificial neural networks perfectly. The results show that when the bonding parameters are 546 ℃ for preheating temperature of steel plate,43.5% for solid volume fraction of Al-28Pb slurry and 8.6 mm/s for rolling speed, the reasonable ratio of Fe-Al compound corresponding to the largest interfacial shear strength of bonding plate is obtained as 71.5%. This reasonable ratio of Fe-Al compound is a quantitative criterion of interfacial embrittlement, that is, when the ratio of FeAl compound at interface is larger than 71.5%, interfacial embrittlement will occur.

  9. Hydrogen bonding in the crystal structure of the molecular salt of pyrazole-pyrazolium picrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ping; Song, Xue-Gang; Sun, Ren-Qiang; Xu, Xing-Man

    2016-06-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title organic salt [systematic name: 1H-pyrazol-2-ium 2,4,6-tri-nitro-phenolate-1H-pyrazole (1/1)], H(C3H4N2)2 (+)·C6H2N3O7 (-), consists of one picrate anion and one hydrogen-bonded dimer of a pyrazolium monocation. The H atom involved in the dimer N-H⋯N hydrogen bond is disordered over both symmetry-unique pyrazole mol-ecules with occupancies of 0.52 (5) and 0.48 (5). In the crystal, the component ions are linked into chains along [100] by two different bifurcated N-H⋯(O,O) hydrogen bonds. In addition, weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link inversion-related chains, forming columns along [100].

  10. Direct visualization of the formation of a new structure of lambda DNA in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方晔; 白春礼; 魏莹; 张平城; 唐有祺; 曹恩华; 何裕建

    1995-01-01

    A DNA component(referred to as new DNA structure),which has higher melting point(~ 73.5℃)and is resistant to DNase I-digestion,has suocessfully been isolated from lambda DNA Hind Ⅲtreated by cooling down quickly following thermal denaturation.Transmission electron microscope(TEM)andatomic force microscope(AFM)visualizations of the DNA molecule have shown that their lenghts fall mainly inthree regions(300 — 500 nm,750 — 1 000 nm and ~ 1 500 nm),indicating that longer fragments of λ-DNA HindⅢ are apt to form the new structure of DNA under experimental conditions;moreover,the apparent width inthe middle part of TEM imagesof a few longer molecules of the new structure of DNA is relatively thinner,wwhich may be reasonably deduced from the inhibition of DNase I(an endonuclease)binding to the new struc-ture of DNA.CD spectrum of the new structure contains a broad positive band centred at 245um anda weak negative band at 220 nm,indicating that the DNA molecule is distinctly different from all the known struc-tures of DNA.

  11. Bond strength investigations and structural applicability of composite fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) rebars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachlakev, Damian Ivanov

    The composite FRP rebars research at Oregon State University was initiated in 1993 principally to develop a non-metallic hollow reinforcement. It was recognized that the tensile properties of such reinforcement are unquestionably superior to steel, but its performance in concrete could be problematic. The bond between FRP rebars and concrete was identified as a critical area of concern. The purpose of this study is (i) to analyze a variety of FRP and steel reinforcing units; (ii) to advance the knowledge of bond mechanism, failure modes, and parameters influencing the bond strength; (iii) to compare composite rebars to conventional steel and to assess their applicability as reinforcing members. Commercially available FRP rebars were investigated. Particular emphasis was given to a hollow glass FRP rod designed at Oregon State University. Several parameters were investigated, including: failure mode, concrete compressive strength, rebar diameter and circumference/cross section ratio, embedment length, concrete cover, and microstructure of the composite rebars. It was recognized that the ASTM C234-90 pull-out standard is test of concrete strength. Therefore, a modified pull-out test was developed for evaluating the bond strength behavior. A newly developed European bond test procedure was compared with locally modified version of the pull-out method. The new procedure was used for the first time in the United States. The study demonstrated a phenomenon, not reported in the published research at this time, defined as a size effect. The size effects result in lower bond strength with increasing area of the interface between FRP bars and concrete. The next phase of the research was dedicated to the hollow glass FRP rebar. The goal was to compare its bond properties to conventional steel and solid FRP bars. The study led to two new phenomena not described in the literature previously. Results showed that the concrete compressive strength does not significantly affect the

  12. N-Face GaN Electronics for Heteroepitaxial and Bonded Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    Letters, vol.32, no.2, pp.132 (1996). [2] Tanabe, K.; Morral, A.; Atwater, H. A.; Aiken , D. J.; Wanlass, Mark W.; “Direct- bonded GaAs/InGaAs tandem...Electron Transistors ", PhD Thesis (2015). [26] Tanabe, K.; Morral, A.; Atwater, H. A.; Aiken , D. J.; Wanlass, Mark W.; “Direct- bonded GaAs/InGaAs tandem

  13. Structure and property of metal melt Ⅰ:The number of residual bonds after solid-liquid phase changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the mechanism of metal solid-liquid phase change and the theory of liquid metal’s micro-inhomogeneity,a physical model is established between latent heats of fusion and vaporization and the numbers of residual bonds and short-range ordered atoms at the melting point inside a metal melt.Meanwhile,the mathematical derivation and proof are also offered.This model produces the numbers of residual bonds and short-range ordered atoms after the solid-liquid phase change only by using basic parameters and thermophysical properties of the crystal structure.Therefore,it presents a more effective way to analyze the melt’s structural information.By using this model,this study calculates the numbers of residual bonds and short-range ordered atoms in Al and Ni melts.The calculated results are consistent with the experimental results.Simultaneously,this study discusses the atomic number’s influence on the numbers of residual bonds and short-range ordered atoms in the melts within the first(ⅠA) and second main group(ⅡA) elements.

