WorldWideScience

Sample records for dna base lesions

  1. Fundamental study of the radiation monitoring system based on evaluation of DNA lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, K.; Matuo, Y.; Izumi, Y.; Ikeda, T.

    2011-01-01

    The biological dosemeter that measures biological responses to ionising radiation is useful for radiation protection. This paper presents the development and characterisation of a gamma ray irradiation dosimetry system based on real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) methodology. Real-time PCR is used to amplify and simultaneously quantify a targeted DNA molecule. If there are no limitations due to limiting substrates or reagents, at each extension step, the amount of DNA target is doubled, leading to exponential (geometric) amplification of the specific DNA fragment. The essential point of this assay is that DNA lesions caused by ionising radiation block DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase, resulting in a decrease in the amplification of a damaged DNA template compared with that of non-damaged DNA templates. (authors)

  2. Accumulation of premutagenic DNA lesions in mice defective in removal of oxidative base damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klungland, Arne; Rosewell, Ian; Hollenbach, Stephan; Larsen, Elisabeth; Daly, Graham; Epe, Bernd; Seeberg, Erling; Lindahl, Tomas; Barnes, Deborah E.

    1999-01-01

    DNA damage generated by oxidant byproducts of cellular metabolism has been proposed as a key factor in cancer and aging. Oxygen free radicals cause predominantly base damage in DNA, and the most frequent mutagenic base lesion is 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). This altered base can pair with A as well as C residues, leading to a greatly increased frequency of spontaneous G·C→T·A transversion mutations in repair-deficient bacterial and yeast cells. Eukaryotic cells use a specific DNA glycosylase, the product of the OGG1 gene, to excise 8-oxoG from DNA. To assess the role of the mammalian enzyme in repair of DNA damage and prevention of carcinogenesis, we have generated homozygous ogg1−/− null mice. These animals are viable but accumulate abnormal levels of 8-oxoG in their genomes. Despite this increase in potentially miscoding DNA lesions, OGG1-deficient mice exhibit only a moderately, but significantly, elevated spontaneous mutation rate in nonproliferative tissues, do not develop malignancies, and show no marked pathological changes. Extracts of ogg1 null mouse tissues cannot excise the damaged base, but there is significant slow removal in vivo from proliferating cells. These findings suggest that in the absence of the DNA glycosylase, and in apparent contrast to bacterial and yeast cells, an alternative repair pathway functions to minimize the effects of an increased load of 8-oxoG in the genome and maintain a low endogenous mutation frequency. PMID:10557315

  3. Base-pairing preferences, physicochemical properties and mutational behaviour of the DNA lesion 8-nitroguanine †

    OpenAIRE

    Bhamra, Inder; Compagnone-Post, Patricia; O’Neil, Ian A.; Iwanejko, Lesley A.; Bates, Andrew D.; Cosstick, Richard

    2012-01-01

    8-Nitro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-nitrodG) is a relatively unstable, mutagenic lesion of DNA that is increasingly believed to be associated with tissue inflammation. Due to the lability of the glycosidic bond, 8-nitrodG cannot be incorporated into oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) by chemical DNA synthesis and thus very little is known about its physicochemical properties and base-pairing preferences. Here we describe the synthesis of 8-nitro-2′-O-methylguanosine, a ribonucleoside analogue of this lesi...

  4. Base-pairing preferences, physicochemical properties and mutational behaviour of the DNA lesion 8-nitroguanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamra, Inder; Compagnone-Post, Patricia; O'Neil, Ian A; Iwanejko, Lesley A; Bates, Andrew D; Cosstick, Richard

    2012-11-01

    8-Nitro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-nitrodG) is a relatively unstable, mutagenic lesion of DNA that is increasingly believed to be associated with tissue inflammation. Due to the lability of the glycosidic bond, 8-nitrodG cannot be incorporated into oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) by chemical DNA synthesis and thus very little is known about its physicochemical properties and base-pairing preferences. Here we describe the synthesis of 8-nitro-2'-O-methylguanosine, a ribonucleoside analogue of this lesion, which is sufficiently stable to be incorporated into ODNs. Physicochemical studies demonstrated that 8-nitro-2'-O-methylguanosine adopts a syn conformation about the glycosidic bond; thermal melting studies and molecular modelling suggest a relatively stable syn-8-nitroG·anti-G base pair. Interestingly, when this lesion analogue was placed in a primer-template system, extension of the primer by either avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase (AMV-RT) or human DNA polymerase β (pol β), was significantly impaired, but where incorporation opposite 8-nitroguanine did occur, pol β showed a 2:1 preference to insert dA over dC, while AMV-RT incorporated predominantly dC. The fact that no 8-nitroG·G base pairing is seen in the primer extension products suggests that the polymerases may discriminate against this pairing system on the basis of its poor geometric match to a Watson-Crick pair.

  5. Base-pairing preferences, physicochemical properties and mutational behaviour of the DNA lesion 8-nitroguanine†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamra, Inder; Compagnone-Post, Patricia; O’Neil, Ian A.; Iwanejko, Lesley A.; Bates, Andrew D.; Cosstick, Richard

    2012-01-01

    8-Nitro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-nitrodG) is a relatively unstable, mutagenic lesion of DNA that is increasingly believed to be associated with tissue inflammation. Due to the lability of the glycosidic bond, 8-nitrodG cannot be incorporated into oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) by chemical DNA synthesis and thus very little is known about its physicochemical properties and base-pairing preferences. Here we describe the synthesis of 8-nitro-2′-O-methylguanosine, a ribonucleoside analogue of this lesion, which is sufficiently stable to be incorporated into ODNs. Physicochemical studies demonstrated that 8-nitro-2′-O-methylguanosine adopts a syn conformation about the glycosidic bond; thermal melting studies and molecular modelling suggest a relatively stable syn-8-nitroG·anti-G base pair. Interestingly, when this lesion analogue was placed in a primer-template system, extension of the primer by either avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase (AMV-RT) or human DNA polymerase β (pol β), was significantly impaired, but where incorporation opposite 8-nitroguanine did occur, pol β showed a 2:1 preference to insert dA over dC, while AMV-RT incorporated predominantly dC. The fact that no 8-nitroG·G base pairing is seen in the primer extension products suggests that the polymerases may discriminate against this pairing system on the basis of its poor geometric match to a Watson–Crick pair. PMID:22965127

  6. Direct assay of radiation-induced DNA base lesions in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Adenine (Ade), 2'-deoxyadenosine (dAdo), 5'-deoxyadenosine monophosphate (dAUT), single stranded poly adenylic acid [poly (dA)], double stranded deoxyadenylic-thymidylic acid [ds poly (dA-T)] and salmon testis DNA were irradiated with 500 Gy under oxic and anoxic conditions. The major damage products were analyzed by BPLC with optical detection and quantitated in terms of the percentage of the adenosine in each model compound found as a specific damage product. Outside of the Ade free base, 8-OH-dAdo was the major oxic damage product from each model compound. The type and quantity of the major damage products depended on the sequence and conformation of the model compounds under anoxic conditions. When dAdo and dAMP were irradiated under anoxic conditions, the major damage product was either the R or S isomer of 8,5'cdAdo and little Ade or α-dAdo was observed. However, when poly(dA), poly(dA-dT), and salmon testis DNA were γ-irradiated under nitrogen, the major deoxyadenosine damage product was identified as the α-anomer of deoxyadenosine. No α-deoxyadenosine was detected after irradiation under oxic conditions. The presence of nucleotides with the α-configuration at the anomeric carbon atom in the DNA chain may have a significant effect on its tertiary structure and possibly modify its biological activity

  7. Nucleotide Excision Repair Lesion-Recognition Protein Rad4 Captures a Pre-Flipped Partner Base in a Benzo[a]pyrene-Derived DNA Lesion: How Structure Impacts the Binding Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Hong; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Min, Jung-Hyun; Zhang, Yingkai; Broyde, Suse

    2017-06-19

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C protein complex (XPC) recognizes a variety of environmentally induced DNA lesions and is the key in initiating their repair by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. When bound to a lesion, XPC flips two nucleotide pairs that include the lesion out of the DNA duplex, yielding a productively bound complex that can lead to successful lesion excision. Interestingly, the efficiencies of NER vary greatly among different lesions, influencing their toxicity and mutagenicity in cells. Though differences in XPC binding may influence NER efficiency, it is not understood whether XPC utilizes different mechanisms to achieve productive binding with different lesions. Here, we investigated the well-repaired 10R-(+)-cis-anti-benzo[a]pyrene-N 2 -dG (cis-B[a]P-dG) DNA adduct in a duplex containing normal partner C opposite the lesion. This adduct is derived from the environmental pro-carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene and is likely to be encountered by NER in the cell. We have extensively investigated its binding to the yeast XPC orthologue, Rad4, using umbrella sampling with restrained molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. The NMR solution structure of this lesion in duplex DNA has shown that the dC complementary to the adducted dG is flipped out of the DNA duplex in the absence of XPC. However, it is not known whether the "pre-flipped" base would play a role in its recognition by XPC. Our results show that Rad4 first captures the displaced dC, which is followed by a tightly coupled lesion-extruding pathway for productive binding. This binding path differs significantly from the one deduced for the small cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesion opposite mismatched thymines [ Mu , H. , ( 2015 ) Biochemistry , 54 ( 34 ), 5263 - 7 ]. The possibility of multiple paths that lead to productive binding to XPC is consistent with the versatile lesion recognition by XPC that is required for successful NER.

  8. i-Motif of cytosine-rich human telomere DNA fragments containing natural base lesions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořáková, Zuzana; Renčiuk, Daniel; Kejnovská, Iva; Školáková, Petra; Bednářová, Klára; Sagi, J.; Vorlíčková, Michaela

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 4 (2018), s. 1624-1634 ISSN 1362-4962 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-06785S; GA ČR GA17-12075S; GA ČR(CZ) GJ17-19170Y; GA MŠk EF15_003/0000477 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : pair opening kinetics * g-quadruplex dna Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology

  9. Immunological probes for lesions and repoair patches in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leadon, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes two immunological approaches for the detection of DNA damage and its repair. The first uses a monoclonal antibody to directly measure the production and removal of one type of oxidized base, thymine glycol; the second uses an antibody to detect the repair synthesis event itself and, when combined with the use of molecular biological techniques, can be used to monitor the production and removal of lesions in specific sequences within the genome

  10. From DNA lesions to tissue malfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denekamp, J.

    1989-01-01

    After large doses of radiation, tissues fail to function when the proliferating cells lose their clonogenic ability. This results from unrepaired or misrepaired double strand breaks in the DNA. The lesions are inflicted immediately but there is a variable latent period before tissue damage is expressed. This ranges from a few days in intestine, to weeks in skin, and to months or years in deep visceral tissues, e.g. heart, lung, kidney, spinal cord. The latency relates to the proliferation kinetics of each tissue component. Doses of 10-30 Gy do not cause serious functional defects in differentiated cells, but they prevent successful mitosis in proliferating cells. Thus each tissue continues to function until its differentiated cells are lost by normal wear and tear processes. After a time which relates to the natural lifespan of the differentiated cells, failure to provide replacement cells from the proliferating compartment becomes important and the tissue shows atrophy and eventually a functional deficit. If the radiation exposure is divided into a series of smaller exposures or is given at a low dose-rate, the biochemical repair of DNA is more effective and less damage is observed. After high LET ionizing radiation, e.g. neutrons or α particles, the response is almost linear and is not affected by doserate or fractionation. (author)

  11. Correlation of bistranded clustered abasic DNA lesion processing with structural and dynamic DNA helix distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignon, Emmanuelle; Gattuso, Hugo; Morell, Christophe; Dehez, François; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Monari, Antonio; Dumont, Elise

    2016-01-01

    Clustered apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP; abasic) DNA lesions produced by ionizing radiation are by far more cytotoxic than isolated AP lesion entities. The structure and dynamics of a series of seven 23-bp oligonucleotides featuring simple bistranded clustered damage sites, comprising of two AP sites, zero, one, three or five bases 3′ or 5′ apart from each other, were investigated through 400 ns explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. They provide representative structures of synthetically engineered multiply damage sites-containing oligonucleotides whose repair was investigated experimentally (Nucl. Acids Res. 2004, 32:5609-5620; Nucl. Acids Res. 2002, 30: 2800–2808). The inspection of extrahelical positioning of the AP sites, bulge and non Watson–Crick hydrogen bonding corroborates the experimental measurements of repair efficiencies by bacterial or human AP endonucleases Nfo and APE1, respectively. This study provides unprecedented knowledge into the structure and dynamics of clustered abasic DNA lesions, notably rationalizing the non-symmetry with respect to 3′ to 5′ position. In addition, it provides strong mechanistic insights and basis for future studies on the effects of clustered DNA damage on the recognition and processing of these lesions by bacterial or human DNA repair enzymes specialized in the processing of such lesions. PMID:27587587

  12. Clustered DNA lesion repair in eukaryotes: Relevance to mutagenesis and cell survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sage, Evelyne [Institut Curie, Bat. 110, Centre Universitaire, 91405 Orsay (France); CNRS UMR3348, Bat. 110, Centre Universitaire, 91405 Orsay (France); Harrison, Lynn, E-mail: lclary@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, LSUHSC-S, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA 71130 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    A clustered DNA lesion, also known as a multiply damaged site, is defined as {>=}2 damages in the DNA within 1-2 helical turns. Only ionizing radiation and certain chemicals introduce DNA damage in the genome in this non-random way. What is now clear is that the lethality of a damaging agent is not just related to the types of DNA lesions introduced, but also to how the damage is distributed in the DNA. Clustered DNA lesions were first hypothesized to exist in the 1990s, and work has progressed where these complex lesions have been characterized and measured in irradiated as well as in non-irradiated cells. A clustered lesion can consist of single as well as double strand breaks, base damage and abasic sites, and the damages can be situated on the same strand or opposing strands. They include tandem lesions, double strand break (DSB) clusters and non-DSB clusters, and base excision repair as well as the DSB repair pathways can be required to remove these complex lesions. Due to the plethora of oxidative damage induced by ionizing radiation, and the repair proteins involved in their removal from the DNA, it has been necessary to study how repair systems handle these lesions using synthetic DNA damage. This review focuses on the repair process and mutagenic consequences of clustered lesions in yeast and mammalian cells. By examining the studies on synthetic clustered lesions, and the effects of low vs high LET radiation on mammalian cells or tissues, it is possible to extrapolate the potential biological relevance of these clustered lesions to the killing of tumor cells by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and to the risk of cancer in non-tumor cells, and this will be discussed.

  13. The (6-4) Dimeric Lesion as a DNA Photosensitizer

    OpenAIRE

    Vendrell Criado, Victoria; Rodríguez Muñiz, Gemma María; Lhiaubet ., Virginie Lyria; Cuquerella Alabort, Maria Consuelo; Miranda Alonso, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Based on our previous investigations into the photophysical properties of the 5-methyl-2-pyrimidone (Pyo) chromophore, we now extend our studies to the photobehavior of the dimeric (6-4) thymine photoproducts (6-4 PP) to evaluate their capability to act as instrinsic DNA photosensitizers. The lesion presents significant absorption in the UVB/UVA region, weak fluorescence emission, a singlet-excited-state energy of approximately 351 kJ mol(-1), and a triplet-excited-state energy of 297 kJ...

  14. Spontaneous mutation by mutagenic repair of spontaneous lesions in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, P.J.; Quah, S.-K.; Borstel, R.C. von

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that strains of yeast carrying mutations in many of the steps in pathways repairing radiation-induced damage to DNA have enhanced spontaneous mutation rates. Most strains isolated because they have enhanced spontaneous mutation carry mutations in DNA repair systems. This suggests that much spontaneous mutation arises by mutagenic repair of spontaneous lesions. (author)

  15. Archaeal RNA polymerase arrests transcription at DNA lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Alexandra M; Santangelo, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Transcription elongation is not uniform and transcription is often hindered by protein-bound factors or DNA lesions that limit translocation and impair catalysis. Despite the high degree of sequence and structural homology of the multi-subunit RNA polymerases (RNAP), substantial differences in response to DNA lesions have been reported. Archaea encode only a single RNAP with striking structural conservation with eukaryotic RNAP II (Pol II). Here, we demonstrate that the archaeal RNAP from Thermococcus kodakarensis is sensitive to a variety of DNA lesions that pause and arrest RNAP at or adjacent to the site of DNA damage. DNA damage only halts elongation when present in the template strand, and the damage often results in RNAP arresting such that the lesion would be encapsulated with the transcription elongation complex. The strand-specific halt to archaeal transcription elongation on modified templates is supportive of RNAP recognizing DNA damage and potentially initiating DNA repair through a process akin to the well-described transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) pathways in Bacteria and Eukarya.

  16. The (6-4) Dimeric Lesion as a DNA Photosensitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrell-Criado, Victoria; Rodríguez-Muñiz, Gemma M; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie; Cuquerella, M Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A

    2016-07-04

    Based on our previous investigations into the photophysical properties of the 5-methyl-2-pyrimidone (Pyo) chromophore, we now extend our studies to the photobehavior of the dimeric (6-4) thymine photoproducts (6-4 PP) to evaluate their capability to act as instrinsic DNA photosensitizers. The lesion presents significant absorption in the UVB/UVA region, weak fluorescence emission, a singlet-excited-state energy of approximately 351 kJ mol(-1) , and a triplet-excited-state energy of 297 kJ mol(-1) . Its triplet transient absorption has a maximum at 420-440 nm, a lifetime of around 7 μs, and a high formation quantum yield, ΦISC =0.86. This species is efficiently quenched by thymidine. Its DNA photosensitizing properties are demonstrated by a series of experiments run on a pBR322 plasmid. The lesion photoinduces both single-strand breaks and the formation of cyclobutane thymine dimers. Altogether, these results show that, the substitution of the pyrimidone ring at C4 by a 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymine does not cancel out the photosensitization properties of the chromophore. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. DNA Damage by Ionizing Radiation: Tandem Double Lesions by Charged Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Wang, Dunyou; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation are the source of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, damage to the central nervous system, lowering of the immune response, as well as other radiation-induced damages to human health. Monte Carlo track simulations and kinetic modeling of radiation damages to the DNA employ available molecular and cellular data to simulate the biological effect of high and low LET radiation io the DNA. While the simulations predict single and double strand breaks and base damages, so far all complex lesions are the result of stochastic coincidence from independent processes. Tandem double lesions have not yet been taken into account. Unlike the standard double lesions that are produced by two separate attacks by charged particles or radicals, tandem double lesions are produced by one single attack. The standard double lesions dominate at the high dosage regime. On the other hand, tandem double lesions do not depend on stochastic coincidences and become important at the low dosage regime of particular interest to NASA. Tandem double lesions by hydroxyl radical attack of guanine in isolated DNA have been reported at a dosage of radiation as low as 10 Gy. The formation of two tandem base lesions was found to be linear with the applied doses, a characteristic of tandem lesions. However, tandem double lesions from attack by a charged particle have not been reported.

  18. Chemical repair activity of free radical scavenger edaravone. Reduction reactions with dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts and suppression of base lesions and AP sites on irradiated plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Kuniki; Katsumura, Yosuke; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Lin Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Fu Haiying

    2015-01-01

    Reactions of edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) with deoxyguanosine monophosphate (dGMP) hydroxyl radical adducts were investigated by pulse radiolysis technique. Edaravone was found to reduce the dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts through electron transfer reactions. The rate constants of the reactions were greater than 4 × 10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 and similar to those of the reactions of ascorbic acid, which is a representative antioxidant. Yields of single-strand breaks, base lesions, and abasic sites produced in pUC18 plasmid DNA by gamma ray irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10–1000 μmol dm -3 ) of edaravone were also quantified, and the chemical repair activity of edaravone was estimated by a method recently developed by the authors. By comparing suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, it was found that base lesions and abasic sites were suppressed by the chemical repair activity of edaravone, although the suppression of single-strand breaks was not very effective. This phenomenon was attributed to the chemical repair activity of edaravone toward base lesions and abasic sites. However, the chemical repair activity of edaravone for base lesions was lower than that of ascorbic acid. (author)

  19. Chemical repair activity of free radical scavenger edaravone: reduction reactions with dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts and suppression of base lesions and AP sites on irradiated plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Kuniki; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Lin, Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Fu, Haiying; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2015-01-01

    Reactions of edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) with deoxyguanosine monophosphate (dGMP) hydroxyl radical adducts were investigated by pulse radiolysis technique. Edaravone was found to reduce the dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts through electron transfer reactions. The rate constants of the reactions were greater than 4 × 10(8) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) and similar to those of the reactions of ascorbic acid, which is a representative antioxidant. Yields of single-strand breaks, base lesions, and abasic sites produced in pUC18 plasmid DNA by gamma ray irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10-1000 μmol dm(-3)) of edaravone were also quantified, and the chemical repair activity of edaravone was estimated by a method recently developed by the authors. By comparing suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, it was found that base lesions and abasic sites were suppressed by the chemical repair activity of edaravone, although the suppression of single-strand breaks was not very effective. This phenomenon was attributed to the chemical repair activity of edaravone toward base lesions and abasic sites. However, the chemical repair activity of edaravone for base lesions was lower than that of ascorbic acid. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  20. DNA Adducts aand Human Atherosclerotis Lesions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strejc, Přemysl; Boubelík, O.; Stávková, Zdena; Chvátalová, Irena; Šrám, Radim

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 42, - (2001), s. 662 ISSN 0008-5472. [Annual Meeting of Proceedings /92./. 24.03.2001-28.03.2001, New Orleans] R&D Projects: GA MZd NM10 Keywords : DNA adducts * LDL cholesterol Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality

  1. Stalled repair of lesions when present within a clustered DNA damage site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomax, M.E.; Cunniffe, S.; O'Neill, P.

    2003-01-01

    Ionising radiation produces clustered DNA damages (two or more lesions within one or two helical turns of the DNA) which could challenge the repair mechanism(s) of the cell. Using purified base excision repair (BER) enzymes and synthetic oligonucleotides a number of recent studies have established the excision of a lesion within clustered damage sites is compromised. Evidence will be presented that the efficiency of repair of lesions within a clustered DNA damage site is reduced, relative to that of the isolated lesions, since the lifetime of both lesions is extended by up to four fold. Simple clustered damage sites, comprised of single-strand breaks, abasic sites and base damages, one or five bases 3' or 5' to each other, were synthesised in oligonucleotides and repair carried out in mammalian cell nuclear extracts. The rate of repair of the single-strand break/abasic site within these clustered damage sites is reduced, mainly due to inhibition of the DNA ligase. The mechanism of repair of the single-strand break/abasic site shows some asymmetry. Repair appears to be by the short-patch BER pathway when the lesions are 5' to each other. In contrast, when the lesions are 3' to each other repair appears to proceed along the long-patch BER pathway. The lesions within the cluster are processed sequentially, the single-strand break/abasic site being repaired before excision of 8-oxoG, limiting the formation of double-strand breaks to <2%. Stalled processing of clustered DNA damage extends the lifetime of the lesions to an extent that could have biological consequences, e.g. if the lesions are still present during transcription and/or at replication mutations could arise

  2. Modification of radiation-induced DNA lesions by oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyn, R.E.; Jenkins, W.T.

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of DNA strand break production by radiation under aerated and hypoxic conditions was determined in CHO cells using the technique of alkaline elution. The resulting oxygen enhancement ratio was surprisingly high, 7.8. When the pH of the elution was increased from 12.1, the normally used pH, to 12.8, a substantial increase in the strand breaks produced in the hypoxic cells was observed, resulting in an OER of 4.8. This difference in susceptibility of DNA strand break detection as a function of pH suggested a difference in the type of lesions produced in DNA when irradiated under aerated and hypoxic conditions. Further experiments to examine the DNA-protein crosslinks produced by radiation suggested that the apparent lower level of strand breaks in hypoxic cells may be due to a higher level of DNA-protein crosslinks produced under hypoxic conditions. Thus, oxygen may not only act by modifying the quantity of radiation-induced DNA lesions but may also cause qualitative changes. If the different types of DNA lesions have different contributions to lethality, the OER for cell survival may represent a complex composite of these changes at the molecular level

  3. Effect of radiomodifying agents on the ratios of X-ray-induced lesions in cellular DNA: use in lethal lesion determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, I.R.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of three radiomodifying agents, cysteamine, hyperthermia, and hypoxia, on the induction of the major classes of X-ray-induced DNA lesions, was studied using mouse L cells and Chinese hamster V79 cells. The use of filter elution techniques allowed most of these studies to be conducted at X-ray doses within the survival-curve range. Cysteamine was found to protect against DNA single-strand breakage (ssb), DNA base damage, and DNA-protein crosslinkage. Hyperthermia had no effect on the level of DNA ssb or DNA base damage, but in L cells (but not in V79 cells) it increased the level of DNA-protein crosslinkage relative to DNA ssb. Hypoxia protected against DNA ssb, had no significant effect on the level of DNA base damage, and enhanced the level of DNA-protein crosslinkage relative to DNA ssb. These results support the previous suggestion that the X-ray-induced lethal lesion is DNA double-strand breakage. Implications of these findings for the mechanisms of formation of X-ray-induced DNA lesions are also discussed. (author)

  4. UVA photoactivation of DNA containing halogenated thiopyrimidines induces cytotoxic DNA lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brem, Reto; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Yao-Zhong; Karran, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Photochemotherapy, the combination of a photosensitiser and ultraviolet (UV) or visible light, is an effective treatment for skin conditions including cancer. The high mutagenicity and non-selectivity of photochemotherapy regimes warrants the development of alternative approaches. We demonstrate that the thiopyrimidine nucleosides 5-bromo-4-thiodeoxyuridine (SBrdU) and 5-iodo-4-thiodeoxyuridine (SIdU) are incorporated into the DNA of cultured human and mouse cells where they synergistically sensitise killing by low doses of UVA radiation. The DNA halothiopyrimidine/UVA combinations induce DNA interstrand crosslinks, DNA-protein crosslinks, DNA strand breaks, nucleobase damage and lesions that resemble UV-induced pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproducts. These are potentially lethal DNA lesions and cells defective in their repair are hypersensitive to killing by SBrdU/UVA and SIdU/UVA. DNA SIdU and SBrdU generate lethal DNA photodamage by partially distinct mechanisms that reflect the different photolabilities of their C–I and C–Br bonds. Although singlet oxygen is involved in photolesion formation, DNA SBrdU and SIdU photoactivation does not detectably increase DNA 8-oxoguanine levels. The absence of significant collateral damage to normal guanine suggests that UVA activation of DNA SIdU or SBrdU might offer a strategy to target hyperproliferative skin conditions that avoids the extensive formation of a known mutagenic DNA lesion. PMID:25747491

  5. Theoretical approach of complex DNA lesions: from formation to repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bignon, Emmanuelle

    2017-01-01

    This thesis work is focused on the theoretical modelling of DNA damages, from formation to repair. Several projects have been led in this framework, which can be sorted into three different parts. One on hand, we studied complex DNA reactivity. It included a study about 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-guanine (8oxoG) mechanisms of formation, a project concerning the UV-induced pyrimidine 6-4 pyrimidone (6-4PP) endogenous photo-sensitizer features, and another one about DNA photo-sensitization by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (i.e. ketoprofen and ibuprofen). On the other hand, we investigated mechanical properties of damaged DNA. The structural signature of a DNA lesion is of major importance for their repair, unfortunately only few NMR and X-ray structures of such systems are available. In order to gain insights into their dynamical structure, we investigated a series of complex damages: clustered abasic sites, interstrand cross-links, and the 6-4PP photo-lesion. Likewise, we studied the interaction modes DNA with several polyamines, which are well known to interact with the double helix, but also with the perspective to model DNA-protein cross-linking. The third part concerned the study of DNA interactions with repair enzymes. In line with the structural study about clustered abasic sites, we investigated the dynamics of the same system, but this time interacting with the APE1 endonuclease. We also studied interactions between the Fpg glycosylase with an oligonucleotides containing tandem 8-oxoG on one hand and 8-oxoG - abasic site as multiply damaged sites. Thus, we shed new lights on damaged DNA reactivity, structure and repair, which provides perspectives for biomedicine and life's mechanisms understanding as we begin to describe nucleosomal DNA. (author)

  6. Increased sensitivity of DNA damage response-deficient cells to stimulated microgravity-induced DNA lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Li

    Full Text Available Microgravity is a major stress factor that astronauts have to face in space. In the past, the effects of microgravity on genomic DNA damage were studied, and it seems that the effect on genomic DNA depends on cell types and the length of exposure time to microgravity or simulated microgravity (SMG. In this study we used mouse embryonic stem (MES and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF cells to assess the effects of SMG on DNA lesions. To acquire the insight into potential mechanisms by which cells resist and/or adapt to SMG, we also included Rad9-deleted MES and Mdc1-deleted MEF cells in addition to wild type cells in this study. We observed significant SMG-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in Rad9-/- MES and Mdc1-/- MEF cells but not in their corresponding wild type cells. A similar pattern of DNA single strand break or modifications was also observed in Rad9-/- MES. As the exposure to SMG was prolonged, Rad9-/- MES cells adapted to the SMG disturbance by reducing the induced DNA lesions. The induced DNA lesions in Rad9-/- MES were due to SMG-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS. Interestingly, Mdc1-/- MEF cells were only partially adapted to the SMG disturbance. That is, the induced DNA lesions were reduced over time, but did not return to the control level while ROS returned to a control level. In addition, ROS was only partially responsible for the induced DNA lesions in Mdc1-/- MEF cells. Taken together, these data suggest that SMG is a weak genomic DNA stress and can aggravate genomic instability in cells with DNA damage response (DDR defects.

  7. Disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis diagnosis based on oral lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Preto Webber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM is a deep mycosis with primary lung manifestations that may present cutaneous and oral lesions. Oral lesions mimic other infectious diseases or even squamous cell carcinoma, clinically and microscopically. Sometimes, the dentist is the first to detect the disease, because lung lesions are asymptomatic, or even misdiagnosed. An unusual case of PCM with 5 months of evolution presenting pulmonary, oral, and cutaneous lesions that was diagnosed by the dentist based on oral lesions is presented and discussed.

  8. Recombinational DNA repair is regulated by compartmentalization of DNA lesions at the nuclear pore complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Géli, Vincent; Lisby, Michael

    2015-01-01

    and colleagues shows that also physiological threats to genome integrity such as DNA secondary structure-forming triplet repeat sequences relocalize to the NPC during DNA replication. Mutants that fail to reposition the triplet repeat locus to the NPC cause repeat instability. Here, we review the types of DNA...... lesions that relocalize to the NPC, the putative mechanisms of relocalization, and the types of recombinational repair that are stimulated by the NPC, and present a model for NPC-facilitated repair....

  9. Clustered DNA lesions containing 5-formyluracil and AP site: repair via the BER system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A Belousova

    Full Text Available Lesions in the DNA arise under ionizing irradiation conditions or various chemical oxidants as a single damage or as part of a multiply damaged site within 1-2 helical turns (clustered lesion. Here, we explored the repair opportunity of the apurinic/apyrimidinic site (AP site composed of the clustered lesion with 5-formyluracil (5-foU by the base excision repair (BER proteins. We found, that if the AP site is shifted relative to the 5-foU of the opposite strand, it could be repaired primarily via the short-patch BER pathway. In this case, the cleavage efficiency of the AP site-containing DNA strand catalyzed by human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (hAPE1 decreased under AP site excursion to the 3'-side relative to the lesion in the other DNA strand. DNA synthesis catalyzed by DNA polymerase lambda was more accurate in comparison to the one catalyzed by DNA polymerase beta. If the AP site was located exactly opposite 5-foU it was expected to switch the repair to the long-patch BER pathway. In this situation, human processivity factor hPCNA stimulates the process.

  10. Miscoding and mutagenic properties of 8-oxoguanine and abasic sites: Ubiquitous lesions in damaged DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grollman, A.P.; Takeshita, Masaru

    1995-01-01

    More than twenty oxidatively-damaged bases, including 8-oxoguanine, have been found to occur in genomic DNA. Some of these lesions block DNA replication and are potentially lethal; others generate mutations which can initiate carcinogenesis and promote cellular aging. In this report, the authors focus attention on the mutagenicity and repair of 8-oxoguanine. Kasai and Nishimura's discovery that hydroxyl radicals react with guanine residues in DNA to form 8-oxoguanine and the development of sensitive methods for the detection and quantitation of this modified base led to the observation that approximately 1 in 10 5 guanine residues in mammalian DNA are oxidized at the C-8 position. DNA containing 8-oxoguanine and synthetic analogs of the abasic site have been used to investigate the miscoding and mutagenic potential of these ubiquitous lesions. Studies in the laboratory were facilitated by the development of solid state synthetic methods by which these lesions could be introduced at defined positions in DNA. In this paper, the authors review studies in which 8-oxoguanine and abasic sites have been used in model systems to explore various early events in the replication of selectively damaged DNA

  11. Processing of free radical damaged DNA bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, S.

    2003-01-01

    Free radicals produced during the radiolysis of water gives rise to a plethora of DNA damages including single strand breaks, sites of base loss and a wide variety of purine and pyrimidine base lesions. All these damages are processed in cells by base excision repair. The oxidative DNA glycosylases which catalyze the first step in the removal of a base damage during base excision repair evolved primarily to protect the cells from the deleterious mutagenic effects of single free radical-induced DNA lesions arising during oxidative metabolism. This is evidenced by the high spontaneous mutation rate in bacterial mutants lacking the oxidative DNA glycosylases. However, when a low LET photon transverses the DNA molecule, a burst of free radicals is produced during the radiolysis of water that leads to the formation of clustered damages in the DNA molecule, that are recognized by the oxidative DNA glycosylases. When substrates containing two closely opposed sugar damages or base and sugar damages are incubated with the oxidative DNA glycosylases in vitro, one strand is readily incised by the lyase activity of the DNA glycosylase. Whether or not the second strand is incised depends on the distance between the strand break resulting from the incised first strand and the remaining DNA lesion on the other strand. If the lesions are more than two or three base pairs apart, the second strand is readily cleaved by the DNA glycosylase, giving rise to a double strand break. Even if the entire base excision repair system is reconstituted in vitro, whether or not a double strand break ensues depends solely upon the ability of the DNA glycosylase to cleave the second strand. These data predicted that cells deficient in the oxidative DNA glycosylases would be radioresistant while those that overproduce an oxidative DNA glycosylase would be radiosensitive. This prediction was indeed borne in Escherichia coli that is, mutants lacking the oxidative DNA glycosylases are radioresistant

  12. Circulating mitochondrial DNA as biomarker linking environmental chemical exposure to early preclinical lesions elevation of mtDNA in human serum after exposure to carcinogenic halo-alkane-based pesticides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lygia T Budnik

    Full Text Available There is a need for a panel of suitable biomarkers for detection of environmental chemical exposure leading to the initiation or progression of degenerative diseases or potentially, to cancer. As the peripheral blood may contain increased levels of circulating cell-free DNA in diseased individuals, we aimed to evaluate this DNA as effect biomarker recognizing vulnerability after exposure to environmental chemicals. We recruited 164 individuals presumably exposed to halo-alkane-based pesticides. Exposure evaluation was based on human biomonitoring analysis; as biomarker of exposure parent halo-methanes, -ethanes and their metabolites, as well as the hemoglobin-adducts methyl valine and hydroxyl ethyl valine in blood were used, complemented by expert evaluation of exposure and clinical intoxication symptoms as well as a questionnaire. Assessment showed exposures to halo alkanes in the concentration range being higher than non-cancer reference doses (RfD but (mostly lower than the occupational exposure limits. We quantified circulating DNA in serum from 86 individuals with confirmed exposure to off-gassing halo-alkane pesticides (in storage facilities or in home environment and 30 non-exposed controls, and found that exposure was significantly associated with elevated serum levels of circulating mitochondrial DNA (in size of 79 bp, mtDNA-79, p = 0.0001. The decreased integrity of mtDNA (mtDNA-230/mtDNA-79 in exposed individuals implicates apoptotic processes (p = 0.015. The relative amounts of mtDNA-79 in serum were positively associated with the lag-time after intoxication to these chemicals (r = 0.99, p<0.0001. Several months of post-exposure the specificity of this biomarker increased from 30% to 97% in patients with intoxication symptoms. Our findings indicate that mitochondrial DNA has a potential to serve as a biomarker recognizing vulnerable risk groups after exposure to toxic/carcinogenic chemicals.

  13. Inducible DNA-repair systems in yeast: competition for lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchel, R E; Morrison, D P

    1987-03-01

    DNA lesions may be recognized and repaired by more than one DNA-repair process. If two repair systems with different error frequencies have overlapping lesion specificity and one or both is inducible, the resulting variable competition for the lesions can change the biological consequences of these lesions. This concept was demonstrated by observing mutation in yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) exposed to combinations of mutagens under conditions which influenced the induction of error-free recombinational repair or error-prone repair. Total mutation frequency was reduced in a manner proportional to the dose of 60Co-gamma- or 254 nm UV radiation delivered prior to or subsequent to an MNNG exposure. Suppression was greater per unit radiation dose in cells gamma-irradiated in O2 as compared to N2. A rad3 (excision-repair) mutant gave results similar to wild-type but mutation in a rad52 (rec-) mutant exposed to MNNG was not suppressed by radiation. Protein-synthesis inhibition with heat shock or cycloheximide indicated that it was the mutation due to MNNG and not that due to radiation which had changed. These results indicate that MNNG lesions are recognized by both the recombinational repair system and the inducible error-prone system, but that gamma-radiation induction of error-free recombinational repair resulted in increased competition for the lesions, thereby reducing mutation. Similarly, gamma-radiation exposure resulted in a radiation dose-dependent reduction in mutation due to MNU, EMS, ENU and 8-MOP + UVA, but no reduction in mutation due to MMS. These results suggest that the number of mutational MMS lesions recognizable by the recombinational repair system must be very small relative to those produced by the other agents. MNNG induction of the inducible error-prone systems however, did not alter mutation frequencies due to ENU or MMS exposure but, in contrast to radiation, increased the mutagenic effectiveness of EMS. These experiments demonstrate

  14. Direct assays of radiation-induced DNA base lesions in mammalian cells: Technical progress report, July 1, 1986--December 1, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, K.T. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Our cesium irradiator was installed in April 1987 and has the capability of irradiating DNA solutions, cells and animals at dose rates from >60 Gy/min to <10/sup /minus/2/ Gy/min. By early summer all of the dosimetry and set-ups were established to perform this research. In may 1987, Dr. Krystyna Lesiak left to return to the National Institutes of Health. However, she has remained a collaborator over the past 1/1/2/ years. She has synthesized a large lot of α-deoxyadenosine, isolated a large batch of both the R and S isomer of cyclodeoxyadenosine and has capped the α-deoxyadenonsine for use in a DNA synthesizer that uses phosphoramidite chemistry. In November 1987, Dr. Andrzej Surowiec joined our unit as a Visiting Research Assistant Professor. Dr. Surowiec has a MS degree in electrical engineering and did his Ph.D. in Biophysics studying the conductivity of DNA in dilute solution. He has been performing the helix-coil transition experiments. In November 1987, Dr. Steven Swarts also joined our unit as a Postdoctoral Fellow. He received his Ph.D. from Oakland University under Dr. Michael Sevilla with whom we have a collaboration studying the induction of base damage in hydrated DNA. Dr. Swarts has a strong background in spectroscopy and, therefore, was a key individual for determination of the limitations of the HPLC assays and the establishment of a GC/MS capability equivalent to Dr. M. Dizdaroglu at the National Bureau of Standards. 9 refs., 1 tab

  15. Enhanced base excision repair capacity in carotid atherosclerosis may protect nuclear DNA but not mitochondrial DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarpengland, Tonje; B. Dahl, Tuva; Skjelland, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Lesional and systemic oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, potentially leading to accumulation of DNA base lesions within atherosclerotic plaques. Although base excision repair (BER) is a major pathway counteracting oxidative DNA damage, our knowledge on BER...

  16. DNA radio-induced tandem lesions: formation, introduction in oligonucleotides and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdat, Anne-Gaelle

    2000-01-01

    Cell killing induced by excited photosensitizers, ionizing radiation or radiomimetic drugs can not be only explained by the formation of single DNA lesions. Thus, multiply damaged sites, are likely to have harmful biological consequences. One example of tandem base damage induced by ".OH radical in X-irradiated aqueous solution of DNA oligomers is N-(2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-formyl-amine (dβF)/8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo). In order to investigate the biological significance of such a tandem lesion, both 8-oxodGuo and dβF were introduced in synthetic oligonucleotides at vicinal positions using the solid phase phosphoramidite method with the 'Pac phosphoramidite' chemistry. The purity of the synthetic DNA fragments and the integrity of modified nucleosides was confirmed using different complementary techniques: HPLC, PAGE, ESI MS, MALDI-TOF MS and capillary electrophoresis. Using the above synthetic substrates, investigations were carried out in order to determine the substrate specificity and the excision mechanism of three glycosylases involved in the base excision repair pathway: endonuclease III, Fpg and yOggl. Both tandem lesions were substrates for the BER enzymes. However, the tandem lesion are not completely excised by the repair enzymes. The rates of excision as inferred from the determination of the ratios of Vm/Km Michaelis kinetics constants were not found to be significantly affected by the presence of the tandem lesions. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was used in order to gain insights into mechanistic aspects of oligonucleotide cleavage by the BER enzymes. During in vitro DNA synthesis by Taq DNA polymerase, Klenow fragment exo- and DNA polymerase β, tandem base damage were found to block the progression of the enzymes. Finally, the level of tandem base damage in the DNA exposed to γ-ray using the liquid chromatography coupled to electro-spray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was determined. Both dβF-8-oxodGuo and 8

  17. DNA repair is responsible for the presence of oxidatively damaged DNA lesions in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, Marcus S.; Evans, Mark D.; Dove, Rosamund; Rozalski, Rafal; Gackowski, Daniel; Siomek, Agnieszka; Lunec, Joseph; Olinski, Ryszard

    2005-01-01

    The repair of oxidatively damaged DNA is integral to the maintenance of genomic stability, and hence prevention of a wide variety of pathological conditions, such as aging, cancer and cardiovascular disease. The ability to non-invasively assess DNA repair may provide information regarding repair pathways, variability in repair capacity, and susceptibility to disease. The development of assays to measure urinary DNA lesions offered this potential, although it rapidly became clear that possible contribution from diet and cell turnover may influence urinary lesion levels. Whilst early studies attempted to address these issues, up until now, much of the data appears conflicting. However, recent work from our laboratories, in which human volunteers were fed highly oxidatively modified 15 N-labelled DNA demonstrates that diet does not appear to contribute to urinary levels of 8-hydroxyguanine and 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine. Furthermore, we propose that a number of literature reports form an argument against a contribution from cell death. Indeed we, and others, have presented evidence, which strongly suggests the involvement of cell death to be minimal. Taken together, these data would appear to rule out various confounding factors, leaving DNA repair pathways as the principal source of urinary purine, if not DNA, lesions enabling such measurements to be used as indicators of repair

  18. DNA-based machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fuan; Willner, Bilha; Willner, Itamar

    2014-01-01

    The base sequence in nucleic acids encodes substantial structural and functional information into the biopolymer. This encoded information provides the basis for the tailoring and assembly of DNA machines. A DNA machine is defined as a molecular device that exhibits the following fundamental features. (1) It performs a fuel-driven mechanical process that mimics macroscopic machines. (2) The mechanical process requires an energy input, "fuel." (3) The mechanical operation is accompanied by an energy consumption process that leads to "waste products." (4) The cyclic operation of the DNA devices, involves the use of "fuel" and "anti-fuel" ingredients. A variety of DNA-based machines are described, including the construction of "tweezers," "walkers," "robots," "cranes," "transporters," "springs," "gears," and interlocked cyclic DNA structures acting as reconfigurable catenanes, rotaxanes, and rotors. Different "fuels", such as nucleic acid strands, pH (H⁺/OH⁻), metal ions, and light, are used to trigger the mechanical functions of the DNA devices. The operation of the devices in solution and on surfaces is described, and a variety of optical, electrical, and photoelectrochemical methods to follow the operations of the DNA machines are presented. We further address the possible applications of DNA machines and the future perspectives of molecular DNA devices. These include the application of DNA machines as functional structures for the construction of logic gates and computing, for the programmed organization of metallic nanoparticle structures and the control of plasmonic properties, and for controlling chemical transformations by DNA machines. We further discuss the future applications of DNA machines for intracellular sensing, controlling intracellular metabolic pathways, and the use of the functional nanostructures for drug delivery and medical applications.

  19. Role of DNA lesions and DNA repair in mutagenesis by carcinogens in diploid human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maher, V.M.; McCormick, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors investigated the cytotoxicity, mutagenicity, and transforming activity of carcinogens and radiation in diploid human fibroblasts, using cells which differ in their DNA repair capacity. The results indicate that cell killing and induction of mutations are correlated with the number of specific lesions remaining unrepaired in the cells at a particular time posttreatment. DNA excision repair acts to eliminate potentially cytotoxic and mutagenic (and transforming) damage from DNA before these can be converted into permanent cellular effects. Normal human fibroblasts were derived from skin biopsies or circumcision material. Skin fibroblasts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients provided cells deficient in nucleotide excision repair of pyrimidine dimers or DNA adducts formed by bulky ring structures. Cytotoxicity was determined from loss of ability to form a colony. The genetic marker used was resistance to 6-thioguanine (TG). Transformation was measured by determining the frequency of anchorage-independent cells

  20. [Mechanistic modelling allows to assess pathways of DNA lesion interactions underlying chromosome aberration formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eĭdel'man, Iu A; Slanina, S V; Sal'nikov, I V; Andreev, S G

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of radiation-induced chromosomal aberration (CA) mechanisms is required in many fields of radiation genetics, radiation biology, biodosimetry, etc. However, these mechanisms are yet to be quantitatively characterised. One of the reasons is that the relationships between primary lesions of DNA/chromatin/chromosomes and dose-response curves for CA are unknown because the pathways of lesion interactions in an interphase nucleus are currently inaccessible for direct experimental observation. This article aims for the comparative analysis of two principally different scenarios of formation of simple and complex interchromosomal exchange aberrations: by lesion interactions at chromosome territories' surface vs. in the whole space of the nucleus. The analysis was based on quantitative mechanistic modelling of different levels of structures and processes involved in CA formation: chromosome structure in an interphase nucleus, induction, repair and interactions of DNA lesions. It was shown that the restricted diffusion of chromosomal loci, predicted by computational modelling of chromosome organization, results in lesion interactions in the whole space of the nucleus being impossible. At the same time, predicted features of subchromosomal dynamics agrees well with in vivo observations and does not contradict the mechanism of CA formation at the surface of chromosome territories. On the other hand, the "surface mechanism" of CA formation, despite having certain qualities, proved to be insufficient to explain high frequency of complex exchange aberrations observed by mFISH technique. The alternative mechanism, CA formation on nuclear centres is expected to be sufficient to explain frequent complex exchanges.

  1. Trans-Lesion DNA Polymerases May Be Involved in Yeast Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbel-Eden, Ayelet; Joseph-Strauss, Daphna; Masika, Hagit; Printzental, Oxana; Rachi, Eléanor; Simchen, Giora

    2013-01-01

    Trans-lesion DNA polymerases (TLSPs) enable bypass of DNA lesions during replication and are also induced under stress conditions. Being only weakly dependent on their template during replication, TLSPs introduce mutations into DNA. The low processivity of these enzymes ensures that they fall off their template after a few bases are synthesized and are then replaced by the more accurate replicative polymerase. We find that the three TLSPs of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rev1, PolZeta (Rev3 and Rev7), and Rad30 are induced during meiosis at a time when DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are formed and homologous chromosomes recombine. Strains deleted for one or any combination of the three TLSPs undergo normal meiosis. However, in the triple-deletion mutant, there is a reduction in both allelic and ectopic recombination. We suggest that trans-lesion polymerases are involved in the processing of meiotic double-strand breaks that lead to mutations. In support of this notion, we report significant yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) associations in meiosis-arrested cells between the TLSPs and DSB proteins Rev1-Spo11, Rev1-Mei4, and Rev7-Rec114, as well as between Rev1 and Rad30. We suggest that the involvement of TLSPs in processing of meiotic DSBs could be responsible for the considerably higher frequency of mutations reported during meiosis compared with that found in mitotically dividing cells, and therefore may contribute to faster evolutionary divergence than previously assumed. PMID:23550131

  2. Relationship of DNA lesions and their repair to chromosomal aberration production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    Recent work on the roles of specific kinds of DNA lesions and their enzymatic repair systems in the production of chromosomal aberrations seems consistent with a simple molecular model of chromosomal aberrations formation. Evidence from experiments with the human repair-deficient genetic diseases xeroderma pigmentosom, ataxia telangiectasia, and Fanconi's anemia is reviewed in the light of the contributions to aberration production of single and double polynucleotide strand breaks, base damage, polynucleotide strand crosslinks, and pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers

  3. Relationship of DNA lesions and their repair to chromosomal aberration production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    Recent work on the roles of specific kinds of DNA lesions and their enzymatic repair systems in the production of chromosomal aberrations seems consistent with a simple molecular model of chromosomal aberrations formation. Evidence from experiments with the human repair-deficient genetic diseases xeroderma pigmentosom, ataxia telangiectasia, and Fanconi's anemia is reviewed in the light of the contributions to aberration production of single and double polynucleotide strand breaks, base damage, polynucleotide strand crosslinks, and pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers.

  4. Traveling Rocky Roads: The Consequences of Transcription-Blocking DNA Lesions on RNA Polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steurer, Barbara; Marteijn, Jurgen A

    2017-10-27

    The faithful transcription of eukaryotic genes by RNA polymerase II (RNAP2) is crucial for proper cell function and tissue homeostasis. However, transcription-blocking DNA lesions of both endogenous and environmental origin continuously challenge the progression of elongating RNAP2. The stalling of RNAP2 on a transcription-blocking lesion triggers a series of highly regulated events, including RNAP2 processing to make the lesion accessible for DNA repair, R-loop-mediated DNA damage signaling, and the initiation of transcription-coupled DNA repair. The correct execution and coordination of these processes is vital for resuming transcription following the successful repair of transcription-blocking lesions. Here, we outline recent insights into the molecular consequences of RNAP2 stalling on transcription-blocking DNA lesions and how these lesions are resolved to restore mRNA synthesis. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Lesion Orientation of O4-Alkylthymidine Influences Replication by Human DNA Polymerase η

    OpenAIRE

    O’Flaherty, D. K.; Patra, A.; Su, Y.; Guengerich, F. P.; Egli, M.; Wilds, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA lesions that elude repair may undergo translesion synthesis catalyzed by Y-family DNA polymerases. O4-Alkylthymidines, persistent adducts that can result from carcinogenic agents, may be encountered by DNA polymerases. The influence of lesion orientation around the C4-O4 bond on processing by human DNA polymerase η (hPol η) was studied for oligonucleotides containing O4-methylthymidine, O4-ethylthymidine, and analogs restricting the O4-methylene group in an anti-orientation. Primer extens...

  6. A new sensitive 32P-postlabeling assay based on the specific enzymatic conversion of bulky DNA lesions to radiolabeled dinucleotides and nucleoside 5'-monophosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randerath, Kurt; Randerath, Erika; Danna, T.F.; Van Golen, K.L.; Putman, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    A new sensitive 32 P-postlabelling assay for DNA adducts has been developed. When DNA containing bulky adducts, X 1 , X 2 , .....X n , is digested with nuclease P1 at pH 5, normal nucleotides are released as 5'-monophosphates, pN, while adducts are excised as 5'-phosphorylated dinucleotides, pX i pN, because inter-nucleotide linkages on the 3' side of X resist attack by nuclease P1. Addition of prostatic acid phosphatase to such a digest results in 5'-dephosphorylation of the nucleotides to normal nucleosides, N, and adducted dinucleotides, X i pN, carrying a 5'-terminal free hydroxyl group. The dinucleotides but not nucleosides are converted to 5'- 32 P-labeled dinucleotides,[ 32 P]pX i pN, by T4 polynucleotide kinase-catalyzed [ 32 P]posphate transfer from [γ- 32 P]ATP. Upon mapping on polyethyleneimine-cellulose anion-exchange TLC, the labeled dinucleotide adducts produce characteristic autoradiographic fingerprints. Alternatively, they are further digested with snake venom phosphodiesterase to yield 5'-monophosphates, [ 32 P]pX i and pN. TLC profiles of the monophosphate adducts are distinct from those of the dinucleotides. These reactions provide the basis of the new 32 P-postlabeling scheme, which is compared in this paper with a previously reported protocol yielding adducts in the form of 5'- 32 P-labeled 3',5'-bisphosphates, [ 32 P]pX i p. (author)

  7. [Direct assays of radiation-induced DNA base lesions in mammalian cells.] Final progress report, February 1, 1984-June 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, K.T.

    1986-01-01

    Adenine (Ade), 2'-deoxyadenosine (dAdo) and 5'-deoxyadenosine monophosphate (5'-dAMP) were irradiated with 50 to 15,000 Gy under oxic and hypoxic conditions. HPLC procedures providing satisfactory separation of the adenine damage products formed during irradiation of DNA model compounds were found. Structures of some of the damage products were confirmed to include 8-OHAde, 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine, and 8-OH-5'-dAMP. Two damage products of dAdo (8-OHdAdo and the major isomer of 8,5'-cdAdo), the formation of which depends on the presence or absence of oxygen, were determined quantitatively by HPLC. The limit for HPLC detection was estimated as 4 to 50 pmoles for these compounds. This corresponds to a detection limit of about 50 Gy in radiation dose units. These two products were also detected in mixtures of all four nucleosides irradiated with 50 Gy

  8. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in preneoplastic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract: A biomarker for the early detection of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montgomery Elizabeth A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatic mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA are common in many human cancers. We have described an oligonucleotide microarray ("MitoChip" for rapid sequencing of the entire mitochondrial genome (Zhou et al, J Mol Diagn 2006, facilitating the analysis of mtDNA mutations in preneoplastic lesions. We examined 14 precancerous lesions, including seven Barrett esophagus biopsies, with or without associated dysplasia; four colorectal adenomas; and three inflammatory colitis-associated dysplasia specimens. In all cases, matched normal tissues from the corresponding site were obtained as germline control. MitoChip analysis was performed on DNA obtained from cryostat-embedded specimens. Results A total of 513,639 bases of mtDNA were sequenced in the 14 samples, with 490,224 bases (95.4% bases assigned by the automated genotyping software. All preneoplastic lesions examined demonstrated at least one somatic mtDNA sequence alteration. Of the 100 somatic mtDNA alterations observed in the 14 cases, 27 were non-synonymous coding region mutations (i.e., resulting in an amino acid change, 36 were synonymous, and 37 involved non-coding mtDNA. Overall, somatic alterations most commonly involved the COI, ND4 and ND5 genes. Notably, somatic mtDNA alterations were observed in preneoplastic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract even in the absence of histopathologic evidence of dysplasia, suggesting that the mitochondrial genome is susceptible at the earliest stages of multistep cancer progression. Conclusion Our findings further substantiate the rationale for exploring the mitochondrial genome as a biomarker for the early diagnosis of cancer, and confirm the utility of a high-throughput array-based platform for this purpose from a clinical applicability standpoint.

  9. Detection and repair of a UV-induced photosensitive lesion in the DNA of human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.A.; Regan, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Irradiation with UV light results in damage to the DNA of human cells. The most numerous lesions are pyrimidine dimers; however, other lesions are known to occur and may contribute to the overall deleterious effect of UV irradiation. The authors have observed evidence of a UV-induced lesion other than pyrimidine dimers in the DNA of human cells by measuring DNA strand breaks induced by irradiating with 313-nm light following UV (254-nm) irradiation. The data suggest that, in normal cells, the lesion responsible for this effect is rapidly repaired or altered; whereas, in xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells it seems to remain unchanged. Some change apparently occurs in the DNA of xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells which results in an increase in photolability. These data indicate a deficiency in DNA repair of xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells as well as in xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells. (Auth.)

  10. DNA alkylation lesions and their repair in human cells: modification of the comet assay with 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (AlkD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hašplová, Katarína; Hudecová, Alexandra; Magdolénová, Zuzana; Bjøras, Magnar; Gálová, Eliška; Miadoková, Eva; Dušinská, Mária

    2012-01-05

    3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (AlkD) belongs to a new family of DNA glycosylases; it initiates repair of cytotoxic and promutagenic alkylated bases (its main substrates being 3-methyladenine and 7-methylguanine). The modification of the comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) using AlkD enzyme thus allows assessment of specific DNA alkylation lesions. The resulting baseless sugars are alkali-labile, and under the conditions of the alkaline comet assay they appear as DNA strand breaks. The alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) was used to induce alkylation lesions and to optimize conditions for the modified comet assay method with AlkD on human lymphoblastoid (TK6) cells. We also studied cellular and in vitro DNA repair of alkylated bases in DNA in TK6 cells after treatment with MMS. Results from cellular repair indicate that 50% of DNA alkylation is repaired in the first 60 min. The in vitro repair assay shows that while AlkD recognises most alkylation lesions after 60 min, a cell extract from TK6 cells recognises most of the MMS-induced DNA adducts already in the first 15 min of incubation, with maximum detection of lesions after 60 min' incubation. Additionally, we tested the in vitro repair capacity of human lymphocyte extracts from 5 individuals and found them to be able to incise DNA alkylations in the same range as AlkD. The modification of the comet assay with AlkD can be useful for in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity studies to detect alkylation damage and repair and also for human biomonitoring and molecular epidemiology studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement and meaning of oxidatively modified DNA lesions in urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, Marcus S; Olinski, Ryszard; Loft, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    and cell death have minimal, if any, influence upon urinary levels of 8-oxodG and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, although this should be assessed on a lesion-by-lesion basis. Broadly speaking, there is consensus between chromatographic techniques; however, ELISA approaches continue to overestimate 8-oxod...

  12. Statistical analysis of post mortem DNA damage-derived miscoding lesions in Neandertal mitochondrial DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vives, Sergi; Gilbert, M Thomas; Arenas, Conchita

    2008-01-01

    in the Heavy strand could explain the observed bias, a phenomenon that could be further tested with non-PCR based approaches. The characterization of the HVS1 hotspots will be of use to future Neandertal mtDNA studies, with specific regards to assessing the authenticity of new positions previously unknown...

  13. Are lesions induced by ionizing radiation direct blocks to DNA chain elongation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Painter, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Ionizing radiation blocks DNA chain elongation in normal diploid fibroblasts but not in fibroblasts from patients with ataxia-telangiectasia, even though there are no differences in the damage induced between the two cell types. This difference suggests that radiation-induced lesions in DNA are not themselves blocks to chain elongation in ataxia cells and raises the possibility that in normal cells a mediator exists between DNA damage and chain termination

  14. On the biophysical interpretation of lethal DNA lesions induced by ionising radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kundrát, Pavel; Stewart, R.D.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 122, 1-4 (2006), s. 169-172 ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : clustered DNA lesions * V79 cells * proton tracks * DNA damage * DNA repair * radiobiological modelling Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 0.446, year: 2006

  15. Lesion measurement in non-radioactive DNA by quantitative gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, J.C.; Chen, Chun Zhang; Emrick, A.; Hacham, H; Monteleone, D.; Ribeiro, E.; Trunk, J.; Sutherland, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    The gel electrophoresis method developed during the past ten years in our laboratories makes possible the quantitation of UV induced pyrimidine dimers, gamma ray induced single- and double-strand breaks and many other types of lesions in nanogram quantities of DNA. The DNA does not have to be labeled with radionuclides or of a particular conformation, thus facilitating the use of the method in measuring damage levels and repair rates in the DNA of intact organisms -- including man. The gel method can quantitate any lesion in DNA that either is, or can be converted to a single- or double-strand break. The formation of a strand break produces two shorter DNA molecules for each molecule that existed before the treatment that produced the break. Determining the number of breaks, and hence the number of lesions, becomes a matter of comparing the average lengths of molecules in samples differing only in lesion-induced breaks. This requires that we determine the distribution of mass of DNA on a gel as a function of its distance of migration and also the dispersion function of its distance of migration and also the dispersion function (the relationship between molecular length and distance of migration) in the gel electrophoresis system. 40 refs., 5 figs

  16. Liquid biopsy in the diagnosis of HPV DNA in breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolis, Sabrina De; Pellegrini, Alice; Santini, Donatella; Ceccarelli, Claudio; De Leo, Antonio; Alessandrini, Federica; Arienti, Chiara; Pignatta, Sara; Tesei, Anna; Mantovani, Vilma; Zamagni, Claudio; Taffurelli, Mario; Sansone, Pasquale; Bonafé, Massimiliano; Cricca, Monica

    2018-02-01

    HPV DNA has never been investigated in nipple discharges (ND) and serum-derived extracellular vesicles, although its presence has been reported in ductal lavage fluids and blood specimens. We analyzed 50 ND, 22 serum-derived extracellular vesicles as well as 51 pathologic breast tissues for the presence of 16 HPV DNA types. We show that the presence of HPV DNA in the ND is predictive of HPV DNA-positive breast lesions and that HPV DNA is more represented in intraductal papillomas. We also show the presence of HPV DNA in the serum-derived extracellular vesicles. Our data supports the use of liquid biopsy to detect HPV DNA in breast pathology.

  17. Identification of potentially cytotoxic lesions induced by UVA photoactivation of DNA 4-thiothymidine in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reelfs, Olivier; Macpherson, Peter; Ren, Xiaolin; Xu, Yao-Zhong; Karran, Peter; Young, Antony R.

