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Sample records for dna mutation frequency

  1. Deficiency of the DNA repair protein nibrin increases the basal but not the radiation induced mutation frequency in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessendorf, Petra; Vijg, Jan; Nussenzweig, André; Digweed, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • lacZ mutant frequencies measured in vivo in mouse models of radiosensitive Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome. • Spontaneous mutation frequencies are increased in lymphatic tissue due to Nbn mutation. • Single base transitions, not deletions, dominate the mutation spectrum. • Radiation induced mutation frequencies are not increased due to Nbn mutation. - Abstract: Nibrin (NBN) is a member of a DNA repair complex together with MRE11 and RAD50. The complex is associated particularly with the repair of DNA double strand breaks and with the regulation of cell cycle check points. Hypomorphic mutation of components of the complex leads to human disorders characterised by radiosensitivity and increased tumour occurrence, particularly of the lymphatic system. We have examined here the relationship between DNA damage, mutation frequency and mutation spectrum in vitro and in vivo in mouse models carrying NBN mutations and a lacZ reporter plasmid. We find that NBN mutation leads to increased spontaneous DNA damage in fibroblasts in vitro and high basal mutation rates in lymphatic tissue of mice in vivo. The characteristic mutation spectrum is dominated by single base transitions rather than the deletions and complex rearrangements expected after abortive repair of DNA double strand breaks. We conclude that in the absence of wild type nibrin, the repair of spontaneous errors, presumably arising during DNA replication, makes a major contribution to the basal mutation rate. This applies also to cells heterozygous for an NBN null mutation. Mutation frequencies after irradiation in vivo were not increased in mice with nibrin mutations as might have been expected considering the radiosensitivity of NBS patient cells in vitro. Evidently apoptosis is efficient, even in the absence of wild type nibrin

  2. Deficiency of the DNA repair protein nibrin increases the basal but not the radiation induced mutation frequency in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessendorf, Petra [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany); Vijg, Jan [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Michael F. Price Center, 1301 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Nussenzweig, André [Laboratory of Genome Integrity, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, 37 Convent Drive, Room 1106, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Digweed, Martin, E-mail: martin.digweed@charite.de [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • lacZ mutant frequencies measured in vivo in mouse models of radiosensitive Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome. • Spontaneous mutation frequencies are increased in lymphatic tissue due to Nbn mutation. • Single base transitions, not deletions, dominate the mutation spectrum. • Radiation induced mutation frequencies are not increased due to Nbn mutation. - Abstract: Nibrin (NBN) is a member of a DNA repair complex together with MRE11 and RAD50. The complex is associated particularly with the repair of DNA double strand breaks and with the regulation of cell cycle check points. Hypomorphic mutation of components of the complex leads to human disorders characterised by radiosensitivity and increased tumour occurrence, particularly of the lymphatic system. We have examined here the relationship between DNA damage, mutation frequency and mutation spectrum in vitro and in vivo in mouse models carrying NBN mutations and a lacZ reporter plasmid. We find that NBN mutation leads to increased spontaneous DNA damage in fibroblasts in vitro and high basal mutation rates in lymphatic tissue of mice in vivo. The characteristic mutation spectrum is dominated by single base transitions rather than the deletions and complex rearrangements expected after abortive repair of DNA double strand breaks. We conclude that in the absence of wild type nibrin, the repair of spontaneous errors, presumably arising during DNA replication, makes a major contribution to the basal mutation rate. This applies also to cells heterozygous for an NBN null mutation. Mutation frequencies after irradiation in vivo were not increased in mice with nibrin mutations as might have been expected considering the radiosensitivity of NBS patient cells in vitro. Evidently apoptosis is efficient, even in the absence of wild type nibrin.

  3. Analysis of mutation/rearrangement frequencies and methylation patterns at a given DNA locus using restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, Alex; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) is a difference in DNA sequences of organisms belonging to the same species. RFLPs are typically detected as DNA fragments of different lengths after digestion with various restriction endonucleases. The comparison of RFLPs allows investigators to analyze the frequency of occurrence of mutations, such as point mutations, deletions, insertions, and gross chromosomal rearrangements, in the progeny of stressed plants. The assay involves restriction enzyme digestion of DNA followed by hybridization of digested DNA using a radioactively or enzymatically labeled probe. Since DNA can be digested with methylation sensitive enzymes, the assay can also be used to analyze a methylation pattern of a particular locus. Here, we describe RFLP analysis using methylation-insensitive and methylation-sensitive enzymes.

  4. Minisequencing mitochondrial DNA pathogenic mutations

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    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of well-known mutations responsible of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA diseases. In order to overcome technical problems related to the analysis of complete mtDNA genomes, a variety of different techniques have been proposed that allow the screening of coding region pathogenic mutations. Methods We here propose a minisequencing assay for the analysis of mtDNA mutations. In a single reaction, we interrogate a total of 25 pathogenic mutations distributed all around the whole mtDNA genome in a sample of patients suspected for mtDNA disease. Results We have detected 11 causal homoplasmic mutations in patients suspected for Leber disease, which were further confirmed by standard automatic sequencing. Mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C occur at higher frequency than expected by change in the Galician (northwest Spain patients carrying haplogroup J lineages (Fisher's Exact test, P-value Conclusion We here developed a minisequencing genotyping method for the screening of the most common pathogenic mtDNA mutations which is simple, fast, and low-cost. The technique is robust and reproducible and can easily be implemented in standard clinical laboratories.

  5. Heart tissue of harlequin (hq)/Big Blue mice has elevated reactive oxygen species without significant impact on the frequency and nature of point mutations in nuclear DNA

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    Crabbe, Rory A. [Department of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Hill, Kathleen A., E-mail: khill22@uwo.ca [Department of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2010-09-10

    Age is a major risk factor for heart disease, and cardiac aging is characterized by elevated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) with compromised mitochondrial and nuclear DNA integrity. To assess links between increased ROS levels and mutations, we examined in situ levels of ROS and cII mutation frequency, pattern and spectrum in the heart of harlequin (hq)/Big Blue mice. The hq mouse is a model of premature aging with mitochondrial dysfunction and increased risk of oxidative stress-induced heart disease with the means for in vivo mutation detection. The hq mutation produces a significant downregulation in the X-linked apoptosis-inducing factor gene (Aif) impairing both the antioxidant and oxidative phosphorylation functions of AIF. Brain and skin of hq disease mice have elevated frequencies of point mutations in nuclear DNA and histopathology characterized by cell loss. Reports of associated elevations in ROS in brain and skin have mixed results. Herein, heart in situ ROS levels were elevated in hq disease compared to AIF-proficient mice (p < 0.0001) yet, mutation frequency and pattern were similar in hq disease, hq carrier and AIF-proficient mice. Heart cII mutations were also assessed 15 days following an acute exposure to an exogenous ROS inducer (10 mg paraquat/kg). Acute paraquat exposure with a short mutant manifestation period was insufficient to elevate mutation frequency or alter mutation pattern in the post-mitotic heart tissue of AIF-proficient mice. Paraquat induction of ROS requires mitochondrial complex I and thus is likely compromised in hq mice. Results of this preliminary survey and the context of recent literature suggest that determining causal links between AIF deficiency and the premature aging phenotypes of specific tissues is better addressed with assay of mitochondrial ROS and large-scale changes in mitochondrial DNA in specific cell types.

  6. Heart tissue of harlequin (hq)/Big Blue mice has elevated reactive oxygen species without significant impact on the frequency and nature of point mutations in nuclear DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crabbe, Rory A.; Hill, Kathleen A.

    2010-01-01

    Age is a major risk factor for heart disease, and cardiac aging is characterized by elevated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) with compromised mitochondrial and nuclear DNA integrity. To assess links between increased ROS levels and mutations, we examined in situ levels of ROS and cII mutation frequency, pattern and spectrum in the heart of harlequin (hq)/Big Blue mice. The hq mouse is a model of premature aging with mitochondrial dysfunction and increased risk of oxidative stress-induced heart disease with the means for in vivo mutation detection. The hq mutation produces a significant downregulation in the X-linked apoptosis-inducing factor gene (Aif) impairing both the antioxidant and oxidative phosphorylation functions of AIF. Brain and skin of hq disease mice have elevated frequencies of point mutations in nuclear DNA and histopathology characterized by cell loss. Reports of associated elevations in ROS in brain and skin have mixed results. Herein, heart in situ ROS levels were elevated in hq disease compared to AIF-proficient mice (p < 0.0001) yet, mutation frequency and pattern were similar in hq disease, hq carrier and AIF-proficient mice. Heart cII mutations were also assessed 15 days following an acute exposure to an exogenous ROS inducer (10 mg paraquat/kg). Acute paraquat exposure with a short mutant manifestation period was insufficient to elevate mutation frequency or alter mutation pattern in the post-mitotic heart tissue of AIF-proficient mice. Paraquat induction of ROS requires mitochondrial complex I and thus is likely compromised in hq mice. Results of this preliminary survey and the context of recent literature suggest that determining causal links between AIF deficiency and the premature aging phenotypes of specific tissues is better addressed with assay of mitochondrial ROS and large-scale changes in mitochondrial DNA in specific cell types.

  7. Reduction of spontaneous somatic mutation frequency by a low-dose X irradiation of Drosophila larvae and possible involvement of DNA single-strand damage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koana, Takao; Takahashi, Takashi; Tsujimura, Hidenobu

    2012-03-01

    The third instar larvae of Drosophila were irradiated with X rays, and the somatic mutation frequency in their wings was measured after their eclosion. In the flies with normal DNA repair and apoptosis functions, 0.2 Gy irradiation at 0.05 Gy/min reduced the frequency of the so-called small spot (mutant cell clone with reduced reproductive activity) compared with that in the sham-irradiated flies. When apoptosis was suppressed using the baculovirus p35 gene, the small spot frequency increased four times in the sham-irradiated control group, but the reduction by the 0.2-Gy irradiation was still evident. In a non-homologous end joining-deficient mutant, the small spot frequency was also reduced by 0.2 Gy radiation. In a mutant deficient in single-strand break repair, no reduction in the small spot frequency by 0.2 Gy radiation was observed, and the small spot frequency increased with the radiation dose. Large spot (mutant cell clone with normal reproductive activity) frequency was not affected by suppression of apoptosis and increased monotonically with radiation dose in wild-type larvae and in mutants for single- or double-strand break repair. It is hypothesized that some of the small spots resulted from single-strand damage and, in wild-type larvae, 0.2 Gy radiation activated the normal single-strand break repair gene, which reduced the background somatic mutation frequency.

  8. DNA adducts, mutant frequencies and mutation spectra in λlacZ transgenic mice treated with N-nitrosodimethylamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souliotis, V.L.; Delft, J.H.M. van; Steenwinkel, M.-J.S.T.; Baan, R.A.; Kyrtopoulos, S.A.

    1998-01-01

    Groups of λlacZ transgenic mice were treated i.p. with N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) as single doses of 5 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg or as 10 daily doses of 1 mg/kg and changes in DNA N7- or O6-methylguanine or the repair enzyme O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) were followed for up to 14 days in

  9. Presence of a consensus DNA motif at nearby DNA sequence of the mutation susceptible CG nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Kaushik; Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Tanu; Sharma, Ankit; Bhagat, Meenakshi; Kamai, Asangla; Ford, Bridget M; Asthana, Shailendra; Mandal, Chandi C

    2018-01-10

    Complexity in tissues affected by cancer arises from somatic mutations and epigenetic modifications in the genome. The mutation susceptible hotspots present within the genome indicate a non-random nature and/or a position specific selection of mutation. An association exists between the occurrence of mutations and epigenetic DNA methylation. This study is primarily aimed at determining mutation status, and identifying a signature for predicting mutation prone zones of tumor suppressor (TS) genes. Nearby sequences from the top five positions having a higher mutation frequency in each gene of 42 TS genes were selected from a cosmic database and were considered as mutation prone zones. The conserved motifs present in the mutation prone DNA fragments were identified. Molecular docking studies were done to determine putative interactions between the identified conserved motifs and enzyme methyltransferase DNMT1. Collective analysis of 42 TS genes found GC as the most commonly replaced and AT as the most commonly formed residues after mutation. Analysis of the top 5 mutated positions of each gene (210 DNA segments for 42 TS genes) identified that CG nucleotides of the amino acid codons (e.g., Arginine) are most susceptible to mutation, and found a consensus DNA "T/AGC/GAGGA/TG" sequence present in these mutation prone DNA segments. Similar to TS genes, analysis of 54 oncogenes not only found CG nucleotides of the amino acid Arg as the most susceptible to mutation, but also identified the presence of similar consensus DNA motifs in the mutation prone DNA fragments (270 DNA segments for 54 oncogenes) of oncogenes. Docking studies depicted that, upon binding of DNMT1 methylates to this consensus DNA motif (C residues of CpG islands), mutation was likely to occur. Thus, this study proposes that DNMT1 mediated methylation in chromosomal DNA may decrease if a foreign DNA segment containing this consensus sequence along with CG nucleotides is exogenously introduced to dividing

  10. Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with increased mutation frequency due to inactivation of the DNA oxidative repair system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandsberg, Lotte F; Ciofu, Oana; Kirkby, N

    2009-01-01

    ,8-dihydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine) than PAO1 after exposure to PMNs, and they developed resistance to antibiotics more frequently. The mechanisms of resistance were increased β-lactamase production and overexpression of the MexCD-OprJ efflux-pump. Mutations in either the mutT or the mutY gene were found...... in resistant HP clinical isolates from patients with CF, and complementation with wild-type genes reverted the phenotype. In conclusion, oxidative stress might be involved in the development of resistance to antibiotics. We therefore suggest the possible use of antioxidants for CF patients to prevent...

  11. RADIA: RNA and DNA integrated analysis for somatic mutation detection.

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    Amie J Radenbaugh

    Full Text Available The detection of somatic single nucleotide variants is a crucial component to the characterization of the cancer genome. Mutation calling algorithms thus far have focused on comparing the normal and tumor genomes from the same individual. In recent years, it has become routine for projects like The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA to also sequence the tumor RNA. Here we present RADIA (RNA and DNA Integrated Analysis, a novel computational method combining the patient-matched normal and tumor DNA with the tumor RNA to detect somatic mutations. The inclusion of the RNA increases the power to detect somatic mutations, especially at low DNA allelic frequencies. By integrating an individual's DNA and RNA, we are able to detect mutations that would otherwise be missed by traditional algorithms that examine only the DNA. We demonstrate high sensitivity (84% and very high precision (98% and 99% for RADIA in patient data from endometrial carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma from TCGA. Mutations with both high DNA and RNA read support have the highest validation rate of over 99%. We also introduce a simulation package that spikes in artificial mutations to patient data, rather than simulating sequencing data from a reference genome. We evaluate sensitivity on the simulation data and demonstrate our ability to rescue back mutations at low DNA allelic frequencies by including the RNA. Finally, we highlight mutations in important cancer genes that were rescued due to the incorporation of the RNA.

  12. DNA mutation motifs in the genes associated with inherited diseases.

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    Michal Růžička

    Full Text Available Mutations in human genes can be responsible for inherited genetic disorders and cancer. Mutations can arise due to environmental factors or spontaneously. It has been shown that certain DNA sequences are more prone to mutate. These sites are termed hotspots and exhibit a higher mutation frequency than expected by chance. In contrast, DNA sequences with lower mutation frequencies than expected by chance are termed coldspots. Mutation hotspots are usually derived from a mutation spectrum, which reflects particular population where an effect of a common ancestor plays a role. To detect coldspots/hotspots unaffected by population bias, we analysed the presence of germline mutations obtained from HGMD database in the 5-nucleotide segments repeatedly occurring in genes associated with common inherited disorders, in particular, the PAH, LDLR, CFTR, F8, and F9 genes. Statistically significant sequences (mutational motifs rarely associated with mutations (coldspots and frequently associated with mutations (hotspots exhibited characteristic sequence patterns, e.g. coldspots contained purine tract while hotspots showed alternating purine-pyrimidine bases, often with the presence of CpG dinucleotide. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we analysed the global bending properties of two selected coldspots and two hotspots with a G/T mismatch. We observed that the coldspots were inherently more flexible than the hotspots. We assume that this property might be critical for effective mismatch repair as DNA with a mutation recognized by MutSα protein is noticeably bent.

  13. Polymorphism and mutation analysis of genomic DNA on cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Tsutomu

    2003-01-01

    DNA repair is a universal process in living cells that maintains the structural integrity of chromosomal DNA molecules in face of damage. A deficiency in DNA damage repair is associated with an increased cancer risk by increasing a mutation frequency of cancer-related genes. Variation in DNA repair capacity may be genetically determined. Therefore, we searched single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in major DNA repair genes. This led to the finding of 600 SNPs and mutations including many novel SNPs in Japanese population. Case-control studies to explore the contribution of the SNPs in DNA repair genes to the risk of lung cancer revealed that five SNPs are associated with lung carcinogenesis. One of these SNPs is found in RAD54L gene, which is involved in double-strand DNA repair. We analyzed and reported activities of Rad54L protein with SNP and mutations. (authors)

  14. EGFR mutation frequency and effectiveness of erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Britta; Hager, Henrik; Sorensen, Boe S

    2014-01-01

    mutation (S768I), and two complex mutations. Seven percent of the patients were never smokers. The differences in median progression-free survival and overall survival between the mutated group and the wild-type group were 8.0 vs. 2.5 months, p...-1 vs. 2-3) and line of treatment (1st vs. 2nd and 3rd) had no influence on outcome in EGFR-mutated patients. CONCLUSION: We found a higher frequency of EGFR mutations than expected in a cohort with less than 10% never smokers. The outcome after treatment with erlotinib was much better in patients......OBJECTIVES: In 2008, we initiated a prospective study to explore the frequency and predictive value of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in an unselected population of Danish patients with non-small cell lung cancer offered treatment with erlotinib, mainly in second-line. MATERIALS...

  15. Frequency of factor V Leiden mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasiruddin; Ali, W.; Rehman, Z.; Anwar, M.; Ayyub, M.; Ali, W.; Ahmed, S.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of factor V Leiden mutation. Design: Observational study. Patients and Methods: Two hundred subjects each of apparently healthy and unrelated Punjabi and Pathan origins were included in the study. Peripheral blood samples were collected in EDTA and DNA extracted by phenol- chloroform extraction method. DNA analysis was done by PCR for restriction fragment length polymorphism. The product was digested overnight with Mn/1 and electrophoresed on acrylamide gel to detect 67 and 153 base pair fragments of factor V Leiden against 37, 67 and 116 base pair fragments of normal factor V. Results: In the 400 subjects studied, only 5 cases of heterozygotes for factor V Leiden were detected. The overall carrier rate was 1.3% (95% CI 0.2-2.2%). The carrier rate in Punjabis and Pathans was 1 % and 1.5% respectively. Conclusion: This study confirms that the prevalence of factor V Leiden is low in Asians and Africans as compared to the European population. (author)

  16. The Oenothera plastome mutator: effect of UV irradiation and nitroso-methyl urea on mutation frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, B.B.; Sokalski, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    Oenothera plants homozygous for a recessive plastome mutator allele (pm) showed spontaneous mutation frequencies for plastome genes that are 200-fold higher than spontaneous levels. Mutations occurred at high frequencies in plants grown in the field, in a glasshouse, or as leaf tip cultures under fluorescent light, indicating that the plastome mutator activity is UV-independent. However, the chlorotic sectors became visible at an earlier stage of development when seedlings were irradiated, compared to seedlings that were not exposed to UV. These results imply that the rate of sorting-out was increased by the irradiation treatment, possibly due to a decrease in the effective number of multiplication-competent plastids, or a reduction in the extent of cytoplasmic mixing. Nitroso-methyl urea treatment of seeds had a dramatic effect on mutation frequency in both wild-type and plastome mutator samples. When the background mutation rates were low, the combination of the plastome mutator nucleus and the chemical mutagenesis treatment resulted in a synergistic effect, suggesting that the plastome mutator may involve a cpDNA repair pathway. (author)

  17. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in human tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    LI, HUI; HONG, ZE-HUI

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria play significant roles in cellular energy metabolism, free radical generation and apoptosis. The dysfunction of mitochondria is correlated with the origin and progression of tumors; thus, mutations in the mitochondrial genome that affect mitochondrial function may be one of the causal factors of tumorigenesis. Although the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in carcinogenesis has been investigated extensively by various approaches, the conclusions remain controversial to ...

  18. Modification of mutation frequency in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vashishat, R.K.; Kakar, S.N.

    1976-01-01

    In a reverse mutation system, using haploid, histidine-requirinq strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the frequency of uv-induced prototrophs increased if the post-irradiation minimal medium was supplemented with limited amounts of histidine. Addition of natural amino acids or RNA bases in the post-irradiation minimal medium, with or without histidine, also increased the uv-induced mutation frequency. Thus, post-irradiation conditions favouring protein and RNA synthesis, are effective in increasing uv-induced mutations in yeast. As compared to uv light, nitrous acid was more effective in inducing reversions in this strain and the frequency increased if the treated cells were plated on minimal medium supplemented with limited amounts of histidine. However, the addition of amino acids or RNA bases decreased the number of revertants. An additional inclusion of histidine reversed the suppressive effect of these metabolites. The mutation induction processes are thus different or differently modifiable in uv and nitrous acid. (author)

  19. Impact of low-frequency hotspot mutation R282Q on the structure of p53 DNA-binding domain as revealed by crystallography at 1.54 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Chao [Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Tan, Yu-Hong [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Shaw, Gary [Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Zhou, Zheng; Bai, Yawen [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Luo, Ray [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Ji, Xinhua, E-mail: jix@ncifcrf.gov [Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States)

    2008-05-01

    The impact of hotspot mutation R282Q on the structure of human p53 DNA-binding domain has been characterized by X-ray crystallography and molecular-dynamics simulations. Tumor suppressor p53 is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein and its central DNA-binding domain (DBD) harbors six hotspots (Arg175, Gly245, Arg248, Arg249, Arg273 and Arg282) for human cancers. Here, the crystal structure of a low-frequency hotspot mutant, p53DBD(R282Q), is reported at 1.54 Å resolution together with the results of molecular-dynamics simulations on the basis of the structure. In addition to eliminating a salt bridge, the R282Q mutation has a significant impact on the properties of two DNA-binding loops (L1 and L3). The L1 loop is flexible in the wild type, but it is not flexible in the mutant. The L3 loop of the wild type is not flexible, whereas it assumes two conformations in the mutant. Molecular-dynamics simulations indicated that both conformations of the L3 loop are accessible under biological conditions. It is predicted that the elimination of the salt bridge and the inversion of the flexibility of L1 and L3 are directly or indirectly responsible for deactivating the tumor suppressor p53.

  20. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  1. Roles of Mitochondrial DNA Mutations in Stem Cell Ageing

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    Tianhong Su

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations accumulate in somatic stem cells during ageing and cause mitochondrial dysfunction. In this review, we summarize the studies that link mtDNA mutations to stem cell ageing. We discuss the age-related behaviours of the somatic mtDNA mutations in stem cell populations and how they potentially contribute to stem cell ageing by altering mitochondrial properties in humans and in mtDNA-mutator mice. We also draw attention to the diverse fates of the mtDNA mutations with different origins during ageing, with potential selective pressures on the germline inherited but not the somatic mtDNA mutations.

  2. Spontaneous mutation by mutagenic repair of spontaneous lesions in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, P.J.; Quah, S.-K.; Borstel, R.C. von

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that strains of yeast carrying mutations in many of the steps in pathways repairing radiation-induced damage to DNA have enhanced spontaneous mutation rates. Most strains isolated because they have enhanced spontaneous mutation carry mutations in DNA repair systems. This suggests that much spontaneous mutation arises by mutagenic repair of spontaneous lesions. (author)

  3. The influence of DNA repair inhibitors on the mutation rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auzinger, Th.; Hruby, R.

    1980-12-01

    The simultaneous influence of gamma-radiation and DNA-repair inhibiting substances on the mutation frequency of mice was investigated in vivo with the micronucleus test. The detergens Tween 80, vitamin A, and the antiphlogisticum phenylbutazone were used as DNA-repair inhibiting substances. Using the same irradiation doses, a statistic significant increase of mutagenicity respectively micronucleus frequency was found in high concentrations of Tween 80 and in all used dosages of vitamin A, but not in phenylbutazone and in low concentrations of tween. (auth.)

  4. Ultra-deep sequencing of mouse mitochondrial DNA: mutational patterns and their origins.

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    Adam Ameur

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations of mtDNA are implicated in the aging process, but there is no universally accepted method for their accurate quantification. We have used ultra-deep sequencing to study genome-wide mtDNA mutation load in the liver of normally- and prematurely-aging mice. Mice that are homozygous for an allele expressing a proof-reading-deficient mtDNA polymerase (mtDNA mutator mice have 10-times-higher point mutation loads than their wildtype siblings. In addition, the mtDNA mutator mice have increased levels of a truncated linear mtDNA molecule, resulting in decreased sequence coverage in the deleted region. In contrast, circular mtDNA molecules with large deletions occur at extremely low frequencies in mtDNA mutator mice and can therefore not drive the premature aging phenotype. Sequence analysis shows that the main proportion of the mutation load in heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice and their wildtype siblings is inherited from their heterozygous mothers consistent with germline transmission. We found no increase in levels of point mutations or deletions in wildtype C57Bl/6N mice with increasing age, thus questioning the causative role of these changes in aging. In addition, there was no increased frequency of transversion mutations with time in any of the studied genotypes, arguing against oxidative damage as a major cause of mtDNA mutations. Our results from studies of mice thus indicate that most somatic mtDNA mutations occur as replication errors during development and do not result from damage accumulation in adult life.

  5. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Three DNA polymerases — Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ — are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson–Crick base pairing and 3′exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to ‘polymerase proofreading associated polyposis’ (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an ‘ultramutator’ phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions. PMID:24583393

  6. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-02-01

    Three DNA polymerases - Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ - are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson-Crick base pairing and 3'exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to 'polymerase proofreading associated polyposis' (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an 'ultramutator' phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Tumor‐associated DNA mutation detection in individuals undergoing colonoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Fleshner, Phillip; Braunstein, Glenn D.; Ovsepyan, Gayane; Tonozzi, Theresa R.; Kammesheidt, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The majority of colorectal cancers (CRC) harbor somatic mutations and epigenetic modifications in the tumor tissue, and some of these mutations can be detected in plasma as circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA). Precancerous colorectal lesions also contain many of these same mutations. This study examined plasma for ctDNA from patients undergoing a screening or diagnostic colonoscopy to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the ctDNA panel for detecting CRC and precancerous lesions. T...

  8. The spontaneous chlorophyll mutation frequency in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms; Jensen, Hans Peter

    1986-01-01

    A total of 1866 barley plants were progeny tested in the greenhouse. Twenty-five plants segregated for newly arisen, spontaneous chlorophyll mutant genes. Among the total of 470,129 seedlings screened there were 79 mutants (1.7 .+-. 0.6 .times. 10-4). The data are added to data from three similar...... materials and the resulting estimate of the chlorophyll mutant frequency is 1.6 .times. 10-4 in about 1.43 million seedlings. The estimate of the chlorophyll mutation rate per generation is close to 67.3 .times. 10-4 per diploid genome or in the order of 6 .times. 10-7 per locus and haploid genome....

  9. The occurrence and frequency of genomic mutations that mediate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence and frequency of genomic mutations that mediate Isoniazid and Rifampicin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from untreated pulmonary Tuberculosis cases in urban Blantyre, Malawi.

  10. Frequency and distribution of Notch mutations in tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutvei, Anders Peter; Fredlund, Erik; Lendahl, Urban

    2015-01-01

    Deregulated Notch signaling is linked to a variety of tumors and it is therefore important to learn more about the frequency and distribution of Notch mutations in a tumor context. In this report, we use data from the recently developed Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia to assess the frequency and distribution of Notch mutations in a large panel of cancer cell lines in silico. Our results show that the mutation frequency of Notch receptor and ligand genes is at par with that for established oncogenes and higher than for a set of house-keeping genes. Mutations were found across all four Notch receptor genes, but with notable differences between protein domains, mutations were for example more prevalent in the regions encoding the LNR and PEST domains in the Notch intracellular domain. Furthermore, an in silico estimation of functional impact showed that deleterious mutations cluster to the ligand-binding and the intracellular domains of NOTCH1. For most cell line groups, the mutation frequency of Notch genes is higher than in associated primary tumors. Our results shed new light on the spectrum of Notch mutations after in vitro culturing of tumor cells. The higher mutation frequency in tumor cell lines indicates that Notch mutations are associated with a growth advantage in vitro, and thus may be considered to be driver mutations in a tumor cell line context. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1278-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  11. Compound mitochondrial DNA mutations in a neurological patient ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Compound mitochondrial DNA mutations in a neurological patient with ataxia, myoclonus and deafness. Ji Hoon Park, Bo Ram Yoon, Hye Jin Kim, Phil Hyu Lee, Byung-Ok Choi and Ki Wha Chung. J. Genet. 93, 173–177. Table 1. Variations from the whole mtDNA sequence in the AMDF patient. Mutation. Report. Locus/ ...

  12. Assessing the contribution of the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase to spontaneous mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leary Jeffry J

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The thymidine kinase (tk mutagenesis assay is often utilized to determine the frequency of herpes simplex virus (HSV replication-mediated mutations. Using this assay, clinical and laboratory HSV-2 isolates were shown to have a 10- to 80-fold higher frequency of spontaneous mutations compared to HSV-1. Methods A panel of HSV-1 and HSV-2, along with polymerase-recombinant viruses expressing type 2 polymerase (Pol within a type 1 genome, were evaluated using the tk and non-HSV DNA mutagenesis assays to measure HSV replication-dependent errors and determine whether the higher mutation frequency of HSV-2 is a distinct property of type 2 polymerases. Results Although HSV-2 have mutation frequencies higher than HSV-1 in the tk assay, these errors are assay-specific. In fact, wild type HSV-1 and the antimutator HSV-1 PAAr5 exhibited a 2–4 fold higher frequency than HSV-2 in the non-HSV DNA mutatagenesis assay. Furthermore, regardless of assay, HSV-1 recombinants expressing HSV-2 Pol had error rates similar to HSV-1, whereas the high mutator virus, HSV-2 6757, consistently showed signficant errors. Additionally, plasmid DNA containing the HSV-2 tk gene, but not type 1 tk or LacZ DNA, was shown to form an anisomorphic DNA stucture. Conclusions This study suggests that the Pol is not solely responsible for the virus-type specific differences in mutation frequency. Accordingly, it is possible that (a mutations may be modulated by other viral polypeptides cooperating with Pol, and (b the localized secondary structure of the viral genome may partially account for the apparently enhanced error frequency of HSV-2.

  13. The influence of calf thymus DNA and deoxyribonucleosides on the induction of different mutation types in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrej, M.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of an exogenous DNA on the induction of mutations by X rays was compared with the influence of an equimolar mixture of four deoxyribonucleosides. Pre-treatment and post-treatment with the calf thymus DNA did not influence mutation frequency in the specific loci dp, b, cn and bw as well as Minute mutations induced in the Drosophila sperm by X radiation. Pre-treatment with the equimolar mixture of four deoxyribonucleosides increased the frequency of the Minutes but did not affect mutation frequency in the loci dp, b, cn, bw. The equimolar mixture of nucleosides alone induced a low frequency of Minute mutations in the Drosophila sperm. DNA alone induced a low frequency of recessive lethals. These lethals arose as mosaics of small sectors of the gonads of the F 1 females and were revealed as late as in the F 3 generation. (author)

  14. Estimating Exceptionally Rare Germline and Somatic Mutation Frequencies via Next Generation Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Eboreime

    Full Text Available We used targeted next generation deep-sequencing (Safe Sequencing System to measure ultra-rare de novo mutation frequencies in the human male germline by attaching a unique identifier code to each target DNA molecule. Segments from three different human genes (FGFR3, MECP2 and PTPN11 were studied. Regardless of the gene segment, the particular testis donor or the 73 different testis pieces used, the frequencies for any one of the six different mutation types were consistent. Averaging over the C>T/G>A and G>T/C>A mutation types the background mutation frequency was 2.6x10-5 per base pair, while for the four other mutation types the average background frequency was lower at 1.5x10-6 per base pair. These rates far exceed the well documented human genome average frequency per base pair (~10-8 suggesting a non-biological explanation for our data. By computational modeling and a new experimental procedure to distinguish between pre-mutagenic lesion base mismatches and a fully mutated base pair in the original DNA molecule, we argue that most of the base-dependent variation in background frequency is due to a mixture of deamination and oxidation during the first two PCR cycles. Finally, we looked at a previously studied disease mutation in the PTPN11 gene and could easily distinguish true mutations from the SSS background. We also discuss the limits and possibilities of this and other methods to measure exceptionally rare mutation frequencies, and we present calculations for other scientists seeking to design their own such experiments.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in mutator mice confer respiration defects and B-cell lymphoma development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Mito

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutator mice are proposed to express premature aging phenotypes including kyphosis and hair loss (alopecia due to their carrying a nuclear-encoded mtDNA polymerase with a defective proofreading function, which causes accelerated accumulation of random mutations in mtDNA, resulting in expression of respiration defects. On the contrary, transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ carrying mtDNA with a large-scale deletion mutation (ΔmtDNA also express respiration defects, but not express premature aging phenotypes. Here, we resolved this discrepancy by generating mtDNA mutator mice sharing the same C57BL/6J (B6J nuclear background with that of mito-miceΔ. Expression patterns of premature aging phenotypes are very close, when we compared between homozygous mtDNA mutator mice carrying a B6J nuclear background and selected mito-miceΔ only carrying predominant amounts of ΔmtDNA, in their expression of significant respiration defects, kyphosis, and a short lifespan, but not the alopecia. Therefore, the apparent discrepancy in the presence and absence of premature aging phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, respectively, is partly the result of differences in the nuclear background of mtDNA mutator mice and of the broad range of ΔmtDNA proportions of mito-miceΔ used in previous studies. We also provided direct evidence that mtDNA abnormalities in homozygous mtDNA mutator mice are responsible for respiration defects by demonstrating the co-transfer of mtDNA and respiration defects from mtDNA mutator mice into mtDNA-less (ρ(0 mouse cells. Moreover, heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice had a normal lifespan, but frequently developed B-cell lymphoma, suggesting that the mtDNA abnormalities in heterozygous mutator mice are not sufficient to induce a short lifespan and aging phenotypes, but are able to contribute to the B-cell lymphoma development during their prolonged lifespan.

  16. Combination of the mutation process with the sensitization and repair processes leading to increased frequencies of mutations in algal populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Necas, J.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of combining the mutation process with the induction of the repair processes was studied to increase the mutation frequencies in algal populations after UV treatment. The repair process induced by visible light was found to be much more effective than the dark repair processes in the chlorococcal algae used. In these algae, visible light possibly does not induce only those repair processes which affect their DNA, but probably also certain recovery processes which affect their damaged structures and physiological functions. A suitable combination of the sensitization of algae cells by a DNA-base analogue before UV treatment and the induction of the light repair and recovery processes resulted in a rather high increase of viable mutations in chlorococcal algae. These findings may be useful in breeding chlorococcal algae, which have no possibility of hybridization other than somatic. (author)

  17. Frequency of BRAF V600E Mutation in the Mexican Population of Patients With Metastatic Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Ruiz-Garcia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The BRAF V600E mutation has been described in melanomas occurring in the Caucasian, European, and Asian populations. However, in the Mexican population, the status and clinical significance of BRAF mutation has not been researched on a large scale. Methods: Consecutive BRAF-tested Mexican patients with metastatic melanoma (n = 127 were analyzed for mutations in exon 15 of the BRAF gene in genomic DNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction technology for amplification and detection. The results were correlated with the clinical-pathologic features and the prognosis of the patients. Results: The frequency of somatic mutation V600E within the BRAF gene was 54.6% (43 of 127 patients. Nodular melanoma was the most prevalent subtype in our population, with BRAF mutations in 37.2% (16 of 55 patients. In contrast, superficial spread had a frequency of 18.6% BRAF mutation (eight of 24. Other clinicopathologic features were assessed to correlate with the mutation status. Conclusion: This study searched for the most prevalent BRAF V600E mutation type in melanoma in a heterogeneous population from Mexico. Nodular melanoma was found to be the most prevalent in metastatic presentation and the presence of BRAF V600E mutation, perhaps related to the mixed ancestry; in the north, ancestry is predominantly European and in the south, it is predominantly Asian. The outcomes of the mutation correlations were similar to those found in other populations.

  18. Performance of mitochondrial DNA mutations detecting early stage cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakupciak, John P; Srivastava, Sudhir; Sidransky, David; O'Connell, Catherine D; Maragh, Samantha; Markowitz, Maura E; Greenberg, Alissa K; Hoque, Mohammad O; Maitra, Anirban; Barker, Peter E; Wagner, Paul D; Rom, William N

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome) have been associated with cancer and many other disorders. These mutations can be point mutations or deletions, or admixtures (heteroplasmy). The detection of mtDNA mutations in body fluids using resequencing microarrays, which are more sensitive than other sequencing methods, could provide a strategy to measure mutation loads in remote anatomical sites. We determined the mtDNA mutation load in the entire mitochondrial genome of 26 individuals with different early stage cancers (lung, bladder, kidney) and 12 heavy smokers without cancer. MtDNA was sequenced from three matched specimens (blood, tumor and body fluid) from each cancer patient and two matched specimens (blood and sputum) from smokers without cancer. The inherited wildtype sequence in the blood was compared to the sequences present in the tumor and body fluid, detected using the Affymetrix Genechip ® Human Mitochondrial Resequencing Array 1.0 and supplemented by capillary sequencing for noncoding region. Using this high-throughput method, 75% of the tumors were found to contain mtDNA mutations, higher than in our previous studies, and 36% of the body fluids from these cancer patients contained mtDNA mutations. Most of the mutations detected were heteroplasmic. A statistically significantly higher heteroplasmy rate occurred in tumor specimens when compared to both body fluid of cancer patients and sputum of controls, and in patient blood compared to blood of controls. Only 2 of the 12 sputum specimens from heavy smokers without cancer (17%) contained mtDNA mutations. Although patient mutations were spread throughout the mtDNA genome in the lung, bladder and kidney series, a statistically significant elevation of tRNA and ND complex mutations was detected in tumors. Our findings indicate comprehensive mtDNA resequencing can be a high-throughput tool for detecting mutations in clinical samples with potential applications for cancer detection, but it is

  19. Clustering of Caucasian Leber hereditary optic neuropathy patients containing the 11778 or 14484 mutations on an mtDNA lineage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.D.; Sun, F.; Wallace, D.C. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a type of blindness caused by mtDNA mutations. Three LHON mtDNA mutations at nucleotide positions 3460, 11778, and 14484 are specific for LHON and account for 90% of worldwide cases and are thus designated as {open_quotes}primary{close_quotes} LHON mutations. Fifteen other {open_quotes}secondary{close_quotes} LHON mtDNA mutations have been identified, but their pathogenicity is unclear. mtDNA haplotype and phylogenetic analysis of the primary LHON mutations in North American Caucasian patients and controls has shown that, unlike the 3460 and 11778 mutations, which are distributed throughout the European-derived (Caucasian) mtDNA phylogeny, patients containing the 14484 mutation tended to be associated with European mtDNA haplotype J. To investigate this apparent clustering, we performed {chi}{sup 2}-based statistical analyses to compare the distribution of LHON patients on the Caucasian phylogenetic tree. Our results indicate that, unlike the 3460 and 11778 mutations, the 14484 mutation was not distributed on the phylogeny in proportion to the frequencies of the major Caucasian mtDNA haplogroups found in North America. The 14484 mutation was next shown to occur on the haplogroup J background more frequently that expected, consistent with the observation that {approximately}75% of worldwide 14484-positive LHON patients occur in association with haplogroup J. The 11778 mutation also exhibited a moderate clustering on haplogroup J. These observations were supported by statistical analysis using all available mutation frequencies reported in the literature. This paper thus illustrates the potential importance of genetic background in certain mtDNA-based diseases, speculates on a pathogenic role for a subset of LHON secondary mutations and their interaction with primary mutations, and provides support for a polygenic model for LHON expression in some cases. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. The role of DNA polymerase {iota} in UV mutational spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jun-Hyuk [Division of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Besaratinia, Ahmad [Division of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Lee, Dong-Hyun [Division of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Lee, Chong-Soon [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Yeungnam University, Gyongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Pfeifer, Gerd P. [Division of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)]. E-mail: gpfeifer@coh.org

    2006-07-25

    UVB (280-320 nm) and UVC (200-280 nm) irradiation generate predominantly cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and (6-4) photoproducts in DNA. CPDs are thought to be responsible for most of the UV-induced mutations. Thymine-thymine CPDs, and probably also CPDs containing cytosine, are replicated in vivo in a largely accurate manner by a DNA polymerase {eta} (Pol {eta}) dependent process. Pol {eta} is a DNA damage-tolerant and error-prone DNA polymerase encoded by the POLH (XPV) gene in humans. Another member of the Y family of error-prone DNA polymerases is POLI encoding DNA polymerase iota (Pol {iota}). In order to clarify the specific role of Pol {iota} in UV mutagenesis, we have used an siRNA knockdown approach in combination with a supF shuttle vector which replicates in mammalian cells, similar as we have previously done for Pol {eta}. Synthetic RNA duplexes were used to efficiently inhibit Pol {iota} expression in 293T cells. The supF shuttle vector was irradiated with 254 nm UVC and replicated in 293T cells in presence of anti-Pol {iota} siRNA. Surprisingly, there was a consistent reduction of recovered plasmid from cells with Pol {iota} knockdown and this was independent of UV irradiation of the plasmid. The supF mutant frequency was unchanged in the siRNA knockdown cells relative to control cells confirming that Pol {iota} does not play an important role in UV mutagenesis. UV-induced supF mutants were sequenced from siRNA-treated cells and controls. Neither the type of mutations nor their distribution along the supF gene were significantly different between controls and siRNA knockdown cells and were predominantly C to T and CC to TT transitions at dipyrimidine sites. These results show that Pol {iota} has no significant role in UV lesion bypass and mutagenesis in vivo and provides some initial data suggesting that this polymerase may be involved in replication of extrachromosomal DNA.

  1. In utero DNA damage from environmental pollution is associated with somatic gene mutation in newborns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, F.; Hemminki, K.; Jedrychowski, W.; Whyatt, R.; Campbell, U.; Hsu, Y.Z.; Santella, R.; Albertini, R.; O' Neill, J.P. [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States). School of Public Health

    2002-10-01

    Transplacental exposure to carcinogenic air pollutants from the combustion of fossil fuels is a growing health concern, given evidence of the heightened susceptibility of the fetus. These mutagenic/carcinogenic pollutants include aromatic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that bind to DNA, forming chemical-DNA adducts. The genotoxic effects of transplacental exposure in humans has been investigated by analyzing aromatic-DNA adducts and the frequency of gene mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus in umbilical cord and maternal blood samples. Here the authors show, in a cross-sectional study of 67 mothers and 64 newborns from the Krakow Region of Poland, that aromatic-DNA adducts measured by P-32-postlabeling are positively associated with HPRT mutant frequency in the newborns (beta = 0.56, P = 0.03) after controlling for exposure to tobacco smoke, diet, and socioeconomic status. In contrast to the fetus, HPRT mutations and DNA adducts do not reflect similar exposure periods in the mother, and the maternal biomarkers were not correlated. Adducts were higher in the newborn than the mother, indicating differential susceptibility of the fetus to DNA damage; but HPRT mutation frequency was 4-fold lower, consistent with the long lifetime of the biomarker. These results provide the first demonstration of a molecular link between somatic mutation in the newborn and transplacental exposure to common air pollutants, a finding that is relevant to cancer risk assessment.

  2. The effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields on mutation induction in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, James W. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Haines, Jackie; Sienkiewicz, Zenon [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom); Dubrova, Yuri E., E-mail: yed2@le.ac.uk [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields on mutation induction in mice were analyzed. • The frequency of ESTR mutation was established in sperm and blood. • Exposure to 10–300 μT for 2 and 15 h did not result in mutation induction. • Mutagenic effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields are likely to be negligible. - Abstract: The growing human exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields has raised a considerable concern regarding their genotoxic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effects of ELF magnetic fields irradiation on mutation induction in the germline and somatic tissues of male mice. Seven week old BALB/c × CBA/Ca F{sub 1} hybrid males were exposed to 10, 100 or 300 μT of 50 Hz magnetic fields for 2 or 15 h. Using single-molecule PCR, the frequency of mutation at the mouse Expanded Simple Tandem Repeat (ESTR) locus Ms6-hm was established in sperm and blood samples of exposed and matched sham-treated males. ESTR mutation frequency was also established in sperm and blood samples taken from male mice exposed to 1 Gy of acute X-rays. The frequency of ESTR mutation in DNA samples extracted from blood of mice exposed to magnetic fields did not significantly differ from that in sham-treated controls. However, there was a marginally significant increase in mutation frequency in sperm but this was not dose-dependent. In contrast, acute exposure X-rays led to significant increases in mutation frequency in sperm and blood of exposed males. The results of our study suggest that, within the range of doses analyzed here, the in vivo mutagenic effects of ELF magnetic fields are likely to be minor if not negligible.

  3. The effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields on mutation induction in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, James W.; Haines, Jackie; Sienkiewicz, Zenon; Dubrova, Yuri E.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields on mutation induction in mice were analyzed. • The frequency of ESTR mutation was established in sperm and blood. • Exposure to 10–300 μT for 2 and 15 h did not result in mutation induction. • Mutagenic effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields are likely to be negligible. - Abstract: The growing human exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields has raised a considerable concern regarding their genotoxic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effects of ELF magnetic fields irradiation on mutation induction in the germline and somatic tissues of male mice. Seven week old BALB/c × CBA/Ca F 1 hybrid males were exposed to 10, 100 or 300 μT of 50 Hz magnetic fields for 2 or 15 h. Using single-molecule PCR, the frequency of mutation at the mouse Expanded Simple Tandem Repeat (ESTR) locus Ms6-hm was established in sperm and blood samples of exposed and matched sham-treated males. ESTR mutation frequency was also established in sperm and blood samples taken from male mice exposed to 1 Gy of acute X-rays. The frequency of ESTR mutation in DNA samples extracted from blood of mice exposed to magnetic fields did not significantly differ from that in sham-treated controls. However, there was a marginally significant increase in mutation frequency in sperm but this was not dose-dependent. In contrast, acute exposure X-rays led to significant increases in mutation frequency in sperm and blood of exposed males. The results of our study suggest that, within the range of doses analyzed here, the in vivo mutagenic effects of ELF magnetic fields are likely to be minor if not negligible

  4. A comprehensive characterization of mitochondrial DNA mutations in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidone, Michele; Clima, Rosanna; Santorsola, Mariangela; Calabrese, Claudia; Girolimetti, Giulia; Kurelac, Ivana; Amato, Laura Benedetta; Iommarini, Luisa; Trevisan, Elisa; Leone, Marco; Soffietti, Riccardo; Morra, Isabella; Faccani, Giuliano; Attimonelli, Marcella; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant brain cancer in adults, with a poor prognosis, whose molecular stratification still represents a challenge in pathology and clinics. On the other hand, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in most tumors as modifiers of the bioenergetics state, albeit in GBM a characterization of the mtDNA status is lacking to date. Here, a characterization of the burden of mtDNA mutations in GBM samples was performed. First, investigation of tumor-specific vs. non tumor-specific mutations was carried out with the MToolBox bioinformatics pipeline by analyzing 45 matched tumor/blood samples, from whole genome or whole exome sequencing datasets obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium. Additionally, the entire mtDNA sequence was obtained in a dataset of 104 fresh-frozen GBM samples. Mitochondrial mutations with potential pathogenic interest were prioritized based on heteroplasmic fraction, nucleotide variability, and in silico prediction of pathogenicity. A preliminary biochemical analysis of the activity of mitochondrial respiratory complexes was also performed on fresh-frozen GBM samples. Although a high number of mutations was detected, we report that the large majority of them does not pass the prioritization filters. Therefore, a relatively limited burden of pathogenic mutations is indeed carried by GBM, which did not appear to determine a general impairment of the respiratory chain. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Exploring the common molecular basis for the universal DNA mutation bias: Revival of Loewdin mutation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Liang-Yu; Wang, Guang-Zhong; Ma, Bin-Guang; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → There exists a universal G:C → A:T mutation bias in three domains of life. → This universal mutation bias has not been sufficiently explained. → A DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago offers a common explanation. -- Abstract: Recently, numerous genome analyses revealed the existence of a universal G:C → A:T mutation bias in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. To explore the molecular basis for this mutation bias, we examined the three well-known DNA mutation models, i.e., oxidative damage model, UV-radiation damage model and CpG hypermutation model. It was revealed that these models cannot provide a sufficient explanation to the universal mutation bias. Therefore, we resorted to a DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago, which was based on inter-base double proton transfers (DPT). Since DPT is a fundamental and spontaneous chemical process and occurs much more frequently within GC pairs than AT pairs, Loewdin model offers a common explanation for the observed universal mutation bias and thus has broad biological implications.

  6. Somatic mtDNA mutation spectra in the aging human putamen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siôn L Williams

    Full Text Available The accumulation of heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA deletions and single nucleotide variants (SNVs is a well-accepted facet of the biology of aging, yet comprehensive mutation spectra have not been described. To address this, we have used next generation sequencing of mtDNA-enriched libraries (Mito-Seq to investigate mtDNA mutation spectra of putamen from young and aged donors. Frequencies of the "common" deletion and other "major arc" deletions were significantly increased in the aged cohort with the fold increase in the frequency of the common deletion exceeding that of major arc deletions. SNVs also increased with age with the highest rate of accumulation in the non-coding control region which contains elements necessary for translation and replication. Examination of predicted amino acid changes revealed a skew towards pathogenic SNVs in the coding region driven by mutation bias. Levels of the pathogenic m.3243A>G tRNA mutation were also found to increase with age. Novel multimeric tandem duplications that resemble murine control region multimers and yeast ρ(- mtDNAs, were identified in both young and aged specimens. Clonal ∼50 bp deletions in the control region were found at high frequencies in aged specimens. Our results reveal the complex manner in which the mitochondrial genome alters with age and provides a foundation for studies of other tissues and disease states.

  7. Absence of correlation between serum CRP levels and mitochondrial D-loop DNA mutations in gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin H. L. Tan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Both inflammation and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutation are thought to play a role in the many human cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between inflammation and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations in the D-loop region in carcinogenesis of gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinomas. Materials and Methods: Blood samples of 20 patients with gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma were taken for measurement of serum C-reactive protein (CRP concentration. Direct sequencing of mtDNA in the D-loop region was done in the 20 adenocarcinoma samples and their corresponding surrounding non-cancerous tissue. Sequences were compared with existing mtDNA databases to identify mutations. Results: mtDNA mutations in the D-loop region occur commonly with almost identical frequency in both non-cancerous tissue (3.0 ΁ 1.6 and adenocarcinoma (3.1 ΁ 1.9 (P = 0.916, paired t-test. CRP levels are not predictive of the number of D-loop mutations in both adenocarcinoma (β: -0.131; 95% CI: -2.354-1.364; P = 0.583 and non-cancerous tissue samples (β: 0.130; 95% CI: -1.125-1.933; P = 0.586. Five new mutations were identified that were not recorded previously in mtDNA databases. Conclusion: D-loop mtDNA mutations are common in both gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma and surrounding non-cancerous tissue. However, the accumulation of such mutations appears to occur independent of systemic inflammation. The frequency of D-loop mutations is likely not useful as a marker for carcinogenesis in gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Singh, Gurparkash; Lott, Marie T.; Hodge, Judy A.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Lezza, Angela M. S.; Elsas, Louis J.; Nikoskelainen, Eeva K.

    1988-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease resulting in optic nerve degeneration and cardiac dysrhythmia. A mitochondrial DNA replacement mutation was identified that correlated with this disease in multiple families. This mutation converted a highly conserved arginine to a histidine at codon 340 in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 gene and eliminated an Sfa NI site, thus providing a simple diagnostic test. This finding demonstrated that a nucleotide change in a mitochondrial DNA energy production gene can result in a neurological disease.

  9. Prospects for DNA methods to measure human heritable mutation rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    A workshop cosponsored by ICPEMC and the US Department of Energy was held in Alta, Utah, December 9-13, 1984 to examine the extent to which DNA-oriented methods might provide new approaches to the important but intractable problem of measuring mutation rates in control and exposed human populations. The workshop identified and analyzed six DNA methods for detection of human heritable mutation, including several created at the meeting, and concluded that none of the methods combine sufficient feasibility and efficiency to be recommended for general application. 8 refs

  10. High frequency of PTEN mutations in nevi and melanomas from xeroderma pigmentosum patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Taro; Wang, Yun; DiGiovanna, John J; Khan, Sikandar G; Raffeld, Mark; Beltaifa, Senda; Hornyak, Thomas J; Darling, Thomas N; Lee, Chyi-Chia R; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2014-05-01

    We examined nevi and melanomas in 10 xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients with defective DNA repair. The lesions had a lentiginous appearance with markedly increased numbers of melanocytes. Using laser capture microdissection, we performed DNA sequencing of 18 benign and atypical nevi and 75 melanomas (melanoma in situ and invasive melanomas). The nevi had a similar high frequency of PTEN mutations as melanomas [61% (11/18) versus 53% (39/73)]. Both had a very high proportion of UV-type mutations (occurring at adjacent pyrimidines) [91% (10/11) versus 92% (36/39)]. In contrast to melanomas in the general population, the frequency of BRAF mutations (11%, 7/61), NRAS mutations (21%, 13/62), and KIT mutations (21%, 6/28) in XP melanomas was lower than for PTEN. Phospho-S6 immunostaining indicated activation of the mTOR pathway in the atypical nevi and melanomas. Thus, the clinical and histological appearances and the molecular pathology of these UV-related XP nevi and melanomas were different from nevi and melanomas in the general population. © 2014 Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jett, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    While characterizing the background mutation spectrum of the Hypoxathine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene in a healthy population, an outlier with a high mutant frequency of thioguanine resistant lymphocytes was found. When studied at the age of 46, this individual had been smoking 60 cigarettes per day for 38 years. His mutant frequency was calculated at 3.6 and 4.2x10{sup {minus}4} for two sampling periods eight months apart. Sequencing analysis of the HPRT gene in his mutant thioguanine resistant T lymphocytes was done to find whether the cells had a high rate of mutation, or if the mutation was due to a single occurrence of mutation and, if so, when in the T lymphocyte development the mutation occurred. By T-cell receptor analysis it has been found that out of 35 thioguanine resistant clones there was no dominant gamma T cell receptor gene rearrangement. During my appointment in the Science & Engineering Research Semester, I found that 34 of those clones have the same base substitution of G{yields}T at cDNA position 197. Due to the consistent mutant frequency from both sampling periods and the varying T cell receptors, the high mutant frequency cannot be due to recent proliferation of a mature mutant T lymphocyte. From the TCR and DNA sequence analysis we conclude that the G{yields}T mutation must have occurred in a T lymphocyte precursor before thymic differentiation so that the thioguanine resistant clones share the same base substitution but not the same gamma T cell receptor gene.

  12. Inspecting Targeted Deep Sequencing of Whole Genome Amplified DNA Versus Fresh DNA for Somatic Mutation Detection: A Genetic Study in Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Laura; Fuster-Tormo, Francisco; Alvira, Daniel; Ademà, Vera; Armengol, María Pilar; Gómez-Marzo, Paula; de Haro, Nuri; Mallo, Mar; Xicoy, Blanca; Zamora, Lurdes; Solé, Francesc

    2017-08-01

    Whole genome amplification (WGA) has become an invaluable method for preserving limited samples of precious stock material and has been used during the past years as an alternative tool to increase the amount of DNA before library preparation for next-generation sequencing. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by presenting somatic mutations in several myeloid-related genes. In this work, targeted deep sequencing has been performed on four paired fresh DNA and WGA DNA samples from bone marrow of MDS patients, to assess the feasibility of using WGA DNA for detecting somatic mutations. The results of this study highlighted that, in general, the sequencing and alignment statistics of fresh DNA and WGA DNA samples were similar. However, after variant calling and when considering variants detected at all frequencies, there was a high level of discordance between fresh DNA and WGA DNA (overall, a higher number of variants was detected in WGA DNA). After proper filtering, a total of three somatic mutations were detected in the cohort. All somatic mutations detected in fresh DNA were also identified in WGA DNA and validated by whole exome sequencing.

  13. The observed human sperm mutation frequency cannot explain the achondroplasia paternal age effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemann-Boege, Irene; Navidi, William; Grewal, Raji; Cohn, Dan; Eskenazi, Brenda; Wyrobek, Andrew J.; Arnheim, Norman

    2002-01-01

    The lifelong spermatogonial stem cell divisions unique to male germ cell production are thought to contribute to a higher mutation frequency in males. The fact that certain de novo human genetic conditions (e.g., achondroplasia) increase in incidence with the age of the father is consistent with this idea. Although it is assumed that the paternal age effect is the result of an increasing frequency of mutant sperm as a man grows older, no direct molecular measurement of the germ-line mutation frequency has been made to confirm this hypothesis. Using sperm DNA from donors of different ages, we determined the frequency of the nucleotide substitution in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene that causes achondroplasia. Surprisingly, the magnitude of the increase in mutation frequency with age appears insufficient to explain why older fathers have a greater chance of having a child with this condition. A number of alternatives may explain this discrepancy, including selection for sperm that carry the mutation or an age-dependent increase in premutagenic lesions that remain unrepaired in sperm and are inefficiently detected by the PCR assay. PMID:12397172

  14. Mitochondrial DNA mutation load in a family with the m.8344A>G point mutation and lipomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Tina Dysgaard; Al-Hashimi, Noor; Duno, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown that difference in mtDNA mutation load among tissues is a result of postnatal modification. We present five family members with the m.8344A>G with variable phenotypes but uniform intrapersonal distribution of mutation load, indicating that there is no postnatal modification of mt......DNA mutation load in this genotype....

  15. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive

  16. Mitochondrial DNA Mutations in Epithelial Ovarian Tumor Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Panici PL, Fazio VM: Mutations of D310 mitochondrial mononu- cleotide repeat in primary tumors and cytological speci- mens . Cancer Lett 2003, 190:73...BR: Detection of LOH and mitochondrial DNA alter- ations in ductal lavage and nipple aspirate fluids from high- risk patients. Breast Cancer Res

  17. Induced mutations in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) II. frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharkwal, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    A comparative study of frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll mutations induced by two physical (gamma rays, fast neutrons) and two chemical mutagens (NMU, EMS) in relation to the effects in M1 plants and induction of mutations in M2 was made in four chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) varieties, two desi (G 130 & H 214) one Kabuli (C 104) and one green seeded (L 345). The treatments included three doses each of gamma rays (400, 500 & 600 Gy) and fast neutrons (5, 10 & 15 Gy) and two concentrations with two different durations of two chemical mutagens, NMU [0.01% (20h), & 0.02% (8h)] and EMS [0.1% (20h) & 0.2% (8h)]. The frequencies and spectrum of three different kinds of induced chlorophyll mutations in the order albina (43.5%), chlorina (27.3%) and xantha (24.2%) were recorded. Chemical mutagens were found to be efficient in inducing chlorophyll mutations in chickpea. Highest frequency of mutations was observed in green seeded var. L 345 (83% of M1 families and 19.9/1000 M2 plants). Kabuli var. C 104 was least responsive for chlorophyll mutations

  18. Study of hepatitis B virus gene mutations with enzymatic colorimetry-based DNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hailei; Wang, Huimin; Zhang, Donglei; Mao, Hongju; Zhao, Jianlong; Shi, Jian; Cui, Zhichu

    2006-01-01

    To establish a modified microarray method for detecting HBV gene mutations in the clinic. Site-specific oligonucleotide probes were immobilized to microarray slides and hybridized to biotin-labeled HBV gene fragments amplified from two-step PCR. Hybridized targets were transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, followed by intensity measurement using BCIP/NBT colorimetry. HBV genes from 99 Hepatitis B patients and 40 healthy blood donors were analyzed. Mutation frequencies of HBV pre-core/core and basic core promoter (BCP) regions were found to be significantly higher in the patient group (42%, 40% versus 2.5%, 5%, P colorimetry method exhibited the same level of sensitivity and reproducibility. An enzymatic colorimetry-based DNA microarray assay was successfully established to monitor HBV mutations. Pre-core/core and BCP mutations of HBV genes could be major causes of HBV infection in HBeAg-negative patients and could also be relevant to chronicity and aggravation of hepatitis B.

  19. Optimal control of gene mutation in DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Juanyi; Li, Jr-Shin; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong

    2012-01-01

    We propose a molecular-level control system view of the gene mutations in DNA replication from the finite field concept. By treating DNA sequences as state variables, chemical mutagens and radiation as control inputs, one cell cycle as a step increment, and the measurements of the resulting DNA sequence as outputs, we derive system equations for both deterministic and stochastic discrete-time, finite-state systems of different scales. Defining the cost function as a summation of the costs of applying mutagens and the off-trajectory penalty, we solve the deterministic and stochastic optimal control problems by dynamic programming algorithm. In addition, given that the system is completely controllable, we find that the global optimum of both base-to-base and codon-to-codon deterministic mutations can always be achieved within a finite number of steps.

  20. Fidelity and mutational spectrum of Pfu DNA polymerase on a human mitochondrial DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, P; Kim, A; Khrapko, K; Thilly, W G

    1997-08-01

    The study of rare genetic changes in human tissues requires specialized techniques. Point mutations at fractions at or below 10(-6) must be observed to discover even the most prominent features of the point mutational spectrum. PCR permits the increase in number of mutant copies but does so at the expense of creating many additional mutations or "PCR noise". Thus, each DNA sequence studied must be characterized with regard to the DNA polymerase and conditions used to avoid interpreting a PCR-generated mutation as one arising in human tissue. The thermostable DNA polymerase derived from Pyrococcus furiosus designated Pfu has the highest fidelity of any DNA thermostable polymerase studied to date, and this property recommends it for analyses of tissue mutational spectra. Here, we apply constant denaturant capillary electrophoresis (CDCE) to separate and isolate the products of DNA amplification. This new strategy permitted direct enumeration and identification of point mutations created by Pfu DNA polymerase in a 96-bp low melting domain of a human mitochondrial sequence despite the very low mutant fractions generated in the PCR process. This sequence, containing part of the tRNA glycine and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 genes, is the target of our studies of mitochondrial mutagenesis in human cells and tissues. Incorrectly synthesized sequences were separated from the wild type as mutant/wild-type heteroduplexes by sequential enrichment on CDCE. An artificially constructed mutant was used as an internal standard to permit calculation of the mutant fraction. Our study found that the average error rate (mutations per base pair duplication) of Pfu was 6.5 x 10(-7), and five of its more frequent mutations (hot spots) consisted of three transversions (GC-->TA, AT-->TA, and AT-->CG), one transition (AT-->GC), and one 1-bp deletion (in an AAAAAA sequence). To achieve an even higher sensitivity, the amount of Pfu-induced mutants must be reduced.

  1. 21 CFR 864.7280 - Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems....7280 Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems. (a) Identification. Factor V Leiden deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mutation detection systems are devices that consist of different reagents and...

  2. Mutation and DNA replication in Escherichia coli treated with low concentrations of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez-Sanchez, A.; Cerda-Olmedo, E.

    1975-01-01

    N-Methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (nitrosoguanidine) causes an unexpectedly high frequency of closely linked double mutants because of its specificity for chromosome regions in replication. Low nitrosoguanidine concentrations (I μg/ml) in liquid cultures allow replication at the normal rate and are mutagenic. It was expected that mutations would be spread over the chromosome as it replicated, but a high frequency of closely linked double mutants was found. If a thymine auxotroph is grown in the presence of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) and nitrosoguanidine and then exposed to 313-nm radiation (which destroys BUdR-substituted DNA), the mutation frequency is much higher among survivors than among non-irradiated cells. It is concluded that nitrosoguanidine inhibits DNA replication in a small fraction of the population and that mutations are induced in that same fraction. Nitrosoguanidine treatment leads to a high frequency of closely linked double mutants under all known conditions

  3. Differences in K-ras and mitochondrial DNA mutations and microsatellite instability between colorectal cancers of Vietnamese and Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwata, Tomohiro; Hiyama, Toru; Quach, Duc Trong; Le, Huy Minh; Hua, Ha Ngoc Thi; Oka, Shiro; Tanaka, Shinji; Arihiro, Koji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2014-11-30

    The incidence of early-onset (under 50 years of age) colorectal cancer (CRC) in the Vietnamese has been reported to be quite higher than that in the Japanese. To clarify the differences in genetic alterations between Vietnamese and Japanese CRCs, we investigated mutations in K-ras and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H) in the CRCs of Vietnamese and Japanese patients. We enrolled 60 Vietnamese and 233 Japanese patients with invasive CRCs. DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. K-ras mutations were examined with PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. mtDNA mutations and MSI-H were examined with microsatellite analysis using D310 and BAT-26, respectively. K-ras mutations were examined in 60 Vietnamese and 45 Japanese CRCs. The frequency of the mutations in the Vietnamese CRCs was significantly higher than that in the Japanese CRCs (8 of 24 [33%] vs 5 of 45 [11%], p =0.048). MSI-H was examined in 60 Vietnamese and 130 Japanese CRCs. The frequency of MSI-H in the Vietnamese CRCs was also significantly higher than that in the Japanese CRCs (6 of 27 [22%] vs 10 of 130 [8%], p =0.030). mtDNA mutations were examined in 60 Vietnamese and 138 Japanese CRCs. The frequency of mtDNA mutations in the Vietnamese CRCs was significantly higher than that in the Japanese CRCs (19 of 44 [43%] vs 11 of 133 [9%], p Vietnamese and Japanese patients. These results indicate that the developmental pathways of CRCs in the Vietnamese may differ from those of CRCs in the Japanese.