  14. Effects of designed sulfhydryl groups and disulfide bonds into soybean proglycinin on its structural stability and heat-induced gelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Motoyasu; Chunying, Ho; Utsumi, Shigeru

    2004-09-08

    The gel-forming ability of glycinin is one of soybean's most important functional properties. The proglycinin A1aB1b homotrimer was engineered to introduce sulfhydryl groups and disulfide bonds, and their effects on the structural stability and the heat-induced gelation were evaluated. On the basis of the crystal structure, five mutants were designed and prepared: R161C and F163C forming an interprotomer disulfide bond with the inherent free cysteine residue of Cys377, N116C/P248C forming a new intraprotomer disulfide bond, and N116C and P248C introducing a new sulfhydryl group. Mutants of R161C, F163C, and N116C/P248C formed a new disulfide bond as expected. N116C/P248C was significantly more stable than the wild type against chemical and thermal denaturation and more resistant to alpha-chymotrypsin digestion, whereas F163C showed significantly increased thermal stability. All mutants exhibited greater hardness of heat-induced gels than wild type, and in particular, N116C/P248C gave the hardest gel. This result indicates that it is possible to increase hardness of glycinin gel by introduction of cysteine residues using protein engineering.

  15. Structures, bonding and reactivity of iron and manganese high-valent metal-oxo complexes: A computational investigation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhawana Pandey; Azaj Ansari; Nidhi Vyas; Gopalan Rajaraman

    2015-02-01

    Iron and manganese ions with terminal oxo and hydroxo ligands are discovered as key intermediates in several synthetic and biochemical catalytic cycles. Since many of these species possess vigorous catalytic abilities, they are extremely transient in nature and experiments which probe the structure and bonding on such elusive species are still rare. We present here comprehensive computational studies on eight iron and manganese oxo and hydroxo (FeIII/IV/V-O, FeIII-OH and MnIII/IV/V-O, MnIII-OH) species using dispersion corrected (B3LYP-D2) density functional method. By computing all the possible spin states for these eight species, we set out to determine the ground state S value of these species; and later on employing MO analysis, we have analysed the bonding aspects which contribute to the high reactivity of these species. Direct structural comparison to iron and manganese-oxo species are made and the observed similarity and differences among them are attributed to the intricate metal–oxygen bonding. By thoroughly probing the bonding in all these species, their reactivity towards common chemical reactions such as C–H activation and oxygen atom transfer are discussed.

  16. Crystal structure of the Lactococcus lactis formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase bound to an abasic site analogue-containing DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serre, Laurence; Pereira de Jésus, Karine; Boiteux, Serge; Zelwer, Charles; Castaing, Bertrand

    2002-06-17

    The formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg, MutM) is a bifunctional base excision repair enzyme (DNA glycosylase/AP lyase) that removes a wide range of oxidized purines, such as 8-oxoguanine and imidazole ring-opened purines, from oxidatively damaged DNA. The structure of a non-covalent complex between the Lactoccocus lactis Fpg and a 1,3-propanediol (Pr) abasic site analogue-containing DNA has been solved. Through an asymmetric interaction along the damaged strand and the intercalation of the triad (M75/R109/F111), Fpg pushes out the Pr site from the DNA double helix, recognizing the cytosine opposite the lesion and inducing a 60 degrees bend of the DNA. The specific recognition of this cytosine provides some structural basis for understanding the divergence between Fpg and its structural homologue endo nuclease VIII towards their substrate specificities. In addition, the modelling of the 8-oxoguanine residue allows us to define an enzyme pocket that may accommodate the extrahelical oxidized base.

  17. On the reactivity of sulfosalts in cyanide aqueous media: structural, bonding and electronic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez, Angel M; Arroyo, Rubén; González, Ignacio