    2011-01-01

    Photochemotherapy—in which a photosensitizing drug is combined with ultraviolet or visible radiation—has proven therapeutic effectiveness. Existing approaches have drawbacks, however, and there is a clinical need to develop alternatives offering improved target cell selectivity. DNA substitution by 4-thiothymidine (S4TdR) sensitizes cells to killing by ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation. Here, we demonstrate that UVA photoactivation of DNA S4TdR does not generate reactive oxygen or cause direct DNA breakage and is only minimally mutagenic. In an organotypic human skin model, UVA penetration is sufficiently robust to kill S4TdR-photosensitized epidermal cells. We have investigated the DNA lesions responsible for toxicity. Although thymidine is the predominant UVA photoproduct of S4TdR in dilute solution, more complex lesions are formed when S4TdR-containing oligonucleotides are irradiated. One of these, a thietane/S5-(6-4)T:T, is structurally related to the (6-4) pyrimidine:pyrimidone [(6-4) Py:Py] photoproducts induced by UVB/C radiation. These lesions are detectable in DNA from S4TdR/UVA-treated cells and are excised from DNA more efficiently by keratinocytes than by leukaemia cells. UVA irradiation also induces DNA interstrand crosslinking of S4TdR-containing duplex oligonucleotides. Cells defective in repairing (6-4) Py:Py DNA adducts or processing DNA crosslinks are extremely sensitive to S4TdR/UVA indicating that these lesions contribute significantly to S4TdR/UVA cytotoxicity. PMID:21890905

  18. Kinetic Analysis of the Bypass of a Bulky DNA Lesion Catalyzed by Human Y-family DNA Polymerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrer, Shanen M.; Sanman, Laura E.; Xia, Cynthia X.; Bolin, Eric R.; Malik, Chanchal K.; Efthimiopoulos, Georgia; Basu, Ashis K.; Suo, Zucai

    2012-01-01

    1-Nitropyrene (1-NP), a mutagen and potential carcinogen, is the most abundant nitro polyaromatic hydrocarbon in diesel exhaust, which reacts with DNA to form predominantly N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-1-aminopyrene (dGAP). If not repaired, this DNA lesion is presumably bypassed in vivo by any of human Y-family DNA polymerases kappa (hPolκ), iota (hPolτ), eta (hPolη), and Rev1 (hRev1). Our running start assays demonstrated that each of these enzymes was indeed capable of traversing a site-specifically placed dGAP on a synthetic DNA template but hRev1 was stopped after lesion bypass. The time required to bypass 50% of the dGAP sites (t50bypass ) encountered by hPolη, hPolκ and hPolτ was determined to be 2.5 s, 4.1 s, and 106.5 s, respectively. The efficiency order of catalyzing translesion synthesis of dGAP (hPolη > hPolκ > hPolτ >> hRev1) is the same as the order for these human Y-family enzymes to elongate undamaged DNA. Although hPolη bypassed dGAP efficiently, replication by both hPolκ and hPolτ was strongly stalled at the lesion site and at a site immediately downstream from dGAP. By employing pre-steady state kinetic methods, a kinetic basis was established for polymerase pausing at these DNA template sites. Besides efficiency of bypass, the fidelity of those low-fidelity polymerases at these pause sites was also significantly decreased. Thus, if the translesion DNA synthesis of dGAP in vivo is catalyzed by a human Y-family DNA polymerase, e.g. hPolη, the process is certainly mutagenic. PMID:22324639

  19. DNA lesions induced by replication stress trigger mitotic aberration and tetraploidy development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Ichijima

    Full Text Available During tumorigenesis, cells acquire immortality in association with the development of genomic instability. However, it is still elusive how genomic instability spontaneously generates during the process of tumorigenesis. Here, we show that precancerous DNA lesions induced by oncogene acceleration, which induce situations identical to the initial stages of cancer development, trigger tetraploidy/aneuploidy generation in association with mitotic aberration. Although oncogene acceleration primarily induces DNA replication stress and the resulting lesions in the S phase, these lesions are carried over into the M phase and cause cytokinesis failure and genomic instability. Unlike directly induced DNA double-strand breaks, DNA replication stress-associated lesions are cryptogenic and pass through cell-cycle checkpoints due to limited and ineffective activation of checkpoint factors. Furthermore, since damaged M-phase cells still progress in mitotic steps, these cells result in chromosomal mis-segregation, cytokinesis failure and the resulting tetraploidy generation. Thus, our results reveal a process of genomic instability generation triggered by precancerous DNA replication stress.

  20. Mapping Base Modifications in DNA by Transverse-Current Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Jose R.; Skachkov, Dmitry; Massey, Steven E.; Kalitsov, Alan; Velev, Julian P.

    2018-02-01

    Sequencing DNA modifications and lesions, such as methylation of cytosine and oxidation of guanine, is even more important and challenging than sequencing the genome itself. The traditional methods for detecting DNA modifications are either insensitive to these modifications or require additional processing steps to identify a particular type of modification. Transverse-current sequencing in nanopores can potentially identify the canonical bases and base modifications in the same run. In this work, we demonstrate that the most common DNA epigenetic modifications and lesions can be detected with any predefined accuracy based on their tunneling current signature. Our results are based on simulations of the nanopore tunneling current through DNA molecules, calculated using nonequilibrium electron-transport methodology within an effective multiorbital model derived from first-principles calculations, followed by a base-calling algorithm accounting for neighbor current-current correlations. This methodology can be integrated with existing experimental techniques to improve base-calling fidelity.

  1. Synthesis of modified oligonucleotides for repair and replication studies of single and double radio-induced DNA lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, E.

    2002-01-01

    Several oxidative processes induce the formation of DNA lesions. In order to evaluate the biological and structural significance of such damage, several DNA lesions were inserted into synthetic oligonucleotides at defined sites. The research work aimed at describing the preparation of oligonucleotides t hat contained DNA damage and the evaluation of the biological properties of the lesions. A first part described the incorporation of radiation-induced lesions, namely (5'S,6S)-5',6-cyclo-5,6-dihydro-2'-deoxyuridine and (5'S,5S,6S)-5',6-cyclo-5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydro-2'-desoxyuridine into oligonucleotides. The modified DNA fragments were characterised by several spectroscopic and biochemical analyses including ESI MS, MALDI-TOF MS, CLHP and enzymatic digestions. During in vitro DNA synthesis by Taq DNA polymerase and Klenow exo fragment, the pyrimidine cyclo-nucleosides were found to block the progression of the enzymes. Then, repair studies by ADN N glycosylases, operating in the base excision repair pathway, have shown that the anhydro-nucleoside lesions were not recognised nor excised by Fpg, endo III, endo VIII, yNtg1 yNtg2 and yOgg1. Interestingly, the Latococcus lactis Fpg protein recognises (formation of a non covalent complex) but do not excise the damage. The incorporation into oligonucleotides of the (5R*) and (5S*) diastereoisomers of 1-[2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl]-5-hydroxy-hydantoin, generated by several oxidative processes was then described. In vitro DNA replication assays using modified oligonucleotides matrix showed a lethal potential of the latter base damage. Repair studies by ADN N-glycosylases showed that the damage was substrate for Fpg, endo III, endo VIII, Ntg1, Ntg2 and Fpg-L1. The rates of excision as inferred from the determination of the Michaelis kinetics constants were found to be affected by the presence of the damage. MALDI-TOF MS was used in order to gain insights into mechanistic aspects of oligonucleotides cleavage by the

  2. Characterization of non-dimer DNA lesions and cellular damages caused by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Kumi

    1989-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms of carcinogenicity and cytotoxicity induced by ultraviolet (UV) light, non-dimer DNA damages produced by near UV light (wave-length: 290∼320 nm) were examined by alkaline elution using Chinese hamster V-79 cells. UV exposure produced a dose-dependent induction of DNA single strand breaks and DNA-protein crosslinks. However, neither of these DNA lesions were repaired within a 24 hr incubation of the cells following UV exposure. Rather the number of these lesions increased. Also, UV exposure inhibited DNA and RNA synthesis. In addition, UV induced both cytotoxicity and chromosomal aberration. Electron spin resornance (ESR) studies showed that the exposure of cells to UV light resulted in the appearance of an ESR signal at -120degC. The roles of glutathione, vitamin E and vitamin B 2 , which were celluar antioxidant, on the induction of cytotoxicity by UV exposure were also examined. Pretreatment with vitamin E reduced the cytotoxicty caused by UV, whereas neither preteatment with vitamin B 2 nor the alteration of cellular gluthaione content affected the cytotoxicity. These results suggest that non-dimer DNA damages, such as DNA single strand breaks and DNA-protein crosslinks play an important role in inducing UV-carcinogenicity and UV-cytotoxicity, and that the mechanisms of these damages may be associated with the generation of free radicals. (author)

  3. Influence of DNA Lesions on Polymerase-Mediated DNA Replication at Single-Molecule Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahlon, Hailey L; Romano, Louis J; Rueda, David

    2017-11-20

    Faithful replication of DNA is a critical aspect in maintaining genome integrity. DNA polymerases are responsible for replicating DNA, and high-fidelity polymerases do this rapidly and at low error rates. Upon exposure to exogenous or endogenous substances, DNA can become damaged and this can alter the speed and fidelity of a DNA polymerase. In this instance, DNA polymerases are confronted with an obstacle that can result in genomic instability during replication, for example, by nucleotide misinsertion or replication fork collapse. It is important to know how DNA polymerases respond to damaged DNA substrates to understand the mechanism of mutagenesis and chemical carcinogenesis. Single-molecule techniques have helped to improve our current understanding of DNA polymerase-mediated DNA replication, as they enable the dissection of mechanistic details that can otherwise be lost in ensemble-averaged experiments. These techniques have also been used to gain a deeper understanding of how single DNA polymerases behave at the site of the damage in a DNA substrate. In this review, we evaluate single-molecule studies that have examined the interaction between DNA polymerases and damaged sites on a DNA template.

  4. Learning tasks as a possible treatment for DNA lesions induced by oxidative stress in hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DragoCrneci; Radu Silaghi-Dumitrescu

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in conditions ranging from cardiovascular dysfunc-tion, arthritis, cancer, to aging and age-related disorders. The organism developed several path-ways to counteract these effects, with base excision repair being responsible for repairing one of the major base lesions (8-oxoG) in al organisms. Epidemiological evidence suggests that cognitive stimulation makes the brain more resilient to damage or degeneration. Recent studies have linked enriched environment to reduction of oxidative stressin neurons of mice with Alzheimer’s dis-ease-like disease, but given its complexity it is not clear what specific aspect of enriched environ-ment has therapeutic effects. Studies from molecular biology have shown that the protein p300, which is a transcription co-activator required for consolidation of memories during specific learning tasks, is at the same time involved in DNA replication and repair, playing a central role in the long-patch pathway of base excision repair. Based on the evidence, we propose that learning tasks such as novel object recognition could be tested as possible methods of base excision repair faci-litation, hence inducing DNA repair in the hippocampal neurons. If this method proves to be effective, it could be the start for designing similar tasks for humans, as a behavioral therapeutic complement to the classical drug-based therapy in treating neurodegenerative disorders. This review presents the current status of therapeutic methods used in treating neurodegenerative diseases induced by reactive oxygen species and proposes a new approach based on existing data.

  5. Genomic and functional integrity of the hematopoietic system requires tolerance of oxidative DNA lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martín-Pardillos, Ana; Tsaalbi-Shtylik, Anastasia; Chen, Si

    2017-01-01

    -distorting nucleotide lesions, resulted in the perinatal loss of hematopoietic stem cells, progressive loss of bone marrow, and fatal aplastic anemia between 3 and 4 months of age. This was associated with replication stress, genomic breaks, DNA damage signaling, senescence, and apoptosis in bone marrow. Surprisingly...

  6. Traveling Rocky Roads: The Consequences of Transcription-Blocking DNA Lesions on RNA Polymerase II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Steurer (Barbara); J.A. Marteijn (Jurgen)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe faithful transcription of eukaryotic genes by RNA polymerase II (RNAP2) is crucial for proper cell function and tissue homeostasis. However, transcription-blocking DNA lesions of both endogenous and environmental origin continuously challenge the progression of elongating RNAP2. The

  7. DNA modification by sulfur mustards and nitrosoureas and repair of these lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludlum, D.B.; Papirmeister, B.; Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD)

    1986-01-01

    The nature and significance of DNA modifications caused by chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) is compared with those produced by chloroethyl cyclohexyl nitrosourea (CCNU). This comparison illustrates the differences in the kind of biological response which can arise from DNA modification by different agents and the role of DNA repair in determining this response. In particular, the ability of tumor cells to become resistant to therapeutic agents has some important implications for the ability of cells in general to tolerate environmental mutagens. DNA modification by CEES and CCNU can be viewed in the context of DNA modification caused by compounds which naturally react with DNA. For example, cycasin and S-adenosylmethionine both methylate DNA. Not surprisingly, a variety of repair mechanisms has evolved which serve to maintain the integrity of DNA in the presence of such naturally-occurring DNA modifiers. The ability of these enzymes to repair other DNA lesions is currently under active investigation as described here. 19 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Association of thymine glycol lesioned DNA with repair enzyme endonuclease III-molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    2001-07-01

    The 2 nanoseconds molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been performed for the system consisting of repair enzyme and DNA 30-mer with native thymine at position 16 replaced by thymine glycol (TG) solvated in water environment. After 950 picoseconds of MD the enzyme and DNA associated together to form complex that lasted stable up to 2 ns when simulation was terminated. At the contact area of enzyme and DNA there is glutamic acid located as close as 1.6 A to the C3' atom of phosphodiester bond of TG. Initial B-DNA molecule was bent and kinked at the TG during MD. This distortion caused that phosphodiester bond was easier accessible by amino acids of enzyme. The negative value of electrostatic energy (-26 kcal/mol) discriminates TG from nearly neutral native thymine and contributes to the specific recognition of this lesion. Higher number of close water molecules at TG site before formation of complex (compared with other nucleotides) indicates that glycosyl bond of the lesion is easily approached by repair enzyme during scanning of DNA surface and suggests the importance of specific hydration at the lesion during recognition process. (author)

  9. Association of thymine glycol lesioned DNA with repair enzyme endonuclease III-molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinak, Miroslav [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-07-01

    The 2 nanoseconds molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been performed for the system consisting of repair enzyme and DNA 30-mer with native thymine at position 16 replaced by thymine glycol (TG) solvated in water environment. After 950 picoseconds of MD the enzyme and DNA associated together to form complex that lasted stable up to 2 ns when simulation was terminated. At the contact area of enzyme and DNA there is glutamic acid located as close as 1.6 A to the C3' atom of phosphodiester bond of TG. Initial B-DNA molecule was bent and kinked at the TG during MD. This distortion caused that phosphodiester bond was easier accessible by amino acids of enzyme. The negative value of electrostatic energy (-26 kcal/mol) discriminates TG from nearly neutral native thymine and contributes to the specific recognition of this lesion. Higher number of close water molecules at TG site before formation of complex (compared with other nucleotides) indicates that glycosyl bond of the lesion is easily approached by repair enzyme during scanning of DNA surface and suggests the importance of specific hydration at the lesion during recognition process. (author)

  10. Lesion Orientation of O4-Alkylthymidine Influences Replication by Human DNA Polymerase η.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, D K; Patra, A; Su, Y; Guengerich, F P; Egli, M; Wilds, C J

    2016-08-01

    DNA lesions that elude repair may undergo translesion synthesis catalyzed by Y-family DNA polymerases. O 4 -Alkylthymidines, persistent adducts that can result from carcinogenic agents, may be encountered by DNA polymerases. The influence of lesion orientation around the C4- O 4 bond on processing by human DNA polymerase η (hPol η ) was studied for oligonucleotides containing O 4 -methylthymidine, O 4 -ethylthymidine, and analogs restricting the O 4 -methylene group in an anti -orientation. Primer extension assays revealed that the O 4 -alkyl orientation influences hPol η bypass. Crystal structures of hPol η •DNA•dNTP ternary complexes with O 4 -methyl- or O 4 -ethylthymidine in the template strand showed the nucleobase of the former lodged near the ceiling of the active site, with the syn - O 4 -methyl group engaged in extensive hydrophobic interactions. This unique arrangement for O 4 -methylthymidine with hPol η , inaccessible for the other analogs due to steric/conformational restriction, is consistent with differences observed for nucleotide incorporation and supports the concept that lesion conformation influences extension across DNA damage. Together, these results provide mechanistic insights on the mutagenicity of O 4 MedT and O 4 EtdT when acted upon by hPol η .

  11. Viewing Human DNA Polymerase β Faithfully and Unfaithfully Bypass an Oxidative Lesion by Time-Dependent Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Rajan; Reed, Andrew J.; Tokarsky, E. John; Suo, Zucai

    2015-01-01

    One common oxidative DNA lesion, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanine (8-oxoG), is highly mutagenic in vivo due to its anti-conformation forming a Watson–Crick base pair with correct deoxycytidine 5′-triphosphate (dCTP) and its syn-conformation forming a Hoogsteen base pair with incorrect deoxyadenosine 5′-triphosphate (dATP). Here, we utilized time-resolved X-ray crystallography to follow 8-oxoG bypass by human DNA polymerase β (hPolβ). In the 12 solved structures, both Watson–Crick (anti-8-oxoG:anti-dCTP) and Hoogsteen (syn-8-oxoG:anti-dATP) base pairing were clearly visible and were maintained throughout the chemical reaction. Additionally, a third Mg2+ appeared during the process of phosphodiester bond formation and was located between the reacting α- and β-phosphates of the dNTP, suggesting its role in stabilizing reaction intermediates. After phosphodiester bond formation, hPolβ reopened its conformation, pyrophosphate was released, and the newly incorporated primer 3′-terminal nucleotide stacked, rather than base paired, with 8-oxoG. These structures provide the first real-time pictures, to our knowledge, of how a polymerase correctly and incorrectly bypasses a DNA lesion. PMID:25825995

  12. Analysis of damaged DNA / proteins interactions: Methodological optimizations and applications to DNA lesions induced by platinum anticancer drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounaix Morand du Puch, Ch

    2010-10-01

    DNA lesions contribute to the alteration of DNA structure, thereby inhibiting essential cellular processes. Such alterations may be beneficial for chemotherapies, for example in the case of platinum anticancer agents. They generate bulky adducts that, if not repaired, ultimately cause apoptosis. A better understanding of the biological response to such molecules can be obtained through the study of proteins that directly interact with the damages. These proteins constitute the DNA lesions interactome. This thesis presents the development of tools aiming at increasing the list of platinum adduct-associated proteins. Firstly, we designed a ligand fishing system made of damaged plasmids immobilized onto magnetic beads. Three platinum drugs were selected for our study: cisplatin, oxali-platin and satra-platin. Following exposure of the trap to nuclear extracts from HeLa cancer cells and identification of retained proteins by proteomics, we obtained already known candidates (HMGB1, hUBF, FACT complex) but also 29 new members of the platinated-DNA interactome. Among them, we noted the presence of PNUTS, TOX4 and WDR82, which associate to form the recently-discovered PTW/PP complex. Their capture was then confirmed with a second model, namely breast cancer cell line MDA MB 231, and the biological consequences of such an interaction now need to be elucidated. Secondly, we adapted a SPRi bio-chip to the study of platinum-damaged DNA/proteins interactions. Affinity of HMGB1 and newly characterized TOX4 for adducts generated by our three platinum drugs could be validated thanks to the bio-chip. Finally, we used our tools, as well as analytical chemistry and biochemistry methods, to evaluate the role of DDB2 (a factor involved in the recognition of UV-induced lesions) in the repair of cisplatin adducts. Our experiments using MDA MB 231 cells differentially expressing DDB2 showed that this protein is not responsible for the repair of platinum damages. Instead, it appears to act

  13. Detection and analysis of human papillomavirus 16 and 18 homologous DNA sequences in oral lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, S; Tsuji, T; Li, X; Mizugaki, Y; Hayatsu, Y; Shinozaki, F

    1997-01-01

    The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and 18 was investigated in oral lesions of the population of northeast China including squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), candida leukoplakias, lichen planuses and papillomas, by southern blot hybridization with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Amplified HPV16 and 18 E6 DNA was analyzed by cycle sequence. HPV DNA was detected in 14 of 45 SCCs (31.1%). HPV18 E6 DNA and HPV16 E6. DNA were detected in 24.4% and 20.0% of SCCs. respectively. Dual infection of both HPV 16 and HPV 18 was detected in 6 of 45 SCCs (13.3%), but not in other oral lesions. HPV 18 E6 DNA was also detected in 2 of 3 oral candida leukoplakias, but in none of the 5 papillomas. Our study indicated that HPV 18 infection might be more frequent than HPV 16 infection in oral SCCs in northeast Chinese, dual infection of high risk HPV types was restricted in oral SCCs, and that HPV infection might be involved in the pathogenesis of oral candida leukoplakia.

  14. Principles of DNA architectonics: design of DNA-based nanoobjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradova, O A; Pyshnyi, D V

    2012-01-01

    The methods of preparation of monomeric DNA blocks that serve as key building units for the construction of complex DNA objects are described. Examples are given of the formation of DNA blocks based on native and modified oligonucleotide components using hydrogen bonding and nucleic acid-specific types of bonding and also some affinity interactions with RNA, proteins, ligands. The static discrete and periodic two- and three-dimensional DNA objects reported to date are described systematically. Methods used to prove the structures of DNA objects and the prospects for practical application of nanostructures based on DNA and its analogues in biology, medicine and biophysics are considered. The bibliography includes 195 references.

  15. Prevalence of human papillomavirus DNA in female cervical lesions from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. B. Cavalcanti

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available A hundred-sixty paraffin-embedded specimens from female cervical lesions were examined for human papillomavirus (HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18 infections by non-isotopic in situ hybridization. The data were compared with histologic diagnosis. Eighty-eight (55 biopsies contained HPV DNA sequences. In low grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN I, HPV infection was detected in 78.7 of the cases, the benign HPV 6 was the most prevalent type. HPV DNA was detected in 58 of CIN II and CIN III cases and in 41.8 of squamous cell carcinomas (SCC. Histologically normal women presented 20 of HPV infection. Oncogenic HPV was found in 10 of these cases, what may indicate a higher risk of developing CINs and cancer. Twenty-five percent of the infected tissues contained mixed infections. HPV 16 was the most common type infecting the cervix and its prevalence raised significantly with the severity of the lesions, pointing its role in cancer pathogenesis. White women presented twice the cervical lesions of mulatto and African origin women, although HPV infection rates were nearly the same for the three groups (approximately 50. Our results showed that HPV typing by in situ hybridization is a useful tool for distinguishing between low and high risk cervical lesions. Further studies are required to elucidate risk factors associated with HPV infection and progression to malignancy in Brazilian population.

  16. Repair of model compounds of photoinduced lesions in DNA. Electrochemical approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussicault, F.

    2006-09-01

    The goal of this work is to better understand the repair mechanism of photoinduced lesions in DNA (cyclobutane dimers and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone adducts) by photolyase redox enzymes, using tools and concepts of molecular electrochemistry. Thanks to the study of model compounds of cyclobutane lesions by cyclic voltametry, we have been able to mimic the key step of the enzymatic repair (dissociative electron transfer) and to monitor the repair of model compounds by Escherichia coli DNA photolyase. From these results, we have discussed the repair mechanism, especially the stepwise or concerted character of the process. Repair mechanism of (6-4) adducts is not known now, but a possible pathway implies an electron transfer coupled to the cleavage of two bonds in the closed form of the lesions (oxetanes). Voltammetric study of reduction and oxidation of model oxetanes and their repair by E. coli DNA photolyase gave some experimental evidence confirming the proposed mechanism and allowing a better understanding of it. (author)

  17. DNA based radiological dosimetry technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Quijada, Gerardo A.; Roy, Emmanuel; Veres, Teodor; Dumoulin, Michel M.; Vachon, Caroline; Blagoeva, Rosita; Pierre, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of this project is to develop a personal and wearable dosimeter using a highly-innovative approach based on the specific recognition of DNA damage with a polymer hybrid. Our biosensor will be sensitive to breaks in nucleic acid macromolecules and relevant to mixed-field radiation. The dosimeter proposed will be small, field deployable and will sense damages for all radiation types at the DNA level. The generalized concept for the novel-based radiological dosimeter: 1) Single or double stranded oligonucleotide is immobilized on surface; 2) Single stranded has higher cross-section for fragmentation; 3) Double stranded is more biological relevant; 4) Radiation induces fragmentation; 5) Ultra-sensitive detection of fragments provides radiation dose. Successful efforts have been made towards a proof-of-concept personal wearable DNA-based dosimeter that is appropriate for mixed-field radiation. The covalent immobilization of oligonucleotides on large areas of plastic surfaces has been demonstrated and corroborated spectroscopically. The surface concentration of DNA was determined to be 8 x 1010 molecules/cm 2 from a Ce(IV) catalyzed hydrolysis study of a fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide. Current efforts are being directed at studying radiation induced fragmentation of DNA followed by its ultra-sensitive detection via a novel method. In addition, proof-of-concept wearable personal devices and a detection platform are presently being fabricated. (author)

  18. Role of DNA lesions and repair in the transformation of human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maher, V.M.; McCormick, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Results of studies on the transformation of diploid human fibroblasts in culture into tumor-forming cells by exposure to chemical carcinogens or radiation indicate that such transformation is multi-stepped process that at least one step, acquisition of anchorage independence, occurs as a mutagenic event. Studies comparing normal-repairing human cells with DNA repair-deficient cells, such as those derived from cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum patients, indicate that excision repair in human fibroblasts is essentially an error-free process that the ability to excise potentially cytotoxic, mutagenic, or transforming lesions induced DNA by carcinogens determines their ultimate biological consequences. Cells deficient in excision repair are abnormally sensitive to these agents. Studies with cells treated at various times in the cell cycle show that there is a certain limited amount of time available for DNA repair between the initial exposure and the onset of the cellular event responsible for mutation induction and transformation to anchorage independence. The data suggest that DNA replication on a template containing unexcised lesions (photoproducts, adducts) is the critical event

  19. Novel DNA lesions generated by the interaction between therapeutic thiopurines and UVA light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Jeffs, Graham; Ren, Xiaolin; O'Donovan, Peter; Montaner, Beatriz; Perrett, Conal M; Karran, Peter; Xu, Yao-Zhong

    2007-03-01

    The therapeutic effect of the thiopurines, 6-thioguanine (6-TG), 6-mercaptopurine, and its prodrug azathioprine, depends on the incorporation of 6-TG into cellular DNA. Unlike normal DNA bases, 6-TG absorbs UVA radiation, and UVA-mediated photochemical damage of DNA 6-TG has potentially harmful side effects. When free 6-TG is UVA irradiated in solution in the presence of molecular oxygen, reactive oxygen species are generated and 6-TG is oxidized to guanine-6-sulfonate (G(SO3)) and guanine-6-thioguanine in reactions involving singlet oxygen. This conversion is prevented by antioxidants, including the dietary vitamin ascorbate. DNA G(SO3) is also the major photoproduct of 6-TG in DNA and it can be selectively introduced into DNA or oligonucleotides in vitro by mild chemical oxidation. Thermal stability measurements indicate that G(SO3) does not form stable base pairs with any of the normal DNA bases in duplex oligonucleotides and is a powerful block for elongation by Klenow DNA polymerase in primer extension experiments. In cultured human cells, DNA damage produced by 6-TG and UVA treatment is associated with replication inhibition and provokes a p53-dependent DNA damage response.

  20. Cancerous hyper-mutagenesis in p53 genes is possibly associated with transcriptional bypass of DNA lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodin, S.N.; Rodin, A.S.; Juhasz, A.; Holmquist, G.P.

    2002-01-01

    The database of tumor-associated p53 base substitutions includes about 5% of tumors with two or more base substitutions. These multiplet base substitutions in one tumor are evidence for hyper-mutagenesis. Our retrospective analysis of this database indicates that most multiplets arise from a single transient hyper-mutagenic event in one cell that subsequently proliferated into a clonal tumor. The hyper-mutagenesis, 1.8x10 -4 substitutions per base pair, is detected as multiple mutations in p53 genes of tumors. It requires one strongly tumorigenic p53 substitution, usually missense, called the driver mutation. The occurrence frequencies of ancillary base substitutions, those that hitch-hike along with the driver mutation, are independent of their amino acid coding properties. In this respect, they act like neutral mutations. In support of this neutrality, we find that the frequency distribution of hitch-hiking CpG transitions along the p53 exons, their mutational spectrum, approximates the spontaneous pre-selection mutational spectrum of most human tissues and is correlated with the mutational spectrum of p53 pseudogenes in mammalian germ cells. The driver substitutions of multiplets predominantly originate along the transcribed strand while the ancillary substitutions tend to originate along the non-transcribed strand. This data is consistent with a model of time-dependent mutagenesis in non-dividing stem cells for generating multiple strand-asymmetric p53 mutations in tumors. By transcriptional bypass of DNA lesions with concomitant misincorporation, transcriptional mutagenesis generates a transient mutant p53 mRNA. The associated mutant p53 protein could allow the host cell a growth advantage, release from G 1 -arrest. Then, during subsequent DNA replication and misreading of the same lesion, the damaged base along the transcribed DNA strand would serve as the origin of the p53 base substitution that drives the hyper-mutagenic event leading to tumors with

  1. Distribution of ultraviolet-induced lesions in Simian Virus 40 DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourre, F.; Renault, G.; Sarasin, A.; Seawell, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    In order to analyze the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis in mammalian cells, we devised an analytical assay using Simian Virus 40 as biological probe. To study the possible correlations between the distribution of the lesions on the treated DNA and the distribution of mutations, we have located and quantified the lesions induced by ultraviolet light (254 nm) on a SV40 DNA fragment. At a fluence of 2,000J/m 2 , our results show that the formation frequency of thymine-thymine dimers (TT) is three to four times higher than the formation frequency of the other types of dimers (TC, CT, CC). On the other hand, the formation frequency of a dimer is influenced by the adjacent sequence. In particular, a pyrimidine in the 5' position of a thymine-thymine dimer enhances its formation frequency. At the dose used the formation frequency of the pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts is twenty times less than the formation frequency of pyrimidine dimers. This paper shows the distribution of the major lesions induced by UV-light on a defined fragment of SV40 genome after UV irradiation. This work is necessary to get an insight in the molecular mechanisms of UV-mutagenesis

  2. Effects of radiation quality and oxygen on clustered DNA lesions and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Robert D; Yu, Victor K; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Koumenis, Constantinos; Park, Joo Han; Carlson, David J

    2011-11-01

    Radiation quality and cellular oxygen concentration have a substantial impact on DNA damage, reproductive cell death and, ultimately, the potential efficacy of radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. To better understand and quantify the effects of radiation quality and oxygen on the induction of clustered DNA lesions, we have now extended the Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) to account for reductions in the initial lesion yield arising from enhanced chemical repair of DNA radicals under hypoxic conditions. The kinetic energy range and types of particles considered in the MCDS have also been expanded to include charged particles up to and including (56)Fe ions. The induction of individual and clustered DNA lesions for arbitrary mixtures of different types of radiation can now be directly simulated. For low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, cells irradiated under normoxic conditions sustain about 2.9 times as many double-strand breaks (DSBs) as cells irradiated under anoxic conditions. New experiments performed by us demonstrate similar trends in the yields of non-DSB (Fpg and Endo III) clusters in HeLa cells irradiated by γ rays under aerobic and hypoxic conditions. The good agreement among measured and predicted DSBs, Fpg and Endo III cluster yields suggests that, for the first time, it may be possible to determine nucleotide-level maps of the multitude of different types of clustered DNA lesions formed in cells under reduced oxygen conditions. As particle LET increases, the MCDS predicts that the ratio of DSBs formed under normoxic to hypoxic conditions by the same type of radiation decreases monotonically toward unity. However, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of higher-LET radiations compared to (60)Co γ rays (0.24 keV/μm) tends to increase with decreasing oxygen concentration. The predicted RBE of a 1 MeV proton (26.9 keV/μm) relative to (60)Co γ rays for DSB induction increases from 1.9 to 2.3 as oxygen concentration

  3. In vitro enzymatic studies on the nature and repair of x-ray induced lesions in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, S.S.

    1979-01-01

    Areas studied include: purification and properties of enzyme probes for x-ray induced DNA lesions using E. Coli x-ray endonuclease and S. cerevisiae endonuclease E; use of enzymes probes; and use of physical, chemical and enzymatic probes to quantify x-ray-induced lesions in viruses and cells

  4. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping of stroke lesions underlying somatosensory deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sarah; Kessner, Simon S; Cheng, Bastian; Bönstrup, Marlene; Schulz, Robert; Hummel, Friedhelm C; De Bruyn, Nele; Peeters, Andre; Van Pesch, Vincent; Duprez, Thierry; Sunaert, Stefan; Schrooten, Maarten; Feys, Hilde; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz; Thijs, Vincent; Verheyden, Geert

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between stroke lesion location and the resulting somatosensory deficit. We studied exteroceptive and proprioceptive somatosensory symptoms and stroke lesions in 38 patients with first-ever acute stroke. The Erasmus modified Nottingham Sensory Assessment was used to clinically evaluate somatosensory functioning in the arm and hand within the first week after stroke onset. Additionally, more objective measures such as the perceptual threshold of touch and somatosensory evoked potentials were recorded. Non-parametric voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping was performed to investigate lesion contribution to different somatosensory deficits in the upper limb. Additionally, structural connectivity of brain areas that demonstrated the strongest association with somatosensory symptoms was determined, using probabilistic fiber tracking based on diffusion tensor imaging data from a healthy age-matched sample. Voxels with a significant association to somatosensory deficits were clustered in two core brain regions: the central parietal white matter, also referred to as the sensory component of the superior thalamic radiation, and the parietal operculum close to the insular cortex, representing the secondary somatosensory cortex. Our objective recordings confirmed findings from clinical assessments. Probabilistic tracking connected the first region to thalamus, internal capsule, brain stem, postcentral gyrus, cerebellum, and frontal pathways, while the second region demonstrated structural connections to thalamus, insular and primary somatosensory cortex. This study reveals that stroke lesions in the sensory fibers of the superior thalamocortical radiation and the parietal operculum are significantly associated with multiple exteroceptive and proprioceptive deficits in the arm and hand.

  5. Atherosclerotic lesions and mitochondria DNA deletions in brain microvessels: implication in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, Gjumrakch; Gasimov, Eldar; Obrenovich, Mark E; Fischbach, Kathryn; Shenk, Justin C; Smith, Mark A; Perry, George

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis that is primarily responsible for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) appears to involve chronic hypoperfusion. We studied the ultrastructural features of vascular lesions and mitochondria in brain vascular wall cells from human AD biopsy samples and two transgenic mouse models of AD, yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) and C57B6/SJL Tg (+), which overexpress human amyloid beta precursor protein (AbetaPP). In situ hybridization using probes for normal and 5 kb deleted human and mouse mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was performed along with immunocytochemistry using antibodies against the Abeta peptide processed from AbetaPP, 8-hydroxy-2'-guanosine (8OHG), and cytochrome c oxidase (COX). More amyloid deposition, oxidative stress markers as well as mitochondrial DNA deletions and structural abnormalities were present in the vascular walls of the human AD samples and the AbetaPP-YAC and C57B6/SJL Tg (+) transgenic mice compared to age-matched controls. Ultrastructural damage in perivascular cells highly correlated with endothelial lesions in all samples. Therefore, pharmacological interventions, directed at correcting the chronic hypoperfusion state, may change the natural course of the development of dementing neurodegeneration.

  6. Mechanisms of Insertion of dCTP and dTTP Opposite the DNA Lesion O6-Methyl-2′-deoxyguanosine by Human DNA Polymerase η*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Amitraj; Zhang, Qianqian; Guengerich, F. Peter; Egli, Martin

    2016-01-01

    O6-Methyl-2′-deoxyguanosine (O6-MeG) is a ubiquitous DNA lesion, formed not only by xenobiotic carcinogens but also by the endogenous methylating agent S-adenosylmethionine. It can introduce mutations during DNA replication, with different DNA polymerases displaying different ratios of correct or incorrect incorporation opposite this nucleoside. Of the “translesion” Y-family human DNA polymerases (hpols), hpol η is most efficient in incorporating equal numbers of correct and incorrect C and T bases. However, the mechanistic basis for this specific yet indiscriminate activity is not known. To explore this question, we report biochemical and structural analysis of the catalytic core of hpol η. Activity assays showed the truncated form displayed similar misincorporation properties as the full-length enzyme, incorporating C and T equally and extending from both. X-ray crystal structures of both dC and dT paired with O6-MeG were solved in both insertion and extension modes. The structures revealed a Watson-Crick-like pairing between O6-MeG and 2"-deoxythymidine-5"-[(α, β)-imido]triphosphate (approximating dT) at both the insertion and extension stages with formation of two H-bonds. Conversely, both the structures with O6- MeG opposite dCTP and dC display sheared configuration of base pairs but to different degrees, with formation of two bifurcated H-bonds and two single H-bonds in the structures trapped in the insertion and extension states, respectively. The structural data are consistent with the observed tendency of hpol η to insert both dC and dT opposite the O6-MeG lesion with similar efficiencies. Comparison of the hpol η active site configurations with either O6-MeG:dC or O6-MeG:dT bound compared with the corresponding situations in structures of complexes of Sulfolobus solfataricus Dpo4, a bypass pol that favors C relative to T by a factor of ∼4, helps rationalize the more error-prone synthesis opposite the lesion by hpol η. PMID:27694439

  7. Repair of UVC induced DNA lesions in erythrocytes from Carassius auratus gibelio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagdonas, E.; Zukas, K.

    2004-01-01

    The kinetics of UVC (254 nm) irradiation induced DNA single-strand breaks generated during the excision repair of UV induced DNA damage in erythrocytes from Carassius auratus gibelio were studied using alkaline comet assay. Nucleotide excision repair recognised DNA lesions such as UVC induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoproducts and produced DNA single-stranded breaks that were easily detected by comet assay. After irradiation of erythrocytes with 58 j/m 2 UVC dose, there was an increase in comet tail moment (CTM) at 2 hours post-radiation, whereas at 4 hours post-radiation CTM decreased and did not differ significantly from the control level (P=0,127). When erythrocytes were exposed to 173 J/m 2 UVC dose, the excision repair delayed in the beginning (0 hours), reached maximum level at 2 hours post-radiation (CTM-54,8) and showed slightly decreased level at 4 hours post-radiation (CTM=18,5). (author)

  8. DNA-based watermarks using the DNA-Crypt algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heider, Dominik; Barnekow, Angelika

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of watermarks based on DNA sequences to identify the unauthorized use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) protected by patents. Predicted mutations in the genome can be corrected by the DNA-Crypt program leaving the encrypted information intact. Existing DNA cryptographic and steganographic algorithms use synthetic DNA sequences to store binary information however, although these sequences can be used for authentication, they may change the target DNA sequence when introduced into living organisms. Results The DNA-Crypt algorithm and image steganography are based on the same watermark-hiding principle, namely using the least significant base in case of DNA-Crypt and the least significant bit in case of the image steganography. It can be combined with binary encryption algorithms like AES, RSA or Blowfish. DNA-Crypt is able to correct mutations in the target DNA with several mutation correction codes such as the Hamming-code or the WDH-code. Mutations which can occur infrequently may destroy the encrypted information, however an integrated fuzzy controller decides on a set of heuristics based on three input dimensions, and recommends whether or not to use a correction code. These three input dimensions are the length of the sequence, the individual mutation rate and the stability over time, which is represented by the number of generations. In silico experiments using the Ypt7 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that the DNA watermarks produced by DNA-Crypt do not alter the translation of mRNA into protein. Conclusion The program is able to store watermarks in living organisms and can maintain the original information by correcting mutations itself. Pairwise or multiple sequence alignments show that DNA-Crypt produces few mismatches between the sequences similar to all steganographic algorithms. PMID:17535434

  9. DNA-based watermarks using the DNA-Crypt algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnekow Angelika

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of watermarks based on DNA sequences to identify the unauthorized use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs protected by patents. Predicted mutations in the genome can be corrected by the DNA-Crypt program leaving the encrypted information intact. Existing DNA cryptographic and steganographic algorithms use synthetic DNA sequences to store binary information however, although these sequences can be used for authentication, they may change the target DNA sequence when introduced into living organisms. Results The DNA-Crypt algorithm and image steganography are based on the same watermark-hiding principle, namely using the least significant base in case of DNA-Crypt and the least significant bit in case of the image steganography. It can be combined with binary encryption algorithms like AES, RSA or Blowfish. DNA-Crypt is able to correct mutations in the target DNA with several mutation correction codes such as the Hamming-code or the WDH-code. Mutations which can occur infrequently may destroy the encrypted information, however an integrated fuzzy controller decides on a set of heuristics based on three input dimensions, and recommends whether or not to use a correction code. These three input dimensions are the length of the sequence, the individual mutation rate and the stability over time, which is represented by the number of generations. In silico experiments using the Ypt7 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that the DNA watermarks produced by DNA-Crypt do not alter the translation of mRNA into protein. Conclusion The program is able to store watermarks in living organisms and can maintain the original information by correcting mutations itself. Pairwise or multiple sequence alignments show that DNA-Crypt produces few mismatches between the sequences similar to all steganographic algorithms.

  10. DNA-based watermarks using the DNA-Crypt algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heider, Dominik; Barnekow, Angelika

    2007-05-29

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of watermarks based on DNA sequences to identify the unauthorized use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) protected by patents. Predicted mutations in the genome can be corrected by the DNA-Crypt program leaving the encrypted information intact. Existing DNA cryptographic and steganographic algorithms use synthetic DNA sequences to store binary information however, although these sequences can be used for authentication, they may change the target DNA sequence when introduced into living organisms. The DNA-Crypt algorithm and image steganography are based on the same watermark-hiding principle, namely using the least significant base in case of DNA-Crypt and the least significant bit in case of the image steganography. It can be combined with binary encryption algorithms like AES, RSA or Blowfish. DNA-Crypt is able to correct mutations in the target DNA with several mutation correction codes such as the Hamming-code or the WDH-code. Mutations which can occur infrequently may destroy the encrypted information, however an integrated fuzzy controller decides on a set of heuristics based on three input dimensions, and recommends whether or not to use a correction code. These three input dimensions are the length of the sequence, the individual mutation rate and the stability over time, which is represented by the number of generations. In silico experiments using the Ypt7 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that the DNA watermarks produced by DNA-Crypt do not alter the translation of mRNA into protein. The program is able to store watermarks in living organisms and can maintain the original information by correcting mutations itself. Pairwise or multiple sequence alignments show that DNA-Crypt produces few mismatches between the sequences similar to all steganographic algorithms.

  11. 'Do not touch' lesions of the skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobre, Mircea C.; Fischbein, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the skull base presents many challenges due to its anatomical complexity, numerous normal variants and lack of familiarity to many radiologists. As the skull base is a region which is not amenable to physical examination and as lesions of the skull base are generally difficult to biopsy and even more difficult to operate on, the radiologist plays a major role in directing patient management via accurate image interpretation. Knowledge of the skull base should not be limited to neuroradiologists and head and neck radiologists, however, as the central skull base is routinely included in the field of view when imaging the brain, cervical spine, or head and neck with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, and hence, its nuances should be familiar to general radiologists as well. We herein review the imaging findings of a subcategory of lesions of the central skull base, the 'do not touch' lesions.

  12. The current state of eukaryotic DNA base damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Corbett, Anita H; Doetsch, Paul W

    2015-12-02

    DNA damage is a natural hazard of life. The most common DNA lesions are base, sugar, and single-strand break damage resulting from oxidation, alkylation, deamination, and spontaneous hydrolysis. If left unrepaired, such lesions can become fixed in the genome as permanent mutations. Thus, evolution has led to the creation of several highly conserved, partially redundant pathways to repair or mitigate the effects of DNA base damage. The biochemical mechanisms of these pathways have been well characterized and the impact of this work was recently highlighted by the selection of Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar and Paul Modrich as the recipients of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their seminal work in defining DNA repair pathways. However, how these repair pathways are regulated and interconnected is still being elucidated. This review focuses on the classical base excision repair and strand incision pathways in eukaryotes, considering both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans, and extends to some important questions and challenges facing the field of DNA base damage repair. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Selective base excision repair of DNA damage by the non-base-flipping DNA glycosylase AlkC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Rongxin; Mullins, Elwood A.; Shen, Xing; #8208; Xing; Lay, Kori T.; Yuen, Philip K.; David, Sheila S.; Rokas, Antonis; Eichman, Brandt F. (UCD); (Vanderbilt)

    2017-10-20

    DNA glycosylases preserve genome integrity and define the specificity of the base excision repair pathway for discreet, detrimental modifications, and thus, the mechanisms by which glycosylases locate DNA damage are of particular interest. Bacterial AlkC and AlkD are specific for cationic alkylated nucleobases and have a distinctive HEAT-like repeat (HLR) fold. AlkD uses a unique non-base-flipping mechanism that enables excision of bulky lesions more commonly associated with nucleotide excision repair. In contrast, AlkC has a much narrower specificity for small lesions, principally N3-methyladenine (3mA). Here, we describe how AlkC selects for and excises 3mA using a non-base-flipping strategy distinct from that of AlkD. A crystal structure resembling a catalytic intermediate complex shows how AlkC uses unique HLR and immunoglobulin-like domains to induce a sharp kink in the DNA, exposing the damaged nucleobase to active site residues that project into the DNA. This active site can accommodate and excise N3-methylcytosine (3mC) and N1-methyladenine (1mA), which are also repaired by AlkB-catalyzed oxidative demethylation, providing a potential alternative mechanism for repair of these lesions in bacteria.

  14. Excision repair of gamma-ray-induced alkali-stable DNA lesions with the help of γ-endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomilin, N.V.; Barenfeld, L.S.

    1979-01-01

    γ-endonuclease Y, an enzyme that hydrolyses phosphodiester bonds at alkali-stable lesions in γ-irradiated (N 2 , tris buffer) DNA, has been partially purified from Micrococcus luteus. The enzyme has a molecular weight of about 19 000, induces single-strand breaks with 3'OH-5'PO 4 termini and contains endonuclease activity towards DNA treated with 7-bromomethylbenz(a)anthracene. γ-endonuclease Y induces breaks in OsO 4 -treated poly(dA-dT) and apparently is specific towards γ-ray-induced base lesions of the t' type. The complete excision repair of γ-endonuclease Y substrate sites has been performed in vitro by γ-endonuclease Y, DNA polymerase and ligase. (author)

  15. Excision repair of gamma-ray-induced alkali-stable DNA lesions with the help of. gamma. -endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomilin, N V; Barenfeld, L S [AN SSSR, Leningrad. Inst. Tsitologii

    1979-03-01

    ..gamma..-endonuclease Y, an enzyme that hydrolyses phosphodiester bonds at alkali-stable lesions in ..gamma..-irradiated (N/sub 2/, tris buffer) DNA, has been partially purified from Micrococcus luteus. The enzyme has a molecular weight of about 19 000, induces single-strand breaks with 3'OH-5'PO/sub 4/ termini and contains endonuclease activity towards DNA treated with 7-bromomethylbenz(a)anthracene. ..gamma..-endonuclease Y induces breaks in OsO/sub 4/-treated poly(dA-dT) and apparently is specific towards ..gamma..-ray-induced base lesions of the t' type. The complete excision repair of ..gamma..-endonuclease Y substrate sites has been performed in vitro by ..gamma..-endonuclease Y, DNA polymerase and ligase.

  16. Transition-state destabilization reveals how human DNA polymerase β proceeds across the chemically unstable lesion N7-methylguanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzon-Shubeita, Hala; Lee, Seongmin

    2014-01-01

    N7-Methyl-2′-deoxyguanosine (m7dG) is the predominant lesion formed by methylating agents. A systematic investigation on the effect of m7dG on DNA replication has been difficult due to the chemical instability of m7dG. To gain insights into the m7dG effect, we employed a 2′-fluorine-mediated transition-state destabilzation strategy. Specifically, we determined kinetic parameters for dCTP insertion opposite a chemically stable m7dG analogue, 2′-fluoro-m7dG (Fm7dG), by human DNA polymerase β (polβ) and solved three X-ray structures of polβ in complex with the templating Fm7dG paired with incoming dCTP or dTTP analogues. The kinetic studies reveal that the templating Fm7dG slows polβ catalysis ∼300-fold, suggesting that m7dG in genomic DNA may impede replication by some DNA polymerases. The structural analysis reveals that Fm7dG forms a canonical Watson–Crick base pair with dCTP, but metal ion coordination is suboptimal for catalysis in the polβ-Fm7dG:dCTP complex, which partially explains the slow insertion of dCTP opposite Fm7dG by polβ. In addition, the polβ-Fm7dG:dTTP structure shows open protein conformations and staggered base pair conformations, indicating that N7-methylation of dG does not promote a promutagenic replication. Overall, the first systematic studies on the effect of m7dG on DNA replication reveal that polβ catalysis across m7dG is slow, yet highly accurate. PMID:24966350

  17. Chemistry of the 8-Nitroguanine DNA Lesion: Reactivity, Labelling and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Katie J; McConville, Matthew; Williams, Kathryn R; Luzyanin, Konstantin V; O'Neil, Ian A; Cosstick, Richard

    2018-02-26

    The 8-nitroguanine lesion in DNA is increasingly associated with inflammation-related carcinogenesis, whereas the same modification on guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate generates a second messenger in NO-mediated signal transduction. Very little is known about the chemistry of 8-nitroguanine nucleotides, despite the fact that their biological effects are closely linked to their chemical properties. To this end, a selection of chemical reactions have been performed on 8-nitroguanine nucleosides and oligodeoxynucleotides. Reactions with alkylating reagents reveal how the 8-nitro substituent affects the reactivity of the purine ring, by significantly decreasing the reactivity of the N2 position, whilst the relative reactivity at N1 appears to be enhanced. Interestingly, the displacement of the nitro group with thiols results in an efficient and specific method of labelling this lesion and is demonstrated in oligodeoxynucleotides. Additionally, the repair of this lesion is also shown to be a chemically feasible reaction through a reductive denitration with a hydride source. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Molecular Triage of Premalignant Lesions in Liquid-Based Cervical Cytology and Circulating Cell-Free DNA from Urine, Using a Panel of Methylated Human Papilloma Virus and Host Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Valle, Blanca L.; Jedlicka, Anne; Turaga, Nitesh; Folawiyo, Oluwasina; Pirini, Francesca; Lawson, Fahcina; Vergura, Angelo; Noordhuis, Maartje; Dziedzic, Amanda; Perez, Gabriela; Renehan, Marisa; Guerrero-Diaz, Carolina; Rodriguez, Edgar De Jesus; Diaz-Montes, Teresa; Orengo, Jose Rodriguez; Mendez, Keimari; Romaguera, Josefina; Trock, Bruce J.; Florea, Liliana; Sidransky, David

    2016-01-01

    Clinically useful molecular tools to triage women for a biopsy upon referral to colposcopy are not available. We aimed to develop a molecular panel to detect cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 2 or higher lesions (CIN2(+)) in women with abnormal cervical cytology and high-risk HPV

  19. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping of stroke lesions underlying somatosensory deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Meyer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between stroke lesion location and the resulting somatosensory deficit. We studied exteroceptive and proprioceptive somatosensory symptoms and stroke lesions in 38 patients with first-ever acute stroke. The Erasmus modified Nottingham Sensory Assessment was used to clinically evaluate somatosensory functioning in the arm and hand within the first week after stroke onset. Additionally, more objective measures such as the perceptual threshold of touch and somatosensory evoked potentials were recorded. Non-parametric voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping was performed to investigate lesion contribution to different somatosensory deficits in the upper limb. Additionally, structural connectivity of brain areas that demonstrated the strongest association with somatosensory symptoms was determined, using probabilistic fiber tracking based on diffusion tensor imaging data from a healthy age-matched sample. Voxels with a significant association to somatosensory deficits were clustered in two core brain regions: the central parietal white matter, also referred to as the sensory component of the superior thalamic radiation, and the parietal operculum close to the insular cortex, representing the secondary somatosensory cortex. Our objective recordings confirmed findings from clinical assessments. Probabilistic tracking connected the first region to thalamus, internal capsule, brain stem, postcentral gyrus, cerebellum, and frontal pathways, while the second region demonstrated structural connections to thalamus, insular and primary somatosensory cortex. This study reveals that stroke lesions in the sensory fibers of the superior thalamocortical radiation and the parietal operculum are significantly associated with multiple exteroceptive and proprioceptive deficits in the arm and hand.

  20. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 escorts XPC to UV-induced DNA lesions during nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robu, Mihaela; Shah, Rashmi G; Purohit, Nupur K; Zhou, Pengbo; Naegeli, Hanspeter; Shah, Girish M

    2017-08-15

    Xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) protein initiates the global genomic subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) for removal of UV-induced direct photolesions from genomic DNA. The XPC has an inherent capacity to identify and stabilize at the DNA lesion sites, and this function is facilitated in the genomic context by UV-damaged DNA-binding protein 2 (DDB2), which is part of a multiprotein UV-DDB ubiquitin ligase complex. The nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) has been shown to facilitate the lesion recognition step of GG-NER via its interaction with DDB2 at the lesion site. Here, we show that PARP1 plays an additional DDB2-independent direct role in recruitment and stabilization of XPC at the UV-induced DNA lesions to promote GG-NER. It forms a stable complex with XPC in the nucleoplasm under steady-state conditions before irradiation and rapidly escorts it to the damaged DNA after UV irradiation in a DDB2-independent manner. The catalytic activity of PARP1 is not required for the initial complex formation with XPC in the nucleoplasm but it enhances the recruitment of XPC to the DNA lesion site after irradiation. Using purified proteins, we also show that the PARP1-XPC complex facilitates the handover of XPC to the UV-lesion site in the presence of the UV-DDB ligase complex. Thus, the lesion search function of XPC in the genomic context is controlled by XPC itself, DDB2, and PARP1. Our results reveal a paradigm that the known interaction of many proteins with PARP1 under steady-state conditions could have functional significance for these proteins.

  1. Carboxymethyl chitin-glucan (CM-CG) protects human HepG2 and HeLa cells against oxidative DNA lesions and stimulates DNA repair of lesions induced by alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamenová, Darina; Kováciková, Ines; Horváthová, Eva; Wsólová, Ladislava; Navarová, Jana

    2010-10-01

    A large number of functional foods, including those that contain β-d-glucans, have been shown to prevent human DNA against genotoxic effects and associated development of cancer and other chronic diseases. In this paper, carboxymethyl chitin-glucan (CM-CG) isolated from Aspergillus niger was investigated from two standpoints: (1) DNA-protective effects against oxidative DNA damage induced by H(2)O(2) and alkylating DNA damage induced by MMS and MNNG, and (2) a potential effect on rejoining of MMS- and MNNG-induced single strand DNA breaks. The results obtained by the comet assay in human cells cultured in vitro showed that CM-CG reduced significantly the level of oxidative DNA lesions induced by H(2)O(2) but did not change the level of alkylating DNA lesions induced by MMS or MNNG. On the other side, the efficiency of DNA-rejoining of single strand DNA breaks induced by MMS and MNNG was significantly higher in HepG2 cells pre-treated with CM-CG. The antioxidative activity of carboxymethyl chitin-glucan was confirmed by the DPPH assay. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular dynamics of formation of TD lesioned DNA complexed with repair enzyme - onset of the enzymatic repair process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinak, Miroslav [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-12-01

    To describe the first step of the enzymatic repair process (formation of complex enzyme-DNA), in which the thymine dimer (TD) part is removed from DNA, the 500 picosecond (ps) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of TD lesioned DNA and part of repair enzyme cell (inclusive of catalytic center - Arg-22, Glu-23, Arg-26 and Thr-2) was performed. TD is UV originated lesion in DNA and T4 Endonuclease V is TD specific repair enzyme. Both molecules were located in the same simulation cell and their relative movement was examined. During the simulation the research was focused on the role of electrostatic energy in formation of complex enzyme-DNA. It is found, that during the first 100 ps of MD, the part of enzyme approaches the DNA surface at the TD lesion, interacts extensively by electrostatic and van der Walls interactions with TD part of DNA and forms complex that lasts stabile for 500 ps of MD. In the beginning of MD, the positive electrostatic interaction energy between part of enzyme and TD ({approx} +10 kcal/mol) drives enzyme towards the DNA molecule. Water-mediated hydrogen bonds between enzyme and DNA help to keep complex stabile. As a reference, the MD simulation of the identical system with native DNA molecule (two native thymines (TT) instead of TD) was performed. In this system the negative electrostatic interaction energy between part of enzyme and TT ({approx} -11 kcal/mol), in contrary to the positive one in the system with TD, doesn't drive enzyme towards DNA and complex is not formed. (author)

  3. Molecular dynamics of formation of TD lesioned DNA complexed with repair enzyme - onset of the enzymatic repair process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    1999-12-01

    To describe the first step of the enzymatic repair process (formation of complex enzyme-DNA), in which the thymine dimer (TD) part is removed from DNA, the 500 picosecond (ps) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of TD lesioned DNA and part of repair enzyme cell (inclusive of catalytic center - Arg-22, Glu-23, Arg-26 and Thr-2) was performed. TD is UV originated lesion in DNA and T4 Endonuclease V is TD specific repair enzyme. Both molecules were located in the same simulation cell and their relative movement was examined. During the simulation the research was focused on the role of electrostatic energy in formation of complex enzyme-DNA. It is found, that during the first 100 ps of MD, the part of enzyme approaches the DNA surface at the TD lesion, interacts extensively by electrostatic and van der Walls interactions with TD part of DNA and forms complex that lasts stabile for 500 ps of MD. In the beginning of MD, the positive electrostatic interaction energy between part of enzyme and TD (∼ +10 kcal/mol) drives enzyme towards the DNA molecule. Water-mediated hydrogen bonds between enzyme and DNA help to keep complex stabile. As a reference, the MD simulation of the identical system with native DNA molecule (two native thymines (TT) instead of TD) was performed. In this system the negative electrostatic interaction energy between part of enzyme and TT (∼ -11 kcal/mol), in contrary to the positive one in the system with TD, doesn't drive enzyme towards DNA and complex is not formed. (author)

  4. The role of DNA base excision repair in brain homeostasis and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, Mansour; Morevati, Marya; Croteau, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modification and spontaneous loss of nucleotide bases from DNA are estimated to occur at the rate of thousands per human cell per day. DNA base excision repair (BER) is a critical mechanism for repairing such lesions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Defective expression or function of p...... energy homeostasis, mitochondrial function and cellular bioenergetics, with especially strong influence on neurological function. Further studies in this area could lead to novel approaches to prevent and treat human neurodegenerative disease....

  5. Repair of model compounds of photoinduced lesions in DNA. Electrochemical approaches; Reparation de modeles de lesions photoinduites de l'ADN. Approches electrochimiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussicault, F

    2006-09-15

    The goal of this work is to better understand the repair mechanism of photoinduced lesions in DNA (cyclobutane dimers and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone adducts) by photolyase redox enzymes, using tools and concepts of molecular electrochemistry. Thanks to the study of model compounds of cyclobutane lesions by cyclic voltametry, we have been able to mimic the key step of the enzymatic repair (dissociative electron transfer) and to monitor the repair of model compounds by Escherichia coli DNA photolyase. From these results, we have discussed the repair mechanism, especially the stepwise or concerted character of the process. Repair mechanism of (6-4) adducts is not known now, but a possible pathway implies an electron transfer coupled to the cleavage of two bonds in the closed form of the lesions (oxetanes). Voltammetric study of reduction and oxidation of model oxetanes and their repair by E. coli DNA photolyase gave some experimental evidence confirming the proposed mechanism and allowing a better understanding of it. (author)

  6. Medical Imaging Lesion Detection Based on Unified Gravitational Fuzzy Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Marie Vianney Kinani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a swift, robust, and practical tool for detecting brain lesions with minimal user intervention to assist clinicians and researchers in the diagnosis process, radiosurgery planning, and assessment of the patient’s response to the therapy. We propose a unified gravitational fuzzy clustering-based segmentation algorithm, which integrates the Newtonian concept of gravity into fuzzy clustering. We first perform fuzzy rule-based image enhancement on our database which is comprised of T1/T2 weighted magnetic resonance (MR and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR images to facilitate a smoother segmentation. The scalar output obtained is fed into a gravitational fuzzy clustering algorithm, which separates healthy structures from the unhealthy. Finally, the lesion contour is automatically outlined through the initialization-free level set evolution method. An advantage of this lesion detection algorithm is its precision and its simultaneous use of features computed from the intensity properties of the MR scan in a cascading pattern, which makes the computation fast, robust, and self-contained. Furthermore, we validate our algorithm with large-scale experiments using clinical and synthetic brain lesion datasets. As a result, an 84%–93% overlap performance is obtained, with an emphasis on robustness with respect to different and heterogeneous types of lesion and a swift computation time.

  7. Does trans-lesion synthesis explain the UV-radiation resistance of DNA synthesis in C.elegans embryos?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, Phil; Reddy, Jennifer; Svendsen, Betty-Ann

    1991-01-01

    Over 10-fold larger fluences were required to inhibit both DNA synthesis and cell division in wild-type C.elegans embryos as compared with other model systems or C.elegans rad mutants. In addition, unlike in other organisms, the molecular weight of daughter DNA strands was reduced only after large, superlethal fluences. The molecular weight of nascent DNA fragments exceeded the interdimer distance by up to 19-fold, indicating that C.elegans embryos can replicate through non-instructional lesions. This putative trans-lesion synthetic capability may explain the refractory nature of UV-radiation on embryonic DNA synthesis and nuclear division in C.elegans. (author). 42 refs.; 7 figs

  8. Does trans-lesion synthesis explain the UV-radiation resistance of DNA synthesis in C. elegans embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, Phil; Reddy, Jennifer; Svendsen, Betty-Ann [Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1991-09-01

    Over 10-fold larger fluences were required to inhibit both DNA synthesis and cell division in wild-type C.elegans embryos as compared with other model systems or C.elegans rad mutants. In addition, unlike in other organisms, the molecular weight of daughter DNA strands was reduced only after large, superlethal fluences. The molecular weight of nascent DNA fragments exceeded the interdimer distance by up to 19-fold, indicating that C.elegans embryos can replicate through non-instructional lesions. This putative trans-lesion synthetic capability may explain the refractory nature of UV-radiation on embryonic DNA synthesis and nuclear division in C.elegans. (author). 42 refs.; 7 figs.