  4. Radiation-induced germ-line mutations detected by a direct comparison of parents and children DNA sequences containing SNPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimyo, M.; Hongo, E.; Higashi, T.; Wu, J.; Matsumoto, I.; Okamoto, M.; Kawano, A.; Tsuji, S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Germ-line mutation is detected in mice but not in humans. To estimate genetic risk of humans, a new approach to extrapolate from animal data to humans or to directly detect radiation-induced mutations in man is expected. We have developed a new method to detect germ-line mutations by directly comparing DNA sequences of parents and children. The nucleotide sequences among mouse strains are almost identical except SNP markers that are detected at 1/1000 frequency. When gamma-irradiated male mice are mated with female mice, heterogeneous nucleotide sequences induced in children DNA are a candidate of mutation, whose assignment can be done by SNP analysis. This system can easily detect all types of mutations such as transition, transversion, frameshift and deletion induced by radiation and can be applied to humans having genetically heterogeneous nucleotide sequences and many SNP markers. C3H male mice of 8 weeks of gestation were irradiated with gamma rays of 3 and 1 Gy and after 3 weeks, they were mated with the same aged C57BL female mice. After 3 weeks breeding, DNA was extracted from parents and children mice. The nucleotide sequences of 150 STS markers containing 300-900 bp and SNPs of parents and children DNA were determined by a direct sequencing; amplification of STS markers by Taq DNA polymerase, purification of PCR products, and DNA sequencing with a dye-terminator method. At each radiation dose, a total amount of 5 Mb DNA sequences were examined to detect radiation-induced mutations. We could find 6 deletions in 3 Gy irradiated mice but not in 1 Gy and control mice. The mutation frequency was about 4.0 x 10 -7 /bp/ Gy or 1.6 x 10 -4 /locus/Gy, and suggested the non-linear increase of mutation rate with dose

  5. Aging of hematopoietic stem cells: DNA damage and mutations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehrle, Bettina M; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-10-01

    Aging in the hematopoietic system and the stem cell niche contributes to aging-associated phenotypes of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), including leukemia and aging-associated immune remodeling. Among others, the DNA damage theory of aging of HSCs is well established, based on the detection of a significantly larger amount of γH2AX foci and a higher tail moment in the comet assay, both initially thought to be associated with DNA damage in aged HSCs compared with young cells, and bone marrow failure in animals devoid of DNA repair factors. Novel data on the increase in and nature of DNA mutations in the hematopoietic system with age, the quality of the DNA damage response in aged HSCs, and the nature of γH2AX foci question a direct link between DNA damage and the DNA damage response and aging of HSCs, and rather favor changes in epigenetics, splicing-factors or three-dimensional architecture of the cell as major cell intrinsic factors of HSCs aging. Aging of HSCs is also driven by a strong contribution of aging of the niche. This review discusses the DNA damage theory of HSC aging in the light of these novel mechanisms of aging of HSCs. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of the factor VIII defect in 147 patients with sporadic hemophilia A: Family studies indicate a mutation type-dependent sex ratio of mutation frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, J.; Schmidt, W.; Olek, K. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The clinical manifestation of hemophilia A is caused by a wide range of different mutations. In this study the factor VIII genes of 147 severe hemophilia A patients-all exclusively from sporadic families-were screened for mutations by use of the complete panel of modern DNA techniques. The pathogenous defect could be characterized in 126 patients (85.7%). Fifty-five patients (37.4%) showed a F8A-gene inversion, 47 (32.0%) a point mutation, 14 (9.5%) a small deletion, 8 (5.4%) a large deletion, and 2 (1.4%) a small insertion. Further, four (2.7%) mutations were localized but could not be sequenced yet. No mutation could be identified in 17 patients (11.6%). Sixteen (10.9%) of the P identified mutations occurred in the B domain. Four of these were located in an adenosine nucleotide stretch at codon 1192, indicating a mutation hotspot. Somatic mosaicisms were detected in 3 (3.9%) of 76 patients` mothers, comprising 3 of 16 de novo mutations in the patients` mothers. Investigation of family relatives allowed detection of a de novo mutation in 16 of 76 two-generation and 28 of 34 three-generation families. On the basis of these data, the male:female ratio of mutation frequencies (k) was estimated as k = 3.6. By use of the quotients of mutation origin in maternal grandfather to patient`s mother or to maternal grandmother, k was directly estimated as k = 15 and k = 7.5, respectively. Considering each mutation type separately, we revealed a mutation type-specific sex ratio of mutation frequencies. Point mutations showed a 5-to-10-fold-higher and inversions a >10-fold- higher mutation rate in male germ cells, whereas deletions showed a >5-fold-higher mutation rate in female germ cells. Consequently, and in accordance with the data of other diseases like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, our results indicate that at least for X-chromosomal disorders the male:female mutation rate of a disease is determined by its proportion of the different mutation types. 68 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  7. R248Q mutation--Beyond p53-DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Jeremy W K; Lama, Dilraj; Lukman, Suryani; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S; Sim, Adelene Y L

    2015-12-01

    R248 in the DNA binding domain (DBD) of p53 interacts directly with the minor groove of DNA. Earlier nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies indicated that the R248Q mutation resulted in conformation changes in parts of DBD far from the mutation site. However, how information propagates from the mutation site to the rest of the DBD is still not well understood. We performed a series of all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to dissect sterics and charge effects of R248 on p53-DBD conformation: (i) wild-type p53 DBD; (ii) p53 DBD with an electrically neutral arginine side-chain; (iii) p53 DBD with R248A; (iv) p53 DBD with R248W; and (v) p53 DBD with R248Q. Our results agree well with experimental observations of global conformational changes induced by the R248Q mutation. Our simulations suggest that both charge- and sterics are important in the dynamics of the loop (L3) where the mutation resides. We show that helix 2 (H2) dynamics is altered as a result of a change in the hydrogen bonding partner of D281. In turn, neighboring L1 dynamics is altered: in mutants, L1 predominantly adopts the recessed conformation and is unable to interact with the major groove of DNA. We focused our attention the R248Q mutant that is commonly found in a wide range of cancer and observed changes at the zinc-binding pocket that might account for the dominant negative effects of R248Q. Furthermore, in our simulations, the S6/S7 turn was more frequently solvent exposed in R248Q, suggesting that there is a greater tendency of R248Q to partially unfold and possibly lead to an increased aggregation propensity. Finally, based on the observations made in our simulations, we propose strategies for the rescue of R248Q mutants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA deletion mutations in adult mouse cardiac side population cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lushaj, Entela B.; Lozonschi, Lucian; Barnes, Maria; Anstadt, Emily; Kohmoto, Takushi

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the presence and potential role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion mutations in adult cardiac stem cells. Cardiac side population (SP) cells were isolated from 12-week-old mice. Standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to screen for the presence of mtDNA deletion mutations in (a) freshly isolated SP cells and (b) SP cells cultured to passage 10. When present, the abundance of mtDNA deletion mutation was analyzed in single cell colonies. The effect of different levels of deletion mutations on SP cell growth and differentiation was determined. MtDNA deletion mutations were found in both freshly isolated and cultured cells from 12-week-old mice. While there was no significant difference in the number of single cell colonies with mtDNA deletion mutations from any of the groups mentioned above, the abundance of mtDNA deletion mutations was significantly higher in the cultured cells, as determined by quantitative PCR. Within a single clonal cell population, the detectable mtDNA deletion mutations were the same in all cells and unique when compared to deletions of other colonies. We also found that cells harboring high levels of mtDNA deletion mutations (i.e. where deleted mtDNA comprised more than 60% of total mtDNA) had slower proliferation rates and decreased differentiation capacities. Screening cultured adult stem cells for mtDNA deletion mutations as a routine assessment will benefit the biomedical application of adult stem cells.

  9. cDNA sequencing improves the detection of P53 missense mutations in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szybka, Malgorzata; Kordek, Radzislaw; Zakrzewska, Magdalena; Rieske, Piotr; Pasz-Walczak, Grazyna; Kulczycka-Wojdala, Dominika; Zawlik, Izabela; Stawski, Robert; Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Liberski, Pawel P

    2009-01-01

    Recently published data showed discrepancies beteween P53 cDNA and DNA sequencing in glioblastomas. We hypothesised that similar discrepancies may be observed in other human cancers. To this end, we analyzed 23 colorectal cancers for P53 mutations and gene expression using both DNA and cDNA sequencing, real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. We found P53 gene mutations in 16 cases (15 missense and 1 nonsense). Two of the 15 cases with missense mutations showed alterations based only on cDNA, and not DNA sequencing. Moreover, in 6 of the 15 cases with a cDNA mutation those mutations were difficult to detect in the DNA sequencing, so the results of DNA analysis alone could be misinterpreted if the cDNA sequencing results had not also been available. In all those 15 cases, we observed a higher ratio of the mutated to the wild type template by cDNA analysis, but not by the DNA analysis. Interestingly, a similar overexpression of P53 mRNA was present in samples with and without P53 mutations. In terms of colorectal cancer, those discrepancies might be explained under three conditions: 1, overexpression of mutated P53 mRNA in cancer cells as compared with normal cells; 2, a higher content of cells without P53 mutation (normal cells and cells showing K-RAS and/or APC but not P53 mutation) in samples presenting P53 mutation; 3, heterozygous or hemizygous mutations of P53 gene. Additionally, for heterozygous mutations unknown mechanism(s) causing selective overproduction of mutated allele should also be considered. Our data offer new clues for studying discrepancy in P53 cDNA and DNA sequencing analysis

  10. DNA methyltransferase 1 mutations and mitochondrial pathology: is mtDNA methylated?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eMaresca

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN and Hereditary sensory neuropathy with dementia and hearing loss (HSN1E are two rare, overlapping neurodegenerative syndromes that have been recently linked to allelic dominant pathogenic mutations in the DNMT1 gene, coding for DNA (cytosine-5-methyltransferase 1. DNMT1 is the enzyme responsible for maintaining the nuclear genome methylation patterns during the DNA replication and repair, thus regulating gene expression. The mutations responsible for ADCA-DN and HSN1E affect the replication foci targeting sequence domain, which regulates DNMT1 binding to chromatin. DNMT1 dysfunction is anticipated to lead to a global alteration of the DNA methylation pattern with predictable downstream consequences on gene expression. Interestingly, ADCA-DN and HSN1E phenotypes share some clinical features typical of mitochondrial diseases, such as optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy and deafness, and some biochemical evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction. The recent discovery of a mitochondrial isoform of DNMT1 and its proposed role in methylating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA suggests that DNMT1 mutations may directly affect mtDNA and mitochondrial physiology. On the basis of this latter finding the link between DNMT1 abnormal activity and mitochondrial dysfunction in ADCA-DN and HSN1E appears intuitive, however mtDNA methylation remains highly debated. In the last years several groups demonstrated the presence of 5-methylcytosine in mtDNA by different approaches, but, on the other end, the opposite evidence that mtDNA is not methylated has also been published. Since over 1500 mitochondrial proteins are encoded by the nuclear genome, the altered methylation of these genes may well have a critical role in leading to the mitochondrial impairment observed in ADCA-DN and HSN1E. Thus, many open questions still remain unanswered, such as why mtDNA should be methylated, and how this process is

  11. DNA adduct formation and mutation induction by aristolochic acid in rat kidney and liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, Nan; Arlt, Volker M.; Phillips, David H.; Heflich, Robert H.; Chen, Tao

    2006-01-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent nephrotoxin and carcinogen and is the causative factor for Chinese herb nephropathy. AA has been associated with the development of urothelial cancer in humans, and kidney and forestomach tumors in rodents. To investigate the molecular mechanisms responsible for the tumorigenicity of AA, we determined the DNA adduct formation and mutagenicity of AA in the liver (nontarget tissue) and kidney (target tissue) of Big Blue rats. Groups of six male rats were gavaged with 0, 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 mg AA/kg body weight five times/week for 3 months. The rats were sacrificed 1 day after the final treatment, and the livers and kidneys were isolated. DNA adduct formation was analyzed by 32 P-postlabeling and mutant frequency (MF) was determined using the λ Select-cII Mutation Detection System. Three major adducts (7-[deoxyadenosin-N 6 -yl]-aristolactam I, 7-[deoxyadenosin-N 6 -yl]-aristolactam II and 7-[deoxyguanosin-N 2 -yl]-aristolactam I) were identified. There were strong linear dose-responses for AA-induced DNA adducts in treated rats, ranging from 25 to 1967 adducts/10 8 nucleotides in liver and 95-4598 adducts/10 8 nucleotides in kidney. A similar trend of dose-responses for mutation induction also was found, the MFs ranging from 37 to 666 x 10 -6 in liver compared with the MFs of 78-1319 x 10 -6 that we previously reported for the kidneys of AA-treated rats. Overall, kidneys had at least two-fold higher levels of DNA adducts and MF than livers. Sequence analysis of the cII mutants revealed that there was a statistically significant difference between the mutation spectra in both kidney and liver of AA-treated and control rats, but there was no significant difference between the mutation spectra in AA-treated livers and kidneys. A:T → T:A transversion was the predominant mutation in AA-treated rats; whereas G:C → A:T transition was the main type of mutation in control rats. These results indicate that the AA treatment that eventually

  12. DNA adduct formation and mutation induction by aristolochic acid in rat kidney and liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Nan [Division of Genetic and Reproductive Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, FDA, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)]. E-mail: nan.mei@fda.hhs.gov; Arlt, Volker M. [Section of Molecular Carcinogenesis, Institute of Cancer Research, Cotswold Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Phillips, David H. [Section of Molecular Carcinogenesis, Institute of Cancer Research, Cotswold Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Heflich, Robert H. [Division of Genetic and Reproductive Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, FDA, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Chen, Tao [Division of Genetic and Reproductive Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, FDA, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent nephrotoxin and carcinogen and is the causative factor for Chinese herb nephropathy. AA has been associated with the development of urothelial cancer in humans, and kidney and forestomach tumors in rodents. To investigate the molecular mechanisms responsible for the tumorigenicity of AA, we determined the DNA adduct formation and mutagenicity of AA in the liver (nontarget tissue) and kidney (target tissue) of Big Blue rats. Groups of six male rats were gavaged with 0, 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 mg AA/kg body weight five times/week for 3 months. The rats were sacrificed 1 day after the final treatment, and the livers and kidneys were isolated. DNA adduct formation was analyzed by {sup 32}P-postlabeling and mutant frequency (MF) was determined using the {lambda} Select-cII Mutation Detection System. Three major adducts (7-[deoxyadenosin-N {sup 6}-yl]-aristolactam I, 7-[deoxyadenosin-N {sup 6}-yl]-aristolactam II and 7-[deoxyguanosin-N {sup 2}-yl]-aristolactam I) were identified. There were strong linear dose-responses for AA-induced DNA adducts in treated rats, ranging from 25 to 1967 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides in liver and 95-4598 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides in kidney. A similar trend of dose-responses for mutation induction also was found, the MFs ranging from 37 to 666 x 10{sup -6} in liver compared with the MFs of 78-1319 x 10{sup -6} that we previously reported for the kidneys of AA-treated rats. Overall, kidneys had at least two-fold higher levels of DNA adducts and MF than livers. Sequence analysis of the cII mutants revealed that there was a statistically significant difference between the mutation spectra in both kidney and liver of AA-treated and control rats, but there was no significant difference between the mutation spectra in AA-treated livers and kidneys. A:T {sup {yields}} T:A transversion was the predominant mutation in AA-treated rats; whereas G:C {sup {yields}} A:T transition was the main type of mutation in control

  13. Frequency of p53 Gene Mutation and Protein Expression in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ara, N.; Atique, M.; Ahmed, S.; Bukhari, S. G. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of p53 gene mutation and protein expression in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) and to establish correlation between the two. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Histopathology Department and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, from May 2010 to May 2011. Methodology: Thirty diagnosed cases of OSCC were selected by consecutive sampling. Seventeen were retrieved from the record files of the AFIP, and 13 fresh/frozen sections were selected from patients reporting to the Oral Surgery Department, Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry (AFID). Gene p53 mutation was analyzed in all the cases using PCRSSCP analysis. DNA was extracted from the formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections and fresh/frozen sections. DNA thus extracted was amplified by polymerase chain reaction. The amplified products were denatured and finally analyzed by gel electrophoresis. Gene mutation was detected as electrophoretic mobility shift. The immunohistochemical marker p53 was applied to the same 30 cases and overexpression of protein p53 was recorded. Results: Immunohistochemical expression of marker p53 was positive in 67% (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 48.7 - 80.9) of the cases. Mutations of the p53 gene were detected in 23% (95% CI 11.5 - 41.2) of the OSCC. No statistically significant correlation was found between p53 gene mutation and protein p53 expression (rs = - 0.057, p = 0.765). Conclusion: A substantial number of patients have p53 gene mutation (23%) and protein p53 expression (67%) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). (author)

  14. Modifying effect of 5-fluoro-2-deoxiuridine on the frequency of x-ray-induced visible mutations in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azatyan, R.A.; Avakyan, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    A modifying effect of FUDR on the output of visible mutations induced by X-ray radiation has been studied at soft fall wheat (Tr. aestivum var. turcicum). It is shown that at X-ray radiation of dry seeds with subsequent treatment of FUDR increased is the mutant percent in M 3 which has constituted 0.61% at irradiation in dose of 100 Gy ad 1.03% at irradiation by the same dose and FUDR influence during 10 hours. In analogous variants at irradiation by 150 Gi dose the mutation frequency reached 1.47 and 2.07% respectively. It is shown that FUDR postradiation treatment promotes not only the increase of frequency but consderablly widens the spectrum of induced mutations. A supposition is made that FUDR modyfying effect is caused by DNA synthesis inhibition. A problem is discussed on a possible realization of potential DNA changes caused by irradiation, at additional influence of inhibitor

  15. Mutation and Methylation Analysis of the Chromodomain-Helicase-DNA Binding 5 Gene in Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie L. Gorringe

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromodomain, helicase, DNA binding 5 (CHD5 is a member of a subclass of the chromatin remodeling Swi/Snf proteins and has recently been proposed as a tumor suppressor in a diverse range of human cancers. We analyzed all 41 coding exons of CHD5 for somatic mutations in 123 primary ovarian cancers as well as 60 primary breast cancers using high-resolution melt analysis. We also examined methylation of the CHD5 promoter in 48 ovarian cancer samples by methylation-specific single-stranded conformation polymorphism and bisulfite sequencing. In contrast to previous studies, no mutations were identified in the breast cancers, but somatic heterozygous missense mutations were identified in 3 of 123 ovarian cancers. We identified promoter methylation in 3 of 45 samples with normal CHD5 and in 2 of 3 samples with CHD5 mutation, suggesting these tumors may have biallelic inactivation of CHD5. Hemizygous copy number loss at CHD5 occurred in 6 of 85 samples as assessed by single nucleotide polymorphism array. Tumors with CHD5 mutation or methylation were more likely to have mutation of KRAS or BRAF (P = .04. The aggregate frequency of CHD5 haploinsufficiency or inactivation is 16.2% in ovarian cancer. Thus, CHD5 may play a role as a tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer; however, it is likely that there is another target of the frequent copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity observed at 1p36.

  16. Enhancement of DNA-transfection frequency by X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Ryota; Fushimi, Kazuo; Hiraki, Yoshio; Namba, Masayoshi [Okayama University Medical School (Japan). Institute of Cellular and Molecular Biology

    1997-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the frequency of DNA transfection into human cells following X-ray irradiation. We transfected plasmid DNA (pSV2neo) into human cells, HeLa and PA-1, by either calcium phosphate precipitation or the lipofection method immediately after irradiating the cells with various doses of X-rays. The transfection frequency was evaluated by counting the number of G418-resistant colonies. When circular plasmid DNA was used, irradiation up to a dose of 2 Gy dose-dependently increased the transfection frequency, which reached a maximum of 5 to 10-fold that of the control unirradiated cells. When linear plasmid DNA was used, the transfection frequency was 2 times higher than that of circular DNA. All five of the clones that were randomly chosen expressed the transfected neo gene. In addition, the pSV2neo gene was randomly integrated into the genomic DNA of each clone. These findings indicate that X-ray treatment can facilitate foreign DNA transfer into human cells and that radiation-induced DNA breaks may promote the insertion of foreign DNA into host DNA. The enhancement of DNA transfection with X-rays may be instrumental in practicing gene therapy. (author)

  17. Enhancement of DNA-transfection frequency by X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Ryota; Fushimi, Kazuo; Hiraki, Yoshio; Namba, Masayoshi

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the frequency of DNA transfection into human cells following X-ray irradiation. We transfected plasmid DNA (pSV2neo) into human cells, HeLa and PA-1, by either calcium phosphate precipitation or the lipofection method immediately after irradiating the cells with various doses of X-rays. The transfection frequency was evaluated by counting the number of G418-resistant colonies. When circular plasmid DNA was used, irradiation up to a dose of 2 Gy dose-dependently increased the transfection frequency, which reached a maximum of 5 to 10-fold that of the control unirradiated cells. When linear plasmid DNA was used, the transfection frequency was 2 times higher than that of circular DNA. All five of the clones that were randomly chosen expressed the transfected neo gene. In addition, the pSV2neo gene was randomly integrated into the genomic DNA of each clone. These findings indicate that X-ray treatment can facilitate foreign DNA transfer into human cells and that radiation-induced DNA breaks may promote the insertion of foreign DNA into host DNA. The enhancement of DNA transfection with X-rays may be instrumental in practicing gene therapy. (author)

  18. HFE H63D mutation frequency shows an increase in Turkish women with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guler Emine

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hereditary hemochromatosis gene HFE plays a pivotal role in iron homeostasis. The association between cancer and HFE hetero- or homozygosity has previously been shown including hepatocellular and nonhepatocellular malignancies. This study was performed to compare frequencies of HFE C282Y and H63D variants in Turkish women with breast cancer and healthy controls. Methods Archived DNA samples of Hacettepe University Oncology Institute were used in this study. The HFE gene was investigated by PCR-RFLP. Results All subjects studied were free from C282Y mutation. Thirty-nine patients had H63D mutation and were all heterozygous. H63D allele frequency was 22.2% (39/176 in the breast cancer patients, and 14% (28/200 in the healthy volunteers. Statistical analysis of cases with HFE H63D phenotype showed significant difference between breast cancer and healthy volunteers (P = 0.02. Conclusion Our results suggest that HFE H63D mutation frequencies were increased in the breast cancer patients in comparison to those in the general population. Also, odds ratios (odds ratio = 2.05 computed in this study suggest that H63D has a positive association with breast cancer.

  19. DNA replication in necessary for fixing induced mutations to streptomycin-resistance in UV-irradiated Escherichia coli cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubinin, N P; Filippov, V D

    1986-01-01

    A suspension of E.coli cells has been subjected to UV radiation, then it has been incubated in the growth medium for 15 min. After that one of the portions was incubated with nalidixic acid (NA), and the other one without it in the presence of an antibiotic. Frequency of mutations depending on or irrespective of photoactivation, has been determined. Dependence of Str mutation fixing, induced by low UV radiation doses, on DNA synthesis is determined. Results indicate that both photoreactivation of mutations and its senstivity to mfd system are simultaneously lost.

  20. Infantile presentation of the mtDNA A3243G tRNA(Leu (UUR)) mutation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okhuijsen-Kroes, E.J.; Trijbels, J.M.F.; Sengers, R.C.A.; Mariman, E.C.M.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Wendel, U.A.H.; Koch, G.; Smeitink, J.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) disorders are clinically very heterogeneous, ranging from single organ involvement to severe multisystem disease. One of the most frequently observed mtDNA mutations is the A-to-G transition at position 3243 of the tRNA(Leu (UUR)) gene. This mutation is often related to

  1. Role of DNA deletion length in mutation and cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L.A.; Morgan, T.L.

    1992-01-01

    A model is presented which is based on the assumption that malignant transformation, mutation, chromosome aberration, and reproductive death of cells are all manifestations of radiation induced deletions in the DNA of the cell, and that the size of the deletion in relation to the spacing of essential genes determines the consequences of that deletion. It is assumed that two independent types of potentially lethal lesions can result in DNA deletions, and that the relative numbers of these types of damage is dependent on radiation quality. The repair of the damage reduces the length of a deletion, but does not always eliminate it. The predictions of this model are in good agreement with a wide variety of experimental evidence. (author)

  2. Investigating the effects of dietary folic acid on sperm count, DNA damage and mutation in Balb/c mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swayne, Breanne G.; Kawata, Alice; Behan, Nathalie A.; Williams, Andrew; Wade, Mike G.; MacFarlane, Amanda J.; Yauk, Carole L.

    2012-01-01

    To date, fewer than 50 mutagens have been studied for their ability to cause heritable mutations. The majority of those studied are classical mutagens like radiation and anti-cancer drugs. Very little is known about the dietary variables influencing germline mutation rates. Folate is essential for DNA synthesis and methylation and can impact chromatin structure. We therefore determined the effects of folic acid-deficient (0 mg/kg), control (2 mg/kg) and supplemented (6 mg/kg) diets in early development and during lactation or post-weaning on mutation rates and chromatin quality in sperm of adult male Balb/c mice. The sperm chromatin structure assay and mutation frequencies at expanded simple tandem repeats (ESTRs) were used to evaluate germline DNA integrity. Treatment of a subset of mice fed the control diet with the mutagen ethylnitrosourea (ENU) at 8 weeks of age was included as a positive control. ENU treated mice exhibited decreased cauda sperm counts, increased DNA fragmentation and increased ESTR mutation frequencies relative to non-ENU treated mice fed the control diet. Male mice weaned to the folic acid deficient diet had decreased cauda sperm numbers, increased DNA fragmentation index, and increased ESTR mutation frequency. Folic acid deficiency in early development did not lead to changes in sperm counts or chromatin integrity in adult mice. Folic acid supplementation in early development or post-weaning did not affect germ cell measures. Therefore, adequate folic acid intake in adulthood is important for preventing chromatin damage and mutation in the male germline. Folic acid supplementation at the level achieved in this study does not improve nor is it detrimental to male germline chromatin integrity.

  3. Investigating the effects of dietary folic acid on sperm count, DNA damage and mutation in Balb/c mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swayne, Breanne G.; Kawata, Alice [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0K9 (Canada); Behan, Nathalie A. [Nutrition Research Division, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0K9 (Canada); Williams, Andrew; Wade, Mike G. [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0K9 (Canada); MacFarlane, Amanda J. [Nutrition Research Division, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0K9 (Canada); Yauk, Carole L., E-mail: carole.yauk@hc-sc.ga.ca [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0K9 (Canada)

    2012-09-01

    To date, fewer than 50 mutagens have been studied for their ability to cause heritable mutations. The majority of those studied are classical mutagens like radiation and anti-cancer drugs. Very little is known about the dietary variables influencing germline mutation rates. Folate is essential for DNA synthesis and methylation and can impact chromatin structure. We therefore determined the effects of folic acid-deficient (0 mg/kg), control (2 mg/kg) and supplemented (6 mg/kg) diets in early development and during lactation or post-weaning on mutation rates and chromatin quality in sperm of adult male Balb/c mice. The sperm chromatin structure assay and mutation frequencies at expanded simple tandem repeats (ESTRs) were used to evaluate germline DNA integrity. Treatment of a subset of mice fed the control diet with the mutagen ethylnitrosourea (ENU) at 8 weeks of age was included as a positive control. ENU treated mice exhibited decreased cauda sperm counts, increased DNA fragmentation and increased ESTR mutation frequencies relative to non-ENU treated mice fed the control diet. Male mice weaned to the folic acid deficient diet had decreased cauda sperm numbers, increased DNA fragmentation index, and increased ESTR mutation frequency. Folic acid deficiency in early development did not lead to changes in sperm counts or chromatin integrity in adult mice. Folic acid supplementation in early development or post-weaning did not affect germ cell measures. Therefore, adequate folic acid intake in adulthood is important for preventing chromatin damage and mutation in the male germline. Folic acid supplementation at the level achieved in this study does not improve nor is it detrimental to male germline chromatin integrity.

  4. Extreme assay sensitivity in molecular diagnostics further unveils intratumour heterogeneity in metastatic colorectal cancer as well as artifactual low-frequency mutations in the KRAS gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Sara; Bertero, Luca; Osella-Abate, Simona; Di Bello, Cristiana; Francia di Celle, Paola; Coppola, Vittoria; Sapino, Anna; Cassoni, Paola; Marchiò, Caterina

    2017-07-25

    Gene mutations in the RAS family rule out metastatic colorectal carcinomas (mCRCs) from anti-EGFR therapies. We report a retrospective analysis by Sequenom Massarray and fast COLD-PCR followed by Sanger sequencing on 240 mCRCs. By Sequenom, KRAS and NRAS exons 2-3-4 were mutated in 52.9% (127/240) of tumours, while BRAF codon 600 mutations reached 5% (12/240). Fast COLD-PCR found extra mutations at KRAS exon 2 in 15/166 (9%) of samples, previously diagnosed by Sequenom as wild-type or mutated at RAS (exons 3-4) or BRAF genes. After UDG digestion results were reproduced in 2/12 analysable subclonally mutated samples leading to a frequency of true subclonal KRAS mutations of 1.2% (2.1% of the previous Sequenom wild-type subgroup). In 10 out of 12 samples, the subclonal KRAS mutations disappeared (9 out of 12) or turned to a different sequence variant (1 out of 12). mCRC can harbour coexisting multiple gene mutations. High sensitivity assays allow the detection of a small subset of patients harbouring true subclonal KRAS mutations. However, DNA changes with mutant allele frequencies <3% detected in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples may be artifactual in a non-negligible fraction of cases. UDG pre-treatment of DNA is mandatory to identify true DNA changes in archival samples and avoid misinterpretation due to artifacts.

  5. Self-cytoplasmic DNA upregulates the mutator enzyme APOBEC3A leading to chromosomal DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suspène, Rodolphe; Mussil, Bianka; Laude, Hélène; Caval, Vincent; Berry, Noémie; Bouzidi, Mohamed S; Thiers, Valérie; Wain-Hobson, Simon; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre

    2017-04-07

    Foreign and self-cytoplasmic DNA are recognized by numerous DNA sensor molecules leading to the production of type I interferons. Such DNA agonists should be degraded otherwise cells would be chronically stressed. Most human APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases can initiate catabolism of cytoplasmic mitochondrial DNA. Using the human myeloid cell line THP-1 with an interferon inducible APOBEC3A gene, we show that cytoplasmic DNA triggers interferon α and β production through the RNA polymerase III transcription/RIG-I pathway leading to massive upregulation of APOBEC3A. By catalyzing C→U editing in single stranded DNA fragments, the enzyme prevents them from re-annealing so attenuating the danger signal. The price to pay is chromosomal DNA damage in the form of CG→TA mutations and double stranded DNA breaks which, in the context of chronic inflammation, could drive cells down the path toward cancer. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Frequency of common CFTR gene mutations in Venezuelan patients with cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, Karen; Arcia, Orlando; Matute, Xiorama; Mindiola, Luz; Chaustre, Ismenia; Takiff, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the CFTR gene in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients have geographic differences and there is scant data on their prevalence in Venezuelan patients. This study determined the frequency of common CFTR gene mutations in these patients. We amplified and sequenced exons 7, 10, 11, 19, 20 and 21, which contain the most common CFTR mutations, from 105 Venezuelan patients in the National CF Program. Eleven different mutations were identified, four with frequencies greater than 1%: p.Phe508del...

  7. Role of Mitochondrial DNA Mutations in Cellular Vulnerability to Mitochondria-Specific Environmental Toxins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hirsch, Etienne C

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, growing evidence has shown that mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are an important cause of mitochondrial disorders in humans, and have been associated with common neurodegenerative disorders, aging and cancers...

  8. Genotoxicity of formaldehyde: Molecular basis of DNA damage and mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanobu eKawanishi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde is commonly used in the chemical industry and is present in the environment, such as vehicle emissions, some building materials, food and tobacco smoke. It also occurs as a natural product in most organisms, the sources of which include a number of metabolic processes. It causes various acute and chronic adverse effects in humans if they inhale its fumes. Among the chronic effects on human health, we summarize data on genotoxicity and carcinogenicity in this review, and we particularly focus on the molecular mechanisms involved in the formaldehyde mutagenesis. Formaldehyde mainly induces N-hydroxymethyl mono-adducts on guanine, adenine and cytosine, and N-methylene crosslinks between adjacent purines in DNA. These crosslinks are types of DNA damage potentially fatal for cell survival if they are not removed by the nucleotide excision repair pathway. In the previous studies, we showed evidence that formaldehyde causes intra-strand crosslinks between purines in DNA using a unique method (Matsuda et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 26, 1769-1774,1998. Using shuttle vector plasmids, we also showed that formaldehyde as well as acetaldehyde induces tandem base substitutions, mainly at 5’-GG and 5’-GA sequences, which would arise from the intra-strand crosslinks. These mutation features are different from those of other aldehydes such as crotonaldehyde, acrolein, glyoxal and methylglyoxal. These findings provide molecular clues to improve our understanding of the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of formaldehyde.

  9. Influence of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase on DNA repair, chromosomal alterations, and mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, A.T.; van Zeeland, A.A.; Zwanenburg, T.S.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase such as 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) and benzamide (B) on the spontaneously occurring as well as mutagen induced chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and point mutations has been studied. In addition, the influence of 3AB on DNA repair was measured following treatment with physical and chemical mutagens. Post treatment of X-irradiated mammalian cells with 3AB increases the frequencies of induced chromosomal aberrations by a factor of 2 to 3. 3AB, when present in the medium containing bromodeoxyuridine(BrdUrd) during two cell cycles, increases the frequencies of SCEs in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) in a concentration dependent manner leading to about a 10-fold increase at 10 mM concentration. The extent of increase in the frequencies of SCEs due to 1 mM 3AB in several human cell lines has been studied, including those derived from patients suffering from genetic diseases such as ataxia telangiectasia (A-T), Fanconi's anemia (FA), and Huntington's chorea. None of these syndromes showed any increased response when compared to normal cells. 3AB, however, increased the frequencies of spontaneously occurring chromosomal aberrations in A-T and FA cells. 3AB does not influence the frequencies of SCEs induced by UV or mitomycin C (MMC) in CHO cells. However, it increases the frequencies of SCEs induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Under the conditions in which 3AB increases the frequencies of spontaneously occurring as well as induced SCEs, it does not increase the frequencies of point mutations in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) locus. 3AB does not influence the amount of repair replication following dimethylsulphate (DMS) treatment of human fibroblasts, or UV irradiated human lymphocytes.

  10. Significance of somatic mutations and content alteration of mitochondrial DNA in esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yu-Fen

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The roles of mitochondria in energy metabolism, the generation of ROS, aging, and the initiation of apoptosis have implicated their importance in tumorigenesis. In this study we aim to establish the mutation spectrum and to understand the role of somatic mtDNA mutations in esophageal cancer. Methods The entire mitochondrial genome was screened for somatic mutations in 20 pairs (18 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, one adenosquamous carcinoma and one adenocarcinoma of tumor/surrounding normal tissue of esophageal cancers, using temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE, followed by direct DNA sequencing to identify the mutations. Results Fourteen somatic mtDNA mutations were identified in 55% (11/20 of tumors analyzed, including 2 novel missense mutations and a frameshift mutation in ND4L, ATP6 subunit, and ND4 genes respectively. Nine mutations (64% were in the D-loop region. Numerous germline variations were found, at least 10 of them were novel and five were missense mutations, some of them occurred in evolutionarily conserved domains. Using real-time quantitative PCR analysis, the mtDNA content was found to increase in some tumors and decrease in others. Analysis of molecular and other clinicopathological findings does not reveal significant correlation between somatic mtDNA mutations and mtDNA content, or between mtDNA content and metastatic status. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that somatic mtDNA mutations in esophageal cancers are frequent. Some missense and frameshift mutations may play an important role in the tumorigenesis of esophageal carcinoma. More extensive biochemical and molecular studies will be necessary to determine the pathological significance of these somatic mutations.

  11. Characterization of a mutant of Escherichia coli B/R defective in mutation frequency decline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, D.L.

    1974-01-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli B/r designated mfd is very deficient in the ability to exhibit mutation frequency decline (MFD), the characteristic loss of potential suppressor mutations which occurs when protein synthesis is briefly inhibited after irradiation with ultraviolet light (uv). This mutant is known to excise pyrimidine dimers very slowly, although it is as uv-resistant as its mfd + B/r parent strain. We have found that the mfd mutant performs the initial incision step of excision repair normally, but repairs the resulting single-strand breaks much more slowly than the mfd + strain. In spite of the slow dimer excision in the mfd mutant, single-strand DNA breaks do not accumulate during postirradiation incubation, implying that incision and excision are well corrdinated. the prolonged postirradiation lag in cell division and DNA synthesis which accompany slow excision in the mfd strain indicates that resumption of these processes of optimal rates is linked to the timing of excision repair. The normal uv-resistance of the mfd mutant also suggests such coordination and shows that the rate of excision repair is independent of its ultimate efficiency in the removal of potentially lethal uv-induced damage. (U.S.)

  12. Frequency of Somatic TP53 Mutations in Combination with Known Pathogenic Mutations in Colon Adenocarcinoma, Non–Small Cell Lung Carcinoma, and Gliomas as Identified by Next-Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shajani-Yi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer. It encodes p53, a DNA-binding transcription factor that regulates multiple genes involved in DNA repair, metabolism, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and senescence. TP53 is associated with human cancer by mutations that lead to a loss of wild-type p53 function as well as mutations that confer alternate oncogenic functions that enable them to promote invasion, metastasis, proliferation, and cell survival. Identifying the discrete TP53 mutations in tumor cells may help direct therapies that are more effective. In this study, we identified the frequency of individual TP53 mutations in patients with colon adenocarcinoma (48%, non–small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC (36%, and glioma/glioblastoma (28% at our institution using next-generation sequencing. We also identified the occurrence of somatic mutations in numerous actionable genes including BRAF, EGFR, KRAS, IDH1, and PIK3CA that occurred concurrently with these TP53 mutations. Of the 480 tumors examined that contained one or more mutations in the TP53 gene, 219 were colon adenocarcinomas, 215 were NSCLCs, and 46 were gliomas/glioblastomas. Among the patients positive for TP53 mutations diagnosed with colon adenocarcinoma, 50% also showed at least one mutation in pathogenic genes of which 14% were BRAF, 33% were KRAS, and 3% were NRAS. Forty-seven percent of NSCLC patients harboring TP53 mutations also had a mutation in at least one actionable pathogenic variant with the following frequencies: BRAF: 4%, EGFR: 10%, KRAS: 28%, and PIK3CA: 4%. Fifty-two percent of patients diagnosed with glioma/glioblastoma with a positive TP53 mutation had at least one concurrent mutation in a known pathogenic gene of which 9% were CDKN2A, 41% were IDH1, and 11% were PIK3CA.

  13. Detection of low frequency FGFR3 mutations in the urine of bladder cancer patients using next-generation deep sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millholl

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available John M Millholland, Shuqiang Li, Cecilia A Fernandez, Anthony P ShuberPredictive Biosciences Inc, Lexington, MA, USAAbstract: Biological fluid-based noninvasive biomarker assays for monitoring and diagnosing disease are clinically powerful. A major technical hurdle for developing these assays is the requirement of high analytical sensitivity so that biomarkers present at very low levels can be consistently detected. In the case of biological fluid-based cancer diagnostic assays, sensitivities similar to those of tissue-based assays are difficult to achieve with DNA markers due to the high abundance of normal DNA background present in the sample. Here we describe a new urine-based assay that uses ultradeep sequencing technology to detect single mutant molecules of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 DNA that are indicative of bladder cancer. Detection of FGFR3 mutations in urine would provide clinicians with a noninvasive means of diagnosing early-stage bladder cancer. The single-molecule assay detects FGFR3 mutant DNA when present at as low as 0.02% of total urine DNA and results in 91% concordance with the frequency that FGFR3 mutations are detected in bladder cancer tumors, significantly improving diagnostic performance. To our knowledge, this is the first practical application of next-generation sequencing technology for noninvasive cancer diagnostics.Keywords: FGFR3, mutation, urine, single molecule, sequencing, bladder cancer

  14. Study in mutation of alfalfa genome DNA due to low energy N+ implantation using RAPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Roulei; Song Daojun; Yu Zengliang; Li Yufeng; Liang Yunzhang

    2001-01-01

    After implanted by various dosage N + beams, germination rate of alfalfa seeds appears to be saddle line with dosage increasing. The authors have studied in mutation of genome DNA due to low energy N + implantation, and concluded that 30 differential DNA fragments have been amplified by 8 primers (S 41 , S 42 , S 45 , S 46 , S 50 , S 52 , S 56 , S 58 ) in 100 primers, moreover, number of differential DNA fragments between CK and treatments increases with dosage. Consequently, low energy ion implantation can cause mutation of alfalfa genome DNA. The more dosage it is, the more mutation alfalfa will be

  15. DNA synthesis time in germinating rice and pattern of diethylsulphate induced mutations in pre-soaked seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narahari, P.

    1978-01-01

    DNA synthesis pattern in germinating rice seeds, pre-soaked in water for varying periods upto 48 hr, was determined by following the pulse incorporation of 3 H-thymidine into the TCA-insoluble nucleoprotein. Synthesis of DNA commenced at 24 hr, progressively increased to a first peak at about 38 hr, thereafter showed a 1/3rd drop and subsequently increased to a 2nd and still higher peak at 46 to 48 hr of pre-soaking. Treatments of diethylsulphate (dES) at a low concentration (0.2%-2hr) administered at various progressing stages of DNA synthesis resulted in decrease in seedling height and survival, and increase in mutation frequency at 45 hr. pre-soaking, maximum mutation frequencies of 20, 10 and 2% on M 1 plants, M 1 spikes and M 2 seedling bases, respectively were observed. Higher dES concentration (0.3%-2hr) given at later periods of pre-soaking showed near lethal effects and consequently decreased mutation frequencies. Treatments of sodium fluoride given singly or in combination with dES did not show any substantially different results as compared to those of the respective controls. Mutation spectra observed after dES treatments to germinating seeds, at different pre-soaking periods, were quite dissimilar. Specific mutations of economic importance like semi-dwarf mutants were isolated from the treatment of germinating seeds pre-soaked for 37.5 hr or more when shoot apex cells were undergoing DNA synthesis. (author)

  16. The spectrum of HNF1A gene mutations in Greek patients with MODY3: relative frequency and identification of seven novel germline mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsi, Christina; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Vazeou-Gerassimidi, Adriani; Chrysis, Dionysios; Delis, Dimitrios; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Dacou-Voutetakis, Catherine; Chrousos, George P; Sertedaki, Amalia

    2013-11-01

    Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY) is the most common type of monogenic diabetes accounting for 1-2% of the population with diabetes. The relative incidence of HNF1A-MODY (MODY3) is high in European countries; however, data are not available for the Greek population. The aims of this study were to determine the relative frequency of MODY3 in Greece, the type of the mutations observed, and their relation to the phenotype of the patients. Three hundred ninety-five patients were referred to our center because of suspected MODY during a period of 15 yr. The use of Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis of polymerase chain reaction amplified DNA revealed 72 patients carrying Glucokinase gene mutations (MODY2) and 8 patients carrying HNF1A gene mutations (MODY3). After using strict criteria, 54 patients were selected to be further evaluated by direct sequencing or by multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA) for the presence of HNF1A gene mutations. In 16 unrelated patients and 13 of their relatives, 15 mutations were identified in the HNF1A gene. Eight of these mutations were previously reported, whereas seven were novel. Clinical features, such as age of diabetes at diagnosis or severity of hyperglycemia, were not related to the mutation type or location. In our cohort of patients fulfilling strict clinical criteria for MODY, 12% carried an HNF1A gene mutation, suggesting that defects of this gene are responsible for a significant proportion of monogenic diabetes in the Greek population. No clear phenotype-genotype correlations were identified. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA mutation screening of male patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-Ying; Li, Hong; Xu, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Liang-Xing

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the differences between the genes of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) displacement loop (D-loop) region and the Cambridge Reference sequence, in order to screen the mutation sites and investigate the correlation between mutations, clinical parameters and complications associated with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). mtDNA was obtained from male patients with OSAHS in the Zhejiang Province. In total, 60 male patients with OSAHS and 102 healthy adults were assessed to determine the levels of fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride (TG) and high-density and low-density lipoproteins (LDL). Furthermore, peripheral mtDNA was extracted and bidirectional sequencing was conducted to enable mutation screening. In the mtDNA D-loop region, 178 mutation sites were identified, of which 115 sites were present in the two groups. The number of non-common sites in the OSAHS group was significantly higher compared with the control group (P0.05). A total of 21 cases in the severe OSAHS group exhibited mutation rates of >10%. In the control group, there were 24 cases where the np73A-G and np263A-G mutations were predominant. The np303-np315 region was identified to be the highly variable region and various mutation forms were observed. Statistically significant differences were observed in the neck perimeter, TG and LDL levels among the OSAHS-no-mutation subgroups (P<0.05) and LDL was shown to be associated with an mtDNA mutation in the OSAHS group. Numerous polymorphic mutation sites were identified in the mtDNA D-loop region of the OSAHS group. Therefore, mtDNA mutation sites may be closely associated with the clinical manifestations and complications of OSAHS.

  18. Highly sensitive detection of ESR1 mutations in cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic breast cancer using molecular barcode sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, Nanae; Kagara, Naofumi; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Miyake, Tomohiro; Tanei, Tomonori; Naoi, Yasuto; Shimoda, Masafumi; Shimazu, Kenzo; Kim, Seung Jin; Noguchi, Shinzaburo

    2018-01-01

    We aimed to develop a highly sensitive method to detect ESR1 mutations in cell-free DNA (cfDNA) using next-generation sequencing with molecular barcode (MB-NGS) targeting the hotspot segment (c.1600-1713). The sensitivity of MB-NGS was tested using serially diluted ESR1 mutant DNA and then cfDNA samples from 34 patients with metastatic breast cancer were analyzed with MB-NGS. The results of MB-NGS were validated in comparison with conventional NGS and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). MB-NGS showed a higher sensitivity (0.1%) than NGS without barcode (1%) by reducing background errors. Of the cfDNA samples from 34 patients with metastatic breast cancer, NGS without barcode revealed seven mutations in six patients (17.6%) and MB-NGS revealed six additional mutations including three mutations not reported in the COSMIC database of breast cancer, resulting in total 13 ESR1 mutations in ten patients (29.4%). Regarding the three hotspot mutations, all the patients with mutations detected by MB-NGS had identical mutations detected by droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), and mutant allele frequency correlated very well between both (r = 0.850, p < 0.01). Moreover, all the patients without these mutations by MB-NGS were found to have no mutations by ddPCR. In conclusion, MB-NGS could successfully detect ESR1 mutations in cfDNA with a higher sensitivity of 0.1% than conventional NGS and was considered as clinically useful as ddPCR.

  19. Frequency of Usher syndrome type 1 in deaf children by massively parallel DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Hidekane; Miyagawa, Maiko; Kumakawa, Kozo; Nishio, Shin-Ya; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1) is the most severe of the three USH subtypes due to its profound hearing loss, absent vestibular response and retinitis pigmentosa appearing at a prepubescent age. Six causative genes have been identified for USH1, making early diagnosis and therapy possible through DNA testing. Targeted exon sequencing of selected genes using massively parallel DNA sequencing (MPS) technology enables clinicians to systematically tackle previously intractable monogenic disorders and improve molecular diagnosis. Using MPS along with direct sequence analysis, we screened 227 unrelated non-syndromic deaf children and detected recessive mutations in USH1 causative genes in five patients (2.2%): three patients harbored MYO7A mutations and one each carried CDH23 or PCDH15 mutations. As indicated by an earlier genotype-phenotype correlation study of the CDH23 and PCDH15 genes, we considered the latter two patients to have USH1. Based on clinical findings, it was also highly likely that one patient with MYO7A mutations possessed USH1 due to a late onset age of walking. This first report describing the frequency (1.3-2.2%) of USH1 among non-syndromic deaf children highlights the importance of comprehensive genetic testing for early disease diagnosis.

  20. Frequency and Prognostic Relevance of FLT3 Mutations in Saudi Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaleb Elyamany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3 is a receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a key role in cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells. Mutations of FLT3 were first described in 1997 and account for the most frequent molecular mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. AML patients with FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD mutations have poor cure rates the prognostic significance of point mutations; tyrosine kinase domain (TKD is still unclear. We analyzed the frequency of FLT3 mutations (ITD and D835 in patients with AML at diagnosis; no sufficient data currently exist regarding FLT3 mutations in Saudi AML patients. This study was aimed at evaluating the frequency of FLT3 mutations in patients with AML and its significance for prognosis. The frequency of FLT3 mutations in our study (18.56% was lower than many of the reported studies, FLT3-ITD mutations were observed in 14.4%, and FLT3-TKD in 4.1%, of 97 newly diagnosed AML patients (82 adult and 15 pediatric. Our data show significant increase of FLT3 mutations in male more than female (13 male, 5 female. Our results support the view that FLT3-ITD mutation has strong prognostic factor in AML patients and is associated with high rate of relapse, and high leucocytes and blast count at diagnosis and relapse.

  1. Targeted mutations induced by a single acetylaminofluorene DNA adduct in mammalian cells and bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moryia, M.; Takeshita, M.; Johnson, F.; Peden, K.; Will, S.; Grollman, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    Mutagenic specificity of 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) has been established in mammalian cells and several strains of bacteria by using a shuttle plasmid vector containing a single N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)acetylaminofluorene (C8-dG-AAF) adduct. The nucleotide sequence of the gene conferring tetracycline resistance was modified by conservative codon replacement so as to accommodate the sequence d(CCTTCGCTAC) flanked by two restriction sites, Bsm I and Xho I. The corresponding synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide underwent reaction with 2-(N-acetoxy-N-acetylamino)-fluorene (AAAF), forming a single dG-AAF adduct. This modified oligodeoxynucleotide was hybridized to its complementary strand and ligated between the Bsm I and Xho I sites of the vector. Plasmids containing the C8-dG-AAF adduct were used to transfect simian virus 40-transformed simian kidney (COS-1) cells and to transform several AB strains of Escherichia coli. Colonies containing mutant plasmides were detected by hybridization to 32 P-labeled oligodeoxynucleotides. Presence of the single DNA adduct increased the mutation frequency by 8-fold in both COS cells and E. coli. Over 80% of mutations detected in both systems were targeted and represented G x C → C x G or G x C → T x A transversions or single nucleotide deletions. The authors conclude that modification of a deoxyguanosine residue with AAF preferentially induces mutations targeted at this site when a plasmid containing a single C8-dG-AAF adduct is introduced into mammalian cells or bacteria

  2. Retrospective assessment of the most common mitochondrial DNA mutations in a large Hungarian cohort of suspect mitochondrial cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remenyi, Viktoria; Inczedy-Farkas, Gabriella; Komlosi, Katalin; Horvath, Rita; Maasz, Anita; Janicsek, Ingrid; Pentelenyi, Klara; Gal, Aniko; Karcagi, Veronika; Melegh, Bela; Molnar, Maria Judit

    2015-08-01

    Prevalence estimations for mitochondrial disorders still vary widely and only few epidemiologic studies have been carried out so far. With the present work we aim to give a comprehensive overview about frequencies of the most common mitochondrial mutations in Hungarian patients. A total of 1328 patients were tested between 1999 and 2012. Among them, 882 were screened for the m.3243A > G, m.8344A > G, m.8993T > C/G mutations and deletions, 446 for LHON primary mutations. The mutation frequency in our cohort was 2.61% for the m.3243A > G, 1.47% for the m.8344A > G, 17.94% for Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (m.3460G > A, m.11778G > A, m.14484T > C) and 0.45% for the m.8993T > C/G substitutions. Single mtDNA deletions were detected in 14.97%, while multiple deletions in 6.01% of the cases. The mutation frequency in Hungarian patients suggestive of mitochondrial disease was similar to other Caucasian populations. Further retrospective studies of different populations are needed in order to accurately assess the importance of mitochondrial diseases and manage these patients.

  3. mtDNA mutation C1494T, haplogroup A, and hearing loss in Chinese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chengye; Kong Qingpeng; Yao Yonggang; Zhang Yaping

    2006-01-01

    Mutation C1494T in mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene was recently reported in two large Chinese families with aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss (AINHL) and was claimed to be pathogenic. This mutation, however, was first reported in a sample from central China in our previous study that was aimed to reconstruct East Asian mtDNA phylogeny. All these three mtDNAs formed a subclade defined by mutation C1494T in mtDNA haplogroup A. It thus seems that mutation C1494T is a haplogroup A-associated mutation and this matrilineal background may contribute a high risk for the penetrance of mutation C1494T in Chinese with AINHL. To test this hypothesis, we first genotyped mutation C1494T in 553 unrelated individuals from three regional Chinese populations and performed an extensive search for published complete or near-complete mtDNA data sets (>3000 mtDNAs), we then screened the C1494T mutation in 111 mtDNAs with haplogroup A status that were identified from 1823 subjects across China. The search for published mtDNA data sets revealed no other mtDNA besides the above-mentioned three carrying mutation C1494T. None of the 553 randomly selected individuals and the 111 haplogroup A mtDNAs was found to bear this mutation. Therefore, our results suggest that C1494T is a very rare event. The mtDNA haplogroup A background in general is unlikely to play an active role in the penetrance of mutation C1494T in AINHL

  4. Random mtDNA mutations modulate proliferation capacity in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukat, Alexandra; Edgar, Daniel; Bratic, Ivana; Maiti, Priyanka; Trifunovic, Aleksandra

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Increased mtDNA mutations in MEFs lead to high level of spontaneous immortalization. → This process is independent of endogenous ROS production. → Aerobic glycolysis significantly contributes to spontaneous immortalization of MEFs. -- Abstract: An increase in mtDNA mutation load leads to a loss of critical cells in different tissues thereby contributing to the physiological process of organismal ageing. Additionally, the accumulation of senescent cells that display changes in metabolic function might act in an active way to further disrupt the normal tissue function. We believe that this could be the important link missing in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of premature ageing in the mtDNA mutator mice. We tested proliferation capacity of mtDNA mutator cells in vitro. When cultured in physiological levels of oxygen (3%) their proliferation capacity is somewhat lower than wild-type cells. Surprisingly, in conditions of increased oxidative stress (20% O 2 ) mtDNA mutator mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit continuous proliferation due to spontaneous immortalization, whereas the same conditions promote senescence in wild-type cells. We believe that an increase in aerobic glycolysis observed in mtDNA mutator mice is a major mechanism behind this process. We propose that glycolysis promotes proliferation and allows a fast turnover of metabolites, but also leads to energy crisis due to lower ATP production rate. This could lead to compromised replication and/or repair and therefore, in rare cases, might lead to mutations in tumor suppressor genes and spontaneous immortalization.

  5. Impact of Emergent Circulating Tumor DNA RAS Mutation in Panitumumab-Treated Chemoresistant Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Won; Peeters, Marc; Thomas, Anne L; Gibbs, Peter; Hool, Kristina; Zhang, Jianqi; Ang, Agnes; Bach, Bruce Allen; Price, Timothy

    2018-06-13

    The accumulation of emergent RAS mutations during anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy is of interest as a mechanism for acquired resistance to anti-EGFR treatment. Plasma analysis of circulating tumor (ct) DNA is a minimally invasive and highly sensitive method to determine RAS mutational status. This biomarker analysis of the global phase III ASPECCT study used next-generation sequencing to detect expanded RAS ctDNA mutations in panitumumab-treated patients. Plasma samples collected at baseline and posttreatment were analyzed categorically for the presence of RAS mutations by the Plasma Select -R™ 64-gene panel at 0.1% sensitivity. Among panitumumab-treated patients with evaluable plasma samples at baseline (n = 238), 188 (79%) were wild-type (WT) RAS, and 50 (21%) were mutant RAS Of the 188 patients with baseline ctDNA WT RAS status, 164 had evaluable posttreatment results with a 32% rate of emergent RAS mutations. The median overall survival (OS) for WT and RAS mutant status by ctDNA at baseline was 13.7 (95% confidence interval: 11.5-15.4) and 7.9 months (6.4-9.6), respectively ( P < 0.0001). Clinical outcomes were not significantly different between patients with and without emergent ctDNA RAS mutations. Although patients with baseline ctDNA RAS mutations had worse outcomes than patients who were WT RAS before initiating treatment, emergent ctDNA RAS mutations were not associated with less favorable patient outcomes in panitumumab-treated patients. Further research is needed to determine a clinically relevant threshold for baseline and emergent ctDNA RAS mutations. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Application of DNA chips in the analysis of gene mutation in HBV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongzhong; Ruan Lihua; Zhou Guoping; Wu Guoxiang; Chen Min

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical applicability of DNA chips for analysis of gene mutation in HBV. Methods: Serum HBV DNA from 47 patients with viral hepatitis type B was amplified with PCR. Possible gene mutations were searched for in site 1896 of pre-C section, sites 1762,1764 of BCP section and sites 528, 552 of P section with DNA chip method based upon membrane coloration. Results: In the 32 patients without lamivudine treatment, the results were as follows: (1) 6 specimens with HBsAg + , HBeAg + , HBeAb - , no mutations observed. (2) 13 specimens with HBsAg + , HBeAg - , HBeAb + , mutations at site 1896, pre- C 4 cases, mutations at sites 1762,1764, BCP 11 cases. (3) 13 specimens with HBsAg + , HBeAg + , HBeAb + , mutations at site 1896 pre -C 4 cases, mutations at sites 1762,1764 BCP 13 cases. In the 15 patients after 48 weeks treatment with lamivudine but remained HBV DNA positive, mutations were observed at: site 1896 pre-C, 5 cases, sites 1762,1764 BCP, 6 cases, site 528 P section, 2 cases, site 552 P section, YVDD 4 cases, YIDD 7 cases. Conclusion: Mutations at sites 1896, 1762,1764 were more frequent in patients with HBeAb + and were related to the negative expression of HBeAg, Mutations at 1762,1764 BCP were closely related to the changes of HBeAg/HBeAb. P section mutations were only observed after lamivadine treatment and were related to resistance against the drug. DNA chip method based upon membrane coloration for detection of gene mutation was expedient and specific and worth popularization. (authors)

  7. DNA sequence analysis of X-ray induced Adh null mutations in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, J.; Fossett, N.G.; Arbour-Reily, P.; McDaniel, M.; Tucker, A.; Chang, S.H.; Lee, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The mutational spectrum for 28 X-ray induced mutations and 2 spontaneous mutations, previously determined by genetic and cytogenetic methods, consisted of 20 multilocus deficiencies (19 induced and 1 spontaneous) and 10 intragenic mutations (9 induced and 1 spontaneous). One of the X-ray induced intragenic mutations was lost, and another was determined to be a recombinant with the allele used in the recovery scheme. The DNA sequence of two X-ray induced intragenic mutations has been published. This paper reports the results of DNA sequence analysis of the remaining intragenic mutations and a summary of the X-ray induced mutational spectrum. The combination of DNA sequence analysis with genetic complementation analysis shows a continuous distribution in size of deletions rather than two different types of mutations consisting of deletions and 'point mutations'. Sequencing is shown to be essential for detecting intragenic deletions. Of particular importance for future studies is the observation that all of the intragenic deletions consist of a direct repeat adjacent to the breakpoint with one of the repeats deleted

  8. HPRT gene mutation frequency and the factor of influence in adult peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jingyong; Zheng Siying; Cui Fengmei; Wang Liuyi; Lao Qinhua; Wu Hongliang

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the HPRT gene loci mutation frequencies and the factor of influence in peripheral blood lymphocytes of adult with ages ranging from 21-50. Methods: HPRT gene mutation frequency (GMf) were examined by the technique of multinuclear cell assay. Relation between GMf and years were fitted with a computer. Results: Relation could be described by the following equation: y = 0.7555 + 0.0440x, r = 0.9829. Smoking has influence on GMf and sex hasn't. Conclusion: HPRT gene mutation frequency increases with increasing of age. Increasing rate is 0.00440% per year

  9. Comparing the DNA hypermethylome with gene mutations in human colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornel E Schuebel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a transcriptome-wide approach to identify genes affected by promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing in colorectal cancer. By screening cell lines and validating tumor-specific hypermethylation in a panel of primary human colorectal cancer samples, we estimate that nearly 5% or more of all known genes may be promoter methylated in an individual tumor. When directly compared to gene mutations, we find larger numbers of genes hypermethylated in individual tumors, and a higher frequency of hypermethylation within individual genes harboring either genetic or epigenetic changes. Thus, to enumerate the full spectrum of alterations in the human cancer genome, and to facilitate the most efficacious grouping of tumors to identify cancer biomarkers and tailor therapeutic approaches, both genetic and epigenetic screens should be undertaken.

  10. Role of Mitochondrial DNA Mutations in Cellular Vulnerability to Mitochondria-Specific Environmental Toxins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hirsch, Etienne C

    2005-01-01

    .... To test such a hypothesis in Parkinson's disease we proposed to: 1) develop an animal model with accumulated mtDNA mutations in catecholaminergic neurons by creating a transgenic mouse containing a tyrosine hydroxylase (TH...

  11. Current study on ionizing radiation-induced mitochondial DNA damage and mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xin; Wang Zhenhua; Zhang Hong

    2012-01-01

    Current advance in ionizing radiation-induced mitochondrial DNA damage and mutations is reviewed, in addition with the essential differences between mtDNA and nDNA damage and mutations. To extent the knowledge about radiation induced mitochondrial alterations, the researchers in Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences developed some technics such as real-time PCR, long-PCR for accurate quantification of radiation induced damage and mutations, and in-depth investigation about the functional changes of mitochondria based on mtDNA damage and mutations were also carried out. In conclusion, the important role of mitochondrial study in radiation biology is underlined, and further study on mitochondrial study associated with late effect and metabolism changes in radiation biology is pointed out. (authors)

  12. Simultaneous Profiling of DNA Mutation and Methylation by Melting Analysis Using Magnetoresistive Biosensor Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Lee, Jung-Rok; Dahl, Christina

    2017-01-01

    specificity. Genomic (mutation) or bisulphite-treated (methylation) DNA is amplified using nondiscriminatory primers, and the amplicons are then hybridized to a giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor array followed by melting curve measurements. The GMR biosensor platform offers scalable multiplexed detection...

  13. Validation of high-resolution DNA melting analysis for mutation scanning of the CDKL5 gene: identification of novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Laure; Diebold, Bertrand; Leroux, Céline; Maurey, Hélène; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Delahaye, Andre; Dulac, Olivier; Metreau, Julia; Melikishvili, Gia; Toutain, Annick; Rivier, François; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) have been predominantly described in epileptic encephalopathies of female, including infantile spasms with Rett-like features. Up to now, detection of mutations in this gene was made by laborious, expensive and/or time consuming methods. Here, we decided to validate high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) for mutation scanning of the CDKL5 gene. Firstly, using a large DNA bank consisting to 34 samples carrying different mutations and polymorphisms, we validated our analytical conditions to analyse the different exons and flanking intronic sequences of the CDKL5 gene by HRMA. Secondly, we screened CDKL5 by both HRMA and denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) in a cohort of 135 patients with early-onset seizures. Our results showed that point mutations and small insertions and deletions can be reliably detected by HRMA. Compared to dHPLC, HRMA profiles are more discriminated, thereby decreasing unnecessary sequencing. In this study, we identified eleven novel sequence variations including four pathogenic mutations (2.96% prevalence). HRMA appears cost-effective, easy to set up, highly sensitive, non-toxic and rapid for mutation screening, ideally suited for large genes with heterogeneous mutations located along the whole coding sequence, such as the CDKL5 gene. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Determining the Location of DNA Modification and Mutation Caused by UVB Light in Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0333 TITLE: Determining the Location of DNA Modification and Mutation Caused by UVB Light in Skin Cancer PRINCIPAL...COVERED 15 Aug 2012 – 14 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0333 Determining the Location of DNA Modification and Mutation ...sequencing libraries generated for both yeast and human cells show pyrimidine bias on the 5’ end, indicating that we are sequencing the dimers

  15. Prevalence of common MEFV mutations and carrier frequencies in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Christian Oberkanins, oberkanins@viennalab.com. 1967; Pras et al. ... affected populations with spreading very diverse mutational patterns, especially ..... Arabs, mainly living in Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, Jordan and Iraq, and North .... Mediterranean fever suspected patients and gender correlation: a retrospective study.

  16. DNA damage by reactive species: Mechanisms, mutation and repair

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA is continuously attacked by reactive species that can affect its structure and function severely. Structural modifications to DNA mainly arise from modifications in its bases that primarily occur due to their exposure to different reactive species. Apart from this, DNA strand break, inter- and intra-strand crosslinks and ...

  17. Effects of TET2 mutations on DNA methylation in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    TET2 enzymatically converts 5-methyl-cytosine to 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine, possibly leading to loss of DNA methylation. TET2 mutations are common in myeloid leukemia and were proposed to contribute to leukemogenesis through DNA methylation. To expand on this concept, we studied chronic myelomonocyti...

  18. Mutations of mtDNA polymerase-γ and hyperlactataemia in the HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mutations of mtDNA polymerase-γ and hyperlactataemia in the HIV-infected Zulu population of South Africa. ... D B A Ojwach, C Aldous, P Kocheleff, B Sartorius ... of their capacity to impede human mitochondrial DNA polymerase-γ (POLG), ...

  19. Mutation of Haemophilus influenzae transforming DNA in vitro with near-ultraviolet radiation: action spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera-Juarez, E; Setlow, J K [Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas, Mexico City. Dept. de Bioquimica; Oak Ridge National Lab., Tenn. (USA). Biology Div.)

    1976-05-01

    Mutations were produced in purified transforming DNA from Haemophilus influenzae by near UV radiation and were assayed as mutants among cells transformed with irradiated DNA. The maximum efficiency of mutation induction was at around 334 nm, and the efficiency dropped off steeply at lower and higher wavelengths. The difference between the action spectrum for mutation and that for the oxygen-independent inactivation of transforming DNA, which had a shoulder at 365 nm, indicates that there are different lesions involved in the inactivating and mutagenic effects of near-UV. The presence of histidine during irradiation enhanced the mutagenic effect at 334 and 365 nm, although it protected against inactivation at 365 nm. The effective near-UV wavelengths for in vitro mutation are to some extent the same as the effective wavelengths for mutation in vivo reported previously. These findings indicate that mutations are produced in vivo by near-UV with DNA as the primary target molecule rather than by a secondary non-photochemical reaction between DNA and some other cell component.

  20. Mutations affecting RNA polymerase I-stimulated exchange and rDNA recombination in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.H.; Keil, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    HOT1 is a cis-acting recombination-stimulatory sequence isolated from the rDNA repeat unit of yeast. The ability of HOT1 to stimulate mitotic exchange appears to depend on its ability to promote high levels of RNA polymerase I transcription. A qualitative colony color sectoring assay was developed to screen for trans-acting mutations that alter the activity of HOT1. Both hypo-recombination and hyper-recombination mutants were isolated. Genetic analysis of seven HOT1 recombination mutants (hrm) that decrease HOT1 activity shows that they behave as recessive nuclear mutations and belong to five linkage groups. Three of these mutations, hrm1, hrm2, and hrm3, also decrease rDNA exchange but do not alter recombination in the absence of HOT1. Another mutation, hrm4, decreases HOT1-stimulated recombination but does not affect rDNA recombination or exchange in the absence of HOT1. Two new alleles of RAD52 were also isolated using this screen. With regard to HOT1 activity, rad52 is epistatic to all four hrm mutations indicating that the products of the HRM genes and of RAD52 mediate steps in the same recombination pathway. Finding mutations that decrease both the activity of HOT1 and exchange in the rDNA supports the hypothesis that HOT1 plays a role in rDNA recombination

  1. Mutation Rate Variation is a Primary Determinant of the Distribution of Allele Frequencies in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbel Harpak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The site frequency spectrum (SFS has long been used to study demographic history and natural selection. Here, we extend this summary by examining the SFS conditional on the alleles found at the same site in other species. We refer to this extension as the "phylogenetically-conditioned SFS" or cSFS. Using recent large-sample data from the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC, combined with primate genome sequences, we find that human variants that occurred independently in closely related primate lineages are at higher frequencies in humans than variants with parallel substitutions in more distant primates. We show that this effect is largely due to sites with elevated mutation rates causing significant departures from the widely-used infinite sites mutation model. Our analysis also suggests substantial variation in mutation rates even among mutations involving the same nucleotide changes. In summary, we show that variable mutation rates are key determinants of the SFS in humans.