    2010-09-10

    The reactivity of the ruby silver minerals proustite (3Ag(2)S⋅As(2)S(3)) and pyrargyrite (3Ag(2)S⋅Sb(2)S(3)) was studied with two types of electrodes: a carbon-paste electroactive electrode (CPEE) and a paraffin-impregnated graphite electrode (PIGE). Polycrystalline samples of α-Ag(2)S (acanthite), As(2)S(3) (orpiment), Sb(2)S(3) (stibnite), Ag(3)AsS(3) (proustite), Ag(3)SbS(3) (pyrargyrite), and three samples of the proustite-pyrargyrite solid solution series were synthesized from pure elements by a solid-state reaction method. Phase identification of samples was carried out by XRD and chemical homogeneity was checked by SEM-EDS. Besides, sulfosalts were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). Flat-band and formal potentials of sulfosalts were determined by the Mott-Schottky method and differential pulse abrasive stripping voltammetry, respectively. Band structure, bonding and solid-state structure are considered to investigate the oxidation and reduction of the solids. A ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) transition from the AsS(3) (or SbS(3)) group to Ag is related to ease of reducing the pyrargyrite-proustite series. Despite the increase in the amount of As (Sb) in Ag(3)SbS(3) (Ag(3)AsS(3)), reactivity is similar due to the similarity of the solid-state structures, and the same oxidation states of S, As, Sb and Ag species in the lattice. However, the nature of the pnictogen (As or Sb) changes the position of the conduction and valence band edges and modulates the reactivity of the pyrargyrite-proustite series. Anodic dissolution occurs by hole transfer from the top of the valence band that is formed mainly by the states of the AsS(3) and SbS(3) groups. Meanwhile, silver reduction occurs by electron transfer from the Ag 5s orbitals located at the bottom of the conduction band. The difficulty in dissolving proustite and pyrargyrite in cyanide is related to the presence of pyramidal AsS(3) and SbS(3) groups in these sulfosalts.

  18. Structural Criteria for the Rational Design of Selective Ligands: Convergent Hydrogen Bonding Sites for the Nitrate Anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Dixon, David A.; Garza , Jorge; Vargas, Rubicelia; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2004-06-30

    Molecular hosts for anion complexation are often constructed by combining two or more hydrogen bonding functional groups, D–H. The deliberate design of complementary host architectures requires knowledge of the optimal geometry for the hydrogen bonds formed between the host and the guest. Herein, we present a detailed study of the structural aspects of hydrogen bonding interactions with the NO3– anion. A large number of crystal structures are analyzed to determine the number of hydrogen bond contacts per anion and to further characterize the structural aspects of these interactions. Electronic structure calculations are used to determine stable geometries and interaction energies for NO3– complexes with several simple molecules possessing D–H groups, including water, methanol, N-methylformamide, and methane. Theoretical results are reported at several levels of density functional theory, including BP86/DN**, B3LYP/TZVP, and B3LYP/TZVP+, and at MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ. In addition, MP2 binding energies for these complexes were obtained at the complete basis set limit by extrapolating from single point energies obtained with larger correlation-consistent basis sets. The results establish that NO3– has an intrinsic hydrogen bonding topography in which there are six optimal sites for proton location. The structural features observed in crystal structures and in the optimized geometries of complexes are explained by a preference to locate the D–H protons in these positions. For the strongest hydrogen bonding interactions, the N–O•••H angle is bent at an angle of 115 ± 10°, and the hydrogen atom lies in the NO3– plane giving O–N–O•••H dihedral angles of 0 and 180°. In addition, the D-H vector points towards the oxygen atom, giving D–H•••O angles that are near linear, 170 ± 10°. Due to steric hindrance, simple alcohol O–H and amide N–H donors form 3:1 complexes with NO3–, with H•••O distances of 1.85 ± 0.5 Å. Thus, the

  19. Chip-package nano-structured copper and nickel interconnections with metallic and polymeric bonding interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ankur

    developed to address the IC packaging requirements beyond the ITRS projections and to introduce innovative design and fabrication concepts that will further advance the performance of the chip, the package, and the system board. The nano-structured interconnect technology simultaneously packages all the ICs intact in wafer form with quantum jump in the number of interconnections with the lowest electrical parasitics. The intrinsic properties of nano materials also enable several orders of magnitude higher interconnect densities with the best mechanical properties for the highest reliability and yet provide higher current and heat transfer densities. Nano-structured interconnects provides the ability to assemble the packaged parts on the system board without the use of underfill materials and to enable advanced analog/digital testing, reliability testing, and burn-in at wafer level. This thesis investigates the electrical and mechanical performance of nanostructured interconnections through modeling and test vehicle fabrication. The analytical models evaluate the performance improvements over solder and compliant interconnections. Test vehicles with nano-interconnections were fabricated using low cost electro-deposition techniques and assembled with various bonding interfaces. Interconnections were fabricated at 200 micron pitch to compare with the existing solder joints and at 50 micron pitch to demonstrate fabrication processes at fine pitches. Experimental and modeling results show that the proposed nano-interconnections could enhance the reliability and potentially meet all the system performance requirements for the emerging micro/nano-systems.

  20. Atomic Structures of the Amino Acids, Glycine, Alanine and Serine and Their Tripeptide, with Bond Lengths as Sums of Atomic Covalent Radii

    CERN Document Server

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the bond lengths of the molecular components of nucleic acids and of caffeine and related molecules were shown to be sums of the appropriate covalent radii of the adjacent atoms. Thus, each atom was shown to have its specific contribution to the bond length. This enabled establishing their atomic structures for the first time. In this work, the known bond lengths for amino acids and the peptide bond are similarly shown to be sums of the atomic covalent radii. Based on this result, the atomic structures of glycine, alanine and serine and their tripeptide have been presented.