  9. Oxidatively-induced DNA damage and base excision repair in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Deniz; Tuna, Gamze; Kirkali, Güldal; Tunca, Zeliha; Can, Güneş; Arat, Hidayet Ece; Kant, Melis; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Özerdem, Ayşegül

    2018-05-01

    Oxidatively-induced DNA damage has previously been associated with bipolar disorder. More recently, impairments in DNA repair mechanisms have also been reported. We aimed to investigate oxidatively-induced DNA lesions and expression of DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder compared to healthy individuals. DNA base lesions including both base and nucleoside modifications were measured using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with isotope-dilution in DNA samples isolated from leukocytes of euthymic patients with bipolar disorder (n = 32) and healthy individuals (n = 51). The expression of DNA repair enzymes OGG1 and NEIL1 were measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The levels of malondialdehyde were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Seven DNA base lesions in DNA of leukocytes of patients and healthy individuals were identified and quantified. Three of them had significantly elevated levels in bipolar patients when compared to healthy individuals. No elevation of lipid peroxidation marker malondialdehyde was observed. The level of OGG1 expression was significantly reduced in bipolar patients compared to healthy individuals, whereas the two groups exhibited similar levels of NEIL1 expression. Our results suggest that oxidatively-induced DNA damage occurs and base excision repair capacity may be decreased in bipolar patients when compared to healthy individuals. Measurement of oxidatively-induced DNA base lesions and the expression of DNA repair enzymes may be of great importance for large scale basic research and clinical studies of bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Metallic Nanostructures Based on DNA Nanoshapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boxuan Shen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metallic nanostructures have inspired extensive research over several decades, particularly within the field of nanoelectronics and increasingly in plasmonics. Due to the limitations of conventional lithography methods, the development of bottom-up fabricated metallic nanostructures has become more and more in demand. The remarkable development of DNA-based nanostructures has provided many successful methods and realizations for these needs, such as chemical DNA metallization via seeding or ionization, as well as DNA-guided lithography and casting of metallic nanoparticles by DNA molds. These methods offer high resolution, versatility and throughput and could enable the fabrication of arbitrarily-shaped structures with a 10-nm feature size, thus bringing novel applications into view. In this review, we cover the evolution of DNA-based metallic nanostructures, starting from the metallized double-stranded DNA for electronics and progress to sophisticated plasmonic structures based on DNA origami objects.

  11. Towards observing the encounter of the T7 DNA replication fork with a lesion site at the Single molecule level

    KAUST Repository

    Shirbini, Afnan

    2017-05-01

    Single-molecule DNA flow-stretching assays have been a powerful approach to study various aspects on the mechanism of DNA replication for more than a decade. This technique depends on flow-induced force on a bead attached to a surface-tethered DNA. The difference in the elastic property between double-strand DNA (long) and single-strand DNA (short) at low regime force allows the observation of the beads motion when the dsDNA is converted to ssDNA by the replisome machinery during DNA replication. Here, I aim to develop an assay to track in real-time the encounter of the bacteriophage T7 replisome with abasic lesion site inserted on the leading strand template. I optimized methods to construct the DNA substrate that contains the abasic site and established the T7 leading strand synthesis at the single molecule level. I also optimized various control experiments to remove any interference from the nonspecific interactions of the DNA with the surface. My work established the foundation to image the encounter of the T7 replisome with abasic site and to characterize how the interactions between the helicase and the polymerase could influence the polymerase proofreading ability and its direct bypass of this highly common DNA damage type.

  12. Are dinucleoside monophosphates relevant models for the study of DNA intrastrand cross-link lesions? The example of g[8-5m]T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrec, Julian; Dumont, Elise

    2014-07-21

    Oxidatively generated tandem lesions such as G[8-5m]T pose a potent threat to genome integrity. Direct experimental studies of the kinetics and thermodynamics of a specific lesion within DNA are very challenging, mostly due to the variety of products that can be formed in oxidative conditions. Dinucleoside monophosphates (DM) involving only the reactive nucleobases in water represent appealing alternative models on which most physical chemistry and structural techniques can be applied. However, it is not yet clear how relevant these models are. Here, we present QM/MM MD simulations of the cyclization step involved in the formation of G[8-5m]T from the guanine-thymine (GpT) DM in water, with the aim of comparing our results to our previous investigation of the same reaction in DNA ( Garrec , J. , Patel , C. , Rothlisberger , U. , and Dumont , E. ( 2012 ) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134 , 2111 - 2119 ). We show that, despite the different levels of preorganization of the two systems, the corresponding reactions share many energetic and structural characteristics. The main difference lies in the angle between the G and T bases, which is slightly higher in the transition state (TS) and product of the reaction in water than in the reaction in DNA. This effect is due to the Watson-Crick H-bonds, which are absent in the {GpT+water} system and restrain the relative positioning of the reactive nucleobases in DNA. However, since the lesion is accommodated easily in the DNA macromolecule, the induced energetic penalty is relatively small. The high similarity between the two reactions strongly supports the use of GpT in water as a model of the corresponding reaction in DNA.

  13. Use of avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex for measurement of UV lesions in human DNA by microELISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leipold, B [Technischen Universitaet Muenchen (Germany, F.R.). Dermatologische Klinik; Remy, W [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biochemie, Muenchen (Germany, F.R.)

    1984-02-10

    The avidin/biotin system was introduced into the standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to increase its sensitivity for detecting UV lesions in human DNA. Goat anti-rabbit IgG-peroxidase used in the standard ELISA as second antibody was replaced by biotinylated goat anti-rabbit IgG plus the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) reagent. Sensitivity of detection of plate-fixed UV-DNA-antibody complexes was increased about 8-fold and photolesions in human DNA samples irradiated with as low a dose as 1 J/m/sup 2/ UVC or a suberythermal dose of UVB light could be detected.

  14. Bypass of a 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside by DNA polymerase β during DNA replication and base excision repair leads to nucleotide misinsertions and DNA strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhongliang; Xu, Meng; Lai, Yanhao; Laverde, Eduardo E; Terzidis, Michael A; Masi, Annalisa; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Liu, Yuan

    2015-09-01

    5',8-Cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleosides including 5',8-cyclo-dA (cdA) and 5',8-cyclo-dG (cdG) are induced by hydroxyl radicals resulting from oxidative stress such as ionizing radiation. 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside lesions are repaired by nucleotide excision repair with low efficiency, thereby leading to their accumulation in the human genome and lesion bypass by DNA polymerases during DNA replication and base excision repair (BER). In this study, for the first time, we discovered that DNA polymerase β (pol β) efficiently bypassed a 5'R-cdA, but inefficiently bypassed a 5'S-cdA during DNA replication and BER. We found that cell extracts from pol β wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibited significant DNA synthesis activity in bypassing a cdA lesion located in replication and BER intermediates. However, pol β knock-out cell extracts exhibited little DNA synthesis to bypass the lesion. This indicates that pol β plays an important role in bypassing a cdA lesion during DNA replication and BER. Furthermore, we demonstrated that pol β inserted both a correct and incorrect nucleotide to bypass a cdA at a low concentration. Nucleotide misinsertion was significantly stimulated by a high concentration of pol β, indicating a mutagenic effect induced by pol β lesion bypass synthesis of a 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside. Moreover, we found that bypass of a 5'S-cdA by pol β generated an intermediate that failed to be extended by pol β, resulting in accumulation of single-strand DNA breaks. Our study provides the first evidence that pol β plays an important role in bypassing a 5',8-cyclo-dA during DNA replication and repair, as well as new insight into mutagenic effects and genome instability resulting from pol β bypassing of a cdA lesion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. XRCC1 and PCNA are loading platforms with distinct kinetic properties and different capacities to respond to multiple DNA lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonhardt Heinrich

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome integrity is constantly challenged and requires the coordinated recruitment of multiple enzyme activities to ensure efficient repair of DNA lesions. We investigated the dynamics of XRCC1 and PCNA that act as molecular loading platforms and play a central role in this coordination. Results Local DNA damage was introduced by laser microirradation and the recruitment of fluorescent XRCC1 and PCNA fusion proteins was monitored by live cell microscopy. We found an immediate and fast recruitment of XRCC1 preceding the slow and continuous recruitment of PCNA. Fluorescence bleaching experiments (FRAP and FLIP revealed a stable association of PCNA with DNA repair sites, contrasting the high turnover of XRCC1. When cells were repeatedly challenged with multiple DNA lesions we observed a gradual depletion of the nuclear pool of PCNA, while XRCC1 dynamically redistributed even to lesions inflicted last. Conclusion These results show that PCNA and XRCC1 have distinct kinetic properties with functional consequences for their capacity to respond to successive DNA damage events.

  16. XRCC1 and PCNA are loading platforms with distinct kinetic properties and different capacities to respond to multiple DNA lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortusewicz, Oliver; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2007-01-01

    Background Genome integrity is constantly challenged and requires the coordinated recruitment of multiple enzyme activities to ensure efficient repair of DNA lesions. We investigated the dynamics of XRCC1 and PCNA that act as molecular loading platforms and play a central role in this coordination. Results Local DNA damage was introduced by laser microirradation and the recruitment of fluorescent XRCC1 and PCNA fusion proteins was monitored by live cell microscopy. We found an immediate and fast recruitment of XRCC1 preceding the slow and continuous recruitment of PCNA. Fluorescence bleaching experiments (FRAP and FLIP) revealed a stable association of PCNA with DNA repair sites, contrasting the high turnover of XRCC1. When cells were repeatedly challenged with multiple DNA lesions we observed a gradual depletion of the nuclear pool of PCNA, while XRCC1 dynamically redistributed even to lesions inflicted last. Conclusion These results show that PCNA and XRCC1 have distinct kinetic properties with functional consequences for their capacity to respond to successive DNA damage events. PMID:17880707

  17. DNA damage signaling and apoptosis in preinvasive tubal lesions of ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chene, Gautier; Ouellet, Veronique; Rahimi, Kurosh; Barres, Veronique; Caceres, Katia; Meunier, Liliane; Cyr, Louis; De Ladurantaye, Manon; Provencher, Diane; Mes Masson, Anne Marie

    2015-06-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) is the most life-threatening gynecological malignancy despite surgery and chemotherapy. A better understanding of the molecular basis of the preinvasive stages might be helpful in early detection and diagnosis. Genetic instability is 1 of the characteristics shared by most human cancers, and its level is variable through precancerous lesions to advanced cancer. Because DNA damage response (DDR) has been described as 1 of the first phases in genomic instability, we investigated the level of DDR activation and the apoptosis pathway in serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC), the potential precursor of HGSC. A tissue microarray including 21 benign fallopian tubes, 21 STICs, 17 HGSCs from patients with STICs (associated ovarian cancer [AOC]) from the same individuals, and 30 HGSCs without STICs (non-AOC) was used in this study.Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the level of DDR proteins (pATM, pChk2, γH2AX, 53BP1, and TRF2), apoptosis proteins (Bcl2, BAX, and BIM), and cyclin E. The expression of all DDR proteins increased from benign fallopian tubes to STICs. The level of expression of pATM, pChk2, γH2AX, and TRF2 was also increased in STICs in comparison with AOC. BAX, BIM, and cyclin E expressions were high in STICs, whereas Bcl2 expression was low. Immunohistochemical profiles of AOC and non-AOC were also different. These results suggest an activation of the DDR and apoptosis pathways in STICs, indicating that genomic instability may occur early in the precancerous lesions of HGSC.

  18. 53BP1 nuclear bodies form around DNA lesions generated by mitotic transmission of chromosomes under replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Claudia; Savic, Velibor; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2011-01-01

    stress increases the frequency of chromosomal lesions that are transmitted to daughter cells. Throughout G1, these lesions are sequestered in nuclear compartments marked by p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) and other chromatin-associated genome caretakers. We show that the number of such 53BP1 nuclear bodies...... increases after genetic ablation of BLM, a DNA helicase associated with dissolution of entangled DNA. Conversely, 53BP1 nuclear bodies are partially suppressed by knocking down SMC2, a condensin subunit required for mechanical stability of mitotic chromosomes. Finally, we provide evidence that 53BP1 nuclear...... bodies shield chromosomal fragile sites sequestered in these compartments against erosion. Together, these data indicate that restoration of DNA or chromatin integrity at loci prone to replication problems requires mitotic transmission to the next cell generations....

  19. Lethal and mutagenic properties of MMS-generated DNA lesions in Escherichia coli cells deficient in BER and AlkB-directed DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Anna; Mielecki, Damian; Chojnacka, Aleksandra; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Wrzesinski, Michal; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta

    2010-03-01

    Methylmethane sulphonate (MMS), an S(N)2-type alkylating agent, generates DNA methylated bases exhibiting cytotoxic and mutagenic properties. Such damaged bases can be removed by a system of base excision repair (BER) and by oxidative DNA demethylation catalysed by AlkB protein. Here, we have shown that the lack of the BER system and functional AlkB dioxygenase results in (i) increased sensitivity to MMS, (ii) elevated level of spontaneous and MMS-induced mutations (measured by argE3 --> Arg(+) reversion) and (iii) induction of the SOS response shown by visualization of filamentous growth of bacteria. In the xth nth nfo strain additionally mutated in alkB gene, all these effects were extreme and led to 'error catastrophe', resulting from the presence of unrepaired apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and 1-methyladenine (1meA)/3-methylcytosine (3meC) lesions caused by deficiency in, respectively, BER and AlkB dioxygenase. The decreased level of MMS-induced Arg(+) revertants in the strains deficient in polymerase V (PolV) (bearing the deletion of the umuDC operon), and the increased frequency of these revertants in bacteria overproducing PolV (harbouring the pRW134 plasmid) indicate the involvement of PolV in the error-prone repair of 1meA/3meC and AP sites. Comparison of the sensitivity to MMS and the induction of Arg(+) revertants in the double nfo alkB and xth alkB, and the quadruple xth nth nfo alkB mutants showed that the more AP sites there are in DNA, the stronger the effect of the lack of AlkB protein. Since the sum of MMS-induced Arg(+) revertants in xth, nfo and nth xth nfo and alkB mutants is smaller than the frequency of these revertants in the BER(-) alkB(-) strain, we consider two possibilities: (i) the presence of AP sites in DNA results in relaxation of its structure that facilitates methylation and (ii) additional AP sites are formed in the BER(-) alkB(-) mutants.

  20. DNA-Based Applications in Nanobiotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid M. Abu-Salah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological molecules such as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA have shown great potential in fabrication and construction of nanostructures and devices. The very properties that make DNA so effective as genetic material also make it a very suitable molecule for programmed self-assembly. The use of DNA to assemble metals or semiconducting particles has been extended to construct metallic nanowires and functionalized nanotubes. This paper highlights some important aspects of conjugating the unique physical properties of dots or wires with the remarkable recognition capabilities of DNA which could lead to miniaturizing biological electronics and optical devices, including biosensors and probes. Attempts to use DNA-based nanocarriers for gene delivery are discussed. In addition, the ecological advantages and risks of nanotechnology including DNA-based nanobiotechnology are evaluated.

  1. DNA Methylation of MMP9 Is Associated with High Levels of MMP-9 Messenger RNA in Periapical Inflammatory Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Kelma; Gomes, Carolina Cavalieri; Farias, Lucyana Conceição; Silva, Renato Menezes; Letra, Ariadne; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are the major class of enzymes responsible for degradation of extracellular matrix components and participate in the pathogenesis of periapical inflammatory lesions. MMP expression may be regulated by DNA methylation. The purpose of the present investigation was to analyze the expression of MMP2 and MMP9 in periapical granulomas and radicular cysts and to test the hypothesis that, in these lesions, their transcription may be modulated by DNA methylation. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate the DNA methylation pattern of the MMP2 gene in 13 fresh periapical granuloma samples and 10 fresh radicular cyst samples. Restriction enzyme digestion was used to assess methylation of the MMP9 gene in 12 fresh periapical granuloma samples and 10 fresh radicular cyst samples. MMP2 and MMP9 messenger RNA transcript levels were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. All periapical lesions and healthy mucosa samples showed partial methylation of the MMP2 gene; however, periapical granulomas showed higher MMP2 mRNA expression levels than healthy mucosa (P = .014). A higher unmethylated profile of the MMP9 gene was found in periapical granulomas and radicular cysts compared with healthy mucosa. In addition, higher MMP9 mRNA expression was observed in the periapical lesions compared with healthy tissues. The present study suggests that the unmethylated status of the MMP9 gene in periapical lesions may explain the observed up-regulation of messenger RNA transcription in these lesions. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Background based Gaussian mixture model lesion segmentation in PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soffientini, Chiara Dolores, E-mail: chiaradolores.soffientini@polimi.it; Baselli, Giuseppe [DEIB, Department of Electronics, Information, and Bioengineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, Milan 20133 (Italy); De Bernardi, Elisabetta [Department of Medicine and Surgery, Tecnomed Foundation, University of Milano—Bicocca, Monza 20900 (Italy); Zito, Felicia; Castellani, Massimo [Nuclear Medicine Department, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, via Francesco Sforza 35, Milan 20122 (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Quantitative {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is limited by the uncertainty in lesion delineation due to poor SNR, low resolution, and partial volume effects, subsequently impacting oncological assessment, treatment planning, and follow-up. The present work develops and validates a segmentation algorithm based on statistical clustering. The introduction of constraints based on background features and contiguity priors is expected to improve robustness vs clinical image characteristics such as lesion dimension, noise, and contrast level. Methods: An eight-class Gaussian mixture model (GMM) clustering algorithm was modified by constraining the mean and variance parameters of four background classes according to the previous analysis of a lesion-free background volume of interest (background modeling). Hence, expectation maximization operated only on the four classes dedicated to lesion detection. To favor the segmentation of connected objects, a further variant was introduced by inserting priors relevant to the classification of neighbors. The algorithm was applied to simulated datasets and acquired phantom data. Feasibility and robustness toward initialization were assessed on a clinical dataset manually contoured by two expert clinicians. Comparisons were performed with respect to a standard eight-class GMM algorithm and to four different state-of-the-art methods in terms of volume error (VE), Dice index, classification error (CE), and Hausdorff distance (HD). Results: The proposed GMM segmentation with background modeling outperformed standard GMM and all the other tested methods. Medians of accuracy indexes were VE <3%, Dice >0.88, CE <0.25, and HD <1.2 in simulations; VE <23%, Dice >0.74, CE <0.43, and HD <1.77 in phantom data. Robustness toward image statistic changes (±15%) was shown by the low index changes: <26% for VE, <17% for Dice, and <15% for CE. Finally, robustness toward the user-dependent volume initialization was

  3. Charge transport through DNA based electronic barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sunil R.; Chawda, Vivek; Qi, Jianqing; Anantram, M. P.; Sinha, Niraj

    2018-05-01

    We report charge transport in electronic 'barriers' constructed by sequence engineering in DNA. Considering the ionization potentials of Thymine-Adenine (AT) and Guanine-Cytosine (GC) base pairs, we treat AT as 'barriers'. The effect of DNA conformation (A and B form) on charge transport is also investigated. Particularly, the effect of width of 'barriers' on hole transport is investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed on energy minimized DNA structures to obtain the electronic Hamiltonian. The quantum transport calculations are performed using the Landauer-Buttiker framework. Our main findings are contrary to previous studies. We find that a longer A-DNA with more AT base pairs can conduct better than shorter A-DNA with a smaller number of AT base pairs. We also find that some sequences of A-DNA can conduct better than a corresponding B-DNA with the same sequence. The counterions mediated charge transport and long range interactions are speculated to be responsible for counter-intuitive length and AT content dependence of conductance of A-DNA.

  4. Lesion-induced DNA weak structural changes detected by pulsed EPR spectroscopy combined with site-directed spin labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicoli, Giuseppe; Mathis, Gérald; Aci-Sèche, Samia; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Boulard, Yves; Gasparutto, Didier; Gambarelli, Serge

    2009-06-01

    Double electron-electron resonance (DEER) was applied to determine nanometre spin-spin distances on DNA duplexes that contain selected structural alterations. The present approach to evaluate the structural features of DNA damages is thus related to the interspin distance changes, as well as to the flexibility of the overall structure deduced from the distance distribution. A set of site-directed nitroxide-labelled double-stranded DNA fragments containing defined lesions, namely an 8-oxoguanine, an abasic site or abasic site analogues, a nick, a gap and a bulge structure were prepared and then analysed by the DEER spectroscopic technique. New insights into the application of 4-pulse DEER sequence are also provided, in particular with respect to the spin probes' positions and the rigidity of selected systems. The lesion-induced conformational changes observed, which were supported by molecular dynamics studies, confirm the results obtained by other, more conventional, spectroscopic techniques. Thus, the experimental approaches described herein provide an efficient method for probing lesion-induced structural changes of nucleic acids.

  5. Synthesis of modified oligonucleotides that contain purine and pyrimidine radio-induced base lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romieu, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    Different factors as oxidizing or carcinogenesis agents, UV and ionizing radiations,.... can generate a wide, spectrum of DNA base damages. In order to study the biochemical and structural features of these DNA damages, it is important to prepare short DNA fragments (20 to 50 bases long) bearing a single or several modifications at specific sites in their sequences. The chemical synthesis is a powerful tool to prepare such modified DNA fragments. This work focusses on the chemical incorporation of several modified nucleosides formed in DNA by ionizing radiations or by photo-sensitization. The first part of this study describes the preparation of a phosphoramidite synthon of 5-hydroxy-2'-deoxyuridine and its subsequent incorporation into synthetic oligonucleotides ranging from 14 to 33 bases long. In a second part (chapters Ill and IV), the synthesis and incorporation of original radiation-induced tandem lesions: the carbon-bridged cyclo-nucleosides are presented. Both (5'R)- and (5'S) diastereomers of 5',8-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine and 5',8-cyclo-2'-deoxyguanosine have been individually inserted into various different oligonucleotides (3 to 22 bases long) by using the standard phosphoramidite chemistry. The chemical incorporation of a pyrimidine analogue: (5'S, 6S)-5',6-cyclo-5,6-dihydro-thymidine has been also achieved. The loss of aromaticity of this modified nucleoside and its poor reactivity required the development of a synthetic strategy entirely different from that used for the preparation and subsequent incorporation of the phosphoramidite synthons of 5',8-cyclo-purine-2'-deoxyribo-nucleosides. The third part of this study deals with the synthesis of a phosphoramidite synthon of 4-hydroxy-8-oxo-4,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine. The two (4R)- and (4S)- diastereomers of this oxidized purine have been separated and individually inserted in several synthetic DNA fragments. No epimerization of C-4 position was observed during the solid-phase synthesis and during the

  6. DNA-Based Enzyme Reactors and Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veikko Linko

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, the possibility to create custom biocompatible nanoshapes using DNA as a building material has rapidly emerged. Further, these rationally designed DNA structures could be exploited in positioning pivotal molecules, such as enzymes, with nanometer-level precision. This feature could be used in the fabrication of artificial biochemical machinery that is able to mimic the complex reactions found in living cells. Currently, DNA-enzyme hybrids can be used to control (multi-enzyme cascade reactions and to regulate the enzyme functions and the reaction pathways. Moreover, sophisticated DNA structures can be utilized in encapsulating active enzymes and delivering the molecular cargo into cells. In this review, we focus on the latest enzyme systems based on novel DNA nanostructures: enzyme reactors, regulatory devices and carriers that can find uses in various biotechnological and nanomedical applications.

  7. On-bead fluorescent DNA nanoprobes to analyze base excision repair activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gines, Guillaume; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Gasparutto, Didier, E-mail: didier.gasparutto@cea.fr

    2014-02-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •On magnetic beads fluorescent enzymatic assays. •Simple, easy, non-radioactive and electrophoresis-free functional assay. •Lesion-containing hairpin DNA probes are selective for repair enzymes. •The biosensing platform allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or within cell free extracts. -- Abstract: DNA integrity is constantly threatened by endogenous and exogenous agents that can modify its physical and chemical structure. Changes in DNA sequence can cause mutations sparked by some genetic diseases or cancers. Organisms have developed efficient defense mechanisms able to specifically repair each kind of lesion (alkylation, oxidation, single or double strand break, mismatch, etc). Here we report the adjustment of an original assay to detect enzymes’ activity of base excision repair (BER), that supports a set of lesions including abasic sites, alkylation, oxidation or deamination products of bases. The biosensor is characterized by a set of fluorescent hairpin-shaped nucleic acid probes supported on magnetic beads, each containing a selective lesion targeting a specific BER enzyme. We have studied the DNA glycosylase alkyl-adenine glycosylase (AAG) and the human AP-endonuclease (APE1) by incorporating within the DNA probe a hypoxanthine lesion or an abasic site analog (tetrahydrofuran), respectively. Enzymatic repair activity induces the formation of a nick in the damaged strand, leading to probe's break, that is detected in the supernatant by fluorescence. The functional assay allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or in cell-free extracts in a fast, specific, quantitative and sensitive way, using only 1 pmol of probe for a test. We recorded a detection limit of 1 μg mL{sup −1} and 50 μg mL{sup −1} of HeLa nuclear extracts for APE1 and AAG enzymes, respectively. Finally, the on-bead assay should be useful to screen inhibitors of DNA repair

  8. On-bead fluorescent DNA nanoprobes to analyze base excision repair activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gines, Guillaume; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Gasparutto, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •On magnetic beads fluorescent enzymatic assays. •Simple, easy, non-radioactive and electrophoresis-free functional assay. •Lesion-containing hairpin DNA probes are selective for repair enzymes. •The biosensing platform allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or within cell free extracts. -- Abstract: DNA integrity is constantly threatened by endogenous and exogenous agents that can modify its physical and chemical structure. Changes in DNA sequence can cause mutations sparked by some genetic diseases or cancers. Organisms have developed efficient defense mechanisms able to specifically repair each kind of lesion (alkylation, oxidation, single or double strand break, mismatch, etc). Here we report the adjustment of an original assay to detect enzymes’ activity of base excision repair (BER), that supports a set of lesions including abasic sites, alkylation, oxidation or deamination products of bases. The biosensor is characterized by a set of fluorescent hairpin-shaped nucleic acid probes supported on magnetic beads, each containing a selective lesion targeting a specific BER enzyme. We have studied the DNA glycosylase alkyl-adenine glycosylase (AAG) and the human AP-endonuclease (APE1) by incorporating within the DNA probe a hypoxanthine lesion or an abasic site analog (tetrahydrofuran), respectively. Enzymatic repair activity induces the formation of a nick in the damaged strand, leading to probe's break, that is detected in the supernatant by fluorescence. The functional assay allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or in cell-free extracts in a fast, specific, quantitative and sensitive way, using only 1 pmol of probe for a test. We recorded a detection limit of 1 μg mL −1 and 50 μg mL −1 of HeLa nuclear extracts for APE1 and AAG enzymes, respectively. Finally, the on-bead assay should be useful to screen inhibitors of DNA repair activities

  9. Pyrimidine dimers are not the principal pre-mutagenic lesions induced in lambda phage DNA by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were performed to examine the role of cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers in the process of mutagenesis by ultraviolet light. Lambda phage DNA was irradiated with u.v. and then incubated with an Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme, which monomerizes cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers upon exposure to visible light. The photoreactivated DNA was packaged into lambda phage particles, which were used to infect E. coli uvr - host cells that had been induced for SOS functions by ultraviolet irradiation. Photoreactivation removed most toxic lesions from irradiated phage, but did not change the frequency of induction of mutations to the clear-plaque phenotype. This implies that cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers can be lethal, but usually do not serve as sites of mutations in the phage. The DNA sequences of mutants, derived from photoreactivated DNA showed that almost two-thirds (16/28) were transitions, the same fraction found for u.v. mutagenesis without photoreactivation. Thus the lesion inducing transitions is not the cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimer. Photoreactivation of SOS-induced host cells before infection with u.v.-irradiated phage reduced mutagenesis substantially. In this case, photoreversal of cyclobutyl dimers serves to reduce expression of the SOS functions that are required in targeted u.v. mutagenesis. (author)

  10. Identification of an Unfolding Intermediate for a DNA Lesion Bypass Polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrer, Shanen M.; Maxwell, Brian A.; Pack, Lindsey R.; Fiala, Kevin A.; Fowler, Jason D.; Zhang, Jun; Suo, Zucai

    2012-01-01

    Sulfolobus solfataricusDNA Polymerase IV (Dpo4), a prototype Y-family DNA polymerase, has been well characterized biochemically and biophysically at 37 °C or lower temperatures. However, the physiological temperature of the hyperthermophile S. solfataricus is approximately 80 °C. With such a large discrepancy in temperature, the in vivo relevance of these in vitro studies of Dpo4 has been questioned. Here, we employed circular dichroism spectroscopy and fluorescence-based thermal scanning to investigate the secondary structural changes of Dpo4 over a temperature range from 26 to 119 °C. Dpo4 was shown to display a high melting temperature characteristic of hyperthermophiles. Unexpectedly, the Little Finger domain of Dpo4, which is only found in the Y-family DNA polymerases, was shown to be more thermostable than the polymerase core. More interestingly, Dpo4 exhibited a three-state cooperative unfolding profile with an unfolding intermediate. The linker region between the Little Finger and Thumb domains of Dpo4 was found to be a source of structural instability. Through site-directed mutagenesis, the interactions between the residues in the linker region and the Palm domain were identified to play a critical role in the formation of the unfolding intermediate. Notably, the secondary structure of Dpo4 was not altered when the temperature was increased from 26 to 87.5 °C. Thus, in addition to providing structural insights into the thermal stability and an unfolding intermediate of Dpo4, our work also validated the relevance of the in vitro studies of Dpo4 performed at temperatures significantly lower than 80 °C. PMID:22667759

  11. Recent progress on DNA based walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jing; Li, Feiran; Cha, Tae-Gon; Chen, Haorong; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2015-08-01

    DNA based synthetic molecular walkers are reminiscent of biological protein motors. They are powered by hybridization with fuel strands, environment induced conformational transitions, and covalent chemistry of oligonucleotides. Recent developments in experimental techniques enable direct observation of individual walkers with high temporal and spatial resolution. The functionalities of state-of-the-art DNA walker systems can thus be analyzed for various applications. Herein we review recent progress on DNA walker principles and characterization methods, and evaluate various aspects of their functions for future applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. DNA Based Electrochromic and Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    using deoxyribonucleic acid complex as an electron blocking layer App. Phys. Lett. 88 (2006) 171109. 23. F.H.C. Crick , J.D. Watson . The complementary...9550-09-1-0647 final 01-09-2009 ; 30-11-2011 DNA Based Electrochromic and Photovoltaic Cells FA 9550-09-1-0647 Pawlicka, Agnieszka, J. Instituto de...Available. DNA is an abundant natural product with very good biodegradation properties and can be used to obtain gel polymer electrolytes (GPEs) with high

  13. Ex vivo assessment of protective effects of carvacrol against DNA lesions induced in primary rat cells by visible light excited methylene blue (VL+MB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamenova, D; Horvathova, E; Chalupa, I; Wsolova, L; Navarova, J

    2011-01-01

    Carvacrol belongs to frequently occurring phenolic components of essential oils (EOs) and it is present in many kinds of plants. Biological effect of this phenol derivative on human beings is however not sufficiently known. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the level of VL+MB-induced oxidative DNA lesions in hepatocytes and testicular cells (freshly isolated from control or carvacrol-watered rats) by the modified single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). The results showed that carvacrol significantly reduced the level of VL+MB-induced oxidized bases (EndoIII- and Fpg-sensitive sites) only in hepatocytes but not in testicular cells. Chromosomal aberration assay of primary hepatocytes, isolated from control or carvacrol-watered rats did not testify any genotoxic activity of carvacrol. We suggest that in vivo applied synthetic carvacrol, whose antioxidative activity was confirmed by DPPH assay, exhibits primarily a strong hepatoprotective activity against oxidative damage to DNA.

  14. Hidden in Plain Sight: Subtle Effects of the 8-Oxoguanine Lesion on the Structure, Dynamics, and Thermodynamics of a 15-Base-Pair Oligodeoxynucleotide Duplex†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crenshaw, Charisse M.; Wade, Jacqueline E.; Arthanari, Haribabu; Frueh, Dominique; Lane, Benjamin F.; Núñez, Megan E.

    2011-01-01

    The base lesion 8-oxoguanine is formed readily by oxidation of DNA, potentially leading to G→T transversion mutations. Despite the apparent similarity of 8-oxoguanine-cytosine base pairs to normal guanine-cytosine base pairs, cellular base excision repair systems effectively recognize the lesion base. Here we apply several techniques to examine a single 8-oxoguanine lesion at the center of a nonpalindromic 15-mer duplex oligonucleotide in an effort to determine what, if anything, distinguishes an 8-oxoguanine-cytosine base pair from a normal base pair. The lesion duplex is globally almost indistinguishable from the unmodified parent duplex using CD spectroscopy and UV melting thermodynamics. The DNA mismatch-detecting photocleavage agent Rh(bpy)2chrysi3+ cleaves only weakly and nonspecifically, revealing that the 8oxoG-C pair is locally stable at the level of the individual base pairs. NMR spectra are also consistent with a well-conserved B-form duplex structure. In the 2D NOESY spectra, base-sugar and imino-imino crosspeaks are strikingly similar between parent and lesion duplexes. Changes in chemical shift due to the 8oxoG lesion are localized to its complementary cytosine and to the 2–3 base pairs immediately flanking the lesion on the lesion strand. Residues further removed from the lesion are shown to be unperturbed by its presence. Notably, imino exchange experiments indicate that the 8-oxoguanine-cytosine pair is strong and stable, with an apparent equilibrium constant for opening equal to that of other internal guanine-cytosine base pairs, on the order of 10−6. This collection of experiments shows that the 8-oxoguanine-cytosine base pair is incredibly stable and similar to the native pair. PMID:21902242

  15. Repriming by PrimPol is critical for DNA replication restart downstream of lesions and chain-terminating nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kaori; Guilliam, Thomas A; Tsuda, Masataka; Yamamoto, Junpei; Bailey, Laura J; Iwai, Shigenori; Takeda, Shunichi; Doherty, Aidan J; Hirota, Kouji

    2016-08-02

    PrimPol is a DNA damage tolerance enzyme possessing both translesion synthesis (TLS) and primase activities. To uncover its potential role in TLS-mediated IgVλ hypermutation and define its interplay with other TLS polymerases, PrimPol(-/-) and PrimPol(-/-)/Polη(-/-)/Polζ (-/-) gene knockouts were generated in avian cells. Loss of PrimPol had no significant impact on the rate of hypermutation or the mutation spectrum of IgVλ. However, PrimPol(-/-) cells were sensitive to methylmethane sulfonate, suggesting that it may bypass abasic sites at the IgVλ segment by repriming DNA synthesis downstream of these sites. PrimPol(-/-) cells were also sensitive to cisplatin and hydroxyurea, indicating that it assists in maintaining / restarting replication at a variety of lesions. To accurately measure the relative contribution of the TLS and primase activities, we examined DNA damage sensitivity in PrimPol(-/-) cells complemented with polymerase or primase-deficient PrimPol. Polymerase-defective, but not primase-deficient, PrimPol suppresses the hypersensitivity of PrimPol(-/-) cells. This indicates that its primase, rather than TLS activity, is pivotal for DNA damage tolerance. Loss of TLS polymerases, Polη and Polζ has an additive effect on the sensitivity of PrimPol(-/-) cells. Moreover, we found that PrimPol and Polη-Polζ redundantly prevented cell death and facilitated unperturbed cell cycle progression. PrimPol(-/-) cells also exhibited increased sensitivity to a wide variety of chain-terminating nucleoside analogs (CTNAs). PrimPol could perform close-coupled repriming downstream of CTNAs and oxidative damage in vitro. Together, these results indicate that PrimPol's repriming activity plays a central role in reinitiating replication downstream from CTNAs and other specific DNA lesions.

  16. Nuclear DNA-Content in Mesenchymal Lesions in Dogs: Its Value as Marker of Malignancy and Extent of Genomic Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerkamp, Kim M.; Rutteman, Gerard R.; Kik, Marja J. L.; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Schulze, Christoph; Grinwis, Guy C. M.

    2012-01-01

    DNA-aneuploidy may reflect the malignant nature of mesenchymal proliferations and herald gross genomic instability as a mechanistic factor in tumor genesis. DNA-ploidy and -index were determined by flow cytometry in canine inflammatory or neoplastic mesenchymal tissues and related to clinico-pathological features, biological behavior and p53 gene mutational status. Half of all sarcomas were aneuploid. Benign mesenchymal neoplasms were rarely aneuploid and inflammatory lesions not at all. The aneuploidy rate was comparable to that reported for human sarcomas with significant variation amongst subtypes. DNA-ploidy status in canines lacked a relation with histological grade of malignancy, in contrast to human sarcomas. While aneuploidy was related to the development of metastases in soft tissue sarcomas it was not in osteosarcomas. No relation amongst sarcomas was found between ploidy status and presence of P53 gene mutations. Heterogeneity of the DNA index between primary and metastatic sarcoma sites was present in half of the cases examined. Hypoploidy is more common in canine sarcomas and hyperploid cases have less deviation of the DNA index than human sarcomas. The variation in the presence and extent of aneuploidy amongst sarcoma subtypes indicates variation in genomic instability. This study strengthens the concept of interspecies variation in the evolution of gross chromosomal aberrations during cancer development. PMID:24213507

  17. Nuclear DNA-Content in Mesenchymal Lesions in Dogs: Its Value as Marker of Malignancy and Extent of Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerkamp, Kim M., E-mail: K.M.Boerkamp@uu.nl; Rutteman, Gerard R. [Department of Clinical Science of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, UU, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kik, Marja J. L. [Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, UU, Yalelaan 1, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kirpensteijn, Jolle [Department of Clinical Science of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, UU, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schulze, Christoph; Grinwis, Guy C. M. [Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, UU, Yalelaan 1, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-12-03

    DNA-aneuploidy may reflect the malignant nature of mesenchymal proliferations and herald gross genomic instability as a mechanistic factor in tumor genesis. DNA-ploidy and -index were determined by flow cytometry in canine inflammatory or neoplastic mesenchymal tissues and related to clinico-pathological features, biological behavior and p53 gene mutational status. Half of all sarcomas were aneuploid. Benign mesenchymal neoplasms were rarely aneuploid and inflammatory lesions not at all. The aneuploidy rate was comparable to that reported for human sarcomas with significant variation amongst subtypes. DNA-ploidy status in canines lacked a relation with histological grade of malignancy, in contrast to human sarcomas. While aneuploidy was related to the development of metastases in soft tissue sarcomas it was not in osteosarcomas. No relation amongst sarcomas was found between ploidy status and presence of P53 gene mutations. Heterogeneity of the DNA index between primary and metastatic sarcoma sites was present in half of the cases examined. Hypoploidy is more common in canine sarcomas and hyperploid cases have less deviation of the DNA index than human sarcomas. The variation in the presence and extent of aneuploidy amongst sarcoma subtypes indicates variation in genomic instability. This study strengthens the concept of interspecies variation in the evolution of gross chromosomal aberrations during cancer development.

  18. Nuclear DNA-Content in Mesenchymal Lesions in Dogs: Its Value as Marker of Malignancy and Extent of Genomic Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Schulze

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA-aneuploidy may reflect the malignant nature of mesenchymal proliferations and herald gross genomic instability as a mechanistic factor in tumor genesis. DNA-ploidy and -index were determined by flow cytometry in canine inflammatory or neoplastic mesenchymal tissues and related to clinico-pathological features, biological behavior and p53 gene mutational status. Half of all sarcomas were aneuploid. Benign mesenchymal neoplasms were rarely aneuploid and inflammatory lesions not at all. The aneuploidy rate was comparable to that reported for human sarcomas with significant variation amongst subtypes. DNA-ploidy status in canines lacked a relation with histological grade of malignancy, in contrast to human sarcomas. While aneuploidy was related to the development of metastases in soft tissue sarcomas it was not in osteosarcomas. No relation amongst sarcomas was found between ploidy status and presence of P53 gene mutations. Heterogeneity of the DNA index between primary and metastatic sarcoma sites was present in half of the cases examined. Hypoploidy is more common in canine sarcomas and hyperploid cases have less deviation of the DNA index than human sarcomas. The variation in the presence and extent of aneuploidy amongst sarcoma subtypes indicates variation in genomic instability. This study strengthens the concept of interspecies variation in the evolution of gross chromosomal aberrations during cancer development.

  19. Nuclear DNA-Content in Mesenchymal Lesions in Dogs: Its Value as Marker of Malignancy and Extent of Genomic Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerkamp, Kim M.; Rutteman, Gerard R.; Kik, Marja J. L.; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Schulze, Christoph; Grinwis, Guy C. M.

    2012-01-01

    DNA-aneuploidy may reflect the malignant nature of mesenchymal proliferations and herald gross genomic instability as a mechanistic factor in tumor genesis. DNA-ploidy and -index were determined by flow cytometry in canine inflammatory or neoplastic mesenchymal tissues and related to clinico-pathological features, biological behavior and p53 gene mutational status. Half of all sarcomas were aneuploid. Benign mesenchymal neoplasms were rarely aneuploid and inflammatory lesions not at all. The aneuploidy rate was comparable to that reported for human sarcomas with significant variation amongst subtypes. DNA-ploidy status in canines lacked a relation with histological grade of malignancy, in contrast to human sarcomas. While aneuploidy was related to the development of metastases in soft tissue sarcomas it was not in osteosarcomas. No relation amongst sarcomas was found between ploidy status and presence of P53 gene mutations. Heterogeneity of the DNA index between primary and metastatic sarcoma sites was present in half of the cases examined. Hypoploidy is more common in canine sarcomas and hyperploid cases have less deviation of the DNA index than human sarcomas. The variation in the presence and extent of aneuploidy amongst sarcoma subtypes indicates variation in genomic instability. This study strengthens the concept of interspecies variation in the evolution of gross chromosomal aberrations during cancer development

  20. Epigenetic reprogramming of pericentromeric satellite DNA in premalignant and malignant lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brückmann, Nadine Heidi; Pedersen, Christina Bøg; Ditzel, Henrik Jørn

    2018-01-01

    on pericentromeric satellites in primary melanocytes. This suggests that polycomb bodies form in cancer cells with global DNA demethylation to control the stability of pericentromeric satellite DNA. These results reveal a novel epigenetic perturbation specific to premalignant and malignant cells thatmaybe used...... as an early diagnostic marker for detection of precancerous changes and a new therapeutic entry point. Implications: Pericentromeric satellite DNA is epigenetically reprogrammed into polycomb bodies as a premalignant event with implications for transcriptional activity and genomic stability. Mol Cancer Res...

  1. Causes and consequences of plant radio-resistance. Formation of DNA basis lesions and self-repairing activity of one of them, the 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-guanine in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dany, A.L.

    2001-01-01

    In this research thesis, the author first explains how and why DNA is injured when it is submitted to an oxidizing stress, and describes precisely the formation and the biological consequences of lesions of DNA bases, the 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-guanine (8-oxoGua). She describes the repairing activities of the oxidized DNA, and more particularly the repairing of 8-oxoGua, in prokaryotes as well as in yeast, mammals and plants. Methodologies used are described, together with the repair activities of the 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-guanine following a biochemical type approach and a molecular biology approach

  2. [Single-molecule detection and characterization of DNA replication based on DNA origami].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Fan, Youjie; Li, Bin

    2014-08-01

    To investigate single-molecule detection and characterization of DNA replication. Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) as the template of DNA replication was attached to DNA origami by a hybridization reaction based on the complementary base-pairing principle. DNA replication catalyzed by E.coli DNA polymerase I Klenow Fragment (KF) was detected using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The height variations between the ssDNA and the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), the distribution of KF during DNA replication and biotin-streptavidin (BA) complexes on the DNA strand after replication were detected. Agarose gel electrophoresis was employed to analyze the changes in the DNA after replication. The designed ssDNA could be anchored on the target positions of over 50% of the DNA origami. The KF was capable of binding to the ssDNA fixed on DNA origami and performing its catalytic activities, and was finally dissociated from the DNA after replication. The height of DNA strand increased by about 0.7 nm after replication. The addition of streptavidin also resulted in an DNA height increase to about 4.9 nm due to the formation of BA complexes on the biotinylated dsDNA. The resulting dsDNA and BA complex were subsequently confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The combination of AFM and DNA origami allows detection and characterization of DNA replication at the single molecule level, and this approach provides better insights into the mechanism of DNA polymerase and the factors affecting DNA replication.

  3. The SRS2 suppressor of rad6 mutations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae acts by channeling DNA lesions into the RAD52 DNA repair pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiestl, R.H.; Prakash, S.; Prakash, L.

    1990-01-01

    rad6 mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are defective in the repair of damaged DNA, DNA damage induced mutagenesis, and sporulation. In order to identify genes that can substitute for RAD6 function, the authors have isolated genomic suppressors of the UV sensitivity of rad6 deletion (rad6Δ) mutations and show that they also suppress the γ-ray sensitivity but not the UV mutagenesis or sporulation defects of rad6. The suppressors show semidominance for suppression of UV sensitivity and dominance for suppression of γ-ray sensitivity. The six suppressor mutations they isolated are all alleles of the same locus and are also allelic to a previously described suppressor of the rad6-1 nonsense mutation, SRS2. They show that suppression of rad6Δ is dependent on the RAD52 recombinational repair pathway since suppression is not observed in the rad6Δ SRS2 strain containing an additional mutation in either the RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, RAD55 or RAD57 genes. Possible mechanisms by which SRS2 may channel unrepaired DNA lesions into the RAD52 DNA repair pathway are discussed

  4. Random amplified polymorphic DNA based genetic characterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA based genetic characterization of four important species of Bamboo, found in Raigad district, Maharashtra State, India. ... Bambusoideae are differentiated from other members of the family by the presence of petiolate blades with parallel venation and stamens are three, four, six or more, ...

  5. NMR studies of abasic sites in DNA duplexes: Deoxyadenosine stacks into the helix opposite acyclic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnik, M.W.; Chang, Chienneng; Johnson, F.; Grollman, A.P.; Patel, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Proton and phosphorus NMR studies are reported for two complementary nonanucleotide duplexes containing acyclic abasic sites. The first duplex, d(C-A-T-G-A-G-T-A-C)·d(G-T-A-C-P-C-A-T-G), contains an acyclic propanyl moiety, P, located opposite a deoxyadenosine at the center of the helix (designated AP P 9-mer duplex). The second duplex, d(C-A-T-G-A-G-T-A-C-)·d(G-T-A-C-E-C-A-T-G), contains a similarly located acyclic ethanyl moiety, E (designated AP E 9-mer duplex). The ethanyl moiety is one carbon shorter than the natural carbon-phosphodiester backbone of a single nucleotide unit of DNA. The majority of the exchangeable and nonexchangeable base and sugar protons in both the AP P 9-mer and AP E 9-mer duplexes, including those at the abasic site, have been assigned by recording and analyzing two-dimensional phase-sensitive NOESY data sets in H 2 O and D 2 O solution between -5 and 5 degree C. These spectroscopic observations establish that A5 inserts into the helix opposite the abasic site (P14 and El14) and stacks between the flanking G4·C15 and G6·C13 Watson-Crick base pairs in both the AP P 9-mer and AP E 9-mer duplexes. Proton NMR parameters for the Ap P 9-mer and AP E 9-mer duplexes are similar to those reported previously. These proton NMR experiments demonstrate that the structures at abasic sites are very similar whether the five-membered ring is open or closed or whether the phosphodiester backbone is shortened by one carbon atom. Phosphorus spectra of the AP P 9-mer and AP E 9-mer duplexes (5 degree C) indicate that the backbone conformation is similarly perturbed at three phosphodiester backbone torsion angles

  6. Interaction of DNA-lesions induced by sodium fluoride and radiation and its influence in apoptotic induction in cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Podder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride is an essential trace element but also an environmental contaminant with major sources of exposure being drinking water, food and pesticides. Previous studies showed that sodium fluoride (NaF at 5 mM or more is required to induce apoptosis and chromosome aberrations and proposed that DNA damage and apoptosis play an important role in toxicity of excessive fluoride. The aim of this study is directed to understand the nature of DNA-lesions induced by NaF by allowing its interaction with radiation induced DNA-lesions. NaF 5 mM was used after observing inability to induce DNA damages and apoptosis by single exposure with 50 μM or 1 mM NaF. Co-exposure to NaF and radiation significantly increased the frequency of aberrant metaphases and exchange aberrations in human lymphocytes and arrested the cells in G1 stage instead of apoptotic death. Flow cytometric analysis, DNA fragmentation and PARP-cleavage analysis clearly indicated that 5 mM NaF together with radiation (1 Gy induced apoptosis in both U87 and K562 cells due to down regulation of expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, like Bcl2 in U87 and inhibitors of apoptotic proteins like survivin and cIAP in K562 cells. This study herein suggested that single exposure with extremely low concentration of NaF unable to induce DNA lesions whereas higher concentration induced DNA lesions interact with the radiation-induced DNA lesions. Both are probably repaired rapidly thus showed increased interactive effect. Coexposure to NaF and radiation induces more apoptosis in cancer cell lines which could be due to increased exchange aberrations through lesions interaction and downregulating anti-apoptotic genes.

  7. The role of the HCR system in the repair of lethal lesions of Bacillus subtilis phages and their transfecting DNA damaged by radiation and alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizdalova, M.; Janovska, E.; Zhestyanikov, V.D.

    1980-01-01

    The role of the HCR system in the repair of prelethal lesions induced by UV light, γ radiation and alkylating agents was studied in the Bacillus subtilis SPP1 phage, its heat sensitive mutants (N3, N73 nad ts 1 ) and corresponding infectious DNA. The survival of phages and their transfecting DNA after treatment with UV light is substantially higher in hcr + cells than in hcr cells, the differences being more striking in intact phages than in their transfecting DNA's. Repair inhibitors reduce survival in hcr + cells: caffeine lowers the survival of UV-irradiated phage SPP1 in exponentially growing hcr + cells but has no effect on its survival in competent hcr + cells; acriflavin and ethidium bromide decrease the survival of the UV-irradiated SPP1 phage in both exponentially growing and competent hcr + cells to the level of survival observed in hcr cells; moreover, ethidium bromide lowers the number of infective centres in hcr + cells of the UV-irradiated DNA of the SPP1 phage. Repair inhibitors do not lower the survival of the UV-irradiated phages or their DNA in hcr cells. The repair mechanism under study also effectively repairs lesions induced by polyfunctional alkylating agents in the transfecting DNA's of B. subtilis phages but is not functional with lesions induced by these agents in free phages and lesions caused in the phages and their DNA by ethyl methanesulphonate or γ radiation. (author)

  8. Base Pair Opening in a Deoxynucleotide Duplex Containing a cis-syn Thymine Cyclobutane Dimer Lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenke, Belinda B.; Huiting, Leah N.; Frankel, Elisa B.; Lane, Benjamin F.; Núñez, Megan E.

    2014-01-01

    The cis-syn thymine cyclobutane dimer is a DNA photoproduct implicated in skin cancer. We compared the stability of individual base pairs in thymine dimer-containing duplexes to undamaged parent 10-mer duplexes. UV melting thermodynamic measurements, CD spectroscopy, and 2D NOESY NMR spectroscopy confirm that the thymine dimer lesion is locally and moderately destabilizing within an overall B-form duplex conformation. We measured the rates of exchange of individual imino protons by NMR using magnetization transfer from water and determined the equilibrium constant for the opening of each base pair Kop. In the normal duplex Kop decreases from the frayed ends of the duplex toward the center, such that the central TA pair is the most stable with a Kop of 8×10−7. In contrast, base pair opening at the 5’T of the thymine dimer is facile. The 5’T of the dimer has the largest equilibrium constant (Kop =3×10−4) in its duplex, considerably larger than even the frayed penultimate base pairs. Notably, base pairing by the 3’T of the dimer is much more stable than by the 5’T, indicating that the predominant opening mechanism for the thymine dimer lesion is not likely to be flipping out into solution as a single unit. The dimer asymmetrically affects the stability of the duplex in its vicinity, destabilizing base pairing on its 5’ side more than on the 3’ side. The striking differences in base pair opening between parent and dimer duplexes occur independently of the duplex-single strand melting transitions. PMID:24328089

  9. Lung lesion doubling times: values and variability based on method of volume determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenbud Quint, Leslie; Cheng, Joan; Schipper, Matthew; Chang, Andrew C.; Kalemkerian, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine doubling times (DTs) of lung lesions based on volumetric measurements from thin-section CT imaging. Methods: Previously untreated patients with ≥ two thin-section CT scans showing a focal lung lesion were identified. Lesion volumes were derived using direct volume measurements and volume calculations based on lesion area and diameter. Growth rates (GRs) were compared by tissue diagnosis and measurement technique. Results: 54 lesions were evaluated including 8 benign lesions, 10 metastases, 3 lymphomas, 15 adenocarcinomas, 11 squamous carcinomas, and 7 miscellaneous lung cancers. Using direct volume measurements, median DTs were 453, 111, 15, 181, 139 and 137 days, respectively. Lung cancer DTs ranged from 23-2239 days. There were no significant differences in GRs among the different lesion types. There was considerable variability among GRs using different volume determination methods. Conclusions: Lung cancer doubling times showed a substantial range, and different volume determination methods gave considerably different DTs

  10. Heavy ion-induced lesions in DNA: A theoretical model for the initial induction of DNA strand breaks and chromatin breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical model has been developed and used to calculate yields and spatial distributions of DNA strand breaks resulting from the interactions of heavy ions with chromatin in aqueous systems. The three dimensional spatial distribution of ionizing events has been modeled for charged particles as a function of charge and velocity. Chromatin has been modeled as a 30 nm diameter solenoid of nucleosomal DNA. The Monte Carlo methods used by Chatterjee et al. have been applied to DNA in a chromatin conformation. Refinements to their methods include: a combined treatment of primary and low energy (<2 keV) secondary electron interactions, an improved low energy delta ray model, and the combined simulation of direct energy deposition on the DNA and attack by diffusing hydroxyl radicals. Individual particle tracks are treated independently, which is assumed to be applicable to low fluence irradiations in which multiple particle effects are negligible. Single strand break cross section open-quotes hooksclose quotes seen in experiments at very high LET appear to be due to the collapsing radial extent of the track, as predicted in the open-quotes deep sieveclose quotes hypothesis proposed by Tobias et al. Spatial distributions of lesions produced by particles have been found to depend on chromatin structure. In the future, heavy ions may be used as a tool to probe the organization of DNA in chromatin. A Neyman A-binomial variation of the open-quotes cluster modelclose quotes for the distribution of chromatin breaks per irradiated cell has been theoretically tested. The model includes a treatment of the chromatin fragment detection technique's resolution, which places a limitation on the minimum size of fragments which can be detected. The model appears to fit some of the experimental data reasonably well. However, further experimental and theoretical refinements are desirable

  11. Optical-Based Artificial Palpation Sensors for Lesion Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Jun Park

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Palpation techniques are widely used in medical procedures to detect the presence of lumps or tumors in the soft breast tissues. Since these procedures are very subjective and depend on the skills of the physician, it is imperative to perform detailed a scientific study in order to develop more efficient medical sensors to measure and generate palpation parameters. In this research, we propose an optical-based, artificial palpation sensor for lesion characterization. This has been developed using a multilayer polydimethylsiloxane optical waveguide. Light was generated at the critical angle to reflect totally within the flexible and transparent waveguide. When a waveguide was compressed by an external force, its contact area would deform and cause the light to scatter. The scattered light was captured by a high-resolution camera and saved as an image format. To test the performance of the proposed system, we used a realistic tissue phantom with embedded hard inclusions. The experimental results show that the proposed sensor can detect inclusions and provide the relative value of size, depth, and Young’s modulus of an inclusion.

  12. Communication: Electron ionization of DNA bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, M. A.; Krishnakumar, E., E-mail: ekkumar@tifr.res.in

    2016-04-28

    No reliable experimental data exist for the partial and total electron ionization cross sections for DNA bases, which are very crucial for modeling radiation damage in genetic material of living cell. We have measured a complete set of absolute partial electron ionization cross sections up to 500 eV for DNA bases for the first time by using the relative flow technique. These partial cross sections are summed to obtain total ion cross sections for all the four bases and are compared with the existing theoretical calculations and the only set of measured absolute cross sections. Our measurements clearly resolve the existing discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental results, thereby providing for the first time reliable numbers for partial and total ion cross sections for these molecules. The results on fragmentation analysis of adenine supports the theory of its formation in space.

  13. Immunohistochemical study of DNA topoisomerase I, DNA topoisomerase II alpha, p53, and Ki-67 in oral preneoplastic lesions and oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafian, Hilal; Venteo, Lydie; Sukhanova, Alyona; Nabiev, Igor; Lefevre, Benoît; Pluot, Michel

    2004-06-01

    Human DNA topoisomerase I (topo I) is the molecular target of the camptothecin group of anticancer drugs. Laboratory studies have shown that the cellular response to topo I-targeted drugs depends on the topo I expression and DNA replication rate and the apoptotic pathway activity. In this study, we tested potential indicators of the sensitivity of topo I-targeted drugs in 36 cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections were immunostained with monoclonal antibodies against Ki-67, p53, and topo I, and with polyclonal antibodies against DNA topoisomerase II-alpha (topo II-alpha). These markers were also tested in 18 epithelial hyperplastic lesions and 18 mild dysplasias. Immunostaining was quantified by the percentage of stained nuclei in each sample (the labeling index); 200 immunoreactive epithelial nuclei were counted per case for each antibody. The results support the possibility of using topo II-alpha staining for assessing the proliferative activity. High expression of topo II-alpha and topo I in OSCCs suggests that they may serve as potential indicators of sensitivity to topo I inhibitors. However, the apoptotic pathway assessed by p53 immunostaining was found to be uninformative. Analysis of the relationship between immunohistochemical results and clinical and pathologic parameters (the T and N stages and differentiation) showed that only the differentiation parameter correlated with the topo I expression rate. Thus, significant increase in the topo I expression in the poorly differentiated OSCCs suggests their higher sensitivity to drug treatment.

  14. The effect of temperature and wavelength on production and photolysis of a UV-induced photosensitive DNA lesion which is not repaired in xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.A.; Carrier, W.L.; Regan, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Ultraviolet light causes a type of damage to the DNA of human cells that results in a DNA strand break upon subsequent irradiation with wavelengths around 300 nm. This DNA damage disappears from normal human fibroblasts within 5 h, but not from pyrimidine dimer excision repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells or from excision proficient xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells. The apparent lack of repair of the ultraviolet light DNA damage described here may contribute to the cancer prone nature of xeroderma pigmentosum variant individuals. These experiments show that the same amount of damage was produced at 0 0 C and 37 0 C indicating a photodynamic effect and not an enzymatic reaction. The disappearance of the photosensitive lesions from the DNA is probably enzymatic since none of the damage was removed at 0 0 C. Both the formation of the lesion and its photolysis by near ultraviolet light were wavelength dependent. An action spectrum for the formation of photosensitive lesions was similar to that for the formation of pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts and included wavelengths found in sunlight. The DNA containing the lesions was sensitive to wavelengths from 304 to 340 nm with a maximum at 313 to 317 nm. This wavelength dependence of photolysis is similar to the absorption and photolysis spectra of the pyrimidine (6-4) photoproducts. (author)

  15. Role of exonucleolytic processing and polymerase-DNA association in bypass of lesions during replication in vitro. Significance for SOS-targeted mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shwartz, H.; Shavitt, O.; Livneh, Z.

    1988-01-01

    The role of exonuclease activity in trans-lesion DNA replication with Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III holoenzyme was investigated. RecA protein inhibited the 3'----5' exonuclease activity of the polymerase 2-fold when assayed in the absence of replication and had no effect on turnover of dNTPs into dNMPs. In contrast, single-stranded DNA-binding protein, which had no effect on the exonuclease activity in the absence of replication, showed a pronounced 7-fold suppression of the 3'----5' exonuclease activity during replication. The excision of incorporated dNMP alpha S residues from DNA by the 3'----5' exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme was inhibited 10-20-fold; still no increase in bypass of pyrimidine photodimers was observed. Thus, in agreement with our previous results in which the exonuclease activity was inhibited at the protein level, inhibition at the DNA level also did not increase bypass of photodimers. Fractionation of the replication mixture after termination of DNA synthesis on a Bio-Gel A-5m column under conditions which favor polymerase-DNA binding yielded a termination complex which could perform turnover of dNTPs into dNMPs. Adding challenge-primed single-stranded DNA to the complex yielded a burst of DNA synthesis which was promoted most likely by DNA polymerase III holoenzyme molecules transferred from the termination complex to the challenge DNA thus demonstrating the instability of the polymerase-DNA association. Addition of a fresh sample of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme to purified termination products, which consist primarily of partially replicated molecules with nascent chains terminated at UV lesions, did not result in any net DNA synthesis as expected

  16. Residual γH2AX foci as an indication of lethal DNA lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banuelos C Adriana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence suggests that tumor cells exposed to some DNA damaging agents are more likely to die if they retain microscopically visible γH2AX foci that are known to mark sites of double-strand breaks. This appears to be true even after exposure to the alkylating agent MNNG that does not cause direct double-strand breaks but does produce γH2AX foci when damaged DNA undergoes replication. Methods To examine this predictive ability further, SiHa human cervical carcinoma cells were exposed to 8 DNA damaging drugs (camptothecin, cisplatin, doxorubicin, etoposide, hydrogen peroxide, MNNG, temozolomide, and tirapazamine and the fraction of cells that retained γH2AX foci 24 hours after a 30 or 60 min treatment was compared with the fraction of cells that lost clonogenicity. To determine if cells with residual repair foci are the cells that die, SiHa cervical cancer cells were stably transfected with a RAD51-GFP construct and live cell analysis was used to follow the fate of irradiated cells with RAD51-GFP foci. Results For all drugs regardless of their mechanism of interaction with DNA, close to a 1:1 correlation was observed between clonogenic surviving fraction and the fraction of cells that retained γH2AX foci 24 hours after treatment. Initial studies established that the fraction of cells that retained RAD51 foci after irradiation was similar to the fraction of cells that retained γH2AX foci and subsequently lost clonogenicity. Tracking individual irradiated live cells confirmed that SiHa cells with RAD51-GFP foci 24 hours after irradiation were more likely to die. Conclusion Retention of DNA damage-induced γH2AX foci appears to be indicative of lethal DNA damage so that it may be possible to predict tumor cell killing by a wide variety of DNA damaging agents simply by scoring the fraction of cells that retain γH2AX foci.