  2. RAPD analysis of alfalfa DNA mutation via N+ implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yufeng; Huang Qunce; Yu Zengliang; Liang Yunzhang

    2003-01-01

    Germination capacity of alfalfa seeds under low energy N + implantation manifests oscillations going down with dose strength. From analyzing alfalfa genome DNA under low energy N + implantation by RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphous DNA), it is recommended that 30 polymorphic DNA fragments be amplified with 8 primers in total 100 primers, and fluorescence intensity of the identical DNA fragment amplified by RAPD is different between CK and treatments. Number of different polymorphic DNA fragments between treatment and CK via N + implantation manifests going up with dose strength

  3. Myopathic mtDNA Depletion Syndrome Due to Mutation in TK2 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Hernández, Elena; García-Silva, María Teresa; Quijada-Fraile, Pilar; Rodríguez-García, María Elena; Rivera, Henry; Hernández-Laín, Aurelio; Coca-Robinot, David; Fernández-Toral, Joaquín; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel A; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing was used to identify the disease gene(s) in a Spanish girl with failure to thrive, muscle weakness, mild facial weakness, elevated creatine kinase, deficiency of mitochondrial complex III and depletion of mtDNA. With whole-exome sequencing data, it was possible to get the whole mtDNA sequencing and discard any pathogenic variant in this genome. The analysis of whole exome uncovered a homozygous pathogenic mutation in thymidine kinase 2 gene ( TK2; NM_004614.4:c.323 C>T, p.T108M). TK2 mutations have been identified mainly in patients with the myopathic form of mtDNA depletion syndromes. This patient presents an atypical TK2-related myopathic form of mtDNA depletion syndromes, because despite having a very low content of mtDNA (TK2 gene in mtDNA depletion syndromes and expanded the phenotypic spectrum.

  4. MELAS syndrome, cardiomyopathy, rhabdomyolysis, and autism associated with the A3260G mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Barbara S; Feigenbaum, Annette S J; Robinson, Brian H; Dipchand, Anne I; Simon, David K; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2010-11-12

    The A to G transition mutation at position 3260 of the mitochondrial genome is usually associated with cardiomyopathy and myopathy. One Japanese kindred reported the phenotype of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS syndrome) in association with the A3260G mtDNA mutation. We describe the first Caucasian cases of MELAS syndrome associated with the A3260G mutation. Furthermore, this mutation was associated with exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis, hearing loss, seizures, cardiomyopathy, and autism in the large kindred. We conclude that the A3260G mtDNA mutation is associated with wide phenotypic heterogeneity with MELAS and other "classical" mitochondrial phenotypes being manifestations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hair Dye–DNA Interaction: Plausible Cause of Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Maiti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hair dye is one of the most popular cosmetic products which are used more widely and frequently to improve an individual’s appearance. Although the genotoxic effects of dye ingredients are widely reported, hair dye in its usable form is not reported extensively. In this contribution, we report the possible mode of interaction of hair dye with DNA which leads to genotoxicity. The effect of dye DNA interaction was studied on the most popular and globally used hair dye with Calf Thymus DNA and plasmid DNA. This interaction of dye DNA was studied by spectroscopic analyses and gel electrophoresis. The result had shown positive interaction of dye with DNA. Gel electrophoresis study confirms the binding of dye with DNA which results in linearization and fragmentation of the plasmid DNA. Dye–DNA interaction causes fragmentation and oxidation of DNA in absence of any catalyst, implies high toxicity of commercial hair dyes. Thus, it can be deduced from the present studies that hair dye in its usable form may lead to its penetration through skin affecting genomic DNA possesses genotoxic property and can be treated as one of the most common mutagen.

  6. Transfection with extracellularly UV-damaged DNA induces human and rat cells to express a mutator phenotype towards parvovirus H-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinsart, C.; Cornelis, J.J.; Klein, B.; van der Eb, A.J.; Rommelaere, J.

    1984-01-01

    Human and rat cells transfected with UV-irradiated linear double-stranded DNA from calf thymus displayed a mutator activity. This phenotype was identified by growing a lytic thermosensitive single-stranded DNA virus (parvovirus H-1) in those cells and determining viral reversion frequencies. Likewise, exogenous UV-irradiated closed circular DNAs, either double-stranded (simian virus 40) or single-stranded (phi X174), enhanced the ability of recipient cells to mutate parvovirus H-1. The magnitude of mutator activity expression increased along with the number of UV lesions present in the inoculated DNA up to a saturation level. Unirradiated DNA displayed little inducing capacity, irrespective of whether it was single or double stranded. Deprivation of a functional replication origin did not impede UV-irradiated simian virus 40 DNA from providing rat and human cells with a mutator function. Our data suggest that in mammalian cells a trans-acting mutagenic signal might be generated from UV-irradiated DNA without the necessity for damaged DNA to replicate

  7. Clinical differences in patients with mitochondriocytopathies due to nuclear versus mitochondrial DNA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Gozalbo, M E; Dijkman, K P; van den Heuvel, L P; Sengers, R C; Wendel, U; Smeitink, J A

    2000-01-01

    Defects in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) are genetically unique because the different components involved in this process, respiratory chain enzyme complexes (I, III, and IV) and complex V, are encoded by nuclear and mitochondrial genome. The objective of the study was to assess whether there are clinical differences in patients suffering from OXPHOS defects caused by nuclear or mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. We studied 16 families with > or = two siblings with a genetically established OXPHOS deficiency, four due to a nuclear gene mutation and 12 due to a mtDNA mutation. Siblings with a nuclear gene mutation showed very similar clinical pictures that became manifest in the first years (ranging from first months to early childhood). There was a severe progressive course. Seven of the eight children died in their first decade. Conversely, siblings with a mtDNA mutation had clinical pictures that varied from almost alike to very distinct. They became symptomatic at an older age (ranging from childhood to adulthood), with the exception of defects associated with Leigh or Leigh-like phenotype. The clinical course was more gradual and relatively less severe; four of the 26 patients died, one in his second year, another in her second decade and two in their sixth decade. There are differences in age at onset, severity of clinical course, outcome, and intrafamilial variability in patients affected of an OXPHOS defect due to nuclear or mtDNA mutations. Patients with nuclear mutations become symptomatic at a young age, and have a severe clinical course. Patients with mtDNA mutations show a wider clinical spectrum of age at onset and severity. These differences may be of importance regarding the choice of which genome to study in affected patients as well as with respect to genetic counseling. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Optimised Pre-Analytical Methods Improve KRAS Mutation Detection in Circulating Tumour DNA (ctDNA) from Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, James L.; Corcoran, Claire; Brown, Helen; Sharpe, Alan D.; Musilova, Milena; Kohlmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Non-invasive mutation testing using circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) is an attractive premise. This could enable patients without available tumour sample to access more treatment options. Materials & Methods Peripheral blood and matched tumours were analysed from 45 NSCLC patients. We investigated the impact of pre-analytical variables on DNA yield and/or KRAS mutation detection: sample collection tube type, incubation time, centrifugation steps, plasma input volume and DNA extraction kits. Results 2 hr incubation time and double plasma centrifugation (2000 x g) reduced overall DNA yield resulting in lowered levels of contaminating genomic DNA (gDNA). Reduced “contamination” and increased KRAS mutation detection was observed using cell-free DNA Blood Collection Tubes (cfDNA BCT) (Streck), after 72 hrs following blood draw compared to EDTA tubes. Plasma input volume and use of different DNA extraction kits impacted DNA yield. Conclusion This study demonstrated that successful ctDNA recovery for mutation detection in NSCLC is dependent on pre-analytical steps. Development of standardised methods for the detection of KRAS mutations from ctDNA specimens is recommended to minimise the impact of pre-analytical steps on mutation detection rates. Where rapid sample processing is not possible the use of cfDNA BCT tubes would be advantageous. PMID:26918901

  9. Optimised Pre-Analytical Methods Improve KRAS Mutation Detection in Circulating Tumour DNA (ctDNA from Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Sherwood

    Full Text Available Non-invasive mutation testing using circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA is an attractive premise. This could enable patients without available tumour sample to access more treatment options.Peripheral blood and matched tumours were analysed from 45 NSCLC patients. We investigated the impact of pre-analytical variables on DNA yield and/or KRAS mutation detection: sample collection tube type, incubation time, centrifugation steps, plasma input volume and DNA extraction kits.2 hr incubation time and double plasma centrifugation (2000 x g reduced overall DNA yield resulting in lowered levels of contaminating genomic DNA (gDNA. Reduced "contamination" and increased KRAS mutation detection was observed using cell-free DNA Blood Collection Tubes (cfDNA BCT (Streck, after 72 hrs following blood draw compared to EDTA tubes. Plasma input volume and use of different DNA extraction kits impacted DNA yield.This study demonstrated that successful ctDNA recovery for mutation detection in NSCLC is dependent on pre-analytical steps. Development of standardised methods for the detection of KRAS mutations from ctDNA specimens is recommended to minimise the impact of pre-analytical steps on mutation detection rates. Where rapid sample processing is not possible the use of cfDNA BCT tubes would be advantageous.

  10. Blocking DNA Repair in Advanced BRCA-Mutated Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with relapsed or refractory advanced cancer and confirmed BRCA mutations who have not previously been treated with a PARP inhibitor will be given BMN 673 by mouth once a day in 28-day cycles.

  11. Somatic mutations in stilbene estrogen-induced Syrian hamster kidney tumors identified by DNA fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Deodutta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Kidney tumors from stilbene estrogen (diethylstilbestrol-treated Syrian hamsters were screened for somatic genetic alterations by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain-reaction (RAPD-PCR fingerprinting. Fingerprints from tumor tissue were generated by single arbitrary primers and compared with fingerprints for normal tissue from the same animal, as well as normal and tumor tissues from different animals. Sixty one of the arbitrary primers amplified 365 loci that contain approximately 476 kbp of the hamster genome. Among these amplified DNA fragments, 44 loci exhibited either qualitative or quantitative differences between the tumor tissues and normal kidney tissues. RAPD-PCR loci showing decreased and increased intensities in tumor tissue DNA relative to control DNA indicate that loci have undergone allelic losses and gains, respectively, in the stilbene estrogen-induced tumor cell genome. The presence or absence of the amplified DNA fragments indicate homozygous insertions or deletions in the kidney tumor DNA compared to the age-matched normal kidney tissue DNA. Seven of 44 mutated loci also were present in the kidney tissues adjacent to tumors (free of macroscopic tumors. The presence of mutated loci in uninvolved (non-tumor surrounding tissue adjacent to tumors from stilbene estrogen-treated hamsters suggests that these mutations occurred in the early stages of carcinogenesis. The cloning and sequencing of RAPD amplified loci revealed that one mutated locus had significant sequence similarity with the hamster Cyp1A1 gene. The results show the ability of RAPD-PCR to detect and isolate, in a single step, DNA sequences representing genetic alterations in stilbene estrogen-induced cancer cells, including losses of heterozygosity, and homozygous deletion and insertion mutations. RAPD-PCR provides an alternative molecular approach for studying cancer cytogenetics in stilbene estrogen-induced tumors in humans and experimental

  12. Frequent occurrence of mitochondrial DNA mutations in Barrett's metaplasia without the presence of dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soong Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Barrett's esophagus (BE is one of the most common premalignant lesions and can progress to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA. The numerous molecular events may play a role in the neoplastic transformation of Barrett's mucosa such as the change of DNA ploidy, p53 mutation and alteration of adhesion molecules. However, the molecular mechanism of the progression of BE to EA remains unclear and most studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations in BE have performed on BE with the presence of dysplasia. METHODS/FINDINGS: Thus, the current study is to investigate new molecular events (Barrett's esophageal tissue-specific-mtDNA alterations/instabilities in mitochondrial genome and causative factors for their alterations using the corresponding adjacent normal mucosal tissue (NT and tissue (BT from 34 patients having Barrett's metaplasia without the presence of dysplasia. Eighteen patients (53% exhibited mtDNA mutations which were not found in adjacent NT. mtDNA copy number was about 3 times higher in BT than in adjacent NT. The activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme complexes in tissues from Barrett's metaplasia without the presence of dysplasia was impaired. Reactive oxygen species (ROS level in BT was significantly higher than those in corresponding samples. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: High ROS level in BT may contribute to the development of mtDNA mutations, which may play a crucial role in disease progression and tumorigenesis in BE.

  13. Effect of combined mutagenic treatments on sensitivity and mutation frequency in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopinathan Nair, V.

    1977-01-01

    Rice seeds were subjected to two sets of combination treatments of radiations and NMH. The effects of mutagenic treatments in the M 1 and M 2 generations were recorded and discussed. Mutation frequencies estimated as number of mutations per 100 M 1 years were not higher than the values expected on the basis of additive effects. When estimated as number of mutants per 100 M 2 plants, the frequencies revealed more than additive effects. The synergistic effect on mutant frequencies was due to increase in the segregation ratio of mutants. This effect was more pronounced at the higher dose combinations of fast neutrons and NMH. (author)

  14. DNA methylation patterns of candidate genes regulated by thymine DNA glycosylase in patients with TP53 germline mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, F.P. [CIPE, Laboratrio de Oncogentica Molecular, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Kuasne, H. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Marchi, F.A. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Programa Inter-Institucional em Bioinformtica, Instituto de Matemtica e Estatstica, Universidade So Paulo, So Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miranda, P.M. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rogatto, S.R. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Achatz, M.I. [CIPE, Laboratrio de Oncogentica Molecular, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Oncogentica, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, So Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-04-28

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare, autosomal dominant, hereditary cancer predisposition disorder. In Brazil, the p.R337H TP53 founder mutation causes the variant form of LFS, Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome. The occurrence of cancer and age of disease onset are known to vary, even in patients carrying the same mutation, and several mechanisms such as genetic and epigenetic alterations may be involved in this variability. However, the extent of involvement of such events has not been clarified. It is well established that p53 regulates several pathways, including the thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) pathway, which regulates the DNA methylation of several genes. This study aimed to identify the DNA methylation pattern of genes potentially related to the TDG pathway (CDKN2A, FOXA1, HOXD8, OCT4, SOX2, and SOX17) in 30 patients with germline TP53mutations, 10 patients with wild-type TP53, and 10 healthy individuals. We also evaluated TDG expression in patients with adrenocortical tumors (ADR) with and without the p.R337H TP53 mutation. Gene methylation patterns of peripheral blood DNA samples assessed by pyrosequencing revealed no significant differences between the three groups. However, increased TDG expression was observed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR in p.R337H carriers with ADR. Considering the rarity of this phenotype and the relevance of these findings, further studies using a larger sample set are necessary to confirm our results.

  15. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for mitochondrial DNA mutations: analysis of one blastomere suffices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallevelt, Suzanne C E H; Dreesen, Joseph C F M; Coonen, Edith; Paulussen, Aimee D C; Hellebrekers, Debby M E I; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Smeets, Hubert J M; Lindsey, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a reproductive strategy for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation carriers, strongly reducing their risk of affected offspring. Embryos either without the mutation or with mutation load below the phenotypic threshold are transferred to the uterus. Because of incidental heteroplasmy deviations in single blastomere and the relatively limited data available, we so far preferred relying on two blastomeres rather than one. Considering the negative effect of a two-blastomere biopsy protocol compared with a single-blastomere biopsy protocol on live birth delivery rate, we re-evaluated the error rate in our current dataset. For the m.3243A>G mutation, sufficient embryos/blastomeres were available for a powerful analysis. The diagnostic error rate, defined as a potential false-negative result, based on a threshold of 15%, was determined in 294 single blastomeres analysed in 73 embryos of 9 female m.3243A>G mutation carriers. Only one out of 294 single blastomeres (0.34%) would have resulted in a false-negative diagnosis. False-positive diagnoses were not detected. Our findings support a single-blastomere biopsy PGD protocol for the m.3243A>G mutation as the diagnostic error rate is very low. As in the early preimplantation embryo no mtDNA replication seems to occur and the mtDNA is divided randomly among the daughter cells, we conclude this result to be independent of the specific mutation and therefore applicable to all mtDNA mutations. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Electrostatic study of Alanine mutational effects on transcription: application to GATA-3:DNA interaction complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Assaad, Atlal; Dawy, Zaher; Nemer, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Protein-DNA interaction is of fundamental importance in molecular biology, playing roles in functions as diverse as DNA transcription, DNA structure formation, and DNA repair. Protein-DNA association is also important in medicine; understanding Protein-DNA binding kinetics can assist in identifying disease root causes which can contribute to drug development. In this perspective, this work focuses on the transcription process by the GATA Transcription Factor (TF). GATA TF binds to DNA promoter region represented by `G,A,T,A' nucleotides sequence, and initiates transcription of target genes. When proper regulation fails due to some mutations on the GATA TF protein sequence or on the DNA promoter sequence (weak promoter), deregulation of the target genes might lead to various disorders. In this study, we aim to understand the electrostatic mechanism behind GATA TF and DNA promoter interactions, in order to predict Protein-DNA binding in the presence of mutations, while elaborating on non-covalent binding kinetics. To generate a family of mutants for the GATA:DNA complex, we replaced every charged amino acid, one at a time, with a neutral amino acid like Alanine (Ala). We then applied Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations feeding into free energy calculations, for each mutation. These calculations delineate the contribution to binding from each Ala-replaced amino acid in the GATA:DNA interaction. After analyzing the obtained data in view of a two-step model, we are able to identify potential key amino acids in binding. Finally, we applied the model to GATA-3:DNA (crystal structure with PDB-ID: 3DFV) binding complex and validated it against experimental results from the literature.

  17. A Constant Rate of Spontaneous Mutation in DNA-Based Microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, John W.

    1991-08-01

    In terms of evolution and fitness, the most significant spontaneous mutation rate is likely to be that for the entire genome (or its nonfrivolous fraction). Information is now available to calculate this rate for several DNA-based haploid microbes, including bacteriophages with single- or double-stranded DNA, a bacterium, a yeast, and a filamentous fungus. Their genome sizes vary by ≈6500-fold. Their average mutation rates per base pair vary by ≈16,000-fold, whereas their mutation rates per genome vary by only ≈2.5-fold, apparently randomly, around a mean value of 0.0033 per DNA replication. The average mutation rate per base pair is inversely proportional to genome size. Therefore, a nearly invariant microbial mutation rate appears to have evolved. Because this rate is uniform in such diverse organisms, it is likely to be determined by deep general forces, perhaps by a balance between the usually deleterious effects of mutation and the physiological costs of further reducing mutation rates.

  18. TRAIP promotes DNA damage response during genome replication and is mutated in primordial dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Margaret E; Murina, Olga; Leitch, Andrea; Higgs, Martin R; Bicknell, Louise S; Yigit, Gökhan; Blackford, Andrew N; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Mackenzie, Karen J; Reddy, Kaalak; Halachev, Mihail; McGlasson, Sarah; Reijns, Martin A M; Fluteau, Adeline; Martin, Carol-Anne; Sabbioneda, Simone; Elcioglu, Nursel H; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Chessa, Luciana; Maghnie, Mohamad; Salim, Mahmoud; Bober, Michael B; Nürnberg, Peter; Jackson, Stephen P; Hurles, Matthew E; Wollnik, Bernd; Stewart, Grant S; Jackson, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    DNA lesions encountered by replicative polymerases threaten genome stability and cell cycle progression. Here we report the identification of mutations in TRAIP, encoding an E3 RING ubiquitin ligase, in patients with microcephalic primordial dwarfism. We establish that TRAIP relocalizes to sites of DNA damage, where it is required for optimal phosphorylation of H2AX and RPA2 during S-phase in response to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, as well as fork progression through UV-induced DNA lesions. TRAIP is necessary for efficient cell cycle progression and mutations in TRAIP therefore limit cellular proliferation, providing a potential mechanism for microcephaly and dwarfism phenotypes. Human genetics thus identifies TRAIP as a component of the DNA damage response to replication-blocking DNA lesions.

  19. The Mutation Frequency in Different Spike Categories in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenberg, O.; Doll, Hans; Sandfær, J.

    1964-01-01

    After gamma irradiation of barley seeds, a comparison has been made between the chlorophyll-mutant frequencies in X1 spikes that had multicellular bud meristems in the seeds at the time of treatment (denoted as pre-formed spikes) and X1 spikes having no recognizable meristems at the time...

  20. The Number of Overlapping AID Hotspots in Germline IGHV Genes Is Inversely Correlated with Mutation Frequency in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chaohui; Chu, Charles C; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Bagnara, Davide; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; MacCarthy, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The targeting of mutations by Activation-Induced Deaminase (AID) is a key step in generating antibody diversity at the Immunoglobulin (Ig) loci but is also implicated in B-cell malignancies such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). AID has previously been shown to preferentially deaminate WRC (W = A/T, R = A/G) hotspots. WGCW sites, which contain an overlapping WRC hotspot on both DNA strands, mutate at much higher frequency than single hotspots. Human Ig heavy chain (IGHV) genes differ in terms of WGCW numbers, ranging from 4 for IGHV3-48*03 to as many as 12 in IGHV1-69*01. An absence of V-region mutations in CLL patients ("IGHV unmutated", or U-CLL) is associated with a poorer prognosis compared to "IGHV mutated" (M-CLL) patients. The reasons for this difference are still unclear, but it has been noted that particular IGHV genes associate with U-CLL vs M-CLL. For example, patients with IGHV1-69 clones tend to be U-CLL with a poor prognosis, whereas patients with IGHV3-30 tend to be M-CLL and have a better prognosis. Another distinctive feature of CLL is that ~30% of (mostly poor prognosis) patients can be classified into "stereotyped" subsets, each defined by HCDR3 similarity, suggesting selection, possibly for a self-antigen. We analyzed >1000 IGHV genes from CLL patients and found a highly significant statistical relationship between the number of WGCW hotspots in the germline V-region and the observed mutation frequency in patients. However, paradoxically, this correlation was inverse, with V-regions with more WGCW hotspots being less likely to be mutated, i.e., more likely to be U-CLL. The number of WGCW hotspots in particular, are more strongly correlated with mutation frequency than either non-overlapping (WRC) hotspots or more general models of mutability derived from somatic hypermutation data. Furthermore, this correlation is not observed in sequences from the B cell repertoires of normal individuals and those with autoimmune diseases.

  1. Frequency and spectrum of mutations induced by gamma irradiation in single, double and triple dwarf wheats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhonukshe, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    Induced mutation studies were carried with three dwarf wheat varieties viz., ''Sonalika'', ''Chhoti Lerma'' and ''Hira'', considered to be single, double and trible dwarfs, respectively. Gamma-rays were used as a source of irradiation. Frequency of chlorophyll mutations were comparatively low and the spectrum was narrow. Chlorophyll mutations were altogether absent in the variety ''Sonalika''. A very wide spectrum of viable mutations affecting stem, leaf, ear growth habit, maturity and fertility characteristics was observed in the M 2 . The cumulative frequency of all the mutants together was quite high, which varied with the varieties. There were varietal differences in the composition and width of the spectrum induced by gamma-rays. The dwarf mutants having desirable leaf and spike characters were isolated in all the three varieties. (author)

  2. Mutation frequencies in male mice and the estimation of genetic hazards of radiation in men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.L.; Kelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    Estimation of the genetic hazards of ionizing radiation in men is based largely on the frequency of transmitted specific-locus mutations induced in mouse spermatogonial stem cells at low radiation dose rates. The publication of new data on this subject has permitted a fresh review of all the information available. The data continue to show no discrepancy from the interpretation that, although mutation frequency decreases markedly as dose rate is decreased from 90 to 0.8 R/min (1 R = 2.6 x 10/sup -4/ coulombs/kg) there seems to be no further change below 0.8 R/min over the range from that dose rate to 0.0007 R/min. Simple mathematical models are used to compute: (a) a maximum likelihood estimate of the induced mutation frequency at the low dose rates, and (b) a maximum likelihood estimate of the ratio of this to the mutation frequency at high dose rates in the range of 72 to 90 R/min. In the application of these results to the estimation of genetic hazards of radiation in man, the former value can be used to calcualte a doubling dose - i.e., the dose of radiation that induces a mutation frequency equal to the spontaneous frequency. The doubling dose based on the low-dose-rate data compiled here is 110 R. The ratio of the mutation frequency at low dose rate to to that at high dose rate is useful when it becomes necessary to extrapolate from experimental determinations, or from human data, at high dose rates to the expected risk at low dose rates. The ratio derived from the present analysis is 0.33

  3. Diversity and frequency of kdr mutations within Anopheles sinensis populations from Guangxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chan; Feng, Xiangyang; Huang, Zushi; Li, Mei; Qiu, Xinghui

    2016-08-15

    Anopheles sinensis is a major vector of malaria in China and its control is under great threat as the development of insecticide resistance. Voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of several classes of insecticides. Genetic mutations of VGSC have been documented to confer knockdown resistance (kdr) to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and pyrethroids in mosquitoes. To control this vector efficiently, it is important to know the resistance-associated genetic mutations, their distribution frequencies and genealogical relations. Three hundreds and thirteen (313) adults of An. sinensis collected from nine locations across Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region were used. The partial sequence of the An. sinensis voltage gated sodium channel gene (AS-VGSC) containing codon 1014 was sequenced. PHASE2.1 was used to construct the haplotypes of each individual, and the accuracy of haplotypes was further confirmed by clone sequencing. The genealogical relations of kdr mutations in AS-VGSC was analysed using TCS 2.1 and Network 5.0. Sixteen AS-VGSC haplotypes including seven haplotypes carrying non-synonymous mutations at codon 1014, and fifty-five AS-VGSC genotypes were identified from 313 mosquitoes collected from nine geographical locations across Guangxi. The number of haplotypes in each of the nine populations ranged from 5 to 13. The frequency of haplotypes carrying kdr mutations ranged from 2.7 to 80.0 % within the nine populations, of which 1014C was unexpectedly high in the northeast of Guangxi. Genealogical analysis suggested multiple origins of kdr mutations in An. sinensis. Diverse haplotypes of AS-VGSC are distributed in Guangxi. The presence of haplotypes carrying mutations at codon 1014 indicates a risk of pyrethroid and DDT resistance. The kdr mutations show differential distribution geographically, with high frequencies occurred in the northeast of Guangxi. Genealogical analysis suggests multiple origins of kdr mutations in An. sinensis populations

  4. Prevalence of migraine in persons with the 3243A>G mutation in mitochondrial DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, S.; Esserlind, A-L; Andersson, Z

    2016-01-01

    % vs. 6%; P persons with the mDNA 3243A>G mutation was found. This finding suggests a clinical association between a monogenetically inherited disorder......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Over the last three decades mitochondrial dysfunction has been postulated to be a potential mechanism in migraine pathogenesis. The lifetime prevalence of migraine in persons carrying the 3243A>G mutation in mitochondrial DNA was investigated. METHODS: In this cross......-sectional study, 57 mDNA 3243A>G mutation carriers between May 2012 and October 2014 were included. As a control group, a population-based cohort from our epidemiological studies on migraine in Danes was used. History of headache and migraine was obtained by telephone interview, based on a validated semi...

  5. Chemical cleavage reactions of DNA on solid support: application in mutation detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotton Richard GH

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The conventional solution-phase Chemical Cleavage of Mismatch (CCM method is time-consuming, as the protocol requires purification of DNA after each reaction step. This paper describes a new version of CCM to overcome this problem by immobilizing DNA on silica solid supports. Results DNA test samples were loaded on to silica beads and the DNA bound to the solid supports underwent chemical modification reactions with KMnO4 (potassium permanganate and hydroxylamine in 3M TEAC (tetraethylammonium chloride solution. The resulting modified DNA was then simultaneously cleaved by piperidine and removed from the solid supports to afford DNA fragments without the requirement of DNA purification between reaction steps. Conclusions The new solid-phase version of CCM is a fast, cost-effective and sensitive method for detection of mismatches and mutations.

  6. Modification of radiation-induced sex-linked recessive lethal mutation frequency by tocopherol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, C.; Roy, R.M.; Sproule, A.

    1982-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of supplementing culture medium with α-tocopherol acetate on the yield of sex-linked recessive lethal mutants induced by X-irradiation in mature sperm of Drosophila. Although tocopherol treatment of males had no impact on the yield of mutations, a drastic reduction in mutation frequency was observed when irradiated males were mated to females raised and subsequently maintained on tocopherol-enriched diet. (orig./MG)

  7. Rich Medium Composition Affects Escherichia coli Survival, Glycation, and Mutation Frequency during Long-Term Batch Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kram, Karin E; Finkel, Steven E

    2015-07-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli are frequently grown to high density to produce biomolecules for study in the laboratory. To achieve this, cells can be incubated in extremely rich media that increase overall cell yield. In these various media, bacteria may have different metabolic profiles, leading to changes in the amounts of toxic metabolites produced. We have previously shown that stresses experienced during short-term growth can affect the survival of cells during the long-term stationary phase (LTSP). Here, we incubated cells in LB, 2× yeast extract-tryptone (YT), Terrific Broth, or Super Broth medium and monitored survival during the LTSP, as well as other reporters of genetic and physiological change. We observe differential cell yield and survival in all media studied. We propose that differences in long-term survival are the result of changes in the metabolism of components of the media that may lead to increased levels of protein and/or DNA damage. We also show that culture pH and levels of protein glycation, a covalent modification that causes protein damage, affect long-term survival. Further, we measured mutation frequency after overnight incubation and observed a correlation between high mutation frequencies at the end of the log phase and loss of viability after 4 days of LTSP incubation, indicating that mutation frequency is potentially predictive of long-term survival. Since glycation and mutation can be caused by oxidative stress, we measured expression of the oxyR oxidative stress regulator during log-phase growth and found that higher levels of oxyR expression during the log phase are consistent with high mutation frequency and lower cell density during the LTSP. Since these complex rich media are often used when producing large quantities of biomolecules in the laboratory, the observed increase in damage resulting in glycation or mutation may lead to production of a heterogeneous population of plasmids or proteins, which could affect the

  8. Mutational jackpot events generate effective frequency-dependent selection in adapting populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallatschek, Oskar

    The site-frequency spectrum is one the most easily measurable quantities that characterize the genetic diversity of a population. While most neutral models predict that site frequency spectra should decay with increasing frequency, a high-frequency uptick has been reported in many populations. Anomalies in the high-frequency tail are particularly unsettling because the highest frequencies can be measured with greatest accuracy. Here, we show that an uptick in the spectrum of neutral mutations generally arises when mutant frequencies are dominated by rare jackpot events, mutational events with large descendant numbers. This leads to an effective pattern of frequency-dependent selection (or unstable internal equilibrium at one half frequency) that causes an accumulation of high-frequency polymorphic sites. We reproduce the known uptick occurring for recurrent hitchhiking (genetic draft) as well as rapid adaptation, and (in the future) generalize the shape of the high-frequency tail to other scenarios that are dominated by jackpot events, such as frequent range expansions. We also tackle (in the future) the inverse approach to use the high-frequency uptick for learning about the tail of the offspring number distribution. Positively selected alleles need to surpass, typically, an u NSF Career Award (PoLS), NIH NIGMS R01, Simons Foundation.

  9. General misincorporation frequency: Re-evaluation of the fidelity of DNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Li, Bianbian; Liu, Xiaoying; Tang, Hong; Zhuang, Xiyao; Yang, Mingqi; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Huidong; Yang, Chun

    2018-02-19

    DNA replication in cells is performed in the presence of four dNTPs and four rNTPs. In this study, we re-evaluated the fidelity of DNA polymerases using the general misincorporation frequency consisting of three incorrect dNTPs and four rNTPs but not using the traditional special misincorporation frequency with only the three incorrect dNTPs. We analyzed both the general and special misincorporation frequencies of nucleotide incorporation opposite dG, rG, or 8-oxoG by Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage 1 (PaP1) DNA polymerase Gp90 or Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA polymerase Dpo4. Both misincorporation frequencies of other DNA polymerases published were also summarized and analyzed. The general misincorporation frequency is obviously higher than the special misincorporation frequency for many DNA polymerases, indicating the real fidelity of a DNA polymerase should be evaluated using the general misincorporation frequency. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of defective DNA double-strand break repair on mutations and chromosome aberrations in the Chinese hamster cell mutant XR-V15B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbig, R.; Speit, G.; Zdzienicka, M.Z.

    1995-01-01

    The radiosensitive Chinese hamster cell line XR-V15B was used to study the effect of decreased rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) on gene mutations and chromosome aberrations. XR-V15B cells are hypersensitive to the cytotoxic effects of neocarzinostatin (NCS) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Both mutagens induced more chromosome aberrations in XR-V15B cells than in the parental cell strain. The clastogenic action of NCS was characterized by the induction of predominantly chromosome-type aberrations in cells of both strains, whereas MMS induced mainly chromatid aberrations. The frequency of induced gene mutations at the hprt locus was not increased compared to the parental V79 cells when considering the same survival level. Molecular analysis by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of mutants induced by NCS revealed a high frequency of deletions in cells of both cell lines. Methyl methane-sulfonate induced mainly mutations without visible change in the PCR pattern, which probably represent point mutations. Our findings suggest a link between a defect in DNA DSB repair and increased cytotoxic and clastogenic effects. However, a decreased ability to rejoin DNA DSBs does not seem to influence the incidence and types of gene mutations at the hprt locus induced by NCS and MMS. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Episodic weakness due to mitochondrial DNA MT-ATP6/8 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auré, Karine; Dubourg, Odile; Jardel, Claude; Clarysse, Lucie; Sternberg, Damien; Fournier, Emmanuel; Laforêt, Pascal; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Petiot, Philippe; Gervais-Bernard, Hélène; Vial, Christophe; Bedat-Millet, Anne-Laure; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Vandier, Christophe; Fontaine, Bertrand; Lombès, Anne

    2013-11-19

    To report that homoplasmic deleterious mutations in the mitochondrial DNA MT-ATP6/8 genes may be responsible for acute episodes of limb weakness mimicking periodic paralysis due to channelopathies and dramatically responding to acetazolamide. Mitochondrial DNA sequencing and restriction PCR, oxidative phosphorylation functional assays, reactive oxygen species metabolism, and patch-clamp technique in cultured skin fibroblasts. Occurrence of a typical MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) syndrome in a single member of a large pedigree with episodic weakness associated with a later-onset distal motor neuropathy led to the disclosure of 2 deleterious mitochondrial DNA mutations. The MT-ATP6 m.9185T>C p.Leu220Pro mutation, previously associated with Leigh syndrome, was present in all family members, while the MT-TL1 m.3271T>C mutation, a known cause of MELAS syndrome, was observed in the sole patient with MELAS presentation. Significant defect of complexes V and I as well as oxidative stress were observed in both primary fibroblasts and cybrid cells with 100% m.9185T>C mutation. Permanent plasma membrane depolarization and altered permeability to K(+) in fibroblasts provided a link with the paralysis episodes. Screening of 9 patients, based on their clinical phenotype, identified 4 patients with similar deleterious MT-ATP6 mutations (twice m.9185T>C and once m.9176T>C or m.8893T>C). A fifth patient presented with an original potentially deleterious MT-ATP8 mutation (m.8403T>C). All mutations were associated with almost-normal complex V activity but significant oxidative stress and permanent plasma membrane depolarization. Homoplasmic mutations in the MT-ATP6/8 genes may cause episodic weakness responding to acetazolamide treatment.

  12. DNA polymerase η mutational signatures are found in a variety of different types of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozin, Igor B; Goncearenco, Alexander; Lada, Artem G; De, Subhajyoti; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav; Nudelman, German; Panchenko, Anna R; Cooper, David N; Pavlov, Youri I

    2018-01-01

    DNA polymerase (pol) η is a specialized error-prone polymerase with at least two quite different and contrasting cellular roles: to mitigate the genetic consequences of solar UV irradiation, and promote somatic hypermutation in the variable regions of immunoglobulin genes. Misregulation and mistargeting of pol η can compromise genome integrity. We explored whether the mutational signature of pol η could be found in datasets of human somatic mutations derived from normal and cancer cells. A substantial excess of single and tandem somatic mutations within known pol η mutable motifs was noted in skin cancer as well as in many other types of human cancer, suggesting that somatic mutations in A:T bases generated by DNA polymerase η are a common feature of tumorigenesis. Another peculiarity of pol ηmutational signatures, mutations in YCG motifs, led us to speculate that error-prone DNA synthesis opposite methylated CpG dinucleotides by misregulated pol η in tumors might constitute an additional mechanism of cytosine demethylation in this hypermutable dinucleotide.

  13. Effect of Ku80 deficiency on mutation frequencies and spectra at a LacZ reporter locus in mouse tissues and cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita A Busuttil

    Full Text Available Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ is thought to be an important mechanism for preventing the adverse effects of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs and its absence has been associated with premature aging. To investigate the effect of inactivated NHEJ on spontaneous mutation frequencies and spectra in vivo and in cultured cells, we crossed a Ku80-deficient mouse with mice harboring a lacZ-plasmid-based mutation reporter. We analyzed various organs and tissues, as well as cultured embryonic fibroblasts, for mutations at the lacZ locus. When comparing mutant with wild-type mice, we observed a significantly higher number of genome rearrangements in liver and spleen and a significantly lower number of point mutations in liver and brain. The reduced point mutation frequency was not due to a decrease in small deletion mutations thought to be a hallmark of NHEJ, but could be a consequence of increased cellular responses to unrepaired DSBs. Indeed, we found a substantial increase in persistent 53BP1 and gammaH2AX DNA damage foci in Ku80-/- as compared to wild-type liver. Treatment of cultured Ku80-deficient or wild-type embryonic fibroblasts, either proliferating or quiescent, with hydrogen peroxide or bleomycin showed no differences in the number or type of induced genome rearrangements. However, after such treatment, Ku80-deficient cells did show an increased number of persistent DNA damage foci. These results indicate that Ku80-dependent repair of DNA damage is predominantly error-free with the effect of alternative more error-prone pathways creating genome rearrangements only detectable after extended periods of time, i.e., in young adult animals. The observed premature aging likely results from a combination of increased cellular senescence and an increased load of stable, genome rearrangements.

  14. Evolutionary constraints and the neutral theory. [mutation-caused nucleotide substitutions in DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukes, T. H.; Kimura, M.

    1984-01-01

    The neutral theory of molecular evolution postulates that nucleotide substitutions inherently take place in DNA as a result of point mutations followed by random genetic drift. In the absence of selective constraints, the substitution rate reaches the maximum value set by the mutation rate. The rate in globin pseudogenes is about 5 x 10 to the -9th substitutions per site per year in mammals. Rates slower than this indicate the presence of constraints imposed by negative (natural) selection, which rejects and discards deleterious mutations.

  15. Development and applications of Bacillus subtilis test systems for mutagens, involving DNA-repair deficiency and suppressible auxotrophic mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanooka, H.

    1977-01-01

    A mutagen-tester of Bacillus subtilis was constructed and tested with known carcinogens. The parental strain HA101 of Okubo and Yanagida carrying suppressible nonsense mutations in his and met genes was transformed to carry an excision-repair deficiency mutation. The constructed strain TKJ5211 showed a 20-30-fold higher sensitivity for His + reversion than the parental strain when treated with UV and UV-mimetic chemicals but unchanged mutation frequency with X-rays and methyl methanesulfonate. The tester strain was used in a spot test of 30 selected chemicals and also for testing with liver homogenate activation. The results showed an almost equivalent but somewhat broader detection spectrum than the Salmonella typhimurium TA100 system. Another test method used a pair of B. subtilis strains differing in their DNA-repair capacity, i.e. the most UV-sensitive mutant HJ-15 and a wild-type strain, to detect repair-dependent DNA damage produced by chemicals. Spores could be used in either test

  16. Plasma circulating tumor DNA as an alternative to metastatic biopsies for mutational analysis in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothé, F; Laes, J-F; Lambrechts, D; Smeets, D; Vincent, D; Maetens, M; Fumagalli, D; Michiels, S; Drisis, S; Moerman, C; Detiffe, J-P; Larsimont, D; Awada, A; Piccart, M; Sotiriou, C; Ignatiadis, M

    2014-10-01

    Molecular screening programs use next-generation sequencing (NGS) of cancer gene panels to analyze metastatic biopsies. We interrogated whether plasma could be used as an alternative to metastatic biopsies. The Ion AmpliSeq™ Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 (Ion Torrent), covering 2800 COSMIC mutations from 50 cancer genes was used to analyze 69 tumor (primary/metastases) and 31 plasma samples from 17 metastatic breast cancer patients. The targeted coverage for tumor DNA was ×1000 and for plasma cell-free DNA ×25 000. Whole blood normal DNA was used to exclude germline variants. The Illumina technology was used to confirm observed mutations. Evaluable NGS results were obtained for 60 tumor and 31 plasma samples from 17 patients. When tumor samples were analyzed, 12 of 17 (71%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 44% to 90%) patients had ≥1 mutation (median 1 mutation per patient, range 0-2 mutations) in either p53, PIK3CA, PTEN, AKT1 or IDH2 gene. When plasma samples were analyzed, 12 of 17 (71%, 95% CI: 44-90%) patients had ≥1 mutation (median 1 mutation per patient, range 0-2 mutations) in either p53, PIK3CA, PTEN, AKT1, IDH2 and SMAD4. All mutations were confirmed. When we focused on tumor and plasma samples collected at the same time-point, we observed that, in four patients, no mutation was identified in either tumor or plasma; in nine patients, the same mutations was identified in tumor and plasma; in two patients, a mutation was identified in tumor but not in plasma; in two patients, a mutation was identified in plasma but not in tumor. Thus, in 13 of 17 (76%, 95% CI 50% to 93%) patients, tumor and plasma provided concordant results whereas in 4 of 17 (24%, 95% CI 7% to 50%) patients, the results were discordant, providing complementary information. Plasma can be prospectively tested as an alternative to metastatic biopsies in molecular screening programs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology

  17. Determining the Location of DNA Modification and Mutation Caused by UVB Light in Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    reads were then processed to determine the dinucleotide composition on the 5’ end by separating the Watson and Crick strands, and the dinucleotide...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0333 TITLE: Determining the Location of DNA ...COVERED 15 August 2012 – 14 August 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Determining the Location of DNA Modification and Mutation Caused

  18. Does aerobic exercises induce mtDNA mutation in human blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of eight weeks aerobic training on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation in human blood leucocytes. Twenty untrained healthy students (training group: n =10, age = 20.7±1.5 yrs, weight = 67.7±10 kg, BF% = 17.5±7.35 & control group: n =10, age = 21±1.3 yrs, weight ...

  19. Somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations in cancer escape purifying selection and high pathogenicity mutations lead to the oncocytic phenotype: pathogenicity analysis of reported somatic mtDNA mutations in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Luísa; Soares, Pedro; Máximo, Valdemar; Samuels, David C

    2012-01-01

    The presence of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in cancer cells has been interpreted in controversial ways, ranging from random neutral accumulation of mutations, to positive selection for high pathogenicity, or conversely to purifying selection against high pathogenicity variants as occurs at the population level. Here we evaluated the predicted pathogenicity of somatic mtDNA mutations described in cancer and compare these to the distribution of variations observed in the global human population and all possible protein variations that could occur in human mtDNA. We focus on oncocytic tumors, which are clearly associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The protein variant pathogenicity was predicted using two computational methods, MutPred and SNPs&GO. The pathogenicity score of the somatic mtDNA variants were significantly higher in oncocytic tumors compared to non-oncocytic tumors. Variations in subunits of Complex I of the electron transfer chain were significantly more common in tumors with the oncocytic phenotype, while variations in Complex V subunits were significantly more common in non-oncocytic tumors. Our results show that the somatic mtDNA mutations reported over all tumors are indistinguishable from a random selection from the set of all possible amino acid variations, and have therefore escaped the effects of purifying selection that act strongly at the population level. We show that the pathogenicity of somatic mtDNA mutations is a determining factor for the oncocytic phenotype. The opposite associations of the Complex I and Complex V variants with the oncocytic and non-oncocytic tumors implies that low mitochondrial membrane potential may play an important role in determining the oncocytic phenotype

  20. Effect of cold atmospheric pressure He-plasma jet on DNA change and mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaopromsiri, C.; Yu, L. D.; Sarapirom, S.; Thopan, P.; Boonyawan, D.

    2015-12-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet (CAPPJ) effect on DNA change was studied for assessment of its safety. The experiment utilized a home-developed CAPPJ using 100% helium to directly treat naked DNA plasmid pGFP (plasmid green fluorescent protein). A traversal electric field was applied to separate the plasma components and both dry and wet sample conditions were adopted to investigate various factor roles in changing DNA. Plasma species were measured by using optical emission spectroscopy. DNA topological form change was analyzed by gel electrophoresis. The plasma jet treated DNA was transferred into bacterial Escherichia coli cells for observing mutation. The results show that the He-CAPPJ could break DNA strands due to actions from charge, radicals and neutrals and potentially cause genetic modification of living cells.

  1. Effect of cold atmospheric pressure He-plasma jet on DNA change and mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaopromsiri, C. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Sarapirom, S. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Bang Khen, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Thopan, P.; Boonyawan, D. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2015-12-15

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet (CAPPJ) effect on DNA change was studied for assessment of its safety. The experiment utilized a home-developed CAPPJ using 100% helium to directly treat naked DNA plasmid pGFP (plasmid green fluorescent protein). A traversal electric field was applied to separate the plasma components and both dry and wet sample conditions were adopted to investigate various factor roles in changing DNA. Plasma species were measured by using optical emission spectroscopy. DNA topological form change was analyzed by gel electrophoresis. The plasma jet treated DNA was transferred into bacterial Escherichia coli cells for observing mutation. The results show that the He-CAPPJ could break DNA strands due to actions from charge, radicals and neutrals and potentially cause genetic modification of living cells.

  2. Mutation analysis with random DNA identifiers (MARDI) catalogs Pig-a mutations in heterogeneous pools of CD48-deficient T cells derived from DMBA-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revollo, Javier R; Crabtree, Nathaniel M; Pearce, Mason G; Pacheco-Martinez, M Monserrat; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N

    2016-03-01

    Identification of mutations induced by xenotoxins is a common task in the field of genetic toxicology. Mutations are often detected by clonally expanding potential mutant cells and genotyping each viable clone by Sanger sequencing. Such a "clone-by-clone" approach requires significant time and effort, and sometimes is even impossible to implement. Alternative techniques for efficient mutation identification would greatly benefit both basic and regulatory genetic toxicology research. Here, we report the development of Mutation Analysis with Random DNA Identifiers (MARDI), a novel high-fidelity Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) approach that circumvents clonal expansion and directly catalogs mutations in pools of mutant cells. MARDI uses oligonucleotides carrying Random DNA Identifiers (RDIs) to tag progenitor DNA molecules before PCR amplification, enabling clustering of descendant DNA molecules and eliminating NGS- and PCR-induced sequencing artifacts. When applied to the Pig-a cDNA analysis of heterogeneous pools of CD48-deficient T cells derived from DMBA-treated rats, MARDI detected nearly all Pig-a mutations that were previously identified by conventional clone-by-clone analysis and discovered many additional ones consistent with DMBA exposure: mostly A to T transversions, with the mutated A located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. DNA damage by reactive species: Mechanisms, mutation and repair

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... crosslinks can also affect the structure of DNA significantly. ... H2O2 by converting it into water, reaction of H2O2 with ..... Damaged nucleotide flipping by (a) AGT due to intercalation of an amino acid (Arg128) (pdb 1t38) and ...

  4. Evaluation the frequency of factor V Leiden mutation in pregnant women with preeclampsia syndrome in an Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Azinfar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Role of genetic factors in etiology of preeclampsia is not confirmed yet.Objective: Gene defect frequency varies in different geographic areas as well as ethnic groups. In this study, the role of factor V Leiden mutation in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia syndrome among the pregnant population of northern shore of Persian Gulf in Iran, were considered.Materials and Methods: Between Jan. 2008 and Dec. 2009, in a nested case control study, pregnant women with preeclampsia (N=198 as cases and healthy (N=201 as controls were enrolled in the study. DNA were extracted from 10 CC peripheral blood and analyzed for presence of factor V Leiden mutation in these subjects. The maternal and neonatal outcomes of pregnancy according to the distribution of factor V Leiden were also compared among cases.Results: In total, 17(8.6% of cases and 2(1% of controls showed the factor V Leiden mutation. The incidence of factor V Leiden was typically higher in preeclamptic women than control group (OR: 9.34 %95 CI: 2.12-41.01. There was no difference in incidence rate of preterm delivery< 37 weeks (OR: 1.23 %95 CI: 0.38-4.02, very early preterm delivery<32 weeks (OR: 1.00 %95 CI: 0.12-8.46, intra uterine fetal growth restriction (IUGR (OR: 1.32 %95 CI: 0.15-11.30 ,and the rate of cesarean section (OR: 0.88 %95 CI: 0.29-2.62 among cases based on the prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation.Conclusion: The pregnant women with factor V Leiden mutation are prone for preeclampsia syndrome during pregnancy, but this risk factor was not correlated to pregnancy complications in the studied women

  5. A Comparative Study for Detection of EGFR Mutations in Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Korean Clinical Diagnostic Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonjung Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid biopsies to genotype the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR for targeted therapy have been implemented in clinical decision-making in the field of lung cancer, but harmonization of detection methods is still scarce among clinical laboratories. We performed a pilot external quality assurance (EQA scheme to harmonize circulating tumor DNA testing among laboratories. For EQA, we created materials containing different levels of spiked cell-free DNA (cfDNA in normal plasma. The limit of detection (LOD of the cobas® EGFR Mutation Test v2 (Roche Molecular Systems was also evaluated. From November 2016 to June 2017, seven clinical diagnostic laboratories participated in the EQA program. The majority (98.94% of results obtained using the cobas assay and next-generation sequencing (NGS were acceptable. Quantitative results from the cobas assay were positively correlated with allele frequencies derived from digital droplet PCR measurements and showed good reproducibility among laboratories. The LOD of the cobas assay was 5~27 copies/mL for p.E746_A750del (exon 19 deletion, 35~70 copies/mL for p.L858R, 18~36 copies/mL for p.T790M, and 15~31 copies/mL for p.A767_V769dup (exon 20 insertion. Deep sequencing of materials (>100,000X depth of coverage resulted in detection of low-level targets present at frequencies of 0.06~0.13%. Our results indicate that the cobas assay is a reliable and rapid method for detecting EGFR mutations in plasma cfDNA. Careful interpretation is particularly important for p.T790M detection in the setting of relapse. Individual laboratories should optimize NGS performance to maximize clinical utility.

  6. Studies of human mutation rates: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.

    1988-01-01

    Progress was recorded between January 1 and July 1, 1987 on a project entitled ''Studies of Human Mutation Rates''. Studies underway include methodology for studying mutation at the DNA level, algorithms for automated analyses of two-dimensional polyacrylamide DNA gels, theoretical and applied population genetics, and studies of mutation frequency in A-bomb survivors

  7. Running on empty: does mitochondrial DNA mutation limit replicative lifespan in yeast?: Mutations that increase the division rate of cells lacking mitochondrial DNA also extend replicative lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Cory D

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations escalate with increasing age in higher organisms. However, it has so far been difficult to experimentally determine whether mtDNA mutation merely correlates with age or directly limits lifespan. A recent study shows that budding yeast can also lose functional mtDNA late in life. Interestingly, independent studies of replicative lifespan (RLS) and of mtDNA-deficient cells show that the same mutations can increase both RLS and the division rate of yeast lacking the mitochondrial genome. These exciting, parallel findings imply a potential causal relationship between mtDNA mutation and replicative senescence. Furthermore, these results suggest more efficient methods for discovering genes that determine lifespan. Copyright © 2011 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Survey on the frequency of somatic mutations in A-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Mitoshi

    1992-01-01

    Several methods have recently been established for quantitatively detecting somatic cell mutations on a specific locus using human blood cells. These methods have enabled the biological estimation of A-bomb radiation doses in surveys on somatic cell mutations. This paper outlines HPRT, GPA, and TCR assays used to measure somatic cell mutations, focusing on the outcome in A-bomb survivors. HPRT assay is based on colony formation with interleukin-2. The frequency of HPRT mutant cells was significantly increased with advancing age in A-bomb survivors and was positively correlated with the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes. There was also a significantly positive correlation between HPRT mutant cell frequencies and DS86 estimated doses, although the slope was slow. In GPA assay, flow cytometric measurements of fluorescence-labeled erythrocytes are used to detect somatic cell mutations. There was a positive correlation between GPA mutant cell frequencies and age in A-bomb survivors. The GPA mutant cell frequencies showed much more positive correlation with lymphocyte chromosomal aberration frequencies than the HPRT mutant cell frequencies. When anti-CD3 antibody and anti-CD4 antibody are labeled with different fluorescences and are analyzed by using flow cytometry, TCR mutant cells having CD3 - 4 + can be detected. When the frequency of TCR mutant cells was examined in 342 A-bomb survivors, it did not correlate with radiation doses. This implies that TCR assay may be unadequate for biological estimation of A-bomb radiation doses throughout a lifetime of A-bomb survivors, because TCR mutant cells seems to be unable to live for a long time due to national selection. (N.K.)

  9. Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome due to mutations in the RRM2B gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Belén; Area, Estela; Flanigan, Kevin M; Ganesh, Jaya; Jayakar, Parul; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Coku, Jorida; Naini, Ali; Shanske, Sara; Tanji, Kurenai; Hirano, Michio; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2008-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome (MDS) is characterized by a reduction in mtDNA copy number and has been associated with mutations in eight nuclear genes, including enzymes involved in mitochondrial nucleotide metabolism (POLG, TK2, DGUOK, SUCLA2, SUCLG1, PEO1) and MPV17. Recently, mutations in the RRM2B gene, encoding the p53-controlled ribonucleotide reductase subunit, have been described in seven infants from four families, who presented with various combinations of hypotonia, tubulopathy, seizures, respiratory distress, diarrhea, and lactic acidosis. All children died before 4 months of age. We sequenced the RRM2B gene in three unrelated cases with unexplained severe mtDNA depletion. The first patient developed intractable diarrhea, profound weakness, respiratory distress, and died at 3 months. The other two unrelated patients had a much milder phenotype and are still alive at ages 27 and 36 months. All three patients had lactic acidosis and severe depletion of mtDNA in muscle. Muscle histochemistry showed RRF and COX deficiency. Sequencing the RRM2B gene revealed three missense mutations and two single nucleotide deletions in exons 6, 8, and 9, confirming that RRM2B mutations are important causes of MDS and that the clinical phenotype is heterogeneous and not invariably fatal in infancy.

  10. CSF studies facilitate DNA diagnosis in familial Alzheimer's disease due to a presenilin-1 mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bot, Susanne T; Kremer, H P H; Dooijes, Dennis; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2009-01-01

    In sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis is becoming increasingly relevant to establish an early diagnosis. We present a case of familial AD due to a presenilin-1 mutation in which CSF studies suggested appropriate DNA diagnostics. A 38 year old Dutch man presented

  11. Fidelity and Mutational Spectrum of Pfu DNA Polymerase on a Human Mitochondrial DNA Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Paulo; Kim, Andrea; Khrapko, Konstantin; Thilly, William G.

    1997-01-01

    The study of rare genetic changes in human tissues requires specialized techniques. Point mutations at fractions at or below 10−6 must be observed to discover even the most prominent features of the point mutational spectrum. PCR permits the increase in number of mutant copies but does so at the expense of creating many additional mutations or “PCR noise”. Thus, each DNA sequence studied must be characterized with regard to the DNA polymerase and conditions used to avoid interpreting a PCR-generated mutation as one arising in human tissue. The thermostable DNA polymerase derived from Pyrococcus furiosus designated Pfu has the highest fidelity of any DNA thermostable polymerase studied to date, and this property recommends it for analyses of tissue mutational spectra. Here, we apply constant denaturant capillary electrophoresis (CDCE) to separate and isolate the products of DNA amplification. This new strategy permitted direct enumeration and identification of point mutations created by Pfu DNA polymerase in a 96-bp low melting domain of a human mitochondrial sequence despite the very low mutant fractions generated in the PCR process. This sequence, containing part of the tRNA glycine and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 genes, is the target of our studies of mitochondrial mutagenesis in human cells and tissues. Incorrectly synthesized sequences were separated from the wild type as mutant/wild-type heteroduplexes by sequential enrichment on CDCE. An artificially constructed mutant was used as an internal standard to permit calculation of the mutant fraction. Our study found that the average error rate (mutations per base pair duplication) of Pfu was 6.5 × 10−7, and five of its more frequent mutations (hot spots) consisted of three transversions (GC → TA, AT → TA, and AT → CG), one transition (AT → GC), and one 1-bp deletion (in an AAAAAA sequence). To achieve an even higher sensitivity, the amount of Pfu-induced mutants must be

  12. High frequency of mutation G377S in Brazilian type 3 Gaucher disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rozenberg

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease (GD, the most prevalent lysosome storage disorder, presents an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. It is a paradigm for therapeutic intervention in medical genetics due to the existence of effective enzyme replacement therapy. We report here the analysis of GD in 262 unrelated Brazilian patients, carried out in order to establish the frequency of the most common mutations and to provide prognostic information based on genotype-phenotype correlations. Among 247 type 1 GD patients, mutation N370S was detected in 47% of all the alleles, but N370S/N370S homozygosity was found in only 10% of the patients, a much lower frequency than expected, suggesting that most individuals presenting this genotype may not receive medical attention. Recombinant alleles were detected at a high frequency: 44% of the chromosomes bearing mutation L444P had other mutations derived from the pseudogene sequence, present in 25% of patients. Three neuronopathic type 2 patients were homozygous for L444P, all presenting additional mutations (E326K or recombinant alleles that probably lead to the more severe phenotypes. Six children, classified as type 1 GD patients, had a L444P/L444P genotype, showing that neuronopathic symptoms may only manifest later in life. This would indicate the need for a higher treatment dose during enzyme replacement therapy. Finally, mutation G377S was present in 4 homozygous type 1 patients and also in compound heterozygosity in 5 (42% type 3 patients. These findings indicate that G377S cannot be unambiguously classified as mild and suggest an allele-dose effect for this mutation.

  13. Pigmentary retinopathy associated with the mitochondrial DNA 3243 point mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue, C M; Mitchell, P; Crimmins, D S; Moshegov, C; Byrne, E; Morris, J G

    1997-10-01

    Fourteen patients from four unrelated families were studied to determine the prevalence of retinal pigmentary abnormalities associated with the MELAS A to G 3243 point mutation. Neurologic and ophthalmic examinations, retinal photography, pattern shift visual evoked potentials, and electroretinography were performed in all patients. Eight of the 14 patients had retinal pigmentary abnormalities characterized by symmetric areas of depigmentation involving predominantly the posterior pole and midperipheral retina. None of the patients had optic atrophy and only one patient with pigmentary retinal abnormalities had impaired visual acuity. None of the diabetic subjects (n = 6) had signs of diabetic retinopathy. Fluorescein angiography demonstrated mottled hyper- and hypofluorescent areas indicating multiple window defects in the retinal pigmentary epithelium. Visual evoked potentials showed delayed P100 responses in four of the eight patients with retinal pigmentary abnormalities. We conclude that there is a high prevalence of retinal pigmentary abnormalities in patients with MELAS A to G 3243 point mutation. These abnormalities are usually asymptomatic and best detected by retinal photography.

  14. Inherited and environmentally induced differences in mutation frequencies between wild strains of Sordaria fimicola from "Evolution Canyon".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, B C; Saleem, M; Scott, W; Thapa, N; Nevo, E

    1998-05-01

    We have studied whether there is natural genetic variation for mutation frequencies, and whether any such variation is environment-related. Mutation frequencies differed significantly between wild strains of the fungus Sordaria fimicola isolated from a harsher or a milder microscale environment in "Evolution Canyon," Israel. Strains from the harsher, drier, south-facing slope had higher frequencies of new spontaneous mutations and of accumulated mutations than strains from the milder, lusher, north-facing slope. Collective total mutation frequencies over many loci for ascospore pigmentation were 2.3, 3.5 and 4.4% for three strains from the south-facing slope, and 0.9, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 and 1.3% for five strains from the north-facing slope. Some of this between-slope difference was inherited through two generations of selfing, with average spontaneous mutation frequencies of 1.9% for south-facing slope strains and 0.8% for north-facing slope strains. The remainder was caused by different frequencies of mutations arising in the original environments. There was also significant heritable genetic variation in mutation frequencies within slopes. Similar between-slope differences were found for ascospore germination-resistance to acriflavine, with much higher frequencies in strains from the south-facing slope. Such inherited variation provides a basis for natural selection for optimum mutation rates in each environment.

  15. Detection of somatic mutations by high-resolution DNA melting (HRM) analysis in multiple cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Bosquet, Jesus; Calcei, Jacob; Wei, Jun S; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Sherman, Mark E; Hewitt, Stephen; Vockley, Joseph; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah P; Khan, Javed; Chanock, Stephen

    2011-01-17

    Identification of somatic mutations in cancer is a major goal for understanding and monitoring the events related to cancer initiation and progression. High resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis represents a fast, post-PCR high-throughput method for scanning somatic sequence alterations in target genes. The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis for tumor mutation screening in a range of tumor samples, which included 216 frozen pediatric small rounded blue-cell tumors as well as 180 paraffin-embedded tumors from breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers (60 of each). HRM analysis was performed in exons of the following candidate genes known to harbor established commonly observed mutations: PIK3CA, ERBB2, KRAS, TP53, EGFR, BRAF, GATA3, and FGFR3. Bi-directional sequencing analysis was used to determine the accuracy of the HRM analysis. For the 39 mutations observed in frozen samples, the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis were 97% and 87%, respectively. There were 67 mutation/variants in the paraffin-embedded samples, and the sensitivity and specificity for the HRM analysis were 88% and 80%, respectively. Paraffin-embedded samples require higher quantity of purified DNA for high performance. In summary, HRM analysis is a promising moderate-throughput screening test for mutations among known candidate genomic regions. Although the overall accuracy appears to be better in frozen specimens, somatic alterations were detected in DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded samples.

  16. Detection of somatic mutations by high-resolution DNA melting (HRM analysis in multiple cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Gonzalez-Bosquet

    Full Text Available Identification of somatic mutations in cancer is a major goal for understanding and monitoring the events related to cancer initiation and progression. High resolution melting (HRM curve analysis represents a fast, post-PCR high-throughput method for scanning somatic sequence alterations in target genes. The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis for tumor mutation screening in a range of tumor samples, which included 216 frozen pediatric small rounded blue-cell tumors as well as 180 paraffin-embedded tumors from breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers (60 of each. HRM analysis was performed in exons of the following candidate genes known to harbor established commonly observed mutations: PIK3CA, ERBB2, KRAS, TP53, EGFR, BRAF, GATA3, and FGFR3. Bi-directional sequencing analysis was used to determine the accuracy of the HRM analysis. For the 39 mutations observed in frozen samples, the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis were 97% and 87%, respectively. There were 67 mutation/variants in the paraffin-embedded samples, and the sensitivity and specificity for the HRM analysis were 88% and 80%, respectively. Paraffin-embedded samples require higher quantity of purified DNA for high performance. In summary, HRM analysis is a promising moderate-throughput screening test for mutations among known candidate genomic regions. Although the overall accuracy appears to be better in frozen specimens, somatic alterations were detected in DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded samples.

  17. Mutations in the DNA methyltransferase gene DNMT3A cause an overgrowth syndrome with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Seal, Sheila; Ruark, Elise; Harmer, Jenny; Ramsay, Emma; Del Vecchio Duarte, Silvana; Zachariou, Anna; Hanks, Sandra; O'Brien, Eleanor; Aksglaede, Lise; Baralle, Diana; Dabir, Tabib; Gener, Blanca; Goudie, David; Homfray, Tessa; Kumar, Ajith; Pilz, Daniela T; Selicorni, Angelo; Temple, I Karen; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Yachelevich, Naomi; van Montfort, Robert; Rahman, Nazneen

    2014-04-01

    Overgrowth disorders are a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by increased growth parameters and other variable clinical features such as intellectual disability and facial dysmorphism. To identify new causes of human overgrowth, we performed exome sequencing in ten proband-parent trios and detected two de novo DNMT3A mutations. We identified 11 additional de novo mutations by sequencing DNMT3A in a further 142 individuals with overgrowth. The mutations alter residues in functional DNMT3A domains, and protein modeling suggests that they interfere with domain-domain interactions and histone binding. Similar mutations were not present in 1,000 UK population controls (13/152 cases versus 0/1,000 controls; P < 0.0001). Mutation carriers had a distinctive facial appearance, intellectual disability and greater height. DNMT3A encodes a DNA methyltransferase essential for establishing methylation during embryogenesis and is commonly somatically mutated in acute myeloid leukemia. Thus, DNMT3A joins an emerging group of epigenetic DNA- and histone-modifying genes associated with both developmental growth disorders and hematological malignancies.

  18. The prognostic value of KRAS mutated plasma DNA in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Anneli Dowler; Garm Spindler, Karen-Lise; Pallisgaard, Niels

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases worldwide and associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. New agents targeting the epidermal growth factor system are emerging, but only a subgroup of the patients will benefit from the therapy. Cell free DNA (cf......DNA) in the blood allows for tumour specific analyses, including KRAS-mutations, and the aim of the study was to investigate the possible prognostic value of plasma mutated KRAS (pmKRAS) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with newly diagnosed, advanced NSCLC eligible....... RESULTS: The study included 246 patients receiving a minimum of 1 treatment cycle, and all but four were evaluable for response according to RECIST. Forty-three patients (17.5%) presented with a KRAS mutation. OS was 8.9 months and PFS by intention to treat 5.4 months. Patients with a detectable plasma...

  19. Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce CCL20 up-regulation promoting tumorigenic phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sligh, James [Department of Medicine—Dermatology Division, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Janda, Jaroslav [University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Jandova, Jana, E-mail: jjandova@email.arizona.edu [Department of Medicine—Dermatology Division, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Alterations in mitochondrial DNA are commonly found in various human cancers. • Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce up-regulation of chemokine CCL20. • Increased growth and motility of mtBALB cells is associated with CCL20 levels. • mtDNA changes in BALB induce in vivo tumor growth through CCL20 up-regulation. • Mutations in mitochondrial DNA play important roles in keratinocyte neoplasia. - Abstract: mtDNA mutations are common in human cancers and are thought to contribute to the process of neoplasia. We examined the role of mtDNA mutations in skin cancer by generating fibroblast cybrids harboring a mutation in the gene encoding the mitochondrial tRNA for arginine. This somatic mutation (9821insA) was previously reported in UV-induced hyperkeratotic skin tumors in hairless mice and confers specific tumorigenic phenotypes to mutant cybrids. Microarray analysis revealed and RT-PCR along with Western blot analysis confirmed the up-regulation of CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 in mtBALB haplotype containing the mt-Tr 9821insA allele compared to wild type mtB6 haplotype. Based on reported role of CCL20 in cancer progression we examined whether the hyper-proliferation and enhanced motility of mtBALB haplotype would be associated with CCL20 levels. Treatment of both genotypes with recombinant CCL20 (rmCCL20) resulted in enhanced growth and motility of mtB6 cybrids. Furthermore, the acquired somatic alteration increased the in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids through the up-regulation of CCL20 since neutralizing antibody significantly decreased in vivo tumor growth of these cells; and tumors from anti-CCL20 treated mice injected with mtBALB cybrids showed significantly decreased CCL20 levels. When rmCCL20 or mtBALB cybrids were used as chemotactic stimuli, mtB6 cybrids showed increased motility while anti-CCL20 antibody decreased the migration and in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids. Moreover, the inhibitors of MAPK signaling and NF

  20. C282Y and H63D Mutation Frequencies in a Population from Central Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Alvarez

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the frequency of hereditary hemochromatosis gene mutations, C282Y and H63D, from 125 autochthonous blood donors originating from a Central region of Spain, to provide epidemiological data about HFE gene in the Iberian Peninsula.

  1. Rapid detection of ERG11 gene mutations in clinical Candida albicans isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole by rolling circle amplification and DNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis David

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amino acid substitutions in the target enzyme Erg11p of azole antifungals contribute to clinically-relevant azole resistance in Candida albicans. A simple molecular method for rapid detection of ERG11 gene mutations would be an advantage as a screening tool to identify potentially-resistant strains and to track their movement. To complement DNA sequencing, we developed a padlock probe and rolling circle amplification (RCA-based method to detect a series of mutations in the C. albicans ERG11 gene using "reference" azole-resistant isolates with known mutations. The method was then used to estimate the frequency of ERG11 mutations and their type in 25 Australian clinical C. albicans isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole and in 23 fluconazole-susceptible isolates. RCA results were compared DNA sequencing. Results The RCA assay correctly identified all ERG11 mutations in eight "reference" C. albicans isolates. When applied to 48 test strains, the RCA method showed 100% agreement with DNA sequencing where an ERG11 mutation-specific probe was used. Of 20 different missense mutations detected by sequencing in 24 of 25 (96% isolates with reduced fluconazole susceptibility, 16 were detected by RCA. Five missense mutations were detected by both methods in 18 of 23 (78% fluconazole-susceptible strains. DNA sequencing revealed that mutations in non-susceptible isolates were all due to homozygous nucleotide changes. With the exception of the mutations leading to amino acid substitution E266D, those in fluconazole-susceptible strains were heterozygous. Amino acid substitutions common to both sets of isolates were D116E, E266D, K128T, V437I and V488I. Substitutions unique to isolates with reduced fluconazole susceptibility were G464 S (n = 4 isolates, G448E (n = 3, G307S (n = 3, K143R (n = 3 and Y123H, S405F and R467K (each n = 1. DNA sequencing revealed a novel substitution, G450V, in one isolate. Conclusion The sensitive RCA

  2. Mitochondrial DNA triplication and punctual mutations in patients with mitochondrial neuromuscular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna, E-mail: emna.mkaouar@gmail.com [Département des Sciences de la Vie, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax (Tunisia); Felhi, Rahma; Tabebi, Mouna [Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire Humaine, Faculté de Médecine de Sfax, Université de Sfax (Tunisia); Alila-Fersi, Olfa; Chamkha, Imen [Département des Sciences de la Vie, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax (Tunisia); Maalej, Marwa; Ammar, Marwa [Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire Humaine, Faculté de Médecine de Sfax, Université de Sfax (Tunisia); Kammoun, Fatma [Service de pédiatrie, C.H.U. Hedi Chaker de Sfax (Tunisia); Keskes, Leila [Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire Humaine, Faculté de Médecine de Sfax, Université de Sfax (Tunisia); Hachicha, Mongia [Service de pédiatrie, C.H.U. Hedi Chaker de Sfax (Tunisia); Fakhfakh, Faiza, E-mail: faiza.fakhfakh02@gmail.com [Département des Sciences de la Vie, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax (Tunisia)

    2016-04-29

    Mitochondrial diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders caused by the impairment of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system which have been associated with various mutations of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear gene mutations. The clinical phenotypes are very diverse and the spectrum is still expanding. As brain and muscle are highly dependent on OXPHOS, consequently, neurological disorders and myopathy are common features of mtDNA mutations. Mutations in mtDNA can be classified into three categories: large-scale rearrangements, point mutations in tRNA or rRNA genes and point mutations in protein coding genes. In the present report, we screened mitochondrial genes of complex I, III, IV and V in 2 patients with mitochondrial neuromuscular disorders. The results showed the presence the pathogenic heteroplasmic m.9157G>A variation (A211T) in the MT-ATP6 gene in the first patient. We also reported the first case of triplication of 9 bp in the mitochondrial NC7 region in Africa and Tunisia, in association with the novel m.14924T>C in the MT-CYB gene in the second patient with mitochondrial neuromuscular disorder. - Highlights: • We reported 2 patients with mitochondrial neuromuscular disorders. • The heteroplasmic MT-ATP6 9157G>A variation was reported. • A triplication of 9 bp in the mitochondrial NC7 region was detected. • The m.14924T>C transition (S60P) in the MT-CYB gene was found.

  3. Endurance exercise rescues progeroid aging and induces systemic mitochondrial rejuvenation in mtDNA mutator mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Adeel; Bourgeois, Jacqueline M.; Ogborn, Daniel I.; Little, Jonathan P.; Hettinga, Bart P.; Akhtar, Mahmood; Thompson, James E.; Melov, Simon; Mocellin, Nicholas J.; Kujoth, Gregory C.; Prolla, Tomas A.; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    A causal role for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutagenesis in mammalian aging is supported by recent studies demonstrating that the mtDNA mutator mouse, harboring a defect in the proofreading-exonuclease activity of mitochondrial polymerase gamma, exhibits accelerated aging phenotypes characteristic of human aging, systemic mitochondrial dysfunction, multisystem pathology, and reduced lifespan. Epidemiologic studies in humans have demonstrated that endurance training reduces the risk of chronic diseases and extends life expectancy. Whether endurance exercise can attenuate the cumulative systemic decline observed in aging remains elusive. Here we show that 5 mo of endurance exercise induced systemic mitochondrial biogenesis, prevented mtDNA depletion and mutations, increased mitochondrial oxidative capacity and respiratory chain assembly, restored mitochondrial morphology, and blunted pathological levels of apoptosis in multiple tissues of mtDNA mutator mice. These adaptations conferred complete phenotypic protection, reduced multisystem pathology, and prevented premature mortality in these mice. The systemic mitochondrial rejuvenation through endurance exercise promises to be an effective therapeutic approach to mitigating mitochondrial dysfunction in aging and related comorbidities. PMID:21368114

  4. [The mutations of the D-loop hypervariable region II and hypervariable region III of mitochondrial DNA in oral squamous cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Zhong; Jia, Mu-Yun; Yuan, Rong-Tao; Han, Guo-Dong; Bu, Ling-Xue

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the frequency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop hypervariable region II (HVR II) and hypervariable region III (HVR III) mutations in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and their correlation to provide the new targets for the prevention and treatment of OSCC. The D-loop HVR II and HVR III regions of mtDNA in seven cases with OSCC tissues, matched with paracancerous tissues and normal mucosa tissues from the same case, were amplified by polymerase chain raction (PCR), then were detected by direct sequencing to find the mutantsites after the comparison of all sequencing results with the mtDNA Cambridge sequence in the GenBank database. 82 (56 species) nucleotide changes, with 51(26 species) nucleotide polymorphism, were found after the comparison of all sequencing results with the mtDNA Cambridge sequence in the GenBank database. 31(30 species) mutations, with 21 located within the HVR II and HVR III regions, were found in 3 tumor tissue samples, their paracancerous and normal mucosa tissue were found more polymorphic changes but no mutation. The mtDNA D-loop HVR II and HVR III regions mutation rate was 42.9% (3/7) in OSCC. The mtDNA D-loop HVR II and HVR III regions were highly polymorphic and mutable regions in OSCC. It suggested that the D-loop HVR II and HVR III regions of mtDNA might play a significant role in the tumorigenesis of OSCC. It may become new targets for the gene therapy of OSCC by regulating the above indexes.

  5. Frequencies, Laboratory Features, and Granulocyte Activation in Chinese Patients with CALR-Mutated Myeloproliferative Neoplasms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixiu Guo

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations in the CALR gene have been recently identified as acquired alterations in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs. In this study, we evaluated mutation frequencies, laboratory features, and granulocyte activation in Chinese patients with MPNs. A combination of qualitative allele-specific polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing was used to detect three driver mutations (i.e., CALR, JAK2V617F, and MPL. CALR mutations were identified in 8.4% of cases with essential thrombocythemia (ET and 5.3% of cases with primary myelofibrosis (PMF. Moreover, 25% of polycythemia vera, 29.5% of ET, and 48.1% of PMF were negative for all three mutations (JAK2V617F, MPL, and CALR. Compared with those patients with JAK2V617F mutation, CALR-mutated ET patients displayed unique hematological phenotypes, including higher platelet counts, and lower leukocyte counts and hemoglobin levels. Significant differences were not found between Chinese PMF patients with mutants CALR and JAK2V617F in terms of laboratory features. Interestingly, patients with CALR mutations showed markedly decreased levels of leukocyte alkaline phosphatase (LAP expression, whereas those with JAK2V617F mutation presented with elevated levels. Overall, a lower mutant rate of CALR gene and a higher triple-negative rate were identified in the cohort of Chinese patients with MPNs. This result indicates that an undiscovered mutant gene may have a significant role in these patients. Moreover, these pathological features further imply that the disease biology varies considerably between mutants CALR and JAK2V617F.

  6. DNA microarray analysis of fim mutations in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Ussery, David; Workman, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion is often mediated by complex polymeric surface structures referred to as fimbriae. Type I fimbriae of Escherichia coli represent the archetypical and best characterised fimbrial system. These adhesive organelles mediate binding to D-mannose and are directly associated...... we have used DNA microarray analysis to examine the molecular events involved in response to fimbrial gene expression in E. coli K-12. Observed differential expression levels of the fim genes were in good agreement with our current knowledge of the stoichiometry of type I fimbriae. Changes in fim...

  7. Mutation Processes in 293-Based Clones Overexpressing the DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica K Akre

    Full Text Available Molecular, cellular, and clinical studies have combined to demonstrate a contribution from the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B to the overall mutation load in breast, head/neck, lung, bladder, cervical, ovarian, and other cancer types. However, the complete landscape of mutations attributable to this enzyme has yet to be determined in a controlled human cell system. We report a conditional and isogenic system for A3B induction, genomic DNA deamination, and mutagenesis. Human 293-derived cells were engineered to express doxycycline-inducible A3B-eGFP or eGFP constructs. Cells were subjected to 10 rounds of A3B-eGFP exposure that each caused 80-90% cell death. Control pools were subjected to parallel rounds of non-toxic eGFP exposure, and dilutions were done each round to mimic A3B-eGFP induced population fluctuations. Targeted sequencing of portions of TP53 and MYC demonstrated greater mutation accumulation in the A3B-eGFP exposed pools. Clones were generated and microarray analyses were used to identify those with the greatest number of SNP alterations for whole genome sequencing. A3B-eGFP exposed clones showed global increases in C-to-T transition mutations, enrichments for cytosine mutations within A3B-preferred trinucleotide motifs, and more copy number aberrations. Surprisingly, both control and A3B-eGFP clones also elicited strong mutator phenotypes characteristic of defective mismatch repair. Despite this additional mutational process, the 293-based system characterized here still yielded a genome-wide view of A3B-catalyzed mutagenesis in human cells and a system for additional studies on the compounded effects of simultaneous mutation mechanisms in cancer cells.

  8. Estimation of the frequency of occult mutations for an autosomal recessive disease in the presence of genetic heterogeneity: application to genetic hearing loss disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberling, William J

    2005-11-01

    The routine testing for pathologic mutation(s) in a patient's DNA has become the foundation of modern molecular genetic diagnosis. It is especially valuable when the phenotype shows genetic heterogeneity, and its importance will grow as treatments become genotype specific. However, the technology of mutation detection is imperfect and mutations are often missed. This can be especially troublesome when dealing with a recessive disorder where the combination of genetic heterogeneity and missed mutation creates an imprecision in the genotypic assessment of individuals who do not appear to have the expected complement of two pathologic mutations. This article describes a statistical approach to the estimation of the likelihood of a genetic diagnosis under these conditions. In addition to providing a means of testing for missed mutations, it also provides a method of estimating and testing for the presence of genetic heterogeneity in the absence of linkage data. Gene frequencies as well as estimates of sensitivity and specificity can be obtained as well. The test is applied to GJB2 recessive nonsyndromic deafness, Usher syndrome types Ib and IIa, and Pendred-enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Frequency of CNKSR2 mutation in the X-linked epilepsy-aphasia spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, John A; Burgess, Rosemary; Kivity, Sara; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Afawi, Zaid; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F; Hildebrand, Michael S

    2017-03-01

    Synaptic proteins are critical to neuronal function in the brain, and their deficiency can lead to seizures and cognitive impairments. CNKSR2 (connector enhancer of KSR2) is a synaptic protein involved in Ras signaling-mediated neuronal proliferation, migration and differentiation. Mutations in the X-linked gene CNKSR2 have been described in patients with seizures and neurodevelopmental deficits, especially those affecting language. In this study, we sequenced 112 patients with phenotypes within the epilepsy-aphasia spectrum (EAS) to determine the frequency of CNKSR2 mutation within this complex set of disorders. We detected a novel nonsense mutation (c.2314 C>T; p.Arg712*) in one Ashkenazi Jewish family, the male proband of which had a severe epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in sleep (ECSWS). His affected brother also had ECSWS with better outcome, whereas the sister had childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes. This mutation segregated in the three affected siblings in an X-linked manner, inherited from their mother who had febrile seizures. Although the frequency of point mutation is low, CNKSR2 sequencing should be considered in families with suspected X-linked EAS because of the specific genetic counseling implications. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  10. Studies on induced mutation frequency in Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don by gamma rays and EMS individually and in combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswarlu, M.; Susheelamma, B.N.; Kumar, P.; Subhash, K.

    1988-01-01

    Seeds of pink flowered (PF) and white flowered (WF) Catharanthus roseus were soaked in distilled water for 24 h and treated with gamma rays and 0.1% EMS separately and in combination. Six types of chlorophyll mutations, viz., xantha, albina, chlorina, viridis, maculata and tigrina were recovered to M 2 generation of both forms. The frequency of chlorophyll mutations was found to be dependent on the dose, of gamma rays and duration of treatment with EMS. Higher frequency of chlorophyll mutations was noticed in PF, which is mutagenically more sensitive than WF. It was also noticed that the combination treatments of gamma rays and EMS enhanced the frequency of chlorophyll mutations

  11. Frequencies of aneuploidy and dominant lethal mutations in young female mice induced by low dose γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Suyan; Zhang Chaoyang; Dai Lianlian; Gao Changwen

    1991-01-01

    Relationship between aneuploidy, dominant lethal mutations and doses in young feral mice induced by low dose γ-rays was examined. The results suggest that the frequencies of aneuploidy of embryos increased at 0.15 Gy, but increases at over 0.50 Gy after irradiation in groups. The frequencies of aneuploidy and dominant lethal mutations increased with increasing doses and fitted linear relationship. This dose-response relationship of trisomic was not significant. The frequency of dominant lethal mutations induced by 60 Co γ irradiation is 5.59%. The effect of dominant lethal mutation is higher than that of the aneuploidy

  12. Germline mutation rates at tandem repeat loci in DNA-repair deficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Ruth C.; Miccoli, Laurent; Buul, Paul P.W. van; Burr, Karen L.-A.; Duyn-Goedhart, Annemarie van; Angulo, Jaime F.; Dubrova, Yuri E.

    2004-01-01

    Mutation rates at two expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci were studied in the germline of non-exposed and irradiated severe combined immunodeficient (scid) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1 -/- ) deficient male mice. Non-exposed scid and PARP -/- male mice showed considerably elevated ESTR mutation rates, far higher than those in wild-type isogenic mice and other inbred strains. The irradiated scid and PARP-1 -/- male mice did not show any detectable increases in their mutation rate, whereas significant ESTR mutation induction was observed in the irradiated wild-type isogenic males. ESTR mutation spectra in the scid and PARP-1 -/- strains did not differ from those in the isogenic wild-type strains. Considering these data and the results of previous studies, we propose that a delay in repair of DNA damage in scid and PARP-1 -/- mice could result in replication fork pausing which, in turn, may affect ESTR mutation rate in the non-irradiated males. The lack of mutation induction in irradiated scid and PARP-1 -/- can be explained by the high cell killing effects of irradiation on the germline of deficient mice

  13. A second mutation associated with apparent [beta]-hexosaminidase A pseudodeficiency: Identification and frequency estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Z.; Chabot, T.; Triggs-Raine, B.L. (Univ. of Manitoba, Winnepeg (Canada)); Natowicz, M.R.; Prence, E.M. (Shriver Center for Mental Retardation, Waltham, MA (United States) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Kaback, M.M.; Lim-Steele, S.T.; Brown, D. (Children' s Hospital, San Diego, CA (United States) Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Deficient activity of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (Hex A), resulting from mutations in the HEXA gene, typically causes Tay-Sachs disease. However, healthy individuals lacking Hex A activity against synthetic substrates (i.e., individuals who are pseudodeficient) have been described. Recently, an apparently benign C[sub 739]-to-T (Arg247Trp) mutation was found among individuals with Hex A levels indistinguishable from those of carriers of Tay-Sachs disease. This allele, when in compound heterozygosity with a second [open quotes]disease-causing[close quotes] allele, results in Hex A pseudodeficiency. The authors examined the HEXA gene of a healthy 42-year-old who was Hex A deficient but did not have the C[sub 739]-to-T mutation. The HEXA exons were PCR amplified, and the products were analyzed for mutations by using restriction-enzyme digestion or single-strand gel electrophoresis. A G[sub 805]-to-A (Gly269Ser) mutation associated with adult-onset G[sub m2] gangliosidosis was found on one chromosome. A new mutation, C[sub 745]-to-T (Arg 249Trp), was identified on the second chromosome. This mutation was detected in an additional 4/63 (6%) non-Jewish and 0/218 Ashkenazi Jewish enzyme-defined carriers. Although the Arg249Trp change may result in a late-onset form of G[sub M2] gangliosidosis, any phenotype must be very mild. This new mutation and the benign C[sub 739]-to-T mutation together account for [approximately]38% of non-Jewish enzyme-defined carriers. Because carriers of the C[sub 739]-to-T and C[sub 745]-to-T mutations cannot be differentiated from carriers of disease-causing alleles by using the classical biochemical screening approaches, DNA-based analyses for these mutations should be offered for non-Jewish enzyme-defined heterozygotes, before definitive counseling is provided. 46 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Frequency of MELAS main mutation in a phenotype-targeted young ischemic stroke patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatlisumak, Turgut; Putaala, Jukka; Innilä, Markus; Enzinger, Christian; Metso, Tiina M; Curtze, Sami; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Amaral-Silva, Alexandre; Jungehulsing, Gerhard Jan; Tanislav, Christian; Thijs, Vincent; Rolfs, Arndt; Norrving, Bo; Fazekas, Franz; Suomalainen, Anu; Kolodny, Edwin H

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial diseases, predominantly mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), may occasionally underlie or coincide with ischemic stroke (IS) in young and middle-aged individuals. We searched for undiagnosed patients with MELAS in a target subpopulation of unselected young IS patients enrolled in the Stroke in Young Fabry Patients study (sifap1). Among the 3291 IS patients aged 18-55 years recruited to the sifap1 study at 47 centers across 14 European countries, we identified potential MELAS patients with the following phenotypic features: (a) diagnosed cardiomyopathy or (b) presence of two of the three following findings: migraine, short stature (≤165 cm for males; ≤155 cm for females), and diabetes. Identified patients' blood samples underwent analysis of the common MELAS mutation, m.3243A>G in the MTTL1 gene of mitochondrial DNA. Clinical and cerebral MRI features of the mutation carriers were reviewed. We analyzed blood samples of 238 patients (177 with cardiomyopathy) leading to identification of four previously unrecognized MELAS main mutation carrier-patients. Their clinical and MRI characteristics were within the expectation for common IS patients except for severe hearing loss in one patient and hyperintensity of the pulvinar thalami on T1-weighted MRI in another one. Genetic testing for the m.3243A>G MELAS mutation in young patients with IS based on phenotypes suggestive of mitochondrial disease identifies previously unrecognized carriers of MELAS main mutation, but does not prove MELAS as the putative cause.

  15. Transcription Restores DNA Repair to Heterochromatin, Determining Regional Mutation Rates in Cancer Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L. Zheng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations in cancer are more frequent in heterochromatic and late-replicating regions of the genome. We report that regional disparities in mutation density are virtually abolished within transcriptionally silent genomic regions of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cSCCs arising in an XPC−/− background. XPC−/− cells lack global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER, thus establishing differential access of DNA repair machinery within chromatin-rich regions of the genome as the primary cause for the regional disparity. Strikingly, we find that increasing levels of transcription reduce mutation prevalence on both strands of gene bodies embedded within H3K9me3-dense regions, and only to those levels observed in H3K9me3-sparse regions, also in an XPC-dependent manner. Therefore, transcription appears to reduce mutation prevalence specifically by relieving the constraints imposed by chromatin structure on DNA repair. We model this relationship among transcription, chromatin state, and DNA repair, revealing a new, personalized determinant of cancer risk.

  16. The frequency of Tay-Sachs disease causing mutations in the Brazilian Jewish population justifies a carrier screening program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rozenberg

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Tay-Sachs disease is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive neurologic degeneration, fatal in early childhood. In the Ashkenazi Jewish population the disease incidence is about 1 in every 3,500 newborns and the carrier frequency is 1 in every 29 individuals. Carrier screening programs for Tay-Sachs disease have reduced disease incidence by 90% in high-risk populations in several countries. The Brazilian Jewish population is estimated at 90,000 individuals. Currently, there is no screening program for Tay-Sachs disease in this population. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the importance of a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program in the Brazilian Jewish population by determining the frequency of heterozygotes and the acceptance of the program by the community. SETTING: Laboratory of Molecular Genetics - Institute of Biosciences - Universidade de São Paulo. PARTICIPANTS: 581 senior students from selected Jewish high schools. PROCEDURE: Molecular analysis of Tay-Sachs disease causing mutations by PCR amplification of genomic DNA, followed by restriction enzyme digestion. RESULTS: Among 581 students that attended educational classes, 404 (70% elected to be tested for Tay-Sachs disease mutations. Of these, approximately 65% were of Ashkenazi Jewish origin. Eight carriers were detected corresponding to a carrier frequency of 1 in every 33 individuals in the Ashkenazi Jewish fraction of the sample. CONCLUSION: The frequency of Tay-Sachs disease carriers among the Ashkenazi Jewish population of Brazil is similar to that of other countries where carrier screening programs have led to a significant decrease in disease incidence. Therefore, it is justifiable to implement a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program for the Brazilian Jewish population.

  17. The frequency of Tay-Sachs disease causing mutations in the Brazilian Jewish population justifies a carrier screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenberg, R; Pereira, L da V

    2001-07-05

    Tay-Sachs disease is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive neurologic degeneration, fatal in early childhood. In the Ashkenazi Jewish population the disease incidence is about 1 in every 3,500 newborns and the carrier frequency is 1 in every 29 individuals. Carrier screening programs for Tay-Sachs disease have reduced disease incidence by 90% in high-risk populations in several countries. The Brazilian Jewish population is estimated at 90,000 individuals. Currently, there is no screening program for Tay-Sachs disease in this population. To evaluate the importance of a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program in the Brazilian Jewish population by determining the frequency of heterozygotes and the acceptance of the program by the community. Laboratory of Molecular Genetics--Institute of Biosciences--Universidade de São Paulo. 581 senior students from selected Jewish high schools. Molecular analysis of Tay-Sachs disease causing mutations by PCR amplification of genomic DNA, followed by restriction enzyme digestion. Among 581 students that attended educational classes, 404 (70%) elected to be tested for Tay-Sachs disease mutations. Of these, approximately 65% were of Ashkenazi Jewish origin. Eight carriers were detected corresponding to a carrier frequency of 1 in every 33 individuals in the Ashkenazi Jewish fraction of the sample. The frequency of Tay-Sachs disease carriers among the Ashkenazi Jewish population of Brazil is similar to that of other countries where carrier screening programs have led to a significant decrease in disease incidence. Therefore, it is justifiable to implement a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program for the Brazilian Jewish population.

  18. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus M204I Mutation by Quantum Dot-Labeled DNA Probe

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    Cheng Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs are semiconductor nanoparticles with a diameter of less than 10 nm, which have been widely used as fluorescent probes in biochemical analysis and vivo imaging because of their excellent optical properties. Sensitive and convenient detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV gene mutations is important in clinical diagnosis. Therefore, we developed a sensitive, low-cost and convenient QDs-mediated fluorescent method for the detection of HBV gene mutations in real serum samples from chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients who had received lamivudine or telbivudine antiviral therapy. We also evaluated the efficiency of this method for the detection of drug-resistant mutations compared with direct sequencing. In CHB, HBV DNA from the serum samples of patients with poor response or virological breakthrough can be hybridized to probes containing the M204I mutation to visualize fluorescence under fluorescence microscopy, where fluorescence intensity is related to the virus load, in our method. At present, the limits of the method used to detect HBV genetic variations by fluorescence quantum dots is 103 IU/mL. These results show that QDs can be used as fluorescent probes to detect viral HBV DNA polymerase gene variation, and is a simple readout system without complex and expensive instruments, which provides an attractive platform for the detection of HBV M204I mutation.

  19. Quantitative evaluation of DNA damage and mutation rate by atmospheric and room-temperature plasma (ARTP) and conventional mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Chong; Zhou, Qian-Qian; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Li-Yan; Chang, Hai-Bo; Li, He-Ping; Oda, Yoshimitsu; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2015-07-01

    DNA damage is the dominant source of mutation, which is the driving force of evolution. Therefore, it is important to quantitatively analyze the DNA damage caused by different mutagenesis methods, the subsequent mutation rates, and their relationship. Atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP) mutagenesis has been used for the mutation breeding of more than 40 microorganisms. However, ARTP mutagenesis has not been quantitatively compared with conventional mutation methods. In this study, the umu test using a flow-cytometric analysis was developed to quantify the DNA damage in individual viable cells using Salmonella typhimurium NM2009 as the model strain and to determine the mutation rate. The newly developed method was used to evaluate four different mutagenesis systems: a new ARTP tool, ultraviolet radiation, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO), and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) mutagenesis. The mutation rate was proportional to the corresponding SOS response induced by DNA damage. ARTP caused greater DNA damage to individual living cells than the other conventional mutagenesis methods, and the mutation rate was also higher. By quantitatively comparing the DNA damage and consequent mutation rate after different types of mutagenesis, we have shown that ARTP is a potentially powerful mutagenesis tool with which to improve the characteristics of microbial cell factories.

  20. Human aging and somatic point mutations in mtDNA: a comparative study of generational differences (grandparents and grandchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Nonato do Rosário Marinho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of somatic mutations in mtDNA is correlated with aging. In this work, we sought to identify somatic mutations in the HVS-1 region (D-loop of mtDNA that might be associated with aging. For this, we compared 31 grandmothers (mean age: 63 ± 2.3 years and their 62 grandchildren (mean age: 15 ± 4.1 years, the offspring of their daughters. Direct DNA sequencing showed that mutations absent in the grandchildren were detected in a presumably homoplasmic state in three grandmothers and in a heteroplasmic state in an additional 13 grandmothers; no mutations were detected in the remaining 15 grandmothers. However, cloning followed by DNA sequencing in 12 grandmothers confirmed homoplasia in only one of the three mutations previously considered to be homoplasmic and did not confirm heteroplasmy in three out of nine grandmothers found to be heteroplasmic by direct sequencing. Thus, of 12 grandmothers in whom mtDNA was analyzed by cloning, eight were heteroplasmic for mutations not detected in their grandchildren. In this study, the use of genetically related subjects allowed us to demonstrate the occurrence of age-related (> 60 years old mutations (homoplasia and heteroplasmy. It is possible that both of these situations (homoplasia and heteroplasmy were a long-term consequence of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation that can lead to the accumulation of mtDNA mutations throughout life.

  1. Gamma radiation-induced heritable mutations at repetitive DNA loci in out-bred mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somers, C.M.; Sharma, R.; Quinn, J.S.; Boreham, D.R.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that expanded-simple-tandem-repeat (ESTR) DNA loci are efficient genetic markers for detecting radiation-induced germ line mutations in mice. Dose responses following irradiation, however, have only been characterized in a small number of inbred mouse strains, and no studies have applied Esters to examine potential modifiers of radiation risk, such as adaptive response. We gamma-irradiated groups of male out-bred Swiss-Webster mice with single acute doses of 0.5 and 1.0 Gy, and compared germ line mutation rates at ESTR loci to a sham-irradiated control. To test for evidence of adaptive response we treated a third group with a total dose of 1.1 Gy that was fractionated into a 0.1 Gy adapting dose, followed by a challenge dose of 1.0 Gy 24 h later. Paternal mutation rates were significantly elevated above the control in the 0.5 Gy (2.8-fold) and 1.0 Gy (3.0-fold) groups, but were similar to each other despite the difference in radiation dose. The doubling dose for paternal mutation induction was 0.26 Gy (95% CI = 0.14-0.51 Gy). Males adapted with a 0.1 Gy dose prior to a 1.0 Gy challenge dose had mutation rates that were not significantly elevated above the control, and were 43% reduced compared to those receiving single doses. We conclude that pre-meiotic male germ cells in out-bred Swiss-Webster mice are sensitive to ESTR mutations induced by acute doses of ionizing radiation, but mutation induction may become saturated at a lower dose than in some strains of inbred mice. Reduced mutation rates in the adapted group provide intriguing evidence for suppression of ESTR mutations in the male germline through adaptive response. Repetitive DNA markers may be useful tools for exploration of biological factors affecting the probability of heritable mutations caused by low-dose ionizing radiation exposure. The biological significance of ESTR mutations in terms of radiation risk assessment, however, is still undetermined

  2. Genotype-Phenotype Correlation of Maternally Inherited Disorders due to Mutations in Mitochondrial DNA

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    Peterus Thajeb

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial disorders are heterogeneous systemic ailments that are most often caused by maternal inheritance of a variety of mutations of the mitochondrial (mt DNA. Paternal inheritance and somatic mutation are rare. The disorders are well recognized not only for the genotypic heterogeneity, but also the phenotypic variation among the affected members of a single family. The genotype-phenotype correlation of the diversity of the syndromic and non-syndromic features of mitochondrial disorders are discussed. Some aspects of the molecular mechanisms of this heterogeneity, and the histopathologic findings are highlighted.

  3. DNA repair in Haemophilus influenzae: isolation and characterization of an ultraviolet sensitive mutator mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    DNA repair in Haemophilus influenzae appears to be quite different from that seen in Escherichia coli in that H. influenzae shows neither SOS nor adaptation phenomena. Repair of DNA lesions in H. influenzae has been seen to occur via recombinational, excision, and mismatch repair pathways acting independently of one another. The author has isolated an ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive mutator mutant (mutB1) of H. influenzae Rd which shows deficiencies in both recombinational and mismatch repair pathways. This mutant is sensitive to a variety of DNA damaging agents as well as being hypermutable by alkylating agents and base analogues. MutB1 cells do not show post-UV DNA breakdown but do begin excision after UV irradiation. Genetic transformation with UV-irradiated DNA on mut B1 recipients shows that high (HE) and low (LE) efficiency markers are transformed at a ratio of 1.0 as in the mismatch repair deficient hex 1 mutant; however, kinetics of UV-inactivation experiments indicate that HE markers are sensitized and act as LE markers do on wild type recipients. Thus, the mutB gene product appears to play a role in both DNA repair and genetic transformation. A model is outlined which presents a role for a DNA helicase in both DNA repair and genetic transformation of H. influenzae

  4. Mutations in the DNA methyltransferase gene, DNMT3A, cause an overgrowth syndrome with intellectual disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Seal, Sheila; Ruark, Elise; Harmer, Jenny; Ramsay, Emma; del Vecchio Duarte, Silvana; Zachariou, Anna; Hanks, Sandra; O’Brien, Eleanor; Aksglaede, Lise; Baralle, Diana; Dabir, Tabib; Gener, Blanca; Goudie, David; Homfray, Tessa; Kumar, Ajith; Pilz, Daniela T; Selicorni, Angelo; Temple, I Karen; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Yachelevich, Naomi; van Montfort, Robert; Rahman, Nazneen

    2014-01-01

    Overgrowth disorders are a heterogeneous group of conditions characterised by increased growth parameters and variable other clinical features, such as intellectual disability and facial dysmorphism1. To identify novel causes of human overgrowth we performed exome sequencing in 10 proband-parent trios and detected two de novo DNMT3A mutations. We identified 11 additional de novo mutations through DNMT3A sequencing of a further 142 individuals with overgrowth. The mutations were all located in functional DNMT3A domains and protein modelling suggests they interfere with domain-domain interactions and histone binding. No similar mutations were present in 1000 UK population controls (13/152 vs 0/1000; P<0.0001). Mutation carriers had a distinctive facial appearance, intellectual disability and increased height. DNMT3A encodes a key methyltransferase essential for establishing the methylation imprint in embryogenesis and is commonly somatically mutated in acute myeloid leukaemia2-4. Thus DNMT3A joins an emerging group of epigenetic DNA and histone modifying genes associated with both developmental growth disorders and haematological malignancies5. PMID:24614070

  5. Identification of unique repeated patterns, location of mutation in DNA finger printing using artificial intelligence technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukunthan, B; Nagaveni, N

    2014-01-01

    In genetic engineering, conventional techniques and algorithms employed by forensic scientists to assist in identification of individuals on the basis of their respective DNA profiles involves more complex computational steps and mathematical formulae, also the identification of location of mutation in a genomic sequence in laboratories is still an exigent task. This novel approach provides ability to solve the problems that do not have an algorithmic solution and the available solutions are also too complex to be found. The perfect blend made of bioinformatics and neural networks technique results in efficient DNA pattern analysis algorithm with utmost prediction accuracy.

  6. Detection of DNA oligonucleotides with base mutations by terahertz spectroscopy and microstructures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjie Tang

    Full Text Available DNA oligonucleotides with a 5-base mutation at the 3'-terminus were investigated by terahertz (THz spectroscopy in a marker-free manner. The four single-stranded oligonucleotides with 17nt have been detected with specificity on a microfluidic chip, and corroborated by spectral measurements with split-ring resonators. The number of hydrogen bonds formed between the oligonucleotide and its surrounding water molecules, deemed a key contribution to the THz absorption of biological solutions, was explored by molecular dynamics simulations to explain the experimental findings. Our work underlies the feasibility of THz spectroscopy combined with microstructures for marker-free detection of DNA, which may form the basis of a prospective diagnostic tool for studying genic mutation.

  7. A Phenotype-Driven Approach to Generate Mouse Models with Pathogenic mtDNA Mutations Causing Mitochondrial Disease

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    Johanna H.K. Kauppila

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of mtDNA are an important cause of human disease, but few animal models exist. Because mammalian mitochondria cannot be transfected, the development of mice with pathogenic mtDNA mutations has been challenging, and the main strategy has therefore been to introduce mutations found in cell lines into mouse embryos. Here, we describe a phenotype-driven strategy that is based on detecting clonal expansion of pathogenic mtDNA mutations in colonic crypts of founder mice derived from heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice. As proof of concept, we report the generation of a mouse line transmitting a heteroplasmic pathogenic mutation in the alanine tRNA gene of mtDNA displaying typical characteristics of classic mitochondrial disease. In summary, we describe a straightforward and technically simple strategy based on mouse breeding and histology to generate animal models of mtDNA-mutation disease, which will be of great importance for studies of disease pathophysiology and preclinical treatment trials.

  8. dNTP pool levels modulate mutator phenotypes of error-prone DNA polymerase ε variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lindsey N; Marjavaara, Lisette; Knowels, Gary M; Schultz, Eric M; Fox, Edward J; Chabes, Andrei; Herr, Alan J

    2015-05-12

    Mutator phenotypes create genetic diversity that fuels tumor evolution. DNA polymerase (Pol) ε mediates leading strand DNA replication. Proofreading defects in this enzyme drive a number of human malignancies. Here, using budding yeast, we show that mutator variants of Pol ε depend on damage uninducible (Dun)1, an S-phase checkpoint kinase that maintains dNTP levels during a normal cell cycle and up-regulates dNTP synthesis upon checkpoint activation. Deletion of DUN1 (dun1Δ) suppresses the mutator phenotype of pol2-4 (encoding Pol ε proofreading deficiency) and is synthetically lethal with pol2-M644G (encoding altered Pol ε base selectivity). Although pol2-4 cells cycle normally, pol2-M644G cells progress slowly through S-phase. The pol2-M644G cells tolerate deletions of mediator of the replication checkpoint (MRC) 1 (mrc1Δ) and radiation sensitive (Rad) 9 (rad9Δ), which encode mediators of checkpoint responses to replication stress and DNA damage, respectively. The pol2-M644G mutator phenotype is partially suppressed by mrc1Δ but not rad9Δ; neither deletion suppresses the pol2-4 mutator phenotype. Thus, checkpoint activation augments the Dun1 effect on replication fidelity but is not required for it. Deletions of genes encoding key Dun1 targets that negatively regulate dNTP synthesis, suppress the dun1Δ pol2-M644G synthetic lethality and restore the mutator phenotype of pol2-4 in dun1Δ cells. DUN1 pol2-M644G cells have constitutively high dNTP levels, consistent with checkpoint activation. In contrast, pol2-4 and POL2 cells have similar dNTP levels, which decline in the absence of Dun1 and rise in the absence of the negative regulators of dNTP synthesis. Thus, dNTP pool levels correlate with Pol ε mutator severity, suggesting that treatments targeting dNTP pools could modulate mutator phenotypes for therapy.

  9. Sensitive detection of point mutation by electrochemiluminescence and DNA ligase-based assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huijuan; Wu, Baoyan

    2008-12-01

    The technology of single-base mutation detection plays an increasingly important role in diagnosis and prognosis of genetic-based diseases. Here we reported a new method for the analysis of point mutations in genomic DNA through the integration of allele-specific oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) with magnetic beads-based electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection scheme. In this assay the tris(bipyridine) ruthenium (TBR) labeled probe and the biotinylated probe are designed to perfectly complementary to the mutant target, thus a ligation can be generated between those two probes by Taq DNA Ligase in the presence of mutant target. If there is an allele mismatch, the ligation does not take place. The ligation products are then captured onto streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads, and detected by measuring the ECL signal of the TBR label. Results showed that the new method held a low detection limit down to 10 fmol and was successfully applied in the identification of point mutations from ASTC-α-1, PANC-1 and normal cell lines in codon 273 of TP53 oncogene. In summary, this method provides a sensitive, cost-effective and easy operation approach for point mutation detection.

  10. Increasing Nucleosome Occupancy Is Correlated with an Increasing Mutation Rate so Long as DNA Repair Machinery Is Intact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jared F.; Khattab, Omar S.; Chen, Yu-Han; Chen, Yumay; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Wang, Ping H.

    2015-01-01

    Deciphering the multitude of epigenomic and genomic factors that influence the mutation rate is an area of great interest in modern biology. Recently, chromatin has been shown to play a part in this process. To elucidate this relationship further, we integrated our own ultra-deep sequenced human nucleosomal DNA data set with a host of published human genomic and cancer genomic data sets. Our results revealed, that differences in nucleosome occupancy are associated with changes in base-specific mutation rates. Increasing nucleosome occupancy is associated with an increasing transition to transversion ratio and an increased germline mutation rate within the human genome. Additionally, cancer single nucleotide variants and microindels are enriched within nucleosomes and both the coding and non-coding cancer mutation rate increases with increasing nucleosome occupancy. There is an enrichment of cancer indels at the theoretical start (74 bp) and end (115 bp) of linker DNA between two nucleosomes. We then hypothesized that increasing nucleosome occupancy decreases access to DNA by DNA repair machinery and could account for the increasing mutation rate. Such a relationship should not exist in DNA repair knockouts, and we thus repeated our analysis in DNA repair machinery knockouts to test our hypothesis. Indeed, our results revealed no correlation between increasing nucleosome occupancy and increasing mutation rate in DNA repair knockouts. Our findings emphasize the linkage of the genome and epigenome through the nucleosome whose properties can affect genome evolution and genetic aberrations such as cancer. PMID:26308346

  11. Increasing Nucleosome Occupancy Is Correlated with an Increasing Mutation Rate so Long as DNA Repair Machinery Is Intact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puya G Yazdi

    Full Text Available Deciphering the multitude of epigenomic and genomic factors that influence the mutation rate is an area of great interest in modern biology. Recently, chromatin has been shown to play a part in this process. To elucidate this relationship further, we integrated our own ultra-deep sequenced human nucleosomal DNA data set with a host of published human genomic and cancer genomic data sets. Our results revealed, that differences in nucleosome occupancy are associated with changes in base-specific mutation rates. Increasing nucleosome occupancy is associated with an increasing transition to transversion ratio and an increased germline mutation rate within the human genome. Additionally, cancer single nucleotide variants and microindels are enriched within nucleosomes and both the coding and non-coding cancer mutation rate increases with increasing nucleosome occupancy. There is an enrichment of cancer indels at the theoretical start (74 bp and end (115 bp of linker DNA between two nucleosomes. We then hypothesized that increasing nucleosome occupancy decreases access to DNA by DNA repair machinery and could account for the increasing mutation rate. Such a relationship should not exist in DNA repair knockouts, and we thus repeated our analysis in DNA repair machinery knockouts to test our hypothesis. Indeed, our results revealed no correlation between increasing nucleosome occupancy and increasing mutation rate in DNA repair knockouts. Our findings emphasize the linkage of the genome and epigenome through the nucleosome whose properties can affect genome evolution and genetic aberrations such as cancer.

  12. Thermodynamic framework to assess low abundance DNA mutation detection by hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Hanny; Jacobs, An; Hadiwikarta, Wahyu Wijaya; Venken, Tom; Valkenborg, Dirk; Van Roy, Nadine; Vandesompele, Jo; Hooyberghs, Jef

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge of genomic DNA variations in patient samples has a high and increasing value for human diagnostics in its broadest sense. Although many methods and sensors to detect or quantify these variations are available or under development, the number of underlying physico-chemical detection principles is limited. One of these principles is the hybridization of sample target DNA versus nucleic acid probes. We introduce a novel thermodynamics approach and develop a framework to exploit the specific detection capabilities of nucleic acid hybridization, using generic principles applicable to any platform. As a case study, we detect point mutations in the KRAS oncogene on a microarray platform. For the given platform and hybridization conditions, we demonstrate the multiplex detection capability of hybridization and assess the detection limit using thermodynamic considerations; DNA containing point mutations in a background of wild type sequences can be identified down to at least 1% relative concentration. In order to show the clinical relevance, the detection capabilities are confirmed on challenging formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded clinical tumor samples. This enzyme-free detection framework contains the accuracy and efficiency to screen for hundreds of mutations in a single run with many potential applications in molecular diagnostics and the field of personalised medicine. PMID:28542229

  13. Evaluation of the metabolic fate of munitions material (TNT & RDX) in plant systems. Initial assessment of plant DNA mutation spectra as a biomarker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, F.; Cataldo, D.A.; Fellows, R.J.; Jarrell, A.E.; Harvey, S.D.

    1995-09-01

    Munitions material can enter the environment as a result of manufacturing activities and field usage. Predictor methodologies, or biomarkers would enhance evaluation of environmental impacts. The goal of this exploratory study deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mutation frequency as a biomarker for munitions exposure. The approach e resolution of an effective repetitive sequence probe for the identification of characteristic mutations, and (2) the development of a testing media [a clonal cell line of carrot (Daucus carota) spension cells]. Commercially available probes demonstrated marginal resolution therefore a low-C{sub o}t library was then constructed. Three colonies from the low-C{sub o}t DNA library were screened and the DNA isolates sequenced. A suspension culture of carrot (Daucus carota) was developed. A mutation spectra experiment was initiated at a 10-mg TNT/L exposure concentration with the attempt to clone over 1500 single TNT-exposed cells. Over the following six months greater than 98% of the initially isolated cells were unable to survive and produce micro calluses. The remaining calli were too few to be statistically significant and the experiment was terminated. The biomarker concept itself remains to be disproved, but the need for large numbers of uniform clones to differentiate true mutations suggest that more direct techniques using whole tissues need to be developed.

  14. Tyr120Asp mutation alters domain flexibility and dynamics of MeCP2 DNA binding domain leading to impaired DNA interaction: Atomistic characterization of a Rett syndrome causing mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Annessa, Ilda; Gandaglia, Anna; Brivio, Elena; Stefanelli, Gilda; Frasca, Angelisa; Landsberger, Nicoletta; Di Marino, Daniele

    2018-05-01

    Mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene represent the main origin of Rett syndrome, causing a profound intellectual disability in females. MeCP2 is an epigenetic transcriptional regulator containing two main functional domains: a methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) and a transcription repression domain (TRD). Over 600 pathogenic mutations were reported to affect the whole protein; almost half of missense mutations affect the MBD. Understanding the impact of these mutations on the MBD structure and interaction with DNA will foster the comprehension of their pathogenicity and possibly genotype/phenotype correlation studies. Herein, we use molecular dynamics simulations to obtain a detailed view of the dynamics of WT and mutated MBD in the presence and absence of DNA. The pathogenic mutation Y120D is used as paradigm for our studies. Further, since the Y120 residue was previously found to be a phosphorylation site, we characterize the dynamic profile of the MBD also in the presence of Y120 phosphorylation (pY120). We found that addition of a phosphate group to Y120 or mutation in aspartic acid affect domain mobility that samples an alternative conformational space with respect to the WT, leading to impaired ability to interact with DNA. Experimental assays showing a significant reduction in the binding affinity between the mutated MBD and the DNA confirmed our predictions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) interacts with p400 ATPase for an efficient DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rebecca J; Savoian, Matthew S; Weber, Lauren E; Park, Jeong Hyeon

    2016-11-04

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and TRRAP proteins belong to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase family and are involved in DNA damage repair and chromatin remodeling. ATM is a checkpoint kinase that is recruited to sites of DNA double-strand breaks where it phosphorylates a diverse range of proteins that are part of the chromatin and DNA repair machinery. As an integral subunit of the TRRAP-TIP60 complexes, p400 ATPase is a chromatin remodeler that is also targeted to DNA double-strand break sites. While it is understood that DNA binding transcriptional activators recruit p400 ATPase into a regulatory region of the promoter, how p400 recognises and moves to DNA double-strand break sites is far less clear. Here we investigate a possibility whether ATM serves as a shuttle to deliver p400 to break sites. Our data indicate that p400 co-immunoprecipitates with ATM independently of DNA damage state and that the N-terminal domain of p400 is vital for this interaction. Heterologous expression studies using Sf9 cells revealed that the ATM-p400 complex can be reconstituted without other mammalian bridging proteins. Overexpression of ATM-interacting p400 regions in U2OS cells induced dominant negative effects including the inhibition of both DNA damage repair and cell proliferation. Consistent with the dominant negative effect, the stable expression of an N-terminal p400 fragment showed a decrease in the association of p400 with ATM, but did not alter the association of p400 with TRRAP. Taken together, our findings suggest that a protein-protein interaction between ATM and p400 ATPase occurs independently of DNA damage and contributes to efficient DNA damage response and repair.

  16. Spectrum and frequency of chlorophyll mutations in urdbean (Vigna mungo L. Hepper) induced by EMS and gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, A.K.; Singh, V.P.; Sarma, M.K.

    2006-01-01

    In mutation breeding experiment, plants with altered characteristics such as chlorophyll changes, sterility, plant lethality etc. could be the marker of the mutability of a variety. In fact, spectrum and frequency of chlorophyll mutations have been studied in the great detail. The chlorophyll mutation is the clear-cut indication of non-directional nature of mutation and possibility of induction of useful mutations. The spectrum and frequency of chlorophyll mutation was estimated by using gamma rays (100, 200, 300 and 400 Gy doses), EMS (0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8%) and combination of gamma rays (100, 200, 300 400 Gy) with 0.2 % concentration EMS on two cultivars, namely, Pant Urd-19 and Pant Urd-30 of urdbean ( Vigna mungo L. Hepper). Five different types of chlorophyll mutations viz., albina, xantha, viridis, chlorina and maculata were identified in both the cultivars. Almost all the combination treatments produced maximum frequency and wider spectrum of chlorophyll mutations followed by single treatment of gamma rays or EMS. The frequency of chlorophyll mutation increased with higher doses of mutagens but decreased at highest dose. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. India. 76(8), I, 2006. 64-68. (author)

  17. DNA Variations in Oculocutaneous Albinism: An Updated Mutation List and Current Outstanding Issues in Molecular Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Wang, Xinjing; Wang, Chen; Sergeev, Yuri; Dolinska, Monika; Bower, Matthew; Fischer, Roxanne; Winer, David; Dubrovsky, Genia; Balog, Joan Z.; Huizing, Marjan; Hart, Rachel; Zein, Wadih M.; Gahl, William A.; Brooks, Brian P.; Adams, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a rare genetic disorder of melanin synthesis that results in hypopigmented hair, skin, and eyes. There are four types of OCA, caused by mutations in TYR (OCA-1), OCA2 (OCA-2), TYRP1 (OCA-3), or SLC45A2 (OCA-4). Here we report 22 novel mutations; 14 from a cohort of 61 patients seen as part of the NIH OCA Natural History Study and 8 from a prior study at the University of Minnesota. We also include a comprehensive list of almost 600 previously reported OCA mutations, along with ethnicity information, carrier frequencies, and in silico pathogenicity predictions. In addition to discussing the clinical and molecular features of OCA, we address the cases of apparent missing heritability. In our cohort, 25% of patients did not have two mutations in a single OCA gene. We demonstrate the utility of multiple detection methods to reveal mutations missed by Sanger sequencing. Finally, we review the TYR p.R402Q temperature sensitive variant and confirm its association with cases of albinism with only one identifiable TYR mutation. PMID:23504663

  18. Clinical heterogeneity within xeroderma pigmentosum associated with mutations in the DNA repair and transcription gene ERCC3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeulen, W.; Kleijer, W.J.; Bootsma, D.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; Weeda, G. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Scott, R.J.; Rodgers, S.; Mueller, H.J. (Univ. Hospital, Basel (Switzerland)); Cole, J.; Arlett, C.F. (Univ. of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom))

    1994-02-01

    The human DNA excision repair gene ERCC3 specifically corrects the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group B. In addition to its function in NER, the ERCC3 DNA helicase was recently identified as one of the components of the human BTF2/TFIIH transcription factor complex, which is required for initiation of transcription of class II genes. To date, a single patient (XP11BE) has been assigned to this XP group B (XP-B), with the remarkable conjunction of two autosomal recessive DNA repair deficiency disorders: XP and Cockayne syndrome (CS). The intriguing involvement of the ERCC3 protein in the vital process of transcription may provide an explanation for the rarity, severity, and wide spectrum of clinical features in this complementation group. Here the authors report the identification of two new XP-B patients: XPCS1BA and XPCS2BA (siblings), by microneedle injection of the cloned ERCC3 repair gene as well as by cell hybridization. Molecular analysis of the ERCC3 gene in both patients revealed a single base substitution causing a missense mutation in a region that is completely conserved in yeast, Drosophila, mouse, and human ERCC3. As in patient XP11BE, the expression of only one allele (paternal) is detected. The mutation causes a virtually complete inactivation of the NER function of the protein. Despite this severe NER defect, both patients display a late onset of neurologic impairment, mild cutaneous symptoms, and a striking absence of skin tumors even at an age of >40 years. Analysis of the frequency of hprt[sup [minus

  19. Translesion DNA synthesis and mutation induced in a plasmid with a single adduct of the environmental contaminant 3-nitrobenzanthrone in SOS-induced Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawanishi, M.; Kanno, T.; Yagi, T.; Enya-Takamura, T.; Fuchs, R.P.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: 3-Nitrobenzanthrone (NBA) is a powerfully mutagenic nitrated aromatic hydrocarbon found in diesel exhaust and in airborne particulate matters. NBA forms an unusual DNA adduct in vitro that has a C-C bond between the C-8 position of deoxyguanosine and the C-2 position of NBA. We previously found that this adduct is also present in the human cells treated with NBA, and induces mutations in supF shuttle vector system. In this study, we analyzed translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) over a single adduct in lacZ' gene in a plasmid in uvrAmutS Escherichia coli. The result showed that the adduct blocked DNA replication and an observed TLS frequency was 5.4% in non-SOS-induced E. coli. All progenies after the TLS had no mutation. On the other hand, TLS increased to 11.3%, and 4.8% of them had mostly G to T mutations in SOS-induced E. coli. These results suggest that this unusual adduct would be one of causes of lung cancer that is increasing in the urban areas polluted with diesel exhaust. It must be interesting to reveal which DNA polymerase is involved in this TLS

  20. Molecular targets, DNA breakage, DNA repair: Their roles in mutation induction in mammalian germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sega, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    Variability in genetic sensitivity among different germ-cell stages in the mammal to various mutagens could be the result of how much chemical reaches the different stages, what molecular targets may be affected in the different stages and whether or not repair of lesions occurs. Several chemicals have been found to bind very strongly to protamine in late-spermatid and early-spermatozoa stages in the mouse. The chemicals also produce their greatest genetic damage in these same germ-cell stages. While chemical binding to DNA has not been correlated with the level of induced genetic damage, DNA breakage in the sensitive stages has been shown to increase. This DNA breakage is believed to indirectly result from chemical binding to sulfhydryl groups in protamine which prevents normal chromatin condensation within the sperm nucleus. 22 refs., 5 figs

  1. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Mette Hartung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Costello syndrome (CS may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS. We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3' splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping.

  2. DNA and cancer biology: role in radiation and drug sensitivity, carcinogenesis and mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yielding, K.L.

    1974-01-01

    The DNA excision repair mechanism is an important factor in the resistance exhibited by tumor cells toward both x rays and alkylating agents as demonstrated by the fact that the chemical alterations to cellular DNA caused by these agents are substrates for the repair enzymes. Furthermore, experiments performed in our laboratory demonstrate that: (a) tumor sensitivity to alkylating agents and x-ray can be increased by inhibition of the repair process, and (b) there is a suggestion that this sensitization can be achieved with some degree of selectivity, thereby improving the balance of sensitivites between tumor and normal tissue. Other work from this laboratory has shown that cocarcinogens probably act by preventing repair of carcinogenic damage to the DNA genome. The possibility has also been raised that mistakes made during repair synthesis might be responsible for some genetic diversity and for the mutations which arise in resting cells. (U.S.)

  3. Enzyme-Free Detection of Mutations in Cancer DNA Using Synthetic Oligonucleotide Probes and Fluorescence Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miotke, Laura; Maity, Arindam; Ji, Hanlee

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rapid reliable diagnostics of DNA mutations are highly desirable in research and clinical assays. Current development in this field goes simultaneously in two directions: 1) high-throughput methods, and 2) portable assays. Non-enzymatic approaches are attractive for both types...... 1000-fold above the potential detection limit. CONCLUSION: Overall, the novel assay we describe could become a new approach to rapid, reliable and enzyme-free diagnostics of cancer or other associated DNA targets. Importantly, stoichiometry of wild type and mutant targets is conserved in our assay...... of methods since they would allow rapid and relatively inexpensive detection of nucleic acids. Modern fluorescence microscopy is having a huge impact on detection of biomolecules at previously unachievable resolution. However, no straightforward methods to detect DNA in a non-enzymatic way using fluorescence...

  4. Frequency of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation in Smokers with Lung Cancer Without Pulmonary Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kenichi; Yamasaki, Akira; Igishi, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Yuji; Ito-Nishii, Shizuka; Izumi, Hiroki; Sakamoto, Tomohiro; Touge, Hirokazu; Kodani, Masahiro; Makino, Haruhiko; Yanai, Masaaki; Tanaka, Natsumi; Matsumoto, Shingo; Araki, Kunio; Nakamura, Hiroshige; Shimizu, Eiji

    2017-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a smoking-related disease, and is categorized into the emphysema and airway dominant phenotypes. We examined the relationship between emphysematous changes and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. The medical records for 250 patients with lung adenocarcinoma were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were categorized into the emphysema or non-emphysema group. Wild-type EGFR was detected in 136 (54%) and mutant EGFR in 48 (19%). Emphysematous changes were observed in 87 (36%) patients. EGFR mutation was highly frequent in the non-emphysema group (p=0.0014). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that emphysema was an independent risk factor for reduced frequency of EGFR mutation (Odds Ratio=3.47, p=0.005). Our data showed a relationship between emphysematous changes and EGFR mutation status. There might be mutually exclusive genetic risk factors for carcinogenesis and development of emphysematous changes. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  5. Low frequency of c-MPL gene mutations in Iranian patients with Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghotaslou, A; Nadali, F; Chahardouli, B; Alizad Ghandforosh, N; Rostami, S H; Alimoghaddam, K; Ghavamzadeh, A

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative disorders are a group of diseases characterized by increased proliferation of myeloid lineage. In addition to JAK2V617F mutation, several mutations in the c-MPL gene have been reported in patients with philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders that could be important in the pathogenesis of diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the frequency of c-MPL and JAK2V617F mutations in Iranian patients with Philadelphia-negativemyeloproliferative disorders. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 60 patients with Philadelphia-negative MPD) Subgroups ET and PMF) and 25 healthy subjects as control group. The mutation status of c-MPL and Jak2V617F were investigated by using Amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) and Allele-Specific PCR (AS-PCR), respectively. The results were confirmed by sequencing. Among 60 patients, 34 (56.6%) and 1(1.7%) had Jak2V617F and c-MPL mutation, respectively. Patients with Jak2V617F mutation had higher WBC counts and hemoglobin concentration than those without the mutation (p= 0.005, p=0.003). In addition, for all healthy subjects in control group, mutations were negative. The present study revealed that the c-MPL mutations unlike the Jak2V617F mutations are rare in Iranian patients with Ph-negative MPNs and the low mutation rate should be considered in the design of screening strategies of MPD patients.

  6. UVA activation of N-dialkylnitrosamines releasing nitric oxide, producing strand breaks as well as oxidative damages in DNA, and inducing mutations in the Ames test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae; Sano, Kayoko; Machida, Masaki; Kaji, Keiko; Yakushi, Keiko

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the photo-mutagenicity and photo-genotoxicity of N-dialkylnitrosamines and its mechanisms of UVA activation. With simultaneous irradiation of UVA, photo-mutagenicity of seven N-dialkylnitrosamines was observed in Ames bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium TA1535) in the absence of metabolic activation. Mutagenicity of pre-irradiated N-dialkylnitrosamines was also observed with S. typhimurium hisG46, TA100, TA102 and YG7108 in the absence of metabolic activation. UVA-mediated mutation with N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) decreased by adding either the NO or OH radical scavenger. When superhelical DNA was irradiated with N-dialkylnitrosamines, nicked circular DNA appeared. Ten N-dialkylnitrosamines examined produced strand breaks in the treated DNA in the presence of UVA. The level of single-strand breaks in φX174 DNA mediated by N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) and UVA decreased by adding either a radical scavenger or superoxide dismutase. When calf thymus DNA was treated with N-dialkylnitrosamines (NDMA, NDEA, NMOR, N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) and N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP)) and UVA, the ratio of 8-oxodG/dG in the DNA increased. Action spectra were obtained to determine if nitrosamine acts as a sensitizer of UVA. Both mutation frequency and NO formation were highest at the absorption maximum of nitrosamines, approximately 340 nm. The plots of NO formation and mutation frequency align with the absorption curve of NPYR, NMOR and NDMA. A significant linear correlation between the optical density of N-dialkynitrosamines at 340 nm and NO formation in each irradiated solution was revealed by ANOVA. We would like to propose the hypothesis that the N-nitroso moiety of N-dialkylnitrosamines absorbs UVA photons, UVA-photolysis of N-dialkylnitrosamines brings release of nitric oxide, and subsequent production of alkyl radical cations and active oxygen species follow as secondary events, which cause DNA strand breaks, oxidative and

  7. UVA activation of N-dialkylnitrosamines releasing nitric oxide, producing strand breaks as well as oxidative damages in DNA, and inducing mutations in the Ames test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae [Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 1-1-1 Tsushima, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sano, Kayoko; Machida, Masaki; Kaji, Keiko; Yakushi, Keiko [Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 1-1-1 Tsushima, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2010-09-10

    We investigated the photo-mutagenicity and photo-genotoxicity of N-dialkylnitrosamines and its mechanisms of UVA activation. With simultaneous irradiation of UVA, photo-mutagenicity of seven N-dialkylnitrosamines was observed in Ames bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium TA1535) in the absence of metabolic activation. Mutagenicity of pre-irradiated N-dialkylnitrosamines was also observed with S. typhimurium hisG46, TA100, TA102 and YG7108 in the absence of metabolic activation. UVA-mediated mutation with N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) decreased by adding either the NO or OH radical scavenger. When superhelical DNA was irradiated with N-dialkylnitrosamines, nicked circular DNA appeared. Ten N-dialkylnitrosamines examined produced strand breaks in the treated DNA in the presence of UVA. The level of single-strand breaks in {phi}X174 DNA mediated by N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) and UVA decreased by adding either a radical scavenger or superoxide dismutase. When calf thymus DNA was treated with N-dialkylnitrosamines (NDMA, NDEA, NMOR, N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) and N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP)) and UVA, the ratio of 8-oxodG/dG in the DNA increased. Action spectra were obtained to determine if nitrosamine acts as a sensitizer of UVA. Both mutation frequency and NO formation were highest at the absorption maximum of nitrosamines, approximately 340 nm. The plots of NO formation and mutation frequency align with the absorption curve of NPYR, NMOR and NDMA. A significant linear correlation between the optical density of N-dialkynitrosamines at 340 nm and NO formation in each irradiated solution was revealed by ANOVA. We would like to propose the hypothesis that the N-nitroso moiety of N-dialkylnitrosamines absorbs UVA photons, UVA-photolysis of N-dialkylnitrosamines brings release of nitric oxide, and subsequent production of alkyl radical cations and active oxygen species follow as secondary events, which cause DNA strand breaks, oxidative and

  8. PMS2 gene mutational analysis: direct cDNA sequencing to circumvent pseudogene interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Katharina; Wernstedt, Annekatrin

    2014-01-01

    The presence of highly homologous pseudocopies can compromise the mutation analysis of a gene of interest. In particular, when using PCR-based strategies, pseudogene co-amplification has to be effectively prevented. This is often achieved by using primers designed to be parental gene specific according to the reference sequence and by applying stringent PCR conditions. However, there are cases in which this approach is of limited utility. For example, it has been shown that the PMS2 gene exchanges sequences with one of its pseudogenes, named PMS2CL. This results in functional PMS2 alleles containing pseudogene-derived sequences at their 3'-end and in nonfunctional PMS2CL pseudogene alleles that contain gene-derived sequences. Hence, the paralogues cannot be distinguished according to the reference sequence. This shortcoming can be effectively circumvented by using direct cDNA sequencing. This approach is based on the selective amplification of PMS2 transcripts in two overlapping 1.6-kb RT-PCR products. In addition to avoiding pseudogene co-amplification and allele dropout, this method has also the advantage that it allows to effectively identify deletions, splice mutations, and de novo retrotransposon insertions that escape the detection of most DNA-based mutation analysis protocols.

  9. Abiotic stress leads to somatic and heritable changes in homologous recombination frequency, point mutation frequency and microsatellite stability in Arabidopsis plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Youli; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-01-01

    In earlier studies, we showed that abiotic stresses, such as ionizing radiation, heavy metals, temperature and water, trigger an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). We also demonstrated that many of these stresses led to inheritance of high-frequency homologous recombination, HRF. Although an increase in recombination frequency is an important indicator of genome rearrangements, it only represents a minor portion of possible stress-induced mutations. Here, we analyzed the influence of heat, cold, drought, flood and UVC abiotic stresses on two major types of mutations in the genome, point mutations and small deletions/insertions. We used two transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, one allowing an analysis of reversions in a stop codon-containing inactivated β-glucuronidase transgene and another one allowing an analysis of repeat stability in a microsatellite-interrupted β-glucuronidase transgene. The transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying the β-glucuronidase-based homologous recombination substrate was used as a positive control. We showed that the majority of stresses increased the frequency of point mutations, homologous recombination and microsatellite instability in somatic cells, with the frequency of homologous recombination being affected the most. The analysis of transgenerational changes showed an increase in HRF to be the most prominent effect observed in progeny. Significant changes in recombination frequency were observed upon exposure to all types of stress except drought, whereas changes in microsatellite instability were observed upon exposure to UVC, heat and cold. The frequency of point mutations in the progeny of stress-exposed plants was the least affected; an increase in mutation frequency was observed only in the progeny of plants exposed to UVC. We thus conclude that transgenerational changes in genome stability in response to stress primarily involve an increase in recombination frequency.

  10. HFE gene C282Y, H63D and S65C mutations frequency in the Transylvania region, Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifa, Adrian P; Popp, Radu A; Militaru, Mariela S; Farcaş, Marius F; Crişan, Tania O; Gana, Ionuţ; Cucuianu, Andrei; Pop, Ioan V

    2012-06-01

    HFE-associated haemochromatosis is one of the most frequent autosomal recessive disorders in the Caucasian population. Although most of the cases are homozygous individuals for the C282Y mutation, another two mutations, H63D and S65C, have been reported to be associated with milder forms of the disease. This study was a first attempt to evaluate the distribution of these HFE gene mutations in the Transylvania region. Two-hundred and twenty-five healthy, unrelated volunteers originating from the Transylvania region, Romania, were screened for the HFE gene C282Y, H63D and S65C mutations, using molecular genetics assays (Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragments Length Polymorphism). For the C282Y mutation, 7 heterozygotes (3.1%) were found, but no homozygous individual. In the case of the H63D mutation, 40 heterozygotes (17.8%) and 4 homozygotes (1.75%) for the mutant allele were evidenced. We found a compound heterozygous genotype (C282Y/H63D) in one individual (0.45%). Thus, the allele frequencies of the C282Y and H63D were 1.75% and 10.9%, respectively. Three individuals (1.3%) were found to harbour the S65C mutation in a heterozygous state, but none in a homozygous state: the allele frequency of the mutant allele was 0.75%. The distribution of the HFE gene C282Y, H63D and S65C mutations found in our group matches the tendencies observed in other European countries: a decreasing gradient from Northern to Southern Europe for the C282Y mutation; high frequency for the H63D mutation, and low frequency for the S65C mutation in most of the countries.