  17. Residual γH2AX foci as an indication of lethal DNA lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banáth, Judit P; Klokov, Dmitry; MacPhail, Susan H; Banuelos, C Adriana; Olive, Peggy L

    2010-01-01

    Evidence suggests that tumor cells exposed to some DNA damaging agents are more likely to die if they retain microscopically visible γH2AX foci that are known to mark sites of double-strand breaks. This appears to be true even after exposure to the alkylating agent MNNG that does not cause direct double-strand breaks but does produce γH2AX foci when damaged DNA undergoes replication. To examine this predictive ability further, SiHa human cervical carcinoma cells were exposed to 8 DNA damaging drugs (camptothecin, cisplatin, doxorubicin, etoposide, hydrogen peroxide, MNNG, temozolomide, and tirapazamine) and the fraction of cells that retained γH2AX foci 24 hours after a 30 or 60 min treatment was compared with the fraction of cells that lost clonogenicity. To determine if cells with residual repair foci are the cells that die, SiHa cervical cancer cells were stably transfected with a RAD51-GFP construct and live cell analysis was used to follow the fate of irradiated cells with RAD51-GFP foci. For all drugs regardless of their mechanism of interaction with DNA, close to a 1:1 correlation was observed between clonogenic surviving fraction and the fraction of cells that retained γH2AX foci 24 hours after treatment. Initial studies established that the fraction of cells that retained RAD51 foci after irradiation was similar to the fraction of cells that retained γH2AX foci and subsequently lost clonogenicity. Tracking individual irradiated live cells confirmed that SiHa cells with RAD51-GFP foci 24 hours after irradiation were more likely to die. Retention of DNA damage-induced γH2AX foci appears to be indicative of lethal DNA damage so that it may be possible to predict tumor cell killing by a wide variety of DNA damaging agents simply by scoring the fraction of cells that retain γH2AX foci

  18. DNA repair kinetic of hydrogen peroxide and UVA/B induced lesions in peripheral blood leucocytes from xeroderma pigmentosum patients and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Elio A Prieto; Mudry, Marta D; Palermo, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the fine kinetics of DNA repair in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) syndrome, a complex disorder linked to a deficiency in repair that increases cancer susceptibility. The repair process was evaluated by the comet assay (CA) in cells from 2 XP patients and 9 controls exposed to UVA/B (UVA 366/UVB 280 nm) and H2O2 (150 μM) at temperatures of 4, 15, and 37°C. Samples were taken at 2-min intervals during the first 10 min to analyze the "fine kinetics" repair during the initial phase of the curve, and then at 15, 20, 25, 30, 45, 60, and 120 min. CA evaluation of DNA repair activity points to BER/NER initiation in the first 30 min with both inductors at 37°C and 15°C, but final comet length showed differences according to treatment. Repair kinetics during 120 min showed a good correlation with clinical features in both XP patients. Differences in final comet length were less pronounced in XP cells treated with H2O2 than with UVA/B, probably because the peroxide produces mainly base oxidation but less bulky lesions; UVA/B generates a mixture of both. These findings reinforce the value of CA in testing in DNA repair ability or exposure monitoring.

  19. DNA polymerases beta and lambda mediate overlapping and independent roles in base excision repair in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena K Braithwaite

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Base excision repair (BER is a DNA repair pathway designed to correct small base lesions in genomic DNA. While DNA polymerase beta (pol beta is known to be the main polymerase in the BER pathway, various studies have implicated other DNA polymerases in back-up roles. One such polymerase, DNA polymerase lambda (pol lambda, was shown to be important in BER of oxidative DNA damage. To further explore roles of the X-family DNA polymerases lambda and beta in BER, we prepared a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line with deletions in the genes for both pol beta and pol lambda. Neutral red viability assays demonstrated that pol lambda and pol beta double null cells were hypersensitive to alkylating and oxidizing DNA damaging agents. In vitro BER assays revealed a modest contribution of pol lambda to single-nucleotide BER of base lesions. Additionally, using co-immunoprecipitation experiments with purified enzymes and whole cell extracts, we found that both pol lambda and pol beta interact with the upstream DNA glycosylases for repair of alkylated and oxidized DNA bases. Such interactions could be important in coordinating roles of these polymerases during BER.

  20. Oxidative DNA damage of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, selectively induced by chronic arsenic exposure, is associated with extent of arsenic-related skin lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Qiuling; Ma, Ning; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Wenchao; Li, Yong; Ma, Zhifeng; Li, Yunyun; Tian, Fengjie; Zhang, Wenping; Mu, Jinjun; Li, Yuanfei; Wang, Dongxing; Liu, Haifang; Yang, Mimi; Ma, Caifeng; Yun, Fen

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that oxidative stress is an important risk factor for arsenic-related diseases. Peripheral blood leukocytes constitute an important defense against microorganisms or pathogens, while the research on the impact of chronic arsenic exposure on peripheral blood leukocytes is much more limited, especially at low level arsenic exposure. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether chronic arsenic exposure affects oxidative stress of peripheral blood leukocytes and possible linkages between oxidative stress and arsenic-induced skin lesions. 75 male inhabitants recruited from an As-endemic region of China were investigated in the present study. The classification of arsenicosis was based on the degree of skin lesions. Arsenic levels were measured in drinking water and urine by Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was tested by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. 8-OHdG of peripheral blood leukocytes was evaluated using immunocytochemical staining. 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), but not in monocytes (MNs). The 8-OHdG staining of PMN cytoplasm was observed in all investigated populations, while the 8-OHdG staining of PMN nuclei was frequently found along with the elevated amounts of cell debris in individuals with skin lesion. Urinary arsenic levels were increased in the severe skin lesion group compared with the normal group. No relationship was observed between drinking water arsenic or urine 8-OHdG and the degree of skin lesions. These findings indicated that the target and persistent oxidative stress in peripheral blood PMNs may be employed as a sensitive biomarker directly to assess adverse health effects caused by chronic exposure to lower levels of arsenic. -- Highlights: ► Male inhabitants were investigated from an As-endemic region of China. ► 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs).

  1. Watson-Crick base pairing controls excited-state decay in natural DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Dominik B; Schlueter, Alexander; Carell, Thomas; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2014-10-13

    Excited-state dynamics are essential to understanding the formation of DNA lesions induced by UV light. By using femtosecond IR spectroscopy, it was possible to determine the lifetimes of the excited states of all four bases in the double-stranded environment of natural DNA. After UV excitation of the DNA duplex, we detected a concerted decay of base pairs connected by Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. A comparison of single- and double-stranded DNA showed that the reactive charge-transfer states formed in the single strands are suppressed by base pairing in the duplex. The strong influence of the Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds indicates that proton transfer opens an efficient decay path in the duplex that prohibits the formation or reduces the lifetime of reactive charge-transfer states. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Betel quid oral lichenoid lesions: a hospital based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Sugandha; Vengal, Manoj; Raju, Bina; Patil, Neelkant; Sathosker, Sujatha; Bateja, Sumit; David, Jamil

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and risk indicators of betel quid oral lichenoid lesions in chewers. A total of 1209 chewers were identified and categorized into three main groups based on the type of lesion: betel quid oral lichenoid lesions only, betel quid oral lichenoid lesions in association with quid-induced other oral mucosal lesions, and no lesions. Multinomial regression analyses were used to determine associations between dependent and independent variables. Betel quid oral lichenoid lesions were more common in individuals who chewed quid comprising both tobacco and areca nut, and in those who chewed it two to three, or greater than three, times a day. Betel quid oral lichenoid lesions + quid-induced other oral mucosal lesions were more likely to occur in females, and in individuals who chewed quid containing both tobacco and areca nut, in their processed and unprocessed forms, and greater than three times a day. The prevalence of betel quid oral lichenoid lesions was higher than that reported in previous studies conducted in India. Increase in the frequency and duration of quid chewing was associated with increased likelihood of developing these oral lichenoid lesions. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Real-time PCR detection of Brucella spp. DNA in lesions and viscera of bovine carcasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Marília Cristina; da Veiga Jardim, Eurione A G; de Freitas, Marcius Ribeiro; de Mesquita, Albenones José

    2014-09-01

    This study reports a real-time PCR assay for the detection of Brucella spp. associated with the FTA® Elute method in lesions observed during sanitary inspections in beef slaughter. Of the total 276 samples, 78 (28.3%) tested positive and 198 (71.7%) negative for Brucella spp. The real-time PCR technique associated with the FTA® Elute method proved to be an important tool for the diagnosis, judgment about and disposal of carcasses and viscera of slaughtered animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  5. CT-based needle marking of superficial intracranial lesions for minimal invasive neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquardt, G.; Wolff, R.; Schick, U.; Lorenz, R.

    2000-01-01

    A CT-based method of marking superficial intracranial lesions with a needle is presented. This form of neuronavigation can be applied in every neurosurgical centre. Owing to its rapid application it is also suitable for cases of emergency. The neurosurgical approach can be centred precisely over this lesion providing for a minimally invasive operation. The method has proved its efficacy in numerous cases of haematomas and cystic lesions. (author)

  6. An ensemble deep learning based approach for red lesion detection in fundus images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, José Ignacio; Prokofyeva, Elena; Del Fresno, Mariana; Blaschko, Matthew B

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the leading causes of preventable blindness in the world. Its earliest sign are red lesions, a general term that groups both microaneurysms (MAs) and hemorrhages (HEs). In daily clinical practice, these lesions are manually detected by physicians using fundus photographs. However, this task is tedious and time consuming, and requires an intensive effort due to the small size of the lesions and their lack of contrast. Computer-assisted diagnosis of DR based on red lesion detection is being actively explored due to its improvement effects both in clinicians consistency and accuracy. Moreover, it provides comprehensive feedback that is easy to assess by the physicians. Several methods for detecting red lesions have been proposed in the literature, most of them based on characterizing lesion candidates using hand crafted features, and classifying them into true or false positive detections. Deep learning based approaches, by contrast, are scarce in this domain due to the high expense of annotating the lesions manually. In this paper we propose a novel method for red lesion detection based on combining both deep learned and domain knowledge. Features learned by a convolutional neural network (CNN) are augmented by incorporating hand crafted features. Such ensemble vector of descriptors is used afterwards to identify true lesion candidates using a Random Forest classifier. We empirically observed that combining both sources of information significantly improve results with respect to using each approach separately. Furthermore, our method reported the highest performance on a per-lesion basis on DIARETDB1 and e-ophtha, and for screening and need for referral on MESSIDOR compared to a second human expert. Results highlight the fact that integrating manually engineered approaches with deep learned features is relevant to improve results when the networks are trained from lesion-level annotated data. An open source implementation of our

  7. DNA & Protein detection based on microbead agglutination

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2012-06-06

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microparticles in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Agglutination-based tests are most often used to explore the antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for mode protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin two-component system, as well as a hybridization based two-component assay; however, as our work shows, two-component systems are prone to self-termination of the linking analyte and thus have a lower sensitivity. Three component systems have also been used with DNA hybridization, as in our work; however, their assay requires 48 hours for incubation, while our assay is performed in 5 minutes making it a real candidate for POC testing. We demonstrate three assays: a two-component biotin/streptavidin assay, a three-component hybridization assay using single stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules and a stepped three-component hybridization assay. The comparison of these three assays shows our simple stepped three-component agglutination assay to be rapid at room temperature and more sensitive than the two-component version by an order of magnitude. An agglutination assay was also performed in a PDMS microfluidic chip where agglutinated beads were trapped by filter columns for easy observation. We developed a rapid (5 minute) room temperature assay, which is based on microbead agglutination. Our three-component assay solves the linker self-termination issue allowing an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity over two–component assays. Our stepped version of the three-component assay solves the issue with probe site saturation thus enabling a wider range of detection. Detection of the agglutinated beads with the naked eye by trapping in microfluidic channels has been shown.

  8. New method for estimating clustering of DNA lesions induced by physical/chemical mutagens using fluorescence anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Ken; Shikazono, Naoya; Saito, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    We have developed a new method for estimating the localization of DNA damage such as apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (APs) on DNA using fluorescence anisotropy. This method is aimed at characterizing clustered DNA damage produced by DNA-damaging agents such as ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. A fluorescent probe with an aminooxy group (AlexaFluor488) was used to label APs. We prepared a pUC19 plasmid with APs by heating under acidic conditions as a model for damaged DNA, and subsequently labeled the APs. We found that the observed fluorescence anisotropy (r obs ) decreases as averaged AP density (λ AP : number of APs per base pair) increases due to homo-FRET, and that the APs were randomly distributed. We applied this method to three DNA-damaging agents, 60 Co γ-rays, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and neocarzinostatin (NCS). We found that r obs -λ AP relationships differed significantly between MMS and NCS. At low AP density (λ AP  < 0.001), the APs induced by MMS seemed to not be closely distributed, whereas those induced by NCS were remarkably clustered. In contrast, the AP clustering induced by 60 Co γ-rays was similar to, but potentially more likely to occur than, random distribution. This simple method can be used to estimate mutagenicity of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Alkyltransferase-like proteins: brokers dealing with alkylated DNA bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schärer, Orlando D

    2012-07-13

    A new pathway for the repair of DNA alkylation damage is described in this issue of Molecular Cell (Latypov et al., 2012). Alkyltransferase-like enzymes mark O(6)-alkylguanine lesions and, depending on adduct size, channel them into global genome or transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair pathways. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. DNA Array-Based Gene Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Provenzano, Maurizio; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Pilati, Pierluigi; Nitti, Donato; Lise, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Cancer is a heterogeneous disease in most respects, including its cellularity, different genetic alterations, and diverse clinical behaviors. Traditional molecular analyses are reductionist, assessing only 1 or a few genes at a time, thus working with a biologic model too specific and limited to confront a process whose clinical outcome is likely to be governed by the combined influence of many genes. The potential of functional genomics is enormous, because for each experiment, thousands of relevant observations can be made simultaneously. Accordingly, DNA array, like other high-throughput technologies, might catalyze and ultimately accelerate the development of knowledge in tumor cell biology. Although in its infancy, the implementation of DNA array technology in cancer research has already provided investigators with novel data and intriguing new hypotheses on the molecular cascade leading to carcinogenesis, tumor aggressiveness, and sensitivity to antiblastic agents. Given the revolutionary implications that the use of this technology might have in the clinical management of patients with cancer, principles of DNA array-based tumor gene profiling need to be clearly understood for the data to be correctly interpreted and appreciated. In the present work, we discuss the technical features characterizing this powerful laboratory tool and review the applications so far described in the field of oncology. PMID:15621987

  11. Excited state dynamics of DNA bases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kleinermanns, K.; Nachtigallová, Dana; de Vries, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 2 (2013), s. 308-342 ISSN 0144-235X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/12/1318 Grant - others:National Science Foundation(US) CHE-0911564; NASA (US) NNX12AG77G; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) SFB 663; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) KI 531-29 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA bases * nucleobases * excited state * dynamics * computations * gas phase * conical intersections Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.920, year: 2013

  12. The beta subunit modulates bypass and termination at UV lesions during in vitro replication with DNA polymerase III holoenzyme of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shavitt, O.; Livneh, Z.

    1989-01-01

    The cycling time of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme during replication of UV-irradiated single-stranded (ss) DNA was longer than with unirradiated DNA (8 versus 3 min, respectively), most likely due to slow dissociation from lesion-terminated nascent DNA strands. Initiation of elongation on primed ssDNA was not significantly inhibited by the presence of UV lesions as indicated by the identical distribution of replication products synthesized at early and late reaction times and by the identical duration of the initial synthesis bursts on both unirradiated and UV-irradiated DNA templates. When replication was performed with DNA polymerase III* supplemented with increasing quantities of purified beta 2 subunit, the cycling time on UV-irradiated DNA decreased from 14.8 min at 1.7 nM beta 2 down to 6 min at 170 nM beta 2, a concentration in which beta 2 was in large excess over the polymerase. In parallel to the reduction in cycling time, also the bypass frequency of cyclobutane-photodimers decreased with increasing beta 2 concentration, and at 170 nM beta 2, bypass of photodimers was essentially eliminated. It has been shown that polymerase complexes with more than one beta 2 per polymerase molecule were formed at high beta 2 concentrations. It is plausible that polymerase complexes obtained under high beta 2 concentration dissociate from lesion-terminated primers faster than polymerase complexes formed at a low beta 2 concentration. This is expected to favor termination over bypass at pyrimidine photodimers and thus decrease their bypass frequency. These results suggest that the beta 2 subunit might act as a sensor for obstacles to replication caused by DNA damage, and that it terminates elongation at these sites by promoting dissociation. The intracellular concentration of beta 2 was estimated to be 250 nM

  13. Peptostreptococcus micros in primary endodontic infections as detected by 16S rDNA-based polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N; Andrade, Arnaldo F B; de Uzeda, Milton

    2003-02-01

    A 16S rDNA-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was used to detect Peptostreptococcus micros in primary root canal infections. Samples were collected from 50 teeth having carious lesions, necrotic pulps, and different forms of periradicular diseases. DNA extracted from the samples was amplified using the PCR assay, which yielded a specific fragment of P. micros 16S rDNA. P. micros was detected in 6 of 22 root canals associated with asymptomatic chronic periradicular lesions (27.3%), 2 of 8 teeth with acute apical periodontitis (25%), and 6 of 20 cases of acute periradicular abscess (30%). In general, P. micros was found in 14 of 50 cases (28%). There was no correlation between the presence of P. micros and the occurrence of symptoms. Findings suggested that P. micros can be involved in the pathogenesis of different forms of periradicular lesions.

  14. A DNA Structure-Based Bionic Wavelet Transform and Its Application to DNA Sequence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequence analysis is of great significance for increasing our understanding of genomic functions. An important task facing us is the exploration of hidden structural information stored in the DNA sequence. This paper introduces a DNA structure-based adaptive wavelet transform (WT – the bionic wavelet transform (BWT – for DNA sequence analysis. The symbolic DNA sequence can be separated into four channels of indicator sequences. An adaptive symbol-to-number mapping, determined from the structural feature of the DNA sequence, was introduced into WT. It can adjust the weight value of each channel to maximise the useful energy distribution of the whole BWT output. The performance of the proposed BWT was examined by analysing synthetic and real DNA sequences. Results show that BWT performs better than traditional WT in presenting greater energy distribution. This new BWT method should be useful for the detection of the latent structural features in future DNA sequence analysis.

  15. Expression of DNA repair proteins MSH2, MLH1 and MGMT in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions: An immunohistochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaginis, Constantinos; Michailidi, Christina; Stolakis, Vasileios; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Tsourouflis, Gerasimos; Klijanienko, Jerzy; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background DNA repair is a major defense mechanism, which contributes to the maintenance of genetic sequence, and minimizes cell death, mutation rates, replication errors, DNA damage persistence and genomic instability. Alterations in the expression levels of proteins participating in DNA repair mechanisms have been associated with several aspects of cancer biology. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of DNA repair proteins MSH2, MLH1 and MGMT in benign and malignant thyroid lesions. Material/Methods MSH2, MLH1 and MGMT protein expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues from 90 patients with benign and malignant lesions. Results The expression levels of MLH1 was significantly upregulated in cases with malignant compared to those with benign thyroid lesions (p=0.038). The expression levels of MGMT was significantly downregulated in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p=0.001). Similar associations for both MLH1 and MGMT between cases with papillary carcinoma and hyperplastic nodules were also noted (p=0.014 and p=0.026, respectively). In the subgroup of malignant thyroid lesions, MSH2 downregulation was significantly associated with larger tumor size (p=0.031), while MLH1 upregulation was significantly associated with the presence of lymphatic and vascular invasion (p=0.006 and p=0.002, respectively). Conclusions Alterations in the mismatch repair proteins MSH2 and MLH1 and the direct repair protein MGMT may result from tumor development and/or progression. Further studies are recommended to draw definite conclusions on the clinical significance of DNA repair proteins in thyroid neoplasia. PMID:21358597

  16. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin modulates estradiol-induced aldehydic DNA lesions in human breast cancer cells through alteration of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shou-Tung; Chen, Dar-Ren; Fang, Ju-Pin; Lin, Po-Hsiung

    2015-05-01

    Many genes responsible for the bioactivation of endogenous estrogen to reactive quinonoid metabolites, including cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, 1A2, and 1B1, are well-known target genes of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The purpose of this research was to investigate the roles of TCDD-mediated altered gene expression in the induction of aldehydic DNA lesions (ADLs) by 17β-estradiol (E2) in human MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We demonstrated that increases in the number of oxidant-mediated ADLs, including abasic sites and aldehydic base/sugar lesions, were detected in MDA-MB-231 cells exposed to E2. The DNA-damaging effects of E2 in MDA-MB-231 cells were prevented by pretreatment of cells with TCDD. In contrast, we did not observe statistically significant increases in the number of ADLs in MCF-7 cells exposed to E2. However, with TCDD pretreatment, an approximately twofold increase in the number of ADLs was detected in MCF-7 cells exposed to E2. TCDD pretreatment induces disparity in the disposition of E2 to reactive quinonoid metabolites and the subsequent formation of oxidative DNA lesions through alteration of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in human breast cancer cells.

  17. Misrepair of overlapping daughter strand gaps as a possible mechanism for UV induced mutagenesis in uvr strains of Escherichia coli: a general model for induced mutagenesis by misrepair (SOS repair) of closely spaced DNA lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedgwick, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    It has been previously reported that an inducible form of post-replication repair appeared to be required for UV induced mutagenesis in an uvrA strain of Escherichia coli. It is shown here that the numbers of daughter strand gaps requiring inducible repair were similar to the numbers calculated to be overlapping one another in opposite daughter chromosomes. An estimation of survival with no repair of these gaps resembled the survival predicted with mutagenesis. It is thus proposed that inducible post-replication repair causes mutagenesis by the repair of overlapping daughter strand gaps. A general model for induced mutagenesis is presented. It is proposed that (a) some DNA lesions introduced by any DNA damaging agent may be close enough to interfere with constitutive repair replication of each other, (b) these lesions induce a repair system (SOS repair) which involves the recA + . lexA + and polC + genes (c) repair, and noncomitant mutagenesis occurs during repair replication by the insertion of mismatched bases oppposite the noncoding DNA lesions

  18. Analytical Devices Based on Direct Synthesis of DNA on Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavan, Ana C; Niu, Jia; Chen, Zhen; Güder, Firat; Cheng, Chao-Min; Liu, David; Whitesides, George M

    2016-01-05

    This paper addresses a growing need in clinical diagnostics for parallel, multiplex analysis of biomarkers from small biological samples. It describes a new procedure for assembling arrays of ssDNA and proteins on paper. This method starts with the synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides covalently linked to paper and proceeds to assemble microzones of DNA-conjugated paper into arrays capable of simultaneously capturing DNA, DNA-conjugated protein antigens, and DNA-conjugated antibodies. The synthesis of ssDNA oligonucleotides on paper is convenient and effective with 32% of the oligonucleotides cleaved and eluted from the paper substrate being full-length by HPLC for a 32-mer. These ssDNA arrays can be used to detect fluorophore-linked DNA oligonucleotides in solution, and as the basis for DNA-directed assembly of arrays of DNA-conjugated capture antibodies on paper, detect protein antigens by sandwich ELISAs. Paper-anchored ssDNA arrays with different sequences can be used to assemble paper-based devices capable of detecting DNA and antibodies in the same device and enable simple microfluidic paper-based devices.

  19. Multiple effects of fluorescent light on repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA lesions in cultured goldfish cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Nobuhiro; Mitani, Hiroshi; Shima, Akihiro

    1995-01-01

    It is known that fluorescent light illumination prior to UV irradiation (FL preillumination) of cultured fish cells increases photorepair (PR) ability. In the present study, it was found that FL preillumination also enhanced UV resistance of logarithmically growing cells in the dark. This enhancement of UV resistance differs from induction of PR because it was not suppressed by cyclohexamide (CH) and it occurred immediately after FL preillumination. The effects of FL preillumination on repair of UV-induced DNA lesions in the dark were examined by an endonuclease-sensitive site assay to measure the repair of cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers, and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to quantitate the repair of (6-4) photoproducts. It was found that excision repair ability for (6-4) photoproducts in the genome overall was increased by FL preillumination. Moreover, a decrease in (6-4) photoproducts by FL illumination immediately after UV irradiation of the cells was found, the decrement being enhanced by FL preillumination with or without CH. (author)

  20. Multiple effects of fluorescent light on repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA lesions in cultured goldfish cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Nobuhiro; Mitani, Hiroshi; Shima, Akihiro [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Lab. of Radiation Biology

    1995-01-01

    It is known that fluorescent light illumination prior to UV irradiation (FL preillumination) of cultured fish cells increases photorepair (PR) ability. In the present study, it was found that FL preillumination also enhanced UV resistance of logarithmically growing cells in the dark. This enhancement of UV resistance differs from induction of PR because it was not suppressed by cyclohexamide (CH) and it occurred immediately after FL preillumination. The effects of FL preillumination on repair of UV-induced DNA lesions in the dark were examined by an endonuclease-sensitive site assay to measure the repair of cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers, and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to quantitate the repair of (6-4) photoproducts. It was found that excision repair ability for (6-4) photoproducts in the genome overall was increased by FL preillumination. Moreover, a decrease in (6-4) photoproducts by FL illumination immediately after UV irradiation of the cells was found, the decrement being enhanced by FL preillumination with or without CH. (author).

  1. Controlling charge current through a DNA based molecular transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnia, S., E-mail: s.behnia@sci.uut.ac.ir; Fathizadeh, S.; Ziaei, J.

    2017-01-05

    Molecular electronics is complementary to silicon-based electronics and may induce electronic functions which are difficult to obtain with conventional technology. We have considered a DNA based molecular transistor and study its transport properties. The appropriate DNA sequence as a central chain in molecular transistor and the functional interval for applied voltages is obtained. I–V characteristic diagram shows the rectifier behavior as well as the negative differential resistance phenomenon of DNA transistor. We have observed the nearly periodic behavior in the current flowing through DNA. It is reported that there is a critical gate voltage for each applied bias which above it, the electrical current is always positive. - Highlights: • Modeling a DNA based molecular transistor and studying its transport properties. • Choosing the appropriate DNA sequence using the quantum chaos tools. • Choosing the functional interval for voltages via the inverse participation ratio tool. • Detecting the rectifier and negative differential resistance behavior of DNA.

  2. Duplex Interrogation by a Direct DNA Repair Protein in Search of Base Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chengqi; Chen, Baoen; Qi, Bo; Zhang, Wen; Jia, Guifang; Zhang, Liang; Li, Charles J.; Dinner, Aaron R.; Yang, Cai-Guang; He, Chuan

    2012-01-01

    ALKBH2 is a direct DNA repair dioxygenase guarding mammalian genome against N1-methyladenine, N3-methylcytosine, and 1,N6-ethenoadenine damage. A prerequisite for repair is to identify these lesions in the genome. Here we present crystal structures of ALKBH2 bound to different duplex DNAs. Together with computational and biochemical analyses, our results suggest that DNA interrogation by ALKBH2 displays two novel features: i) ALKBH2 probes base-pair stability and detects base pairs with reduced stability; ii) ALKBH2 does not have nor need a “damage-checking site”, which is critical for preventing spurious base-cleavage for several glycosylases. The demethylation mechanism of ALKBH2 insures that only cognate lesions are oxidized and reversed to normal bases, and that a flipped, non-substrate base remains intact in the active site. Overall, the combination of duplex interrogation and oxidation chemistry allows ALKBH2 to detect and process diverse lesions efficiently and correctly. PMID:22659876

  3. An evidence-based review for the management of cystic pancreatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planner, A.C.; Anderson, E.M.; Slater, A.; Phillips-Hughes, J.; Bungay, H.K.; Betts, M.

    2007-01-01

    The incidental finding of pancreatic cysts is becoming more common because of the increased use of cross-sectional imaging. As a result, the perspective from historical series of symptomatic patients is not always applicable to the current cohort of patients with cystic lesions in their pancreas. In this review, the characteristic radiological features that aid diagnosis are highlighted, and the complementary role of different imaging methods and the appropriate use of tissue sampling are identified. Based on the literature regarding the diagnostic role of imaging in characterizing cystic pancreatic lesions, it is possible to recommend a practical imaging algorithm for the diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesions

  4. Synthesis of furan-based DNA binders and their interaction with DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voege, Andrea; Hoffmann, Sascha; Gabel, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, many substances, based on naturally occurring DNA-binding molecules have been developed for the use in cancer therapy and as virostatica. Most of these substances are binding specifically to A-T rich sequences in the DNA minor groove. Neutral and positively charged DNA-binders are known. BNCT is most effective, which the boron is directly located in the cellular nucleus, so that the intercation with thermal neutrons can directly damage the DNA. To reach this aim, we have connected ammonioundecahydrododecaborate(1-) to DNA-binding structures such as 2,5-bis(4-formylphenyl)furan via a Schiff-Base reaction followed by a reduction of the imine to a secondary amine. In a following step the amine can be alkylated to insert positive charges to prevent repulsion between the compounds and the negatively charged sugar-phosphate-backbone of the DNA. (author)

  5. Mass lesions in chronic pancreatitis: benign or malignant? An "evidence-based practice" approach.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gerstenmaier, Jan F

    2012-02-01

    The diagnosis of a pancreatic mass lesion in the presence of chronic pancreatitis can be extremely challenging. At the same time, a high level of certainty about the diagnosis is necessary for appropriate management planning. The aim of this study was to establish current best evidence about which imaging methods reliably differentiate a benign from a malignant lesion, and show how that evidence is best applied. A diagnostic algorithm based on Bayesian analysis is proposed.

  6. DNA sequence modeling based on context trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, C.J.; Ignatenko, T.; Roland, J.; Horlin, F.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic sequences contain instructions for protein and cell production. Therefore understanding and identification of biologically and functionally meaningful patterns in DNA sequences is of paramount importance. Modeling of DNA sequences in its turn can help to better understand and identify such

  7. Electroporation-based DNA delivery technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gothelf, A; Gehl, Julie

    2014-01-01

    DNA delivery to for example skin and muscle can easily be performed with electroporation. The method is efficient, feasible, and inexpensive and the future possibilities are numerous. Here we present our protocol for gene transfection to mouse skin using naked plasmid DNA and electric pulses....

  8. Folic Acid Supplementation Delays Atherosclerotic Lesion Development by Modulating MCP1 and VEGF DNA Methylation Levels In Vivo and In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shanshan; Li, Wen; Lv, Xin; Wang, Pengyan; Gao, Yuxia; Huang, Guowei

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis has been partly acknowledged to result from aberrant epigenetic mechanisms. Accordingly, low folate levels are considered to be a contributing factor to promoting vascular disease because of deregulation of DNA methylation. We hypothesized that increasing the levels of folic acid may act via an epigenetic gene silencing mechanism to ameliorate atherosclerosis. Here, we investigated the atheroprotective effects of folic acid and the resultant methylation status in high-fat diet-fed ApoE knockout mice and in oxidized low-density lipoprotein-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We analyzed atherosclerotic lesion histology, folate concentration, homocysteine concentration, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), and DNA methyltransferase activity, as well as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and promoter methylation. Folic acid reduced atherosclerotic lesion size in ApoE knockout mice. The underlying folic acid protective mechanism appears to operate through regulating the normal homocysteine state, upregulating the SAM: SAH ratio, elevating DNA methyltransferase activity and expression, altering MCP1 and VEGF promoter methylation, and inhibiting MCP1 and VEGF expression. We conclude that folic acid supplementation effectively prevented atherosclerosis by modifying DNA methylation through the methionine cycle, improving DNA methyltransferase activity and expression, and thus changing the expression of atherosclerosis-related genes. PMID:28475147

  9. Induced Polarization Influences the Fundamental Forces in DNA Base Flipping

    OpenAIRE

    Lemkul, Justin A.; Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Base flipping in DNA is an important process involved in genomic repair and epigenetic control of gene expression. The driving forces for these processes are not fully understood, especially in the context of the underlying dynamics of the DNA and solvent effects. We studied double-stranded DNA oligomers that have been previously characterized by imino proton exchange NMR using both additive and polarizable force fields. Our results highlight the importance of induced polarization on the base...

  10. DNA-Mediated Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Buzzeo, Marisa C.

    2009-01-01

    The base pair stack of DNA has been demonstrated as a medium for long range charge transport chemistry both in solution and at DNA-modified surfaces. This chemistry is exquisitely sensitive to structural perturbations in the base pair stack as occur with lesions, single base mismatches, and protein binding. We have exploited this sensitivity for the development of reliable electrochemical assays based on DNA charge transport at self-assembled DNA monolayers. Here we discuss the characteristic features, applications, and advantages of DNA-mediated electrochemistry. PMID:18980370

  11. Random amplified polymorphic DNA based genetic characterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DIRECTOR

    2013-07-10

    Jul 10, 2013 ... Electrophoresis) buffer, 2 µl of SYBR-safe (DNA staining dye) was added to it, mixed properly, ..... tools in plant genetic resources conservation: a guide to the technologies. IPGRI. Rome ... Creating Capital. Seethalakshmi KK ...

  12. Quantifying the margin sharpness of lesions on radiological images for content-based image retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jiajing; Napel, Sandy; Greenspan, Hayit; Beaulieu, Christopher F.; Agrawal, Neeraj; Rubin, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    . Equivalence across deformations was assessed using Schuirmann's paired two one-sided tests. Results: In simulated images, the concordance correlation between measured gradient and actual gradient was 0.994. The mean (s.d.) and standard deviation NDCG score for the retrieval of K images, K = 5, 10, and 15, were 84% (8%), 85% (7%), and 85% (7%) for CT images containing liver lesions, and 82% (7%), 84% (6%), and 85% (4%) for CT images containing lung nodules, respectively. The authors’ proposed method outperformed the two existing margin characterization methods in average NDCG scores over all K, by 1.5% and 3% in datasets containing liver lesion, and 4.5% and 5% in datasets containing lung nodules. Equivalence testing showed that the authors’ feature is more robust across all margin deformations (p < 0.05) than the two existing methods for margin sharpness characterization in both simulated and clinical datasets. Conclusions: The authors have described a new image feature to quantify the margin sharpness of lesions. It has strong correlation with known margin sharpness in simulated images and in clinical CT images containing liver lesions and lung nodules. This image feature has excellent performance for retrieving images with similar margin characteristics, suggesting potential utility, in conjunction with other lesion features, for content-based image retrieval applications.

  13. A nuclear DNA-based species determination and DNA quantification assay for common poultry species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, J; Satkoski, J; Premasuthan, A; Kanthaswamy, S

    2014-12-01

    DNA testing for food authentication and quality control requires sensitive species-specific quantification of nuclear DNA from complex and unknown biological sources. We have developed a multiplex assay based on TaqMan® real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) for species-specific detection and quantification of chicken (Gallus gallus), duck (Anas platyrhynchos), and turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) nuclear DNA. The multiplex assay is able to accurately detect very low quantities of species-specific DNA from single or multispecies sample mixtures; its minimum effective quantification range is 5 to 50 pg of starting DNA material. In addition to its use in food fraudulence cases, we have validated the assay using simulated forensic sample conditions to demonstrate its utility in forensic investigations. Despite treatment with potent inhibitors such as hematin and humic acid, and degradation of template DNA by DNase, the assay was still able to robustly detect and quantify DNA from each of the three poultry species in mixed samples. The efficient species determination and accurate DNA quantification will help reduce fraudulent food labeling and facilitate downstream DNA analysis for genetic identification and traceability.

  14. Association between lesion location and language function in adult glioma using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Banerjee

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Our findings identify the key anatomic structures involved in language functioning in adult glioma patients using an innovative lesion analysis technique and suggest that expressive language abilities may be more task-dependent and distributed than receptive language abilities.

  15. New paradigms in the repair of oxidative damage in human genome: mechanisms ensuring repair of mutagenic base lesions during replication and involvement of accessory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Arijit; Yang, Chunying; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L

    2015-05-01

    Oxidized bases in the mammalian genome, which are invariably mutagenic due to their mispairing property, are continuously induced by endogenous reactive oxygen species and more abundantly after oxidative stress. Unlike bulky base adducts induced by UV and other environmental mutagens in the genome that block replicative DNA polymerases, oxidatively damaged bases such as 5-hydroxyuracil, produced by oxidative deamination of cytosine in the template strand, do not block replicative polymerases and thus need to be repaired prior to replication to prevent mutation. Following up our earlier studies, which showed that the Nei endonuclease VIII like 1 (NEIL1) DNA glycosylase, one of the five base excision repair (BER)-initiating enzymes in mammalian cells, has enhanced expression during the S-phase and higher affinity for replication fork-mimicking single-stranded (ss) DNA substrates, we recently provided direct experimental evidence for NEIL1's role in replicating template strand repair. The key requirement for this event, which we named as the 'cow-catcher' mechanism of pre-replicative BER, is NEIL1's non-productive binding (substrate binding without product formation) to the lesion base in ss DNA template to stall DNA synthesis, causing fork regression. Repair of the lesion in reannealed duplex is then carried out by NEIL1 in association with the DNA replication proteins. NEIL1 (and other BER-initiating enzymes) also interact with several accessory and non-canonical proteins including the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U and Y-box-binding protein 1 as well as high mobility group box 1 protein, whose precise roles in BER are still obscure. In this review, we have discussed the recent advances in our understanding of oxidative genome damage repair pathways with particular focus on the pre-replicative template strand repair and the role of scaffold factors like X-ray repairs cross-complementing protein 1 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 and other accessory

  16. Ultrasensitive FRET-based DNA sensor using PNA/DNA hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lan-Hee; Ahn, Dong June; Koo, Eunhae

    2016-12-01

    In the diagnosis of genetic diseases, rapid and highly sensitive DNA detection is crucial. Therefore, many strategies for detecting target DNA have been developed, including electrical, optical, and mechanical methods. Herein, a highly sensitive FRET based sensor was developed by using PNA (Peptide Nucleic Acid) probe and QD, in which red color QDs are hybridized with capture probes, reporter probes and target DNAs by EDC-NHS coupling. The hybridized probe with target DNA gives off fluorescent signal due to the energy transfer from QD to Cy5 dye in the reporter probe. Compared to the conventional DNA sensor using DNA probes, the DNA sensor using PNA probes shows higher FRET factor and efficiency due to the higher reactivity between PNA and target DNA. In addition, to elicit the effect of the distance between the donor and the acceptor, we have investigated two types of the reporter probes having Cy5 dyes attached at the different positions of the reporter probes. Results show that the shorter the distance between QDs and Cy5s, the stronger the signal intensity. Furthermore, based on the fluorescence microscopy images using microcapillary chips, the FRET signal is enhanced to be up to 276% times stronger than the signal obtained using the cuvette by the fluorescence spectrometer. These results suggest that the PNA probe system conjugated with QDs can be used as ultrasensitive DNA nanosensors. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Indicator Based and Indicator - Free Electrochemical DNA Biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kerman, Kagan

    2001-01-01

    The utility and advantages of an indicator free and MB based sequence specific DNA hybridization biosensor based on guanine and adenine oxidation signals and MB reduction signals have been demonstrated...

  18. DNA nanostructure-based drug delivery nanosystems in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dandan; Wang, Lei; Li, Wei; Xu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Wei

    2017-11-25

    DNA as a novel biomaterial can be used to fabricate different kinds of DNA nanostructures based on its principle of GC/AT complementary base pairing. Studies have shown that DNA nanostructure is a nice drug carrier to overcome big obstacles existing in cancer therapy such as systemic toxicity and unsatisfied drug efficacy. Thus, different types of DNA nanostructure-based drug delivery nanosystems have been designed in cancer therapy. To improve treating efficacy, they are also developed into more functional drug delivery nanosystems. In recent years, some important progresses have been made. The objective of this review is to make a retrospect and summary about these different kinds of DNA nanostructure-based drug delivery nanosystems and their latest progresses: (1) active targeting; (2) mutidrug co-delivery; (3) construction of stimuli-responsive/intelligent nanosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. qPCR-based mitochondrial DNA quantification: Influence of template DNA fragmentation on accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Christopher B.; Gallati, Sabina; Schaller, André

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Serial qPCR accurately determines fragmentation state of any given DNA sample. ► Serial qPCR demonstrates different preservation of the nuclear and mitochondrial genome. ► Serial qPCR provides a diagnostic tool to validate the integrity of bioptic material. ► Serial qPCR excludes degradation-induced erroneous quantification. -- Abstract: Real-time PCR (qPCR) is the method of choice for quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by relative comparison of a nuclear to a mitochondrial locus. Quantitative abnormal mtDNA content is indicative of mitochondrial disorders and mostly confines in a tissue-specific manner. Thus handling of degradation-prone bioptic material is inevitable. We established a serial qPCR assay based on increasing amplicon size to measure degradation status of any DNA sample. Using this approach we can exclude erroneous mtDNA quantification due to degraded samples (e.g. long post-exicision time, autolytic processus, freeze–thaw cycles) and ensure abnormal DNA content measurements (e.g. depletion) in non-degraded patient material. By preparation of degraded DNA under controlled conditions using sonification and DNaseI digestion we show that erroneous quantification is due to the different preservation qualities of the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome. This disparate degradation of the two genomes results in over- or underestimation of mtDNA copy number in degraded samples. Moreover, as analysis of defined archival tissue would allow to precise the molecular pathomechanism of mitochondrial disorders presenting with abnormal mtDNA content, we compared fresh frozen (FF) with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skeletal muscle tissue of the same sample. By extrapolation of measured decay constants for nuclear DNA (λ nDNA ) and mtDNA (λ mtDNA ) we present an approach to possibly correct measurements in degraded samples in the future. To our knowledge this is the first time different degradation impact of the two

  20. qPCR-based mitochondrial DNA quantification: Influence of template DNA fragmentation on accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Christopher B., E-mail: Christopher.jackson@insel.ch [Division of Human Genetics, Departements of Pediatrics and Clinical Research, Inselspital, University of Berne, Freiburgstrasse, CH-3010 Berne (Switzerland); Gallati, Sabina, E-mail: sabina.gallati@insel.ch [Division of Human Genetics, Departements of Pediatrics and Clinical Research, Inselspital, University of Berne, Freiburgstrasse, CH-3010 Berne (Switzerland); Schaller, Andre, E-mail: andre.schaller@insel.ch [Division of Human Genetics, Departements of Pediatrics and Clinical Research, Inselspital, University of Berne, Freiburgstrasse, CH-3010 Berne (Switzerland)

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR accurately determines fragmentation state of any given DNA sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR demonstrates different preservation of the nuclear and mitochondrial genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR provides a diagnostic tool to validate the integrity of bioptic material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR excludes degradation-induced erroneous quantification. -- Abstract: Real-time PCR (qPCR) is the method of choice for quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by relative comparison of a nuclear to a mitochondrial locus. Quantitative abnormal mtDNA content is indicative of mitochondrial disorders and mostly confines in a tissue-specific manner. Thus handling of degradation-prone bioptic material is inevitable. We established a serial qPCR assay based on increasing amplicon size to measure degradation status of any DNA sample. Using this approach we can exclude erroneous mtDNA quantification due to degraded samples (e.g. long post-exicision time, autolytic processus, freeze-thaw cycles) and ensure abnormal DNA content measurements (e.g. depletion) in non-degraded patient material. By preparation of degraded DNA under controlled conditions using sonification and DNaseI digestion we show that erroneous quantification is due to the different preservation qualities of the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome. This disparate degradation of the two genomes results in over- or underestimation of mtDNA copy number in degraded samples. Moreover, as analysis of defined archival tissue would allow to precise the molecular pathomechanism of mitochondrial disorders presenting with abnormal mtDNA content, we compared fresh frozen (FF) with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skeletal muscle tissue of the same sample. By extrapolation of measured decay constants for nuclear DNA ({lambda}{sub nDNA}) and mtDNA ({lambda}{sub mtDNA}) we present an approach to possibly correct measurements in

  1. Neural network ensemble based CAD system for focal liver lesions from B-mode ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virmani, Jitendra; Kumar, Vinod; Kalra, Naveen; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2014-08-01

    A neural network ensemble (NNE) based computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) system to assist radiologists in differential diagnosis between focal liver lesions (FLLs), including (1) typical and atypical cases of Cyst, hemangioma (HEM) and metastatic carcinoma (MET) lesions, (2) small and large hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions, along with (3) normal (NOR) liver tissue is proposed in the present work. Expert radiologists, visualize the textural characteristics of regions inside and outside the lesions to differentiate between different FLLs, accordingly texture features computed from inside lesion regions of interest (IROIs) and texture ratio features computed from IROIs and surrounding lesion regions of interests (SROIs) are taken as input. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used for reducing the dimensionality of the feature space before classifier design. The first step of classification module consists of a five class PCA-NN based primary classifier which yields probability outputs for five liver image classes. The second step of classification module consists of ten binary PCA-NN based secondary classifiers for NOR/Cyst, NOR/HEM, NOR/HCC, NOR/MET, Cyst/HEM, Cyst/HCC, Cyst/MET, HEM/HCC, HEM/MET and HCC/MET classes. The probability outputs of five class PCA-NN based primary classifier is used to determine the first two most probable classes for a test instance, based on which it is directed to the corresponding binary PCA-NN based secondary classifier for crisp classification between two classes. By including the second step of the classification module, classification accuracy increases from 88.7 % to 95 %. The promising results obtained by the proposed system indicate its usefulness to assist radiologists in differential diagnosis of FLLs.

  2. A NOVEL ROLLING BASED DNA CRYPTOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejwana Haque

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA Cryptography can be defined as a hiding data in terms of DNA Sequence. In this paper we propose a new DNA Encryption Technique where three different types of ordering is use to make binary data into cipher text. The main stages of this encryption technique are: Key Analysis, Data and Key Arrangement, Roll in encoding, Secondary Arrangement and Shifting. Decryption process has six main steps to obtain the original binary data from the encrypted data and key. Decryption steps are: Key Analysis, Shifting, Secondary Arrangement, Key Arrangement, Roll-out decoding, Data Arrangement. Here key size is half of binary data and the key is varies from data to data so key are used as one time pad. In this paper we also discuss about the implementation from sample data and security analysis for this given method.

  3. Hide and seek: How do DNA glycosylases locate oxidatively damaged DNA bases amidst a sea of undamaged bases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrea J; Wallace, Susan S

    2017-06-01

    The first step of the base excision repair (BER) pathway responsible for removing oxidative DNA damage utilizes DNA glycosylases to find and remove the damaged DNA base. How glycosylases find the damaged base amidst a sea of undamaged bases has long been a question in the BER field. Single molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (SM TIRFM) experiments have allowed for an exciting look into this search mechanism and have found that DNA glycosylases scan along the DNA backbone in a bidirectional and random fashion. By comparing the search behavior of bacterial glycosylases from different structural families and with varying substrate specificities, it was found that glycosylases search for damage by periodically inserting a wedge residue into the DNA stack as they redundantly search tracks of DNA that are 450-600bp in length. These studies open up a wealth of possibilities for further study in real time of the interactions of DNA glycosylases and other BER enzymes with various DNA substrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Three-dimensional spatiotemporal features for fast content-based retrieval of focal liver lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sharmili; Chi, Yanling; Liu, Jimin; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K; Brown, Michael S

    2014-11-01

    Content-based image retrieval systems for 3-D medical datasets still largely rely on 2-D image-based features extracted from a few representative slices of the image stack. Most 2 -D features that are currently used in the literature not only model a 3-D tumor incompletely but are also highly expensive in terms of computation time, especially for high-resolution datasets. Radiologist-specified semantic labels are sometimes used along with image-based 2-D features to improve the retrieval performance. Since radiological labels show large interuser variability, are often unstructured, and require user interaction, their use as lesion characterizing features is highly subjective, tedious, and slow. In this paper, we propose a 3-D image-based spatiotemporal feature extraction framework for fast content-based retrieval of focal liver lesions. All the features are computer generated and are extracted from four-phase abdominal CT images. Retrieval performance and query processing times for the proposed framework is evaluated on a database of 44 hepatic lesions comprising of five pathological types. Bull's eye percentage score above 85% is achieved for three out of the five lesion pathologies and for 98% of query lesions, at least one same type of lesion is ranked among the top two retrieved results. Experiments show that the proposed system's query processing is more than 20 times faster than other already published systems that use 2-D features. With fast computation time and high retrieval accuracy, the proposed system has the potential to be used as an assistant to radiologists for routine hepatic tumor diagnosis.

  5. DNA hybridization sensor based on pentacene thin film transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Min; Jha, Sandeep Kumar; Chand, Rohit; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2011-01-15

    A DNA hybridization sensor using pentacene thin film transistors (TFTs) is an excellent candidate for disposable sensor applications due to their low-cost fabrication process and fast detection. We fabricated pentacene TFTs on glass substrate for the sensing of DNA hybridization. The ss-DNA (polyA/polyT) or ds-DNA (polyA/polyT hybrid) were immobilized directly on the surface of the pentacene, producing a dramatic change in the electrical properties of the devices. The electrical characteristics of devices were studied as a function of DNA immobilization, single-stranded vs. double-stranded DNA, DNA length and concentration. The TFT device was further tested for detection of λ-phage genomic DNA using probe hybridization. Based on these results, we propose that a "label-free" detection technique for DNA hybridization is possible through direct measurement of electrical properties of DNA-immobilized pentacene TFTs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Blood-Based Biomarkers for Lung Cancer Early Detection and Evaluation of CT-Based Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    conserved protein in eukaryotic nuclei, binds to NuMA. J Biol Chem 2000;275: 31979–85. 45. Debernardi S, Bassini A, Jones LK, Chaplin T, Linder B, de Bruijn...level and two-hit gene dosage and/or DNA methylation alterations and (ii) undergoing concomitant alterations at the mRNA level would be indicative of...methylated in our cohort ( indicated in Supplementary Table S2). Of these, we focused on the putative TSG EYA4, based on the high frequency of

  7. Towards DNA-Based Programmable Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    thiolated   ssDNA  was  first  immobilized  onto  the  gold...surface.  The  surface  was  then  passivated  with   mercaptohexanol.  Subsequently,  another  complementary   thiolated ...right).       Approach  3:  DNA-­‐mediated  interaction  between   polymer -­‐coated  surfaces   We  also  tried

  8. Modulation of DNA base excision repair during neuronal differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sykora, Peter; Yang, Jenq-Lin; Ferrarelli, Leslie K

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage susceptibility and base excision DNA repair (BER) capacity in undifferentiated and differentiated human neural cells. The results show that undifferentiated human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells are less sensitive to oxidative damage than their differentiated counterparts, in part because...

  9. DNA interaction with platinum-based cytostatics revealed by DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerkova, Kristyna; Vaculovic, Tomas; Vaculovicova, Marketa; Kynicky, Jindrich; Brtnicky, Martin; Eckschlager, Tomas; Stiborova, Marie; Hubalek, Jaromir; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-12-15

    The main mechanism of action of platinum-based cytostatic drugs - cisplatin, oxaliplatin and carboplatin - is the formation of DNA cross-links, which restricts the transcription due to the disability of DNA to enter the active site of the polymerase. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed as a simplified model of the amplification process in the cell nucleus. PCR with fluorescently labelled dideoxynucleotides commonly employed for DNA sequencing was used to monitor the effect of platinum-based cytostatics on DNA in terms of decrease in labeling efficiency dependent on a presence of the DNA-drug cross-link. It was found that significantly different amounts of the drugs - cisplatin (0.21 μg/mL), oxaliplatin (5.23 μg/mL), and carboplatin (71.11 μg/mL) - were required to cause the same quenching effect (50%) on the fluorescent labelling of 50 μg/mL of DNA. Moreover, it was found that even though the amounts of the drugs was applied to the reaction mixture differing by several orders of magnitude, the amount of incorporated platinum, quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, was in all cases at the level of tenths of μg per 5 μg of DNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chromatin associated mechanisms in base excision repair - nucleosome remodeling and DNA transcription, two key players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menoni, Hervé; Di Mascio, Paolo; Cadet, Jean; Dimitrov, Stefan; Angelov, Dimitar

    2017-06-01

    Genomic DNA is prone to a large number of insults by a myriad of endogenous and exogenous agents. The base excision repair (BER) is the major mechanism used by cells for the removal of various DNA lesions spontaneously or environmentally induced and the maintenance of genome integrity. The presence of persistent DNA damage is not compatible with life, since abrogation of BER leads to early embryonic lethality in mice. There are several lines of evidences showing existence of a link between deficient BER, cancer proneness and ageing, thus illustrating the importance of this DNA repair pathway in human health. Although the enzymology of BER mechanisms has been largely elucidated using chemically defined DNA damage substrates and purified proteins, the complex interplay of BER with another vital process like transcription or when DNA is in its natural state (i.e. wrapped in nucleosome and assembled in chromatin fiber is largely unexplored. Cells use chromatin remodeling factors to overcome the general repression associated with the nucleosomal organization. It is broadly accepted that energy-dependent nucleosome remodeling factors disrupt histones-DNA interactions at the expense of ATP hydrolysis to favor transcription as well as DNA repair. Importantly, unlike transcription, BER is not part of a regulated developmental process but represents a maintenance system that should be efficient anytime and anywhere in the genome. In this review we will discuss how BER can deal with chromatin organization to maintain genetic information. Emphasis will be placed on the following challenging question: how BER is initiated within chromatin? Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. How distributed processing produces false negatives in voxel-based lesion-deficit analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajardo-Vidal, Andrea; Lorca-Puls, Diego L; Crinion, Jennifer T; White, Jitrachote; Seghier, Mohamed L; Leff, Alex P; Hope, Thomas M H; Ludersdorfer, Philipp; Green, David W; Bowman, Howard; Price, Cathy J

    2018-07-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that if the same deficit can be caused by damage to one or another part of a distributed neural system, then voxel-based analyses might miss critical lesion sites because preservation of each site will not be consistently associated with preserved function. The first part of our investigation used voxel-based multiple regression analyses of data from 359 right-handed stroke survivors to identify brain regions where lesion load is associated with picture naming abilities after factoring out variance related to object recognition, semantics and speech articulation so as to focus on deficits arising at the word retrieval level. A highly significant lesion-deficit relationship was identified in left temporal and frontal/premotor regions. Post-hoc analyses showed that damage to either of these sites caused the deficit of interest in less than half the affected patients (76/162 = 47%). After excluding all patients with damage to one or both of the identified regions, our second analysis revealed a new region, in the anterior part of the left putamen, which had not been previously detected because many patients had the deficit of interest after temporal or frontal damage that preserved the left putamen. The results illustrate how (i) false negative results arise when the same deficit can be caused by different lesion sites; (ii) some of the missed effects can be unveiled by adopting an iterative approach that systematically excludes patients with lesions to the areas identified in previous analyses, (iii) statistically significant voxel-based lesion-deficit mappings can be driven by a subset of patients; (iv) focal lesions to the identified regions are needed to determine whether the deficit of interest is the consequence of focal damage or much more extensive damage that includes the identified region; and, finally, (v) univariate voxel-based lesion-deficit mappings cannot, in isolation, be used to predict outcome in other patients

  12. Highly sensitive DNA sensors based on cerium oxide nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyet, Nguyen Thi; Hai Yen, Le Thi; Van Thu, Vu; lan, Hoang; Trung, Tran; Vuong, Pham Hung; Tam, Phuong Dinh

    2018-04-01

    In this work, a CeO2 nanorod (NR)-based electrochemical DNA sensor was developed to identify Salmonella that causes food-borne infections. CeO2 NRs were synthesized without templates via a simple and unexpensive hydrothermal approach at 170 °C for 12 h by using CeO(NO3)3·6H2O as a Ce source. The DNA probe was immobilized onto the CeO2 NR-modified electrode through covalent attachment. The characteristics of the hybridized DNA were analyzed through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with [Fe(CN)6]3-/4- as a redox probe. Experimental results showed that electron transfer resistance (Ret) increased after the DNA probe was attached to the electrode surface and increased further after the DNA probe hybridized with its complementary sequence. A linear response of Ret to the target DNA concentration was found from 0.01 μM to 2 μM. The detection limit and sensitivity of the DNA sensor were 0.01 μM and 3362.1 Ω μM-1 cm-2, respectively. Various parameters, such as pH value, ionic strength, DNA probe concentration, and hybridization time, influencing DNA sensor responses were also investigated.

  13. Visualization of suspicious lesions in breast MRI based on intelligent neural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twellmann, Thorsten; Lange, Oliver; Nattkemper, Tim Wilhelm; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2006-05-01

    Intelligent medical systems based on supervised and unsupervised artificial neural networks are applied to the automatic visualization and classification of suspicious lesions in breast MRI. These systems represent an important component of future sophisticated computer-aided diagnosis systems and enable the extraction of spatial and temporal features of dynamic MRI data stemming from patients with confirmed lesion diagnosis. By taking into account the heterogenity of the cancerous tissue, these techniques reveal the malignant, benign and normal kinetic signals and and provide a regional subclassification of pathological breast tissue. Intelligent medical systems are expected to have substantial implications in healthcare politics by contributing to the diagnosis of indeterminate breast lesions by non-invasive imaging.

  14. Recurring DNA copy number gain at chromosome 9p13 plays a role in the activation of multiple candidate oncogenes in progressing oral premalignant lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towle, Rebecca; Tsui, Ivy F L; Zhu, Yuqi; MacLellan, Sara; Poh, Catherine F; Garnis, Cathie

    2014-01-01

    Genomic alteration at chromosome 9p has been previously reported as a frequent and critical event in oral premalignancy. While this alteration is typically reported as a loss driven by selection for CDKN2A deactivation (at 9p21.3), we detect a recurrent DNA copy number gain of ∼2.49 Mbp at chromosome 9p13 in oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) that later progressed to invasive lesions. This recurrent alteration event has been validated using fluorescence in situ hybridization in an independent set of OPLs. Analysis of publicly available gene expression datasets aided in identifying three oncogene candidates that may have driven selection for DNA copy number increases in this region (VCP, DCTN3, and STOML2). We performed in vitro silencing and activation experiments for each of these genes in oral cancer cell lines and found that each gene is independently capable of upregulating proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. We next analyzed the activity of each of these genes in biopsies of varying histological grades that were obtained from a diseased oral tissue field in a single patient, finding further molecular evidence of parallel activation of VCP, DCTN3, and STOML2 during progression from normal healthy tissue to invasive oral carcinoma. Our results support the conclusion that DNA gain at 9p13 is important to the earliest stages of oral tumorigenesis and that this alteration event likely contributes to the activation of multiple oncogene candidates capable of governing oral cancer phenotypes

  15. Characterizing stroke lesions using digital templates and lesion quantification tools in a web-based imaging informatics system for a large-scale stroke rehabilitation clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ximing; Edwardson, Matthew; Dromerick, Alexander; Winstein, Carolee; Wang, Jing; Liu, Brent

    2015-03-01

    Previously, we presented an Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (ICARE) imaging informatics system that supports a large-scale phase III stroke rehabilitation trial. The ePR system is capable of displaying anonymized patient imaging studies and reports, and the system is accessible to multiple clinical trial sites and users across the United States via the web. However, the prior multicenter stroke rehabilitation trials lack any significant neuroimaging analysis infrastructure. In stroke related clinical trials, identification of the stroke lesion characteristics can be meaningful as recent research shows that lesion characteristics are related to stroke scale and functional recovery after stroke. To facilitate the stroke clinical trials, we hope to gain insight into specific lesion characteristics, such as vascular territory, for patients enrolled into large stroke rehabilitation trials. To enhance the system's capability for data analysis and data reporting, we have integrated new features with the system: a digital brain template display, a lesion quantification tool and a digital case report form. The digital brain templates are compiled from published vascular territory templates at each of 5 angles of incidence. These templates were updated to include territories in the brainstem using a vascular territory atlas and the Medical Image Processing, Analysis and Visualization (MIPAV) tool. The digital templates are displayed for side-by-side comparisons and transparent template overlay onto patients' images in the image viewer. The lesion quantification tool quantifies planimetric lesion area from user-defined contour. The digital case report form stores user input into a database, then displays contents in the interface to allow for reviewing, editing, and new inputs. In sum, the newly integrated system features provide the user with readily-accessible web-based tools to identify the vascular territory involved, estimate lesion area

  16. Detection of the Epstein-Barr Virus and DNA-Topoisomerase II-α in Recurrent and Nonrecurrent Giant Cell Lesion of the Jawbones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal M. Zyada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to determine whether the expression of Topo II- correlates with presence of EBV in giant cell lesion of the jawbones and whether it is predictive of clinical biologic behavior of these lesions. Paraffin-embedded tissues from 8 recurrent and 7 nonrecurrent cases of bony GCLs and 9 peripheral giant cell lesions (PGCLs as a control group were assessed for the expression of EBV and Topo II- using immunohistochemistry. The results showed positive staining for Topo II- in mononuclear stromal cells (MSCs and multinucleated giant cells (MGCs. Student t-test showed that mean Topo II- labelling index (LI in recurrent cases was significantly higher than that in non-recurrent cases (. Moreover, Spearman's correlation coefficients method showed a significant correlation between DNA Topo II- LI and both of gender and site in these lesions. Moderate EBV expression in relation to the highest Topo II- LI was observed in two cases of GCT. It was concluded that high Topo II- LIs could be identified as reliable predicators for the clinical behavior of GCLs. Moreover, EBV has no etiological role in the benign CGCLs in contrast to its role in the pathogenesis of GCTs.

  17. Hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase gene polymorphism based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase gene polymorphism based prediction of genotypes in chronic HBV patients from Western India. Yashwant G. Chavan, Sharad R. Pawar, Minal Wani, Amol D. Raut, Rabindra N. Misra ...

  18. Size and Base Composition of RNA in Supercoiled Plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peter H.; Boyer, Herbert W.; Helinski, Donald R.