  11. Mechanisms of mtDNA segregation and mitochondrial signalling in cells with the pathogenic A3243G mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jahangir Tafrechi, Roshan Sakineh

    2008-01-01

    Using newly developed single cell A3243G mutation load assays a novel mechanism of mtDNA segregation was identified in which the multi-copy mtDNA nucleoid takes a central position. Furthermore, likely due to low level changes in gene expression, no genes or gene sets could be identified with gene

  12. Frequency and spectrum of hemoglobinopathy mutations in a Uruguayan pediatric population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Da Luz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobinopathies are the most common recessive diseases worldwide but their prevalence in Uruguay has not been investigated. In this study, 397 unrelated outpatient children from the Pereira Rosell Hospital Center (CHPR, as well as 31 selected patients with microcytic anemia and 28 β-thalassemia carriers were analyzed for hemoglobinopathies by using biochemical and molecular biology methods. Parametric and non-parametric methods were used to compare the hematological indices between groups of genotypes. Of the 397 patients in the first group, approximately 1% (0.76% HbS and 0.25% β-thalassemia had a mutation in the HBB gene and 3.3% had α-thalassemia. These mutations had a heterogeneous distribution that varied according to individual ancestry. HbS was found exclusively in individuals with declared African ancestry and had a carrier frequency of 2.2%. The frequency of α-thalassemia carriers in outpatients of European and African ancestry was 1.2% and 6.5%, respectively. In contrast, the frequency of α-thalassemia carriers in patients with microcytic anemia was 25.8%, significantly higher (p < 0.01 than that observed in the sample as a whole and in Afro-descendants and Euro-descendants. Significant differences were observed in the hematological parameters between individuals with thalassemia genotypes and those with a normal genotype. These results indicate that hemoglobinopathies are a relevant health problem in Uruguay.

  13. Mutation Detection in Patients With Advanced Cancer by Universal Sequencing of Cancer-Related Genes in Tumor and Normal DNA vs Guideline-Based Germline Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelker, Diana; Zhang, Liying; Kemel, Yelena; Stadler, Zsofia K; Joseph, Vijai; Zehir, Ahmet; Pradhan, Nisha; Arnold, Angela; Walsh, Michael F; Li, Yirong; Balakrishnan, Anoop R; Syed, Aijazuddin; Prasad, Meera; Nafa, Khedoudja; Carlo, Maria I; Cadoo, Karen A; Sheehan, Meg; Fleischut, Megan H; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Trottier, Magan; Lipkin, Steven M; Lincoln, Anne; Mukherjee, Semanti; Ravichandran, Vignesh; Cambria, Roy; Galle, Jesse; Abida, Wassim; Arcila, Marcia E; Benayed, Ryma; Shah, Ronak; Yu, Kenneth; Bajorin, Dean F; Coleman, Jonathan A; Leach, Steven D; Lowery, Maeve A; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Kantoff, Philip W; Sawyers, Charles L; Dickler, Maura N; Saltz, Leonard; Motzer, Robert J; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Scher, Howard I; Baselga, Jose; Klimstra, David S; Solit, David B; Hyman, David M; Berger, Michael F; Ladanyi, Marc; Robson, Mark E; Offit, Kenneth

    2017-09-05

    Guidelines for cancer genetic testing based on family history may miss clinically actionable genetic changes with established implications for cancer screening or prevention. To determine the proportion and potential clinical implications of inherited variants detected using simultaneous sequencing of the tumor and normal tissue ("tumor-normal sequencing") compared with genetic test results based on current guidelines. From January 2014 until May 2016 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 10 336 patients consented to tumor DNA sequencing. Since May 2015, 1040 of these patients with advanced cancer were referred by their oncologists for germline analysis of 76 cancer predisposition genes. Patients with clinically actionable inherited mutations whose genetic test results would not have been predicted by published decision rules were identified. Follow-up for potential clinical implications of mutation detection was through May 2017. Tumor and germline sequencing compared with the predicted yield of targeted germline sequencing based on clinical guidelines. Proportion of clinically actionable germline mutations detected by universal tumor-normal sequencing that would not have been detected by guideline-directed testing. Of 1040 patients, the median age was 58 years (interquartile range, 50.5-66 years), 65.3% were male, and 81.3% had stage IV disease at the time of genomic analysis, with prostate, renal, pancreatic, breast, and colon cancer as the most common diagnoses. Of the 1040 patients, 182 (17.5%; 95% CI, 15.3%-19.9%) had clinically actionable mutations conferring cancer susceptibility, including 149 with moderate- to high-penetrance mutations; 101 patients tested (9.7%; 95% CI, 8.1%-11.7%) would not have had these mutations detected using clinical guidelines, including 65 with moderate- to high-penetrance mutations. Frequency of inherited mutations was related to case mix, stage, and founder mutations. Germline findings led to discussion or initiation of

  14. DNA mutations mediate microevolution between host-adapted forms of the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise A Magditch

    Full Text Available The disease cryptococcosis, caused by the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, is acquired directly from environmental exposure rather than transmitted person-to-person. One explanation for the pathogenicity of this species is that interactions with environmental predators select for virulence. However, co-incubation of C. neoformans with amoeba can cause a "switch" from the normal yeast morphology to a pseudohyphal form, enabling fungi to survive exposure to amoeba, yet conversely reducing virulence in mammalian models of cryptococcosis. Like other human pathogenic fungi, C. neoformans is capable of microevolutionary changes that influence the biology of the organism and outcome of the host-pathogen interaction. A yeast-pseudohyphal phenotypic switch also happens under in vitro conditions. Here, we demonstrate that this morphological switch, rather than being under epigenetic control, is controlled by DNA mutation since all pseudohyphal strains bear mutations within genes encoding components of the RAM pathway. High rates of isolation of pseudohyphal strains can be explained by the physical size of RAM pathway genes and a hypermutator phenotype of the strain used in phenotypic switching studies. Reversion to wild type yeast morphology in vitro or within a mammalian host can occur through different mechanisms, with one being counter-acting mutations. Infection of mice with RAM mutants reveals several outcomes: clearance of the infection, asymptomatic maintenance of the strains, or reversion to wild type forms and progression of disease. These findings demonstrate a key role of mutation events in microevolution to modulate the ability of a fungal pathogen to cause disease.

  15. SOLAR RADIATION AND INDUCTION OF DNA DAMAGE, MUTATIONS AND SKIN CANCERS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SETLOW,R.B.

    2007-05-10

    An understanding of the effects of sunlight on human skin begins with the effects on DNA and extends to cells, animals and humans. The major DNA photoproducts arising from UVB (280-320 nm) exposures are cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. If unrepaired, they may kill or mutate cells and result in basal and squamous cell carcinomas. Although UVA (320-400 nm) and visible wavelengths are poorly absorbed by DNA, the existing data indicate clearly that exposures to these wavelengths are responsible, in an animal model, for {approx}95 % of the incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). Six lines of evidence, to be discussed in detail, support the photosensitizing role of melanin in the induction of this cancer. They are: (1) Melanomas induced in backcross hybrids of small tropical fish of the genus Xiphophorus, exposed to wavelengths from 302-547 nm, indicate that {approx}95% of the cancers induced by exposure to sunlight would arise from UVA + visible wavelengths; (2) The action spectrum for inducing melanin-photosensitized oxidant production is very similar to the spectrum for inducing melanoma; (3) Albino whites and blacks, although very sensitive to sunburn and the sunlight induction of non-CMM, have very low incidences of CMM; (4) The incidence of CMM as a function of latitude is very similar to that of UVA, but not UVB; (5) Use of UVA-exposing sun-tanning parlors by the young increases the incidence rate of CMM and (6) Major mutations observed in CMM are not UVB-induced.

  16. Senataxin Mutation Reveals How R-Loops Promote Transcription by Blocking DNA Methylation at Gene Promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunseich, Christopher; Wang, Isabel X; Watts, Jason A; Burdick, Joshua T; Guber, Robert D; Zhu, Zhengwei; Bruzel, Alan; Lanman, Tyler; Chen, Kelian; Schindler, Alice B; Edwards, Nancy; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Yao, Jianhua; Lehky, Tanya; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Crain, Barbara; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Cheung, Vivian G

    2018-02-01

    R-loops are three-stranded nucleic acid structures found abundantly and yet often viewed as by-products of transcription. Studying cells from patients with a motor neuron disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 4 [ALS4]) caused by a mutation in senataxin, we uncovered how R-loops promote transcription. In ALS4 patients, the senataxin mutation depletes R-loops with a consequent effect on gene expression. With fewer R-loops in ALS4 cells, the expression of BAMBI, a negative regulator of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), is reduced; that then leads to the activation of the TGF-β pathway. We uncovered that genome-wide R-loops influence promoter methylation of over 1,200 human genes. DNA methyl-transferase 1 favors binding to double-stranded DNA over R-loops. Thus, in forming R-loops, nascent RNA blocks DNA methylation and promotes further transcription. Hence, our results show that nucleic acid structures, in addition to sequences, influence the binding and activity of regulatory proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Electrical signatures of single-stranded DNA with single base mutations in a nanopore capacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracheva, Maria E; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Leburton, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the magnitude of the electrical signals produced by DNA translocation through a 1 nm diameter nanopore in a capacitor membrane with a numerical multi-scale approach, and assess the possibility of resolving individual nucleotides as well as their types in the absence of conformational disorder. We show that the maximum recorded voltage caused by the DNA translocation is about 35 mV, while the maximum voltage signal due to the DNA backbone is about 30 mV, and the maximum voltage of a DNA base is about 8 mV. Signals from individual nucleotides can be identified in the recorded voltage traces, suggesting a 1 nm diameter pore in a capacitor can be used to accurately count the number of nucleotides in a DNA strand. Furthermore, we study the effect of a single base substitution on the voltage trace, and calculate the differences among the voltage traces due to a single base mutation for the sequences C 3 AC 7 , C 3 CC 7 , C 3 GC 7 and C 3 TC 7 . The calculated voltage differences are in the 5-10 mV range. The calculated maximum voltage caused by the translocation of individual bases varies from 2 to 9 mV, which is experimentally detectable

  18. Whole-exome sequencing of muscle-invasive bladder cancer identifies recurrent mutations of UNC5C and prognostic importance of DNA repair gene mutations on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Kai Lee; Kiyotani, Kazuma; Tamura, Kenji; Antic, Tatjana; Jang, Miran; Montoya, Magdeline; Campanile, Alexa; Yew, Poh Yin; Ganshert, Cory; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Steinberg, Gary D; O'Donnell, Peter H; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2014-12-15

    Because of suboptimal outcomes in muscle-invasive bladder cancer even with multimodality therapy, determination of potential genetic drivers offers the possibility of improving therapeutic approaches and discovering novel prognostic indicators. Using pTN staging, we case-matched 81 patients with resected ≥pT2 bladder cancers for whom perioperative chemotherapy use and disease recurrence status were known. Whole-exome sequencing was conducted in 43 cases to identify recurrent somatic mutations and targeted sequencing of 10 genes selected from the initial screening in an additional 38 cases was completed. Mutational profiles along with clinicopathologic information were correlated with recurrence-free survival (RFS) in the patients. We identified recurrent novel somatic mutations in the gene UNC5C (9.9%), in addition to TP53 (40.7%), KDM6A (21.0%), and TSC1 (12.3%). Patients who were carriers of somatic mutations in DNA repair genes (one or more of ATM, ERCC2, FANCD2, PALB2, BRCA1, or BRCA2) had a higher overall number of somatic mutations (P = 0.011). Importantly, after a median follow-up of 40.4 months, carriers of somatic mutations (n = 25) in any of these six DNA repair genes had significantly enhanced RFS compared with noncarriers [median, 32.4 vs. 14.8 months; hazard ratio of 0.46, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.22-0.98; P = 0.0435], after adjustment for pathologic pTN staging and independent of adjuvant chemotherapy usage. Better prognostic outcomes of individuals carrying somatic mutations in DNA repair genes suggest these mutations as favorable prognostic events in muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Additional mechanistic investigation into the previously undiscovered role of UNC5C in bladder cancer is warranted. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Analysis of morphology, DNA and isozyme of leaf mutation in Brassica napus L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Zhen; Hu Dongwei; Li Xiaobai

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to study the rule of irradiating effects, provide the effective way of analyzing mutant, and discuss the production application of mutant. By irradiating the 040B of Brassica napus L with . 0Co γ- ray, an obvious leaf mutation (ML) with large leaf area was found. The ML which has been inherited stably after three generations was compared with wide-type (CK) on the morphologic, DNA and isozymic levels. Results showed that S 4 and S17 from RAPD were two molecular markers which can express good polymorphism and have close relationships with leaf mutation sites. And in the analysis of EST and POD between ML and CK, the polymorphisms also proved that many discrepancies exist between ML and CK on the protein level. In addition, the research results in question can be applied to the breeding and genetic research of Brassica napus L

  20. Arsenic trioxide promotes mitochondrial DNA mutation and cell apoptosis in primary APL cells and NB4 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ran; Zhou, Jin; Sui, Meng; Li, ZhiYong; Feng, GuoSheng; Yang, BaoFeng

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) on the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells. The NB4 cell line was treated with 2.0 micromol/L As(2)O(3) in vitro, and the primary APL cells were treated with 2.0 micromol/L As(2)O(3) in vitro and 0.16 mg kg(-1) d(-1) As(2)O(3) in vivo. The mitochondrial DNA of all the cells above was amplified by PCR, directly sequenced and analyzed by Sequence Navigatore and Factura software. The apoptosis rates were assayed by flow cytometry. Mitochondrial DNA mutation in the D-loop region was found in NB4 and APL cells before As(2)O(3) use, but the mutation spots were remarkably increased after As(2)O(3) treatment, which was positively correlated to the rates of cellular apoptosis, the correlation coefficient: r (NB4-As2O3)=0.973818, and r (APL-As2O3)=0.934703. The mutation types include transition, transversion, codon insertion or deletion, and the mutation spots in all samples were not constant and regular. It is revealed that As(2)O(3) aggravates mtDNA mutation in the D-loop region of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells both in vitro and in vivo. Mitochondrial DNA might be one of the targets of As(2)O(3) in APL treatment.

  1. The Frequency and Type of K-RAS Mutations in Mexican Patients With Colorectal Cancer: A National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Ramos, Susana G; Alcázar-González, Gregorio; Reyes-Cortés, Luisa M; Torres-Grimaldo, Abdiel A; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana L; Morales-Casas, José; Flores-Sánchez, Patricia; De León-Escobedo, Raúl; Gómez-Díaz, Antonio; Moreno-Bringas, Carmen; Sánchez-Guillén, Jorge; Ramos-Salazar, Pedro; González-de León, César; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A

    2017-06-01

    Current metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) therapy uses monoclonal antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor. This treatment is only useful in the absence of K-RAS gene mutations; therefore the study of such mutations is part of a personalized treatment. The aim of this work is to determine the frequency and type of the most common K-RAS mutations in Mexican patients with metastatic disease by nucleotide sequencing. We studied 888 patients with mCRC from different regions of Mexico. The presence of mutations in exon 2, codons 12 and 13, of the K-RAS gene was determined by nucleotide sequencing. Patients exhibited K-RAS gene mutations in 35% (310/888) of cases. Mutation frequency of codons 12 and 13 was 71% (221/310) and 29% (89/310), respectively. The most common mutation (45.7%) in codon 12 was c.35G>A (p.G12D), whereas the one in codon 13 was c.38G>A (p.G13D) (78.7%). Given the frequency of K-RAS mutations in Mexicans, making a genetic study before deciding to treat mCRC patients with monoclonal antibodies is indispensable.

  2. Nucleotide pools dictate the identity and frequency of ribonucleotide incorporation in mitochondrial DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Karin Berglund

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous work has demonstrated the presence of ribonucleotides in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA and in the present study we use a genome-wide approach to precisely map the location of these. We find that ribonucleotides are distributed evenly between the heavy- and light-strand of mtDNA. The relative levels of incorporated ribonucleotides reflect that DNA polymerase γ discriminates the four ribonucleotides differentially during DNA synthesis. The observed pattern is also dependent on the mitochondrial deoxyribonucleotide (dNTP pools and disease-causing mutations that change these pools alter both the absolute and relative levels of incorporated ribonucleotides. Our analyses strongly suggest that DNA polymerase γ-dependent incorporation is the main source of ribonucleotides in mtDNA and argues against the existence of a mitochondrial ribonucleotide excision repair pathway in human cells. Furthermore, we clearly demonstrate that when dNTP pools are limiting, ribonucleotides serve as a source of building blocks to maintain DNA replication. Increased levels of embedded ribonucleotides in patient cells with disturbed nucleotide pools may contribute to a pathogenic mechanism that affects mtDNA stability and impair new rounds of mtDNA replication.

  3. Nucleotide pools dictate the identity and frequency of ribonucleotide incorporation in mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Anna-Karin; Navarrete, Clara; Engqvist, Martin K M; Hoberg, Emily; Szilagyi, Zsolt; Taylor, Robert W; Gustafsson, Claes M; Falkenberg, Maria; Clausen, Anders R

    2017-02-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the presence of ribonucleotides in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and in the present study we use a genome-wide approach to precisely map the location of these. We find that ribonucleotides are distributed evenly between the heavy- and light-strand of mtDNA. The relative levels of incorporated ribonucleotides reflect that DNA polymerase γ discriminates the four ribonucleotides differentially during DNA synthesis. The observed pattern is also dependent on the mitochondrial deoxyribonucleotide (dNTP) pools and disease-causing mutations that change these pools alter both the absolute and relative levels of incorporated ribonucleotides. Our analyses strongly suggest that DNA polymerase γ-dependent incorporation is the main source of ribonucleotides in mtDNA and argues against the existence of a mitochondrial ribonucleotide excision repair pathway in human cells. Furthermore, we clearly demonstrate that when dNTP pools are limiting, ribonucleotides serve as a source of building blocks to maintain DNA replication. Increased levels of embedded ribonucleotides in patient cells with disturbed nucleotide pools may contribute to a pathogenic mechanism that affects mtDNA stability and impair new rounds of mtDNA replication.

  4. Identification of a novel mutation in WFS1 in a family affected by low-frequency hearing impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, Juergen; Marquez-Klaka, Ben; Uebe, Steffen; Volz-Peters, Anja; Berger, Roswitha; Rausch, Peter

    2003-04-09

    Previously we confirmed linkage of autosomal dominantly inherited low-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment (LFSNHI) in a German family to the genetic locus DFNA6/DFNA14 on chromosome 4p16.3 close to the markers D4S432 and D4S431. Analysis of data from the Human Genome Project, showed that WFS1 is located in this region. Mutations in WFS1 are known to be responsible for Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD, MIM no. 606201), which follows an autosomal recessive trait. Studies in low-frequency hearing loss families showed that mutations in WFS1 were responsible for the phenotype. In all affected family members analysed, we detected a missense mutation in WFS1 (K705N) and therefore confirm the finding that the majority of mutations responsible for LFSNHI are missense mutations which localise to the C-terminal domain of the protein.

  5. Identification of a novel mutation in WFS1 in a family affected by low-frequency hearing impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, Juergen; Marquez-Klaka, Ben; Uebe, Steffen; Volz-Peters, Anja; Berger, Roswitha; Rausch, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Previously we confirmed linkage of autosomal dominantly inherited low-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment (LFSNHI) in a German family to the genetic locus DFNA6/DFNA14 on chromosome 4p16.3 close to the markers D4S432 and D4S431. Analysis of data from the Human Genome Project, showed that WFS1 is located in this region. Mutations in WFS1 are known to be responsible for Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD, MIM no. 606201), which follows an autosomal recessive trait. Studies in low-frequency hearing loss families showed that mutations in WFS1 were responsible for the phenotype. In all affected family members analysed, we detected a missense mutation in WFS1 (K705N) and therefore confirm the finding that the majority of mutations responsible for LFSNHI are missense mutations which localise to the C-terminal domain of the protein

  6. Reconstruction of DNA sequences using genetic algorithms and cellular automata: towards mutation prediction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizas, Ch; Sirakoulis, G Ch; Mardiris, V; Karafyllidis, I; Glykos, N; Sandaltzopoulos, R

    2008-04-01

    Change of DNA sequence that fuels evolution is, to a certain extent, a deterministic process because mutagenesis does not occur in an absolutely random manner. So far, it has not been possible to decipher the rules that govern DNA sequence evolution due to the extreme complexity of the entire process. In our attempt to approach this issue we focus solely on the mechanisms of mutagenesis and deliberately disregard the role of natural selection. Hence, in this analysis, evolution refers to the accumulation of genetic alterations that originate from mutations and are transmitted through generations without being subjected to natural selection. We have developed a software tool that allows modelling of a DNA sequence as a one-dimensional cellular automaton (CA) with four states per cell which correspond to the four DNA bases, i.e. A, C, T and G. The four states are represented by numbers of the quaternary number system. Moreover, we have developed genetic algorithms (GAs) in order to determine the rules of CA evolution that simulate the DNA evolution process. Linear evolution rules were considered and square matrices were used to represent them. If DNA sequences of different evolution steps are available, our approach allows the determination of the underlying evolution rule(s). Conversely, once the evolution rules are deciphered, our tool may reconstruct the DNA sequence in any previous evolution step for which the exact sequence information was unknown. The developed tool may be used to test various parameters that could influence evolution. We describe a paradigm relying on the assumption that mutagenesis is governed by a near-neighbour-dependent mechanism. Based on the satisfactory performance of our system in the deliberately simplified example, we propose that our approach could offer a starting point for future attempts to understand the mechanisms that govern evolution. The developed software is open-source and has a user-friendly graphical input interface.

  7. Novel Quantitative Real-Time LCR for the Sensitive Detection of SNP Frequencies in Pooled DNA: Method Development, Evaluation and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psifidi, Androniki; Dovas, Chrysostomos; Banos, Georgios

    2011-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) have proven to be powerful genetic markers for genetic applications in medicine, life science and agriculture. A variety of methods exist for SNP detection but few can quantify SNP frequencies when the mutated DNA molecules correspond to a small fraction of the wild-type DNA. Furthermore, there is no generally accepted gold standard for SNP quantification, and, in general, currently applied methods give inconsistent results in selected cohorts. In the present study we sought to develop a novel method for accurate detection and quantification of SNP in DNA pooled samples. Methods The development and evaluation of a novel Ligase Chain Reaction (LCR) protocol that uses a DNA-specific fluorescent dye to allow quantitative real-time analysis is described. Different reaction components and thermocycling parameters affecting the efficiency and specificity of LCR were examined. Several protocols, including gap-LCR modifications, were evaluated using plasmid standard and genomic DNA pools. A protocol of choice was identified and applied for the quantification of a polymorphism at codon 136 of the ovine PRNP gene that is associated with susceptibility to a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in sheep. Conclusions The real-time LCR protocol developed in the present study showed high sensitivity, accuracy, reproducibility and a wide dynamic range of SNP quantification in different DNA pools. The limits of detection and quantification of SNP frequencies were 0.085% and 0.35%, respectively. Significance The proposed real-time LCR protocol is applicable when sensitive detection and accurate quantification of low copy number mutations in DNA pools is needed. Examples include oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes, infectious diseases, pathogenic bacteria, fungal species, viral mutants, drug resistance resulting from point mutations, and genetically modified organisms in food. PMID:21283808

  8. Frequency of Antiretroviral Resistance Mutations among Infants Exposed to Single-Dose Nevirapine and Short Course Maternal Antiretroviral Regimens: ACTG A5207.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitti, Jane; Halvas, Elias K; Zheng, Lu; Panousis, Constantinos G; Kabanda, Joseph; Taulo, Frank; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Pape, Jean William; Lalloo, Umesh; Sprenger, Heather; Klingman, Karin L; Chan, Ellen S; McMahon, Deborah; Mellors, John W

    2014-11-01

    Intrapartum single-dose nevirapine (sdNVP) reduces HIV-1 perinatal transmission but selects NVP resistance among mothers and infants. We evaluated the frequency of antiretroviral resistance among infants with intrauterine HIV-1 infection exposed to sdNVP and maternal antenatal or breastfeeding antiretroviral therapy. This analysis included 429 infants from sub-Saharan Africa, India and Haiti whose 422 mothers received sdNVP plus maternal study treatment. At entry mothers had CD4>250/μL and were ART-naïve except for antenatal ZDV per local standard of care. Maternal study treatment started intrapartum and included ZDV/3TC, TDF/FTC or LPV/r for 7 or 21 days in a randomized factorial design. Infants received sdNVP study treatment and ZDV if local standard of care. Infant HIV RNA or DNA PCR and samples for genotype were obtained at birth and weeks 2, 4 and 12; infants who ever breast-fed were also tested at weeks 16, 24, 48 and 96. Samples from HIV-1-infected infants were tested for drug resistance by population genotype (ViroSeq). NVP or NRTI resistance mutations were assessed using the IAS-USA mutation list. Perinatal HIV-1 transmission occurred in 17 (4.0%) infants including 12 intrauterine infections. Resistance mutations were detected among 5 (42%) intrauterine-infected infants; of these, 3 had mutations conferring resistance to NVP alone, 1 had resistance to NRTI alone, and 1 had dual-class resistance mutations. Among the 2 infants with NRTI mutations, one (K70R) was likely maternally transmitted and one (K65R) occurred in the context of breastfeeding exposure to maternal antiretroviral therapy. Infants with intrauterine HIV infection are at risk of acquiring resistance mutations from exposure to maternal antiretroviral medications intrapartum and/or during breastfeeding. New approaches are needed to lower the risk of antiretroviral resistance in these infants.

  9. The Frequency of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Mutations in Migraine Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhsen Öcal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Migraine is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, but its pathophysiology is still unclear. Genetic factors that predispose patients to thrombosis have been studied in patients with migraine to highlight the pathogenesis, but the results remain controversial. In this study, the frequencies of factor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin (Pt G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutations were investigated. METHODS: One hundred and sixty patients aged of 15 to 55 years with no history of systemic disease and who had been diagnosed as migraine according to the International Headache Society (IHS diagnostic criteria at Baskent University Hospital Neurology Outpatient Clinics were investigated for FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T mutations from their genomic DNA, and the results were compared with those of healthy controls. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty five (96.9% of 160 migraine patients were homozygote normal, 5 (3.1% were heterozygote and none of them were homozygote mutant for FVL. The control group had 9.8% heterozygote individuals but the difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p> 0.05. There were no homozygote mutant individuals in the Turkish population study in normal subjects like our study. Thirty nine (24.4% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 8 (5% were homozygote mutant for MTHFR C677T. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.15. Three (1.9% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 5 (2.9% of the control group were heterozygote mutant for Pt G20210A mutation. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.420. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T gene mutations, which are considered

  10. The Frequency of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Mutations in Migraine Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhsen Öcal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Migraine is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, but its pathophysiology is still unclear. Genetic factors that predispose patients to thrombosis have been studied in patients with migraine to highlight the pathogenesis, but the results remain controversial. In this study, the frequencies of factor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin (Pt G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutations were investigated. METHODS: One hundred and sixty patients aged of 15 to 55 years with no history of systemic disease and who had been diagnosed as migraine according to the International Headache Society (IHS diagnostic criteria at Baskent University Hospital Neurology Outpatient Clinics were investigated for FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T mutations from their genomic DNA, and the results were compared with those of healthy controls. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty five (96.9% of 160 migraine patients were homozygote normal, 5 (3.1% were heterozygote and none of them were homozygote mutant for FVL. The control group had 9.8% heterozygote individuals but the difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p> 0.05. There were no homozygote mutant individuals in the Turkish population study in normal subjects like our study. Thirty nine (24.4% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 8 (5% were homozygote mutant for MTHFR C677T. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.15. Three (1.9% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 5 (2.9% of the control group were heterozygote mutant for Pt G20210A mutation. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.420. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T gene mutations, which are considered

  11. Mitochondrial DNA depletion, mitochondrial mutations and high TFAM expression in hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Lihua; Ru, Guoqing; Mao, Zhuochao; Wang, Chenghui; Nie, Zhipeng; Li, Qiang; Huang-yang, Yiyi; Zhu, Ling; Liang, Xiaoyang; Yu, Jialing; Jiang, Pingping

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the role of mitochondrial genetic alterations in hepatocellular carcinoma by directly comparing the mitochondrial genomes of 86 matched pairs of HCC and non-tumor liver samples. Substitutions in 637 mtDNA sites were detected, comprising 89.80% transitions and 6.60% transversions. Forty-six somatic variants, including 15 novel mutations, were identified in 40.70% of tumor tissues. Of those, 21 were located in the non-coding region and 25 in the protein-coding region. Twenty-two...

  12. Mutation frequencies of the cytochrome CYP2D6 gene in Parkinson disease patients and in families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucotte, G.; Turpin, J.C. [CHR, Reims (France); Gerard, N. [INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1996-07-26

    The frequencies of five mutations of the debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (CYP2D6) gene (mutations D6-A, B, C, D, and T), corresponding to poor metabolizer (PM) phenotypes, were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 47 patients with Parkinson disease, and compared with the findings in 47 healthy controls. These mutant alleles were about twice as frequent among patients as in controls, with an approximate relative risk ratio of 2.12 (95% confidence interval, 1.41-2.62). There seem to be no significant differences in frequencies of mutant genotypes in patients among gender and modalities of response with levodopa therapy; but frequency of the mutations was slightly enhanced after age-at-onset of 60 years. Mutations D6-B, D, and T were detected in 7 patients belonging to 10 Parkinson pedigrees. 25 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. Population data and mutation rates of 19 STR loci in seven provinces from China based on Goldeneye™ DNA ID System 20A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiu-Ling; Chen, Ye-Fei; Huang, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Kai-Yan; Zhao, Hu; Lu, De-Jian

    2017-05-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) analysis is a primary tool in forensic casework. Population data and mutation rates of STRs are very important for paternity testing and forensic genetics. However, the population data and mutation rates of STRs in Han nationality based on large samples have still not been fully described in China. In this study, the allelic frequencies, forensic parameters, and mutation rate of 19 STR loci (D19S433, D5S818, D21S11, D18S51, D6S1043, D3S1358, D13S317, D7S820, D16S539, CSFIPO, PentaD, vWA, D8S1179, TPOX, Penta E, TH01, D12S391, D2S1338, and FGA) based on the Goldeneye™ DNA ID System 20A in Southern China Han nationality among seven provinces were investigated. Furthermore, population stratification of Southern China Han nationality among seven provinces was established. The multidimensional scaling (MDS) plot based on genetic distances (Fst) showed that the studied populations can be clustered into two major groups. However, relationships among populations were weak (Fst < 0.0043). A total of 376 cases of mutation were detected from the 19 selected loci in 15,396 meioses. The average mutation rate for the 19 loci was estimated to be 1.3 × 10 -3 per meiosis. The mutation was mainly single step; the paternal mutation rate was higher than the maternal; and paternal mutation rate increases with paternal age.

  14. Risk of colorectal cancer for people with a mutation in both a MUTYH and a DNA mismatch repair gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Aung Ko; Reece, Jeanette C.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P.; Cleary, Sean P.; Kim, Hyeja; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dowty, James G.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Tucker, Katherine M.; Winship, Ingrid M.; Macrae, Finlay A.; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Hopper, John L.; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The base excision repair protein, MUTYH, functionally interacts with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. As genetic testing moves from testing one gene at a time, to gene panel and whole exome next generation sequencing approaches, understanding the risk associated with co-existence of germline mutations in these genes will be important for clinical interpretation and management. From the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we identified 10 carriers who had both a MUTYH mutation (6 with c.1187G>A p.(Gly396Asp), 3 with c.821G>A p.(Arg274Gln), and 1 with c.536A>G p.(Tyr179Cys)) and a MMR gene mutation (3 in MLH1, 6 in MSH2, and 1 in PMS2), 375 carriers of a single (monoallelic) MUTYH mutation alone, and 469 carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Of the 10 carriers of both gene mutations, 8 were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Using a weighted cohort analysis, we estimated that risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of both a MUTYH and a MMR gene mutation was substantially higher than that for carriers of a MUTYH mutation alone [hazard ratio (HR) 21.5, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 9.19–50.1; p colorectal cancer for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Our finding suggests MUTYH mutation testing in MMR gene mutation carriers is not clinically informative. PMID:26202870

  15. Droplet digital PCR-based EGFR mutation detection with an internal quality control index to determine the quality of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Su; Choi, Hyun-Jeung; Kim, Jin Ju; Kim, M Sun; Lee, In-Seon; Byun, Bohyun; Jia, Lina; Oh, Myung Ryurl; Moon, Youngho; Park, Sarah; Choi, Joon-Seok; Chae, Seoung Wan; Nam, Byung-Ho; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Jihun; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Jae Seok; Won, Jae-Kyung; Cho, Soo Youn; Choi, Yoon-La; Shin, Young Kee

    2018-01-11

    In clinical translational research and molecular in vitro diagnostics, a major challenge in the detection of genetic mutations is overcoming artefactual results caused by the low-quality of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPET)-derived DNA (FFPET-DNA). Here, we propose the use of an 'internal quality control (iQC) index' as a criterion for judging the minimum quality of DNA for PCR-based analyses. In a pre-clinical study comparing the results from droplet digital PCR-based EGFR mutation test (ddEGFR test) and qPCR-based EGFR mutation test (cobas EGFR test), iQC index ≥ 0.5 (iQC copies ≥ 500, using 3.3 ng of FFPET-DNA [1,000 genome equivalents]) was established, indicating that more than half of the input DNA was amplifiable. Using this criterion, we conducted a retrospective comparative clinical study of the ddEGFR and cobas EGFR tests for the detection of EGFR mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) FFPET-DNA samples. Compared with the cobas EGFR test, the ddEGFR test exhibited superior analytical performance and equivalent or higher clinical performance. Furthermore, iQC index is a reliable indicator of the quality of FFPET-DNA and could be used to prevent incorrect diagnoses arising from low-quality samples.

  16. A hotspot in the glucocorticoid receptor DNA-binding domain susceptible to loss of function mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banuelos, Jesus; Shin, Soon Cheon; Lu, Nick Z.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are used to treat a variety of inflammatory disorders and certain cancers. However, GC resistance occurs in subsets of patients. We found that EL4 cells, a GC-resistant mouse thymoma cell line, harbored a point mutation in their GC receptor (GR) gene, resulting in the substitution of arginine 493 by a cysteine in the second zinc finger of the DNA-binding domain. Allelic discrimination analyses revealed that the R493C mutation occurred on both alleles. In the absence of GCs, the GR in EL4 cells localized predominantly in the cytoplasm and upon dexamethasone treatment underwent nuclear translocation, suggesting the ligand binding ability of the GR in EL4 cells was intact. In transient transfection assays, the R493C mutant could not transactivate the MMTV-luciferase reporter. Site-directed mutagenesis to revert the R493C mutation restored the transactivation activity. Cotransfection experiments showed that the R493C mutant did not inhibit the transcriptional activities of the wild-type GR. In addition, the R493C mutant did not repress either the AP-1 or NF-κB reporters as effectively as WT GR. Furthermore, stable expression of the WT GR in the EL4 cells enabled GC-mediated gene regulation, specifically upregulation of IκBα and downregulation of interferon γ and interleukin 17A. Arginine 493 is conserved among multiple species and all human nuclear receptors and its mutation has also been found in the human GR, androgen receptor, and mineralocorticoid receptor. Thus, R493 is necessary for the transcriptional activity of the GR and a hotspot for mutations that result in GC resistance. PMID:25676786

  17. Mutation frequency and genotype/phenotype correlation among phenylketonuria patients from Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, S.L.C.; Martinez, D.; Kuozmine, A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of hepatic phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). To determine the molecular basis of PKU in the state of Georgia, thirty-five Georgian PKU patients representing sixty independent alleles were examined by a combination of DGGE and direct sequence analysis. At present, this approach has led to the identification of 55/60 or about 92% of all mutant alleles. The relatively high frequencies of mutations common to the British Isles (R408W, I65T and L348V) are compatible with 1990 census data showing that 34% of the general Georgian population claim Irish, English or Scottish ancestors. Three new mutations, E76A (1/60), R241L (2/60), and R400R (2/60), were also detected in this study. Although the nucleotide substitution in codon 400 (AGG{r_arrow}CGG) did not change the amino acid sequence, it was the only base change detected in a scan of all 13 exons of two independent alleles. Since codon 400 is split between exons 11 and 12, this change may exert some effect on splicing, as has previously been seen in the PAH gene for the silent mutation Q304Q and the nonsense mutation Y356X, each of which effect codons immediately adjacent to splicing signals. This hypothesis remains to be tested by expression analysis or studies of ectopic transcripts. The remaining 19 characterized alleles contained one of 15 previously identified mutations. Twenty-five of the thirty non-related patients examined in this study were completely genotyped, and there was a strong correlation between mutant PAH genotype, PAH activity predicted from in vitro expression studies where known, and PKU or HPA phenotype. For mutations not yet studied by expression analysis, this correlation suggests that L213P, R241L, Y277D may drastically reduce residual PAH activity while F39L and E76A may retain significant amounts of PAH activity.

  18. Frequency and clinical features of the JAK2 V617F mutation in pediatric patients with sporadic essential thrombocythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Takuya; Imamura, Toshihiko; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Wakaizumi, Katsuji; Yamamoto, Tohru; Otabe, Osamu; Ishigami, Tsuyoshi; Adachi, Souichi; Morimoto, Akira

    2008-12-01

    Pediatric essential thrombocythemia (ET) is a rare and heterogenous disease entity. While several recent studies have focused on the role of the JAK2 V617F mutation in pediatric ET, the frequency of pediatric ET cases with this mutation and the associated clinical features remain unclear. We examined six childhood cases who had been diagnosed with ET according to WHO criteria (onset age: 0.2-14 years) for the presence of the JAK2 V617F mutation, MPLW515L mutation and JAK2 exon 12 mutations. Two sensitive PCR-based methods were used for the JAK2 V617F genotyping. We also examined the expression of polycythemia rubra vera-1 (PRV-1), which is a diagnostic marker for clonal ET. We found that three of the six cases had the JAK2 V617F mutation and that all six cases expressed PRV-1 in their peripheral granulocytes. Neither MPL W515L mutation nor JAK2 exon 12 mutations was detected in the patients without JAK2 V617F mutation. The two patients who developed thrombocythemia during infancy were JAK2 V617F-negative. These findings suggest that the JAK2 V617F mutation is not rare in childhood sporadic ET cases, and that these cases might be older and myeloproliferative features.

  19. Experiences from treatment-predictive KRAS testing; high mutation frequency in rectal cancers from females and concurrent mutations in the same tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Mats; Ekstrand, Anna; Edekling, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    . METHODS: We used a real-time PCR based method to determine KRAS mutations in 136 colorectal cancers with mutations identified in 53 (39%) tumors. RESULTS: KRAS mutations were significantly more often found in rectal cancer (21/38, 55%) than in colon cancer (32/98, 33%) (P = 0.02). This finding...... was explained by marked differences mutation rates in female patients who showed mutations in 33% of the colon cancers and in 67% of the rectal cancers (P = 0.01). Concurrent KRAS mutations were identified in three tumors; two colorectal cancers harbored Gly12Asp/Gly13Asp and Gly12Cys/Gly13Asp and a third tumor...... carried Gly12Cys/Gly12Asp in an adenomatous component and additionally acquired Gly12Val in the invasive component. CONCLUSION: The demonstration of a particularly high KRAS mutation frequency among female rectal cancer patients suggests that this subset is the least likely to respond to anti...

  20. Ancient DNA analysis reveals high frequency of European lactase persistence allele (T-13910) in medieval central europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüttli, Annina; Bouwman, Abigail; Akgül, Gülfirde; Della Casa, Philippe; Rühli, Frank; Warinner, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Ruminant milk and dairy products are important food resources in many European, African, and Middle Eastern societies. These regions are also associated with derived genetic variants for lactase persistence. In mammals, lactase, the enzyme that hydrolyzes the milk sugar lactose, is normally down-regulated after weaning, but at least five human populations around the world have independently evolved mutations regulating the expression of the lactase-phlorizin-hydrolase gene. These mutations result in a dominant lactase persistence phenotype and continued lactase tolerance in adulthood. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at C/T-13910 is responsible for most lactase persistence in European populations, but when and where the T-13910 polymorphism originated and the evolutionary processes by which it rose to high frequency in Europe have been the subject of strong debate. A history of dairying is presumed to be a prerequisite, but archaeological evidence is lacking. In this study, DNA was extracted from the dentine of 36 individuals excavated at a medieval cemetery in Dalheim, Germany. Eighteen individuals were successfully genotyped for the C/T-13910 SNP by molecular cloning and sequencing, of which 13 (72%) exhibited a European lactase persistence genotype: 44% CT, 28% TT. Previous ancient DNA-based studies found that lactase persistence genotypes fall below detection levels in most regions of Neolithic Europe. Our research shows that by AD 1200, lactase persistence frequency had risen to over 70% in this community in western Central Europe. Given that lactase persistence genotype frequency in present-day Germany and Austria is estimated at 71-80%, our results suggest that genetic lactase persistence likely reached modern levels before the historic population declines associated with the Black Death, thus excluding plague-associated evolutionary forces in the rise of lactase persistence in this region. This new evidence sheds light on the dynamic evolutionary

  1. Ancient DNA analysis reveals high frequency of European lactase persistence allele (T-13910 in medieval central europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annina Krüttli

    Full Text Available Ruminant milk and dairy products are important food resources in many European, African, and Middle Eastern societies. These regions are also associated with derived genetic variants for lactase persistence. In mammals, lactase, the enzyme that hydrolyzes the milk sugar lactose, is normally down-regulated after weaning, but at least five human populations around the world have independently evolved mutations regulating the expression of the lactase-phlorizin-hydrolase gene. These mutations result in a dominant lactase persistence phenotype and continued lactase tolerance in adulthood. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at C/T-13910 is responsible for most lactase persistence in European populations, but when and where the T-13910 polymorphism originated and the evolutionary processes by which it rose to high frequency in Europe have been the subject of strong debate. A history of dairying is presumed to be a prerequisite, but archaeological evidence is lacking. In this study, DNA was extracted from the dentine of 36 individuals excavated at a medieval cemetery in Dalheim, Germany. Eighteen individuals were successfully genotyped for the C/T-13910 SNP by molecular cloning and sequencing, of which 13 (72% exhibited a European lactase persistence genotype: 44% CT, 28% TT. Previous ancient DNA-based studies found that lactase persistence genotypes fall below detection levels in most regions of Neolithic Europe. Our research shows that by AD 1200, lactase persistence frequency had risen to over 70% in this community in western Central Europe. Given that lactase persistence genotype frequency in present-day Germany and Austria is estimated at 71-80%, our results suggest that genetic lactase persistence likely reached modern levels before the historic population declines associated with the Black Death, thus excluding plague-associated evolutionary forces in the rise of lactase persistence in this region. This new evidence sheds light on the dynamic

  2. rDNA Copy Number Variants Are Frequent Passenger Mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Deletion Collections and de Novo Transformants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth X. Kwan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal DNA (rDNA locus is known to exhibit greater instability relative to the rest of the genome. However, wild-type cells preferentially maintain a stable number of rDNA copies, suggesting underlying genetic control of the size of this locus. We performed a screen of a subset of the Yeast Knock-Out (YKO single gene deletion collection to identify genetic regulators of this locus and to determine if rDNA copy number correlates with yeast replicative lifespan. While we found no correlation between replicative lifespan and rDNA size, we identified 64 candidate strains with significant rDNA copy number differences. However, in the process of validating candidate rDNA variants, we observed that independent isolates of our de novo gene deletion strains had unsolicited but significant changes in rDNA copy number. Moreover, we were not able to recapitulate rDNA phenotypes from the YKO yeast deletion collection. Instead, we found that the standard lithium acetate transformation protocol is a significant source of rDNA copy number variation, with lithium acetate exposure being the treatment causing variable rDNA copy number events after transformation. As the effects of variable rDNA copy number are being increasingly reported, our finding that rDNA is affected by lithium acetate exposure suggested that rDNA copy number variants may be influential passenger mutations in standard strain construction in S. cerevisiae.

  3. rDNA Copy Number Variants Are Frequent Passenger Mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Deletion Collections and de Novo Transformants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Elizabeth X; Wang, Xiaobin S; Amemiya, Haley M; Brewer, Bonita J; Raghuraman, M K

    2016-09-08

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus is known to exhibit greater instability relative to the rest of the genome. However, wild-type cells preferentially maintain a stable number of rDNA copies, suggesting underlying genetic control of the size of this locus. We performed a screen of a subset of the Yeast Knock-Out (YKO) single gene deletion collection to identify genetic regulators of this locus and to determine if rDNA copy number correlates with yeast replicative lifespan. While we found no correlation between replicative lifespan and rDNA size, we identified 64 candidate strains with significant rDNA copy number differences. However, in the process of validating candidate rDNA variants, we observed that independent isolates of our de novo gene deletion strains had unsolicited but significant changes in rDNA copy number. Moreover, we were not able to recapitulate rDNA phenotypes from the YKO yeast deletion collection. Instead, we found that the standard lithium acetate transformation protocol is a significant source of rDNA copy number variation, with lithium acetate exposure being the treatment causing variable rDNA copy number events after transformation. As the effects of variable rDNA copy number are being increasingly reported, our finding that rDNA is affected by lithium acetate exposure suggested that rDNA copy number variants may be influential passenger mutations in standard strain construction in S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2016 Kwan et al.

  4. Detection of MPLW515L/K mutations and determination of allele frequencies with a single-tube PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Hiraku; Morishita, Soji; Araki, Marito; Edahiro, Yoko; Sunami, Yoshitaka; Hironaka, Yumi; Noda, Naohiro; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Ohsaka, Akimichi; Komatsu, Norio

    2014-01-01

    A gain-of-function mutation in the myeloproliferative leukemia virus (MPL) gene, which encodes the thrombopoietin receptor, has been identified in patients with essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, subgroups of classic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). The presence of MPL gene mutations is a critical diagnostic criterion for these diseases. Here, we developed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective method of detecting two major MPL mutations, MPLW515L/K, in a single PCR assay; we termed this method DARMS (dual amplification refractory mutation system)-PCR. DARMS-PCR is designed to produce three different PCR products corresponding to MPLW515L, MPLW515K, and all MPL alleles. The amplicons are later detected and quantified using a capillary sequencer to determine the relative frequencies of the mutant and wild-type alleles. Applying DARMS-PCR to human specimens, we successfully identified MPL mutations in MPN patients, with the exception of patients bearing mutant allele frequencies below the detection limit (5%) of this method. The MPL mutant allele frequencies determined using DARMS-PCR correlated strongly with the values determined using deep sequencing. Thus, we demonstrated the potential of DARMS-PCR to detect MPL mutations and determine the allele frequencies in a timely and cost-effective manner.

  5. Detection of MPLW515L/K mutations and determination of allele frequencies with a single-tube PCR assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiraku Takei

    Full Text Available A gain-of-function mutation in the myeloproliferative leukemia virus (MPL gene, which encodes the thrombopoietin receptor, has been identified in patients with essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, subgroups of classic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs. The presence of MPL gene mutations is a critical diagnostic criterion for these diseases. Here, we developed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective method of detecting two major MPL mutations, MPLW515L/K, in a single PCR assay; we termed this method DARMS (dual amplification refractory mutation system-PCR. DARMS-PCR is designed to produce three different PCR products corresponding to MPLW515L, MPLW515K, and all MPL alleles. The amplicons are later detected and quantified using a capillary sequencer to determine the relative frequencies of the mutant and wild-type alleles. Applying DARMS-PCR to human specimens, we successfully identified MPL mutations in MPN patients, with the exception of patients bearing mutant allele frequencies below the detection limit (5% of this method. The MPL mutant allele frequencies determined using DARMS-PCR correlated strongly with the values determined using deep sequencing. Thus, we demonstrated the potential of DARMS-PCR to detect MPL mutations and determine the allele frequencies in a timely and cost-effective manner.

  6. NSD1 mutations generate a genome-wide DNA methylation signature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Choufani, S

    2015-12-22

    Sotos syndrome (SS) represents an important human model system for the study of epigenetic regulation; it is an overgrowth\\/intellectual disability syndrome caused by mutations in a histone methyltransferase, NSD1. As layered epigenetic modifications are often interdependent, we propose that pathogenic NSD1 mutations have a genome-wide impact on the most stable epigenetic mark, DNA methylation (DNAm). By interrogating DNAm in SS patients, we identify a genome-wide, highly significant NSD1(+\\/-)-specific signature that differentiates pathogenic NSD1 mutations from controls, benign NSD1 variants and the clinically overlapping Weaver syndrome. Validation studies of independent cohorts of SS and controls assigned 100% of these samples correctly. This highly specific and sensitive NSD1(+\\/-) signature encompasses genes that function in cellular morphogenesis and neuronal differentiation, reflecting cardinal features of the SS phenotype. The identification of SS-specific genome-wide DNAm alterations will facilitate both the elucidation of the molecular pathophysiology of SS and the development of improved diagnostic testing.

  7. Exome sequencing identifies rare deleterious mutations in DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM as potential breast cancer susceptibility alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella R Thompson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive efforts using linkage and candidate gene approaches, the genetic etiology for the majority of families with a multi-generational breast cancer predisposition is unknown. In this study, we used whole-exome sequencing of thirty-three individuals from 15 breast cancer families to identify potential predisposing genes. Our analysis identified families with heterozygous, deleterious mutations in the DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM, which are responsible for the autosomal recessive disorders Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome. In total, screening of all exons in these genes in 438 breast cancer families identified three with truncating mutations in FANCC and two with truncating mutations in BLM. Additional screening of FANCC mutation hotspot exons identified one pathogenic mutation among an additional 957 breast cancer families. Importantly, none of the deleterious mutations were identified among 464 healthy controls and are not reported in the 1,000 Genomes data. Given the rarity of Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome disorders among Caucasian populations, the finding of multiple deleterious mutations in these critical DNA repair genes among high-risk breast cancer families is intriguing and suggestive of a predisposing role. Our data demonstrate the utility of intra-family exome-sequencing approaches to uncover cancer predisposition genes, but highlight the major challenge of definitively validating candidates where the incidence of sporadic disease is high, germline mutations are not fully penetrant, and individual predisposition genes may only account for a tiny proportion of breast cancer families.

  8. Analysis of mutant frequencies and mutation spectra in hMTH1 knockdown TK6 cells exposed to UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotouhi, Asal [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University (Sweden); Hagos, Winta Woldai [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Ilic, Marina; Wojcik, Andrzej; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University (Sweden); Gruijl, Frank de [Department of Dermatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Mullenders, Leon; Jansen, Jacob G. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Haghdoost, Siamak, E-mail: Siamak.Haghdoost@su.se [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University (Sweden)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • hMTH1 protects cells from mutagenesis induced by UVA and UVB, but not UVC. • No protective role of hMTH1 in cell survival post UVB and UVC irradiation. • hMTH1 prevents induction of transition-type mutations at AT and GC post UVA irradiation. • 2-OH-dATP rather than 8-oxo-dGTP in the nucleotide pool likely contributes in UVA-induced mutations. - Abstract: Ultraviolet radiation is a highly mutagenic agent that damages the DNA by the formation of mutagenic photoproducts at dipyrimidine sites and by oxidative DNA damages via reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS can also give rise to mutations via oxidation of dNTPs in the nucleotide pool, e.g. 8-oxo-dGTP and 2-OH-dATP and subsequent incorporation during DNA replication. Here we show that expression of human MutT homolog 1 (hMTH1) which sanitizes the nucleotide pool by dephosphorylating oxidized dNTPs, protects against mutagenesis induced by long wave UVA light and by UVB light but not by short wave UVC light. Mutational spectra analyses of UVA-induced mutations at the endogenous Thymidine kinase gene in human lymphoblastoid cells revealed that hMTH1 mainly protects cells from transitions at GC and AT base pairs.

  9. High Frequency of Alkaptonuria in Slovakia: Evidence for the Appearance of Multiple Mutations in HGO Involving Different Mutational Hot Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatková, Andrea; de Bernabé, Daniel Beltrán Valero; Poláková, Helena; Zvarík, Marek; Feráková, Eva; Bošák, Vladimir; Ferák, Vladimír; Kádasi, L'udovít; de Córdoba , Santiago Rodríguez

    2000-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase (HGO) activity. AKU shows a very low prevalence (1:100,000–250,000) in most ethnic groups. One notable exception is in Slovakia, where the incidence of AKU rises to 1:19,000. This high incidence is difficult to explain by a classical founder effect, because as many as 10 different AKU mutations have been identified in this relatively small country. We have determined the allelic associations of 11 HGO intragenic polymorphisms for 44 AKU chromosomes from 20 Slovak pedigrees. These data were compared to the HGO haplotype data available in our laboratory for >80 AKU chromosomes from different European and non-European countries. The results show that common European AKU chromosomes have had only a marginal contribution to the Slovak AKU gene pool. Six of the ten Slovak AKU mutations, including the prevalent G152fs, G161R, G270R, and P370fs mutations, most likely originated in Slovakia. Data available for 17 Slovak AKU pedigrees indicate that most of the AKU chromosomes have their origins in a single very small region in the Carpathian mountains, in the northwestern part of the country. Since all six Slovak AKU mutations are associated with HGO mutational hot spots, we suggest that an increased mutation rate at the HGO gene is responsible for the clustering of AKU mutations in such a small geographical region. PMID:11017803

  10. Comparison of somatic mutation frequencies at HGPRT locus induced by radiation and chemical pollutant from energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Honglan; Cao Yi; Duan Zhikai; Wu Qiqing; Chen Ying; Zhang Shuxian

    1998-12-01

    The somatic induction frequencies of mutation at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus induced by 60 Co γ-rays and Benzo-a-pyrene (B(a)P), which are representative of hazardous emission and pollutant from nuclear energy cycle and fossil-fuelled energy cycle respectively, were detected by using forward mutation assay and cloning technique in both V 79 Chinese hamster cells and human peripheral blood T-lymphocytes. Resistant mutants were selected with 6-thioguanine (6-TG). Dose-response curves and mathematical expressions were obtained for mutation frequencies and survival following γ-ray and B(a)P(+S 9 ) treatments. The dose ranges for the two mutagens were compared when they induced the same mutation frequencies. In V 79 /HGPRT assay system, when the mutation frequencies were 5∼35 mutants/10 6 cells the response of γ-rays in the dose range from 0.93∼4.96 Gy at dose rate of 1.16 Gy/min is nearly equivalent to that in the B(a)P dose range from 0.52∼4.27 μg/ml. By using cloning technique in T-lymphocytes, when the mutation frequencies were 1∼14 mutants/10 5 cells the response of γ-rays in the dose range from 0.05∼4.77 Gy at dose rate of 1.03 Gy/min is nearly equivalent to that in the B(a)P dose range from 0.15∼7.36 μg/ml. When the survival fraction is 37%, the mutation frequency induced by B(a)P is higher than that induced by 60 Co γ-rays

  11. Founder Mutations in Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Deborah; DiGiovanna, John J.; Kraemer, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    In this issue, Soufir et al. report a founder mutation in the XPC DNA repair gene in 74% of families with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) in the Maghreb region (Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia) of northern Africa. These patients have a high frequency of skin cancer. The presence of this founder mutation provides an opportunity for genetic counseling and early diagnosis of XP. PMID:20463673

  12. A threshold in the dose-response relationship for X-ray induced somatic mutation frequency in drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koana, Takao; Sakai, Kazuo; Okada, M.O.

    2004-01-01

    The dose-response relationship of ionizing radiation and its stochastic effects has been thought to be linear without any thresholds for a long time. The basic data for this model was obtained from mutational assays using germ cells of male fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, cancer-causing activity should be examined more appropriately in somatic cells than in germ cells. In this paper, we examined the dose-response relationship of X-ray irradiation and somatic mutation in drosophila, and found a threshold at approximately 1 Gy in the DNA repair proficient flies. In the repair deficient siblings, the threshold was smaller and the inclination of the dose-response curve was five times steeper. These results suggest that the dose-response relationship between X-ray irradiation and somatic mutation has a threshold, and that the DNA repair function contributes to its formation. (author)

  13. A novel approach to detect KRAS/BRAF mutation for colon cancer: Highly sensitive simultaneous detection of mutations and simple pre-treatment without DNA extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shun-Ichi; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Hirai, Mitsuharu; Shibata, Harumi; Takagi, Koichi; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Hatake, Kiyohiko

    2015-07-01

    It has been reported that colon cancer patients with KRAS and BRAF mutations that lie downstream of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) acquire resistance against therapy with anti‑EGFR antibodies, cetuximab and panitumumab. On the other hand, some reports say KRAS codon 13 mutation (p.G13D) has lower resistance against anti-EGFR antibodies, thus there is a substantial need for detection of specific KRAS mutations. We have established a state-of-the-art measurement system using QProbe (QP) method that allows simultaneous measurement of KRAS codon 12/13, p.G13D and BRAF mutation, and compared this method against Direct Sequencing (DS) using 182 specimens from colon cancer patients. In addition, 32 biopsy specimens were processed with a novel pre-treatment method without DNA purification in order to detect KRAS/BRAF. As a result of KRAS mutation measurement, concordance rate between the QP method and DS method was 81.4% (144/177) except for the 5 specimens that were undeterminable. Among them, 29 specimens became positive with QP method and negative with DS method. BRAF was measured with QP method only, and the mutation detection rate was 3.9% (6/153). KRAS measurement using a simple new pre-treatment method without DNA extraction resulted in 31 good results out of 32, all of them matching with the DS method. We have established a simple but highly sensitive simultaneous detection system for KRAS/BRAF. Moreover, introduction of the novel pre-treatment technology eliminated the inconvenient DNA extraction process. From this research achievement, we not only anticipate quick and accurate results returned in the clinical field but also contribution in improving the test quality and work efficiency.

  14. PMS2 gene mutation results in DNA mismatch repair system failure in a case of adult granulosa cell tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Lee, Ya-Ting; Lai, Yen-Chein

    2017-01-01

    Background Granulosa cell tumors are rare ovarian malignancies. Their characteristics include unpredictable indolent growth with malignant potential and late recurrence. Approximately 95% are of adult type. Recent molecular studies have characterized the FOXL2 402C?>?G mutation in adult granulosa cell tumor. Our previous case report showed that unique FOXL2 402C?>?G mutation and defective DNA mismatch repair system are associated with the development of adult granulosa cell tumor. Findings In...

  15. Alkylating agent (MNU)-induced mutation in space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, T.; Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, K.; Takahashi, S.; Masukawa, M.; Sekikawa, K.; Amano, T.; Nakano, T.; Nagaoka, S.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, some contradictory data about the effects of microgravity on radiation-induced biological responses in space experiments have been reported. We prepared a damaged template DNA produced with an alkylating agent (N-methyl-N-nitroso urea; MNU) to measure incorrect base-incorporation during DNA replication in microgravity. We examined whether mutation frequency is affected by microgravity during DNA replication for a DNA template damaged by an alkylating agent. Using an in vitro enzymatic reaction system, DNA synthesis by Taq polymerase or polymerase III was done during a US space shuttle mission (Discovery, STS-91). After the flight, DNA replication and mutation frequencies were measured. We found that there was almost no effect of microgravity on DNA replication and mutation frequency. It is suggested that microgravity might not affect at the stage of substrate incorporation in induced-mutation frequency.

  16. Effects of the ssb-1 and ssb-113 mutations on survival and DNA repair in UV-irradiated delta uvrB strains of Escherichia coli K-12.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, T C; Smith, K C

    1982-01-01

    The molecular defect in DNA repair caused by ssb mutations (single-strand binding protein) was studied by analyzing DNA synthesis and DNA double-strand break production in UV-irradiated Escherichia coli delta uvrB strains. The presence of the ssb-113 mutation produced a large inhibition of DNA synthesis and led to the formation of double-strand breaks, whereas the ssb-1 mutation produced much less inhibition of DNA synthesis and fewer double-strand breaks. We suggest that the single-strand bi...

  17. Mutation of mtDNA ND1 Gene in 20 Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients of Gorontalonese and Javanese Ethnicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMIEN RAMADHAN ISHAK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial gene mutation plays a role in the development of type two diabetes mellitus (T2DM. A point mutation in the mitochondrial gene Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase 1 (mtDNA ND1 gene mainly reported as the most common mutation related to T2DM. However, several studies have identified another SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the RNA region of mtDNA from patients from specific ethnic populations in Indonesia. Building on those findings, this study aimed to use PCR and DNA sequencing technology to identify nucleotides in RNA and ND1 fragment from 20 Gorontalonese and 20 Javanese T2DM patients, that may trigger T2DM expression. The results showed successful amplification of RNA along 294 bp for all samples. From these samples, we found two types of point mutation in Javanese patients in the G3316A and T3200C points of the rRNA and ND1 gene. In samples taken from Gorontalonese patients, no mutation were found in the RNA or ND1 region. We conclude that T2DM was triggered differently in our two populations. While genetic mutation is implicated for the 20 Javanese patients, T2DM pathogenesis in the Gorontalonese patients must be traced to other genetic, environmental, or behavioral factors.

  18. The effects of radiation on p53-mutated glioma cells using cDNA microarray technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, F.Q.H.; Hsiao, Y.-Y.H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In this study, we investigated the effects of 10-Gy irradiation on cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis and clonogenic death in the p53-mutated human U138MG (malignant glioblastoma) cell line. In order to evaluate time-dependent events in cellular responses to radiation, we did a time course study by incubating cells ranging from 0.5 to 48 hours after irradiation. Cell-cycle distribution and apoptosis were evaluated by flow cytometry using propidium iodide (PI) and annexin-V plus PI staining. Cell viability and proliferative capacity were studied by colony formation assay. Dual fluorescence cDNA microarray technique was used to examine the differential expression patterns of the irradiated cells. The cDNA microarray chips used contained DNA sequences corresponding to 12,814 human genes. From the flow cytometry data, it can be observed that radiation induced G2/M phase arrest and that late apoptosis was more evident following G2/M arrest. After 36 hours, some cells underwent senescence and the remains continued on with the cell cycle. Microarray analyses revealed changes in the expression of a small number of cell-cycle-related genes (p21, cyclin B1, etc.) and cell-death genes (tumor necrosis factors, DDB2, etc.) suggesting their involvement in radiation-induced cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. In silico interpretations of the molecular mechanisms responsible for these radiation effects are in progress

  19. The Decrease in Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Load Parallels Visual Recovery in a Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Emperador

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The onset of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is relatively rare in childhood and, interestingly, the rate of spontaneous visual recovery is very high in this group of patients. Here, we report a child harboring a rare pathological mitochondrial DNA mutation, present in heteroplasmy, associated with the disease. A patient follow-up showed a rapid recovery of the vision accompanied by a decrease of the percentage of mutated mtDNA. A retrospective study on the age of recovery of all childhood-onset Leber hereditary optic neuropathy patients reported in the literature suggested that this process was probably related with pubertal changes.

  20. Frequency of mutations in the genes associated with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy in a UK cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, G L; Murphy, S M; Polke, J M; Laura, M; Salih, M A M; Muntoni, F; Blake, J; Brandner, S; Davies, N; Horvath, R; Price, S; Donaghy, M; Roberts, M; Foulds, N; Ramdharry, G; Soler, D; Lunn, M P; Manji, H; Davis, M B; Houlden, H; Reilly, M M

    2012-08-01

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, also known as the hereditary sensory neuropathies) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, characterised by a progressive sensory neuropathy often complicated by ulcers and amputations, with variable motor and autonomic involvement. To date, mutations in twelve genes have been identified as causing HSAN. To study the frequency of mutations in these genes and the associated phenotypes, we screened 140 index patients in our inherited neuropathy cohort with a clinical diagnosis of HSAN for mutations in the coding regions of SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 (TRKA) and NGFB. We identified 25 index patients with mutations in six genes associated with HSAN (SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 and NGFB); 20 of which appear to be pathogenic giving an overall mutation frequency of 14.3%. Mutations in the known genes for HSAN are rare suggesting that further HSAN genes are yet to be identified. The p.Cys133Trp mutation in SPTLC1 is the most common cause of HSAN in the UK population and should be screened first in all patients with sporadic or autosomal dominant HSAN.

  1. Frequency of mutations in the genes associated with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy in a UK cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davidson, G L

    2012-08-01

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, also known as the hereditary sensory neuropathies) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, characterised by a progressive sensory neuropathy often complicated by ulcers and amputations, with variable motor and autonomic involvement. To date, mutations in twelve genes have been identified as causing HSAN. To study the frequency of mutations in these genes and the associated phenotypes, we screened 140 index patients in our inherited neuropathy cohort with a clinical diagnosis of HSAN for mutations in the coding regions of SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1\\/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 (TRKA) and NGFB. We identified 25 index patients with mutations in six genes associated with HSAN (SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1\\/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 and NGFB); 20 of which appear to be pathogenic giving an overall mutation frequency of 14.3%. Mutations in the known genes for HSAN are rare suggesting that further HSAN genes are yet to be identified. The p.Cys133Trp mutation in SPTLC1 is the most common cause of HSAN in the UK population and should be screened first in all patients with sporadic or autosomal dominant HSAN.

  2. Microsatellite frequencies vary with body mass and body temperature in mammals, suggesting correlated variation in mutation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Amos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Substitution rate is often found to correlate with life history traits such as body mass, a predictor of population size and longevity, and body temperature. The underlying mechanism is unclear but most models invoke either natural selection or factors such as generation length that change the number of mutation opportunities per unit time. Here we use published genome sequences from 69 mammals to ask whether life history traits impact another form of genetic mutation, the high rates of predominantly neutral slippage in microsatellites. We find that the length-frequency distributions of three common dinucleotide motifs differ greatly between even closely related species. These frequency differences correlate with body mass and body temperature and can be used to predict the phenotype of an unknown species. Importantly, different length microsatellites show complicated patterns of excess and deficit that cannot be explained by a simple model where species with short generation lengths have experienced more mutations. Instead, the patterns probably require changes in mutation rate that impact alleles of different length to different extents. Body temperature plausibly influences mutation rate by modulating the propensity for slippage. Existing hypotheses struggle to account for a link between body mass and mutation rate. However, body mass correlates inversely with population size, which in turn predicts heterozygosity. We suggest that heterozygote instability, HI, the idea that heterozygous sites show increased mutability, could provide a plausible link between body mass and mutation rate.