    1973-01-01

    The average size and base composition of the covalently integrated RNA segment in supercoiled ColE1 DNA synthesized in Escherichia coli in the presence of chloramphenicol (CM-ColE1 DNA) have been determined by two independent methods. The two approaches yielded similar results, indicating that the RNA segment in CM-ColE1 DNA contains GMP at the 5′ end and comprises on the average 25 to 26 ribonucleotides with a base composition of 10-11 G, 3 A, 5-6 C, and 6-7 U. PMID:4359488

  19. Recurrent neural networks for breast lesion classification based on DCE-MRIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antropova, Natasha; Huynh, Benjamin; Giger, Maryellen

    2018-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) plays a significant role in breast cancer screening, cancer staging, and monitoring response to therapy. Recently, deep learning methods are being rapidly incorporated in image-based breast cancer diagnosis and prognosis. However, most of the current deep learning methods make clinical decisions based on 2-dimentional (2D) or 3D images and are not well suited for temporal image data. In this study, we develop a deep learning methodology that enables integration of clinically valuable temporal components of DCE-MRIs into deep learning-based lesion classification. Our work is performed on a database of 703 DCE-MRI cases for the task of distinguishing benign and malignant lesions, and uses the area under the ROC curve (AUC) as the performance metric in conducting that task. We train a recurrent neural network, specifically a long short-term memory network (LSTM), on sequences of image features extracted from the dynamic MRI sequences. These features are extracted with VGGNet, a convolutional neural network pre-trained on a large dataset of natural images ImageNet. The features are obtained from various levels of the network, to capture low-, mid-, and high-level information about the lesion. Compared to a classification method that takes as input only images at a single time-point (yielding an AUC = 0.81 (se = 0.04)), our LSTM method improves lesion classification with an AUC of 0.85 (se = 0.03).

  20. Base damage within single-strand DNA underlies in vivo hypermutability induced by a ubiquitous environmental agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Chan

    Full Text Available Chromosomal DNA must be in single-strand form for important transactions such as replication, transcription, and recombination to occur. The single-strand DNA (ssDNA is more prone to damage than double-strand DNA (dsDNA, due to greater exposure of chemically reactive moieties in the nitrogenous bases. Thus, there can be agents that damage regions of ssDNA in vivo while being inert toward dsDNA. To assess the potential hazard posed by such agents, we devised an ssDNA-specific mutagenesis reporter system in budding yeast. The reporter strains bear the cdc13-1 temperature-sensitive mutation, such that shifting to 37°C results in telomere uncapping and ensuing 5' to 3' enzymatic resection. This exposes the reporter region, containing three closely-spaced reporter genes, as a long 3' ssDNA overhang. We validated the ability of the system to detect mutagenic damage within ssDNA by expressing a modified human single-strand specific cytosine deaminase, APOBEC3G. APOBEC3G induced a high density of substitutions at cytosines in the ssDNA overhang strand, resulting in frequent, simultaneous inactivation of two reporter genes. We then examined the mutagenicity of sulfites, a class of reactive sulfur oxides to which humans are exposed frequently via respiration and food intake. Sulfites, at a concentration similar to that found in some foods, induced a high density of mutations, almost always as substitutions at cytosines in the ssDNA overhang strand, resulting in simultaneous inactivation of at least two reporter genes. Furthermore, sulfites formed a long-lived adducted 2'-deoxyuracil intermediate in DNA that was resistant to excision by uracil-DNA N-glycosylase. This intermediate was bypassed by error-prone translesion DNA synthesis, frequently involving Pol ζ, during repair synthesis. Our results suggest that sulfite-induced lesions in DNA can be particularly deleterious, since cells might not possess the means to repair or bypass such lesions

  1. PCR-based cDNA library construction: general cDNA libraries at the level of a few cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Belyavsky, A; Vinogradova, T; Rajewsky, K

    1989-01-01

    A procedure for the construction of general cDNA libraries is described which is based on the amplification of total cDNA in vitro. The first cDNA strand is synthesized from total RNA using an oligo(dT)-containing primer. After oligo(dG) tailing the total cDNA is amplified by PCR using two primers complementary to oligo(dA) and oligo(dG) ends of the cDNA. For insertion of the cDNA into a vector a controlled trimming of the 3' ends of the cDNA by Klenow enzyme was used. Starting from 10 J558L ...

  2. The impact of sample size on the reproducibility of voxel-based lesion-deficit mappings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorca-Puls, Diego L; Gajardo-Vidal, Andrea; White, Jitrachote; Seghier, Mohamed L; Leff, Alexander P; Green, David W; Crinion, Jenny T; Ludersdorfer, Philipp; Hope, Thomas M H; Bowman, Howard; Price, Cathy J

    2018-07-01

    This study investigated how sample size affects the reproducibility of findings from univariate voxel-based lesion-deficit analyses (e.g., voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping and voxel-based morphometry). Our effect of interest was the strength of the mapping between brain damage and speech articulation difficulties, as measured in terms of the proportion of variance explained. First, we identified a region of interest by searching on a voxel-by-voxel basis for brain areas where greater lesion load was associated with poorer speech articulation using a large sample of 360 right-handed English-speaking stroke survivors. We then randomly drew thousands of bootstrap samples from this data set that included either 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, or 360 patients. For each resample, we recorded effect size estimates and p values after conducting exactly the same lesion-deficit analysis within the previously identified region of interest and holding all procedures constant. The results show (1) how often small effect sizes in a heterogeneous population fail to be detected; (2) how effect size and its statistical significance varies with sample size; (3) how low-powered studies (due to small sample sizes) can greatly over-estimate as well as under-estimate effect sizes; and (4) how large sample sizes (N ≥ 90) can yield highly significant p values even when effect sizes are so small that they become trivial in practical terms. The implications of these findings for interpreting the results from univariate voxel-based lesion-deficit analyses are discussed. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Programmable molecular recognition based on the geometry of DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sungwook; Rothemund, Paul W K

    2011-07-10

    From ligand-receptor binding to DNA hybridization, molecular recognition plays a central role in biology. Over the past several decades, chemists have successfully reproduced the exquisite specificity of biomolecular interactions. However, engineering multiple specific interactions in synthetic systems remains difficult. DNA retains its position as the best medium with which to create orthogonal, isoenergetic interactions, based on the complementarity of Watson-Crick binding. Here we show that DNA can be used to create diverse bonds using an entirely different principle: the geometric arrangement of blunt-end stacking interactions. We show that both binary codes and shape complementarity can serve as a basis for such stacking bonds, and explore their specificity, thermodynamics and binding rules. Orthogonal stacking bonds were used to connect five distinct DNA origami. This work, which demonstrates how a single attractive interaction can be developed to create diverse bonds, may guide strategies for molecular recognition in systems beyond DNA nanostructures.

  4. Repair of Clustered Damage and DNA Polymerase Iota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousova, E A; Lavrik, O I

    2015-08-01

    Multiple DNA lesions occurring within one or two turns of the DNA helix known as clustered damage are a source of double-stranded DNA breaks, which represent a serious threat to the cells. Repair of clustered lesions is accomplished in several steps. If a clustered lesion contains oxidized bases, an individual DNA lesion is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) mechanism involving a specialized DNA polymerase after excising DNA damage. Here, we investigated DNA synthesis catalyzed by DNA polymerase iota using damaged DNA templates. Two types of DNA substrates were used as model DNAs: partial DNA duplexes containing breaks of different length, and DNA duplexes containing 5-formyluracil (5-foU) and uracil as a precursor of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP) in opposite DNA strands. For the first time, we showed that DNA polymerase iota is able to catalyze DNA synthesis using partial DNA duplexes having breaks of different length as substrates. In addition, we found that DNA polymerase iota could catalyze DNA synthesis during repair of clustered damage via the BER system by using both undamaged and 5-foU-containing templates. We found that hPCNA (human proliferating cell nuclear antigen) increased efficacy of DNA synthesis catalyzed by DNA polymerase iota.

  5. The proofreading 3'→5' exonuclease activity of DNA polymerases: a kinetic barrier to translesion DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare, Vineeta; Eckert, Kristin A.

    2002-01-01

    The 3'→5' exonuclease activity intrinsic to several DNA polymerases plays a primary role in genetic stability; it acts as a first line of defense in correcting DNA polymerase errors. A mismatched basepair at the primer terminus is the preferred substrate for the exonuclease activity over a correct basepair. The efficiency of the exonuclease as a proofreading activity for mispairs containing a DNA lesion varies, however, being dependent upon both the DNA polymerase/exonuclease and the type of DNA lesion. The exonuclease activities intrinsic to the T4 polymerase (family B) and DNA polymerase γ (family A) proofread DNA mispairs opposite endogenous DNA lesions, including alkylation, oxidation, and abasic adducts. However, the exonuclease of the Klenow polymerase cannot discriminate between correct and incorrect bases opposite alkylation and oxidative lesions. DNA damage alters the dynamics of the intramolecular partitioning of DNA substrates between the 3'→5' exonuclease and polymerase activities. Enzymatic idling at lesions occurs when an exonuclease activity efficiently removes the same base that is preferentially incorporated by the DNA polymerase activity. Thus, the exonuclease activity can also act as a kinetic barrier to translesion synthesis (TLS) by preventing the stable incorporation of bases opposite DNA lesions. Understanding the downstream consequences of exonuclease activity at DNA lesions is necessary for elucidating the mechanisms of translesion synthesis and damage-induced cytotoxicity

  6. Difficulty of MRI based identification of lesion age by acute infra-tentorial ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Grosse-Dresselhaus

    Full Text Available Systemic thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke is restricted to the 4.5 h time window. Many patients are excluded from this treatment because symptom onset is unknown. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI studies have shown that stroke patients presenting with acute supra-tentorial diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI lesions that do not have matching lesions on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR are likely to be within a 4.5 hour time window. This study examines the DWI-FLAIR mismatch in infra-tentorial stroke.This was a retrospectively conducted substudy of the "1000+" study; a prospective, single-center observational study (http://clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00715533. Fifty-six patients with infra-tentorial stroke confirmed by MRI and known symptom onset who underwent the scan within 24 h after symptom onset were analysed. Two neurologists blinded to clinical information separately rated the DWI lesion visibility on FLAIR. Lesion volume, relative signal intensities of DWI and relative apparent diffusion coefficient values were determined.Regarding baseline characteristics our study population had a median age of 66 years, a median time from symptom onset to MRI of 616.5 minutes, a median NIHSS of 3 and a median DWI lesion volume of 0.26 ml. A negative FLAIR allocated patients to a time window under 4.5 h correctly with a sensitivity of 55% and a specificity of 61%, a positive predictive value of 44% and a negative predictive value of 71%. FLAIR positivity decreased with age (p = 0.018, and showed no significant correlation to lesion volume (p = 0.145.In our study the DWI-FLAIR-Mismatch does not help to reliably identify patients within 4.5 h of symptom onset in acute ischemic infra-tentorial stroke. Thus therapeutical decisions based on the DWI-FLAIR mismatch estimation of time from onset cannot be recommended in patients with infra-tentorial stroke.

  7. How stable are the mutagenic tautomers of DNA bases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brovarets’ O. O.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the lifetime of the mutagenic tautomers of DNA base pairs through the investigation of the physicochemical mechanisms of their intramolecular proton transfer. Methods. Non-empirical quantum chemistry, the analysis of the electron density by means of Bader’s atom in molecules (AIM theory and physicochemical kinetics were used. Results. Physicochemical character of the transition state of the intramolecular tautomerisation of DNA bases was investigated, the lifetime of mutagenic tautomers was calculated. Conclusions. The lifetime of the DNA bases mutagenic tautomers by 3–10 orders exceeds typical time of DNA replication in the cell (~103 s. This fact confirms that the postulate, on which the Watson-Crick tautomeric hypothesis of spontaneous transitions grounds, is adequate. The absence of intramolecular H-bonds in the canonical and mutagenic tautomeric forms determine their high stability

  8. Oxidative DNA base modifications as factors in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olinski, R.; Jaruga, P.; Zastawny, T.H.

    1998-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species can cause extensive DNA modifications including modified bases. Some of the DNA base damage has been found to possess premutagenic properties. Therefore, if not repaired, it can contribute to carcinogenesis. We have found elevated amounts of modified bases in cancerous and precancerous tissues as compared with normal tissues. Most of the agents used in anticancer therapy are paradoxically responsible for induction of secondary malignancies and some of them may generate free radicals. The results of our experiments provide evidence that exposure of cancer patients to therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation and anticancer drugs cause base modifications in genomic DNA of lymphocytes. Some of these base damages could lead to mutagenesis in critical genes and ultimately to secondary cancers such as leukemias. This may point to an important role of oxidative base damage in cancer initiation. Alternatively, the increased level of the modified base products may contribute to genetic instability and metastatic potential of tumor cells. (author)

  9. The brain and the subjective experience of time. A voxel based symptom-lesion mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojano, Luigi; Caccavale, Michelina; De Bellis, Francesco; Crisci, Claudio

    2017-06-30

    The aim of the study was to identify the anatomical bases involved in the subjective experience of time, by means of a voxel based symptom-lesion mapping (VLSM) study on patients with focal brain damage. Thirty-three patients (nineteen with right-hemisphere lesions -RBD, and fourteen with left lesion- LBD) and twenty-eight non-neurological controls (NNC) underwent the semi-structured QUEstionnaire for the Subjective experience of Time (QUEST) requiring retrospective and prospective judgements on self-relevant time intervals. All participants also completed tests to assess general cognitive functioning and two questionnaires to evaluate their emotional state. Both groups of brain-damaged patients achieved significantly different scores from NNC on the time performance, without differences between RBD and LBD. VLSM showed a cluster of voxels located in the right inferior parietal lobule significantly related to errors in the prospective items. The lesion subtraction analysis revealed two different patterns possibly associated with errors in the prospective items (the right inferior parietal cortex, rolandic operculum and posterior middle temporal gyrus) and in the retrospective items (superior middle temporal gyrus, white matter posterior to the insula). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. One-electron oxidation reactions of purine and pyrimidine bases in cellular DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J Richard; Shafirovich, Vladimir; Geacintov, Nicholas E

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this survey is to critically review the available information on one-electron oxidation reactions of nucleobases in cellular DNA with emphasis on damage induced through the transient generation of purine and pyrimidine radical cations. Since the indirect effect of ionizing radiation mediated by hydroxyl radical is predominant in cells, efforts have been made to selectively ionize bases using suitable one-electron oxidants that consist among others of high intensity UVC laser pulses. Thus, the main oxidation product in cellular DNA was found to be 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine as a result of direct bi-photonic ionization of guanine bases and indirect formation of guanine radical cations through hole transfer reactions from other base radical cations. The formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine and other purine and pyrimidine degradation products was rationalized in terms of the initial generation of related radical cations followed by either hydration or deprotonation reactions in agreement with mechanistic pathways inferred from detailed mechanistic studies. The guanine radical cation has been shown to be implicated in three other nucleophilic additions that give rise to DNA-protein and DNA-DNA cross-links in model systems. Evidence was recently provided for the occurrence of these three reactions in cellular DNA. There is growing evidence that one-electron oxidation reactions of nucleobases whose mechanisms have been characterized in model studies involving aqueous solutions take place in a similar way in cells. It may also be pointed out that the above cross-linked lesions are only produced from the guanine radical cation and may be considered as diagnostic products of the direct effect of ionizing radiation.

  11. The role of rostral prefrontal cortex in prospective memory: a voxel-based lesion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volle, Emmanuelle; Gonen-Yaacovi, Gil; Costello, Angela de Lacy; Gilbert, Sam J; Burgess, Paul W

    2011-07-01

    Patients with lesions in rostral prefrontal cortex (PFC) often experience problems in everyday-life situations requiring multitasking. A key cognitive component that is critical in multitasking situations is prospective memory, defined as the ability to carry out an intended action after a delay period filled with unrelated activity. The few functional imaging studies investigating prospective memory have shown consistent activation in both medial and lateral rostral PFC but also in more posterior prefrontal regions and non-frontal regions. The aim of this study was to determine regions that are necessary for prospective memory performance, using the human lesion approach. We designed an experimental paradigm allowing us to assess time-based (remembering to do something at a particular time) and event-based (remembering to do something in a particular situation) prospective memory, using two types of material, words and pictures. Time estimation tasks and tasks controlling for basic attention, inhibition and multiple instructions processing were also administered. We examined brain-behaviour relationships with a voxelwise lesion method in 45 patients with focal brain lesions and 107 control subjects using this paradigm. The results showed that lesions in the right polar prefrontal region (in Brodmann area 10) were specifically associated with a deficit in time-based prospective memory tasks for both words and pictures. This deficit could not be explained by impairments in basic attention, detection, inhibition or multiple instruction processing, and there was also no deficit in event-based prospective memory conditions. In addition to their prospective memory difficulties, these polar prefrontal patients were significantly impaired in time estimation ability compared to other patients. The same region was found to be involved using both words and pictures, suggesting that right rostral PFC plays a material nonspecific role in prospective memory. This is the first

  12. Glycosylase-mediated repair of radiation-induced DNA bases: substrate specificities and mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'ham, Cedric

    1998-01-01

    Cellular DNA is subject to permanent damage and repair processes. One way to restore the integrity of DNA involves the base excision repair pathway. Glycosylases are the key-enzymes of this process. The present work deals with the determination of the substrate specificity and the mechanism of action of three glycosylases: endonuclease III and Fpg of Escherichia coli and Ogg1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The present manuscript is divided into four parts: Endonuclease III-mediated excision of 5,6-dihydro-thymine and 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydro-thymine from γ-irradiated DNA was analyzed by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assay, including a liquid chromatography pre-purification step. This was found to be necessary in order to separate the cis and trans isomers of 6-hydroxy-5,6-dihydro-thymine from the 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydro-thymine. Modified oligonucleotides that contained a unique lesion, including thymine glycol, 5,6-dihydro-thymine and 5-hydroxy-cytosine were synthesized to assess the substrate specificity of endonuclease III and Fpg. The order of preference of the enzymes for the substrates was determined by the measurement of the Michaelis constants of the kinetics. Furthermore, the mechanism of action of endonuclease III has been reconsidered, after analysis using the MALDI mass spectrometry technique. These studies reveal that hydrolysis is the main pathway by which endonuclease III cleaves the DNA backbone. Using a modified oligonucleotide, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-adenine was shown to be a product of excision of the Ogg1 enzyme. The role of the complementary base towards the lesion was found to be preponderant in the damage excision. A last chapter concerns the synthesis and the characterization of the four isomers of 5(6)-hydroxy-6(5)-hydroperoxides of thymine. These products may be substrates for endonuclease III or Fpg. (author) [fr

  13. DNA fragments assembly based on nicking enzyme system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Yan Wang

    Full Text Available A couple of DNA ligation-independent cloning (LIC methods have been reported to meet various requirements in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. The principle of LIC is the assembly of multiple overlapping DNA fragments by single-stranded (ss DNA overlaps annealing. Here we present a method to generate single-stranded DNA overlaps based on Nicking Endonucleases (NEases for LIC, the method was termed NE-LIC. Factors related to cloning efficiency were optimized in this study. This NE-LIC allows generating 3'-end or 5'-end ss DNA overlaps of various lengths for fragments assembly. We demonstrated that the 10 bp/15 bp overlaps had the highest DNA fragments assembling efficiency, while 5 bp/10 bp overlaps showed the highest efficiency when T4 DNA ligase was added. Its advantage over Sequence and Ligation Independent Cloning (SLIC and Uracil-Specific Excision Reagent (USER was obvious. The mechanism can be applied to many other LIC strategies. Finally, the NEases based LIC (NE-LIC was successfully applied to assemble a pathway of six gene fragments responsible for synthesizing microbial poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB.

  14. Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus mimicking intraosseous lesions of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalali, Elnaz; Tadinada, Aditya [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus is a developmental variant that is not always well recognized and is often confused with other pathologies associated with the skull base. This report describes the case of a patient referred for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging for dental implant therapy. CBCT demonstrated a well-defined incidental lesion in the left sphenoid sinus with soft tissue-like density and sclerotic borders with internal curvilinear opacifications. The differential diagnoses included intraosseous lipoma, arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus, chondrosarcoma, chondroid chordoma, and ossifying fibroma. The radiographic diagnosis of arrested pneumatization was based on the location of the lesion, its well-defined nature, the presence of internal opacifications, and lack of expansion. Gray-scale CBCT imaging of the area demonstrated values similar to fatty tissue. This case highlighted the fact that benign developmental variants associated with the skull base share similar radiographic features with more serious pathological entities.

  15. Natural history of chondroid skull base lesions - case report and review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidinger, A.; Rosahl, S.K.; Vorkapic, P.; Samii, M.

    2002-01-01

    Long-term follow-up reports on chondroid lesions of the skull base are rarely presented in the literature. There are virtually no data on natural growth rates of these tumors based on MRI obtained over a period of 10 years or longer. We followed a patient who has had such a lesion for more than 12 years. A non-progressive, slight abducens palsy has been the only associated symptom so far. Even though the patient was operated on for an additional intracranial arterio-venous malformation, clinical features and chromosomal testing excluded Maffucci's syndrome. The MRI follow-up in this case provides an extraordinary perspective on the natural history of chondroid skull base tumors. (orig.)

  16. DNA barcode-based molecular identification system for fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungmin; Eo, Hae-Seok; Koo, Hyeyoung; Choi, Jun-Kil; Kim, Won

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we applied DNA barcoding to identify species using short DNA sequence analysis. We examined the utility of DNA barcoding by identifying 53 Korean freshwater fish species, 233 other freshwater fish species, and 1339 saltwater fish species. We successfully developed a web-based molecular identification system for fish (MISF) using a profile hidden Markov model. MISF facilitates efficient and reliable species identification, overcoming the limitations of conventional taxonomic approaches. MISF is freely accessible at http://bioinfosys.snu.ac.kr:8080/MISF/misf.jsp .

  17. A Novel Image Encryption Algorithm Based on DNA Subsequence Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel image encryption algorithm based on DNA subsequence operation. Different from the traditional DNA encryption methods, our algorithm does not use complex biological operation but just uses the idea of DNA subsequence operations (such as elongation operation, truncation operation, deletion operation, etc. combining with the logistic chaotic map to scramble the location and the value of pixel points from the image. The experimental results and security analysis show that the proposed algorithm is easy to be implemented, can get good encryption effect, has a wide secret key's space, strong sensitivity to secret key, and has the abilities of resisting exhaustive attack and statistic attack.

  18. A Rewritable, Random-Access DNA-Based Storage System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, S M Hossein Tabatabaei; Yuan, Yongbo; Ma, Jian; Zhao, Huimin; Milenkovic, Olgica

    2015-09-18

    We describe the first DNA-based storage architecture that enables random access to data blocks and rewriting of information stored at arbitrary locations within the blocks. The newly developed architecture overcomes drawbacks of existing read-only methods that require decoding the whole file in order to read one data fragment. Our system is based on new constrained coding techniques and accompanying DNA editing methods that ensure data reliability, specificity and sensitivity of access, and at the same time provide exceptionally high data storage capacity. As a proof of concept, we encoded parts of the Wikipedia pages of six universities in the USA, and selected and edited parts of the text written in DNA corresponding to three of these schools. The results suggest that DNA is a versatile media suitable for both ultrahigh density archival and rewritable storage applications.

  19. A universal DNA-based protein detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thua N N; Cui, Jinhui; Hartman, Mark R; Peng, Songming; Funabashi, Hisakage; Duan, Faping; Yang, Dayong; March, John C; Lis, John T; Cui, Haixin; Luo, Dan

    2013-09-25

    Protein immune detection requires secondary antibodies which must be carefully selected in order to avoid interspecies cross-reactivity, and is therefore restricted by the limited availability of primary/secondary antibody pairs. Here we present a versatile DNA-based protein detection system using a universal adapter to interface between IgG antibodies and DNA-modified reporter molecules. As a demonstration of this capability, we successfully used DNA nano-barcodes, quantum dots, and horseradish peroxidase enzyme to detect multiple proteins using our DNA-based labeling system. Our system not only eliminates secondary antibodies but also serves as a novel method platform for protein detection with modularity, high capacity, and multiplexed capability.

  20. The method for detecting small lesions in medical image based on sliding window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guilai; Jiao, Yuan

    2016-10-01

    At present, the research on computer-aided diagnosis includes the sample image segmentation, extracting visual features, generating the classification model by learning, and according to the model generated to classify and judge the inspected images. However, this method has a large scale of calculation and speed is slow. And because medical images are usually low contrast, when the traditional image segmentation method is applied to the medical image, there is a complete failure. As soon as possible to find the region of interest, improve detection speed, this topic attempts to introduce the current popular visual attention model into small lesions detection. However, Itti model is mainly for natural images. But the effect is not ideal when it is used to medical images which usually are gray images. Especially in the early stages of some cancers, the focus of a disease in the whole image is not the most significant region and sometimes is very difficult to be found. But these lesions are prominent in the local areas. This paper proposes a visual attention mechanism based on sliding window, and use sliding window to calculate the significance of a local area. Combined with the characteristics of the lesion, select the features of gray, entropy, corner and edge to generate a saliency map. Then the significant region is segmented and distinguished. This method reduces the difficulty of image segmentation, and improves the detection accuracy of small lesions, and it has great significance to early discovery, early diagnosis and treatment of cancers.

  1. Three dimensional quantitative coronary angiography can detect reliably ischemic coronary lesions based on fractional flow reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woo-Young; Choi, Byoung-Joo; Lim, Seong-Hoon; Matsuo, Yoshiki; Lennon, Ryan J; Gulati, Rajiv; Sandhu, Gurpreet S; Holmes, David R; Rihal, Charanjit S; Lerman, Amir

    2015-06-01

    Conventional coronary angiography (CAG) has limitations in evaluating lesions producing ischemia. Three dimensional quantitative coronary angiography (3D-QCA) shows reconstructed images of CAG using computer based algorithm, the Cardio-op B system (Paieon Medical, Rosh Ha'ayin, Israel). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether 3D-QCA can reliably predict ischemia assessed by myocardial fractional flow reserve (FFR) < 0.80. 3D-QCA images were reconstructed from CAG which also were evaluated with FFR to assess ischemia. Minimal luminal diameter (MLD), percent diameter stenosis (%DS), minimal luminal area (MLA), and percent area stenosis (%AS) were obtained. The results of 3D-QCA and FFR were compared. A total of 266 patients was enrolled for the present study. FFR for all lesions ranged from 0.57 to 1.00 (0.85 ± 0.09). Measurement of MLD, %DS, MLA, and %AS all were significantly correlated with FFR (r = 0.569, 0609, 0.569, 0.670, respectively, all P < 0.001). In lesions with MLA < 4.0 mm(2), %AS of more than 65.5% had a 80% sensitivity and a 83% specificity to predict FFR < 0.80 (area under curve, AUC was 0.878). 3D-QCA can reliably predict coronary lesions producing ischemia and may be used to guide therapeutic approach for coronary artery disease.

  2. Ultraviolet enhancement of DNA base release by bleomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakinuma, J.; Tanabe, M.; Orii, H.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of UV irradiation on base-releasing activity of bleomycin was studied on bleomycin A 2 -DNA reaction mixture in the presence of Fe(II) and 2-mercaptoethanol. This effect was measured by the release of free bases from calf thymus DNA with high-performance liquid chromatography. UV irradiation enhanced DNA base-releasing activity of bleomycin and simultaneously caused disappearance of fluorescence emission maximum at 355 nm assigned to bithiazole rings and increase in the intensity of a peak at 400 nm. UV irradiation at 295 nm, the UV absorption maximum of bleomycin, is the most effective in releasing free bases and in changing fluorescence emission patterns. From these results, we suggest that some alterations in the bithiazole group of bleomycin molecule were initiated by UV irradiation and contributed to increased base-releasing activity of bleomycin through a yet unexplained mechanism, presumably through bleomycin dimer formation. (orig.)

  3. Towards observing the encounter of the T7 DNA replication fork with a lesion site at the Single molecule level

    KAUST Repository

    Shirbini, Afnan

    2017-01-01

    and established the T7 leading strand synthesis at the single molecule level. I also optimized various control experiments to remove any interference from the nonspecific interactions of the DNA with the surface. My work established the foundation to image

  4. Effects of formic acid hydrolysis on the quantitative analysis of radiation-induced DNA base damage products assayed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swarts, S.G.; Smith, G.S.; Miao, L.; Wheeler, K.T.

    1996-01-01

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/ MS-SIM) is an excellent technique for performing both qualitative and quantitative analysis of DNA base damage products that are formed by exposure to ionizing radiation or by the interaction of intracellular DNA with activated oxygen species. This technique commonly uses a hot formic acid hydrolysis step to degrade the DNA to individual free bases. However, due to the harsh nature of this degradation procedure, the quantitation of DNA base damage products may be adversely affected. Consequently, we examined the effects of various formic acid hydrolysis procedures on the quantitation of a number of DNA base damage products and identified several factors that can influence this quantitation. These factors included (1) the inherent acid stabilities of both the lesions and the internal standards; (2) the hydrolysis temperature; (3) the source and grade of the formic acid; and (4) the sample mass during hydrolysis. Our data also suggested that the N, O-bis (trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) derivatization efficiency can be adversely affected, presumably by trace contaminants either in the formic acid or from the acid-activated surface of the glass derivatization vials. Where adverse effects were noted, modifications were explored in an attempt to improve the quantitation of these DNA lesions. Although experimental steps could be taken to minimize the influence of these factors on the quantitation of some base damage products, no single procedure solved the quantitation problem for all base lesions. However, a significant improvement in the quantitation was achieved if the relative molecular response factor (RMRF) values for these lesions were generated with authentic DNA base damage products that had been treated exactly like the experimental samples. (orig.)

  5. Locate the Lesion: A Project-Based Learning Case that Stimulates Comprehension and Application of Neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Michele L

    2017-01-01

    A fictitious patient, Mr. Challenge, is admitted to the emergency room and displays symptoms consistent with damage to the central nervous system. In this problem-based learning case, students are challenged to determine the location of a lesion that is consistent with Mr. Challenge's symptoms. Students discover details about Mr. Challenge's symptoms while exploring three anatomical pathways: corticospinal tract, spinothalamic tract and medial lemniscal pathway. Students make predictions as to which of these pathways may be damaged in Mr. Challenge and defend their predictions based on their research of the function and anatomical location of these tracts. This ultimately leads the student to identifying a single lesion site that can account for Mr. Challenge's symptoms. This case is executed in an undergraduate neuroscience course and would be useful in anatomy and physiology course, as well as other courses that serve students interested in health science related careers.

  6. DNA based random key generation and management for OTP encryption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Liu, Xin; Sun, Manhui

    2017-09-01

    One-time pad (OTP) is a principle of key generation applied to the stream ciphering method which offers total privacy. The OTP encryption scheme has proved to be unbreakable in theory, but difficult to realize in practical applications. Because OTP encryption specially requires the absolute randomness of the key, its development has suffered from dense constraints. DNA cryptography is a new and promising technology in the field of information security. DNA chromosomes storing capabilities can be used as one-time pad structures with pseudo-random number generation and indexing in order to encrypt the plaintext messages. In this paper, we present a feasible solution to the OTP symmetric key generation and transmission problem with DNA at the molecular level. Through recombinant DNA technology, by using only sender-receiver known restriction enzymes to combine the secure key represented by DNA sequence and the T vector, we generate the DNA bio-hiding secure key and then place the recombinant plasmid in implanted bacteria for secure key transmission. The designed bio experiments and simulation results show that the security of the transmission of the key is further improved and the environmental requirements of key transmission are reduced. Analysis has demonstrated that the proposed DNA-based random key generation and management solutions are marked by high security and usability. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. [Evidence-based therapy for cartilage lesions in the knee - regenerative treatment options].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proffen, B; von Keudell, A; Vavken, P

    2012-06-01

    The treatment of cartilage defects has seen a shift from replacement to regeneration in the last few years. The rationale behind this development is the improvement in the quality-of-care for the growing segment of young patients who are prone to arthroplasty complications because of their specific characteristics - young age, high level of activity, high demand for functionality. These days, two of the most popular regenerative treatments are microfracture and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Although these new options show promising results, no final algorithm for the treatment of cartilage lesions has been established as yet. The objective of this review is to describe and compare these two treatment options and to present an evidence-based treatment algorithm for focal cartilage defects. Microfracture is a cost-effective, arthroscopic one-stage procedure, in which by drilling of the subchondral plate, mesenchymal stem cells from the bone marrow migrate into the defect and rebuild the cartilage. ACI is a two-stage procedure in which first chondrocytes are harvested, expanded in cell culture and in a second open procedure reimplanted into the cartilage defect. Microfracture is usually used for focal cartilage defects osteophyte, and for the ACI patient, periosteal hypertrophy and the need for two procedures in ACI. Only a few studies provide detailed and evidence-based information on a comparative assessment. These studies, however, are showing widely similar clinical outcomes but better histological results for ACI, which are likely to translate into better long-term outcomes. Although evidence-based studies comparing microfracture and ACI have not found significant differences in the clinical outcome, the literature does show that choosing the treatment based on the size and characteristics of the osteochondral lesion might be beneficial. The American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons suggest that contained lesions < 4 cm2 should be treated by

  8. RPA physically interacts with the human DNA glycosylase NEIL1 to regulate excision of oxidative DNA base damage in primer-template structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, Corey A; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Hazra, Tapas K; Mitra, Sankar

    2010-06-04

    The human DNA glycosylase NEIL1, activated during the S-phase, has been shown to excise oxidized base lesions in single-strand DNA substrates. Furthermore, our previous work demonstrating functional interaction of NEIL1 with PCNA and flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) suggested its involvement in replication-associated repair. Here we show interaction of NEIL1 with replication protein A (RPA), the heterotrimeric single-strand DNA binding protein that is essential for replication and other DNA transactions. The NEIL1 immunocomplex isolated from human cells contains RPA, and its abundance in the complex increases after exposure to oxidative stress. NEIL1 directly interacts with the large subunit of RPA (K(d) approximately 20 nM) via the common interacting interface (residues 312-349) in NEIL1's disordered C-terminal region. RPA inhibits the base excision activity of both wild-type NEIL1 (389 residues) and its C-terminal deletion CDelta78 mutant (lacking the interaction domain) for repairing 5-hydroxyuracil (5-OHU) in a primer-template structure mimicking the DNA replication fork. This inhibition is reduced when the damage is located near the primer-template junction. Contrarily, RPA moderately stimulates wild-type NEIL1 but not the CDelta78 mutant when 5-OHU is located within the duplex region. While NEIL1 is inhibited by both RPA and Escherichia coli single-strand DNA binding protein, only inhibition by RPA is relieved by PCNA. These results showing modulation of NEIL1's activity on single-stranded DNA substrate by RPA and PCNA support NEIL1's involvement in repairing the replicating genome. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The contribution of thermally labile sugar lesions to DNA double-strand break formation in cells grown in the presence of BrdU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fanghua; Cheng, Yanlei; Iliakis, George

    2015-04-01

    Radiosensitization by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) is commonly attributed to an increase in the yield of double-strand breaks (DSB) in the DNA and an associated decrease in the reparability of these lesions. Radiation chemistry provides a mechanism for the increased yield of DSB through the generation, after bromine loss, of a highly reactive uracilyl radical that attacks the sugar moiety of the nucleotide to produce a single-strand break (SSB). The effects underpinning DSB repair inhibition remain, in contrast, incompletely characterized. A possible source of reduced reparability is a change in the nature or complexity of the DSB in BrdU-substituted DNA. Recent studies show that DSB-complexity or DSB-nature may also be affected by the presence within the cluster of thermally labile sugar lesions (TLSL) that break the DNA backbone only if they chemically evolve to SSB, a process thought to occur within the first hour post-irradiation. Since BrdU radiosensitization might be associated with increased yields and reduced reparability of DSB, we investigated whether BrdU underpins these effects by shifting the balance in the generation of TLSL. We employed asymmetric-field-inversion gel electrophoresis (AFIGE), a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) method to quantitate DSB in a battery of five cells lines grown in the presence of different concentrations of BrdU. We measured specifically the yields of promptly forming DSB (prDSB) using low temperature lysis protocols, and the yields of total DSB (tDSB = prDSB + tlDSB; tlDSB form after evolution to SSB of TLSL) using high temperature lysis protocols. We report that incorporation of BrdU generates similar increases in the formation of tlDSB and prDSB, but variations are noted among the different cell lines tested. The similar increase in the yields of tlDSB and prDSB in BrdU substituted DNA showed that shifts in the yields of these forms of lesions could not be invoked to explain BrdU radiosensitization.

  10. Application of DNA-based methods in forensic entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jeffrey D; Stevens, Jamie R

    2008-01-01

    A forensic entomological investigation can benefit from a variety of widely practiced molecular genotyping methods. The most commonly used is DNA-based specimen identification. Other applications include the identification of insect gut contents and the characterization of the population genetic structure of a forensically important insect species. The proper application of these procedures demands that the analyst be technically expert. However, one must also be aware of the extensive list of standards and expectations that many legal systems have developed for forensic DNA analysis. We summarize the DNA techniques that are currently used in, or have been proposed for, forensic entomology and review established genetic analyses from other scientific fields that address questions similar to those in forensic entomology. We describe how accepted standards for forensic DNA practice and method validation are likely to apply to insect evidence used in a death or other forensic entomological investigation.

  11. Age and lesion-induced increases of GDNF transgene expression in brain following intracerebral injections of DNA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurek, D M; Hasselrot, U; Cass, W A; Sesenoglu-Laird, O; Padegimas, L; Cooper, M J

    2015-01-22

    In previous studies that used compacted DNA nanoparticles (DNP) to transfect cells in the brain, we observed higher transgene expression in the denervated striatum when compared to transgene expression in the intact striatum. We also observed that long-term transgene expression occurred in astrocytes as well as neurons. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that the higher transgene expression observed in the denervated striatum may be a function of increased gliosis. Several aging studies have also reported an increase of gliosis as a function of normal aging. In this study we used DNPs that encoded for human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (hGDNF) and either a non-specific human polyubiquitin C (UbC) or an astrocyte-specific human glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter. The DNPs were injected intracerebrally into the denervated or intact striatum of young, middle-aged or aged rats, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) transgene expression was subsequently quantified in brain tissue samples. The results of our studies confirmed our earlier finding that transgene expression was higher in the denervated striatum when compared to intact striatum for DNPs incorporating either promoter. In addition, we observed significantly higher transgene expression in the denervated striatum of old rats when compared to young rats following injections of both types of DNPs. Stereological analysis of GFAP+ cells in the striatum confirmed an increase of GFAP+ cells in the denervated striatum when compared to the intact striatum and also an age-related increase; importantly, increases in GFAP+ cells closely matched the increases in GDNF transgene levels. Thus neurodegeneration and aging may lay a foundation that is actually beneficial for this particular type of gene therapy while other gene therapy techniques that target neurons are actually targeting cells that are decreasing as the disease progresses. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by

  12. Pigmented skin lesion detection using random forest and wavelet-based texture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ping; Yang, Tie-jun

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma, a disease of worldwide distribution and is the deadliest form of skin cancer, has been rapidly increasing over the last few decades. Because advanced cutaneous melanoma is still incurable, early detection is an important step toward a reduction in mortality. Dermoscopy photographs are commonly used in melanoma diagnosis and can capture detailed features of a lesion. A great variability exists in the visual appearance of pigmented skin lesions. Therefore, in order to minimize the diagnostic errors that result from the difficulty and subjectivity of visual interpretation, an automatic detection approach is required. The objectives of this paper were to propose a hybrid method using random forest and Gabor wavelet transformation to accurately differentiate which part belong to lesion area and the other is not in a dermoscopy photographs and analyze segmentation accuracy. A random forest classifier consisting of a set of decision trees was used for classification. Gabor wavelets transformation are the mathematical model of visual cortical cells of mammalian brain and an image can be decomposed into multiple scales and multiple orientations by using it. The Gabor function has been recognized as a very useful tool in texture analysis, due to its optimal localization properties in both spatial and frequency domain. Texture features based on Gabor wavelets transformation are found by the Gabor filtered image. Experiment results indicate the following: (1) the proposed algorithm based on random forest outperformed the-state-of-the-art in pigmented skin lesions detection (2) and the inclusion of Gabor wavelet transformation based texture features improved segmentation accuracy significantly.

  13. Prevalent Bacterial Species and Novel Phylotypes in Advanced Noma Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Paster, B. J.; Falkler, Jr., W. A.; Enwonwu, C. O.; Idigbe, E. O.; Savage, K. O.; Levanos, V. A.; Tamer, M. A.; Ericson, R. L.; Lau, C. N.; Dewhirst, F. E.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the bacterial diversity in advanced noma lesions using culture-independent molecular methods. 16S ribosomal DNA bacterial genes from DNA isolated from advanced noma lesions of four Nigerian children were PCR amplified with universally conserved primers and spirochetal selective primers and cloned into Escherichia coli. Partial 16S rRNA sequences of approximately 500 bases from 212 cloned inserts were used initially to determine species identity or cl...

  14. Transforming bases to bytes: Molecular computing with DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Despite the popular image of silicon-based computers for computation, an embryonic field of mole- cular computation is emerging, where molecules in solution perform computational ..... [4] Mao C, Sun W, Shen Z and Seeman N C 1999. A nanomechanical device based on the B-Z transition of DNA; Nature 397 144–146.

  15. DNA based methods used for characterization and detection of food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Detection of food borne pathogen is of outmost importance in the food industries and related agencies. For the last few decades conventional methods were used to detect food borne pathogens based on phenotypic characters. At the advent of complementary base pairing and amplification of DNA, the diagnosis of food ...

  16. DNA & Protein detection based on microbead agglutination

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas; Castro, David; Foulds, Ian G.; Parameswaran, Ash M.; Sumanpreet, K. Chhina

    2012-01-01

    the macroscopic observation. Agglutination-based tests are most often used to explore the antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for mode protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin two-component system, as well as a hybridization based two

  17. Early detection of breast cancer mass lesions by mammogram segmentation images based on texture features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, F.H.

    2012-01-01

    Mammography is at present one of the available method for early detection of masses or abnormalities which is related to breast cancer.The calcifications. The challenge lies in early and accurate detection to overcome the development of breast cancer that affects more and more women throughout the world. Breast cancer is diagnosed at advanced stages with the help of the digital mammogram images. Masses appear in a mammogram as fine, granular clusters, which are often difficult to identify in a raw mammogram. The incidence of breast cancer in women has increased significantly in recent years. This paper proposes a computer aided diagnostic system for the extraction of features like mass lesions in mammograms for early detection of breast cancer. The proposed technique is based on a four-step procedure: (a) the preprocessing of the image is done, (b) regions of interest (ROI) specification, (c) supervised segmentation method includes two to stages performed using the minimum distance (M D) criterion, and (d) feature extraction based on Gray level Co-occurrence matrices GLC M for the identification of mass lesions. The method suggested for the detection of mass lesions from mammogram image segmentation and analysis was tested over several images taken from A L-llwiya Hospital in Baghdad, Iraq.The proposed technique shows better results.

  18. Distinct kinetics of DNA repair protein accumulation at DNA lesions and cell cycle-dependent formation of gammaH2AX- and NBS1-positive repair foci

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suchánková, Jana; Kozubek, Stanislav; Legartová, Soňa; Sehnalová, Petra; Kuntzinger, T.; Bártová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 12 (2015), s. 440-454 ISSN 0248-4900 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G157; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-07822S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Cell cycle * DNA repair * Interphase Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.552, year: 2015

  19. Molecular genotyping of Colletotrichum species based on arbitrarily primed PCR, A + T-Rich DNA, and nuclear DNA analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, S.; Pham, M.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Molecular genotyping of Colletotrichum species based on arbitrarily primed PCR, A + T-rich DNA, and nuclear DNA analyses. Experimental Mycology 17, 309-322. Isolates of Colletotrichum were grouped into 10 separate species based on arbitrarily primed PCR (ap-PCR), A + T-rich DNA (AT-DNA) and nuclear DNA banding patterns. In general, the grouping of Colletotrichum isolates by these molecular approaches corresponded to that done by classical taxonomic identification, however, some exceptions were observed. PCR amplification of genomic DNA using four different primers allowed for reliable differentiation between isolates of the 10 species. HaeIII digestion patterns of AT-DNA also distinguished between species of Colletotrichum by generating species-specific band patterns. In addition, hybridization of the repetitive DNA element (GcpR1) to genomic DNA identified a unique set of Pst 1-digested nuclear DNA fragments in each of the 10 species of Colletotrichum tested. Multiple isolates of C. acutatum, C. coccodes, C. fragariae, C. lindemuthianum, C. magna, C. orbiculare, C. graminicola from maize, and C. graminicola from sorghum showed 86-100% intraspecies similarity based on ap-PCR and AT-DNA analyses. Interspecies similarity determined by ap-PCR and AT-DNA analyses varied between 0 and 33%. Three distinct banding patterns were detected in isolates of C. gloeosporioides from strawberry. Similarly, three different banding patterns were observed among isolates of C. musae from diseased banana.

  20. Electrochemical DNA Hybridization Sensors Based on Conducting Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Mahbubur; Li, Xiao-Bo; Lopa, Nasrin Siraj; Ahn, Sang Jung; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Conducting polymers (CPs) are a group of polymeric materials that have attracted considerable attention because of their unique electronic, chemical, and biochemical properties. This is reflected in their use in a wide range of potential applications, including light-emitting diodes, anti-static coating, electrochromic materials, solar cells, chemical sensors, biosensors, and drug-release systems. Electrochemical DNA sensors based on CPs can be used in numerous areas related to human health. This review summarizes the recent progress made in the development and use of CP-based electrochemical DNA hybridization sensors. We discuss the distinct properties of CPs with respect to their use in the immobilization of probe DNA on electrode surfaces, and we describe the immobilization techniques used for developing DNA hybridization sensors together with the various transduction methods employed. In the concluding part of this review, we present some of the challenges faced in the use of CP-based DNA hybridization sensors, as well as a future perspective. PMID:25664436

  1. Electrochemical DNA Hybridization Sensors Based on Conducting Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mahbubur Rahman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Conducting polymers (CPs are a group of polymeric materials that have attracted considerable attention because of their unique electronic, chemical, and biochemical properties. This is reflected in their use in a wide range of potential applications, including light-emitting diodes, anti-static coating, electrochromic materials, solar cells, chemical sensors, biosensors, and drug-release systems. Electrochemical DNA sensors based on CPs can be used in numerous areas related to human health. This review summarizes the recent progress made in the development and use of CP-based electrochemical DNA hybridization sensors. We discuss the distinct properties of CPs with respect to their use in the immobilization of probe DNA on electrode surfaces, and we describe the immobilization techniques used for developing DNA hybridization sensors together with the various transduction methods employed. In the concluding part of this review, we present some of the challenges faced in the use of CP-based DNA hybridization sensors, as well as a future perspective.

  2. Influence of free-stall base on tarsal joint lesions and hygiene in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulwider, W K; Grandin, T; Garrick, D J; Engle, T E; Lamm, W D; Dalsted, N L; Rollin, B E

    2007-07-01

    The objective was to quantify the incidence of tarsal lesions and level of hygiene by stall bed type. Cows were scored on 100 dairies from Wisconsin, Minnesota, Indiana, Iowa, and New York in the fall and winter. Thirty-eight dairies used rubber-filled mattresses (RFM), 27 had sand beds, 29 had waterbeds, and 6 used compost packs (CPk). Stocking density, stall dimensions, bedding amount, bedding frequency, and type of bedding were recorded. One pen of early-lactation multiparous cows on each dairy was scored based on injury of the tarsal joints at the lateral and medial surfaces and tuber calcis at the dorsal, lateral, and medial surfaces. A tarsal score of 1 represented hair loss, 2 was moderate, and 3 indicated severe swelling. Differences between bed types in the percentages of cows with lesions were tested with one-way ANOVA by lesion severity and incidence, with farm as the experimental unit. Cows on sand beds or waterbeds had fewer lesion scores of 1, 2, and 3 than those on RFM. The percentages of score 1 were 54.6 +/- 4.4 (RFM), 22.5 +/- 4.7 (sand), and 29.8 +/- 4.3 (waterbed), whereas the percentages of score 2 were 14.0 +/- 1.4, 2.3 +/- 1.5, and 5.0 +/- 1.4, and of score 3 were 3.0 +/- 0.4, 0.2 +/- 0.4, and 0.4 +/- 0.4. Cows on CPk had no lesions. Hygiene scores ranged from 1 to 5, with 1 being clean and 5 soiled. The percentages of hygiene score 1 were 0 (compost), 0.4 (RFM), 0.4 (sand), and 0.4 (waterbeds); those with score 2 were 79.0, 84.0 +/- 0.01, 73.2 +/- 0.01, and 80.4 +/- 0.01; with score 3 were 20.3, 15.2 +/- 0.01, 23.8 +/- 0.01, and 18.6 +/- 0.01; with score 4 were 0.8, 0.005 +/- 0.001, 0.006 +/- 0.001, and 0.025 +/- 0.003; and with score 5 was 0 for all bed types. Cows on RFM and waterbeds had improved hygiene compared with cows on sand beds. There was no difference in somatic cell count (SCC) by bed type. The percentage of cows in fourth lactation or greater on waterbeds (19.8 +/- 1.8) was greater than those on RFM (13.3 +/- 1.6) or on sand

  3. DNA-based species detection capabilities using laser transmission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, A R; Barnes, M A; Li, F; Egan, S P; Tanner, C E; Ruggiero, S T; Feder, J L; Lodge, D M

    2013-01-06

    Early detection of invasive species is critical for effective biocontrol to mitigate potential ecological and economic damage. Laser transmission spectroscopy (LTS) is a powerful solution offering real-time, DNA-based species detection in the field. LTS can measure the size, shape and number of nanoparticles in a solution and was used here to detect size shifts resulting from hybridization of the polymerase chain reaction product to nanoparticles functionalized with species-specific oligonucleotide probes or with the species-specific oligonucleotide probes alone. We carried out a series of DNA detection experiments using the invasive freshwater quagga mussel (Dreissena bugensis) to evaluate the capability of the LTS platform for invasive species detection. Specifically, we tested LTS sensitivity to (i) DNA concentrations of a single target species, (ii) the presence of a target species within a mixed sample of other closely related species, (iii) species-specific functionalized nanoparticles versus species-specific oligonucleotide probes alone, and (iv) amplified DNA fragments versus unamplified genomic DNA. We demonstrate that LTS is a highly sensitive technique for rapid target species detection, with detection limits in the picomolar range, capable of successful identification in multispecies samples containing target and non-target species DNA. These results indicate that the LTS DNA detection platform will be useful for field application of target species. Additionally, we find that LTS detection is effective with species-specific oligonucleotide tags alone or when they are attached to polystyrene nanobeads and with both amplified and unamplified DNA, indicating that the technique may also have versatility for broader applications.

  4. [Arthroscopic treatment of chondral lesions of the ankle joint. Evidence-based therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M; Jordan, M; Hamborg-Petersen, E

    2016-02-01

    Ankle sprains are the most relevant injuries of the lower extremities and can lead to damage to ligaments and osteochondral lesions. Up to 50 % of patients with a sprained ankle later develop a lesion of the cartilage in the ankle joint or an osteochondral lesion of the talus. This can lead to osteoarthritis of the injured ankle joint. Spontaneous healing is possible in all age groups in cases of a bone bruise in the subchondral bone but in isolated chondral injuries is only useful in pediatric patients. In many cases chondral and osteochondral injuries lead to increasing demarcation of the affected area and can result in progressive degeneration of the joint if not recognized in time. There also exist a certain number of osteochondral changes of the articular surface of the talus without any history of relevant trauma, which are collectively grouped under the term osteochondrosis dissecans. Perfusion disorders are discussed as one of many possible causes of these alterations. Nowadays, chondral and osteochondral defects can be treated earlier due to detection using very sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) techniques. The use of conservative treatment only has a chance of healing in pediatric patients. Conservative measures for adults should only be considered as adjuvant treatment to surgery.Based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, this article gives an overview and critical analysis of the current concepts for treatment of chondral and osteochondral injuries and lesions of the talus. With arthroscopic therapy curettage and microfracture of talar lesions are the predominant approaches or retrograde drilling of the defect is another option when the chondral coating is retained. Implantation of autologous chondral cells or homologous juvenile cartilage tissue is also possible with arthroscopic techniques. Osteochondral fractures (flake fracture) are usually performed as a mini-open procedure supported by

  5. Oncogenic human papilloma virus and cervical pre-cancerous lesions in brothel-based sex workers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalesh Sarkar

    Full Text Available Summary: A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in brothel-based sex workers of West Bengal, Eastern India, to determine their oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV status and the presence of pre-cancerous lesions. A total of 229 sex workers from three districts of West Bengal participated in the study. All the study participants were interviewed with the aid of a pre-tested questionnaire to determine their sociodemographics, risk behaviour and risk perceptions after obtaining informed verbal consent. The interview was followed by collection of cervical cells from all participants using a disposable vaginal speculum and cervical cytobrush. Oncogenic HPV DNA was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. A simultaneous Papanicolaou test (‘Pap smear’ was performed to detect cervical cytological abnormalities. Overall, the prevalence of oncogenic HPV was found to be 25% (58/229 among the studied population. A subset (n = 112 of the sample was tested separately to determine the existence and magnitude of HPV genotypes 16 and 18. The results showed that genotype 16 was prevalent in 10% (11/112, genotype 18 in 7% (8/112 and both genotype 16 and 18 in 7% (8/112. The HPV prevalence rate showed a decreasing trend with age, being 71.4% in the 10–19 years age group, 32.3% in the 20–29 years age group, 18.3% in the 30–39 years age group and 2.5% in the ≥40 years age group (statistically significant differences, P ≤ 0.00001. Considering the duration of sex work, oncogenic HPV prevalence was found to be 55% (n = 21 and 19% (n = 35 in sex workers with a sex working duration of ≤1 year and >1 year, respectively. This difference was found to be statistically significant both by univariate and multivariate analysis. In this study, it was observed that sex workers with an average number of daily clients of six or more had an HPV prevalence of 67% (n = 6, those with four to five clients had a prevalence of 45% (n

  6. Improved chaos-based video steganography using DNA alphabets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmalya Kar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA based steganography plays a vital role in the field of privacy and secure communication. Here, we propose a DNA properties-based mechanism to send data hidden inside a video file. Initially, the video file is converted into image frames. Random frames are then selected and data is hidden in these at random locations by using the Least Significant Bit substitution method. We analyze the proposed architecture in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio as well as mean squared error measured between the original and steganographic files averaged over all video frames. The results show minimal degradation of the steganographic video file. Keywords: Chaotic map, DNA, Linear congruential generator, Video steganography, Least significant bit

  7. DNA methylation based biomarkers: Practical considerations and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; How Kit, Alexandre; Tost, Jorg

    2012-01-01

    of biochemical molecules such as proteins, DNA, RNA or lipids, whereby protein biomarkers have been the most extensively studied and used, notably in blood-based protein quantification tests or immunohistochemistry. The rise of interest in epigenetic mechanisms has allowed the identification of a new type...... of biomarker, DNA methylation, which is of great potential for many applications. This stable and heritable covalent modification mostly affects cytosines in the context of a CpG dinucleotide in humans. It can be detected and quantified by a number of technologies including genome-wide screening methods...... as well as locus- or gene-specific high-resolution analysis in different types of samples such as frozen tissues and FFPE samples, but also in body fluids such as urine, plasma, and serum obtained through non-invasive procedures. In some cases, DNA methylation based biomarkers have proven to be more...

  8. Trial watch: Naked and vectored DNA-based anticancer vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloy, Norma; Buqué, Aitziber; Aranda, Fernando; Castoldi, Francesca; Eggermont, Alexander; Cremer, Isabelle; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Spisek, Radek; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-05-01

    One type of anticancer vaccine relies on the administration of DNA constructs encoding one or multiple tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). The ultimate objective of these preparations, which can be naked or vectored by non-pathogenic viruses, bacteria or yeast cells, is to drive the synthesis of TAAs in the context of an immunostimulatory milieu, resulting in the (re-)elicitation of a tumor-targeting immune response. In spite of encouraging preclinical results, the clinical efficacy of DNA-based vaccines employed as standalone immunotherapeutic interventions in cancer patients appears to be limited. Thus, efforts are currently being devoted to the development of combinatorial regimens that allow DNA-based anticancer vaccines to elicit clinically relevant immune responses. Here, we discuss recent advances in the preclinical and clinical development of this therapeutic paradigm.

  9. DNA minor groove targeted alkylating agents based on bisbenzimidazole carriers: synthesis, cytotoxicity and sequence-specificity of DNA alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaill, J B; Fan, J Y; Denny, W A

    1998-12-01

    A series of bisbenzimidazoles bearing a variety of alkylating agents [ortho- and meta-mustards, imidazolebis(hydroxymethyl), imidazolebis(methylcarbamate) and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl)], appended by a propyl linker chain, were prepared and investigated for sequence-specificity of DNA alkylation and their cytotoxicity. Previous work has shown that, for para-aniline mustards, a propyl linker is optimal for cytotoxicity. Alkaline cleavage assays using a variety of different labelled oligonucleotides showed that the preferred sequences for adenine alkylation were 5'-TTTANANAANN and 5'-ATTANANAANN (underlined bases show the drug alkylation sites), with AT-rich sequences required on both the 5' and 3' sides of the alkylated adenine. The different aniline mustards showed little variation in alkylation pattern and similar efficiencies of DNA cross-link formation despite the changes in orientation and positioning of the mustard, suggesting that the propyl linker has some flexibility. The imidazole- and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl) alkylators showed no DNA strand cleavage following base treatment, indicating that no guanine or adenine N3 or N7 adducts were formed. Using the PCR-based polymerase stop assay, these alkylators showed PCR blocks at 5'-C*G sites (the * nucleotide indicates the blocked site), particularly at 5'-TAC*GA 5'-AGC*GGA, and 5'-AGCC*GGT sequences, caused by guanine 2-NH2 lesions on the opposite strand. Only the (more reactive) imidazolebis(methylcarbamoyl) and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl) alkylators demonstrated interstrand cross-linking ability. All of the bifunctional mustards showed large (approximately 100-fold) increases in cytotoxicity over chlorambucil, with the corresponding monofunctional mustards being 20- to 60-fold less cytotoxic. These results suggest that in the mustards the propyl linker provides sufficient flexibility to achieve delivery of the alkylator to favoured (adenine N3) sites in the minor groove, regardless of its exact geometry with

  10. Base excision repair deficient mice lacking the Aag alkyladenine DNA glycosylase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.P. Engelward (Bevin); G. Weeda (Geert); M.D. Wyatt; J.L.M. Broekhof (Jose'); J. de Wit (Jan); I. Donker (Ingrid); J.M. Allan (James); B. Gold (Bert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); L.D. Samson (Leona)

    1997-01-01

    textabstract3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA glycosylases remove 3MeAs from alkylated DNA to initiate the base excision repair pathway. Here we report the generation of mice deficient in the 3MeA DNA glycosylase encoded by the Aag (Mpg) gene. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase turns out to be the major DNA

  11. Candidate lesion-based criteria for defining a positive sacroiliac joint MRI in two cohorts of patients with axial spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Ulrich; Østergaard, Mikkel; Lambert, Robert G W

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine candidate lesion-based criteria for a positive sacroiliac joint (SIJ) MRI based on bone marrow oedema (BMO) and/or erosion in non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA); to compare the performance of lesion-based criteria with global evaluation by expert readers. ...... for classification of axial SpA, reflecting the contextual information provided by T1SE and STIR sequences....

  12. Effect of MTA-based sealer on the healing of periapical lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Eduardo GOMES-FILHO

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Some manufacturers have recently added specific components to improve the ease of handling and insertion material properties of MTA in order to create MTA-based sealers. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing of periapical lesions in canine teeth after a single session of endodontic treatment with MTA Fillapex® compared with Sealapex® or Endo-CPM-Sealer®. Material and Methods Sixty-two root canals were performed on two 1-year-old male dogs. After coronal access and pulp extirpation, the canals were exposed to the oral cavity for 6 months in order to induce periapical lesions. The root canals were prepared, irrigated with a solution of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite and filled with gutta-percha and different sealers, according to the following groups: 1 Sealapex®; 2 Endo-CPM-Sealer®; and 3 MTA Fillapex®. Some teeth with periapical lesions were left untreated for use as positive controls. Healthy teeth were used as negative controls. After 6 months, the animals were sacrificed and serial sections from the roots were prepared for histomorphologic analysis and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and the Brown and Brenn technique. The lesions were scored according to pre-established histomorphologic parameters and the scores statistically analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results All 3 materials produced similar patterns of healing (p>0.05; in particular, persistent inflammation and absence of complete periapical tissue healing were consistently noted. Conclusions Preparation of the infected root canals followed by filling with the materials studied was insufficient to provide complete healing of the periapical tissues.

  13. Effect of MTA-based sealer on the healing of periapical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Filho, João Eduardo; Watanabe, Simone; Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Nery, Mauro Juvenal; Dezan-Júnior, Eloi; Queiroz, India Olinta Azevedo; Lodi, Carolina Simonetti; Basso, Maria Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Some manufacturers have recently added specific components to improve the ease of handling and insertion material properties of MTA in order to create MTA-based sealers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing of periapical lesions in canine teeth after a single session of endodontic treatment with MTA Fillapex® compared with Sealapex® or Endo-CPM-Sealer®. Sixty-two root canals were performed on two 1-year-old male dogs. After coronal access and pulp extirpation, the canals were exposed to the oral cavity for 6 months in order to induce periapical lesions. The root canals were prepared, irrigated with a solution of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite and filled with gutta-percha and different sealers, according to the following groups: 1) Sealapex®; 2) Endo-CPM-Sealer®; and 3) MTA Fillapex®. Some teeth with periapical lesions were left untreated for use as positive controls. Healthy teeth were used as negative controls. After 6 months, the animals were sacrificed and serial sections from the roots were prepared for histomorphologic analysis and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and the Brown and Brenn technique. The lesions were scored according to pre-established histomorphologic parameters and the scores statistically analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. All 3 materials produced similar patterns of healing (p>0.05); in particular, persistent inflammation and absence of complete periapical tissue healing were consistently noted. Preparation of the infected root canals followed by filling with the materials studied was insufficient to provide complete healing of the periapical tissues.

  14. DNA-based random number generation in security circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gearheart, Christy M; Arazi, Benjamin; Rouchka, Eric C

    2010-06-01

    DNA-based circuit design is an area of research in which traditional silicon-based technologies are replaced by naturally occurring phenomena taken from biochemistry and molecular biology. This research focuses on further developing DNA-based methodologies to mimic digital data manipulation. While exhibiting fundamental principles, this work was done in conjunction with the vision that DNA-based circuitry, when the technology matures, will form the basis for a tamper-proof security module, revolutionizing the meaning and concept of tamper-proofing and possibly preventing it altogether based on accurate scientific observations. A paramount part of such a solution would be self-generation of random numbers. A novel prototype schema employs solid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides for random construction of DNA sequences; temporary storage and retrieval is achieved through plasmid vectors. A discussion of how to evaluate sequence randomness is included, as well as how these techniques are applied to a simulation of the random number generation circuitry. Simulation results show generated sequences successfully pass three selected NIST random number generation tests specified for security applications.

  15. A new background distribution-based active contour model for three-dimensional lesion segmentation in breast DCE-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Yiping; Qiu, Tianshuang [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, Zuowei, E-mail: liuhui@dlut.edu.cn [Second Affiliated Hospital, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116027 (China); Zhang, Lina [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116027 (China)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a computerized semiautomatic segmentation method for accurate extraction of three-dimensional lesions from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images (DCE-MRIs) of the breast. Methods: The authors propose a new background distribution-based active contour model using level set (BDACMLS) to segment lesions in breast DCE-MRIs. The method starts with manual selection of a region of interest (ROI) that contains the entire lesion in a single slice where the lesion is enhanced. Then the lesion volume from the volume data of interest, which is captured automatically, is separated. The core idea of BDACMLS is a new signed pressure function which is based solely on the intensity distribution combined with pathophysiological basis. To compare the algorithm results, two experienced radiologists delineated all lesions jointly to obtain the ground truth. In addition, results generated by other different methods based on level set (LS) are also compared with the authors’ method. Finally, the performance of the proposed method is evaluated by several region-based metrics such as the overlap ratio. Results: Forty-two studies with 46 lesions that contain 29 benign and 17 malignant lesions are evaluated. The dataset includes various typical pathologies of the breast such as invasive ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinomain situ, scar carcinoma, phyllodes tumor, breast cysts, fibroadenoma, etc. The overlap ratio for BDACMLS with respect to manual segmentation is 79.55% ± 12.60% (mean ± s.d.). Conclusions: A new active contour model method has been developed and shown to successfully segment breast DCE-MRI three-dimensional lesions. The results from this model correspond more closely to manual segmentation, solve the weak-edge-passed problem, and improve the robustness in segmenting different lesions.

  16. Evidence of end-effector based gait machines in gait rehabilitation after CNS lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, S; Schattat, N; Mehrholz, J; Werner, C

    2013-01-01

    A task-specific repetitive approach in gait rehabilitation after CNS lesion is well accepted nowadays. To ease the therapists' and patients' physical effort, the past two decades have seen the introduction of gait machines to intensify the amount of gait practice. Two principles have emerged, an exoskeleton- and an endeffector-based approach. Both systems share the harness and the body weight support. With the end-effector-based devices, the patients' feet are positioned on two foot plates, whose movements simulate stance and swing phase. This article provides an overview on the end-effector based machine's effectiveness regarding the restoration of gait. For the electromechanical gait trainer GT I, a meta analysis identified nine controlled trials (RCT) in stroke subjects (n = 568) and were analyzed to detect differences between end-effector-based locomotion + physiotherapy and physiotherapy alone. Patients practising with the machine effected in a superior gait ability (210 out of 319 patients, 65.8% vs. 96 out of 249 patients, 38.6%, respectively, Z = 2.29, p = 0.020), due to a larger training intensity. Only single RCTs have been reported for other devices and etiologies. The introduction of end-effector based gait machines has opened a new succesful chapter in gait rehabilitation after CNS lesion.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA sequence-based phylogenetic relationship ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cophaga ranges from 0.037–0.106 and 0.049–0.207 for COI and ND5 genes, respectively (tables 2 and 3). Analysis of genetic distance on the basis of sequence difference for both the mitochondrial genes shows very little genetic difference. The discrepancy in the phylogenetic trees based on individ- ual genes may be due ...

  18. GTV-based prescription in SBRT for lung lesions using advanced dose calculation algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacornerie, Thomas; Lisbona, Albert; Mirabel, Xavier; Lartigau, Eric; Reynaert, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The aim of current study was to investigate the way dose is prescribed to lung lesions during SBRT using advanced dose calculation algorithms that take into account electron transport (type B algorithms). As type A algorithms do not take into account secondary electron transport, they overestimate the dose to lung lesions. Type B algorithms are more accurate but still no consensus is reached regarding dose prescription. The positive clinical results obtained using type A algorithms should be used as a starting point. In current work a dose-calculation experiment is performed, presenting different prescription methods. Three cases with three different sizes of peripheral lung lesions were planned using three different treatment platforms. For each individual case 60 Gy to the PTV was prescribed using a type A algorithm and the dose distribution was recalculated using a type B algorithm in order to evaluate the impact of the secondary electron transport. Secondly, for each case a type B algorithm was used to prescribe 48 Gy to the PTV, and the resulting doses to the GTV were analyzed. Finally, prescriptions based on specific GTV dose volumes were evaluated. When using a type A algorithm to prescribe the same dose to the PTV, the differences regarding median GTV doses among platforms and cases were always less than 10% of the prescription dose. The prescription to the PTV based on type B algorithms, leads to a more important variability of the median GTV dose among cases and among platforms, (respectively 24%, and 28%). However, when 54 Gy was prescribed as median GTV dose, using a type B algorithm, the variability observed was minimal. Normalizing the prescription dose to the median GTV dose for lung lesions avoids variability among different cases and treatment platforms of SBRT when type B algorithms are used to calculate the dose. The combination of using a type A algorithm to optimize a homogeneous dose in the PTV and using a type B algorithm to prescribe the

  19. The caretakers of the genome. Repair of DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet-light and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiteux, S.; Radicella, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    The DNA contained in the nucleus of each of our cells daily suffers of thousand damages caused by solar ultraviolet radiations or ionizing radiations, with a natural or not origin, agents able to modify the genetic information. This information stays stable. True caretakers of the genome repair the DNA, provided that the cell is not over-taken by the level of the attack. Alterations of the repair mechanism are at the origin of extremely severe syndromes. The failure of one of these caretakers of the genome, the O.G.G.1 gene, seems implicated in the cancer development. It can be a lead to discover a predisposition to radioinduced or caused by other toxic agents cancers. (N.C.)

  20. Charge transfer in DNA: role of base pairing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratochvílová, Irena; Bunček, M.; Schneider, Bohdan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 38, Suppl. (2009), S123-S123 ISSN 0175-7571. [EBSA European Biophysics Congress /7./. Genoa, 11.07.2009-15.07.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : DNA * charge transport * base pairing Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.437, year: 2009

  1. DNA-based asymmetric organometallic catalysis in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oelerich, Jens; Roelfes, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Here, the first examples of DNA-based organometallic catalysis in water that give rise to high enantioselectivities are described. Copper complexes of strongly intercalating ligands were found to enable the asymmetric intramolecular cyclopropanation of alpha-diazo-beta-keto sulfones in water. Up to

  2. DNA/RNA-based formulations for treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhaolu; Zeng, Xianghui

    2017-12-01

    To develop a successful formulation for the gene therapy of breast cancer, an effective therapeutic nucleic acid and a proper delivery system are essential. Increased understanding of breast cancer, and developments in biotechnology, material science and nanotechnology have provided a major impetus in the development of effective formulations for the gene therapy of breast cancer. Areas covered: We discuss DNA/RNA-based formulations that can inhibit the growth of breast cancer cells and control the progress of breast cancer. Targets for the gene therapy of breast cancer, DNA/RNA-based therapeutics and delivery systems are summarized. And examples of successful DNA/RNA-based formulations for breast cancer gene therapy are reviewed. Expert opinion: Several challenges remain in developing effective DNA/RNA-based formulations for treatment of breast cancer. Firstly, most of the currently utilized targets are not effective enough as monotherapy for breast cancer. Secondly, the requirements for co-delivery system make the preparation of formulation more complicated. Thirdly, nanoparticles with the modification of tumor-targeting ligands could be more unstable in circulation and normal tissues. Lastly, immune responses against the viral vectors are unfavorable for the gene therapy of breast cancer because of the damage to the host and the impaired therapeutic ability.

  3. (Brassicaceae) based on nuclear ribosomal ITS DNA sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 93; Issue 2. Phylogeny and biogeography of Alyssum (Brassicaceae) based on nuclear ribosomal ITS DNA sequences. Yan Li Yan Kong Zhe Zhang Yanqiang Yin Bin Liu Guanghui Lv Xiyong Wang. Research Article Volume 93 Issue 2 August 2014 pp 313-323 ...

  4. The anterior interhemispheric approach: a safe and effective approach to anterior skull base lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Dorothee; Mayfrank, Lothar; Psychogios, Marios Nikos; Rohde, Veit

    2014-04-01

    Many approaches to the anterior skull base have been reported. Frequently used are the pterional, the unilateral or bilateral frontobasal, the supraorbital and the frontolateral approach. Recently, endoscopic transnasal approaches have become more popular. The benefits of each approach has to be weighted against its complications and limitations. The aim of this study was to investigate if the anterior interhemispheric approach (AIA) could be a safe and effective alternative approach to tumorous and non-tumorous lesions of the anterior skull base. We screened the operative records of all patients with an anterior skull base lesion undergoing transcranial surgery. We have used the AIA in 61 patients. These were exclusively patients with either olfactory groove meningioma (OGM) (n = 43), ethmoidal dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) ( n = 6) or frontobasal fractures of the anterior midline with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage ( n = 12). Patient records were evaluated concerning accessibility of the lesion, realization of surgical aims (complete tumor removal, dAVF obliteration, closure of the dural tear), and approach related complications. The use of the AIA exclusively in OGMs, ethmoidal dAVFs and midline frontobasal fractures indicated that we considered lateralized frontobasal lesions not suitable to be treated successfully. If restricted to these three pathologies, the AIA is highly effective and safe. The surgical aim (complete tumor removal, complete dAVF occlusion, no rhinorrhea) was achieved in all patients. The complication rate was 11.5 % (wound infection (n = 2; 3.2 %), contusion of the genu of the corpus callosum, subdural hygroma, epileptic seizure, anosmia and asymptomatic bleed into the tumor cavity (n = 1 each). Only the contusion of the corpus callosum was directly related to the approach (1.6 %). Olfaction, if present before surgery, was preserved in all patients, except one (1.6 %). The AIA is an effective and a safe approach

  5. Radiation-induced base substitution mutagenesis in single-stranded DNA phage M13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandenburger, A.; Godson, G.N.; Glickman, B.W.; Sluis, C.A. van

    1981-01-01

    To elucidate the relative contributions of targeted and untargeted mutations to γ and UV radiation mutagenesis, the DNA sequences of 174 M13 revertant phages isolated from stocks of irradiated or unirradiated amber mutants grown in irradiated (SOS-induced) or unirradiated (non-induced) host bacteria, have been determined. Differences in the spectra of base change mutations induced in the various conditions were apparent, but no obvious specificity of mutagenesis was detected. In particular, under the present conditions, pyrimidine dimers did not seem to be the principal sites of UV-induced base substitution mutagenesis, suggesting that such mutagenesis occurs at the sites of lesions other than pyrimidine dimers, or is untargeted. (U.K.)

  6. Spectral embedding based active contour (SEAC): application to breast lesion segmentation on DCE-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agner, Shannon C.; Xu, Jun; Rosen, Mark; Karthigeyan, Sudha; Englander, Sarah; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-03-01

    Spectral embedding (SE), a graph-based manifold learning method, has previously been shown to be useful in high dimensional data classification. In this work, we present a novel SE based active contour (SEAC) segmentation scheme and demonstrate its applications in lesion segmentation on breast dynamic contrast enhance magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). In this work, we employ SE on DCE-MRI on a per voxel basis to embed the high dimensional time series intensity vector into a reduced dimensional space, where the reduced embedding space is characterized by the principal eigenvectors. The orthogonal eigenvector-based data representation allows for computation of strong tensor gradients in the spectrally embedded space and also yields improved region statistics that serve as optimal stopping criteria for SEAC. We demonstrate both analytically and empirically that the tensor gradients in the spectrally embedded space are stronger than the corresponding gradients in the original grayscale intensity space. On a total of 50 breast DCE-MRI studies, SEAC yielded a mean absolute difference (MAD) of 3.2+/-2.1 pixels and mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.74+/-0.13 compared to manual ground truth segmentation. An active contour in conjunction with fuzzy c-means (FCM+AC), a commonly used segmentation method for breast DCE-MRI, produced a corresponding MAD of 7.2+/-7.4 pixels and mean DSC of 0.58+/-0.32. In conjunction with a set of 6 quantitative morphological features automatically extracted from the SEAC derived lesion boundary, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier yielded an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.73, for discriminating between 10 benign and 30 malignant lesions; the corresponding SVM classifier with the FCM+AC derived morphological features yielded an AUC of 0.65.

  7. DNA-Based Self-Assembly of Fluorescent Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Neumann, Andre; Lindlau, Jessica; Wu, Yuzhou; Pramanik, Goutam; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor; Schüder, Florian; Huber, Sebastian; Huber, Marinus; Stehr, Florian; Högele, Alexander; Weil, Tanja; Liedl, Tim

    2015-08-12

    As a step toward deterministic and scalable assembly of ordered spin arrays we here demonstrate a bottom-up approach to position fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) with nanometer precision on DNA origami structures. We have realized a reliable and broadly applicable surface modification strategy that results in DNA-functionalized and perfectly dispersed NDs that were then self-assembled in predefined geometries. With optical studies we show that the fluorescence properties of the nitrogen-vacancy color centers in NDs are preserved during surface modification and DNA assembly. As this method allows the nanoscale arrangement of fluorescent NDs together with other optically active components in complex geometries, applications based on self-assembled spin lattices or plasmon-enhanced spin sensors as well as improved fluorescent labeling for bioimaging could be envisioned.

  8. Micromechanics of base pair unzipping in the DNA duplex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, Sergey N; Paramonova, Ekaterina V; Yakubovich, Alexander V; Solov’yov, Andrey V

    2012-01-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of DNA duplex unzipping in a water environment were performed. The investigated DNA double helix consists of a Drew-Dickerson dodecamer sequence and a hairpin (AAG) attached to the end of the double-helix chain. The considered system is used to examine the process of DNA strand separation under the action of an external force. This process occurs in vivo and now is being intensively investigated in experiments with single molecules. The DNA dodecamer duplex is consequently unzipped pair by pair by means of the steered MD. The unzipping trajectories turn out to be similar for the duplex parts with G⋅C content and rather distinct for the parts with A⋅T content. It is shown that during the unzipping each pair experiences two types of motion: relatively quick rotation together with all the duplex and slower motion in the frame of the unzipping fork. In the course of opening, the complementary pair passes through several distinct states: (i) the closed state in the double helix, (ii) the metastable preopened state in the unzipping fork and (iii) the unbound state. The performed simulations show that water molecules participate in the stabilization of the metastable states of the preopened base pairs in the DNA unzipping fork. (paper)

  9. Incidence of chronic knee lesions in long-distance runners based on training level: Findings at MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia; Schueller, Gerd; Uffmann, Martin; Bader, Till

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of chronic knee changes in long-distance runners based on the training status, including distance, running frequency, training pace, and running experience. Methods: MRI of the knee was performed in 26 non-professional runners 5 days after their last training unit. Lesions of the menisci and cartilage (5-point scale), bone marrow and ligaments (3-point scale), and joint effusion were evaluated. A total score comprising all knee lesions in each runner was evaluated. The incidence of the knee changes was correlated with the training level, gender, and age of the runners. Results: Grade 1 lesions of the menisci were found in six runners with a high training level, and in only four runners with a low training level. Grade 1 cartilage lesions were found in three high-trained runners and in one low-trained runner, and grade 2 lesions were found in one high-trained runner and in two low-trained runners, respectively. Grade 1 anterior cruciate ligament lesions were seen in three runners with a high- and in two runners with a low-training level. Runners with a higher training level showed a statistically significant higher score for all chronic knee lesions than those with a lower training level (p < 0.05). Conclusions: MRI findings indicate that a higher training level in long-distance runners is a risk factor for chronic knee lesions

  10. Incidence of chronic knee lesions in long-distance runners based on training level: Findings at MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: claudia.schueller-weidekamm@meduniwien.ac.at; Schueller, Gerd [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Uffmann, Martin [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bader, Till [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of chronic knee changes in long-distance runners based on the training status, including distance, running frequency, training pace, and running experience. Methods: MRI of the knee was performed in 26 non-professional runners 5 days after their last training unit. Lesions of the menisci and cartilage (5-point scale), bone marrow and ligaments (3-point scale), and joint effusion were evaluated. A total score comprising all knee lesions in each runner was evaluated. The incidence of the knee changes was correlated with the training level, gender, and age of the runners. Results: Grade 1 lesions of the menisci were found in six runners with a high training level, and in only four runners with a low training level. Grade 1 cartilage lesions were found in three high-trained runners and in one low-trained runner, and grade 2 lesions were found in one high-trained runner and in two low-trained runners, respectively. Grade 1 anterior cruciate ligament lesions were seen in three runners with a high- and in two runners with a low-training level. Runners with a higher training level showed a statistically significant higher score for all chronic knee lesions than those with a lower training level (p < 0.05). Conclusions: MRI findings indicate that a higher training level in long-distance runners is a risk factor for chronic knee lesions.

  11. Coexposure to benzo[a]pyrene plus UVA induced DNA double strand breaks: visualization of Ku assembly in the nucleus having DNA lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyooka, Tatsushi; Ibuki, Yuko; Koike, Manabu; Ohashi, Norio; Takahashi, Sentaro; Goto, Rensuke

    2004-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant with potential carcinogenicity. It has been shown that BaP, upon UVA irradiation, synergistically induced oxidative DNA damage, but other DNA damage was not confirmed. In this study, we examined whether coexposure to BaP plus UVA induces double strand breaks (DSBs) using xrs-5 cells, deficient in the repair of DSBs (Ku80 mutant), and whether Ku translocates involving the formation of DSBs. BaP plus UVA had a significant cytotoxic effect on CHO-K1 cells and an even more drastic effect on Ku80-deficient, xrs-5 cells, suggesting that the DSBs were generated by coexposure to BaP plus UVA. The DSBs were repaired in CHO-K1 cells within 30 min, but not in xrs-5 cells, indicating the involvement of a non-homologous end joining, which needs Ku proteins. Furthermore, we succeeded in visualizing that Ku80 rapidly assembled to the exposed region, in which DSBs might be generated, and clarified that the presence of both Ku70 and Ku80 was important for their accumulation

  12. LORD-Q: a long-run real-time PCR-based DNA-damage quantification method for nuclear and mitochondrial genome analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehle, Simon; Hildebrand, Dominic G.; Merz, Britta; Malak, Peter N.; Becker, Michael S.; Schmezer, Peter; Essmann, Frank; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Rothfuss, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage is tightly associated with various biological and pathological processes, such as aging and tumorigenesis. Although detection of DNA damage is attracting increasing attention, only a limited number of methods are available to quantify DNA lesions, and these techniques are tedious or only detect global DNA damage. In this study, we present a high-sensitivity long-run real-time PCR technique for DNA-damage quantification (LORD-Q) in both the mitochondrial and nuclear genome. While most conventional methods are of low-sensitivity or restricted to abundant mitochondrial DNA samples, we established a protocol that enables the accurate sequence-specific quantification of DNA damage in >3-kb probes for any mitochondrial or nuclear DNA sequence. In order to validate the sensitivity of this method, we compared LORD-Q with a previously published qPCR-based method and the standard single-cell gel electrophoresis assay, demonstrating a superior performance of LORD-Q. Exemplarily, we monitored induction of DNA damage and repair processes in human induced pluripotent stem cells and isogenic fibroblasts. Our results suggest that LORD-Q provides a sequence-specific and precise method to quantify DNA damage, thereby allowing the high-throughput assessment of DNA repair, genotoxicity screening and various other processes for a wide range of life science applications. PMID:24371283

  13. Application of a data-mining method based on Bayesian networks to lesion-deficit analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herskovits, Edward H.; Gerring, Joan P.

    2003-01-01

    Although lesion-deficit analysis (LDA) has provided extensive information about structure-function associations in the human brain, LDA has suffered from the difficulties inherent to the analysis of spatial data, i.e., there are many more variables than subjects, and data may be difficult to model using standard distributions, such as the normal distribution. We herein describe a Bayesian method for LDA; this method is based on data-mining techniques that employ Bayesian networks to represent structure-function associations. These methods are computationally tractable, and can represent complex, nonlinear structure-function associations. When applied to the evaluation of data obtained from a study of the psychiatric sequelae of traumatic brain injury in children, this method generates a Bayesian network that demonstrates complex, nonlinear associations among lesions in the left caudate, right globus pallidus, right side of the corpus callosum, right caudate, and left thalamus, and subsequent development of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, confirming and extending our previous statistical analysis of these data. Furthermore, analysis of simulated data indicates that methods based on Bayesian networks may be more sensitive and specific for detecting associations among categorical variables than methods based on chi-square and Fisher exact statistics.

  14. Recovery Based Nanowire Field-Effect Transistor Detection of Pathogenic Avian Influenza DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Heng; Chu, Chia-Jung; Teng, Kang-Ning; Su, Yi-Jr; Chen, Chii-Dong; Tsai, Li-Chu; Yang, Yuh-Shyong

    2012-02-01

    Fast and accurate diagnosis is critical in infectious disease surveillance and management. We proposed a DNA recovery system that can easily be adapted to DNA chip or DNA biosensor for fast identification and confirmation of target DNA. This method was based on the re-hybridization of DNA target with a recovery DNA to free the DNA probe. Functionalized silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) was demonstrated to monitor such specific DNA-DNA interaction using high pathogenic strain virus hemagglutinin 1 (H1) DNA of avian influenza (AI) as target. Specific electric changes were observed in real-time for AI virus DNA sensing and device recovery when nanowire surface of SiNW FET was modified with complementary captured DNA probe. The recovery based SiNW FET biosensor can be further developed for fast identification and further confirmation of a variety of influenza virus strains and other infectious diseases.

  15. Association between human papillomavirus and Epstein - Barr virus DNA and gene promoter methylation of RB1 and CDH1 in the cervical lesions: a transversal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Thaís M; Canedo, Nathalie H S; Furtado, Yara L; Silveira, Filomena A; de Lima, Roberto J; Rosman, Andréa D F; Almeida Filho, Gutemberg L; Carvalho, Maria da Glória da C

    2015-06-02

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) inactivates the retinoblastoma 1 (RB1) gene by promoter methylation and reduces cellular E-cadherin expression by overexpression of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic virus that may be related to cervical carcinogenesis. In gastric cancer, it has been demonstrated that E-cadherin gene (CDH1) hypermethylation is associated with DNMT1 overexpression by EBV infection. Our aim was to analyze the gene promoter methylation frequency of RB1 and CDH1 and verify the association between that methylation frequency and HPV and EBV infection in cervical lesions. Sixty-five samples were obtained from cervical specimens: 15 normal cervices, 17 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 15 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), and 18 cervical cancers. HPV and EBV DNA testing was performed by PCR, and the methylation status was verified by MSP. HPV frequency was associated with cervical cancer cases (p = 0.005) but not EBV frequency (p = 0.732). Viral co-infection showed a statistically significant correlation with cancer (p = 0.027). No viral infection was detected in 33.3% (5/15) of controls. RB1 methylated status was associated with cancer (p = 0.009) and HPV infection (p = 0.042). CDH1 methylation was not associated with cancer (p = 0.181). Controls and LSIL samples did not show simultaneous methylation, while both genes were methylated in 27.8% (5/18) of cancer samples. In the presence of EBV, CDH1 methylation was present in 27.8% (5/18) of cancer samples. Only cancer cases presented RB1 promoter methylation in the presence of HPV and EBV (33.3%). The methylation status of both genes increased with disease progression. With EBV, RB1 methylation was a tumor-associated event because only the cancer group presented methylated RB1 with HPV infection. HPV infection was shown to be significantly correlated with cancer conditions. The global methylation frequency was

  16. DNA Repair Mechanisms and the Bypass of DNA Damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteux, Serge; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are critical for maintaining the integrity of genomic DNA, and their loss is associated with cancer predisposition syndromes. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have played a central role in elucidating the highly conserved mechanisms that promote eukaryotic genome stability. This review will focus on repair mechanisms that involve excision of a single strand from duplex DNA with the intact, complementary strand serving as a template to fill the resulting gap. These mechanisms are of two general types: those that remove damage from DNA and those that repair errors made during DNA synthesis. The major DNA-damage repair pathways are base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair, which, in the most simple terms, are distinguished by the extent of single-strand DNA removed together with the lesion. Mistakes made by DNA polymerases are corrected by the mismatch repair pathway, which also corrects mismatches generated when single strands of non-identical duplexes are exchanged during homologous recombination. In addition to the true repair pathways, the postreplication repair pathway allows lesions or structural aberrations that block replicative DNA polymerases to be tolerated. There are two bypass mechanisms: an error-free mechanism that involves a switch to an undamaged template for synthesis past the lesion and an error-prone mechanism that utilizes specialized translesion synthesis DNA polymerases to directly synthesize DNA across the lesion. A high level of functional redundancy exists among the pathways that deal with lesions, which minimizes the detrimental effects of endogenous and exogenous DNA damage. PMID:23547164

  17. Immunogenicity of a DNA-launched replicon-based canine parvovirus DNA vaccine expressing VP2 antigen in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Shyam S; Saini, Mohini; Kumar, Pankaj; Gupta, Praveen K

    2012-10-01

    A replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was developed by cloning CPV-VP2 gene into a replicon-based DNA vaccine vector (pAlpha). The characteristics of a replicon-based DNA vaccine like, self-amplification of transcripts and induction of apoptosis were analyzed in transfected mammalian cells. When the pAlpha-CPV-VP2 was injected intradermal as DNA-launched replicon-based DNA vaccine in dogs, it induced CPV-specific humoral and cell mediated immune responses. The virus neutralization antibody and lymphocyte proliferative responses were higher than conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. These results indicated that DNA-launched replicon-based CPV DNA vaccine was effective in inducing both CPV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective alternative to conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. HPV16-E2 induces prophase arrest and activates the cellular DNA damage response in vitro and in precursor lesions of cervical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuezhen; Toh, Shen Yon; He, Pingping; Lim, Thimothy; Lim, Diana; Pang, Chai Ling; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Thierry, Françoise

    2015-10-27

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and is the precursor to cervical carcinoma. The completion of the HPV productive life cycle depends on the expression of viral proteins which further determines the severity of the cervical neoplasia. Initiation of the viral productive replication requires expression of the E2 viral protein that cooperates with the E1 viral DNA helicase. A decrease in the viral DNA replication ability and increase in the severity of cervical neoplasia is accompanied by simultaneous elevated expression of E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Here we reveal a novel and important role for the HPV16-E2 protein in controlling host cell cycle during malignant transformation. We showed that cells expressing HPV16-E2 in vitro are arrested in prophase alongside activation of a sustained DDR signal. We uncovered evidence that HPV16-E2 protein is present in vivo in cells that express both mitotic and DDR signals specifically in CIN3 lesions, immediate precursors of cancer, suggesting that E2 may be one of the drivers of genomic instability and carcinogenesis in vivo.

  19. A component of DNA double-strand break repair is dependent on the spatial orientation of the lesions within the higher-order structures of chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, P.J.; Bryant, P.E. (Saint Andrews Univ. (United Kingdom))

    1994-11-01

    By the use of a modified neutral filter elution procedure variations in the repair of DNA dsb have been observed between the ionising radiation sensitive mutant xrs-5 and the parent cell line CHO-K1. Conventional neutral filter elution requires harsh lysis conditions to remove higher-order chromatin structures which interfere with elution of DNA containing dsb. By lysing cells with non-ionic detergent in the presence of 2 mol dm[sup -3] salt, histone-depleted structures that retain the higher-order nuclear matrix organization, including chromatin loops, can be produced. Elution from these structures will only occur if two or more dsb lie within a single-looped domain delineated by points of attachment to the nuclear matrix. Repair experiments indicate that in CHO cells repair of dsb in loops containing multiple dsb are repaired with slow kinetics whilst dsb occurring in loops containing single dsb are repaired with fast kinetics. Xrs-5 cells are defective in the repair of multiply damaged loops. This work indicates that the spatial orientation of dsb in the higher-order structures of chromatin are a possible factor in the repair of these lesions. (Author).

  20. A component of DNA double-strand break repair is dependent on the spatial orientation of the lesions within the higher-order structures of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, P.J.; Bryant, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    By the use of a modified neutral filter elution procedure variations in the repair of DNA dsb have been observed between the ionising radiation sensitive mutant xrs-5 and the parent cell line CHO-K1. Conventional neutral filter elution requires harsh lysis conditions to remove higher-order chromatin structures which interfere with elution of DNA containing dsb. By lysing cells with non-ionic detergent in the presence of 2 mol dm -3 salt, histone-depleted structures that retain the higher-order nuclear matrix organization, including chromatin loops, can be produced. Elution from these structures will only occur if two or more dsb lie within a single-looped domain delineated by points of attachment to the nuclear matrix. Repair experiments indicate that in CHO cells repair of dsb in loops containing multiple dsb are repaired with slow kinetics whilst dsb occurring in loops containing single dsb are repaired with fast kinetics. Xrs-5 cells are defective in the repair of multiply damaged loops. This work indicates that the spatial orientation of dsb in the higher-order structures of chromatin are a possible factor in the repair of these lesions. (Author)

  1. Genetic diversity of sago palm in Indonesia based on chloroplast DNA (cpDNA markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEMEN SURAHMAN

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abbas B, Renwarin Y, Bintoro MH, Sudarsono, Surahman M, Ehara H (2010 Genetic diversity of sago palm in Indonesia based on chloroplast DNA (cpDNA markers. Biodiversitas 11: 112-117. Sago palm (Metroxylon sagu Rottb. was believed capable to accumulate high carbohydrate content in its trunk. The capability of sago palm producing high carbohydrate should be an appropriate criterion for defining alternative crops in anticipating food crisis. The objective of this research was to study genetic diversity of sago palm in Indonesia based on cpDNA markers. Total genome extraction was done following the Qiagen DNA isolation protocols 2003. Single Nucleotide Fragments (SNF analyses were performed by using ABI Prism GeneScanR 3.7. SNF analyses detected polymorphism revealing eleven alleles and ten haplotypes from total 97 individual samples of sago palm. Specific haplotypes were found in the population from Papua, Sulawesi, and Kalimantan. Therefore, the three islands will be considered as origin of sago palm diversities in Indonesia. The highest haplotype numbers and the highest specific haplotypes were found in the population from Papua suggesting this islands as the centre and the origin of sago palm diversities in Indonesia. The research had however no sufficient data yet to conclude the Papua origin of sago palm. Genetic hierarchies and differentiations of sago palm samples were observed significantly different within populations (P=0.04574, among populations (P=0.04772, and among populations within the island (P=0.03366, but among islands no significant differentiations were observed (P= 0.63069.

  2. Focal retrograde amnesia: voxel-based morphometry findings in a case without MRI lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Sehm

    Full Text Available Focal retrograde amnesia (FRA is a rare neurocognitive disorder presenting with an isolated loss of retrograde memory. In the absence of detectable brain lesions, a differentiation of FRA from psychogenic causes is difficult. Here we report a case study of persisting FRA after an epileptic seizure. A thorough neuropsychological assessment confirmed severe retrograde memory deficits while anterograde memory abilities were completely normal. Neurological and psychiatric examination were unremarkable and high-resolution MRI showed no neuroradiologically apparent lesion. However, voxel-based morphometry (VBM-comparing the MRI to an education-, age-and sex-matched control group (n = 20 disclosed distinct gray matter decreases in left temporopolar cortex and a region between right posterior parahippocampal and lingual cortex. Although the results of VBM-based comparisons between a single case and a healthy control group are generally susceptible to differences unrelated to the specific symptoms of the case, we believe that our data suggest a causal role of the cortical areas detected since the retrograde memory deficit is the preeminent neuropsychological difference between patient and controls. This was paralleled by grey matter differences in central nodes of the retrograde memory network. We therefore suggest that these subtle alterations represent structural correlates of the focal retrograde amnesia in our patient. Beyond the implications for the diagnosis and etiology of FRA, our results advocate the use of VBM in conditions that do not show abnormalities in clinical radiological assessment, but show distinct neuropsychological deficits.

  3. hREV3 is essential for error-prone translesion synthesis past UV or benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide-induced DNA lesions in human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Ziqiang; Zhang Hong; McManus, Terrence P.; McCormick, J. Justin; Lawrence, Christopher W.; Maher, Veronica M

    2002-12-29

    In S. cerevisiae, the REV3 gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of polymerase zeta, is involved in translesion synthesis and required for the production of mutations induced by ultraviolet radiation (UV) photoproducts and other DNA fork-blocking lesions, and for the majority of spontaneous mutations. To determine whether hREV3, the human homolog of yeast REV3, is similarly involved in error-prone translesion synthesis past UV photoproducts and other lesions that block DNA replication, an hREV3 antisense construct under the control of the TetP promoter was transfected into an infinite life span human fibroblast cell strain that expresses a high level of tTAk, the activator of that promoter. Three transfectant strains expressing high levels of hREV3 antisense RNA were identified and compared with their parental cell strain for sensitivity to the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of UV. The three hREV3 antisense-expressing cell strains were not more sensitive than the parental strain to the cytotoxic effect of UV, but the frequency of mutants induced by UV in their HPRT gene was significantly reduced, i.e. to 14% that of the parent. Two of these hREV3 antisense-expressing cell strains were compared with the parental strain for sensitivity to ({+-})-7{beta},8{alpha}-dihydroxy-9{alpha},10{alpha}-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro= benzo[a]pyrene (BPDE). They were not more sensitive than the parent strain to the cytotoxic effect of BPDE, but the frequency of mutants induced was significantly reduced, i.e. in one strain, to 17% that of the parent, and in the other, to 24%. DNA sequencing showed that the kinds of mutations induced by BPDE in the parental and the derivative strains did not differ and were similar to those found previously with finite life span human fibroblasts. The data strongly support the hypothesis that hRev3 plays a critical role in the induction of mutations by UV or BPDE. Because the level of hRev3 protein in human fibroblasts is below the level of antibody

  4. hREV3 is essential for error-prone translesion synthesis past UV or benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide-induced DNA lesions in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ziqiang; Zhang Hong; McManus, Terrence P.; McCormick, J. Justin; Lawrence, Christopher W.; Maher, Veronica M.

    2002-01-01

    In S. cerevisiae, the REV3 gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of polymerase zeta, is involved in translesion synthesis and required for the production of mutations induced by ultraviolet radiation (UV) photoproducts and other DNA fork-blocking lesions, and for the majority of spontaneous mutations. To determine whether hREV3, the human homolog of yeast REV3, is similarly involved in error-prone translesion synthesis past UV photoproducts and other lesions that block DNA replication, an hREV3 antisense construct under the control of the TetP promoter was transfected into an infinite life span human fibroblast cell strain that expresses a high level of tTAk, the activator of that promoter. Three transfectant strains expressing high levels of hREV3 antisense RNA were identified and compared with their parental cell strain for sensitivity to the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of UV. The three hREV3 antisense-expressing cell strains were not more sensitive than the parental strain to the cytotoxic effect of UV, but the frequency of mutants induced by UV in their HPRT gene was significantly reduced, i.e. to 14% that of the parent. Two of these hREV3 antisense-expressing cell strains were compared with the parental strain for sensitivity to (±)-7β,8α-dihydroxy-9α,10α-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPDE). They were not more sensitive than the parent strain to the cytotoxic effect of BPDE, but the frequency of mutants induced was significantly reduced, i.e. in one strain, to 17% that of the parent, and in the other, to 24%. DNA sequencing showed that the kinds of mutations induced by BPDE in the parental and the derivative strains did not differ and were similar to those found previously with finite life span human fibroblasts. The data strongly support the hypothesis that hRev3 plays a critical role in the induction of mutations by UV or BPDE. Because the level of hRev3 protein in human fibroblasts is below the level of antibody detection, it was not

  5. Impact of Lesion Placement on Efficacy and Safety of Catheter-Based Radiofrequency Renal Denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoud, Felix; Tunev, Stefan; Ewen, Sebastian; Cremers, Bodo; Ruwart, Jennifer; Schulz-Jander, Daniel; Linz, Dominik; Davies, Justin; Kandzari, David E; Whitbourn, Robert; Böhm, Michael; Melder, Robert J

    2015-10-20

    Insufficient procedural efficacy has been proposed to explain nonresponse to renal denervation (RDN). The aim of this study was to examine the impact of different patterns of lesion placements on the efficacy and consistency of catheter-based radiofrequency RDN in pigs. The impact of increasing number of lesions versus location of RDN was investigated in a porcine model (Group 1; n = 51). The effect of treating the main artery, the branches, and the 2 combined was compared in Group 2 (n = 48). The durability of response and safety of combined treatment of the main artery plus branches was examined in Group 3 (n = 16). Renal norepinephrine (NE) tissue content and renal cortical axon density were assessed. Increasing the number of RF lesions (4, 8, and 12) in the main renal artery was not sufficient to yield a clear dose-response relationship on NE content and axon density. In contrast, targeted treatment of the renal artery branches or distal segment of the main renal artery resulted in markedly less variability of response and significantly greater reduction of both NE and axon density than conventional treatment of only the main renal artery. Combination treatment (main artery plus branches) produced the greatest change in renal NE and axon density with the least heterogeneity. The changes were durable through 28 days post-treatment. These data provide the rationale for investigation of an optimized approach for RDN in future clinical studies. This may have profound implications for the clinical application of RDN, as this approach may not only achieve greater reductions in sympathetic activity but also reduce treatment effect variability. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. DNA-based identification of spices: DNA isolation, whole genome amplification, and polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focke, Felix; Haase, Ilka; Fischer, Markus

    2011-01-26

    Usually spices are identified morphologically using simple methods like magnifying glasses or microscopic instruments. On the other hand, molecular biological methods like the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enable an accurate and specific detection also in complex matrices. Generally, the origins of spices are plants with diverse genetic backgrounds and relationships. The processing methods used for the production of spices are complex and individual. Consequently, the development of a reliable DNA-based method for spice analysis is a challenging intention. However, once established, this method will be easily adapted to less difficult food matrices. In the current study, several alternative methods for the isolation of DNA from spices have been developed and evaluated in detail with regard to (i) its purity (photometric), (ii) yield (fluorimetric methods), and (iii) its amplifiability (PCR). Whole genome amplification methods were used to preamplify isolates to improve the ratio between amplifiable DNA and inhibiting substances. Specific primer sets were designed, and the PCR conditions were optimized to detect 18 spices selectively. Assays of self-made spice mixtures were performed to proof the applicability of the developed methods.

  7. Evaluation of colonic lesions and pitfalls in CT colonography: A systematic approach based on morphology, attenuation and mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mang, Thomas; Gryspeerdt, Stefaan; Schima, Wolfgang; Lefere, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomographic colonography is a reliable technique for the detection and classification of neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions of the colon. It is based on a thin-section CT dataset of the cleansed and air-distended colon, acquired in prone and supine position. Two-dimensional and 3D projections are used in combination for image interpretation. The evaluation of CT colonography datasets is based on two steps, lesion perception to detect a polyp candidate and image interpretation to correctly characterize colonic filling defects. A thorough knowledge of the morphologic and attenuation characteristics of common colonic lesions and artifacts facilitates characterization of the findings. The purpose of this review article is to give an overview of the key CT colonographic imaging criteria to correctly characterize common colorectal lesions and to identify typical pitfalls and pseudolesions

  8. Identification of Species in Tripterygium (Celastraceae) Based on DNA Barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Li, Na; Yao, Yuanyuan; Liang, Xuming; Qu, Xianyou; Liu, Xiang; Zhu, Yingjie; Yang, Dajian; Sun, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Species of genus Tripterygium (Celastraceae) have attracted much attention owing to their excellent effect on treating autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. However, due to high market demand causing overexploitation, natural populations of genus Tripterygium have rapidly declined. Tripterygium medicinal materials are mainly collected from the wild, making the quality of medicinal materials unstable. Additionally, identification of herbal materials from Tripterygium species and their adulterants is difficult based on morphological characters. Therefore, an accurate, convenient, and stability method is urgently needed. In this wok, we developed a DNA barcoding technique to distinguish T. wilfordii HOOK. f., T. hypoglaucum (LÉVL.) HUTCH, and T. regelii SPRAGUE et TAKEDA and their adulterants based on four uniform and standard DNA regions (internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2), matK, rbcL, and psbA-trnH). DNA was extracted from 26 locations of fresh leaves. Phylogenetic tree was constructed with Neighbor-Joining (NJ) method, while barcoding gap was analyzed to assess identification efficiency. Compared with the other DNA barcodes applied individually or in combination, ITS2+psbA-trnH was demonstrated as the optimal barcode. T. hypoglaucum and T. wilfordii can be considered as conspecific, while T. regelii was recognized as a separate species. Furthermore, identification of commercial Tripterygium samples was conducted using BLAST against GenBank and Species Identification System for Traditional Chinese Medicine. Our results indicated that DNA barcoding is a convenient, effective, and stability method to identify and distinguish Tripterygium and its adulterants, and could be applied as the quality control for Tripterygium medicinal preparations and monitoring of the medicinal herb trade in markets.

  9. Computational modeling of a carbon nanotube-based DNA nanosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalantari-Nejad, R; Bahrami, M [Mechanical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rafii-Tabar, H [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering and Research Centre for Medical Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rungger, I; Sanvito, S, E-mail: mbahrami@aut.ac.ir [School of Physics and CRANN, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-11-05

    During the last decade the design of biosensors, based on quantum transport in one-dimensional nanostructures, has developed as an active area of research. Here we investigate the sensing capabilities of a DNA nanosensor, designed as a semiconductor single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) connected to two gold electrodes and functionalized with a DNA strand acting as a bio-receptor probe. In particular, we have considered both covalent and non-covalent bonding between the DNA probe and the SWCNT. The optimized atomic structure of the sensor is computed both before and after the receptor attaches itself to the target, which consists of another DNA strand. The sensor's electrical conductance and transmission coefficients are calculated at the equilibrium geometries via the non-equilibrium Green's function scheme combined with the density functional theory in the linear response limit. We demonstrate a sensing efficiency of 70% for the covalently bonded bio-receptor probe, which drops to about 19% for the non-covalently bonded one. These results suggest that a SWCNT may be a promising candidate for a bio-molecular FET sensor.

  10. Computational modeling of a carbon nanotube-based DNA nanosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalantari-Nejad, R; Bahrami, M; Rafii-Tabar, H; Rungger, I; Sanvito, S

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade the design of biosensors, based on quantum transport in one-dimensional nanostructures, has developed as an active area of research. Here we investigate the sensing capabilities of a DNA nanosensor, designed as a semiconductor single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) connected to two gold electrodes and functionalized with a DNA strand acting as a bio-receptor probe. In particular, we have considered both covalent and non-covalent bonding between the DNA probe and the SWCNT. The optimized atomic structure of the sensor is computed both before and after the receptor attaches itself to the target, which consists of another DNA strand. The sensor's electrical conductance and transmission coefficients are calculated at the equilibrium geometries via the non-equilibrium Green's function scheme combined with the density functional theory in the linear response limit. We demonstrate a sensing efficiency of 70% for the covalently bonded bio-receptor probe, which drops to about 19% for the non-covalently bonded one. These results suggest that a SWCNT may be a promising candidate for a bio-molecular FET sensor.

  11. A dynamic bead-based microarray for parallel DNA detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sochol, R D; Lin, L; Casavant, B P; Dueck, M E; Lee, L P

    2011-01-01

    A microfluidic system has been designed and constructed by means of micromachining processes to integrate both microfluidic mixing of mobile microbeads and hydrodynamic microbead arraying capabilities on a single chip to simultaneously detect multiple bio-molecules. The prototype system has four parallel reaction chambers, which include microchannels of 18 × 50 µm 2 cross-sectional area and a microfluidic mixing section of 22 cm length. Parallel detection of multiple DNA oligonucleotide sequences was achieved via molecular beacon probes immobilized on polystyrene microbeads of 16 µm diameter. Experimental results show quantitative detection of three distinct DNA oligonucleotide sequences from the Hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome with single base-pair mismatch specificity. Our dynamic bead-based microarray offers an effective microfluidic platform to increase parallelization of reactions and improve microbead handling for various biological applications, including bio-molecule detection, medical diagnostics and drug screening

  12. Simulation on Temperature Field of Radiofrequency Lesions System Based on Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, D; Qian, Z; Li, W; Qian, L

    2011-01-01

    This paper mainly describes the way to get the volume model of damaged region according to the simulation on temperature field of radiofrequency ablation lesion system in curing Parkinson's disease based on finite element method. This volume model reflects, to some degree, the shape and size of the damaged tissue during the treatment with all tendencies in different time or core temperature. By using Pennes equation as heat conduction equation of radiofrequency ablation of biological tissue, the author obtains the temperature distribution field of biological tissue in the method of finite element for solving equations. In order to establish damage models at temperature points of 60 deg. C, 65 deg. C, 70 deg. C, 75 deg. C, 80 deg. C, 85 deg. C and 90 deg. C while the time points are 30s, 60s, 90s and 120s, Parkinson's disease model of nuclei is reduced to uniform, infinite model with RF pin at the origin. Theoretical simulations of these models are displayed, focusing on a variety of conditions about the effective lesion size on horizontal and vertical. The results show the binary complete quadratic non-linear joint temperature-time models of the maximum damage diameter and maximum height. The models can comprehensively reflect the degeneration of target tissue caused by radio frequency temperature and duration. This lay the foundation for accurately monitor of clinical RF treatment of Parkinson's disease in the future.

  13. Histogram-based quantitative evaluation of endobronchial ultrasonography images of peripheral pulmonary lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Kei; Kurimoto, Noriaki; Inoue, Takeo; Mineshita, Masamichi; Miyazawa, Teruomi

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasonography using a guide sheath (EBUS-GS) is an increasingly common bronchoscopic technique, but currently, no methods have been established to quantitatively evaluate EBUS images of peripheral pulmonary lesions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether histogram data collected from EBUS-GS images can contribute to the diagnosis of lung cancer. Histogram-based analyses focusing on the brightness of EBUS images were retrospectively conducted: 60 patients (38 lung cancer; 22 inflammatory diseases), with clear EBUS images were included. For each patient, a 400-pixel region of interest was selected, typically located at a 3- to 5-mm radius from the probe, from recorded EBUS images during bronchoscopy. Histogram height, width, height/width ratio, standard deviation, kurtosis and skewness were investigated as diagnostic indicators. Median histogram height, width, height/width ratio and standard deviation were significantly different between lung cancer and benign lesions (all p histogram standard deviation. Histogram standard deviation appears to be the most useful characteristic for diagnosing lung cancer using EBUS images. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Arduino-based automation of a DNA extraction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Won; Lee, Mi-So; Ryu, Mun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    There have been many studies to detect infectious diseases with the molecular genetic method. This study presents an automation process for a DNA extraction system based on microfluidics and magnetic bead, which is part of a portable molecular genetic test system. This DNA extraction system consists of a cartridge with chambers, syringes, four linear stepper actuators, and a rotary stepper actuator. The actuators provide a sequence of steps in the DNA extraction process, such as transporting, mixing, and washing for the gene specimen, magnetic bead, and reagent solutions. The proposed automation system consists of a PC-based host application and an Arduino-based controller. The host application compiles a G code sequence file and interfaces with the controller to execute the compiled sequence. The controller executes stepper motor axis motion, time delay, and input-output manipulation. It drives the stepper motor with an open library, which provides a smooth linear acceleration profile. The controller also provides a homing sequence to establish the motor's reference position, and hard limit checking to prevent any over-travelling. The proposed system was implemented and its functionality was investigated, especially regarding positioning accuracy and velocity profile.

  15. DNA-based approaches to identify forest fungi in Pacific Islands: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna E. Case; Sara M. Ashiglar; Phil G. Cannon; Ernesto P. Militante; Edwin R. Tadiosa; Mutya Quintos-Manalo; Nelson M. Pampolina; John W. Hanna; Fred E. Brooks; Amy L. Ross-Davis; Mee-Sook Kim; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2013-01-01

    DNA-based diagnostics have been successfully used to characterize diverse forest fungi (e.g., Hoff et al. 2004, Kim et al. 2006, Glaeser & Lindner 2011). DNA sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and large subunit (LSU) regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) has proved especially useful (Sonnenberg et al. 2007, Seifert 2009, Schoch et al. 2012) for...

  16. Diagnostic markers of urothelial cancer based on DNA methylation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chihara, Yoshitomo; Hirao, Yoshihiko; Kanai, Yae; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Sugano, Kokichi; Kawashima, Kiyotaka; Liang, Gangning; Jones, Peter A; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Kuniyasu, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    Early detection and risk assessment are crucial for treating urothelial cancer (UC), which is characterized by a high recurrence rate, and necessitates frequent and invasive monitoring. We aimed to establish diagnostic markers for UC based on DNA methylation. In this multi-center study, three independent sample sets were prepared. First, DNA methylation levels at CpG loci were measured in the training sets (tumor samples from 91 UC patients, corresponding normal-appearing tissue from these patients, and 12 normal tissues from age-matched bladder cancer-free patients) using the Illumina Golden Gate methylation assay to identify differentially methylated loci. Next, these methylated loci were validated by quantitative DNA methylation by pyrosequencing, using another cohort of tissue samples (Tissue validation set). Lastly, methylation of these markers was analyzed in the independent urine samples (Urine validation set). ROC analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of these 12 selected markers. Of the 1303 CpG sites, 158 were hyper ethylated and 356 were hypo ethylated in tumor tissues compared to normal tissues. In the panel analysis, 12 loci showed remarkable alterations between tumor and normal samples, with 94.3% sensitivity and 97.8% specificity. Similarly, corresponding normal tissue could be distinguished from normal tissues with 76.0% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Furthermore, the diagnostic accuracy for UC of these markers determined in urine samples was high, with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Based on these preliminary findings, diagnostic markers based on differential DNA methylation at specific loci can be useful for non-invasive and reliable detection of UC and epigenetic field defect

  17. Base sequence effects on DNA replication influenced by bulky adducts. Final report, March 1, 1995--February 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geacintov, N.E.

    1997-05-31

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are environmental pollutants that are present in air, food, and water. While PAH compounds are chemically inert and are sparingly soluble in aqueous solutions, in living cells they are metabolized to a variety of oxygenated derivatives, including the high mutagenic and tumorigenic diol epoxide derivatives. The diol epoxides of the sterically hindered fjord region compound benzo[c]phenanthrene (B[c]PhDE) are among the most powerful tumorigenic compounds in animal model test systems. In this project, site-specifically modified oligonucleotides containing single B[c]PhDE-N{sup 6}-dA lesions derived from the reactions of the 1S,2R,3R,4S and 1R,2S,3S,4R diol epoxides of B[c]PhDE with dA residues were synthesized. The replication of DNA catalyzed by a prokaryotic DNA polymerase (the exonuclease-free Klenow fragment E. Coli Po1 I) in the vicinity of the lesion at base-specific sites on B[c]PhDE-modified template strands was investigated in detail. The Michaelis-Menten parameters for the insertion of single deoxynucleotide triphosphates into growing DNA (primer) strands using the modified dA* and the bases just before and after the dA* residue as templates, depend markedly on the stereochemistry of the B[c]PhDE-modified dA residues. These observations provide novel insights into the mechanisms by which bulky PAH-DNA adducts affect normal DNA replication.

  18. Complete sequence analysis of 18S rDNA based on genomic DNA extraction from individual Demodex mites (Acari: Demodicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-E; Xu, Ji-Ru; Hu, Li; Wu, Li-Ping; Wang, Zheng-Hang

    2012-05-01

    The study for the first time attempted to accomplish 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) complete sequence amplification and analysis for three Demodex species (Demodex folliculorum, Demodex brevis and Demodex canis) based on gDNA extraction from individual mites. The mites were treated by DNA Release Additive and Hot Start II DNA Polymerase so as to promote mite disruption and increase PCR specificity. Determination of D. folliculorum gDNA showed that the gDNA yield reached the highest at 1 mite, tending to descend with the increase of mite number. The individual mite gDNA was successfully used for 18S rDNA fragment (about 900 bp) amplification examination. The alignments of 18S rDNA complete sequences of individual mite samples and those of pooled mite samples ( ≥ 1000mites/sample) showed over 97% identities for each species, indicating that the gDNA extracted from a single individual mite was as satisfactory as that from pooled mites for PCR amplification. Further pairwise sequence analyses showed that average divergence, genetic distance, transition/transversion or phylogenetic tree could not effectively identify the three Demodex species, largely due to the differentiation in the D. canis isolates. It can be concluded that the individual Demodex mite gDNA can satisfy the molecular study of Demodex. 18S rDNA complete sequence is suitable for interfamily identification in Cheyletoidea, but whether it is suitable for intrafamily identification cannot be confirmed until the ascertainment of the types of Demodex mites parasitizing in dogs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Graphene-Based Biosensing Platform Based on Regulated Release of an Aptameric DNA Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yu; Chen, Yongli; Li, Song; Lin, Shuo; Jiang, Yuyang

    2015-11-09

    A novel biosensing platform was developed by integrating an aptamer-based DNA biosensor with graphene oxide (GO) for rapid and facile detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP, as a model target). The DNA biosensor, which is locked by GO, is designed to contain two sensing modules that include recognition site for ATP and self-replication track that yields the nicking domain for Nt.BbvCI. By taking advantage of the different binding affinity of single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA and aptamer-target complex toward GO, the DNA biosensor could be efficiently released from GO in the presence of target with the help of a complementary DNA strand (CPDNA) that partially hybridizes to the DNA biosensor. Then, the polymerization/nicking enzyme synergetic isothermal amplification could be triggered, leading to the synthesis of massive DNA amplicons, thus achieving an enhanced sensitivity with a wide linear dynamic response range of four orders of magnitude and good selectivity. This biosensing strategy expands the applications of GO-DNA nanobiointerfaces in biological sensing, showing great potential in fundamental research and biomedical diagnosis.

  20. An object-based approach for detecting small brain lesions: application to Virchow-Robin spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descombes, Xavier; Kruggel, Frithjof; Wollny, Gert; Gertz, Hermann Josef

    2004-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the detection of multiple small brain lesions from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. A model based on the marked point process framework is designed to detect Virchow-Robin spaces (VRSs). These tubular shaped spaces are due to retraction of the brain parenchyma from its supplying arteries. VRS are described by simple geometrical objects that are introduced as small tubular structures. Their radiometric properties are embedded in a data term. A prior model includes interactions describing the clustering property of VRS. A Reversible Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm (RJMCMC) optimizes the proposed model, obtained by multiplying the prior and the data model. Example results are shown on T1-weighted MRI datasets of elderly subjects.

  1. [Psychotherapy of patients with brain lesions: an integrative model based on neuropsychological and psychodynamic perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouss-Ryngaert, Lisa

    2010-12-01

    Our model of psychotherapy for patients with brain lesions is based on an integrative approach of psychobehavioral symptoms, especially from the neuropsychological and psychodynamic perspectives. Adjustment of technical modalities and aims of psychoanalytical therapy is required for these patients. The analysis of the influence of cognitive disorders on transference and contre-transference plays a major role, including the role of procedural processes in changes in the intersubjective relationship between the patient and the therapist. Two vignettes are presented to illustrate our model, which respects the integrity of the cognitive and psychodynamic approaches and can be implemented by only one therapist, using alternatively each lecture, or by a working team bringing to light the different aspects of the same symptom.

  2. Accommodation of an N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-acetylaminofluorene adduct in the active site of human DNA polymerase iota: Hoogsteen or Watson-Crick base pairing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donny-Clark, Kerry; Shapiro, Robert; Broyde, Suse

    2009-01-13

    Bypass across DNA lesions by specialized polymerases is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. Human DNA polymerase iota (poliota) is a bypass polymerase of the Y family. Crystal structures of poliota suggest that Hoogsteen base pairing is employed to bypass minor groove DNA lesions, placing them on the spacious major groove side of the enzyme. Primer extension studies have shown that poliota is also capable of error-free nucleotide incorporation opposite the bulky major groove adduct N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-acetylaminofluorene (dG-AAF). We present molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations suggesting that Watson-Crick base pairing could be employed in poliota for bypass of dG-AAF. In poliota with Hoogsteen-paired dG-AAF the bulky AAF moiety would reside on the cramped minor groove side of the template. The Hoogsteen-capable conformation distorts the active site, disrupting interactions necessary for error-free incorporation of dC opposite the lesion. Watson-Crick pairing places the AAF rings on the spacious major groove side, similar to the position of minor groove adducts observed with Hoogsteen pairing. Watson-Crick-paired structures show a well-ordered active site, with a near reaction-ready ternary complex. Thus our results suggest that poliota would utilize the same spacious region for lesion bypass of both major and minor groove adducts. Therefore, purine adducts with bulk on the minor groove side would use Hoogsteen pairing, while adducts with the bulky lesion on the major groove side would utilize Watson-Crick base pairing as indicated by our MD simulations for dG-AAF. This suggests the possibility of an expanded role for poliota in lesion bypass.

  3. Ultrasound-guided versus computed tomography-scan guided biopsy of pleural-based lung lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Rahul; McLean, Anna W; Smith, Jessica A

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) guided biopsies have long been the standard technique to obtain tissue from the thoracic cavity and is traditionally performed by interventional radiologists. Ultrasound (US) guided biopsy of pleural-based lesions, performed by pulmonologists is gaining popularity and has the advantage of multi-planar imaging, real-time technique, and the absence of radiation exposure to patients. In this study, we aim to determine the diagnostic accuracy, the time to diagnosis after the initial consult placement, and the complications rates between the two different modalities. A retrospective study of electronic medical records was done of patients who underwent CT-guided biopsies and US-guided biopsies for pleural-based lesions between 2005 and 2014 and the data collected were analyzed for comparing the two groups. A total of 158 patients underwent 162 procedures during the study period. 86 patients underwent 89 procedures in the US group, and 72 patients underwent 73 procedures in the CT group. The overall yield in the US group was 82/89 (92.1%) versus 67/73 (91.8%) in the CT group (P = 1.0). Average days to the procedure was 7.2 versus 17.5 (P = 0.00001) in the US and CT group, respectively. Complication rate was higher in CT group 17/73 (23.3%) versus 1/89 (1.1%) in the US group (P guided biopsy is similar to that of CT-guided biopsy, with a lower complication rate and a significantly reduced time to the procedure.

  4. Electrochemical DNA biosensor based on avidin-biotin conjugation for influenza virus (type A) detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Da-Jung; Kim, Ki-Chul; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2011-09-01

    An electrochemical DNA biosensor (E-DNA biosensor) was fabricated by avidin-biotin conjugation of a biotinylated probe DNA, 5'-biotin-ATG AGT CTT CTA ACC GAG GTC GAA-3', and an avidin-modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to detect the influenza virus (type A). An avidin-modified GCE was prepared by the reaction of avidin and a carboxylic acid-modified GCE, which was synthesized by the electrochemical reduction of 4-carboxyphenyl diazonium salt. The current value of the E-DNA biosensor was evaluated after hybridization of the probe DNA and target DNA using cyclic voltammetry (CV). The current value decreased after the hybridization of the probe DNA and target DNA. The DNA that was used follows: complementary target DNA, 5'-TTC GAC CTC GGT TAG AAG ACT CAT-3' and two-base mismatched DNA, 5'-TTC GAC AGC GGT TAT AAG ACT CAT-3'.

  5. Magnetophoresis of flexible DNA-based dumbbell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, B.; Ghai, R.; Dimitrov, K.

    2008-02-01

    Controlled movement and manipulation of magnetic micro- and nanostructures using magnetic forces can give rise to important applications in biomedecine, diagnostics, and immunology. We report controlled magnetophoresis and stretching, in aqueous solution, of a DNA-based dumbbell structure containing magnetic and diamagnetic microspheres. The velocity and stretching of the dumbbell were experimentally measured and correlated with a theoretical model based on the forces acting on individual magnetic beads or the entire dumbbell structures. The results show that precise and predictable manipulation of dumbbell structures is achievable and can potentially be applied to immunomagnetic cell separators.

  6. Developing a biological dosimeter based on mitochondrial DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S; Carlisle, S M; Unrau, P; Deugau, K V [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    Direct measurement of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage from ionizing radiation may be advantageous in determining radiation radiation exposures and assessing their effects on atomic radiation workers. The mitochondrial DNA molecule is one potential cellular DNA target which is: fully defined and sequenced; present in many copies per cell; not vital to cellular survival; and less subject to DNA repair than nuclear DNA. A method is described to isolate and analyse normal mitochondrial DNA. We describe the developments needed to determine DNA damage in mitochondrial DNA. The target is to make a biological dosimeter. (author). 6 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Developing a biological dosimeter based on mitochondrial DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, S.; Carlisle, S.M.; Unrau, P.; Deugau, K.V.