  3. Preliminary studies on DNA retardation by MutS applied to the detection of point mutations in clinical samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanislawska-Sachadyn, Anna; Paszko, Zygmunt; Kluska, Anna; Skasko, Elzibieta; Sromek, Maria; Balabas, Aneta; Janiec-Jankowska, Aneta; Wisniewska, Alicja; Kur, Jozef; Sachadyn, Pawel

    2005-01-01

    MutS ability to bind DNA mismatches was applied to the detection of point mutations in PCR products. MutS recognized mismatches from single up to five nucleotides and retarded the electrophoretic migration of mismatched DNA. The electrophoretic detection of insertions/deletions above three nucleotides is also possible without MutS, thanks to the DNA mobility shift caused by the presence of large insertion/deletion loops in the heteroduplex DNA. Thus, the method enables the search for a broad range of mutations: from single up to several nucleotides. The mobility shift assays were carried out in polyacrylamide gels stained with SYBR-Gold. One assay required 50-200 ng of PCR product and 1-3 μg of Thermus thermophilus his 6 -MutS protein. The advantages of this approach are: the small amounts of DNA required for the examination, simple and fast staining, no demand for PCR product purification, no labelling and radioisotopes required. The method was tested in the detection of cancer predisposing mutations in RET, hMSH2, hMLH1, BRCA1, BRCA2 and NBS1 genes. The approach appears to be promising in screening for unknown point mutations

  4. The SRS2 suppressor of rad6 mutations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae acts by channeling DNA lesions into the RAD52 DNA repair pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiestl, R.H.; Prakash, S.; Prakash, L.

    1990-01-01

    rad6 mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are defective in the repair of damaged DNA, DNA damage induced mutagenesis, and sporulation. In order to identify genes that can substitute for RAD6 function, the authors have isolated genomic suppressors of the UV sensitivity of rad6 deletion (rad6Δ) mutations and show that they also suppress the γ-ray sensitivity but not the UV mutagenesis or sporulation defects of rad6. The suppressors show semidominance for suppression of UV sensitivity and dominance for suppression of γ-ray sensitivity. The six suppressor mutations they isolated are all alleles of the same locus and are also allelic to a previously described suppressor of the rad6-1 nonsense mutation, SRS2. They show that suppression of rad6Δ is dependent on the RAD52 recombinational repair pathway since suppression is not observed in the rad6Δ SRS2 strain containing an additional mutation in either the RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, RAD55 or RAD57 genes. Possible mechanisms by which SRS2 may channel unrepaired DNA lesions into the RAD52 DNA repair pathway are discussed

  5. Frequency and persistency of DNA vaccine encoding GP25 by oral on common carp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Nuryati

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Koi herpesvirus (KHV is a major viral pathogen that infects common carp and koi. KHV disease outbreak is happened in almost all centre of common carp culture in Indonesia and caused mass mortality. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA vaccination method is one of ways to cope with KHV infection. Vaccines were commonly given by injection. The aim of this research was to get frequency and persistency of DNA vaccine encoding GP25 given by oral delivery method in common carp. This research would like to determine dose, frequency of vaccination, persistency of DNA vaccine and culture medium for the bacterial host. DNA vaccine persistency test was done by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR method with the specific primer for GP25 gene. The results showed that level of DNA vaccine that could be detected in feed was 7.56 ng (equal to 1.598×1010 copies. Efficient culture medium for Escherichia coli DH5α carrying DNA vaccine was LB triptone. Feeding fish with diet supplemented with 1 mL E. coli DH5α containing DNA vaccine for each fish and two times a week allowed persistence of DNA vaccine in kindney and spleen. Keywords: common carp, KHV, DNA vaccine, GP25, persistance  ABSTRAK Koi herpesvirus (KHV adalah virus patogen utama yang menginfeksi ikan mas dan ikan koi. Wabah penyakit KHV terjadi di hampir semua sentra budidaya ikan mas di Indonesia dan menyebabkan kematian massal ikan. Metode vaksinasi DNA merupakan salah satu cara yang dapat dilakukan untuk menanggulangi serangan KHV. Pemberian vaksin umumnya dilakukan dengan cara injeksi. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk menguji frekuensi dan persistensi vaksin DNA GP25 antivirus KHV yang diberikan melalui oral pada ikan mas. Pada penelitian ini dilakukan uji dosis, frekuensi pemberian vaksin, persistensi vaksin DNA, dan media kultur bakteri inang. Persistensi vaksin DNA dianalisis menggunakan metode PCR dengan primer spesifik gen GP25. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa dosis vaksin DNA yang

  6. The role of human demographic history in determining the distribution and frequency of transferase-deficient galactosaemia mutations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flanagan, J M

    2010-02-01

    Classical or transferase-deficient galactosaemia is an inherited metabolic disorder caused by mutation in the human Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) gene. Of some 170 causative mutations reported, fewer than 10% are observed in more than one geographic region or ethnic group. To better understand the population history of the common GALT mutations, we have established a haplotyping system for the GALT locus incorporating eight single nucleotide polymorphisms and three short tandem repeat markers. We analysed haplotypes associated with the three most frequent GALT gene mutations, Q188R, K285N and Duarte-2 (D2), and estimated their age. Haplotype diversity, in conjunction with measures of genetic diversity and of linkage disequilibrium, indicated that Q188R and K285N are European mutations. The Q188R mutation arose in central Europe within the last 20 000 years, with its observed east-west cline of increasing relative allele frequency possibly being due to population expansion during the re-colonization of Europe by Homo sapiens in the Mesolithic age. K285N was found to be a younger mutation that originated in Eastern Europe and is probably more geographically restricted as it arose after all major European population expansions. The D2 variant was found to be an ancient mutation that originated before the expansion of Homo sapiens out of Africa.

  7. A comparative investigation of DNA strand breaks, sister chromatid exchanges and K-ras gene mutations induced by cadmium salts in cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouron, Silvana Andrea; Grillo, Claudia Alejandra; Dulout, Fernando Noel; Golijow, Carlos Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic heavy metal of continuing occupational and environmental concern with a wide variety of adverse effects. Several studies have shown that cadmium produces DNA strand breaks, DNA-protein cross-links, oxidative DNA damage, chromosomal aberrations, dysregulation of gene expression resulting in enhanced proliferation, depressed apoptosis and/or altered DNA repair. This study was undertaken to investigate the ability of cadmium chloride (CdCl 2 ) and cadmium sulphate (CdSO 4 ) to induce point mutations in codon 12 of the K-ras protooncogene assessed by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphisms (PCR-SSCP) and RFLP-enriched PCR methods. Also their genotoxic effects were analyzed by the comet assay and sister chromatid exchanges test. The human lung fibroblast cell line MRC-5 was used for the experiments. Sister chromatid exchanges assay (SCEs) frequencies were significantly increased in cells exposed to cadmium salts in relation to controls (p < 0.001). Despite the slow increment observed in the three comet parameters considered when cells were treated with cadmium chloride, significant differences between groups were only found in the variable comet moment (CM) (p < 0.005). On the other hand, when cells were exposed to cadmium sulphate, the Kruskal-Wallis test showed highly significant differences between groups for migration, tail moment and comet moment parameters (p < 0.001). Nevertheless, a null or weak point mutation induction in K-ras protooncogene was detected using polymerase chain reaction-low ionic strength-single strand conformation polymorphisms (PCR-LIS-SSCP) and RFLP-enriched PCR methods when cells were treated with cadmium salts. Thus, inorganic cadmium produces genotoxicity in human lung fibroblast MRC-5 cells, in the absence of significant point mutation of the K-ras gene

  8. The allele-frequency spectrum in a decoupled Moran model with mutation, drift, and directional selection, assuming small mutation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Claus; Clemente, Florian

    2012-05-01

    We analyze a decoupled Moran model with haploid population size N, a biallelic locus under mutation and drift with scaled forward and backward mutation rates θ(1)=μ(1)N and θ(0)=μ(0)N, and directional selection with scaled strength γ=sN. With small scaled mutation rates θ(0) and θ(1), which is appropriate for single nucleotide polymorphism data in highly recombining regions, we derive a simple approximate equilibrium distribution for polymorphic alleles with a constant of proportionality. We also put forth an even simpler model, where all mutations originate from monomorphic states. Using this model we derive the sojourn times, conditional on the ancestral and fixed allele, and under equilibrium the distributions of fixed and polymorphic alleles and fixation rates. Furthermore, we also derive the distribution of small samples in the diffusion limit and provide convenient recurrence relations for calculating this distribution. This enables us to give formulas analogous to the Ewens-Watterson estimator of θ for biased mutation rates and selection. We apply this theory to a polymorphism dataset of fourfold degenerate sites in Drosophila melanogaster. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrova, Y.E.; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of γ-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure 137 Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed

  10. Comparison of the quantification of KRAS mutations by digital PCR and E-ice-COLD-PCR in circulating-cell-free DNA from metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefrioui, David; Mauger, Florence; Leclere, Laurence; Beaussire, Ludivine; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Deleuze, Jean-François; Sarafan-Vasseur, Nasrin; Tost, Jörg

    2017-02-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (ccfDNA) bears great promise as biomarker for personalized medicine, but ccfDNA is present only at low levels in the plasma or serum of cancer patients. E-ice-COLD-PCR is a recently developed enrichment method to detect and identify mutations present at low-abundance in clinical samples. However, recent studies have shown the importance to accurately quantify low-abundance mutations as clinically important decisions will depend on certain mutation thresholds. The possibility for an enrichment method to accurately quantify the mutation levels remains a point of concern and might limit its clinical applicability. In the present study, we compared the quantification of KRAS mutations in ccfDNA from metastatic colorectal cancer patients by E-ice-COLD-PCR with two digital PCR approaches. For the quantification of mutations by E-ice-COLD-PCR, cell lines with known mutations diluted into WT genomic DNA were used for calibration. E-ice-COLD-PCR and the two digital PCR approaches showed the same range of the mutation level and were concordant for mutation levels below the clinical relevant threshold. E-ice-COLD-PCR can accurately detect and quantify low-abundant mutations in ccfDNA and has a shorter time to results making it compatible with the requirements of analyses in a clinical setting without the loss of quantitative accuracy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Somatic point mutations in mtDNA control region are influenced by genetic background and associated with healthy aging: a GEHA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Giuseppina; Romeo, Giuseppe; Dato, Serena

    2010-01-01

    and of mortality risk in the elderly. Our study provides new evidence on the relevance of mtDNA somatic mutations in aging and longevity and confirms that the occurrence of specific point mutations in the mtDNA control region may represent a strategy for the age-related remodelling of organismal functions....

  12. High frequency of parvovirus B19 DNA in bone marrow samples from rheumatic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundqvist, Anders; Isa, Adiba; Tolfvenstam, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human parvovirus B19 (B19) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is now a routine analysis and serves as a diagnostic marker as well as a complement or alternative to B19 serology. The clinical significance of a positive B19 DNA finding is however dependent on the type of tissue or body fluid...... analysed and of the immune status of the patient. OBJECTIVES: To analyse the clinical significance of B19 DNA positivity in bone marrow samples from rheumatic patients. STUDY DESIGN: Parvovirus B19 DNA was analysed in paired bone marrow and serum samples by nested PCR technique. Serum was also analysed...... negative group. A high frequency of parvovirus B19 DNA was thus detected in bone marrow samples in rheumatic patients. The clinical data does not support a direct association between B19 PCR positivity and rheumatic disease manifestation. Therefore, the clinical significance of B19 DNA positivity in bone...

  13. The frequency pattern of dumpy mutations induced by x-rays in the successive stages of oocytes of Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Tomio; Nakao, Yoshio

    1978-01-01

    The frequency patterns of the different kinds of dumpy mutations induced by x-rays (1,500 and 3,000R) in the successive stages of oocyte development were investigated by transferring the inseminated females daily to fresh vials for 12 days. Under this transferring procedure, the first egg-laying period represents oocytes irradiated when they are at stage 14, and the subsequent ones represent progressively earlier stages of oocyte development at the time of irradiation. The results obtained indicate that (1) the overall yield of complete dumpy mutations recovered in the first six day egg-laying periods (1st-6th day) are relatively higher than that in the subsequent six day periods (7th-12th day), showing a response pattern with a higher mutation frequency in the early egg-laying periods and a lower frequency in the late egg-laying periods; (2) the frequency patterns for the exceptions of the ol and lv types and those of ov and olv types through the sampling periods are practically similar to those observed in the total dumpy mutations; (3) a somewhat peculiar frequency pattern, which seems to be variable by dose, is found in the yield of the o and v exceptions. At the exposure level of 1,500R, no definite difference in response pattern for these exceptions is found, though a response pattern which is practically similar to that observed in the total dumpy mutations is found at the exposure level of 3,000R. The foregoing findings seem to indicate that the different kinds of dumpy exceptions are affected at various degrees by the difference in the cell stages of oocyte. This may possibly suggest that these exceptions are different from each other in the nature of their mutations, that is to say, whether they are associated with chromosome breakage events or not. (auth.)

  14. High prevalence of impaired glucose homeostasis and myopathy in asymptomatic and oligosymptomatic 3243A>G mitochondrial DNA mutation-positive subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, A.L.; Jeppesen, T.D.; Vissing, J.

    2009-01-01

    combinations. Consequently, it is difficult to predict the "phenotypic risk profile" of 3243A>G mutation-positive subjects. The 3243A>G mutation coexists in cells with wild-type mtDNA, a phenomenon called heteroplasmy. The marked variability in mutation loads in different tissues is the main explanation...

  15. PMS2 gene mutation results in DNA mismatch repair system failure in a case of adult granulosa cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Lee, Ya-Ting; Lai, Yen-Chein

    2017-03-27

    Granulosa cell tumors are rare ovarian malignancies. Their characteristics include unpredictable indolent growth with malignant potential and late recurrence. Approximately 95% are of adult type. Recent molecular studies have characterized the FOXL2 402C > G mutation in adult granulosa cell tumor. Our previous case report showed that unique FOXL2 402C > G mutation and defective DNA mismatch repair system are associated with the development of adult granulosa cell tumor. In this study, the DNA sequences of four genes, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2, in the DNA mismatch repair system were determined via direct sequencing to elucidate the exact mechanism for the development of this granulosa cell tumor. The results showed that two missense germline mutations, T485K and N775L, inactivate the PMS2 gene. The results of this case study indicated that although FOXL2 402C > G mutation determines the development of granulosa cell tumor, PMS2 mutation may be the initial driver of carcinogenesis. Immunohistochemistry-based tumor testing for mismatch repair gene expression may be necessary for granulosa cell tumors to determine their malignant potential or if they are part of Lynch syndrome.

  16. Ultraviolet-irradiated simian virus 40 activates a mutator function in rat cells under conditions preventing viral DNA replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelis, J.; Su, Z.Z.; Dinsart, C.; Rommelaere, J. (Universite libre de Bruxelles, Rhode St Genese (Belgium))

    The UV-irradiated temperature-sensitive early SV40 mutant tsA209 is able to activate at the nonpermissive temperature the expression of mutator and recovery functions in rat cells. Unirradiated SV40 activates these functions only to a low extent. The expression of these mutator and recovery functions in SV40-infected cells was detected using the single-stranded DNA parvovirus H-1 as a probe. Because early SV40 mutants are defective in the initiation of viral DNA synthesis at the nonpermissive temperature, these results suggest that replication of UV-damaged DNA is not a prerequisite for the activation of mutator and recovery functions in mammalian cells. The expression of the mutator function is dose-dependent, i.e., the absolute number of UV-irradiated SV40 virions introduced per cell determines its level. Implications for the interpretation of mutation induction curves in the progeny of UV-irradiated SV40 in permissive host cells are discussed.

  17. Frequent mutations in EGFR, KRAS and TP53 genes in human lung cancer tumors detected by ion torrent DNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Cai

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common malignancy and the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. While smoking is by far the leading cause of lung cancer, other environmental and genetic factors influence the development and progression of the cancer. Since unique mutations patterns have been observed in individual cancer samples, identification and characterization of the distinctive lung cancer molecular profile is essential for developing more effective, tailored therapies. Until recently, personalized DNA sequencing to identify genetic mutations in cancer was impractical and expensive. The recent technological advancements in next-generation DNA sequencing, such as the semiconductor-based Ion Torrent sequencing platform, has made DNA sequencing cost and time effective with more reliable results. Using the Ion Torrent Ampliseq Cancer Panel, we sequenced 737 loci from 45 cancer-related genes to identify genetic mutations in 76 human lung cancer samples. The sequencing analysis revealed missense mutations in KRAS, EGFR, and TP53 genes in the breast cancer samples of various histologic types. Thus, this study demonstrates the necessity of sequencing individual human cancers in order to develop personalized drugs or combination therapies to effectively target individual, breast cancer-specific mutations.

  18. Screening individuals with intellectual disability, autism and Tourette's syndrome for KCNK9 mutations and aberrant DNA methylation within the 8q24 imprinted cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Delgado, Marta; Camprubí, Cristina; Tümer, Zeynep; Martínez, Francisco; Milà, Montserrat; Monk, David

    2014-09-01

    The phenotype overlap between autism spectrum disorders (ASD) & intellectual disabilities (ID) is mirrored at the genetic level, with common genes being reported mutated in variety of developmental disabilities. However despite widespread genetic screening for mutations, in approximately 40-60% of childhood developmental disorders the genetic cause remains unknown. Several genome-wide linkage screens in ASD have identified a locus mapping to distal 8q. We have recently identified a novel brain-specific imprinted cluster at this location, which contains the reciprocally expressed maternal KCNK9 and paternally expressed non-coding PEG13 transcripts, the latter located within an intron of TRAPPC9. Interestingly, mutations of KCNK9 and TRAPPC9 have been reported in Birk-Barel mental retardation and non-syndromic familial forms of ID, respectively. Here, we report a genetic screen for KCNK9 coding mutations and potential epigenetic aberrations that could result in deregulated imprinting in a cohort of 120 ID, 86 ASD and 86 Tourette syndrome patients. Fifteen of the ID patients had clinical characteristics overlapping with Birk-Barel syndrome. Sequencing of the two coding exons of KCNK9 failed to identify pathologic mutations, with only one variant, rs2615374, being present with allele frequencies similar to those described in dbSNP database. DNA methylation profiling of the KCNK9 and TRAPPC9 promoters, the maternally methylated PEG13 DMR and a long-range enhancer region were normal in all patients. Our findings suggest that mutations of KCNK9 or epigenetic disturbances within the PEG13 imprinted cluster do not significantly contribute to the cause of the developmental disabilities tested in this study. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. [Mutational frequencies in usherin(USH2A gene) in 26 Colombian individuals with Usher syndrome type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Greizy; Gelvez, Nancy Yaneth; Tamayo, Martalucía

    2011-03-01

    Usher syndrome is a disorder characterized by progressive retinitis pigmentosa, prelingual sensory hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. It is the most frequent cause of deaf-blindness in humans. Three clinical types and twelve genetic subtypes have been characterized. Type II is the most common, and among these cases, nearly 80% have mutations in the USH2A gene. The aim of the study was to establish the mutational frequencies for the short isoform of USH2A gene in Usher syndrome type II. Twenty-six Colombian individuals with Usher syndrome type II were included. SSCP analysis for 20 exons of the short isoform was performed and abnormal patterns were sequenced. Sequencing of exon 13 of the USH2A gene was performed for all the individuals because the most frequent mutation is located in this exon. The most frequent mutation was c.2299delG, identified in the 27% (n=8) of the sample. The second mutation, p.R334W, showed a frequency of 15%. A new variant identified in the 5’UTR region, g.129G>T, was present in 1 individual (4%). Four polymorphisms were identified; one of them is a new deletion in exon 20, first reported in this study. Mutations in the usherin short isoform were identified in 38% of a sample of 26 USH2 cases. Molecular diagnosis was established in 7 of the 26.

  20. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in preneoplastic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract: A biomarker for the early detection of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montgomery Elizabeth A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatic mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA are common in many human cancers. We have described an oligonucleotide microarray ("MitoChip" for rapid sequencing of the entire mitochondrial genome (Zhou et al, J Mol Diagn 2006, facilitating the analysis of mtDNA mutations in preneoplastic lesions. We examined 14 precancerous lesions, including seven Barrett esophagus biopsies, with or without associated dysplasia; four colorectal adenomas; and three inflammatory colitis-associated dysplasia specimens. In all cases, matched normal tissues from the corresponding site were obtained as germline control. MitoChip analysis was performed on DNA obtained from cryostat-embedded specimens. Results A total of 513,639 bases of mtDNA were sequenced in the 14 samples, with 490,224 bases (95.4% bases assigned by the automated genotyping software. All preneoplastic lesions examined demonstrated at least one somatic mtDNA sequence alteration. Of the 100 somatic mtDNA alterations observed in the 14 cases, 27 were non-synonymous coding region mutations (i.e., resulting in an amino acid change, 36 were synonymous, and 37 involved non-coding mtDNA. Overall, somatic alterations most commonly involved the COI, ND4 and ND5 genes. Notably, somatic mtDNA alterations were observed in preneoplastic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract even in the absence of histopathologic evidence of dysplasia, suggesting that the mitochondrial genome is susceptible at the earliest stages of multistep cancer progression. Conclusion Our findings further substantiate the rationale for exploring the mitochondrial genome as a biomarker for the early diagnosis of cancer, and confirm the utility of a high-throughput array-based platform for this purpose from a clinical applicability standpoint.

  1. Mutation of Mitochondrial DNA G13513A Presenting with Leigh Syndrome, Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome and Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Bing Wang

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA G13513A, encoding the ND5 subunit of respiratory chain complex I, can cause mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS and Leigh syndrome. Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome and optic atrophy were reported in a high proportion of patients with this mutation. We report an 18-month-old girl, with an 11-month history of psychomotor regression who was diagnosed with WPW syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, in association with Leigh syndrome. Supplementation with coenzyme Q10, thiamine and carnitine prevented further regression in gross motor function but the patient's heart function deteriorated and dilated cardiomyopathy developed 11 months later. She was found to have a mutation of mtDNA G13513A. We suggest that mtDNA G13513A mutation is an important factor in patients with Leigh syndrome associated with WPW syndrome and/or optic atrophy, and serial heart function monitoring by echocardiography is recommended in this group of patients.

  2. Non-B DNA-forming sequences and WRN deficiency independently increase the frequency of base substitution in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacolla, Albino; Wang, Guliang; Jain, Aklank

    2011-01-01

    Although alternative DNA secondary structures (non-B DNA) can induce genomic rearrangements, their associated mutational spectra remain largely unknown. The helicase activity of WRN, which is absent in the human progeroid Werner syndrome, is thought to counteract this genomic instability. We dete...

  3. Creation of chimeric human/rabbit APOBEC1 with HIV-1 restriction and DNA mutation activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Terumasa; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Koito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC1 (A1) proteins from lagomorphs and rodents have deaminase-dependent restriction activity against HIV-1, whereas human A1 exerts a negligible effect. To investigate these differences in the restriction of HIV-1 by A1 proteins, a series of chimeric proteins combining rabbit and human A1s was constructed. Homology models of the A1s indicated that their activities derive from functional domains that likely act in tandem through a dimeric interface. The C-terminal region containing the leucine-rich motif and the dimerization domains of rabbit A1 is important for its anti-HIV-1 activity. The A1 chimeras with strong anti-HIV-1 activity were incorporated into virions more efficiently than those without anti-HIV-1 activity, and exhibited potent DNA-mutator activity. Therefore, the C-terminal region of rabbit A1 is involved in both its packaging into the HIV-1 virion and its deamination activity against both viral cDNA and genomic RNA. This study identifies the novel molecular mechanism underlying the target specificity of A1.

  4. Wavelet analysis of frequency chaos game signal: a time-frequency signature of the C. elegans DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messaoudi, Imen; Oueslati, Afef Elloumi; Lachiri, Zied

    2014-12-01

    Challenging tasks are encountered in the field of bioinformatics. The choice of the genomic sequence's mapping technique is one the most fastidious tasks. It shows that a judicious choice would serve in examining periodic patterns distribution that concord with the underlying structure of genomes. Despite that, searching for a coding technique that can highlight all the information contained in the DNA has not yet attracted the attention it deserves. In this paper, we propose a new mapping technique based on the chaos game theory that we call the frequency chaos game signal (FCGS). The particularity of the FCGS coding resides in exploiting the statistical properties of the genomic sequence itself. This may reflect important structural and organizational features of DNA. To prove the usefulness of the FCGS approach in the detection of different local periodic patterns, we use the wavelet analysis because it provides access to information that can be obscured by other time-frequency methods such as the Fourier analysis. Thus, we apply the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) with the complex Morlet wavelet as a mother wavelet function. Scalograms that relate to the organism Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) exhibit a multitude of periodic organization of specific DNA sequences.

  5. Frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll-deficient mutations in rice after treatment with radiation and alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhan, A.K.; Kaul, M.L.H.

    1976-01-01

    Three varieties of rice were treated with gamma rays and two alkylating agents EMS and DES, separately and in combinations, with a view to finding out the frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll mutations in relation to the genotype and the nature of the mutagen. Chlorophyll mutation frequency was enhanced with increasing dose but dropped at very high doses (doses that induced over 90% seeding lethality in M 1 ). The fall was attributed to either the increased mutated sector and diplontic selection after exposure to very high doses or relatively high resistance of some of the seeds. Among chlorophyll mutants in M 2 induced by radiations as well as alkylating agents, the albina type formed the majority class. EMS induced a significantly higher proportion of albinas than did gamma rays

  6. DNA fragmentation in human fibroblasts under extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focke, Frauke; Schuermann, David; Kuster, Niels; Schaer, Primo

    2010-01-01

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) were reported to affect DNA integrity in human cells with evidence based on the Comet assay. These findings were heavily debated for two main reasons; the lack of reproducibility, and the absence of a plausible scientific rationale for how EMFs could damage DNA. Starting out from a replication of the relevant experiments, we performed this study to clarify the existence and explore origin and nature of ELF-EMF induced DNA effects. Our data confirm that intermittent (but not continuous) exposure of human primary fibroblasts to a 50 Hz EMF at a flux density of 1 mT induces a slight but significant increase of DNA fragmentation in the Comet assay, and we provide first evidence for this to be caused by the magnetic rather than the electric field. Moreover, we show that EMF-induced responses in the Comet assay are dependent on cell proliferation, suggesting that processes of DNA replication rather than the DNA itself may be affected. Consistently, the Comet effects correlated with a reduction of actively replicating cells and a concomitant increase of apoptotic cells in exposed cultures, whereas a combined Fpg-Comet test failed to produce evidence for a notable contribution of oxidative DNA base damage. Hence, ELF-EMF induced effects in the Comet assay are reproducible under specific conditions and can be explained by minor disturbances in S-phase processes and occasional triggering of apoptosis rather than by the generation of DNA damage.

  7. DNA fragmentation in human fibroblasts under extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Focke, Frauke; Schuermann, David [Institute of Biochemistry and Genetics, Department of Biomedicine, University of Basel, Mattenstrasse 28, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland); Kuster, Niels [IT' IS Foundation, Zeughausstrasse 43, CH-8004 Zurich (Switzerland); Schaer, Primo, E-mail: primo.schaer@unibas.ch [Institute of Biochemistry and Genetics, Department of Biomedicine, University of Basel, Mattenstrasse 28, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland)

    2010-01-05

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) were reported to affect DNA integrity in human cells with evidence based on the Comet assay. These findings were heavily debated for two main reasons; the lack of reproducibility, and the absence of a plausible scientific rationale for how EMFs could damage DNA. Starting out from a replication of the relevant experiments, we performed this study to clarify the existence and explore origin and nature of ELF-EMF induced DNA effects. Our data confirm that intermittent (but not continuous) exposure of human primary fibroblasts to a 50 Hz EMF at a flux density of 1 mT induces a slight but significant increase of DNA fragmentation in the Comet assay, and we provide first evidence for this to be caused by the magnetic rather than the electric field. Moreover, we show that EMF-induced responses in the Comet assay are dependent on cell proliferation, suggesting that processes of DNA replication rather than the DNA itself may be affected. Consistently, the Comet effects correlated with a reduction of actively replicating cells and a concomitant increase of apoptotic cells in exposed cultures, whereas a combined Fpg-Comet test failed to produce evidence for a notable contribution of oxidative DNA base damage. Hence, ELF-EMF induced effects in the Comet assay are reproducible under specific conditions and can be explained by minor disturbances in S-phase processes and occasional triggering of apoptosis rather than by the generation of DNA damage.

  8. Concordance of mutation detection in circulating tumor DNA in early clinical trials using different blood collection protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlborn, Lise B.; Madsen, Mette; Jonson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    in a clinical setting. Here we investigate the concordance between standard blood collection for molecular analysis using immediate separation of plasma, compared to the use of collection tubes allowing for delayed processing. Methods: In this study, we measured the fractional abundance of tumor specific...... patients with advanced solid cancers enrolled in early clinical trials. Results: Concordance in the fractional abundance of mutations in ctDNA isolated from blood collected in either K3EDTA or BCT tubes from patients with different solid cancers was observed. Conclusions: This study indicates that BCT...... mutations (BRAF p.V600E and PIK3CA p.H1047R) in ctDNA isolated from blood samples collected in either cell-stabilizing Cell-Free DNA BCT tubes (delayed processing within 72 hours) or standard K3EDTA tubes (immediate processing within 15 minutes). Twenty-five blood sample pairs (EDTA/BCT) were collected from...

  9. MELAS syndrome associated with both A3243G-tRNALeu mutation and multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharoni, Sharon; Traves, Teres A; Melamed, Eldad; Cohen, Sarit; Silver, Esther Leshinsky

    2010-09-15

    The syndrome of mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode (MELAS) is characterized clinically by recurrent focal neurological deficits, epilepsy, and short stature. The phenotypic spectrum is extremely diverse, with multisystemic organ involvement leading to isolated diabetes, deafness, renal tubulopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. In 80% of cases, the syndrome is associated with an AG transmission mutation (A3243G) in the tRNALeu gene of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We describe a woman with a unique combination of the MELAS A3243G mutation and multiple mtDNA deletions with normal POLG sequence. The patient presented with diabetes mellitus, sensorineural deafness, short stature, and mental disorientation. All her three children died in early adolescence. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutagenic effects of gamma rays and EMS on frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll mutations in urdbean (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usharani, K.S.; Ananda Kumar, C.R.

    2015-01-01

    Chlorophyll mutations act as a significant index in the judgment of induced genetic variations in mutagen treated populations. Different types of chlorophyll mutation have been observed in various crop plants. In the current study, the effect of different concentrations (40 kR, 50 kR and 60 kR) of gamma rays, Ethyl Methane Sulphonate (50 mM, 60 mM and 70 mM) in single and combination dose/concentration on the frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll mutation and the effect of VBN 4 urdbean variety to such irradiation dose was observed. Results showed induction of broad spectrum of chlorophyll mutations which included albina, xantha, chlorina and viridis. Among these chlorina type was predominant in all the mutagenic treatments. The albina type of chlorophyll mutants occurred very rarely and was found only at 60 mM of EMS treatment and at 40 kR + 50 mM, 60 kR + 70 mM of combination treatments. Based on the chlorophyll mutation frequency, gamma rays were most effective followed by EMS and combination of treatments. (author)

  11. Different mosaicism frequencies for proximal and distal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mutations indicate difference in etiology and recurrence risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passos-Bueno, M.R.; Takata, R.I.; Rapaport, D.; Bakker, E.; Kneppers, A.L.J.; Dunnen, J.T. den; Ommen, J.B. van

    1992-11-01

    In about 65% of the cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) a partial gene deletion or duplication in the dystrophin gene can be detected. These mutations are clustered at two hot spots: 30% at the hot spot in the proximal part of the gene and about 70% at a more distal hot spot. Unexpectedly the authors observed a higher frequency of proximal gene rearrangements among proved germ line' mosaic cases. Of the 24 mosaic cases they are aware of, 19 (79%) have a proximal mutation, while only 5 (21%) have a distal mutation. This finding indicates that the mutations at the two hot spots in the dystrophin gene differ in origin. Independent support for the different mosaicism frequency was found by comparing the mutation spectra observed in isolated cases of DMD and familial cases (ratio 1:1). The authors conclude from these data that proximal deletions most likely occur early in embryonic development, causing them to have a higher chance of becoming familial, while distal deletions occur later and have a higher chance of causing only isolated cases. Finally, the findings have important consequences for the calculation of recurrence-risk estimates according to the site of the deletion: a [open quote]proximal[close quote] new mutant has an increased recurrence risk of approximately 30%, and a [open quote]distal[close quote] new mutant has a decreased recurrence risk of approximately 4%. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Effect of dose-rate on the frequency of X-linked lethal mutation in the nematode Panagrellus redivivus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ager, D.

    1984-01-01

    A total X-ray dose of 50 Gy was applied to the nematode Panagrellus redivivus using dose-rates ranging from 0.23 Gy/min to 10.49 Gy/min, and the frequency of lethal X-chromosomes was determined. This frequency ranged from approximately 1.6% at the lower dose-rate to 4.3% at the highest dose-rate, indicating a dose-rate dependency of mutation frequency in the spermatogonia and oogonia of this organism. (orig.)

  13. Genetic variation among the Mapuche Indians from the Patagonian region of Argentina: mitochondrial DNA sequence variation and allele frequencies of several nuclear genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginther, C; Corach, D; Penacino, G A; Rey, J A; Carnese, F R; Hutz, M H; Anderson, A; Just, J; Salzano, F M; King, M C

    1993-01-01

    DNA samples from 60 Mapuche Indians, representing 39 maternal lineages, were genetically characterized for (1) nucleotide sequences of the mtDNA control region; (2) presence or absence of a nine base duplication in mtDNA region V; (3) HLA loci DRB1 and DQA1; (4) variation at three nuclear genes with short tandem repeats; and (5) variation at the polymorphic marker D2S44. The genetic profile of the Mapuche population was compared to other Amerinds and to worldwide populations. Two highly polymorphic portions of the mtDNA control region, comprising 650 nucleotides, were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and directly sequenced. The 39 maternal lineages were defined by two or three generation families identified by the Mapuches. These 39 lineages included 19 different mtDNA sequences that could be grouped into four classes. The same classes of sequences appear in other Amerinds from North, Central, and South American populations separated by thousands of miles, suggesting that the origin of the mtDNA patterns predates the migration to the Americas. The mtDNA sequence similarity between Amerind populations suggests that the migration throughout the Americas occurred rapidly relative to the mtDNA mutation rate. HLA DRB1 alleles 1602 and 1402 were frequent among the Mapuches. These alleles also occur at high frequency among other Amerinds in North and South America, but not among Spanish, Chinese or African-American populations. The high frequency of these alleles throughout the Americas, and their specificity to the Americas, supports the hypothesis that Mapuches and other Amerind groups are closely related.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. WFS1 and non-syndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss: a novel mutation in a Portuguese case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, A C; Matos, T D; Simões-Teixeira, H R; Pimenta Machado, M; Simão, M; Dias, O P; Andrea, M; Fialho, G; Caria, H

    2014-04-01

    Low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL) is an unusual type of HL in which frequencies at 2,000 Hz and below are predominantly affected. Most of the families with LFSNHL carry missense mutations in WFS1 gene, coding for wolframin. A Portuguese patient aged 49, reporting HL since her third decade of life, and also referring tinnitus, was shown to display bilateral moderate LFSNHL after audiological evaluation. Molecular analysis led to the identification of a novel mutation, c.511G>A (p.Asp171Asn), found in heterozygosity in the exon 5 of the WFS1 gene, and changing the aspartic acid at position 171 to an asparagine, in the extracellular N-terminus domain of the wolframin protein. This novel mutation wasn't present either in 200 control chromosomes analyzed or in the hearing proband's half-brother, and it had not been reported in 1000 Genomes, Exome Variant Server, HGMD or dbSNP databases. No mutations were found in GJB2 and GJB6 genes. Multi-alignment of 27 wolframin sequences from mammalian species, against the human wolframin sequence in ConSurf, indicated a conservation score corresponding to 7 in a 1-9 color scale where 9 is conserved and 1 is variable. In addition, the mutation p.Asp171Asn was predicted to be damaging and possibly damaging by SIFT and Polyphen-2, respectively. The auditory phenotype of this patient could thus be due to the novel mutation p.Asp171Asn. Further functional characterization might enable to elucidate in which way the change in the residue 171, as other changes introduced by LFSNHL-associated mutations previously described, leads to this type of HL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Frequency of JAK2 V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia positive Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Najia; Saboor, Mohammed; Ghani, Rubina; Moinuddin, Moinuddin

    2014-01-01

    Co-existence of myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) and Janus associated kinase 2 mutation (JAK2 V617F) is a well-established fact. Only few case reports are available showing presence of JAK2 V617F mutation in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of JAK2 V617F mutation in Philadelphia Chromosome positive (Ph (+)) CML patients in Pakistan. The study was conducted from August 2009 to July 2010 at Civil Hospital and Baqai Institute of Hematology (BIH) Karachi. Blood samples from 25 patients with CML were collected. Multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed for Breakpoint Cluster Region - Abelson (BCR-ABL) rearrangement. Conventional PCR was performed for JAK2 V617F mutation on BCR-ABL positive samples. All 25 samples showed BCR-ABL rearrangement. Out of these 11 samples (44%) had JAK2 V617F mutation; the remaining 14 (56%) cases showed JAK2 617V wild type. It is concluded that the co-existence of Ph (+)CML and JAK2 V617F mutation is possible.

  16. Mutation induction by ion beams in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    The effect of ion beams such as C, He, and Ne ions was investigated on the mutation induction in plants with the expectation that ion beams of high linear energy transfer (LET) can frequently produce large DNA alternation such as inversion, translocation and large deletion rather than point mutation. Mutation frequency was investigated using Arabidopsis visible phenotype loci and was 8 to 33 fold higher for 220 MeV carbon ions than for electrons. Mutation spectrum was investigated on the flower color of chrysanthemum cv to find that flower mutants induced by ion beams show complex and stripe types rather than single color. Polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to investigate DNA alteration of mutations. In conclusion, the characteristics of ion beams for the mutation induction are 1) high frequency, 2) broad mutation spectrum, and 3) novel mutants. (S. Ohno)

  17. Mutation induction by ion beams in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Atsushi

    2001-01-01

    The effect of ion beams such as C, He, and Ne ions was investigated on the mutation induction in plants with the expectation that ion beams of high linear energy transfer (LET) can frequently produce large DNA alternation such as inversion, translocation and large deletion rather than point mutation. Mutation frequency was investigated using Arabidopsis visible phenotype loci and was 8 to 33 fold higher for 220 MeV carbon ions than for electrons. Mutation spectrum was investigated on the flower color of chrysanthemum cv to find that flower mutants induced by ion beams show complex and stripe types rather than single color. Polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to investigate DNA alteration of mutations. In conclusion, the characteristics of ion beams for the mutation induction are 1) high frequency, 2) broad mutation spectrum, and 3) novel mutants. (S. Ohno)

  18. MethylMeter(®): bisulfite-free quantitative and sensitive DNA methylation profiling and mutation detection in FFPE samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, David; Pulverer, Walter; Weinhaeusel, Andreas; Diago, Oscar R; Hogan, Daniel J; Ostertag, Derek; Hanna, Michelle M

    2016-06-01

    Development of a sensitive method for DNA methylation profiling and associated mutation detection in clinical samples. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tumors received by clinical laboratories often contain insufficient DNA for analysis with bisulfite or methylation sensitive restriction enzymes-based methods. To increase sensitivity, methyl-CpG DNA capture and Coupled Abscription PCR Signaling detection were combined in a new assay, MethylMeter(®). Gliomas were analyzed for MGMT methylation, glioma CpG island methylator phenotype and IDH1 R132H. MethylMeter had 100% assay success rate measuring all five biomarkers in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue. MGMT methylation results were supported by survival and mRNA expression data. MethylMeter is a sensitive and quantitative method for multitarget DNA methylation profiling and associated mutation detection. The MethylMeter-based GliomaSTRAT assay measures methylation of four targets and one mutation to simultaneously grade gliomas and predict their response to temozolomide. This information is clinically valuable in management of gliomas.

  19. The mitochondrial DNA 10197 G > A mutation causes MELAS/Leigh overlap syndrome presenting with acute auditory agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yinglin; Liu, Yuhe; Fang, Xiaojing; Li, Yao; Yu, Lei; Yuan, Yun; Wang, Zhaoxia

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes/Leigh (MELAS/LS) overlap syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder subtype with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that are characteristic of both MELAS and Leigh syndrome (LS). Here, we report an MELAS/LS case presenting with cortical deafness and seizures. Cranial MRI revealed multiple lesions involving bilateral temporal lobes, the basal ganglia and the brainstem, which conformed to neuroimaging features of both MELAS and LS. Whole mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing and PCR-RFLP revealed a de novo heteroplasmic m.10197 G > A mutation in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 gene (ND3), which was predicted to cause an alanine to threonine substitution at amino acid 47. Although the mtDNA m.10197 G > A mutation has been reported in association with LS, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dystonia, it has never been linked with MELAS/LS overlap syndrome. Our patient therefore expands the phenotypic spectrum of the mtDNA m.10197 G > A mutation.

  20. Quantitative cell-free DNA, KRAS, and BRAF mutations in plasma from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer during treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, Niels; Vogelius, Ivan Storgaard

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the levels of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in plasma from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in relation to third-line treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan and the quantitative relationship of cfDNA with tumor-specific mutations in plasma....

  1. DNA repair gene polymorphisms in relation to chromosome aberration frequencies in retired radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilding, Craig S.; Relton, Caroline L.; Rees, Gwen S.; Tarone, Robert E.; Whitehouse, Caroline A.; Tawn, E. Janet

    2005-01-01

    Polymorphic variation in DNA repair genes was examined in a group of retired workers from the British Nuclear Fuels plc facility at Sellafield in relation to previously determined translocation frequencies in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Variation at seven polymorphisms in four genes involved in the base excision repair (XRCC1 R194W, R399Q and a [AC] n microsatellite in the 3' UTR) and double strand break repair (XRCC3 T241M and a [AC] n microsatellite in intron 3 of XRCC3, XRCC4 I134T, and a GACTAn microsatellite located 120kb 5' of XRCC5) pathways was determined for 291 retired radiation workers who had received cumulative occupational external radiation doses of between 0 and 1873mSv. When the interaction between radiation dose and each DNA repair gene polymorphism was examined in relation to translocation frequency there was no evidence for any of the polymorphisms studied influencing the response to occupational exposure. A positive interaction observed between genotype (individuals with at least one allele >=20 repeat units) at a microsatellite locus in the XRCC3 gene and smoking status should be interpreted cautiously because interactions were investigated for seven polymorphisms and two exposures. Nonetheless, further research is warranted to examine whether this DNA repair gene variant might be associated with a sub-optimal repair response to smoking-induced DNA damage and hence an increased frequency of translocations

  2. Allele frequencies of hemojuvelin gene (HJV I222N and G320V missense mutations in white and African American subjects from the general Alabama population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohannon Sean B

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for coding region mutations of the hemojuvelin gene (HJV in whites is a cause of early age-of-onset iron overload (juvenile hemochromatosis, and of hemochromatosis phenotypes in some young or middle-aged adults. HJV coding region mutations have also been identified recently in African American primary iron overload and control subjects. Primary iron overload unexplained by typical hemochromatosis-associated HFE genotypes is common in white and black adults in Alabama, and HJV I222N and G320V were detected in a white Alabama juvenile hemochromatosis index patient. Thus, we estimated the frequency of the HJV missense mutations I222N and G320V in adult whites and African Americans from Alabama general population convenience samples. Methods We evaluated the genomic DNA of 241 Alabama white and 124 African American adults who reported no history of hemochromatosis or iron overload to detect HJV missense mutations I222N and G320V using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP technique. Analysis for HJV I222N was performed in 240 whites and 124 African Americans. Analysis for HJV G320V was performed in 241 whites and 118 African Americans. Results One of 240 white control subjects was heterozygous for HJV I222N; she was also heterozygous for HFE C282Y, but had normal serum iron measures and bone marrow iron stores. HJV I222N was not detected in 124 African American subjects. HJV G320V was not detected in 241 white or 118 African American subjects. Conclusions HJV I222N and G320V are probably uncommon causes or modifiers of primary iron overload in adult whites and African Americans in Alabama. Double heterozygosity for HJV I222N and HFE C282Y may not promote increased iron absorption.

  3. Effect of uvs1, uvs2 and xrs mutations on the radiosensitivity and the induced mitotic recombination frequency in diploid yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suslova, N.G.; Fedorova, I.V.; Zheleznyakova, N.Yu.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of the loci of radiosensitivity uvs1, uvs2, and xrs in the homozygous state at the diploid level on the sensitivity to UV and ionizing radiation and induced mitotic recombination was studied in the yeast Sacch. cerevisiae. Hypersensitivity to UV irradiation was detected in the diploids uvs2 uvs2 xrs xrs in comparision with the corresponding control. The diploid uvs1 uvs1 uvs2 uvs2 does not differ in UV sensitivity from the diploid uvs1 uvs1 UVS2 UVS2. These facts demonstrate that the uvs1 and uvs2 mutations, on the one hand, and the xrs mutations, on the other, normally control different pathways of elimination of UV-induced damages. It was shown that the diploid uvs2 uvs2 xrs3 xrs3 is far more sensitive to the lethal action of x rays than the control diploid UVS2 UVS2 xrs3 xrs3. Consequently, the mutations uvs2 and xrs3 block different modes of repair of damages induced by ionizing radiation. In all the double-mutant diploids, the frequency of mitotic recombination induced by UV rays increases sharply in comparison with that of the radioresistant diploids UVS UVS XRS XRS and the UV-sensitive diploids uvs2 uvs2 XRS XRS. Possible causes of the observed phenomenon are discussed. It was established that in a diploid homozygous for the loci uvs2 xrs5, the frequency of mitotic recombination induced by x rays increases extremely sharply. This fact confirms the hypothesis that the gene product of the locus uvs2 participates in the repair of DNA after the action of ionizing radiation. (author)

  4. Tumor-specific mutations in low-frequency genes affect their functional properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Erdem-Eraslan (Lale); D. Heijsman (Daphne); M. De Wit (Maurice); A.E. Kremer (Andreas); A. Sacchetti (Andrea); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); P.A.E. Sillevis Smitt (Peter); P.J. French (Pim)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCausal genetic changes in oligodendrogliomas (OD) with 1p/19q co-deletion include mutations in IDH1, IDH2, CIC, FUBP1, TERT promoter and NOTCH1. However, it is generally assumed that more somatic mutations are required for tumorigenesis. This study aimed to establish whether genes

  5. Mutational specificity of alkylating agents and the influence of DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsfall, M.J.; Gordon, A.J.; Burns, P.A.; Zielenska, M.; van der Vliet, G.M.; Glickman, B.W. (York Univ., Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    Alkylating treatments predominantly induce G:C = greater than A:T transitions, consistent with the predicted significance of the miscoding potential of the O6-alG lesion. However, the frequency and distribution of these events induced by any one compound may be diagnostic. SN1 agents that act via an alkyldiazonium cation, such as the N-nitroso compounds, preferentially generate G:C = greater than A:T transitions at 5'-RG-3' sites, while the more SN2 alkylsulfates and alkylalkane-sulfonates do not. The precise nature of this site bias and the possibility of strand bias are target dependent. The extent of this site bias and the contribution of other base substitutions are substituent size dependent. A similar 5'-RT-3' effect is seen for A:T = greater than G:C transitions, presumably directed by O4-alT lesions. The 5'-RG-3' effect, at least, likely reflects a deposition specificity arising from some aspect of helix geometry, although it may be further exaggerated by alkylation-specific repair. Excision repair appears to preferentially reduce the occurrence of ethylation-induced G:C = greater than A:T and A:T = greater than G:C transitions at sites flanked by A:T base pairs. This may be due to an enhancement of the helical distortion imposed by damage at such positions. A similar effect is not seen for methylation-induced mutations and in the case of propyl adducts, the influence of excision repair on the ultimate distribution of mutation cannot be as easily defined with respect to neighbouring sequence. 199 references.

  6. Simultaneous DNA and RNA mapping of somatic mitochondrial mutations across diverse human cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, James B.; Alaei-Mahabadi, Babak; Radhakrishnan, Sabarinathan

    2015-01-01

    of evidence from both genomic and transcriptomic sequencing. We find that there is selective pressure against deleterious coding mutations, supporting that functional mitochondria are required in tumor cells, and also observe a strong mutational strand bias, compatible with endogenous replication...

  7. Frequency of rare mutations and common genetic variations in severe hypertriglyceridemia in the general population of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamiquiz-Moneo, Itziar; Blanco-Torrecilla, Cristian; Bea, Ana M; Mateo-Gallego, Rocío; Pérez-Calahorra, Sofía; Baila-Rueda, Lucía; Cenarro, Ana; Civeira, Fernando; de Castro-Orós, Isabel

    2016-04-23

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a common complex metabolic trait that results of the accumulation of relatively common genetic variants in combination with other modifier genes and environmental factors resulting in increased plasma triglyceride (TG) levels. The majority of severe primary hypertriglyceridemias is diagnosed in adulthood and their molecular bases have not been fully defined yet. The prevalence of HTG is highly variable among populations, possibly caused by differences in environmental factors and genetic background. However, the prevalence of very high TG and the frequency of rare mutations causing HTG in a whole non-selected population have not been previously studied. The total of 23,310 subjects over 18 years from a primary care-district in a middle-class area of Zaragoza (Spain) with TG >500 mg/dL were selected to establish HTG prevalence. Those affected of primary HTG were considered for further genetic analysis. The promoters, coding regions and exon-intron boundaries of LPL, LMF1, APOC2, APOA5, APOE and GPIHBP1 genes were sequenced. The frequency of rare variants identified was studied in 90 controls. One hundred ninety-four subjects (1.04%) had HTG and 90 subjects (46.4%) met the inclusion criteria for primary HTG. In this subgroup, nine patients (12.3%) were carriers of 7 rare variants in LPL, LMF1, APOA5, GPIHBP1 or APOE genes. Three of these mutations are described for the first time in this work. The presence of a rare pathogenic mutation did not confer a differential phenotype or a higher family history of HTG. The prevalence of rare mutations in candidate genes in subjects with primary HTG is low. The low frequency of rare mutations, the absence of a more severe phenotype or the dominant transmission of the HTG would not suggest the use of genetic analysis in the clinical practice in this population.

  8. Frequency of CDH1 germline mutations in gastric carcinoma coming from high- and low-risk areas: metanalysis and systematic review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corso, Giovanni; Marrelli, Daniele; Pascale, Valeria; Vindigni, Carla; Roviello, Franco

    2012-01-01

    The frequency of E-cadherin germline mutations in countries with different incidence rates for gastric carcinoma has not been well established. The goal of this study was to assess the worldwide frequency of CDH1 germline mutations in gastric cancers coming from low- and high-risk areas. English articles using MEDLINE access (from 1998 to 2011). Search terms included CDH1, E-cadherin, germline mutation, gastric cancer, hereditary, familial and diffuse histotype. The study included all E-cadherin germline mutations identified in gastric cancer patients; somatic mutations and germline mutations reported in other tumors were excluded. The method of this study was scheduled in accordance with the 'PRISMA statement for reporting systematic reviews and meta-analyses'. Countries were classified as low- or middle/high risk-areas for gastric carcinoma incidence. Statistical analysis was performed to correlate the CDH1 mutation frequency with gastric cancer incidence areas. A total of 122 E-cadherin germline mutations have been identified; the majority (87.5%) occurred in gastric cancers coming from low-risk areas. In high-risk areas, we identified 16 mutations in which missense mutations were predominant. (68.8%). We verified a significant association between the mutation frequency and the gastric cancer risk area (p < 0.001: overall identified mutations in low- vs. middle/high-risk areas). E-cadherin genetic screenings performed in low-risk areas for gastric cancer identified a higher frequency of CDH1 germline mutations. This data could open new approaches in the gastric cancer prevention test; before proposing a proband candidate for the CDH1 genetic screening, geographic variability, alongside the family history should be considered

  9. Frequency of janus associated kinase 2 (jak2) mutation in patients of bcr-abl negative myeloproliferative neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, M.A.; Ahmed, S.; Ali, N.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the frequency of Janus associated kinase 2 mutation in the patients of BCR-ABL negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms. Study Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study Place and Duration of Study: Molecular Department of Haematology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi from Jul 2011 to Jul 2012. Patients and Methods: Ninety three consecutive patients of Polycythaemia vera (PV), Essential thrombocythaemia (ET) and Idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) diagnosed by the conventional haematological criteria were included in the study. All patients were screened for G-T point mutation (V617F) in the JAK2 gene on chromosome 9 by an allele specific PCR. Results: Out of the 93 myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) patients, 33(35%) had polycythaemia vera, 36(39%) had essential thrombocythaemia and 24(26%) had idiopathic myelofibrosis. JAK2 mutation was seen in 64/93 (69%) patients including 33/33(100%) in PV, 19/36(52.6%) in ET and 12/24(50%) in IMF. Conclusion: Classical myeloproliferative neoplasms are an important group of heamatological disorder in our country. JAK2 gene mutation is seen in significant proportion of these disorders (69%). JAK2 mutation analysis can be used to differentiate between polycythemia vera and secondary polycythemia in most cases with near certainty, where it was found in 100% of the cases. (author)

  10. A combinatorial role for MutY and Fpg DNA glycosylases in mutation avoidance in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassim, Farzanah; Papadopoulos, Andrea O.; Kana, Bavesh D.; Gordhan, Bhavna G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We studied the combined role of MutY and Fpg DNA glycosylases in M. smegmatis. • Loss of MutY showed increased sensitivity to oxidative damage. • Loss of MutY together with the Fpg glycosylases showed increased mutation rates. • Our data indicate interplay between these enzymes to control mutagenesis. - Abstract: Hydroxyl radical (·OH) among reactive oxygen species cause damage to nucleobases with thymine being the most susceptible, whilst in contrast, the singlet oxygen ( 1 0 2 ) targets only guanine bases. The high GC content of mycobacterial genomes predisposes these organisms to oxidative damage of guanine. The exposure of cellular DNA to ·OH and one-electron oxidants results in the formation of two main degradation products, the pro-mutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua) and the cytotoxic 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyGua). These lesions are repaired through the base excision repair (BER) pathway and we previously, demonstrated a combinatorial role for the mycobacterial Endonuclease III (Nth) and the Nei family of DNA glycosylases in mutagenesis. In addition, the formamidopyrimidine (Fpg/MutM) and MutY DNA glycosylases have also been implicated in mutation avoidance and BER in mycobacteria. In this study, we further investigate the combined role of MutY and the Fpg/Nei DNA glycosylases in Mycobacterium smegmatis and demonstrate that deletion of mutY resulted in enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress, an effect which was not exacerbated in Δfpg1 Δfpg2 or Δnei1 Δnei2 double mutant backgrounds. However, combinatorial loss of the mutY, fpg1 and fpg2 genes resulted in a significant increase in mutation rates suggesting interplay between these enzymes. Consistent with this, there was a significant increase in C → A mutations with a corresponding change in cell morphology of rifampicin resistant mutants in the Δfpg1 Δfpg2 ΔmutY deletion mutant. In contrast, deletion of mutY together with the nei homologues

  11. The erratic mitochondrial clock: variations of mutation rate, not population size, affect mtDNA diversity across birds and mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galtier Nicolas

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last ten years, major advances have been made in characterizing and understanding the evolution of mitochondrial DNA, the most popular marker of molecular biodiversity. Several important results were recently reported using mammals as model organisms, including (i the absence of relationship between mitochondrial DNA diversity and life-history or ecological variables, (ii the absence of prominent adaptive selection, contrary to what was found in invertebrates, and (iii the unexpectedly large variation in neutral substitution rate among lineages, revealing a possible link with species maximal longevity. We propose to challenge these results thanks to the bird/mammal comparison. Direct estimates of population size are available in birds, and this group presents striking life-history trait differences with mammals (higher mass-specific metabolic rate and longevity. These properties make birds the ideal model to directly test for population size effects, and to discriminate between competing hypotheses about the causes of substitution rate variation. Results A phylogenetic analysis of cytochrome b third-codon position confirms that the mitochondrial DNA mutation rate is quite variable in birds, passerines being the fastest evolving order. On average, mitochondrial DNA evolves slower in birds than in mammals of similar body size. This result is in agreement with the longevity hypothesis, and contradicts the hypothesis of a metabolic rate-dependent mutation rate. Birds show no footprint of adaptive selection on cytochrome b evolutionary patterns, but no link between direct estimates of population size and cytochrome b diversity. The mutation rate is the best predictor we have of within-species mitochondrial diversity in birds. It partly explains the differences in mitochondrial DNA diversity patterns observed between mammals and birds, previously interpreted as reflecting Hill-Robertson interferences with the W

  12. A combinatorial role for MutY and Fpg DNA glycosylases in mutation avoidance in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassim, Farzanah; Papadopoulos, Andrea O.; Kana, Bavesh D.; Gordhan, Bhavna G., E-mail: bhavna.gordhan@nhls.ac.za

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We studied the combined role of MutY and Fpg DNA glycosylases in M. smegmatis. • Loss of MutY showed increased sensitivity to oxidative damage. • Loss of MutY together with the Fpg glycosylases showed increased mutation rates. • Our data indicate interplay between these enzymes to control mutagenesis. - Abstract: Hydroxyl radical (·OH) among reactive oxygen species cause damage to nucleobases with thymine being the most susceptible, whilst in contrast, the singlet oxygen ({sup 1}0{sub 2}) targets only guanine bases. The high GC content of mycobacterial genomes predisposes these organisms to oxidative damage of guanine. The exposure of cellular DNA to ·OH and one-electron oxidants results in the formation of two main degradation products, the pro-mutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua) and the cytotoxic 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyGua). These lesions are repaired through the base excision repair (BER) pathway and we previously, demonstrated a combinatorial role for the mycobacterial Endonuclease III (Nth) and the Nei family of DNA glycosylases in mutagenesis. In addition, the formamidopyrimidine (Fpg/MutM) and MutY DNA glycosylases have also been implicated in mutation avoidance and BER in mycobacteria. In this study, we further investigate the combined role of MutY and the Fpg/Nei DNA glycosylases in Mycobacterium smegmatis and demonstrate that deletion of mutY resulted in enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress, an effect which was not exacerbated in Δfpg1 Δfpg2 or Δnei1 Δnei2 double mutant backgrounds. However, combinatorial loss of the mutY, fpg1 and fpg2 genes resulted in a significant increase in mutation rates suggesting interplay between these enzymes. Consistent with this, there was a significant increase in C → A mutations with a corresponding change in cell morphology of rifampicin resistant mutants in the Δfpg1 Δfpg2 ΔmutY deletion mutant. In contrast, deletion of mutY together with the nei

  13. Identification of DNA polymerase molecules repairing DNA irradiated damage and molecular biological study on modified factors of mutation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Koichi; Inoue, Shuji [National Inst. of Healthand Nutrition, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    DNA repairing polymerase has not been identified in human culture cells because the specificities of enzyme inhibitors used in previous studies were not so high. In this study, anti-sense oligonucleotides were transfected into human fibroblast cells by electroporation and several clones selected by geneticin treatment were found to express the RNA of the incorporated DNA. However, the expression was not significant and its reproducibility was poor. Then, a study on repairing mechanism was made using XP30 RO and XP 115 LO cells which are variant cells of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human hereditary disease aiming to identify the DNA polymerase related to the disease. There were abnormalities in DNA polymerase subunit {delta} or {epsilon} which consists DNA replication complex. Thus, it was suggested that the DNA replication of these mutant cells might terminate at the site containing such abnormality. (M.N.)

  14. Deep sequencing shows that oocytes are not prone to accumulate mtDNA heteroplasmic mutations during ovarian ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucret, L; Bris, C; Seegers, V; Goudenège, D; Desquiret-Dumas, V; Domin-Bernhard, M; Ferré-L'Hotellier, V; Bouet, P E; Descamps, P; Reynier, P; Procaccio, V; May-Panloup, P

    2017-10-01

    Does ovarian ageing increase the number of heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations in oocytes? Our results suggest that oocytes are not subject to the accumulation of mtDNA point mutations during ovarian ageing. Ageing is associated with the alteration of mtDNA integrity in various tissues. Primary oocytes, present in the ovary since embryonic life, may accumulate mtDNA mutations during the process of ovarian ageing. This was an observational study of 53 immature oocyte-cumulus complexes retrieved from 35 women undergoing IVF at the University Hospital of Angers, France, from March 2013 to March 2014. The women were classified in two groups, one including 19 women showing signs of ovarian ageing objectified by a diminished ovarian reserve (DOR), and the other, including 16 women with a normal ovarian reserve (NOR), which served as a control group. mtDNA was extracted from isolated oocytes, and from their corresponding cumulus cells (CCs) considered as a somatic cell compartment. The average mtDNA content of each sample was assessed by using a quantitative real-time PCR technique. Deep sequencing was performed using the Ion Torrent Proton for Next-Generation Sequencing. Signal processing and base calling were done by the embedded pre-processing pipeline and the variants were analyzed using an in-house workflow. The distribution of the different variants between DOR and NOR patients, on one hand, and oocyte and CCs, on the other, was analyzed with the generalized mixed linear model to take into account the cluster of cells belonging to a given mother. There were no significant differences between the numbers of mtDNA variants between the DOR and the NOR patients, either in the oocytes (P = 0.867) or in the surrounding CCs (P = 0.154). There were also no differences in terms of variants with potential functional consequences. De-novo mtDNA variants were found in 28% of the oocytes and in 66% of the CCs with the mean number of variants being

  15. Modification of UV-induced mutation frequencies in Chinese hamster- cells by dose fractionation, cycloheximide and caffeine treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.-C.; Schultz, R.; Trosko, J.E.; D'Ambrosio, S.M.; Setlow, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Chinese hamster (V79) cells were irradiated with a fractionated regime of ultraviolet light (UV 1 +UV 2 ). The fractionation of a UV dose always increased the colony-forming ability but reduced (or it did not change) the mutation frequencies. Treatment with cycloheximide between the two UV irradiations resulted in two types of effects, depending on the protocols used. Long exposures to cycloheximide (i.e., >6h) for the entire period between UV 1 and UV 2 or partial treatment of cycloheximide (i.e., 3h) long before UV 2 always resulted in reduced colony-forming ability and enhanced or unchanged mutation frequencies. Exposure to cycloheximide for the entire period in the short fractionated regime (i.e., 4h) between UV 1 and UV 2 or partial treatment of cycloheximide just prior to UV 2 tended to give the opposite effects. Caffeine treatment before UV 2 , with or without UV 1 , significantly increased the mutation frequencies. These results suggest that an error-free postreplication repair system exists in Chinese hamster cells which is inhibitable by particular cycloheximide or caffeine treatments. (Auth.)

  16. Ultraviolet light induction of diphtheria toxin-resistant mutations in normal and DNA repair-deficient human and Chinese hamster fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trosko, J.E.; Schultz, R.S.; Chang, C.C.; Glover, T.

    1980-01-01

    The role on unrepaired DNA lesions in the production of mutations is suspected of contributing to the initiation phase of carcinogenesis. Since the molecular basis of mutagenesis is not understood in eukaryotic cells, development of new genetic markers for quantitative in vitro measurement of mutations for mammalian cells is needed. Furthermore, mammalian cells, genetically deficient for various DNA repair enzymes, will be needed to study the role of unrepaired DNA lesions in mutagenesis. The results in this report relate to preliminary attempts to characterize the diphtheria toxin resistance marker as a useful quantitative genetic marker in human cells and to isolate and characterize various DNA repair-deficient Chinese hamster cells

  17. High prevalence of impaired glucose homeostasis and myopathy in asymptomatic and oligosymptomatic 3243A>G mitochondrial DNA mutation-positive subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, A.L.; Jeppesen, T.D.; Vissing, J.

    2009-01-01

    controls were subjected to an oral glucose tolerance test. Twenty-six adult 3243A>G carriers with unknown myopathy status and 17 healthy controls had a maximal cycle test and a muscle biopsy performed. The mutation loads were quantified in blood and muscle biopsies and correlated to the clinical......INTRODUCTION: The point mutation of 3243A>G mtDNA is the most frequent cause of mitochondrial diabetes, often presenting as the syndrome maternally inherited diabetes and deafness (MIDD). The mutation may also cause myopathy, ataxia, strokes, ophthalmoplegia, epilepsy, and cardiomyopathy in various...... combinations. Consequently, it is difficult to predict the "phenotypic risk profile" of 3243A>G mutation-positive subjects. The 3243A>G mutation coexists in cells with wild-type mtDNA, a phenomenon called heteroplasmy. The marked variability in mutation loads in different tissues is the main explanation...

  18. Mutation frequencies in female mice and the estimation of genetic hazards of radiation in women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    The female germ cell stage of primary importance in radiation genetic hazards is the immature, arrested oocyte. In the mouse, this stage has a near zero or zero sensitivity to mutation induction by radiation. However, the application of these mouse results to women has been questioned on the ground that the mouse arrested oocytes are highly sensitive to killing by radiation, while the human cells are not; and, furthermore, that the mature and maturing oocytes in the mouse, which are resistant to killing, are sensitive to mutation induction. The present results have a 2-fold bearing on this problem. First, a more detailed analysis of oocyte-stage sensitivity to killing and mutation induction shows that there is no consistent correlation, either negative or positive, between the two. This indicates that the sensitivity to cell killing of the mouse immature oocyte may not be sufficient reason to prevent its use in predicting the mutational response of the human immature oocyte. Second, if the much more cautious assumption is made that the human arrested oocyte might be as mutationally sensitive as the most sensitive of all oocyte stages in the mouse, namely the maturing and mature ones, then the present data on the duration of these stages permit more accurate estimates than were heretofore possible on the mutational response of these stages to chronic irradiation

  19. High frequency of potentially pathogenic SORL1 mutations in autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottier, C; Hannequin, D; Coutant, S; Rovelet-Lecrux, A; Wallon, D; Rousseau, S; Legallic, S; Paquet, C; Bombois, S; Pariente, J; Thomas-Anterion, C; Michon, A; Croisile, B; Etcharry-Bouyx, F; Berr, C; Dartigues, J-F; Amouyel, P; Dauchel, H; Boutoleau-Bretonnière, C; Thauvin, C; Frebourg, T; Lambert, J-C; Campion, D

    2012-09-01

    Performing exome sequencing in 14 autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease (ADEOAD) index cases without mutation on known genes (amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin1 (PSEN1) and presenilin2 (PSEN2)), we found that in five patients, the SORL1 gene harbored unknown nonsense (n=1) or missense (n=4) mutations. These mutations were not retrieved in 1500 controls of same ethnic origin. In a replication sample, including 15 ADEOAD cases, 2 unknown non-synonymous mutations (1 missense, 1 nonsense) were retrieved, thus yielding to a total of 7/29 unknown mutations in the combined sample. Using in silico predictions, we conclude that these seven private mutations are likely to have a pathogenic effect. SORL1 encodes the Sortilin-related receptor LR11/SorLA, a protein involved in the control of amyloid beta peptide production. Our results suggest that besides the involvement of the APP and PSEN genes, further genetic heterogeneity, involving another gene of the same pathway is present in ADEOAD.

  20. Homoplasmy of the G7444A mtDNA and heterozygosity of the GJB2 c.35delG mutations in a family with hearing loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokotas, Haris; Grigoriadou, Maria; Yang, Li

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial mutations have been shown to be responsible for syndromic as well as non-syndromic hearing loss. The G7444A mitochondrial DNA mutation affects COI/the precursor of tRNA(Ser(UCN)), encoding the first subunit of cytochrome oxidase. Here we report on the first Greek family with the G74...

  1. High mutation detection rate in the COL4A5 collagen gene in suspected Alport syndrome using PCR and direct DNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, P; Heiskari, N; Zhou, J

    1998-01-01

    -amplified and sequenced from DNA of 50 randomly chosen patients with suspected Alport syndrome. Mutations were found in 41 patients, giving a mutation detection rate of 82%. Retrospective analysis of clinical data revealed that two of the cases might be autosomal. Although it could not be determined whether the remaining...

  2. Frequency of Fanconi anemia in Brazil and efficacy of screening for the FANCA 3788-3790del mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Magdalena

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia (FA is an autosomal recessive genetic disease characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, susceptibility to cancer and multiple congenital anomalies. There is important clinical variability among patients and the knowledge of factors which might predict outcome would greatly help the decision making regarding the choices of treatment and the appropriate time to start it. Future studies of the possible correlation between specific mutations with specific clinical presentations will provide the answer to one of these factors. At our Center we standardized a rapid and precise screening test using a mismatch PCR assay for a specific mutation (3788-3790del in exon 38 of gene FANCA in Brazilian FA patients. We present the results obtained after screening 80 non-consanguineous FA patients referred from all regions of Brazil with a clinical diagnosis of FA supported by cellular hypersensitivity to diepoxybutane. We were able to detect the 3788-3790del allele in 24 of the 80 (30% FA patients studied. Thirteen of the 80 (16.25% were homozygotes and 11 of the 80 (13.75% were compound heterozygotes, thus confirming the high frequency of the FANCA 3788-3790del mutation in Brazilian FA patients. The identification of patients with specific mutations in the FA genes may lead to a better clinical description of this condition, also providing data for genotype-phenotype correlations, to a better understanding of the interaction of this specific mutation with other mutations in compound heterozygote patients, and ultimately to the right choices of treatment for each patient with improvement of the prognosis on future studies.

  3. Frequency of Fanconi anemia in Brazil and efficacy of screening for the FANCA 3788-3790del mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdalena, N; Pilonetto, D V; Bitencourt, M A; Pereira, N F; Ribeiro, R C; Jeng, M; Pasquini, R

    2005-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disease characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, susceptibility to cancer and multiple congenital anomalies. There is important clinical variability among patients and the knowledge of factors which might predict outcome would greatly help the decision making regarding the choices of treatment and the appropriate time to start it. Future studies of the possible correlation between specific mutations with specific clinical presentations will provide the answer to one of these factors. At our Center we standardized a rapid and precise screening test using a mismatch PCR assay for a specific mutation (3788-3790del in exon 38 of gene FANCA) in Brazilian FA patients. We present the results obtained after screening 80 non-consanguineous FA patients referred from all regions of Brazil with a clinical diagnosis of FA supported by cellular hypersensitivity to diepoxybutane. We were able to detect the 3788-3790del allele in 24 of the 80 (30%) FA patients studied. Thirteen of the 80 (16.25%) were homozygotes and 11 of the 80 (13.75%) were compound heterozygotes, thus confirming the high frequency of the FANCA 3788-3790del mutation in Brazilian FA patients. The identification of patients with specific mutations in the FA genes may lead to a better clinical description of this condition, also providing data for genotype-phenotype correlations, to a better understanding of the interaction of this specific mutation with other mutations in compound heterozygote patients, and ultimately to the right choices of treatment for each patient with improvement of the prognosis on future studies.

  4. Molecular nature of X-ray-induced mutations compared with that of spontaneous ones in human c-hprt gene integrated into mammalian chromosomal DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Kato, Takesi.

    1992-01-01

    X-ray-induced mutations were analysed at molecular levels in comparison with spontaneous mutations. Altered sequences were determined tentatively of 30 independent X-ray-induced mutations in a cDNA of the human hprt gene which was integrated into mammalian chromosome as a part of a shuttle vector. Mutations consisted of base substitutions (37 %), frameshifts (27 %), deletions (27 %) and others (10 %). All these mutational events were distributed randomly over the gene without there being hot spots. The spectrum and distribution of X-ray-induced mutations resembled those of spontaneous mutations. Among base substitutions, transversions were predominant and base substitution mutations occurred more at A:T sites than at G:C sites, which is also the case in spontaneous mutations. Most of the frameshift and deletion mutations induced by X-rays, as well as those spontaneously arising, were characterized by the existence of short direct repeats of several identical bases in a row at the sites of the mutations. A slippage misalignment mechanism in replication well accounts for the generation of these classes of mutations. Judging from the data accumulated so far, it can be concluded that X-ray-induced mutations at molecular levels are similar to those spontaneously occurring. (author)

  5. Emergence of Tetracycline Resistance in Helicobacter pylori: Multiple Mutational Changes in 16S Ribosomal DNA and Other Genetic Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailidiene, Daiva; Bertoli, M. Teresita; Miciuleviciene, Jolanta; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Dailide, Giedrius; Pascasio, Mario Alberto; Kupcinskas, Limas; Berg, Douglas E.

    2002-01-01

    Tetracycline is useful in combination therapies against the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. We found 6 tetracycline-resistant (Tetr) strains among 159 clinical isolates (from El Salvador, Lithuania, and India) and obtained the following four results: (i) 5 of 6 Tetr isolates contained one or two nucleotide substitutions in one part of the primary tetracycline binding site in 16S rRNA (AGA965-967 [Escherichia coli coordinates] changed to gGA, AGc, guA, or gGc [lowercase letters are used to represent the base changes]), whereas the sixth (isolate Ind75) retained AGA965-967; (ii) PCR products containing mutant 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) alleles transformed recipient strains to Tetr phenotypes, but transformants containing alleles with single substitutions (gGA and AGc) were less resistant than their Tetr parents; (iii) each of 10 Tetr mutants of reference strain 26695 (in which mutations were induced with metronidazole, a mutagenic anti-H. pylori agent) contained the normal AGA965-967 sequence; and (iv) transformant derivatives of Ind75 and of one of the Tetr 26695 mutants that had acquired mutant rDNA alleles were resistant to tetracycline at levels higher than those to which either parent strain was resistant. Thus, tetracycline resistance in H. pylori results from an accumulation of changes that may affect tetracycline-ribosome affinity and/or other functions (perhaps porins or efflux pumps). We suggest that the rarity of tetracycline resistance among clinical isolates reflects this need for multiple mutations and perhaps also the deleterious effects of such mutations on fitness. Formally equivalent mutations with small but additive effects are postulated to contribute importantly to traits such as host specificity and virulence and to H. pylori's great genetic diversity. PMID:12435699

  6. Analysis of UV-induced mutation spectra in Escherichia coli by DNA polymerase {eta} from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, Maria Jesus [Departamento de Genetica, Facultad de Ciencias, Edificio Gregor Mendel, Campus Rabanales, Universidad de Cordoba (Spain); Alejandre-Duran, Encarna [Departamento de Genetica, Facultad de Ciencias, Edificio Gregor Mendel, Campus Rabanales, Universidad de Cordoba (Spain); Ruiz-Rubio, Manuel [Departamento de Genetica, Facultad de Ciencias, Edificio Gregor Mendel, Campus Rabanales, Universidad de Cordoba (Spain)]. E-mail: ge1rurum@uco.es

    2006-10-10

    DNA polymerase {eta} belongs to the Y-family of DNA polymerases, enzymes that are able to synthesize past template lesions that block replication fork progression. This polymerase accurately bypasses UV-associated cis-syn cyclobutane thymine dimers in vitro and therefore may contributes to resistance against sunlight in vivo, both ameliorating survival and decreasing the level of mutagenesis. We cloned and sequenced a cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana which encodes a protein containing several sequence motifs characteristics of Pol{eta} homologues, including a highly conserved sequence reported to be present in the active site of the Y-family DNA polymerases. The gene, named AtPOLH, contains 14 exons and 13 introns and is expressed in different plant tissues. A strain from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, deficient in Pol{eta} activity, was transformed with a yeast expression plasmid containing the AtPOLH cDNA. The rate of survival to UV irradiation in the transformed mutant increased to similar values of the wild type yeast strain, showing that AtPOLH encodes a functional protein. In addition, when AtPOLH is expressed in Escherichia coli, a change in the mutational spectra is detected when bacteria are irradiated with UV light. This observation might indicate that AtPOLH could compete with DNA polymerase V and then bypass cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers incorporating two adenylates.

  7. SNPase-ARMS qPCR: Ultrasensitive Mutation-Based Detection of Cell-Free Tumor DNA in Melanoma Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Stadler

    Full Text Available Cell-free circulating tumor DNA in the plasma of cancer patients has become a common point of interest as indicator of therapy options and treatment response in clinical cancer research. Especially patient- and tumor-specific single nucleotide variants that accurately distinguish tumor DNA from wild type DNA are promising targets. The reliable detection and quantification of these single-base DNA variants is technically challenging. Currently, a variety of techniques is applied, with no apparent "gold standard". Here we present a novel qPCR protocol that meets the conditions of extreme sensitivity and specificity that are required for detection and quantification of tumor DNA. By consecutive application of two polymerases, one of them designed for extreme base-specificity, the method reaches unprecedented sensitivity and specificity. Three qPCR assays were tested with spike-in experiments, specific for point mutations BRAF V600E, PTEN T167A and NRAS Q61L of melanoma cell lines. It was possible to detect down to one copy of tumor DNA per reaction (Poisson distribution, at a background of up to 200 000 wild type DNAs. To prove its clinical applicability, the method was successfully tested on a small cohort of BRAF V600E positive melanoma patients.

  8. Somatic mutation frequencies in the stamen hairs of stable and mutable clones of Tradescantia after acute gamma-ray treatments with small doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Sadao; Takahashi, C.S.

    1977-01-01

    Young inflorescences of two different Tradescantia clones heterozygous for flower and stamen-hair color, one stable (KU 9) and the other spontaneously mutable (KU 20), were irradiated acutely with small doses (approx. 3 to 50 R) of 60 Co gamma-rays. Somatic mutation frequencies from blue to pink in the stamen hairs scored on post-irradiation days 10 to 16 increased essentially linearly with increasing gamma-ray dose in both clones. Despite about a 5-fold difference in spontaneous mutation frequency per hair found between the two clones, the dose-response curves of pink mutations determined were similar to each other, giving average mutation frequencies of 1.51 and 1.41 pink-mutant events per 1000 hairs per R for KU 9 and KU 20, respectively. These frequencies are comparable to earlier results obtained from acute irradiation treatments of other clones with higher doses. The doubling dose of pink mutation (the radiation dose making the mutation frequency double the spontaneous level) was calculated to be 2.09 R for KU 9, and this low doubling dose must be given full attention. On the other hand, the doubling dose for KU 20 (calculated to be 10.4 R) is of questionable value, being greatly subject to change because of the diversely variable spontaneous mutation frequency of this clone

  9. scid mutation in mice confers hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation and a deficiency in DNA double-strand break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biedermann, K.A.; Sun, J.R.; Giaccia, A.J.; Tosto, L.M.; Brown, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    C.B-17 severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mice carry the scid mutation and are severely deficient in both T cell- and B cell-mediated immunity, apparently as a result of defective V(D)J joining of the immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene elements. In the present studies, we have defined the tissue, cellular, and molecular basis of another characteristic of these mice: their hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. Bone marrow stem cells, intestinal crypt cells, and epithelial skin cells from scid mice are 2- to 3-fold more sensitive when irradiated in situ than are congenic BALB/c or C.B-17 controls. Two independently isolated embryo fibroblastic scid mouse cell lines display similar hypersensitivities to gamma-rays. In addition, these cell lines are sensitive to cell killing by bleomycin, which also produces DNA strand breaks, but not by the DNA crosslinking agent mitomycin C or UV irradiation. Measurement of the rejoining of gamma-ray-induced DNA double-strand breaks by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis indicates that these animals are defective in this repair system. This suggests that the gamma-ray sensitivity of the scid mouse fibroblasts could be the result of reduced repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Therefore, a common factor may participate in both the repair of DNA double-strand breaks as well as V(D)J rejoining during lymphocyte development. This murine autosomal recessive mutation should prove extremely useful in fundamental studies of radiation-induced DNA damage and repair

  10. [Research progress of mutational spectrum and pathophysiology of WFS1 gene in Wolfram syndrome and nonsyndromic low frequency sensorineural hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, S M; Han, Y H; Wang, H B

    2016-09-07

    Compound homozygous or heterozygous mutations in WFS 1 can lead to autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome (WS), and heterozygous mutations in WFS 1 can lead to autosomal dominant non-syndromic low frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL). In addition, mutations in the WFS region has relationship with diabetes and psychiatric diseases. In this paper, we provide an overview of genetic research with different phenotypes, including WS and LFSNHL.

  11. Effects of diurnal temperature difference and gamma radiation on the frequency of somatic cell mutations in the stamen hairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, Won Rok; Kim, Jae Sung; Shin, Hae Shick; Lee, Jeong Joo

    1998-01-01

    This study deals with the effects of diurnal temperature difference (DTD) on somatic cell mutation frequencies in Tradescantia stamen hairs irradiated with radiation. Potted plants of Tradescantia 4430 were irradiated with 0.3, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Gy of gamma radiation. The irradiated plants were maintained under two different experimental conditions; at constant temperature of 20 degree C (DTD0) and at 28 degree C for 14-h day and 8 degree C for 10-h night (DTD20). The somatic cell mutation rate in 0.5 Gy irradiated group showed a big increase on the 6th day and reached a maximum value on the 10th day after irradiation while the rate in the experimental group under the condition of DTD20 started to increase on the 8th day and got to a maximal value on the 14th day postirradiation. In both of the two experiments, the dose-response relationships were clearly linear. The slope of the DTD20 dose-response curve was much steeper than that of the DTD0 one. In conclusion, a great DTD, as one of environmental stresses, enhanced the effectiveness of radiation in the induction of somatic cell mutations and caused a shift of the peak interval of radiation-induced mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs

  12. A novel mutation in the WFS1 gene identified in a Taiwanese family with low-frequency hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Shing-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wolfram syndrome gene 1 (WFS1 accounts for most of the familial nonsyndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL which is characterized by sensorineural hearing losses equal to and below 2000 Hz. The current study aimed to contribute to our understanding of the molecular basis of LFSNHL in an affected Taiwanese family. Methods The Taiwanese family with LFSNHL was phenotypically characterized using audiologic examination and pedigree analysis. Genetic characterization was performed by direct sequencing of WFS1 and mutation analysis. Results Pure tone audiometry confirmed that the family members affected with LFSNHL had a bilateral sensorineural hearing loss equal to or below 2000 Hz. The hearing loss threshold of the affected members showed no progression, a characteristic that was consistent with a mutation in the WFS1 gene located in the DFNA6/14/38 locus. Pedigree analysis showed a hereditarily autosomal dominant pattern characterized by a full penetrance. Among several polymorphisms, a missense mutation Y669H (2005T>C in exon 8 of WFS1 was identified in members of a Taiwanese family diagnosed with LFSNHL but not in any of the control subjects. Conclusion We discovered a novel heterozygous missense mutation in exon 8 of WFS1 (i.e., Y669H which is likely responsible for the LFSNHL phenotype in this particular Taiwanese family.

  13. Prevalence of Germline Mutations in Genes Engaged in DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination in Patients with Triple-Negative and Hereditary Non-Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Domagala

    Full Text Available This study sought to assess the prevalence of common germline mutations in several genes engaged in the repair of DNA double-strand break by homologous recombination in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Tumors deficient in this type of DNA damage repair are known to be especially sensitive to DNA cross-linking agents (e.g., platinum drugs and to poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors.Genetic testing was performed for 36 common germline mutations in genes engaged in the repair of DNA by homologous recombination, i.e., BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, NBN, ATM, PALB2, BARD1, and RAD51D, in 202 consecutive patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers.Thirty five (22.2% of 158 patients in the triple-negative group carried mutations in genes involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination, while 10 (22.7% of the 44 patients in the hereditary non-triple-negative group carried such mutations. Mutations in BRCA1 were most frequent in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (18.4%, and mutations in CHEK2 were most frequent in patients with hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers (15.9%. In addition, in the triple-negative group, mutations in CHEK2, NBN, and ATM (3.8% combined were found, while mutations in BRCA1, NBN, and PALB2 (6.8% combined were identified in the hereditary non-triple-negative group.Identifying mutations in genes engaged in DNA damage repair by homologous recombination other than BRCA1/2 can substantially increase the proportion of patients with triple-negative breast cancer and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancer who may be eligible for therapy using PARP inhibitors and platinum drugs.

  14. Relationship between mutation frequency of GPA locus and cumulative dose among medical diagnostic X-ray workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jixian; Yu Wenru; Li Benxiao; Fan Tiqiang; Li Zhen; Gao Zhiwei; Chen Zhenjun; Zhao Yongcheng

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of using GPA locus mutation assay as a bio-dosimeter for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. Methods: An improved technique of GPA locus mutation assay was used in th study. The frequencies of mutant RBC in peripheral blood of 55 medical X-ray workers and 50 controls employed in different calendar-year periods were detected. The relationship between mutation frequencies (MFs) and period of entry, working years and cumulative doses were analyzed. Results: The MFs were significantly elevated among X-ray workers employed before 1970. This finding is similar to the result of cancer epidemiological study among medical X-ray workers , in which the cancer risk was significantly increased only X-ray workers employed before 1970. The MFs of GPA increased with increasing cumulative dose. The dose-effect relationship of Nφ MF with cumulative dose was closer than that of NN MF. Conclusion: There are many problems to be solved for using GPA MF assay as a bio-dosimeter such as individual variation, specificity and calibration curve of dose-effect relationship

  15. Rats with a missense mutation in Atm display neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration subsequent to accumulation of cytosolic DNA following unrepaired DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Hazel; Luff, John; Cheung, KaGeen; Kozlov, Sergei; Gatei, Magtouf; Lee, C Soon; Bellingham, Mark C; Noakes, Peter G; Lim, Yi Chieh; Barnett, Nigel L; Dingwall, Steven; Wolvetang, Ernst; Mashimo, Tomoji; Roberts, Tara L; Lavin, Martin F

    2017-04-01

    Mutations in the ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T)-mutated ( ATM ) gene give rise to the human genetic disorder A-T, characterized by immunodeficiency, cancer predisposition, and neurodegeneration. Whereas a series of animal models recapitulate much of the A-T phenotype, they fail to present with ataxia or neurodegeneration. We describe here the generation of an Atm missense mutant [amino acid change of leucine (L) to proline (P) at position 2262 (L2262P)] rat by intracytoplasmic injection (ICSI) of mutant sperm into oocytes. Atm -mutant rats ( Atm L2262P/L2262P ) expressed low levels of ATM protein, suggesting a destabilizing effect of the mutation, and had a significantly reduced lifespan compared with Atm +/+ Whereas these rats did not show cerebellar atrophy, they succumbed to hind-limb paralysis (45%), and the remainder developed tumors. Closer examination revealed the presence of both dsDNA and ssDNA in the cytoplasm of cells in the hippocampus, cerebellum, and spinal cord of Atm L2262P/L2262P rats. Significantly increased levels of IFN-β and IL-1β in all 3 tissues were indicative of DNA damage induction of the type 1 IFN response. This was further supported by NF-κB activation, as evidenced by p65 phosphorylation (P65) and translocation to the nucleus in the spinal cord and parahippocampus. Other evidence of neuroinflammation in the brain and spinal cord was the loss of motor neurons and the presence of increased activation of microglia. These data provide support for a proinflammatory phenotype that is manifested in the Atm mutant rat as hind-limb paralysis. This mutant represents a useful model to investigate the importance of neuroinflammation in A-T. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  16. Molecular spectrum of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, and APC somatic gene mutations in Arab patients with colorectal cancer: determination of frequency and distribution pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shamsi, Humaid O.; Jones, Jeremy; Fahmawi, Yazan; Dahbour, Ibrahim; Tabash, Aziz; Abdel-Wahab, Reham; Abousamra, Ahmed O. S.; Shaw, Kenna R.; Xiao, Lianchun; Hassan, Manal M.; Kipp, Benjamin R.; Kopetz, Scott; Soliman, Amr S.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Wolff, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The frequency rates of mutations such as KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA in colorectal cancer (CRC) differ among populations. The aim of this study was to assess mutation frequencies in the Arab population and determine their correlations with certain clinicopathological features. Methods Arab patients from the Arab Gulf region and a population of age- and sex-matched Western patients with CRC whose tumors were evaluated with next-generation sequencing (NGS) were identified and retrospectively reviewed. The mutation rates of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, and APC were recorded, along with clinicopathological features. Other somatic mutation and their rates were also identified. Fisher’s exact test was used to determine the association between mutation status and clinical features. Results A total of 198 cases were identified; 99 Arab patients and 99 Western patients. Fifty-two point seven percent of Arab patients had stage IV disease at initial presentation, 74.2% had left-sided tumors. Eighty-nine point two percent had tubular adenocarcinoma and 10.8% had mucinous adenocarcinoma. The prevalence rates of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, APC, SMAD, FBXW7 mutations in Arab population were 44.4%, 4%, 4%, 13.1%, 52.5%, 27.3%, 2% and 3% respectively. Compared to 48.4%, 4%, 4%, 12.1%, 47.5%, 24.2%, 11.1% and 0% respectively in matched Western population. Associations between these mutations and patient clinicopathological features were not statistically significant. Conclusions This is the first study to report comprehensive hotspot mutations using NGS in Arab patients with CRC. The frequency of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, TP53, APC and PIK3CA mutations were similar to reported frequencies in Western population except SMAD4 that had a lower frequency and higher frequency of FBXW7 mutation. PMID:28078112

  17. Modification of UV-induced mutation frequency and cell survival of Escherichia coli B/r WP2 trpE65 by treatment before irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doudney, C.O.; Rinaldi, C.N.

    1984-01-01

    The UV radiation survival curve of exponentially growing cultures of Escherichia coli B/r WP2 trpE65 was modified by pretreatment for short incubation periods (up to 20 min) with chloramphenicol such that an extended exponential section of intermediate slope appeared between the shoulder and the final exponential slope. Surges of mutation to tryptophan independence occurred with each increase in slope of the survival curve. These surges were separated by extended sections of little mutation. Nalidixic acid prevented both the changes in survival and mutation. Mutation curves obtained with overnight cultures had three extended sections of little mutation alternating with section of high mutation. Reincubation for 60 min in fresh medium reduced or eliminated the low-response sections. These reappeared after 80 to 90 min, when DNA had doubled in the culture and before the initial synchronous cell divisions had occurred. Nalidixic acid prevented this reappearance

  18. [Frequency of the most common mutations of the CFTR gene in peruvian patients with cystic fibrosis using the ARMS-PCR technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Ruth; Protzel, Ana; Rivera, Juan; Abarca, Hugo; Dueñas, Milagros; Nestarez, Cecilia; Purizaga, Nestor; Diringer, Benoit

    2017-01-01

    To determine the frequency of the ten most common mutations of the CFTR gene reported in Latin Americausing amplification-refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) in two referral hospitals in Peru during the year 2014. The frequency of the ten most common mutations of the CFTR gene was assessed in patients of the Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins and the Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño, both located in Lima, Peru. Blood samples were collected from 36 patients with CF, and the ARMS-PCR technique was used to determine the presence of these mutations. The study group included 73.5% of patients with a known diagnosis of CF in the country when the study was carried out. ARMS-PCR allowed three of the mutations to be identified in a combined 30.6% of the alleles from patients with CF, and 64.9% of the mutated alleles were not identified. The mutations found were p.Phe508del (22,2%), p.Gly542* (6,9%), and p.Arg1162* (1,4%). There is significant variability in both the frequency and type of mutations present in our study population and in what has been reported in other Latin American countries. It is necessary to perform studies that use complete sequencing technology for the CFTR gene to identify other mutations present in our population.

  19. Association between mutation spectra and stable and unstable DNA adduct profiles in Salmonella for benzo[a]pyrene and dibenzo[a,l]pyrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMarini, David M., E-mail: demarini.david@epa.gov [Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Hanley, Nancy M.; Warren, Sarah H.; Adams, Linda D.; King, Leon C. [Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Highlights: {yields} Benzo[a]pyrene (BP) induces stable DNA adducts and mutations primarily at guanine. {yields} Dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) induces them primarily at adenine. {yields} BP induces abasic sites, but DBP does not in the Salmonella mutagenicity assay. {yields} Stable DNA adducts alone appear to account for the mutation spectrum of DBP. {yields} Stable DNA adducts and possibly abasic sites account for the mutation spectrum of BP. - Abstract: Benzo[a]pyrene (BP) and dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) are two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that exhibit distinctly different mutagenicity and carcinogenicity profiles. Although some studies show that these PAHs produce unstable DNA adducts, conflicting data and arguments have been presented regarding the relative roles of these unstable adducts versus stable adducts, as well as oxidative damage, in the mutagenesis and tumor-mutation spectra of these PAHs. However, no study has determined the mutation spectra along with the stable and unstable DNA adducts in the same system with both PAHs. Thus, we determined the mutagenic potencies and mutation spectra of BP and DBP in strains TA98, TA100 and TA104 of Salmonella, and we also measured the levels of abasic sites (aldehydic-site assay) and characterized the stable DNA adducts ({sup 32}P-postlabeling/HPLC) induced by these PAHs in TA104. Our results for the mutation spectra and site specificity of stable adducts were consistent with those from other systems, showing that DBP was more mutagenic than BP in TA98 and TA100. The mutation spectra of DBP and BP were significantly different in TA98 and TA104, with 24% of the mutations induced by BP in TA98 being complex frameshifts, whereas DBP produced hardly any of these mutations. In TA104, BP produced primarily GC to TA transversions, whereas DBP produced primarily AT to TA transversions. The majority (96%) of stable adducts induced by BP were at guanine, whereas the majority (80%) induced by DBP were at adenine

  20. A combinatorial role for MutY and Fpg DNA glycosylases in mutation avoidance in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassim, Farzanah; Papadopoulos, Andrea O; Kana, Bavesh D; Gordhan, Bhavna G

    2015-09-01

    Hydroxyl radical (OH) among reactive oxygen species cause damage to nucleobases with thymine being the most susceptible, whilst in contrast, the singlet oxygen ((1)02) targets only guanine bases. The high GC content of mycobacterial genomes predisposes these organisms to oxidative damage of guanine. The exposure of cellular DNA to OH and one-electron oxidants results in the formation of two main degradation products, the pro-mutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua) and the cytotoxic 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyGua). These lesions are repaired through the base excision repair (BER) pathway and we previously, demonstrated a combinatorial role for the mycobacterial Endonuclease III (Nth) and the Nei family of DNA glycosylases in mutagenesis. In addition, the formamidopyrimidine (Fpg/MutM) and MutY DNA glycosylases have also been implicated in mutation avoidance and BER in mycobacteria. In this study, we further investigate the combined role of MutY and the Fpg/Nei DNA glycosylases in Mycobacterium smegmatis and demonstrate that deletion of mutY resulted in enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress, an effect which was not exacerbated in Δfpg1 Δfpg2 or Δnei1 Δnei2 double mutant backgrounds. However, combinatorial loss of the mutY, fpg1 and fpg2 genes resulted in a significant increase in mutation rates suggesting interplay between these enzymes. Consistent with this, there was a significant increase in C → A mutations with a corresponding change in cell morphology of rifampicin resistant mutants in the Δfpg1 Δfpg2 ΔmutY deletion mutant. In contrast, deletion of mutY together with the nei homologues did not result in any growth/survival defects or changes in mutation rates. Taken together these data indicate that the mycobacterial mutY, in combination with the Fpg DNA N-glycosylases, plays an important role in controlling mutagenesis under oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel class of mutations that affect DNA replication in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordman, Jared; Skovgaard, Ole; Wright, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Over-initiation of DNA replication in cells containing the cold-sensitive dnaA(cos) allele has been shown to lead to extensive DNA damage, potentially due to head-to-tail replication fork collisions that ultimately lead to replication fork collapse, growth stasis and/or cell death. Based on the a...

  2. DNA repair and its relation to recombination-deficient and other mutations in Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, A.T.

    1975-01-01

    DNA repair processes operating in Bacillus subtilis are similar to other transformable bacterial systems. Radiation-sensitive, recombination-deficient mutants are blocked in distinct steps leading to recombination. DNA polymerase I is essential for the repair of x-ray-induced damage to DNA but not for recombination

  3. Polymorphism discovery and allele frequency estimation using high-throughput DNA sequencing of target-enriched pooled DNA samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullen Michael P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central role of the somatotrophic axis in animal post-natal growth, development and fertility is well established. Therefore, the identification of genetic variants affecting quantitative traits within this axis is an attractive goal. However, large sample numbers are a pre-requisite for the identification of genetic variants underlying complex traits and although technologies are improving rapidly, high-throughput sequencing of large numbers of complete individual genomes remains prohibitively expensive. Therefore using a pooled DNA approach coupled with target enrichment and high-throughput sequencing, the aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms and estimate allele frequency differences across 83 candidate genes of the somatotrophic axis, in 150 Holstein-Friesian dairy bulls divided into two groups divergent for genetic merit for fertility. Results In total, 4,135 SNPs and 893 indels were identified during the resequencing of the 83 candidate genes. Nineteen percent (n = 952 of variants were located within 5' and 3' UTRs. Seventy-two percent (n = 3,612 were intronic and 9% (n = 464 were exonic, including 65 indels and 236 SNPs resulting in non-synonymous substitutions (NSS. Significant (P ® MassARRAY. No significant differences (P > 0.1 were observed between the two methods for any of the 43 SNPs across both pools (i.e., 86 tests in total. Conclusions The results of the current study support previous findings of the use of DNA sample pooling and high-throughput sequencing as a viable strategy for polymorphism discovery and allele frequency estimation. Using this approach we have characterised the genetic variation within genes of the somatotrophic axis and related pathways, central to mammalian post-natal growth and development and subsequent lactogenesis and fertility. We have identified a large number of variants segregating at significantly different frequencies between cattle groups divergent for calving

  4. Specific mutations in the C-terminus domain of HBV surface antigen significantly correlate with low level of serum HBV-DNA in patients with chronic HBV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirabelli, Carmen; Surdo, Matteo; van Hemert, Formijn; Lian, Zhichao; Salpini, Romina; Cento, Valeria; Cortese, Maria Francesca; Aragri, Marianna; Pollicita, Michela; Alteri, Claudia; Bertoli, Ada; Berkhout, Ben; Micheli, Valeria; Gubertini, Guido; Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Romano, Sara; Visca, Michela; Bernassola, Martina; Longo, Roberta; de Sanctis, Giuseppe Maria; Trimoulet, Pascal; Fleury, Hervè; Marino, Nicoletta; Mazzotta, Francesco; Cappiello, Giuseppina; Spanò, Alberto; Sarrecchia, Cesare; Zhang, Jing Maria; Andreoni, Massimo; Angelico, Mario; Verheyen, Jens; Perno, Carlo Federico; Svicher, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Background: To define HBsAg-mutations correlated with different serum HBV-DNA levels in HBV chronically-infected drug-naive patients. Methods: This study included 187 patients stratified into the following ranges of serum HBV-DNA: 12-2000 IU/ml, 2000-100,000 IU/ml, and > 100,000 IU/ml.

  5. Enzymic colorimetry-based DNA chip: a rapid and accurate assay for detecting mutations for clarithromycin resistance in the 23S rRNA gene of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Shi-Hai; Zhou, Yu-Gui; Shao, Bo; Cui, Ya-Lin; Li, Jian; Yin, Hong-Bo; Song, Xiao-Ping; Cong, Hui; Jing, Feng-Xiang; Jin, Qing-Hui; Wang, Hui-Min; Zhou, Jie

    2009-11-01

    Macrolide drugs, such as clarithromycin (CAM), are a key component of many combination therapies used to eradicate Helicobacter pylori. However, resistance to CAM is increasing in H. pylori and is becoming a serious problem in H. pylori eradication therapy. CAM resistance in H. pylori is mostly due to point mutations (A2142G/C, A2143G) in the peptidyltransferase-encoding region of the 23S rRNA gene. In this study an enzymic colorimetry-based DNA chip was developed to analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the 23S rRNA gene to determine the prevalence of mutations in CAM-related resistance in H. pylori-positive patients. The results of the colorimetric DNA chip were confirmed by direct DNA sequencing. In 63 samples, the incidence of the A2143G mutation was 17.46 % (11/63). The results of the colorimetric DNA chip were concordant with DNA sequencing in 96.83 % of results (61/63). The colorimetric DNA chip could detect wild-type and mutant signals at every site, even at a DNA concentration of 1.53 x 10(2) copies microl(-1). Thus, the colorimetric DNA chip is a reliable assay for rapid and accurate detection of mutations in the 23S rRNA gene of H. pylori that lead to CAM-related resistance, directly from gastric tissues.

  6. Role of specific DNA mutations in the peripheral blood of colorectal cancer patients for the assessment of tumor stage and residual disease following tumor resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcic, Gregor; Jelenc, Franc; Cerkovnik, Petra; Stegel, Vida; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the detection of tumor-specific KRAS proto-oncogene, GTPase (KRAS) and B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) mutations in the peripheral blood of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients at all stages and adenomas was used for the estimation of disease stage prior to surgery and for residual disease following surgery. A total of 65 CRC patients were enrolled. The primary tumor tested positive for the specific mutations (KRAS mutations in codons 12, 13, 61, 117 or 146 and BRAF mutations in codon 600) in 35 patients. In all these patients, the specimen of normal bowel resected with the tumor was also tested for the presence of the same mutations in order to exclude the germ-line mutations. Only patients who tested positive for the specific mutation in the primary tumor were included in further analysis for the presence of tumor-specific mutation in the peripheral blood. No statistically significant differences were found between the detection rates of tumor mutations in the blood and different tumor stages (P=0.491). However, statistically significant differences in the proportions of patients with detected tumor-specific DNA mutations in the peripheral blood were found when comparing the groups of patients with R0 and R2 resections (P=0.038). Tumor-specific DNA mutations in the peripheral blood were more frequently detected in the patients with an incomplete surgical clearance of the tumor due to macroscopic residual disease (R2 resections). Therefore, the study concludes that the follow-up of somatic KRAS- and BRAF-mutated DNA in the peripheral blood of CRC patients may be useful in assessing the surgical clearance of the disease. PMID:27900004

  7. DNA sequence analysis of the mutational specificity of u.v. light in the SUP4-o gene of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, B.A.; Mis, J.R.A.; Pierce, M.K.; Giroux, C.N.

    1987-01-01

    Mutations induced in the SUP4-o gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by u.v. irradiation have been characterized. DNA sequence analysis of 120 mutants revealed that u.v. induced all types of base substitutions, although transitions, in particular G:C → A:T events predominated. In addition, a small number of single base pair deletions and double mutations, occurring in tandem or separated by a few base pairs, were recovered. The base pair substitutions were not distributed randomly in the SUP4-o gene and, with one exception, were all located at sites of adjacent pyrimidines, suggesting they were targeted by u.v. photolesions. A substantial fraction of the mutations were detected at hotspots for u.v. mutagenesis. The majority of changes occurred at the 3' base of dipyrimidine sequences where both cyclobutane dimers and [6-4]-photoproducts could form. Approximately one-third of the induced base substitutions were found at potential pyrimidine dimer sites where [6-4]-photoproducts would be expected to occur rarely. Possible origins of the induced mutations and the role of cyclobutane dimers as premutational u.v. lesions in yeast are considered. (author)

  8. Structure-guided Mutational Analysis of the Nucleotidyltransferase Domain of Escherichia coli DNA Ligase (LigA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li Kai; Zhu, Hui; Shuman, Stewart

    2009-03-27

    NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases (LigA) are ubiquitous in bacteria, where they are essential for growth and present attractive targets for antimicrobial drug discovery. LigA has a distinctive modular structure in which a nucleotidyltransferase catalytic domain is flanked by an upstream NMN-binding module and by downstream OB-fold, zinc finger, helix-hairpin-helix, and BRCT domains. Here we conducted a structure-function analysis of the nucleotidyltransferase domain of Escherichia coli LigA, guided by the crystal structure of the LigA-DNA-adenylate intermediate. We tested the effects of 29 alanine and conservative mutations at 15 amino acids on ligase activity in vitro and in vivo. We thereby identified essential functional groups that coordinate the reactive phosphates (Arg(136)), contact the AMP adenine (Lys(290)), engage the phosphodiester backbone flanking the nick (Arg(218), Arg(308), Arg(97) plus Arg(101)), or stabilize the active domain fold (Arg(171)). Finer analysis of the mutational effects revealed step-specific functions for Arg(136), which is essential for the reaction of LigA with NAD(+) to form the covalent ligase-AMP intermediate (step 1) and for the transfer of AMP to the nick 5'-PO(4) to form the DNA-adenylate intermediate (step 2) but is dispensable for phosphodiester formation at a preadenylylated nick (step 3).

  9. Sequence-specific DNA alkylation targeting for Kras codon 13 mutation by pyrrole-imidazole polyamide seco-CBI conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rhys Dylan; Asamitsu, Sefan; Takenaka, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Makoto; Hashiya, Kaori; Kawamoto, Yusuke; Bando, Toshikazu; Nagase, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-27

    Hairpin N-methylpyrrole-N-methylimidazole polyamide seco-CBI conjugates 2-6 were designed for synthesis by Fmoc solid-phase synthesis, and their DNA-alkylating activities against the Kras codon 13 mutation were compared by high-resolution denaturing gel electrophoresis with 225 base pair (bp) DNA fragments. Conjugate 5 had high reactivity towards the Kras codon 13 mutation site, with alkylation occurring at the A of the sequence 5'-ACGTCACCA-3' (site 2), including minor 1 bp-mismatch alkylation against wild type 5'-ACGCCACCA-3' (site 3). Conjugate 6, which differs from conjugate 5 by exchanging one Py unit with a β unit, showed high selectivity but only weakly alkylated the A of 5'-ACGTCACCA-3' (site 2). The hairpin polyamide seco-CBI conjugate 5 thus alkylates according to Dervan's pairing rule with the pairing recognition which β/β pair targets T-A and A-T pairs. SPR and a computer-minimized model suggest that 5 binds to the target sequence with high affinity in a hairpin conformation, allowing for efficient DNA alkylation. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Mutations on the DNA binding surface of TBP discriminate between yeast TATA and TATA-less gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenova, Ivanka; Warfield, Linda; Hahn, Steven

    2014-08-01

    Most RNA polymerase (Pol) II promoters lack a TATA element, yet nearly all Pol II transcription requires TATA binding protein (TBP). While the TBP-TATA interaction is critical for transcription at TATA-containing promoters, it has been unclear whether TBP sequence-specific DNA contacts are required for transcription at TATA-less genes. Transcription factor IID (TFIID), the TBP-containing coactivator that functions at most TATA-less genes, recognizes short sequence-specific promoter elements in metazoans, but analogous promoter elements have not been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We generated a set of mutations in the yeast TBP DNA binding surface and found that most support growth of yeast. Both in vivo and in vitro, many of these mutations are specifically defective for transcription of two TATA-containing genes with only minor defects in transcription of two TATA-less, TFIID-dependent genes. TBP binds several TATA-less promoters with apparent high affinity, but our results suggest that this binding is not important for transcription activity. Our results are consistent with the model that sequence-specific TBP-DNA contacts are not important at yeast TATA-less genes and suggest that other general transcription factors or coactivator subunits are responsible for recognition of TATA-less promoters. Our results also explain why yeast TBP derivatives defective for TATA binding appear defective in activated transcription. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Impact of Somatic Mutations in the D-Loop of Mitochondrial DNA on the Survival of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-Ching; Wang, Chen-Chi; Jiang, Rong-San; Wang, Wen-Yi; Liu, Shih-An

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate somatic mutations in the D-loop of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and their impact on survival in oral squamous cell carcinoma patients. Materials and Methods Surgical specimen confirmed by pathological examination and corresponding non-cancerous tissues were collected from 120 oral squamous cell carcinoma patients. The sequence in the D-loop of mtDNA from non-cancerous tissues was compared with that from paired cancer samples and any sequence differences were recognized as somatic mutations. Results Somatic mutations in the D-loop of mtDNA were identified in 75 (62.5%) oral squamous cell carcinoma patients and most of them occurred in the poly-C tract. Although there were no significant differences in demographic and tumor-related features between participants with and without somatic mutation, the mutation group had a better survival rate (5 year disease-specific survival rate: 64.0% vs. 43.0%, P = 0.0266). Conclusion Somatic mutation in D-loop of mtDNA was associated with a better survival in oral squamous cell carcinoma patients. PMID:25906372

  12. Frequency of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in Jordanian lung adenocarcinoma patients at diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natheir Obeidat

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study revealed that the EGFR mutations rate in Jordanian patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung was higher than in African-American, and some white Caucasian patients, and was lower than in patients in East Asia, and other countries of South Asia.

  13. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, Anne-Mette; Swensen, Jeff; Uriz, Inaki E

    2016-01-01

    by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO) that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti......-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping....

  14. Early-onset parkinsonism associated with PINK1 mutations: frequency, genotypes, and phenotypes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonifati, V.; Rohe, C.F.; Breedveld, G.J.; Fabrizio, E.; Mari, M. De; Tassorelli, C.; Tavella, A.; Marconi, R.; Nicholl, D.; Chien, H.F.; Fincati, E.; Abbruzzese, G.; Marini, P.; Gaetano, A. De; Horstink, M.W.I.M.; Maat-Kievit, J.A.; Sampaio, C.; Antonini, A.; Stocchi, F.; Montagna, P.; Toni, V.; Guidi, M.; Dalla Libera, A.; Tinazzi, M.; Pandis, F. De; Goldwurm, S.; Klein, A. de; Barbosa, E.; Lopiano, L.; Martignoni, E.; Lamberti, P.; Vanacore, N.; Meco, G.; Oostra, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence, nature, and associated phenotypes of PINK1 gene mutations in a large series of patients with early-onset (<50 years) parkinsonism. METHODS: The authors studied 134 patients (116 sporadic and 18 familial; 77% Italian) and 90 Italian controls. The whole PINK1

  15. The frequency of CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 32 mutation in Iranian populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zare-Bidaki

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Evidence showed that chemokines serve as pro-migratory factors for immune cells. CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5, as the main CC  chemokines subfamily members, activate immune cells through binding to CC chemokine receptor 5 or CCR5. Macrophages, NK cells and T lymphocytes express CCR5 and thus, affected CCR5 expression or functions could be associated with altered immune responses. Deletion of 32 base pairs (D 32 in the exon 1 of the CCR5 gene, which is known as CCR5 D 32 mutation causes down regulation and malfunction of the molecule. Furthermore, it has been evidenced that three polymorphisms in the promoter region of CCR5 modulate its expression. Altered CCR5 expression in microbial infection and immune related diseases have been reported by several researchers but the role of CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 D 32 mutation in Iranian patients suffering from these diseases are controversial. Due to the fact that Iranian people have different genetic backgrounds compared to other ethnics, hence, CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 D 32 mutation association with the diseases may be different in Iranian patients. Therefore, this review addresses the most recent information regarding the prevalence as well as association of the mutation and polymorphisms in Iranian patients with microbial infection and immune related diseases as along with normal population.

  16. Mutations in DNA repair genes are associated with the Haarlem lineage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis independently of their antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olano, Juanita; López, Beatriz; Reyes, Alejandro; Lemos, María del Pilar; Correa, Nidia; Del Portillo, Patricia; Barrera, Lucia; Robledo, Jaime; Ritacco, Viviana; Zambrano, María Mercedes

    2007-11-01

    The analysis of the DNA repair genes ogt and ung was carried out in 117 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Argentina and Colombia in order to explore correlation between mutations in these genes and multi-drug resistance. With the exception of two Beijing family isolates, the rest of the strains harbored either two wild-type or two mutant alleles with identical single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in each gene (ogt44 and ung501). These ogt44 and ung501 mutations were not associated with multi-drug resistance and occurred simultaneously in circulating Haarlem genotype M. tuberculosis strains. We therefore propose the use of these markers as tools in phylogenetic and epidemiologic studies.

  17. The spectrum of mutation produced by low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morley, Alexander A.; Turner, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Inherited mutations are the basis of evolution and acquired mutations in humans are important in ageing, cancer and possibly various forms of tissue degeneration. Mutations are responsible for many of the long-term effects of radiation. However, sensitive direct detection of mutations in humans has been difficult. The aims of the project were to develop methods for the sensitive enumeration of mutations in DNA, to measure mutation frequencies in a wide variety of tissue types and to quantify the mutational effect of direct oxidative damage produced by radiation, at both high and low doses. The project was successful in developing a sensitive method which could detect mutations directly in the genetic material, DNA at a sensitivity of 1 mutated molecule in 1000000000 unmutated molecules. However a number of methodological problems had to be overcome and lack of ongoing funding made it impossible to fulfill all of the aims of the project

  18. Cadmium induces DNA damage in tobacco roots, but no DNA damage, somatic mutations or homologous recombination in tobacco leaves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gichner, Tomáš; Patková, Zdeňka; Száková, J.; Demnerová, K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 559, 1/2 (2004), s. 49-57 ISSN 1383-5718 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/02/0293; GA ČR GA521/02/0400; GA MŠk LN00B030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : beta-Glucuronidase * Chlorophyll mutations * Comet assay Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.020, year: 2004

  19. A comparative study on low-energy ion beam and neutralized beam modifications of naked DNA and biological effect on mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapirom, S.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    DNA conformation change or damage induced by low-energy ion irradiation has been of great interest owing to research developments in ion beam biotechnology and ion beam application in biomedicine. Mechanisms involved in the induction of DNA damage may account for effect from implanting ion charge. In order to check this effect, we used both ion beam and neutralized beam at keV energy to bombard naked DNA. Argon or nitrogen ion beam was generated and extracted from a radiofrequency (RF) ion source and neutralized by microwave-driven plasma in the beam path. Plasmid DNA pGFP samples were irradiated with the ion or neutralized beam in vacuum, followed by gel electrophoresis to observe changes in the DNA conformations. It was revealed that the ion charge played a certain role in inducing DNA conformation change. The subsequent DNA transfer into bacteria Escherichia coli ( E. coli) for mutation analysis indicated that the charged ion beam induced DNA change had high potential in mutation induction while neutralized beam did not. The intrinsic reason was attributed to additional DNA deformation and contortion caused by ion charge exchange effect so that the ion beam induced DNA damage could hardly be completely repaired, whereas the neutralized beam induced DNA change could be more easily recoverable owing to absence of the additional DNA deformation and contortion.

  20. A comparative study on low-energy ion beam and neutralized beam modifications of naked DNA and biological effect on mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarapirom, S.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Yu, L.D.

    2012-01-01

    DNA conformation change or damage induced by low-energy ion irradiation has been of great interest owing to research developments in ion beam biotechnology and ion beam application in biomedicine. Mechanisms involved in the induction of DNA damage may account for effect from implanting ion charge. In order to check this effect, we used both ion beam and neutralized beam at keV energy to bombard naked DNA. Argon or nitrogen ion beam was generated and extracted from a radiofrequency (RF) ion source and neutralized by microwave-driven plasma in the beam path. Plasmid DNA pGFP samples were irradiated with the ion or neutralized beam in vacuum, followed by gel electrophoresis to observe changes in the DNA conformations. It was revealed that the ion charge played a certain role in inducing DNA conformation change. The subsequent DNA transfer into bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) for mutation analysis indicated that the charged ion beam induced DNA change had high potential in mutation induction while neutralized beam did not. The intrinsic reason was attributed to additional DNA deformation and contortion caused by ion charge exchange effect so that the ion beam induced DNA damage could hardly be completely repaired, whereas the neutralized beam induced DNA change could be more easily recoverable owing to absence of the additional DNA deformation and contortion.

  1. Mutagenic treatments towards increasing the frequency of day-neutral mutations and standardization of procedures for tissue culture, in potato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhya, M.D.; Chandra, R.; Abraham, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    Various chemical mutagens and gamma radiation have been used on single dormant eyes and true seeds with a view to finding effective mutagenic treatment for the induction of day-length neutral mutants in potato using an effective screening technique for the isolation of day-length neutral mutants. Sodium meta bisulphite (SMS) was found to be an efficient mutagen in inducing mutations for this trait in true seeds although the same concentrations, when used for treating the single tuber eyes proved lethal. Pre-soaking the seeds for 24 hrs prior to treatment with 0.0025M SMS gave highest frequency of the mutants followed by 48 hrs presoaking, indicating a sensitive stage during the cell cycle in true seeds. Other mutagen treatments gave different frequencies of mutations. The highest frequency of day-length neutral mutants was observed when seeds irradiated with 40 Kr of gamma radiation were treated with 0.05M hydrazinium dichloride solution. Screening procedures have also been standardised with the development of synethetic media for the isolation of biochemical mutants at the true seed level. Initial efforts have yielded mutants resistant to LD 100 doses of ethionine. Another aspect of the study was to develop a proper potato callus culture technique. A medium has been developed to produce and maintain callus from potato leaf strips. Efforts on the regeneration of shoot and roots from callus, have so far lead to differentiation of callus to form roots. The ultimate aim of these studies is to develop plantlets from single cell which would form the units of mutation induction and isolation. (author)

  2. Structural and mutational analysis of Escherichia coli AlkB provides insight into substrate specificity and DNA damage searching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Holland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Escherichia coli, cytotoxic DNA methyl lesions on the N1 position of purines and N3 position of pyrimidines are primarily repaired by the 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG iron(II dependent dioxygenase, AlkB. AlkB repairs 1-methyladenine (1-meA and 3-methylcytosine (3-meC lesions, but it also repairs 1-methylguanine (1-meG and 3-methylthymine (3-meT at a much less efficient rate. How the AlkB enzyme is able to locate and identify methylated bases in ssDNA has remained an open question. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined the crystal structures of the E. coli AlkB protein holoenzyme and the AlkB-ssDNA complex containing a 1-meG lesion. We coupled this to site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids in and around the active site, and tested the effects of these mutations on the ability of the protein to bind both damaged and undamaged DNA, as well as catalyze repair of a methylated substrate. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A comparison of our substrate-bound AlkB-ssDNA complex with our unliganded holoenzyme reveals conformational changes of residues within the active site that are important for binding damaged bases. Site-directed mutagenesis of these residues reveals novel insight into their roles in DNA damage recognition and repair. Our data support a model that the AlkB protein utilizes at least two distinct conformations in searching and binding methylated bases within DNA: a "searching" mode and "repair" mode. Moreover, we are able to functionally separate these modes through mutagenesis of residues that affect one or the other binding state. Finally, our mutagenesis experiments show that amino acid D135 of AlkB participates in both substrate specificity and catalysis.

  3. Mutational analysis of an archaeal minichromosome maintenance protein exterior hairpin reveals critical residues for helicase activity and DNA binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brewster Aaron S

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mini-chromosome maintenance protein (MCM complex is an essential replicative helicase for DNA replication in Archaea and Eukaryotes. While the eukaryotic complex consists of six homologous proteins (MCM2-7, the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has only one MCM protein (ssoMCM, six subunits of which form a homohexamer. We have recently reported a 4.35Å crystal structure of the near full-length ssoMCM. The structure reveals a total of four β-hairpins per subunit, three of which are located within the main channel or side channels of the ssoMCM hexamer model generated based on the symmetry of the N-terminal Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (mtMCM structure. The fourth β-hairpin, however, is located on the exterior of the hexamer, near the exit of the putative side channels and next to the ATP binding pocket. Results In order to better understand this hairpin's role in DNA binding and helicase activity, we performed a detailed mutational and biochemical analysis of nine residues on this exterior β-hairpin (EXT-hp. We examined the activities of the mutants related to their helicase function, including hexamerization, ATPase, DNA binding and helicase activities. The assays showed that some of the residues on this EXT-hp play a role for DNA binding as well as for helicase activity. Conclusions These results implicate several current theories regarding helicase activity by this critical hexameric enzyme. As the data suggest that EXT-hp is involved in DNA binding, the results reported here imply that the EXT-hp located near the exterior exit of the side channels may play a role in contacting DNA substrate in a manner that affects DNA unwinding.

  4. Role of Macronutrients and Micronutrients in DNA Damage: Results From a Food Frequency Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ladeira

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The links between diet and genomic instability have been under investigation for several decades, and evidence suggests a significant causal or preventive role for various dietary factors. This study investigates the influence of macronutrients (calories, protein, and glucides and micronutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, as assessed by a food frequency questionnaire, on genotoxicity biomarkers measured by cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and comet assay. The results found significant positive and negative correlations. Micronucleus frequency tends to increase with higher intake of caffeine, calcium, magnesium, zinc, and protein ( P  < .05, Spearman correlation. Calorie and omega-6 intakes are negatively correlated with DNA damage measured by the comet assay. These results are somewhat controversial because some of the correlations found are contrary to dominant views in the literature; however, we suggest that unraveling the association between diet and genetic instability requires a much better understanding of the modulating role of macronutrients and micronutrients.

  5. Mutation, somatic mutation and diseases of man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnet, F.M.

    1976-01-01

    The relevance of the intrinsic mutagenesis for the evolution process, genetic diseases and the process of aging is exemplified. The fundamental reaction is the function of the DNA and the DNA-enzymes like the DNA-polymerases in replication, repair, and transcription. These defects are responsible for the mutation frequency and the genetic drift in the evolution process. They cause genetic diseases like Xeroderma pigmentosum which is described here in detail. The accumulation of structural and functional mistakes leads to diseases of old age, for example to autoimmune diseases and immune suppression. There is a proportionality between the duration of life and the frequency of mistakes in the enzymatic repair system. No possibility of prophylaxis or therapy is seen. Methods for prognosis could be developed. (AJ) [de

  6. MELAS and Kearns–Sayre overlap syndrome due to the mtDNA m. A3243G mutation and large-scale mtDNA deletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nian Yu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reported an unusual manifestation of a 19-year-old Chinese male patient presented with a complex phenotype of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS syndrome and Kearns–Sayre syndrome (KSS. He was admitted to our hospital with the chief complaint of “acute fever, headache and slow reaction for 21 days”. He was initially misdiagnosed as “viral encephalitis”. This Chinese man with significant past medical history of intolerating fatigue presented paroxysmal neurobehavioral attacks that started about 10 years ago. During this span, 3 or 4 attack clusters were described during which several attacks occurred over a few days. The further examination found that the hallmark signs of this patient included progressive myoclonus epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, hearing loss, myopathic weakness, ophthalmoparesis, pigmentary retinopathy and bifascicular heart block (Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome. By young age the disease progression is characterized by the addition of migraine, vomiting, and stroke-like episodes, symptoms of MELAS expression, which indicated completion of the MELAS/KSS overlap syndrome. The m. A3243G mitochondrial DNA mutation and single large-scale mtDNA deletions were found in this patient. This mutation has been reported with MELAS, KSS, myopathy, deafness and mental disorder with cognitive impairment. This is the first description with a MELAS/KSS syndrome in Chinese.

  7. Novel primer specific false terminations during DNA sequencing reactions: danger of inaccuracy of mutation analysis in molecular diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, R; Booth, A; Churchill, A J; Markham, A F

    1996-01-01

    The determination of nucleotide sequence is fundamental to the identification and molecular analysis of genes. Direct sequencing of PCR products is now becoming a commonplace procedure for haplotype analysis, and for defining mutations and polymorphism within genes, particularly for diagnostic purposes. A previously unrecognised phenomenon, primer related variability, observed in sequence data generated using Taq cycle sequencing and T7 Sequenase sequencing, is reported. This suggests that caution is necessary when interpreting DNA sequence data. This is particularly important in situations where treatment may be dependent on the accuracy of the molecular diagnosis. Images PMID:16696096

  8. Increased frequency of co-existing JAK2 exon-12 or MPL exon-10 mutations in patients with low JAK2(V617F) allelic burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussenzveig, Roberto H; Pham, Ha T; Perkins, Sherrie L; Prchal, Josef T; Agarwal, Archana M; Salama, Mohamed E

    2016-01-01

    The frequency of co-existing JAK2(V617F)/MPL and JAK2(V617F)/JAK2 exon-12 mutations has not been previously investigated in MPNs. Poor survival was reported in primary myelofibrosis with low JAK2(V617F) allelic burden. However, mutational status of JAK2 exon-12 or MPL were not reported in these patients. This study developed a cost-effective multiplex high resolution melt assay that screens for mutations in JAK2 gene exons-12 and -14 ((V617F)) and MPL gene exon-10. Co-existing mutations with JAK2(V617F) were detected in 2.9% (6/208; two JAK2 exon-12 and four MPL exon-10) patient specimens with known JAK2(V617F) (allelic-burden range: 0.1-96.8%). Co-existing mutations were detected in specimens with MPL exon-10 mutation should be pursued.

  9. Recent research in DNA repair, mutation and recombination: a report of the DNA Repair Network meeting, held at City University, London on 18 December 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, N J; Strike, P

    1996-09-02

    The now traditional one day Christmas DNA Repair meeting was held at City University, London for the third year in succession. With over 130 participants and a programme consisting of a total of 24 pre-offered presentations the meeting reached record dimensions. Attendees were from 24 institutions throughout the United Kingdom, and with several distinct research groups contained within the large contingents from the ICRF Clare Hall Laboratories and the MRC Cell Mutation Unit in Brighton, this indicates the increasing interest and depth of UK research in DNA repair. One slight disappointment of the meeting was the fall in the numbers of non-UK participants. Although the meeting in 1994 (Strike, 1995) saw an increase in presentations from Continental Europe (six countries including France, Germany. The Netherlands and Switzerland), the trend did not continue this year, with only Denmark being represented. The 24 contributors consisted of approximately equal numbers of postgraduate students, postdoctoral researchers and more "established' scientists reflecting the continuing policy of encouraging younger members of the repair community to present their work. The mix of presenters was particularly well illustrated by two excellent and consecutive talks by Professor Bryn Bridges (MRC Cell Mutation Unit) and Alison Mitchell, a postgraduate student in Stephen West's laboratory (ICRF, Clare Hall). The organisms under study were as equally disparate and included Archaebacteria, Escherichia coli. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Aspergillus, mice and men. The range of topics was also varied and included bacterial mutagenesis, NMR studies of Ada protein, preferential DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoint genes, reconstitution of nucleotide excision repair and V(D)J recombination in vitro, creation of repair deficient transgenic mice and mismatch defects in human cells. The result was a very successful meeting which was characterized by the consistently high

  10. Prime-boost therapeutic vaccination in mice with DNA/DNA or DNA/Fowlpox virus recombinants expressing the Human Papilloma Virus type 16 E6 and E7 mutated proteins fused to the coat protein of Potato virus X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illiano, Elena; Bissa, Massimiliano; Paolini, Francesca; Zanotto, Carlo; De Giuli Morghen, Carlo; Franconi, Rosella; Radaelli, Antonia; Venuti, Aldo

    2016-10-02

    The therapeutic antitumor potency of a prime-boost vaccination strategy was explored, based on the mutated, nontransforming forms of the E6 (E6 F47R ) and E7 (E7 GGG ) oncogenes of Human Papilloma Virus type 16 (HPV16), fused to the Potato virus X (PVX) coat protein (CP) sequence. Previous data showed that CP fusion improves the immunogenicity of tumor-associated antigens and may thus increase their efficacy. After verifying the correct expression of E6 F47R CP and E7 GGG CP inserted into DNA and Fowlpox virus recombinants by Western blotting and immunofluorescence, their combined use was evaluated for therapy in a pre-clinical mouse model of HPV16-related tumorigenicity. Immunization protocols were applied using homologous (DNA/DNA) or heterologous (DNA/Fowlpox) prime-boost vaccine regimens. The humoral immune responses were determined by ELISA, and the therapeutic efficacy evaluated by the delay in tumor appearance and reduced tumor volume after inoculation of syngeneic TC-1* tumor cells. Homologous DNA/DNA genetic vaccines were able to better delay tumor appearance and inhibit tumor growth when DNAE6 F47R CP and DNAE7 GGG CP were administered in combination. However, the heterologous DNA/Fowlpox vaccination strategy was able to delay tumor appearance in a higher number of animals when E6 F47R CP and in particular E7 GGG CP were administered alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Strikingly different penetrance of LHON in two Chinese families with primary mutation G11778A is independent of mtDNA haplogroup background and secondary mutation G13708A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huawei; Jia Xiaoyun; Ji Yanli; Kong Qingpeng; Zhang Qingjiong; Yao Yonggang; Zhang Yaping

    2008-01-01

    The penetrance of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) in families with primary mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is very complex. Matrilineal and nuclear genetic background, as well as environmental factors, have been reported to be involved in different affected pedigrees. Here we describe two large Chinese families that show a striking difference in the penetrance of LHON, in which 53.3% and 15.0% of members were affected (P < 0.02), respectively. Analysis of the complete mtDNA genome of the two families revealed the presence of the primary mutation G11778A and several other variants suggesting the same haplogroup status G2a. The family with higher penetrance contained a previously described secondary mutation G13708A, which presents a polymorphism in normal Chinese samples and does not affect in vivo mitochondrial oxidative metabolism as described in a previous study. Evolutionary analysis failed to indicate any putatively pathogenic mutation that cosegregated with G11778A in these two pedigrees. Our results suggest that the variable penetrance of LHON in the two Chinese families is independent of both their mtDNA haplotype background and a secondary mutation G13708A. As a result, it is likely that unknown nuclear gene involvement and/or other factors contribute to the strikingly different penetrance of LHON

  12. Strikingly different penetrance of LHON in two Chinese families with primary mutation G11778A is independent of mtDNA haplogroup background and secondary mutation G13708A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Huawei [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223 (China)]|[Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Bio-resource, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Jia Xiaoyun; Ji Yanli [State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Kong Qingpeng [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223 (China); Zhang Qingjiong [State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060 (China)], E-mail: qingjiongzhang@yahoo.com; Yao Yonggang [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223 (China)]|[State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223 (China)], E-mail: ygyaozh@yahoo.com; Zhang Yaping [Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Bio-resource, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China)]|[State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223 (China)

    2008-08-25

    The penetrance of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) in families with primary mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is very complex. Matrilineal and nuclear genetic background, as well as environmental factors, have been reported to be involved in different affected pedigrees. Here we describe two large Chinese families that show a striking difference in the penetrance of LHON, in which 53.3% and 15.0% of members were affected (P < 0.02), respectively. Analysis of the complete mtDNA genome of the two families revealed the presence of the primary mutation G11778A and several other variants suggesting the same haplogroup status G2a. The family with higher penetrance contained a previously described secondary mutation G13708A, which presents a polymorphism in normal Chinese samples and does not affect in vivo mitochondrial oxidative metabolism as described in a previous study. Evolutionary analysis failed to indicate any putatively pathogenic mutation that cosegregated with G11778A in these two pedigrees. Our results suggest that the variable penetrance of LHON in the two Chinese families is independent of both their mtDNA haplotype background and a secondary mutation G13708A. As a result, it is likely that unknown nuclear gene involvement and/or other factors contribute to the strikingly different penetrance of LHON.

  13. SLC45A2 mutation frequency in Oculocutaneous Albinism Italian patients doesn't differ from other European studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Lucia; Barone, Luca; Al Oum, Muna; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Manfredini, Emanuela; Stanzial, Franco; Benedicenti, Francesco; Penco, Silvana; Patrosso, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous Albinism (OCA) is a heterogeneous group of inherited diseases involving hair, skin and eyes. To date, six forms are recognized on the effects of different melanogenesis genes. OCA4 is caused by mutations in SLC45A2 showing a heterogeneous phenotype ranging from white hair, blue irides and nystagmus to brown/black hair, brown irides and no nystagmus. The high clinic variety often leads to misdiagnosis. Our aim is to contribute to OCA4 diagnosis defining SLC45A2 genetic variants in Italian patients with OCA without any TYR, OCA2 and TYRP1 gene defects. After the clinical diagnosis of OCA, all patients received genetic counseling and genetic test. Automatic sequencing of TYR, OCA2, and TYRP1 genes was performed on DNA of 117 albino patients. Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) was carried out on TYR and OCA2 genes to increase the mutation rate. SLC45A2 gene sequencing was then executed in the patients with a single mutation in one of the TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 genes and in the patients, which resulted negative at the screening of these genes. SLC45A2 gene analysis was performed in 41 patients and gene alterations were found in 5 patients. Four previously reported SLC45A2 mutations were found: p.G100S, p.W202C, p.A511E and c.986delC, and three novel variants were identified: p.M265L, p.H94D, and c.1156+1G>A. All the alterations have been detected in the group of patients without mutations in the other OCA genes. Three new variants were identified in OCA4 gene; the analysis allowed the classification of a patient previously misdiagnosed as OA1 because of skin and hair pigmentation presence. The molecular defects in SLC45A2 gene represent the 3.4% in this cohort of Italian patients, similar to other Caucasian populations; our data differ from those previously published by an Italian researcher group, obtained on a smaller cohort of patients. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Spectrum and Frequency of Mutations Induced by Gamma Radiations in Three Varieties of Nigerian Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Liman MUHAMMAD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient genetic variability is one of the major problems of plant breeding programmes, especially in sesame. Gamma radiation has been reported to be very effective in creating genetic variability in plants. Three varieties of Nigerian sesame were assessed for spectrum and frequency of mutation induced by Gamma radiations in M1 and M2 generations. The varieties (NCRIBEN-04E, NCRIBEN-01M and NCRIBEN-03L were treated with four different doses of gamma rays (250, 350, 450 and 550 Gy. The treated and untreated seeds (control were sown in planting bags (under field condition to raise M1 plants. Four treatments: V1D5, V2D3, V3D2 and V3D4 (from M1 plants were selected and bulked to obtain M2 populations. The results of M1 revealed four mutant fruit traits: multicarpellate capsule, multiple capsule per leaf axil, indehiscent capsule and terminal capsules. The highest frequencies of the traits in M1 generation were 2.50×10-2, 9.17×10-2, 1.67×10-2and3.33×10-2 respectively. The highest branching (7 was from NCRIBEN-01M, while the least (2 was from NCRIBEN-04E. The M2 plants were grouped into eight M2 lines. The dose range (250-550 Gy was proved to be effective in inducing viable mutations in sesame.