    1995-01-01

    Direct measurement of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage from ionizing radiation may be advantageous in determining radiation radiation exposures and assessing their effects on atomic radiation workers. The mitochondrial DNA molecule is one potential cellular DNA target which is: fully defined and sequenced; present in many copies per cell; not vital to cellular survival; and less subject to DNA repair than nuclear DNA. A method is described to isolate and analyse normal mitochondrial DNA. We describe the developments needed to determine DNA damage in mitochondrial DNA. The target is to make a biological dosimeter. (author). 6 refs., 3 figs

  8. Detection of endonuclease III- and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase-sensitive base modifications in γ-irradiated DNA and cells by the aldehyde reactive probe (ARP) assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsin Ali, M.; Kurisu, Satofumi; Yoshioka, Yoshihiro; Terato, Hiroaki; Ohyama, Yoshihiko; Ide Hiroshi; Kubo, Kihei

    2004-01-01

    Ionizing radiation generates diverse DNA lesions that differentially induce cell death and mutations. In the present study, calf thymus DNA (400 μg/ml) and HeLa cells were irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays, and abasic (AP) sites and endonuclease (Endo) III- and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase (hOGG1)-sensitive base modifications in DNA were quantitated by the aldehyde reactive probe (ARP) assay. The irradiation of calf thymus DNA in phosphate buffer generated 91 Endo III- and 100 hOGG1-sensitive base modifications and 110 AP sites per 10 6 base pairs (bp) per Gy. The yield of the lesions in Tris buffer was 41- to 91-fold lower than that in phosphate, demonstrating a radioprotective effect of Tris. The HeLa cell chromosomal DNA contained 12 Endo III- and 3.8 hOGG1-sensitive base modifications and less than 1 AP sites per 10 6 bp as endogenous damage, and their level was increased by irradiation. The yields of the damage at 1 Gy (roughly equivalent to the lethal dose of HeLa cells [1.6-1.8 Gy]) were 0.13 Endo III, 0.091 hOGG1, and 0.065 AP sites per 10 6 bp, showing that irradiation with a lethal dose brought about only a marginal increase in base damage relative to an endogenous one. A comparison of the present data with those reported for DNA strand breaks supports the primary importance of double-strand breaks and clustered lesions as lethal damages formed by ionizing radiation. (author)

  9. An ICA-based method for the segmentation of pigmented skin lesions in macroscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Pablo G; Scharcanski, Jacob; Di Persia, Leandro E; Milone, Diego H

    2011-01-01

    Segmentation is an important step in computer-aided diagnostic systems for pigmented skin lesions, since that a good definition of the lesion area and its boundary at the image is very important to distinguish benign from malignant cases. In this paper a new skin lesion segmentation method is proposed. This method uses Independent Component Analysis to locate skin lesions in the image, and this location information is further refined by a Level-set segmentation method. Our method was evaluated in 141 images and achieved an average segmentation error of 16.55%, lower than the results for comparable state-of-the-art methods proposed in literature.

  10. Modulation of proteostasis counteracts oxidative stress and affects DNA base excision repair capacity in ATM-deficient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletto, Mattia; Yang, Di; Fletcher, Sally C; Vendrell, Iolanda; Fischer, Roman; Legrand, Arnaud J; Dianov, Grigory L

    2017-09-29

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a syndrome associated with loss of ATM protein function. Neurodegeneration and cancer predisposition, both hallmarks of A-T, are likely to emerge as a consequence of the persistent oxidative stress and DNA damage observed in this disease. Surprisingly however, despite these severe features, a lack of functional ATM is still compatible with early life, suggesting that adaptation mechanisms contributing to cell survival must be in place. Here we address this gap in our knowledge by analysing the process of human fibroblast adaptation to the lack of ATM. We identify profound rearrangement in cellular proteostasis occurring very early on after loss of ATM in order to counter protein damage originating from oxidative stress. Change in proteostasis, however, is not without repercussions. Modulating protein turnover in ATM-depleted cells also has an adverse effect on the DNA base excision repair pathway, the major DNA repair system that deals with oxidative DNA damage. As a consequence, the burden of unrepaired endogenous DNA lesions intensifies, progressively leading to genomic instability. Our study provides a glimpse at the cellular consequences of loss of ATM and highlights a previously overlooked role for proteostasis in maintaining cell survival in the absence of ATM function. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Comparison of Two Base Materials Regarding Their Effect on Root Canal Treatment Success in Primary Molars with Furcation Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Arikan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to compare MTA with another base material, IRM, which is generally used on pulpal floor after root canal treatment, regarding their effect on the success of root canal treatment of primary teeth with furcation lesions. Materials and Methods. Fifty primary teeth with furcation lesions were divided into 2 groups. Following root canal treatment, the pulpal floor was coated with MTA in the experimental group and with IRM in the control group. Teeth were followed up considering clinical (pain, pathological mobility, tenderness to percussion and palpation, and any soft tissue pathology and sinus tract and radiographical (pathological root resorption, reduced size or healing of existing lesion, and absence of new lesions at the interradicular or periapical area criteria for 18 months. For the statistical analysis, Fisher’s exact test and Pearson’s chi-square tests were used and a p value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results. Although there were no statistically significant differences between two groups in terms of treatment success, lesions healed significantly faster in the MTA group. Conclusion. In primary teeth with furcation lesions, usage of MTA on the pulpal floor following root canal treatment can be a better alternative since it induced faster healing.

  12. An inverse switch in DNA base excision and strand break repair contributes to melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirta M L Sousa

    Full Text Available Alterations in checkpoint and DNA repair pathways may provide adaptive mechanisms contributing to acquired drug resistance. Here, we investigated the levels of proteins mediating DNA damage signaling and -repair in RPMI8226 multiple myeloma cells and its Melphalan-resistant derivative 8226-LR5. We observed markedly reduced steady-state levels of DNA glycosylases UNG2, NEIL1 and MPG in the resistant cells and cross-resistance to agents inducing their respective DNA base lesions. Conversely, repair of alkali-labile sites was apparently enhanced in the resistant cells, as substantiated by alkaline comet assay, autoribosylation of PARP-1, and increased sensitivity to PARP-1 inhibition by 4-AN or KU58684. Reduced base-excision and enhanced single-strand break repair would both contribute to the observed reduction in genomic alkali-labile sites, which could jeopardize productive processing of the more cytotoxic Melphalan-induced interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs. Furthermore, we found a marked upregulation of proteins in the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ pathway of double-strand break (DSB repair, likely contributing to the observed increase in DSB repair kinetics in the resistant cells. Finally, we observed apparent upregulation of ATR-signaling and downregulation of ATM-signaling in the resistant cells. This was accompanied by markedly increased sensitivity towards Melphalan in the presence of ATR-, DNA-PK, or CHK1/2 inhibitors whereas no sensitizing effect was observed subsequent to ATM inhibition, suggesting that replication blocking lesions are primary triggers of the DNA damage response in the Melphalan resistant cells. In conclusion, Melphalan resistance is apparently contributed by modulation of the DNA damage response at multiple levels, including downregulation of specific repair pathways to avoid repair intermediates that could impair efficient processing of cytotoxic ICLs and ICL-induced DSBs. This study has revealed several novel

  13. Frequency of fungal infection in biopsies of oral mucosal lesions: A prospective hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thimmarasa Venkappa Bhovi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To determine the frequency and common site of fungal infection in biopsies of oral mucosal lesions and also to detect the lesions most likely to be infected with fungal infection. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 patients with oral mucosal lesions were advised routine hematological examination followed by incisional biopsy under local anesthesia. The specimen were fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin and processed. One section from the specimen was stained with hematoxylin and eosin staining for histopathological diagnosis of the lesion and a second section was stained with Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS stain for detection of fungal infection. Results: Out of the 100 patients, the most common mucosal lesion encountered was carcinoma (56% followed by lesions with dysplastic changes (28%, benign lesions (9%, squamous papilloma (2% and oral submucous fibrosis (5%. The most common anatomic location affected by the mucosal lesions were buccal mucosa, followed by the tongue, gingiva, maxillary tuberosity and floor of the mouth with values of 73%, 16%, 6%, 4% and 1%, respectively. Squamous papilloma had the highest positive association with fungal infection (100% followed by lesions with dysplastic changes (17.9% and carcinoma (8.9%. The maximum fungal positive association was encountered in the mucosal lesions over the tongue (18.7% followed by the buccal mucosa (12.3%. Conclusion: There is statistically significant association of fungal infection with dysplastic lesions and papilloma with the tongue and buccal mucosa as the most common sites. Hence a PAS stain should be performed whenever epithelial dysplasia on the tongue and buccal mucosa is diagnosed.

  14. Electrochemical DNA biosensor based on the BDD nanograss array electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huali; Wei, Min; Wang, Jinshui

    2013-04-10

    The development of DNA biosensor has attracted considerable attention due to their potential applications, including gene analysis, clinical diagnostics, forensic study and more medical applications. Using electroactive daunomycin as an indicator, the hybridization detection was measured by differential pulse voltammetry in this study. Electrochemical DNA biosensor was developed based on the BDD film electrode (fBDD) and BDD nanograss array electrode (nBDD). In comparison with fBDD and AuNPs/CA/fBDD electrode, the lower semicircle diameter of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy obtained on nBDD and AuNPs/CA/nBDD electrode indicated that the presence of nanograss array improved the reactive site, reduced the interfacial resistance, and made the electron transfer easier. Using electroactive daunomycin as an indicator, the hybridization detection was measured by differential pulse voltammetry. The experimental results demonstrated that the prepared AuNPs/CA/nBDD electrode was suitable for DNA hybridization with favorable performance of faster response, higher sensitivity, lower detection limit and satisfactory selectivity, reproducibility and stability.

  15. Managing Carious Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwendicke, F; Frencken, J E; Bjørndal, L

    2016-01-01

    should be prioritized, while in shallow or moderately deep lesions, restoration longevity becomes more important. For teeth with shallow or moderately deep cavitated lesions, carious tissue removal is performed according toselective removal to firm dentine.In deep cavitated lesions in primary......The International Caries Consensus Collaboration undertook a consensus process and here presents clinical recommendations for carious tissue removal and managing cavitated carious lesions, including restoration, based on texture of demineralized dentine. Dentists should manage the disease dental...

  16. Tyramine Hydrochloride Based Label-Free System for Operating Various DNA Logic Gates and a DNA Caliper for Base Number Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Daoqing; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Dong, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang

    2017-07-05

    DNA is believed to be a promising candidate for molecular logic computation, and the fluorogenic/colorimetric substrates of G-quadruplex DNAzyme (G4zyme) are broadly used as label-free output reporters of DNA logic circuits. Herein, for the first time, tyramine-HCl (a fluorogenic substrate of G4zyme) is applied to DNA logic computation and a series of label-free DNA-input logic gates, including elementary AND, OR, and INHIBIT logic gates, as well as a two to one encoder, are constructed. Furthermore, a DNA caliper that can measure the base number of target DNA as low as three bases is also fabricated. This DNA caliper can also perform concatenated AND-AND logic computation to fulfil the requirements of sophisticated logic computing. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. The yield of DNA double strand breaks determined after exclusion of those forming from heat-labile lesions predicts tumor cell radiosensitivity to killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yanlei; Li, Fanghua; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2015-09-01

    The radiosensitivity to killing of tumor cells and in-field normal tissue are key determinants of radiotherapy response. In vitro radiosensitivity of tumor- and normal-tissue-derived cells often predicts radiation response, but high determination cost in time and resources compromise utility as routine response-predictor. Efforts to use induction or repair of DNA double-strand-breaks (DSBs) as surrogate-predictors of cell radiosensitivity to killing have met with limited success. Here, we re-visit this issue encouraged by our recent observations that ionizing radiation (IR) induces not only promptly-forming DSBs (prDSBs), but also DSBs developing after irradiation from the conversion to breaks of thermally-labile sugar-lesions (tlDSBs). We employ pulsed-field gel-electrophoresis and flow-cytometry protocols to measure total DSBs (tDSB=prDSB+tlDSBs) and prDSBs, as well as γH2AX and parameters of chromatin structure. We report a fully unexpected and in many ways unprecedented correlation between yield of prDSBs and radiosensitivity to killing in a battery of ten tumor cell lines that is not matched by yields of tDSBs or γH2AX, and cannot be explained by simple parameters of chromatin structure. We propose the introduction of prDSBs-yield as a novel and powerful surrogate-predictor of cell radiosensitivity to killing with potential for clinical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Determinants of cerebral white matter lesions: A longitudinal population based MRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.F. de Leeuw (Frank)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractW hite matter lesions are frequently found on cerebral magnetic resonance imaging scans of elderly non-demented and demented people. l-4 The pathogenesis of white matter lesions is largely unknown. However age and high diastolic and systolic blood pressure levels and indicators of

  19. Solution-based targeted genomic enrichment for precious DNA samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shearer Aiden

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solution-based targeted genomic enrichment (TGE protocols permit selective sequencing of genomic regions of interest on a massively parallel scale. These protocols could be improved by: 1 modifying or eliminating time consuming steps; 2 increasing yield to reduce input DNA and excessive PCR cycling; and 3 enhancing reproducible. Results We developed a solution-based TGE method for downstream Illumina sequencing in a non-automated workflow, adding standard Illumina barcode indexes during the post-hybridization amplification to allow for sample pooling prior to sequencing. The method utilizes Agilent SureSelect baits, primers and hybridization reagents for the capture, off-the-shelf reagents for the library preparation steps, and adaptor oligonucleotides for Illumina paired-end sequencing purchased directly from an oligonucleotide manufacturing company. Conclusions This solution-based TGE method for Illumina sequencing is optimized for small- or medium-sized laboratories and addresses the weaknesses of standard protocols by reducing the amount of input DNA required, increasing capture yield, optimizing efficiency, and improving reproducibility.

  20. Benchmarking DNA Metabarcoding for Biodiversity-Based Monitoring and Assessment

    KAUST Repository

    Aylagas, Eva

    2016-06-10

    Characterization of biodiversity has been extensively used to confidently monitor and assess environmental status. Yet, visual morphology, traditionally and widely used for species identification in coastal and marine ecosystem communities, is tedious and entails limitations. Metabarcoding coupled with high-throughput sequencing (HTS) represents an alternative to rapidly, accurately, and cost-effectively analyze thousands of environmental samples simultaneously, and this method is increasingly used to characterize the metazoan taxonomic composition of a wide variety of environments. However, a comprehensive study benchmarking visual and metabarcoding-based taxonomic inferences that validates this technique for environmental monitoring is still lacking. Here, we compare taxonomic inferences of benthic macroinvertebrate samples of known taxonomic composition obtained using alternative metabarcoding protocols based on a combination of different DNA sources, barcodes of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene and amplification conditions. Our results highlight the influence of the metabarcoding protocol in the obtained taxonomic composition and suggest the better performance of an alternative 313 bp length barcode to the traditionally 658 bp length one used for metazoan metabarcoding. Additionally, we show that a biotic index inferred from the list of macroinvertebrate taxa obtained using DNA-based taxonomic assignments is comparable to that inferred using morphological identification. Thus, our analyses prove metabarcoding valid for environmental status assessment and will contribute to accelerating the implementation of this technique to regular monitoring programs.

  1. Benchmarking DNA Metabarcoding for Biodiversity-Based Monitoring and Assessment

    KAUST Repository

    Aylagas, Eva; Borja, Á ngel; Irigoien, Xabier; Rodrí guez-Ezpeleta, Naiara

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of biodiversity has been extensively used to confidently monitor and assess environmental status. Yet, visual morphology, traditionally and widely used for species identification in coastal and marine ecosystem communities, is tedious and entails limitations. Metabarcoding coupled with high-throughput sequencing (HTS) represents an alternative to rapidly, accurately, and cost-effectively analyze thousands of environmental samples simultaneously, and this method is increasingly used to characterize the metazoan taxonomic composition of a wide variety of environments. However, a comprehensive study benchmarking visual and metabarcoding-based taxonomic inferences that validates this technique for environmental monitoring is still lacking. Here, we compare taxonomic inferences of benthic macroinvertebrate samples of known taxonomic composition obtained using alternative metabarcoding protocols based on a combination of different DNA sources, barcodes of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene and amplification conditions. Our results highlight the influence of the metabarcoding protocol in the obtained taxonomic composition and suggest the better performance of an alternative 313 bp length barcode to the traditionally 658 bp length one used for metazoan metabarcoding. Additionally, we show that a biotic index inferred from the list of macroinvertebrate taxa obtained using DNA-based taxonomic assignments is comparable to that inferred using morphological identification. Thus, our analyses prove metabarcoding valid for environmental status assessment and will contribute to accelerating the implementation of this technique to regular monitoring programs.

  2. Classification of the supraspinatus lesions based on the correlation between MRI and surgical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capiel, Carlos A. h; Sammartino, Mario R.; Bouzas, Carlos A.; Mussini, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of MR in the diagnosis of supraspinatus disorders and to report a classification based on the correlation between MR and surgical findings. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine patients with clinical suspected rotator cuff abnormalities were examined with MR. Two radiologists interpreted the images without knowledge of the surgical findings. MR findings were correlated with surgical ones. The classification used divides the supraspinatus disorders in two groups: a) With tendinous continuity (tendinosis and partial cuff tear); and b) Interruption of the tendinous continuity (full-thickness tear). Full thickness tears can be with severe or small retraction. Results: All the patients had full-thickness tear. MR correctly diagnosed thirty-eight tears with a sensitivity of 97,4%. Twelve tears showed small retraction and twenty-seven a severe retraction. Five patients had irreparable lesions. Conclusion: MR is an excellent method in the diagnosis of rotator cuff disorders. The classification based on the correlation between MR and surgical findings supplies an accurate diagnosis and gives an integrated scope of supraspinatus disorders. In this way the orthopaedic surgeons can define if the disorders can be clinically or surgically treated, and in this case, determine the type of surgery required (open surgery or arthroscopy). (author)

  3. Characterization of oral precancerous lesions based on higher-harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chih-Feng; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2013-03-01

    It is generally accepted that oral cancer arises in the presence of oral precancerous lesions. However, the clinical courses of these lesions are quite unpredictable, and a fundamental enigma remains that when and how these lesions turn to malignant growth. Characterization of these potentially malignant lesions is thus important and could serve as early indicators of this neoplastic transformation process, potentially facilitates the treatment outcome and improves the survival rate. Higher harmonic generation microscope (HGM), providing images with a leaving photodamages in the tissues, was used for this purpose. Oral cavity biopsies were obtained from 18 patients with clinical suspected oral precancerous lesions scheduled for surgical biopsy. HGM images were compared with histological images to determine the results. By visualization of subtle cellular and morphological changes, the preliminary result of this HGM image discloses excellent consistency with traditional histolopathology studies, without the need for fixation, sectioning and staining. More specifically speaking, the keratin thickness was found to be increased comparing with normal adjacent controls. In some cases, variations in cell size, nuclear size and increased nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio, and increased size of nucleoli were identified, indicating different stages of malignant transformation. These results together indicated that HGM provides the capability to characterize features of oral precancerous lesions as well as oral cancer progression, and holds the greatest potential as an ideal tool for clinical screening and surveillance of suspicious oral lesions.

  4. Sequential addition of short DNA oligos in DNA-polymerase-based synthesis reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Shea N; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P; Christian, Allen T; Young, Jennifer A; Clague, David S

    2013-06-25

    A method of preselecting a multiplicity of DNA sequence segments that will comprise the DNA molecule of user-defined sequence, separating the DNA sequence segments temporally, and combining the multiplicity of DNA sequence segments with at least one polymerase enzyme wherein the multiplicity of DNA sequence segments join to produce the DNA molecule of user-defined sequence. Sequence segments may be of length n, where n is an odd integer. In one embodiment the length of desired hybridizing overlap is specified by the user and the sequences and the protocol for combining them are guided by computational (bioinformatics) predictions. In one embodiment sequence segments are combined from multiple reading frames to span the same region of a sequence, so that multiple desired hybridizations may occur with different overlap lengths.

  5. Cloud-based adaptive exon prediction for DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putluri, Srinivasareddy; Zia Ur Rahman, Md; Fathima, Shaik Yasmeen

    2018-02-01

    Cloud computing offers significant research and economic benefits to healthcare organisations. Cloud services provide a safe place for storing and managing large amounts of such sensitive data. Under conventional flow of gene information, gene sequence laboratories send out raw and inferred information via Internet to several sequence libraries. DNA sequencing storage costs will be minimised by use of cloud service. In this study, the authors put forward a novel genomic informatics system using Amazon Cloud Services, where genomic sequence information is stored and accessed for processing. True identification of exon regions in a DNA sequence is a key task in bioinformatics, which helps in disease identification and design drugs. Three base periodicity property of exons forms the basis of all exon identification techniques. Adaptive signal processing techniques found to be promising in comparison with several other methods. Several adaptive exon predictors (AEPs) are developed using variable normalised least mean square and its maximum normalised variants to reduce computational complexity. Finally, performance evaluation of various AEPs is done based on measures such as sensitivity, specificity and precision using various standard genomic datasets taken from National Center for Biotechnology Information genomic sequence database.

  6. Intelligent DNA-based molecular diagnostics using linked genetic markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, D.K.; Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a knowledge-based system for molecular diagnostics, and its application to fully automated diagnosis of X-linked genetic disorders. Molecular diagnostic information is used in clinical practice for determining genetic risks, such as carrier determination and prenatal diagnosis. Initially, blood samples are obtained from related individuals, and PCR amplification is performed. Linkage-based molecular diagnosis then entails three data analysis steps. First, for every individual, the alleles (i.e., DNA composition) are determined at specified chromosomal locations. Second, the flow of genetic material among the individuals is established. Third, the probability that a given individual is either a carrier of the disease or affected by the disease is determined. The current practice is to perform each of these three steps manually, which is costly, time consuming, labor-intensive, and error-prone. As such, the knowledge-intensive data analysis and interpretation supersede the actual experimentation effort as the major bottleneck in molecular diagnostics. By examining the human problem solving for the task, we have designed and implemented a prototype knowledge-based system capable of fully automating linkage-based molecular diagnostics in X-linked genetic disorders, including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Our system uses knowledge-based interpretation of gel electrophoresis images to determine individual DNA marker labels, a constraint satisfaction search for consistent genetic flow among individuals, and a blackboard-style problem solver for risk assessment. We describe the system`s successful diagnosis of DMD carrier and affected individuals from raw clinical data.

  7. Impact of a new respiratory amplitude-based gating technique in evaluation of upper abdominal PET lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Der Gucht, Axel, E-mail: axel.vandergucht@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Princesse Grace, Monaco (Monaco); Serrano, Benjamin [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Princesse Grace, Monaco (Monaco); Hugonnet, Florent; Paulmier, Benoît [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Princesse Grace, Monaco (Monaco); Garnier, Nicolas [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Princesse Grace, Monaco (Monaco); Faraggi, Marc [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Princesse Grace, Monaco (Monaco)

    2014-03-15

    PET acquisition requires several minutes which can lead to respiratory motion blurring, to increase partial volume effect and SUV under-estimation. To avoid these artifacts, conventional 10-min phase-based respiratory gating (PBRG) can be performed but is time-consuming and difficult with a non-compliant patient. We evaluated an automatic amplitude-based gating method (AABG) which keeps 35% of the counts at the end of expiration to minimize respiratory motion. We estimated the impact of AABG on upper abdominal lesion detectability, quantification and patient management. Methods: We consecutively included 31 patients (82 hepatic and 25 perihepatic known lesions). Each patient underwent 3 acquisitions on a Siemens Biograph mCT (4 rings and time-of-flight): a standard free-breathing whole-body (SWB, 5–7 steps/2.5 min per step, 3.3 ± 0.4 MBq/kg of 18F-FDG), a 10-min PBRG with six bins and a 5-min AABG method. All gated acquisitions were performed with an ANZAI respiratory gating system. SUV{sub max} and target to background ratio (TBR, defined as the maximum SUV of the lesion divided by the mean SUV of a region of interest drawn in healthy liver) were compared. Results: All 94 lesions in SWB images were detected in the gated images. 10-min PBRG and 5-min AABG acquisitions respectively revealed 9 and 13 new lesions and relocated 7 and 8 lesions. Four lesions revealed by 5-min AABG were missed by 10-min PBRG in 3 non-compliant patients. Both gated methods failed to relocate 2 lesions seen on SWB acquisition. Compared to SWB, TBR increased significantly with 10-min PBRG and with 5-min AABG (respectively 41 ± 59%, p = 4.10–3 and 66 ± 75%, p = 6.10–5) whereas SUV{sub max} did not (respectively 14 ± 43%, p = 0.29 with 10-min PBRG, and 24 ± 46%, p = 0.11 with 5-min AABG). Conclusion: The AABG is a fast and a user-friendly respiratory gating method to increase detectability and quantification of upper abdominal lesions compared to the conventional PBRG procedure and

  8. DNA Source Selection for Downstream Applications Based on DNA Quality Indicators Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena-Aguilar, Gema; Sánchez-López, Ana María; Barberán-Aceituno, Cristina; Carrillo-Ávila, José Antonio; López-Guerrero, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    High-quality human DNA samples and associated information of individuals are necessary for biomedical research. Biobanks act as a support infrastructure for the scientific community by providing a large number of high-quality biological samples for specific downstream applications. For this purpose, biobank methods for sample preparation must ensure the usefulness and long-term functionality of the products obtained. Quality indicators are the tool to measure these parameters, the purity and integrity determination being those specifically used for DNA. This study analyzes the quality indicators in DNA samples derived from 118 frozen human tissues in optimal cutting temperature (OCT) reactive, 68 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, 119 frozen blood samples, and 26 saliva samples. The results obtained for DNA quality are discussed in association with the usefulness for downstream applications and availability of the DNA source in the target study. In brief, if any material is valid, blood is the most approachable option of prospective collection of samples providing high-quality DNA. However, if diseased tissue is a requisite or samples are available, the recommended source of DNA would be frozen tissue. These conclusions will determine the best source of DNA, according to the planned downstream application. Furthermore our results support the conclusion that a complete procedure of DNA quantification and qualification is necessary to guarantee the appropriate management of the samples, avoiding low confidence results, high costs, and a waste of samples. PMID:27158753

  9. An image based system to automatically and objectivelly score the degreeof redness and scaling in psoriasi lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez, David Delgado; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Carstensen, Jens Michael

    2004-01-01

    In this work, a combined statistical and image analysis method to automatically evaluate the severity of scaling in psoriasis lesions is proposed. The method separates the different regions of the disease in the image and scores the degree of scaling based on the properties of these areas. The pr...... that the obtained scores are highly correlated with scores made by doctors. This and the fact that the obtained measures are continuous indicate the proposed method is a suitable tool to evaluate the lesion and to track the evolution of dermatological diseases....

  10. Incidence of symptomatic osteochondritis dissecans lesions of the knee : A population-based study in Olmsted County

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pareek, A.; Sanders, T. L.; Wu, I. T.; Larson, D. R.; Saris, D. B.F.; Krych, A.J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To (1) define population-based incidence of knee Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions using the population of Olmsted County, (2) examine trends over time, and (3) evaluate rate of surgical management over time. Method: Study population included 302 individuals who were diagnosed with

  11. An improved strategy for skin lesion detection and classification using uniform segmentation and feature selection based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Muhammad; Attique Khan, Muhammad; Sharif, Muhammad; Lali, Ikram Ullah; Saba, Tanzila; Iqbal, Tassawar

    2018-02-21

    Melanoma is the deadliest type of skin cancer with highest mortality rate. However, the annihilation in early stage implies a high survival rate therefore, it demands early diagnosis. The accustomed diagnosis methods are costly and cumbersome due to the involvement of experienced experts as well as the requirements for highly equipped environment. The recent advancements in computerized solutions for these diagnoses are highly promising with improved accuracy and efficiency. In this article, we proposed a method for the classification of melanoma and benign skin lesions. Our approach integrates preprocessing, lesion segmentation, features extraction, features selection, and classification. Preprocessing is executed in the context of hair removal by DullRazor, whereas lesion texture and color information are utilized to enhance the lesion contrast. In lesion segmentation, a hybrid technique has been implemented and results are fused using additive law of probability. Serial based method is applied subsequently that extracts and fuses the traits such as color, texture, and HOG (shape). The fused features are selected afterwards by implementing a novel Boltzman Entropy method. Finally, the selected features are classified by Support Vector Machine. The proposed method is evaluated on publically available data set PH2. Our approach has provided promising results of sensitivity 97.7%, specificity 96.7%, accuracy 97.5%, and F-score 97.5%, which are significantly better than the results of existing methods available on the same data set. The proposed method detects and classifies melanoma significantly good as compared to existing methods. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Voxel-based lesion analysis of brain regions underlying reading and writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, Juliana V; Kacinik, Natalie; Ludy, Carl; Paulraj, Selvi; Moncrief, Amber; Piai, Vitória; Curran, Brian; Turken, And; Herron, Tim; Dronkers, Nina F

    2018-03-20

    The neural basis of reading and writing has been a source of inquiry as well as controversy in the neuroscience literature. Reading has been associated with both left posterior ventral temporal zones (termed the "visual word form area") as well as more dorsal zones, primarily in left parietal cortex. Writing has also been associated with left parietal cortex, as well as left sensorimotor cortex and prefrontal regions. Typically, the neural basis of reading and writing are examined in separate studies and/or rely on single case studies exhibiting specific deficits. Functional neuroimaging studies of reading and writing typically identify a large number of activated regions but do not necessarily identify the core, critical hubs. Last, due to constraints on the functional imaging environment, many previous studies have been limited to measuring the brain activity associated with single-word reading and writing, rather than sentence-level processing. In the current study, the brain correlates of reading and writing at both the single- and sentence-level were studied in a large sample of 111 individuals with a history of chronic stroke using voxel-based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM). VLSM provides a whole-brain, voxel-by-voxel statistical analysis of the role of distinct regions in a particular behavior by comparing performance of individuals with and without a lesion at every voxel. Rather than comparing individual cases or small groups with particular behavioral dissociations in reading and writing, VLSM allowed us to analyze data from a large, well-characterized sample of stroke patients exhibiting a wide range of reading and writing impairments. The VLSM analyses revealed that reading was associated with a critical left inferior temporo-occipital focus, while writing was primarily associated with the left supramarginal gyrus. Separate VLSM analyses of single-word versus sentence-level reading showed that sentence-level reading was uniquely associated with anterior

  13. DNA based identification of medicinal materials in Chinese patent medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Dong, Juan; Cui, Xin; Wang, Wei; Yasmeen, Afshan; Deng, Yun; Zeng, Xiaomao; Tang, Zhuo

    2012-12-01

    Chinese patent medicines (CPM) are highly processed and easy to use Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). The market for CPM in China alone is tens of billions US dollars annually and some of the CPM are also used as dietary supplements for health augmentation in the western countries. But concerns continue to be raised about the legality, safety and efficacy of many popular CPM. Here we report a pioneer work of applying molecular biotechnology to the identification of CPM, particularly well refined oral liquids and injections. What's more, this PCR based method can also be developed to an easy to use and cost-effective visual chip by taking advantage of G-quadruplex based Hybridization Chain Reaction. This study demonstrates that DNA identification of specific Medicinal materials is an efficient and cost-effective way to audit highly processed CPM and will assist in monitoring their quality and legality.

  14. Dendrimer-based biosensor for chemiluminescent detection of DNA hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, P.; Hun, X.; Qing, H.

    2011-01-01

    We report on a highly sensitive chemiluminescent (CL) biosensor for the sequence-specific detection of DNA using a novel bio barcode DNA probe modified with gold nanoparticles that were covered with a dendrimer. The modified probe is composed of gold nanoparticles, a dendrimer, the CL reagent, and the DNA. The capture probe DNA was immobilized on magnetic beads covered with gold. It first hybridizes with the target DNA and then with one terminal end of the signal DNA on the barcoded DNA probe. CL was generated by adding H 2 O 2 and Co(II) ions as the catalyst. The immobilization of dendrimer onto the gold nanoparticles can significantly enhance sensitivity and gives a detection limit of 6 fmol L -1 of target DNA. (author)

  15. Structural basis for the inhibition of human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) by 3,N4-ethenocytosine-containing DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingaraju, Gondichatnahalli M; Davis, C Ainsley; Setser, Jeremy W; Samson, Leona D; Drennan, Catherine L

    2011-04-15

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, generated by neutrophils and macrophages in chronically inflamed tissues, readily damage DNA, producing a variety of potentially genotoxic etheno base lesions; such inflammation-related DNA damage is now known to contribute to carcinogenesis. Although the human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) can specifically bind DNA containing either 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (εA) lesions or 3,N(4)-ethenocytosine (εC) lesions, it can only excise εA lesions. AAG binds very tightly to DNA containing εC lesions, forming an abortive protein-DNA complex; such binding not only shields εC from repair by other enzymes but also inhibits AAG from acting on other DNA lesions. To understand the structural basis for inhibition, we have characterized the binding of AAG to DNA containing εC lesions and have solved a crystal structure of AAG bound to a DNA duplex containing the εC lesion. This study provides the first structure of a DNA glycosylase in complex with an inhibitory base lesion that is induced endogenously and that is also induced upon exposure to environmental agents such as vinyl chloride. We identify the primary cause of inhibition as a failure to activate the nucleotide base as an efficient leaving group and demonstrate that the higher binding affinity of AAG for εC versus εA is achieved through formation of an additional hydrogen bond between Asn-169 in the active site pocket and the O(2) of εC. This structure provides the basis for the design of AAG inhibitors currently being sought as an adjuvant for cancer chemotherapy.

  16. O6-ethylguanine carcinogenic lesions in DNA: An NMR study of O6etG·T pairing in dodecanucloetide duplexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnik, M.W.; Li, B.F.L.; Swann, P.F.; Patel, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional NMR studies are reported on the self-complementary d-(C1-G2-C3-O 6 etG4-A5-G6-C7-T8-T9-G10-C11-G12) duplex (designated O 6 etG·T 12-mer) containing two symmetrically related O 6 etG·T lesion sites located four base pairs in from either end of the duplex. Parallel studies were undertaken on a related sequence containing O 6 meG·T lesion sites (designated O 6 meG·T 12-mer) in order to evaluate the influence of the size of the alkyl substituent on the structure of the duplex and were undertaken on a related sequence containing G·T mismatch sites (designated G·T 12-mer duplex), which served as the control duplex. The exchangeable and nonexchangeable proton and the phosphorus nuclei have been assigned from an analysis of two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) and correlated spectra of the O 6 etG·T 12-mer, O 6 meG·T 12-mer, and G·T 12-mer duplexes in H 2 O and D 2 O solutions. The distance connectivities observed in the NOESY spectra of the O 6 alkG·T 12-mer duplexes establish that the helix is right-handed and all of the bases adopt an anti conformation of the glycosidic torsion angle including the O 6 alkG4 and T9 bases at the lesion site. These observations establish that the O 6 alkG4 and T9 residues are stacked into the duplex and that the O 6 CH 3 and O 6 CH 2 CH 3 groups of O 6 alkG4 adopt a syn orientation with respect to the N 1 of the alkylated guanine. Since the O 6 -alkyl group adopts a syn orientation, the separation between the O 6 of O 6 alkG4 and the O 4 of T9 in the major groove is increased, preventing the formation of a short hydrogen bond between the N 1 ring nitrogen of O 6 alkG4 and the imino proton of T9

  17. A DNA-based nanomechanical device with three robust states

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Banani; Sha, Ruojie; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2008-01-01

    DNA has been used to build a variety of devices, ranging from those that are controlled by DNA structural transitions to those that are controlled by the addition of specific DNA strands. These sequence-dependent devices fulfill the promise of DNA in nanotechnology because a variety of devices in the same physical environment can be controlled individually. Many such devices have been reported, but most of them contain one or two structurally robust end states, in addition to a floppy interme...

  18. Statistical length of DNA based on AFM image measured by a computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xinqing; Qiu Xijun; Zhang Yi; Hu Jun; Wu Shiying; Huang Yibo; Ai Xiaobai; Li Minqian

    2001-01-01

    Taking advantage of image processing technology, the contour length of DNA molecule was measured automatically by a computer. Based on the AFM image of DNA, the topography of DNA was simulated into a curve. Then the DNA length was measured automatically by inserting mode. It was shown that the experimental length of a naturally deposited DNA (180.4 +- 16.4 nm) was well consistent with the theoretical length (185.0 nm). Comparing to other methods, the present approach had advantages of precision and automatism. The stretched DNA was also measured. It present approach had advantages of precision and automatism. The stretched DNA was also measured. It was shown that the experimental length (343.6 +- 20.7 nm) was much longer than the theoretical length (307.0 nm). This result indicated that the stretching process had a distinct effect on the DNA length. However, the method provided here avoided the DNA-stretching effect

  19. Design and specificity of long ssDNA donors for CRISPR-based knock-in

    OpenAIRE

    Leonetti, Manuel; Li, Han; Beckman, Kyle; Pessino, Veronica; Huang, Bo; Weissman, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas technologies have transformed our ability to manipulate genomes for research and gene-based therapy. In particular, homology-directed repair after genomic cleavage allows for precise modification of genes using exogenous donor sequences as templates. While both single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) forms of donors have been used as repair templates, a systematic comparison of the performance and specificity of repair using ssDNA versus dsDNA donors is still la...

  20. Object-action dissociation: A voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping study on 102 patients after glioma removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Pisoni

    Full Text Available Data concerning the neural basis of noun and verb processing are inconsistent. Some authors assume that action-verb processing is based on frontal areas while nouns processing relies on temporal regions; others argue that the circuits processing verbs and nouns are closely interconnected in a predominantly left-lateralized fronto-temporal-parietal network; yet, other researchers consider that the primary motor cortex plays a crucial role in processing action verbs. In the present study, one hundred and two patients with a tumour either in the right or left hemisphere were submitted to picture naming of objects and actions before and after surgery. To test the effect of specific brain regions in object and action naming, patients' lesions were mapped and voxel-lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM was computed. Behavioural results showed that left-brain damaged patients were significantly more impaired than right brain-damaged patients. The VLSM showed that these two grammatical classes are segregated in the left hemisphere. In particular, scores in naming of objects correlated with damage to the anterior temporal region, while scores in naming of actions correlated with lesions in the parietal areas and in the posterior temporal cortex. In addition, VLSM analyses carried out on non-linguistic tasks were not significant, confirming that the regions associated with deficits in object and action naming were not generally engaged in all cognitive tasks. Finally, the involvement of subcortical pathways was investigated and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus proved to play a role in object naming, while no specific bundle was identified for actions. Keywords: Object action dissociation, Temporal lesion, Frontal lesion, Voxel-based lesion symptom mapping

  1. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...... base lesions is base excision repair, and such repair is crucial for neurons given their high rates of oxygen metabolism. Mismatch repair corrects base mispairs generated during replication and evidence indicates that oxidative DNA damage can cause this pathway to expand trinucleotide repeats, thereby...

  2. Metal-mediated DNA base pairing: alternatives to hydrogen-bonded Watson-Crick base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezawa, Yusuke; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2012-12-18

    With its capacity to store and transfer the genetic information within a sequence of monomers, DNA forms its central role in chemical evolution through replication and amplification. This elegant behavior is largely based on highly specific molecular recognition between nucleobases through the specific hydrogen bonds in the Watson-Crick base pairing system. While the native base pairs have been amazingly sophisticated through the long history of evolution, synthetic chemists have devoted considerable efforts to create alternative base pairing systems in recent decades. Most of these new systems were designed based on the shape complementarity of the pairs or the rearrangement of hydrogen-bonding patterns. We wondered whether metal coordination could serve as an alternative driving force for DNA base pairing and why hydrogen bonding was selected on Earth in the course of molecular evolution. Therefore, we envisioned an alternative design strategy: we replaced hydrogen bonding with another important scheme in biological systems, metal-coordination bonding. In this Account, we provide an overview of the chemistry of metal-mediated base pairing including basic concepts, molecular design, characteristic structures and properties, and possible applications of DNA-based molecular systems. We describe several examples of artificial metal-mediated base pairs, such as Cu(2+)-mediated hydroxypyridone base pair, H-Cu(2+)-H (where H denotes a hydroxypyridone-bearing nucleoside), developed by us and other researchers. To design the metallo-base pairs we carefully chose appropriate combinations of ligand-bearing nucleosides and metal ions. As expected from their stronger bonding through metal coordination, DNA duplexes possessing metallo-base pairs exhibited higher thermal stability than natural hydrogen-bonded DNAs. Furthermore, we could also use metal-mediated base pairs to construct or induce other high-order structures. These features could lead to metal-responsive functional

  3. Electrochemical DNA biosensor based on MNAzyme-mediated signal amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diao, Wei; Tang, Min; Ding, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Ye; Yang, Jianru; Cheng, Wenbin; Mo, Fei; Wen, Bo; Xu, Lulu; Yan, Yurong

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe an electrochemical sensing strategy for highly sensitive and specific detection of target (analyte) DNA based on an amplification scheme mediated by a multicomponent nucleic acid enzyme (MNAzyme). MNAzymes were formed by multicomponent complexes which produce amplified “output” signals in response to specific “input” signal. In the presence of target nucleic acid, multiple partial enzymes (partzymes) oligonucleotides are assembled to form active MNAzymes. These can cleave H0 substrate into two pieces, thereby releasing the activated MNAzyme to undergo an additional cycle of amplification. Here, the two pieces contain a biotin-tagged sequence and a byproduct. The biotin-tagged sequences are specifically captured by the detection probes immobilized on the gold electrode. By employing streptavidinylated alkaline phosphatase as an enzyme label, an electrochemical signal is obtained. The electrode, if operated at a working potential of 0.25 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) in solution of pH 7.5, covers the 100 pM to 0.25 μM DNA concentration range, with a 79 pM detection limit. In our perception, the strategy introduced here has a wider potential in that it may be applied to molecular diagnostics and pathogen detection. (author)

  4. LESIONS OF THE MANDIBLE - A PATTERN BASED APPROACH TO DIAGNOSIS BY OPG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Govind

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study of 95 orthopentograms focused on importance of OPG as a first line of investigation in the diagnosis of mandibular lesions and establish its role beyond doubt in some the conditions due to its pathognomonic appearance. It also narrows down the list of differential diagnosis. INTRODUCTION Mandibular lesions cause a variety of problems ranging from swelling, tooth mobility, displacement of adjacent teeth, mild sensitivity, root deformation of developing permanent teeth and potential to expand the bone causing fractures. Some of these mandibular lesions are silent in their progression and pose a challenge in early diagnosis for clinicians. Radiographic characteristics such as location, margin, density, relation to tooth, along with clinical notes is the first step in interpreting mandibular pathologies. Orthopentogram is a simple, accurate and cost effective technique commonly employed for diagnosing dental and maxillofacial lesions. We retrospectively evaluated spectrum of mandibular lesions from a database of groundwork diagnostic OPGs. METHODS We reviewed a total of 2690 orthopentograms of patients with tooth ache and/or swelling, referred to the radiologist for the preliminary diagnosis. All osteolytic lesions more than 10 mm. and having characteristics of root abscess were included for evaluation. OPG taken for orthodontic work up, showing dental abscess less than 10 mm and OPG of patients with Gingival and T.M. joint pathologies were excluded. RESULTS In our study, we found 0.35% (95/2690 of patients were having a spectrum of mandibular lesions. The frequency of appearance of mandibular lesions on OPG was buccal-neoplasm>dentigerous-cysts>dental-cyst>neoplastic=traumatic-bone-cyst= osteomyelitis >kerato-cyst. The most frequent sites of these lesions were 80/103(77.6% molars, 14/103(13.6% incisors, and 9/103(8.7% angle of mandibles. No lesions were found on condyles. CONCLUSION The present study proves that OPG is a first

  5. Fusion of classifiers for REIS-based detection of suspicious breast lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Dror; Wang, Xingwei; Zheng, Bin; Sumkin, Jules H.; Tublin, Mitchell; Gur, David

    2011-03-01

    After developing a multi-probe resonance-frequency electrical impedance spectroscopy (REIS) system aimed at detecting women with breast abnormalities that may indicate a developing breast cancer, we have been conducting a prospective clinical study to explore the feasibility of applying this REIS system to classify younger women (breast cancer. The system comprises one central probe placed in contact with the nipple, and six additional probes uniformly distributed along an outside circle to be placed in contact with six points on the outer breast skin surface. In this preliminary study, we selected an initial set of 174 examinations on participants that have completed REIS examinations and have clinical status verification. Among these, 66 examinations were recommended for biopsy due to findings of a highly suspicious breast lesion ("positives"), and 108 were determined as negative during imaging based procedures ("negatives"). A set of REIS-based features, extracted using a mirror-matched approach, was computed and fed into five machine learning classifiers. A genetic algorithm was used to select an optimal subset of features for each of the five classifiers. Three fusion rules, namely sum rule, weighted sum rule and weighted median rule, were used to combine the results of the classifiers. Performance evaluation was performed using a leave-one-case-out cross-validation method. The results indicated that REIS may provide a new technology to identify younger women with higher than average risk of having or developing breast cancer. Furthermore, it was shown that fusion rule, such as a weighted median fusion rule and a weighted sum fusion rule may improve performance as compared with the highest performing single classifier.

  6. Platelet lysate formulations based on mucoadhesive polymers for the treatment of corneal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Giuseppina; Bonferoni, Maria Cristina; Rossi, Silvia; Ferrari, Franca; Mori, Michela; Del Fante, Claudia; Perotti, Cesare; Scudeller, Luigia; Caramella, Carla

    2011-02-01

    Growth factors contained in platelet α-granules initiate and modulate tissue repair and are proposed for the treatment of soft and hard-tissue surgical conditions and in the management of non-healing wounds. Platelet lysate is a hemoderivative obtained from platelet-rich plasma and is capable of releasing a pool of growth factors. Many medical and surgical techniques have been proposed for the treatment of corneal lesions; management of these conditions remains problematic and healing with standard protocols is unattainable. The aim of this study was to develop formulations suitable for prolonging the contact of platelet lysate with the damaged cornea for the time necessary to exert a therapeutic effect. Two vehicles, one based on polyacrylic acid and one based on chitosan, were autoclaved and loaded with platelet lysate and the resultant formulations were characterized for rheology, mucoadhesion, vehicle compatibility and stability. The proliferation effect was tested on two cell culture types (rabbit corneal epithelial cells and fibroblasts). An in-vitro wound-healing test was performed on fibroblasts. In both cases the formulations were compared with platelet lysate diluted with saline at the same concentration. Both formulations maintained the rheological and mucoadhesive properties of the vehicles and the proliferative activity of platelet lysate. The chitosan formulation was able to significantly enhance epithelial cell growth even after storage of up to 2 weeks (in-use conditions), while the polyacrylic acid formulation was less efficient, probably due to the characteristics of the cell model used. The in-vitro wound-healing test performed on fibroblasts confirmed the differences between the two vehicles. The effect induced by the platelet lysate and chitosan formulation was faster than that of the polyacrylic acid formulation and complete in-vitro wound repair was achieved within 48 h. © 2010 The Authors. JPP © 2010 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  7. NMR studies of the exocyclic 1,N6-ethenodeoxyadenosine adduct (εdA) opposite thymidine in a DNA duplex. Nonplanar alignment of εdA(anti) and dT(anti) at the lesion site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouchakdjian, M.; Patel, D.J.; Eisenberg, M.; Yarema, K.; Basu, A.; Essigmann, J.

    1991-01-01

    Two-dimensional proton NMR studies are reported on the complementary d(C-A-T-G-T-G-T-A-C)·d(G-T-A-C-εA-C-A-T-G) nonanucleotide duplex (designated εdA·dT 9-mer duplex) containing 1,N 6 -ethenodeoxyadenosine (εdA), a carcinogen-DNA adduct, positioned opposite thymidine in the center of the helix. The authors NMR studies have focused on the conformation of the εdA·dT 9-mer duplex at neutral pH with emphasis on defining the alignment at the dT5·εdA14 lesion site. The through-space NOE distance connectivities establish that both dT5 and εdA14 adopt anti glycosidic torsion angles, are directed into the interior of the helix, and stack with flanking Watson-Crick dG4·dC15 and dG6·dC13 pairs. Furthermore, the d(G4-T5-G6)·d(C13-εA14-C15) trinucleotide segment centered about the dT5·εdA14 lesion site adopts a right-handed helical conformation in solution. Energy minimization computations were undertaken starting from six different alignments of dT5(anti) and εdA14(anti) at the lesion site and were guided by distance constraints defined by lower and upper bounds estimated from NOESY data sets on the εdA·dT 9-mer duplex. The NMR data are consistent with a nonplanar alignment of εdA14(anti) and dT5(anti) with dT5 displaced toward the flanking dG4·dC15 base pair within the d(G4-T5-G6)·d(C13-εA14-C15) segment of the εdA·dT 9-mer duplex

  8. A history of the DNA repair and mutagenesis field: The discovery of base excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Errol C

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the early history of the discovery of an DNA repair pathway designated as base excision repair (BER), since in contrast to the enzyme-catalyzed removal of damaged bases from DNA as nucleotides [called nucleotide excision repair (NER)], BER involves the removal of damaged or inappropriate bases, such as the presence of uracil instead of thymine, from DNA as free bases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. PCR-based detection of a rare linear DNA in cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saveliev Sergei V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The described method allows for detection of rare linear DNA fragments generated during genomic deletions. The predicted limit of the detection is one DNA molecule per 107 or more cells. The method is based on anchor PCR and involves gel separation of the linear DNA fragment and chromosomal DNA before amplification. The detailed chemical structure of the ends of the linear DNA can be defined with the use of additional PCR-based protocols. The method was applied to study the short-lived linear DNA generated during programmed genomic deletions in a ciliate. It can be useful in studies of spontaneous DNA deletions in cell culture or for tracking intracellular modifications at the ends of transfected DNA during gene therapy trials.

  10. PCR-based detection of a rare linear DNA in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveliev, Sergei V.

    2002-11-11

    The described method allows for detection of rare linear DNA fragments generated during genomic deletions. The predicted limit of the detection is one DNA molecule per 10(7) or more cells. The method is based on anchor PCR and involves gel separation of the linear DNA fragment and chromosomal DNA before amplification. The detailed chemical structure of the ends of the linear DNA can be defined with the use of additional PCR-based protocols. The method was applied to study the short-lived linear DNA generated during programmed genomic deletions in a ciliate. It can be useful in studies of spontaneous DNA deletions in cell culture or for tracking intracellular modifications at the ends of transfected DNA during gene therapy trials.

  11. DNA-based asymmetric catalysis : Sequence-dependent rate acceleration and enantioselectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, Arnold J.; Klijn, Jaap E.; Feringa, Ben L.; Roelfes, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    This study shows that the role of DNA in the DNA-based enantioselective Diels-Alder reaction of azachalcone with cyclopentadiene is not limited to that of a chiral scaffold. DNA in combination with the copper complex of 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (Cu-L1) gives rise to a rate acceleration of up to

  12. Constructing DNA Barcode Sets Based on Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Zheng, Xuedong; Zhou, Shihua; Zhou, Changjun; Wei, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Qiang; Wei, Ziqi

    2018-01-01

    Following the completion of the human genome project, a large amount of high-throughput bio-data was generated. To analyze these data, massively parallel sequencing, namely next-generation sequencing, was rapidly developed. DNA barcodes are used to identify the ownership between sequences and samples when they are attached at the beginning or end of sequencing reads. Constructing DNA barcode sets provides the candidate DNA barcodes for this application. To increase the accuracy of DNA barcode sets, a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm has been modified and used to construct the DNA barcode sets in this paper. Compared with the extant results, some lower bounds of DNA barcode sets are improved. The results show that the proposed algorithm is effective in constructing DNA barcode sets.

  13. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based lateral flow biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takalkar, Sunitha; Baryeh, Kwaku; Liu, Guodong

    2017-12-15

    We report a fluorescent carbon nanoparticle (FCN)-based lateral flow biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of DNA. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle with a diameter of around 15nm was used as a tag to label a detection DNA probe, which was complementary with the part of target DNA. A capture DNA probe was immobilized on the test zone of the lateral flow biosensor. Sandwich-type hybridization reactions among the FCN-labeled DNA probe, target DNA and capture DNA probe were performed on the lateral flow biosensor. In the presence of target DNA, FCNs were captured on the test zone of the biosensor and the fluorescent intensity of the captured FCNs was measured with a portable fluorescent reader. After systematic optimizations of experimental parameters (the components of running buffers, the concentration of detection DNA probe used in the preparation of FCN-DNA conjugates, the amount of FCN-DNA dispensed on the conjugate pad and the dispensing cycles of the capture DNA probes on the test-zone), the biosensor could detect a minimum concentration of 0.4 fM DNA. This study provides a rapid and low-cost approach for DNA detection with high sensitivity, showing great promise for clinical application and biomedical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of DNA-based radiopharmaceuticals carrying Auger-electron emitters for anti-gene radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panyutin, I.G.; Winters, T.A.; Feinendegen, L.E.; Neumann, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    Targeting of radiation damage to specific DNA sequences is the essence of antigene radiotherapy. This technique also provides a tool to study molecular mechanisms of DNA repair on a defined, single radio damaged site. It was achieved such sequence-specific radio damage by combining the highly localized DNA damage produced by the decay of Auger-electron-emitters such as 125 I with the sequence-specific action of triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFO). TFO complementary to polypurine-polypyrimidine regions of human genes were synthesized and labeled with 125 I-dCTP by the primer extension method. 125 I-TFO were delivered into cells with several delivery systems. In addition, human enzymes capable of supporting DNA single-strand-break repair were isolated and assessed for their role in the repair of this lesion. Also, the mutagenicity and repairability of 125 I-TFO-induced double strand breaks (DSB) were assessed by repair of plasmid possessing a site-specific DSB lesion. Using plasmids containing target polypurine-polypyrimidine tracts, it was obtained the fine structure of sequence-specific DNA breaks produced by decay of 125 I with single-nucleotide resolution. It was showed that the designed 125 I-TFO in nanomolar concentrations could bind to and introduce double-strand breaks into the target sequences in situ, i.e., within isolated nuclei and intact digitonin-permeabilized cells. It was also showed 125 I-TFO-induced DSB to be highly mutagenic lesions resulting in a mutation frequency of nearly 80%, with deletions comprising the majority of mutations. The results obtained demonstrate the ability of 125 I-TFO to target specific sequences in their natural environment - within eukaryotic nucleus. Repair of 125 I-TFO-induced DNA damage should typically result in mutagenic gene inactivation

  15. O6-ethylguanine carcinogenic lesions in DNA: An NMR study of O6etG·C pairing in dodecanucleotide duplexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnik, M.W.; Li, B.F.L.; Swann, P.F.; Patel, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    The pairing of O 6 etG with C located four base pairs in from either end of the self-complementary d(C1-G2-C3-O 6 etG4-A5-G6-C7-T8-C9-G10-C11-G12) duplex (designated O 6 etG·C 12-mer) has been investigated from an analysis of proton and phosphorus two-dimensional NMR experiments. The structural consequences of increasing the alkyl group size were elucidated from a comparative study of the pairing of O 6 meG4 with C9 in a related sequence (designated O 6 meG·C 12-mer). The NMR parameters for both O 6 alkG-containing dodecanucleotides are also compared with those of the control sequence containing G4·C9 base pairs (designated G·C 12-mer). The NOE cross-peaks detected in the two-dimensional NOESY spectra of the O 6 alkG·C 12-mer duplexes in H 2 O solution establish that the O 6 etG4/O 6 meG4 and C9 bases at the lesion site stack into the helix between the flanking C3·G10 and A5·T8 Watson-Crick base pairs. The observed NOEs between the amino protons of C9 and the CH 3 protons of O 6 alkG4 establish a syn orientation of the O 6 -alkyl group with respect to the N 1 of alkylated guanine. A wobble alignment of the O 6 alkG4·C9 base pair stabilized by two hydrogen bonds, one between the amino group of C9 and N 1 of O 6 alkG and the other between the amino group of O 6 alkG and N 3 of C9, is tentatively proposed on the basis of the NOEs between the amino protons of C9 at the lesion site and the imino protons of flanking Watson-Crick base pairs

  16. DNA methylation-based classification of central nervous system tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capper, David; Jones, David T.W.; Sill, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Accurate pathological diagnosis is crucial for optimal management of patients with cancer. For the approximately 100 known tumour types of the central nervous system, standardization of the diagnostic process has been shown to be particularly challenging - with substantial inter-observer variabil......Accurate pathological diagnosis is crucial for optimal management of patients with cancer. For the approximately 100 known tumour types of the central nervous system, standardization of the diagnostic process has been shown to be particularly challenging - with substantial inter......-observer variability in the histopathological diagnosis of many tumour types. Here we present a comprehensive approach for the DNA methylation-based classification of central nervous system tumours across all entities and age groups, and demonstrate its application in a routine diagnostic setting. We show...

  17. A sequence-dependent rigid-base model of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, O.; Petkevičiutė, D.; Maddocks, J. H.

    2013-02-01

    A novel hierarchy of coarse-grain, sequence-dependent, rigid-base models of B-form DNA in solution is introduced. The hierarchy depends on both the assumed range of energetic couplings, and the extent of sequence dependence of the model parameters. A significant feature of the models is that they exhibit the phenomenon of frustration: each base cannot simultaneously minimize the energy of all of its interactions. As a consequence, an arbitrary DNA oligomer has an intrinsic or pre-existing stress, with the level of this frustration dependent on the particular sequence of the oligomer. Attention is focussed on the particular model in the hierarchy that has nearest-neighbor interactions and dimer sequence dependence of the model parameters. For a Gaussian version of this model, a complete coarse-grain parameter set is estimated. The parameterized model allows, for an oligomer of arbitrary length and sequence, a simple and explicit construction of an approximation to the configuration-space equilibrium probability density function for the oligomer in solution. The training set leading to the coarse-grain parameter set is itself extracted from a recent and extensive database of a large number of independent, atomic-resolution molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of short DNA oligomers immersed in explicit solvent. The Kullback-Leibler divergence between probability density functions is used to make several quantitative assessments of our nearest-neighbor, dimer-dependent model, which is compared against others in the hierarchy to assess various assumptions pertaining both to the locality of the energetic couplings and to the level of sequence dependence of its parameters. It is also compared directly against all-atom MD simulation to assess its predictive capabilities. The results show that the nearest-neighbor, dimer-dependent model can successfully resolve sequence effects both within and between oligomers. For example, due to the presence of frustration, the model can

  18. A sequence-dependent rigid-base model of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, O; Petkevičiūtė, D; Maddocks, J H

    2013-02-07

    A novel hierarchy of coarse-grain, sequence-dependent, rigid-base models of B-form DNA in solution is introduced. The hierarchy depends on both the assumed range of energetic couplings, and the extent of sequence dependence of the model parameters. A significant feature of the models is that they exhibit the phenomenon of frustration: each base cannot simultaneously minimize the energy of all of its interactions. As a consequence, an arbitrary DNA oligomer has an intrinsic or pre-existing stress, with the level of this frustration dependent on the particular sequence of the oligomer. Attention is focussed on the particular model in the hierarchy that has nearest-neighbor interactions and dimer sequence dependence of the model parameters. For a Gaussian version of this model, a complete coarse-grain parameter set is estimated. The parameterized model allows, for an oligomer of arbitrary length and sequence, a simple and explicit construction of an approximation to the configuration-space equilibrium probability density function for the oligomer in solution. The training set leading to the coarse-grain parameter set is itself extracted from a recent and extensive database of a large number of independent, atomic-resolution molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of short DNA oligomers immersed in explicit solvent. The Kullback-Leibler divergence between probability density functions is used to make several quantitative assessments of our nearest-neighbor, dimer-dependent model, which is compared against others in the hierarchy to assess various assumptions pertaining both to the locality of the energetic couplings and to the level of sequence dependence of its parameters. It is also compared directly against all-atom MD simulation to assess its predictive capabilities. The results show that the nearest-neighbor, dimer-dependent model can successfully resolve sequence effects both within and between oligomers. For example, due to the presence of frustration, the model can

  19. Ionizing radiation sensitivity of DNA polymerase lambda-deficient cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, C.; Bertocci, B.; Begg, A.C.; Vens, C.

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces a diverse spectrum of DNA lesions, including strand breaks and oxidized bases. In mammalian cells, ionizing radiation-induced lesions are targets of non-homologous end joining, homologous recombination, and base excision repair. In vitro assays show a potential involvement

  20. DNA microarray-based PCR ribotyping of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberg, Alexander; Ehricht, Ralf; Slickers, Peter; Baier, Vico; Neubauer, Heinrich; Zimmermann, Stefan; Rabold, Denise; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Seyboldt, Christian

    2015-02-01

    This study presents a DNA microarray-based assay for fast and simple PCR ribotyping of Clostridium difficile strains. Hybridization probes were designed to query the modularly structured intergenic spacer region (ISR), which is also the template for conventional and PCR ribotyping with subsequent capillary gel electrophoresis (seq-PCR) ribotyping. The probes were derived from sequences available in GenBank as well as from theoretical ISR module combinations. A database of reference hybridization patterns was set up from a collection of 142 well-characterized C. difficile isolates representing 48 seq-PCR ribotypes. The reference hybridization patterns calculated by the arithmetic mean were compared using a similarity matrix analysis. The 48 investigated seq-PCR ribotypes revealed 27 array profiles that were clearly distinguishable. The most frequent human-pathogenic ribotypes 001, 014/020, 027, and 078/126 were discriminated by the microarray. C. difficile strains related to 078/126 (033, 045/FLI01, 078, 126, 126/FLI01, 413, 413/FLI01, 598, 620, 652, and 660) and 014/020 (014, 020, and 449) showed similar hybridization patterns, confirming their genetic relatedness, which was previously reported. A panel of 50 C. difficile field isolates was tested by seq-PCR ribotyping and the DNA microarray-based assay in parallel. Taking into account that the current version of the microarray does not discriminate some closely related seq-PCR ribotypes, all isolates were typed correctly. Moreover, seq-PCR ribotypes without reference profiles available in the database (ribotype 009 and 5 new types) were correctly recognized as new ribotypes, confirming the performance and expansion potential of the microarray. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Roles of the Amino Group of Purine Bases in the Thermodynamic Stability of DNA Base Pairing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-ichi Nakano

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The energetic aspects of hydrogen-bonded base-pair interactions are important for the design of functional nucleotide analogs and for practical applications of oligonucleotides. The present study investigated the contribution of the 2-amino group of DNA purine bases to the thermodynamic stability of oligonucleotide duplexes under different salt and solvent conditions, using 2'-deoxyriboinosine (I and 2'-deoxyribo-2,6-diaminopurine (D as non-canonical nucleotides. The stability of DNA duplexes was changed by substitution of a single base pair in the following order: G•C > D•T ≈ I•C > A•T > G•T > I•T. The apparent stabilization energy due to the presence of the 2-amino group of G and D varied depending on the salt concentration, and decreased in the water-ethanol mixed solvent. The effects of salt concentration on the thermodynamics of DNA duplexes were found to be partially sequence-dependent, and the 2-amino group of the purine bases might have an influence on the binding of ions to DNA through the formation of a stable base-paired structure. Our results also showed that physiological salt conditions were energetically favorable for complementary base recognition, and conversely, low salt concentration media and ethanol-containing solvents were effective for low stringency oligonucleotide hybridization, in the context of conditions employed in this study.