  15. Oncogenetic tree model of somatic mutations and DNA methylation in colon tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Carol; Boucher, Kenneth M; Samowitz, Wade S; Wolff, Roger K; Albertsen, Hans; Curtin, Karen; Caan, Bette J; Slattery, Martha L

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of somatic alterations in colon cancer has evolved from a concept of a series of events taking place in a single sequence to a recognition of multiple pathways. An oncogenetic tree is a model intended to describe the pathways and sequence of somatic alterations in carcinogenesis without assuming that tumors will fall in mutually exclusive categories. We applied this model to data on colon tumor somatic alterations. An oncogenetic tree model was built using data on mutations of TP53, KRAS2, APC, and BRAF genes, methylation at CpG sites of MLH1 and TP16 genes, methylation in tumor (MINT) markers, and microsatellite instability (MSI) for 971 colon tumors from a population-based series. Oncogenetic tree analysis resulted in a reproducible tree with three branches. The model represents methylation of MINT markers as initiating a branch and predisposing to MSI, methylation of MHL1 and TP16, and BRAF mutation. APC mutation is the first alteration in an independent branch and is followed by TP53 mutation. KRAS2 mutation was placed a third independent branch, implying that it neither depends on, nor predisposes to, the other alterations. Individual tumors were observed to have alteration patterns representing every combination of one, two, or all three branches. The oncogenetic tree model assumptions are appropriate for the observed heterogeneity of colon tumors, and the model produces a useful visual schematic of the sequence of events in pathways of colon carcinogenesis.

  16. Recurrent APC gene mutations in Polish FAP families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pławski Andrzej

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular diagnostics of genetically conditioned disorders is based on the identification of the mutations in the predisposing genes. Hereditary cancer disorders of the gastrointestinal tracts are caused by mutations of the tumour suppressor genes or the DNA repair genes. Occurrence of recurrent mutation allows improvement of molecular diagnostics. The mutation spectrum in the genes causing hereditary forms of colorectal cancers in the Polish population was previously described. In the present work an estimation of the frequency of the recurrent mutations of the APC gene was performed. Eight types of mutations occurred in 19.4% of our FAP families and these constitute 43% of all Polish diagnosed families.

  17. Different frequencies of drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 subtypes circulating in China: a comprehensive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongshuai Sui

    Full Text Available The rapid spreading of HIV drug resistance is threatening the overall success of free HAART in China. Much work has been done on drug-resistant mutations, however, most of which were based on subtype B. Due to different genetic background, subtypes difference would have an effect on the development of drug-resistant mutations, which has already been proved by more and more studies. In China, the main epidemic subtypes are CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC, Thai B and CRF01_AE. The depiction of drug resistance mutations in those subtypes will be helpful for the selection of regimens for Chinese. In this study, the distributions difference of amino acids at sites related to HIV drug resistance were compared among subtype B, CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and CRF08_BC strains prevalent in China. The amino acid composition of sequences belonging to different subtypes, which were obtained from untreated and treated individuals separately, were also compared. The amino acids proportions of 19 sites in RT among subtype B, CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC have significant difference in drug resistance groups (chi-square test, p<0.05. Genetic barriers analysis revealed that sites 69, 138, 181, 215 and 238 were significantly different among subtypes (Kruskal Wallis test, p<0.05. All subtypes shared three highest prevalent drug resistance sites 103, 181 and 184 in common. Many drug resistant sites in protease show surprising high proportions in almost all subtypes in drug-naïve patients. This is the first comprehensive study in China on different development of drug resistance among different subtypes. The detailed data will lay a foundation for HIV treatment regimens design and improve HIV therapy in China.

  18. Genetic mutation analysis of HBV covalently closed circular DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from chronic hepatitis B patients with nucleos(tide analog-resistant mutations in serum virions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-bin LI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To analyze the characteristics of genetic mutations in reverse-transcriptase (RT domain of HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs obtained from chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients with drug-resistant mutations in serum virions during nucleoside/nucleotide analog (NA therapy. Methods  A total of 30 CHB patients admitted to 302 Hospital of PLA from July 2010 to August 2011 were included in this study. All the patients were confirmed to harbor the drug-resistant mutations in serum virions during an NA therapy longer than 6 months. Total DNA was extracted from PBMCs isolated from 30 whole blood samples at the same time point as that of serum analysis. Plasmid-safe ATP-dependent DNase (PSAD digestion in combination with rolling circle amplification and gap-spanning semi-nested PCR were used to amplify the RT region of HBV cccDNA. NA-resistant-associated mutations were analyzed at nine sites. Results  HBV cccDNA was efficiently amplified in 16 out of 30 (53.3% PBMC samples, and the detection rate was not correlated with HBeAg-positive rate, serum ALT level or HBV DNA load. Five of 16 (31.3% patients were sustained to have genotype B HBV infection, and 11 of 16 (68.8% were of genotype C HBV infection, and the result was consistent with the genotyping results using serum HBV. Different from drug-resistant mutations detected in the serum virions, the viruses detected in HBV cccDNA of 16 PBMC samples were all wild-type viruses without NA-resistant-associated mutations in RT region. Conclusions  During NA antiviral treatment, if drug-resistant mutations occur in serum HBV DNA of CHB patients, the dominant species of HBV cccDNA in PBMCs from the same patient is still the original wild-type strains. It is speculated that PBMCs might be the potential "repository" of HBV wild-type strain in vivo.

  19. The Frequency of MEFV Gene Mutations and Genotypes in Sanliurfa Province, South-Eastern Region of Turkey, after the Syrian Civil War by Using Next Generation Sequencing and Report of a Novel Exon 4 Mutation (I423T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evren Gumus

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF is a genetic disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and abdominal pain. Mutations in the Mediterranean fever (MEFV gene are localized on the p arm of chromosome 16. Over 333 MEFV sequence variants have been identified so far in FMF patients, which occur mostly in the 2nd and 10th exons of the gene. Methods: In this study, 296 unrelated patients with clinical suspicion of FMF, which were admitted during January–December 2017, were retrospectively reviewed to identify the frequency of MEFV gene mutations by using next generation sequencing. Results: Eighteen different mutations, 45 different genotypes and a novel exon 4 (I423T mutation were identified in this study. This mutation is the fourth mutation identified in exon 4.The most frequent mutation was R202Q, followed by M694V, E148Q, M680I, R761H, V726A and R354W. Conclusions: One of the most important aims of this study is to investigate the MEFV mutation type and genotype of migrants coming to Sanliurfa after the civil war of Syria. This study also examines the effect of the condition on the region’s gene pool and the distribution of different types of mutations. Our results indicated that MEFV mutations are highly heterogeneous in our patient population, which is consistent with the findings of other studies in our region. Previously used methods, such as Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP, do not define uncommon or especially novel mutations. Therefore, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS analysis of the MEFV gene could be useful for finding novel mutations, except for those located on exon 2 and 10.

  20. The Frequency of MEFV Gene Mutations and Genotypes in Sanliurfa Province, South-Eastern Region of Turkey, after the Syrian Civil War by Using Next Generation Sequencing and Report of a Novel Exon 4 Mutation (I423T).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Evren

    2018-05-07

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a genetic disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and abdominal pain. Mutations in the Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene are localized on the p arm of chromosome 16. Over 333 MEFV sequence variants have been identified so far in FMF patients, which occur mostly in the 2nd and 10th exons of the gene. In this study, 296 unrelated patients with clinical suspicion of FMF, which were admitted during January⁻December 2017, were retrospectively reviewed to identify the frequency of MEFV gene mutations by using next generation sequencing. Eighteen different mutations, 45 different genotypes and a novel exon 4 (I423T) mutation were identified in this study. This mutation is the fourth mutation identified in exon 4.The most frequent mutation was R202Q, followed by M694V, E148Q, M680I, R761H, V726A and R354W. One of the most important aims of this study is to investigate the MEFV mutation type and genotype of migrants coming to Sanliurfa after the civil war of Syria. This study also examines the effect of the condition on the region’s gene pool and the distribution of different types of mutations. Our results indicated that MEFV mutations are highly heterogeneous in our patient population, which is consistent with the findings of other studies in our region. Previously used methods, such as Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP), do not define uncommon or especially novel mutations. Therefore, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) analysis of the MEFV gene could be useful for finding novel mutations, except for those located on exon 2 and 10.

  1. Mutation frequencies in male mice and the estimation of genetic hazards of radiation in men: (specific-locus mutations/dose-rate effect/doubling dose/risk estimation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.L.; Kelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    Estimation of the genetic hazards of ionizing radiation in men is based largely on the frequency of transmitted specific-locus mutations induced in mouse spermatogonial stem cells at low radiation dose rates. The publication of new data on this subject has permitted a fresh review of all the information available. The data continue to show no discrepancy from the interpretation that, although mutation frequency decreases markedly as dose rate is decreased from 90 to 0.8 R/min (1 R = 2.6 X 10 -4 coulombs/kg) there seems to be no further change below 0.8 R/min over the range from that dose rate to 0.0007 R/min. Simple mathematical models are used to compute: (a) a maximum likelihood estimate of the induced mutation frequency at the low dose rates, and (b) a maximum likelihood estimate of the ratio of this to the mutation frequency at high dose rates in the range of 72 to 90 R/min. In the application of these results to the estimation of genetic hazards of radiation in man, the former value can be used to calculate a doubling dose - i.e., the dose of radiation that induces a mutation frequency equal to the spontaneous frequency. The doubling dose based on the low-dose-rate data compiled here is 110 R. The ratio of the mutation frequency at low dose rate to that at high dose rate is useful when it becomes necessary to extrapolate from experimental determinations, or from human data, at high dose rates to the expected risk at low dose rates. The ratio derived from the present analysis is 0.33

  2. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of transient neonatal diabetes type 1 patients with mutations in ZFP57.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Mads; Boonen, Susanne E; Dahl, Christina; Hahnemann, Johanne M D; Mackay, Deborah J D G; Tümer, Zeynep; Grønskov, Karen; Temple, I Karen; Guldberg, Per; Tommerup, Niels

    2016-04-14

    Transient neonatal diabetes mellitus 1 (TNDM1) is a rare imprinting disorder characterized by intrautering growth retardation and diabetes mellitus usually presenting within the first six weeks of life and resolves by the age of 18 months. However, patients have an increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 2 later in life. Transient neonatal diabetes mellitus 1 is caused by overexpression of the maternally imprinted genes PLAGL1 and HYMAI on chromosome 6q24. One of the mechanisms leading to overexpression of the locus is hypomethylation of the maternal allele of PLAGL1 and HYMAI. A subset of patients with maternal hypomethylation at PLAGL1 have hypomethylation at additional imprinted loci throughout the genome, including GRB10, ZIM2 (PEG3), MEST (PEG1), KCNQ1OT1 and NESPAS (GNAS-AS1). About half of the TNDM1 patients carry mutations in ZFP57, a transcription factor involved in establishment and maintenance of methylation of imprinted loci. Our objective was to investigate whether additional regions are aberrantly methylated in ZFP57 mutation carriers. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis was performed on four individuals with homozygous or compound heterozygous ZFP57 mutations, three relatives with heterozygous ZFP57 mutations and five controls. Methylation status of selected regions showing aberrant methylation in the patients was verified using bisulfite-sequencing. We found large variability among the patients concerning the number and identity of the differentially methylated regions, but more than 60 regions were aberrantly methylated in two or more patients and a novel region within PPP1R13L was found to be hypomethylated in all the patients. The hypomethylated regions in common between the patients are enriched for the ZFP57 DNA binding motif. We have expanded the epimutational spectrum of TNDM1 associated with ZFP57 mutations and found one novel region within PPP1R13L which is hypomethylated in all TNDM1 patients included in this study. Functional

  3. TED, an Autonomous and Rare Maize Transposon of the Mutator Superfamily with a High Gametophytic Excision Frequency[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yubin; Harris, Linda; Dooner, Hugo K.

    2013-01-01

    Mutator (Mu) elements, one of the most diverse superfamilies of DNA transposons, are found in all eukaryotic kingdoms, but are particularly numerous in plants. Most of the present knowledge on the transposition behavior of this superfamily comes from studies of the maize (Zea mays) Mu elements, whose transposition is mediated by the autonomous Mutator-Don Robertson (MuDR) element. Here, we describe the maize element TED (for Transposon Ellen Dempsey), an autonomous cousin that differs significantly from MuDR. Element excision and reinsertion appear to require both proteins encoded by MuDR, but only the single protein encoded by TED. Germinal excisions, rare with MuDR, are common with TED, but arise in one of the mitotic divisions of the gametophyte, rather than at meiosis. Instead, transposition-deficient elements arise at meiosis, suggesting that the double-strand breaks produced by element excision are repaired differently in mitosis and meiosis. Unlike MuDR, TED is a very low-copy transposon whose number and activity do not undergo dramatic changes upon inbreeding or outcrossing. Like MuDR, TED transposes mostly to unlinked sites and can form circular transposition products. Sequences closer to TED than to MuDR were detected only in the grasses, suggesting a rather recent evolutionary split from a common ancestor. PMID:24038653

  4. TED, an autonomous and rare maize transposon of the mutator superfamily with a high gametophytic excision frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yubin; Harris, Linda; Dooner, Hugo K

    2013-09-01

    Mutator (Mu) elements, one of the most diverse superfamilies of DNA transposons, are found in all eukaryotic kingdoms, but are particularly numerous in plants. Most of the present knowledge on the transposition behavior of this superfamily comes from studies of the maize (Zea mays) Mu elements, whose transposition is mediated by the autonomous Mutator-Don Robertson (MuDR) element. Here, we describe the maize element TED (for Transposon Ellen Dempsey), an autonomous cousin that differs significantly from MuDR. Element excision and reinsertion appear to require both proteins encoded by MuDR, but only the single protein encoded by TED. Germinal excisions, rare with MuDR, are common with TED, but arise in one of the mitotic divisions of the gametophyte, rather than at meiosis. Instead, transposition-deficient elements arise at meiosis, suggesting that the double-strand breaks produced by element excision are repaired differently in mitosis and meiosis. Unlike MuDR, TED is a very low-copy transposon whose number and activity do not undergo dramatic changes upon inbreeding or outcrossing. Like MuDR, TED transposes mostly to unlinked sites and can form circular transposition products. Sequences closer to TED than to MuDR were detected only in the grasses, suggesting a rather recent evolutionary split from a common ancestor.

  5. Impact of HBV genotype and mutations on HBV DNA and qHBsAg levels in patients with HBeAg-negative chronic HBV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnhenn, L; Jiang, B; Kubesch, A; Vermehren, J; Knop, V; Susser, S; Dietz, J; Carra, G; Finkelmeier, F; Grammatikos, G; Zeuzem, S; Sarrazin, C; Hildt, E; Peiffer, K-H

    2018-04-10

    HBV DNA and quantitative (q)HBsAg levels as prognostic markers for HBV-related disease are mostly validated in Asia and their significance in Western populations is uncertain. To analyse the impact of the HBV genotype and frequent mutations in precore (PC), basal core promoter (BCP) and preS on HBV DNA and qHBsAg levels. HBV DNA and qHBsAg serum levels of 465 patients with HBeAg-negative chronic HBV infection were correlated with the HBV genotype and mutations in PC, BCP and preS. For a detailed analysis of the molecular virology, genotype A2 genomes harbouring these mutations were analysed for replication efficacy and HBsAg release in cell culture. While no impact of the HBV genotype on HBV DNA levels was observed, qHBsAg levels differed up to 1.4 log among the genotypes (P HBV DNA levels (P HBV genome harbouring a preS deletion. In contrast, a perinuclear HBsAg accumulation was detected for the PC and BCP-variants, reflecting an impaired HBsAg release. qHBsAg serum levels depend on the HBV genotype and together with HBV DNA levels on frequent mutations in PC, BCP and preS in HBeAg-negative patients. qHBsAg cut-offs when used as prognostic markers require genotype-dependent validation. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The Frequency of c.550delA Mutation of the CANP3 Gene in the Polish LGMD2A Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorobek, Małgorzata; Ryniewicz, Barbara; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Fidziańska, Anna; Styczyńska, Maria; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Irena

    2015-11-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A (LGMD2A) is the most frequent LGMD variant in the European population, representing about 40% of LGMD. The c.550delA mutation in the CANP3 (calcium activated neutral protease 3) gene is the most commonly reported mutation in LGMD2A. Prevalence of this mutation in the Polish population has not been previously investigated. The aim of this study was to identify and estimate the frequency of the c.550delA mutation in Polish LGMD2A patients. Polymerase chain reaction-sequencing analysis, restriction fragment length polymorphism polymerase chain reaction method. We analyzed 76 families affected with LGMD and identified 62 probands with mutations in the CANP3 gene. C.550delA was the most common mutation identified, being found in 78% of the LGMD2A families. The remaining mutations observed multiple times were as follows: c.598-612del15ntd; c.2242C>T; c.418dupC; c.1356insT, listed in terms of decreasing frequency. Two novel variants in the CANP3 gene, that is, c.700G>A Gly234Arg and c.661G>A Gly221Ser were also characterized. Overall, mutations in the LGMD2A gene were estimated to be present in 81% of patients with the LGMD phenotype who were without sarcoglycans and dysferlin deficiency on immunocytochemical analysis. The frequency of the heterozygous c.550delA mutation in the healthy Polish population was estimated at 1/124. The c.550delA is the most frequent CANP3 mutation in the Polish population, thus sequencing of exon 4 of this gene could identify the majority of LGMD2A patients in Poland.

  7. Radiation-induced mutation frequency in marked chromosome of Macaca mulatta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhemilev, Z.A.; Machavariani, M.G.

    1976-01-01

    The symmetric and asymmetric exchange frequencies of marked (nucleolus forming) chromosomes were studied in the lymphocytes and epithelial kidney cells irradiated by X-rays at G 0 , both in vivo and in vitro. Symmetric and asymmetric exchange frequencies were found to be equal. In both the types of Macaca mulatta cells, the exchange frequency in the long arm appeared to be higher than theoretically expected. The increased exchange in the long arm is thought to be due to a greater quantity of late replicating heterochromatin in it. The short arm of marked chromosome of epithelial kidney cells enters the exchange in accordance to its length in mitosis, but exchange number in the short arm chromosome in lymphocytes is lower than in epithelial cells. This difference is caused likely by different functioning of the nucleolus forming heterochromatin. (author)

  8. Mutations of mtDNA polymerase-γ and hyperlactataemia in the HIV-infected Zulu population of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojwach, D B A; Aldous, C; Kochleff, P; Sartorius, B

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity, particularly symptomatic hyperlactataemia or lactic acidosis (SHL/LA), has been attributed to the use of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), possibly because of their capacity to impede human mitochondrial DNA polymerase-γ (POLG), which is responsible for the replication of mitochondrial DNA. To determine whether known monogenic POLG1 polymorphisms could be linked with the unexpectedly high incidence of SHL/LA observed in HIV-infected Zulu-speaking patients exposed to the NRTIs stavudine or zidovudine in their antiretroviral therapy. One hundred and sixteen patients from Edendale Hospital, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, participated in the study between March and August 2014. Fifty-nine symptomatic cases were compared with 57 non-symptomatic controls on stavudine for ≥24 months. Among the symptomatic patients, 13 had SHL with measured lactate between 3.0 and 4.99 mmol/L, and 46 had LA with a lactate level ≥5 mmol/L. Genomic DNA from 113 samples was used for subsequent allelic discrimination polymerase chain reaction screening for the R964C and E1143G single-nucleotide polymorphisms of POLG1. Sequencing was performed for 40/113 randomly selected samples for confirmation of the genotyping results. Neither of the two known POLG1 mutations was observed. The cases presented with SHL/LA between 4 and 18 months on stavudine. Females (70.4%) were significantly (p<0.001) more likely to be cases (adjusted odds ratio 24.24, 95% CI 5.14 - 114.25) compared with males. This study has shown that our sample of the Zulu-speaking population does not exhibit a genetic predisposition to SHL/LA associated with known monogenic POLG1 mutations, indicating another possible predisposing factor for increased risk of SHL/LA.

  9. Promoter hypermethylation of the DNA repair gene O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase is associated with the presence of G:C to A:T transition mutations in p53 in human colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteller, M; Risques, R A; Toyota, M; Capella, G; Moreno, V; Peinado, M A; Baylin, S B; Herman, J G

    2001-06-15

    Defects in DNA repair may be responsible for the genesis of mutations in key genes in cancer cells. The tumor suppressor gene p53 is commonly mutated in human cancer by missense point mutations, most of them G:C to A:T transitions. A recognized cause for this type of change is spontaneous deamination of the methylcytosine. However, the persistence of a premutagenic O(6)-methylguanine can also be invoked. This last lesion is removed in the normal cell by the DNA repair enzyme O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). In many tumor types, epigenetic silencing of MGMT by promoter hypermethylation has been demonstrated and linked to the appearance of G to A mutations in the K-ras oncogene in colorectal tumors. To study the relevance of defective MGMT function by aberrant methylation in relation to the presence of p53 mutations, we studied 314 colorectal tumors for MGMT promoter hypermethylation and p53 mutational spectrum. Inactivation of MGMT by aberrant methylation was associated with the appearance of G:C to A:T transition mutations at p53 (Fischer's exact test, two-tailed; P = 0.01). Overall, MGMT methylated tumors displayed p53 transition mutations in 43 of 126 (34%) cases, whereas MGMT unmethylated tumors only showed G:C to A:T changes in 37 of 188 (19%) tumors. A more striking association was found in G:C to A:T transitions in non-CpG dinucleotides; 71% (12 of 17) of the total non-CpG transition mutations in p53 were observed in MGMT aberrantly methylated tumors (Fischer's exact test, two-tailed; P = 0.008). Our data suggest that epigenetic silencing of MGMT by promoter hypermethylation may lead to G:C to A:T transition mutations in p53.

  10. The influence of large deletions on the mutation frequency induced by tritiated water and X-radiation in male Drosophila melanogaster post-meiotic germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossett, N.G.; Byrne, B.J.; Kelley, S.J.; Tucker, A.B.; Arbour-Reily, P.; Lee, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    Tritium beta radiation ( 3 H β-radiation) in the form of tritiated water was used to induce mutations at the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) locus in male Drosophila melanogaster post-meiotic germ cells. All 23 Adh null mutations were large deletions (>20 kb), determined by genetic complementation and Southern blot analyses. 27 Adh null mutations have been induced by 100-kVp X-rays and have been genetically and molecularly characterized. In contrast to 3 H β-radiation, 100-kVp X-rays induced a bimodal distribution of Adh null mutations, intragenic mutations, ≤250 bp, and large deletions, >100 kb. A statistically significant difference was observed between the frequency of large deletions (23/23 or 1.0) induced by 3 H β-radiation and the frequency of large deletions (19/27 or 0.7) induced by 100-kVp X-rays. However, a statistical difference was not observed between the size distribution of the large deletions induced by 3 H β-radiation and X-rays. The relative deletion frequency (RDF) induced by 3 H β-radiation and 100-kVp X-rays was (1.0/0.7=1.4). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of these two radiation sources was 1.4, determined from the ratio of the regression coefficients of the respective 3 H β-radiation and X-ray sex-linked recessive lethal (SLRL) dose-response data. The large difference in size between the two classes of X-ray-induced Adh null mutations and the increase in mutation frequency and deletion frequency for 3 H β-radiation with respect to X-rays may indicate that the relative deletion frequency (RDF) is the molecular biological basis for the increase in the RBE for radiation sources with a mean LET value ≤10 keV/μm

  11. The effect of DNA replication on mutation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CDC8 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaborowska, D; Zuk, J

    1990-04-01

    Incubation in YPD medium under permissive conditions when DNA replication is going on, strongly stimulates the induction of cdc+ colonies of UV-irradiated cells of yeast strains HB23 (cdc8-1/cdc8-3), HB26 (cdc8-3/cdc8-3) and HB7 (cdc8-1/cdc8-1). Inhibition of DNA replication by hydroxyurea, araCMP, cycloheximide or caffeine or else by incubation in phosphate buffer pH 7.0, abolishes this stimulation. Thus the replication of DNA is strongly correlated with the high induction of cdc+ colonies by UV irradiation. It is postulated that these UV-induced cdc+ colonies arise as the result infidelity in DNA replication.

  12. Rapid detection of ERG11 gene mutations in clinical Candida albicans isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole by rolling circle amplification and DNA sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huiping; Kong, Fanrong; Sorrell, Tania C; Wang, Bin; McNicholas, Paul; Pantarat, Namfon; Ellis, David; Xiao, Meng; Widmer, Fred; Chen, Sharon CA

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Amino acid substitutions in the target enzyme Erg11p of azole antifungals contribute to clinically-relevant azole resistance in Candida albicans. A simple molecular method for rapid detection of ERG11 gene mutations would be an advantage as a screening tool to identify potentially-resistant strains and to track their movement. To complement DNA sequencing, we developed a padlock probe and rolling circle amplification (RCA)-based method to detect a series of mutations in th...

  13. A Threshold Exists in the Dose-response Relationship for Somatic Mutation Frequency Inducted by X-ray Irradiation of Drosophia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koana, T.; Takashima, Y.; Okada, M. O.; Ikehata, M.; Miyakoshi, J.; Sakai, K.

    2004-01-01

    The dose-response relationship of ionizing radiation and its stochastic effects has been thought to be linear without any thresholds. The basic data for this model was obtained from mutational assays in the male germ cells of fruits fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, carcinogenic activity should be examined more appropriately in somatic cells than in germ cells. Here, the dose-response relationship of X- ray irradiation and somatic mutation is examined in Drosophila. A threshold at approximately 1Gy was observed in the DNA repair proficient flies. In the repair deficient siblings, the threshold was smaller and the inclination of the dose-response curve was much steeper. These results suggest that the dose-response relationship between X-ray irradiation and somatic mutation has a threshold, and that the DNA repair function contributes to its formation. (Author) 35 refs

  14. Synergistic effects of UdgB and Ung in mutation prevention and protection against commonly encountered DNA damaging agents in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malshetty, Vidyasagar S; Jain, Ruchi; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan; Kurthkoti, Krishna; Varshney, Umesh

    2010-03-01

    The incorporation of dUMP during replication or the deamination of cytosine in DNA results in the occurrence of uracils in genomes. To maintain genomic integrity, uracil DNA glycosylases (UDGs) excise uracil from DNA and initiate the base-excision repair pathway. Here, we cloned, purified and biochemically characterized a family 5 UDG, UdgB, from Mycobacterium smegmatis to allow us to use it as a model organism to investigate the physiological significance of the novel enzyme. Studies with knockout strains showed that compared with the wild-type parent, the mutation rate of the udgB( -) strain was approximately twofold higher, whereas the mutation rate of a strain deficient in the family 1 UDG (ung(- )) was found to be approximately 8.4-fold higher. Interestingly, the mutation rate of the double-knockout (ung(-)/ udgB(-)) strain was remarkably high, at approximately 19.6-fold. While CG to TA mutations predominated in the ung(-) and ung(-)/udgB(-) strains, AT to GC mutations were enhanced in the udgB(-) strain. The ung(-)/udgB(-) strain was notably more sensitive to acidified nitrite and hydrogen peroxide stresses compared with the single knockouts (ung(-) or udgB(-)). These observations reveal a synergistic effect of UdgB and Ung in DNA repair, and could have implications for the generation of attenuated strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  15. Mutations in Cytosine-5 tRNA Methyltransferases Impact Mobile Element Expression and Genome Stability at Specific DNA Repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Genenncher

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of eukaryotic genome stability is ensured by the interplay of transcriptional as well as post-transcriptional mechanisms that control recombination of repeat regions and the expression and mobility of transposable elements. We report here that mutations in two (cytosine-5 RNA methyltransferases, Dnmt2 and NSun2, impact the accumulation of mobile element-derived sequences and DNA repeat integrity in Drosophila. Loss of Dnmt2 function caused moderate effects under standard conditions, while heat shock exacerbated these effects. In contrast, NSun2 function affected mobile element expression and genome integrity in a heat shock-independent fashion. Reduced tRNA stability in both RCMT mutants indicated that tRNA-dependent processes affected mobile element expression and DNA repeat stability. Importantly, further experiments indicated that complex formation with RNA could also contribute to the impact of RCMT function on gene expression control. These results thus uncover a link between tRNA modification enzymes, the expression of repeat DNA, and genomic integrity.

  16. Genetic signatures from amplification profiles characterize DNA mutation in somatic and radiation-induced sports of chrysanthemum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trigiano, R.N.; Scott, M.C.; Caetano-Anolles, G.

    1998-01-01

    The chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev.) cultivars 'Dark Charm', 'Salmon Charm', 'Coral Charm' and 'Dark Bronze Charm' are either radiation-induced mutants or spontaneous sports of 'Charm' and constitute a family or series of plants that primarily differ in flower color. These cultivars, which were difficult to differentiate genetically by DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF), were easily identified by using arbitrary signatures from amplification profiles (ASAP). Genomic DNA was first amplified with three standard octamer arbitrary primers, all of which produced monomorphic profiles. Products from each of these DNA fingerprints were subsequently reamplified using four minihairpin decamer primers. The 12 primer combinations produced signatures containing approximately 37% polymorphic character loci, which were used to estimate genetic relationships between cultivars. Forty-six (32%) unique amplification products were associated with individual cultivars. The number of ASAP polymorphisms detected provided an estimate of the mutation rate in the mutant cultivars, ranging from 0.03% to 1.6% of nucleotide changes within an average of 18 kb of arbitrary amplified DAF sequence. The ASAP technique permits the clear genetic identification of somatic mutants and radiation-induced sports that are genetically highly homogeneous and should facilitate marker assisted breeding and protection of plant breeders rights of varieties or cultivars

  17. An innovative strategy to clone positive modifier genes of defects caused by mtDNA mutations: MRPS18C as suppressor gene of m.3946G>A mutation in MT-ND1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-García, María Elena; Cotrina-Vinagre, Francisco Javier; Carnicero-Rodríguez, Patricia; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2017-07-01

    We have developed a new functional complementation approach to clone modifier genes which overexpression is able to suppress the biochemical defects caused by mtDNA mutations (suppressor genes). This strategy consists in transferring human genes into respiratory chain-deficient fibroblasts, followed by a metabolic selection in a highly selective medium. We used a normalized expression cDNA library in an episomal vector (pREP4) to transfect the fibroblasts, and a medium with glutamine and devoid of any carbohydrate source to select metabolically. Growing the patient's fibroblasts in this selective medium, the deficient cells rapidly disappear unless they are rescued by the cDNA of a suppressor gene. The use of an episomal vector allows us to carry out several rounds of transfection/selection (cyclical phenotypic rescue) to enrich the rescue with true clones of suppressor genes. Using fibroblasts from a patient with epileptic encephalopathy with the m.3946G>A (p.E214K) mutation in the MT-ND1 gene, several candidate genes were identified and one of them was characterized functionally. Thus, overexpression of MRPS18C gene (that encode for bS18m protein) suppressed the molecular defects produced by this mtDNA mutation, recovering the complex I activity and reducing the ROS produced by this complex to normal levels. We suggest that modulation of bS18m expression may be an effective therapeutic strategy for the patients with this mutation.

  18. Use of spontaneously mutated human DNA as competitive internal standard for nucleic acid quantification by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudnicka, L.; Diaz, A.; Varga, J.; Jimenez, S.A.; Christiano, A.; Uitto, J.

    1995-01-01

    Quantification of gene expression is of increasing interest in many medical sciences. Methods based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs) are timesaving and require only very small amounts of RNA. A limiting factor, however, is the significant fluctuation in the efficacy of reverse transcription as well in the polymerase chain reactions. Various external and internal standards have been suggested for correcting these fluctuations. We describe a novel way of creating an internal standard for assessing the expression of type VII collagen in human cells. The total RNA of a patient with hereditary 'epidermilysis bulosa dystrophica' associated with a homozygous T to A point mutation in type VII collagen gene was reverse transcribed and a 382bp fragment of type VII collagen cDNA containing the mutation was amplified. The mutated cDNA, unlike normal type VII collagen cDNA could be cleaved by 'Ear I' endonuclease into 244bp and 138bp fragments. Semiquantitative PCR was performed with the mutated cDNA as internal standard and the studied cDNA sample in the same tube in the presence of α 32 P-labelled dCTP. The reaction was followed by 'Ear I' digestion, electrophoresis on a polyacrylamide gel and exposure to a X-ray film. In conclusion, we describe a timesaving method for creating internal standards for semiquantitative RT-PCR. (author). 12 refs, 3 figs

  19. Molecular and clinical characterization of the myopathic form of mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome caused by mutations in the thymidine kinase (TK2) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanprasert, Sirisak; Wang, Jing; Weng, Shao-Wen; Enns, Gregory M; Boué, Daniel R; Wong, Brenda L; Mendell, Jerry R; Perry, Deborah A; Sahenk, Zarife; Craigen, William J; Alcala, Francisco J Climent; Pascual, Juan M; Melancon, Serge; Zhang, Victor Wei; Scaglia, Fernando; Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes (MDSs) are a clinically and molecularly heterogeneous group of mitochondrial cytopathies characterized by severe mtDNA copy number reduction in affected tissues. Clinically, MDSs are mainly categorized as myopathic, encephalomyopathic, hepatocerebral, or multi-systemic forms. To date, the myopathic form of MDS is mainly caused by mutations in the TK2 gene, which encodes thymidine kinase 2, the first and rate limiting step enzyme in the phosphorylation of pyrimidine nucleosides. We analyzed 9 unrelated families with 11 affected subjects exhibiting the myopathic form of MDS, by sequencing the TK2 gene. Twelve mutations including 4 novel mutations were detected in 9 families. Skeletal muscle specimens were available from 7 out of 11 subjects. Respiratory chain enzymatic activities in skeletal muscle were measured in 6 subjects, and enzymatic activities were reduced in 3 subjects. Quantitative analysis of mtDNA content in skeletal muscle was performed in 5 subjects, and marked mtDNA content reduction was observed in each. In addition, we outline the molecular and clinical characteristics of this syndrome in a total of 52 patients including those previously reported, and a total of 36 TK2 mutations are summarized. Clinically, hypotonia and proximal muscle weakness are the major phenotypes present in all subjects. In summary, our study expands the molecular and clinical spectrum associated with TK2 deficiency. © 2013.

  20. Complexity of the ultraviolet mutation frequency response curve in Escherichia coli B/r: SOS induction, one-lesion and two-lesion mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doudney, C.O.

    1976-01-01

    Three distinct sections of the ultraviolet mutation frequency response (MFR) curve toward tryptophan prototrophy have been demonstrated in Escherichia coli B/r WP2 trp thy and its uvrA derivative in log-phase growth in minimal medium. The initial section, which appears fluence-squared, may reflect the necessity, if mutation is to result, for induction of two lesions, one located within the potentially mutated genetic locus and the other damaging deoxyribonucleic acid replication and resulting in induction of the error-prone SOS repair function. A second linear section is ascribed to the continued induction, after exposure above that sufficient for complete SOS expression, of isolated lesions which lead to mutation in potentially mutated loci. The third section demonstrates an increased rate of mutagenesis and suggests the induction of two lesions in proximity which result in additional mutations. Split-exposure studies support the inducible nature of the SOS function and suggest that mutation frequency decline (MFD) is due to excision resulting from or related to the prevention of SOS induction by inhibition of protein synthesis. Preirradiation tryptophan starvation of the uvr + strain for 30 min decreases MFR in the first and second sections of the curve. Reduction of MFR in the third section requires more prestarvation time and is blocked by nalidixic acid. The decreased MFR of the first and second sections is ascribed to promotion of postirradiation MFD based on excision and that of the third section to completion of the chromosome during the prestarvation period

  1. Heterozygous SSBP1 start loss mutation co-segregates with hearing loss and the m.1555A>G mtDNA variant in a large multigenerational family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullar, Peter J; Gomez-Duran, Aurora; Gammage, Payam A; Garone, Caterina; Minczuk, Michal; Golder, Zoe; Wilson, Janet; Montoya, Julio; Häkli, Sanna; Kärppä, Mikko; Horvath, Rita; Majamaa, Kari; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2018-01-01

    The m.1555A>G mtDNA variant causes maternally inherited deafness, but the reasons for the highly variable clinical penetrance are not known. Exome sequencing identified a heterozygous start loss mutation in SSBP1, encoding the single stranded binding protein 1 (SSBP1), segregating with hearing loss in a multi-generational family transmitting m.1555A>G, associated with mtDNA depletion and multiple deletions in skeletal muscle. The SSBP1 mutation reduced steady state SSBP1 levels leading to a perturbation of mtDNA metabolism, likely compounding the intra-mitochondrial translation defect due to m.1555A>G in a tissue-specific manner. This family demonstrates the importance of rare trans-acting genetic nuclear modifiers in the clinical expression of mtDNA disease. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  2. [DNA mutations associated to rifampicin or isoniazid resistance in M. tuberculosis clinical isolates from Sonora, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolado-Martínez, Enrique; Pérez-Mendoza, Ansix; Alegría-Morquecho, Francisco Monserrat; Candia-Plata, María del Carmen; Aguayo-Verdugo, María del Rosario; Alvarez-Hernández, Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    To perform the analysis of specific regions of the major genes associated with resistance to isoniazid or rifampin. Twenty two M. tuberculosis strains, isolated from human samples obtained in Sonora, Mexico. Specific primers for hotspots of the rpoB, katG, inhA genes and the ahpC-oxyR intergenic region were used. The purified PCR products were sequenced. Mutations in the promoter of inhA, the ahpC-oxyR region, and codon 315 of katG and in 451 or 456 codons of rpoB, were identified. Detection of mutations not previously reported requires further genotypic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Sonora.

  3. The mutation frequency of Drosophila melanogaster populations living under conditions of increased background radiation due to the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainullin, V.G.; Rakin, A.O.; Shevchenko, V.A.; Myasnyankina, E.N.; Generalova, M.V.

    1992-01-01

    One of the problems facing the program in the wake of the Chernobyl accident is the estimation of genetic damage to plants and animals. Special attention was directed to studying the influence of radioactive pollutants at the accident site by means of an appropriate test system, using standard genetic subjects. The present study describes such investigations. Levels of persistent genetic damage in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster found in the vicinity of the Chernobyl accident site were examined from August 1986-September 1989. Evidence is presented which indicates a relationship between the levels of radioactive pollution resulting from the Chernobyl accident and increasing genetic damage to exposed populations. The possible reasons for the decrease of mutation frequency observed in 1988 and 1989 are also discussed. Furthermore, evidence is presented which suggests that radiosensitive Drosophila mutants may be particularly sensitive indicators of radioactive pollution. (author). 16 refs.; 6 figs

  4. Specific UV-induced mutation spectrum in the p53 gene of skin tumors from DNA-repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumaz, N.; Drougard, C.; Sarasin, A.; Daya-Grosjean, L.

    1993-01-01

    The UV component of sunlight is the major carcinogen involved in the etiology of skin cancers. The authors have studied the rare, hereditary syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), which is characterized by a very high incidence of cutaneous tumors on exposed skin at an early age, probably due to a deficiency in excision repair of UV-induced lesions. It is interesting to determine the UV mutation spectrum in XP skin tumors in order to correlate the absence of repair of specific DNA lesions and the initiation of skin tumors. The p53 gene is frequently mutated in human cancers and represents a good target for studying mutation spectra since there are >100 potential sites for phenotypic mutations. Using reverse transcription-PCR and single-strand conformation polymorphism to analyze >40 XP skin tumors (mainly basal and squamous cell carcinomas), the authors have found that 40% (17 out of 43) contained at least one point mutation on the p53 gene. All the mutations were located at dipyrimidine sites, essentially at CC sequences, which are hot spots for UV-induced DNA lesions. Sixty-one percent of these mutations were tandem CC → TT mutations considered to be unique to UV-induced lesions; these mutations are not observed in internal human tumors. All the mutations, except two, must be due to translesion synthesis of unrepaired dipyrimidine lesions left on the nontranscribed strand. These results show the existence of preferential repair of UV lesions [either pyrimidine dimers or pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts] on the transcribed strand in human tissues

  5. ASSOCIATION OF HFE GENE MUTATION IN THALASSEMIA MAJOR PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Tiwari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Thalassemia major patients are dependent on frequent blood transfusion and consequently develop iron overload. HFE gene mutations (C282Y, H63D and S65C in hereditary haemochromatosis has been shown to be associated with iron overload. The study aims at finding the association of HFE gene mutations in β-thalassemia major patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS A descriptive observational pilot study was conducted including fifty diagnosed -thalassemia major cases. DNA analysis by PCR-RFLP method for HFE gene mutations was performed. RESULTS Only H63D mutation (out of three HFE gene mutations was detected in 8 out of 50 cases. Observed frequency of H63D mutation was 16%. While frequency of C282Y and S65C were 0% each. CONCLUSION The frequency of HFE mutation in -thalassemia major is not very common.

  6. Frequency of CHEK2 mutations in a population based, case–control study of breast cancer in young women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrichsen, Danielle M; Malone, Kathleen E; Doody, David R; Daling, Janet R; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2004-01-01

    The cell-cycle checkpoint kinase (CHEK)2 protein truncating mutation 1100delC has been associated with increased risk for breast or prostate cancer. Multiple studies have found an elevated frequency of the 1100delC variant in specific stratifications of breast cancer patients with a family history of the disease, including BRCA1/BRCA2 negative families and families with a history of bilateral disease or male breast cancer. However, the 1100delC mutation has only been investigated in a few population-based studies and none from North America. We report here on the frequency of three CHEK2 variants that alter protein function – 1100delC, R145W, and I175T – in 506 cases and 459 controls from a population based, case–control study of breast cancer conducted in young women from western Washington. There was a suggestive enrichment in the 1100delC variant in the cases (1.2%) as compared with the controls (0.4%), but this was based on small numbers of carriers and the differences were not statistically significant. The 1100delC variant was more frequent in cases with a first-degree family history of breast cancer (4.3%; P = 0.02) and slightly enriched in cases with a family history of ovarian cancer (4.4%; P = 0.09). The CHEK2 variants are rare in the western Washington population and, based on accumulated evidence across studies, are unlikely to be major breast cancer susceptibility genes. Thus, screening for the 1100delC variant may have limited usefulness in breast cancer prevention programs in the USA

  7. Mutation breeding in ornamental plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutation induction produced a large number of new promising varieties in ornamental species. 37 new mutants of Chrysanthemum and 14 of rose have been developed by mutations and released for commercialisation. The mutations in flower colour/shape were detected as chimeras in M 1 V 1 , M 1 V 2 , M 1 V 3 generations. The mutation frequency varied with the cultivar and exposure to gamma rays. Comparative analysis of original cultivars and their respective induced mutants on cytomorphological, anatomical and biochemical characters are being carried out for better understanding of the mechanism involved in the origin and evolution of somatic flower colour/shape mutations. Cytological analysis with reference to chromosomal aberrations, chromosome number, ICV, INV and DNA content gave no differences between the original and mutant cultivars. Analysis of florets/petal pigments by TLC and spectrophotometric methods indicated both qualitative and quantitative changes. (author)

  8. Protective action of DNA preparations on the survival of cells and yield of 8-azaguanine resistant mutations in X-irradiated cell culture of chinese hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsova, N.N.; Feoktistova, T.P.

    1976-01-01

    A DNA preparation (molecular weight 19.6-21.0x1O 6 daltons) administered to cell culture of Chinese hamsters in concentrations of 100 to 122 μg/ml 60 minutes before and in the course of 3 days after X-irradiation (600 R) decreased the lethality of irradiated cells and reduced induction of 8-azaguanine resistant genic mutations. DNA preparations with the concentrations under study had no toxic action on cells and were not mutagenous

  9. Microsatellites in the Eukaryotic DNA Mismatch Repair Genes as Modulators of Evolutionary Mutation Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Dong Kyung; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Boland, C. Richard

    2003-01-01

    All "minor" components of the human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system-MSH3, MSH6, PMS2, and the recently discovered MLH3-contain mononucleotide microsatellites in their coding sequences. This intriguing finding contrasts with the situation found in the major components of the DNA MMR system-MSH2 and MLH1-and, in fact, most human genes. Although eukaryotic genomes are rich in microsatellites, non-triplet microsatellites are rare in coding regions. The recurring presence of exonal mononucleotide repeat sequences within a single family of human genes would therefore be considered exceptional.

  10. Base-pairing preferences, physicochemical properties and mutational behaviour of the DNA lesion 8-nitroguanine †

    OpenAIRE

    Bhamra, Inder; Compagnone-Post, Patricia; O’Neil, Ian A.; Iwanejko, Lesley A.; Bates, Andrew D.; Cosstick, Richard

    2012-01-01

    8-Nitro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-nitrodG) is a relatively unstable, mutagenic lesion of DNA that is increasingly believed to be associated with tissue inflammation. Due to the lability of the glycosidic bond, 8-nitrodG cannot be incorporated into oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) by chemical DNA synthesis and thus very little is known about its physicochemical properties and base-pairing preferences. Here we describe the synthesis of 8-nitro-2′-O-methylguanosine, a ribonucleoside analogue of this lesi...

  11. Cancer spectrum in DNA mismatch repair gene mutation carriers: results from a hospital based Lynch syndrome registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Mala; Wei, Chongjuan; Chen, Jinyun; Amos, Christopher I; Lynch, Patrick M; Lu, Karen H; Lucio, Laura A; Boyd-Rogers, Stephanie G; Bannon, Sarah A; Mork, Maureen E; Frazier, Marsha L

    2012-09-01

    The spectrum of cancers seen in a hospital based Lynch syndrome registry of mismatch repair gene mutation carriers was examined to determine the distribution of cancers and examine excess cancer risk. Overall there were 504 cancers recorded in 368 mutation carriers from 176 families. These included 236 (46.8 %) colorectal and 268 (53.2 %) extracolonic cancers. MLH1 mutation carriers had a higher frequency of colorectal cancers whereas MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 mutation carriers had more extracolonic cancers although these differences were not statistically significant. Men had fewer extracolonic cancers than colorectal (45.3 vs. 54.7 %), whereas women had more extracolonic than colorectal cancers (59.0 vs. 41.0 %). The mean age at diagnosis overall for extracolonic cancers was older than for colorectal, 49.1 versus 44.8 years (P ≤ 0.001). As expected, the index cancer was colorectal in 58.1 % of patients and among the extracolonic index cancers, endometrial was the most common (13.8 %). A significant number of non-Lynch syndrome index cancers were recorded including breast (n = 5) prostate (n = 3), thyroid (n = 3), cervix (n = 3), melanoma (n = 3), and 1 case each of thymoma, sinus cavity, and adenocarcinoma of the lung. However, standardized incidence ratios calculated to assess excess cancer risk showed that only those cancers known to be associated with Lynch syndrome were significant in our sample. We found that Lynch syndrome patients can often present with cancers that are not considered part of Lynch syndrome. This has clinical relevance both for diagnosis of Lynch syndrome and surveillance for cancers of different sites during follow-up of these patients.

  12. Mutagenic and epigenetic influence of caffeine on the frequencies of UV-induced ouabain-resistant Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chia-Cheng; Philipps, C.; Trosko, J.E.; Hart, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    Caffeine, given as a post-treatment to UV-irradiated Chinese hamster cells in vitro, modified the frequency of induced mutations at the ouabain resistance locus. Mutation frequencies were increased when caffeine was added only for the DNA repair and mutation fixation period. When caffeine was added after the DNA repair and mutation fixation period, or immediately after DNA damage and for the entire repair and selection period, mutation frequencies were reduced. A hypothesis, given to explain both results, is that caffeine, by blocking a constitutive 'error-free' postreplication repair process, allows an 'error-prone' DNA repair process to produce many mutations. Moreover, caffeine, possibly by modifying C-AMP metabolism, causes a repression of induced mutations which, in effect, explains its anti-mutagenic and anti-carcinogenic properties

  13. Structure-guided mutational analysis of the OB, HhH, and BRCT domains of Escherichia coli DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li Kai; Nair, Pravin A; Shuman, Stewart

    2008-08-22

    NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases (LigAs) are ubiquitous in bacteria and essential for growth. LigA enzymes have a modular structure in which a central catalytic core composed of nucleotidyltransferase and oligonucleotide-binding (OB) domains is linked via a tetracysteine zinc finger to distal helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) and BRCT (BRCA1-like C-terminal) domains. The OB and HhH domains contribute prominently to the protein clamp formed by LigA around nicked duplex DNA. Here we conducted a structure-function analysis of the OB and HhH domains of Escherichia coli LigA by alanine scanning and conservative substitutions, entailing 43 mutations at 22 amino acids. We thereby identified essential functional groups in the OB domain that engage the DNA phosphodiester backbone flanking the nick (Arg(333)); penetrate the minor grove and distort the nick (Val(383) and Ile(384)); or stabilize the OB fold (Arg(379)). The essential constituents of the HhH domain include: four glycines (Gly(455), Gly(489), Gly(521), Gly(553)), which bind the phosphate backbone across the minor groove at the outer margins of the LigA-DNA interface; Arg(487), which penetrates the minor groove at the outer margin on the 3 (R)-OH side of the nick; and Arg(446), which promotes protein clamp formation via contacts to the nucleotidyltransferase domain. We find that the BRCT domain is required in its entirety for effective nick sealing and AMP-dependent supercoil relaxation.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA polymerase editing mutation, PolgD257A, reduces the diabetic phenotype of Akita male mice by suppressing appetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Raymond; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Reddick, Robert L; Kujoth, Gregory C; Prolla, Tomas A; Tsutsumi, Shuichi; Wada, Youichiro; Smithies, Oliver; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2011-05-24

    Diabetes and the development of its complications have been associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) dysfunction, but causal relationships remain undetermined. With the objective of testing whether increased mtDNA mutations exacerbate the diabetic phenotype, we have compared mice heterozygous for the Akita diabetogenic mutation (Akita) with mice homozygous for the D257A mutation in mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (Polg) or with mice having both mutations (Polg-Akita). The Polg-D257A protein is defective in proofreading and increases mtDNA mutations. At 3 mo of age, the Polg-Akita and Akita male mice were equally hyperglycemic. Unexpectedly, as the Polg-Akita males aged to 9 mo, their diabetic symptoms decreased. Thus, their hyperglycemia, hyperphagia and urine output declined significantly. The decrease in their food intake was accompanied by increased plasma leptin and decreased plasma ghrelin, while hypothalamic expression of the orexic gene, neuropeptide Y, was lower and expression of the anorexic gene, proopiomelanocortin, was higher. Testis function progressively worsened with age in the double mutants, and plasma testosterone levels in 9-mo-old Polg-Akita males were significantly reduced compared with Akita males. The hyperglycemia and hyperphagia returned in aged Polg-Akita males after testosterone administration. Hyperglycemia-associated distal tubular damage in the kidney also returned, and Polg-D257A-associated proximal tubular damage was enhanced. The mild diabetes of female Akita mice was not affected by the Polg-D257A mutation. We conclude that reduced diabetic symptoms of aging Polg-Akita males results from appetite suppression triggered by decreased testosterone associated with damage to the Leydig cells of the testis.

  15. Frequency and Clinical Implication of the R450H Mutation in the Thyrotropin Receptor Gene in the Japanese Population Detected by Smart Amplification Process 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Yoshimaro; Aoki, Tomoyuki; Morimura, Tadashi; Araki, Osamu; Kimura, Takao; Ogiwara, Takayuki; Kotajima, Nobuo; Yanagawa, Masumi; Murakami, Masami

    2014-01-01

    In Japanese pediatric patients with thyrotropin (TSH) resistance, the R450H mutation in TSH receptor gene (TSHR) is occasionally observed. We studied the frequency and clinical implication of the R450H mutation in TSHR in the general population of Japanese adults using smart amplification process 2 (SmartAmp2). We designed SmartAmp2 primer sets to detect this mutation using a drop of whole blood. We analyzed thyroid function, antithyroid antibodies, and this mutation in 429 Japanese participants who had not been found to have thyroid disease. Two cases without antithyroid antibodies were heterozygous for the R450H mutation in TSHR. Thus, the prevalence of this mutation was 0.47% in the general population and 0.63% among those without antithyroid antibodies. Their serum TSH concentrations were higher than the average TSH concentration not only in subjects without antithyroid antibodies but also in those with antithyroid antibodies. The R450H mutation in TSHR is relatively common in the Japanese population and potentially affects thyroid function. The present study demonstrates that the SmartAmp2 method is useful to detect the R450H mutation in TSHR, which is one of the common causes of TSH resistance in the Japanese population. PMID:24895636

  16. BRCA Mutation Frequency and Patterns of Treatment Response in BRCA Mutation–Positive Women With Ovarian Cancer: A Report From the Australian Ovarian Cancer Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Kathryn; Fereday, Sian; Meldrum, Cliff; deFazio, Anna; Emmanuel, Catherine; George, Joshy; Dobrovic, Alexander; Birrer, Michael J.; Webb, Penelope M.; Stewart, Colin; Friedlander, Michael; Fox, Stephen; Bowtell, David; Mitchell, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The frequency of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutations in women with ovarian cancer is unclear; reports vary from 3% to 27%. The impact of germ-line mutation on response requires further investigation to understand its impact on treatment planning and clinical trial design. Patients and Methods Women with nonmucinous ovarian carcinoma (n = 1,001) enrolled onto a population-based, case-control study were screened for point mutations and large deletions in both genes. Survival outcomes and responses to multiple lines of chemotherapy were assessed. Results Germ-line mutations were found in 14.1% of patients overall, including 16.6% of serous cancer patients (high-grade serous, 22.6%); 44% had no reported family history of breast or ovarian cancer. Patients carrying germ-line mutations had improved rates of progression-free and overall survival. In the relapse setting, patients carrying mutations more frequently responded to both platin- and nonplatin-based regimens than mutation-negative patients, even in patients with early relapse after primary treatment. Mutation-negative patients who responded to multiple cycles of platin-based treatment were more likely to carry somatic BRCA1/2 mutations. Conclusion BRCA mutation status has a major influence on survival in ovarian cancer patients and should be an additional stratification factor in clinical trials. Treatment outcomes in BRCA1/2 carriers challenge conventional definitions of platin resistance, and mutation status may be able to contribute to decision making and systemic therapy selection in the relapse setting. Our data, together with the advent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor trials, supports the recommendation that germ-line BRCA1/2 testing should be offered to all women diagnosed with nonmucinous, ovarian carcinoma, regardless of family history. PMID:22711857

  17. INVESTIGATION OF RANGES AND FREQUENCY OF MUTATIONS IN THE embB GENE IN MYCOBACTERIUMTUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATED WITH RESISTANCE TO ETHAMBUTOL USING REAL-TIME POLYMERASE CHAINREACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. S. Аlyapkinа

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on real-time allele-specific polymerase chain reaction, the ranges of potential mutations in codons of 306 and 405 of the embBgene in Mycobacterium tuberculosis associated with resistance to ethambutol were investigated. 5 different mutations were detected in codon 306 and 3 mutations were found in codon 406 of the embB gene. The detected mutations were confirmed by sequencing and mass spectrometry. By analyzing the frequency of detected mutations of , the set of reagents was developed for rapid testing of susceptibility tuberculous mycobacteria to ethambutol by multi-competitive allele-specific real-time PCR. Out of 107 tested specimens of clinical isolates, mutations of the embB gene of M. tuberculosis were detected in 49 (45.8% specimens, and no mutations were found in 58 (52.2% specimens. 39 (36.4% specimens had mutations in codon 306 of the embB gene, and 9 (8.4% specimens had a mutation in codon 406, and 1 (0.9% specimen had mutations in both codons 306 and 406. The high level of agreement in the results of molecular genetic and bacteriological tests (84% proved the significance of mutations in codons 306 and 406 of the embB gene in M. tuberculosis and the need for their identification in order to detect ethambutol resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. When using molecular genetic tests, the sensitivity level made 75.8%, while the specificity of standard culture-based methods makes 95.6%.

  18. Malignant chondroblastoma presenting as a recurrent pelvic tumor with DNA aneuploidy and p53 mutation as supportive evidence of malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrowski, M.L. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, The Methodist Hospital and Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Houston, TX (United States). Methodist Hospital; Johnson, M.E. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, The Methodist Hospital and Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Truong, L.D.; Hicks, M.J.; Spjut, H.J. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, The Methodist Hospital and Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, F.E. [Department of Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, The Methodist Hospital and Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States)

    1999-11-01

    We report a rare case of malignant chondroblastoma, which presented in a 47-year-old man as a recurrent tumor, 18 years following wide excision of a typical pelvic chondroblastoma. Radiologic studies of the recurrent tumor showed a large, lytic, destructive lesion of the right pelvic bones and femur, with a pathologic fracture of the latter, a large pelvic soft tissue mass, and multiple pulmonary metastases. Biopsy tissue showed typical features of chondroblastoma, but also increased nuclear atypia, hyperchromasia, and pleomorphism, compared to the original tumor, and, most significantly, abnormal mitotic figures. Immunohistochemical studies of the recurrent tumor revealed p53 mutation and extensive proliferative activity, and flow cytometric studies showed DNA aneuploidy, none of which was present in the original tumor. The patient received chemotherapy and radiation, but died of disease eight months after presentation. We also review chondroblastoma in general, to assign this unusual lesion to a tumor subtype. (orig.)

  19. Genetic and epigenetic mutations affect the DNA binding capability of human ZFP57 in transient neonatal diabetes type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglivo, Ilaria; Esposito, Sabrina; De Cesare, Lucia; Sparago, Angela; Anvar, Zahra; Riso, Vincenzo; Cammisa, Marco; Fattorusso, Roberto; Grimaldi, Giovanna; Riccio, Andrea; Pedone, Paolo V

    2013-05-21

    In the mouse, ZFP57 contains three classical Cys2His2 zinc finger domains (ZF) and recognizes the methylated TGC(met)CGC target sequence using the first and the second ZFs. In this study, we demonstrate that the human ZFP57 (hZFP57) containing six Cys2His2 ZFs, binds the same methylated sequence through the third and the fourth ZFs, and identify the aminoacids critical for DNA interaction. In addition, we present evidences indicating that hZFP57 mutations and hypomethylation of the TNDM1 ICR both associated with Transient Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus type 1 result in loss of hZFP57 binding to the TNDM1 locus, likely causing PLAGL1 activation. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. DNA detection and single nucleotide mutation identification using SERS for molecular diagnostics and global health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Hoan T.; Gandra, Naveen; Fales, Andrew M.; Taylor, Steve M.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2017-02-01

    Nucleic acid-based molecular diagnostics at the point-of-care (POC) and in resource-limited settings is still a challenge. We present a sensitive yet simple DNA detection method with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identification capability. The detection scheme involves sandwich hybridization of magnetic beads conjugated with capture probes, target sequences, and ultrabright surface-enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) nanorattles conjugated with reporter probes. Upon hybridization, the sandwich probes are concentrated at the detection focus controlled by a magnetic system for SERS measurements. The ultrabright SERS nanorattles, consisting of a core and a shell with resonance Raman reporters loaded in the gap space between the core and the shell, serve as SERS tags for ultrasensitive signal detection. Specific DNA sequences of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and dengue virus 1 (DENV1) were used as the model marker system. Detection limit of approximately 100 attomoles was achieved. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination of wild type malaria DNA and mutant malaria DNA, which confers resistance to artemisinin drugs, was also demonstrated. The results demonstrate the molecular diagnostic potential of the nanorattle-based method to both detect and genotype infectious pathogens. The method's simplicity makes it a suitable candidate for molecular diagnosis at the POC and in resource-limited settings.

  1. Sensitive electrochemical determination of unlabeled MutS protein and detection of point mutations in DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paleček, Emil; Masařík, Michal; Kizek, René; Kuhlmeier, D.; Hassmann, J.; Schülein, J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 19 (2004), s. 5930-5936 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5004355; GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : MutS protein * DNA repair * mercury electrodes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.450, year: 2004

  2. Desmin common mutation is associated with multi-systemic disease manifestations and depletion of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth eMcCormick

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Desmin (DES is a major muscle scaffolding protein that also functions to anchor mitochondria. Pathogenic DES mutations, however, have not previously been recognized as a cause of multi-systemic mitochondrial disease. Here, we describe a 45-year-old man who presented to The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Mitochondrial-Genetics Diagnostic Clinic for evaluation of progressive cardiac, neuromuscular, gastrointestinal, and mood disorders. Muscle biopsy at age 45 was remarkable for cytoplasmic bodies, as well as ragged red fibers and SDH positive/COX negative fibers that were suggestive of a mitochondrial myopathy. Muscle also showed significant reductions in mitochondrial content (16% of control mean for citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA (35% of control mean. His family history was significant for cardiac conduction defects and myopathy in multiple maternal relatives. Multiple single gene and panel-based sequencing studies were unrevealing. Whole exome sequencing identified a known pathogenic p.S13F mutation in DES that had previously been associated with desmin-related myopathy. Desmin-related myopathy is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by right ventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myopathy, and arrhythmias. However, neuropathy, gastrointestinal dysfunction, and depletion of both mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA have not previously been widely recognized in this disorder. Recognition that mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in desmin-related myopathy clarifies the basis for the multi-systemic manifestations, as are typical of primary mitochondrial disorders. Understanding the mitochondrial pathophysiology of desmin-related myopathy highlights the possibility of new therapies for the otherwise untreatable and often fatal class of disease. We postulate that drug treatments aimed at improving mitochondrial biogenesis or reducing oxidative stress may be effective therapies to ameliorate the effects of desmin

  3. TP53 germline mutation testing in 180 families suspected of Li-Fraumeni syndrome: mutation detection rate and relative frequency of cancers in different familial phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, M.W.G.; Verhoef, S.; Rookus, M.A.; Pruntel, R.; van der Hout, A.H.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R.H.; Aalfs, C.M.; Wagner, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; van Asperen, C.J.; Gómez García, E.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; ten Kate, L.P.; Menko, F.H.; van 't Veer, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. Most families fulfilling the classical diagnostic criteria harbour TP53 germline mutations. However, TP53 germline mutations may also occur in less obvious phenotypes. As a result, different criteria

  4. Frequency of ABL gene mutations in chronic myeloid leukemia patients resistant to imatinib and results of treatment switch to second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcé, Silvia; Zamora, Lurdes; Cabezón, Marta; Xicoy, Blanca; Boqué, Concha; Fernández, Cristalina; Grau, Javier; Navarro, José-Tomás; Fernández de Sevilla, Alberto; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Feliu, Evarist; Millá, Fuensanta

    2013-08-04

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have improved the management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, a significant proportion of patients do not achieve the optimal response or are resistant to TKI. ABL kinase domain mutations have been extensively implicated in the pathogenesis of TKI resistance. Treatment with second-generation TKI has produced high rates of hematologic and cytogenetic responses in mutated ABL patients. The aim of this study was to determine the type and frequency of ABL mutations in patients who were resistant to imatinib or had lost the response, and to analyze the effect of second-generation TKI on their outcome. The presence of ABL mutations in 45 CML patients resistant to imatinib was evaluated by direct sequencing and was correlated with the results of the cytogenetic study (performed in 39 cases). The outcome of these patients after therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib was analyzed. ABL mutations were detected in 14 out of 45 resistant patients. Patients with clonal cytogenetic evolution tended to develop mutations more frequently than those without clonal evolution. Nine out of the 15 patients with ABL mutation responded to a treatment switch to nilotinib (n=4), dasatinib (n=2), interferon (n=1) or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (n=2). The frequency of ABL mutations in CML patients resistant to imatinib is high and is more frequent among those with clonal cytogenetic evolution. The change to second-generation TKI can overcome imatinib resistance in most of the mutated patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. The resistance of Micrococcus radiodurans to killing and mutation by agents which damage DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, D.M.; Moseley, B.E.B.

    1976-01-01

    The resistance of Micrococcus radiodurans to the lethal and mutagenic action of ultraviolet (UV) light, ionising (γ) radiation, mitomycin C (MTC), nitrous acid (NA), hydroxylamine (HA), N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NG), ethylmethanesulphonate (EMS) and β-propiolactone (βPL) has been compared with that of Escherichia coli B/r. M. radiodurans was much more resistant than E. coli B/r to the lethal effects of UV light (by a factor of 33), γ-radiation (55), NG (15) and NA (62), showed intermediate resistance to MTC (4) and HA (7), but was sensitive to EMS (1) and βPL (2). M. radiodurans was very resistant to mutagens producing damage which can be repaired by a recombination system, indicating that it possesses an extremely efficient recombination repair mechanism. Both species were equally sensitive to mutation to trimethoprim resistance by NG, but M. radiodurans was more resistant than E. coli B/r to the other mutagens tested, being non-mutable by UV light, γ-radiation, MTC and HA, and only slightly sensitive to mutation by NA, EMS, and βPL. The resistance of M. radiodurans to mutation by UV light, γ-radiation and MTC is consistent with an hypothesis that recombination repair in M. radiodurans is accurate since these mutagens may depend on an 'error-prone' recombination system for their mutagenic effect in E. coli B/r. However, because M. radiodurans is also resistant to mutagens such as HA and EMS, which are mutagenic in E. coli in the absence of an 'error-prone' system, we propose that all the mutagens tested may have a common mode of action in E. coli B/r, but that this mutagenic pathway is missing in M. radiodurans

  6. Resistance of Micrococcus radiodurans to killing and mutation by agents which damage DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, D M; Moseley, B E.B. [Edinburgh Univ. (UK). School of Agriculture

    1976-02-01

    The resistance of Micrococcus radiodurans to the lethal and mutagenic action of ultraviolet (UV) light, ionising (..gamma..) radiation, mitomycin C (MTC), nitrous acid (NA), hydroxylamine (HA), N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NG), ethylmethanesulphonate (EMS) and ..beta..-propiolactone (..beta..PL) has been compared with that of Escherichia coli B/r. M. radiodurans was much more resistant than E. coli B/r to the lethal effects of UV light (by a factor of 33), ..gamma..-radiation (55), NG (15) and NA (62), showed intermediate resistance to MTC (4) and HA (7), but was sensitive to EMS (1) and ..beta..PL (2). M. radiodurans was very resistant to mutagens producing damage which can be repaired by a recombination system, indicating that it possesses an extremely efficient recombination repair mechanism. Both species were equally sensitive to mutation to trimethoprim resistance by NG, but M. radiodurans was more resistant than E. coli B/r to the other mutagens tested, being non-mutable by UV light, ..gamma..-radiation, MTC and HA, and only slightly sensitive to mutation by NA, EMS, and ..beta..PL. The resistance of M. radiodurans to mutation by UV light, ..gamma.. radiation and MTC is consistent with an hypothesis that recombination repair in M. radiodurans is accurate since these mutagens may depend on an 'error-prone' recombination system for their mutagenic effect in E. coli B/r. However, because M. radiodurans is also resistant to mutagens such as HA and EMS, which are mutagenic in E. coli in the absence of an 'error-prone' system, we propose that all the mutagens tested may have a common mode of action in E. coli B/r, but that this mutagenic pathway is missing in M. radiodurans.

  7. Missense mutations located in structural p53 DNA-binding motifs are associated with extremely poor survival in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trbusek, Martin; Smardova, Jana; Malcikova, Jitka; Sebejova, Ludmila; Dobes, Petr; Svitakova, Miluse; Vranova, Vladimira; Mraz, Marek; Francova, Hana Skuhrova; Doubek, Michael; Brychtova, Yvona; Kuglik, Petr; Pospisilova, Sarka; Mayer, Jiri

    2011-07-01

    There is a distinct connection between TP53 defects and poor prognosis in chronic lymphoc