  2. Modes of DNA repair and replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawalt, P.; Kondo, S.

    1979-01-01

    Modes of DNA repair and replication require close coordination as well as some overlap of enzyme functions. Some classes of recovery deficient mutants may have defects in replication rather than repair modes. Lesions such as the pyrimidine dimers produced by ultraviolet light irradiation are the blocks to normal DNA replication in vivo and in vitro. The DNA synthesis by the DNA polymerase 1 of E. coli is blocked at one nucleotide away from the dimerized pyrimidines in template strands. Thus, some DNA polymerases seem to be unable to incorporate nucleotides opposite to the non-pairing lesions in template DNA strands. The lesions in template DNA strands may block the sequential addition of nucleotides in the synthesis of daughter strands. Normal replication utilizes a constitutive ''error-free'' mode that copies DNA templates with high fidelity, but which may be totally blocked at a lesion that obscures the appropriate base pairing specificity. It might be expected that modified replication system exhibits generally high error frequency. The error rate of DNA polymerases may be controlled by the degree of phosphorylation of the enzyme. Inducible SOS system is controlled by recA genes that also control the pathways for recombination. It is possible that SOS system involves some process other than the modification of a blocked replication apparatus to permit error-prone transdimer synthesis. (Yamashita, S.)

  3. Base excision repair of chemotherapeutically-induced alkylated DNA damage predominantly causes contractions of expanded GAA repeats associated with Friedreich's ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhao Lai

    Full Text Available Expansion of GAA·TTC repeats within the first intron of the frataxin gene is the cause of Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA, an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder. However, no effective treatment for the disease has been developed as yet. In this study, we explored a possibility of shortening expanded GAA repeats associated with FRDA through chemotherapeutically-induced DNA base lesions and subsequent base excision repair (BER. We provide the first evidence that alkylated DNA damage induced by temozolomide, a chemotherapeutic DNA damaging agent can induce massive GAA repeat contractions/deletions, but only limited expansions in FRDA patient lymphoblasts. We showed that temozolomide-induced GAA repeat instability was mediated by BER. Further characterization of BER of an abasic site in the context of (GAA20 repeats indicates that the lesion mainly resulted in a large deletion of 8 repeats along with small expansions. This was because temozolomide-induced single-stranded breaks initially led to DNA slippage and the formation of a small GAA repeat loop in the upstream region of the damaged strand and a small TTC loop on the template strand. This allowed limited pol β DNA synthesis and the formation of a short 5'-GAA repeat flap that was cleaved by FEN1, thereby leading to small repeat expansions. At a later stage of BER, the small template loop expanded into a large template loop that resulted in the formation of a long 5'-GAA repeat flap. Pol β then performed limited DNA synthesis to bypass the loop, and FEN1 removed the long repeat flap ultimately causing a large repeat deletion. Our study indicates that chemotherapeutically-induced alkylated DNA damage can induce large contractions/deletions of expanded GAA repeats through BER in FRDA patient cells. This further suggests the potential of developing chemotherapeutic alkylating agents to shorten expanded GAA repeats for treatment of FRDA.

  4. Slow elimination of injured liver DNA bases of γ-irradiated old mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaziev, A.I.; Malakhov, L.V.; Fomenko, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    The paper presents a study of the elimination of injured bases from the liver DNA of old and young mice after their exposure to γ rays. The presented data show that if DNA from the liver of irradiated mice is treated with incision enzymes, its priming activity is increased. In the case of enzymatic treatment of DNA isolated 5 h after irradiation we find a great difference between the priming activity of the liver DNA of old and young mice. The reason for this difference is that the liver DNA of 20-month old mice 5 h after irradiation still has many unrepaired injured bases. These data indicated that the rate of incision of γ-injured DNA bases in the liver of old mice is lower than in the liver of young mice. In the liver of mice of different age the rate of restitution of DNA, single-strand breaks induced by γ rays in doses up to 100 Gy is the same. At the same time, the level of induced reparative synthesis of DNA in cells of an old organism is lower than in cells of a young organism. The obtained data suggest that reduction of the rate of elimination of modified bases from the cell DNA of 20-month old mice is due to reduction of the activity of the DNA repair enzymes or to restrictions in the chromatin in the access of these enzymes to the injured regions of DNA in the cells of old animals

  5. Effect of food processing on plant DNA degradation and PCR-based GMO analysis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryson, Nicolas

    2010-03-01

    The applicability of a DNA-based method for GMO detection and quantification depends on the quality and quantity of the DNA. Important food-processing conditions, for example temperature and pH, may lead to degradation of the DNA, rendering PCR analysis impossible or GMO quantification unreliable. This review discusses the effect of several food processes on DNA degradation and subsequent GMO detection and quantification. The data show that, although many of these processes do indeed lead to the fragmentation of DNA, amplification of the DNA may still be possible. Length and composition of the amplicon may, however, affect the result, as also may the method of extraction used. Also, many techniques are used to describe the behaviour of DNA in food processing, which occasionally makes it difficult to compare research results. Further research should be aimed at defining ingredients in terms of their DNA quality and PCR amplification ability, and elaboration of matrix-specific certified reference materials.

  6. Detection of influenza A virus using carbon nanotubes field effect transistor based DNA sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thi Luyen; Nguyen, Thi Thuy; Huyen Tran, Thi Thu; Chu, Van Tuan; Thinh Tran, Quang; Tuan Mai, Anh

    2017-09-01

    The carbon nanotubes field effect transistor (CNTFET) based DNA sensor was developed, in this paper, for detection of influenza A virus DNA. Number of factors that influence the output signal and analytical results were investigated. The initial probe DNA, decides the available DNA strands on CNTs, was 10 μM. The hybridization time for defined single helix was 120 min. The hybridization temperature was set at 30 °C to get a net change in drain current of the DNA sensor without altering properties of any biological compounds. The response time of the DNA sensor was less than one minute with a high reproducibility. In addition, the DNA sensor has a wide linear detection range from 1 pM to 10 nM, and a very low detection limit of 1 pM. Finally, after 7-month storage in 7.4 pH buffer, the output signal of DNA sensor recovered 97%.

  7. DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) and Cancer Gene Therapy: Use of the Human N-mythlpurien DNA Glycosylase (MPG) to Sensitize Breast Cancer Cells to Low Dose Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harvey, Tia

    2003-01-01

    The DNA Base Excision Repair (PER) pathway is responsible for the repair of alkylation and oxidative DNA damage resulting in protection against the deleterious effects of endogenous and exogenous agents encountered on a daily basis...

  8. Comparison of human papillomavirus DNA tests, liquid-based cytology and conventional cytology for the early detection of cervix uteri cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girianelli, Vania R; Thuler, Luiz Claudio S; Szklo, Moyses; Donato, Alexandre; Zardo, Lucilia M G; Lozana, José A; Almeida Neto, Olimpio F; Carvalho, Aurenice C L; Matos, Jorge H; Figueiredo, Valeska

    2006-12-01

    To compare the performance of human papillomavirus DNA tests (samples collected by a healthcare professional and self-collected) and liquid-based cytology with conventional cytology in the detection of cervix uteri cancer and its precursor lesions. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 1777 women living in poor communities in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Eligibility criteria included ages 25-59 years and not having had a Papanicolau test within at least 3 years prior to the study. Cytology (conventional or liquid-based) and human papillomavirus DNA (collected by a healthcare professional or self-collected) tests were performed using samples collected in a single visit. Women with abnormalities in at least one test and a systematic sample of 70 women with negative test results were referred to a colposcopic examination. Test readings were double-masked, and the outcome of interest was high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or worse. The pathology report was used as the gold standard. The prevalence of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or worse was 2.0%. Human papillomavirus DNA test collected by a health professional alone or combined with conventional cytology had the highest sensitivity (91.4 and 97.1%, respectively). The highest specificity was found for conventional cytology (91.6%) and for a human papillomavirus DNA test collected by a healthcare professional (90.2%). On the basis of only test performance, the use of human papillomavirus DNA tests, alone or combined with cytology, would seem to be recommended. Its population-wide implementation, however, is conditional on a cost-effectiveness analysis.

  9. The use of gold nanoparticle aggregation for DNA computing and logic-based biomolecular detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In-Hee; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Zhang, Byoung-Tak; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Park, Ji-Yoon; Chai, Young Gyu; Lee, Jae-Hoon

    2008-01-01

    The use of DNA molecules as a physical computational material has attracted much interest, especially in the area of DNA computing. DNAs are also useful for logical control and analysis of biological systems if efficient visualization methods are available. Here we present a quick and simple visualization technique that displays the results of the DNA computing process based on a colorimetric change induced by gold nanoparticle aggregation, and we apply it to the logic-based detection of biomolecules. Our results demonstrate its effectiveness in both DNA-based logical computation and logic-based biomolecular detection

  10. Phylogeny of the Serrasalmidae (Characiformes based on mitochondrial DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Ortí

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies based on DNA sequences of mitochondrial (mt rRNA genes showed three main groups within the subfamily Serrasalminae: (1 a "pacu" clade of herbivores (Colossoma, Mylossoma, Piaractus; (2 the "Myleus" clade (Myleus, Mylesinus, Tometes, Ossubtus; and (3 the "piranha" clade (Serrasalmus, Pygocentrus, Pygopristis, Pristobrycon, Catoprion, Metynnis. The genus Acnodon was placed as the sister taxon of clade (2+3. However, poor resolution within each clade was obtained due to low levels of variation among rRNA gene sequences. Complete sequences of the hypervariable mtDNA control region for a total of 45 taxa, and additional sequences of 12S and 16S rRNA from a total of 74 taxa representing all genera in the family are now presented to address intragroup relationships. Control region sequences of several serrasalmid species exhibit tandem repeats of short motifs (12 to 33 bp in the 3' end of this region, accounting for substantial length variation. Bayesian inference and maximum parsimony analyses of these sequences identify the same groupings as before and provide further evidence to support the following observations: (a Serrasalmus gouldingi and species of Pristobrycon (non-striolatus form a monophyletic group that is the sister group to other species of Serrasalmus and Pygocentrus; (b Catoprion, Pygopristis, and Pristobrycon striolatus form a well supported clade, sister to the group described above; (c some taxa assigned to the genus Myloplus (M. asterias, M tiete, M ternetzi, and M rubripinnis form a well supported group whereas other Myloplus species remain with uncertain affinities (d Mylesinus, Tometes and Myleus setiger form a monophyletic group.

  11. DNA repair is indispensable for survival after acute inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Jennifer A.; Meira, Lisiane B.; Lee, Chun-Yue I.; Moroski-Erkul, Catherine A.; Abolhassani, Nona; Taghizadeh, Koli; Eichinger, Lindsey W.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Nordstrand, Line M.; Klungland, Arne; Samson, Leona D.

    2012-01-01

    More than 15% of cancer deaths worldwide are associated with underlying infections or inflammatory conditions, therefore understanding how inflammation contributes to cancer etiology is important for both cancer prevention and treatment. Inflamed tissues are known to harbor elevated etheno-base (ε-base) DNA lesions induced by the lipid peroxidation that is stimulated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) released from activated neutrophils and macrophages. Inflammation contributes to carcinogenesis in part via RONS-induced cytotoxic and mutagenic DNA lesions, including ε-base lesions. The mouse alkyl adenine DNA glycosylase (AAG, also known as MPG) recognizes such base lesions, thus protecting against inflammation-associated colon cancer. Two other DNA repair enzymes are known to repair ε-base lesions, namely ALKBH2 and ALKBH3; thus, we sought to determine whether these DNA dioxygenase enzymes could protect against chronic inflammation-mediated colon carcinogenesis. Using established chemically induced colitis and colon cancer models in mice, we show here that ALKBH2 and ALKBH3 provide cancer protection similar to that of the DNA glycosylase AAG. Moreover, Alkbh2 and Alkbh3 each display apparent epistasis with Aag. Surprisingly, deficiency in all 3 DNA repair enzymes confers a massively synergistic phenotype, such that animals lacking all 3 DNA repair enzymes cannot survive even a single bout of chemically induced colitis. PMID:22684101

  12. Studies of base pair sequence effects on DNA solvation based on all

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Detailed analyses of the sequence-dependent solvation and ion atmosphere of DNA are presented based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on all the 136 unique tetranucleotide steps obtained by the ABC consortium using the AMBER suite of programs. Significant sequence effects on solvation and ion localization ...

  13. Recognition of base J in duplex DNA by J-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabatini, Robert; Meeuwenoord, Nico; van Boom, Jacques H.; Borst, Piet

    2002-01-01

    beta-d-Glucosylhydroxymethyluracil, also called base J, is an unusual modified DNA base conserved among Kinetoplastida. Base J is found predominantly in repetitive DNA and correlates with epigenetic silencing of telomeric variant surface glycoprotein genes. We have previously found a J-binding

  14. Isothermal amplification of environmental DNA (eDNA for direct field-based monitoring and laboratory confirmation of Dreissena sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie R Williams

    Full Text Available Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP of aquatic invasive species environmental DNA (AIS eDNA was used for rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of Dreissena sp. relevant to the Great Lakes (USA basin. The method was validated for two uses including i direct amplification of eDNA using a hand filtration system and ii confirmation of the results after DNA extraction using a conventional thermal cycler run at isothermal temperatures. Direct amplification eliminated the need for DNA extraction and purification and allowed detection of target invasive species in grab or concentrated surface water samples, containing both free DNA as well as larger cells and particulates, such as veligers, eggs, or seeds. The direct amplification method validation was conducted using Dreissena polymorpha and Dreissena bugensis and uses up to 1 L grab water samples for high target abundance (e.g., greater than 10 veligers (larval mussels per L for Dreissena sp. or 20 L samples concentrated through 35 μm nylon screens for low target abundance, at less than 10 veligers per liter water. Surface water concentrate samples were collected over a period of three years, mostly from inland lakes in Michigan with the help of a network of volunteers. Field samples collected from 318 surface water locations included i filtered concentrate for direct amplification validation and ii 1 L grab water sample for eDNA extraction and confirmation. Though the extraction-based protocol was more sensitive (resulting in more positive detections than direct amplification, direct amplification could be used for rapid screening, allowing for quicker action times. For samples collected between May and August, results of eDNA direct amplification were consistent with known presence/absence of selected invasive species. A cross-platform smartphone application was also developed to disseminate the analyzed results to volunteers. Field tests of the direct amplification protocol using a

  15. Resection of highly language-eloquent brain lesions based purely on rTMS language mapping without awake surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ille, Sebastian; Sollmann, Nico; Butenschoen, Vicki M; Meyer, Bernhard; Ringel, Florian; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-12-01

    The resection of left-sided perisylvian brain lesions harbours the risk of postoperative language impairment. Therefore the individual patient's language distribution is investigated by intraoperative direct cortical stimulation (DCS) during awake surgery. Yet, not all patients qualify for awake surgery. Non-invasive language mapping by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has frequently shown a high correlation in comparison with the results of DCS language mapping in terms of language-negative brain regions. The present study analyses the extent of resection (EOR) and functional outcome of patients who underwent left-sided perisylvian resection of brain lesions based purely on rTMS language mapping. Four patients with left-sided perisylvian brain lesions (two gliomas WHO III, one glioblastoma, one cavernous angioma) underwent rTMS language mapping prior to surgery. Data from rTMS language mapping and rTMS-based diffusion tensor imaging fibre tracking (DTI-FT) were transferred to the intraoperative neuronavigation system. Preoperatively, 5 days after surgery (POD5), and 3 months after surgery (POM3) clinical follow-up examinations were performed. No patient suffered from a new surgery-related aphasia at POM3. Three patients underwent complete resection immediately, while one patient required a second rTMS-based resection some days later to achieve the final, complete resection. The present study shows for the first time the feasibility of successfully resecting language-eloquent brain lesions based purely on the results of negative language maps provided by rTMS language mapping and rTMS-based DTI-FT. In very select cases, this technique can provide a rescue strategy with an optimal functional outcome and EOR when awake surgery is not feasible.

  16. Enhanced Stability of DNA Nanostructures by Incorporation of Unnatural Base Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Guocheng; Wang, Ting; Fu, Jing; Li, Rujiao; Song, Linlin; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Ding, Baoquan; Chen, Fei

    2017-11-03

    Self-assembled DNA nanostructures hold great promise in the fields of nanofabrication, biosensing and nanomedicine. However, the inherent low stability of the DNA double helices, formed by weak interactions, largely hinders the assembly and functions of DNA nanostructures. In this study, we redesigned and constructed a six-arm DNA junction by incorporation of the unnatural base pairs 5-Me-isoC/isoG and A/2-thioT into the double helices. They not only retained the structural integrity of the DNA nanostructure, but also showed enhanced thermal stability and resistance to T7 Exonuclease digestion. This research may expand the applications of DNA nanostructures in nanofabrication and biomedical fields, and furthermore, the genetic alphabet expansion with unnatural base pairs may enable us to construct more complicated and diversified self-assembled DNA nanostructures. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. DNA methylation-based classification of central nervous system tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capper, David; Jones, David T W; Sill, Martin; Hovestadt, Volker; Schrimpf, Daniel; Sturm, Dominik; Koelsche, Christian; Sahm, Felix; Chavez, Lukas; Reuss, David E; Kratz, Annekathrin; Wefers, Annika K; Huang, Kristin; Pajtler, Kristian W; Schweizer, Leonille; Stichel, Damian; Olar, Adriana; Engel, Nils W; Lindenberg, Kerstin; Harter, Patrick N; Braczynski, Anne K; Plate, Karl H; Dohmen, Hildegard; Garvalov, Boyan K; Coras, Roland; Hölsken, Annett; Hewer, Ekkehard; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Schick, Matthias; Fischer, Roger; Beschorner, Rudi; Schittenhelm, Jens; Staszewski, Ori; Wani, Khalida; Varlet, Pascale; Pages, Melanie; Temming, Petra; Lohmann, Dietmar; Selt, Florian; Witt, Hendrik; Milde, Till; Witt, Olaf; Aronica, Eleonora; Giangaspero, Felice; Rushing, Elisabeth; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Geisenberger, Christoph; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Becker, Albert; Preusser, Matthias; Haberler, Christine; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Cryan, Jane; Farrell, Michael; Deckert, Martina; Hench, Jürgen; Frank, Stephan; Serrano, Jonathan; Kannan, Kasthuri; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Brück, Wolfgang; Hofer, Silvia; Brehmer, Stefanie; Seiz-Rosenhagen, Marcel; Hänggi, Daniel; Hans, Volkmar; Rozsnoki, Stephanie; Hansford, Jordan R; Kohlhof, Patricia; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Lechner, Matt; Lopes, Beatriz; Mawrin, Christian; Ketter, Ralf; Kulozik, Andreas; Khatib, Ziad; Heppner, Frank; Koch, Arend; Jouvet, Anne; Keohane, Catherine; Mühleisen, Helmut; Mueller, Wolf; Pohl, Ute; Prinz, Marco; Benner, Axel; Zapatka, Marc; Gottardo, Nicholas G; Driever, Pablo Hernáiz; Kramm, Christof M; Müller, Hermann L; Rutkowski, Stefan; von Hoff, Katja; Frühwald, Michael C; Gnekow, Astrid; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Tippelt, Stephan; Calaminus, Gabriele; Monoranu, Camelia-Maria; Perry, Arie; Jones, Chris; Jacques, Thomas S; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Gessi, Marco; Pietsch, Torsten; Schramm, Johannes; Schackert, Gabriele; Westphal, Manfred; Reifenberger, Guido; Wesseling, Pieter; Weller, Michael; Collins, Vincent Peter; Blümcke, Ingmar; Bendszus, Martin; Debus, Jürgen; Huang, Annie; Jabado, Nada; Northcott, Paul A; Paulus, Werner; Gajjar, Amar; Robinson, Giles W; Taylor, Michael D; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Ryzhova, Marina; Platten, Michael; Unterberg, Andreas; Wick, Wolfgang; Karajannis, Matthias A; Mittelbronn, Michel; Acker, Till; Hartmann, Christian; Aldape, Kenneth; Schüller, Ulrich; Buslei, Rolf; Lichter, Peter; Kool, Marcel; Herold-Mende, Christel; Ellison, David W; Hasselblatt, Martin; Snuderl, Matija; Brandner, Sebastian; Korshunov, Andrey; von Deimling, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M

    2018-03-22

    Accurate pathological diagnosis is crucial for optimal management of patients with cancer. For the approximately 100 known tumour types of the central nervous system, standardization of the diagnostic process has been shown to be particularly challenging-with substantial inter-observer variability in the histopathological diagnosis of many tumour types. Here we present a comprehensive approach for the DNA methylation-based classification of central nervous system tumours across all entities and age groups, and demonstrate its application in a routine diagnostic setting. We show that the availability of this method may have a substantial impact on diagnostic precision compared to standard methods, resulting in a change of diagnosis in up to 12% of prospective cases. For broader accessibility, we have designed a free online classifier tool, the use of which does not require any additional onsite data processing. Our results provide a blueprint for the generation of machine-learning-based tumour classifiers across other cancer entities, with the potential to fundamentally transform tumour pathology.

  18. Spectral embedding based active contour (SEAC) for lesion segmentation on breast dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agner, Shannon C; Xu, Jun; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-03-01

    Segmentation of breast lesions on dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the first step in lesion diagnosis in a computer-aided diagnosis framework. Because manual segmentation of such lesions is both time consuming and highly susceptible to human error and issues of reproducibility, an automated lesion segmentation method is highly desirable. Traditional automated image segmentation methods such as boundary-based active contour (AC) models require a strong gradient at the lesion boundary. Even when region-based terms are introduced to an AC model, grayscale image intensities often do not allow for clear definition of foreground and background region statistics. Thus, there is a need to find alternative image representations that might provide (1) strong gradients at the margin of the object of interest (OOI); and (2) larger separation between intensity distributions and region statistics for the foreground and background, which are necessary to halt evolution of the AC model upon reaching the border of the OOI. In this paper, the authors introduce a spectral embedding (SE) based AC (SEAC) for lesion segmentation on breast DCE-MRI. SE, a nonlinear dimensionality reduction scheme, is applied to the DCE time series in a voxelwise fashion to reduce several time point images to a single parametric image where every voxel is characterized by the three dominant eigenvectors. This parametric eigenvector image (PrEIm) representation allows for better capture of image region statistics and stronger gradients for use with a hybrid AC model, which is driven by both boundary and region information. They compare SEAC to ACs that employ fuzzy c-means (FCM) and principal component analysis (PCA) as alternative image representations. Segmentation performance was evaluated by boundary and region metrics as well as comparing lesion classification using morphological features from SEAC, PCA+AC, and FCM+AC. On a cohort of 50 breast DCE-MRI studies, Pr

  19. High Interlaboratory Reprocucibility of DNA Sequence-based Typing of Bacteria in a Multicenter Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sousa, MA de; Boye, Kit; Lencastre, H de

    2006-01-01

    Current DNA amplification-based typing methods for bacterial pathogens often lack interlaboratory reproducibility. In this international study, DNA sequence-based typing of the Staphylococcus aureus protein A gene (spa, 110 to 422 bp) showed 100% intra- and interlaboratory reproducibility without...... extensive harmonization of protocols for 30 blind-coded S. aureus DNA samples sent to 10 laboratories. Specialized software for automated sequence analysis ensured a common typing nomenclature....

  20. Use of capillary GC-MS for identification of radiation-induced DNA base damage: Implications for base-excision repair of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dizdaroglu, M.

    1985-01-01

    Application of GC-MS to characterization of radiation-induced base products of DNA and DNa base-amino acid crosslinks is presented. Samples of γ-irradiated DNa were hydrolyzed with formic acid, trimethylsilylated and subjected to GC-MS analysis using a fused silica capillary column. Hydrolysis conditions suitable for the simultaneous analysis of the radiation-induced products of all four DNA bases in a single run were determined. The trimethylsilyl derivatives of these products had excellent GC-properties and easily interpretable mass spectra. The complementary use of t-butyldimetylsilyl derivatives was also demonstrated. Moreover, the usefulness of this method for identification of radiation-induced DNA base-amino acid crosslinks was shown using γ-irradiated mixtures of thymine and tyrosine or phenylalanine. Because of the excellent resolving power of capillary GC and the instant and highly sensitive identification by MS, GC-MS is suggested as a suitable technique for identification of altered bases removed from DNA by base-excision repair enzymes

  1. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: Match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to biotic condition assessment and non-native species early-detection monitoring. However, the abi...

  2. Influence of DNA isolation on Q-PCR-based quantification of methanogenic Archaea in biogas fermenters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, I; Mundt, K; Sontag, M; Baumstark, I; Nettmann, E; Klocke, M

    2010-03-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) is commonly applied for the detection of certain microorganisms in environmental samples. However, some environments, like biomass-degrading biogas fermenters, are enriched with PCR-interfering substances. To study the impact of the DNA extraction protocol on the results of Q-PCR-based analysis of the methane-producing archaeal community in biogas fermenters, nine different protocols with varying cell disruption and DNA purification approaches were tested. Differences in the quantities of the isolated DNA and the purity parameters were found, with the best cell lysis efficiencies being obtained by a combined lysozyme/SDS-based lysis. When DNA was purified by sephacryl columns, the amount of DNA decreased by one log cycle but PCR inhibitors were eliminated sufficiently. In the case of detection of methanogenic Archaea, the chosen DNA isolation protocol strongly influenced the Q-PCR-based determination of 16S rDNA copy numbers. For example, with protocols including mechanical cell disruption, the 16S rDNA of Methanobacteriales were predominantly amplified (81-90% of the total 16S rDNA copy numbers), followed by the 16S rDNA of Methanomicrobiales (9-18%). In contrast, when a lysozyme/SDS-based cell lysis was applied, the 16S rDNA copy numbers determined for these two orders were the opposite (Methanomicrobiales 82-95%, Methanobacteriales 4-18%). In extreme cases, the DNA isolation method led to discrimination of some groups of methanogens (e.g. members of the Methanosaetaceae). In conclusion, for extraction of high amounts of microbial DNA with high purity from samples of biogas plants, a combined lysozyme/SDS-based cell lysis followed by a purification step with sephacryl columns is recommended. Copyright 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Visualization of complex DNA damage along accelerated ions tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Elena; Boreyko, Alla; Bulanova, Tatiana; Ježková, Lucie; Zadneprianetc, Mariia; Smirnova, Elena

    2018-04-01

    The most deleterious DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation are clustered DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Clustered or complex DNA damage is a combination of a few simple lesions (single-strand breaks, base damage etc.) within one or two DNA helix turns. It is known that yield of complex DNA lesions increases with increasing linear energy transfer (LET) of radiation. For investigation of the induction and repair of complex DNA lesions, human fibroblasts were irradiated with high-LET 15N ions (LET = 183.3 keV/μm, E = 13MeV/n) and low-LET 60Co γ-rays (LET ≈ 0.3 keV/μm) radiation. DNA DSBs (γH2AX and 53BP1) and base damage (OGG1) markers were visualized by immunofluorecence staining and high-resolution microscopy. The obtained results showed slower repair kinetics of induced DSBs in cells irradiated with accelerated ions compared to 60Co γ-rays, indicating induction of more complex DNA damage. Confirming previous assumptions, detailed 3D analysis of γH2AX/53BP1 foci in 15N ions tracks revealed more complicated structure of the foci in contrast to γ-rays. It was shown that proteins 53BP1 and OGG1 involved in repair of DNA DSBs and modified bases, respectively, were colocalized in tracks of 15N ions and thus represented clustered DNA DSBs.

  4. A Method for Extracting Suspected Parotid Lesions in CT Images using Feature-based Segmentation and Active Contours based on Stationary Wavelet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T. Y.; Lin, S. F.

    2013-10-01

    Automatic suspected lesion extraction is an important application in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). In this paper, we propose a method to automatically extract the suspected parotid regions for clinical evaluation in head and neck CT images. The suspected lesion tissues in low contrast tissue regions can be localized with feature-based segmentation (FBS) based on local texture features, and can be delineated with accuracy by modified active contour models (ACM). At first, stationary wavelet transform (SWT) is introduced. The derived wavelet coefficients are applied to derive the local features for FBS, and to generate enhanced energy maps for ACM computation. Geometric shape features (GSFs) are proposed to analyze each soft tissue region segmented by FBS; the regions with higher similarity GSFs with the lesions are extracted and the information is also applied as the initial conditions for fine delineation computation. Consequently, the suspected lesions can be automatically localized and accurately delineated for aiding clinical diagnosis. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing with the results outlined by clinical experts. The experiments on 20 pathological CT data sets show that the true-positive (TP) rate on recognizing parotid lesions is about 94%, and the dimension accuracy of delineation results can also approach over 93%.

  5. Novel DNA sequence detection method based on fluorescence energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Tamiya, E.; Karube, I.

    1987-01-01

    Recently the detection of specific DNA sequence, DNA analysis, has been becoming more important for diagnosis of viral genomes causing infections disease and human sequences related to inherited disorders. These methods typically involve electrophoresis, the immobilization of DNA on a solid support, hybridization to a complementary probe, the detection using labeled with /sup 32/P or nonisotopically with a biotin-avidin-enzyme system, and so on. These techniques are highly effective, but they are very time-consuming and expensive. A principle of fluorescene energy transfer is that the light energy from an excited donor (fluorophore) is transferred to an acceptor (fluorophore), if the acceptor exists in the vicinity of the donor and the excitation spectrum of donor overlaps the emission spectrum of acceptor. In this study, the fluorescence energy transfer was applied to the detection of specific DNA sequence using the hybridization method. The analyte, single-stranded DNA labeled with the donor fluorophore is hybridized to a probe DNA labeled with the acceptor. Because of the complementary DNA duplex formation, two fluorophores became to be closed to each other, and the fluorescence energy transfer was occurred

  6. Microcantilver-based DNA hybridization sensors for Salmonella identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ricciardi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The detection of pathogenic microorganisms in foods remains a challenging since the safety of foodstuffs has to be ensured by the food producing companies. Conventional methods for the detection and identification of bacteria mainly rely on specific microbiological and biochemical identification. Biomolecular methods, are commonly used as a support for traditional techniques, thanks to their high sensitivity, specificity and not excessive costs. However, new methods like biosensors for example, can be an exciting alternative to the more traditional tecniques for the detection of pathogens in food. In this study we report Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis DNA detection through a novel class of label-free biosensors: microcantilevers (MCs. In general, MCs can operate as a microbalance and is used to detect the mass of the entities anchored to the cantilever surface using the decrease in the resonant frequency. We use DNA hybridization as model reaction system and for this reason, specific single stranded probe DNA of the pathogen and three different DNA targets (single-stranded complementary DNA, PCR product and serial dilutions of DNA extracted from S. Enteritidis strains were applied. Two protocols were reported in order to allow the probe immobilization on cantilever surface: i MC surface was functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and glutaraldehyde and an amino-modified DNA probe was used; ii gold-coated sensors and thiolated DNA probes were used in order to generate a covalent bonding (Th-Au. For the first one, measures after hybridization with the PCR product showed related frequency shift 10 times higher than hybridization with complementary probe and detectable signals were obtained at the concentrations of 103 and 106 cfu/mL after hybridization with bacterial DNA. There are currently optimizations of the second protocol, where preliminary results have shown to be more uniform and therefore more precise within each of the

  7. DNAzyme-Based Logic Gate-Mediated DNA Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Shuoxing; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-13

    Controlling DNA self-assembly processes using rationally designed logic gates is a major goal of DNA-based nanotechnology and programming. Such controls could facilitate the hierarchical engineering of complex nanopatterns responding to various molecular triggers or inputs. Here, we demonstrate the use of a series of DNAzyme-based logic gates to control DNA tile self-assembly onto a prescribed DNA origami frame. Logic systems such as "YES," "OR," "AND," and "logic switch" are implemented based on DNAzyme-mediated tile recognition with the DNA origami frame. DNAzyme is designed to play two roles: (1) as an intermediate messenger to motivate downstream reactions and (2) as a final trigger to report fluorescent signals, enabling information relay between the DNA origami-framed tile assembly and fluorescent signaling. The results of this study demonstrate the plausibility of DNAzyme-mediated hierarchical self-assembly and provide new tools for generating dynamic and responsive self-assembly systems.

  8. EVOLUTIONARY RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN 4 SPECIES OF CLADOPHORA (CLADOPHORALES, CHLOROPHYTA) BASED ON DNA-DNA HYBRIDIZATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOT, PVM; BRUSSAARD, CPD; STAM, WT; VANDENHOEK, C

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of the reassociation kinetics of the DNA from Cladophora pellucida (Huds.) Kutz. indicates that the genome of this benthic alga is comprised of approximately 75% repetitive sequences. Single-copy sequences reassociated with a rate constant of 1.8 x 10(-3) M-1.s-1, which corresponds to a

  9. Comparison of the diagnostic value of cervical cytology and HPV HR DNA testing for the diagnosis of low-grade and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions across different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Pruski, Dominik; Iwaniec, Kinga; Kędzia, Witold

    2017-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of cervical cytology and HPV HR DNA testing for the diagnosis of low grade and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions across different age groups. The study included 1103 patients, age 25-70 years. All patients underwent in-depth diagnostic tests following either an abnormal Pap test result or a clinically suspicious cervical lesion. In all women the following examinations were performed: a molecular test detecting 14 high-risk types of HPV, a colposcopy examination, as well as directed-biopsy of the cervix. The studied population was subdivided into four age groups. It was observed that the percentage of high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and cancers increased with women's age. Sensitivity of both methods for detecting high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions was highest for women aged 40-49 years. Sensitivity values of HPV testing was higher than that of cervical cytology among women under age 50. Specificity of HPV testing increased significantly with age of women and was several fold higher across all age groups than the specificity of cervical cytology.

  10. Electron accommodation dynamics in the DNA base thymine

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Sarah B.; Stephansen, Anne B.; Yokoi, Yuki; Yandell, Margaret A.; Kunin, Alice; Takayanagi, Toshiyuki; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of electron attachment to the DNA base thymine are investigated using femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging of the gas phase iodide-thymine (I-T) complex. An ultraviolet pump pulse ejects an electron from the iodide and prepares an iodine-thymine temporary negative ion that is photodetached with a near-IR probe pulse. The resulting photoelectrons are analyzed with velocity-map imaging. At excitation energies ranging from -120 meV to +90 meV with respect to the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of 4.05 eV for I-T, both the dipole-bound and valence-bound negative ions of thymine are observed. A slightly longer rise time for the valence-bound state than the dipole-bound state suggests that some of the dipole-bound anions convert to valence-bound species. No evidence is seen for a dipole-bound anion of thymine at higher excitation energies, in the range of 0.6 eV above the I-T VDE, which suggests that if the dipole-bound anion acts as a "doorway" to the valence-bound anion, it only does so at excitation energies near the VDE of the complex.

  11. Electron accommodation dynamics in the DNA base thymine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Sarah B.; Yandell, Margaret A.; Kunin, Alice [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Stephansen, Anne B. [Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 København Ø (Denmark); Yokoi, Yuki; Takayanagi, Toshiyuki [Department of Chemistry, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama City, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Neumark, Daniel M., E-mail: dneumark@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-07-14

    The dynamics of electron attachment to the DNA base thymine are investigated using femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging of the gas phase iodide-thymine (I{sup −}T) complex. An ultraviolet pump pulse ejects an electron from the iodide and prepares an iodine-thymine temporary negative ion that is photodetached with a near-IR probe pulse. The resulting photoelectrons are analyzed with velocity-map imaging. At excitation energies ranging from −120 meV to +90 meV with respect to the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of 4.05 eV for I{sup −}T, both the dipole-bound and valence-bound negative ions of thymine are observed. A slightly longer rise time for the valence-bound state than the dipole-bound state suggests that some of the dipole-bound anions convert to valence-bound species. No evidence is seen for a dipole-bound anion of thymine at higher excitation energies, in the range of 0.6 eV above the I{sup −}T VDE, which suggests that if the dipole-bound anion acts as a “doorway” to the valence-bound anion, it only does so at excitation energies near the VDE of the complex.

  12. DNA Damage and Base Excision Repair in Mitochondria and Their Role in Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Gredilla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, our knowledge about the processes involved in the aging process has exponentially increased. However, further investigation will be still required to globally understand the complexity of aging. Aging is a multifactorial phenomenon characterized by increased susceptibility to cellular loss and functional decline, where mitochondrial DNA mutations and mitochondrial DNA damage response are thought to play important roles. Due to the proximity of mitochondrial DNA to the main sites of mitochondrial-free radical generation, oxidative stress is a major source of mitochondrial DNA mutations. Mitochondrial DNA repair mechanisms, in particular the base excision repair pathway, constitute an important mechanism for maintenance of mitochondrial DNA integrity. The results reviewed here support that mitochondrial DNA damage plays an important role in aging.

  13. Solvent effects on hydrogen bonds in Watson-Crick, mismatched, and modified DNA base pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poater, Jordi; Swart, Marcel; Guerra, Celia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias

    2012-01-01

    We have theoretically analyzed a complete series of Watson–Crick and mismatched DNA base pairs, both in gas phase and in solution. Solvation causes a weakening and lengthening of the hydrogen bonds between the DNA bases because of the stabilization of the lone pairs involved in these bonds. We have

  14. Gold-based optical biosensor for single-mismatched DNA detection using salt-induced hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Zongrui; Ma, Xingyi; Cao, Cuong

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a gold nanoparticle (Au-NP)-based detection method for sensitive and specific DNA-based diagnostic applications is described. A sandwich format consisting of Au-NPs/DNA/PMP (Streptavidin-coated MagnetSphere Para-Magnetic Particles) was fabricated. PMPs captured and separated target...

  15. Electrochemical DNA biosensor based on grafting-to mode of terminal deoxynucleoside transferase-mediated extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyuan; Liu, Zhoujie; Peng, Huaping; Zheng, Yanjie; Lin, Zhen; Liu, Ailin; Chen, Wei; Lin, Xinhua

    2017-12-15

    Previously reported electrochemical DNA biosensors based on in-situ polymerization approach reveal that terminal deoxynucleoside transferase (TdTase) has good amplifying performance and promising application in the design of electrochemical DNA biosensor. However, this method, in which the background is significantly affected by the amount of TdTase, suffers from being easy to produce false positive result and poor stability. Herein, we firstly present a novel electrochemical DNA biosensor based on grafting-to mode of TdTase-mediated extension, in which DNA targets are polymerized in homogeneous solution and then hybridized with DNA probes on BSA-based DNA carrier platform. It is surprising to find that the background in the grafting-to mode of TdTase-based electrochemical DNA biosensor have little interference from the employed TdTase. Most importantly, the proposed electrochemical DNA biosensor shows greatly improved detection performance over the in-situ polymerization approach-based electrochemical DNA biosensor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Biological effects of DNA repair, including mutagenesis. Progress report, August 15, 1982-August 1, 1983. COO-3571-23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, F.

    1983-01-01

    The research supported by this contract for the period covered by this report has concerned mechanisms in mutagenesis. Specifically, the work has been aimed at determining the lesions in DNA formed by particular mutagenic agents which lead to mutations, and to characterization of the pathways by which these lesions lead to changes in the sequence of bases in the genomic DNA

  17. Involvement of DNA polymerase beta in repair of ionizing radiation damage as measured by in vitro plasmid assays.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vens, C.; Hofland, I.; Begg, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Characteristic of damage introduced in DNA by ionizing radiation is the induction of a wide range of lesions. Single-strand breaks (SSBs) and base damages outnumber double-strand breaks (DSBs). If unrepaired, these lesions can lead to DSBs and increased mutagenesis. XRCC1 and DNA polymerase beta

  18. Lesion activity assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrand, K R; Zero, D T; Martignon, S

    2009-01-01

    in response to cariogenic plaque as well as lesion arrest. Based on this understanding, different clinical scoring systems have been developed to assess the severity/depth and activity of lesions. A recent system has been devised by the International Caries Detection and Assessment System Committee...

  19. comparison between dna-based, pomological and chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... of extra virgin olive oil and consequently for better marketing. Habitually, the ... Several molecular marker techniques such as random amplified .... negatively correlated to the rate of unsaponifiable matter. .... DNA Extraction.

  20. Phylogenetic relationships of the Gomphales based on nuc-25S-rDNA, mit-12S-rDNA, and mit-atp6-DNA combined sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admir J. Giachini; Kentaro Hosaka; Eduardo Nouhra; Joseph Spatafora; James M. Trappe

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among Geastrales, Gomphales, Hysterangiales, and Phallales were estimated via combined sequences: nuclear large subunit ribosomal DNA (nuc-25S-rDNA), mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal DNA (mit-12S-rDNA), and mitochondrial atp6 DNA (mit-atp6-DNA). Eighty-one taxa comprising 19 genera and 58 species...

  1. Repair of endogenous and ionizing radiation-induced DNA damages: mechanisms and biological functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiteux, S.

    2002-01-01

    The cellular DNA is continuously exposed to endogenous and exogenous stress. Oxidative stress due to cellular metabolism is the major cause of endogenous DNA damage. On the other hand, ionizing radiation (IR) is an important exogenous stress. Both induce similar DNA damages: damaged bases, abasic sites and strand breakage. Most of these lesions are lethal and/or mutagenic. The survival of the cell is managed by efficient and accurate DNA repair mechanisms that remove lesions before their replication or transcription. DNA repair pathways involved in the removal of IR-induced lesions are briefly described. Base excision repair (BER) is mostly involved in the removal of base damage, abasic sites and single strand breaks. In contrast, DNA double strand breaks are mostly repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). How DNA repair pathways prevent cancer process is also discussed. (author)

  2. DNA hydrogel-based supercapacitors operating in physiological fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Hur, Jaehyun; Im, Kyuhyun; Hwang, Sekyu; Choi, ByoungLyong; Kim, Sungjee; Hwang, Sungwoo; Park, Nokyoung; Kim, Kinam

    2013-01-01

    DNA nanostructures have been attractive due to their structural properties resulting in many important breakthroughs especially in controlled assemblies and many biological applications. Here, we report a unique energy storage device which is a supercapacitor that uses nanostructured DNA hydrogel (Dgel) as a template and layer-by-layer (LBL)-deposited polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) as conductors. Our device, named as PEM-Dgel supercapacitor, showed excellent performance in direct contact ...

  3. Slow elimination of DNA damaged bases in the liver of old gamma-irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaziev, A I; Malakhova, L V; Fomenko, L A [AN SSSR, Pushchino-na-Oke. Inst. Biologicheskoj Fiziki

    1981-01-01

    Elimination of the DNA damaged bases in the liver of old and young mice after their gamma-irradiation is studied. It is established that the incision rate of DNA gamma-damaged bases in the liver of old mice is lower than in the liver of the young ones. It is supposed to be connected with the decrease of the activity of DNA reparation ferments or with the presence of limitations in chromatin for the access of these ferments to the damaged parts of DNA in the cells of old animals.

  4. DNA origami-based standards for quantitative fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmied, Jürgen J; Raab, Mario; Forthmann, Carsten; Pibiri, Enrico; Wünsch, Bettina; Dammeyer, Thorben; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Validating and testing a fluorescence microscope or a microscopy method requires defined samples that can be used as standards. DNA origami is a new tool that provides a framework to place defined numbers of small molecules such as fluorescent dyes or proteins in a programmed geometry with nanometer precision. The flexibility and versatility in the design of DNA origami microscopy standards makes them ideally suited for the broad variety of emerging super-resolution microscopy methods. As DNA origami structures are durable and portable, they can become a universally available specimen to check the everyday functionality of a microscope. The standards are immobilized on a glass slide, and they can be imaged without further preparation and can be stored for up to 6 months. We describe a detailed protocol for the design, production and use of DNA origami microscopy standards, and we introduce a DNA origami rectangle, bundles and a nanopillar as fluorescent nanoscopic rulers. The protocol provides procedures for the design and realization of fluorescent marks on DNA origami structures, their production and purification, quality control, handling, immobilization, measurement and data analysis. The procedure can be completed in 1-2 d.

  5. A DNA-based nanomechanical device with three robust states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Banani; Sha, Ruojie; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2008-11-11

    DNA has been used to build a variety of devices, ranging from those that are controlled by DNA structural transitions to those that are controlled by the addition of specific DNA strands. These sequence-dependent devices fulfill the promise of DNA in nanotechnology because a variety of devices in the same physical environment can be controlled individually. Many such devices have been reported, but most of them contain one or two structurally robust end states, in addition to a floppy intermediate or even a floppy end state. We describe a system in which three different structurally robust end states can be obtained, all resulting from the addition of different set strands to a single floppy intermediate. This system is an extension of the PX-JX(2) DNA device. The three states are related to each other by three different motions, a twofold rotation, a translation of approximately 2.1-2.5 nm, and a twofold screw rotation, which combines these two motions. We demonstrate the transitions by gel electrophoresis, by fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and by atomic force microscopy. The control of this system by DNA strands opens the door to trinary logic and to systems containing N devices that are able to attain 3(N) structural states.

  6. Laryngeal giant cell tumour presenting as a tongue base lesion causing severe dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Razi M. Saud, MBBS

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available الملخص: أورام الخلايا العملاقة هي آفات حميدة وغير مألوفة تظهر في الحنجرة. قد يصاب المريض بصعوبة في البلع، وبحة في الصوت وتورم في الجهة الأمامية من الرقبة. أورام الخلايا العملاقة هي نادرة للغاية، وهناك حالات قليلة في الأدبيات المنشورة. نعرض لحالة إمرأة مسنة قدمت بصعوبة شديدة في البلع، وورم في قاعدة اللسان. أظهرت نتيجة الورم بأنه ورم الخلايا العملاقة في الحنجرة وتم علاجه بنجاح باستخدام المعالجة الكيميائية. Abstract: Giant cell tumours are benign lesions that are uncommonly found in the larynx. Patients with these tumours may present with dysphagia, hoarseness and anterior neck swelling. Giant cell tumours are extremely rare and only a few cases have been reported. We present a case of an elderly woman who presented with severe dysphagia and a mass at the base of her tongue. The mass was found to be a laryngeal giant cell tumour and was successfully treated with chemotherapy. الكلمات المفتاحية: أورام الخلايا العملاقة, الحنجرة, صعوبة البلع, دينوسوماب, المعالجة الكيميائية, Keywords: Chemotherapy, Denosumab, Dysphagia, Giant cell tumour, Larynx

  7. DENA: A Configurable Microarchitecture and Design Flow for Biomedical DNA-Based Logic Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiki, Zohre; Jahanian, Ali

    2017-10-01

    DNA is known as the building block for storing the life codes and transferring the genetic features through the generations. However, it is found that DNA strands can be used for a new type of computation that opens fascinating horizons in computational medicine. Significant contributions are addressed on design of DNA-based logic gates for medical and computational applications but there are serious challenges for designing the medium and large-scale DNA circuits. In this paper, a new microarchitecture and corresponding design flow is proposed to facilitate the design of multistage large-scale DNA logic systems. Feasibility and efficiency of the proposed microarchitecture are evaluated by implementing a full adder and, then, its cascadability is determined by implementing a multistage 8-bit adder. Simulation results show the highlight features of the proposed design style and microarchitecture in terms of the scalability, implementation cost, and signal integrity of the DNA-based logic system compared to the traditional approaches.

  8. Research on Image Encryption Based on DNA Sequence and Chaos Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian Zhang, Tian; Yan, Shan Jun; Gu, Cheng Yan; Ren, Ran; Liao, Kai Xin

    2018-04-01

    Nowadays encryption is a common technique to protect image data from unauthorized access. In recent years, many scientists have proposed various encryption algorithms based on DNA sequence to provide a new idea for the design of image encryption algorithm. Therefore, a new method of image encryption based on DNA computing technology is proposed in this paper, whose original image is encrypted by DNA coding and 1-D logistic chaotic mapping. First, the algorithm uses two modules as the encryption key. The first module uses the real DNA sequence, and the second module is made by one-dimensional logistic chaos mapping. Secondly, the algorithm uses DNA complementary rules to encode original image, and uses the key and DNA computing technology to compute each pixel value of the original image, so as to realize the encryption of the whole image. Simulation results show that the algorithm has good encryption effect and security.

  9. Label-free DNA biosensor based on resistance change of platinum nanoparticles assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotadis, Evangelos; Voutyras, Konstantinos; Chatzipetrou, Marianneza; Tsekenis, Georgios; Patsiouras, Lampros; Madianos, Leonidas; Chatzandroulis, Stavros; Zergioti, Ioanna; Tsoukalas, Dimitris

    2016-07-15

    A novel nanoparticle based biosensor for the fast and simple detection of DNA hybridization events is presented. The sensor utilizes hybridized DNA's charge transport properties, combining them with metallic nanoparticle networks that act as nano-gapped electrodes. The DNA hybridization events can be detected by a significant reduction in the sensor's resistance due to the conductive bridging offered by hybridized DNA. By modifying the nanoparticle surface coverage, which can be controlled experimentally being a function of deposition time, and the structural properties of the electrodes, an optimized biosensor for the in situ detection of DNA hybridization events is ultimately fabricated. The fabricated biosensor exhibits a wide response range, covering four orders of magnitude, a limit of detection of 1nM and can detect a single base pair mismatch between probe and complementary DNA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Rad10 exhibits lesion-dependent genetic requirements for recruitment to DNA double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Destaye M; Karlin, Justin; González-Barrera, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Rad1-Rad10 protein complex participates in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and homologous recombination (HR). During HR, the Rad1-Rad10 endonuclease cleaves 3' branches of DNA and aberrant 3' DNA ends that are refractory to other 3' processing enzymes. ...

  11. All-Atom Polarizable Force Field for DNA Based on the Classical Drude Oscillator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Presented is a first generation atomistic force field for DNA in which electronic polarization is modeled based on the classical Drude oscillator formalism. The DNA model is based on parameters for small molecules representative of nucleic acids, including alkanes, ethers, dimethylphosphate, and the nucleic acid bases and empirical adjustment of key dihedral parameters associated with the phosphodiester backbone, glycosidic linkages and sugar moiety of DNA. Our optimization strategy is based on achieving a compromise between satisfying the properties of the underlying model compounds in the gas phase targeting QM data and reproducing a number of experimental properties of DNA duplexes in the condensed phase. The resulting Drude force field yields stable DNA duplexes on the 100 ns time scale and satisfactorily reproduces (1) the equilibrium between A and B forms of DNA and (2) transitions between the BI and BII sub-states of B form DNA. Consistency with the gas phase QM data for the model compounds is significantly better for the Drude model as compared to the CHARMM36 additive force field, which is suggested to be due to the improved response of the model to changes in the environment associated with the explicit inclusion of polarizability. Analysis of dipole moments associated with the nucleic acid bases shows the Drude model to have significantly larger values than those present in CHARMM36, with the dipoles of individual bases undergoing significant variations during the MD simulations. Additionally, the dipole moment of water was observed to be perturbed in the grooves of DNA. PMID:24752978

  12. Investigation of the charge effect on the electrochemical transduction in a quinone-based DNA sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisberg, S.; Piro, B.; Noel, V.

    2008-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism involved in the electrochemical transduction process of a conducting polymer-based DNA sensor, peptide nucleic acids (PNA) were used. PNA are DNA analogues having similar hybridization properties but are neutral. This allows to discriminate the electrostatic effect of D...... strands from the steric hindrance generated on the bioelectrode upon hybridization. It can be concluded that DNA conformational changes are determinant in the transduction process and that the electrostatic effect is negligible....

  13. DNA methylation-based variation between human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader, Farzeen; Ghai, Meenu

    2017-02-01

    Several studies have proved that DNA methylation affects regulation of gene expression and development. Epigenome-wide studies have reported variation in methylation patterns between populations, including Caucasians, non-Caucasians (Blacks), Hispanics, Arabs, and numerous populations of the African continent. Not only has DNA methylation differences shown to impact externally visible characteristics, but is also a potential biomarker for underlying racial health disparities between human populations. Ethnicity-related methylation differences set their mark during early embryonic development. Genetic variations, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms and environmental factors, such as age, dietary folate, socioeconomic status, and smoking, impacts DNA methylation levels, which reciprocally impacts expression of phenotypes. Studies show that it is necessary to address these external influences when attempting to differentiate between populations since the relative impacts of these factors on the human methylome remain uncertain. The present review summarises several reported attempts to establish the contribution of differential DNA methylation to natural human variation, and shows that DNA methylation could represent new opportunities for risk stratification and prevention of several diseases amongst populations world-wide. Variation of methylation patterns between human populations is an exciting prospect which inspires further valuable research to apply the concept in routine medical and forensic casework. However, trans-generational inheritance needs to be quantified to decipher the proportion of variation contributed by DNA methylation. The future holds thorough evaluation of the epigenome to understand quantification, heritability, and the effect of DNA methylation on phenotypes. In addition, methylation profiling of the same ethnic groups across geographical locations will shed light on conserved methylation differences in populations.

  14. World wide web-based cytological analysis of atypical squamous cells cannot exclude high-grade intraepithelial lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washiya, Kiyotada; Takamizu, Ryuichi; Kumagai, Yukie; Himeji, Yukari; Kobayashi, Takako; Iwai, Muneo; Watanabe, Jun

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that the low level of consistency of diagnosis of atypical squamous cells cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASC-H) in uterine cervical cancer screening using the Bethesda System, indicating the necessity of a large-scale survey. We presented cases cytologically judged as ASC-H on our website and invited our members to give their opinions regarding the diagnosis by voting online. The Web voting results were analyzed and ASC-H was cytologically investigated. Virtual slides of atypical cells in cytology preparations of 53 cases were prepared and presented on a website. ASC-H cases were divided into 42 cases sampled by brush scraping and 11 cases sampled by cotton swab scraping. Fifty-three cases cytologically judged as ASC-H were classified into benign and CIN2/3, and their patterns of arrangement of atypical cells and 8 cytological parameters were morphologically investigated. The frequency of ASC-H diagnosis in the Web votes was low: 29.2% for brush-scraped and 26.2% for cotton swab-scraped cases. Three-dimensionality, coarse chromatin and irregular nuclei were significantly different between high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and benign cases. Web-based surveys showed the difference of cytological findings between high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and benign cases. To increase interobserver consistency, it may be useful to share information online, which avoids geographical and temporal limitations. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) complex with DNA and the determination of DNA using the complex as a fluorescence probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Qianru; Yang, Zhousheng

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) (Cu(TSSB) 22+) complex with DNA was explored by using UV-vis, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and voltammetry. In pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution, the binding constant of the Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex interaction with DNA was 3.49 × 10 4 L mol -1. Moreover, due to the fluorescence enhancing of Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex in the presence of DNA, a method for determination of DNA with Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex as a fluorescence probe was developed. The fluorescence spectra indicated that the maximum excitation and emission wavelength were 389 nm and 512 nm, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range of 0.03-9.03 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), 0.10-36 μg mL -1 for yeast DNA and 0.01-10.01 μg mL -1 for salmon DNA (SM-DNA), respectively. The corresponding detection limits are 7 ng mL -1 for CT-DNA, 3 ng mL -1 for yeast DNA and 3 ng mL -1 for SM-DNA. Using this method, DNA in synthetic samples was determined with satisfactory results.

  16. Association between quantitative measures obtained using fluorescence-based methods and activity status of occlusal caries lesions in primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Tatiane Fernandes; Reyes, Alessandra; Matos, Ronilza; Antunes-Pontes, Laura Regina; Marques, Renata Pereira de Samuel; Braga, Mariana Minatel; Diniz, Michele Baffi; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros

    2017-05-01

    Fluorescence-based methods (FBM) can add objectiveness to diagnosis strategy for caries. Few studies, however, have focused on the evaluation of caries activity. To evaluate the association between quantitative measures obtained with FBM, clinical parameters acquired from the patients, caries detection, and assessment of activity status in occlusal surfaces of primary molars. Six hundred and six teeth from 113 children (4-14 years) were evaluated. The presence of a biofilm, caries experience, and the number of active lesions were recorded. The teeth were assessed using FBM: DIAGNOdent pen (Lfpen) and Quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF). As reference standard, all teeth were evaluated using the ICDAS (International Caries Detection and Assessment System) associated with clinical activity assessments. Multilevel regressions compared the FBM values and evaluated the association between the FBM measures and clinical variables related to the caries activity. The measures from the FBM were higher in cavitated lesions. Only, ∆F values distinguished active and inactive lesions. The LFpen measures were higher in active lesions, at the cavitated threshold (56.95 ± 29.60). Following regression analyses, only the presence of visible biofilm on occlusal surfaces (adjusted prevalence ratio = 1.43) and ∆R values of the teeth (adjusted prevalence ratio = 1.02) were associated with caries activity. Some quantitative measures from FBM parameters are associated with caries activity evaluation, which is similar to the clinical evaluation of the presence of visible biofilm. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Identification and Map-Based Cloning of the Light-Induced Lesion Mimic Mutant 1 (LIL1) Gene in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qian; Zhang, Zhifei; Liu, Tiantian; Gao, Bida; Xiong, Xingyao

    2017-01-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is a mechanism by which plants prevent the spread of pathogen. Despite extensive study, the molecular mechanisms underlying HR remain poorly understood. Lesion mimic mutants (LMMs), such as LIL1 that was identified in an ethylmethane sulfonate mutagenized population of Indica rice ( Oryza sativa L. ssp. Indica ) 93-11, can be used to study the HR. Under natural field conditions, the leaves of LIL1 mutant plants exhibited light-induced, small, rust-red lesions that first appeared at the leaf tips and subsequently expanded throughout the entire leaf blade to the leaf sheath. Histochemical staining indicated that LIL1 lesions displayed an abnormal accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and resulted from programmed cell death (PCD). The LIL1 mutants also displayed increased expression of defense-related genes and enhanced resistance to rice blast fungus ( Magnaporthe grisea ). Genetic analysis showed that mutation of LIL1 created a semi-dominant allele. Using 1,758 individuals in the F 2 population, LIL1 was mapped in a 222.3 kb region on the long arm of chromosome 7. That contains 12 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Sequence analysis of these 12 candidate genes revealed a G to A base substitution in the fourth exon of LOC_Os07g30510, a putative cysteine-rich receptor-like kinase (CRK), which led to an amino acid change (Val 429 to Ile) in the LIL1 protein. Comparison of the transcript accumulation of the 12 candidate genes between LIL1 and 93-11 revealed that LOC_Os07g30510 was up-regulated significantly in LIL1 . Overexpression of the LOC_Os07g30510 gene from LIL1 induced a LIL1 -like lesion phenotype in Nipponbare. Thus, LIL1 is a novel LMM in rice that will facilitate the further study of the molecular mechanisms of HR and the rice blast resistance.

  18. High-resolution NMR studies of chimeric DNA-RNA-DNA duplexes, heteronomous base pairing, and continuous base stacking at junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Shanho; Flynn, P.; Wang, A.; Reid, B.

    1991-01-01

    Two symmetrical DNA-RNA-DNA duplex chimeras, d(CGCG)r(AAUU)d(CGCG) (designated rAAUU) and d(CGCG)r(UAUA)d(CGCG) (designated rUAUA), and a nonsymmetrical chimeric duplex, d(CGTT)r(AUAA)d(TGCG)/d(CGCA)r(UUAU)d(AACG) (designated rAUAA), as well as their pure DNA analogues, containing dU instead of T, have been synthesized by solid-phase phosphoramidite methods and studied by high-resolution NMR techniques. The 1D imino proton NOE spectra of these d-r-d chimeras indicate normal Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding and base stacking at the junction region. Preliminary qualitative NOESY, COSY, and chemical shift data suggest that the internal RNA segment contains C3'-endo (A-type) sugar conformations except for the first RNA residues (position 5 and 17) following the 3' end of the DNA block, which, unlike the other six ribonucleotides, exhibit detectable H1'-H2' J coupling. The nucleosides of the two flanking DNA segments appear to adopt a fairly normal C2'-endo B-DNA conformation except at the junction with the RNA blocks (residues 4 and 16), where the last DNA residue appears to adopt an intermediate sugar conformation. The data indicate that A-type and B-type conformations can coexist in a single short continuous nucleic acid duplex, but these results differ somewhat from previous theoretical model studies

  19. HISTOPATHOLOGICAL PROFILE OF LIVER LESIONS IN AUTOPSY EXAMINATION- A HOSPITAL-BASED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratan Konjengbam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Liver is the main site of various primary and secondary diseases including variety of external agents. Most of the chronic liver diseases remained asymptomatic even in the late stage. In apparently healthy persons, many liver lesions are detected incidentally following a postmortem examination. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was done for a period of 5 years in a tertiary hospital to evaluate the histopathological profile of liver specimen in autopsy examination. Haematoxylin and Eosin sections of liver specimen were studied. A total of 352 samples were evaluated with male predominates the female sex in the ratio of 5.2:1. RESULTS The most common lesion was fatty liver (19% followed by cirrhosis (11.8%, venous congestion (11.5%, portal triaditis (10.9%, chronic hepatitis (6.2%, granulomatous hepatitis (2.1%, autolysis (16% and others (0.96%. Liver finding was normal in 14% of the cases. CONCLUSION Silent liver diseases are a quite regular finding in autopsy cases and thereby may implicate a common occurrence in general population. Autopsy examination of liver is a must for detection of silent liver diseases like fatty change, cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis.

  20. IS IT NECESSARY TO EXCISE ALL BREAST LESIONS? EXPERIENCE FROM A UNIVERSITY-BASED BREAST UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YIP CH

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is becoming more important in Asia since it affect the younger age group. Question arises whether it is safe for breast lesions to be left in-situ if all the elements in triple assessment are benign. The aim of this study is to audit all the excision biopsies of breast lumps done in the University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC, to review the association of age with the type of pathological finding and to evaluate the rate of carcinoma in these biopsies. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of all women who had excision biopsy of a breast lump in the University Malaya Medical Centre from January 2005 to December 2006. All patients with malignant preoperative biopsies were excluded. Results: Of 717 lesions in 664 patients, 459 (64% were fibroadenoma, 114 (15.9% were fibrocystic disease, 20 (2.8% were phylloides tumour, 27 (3.8% were papilloma, 59 (8.2% were malignant and 38 (5.3% were of other pathology. Of the 717 open biopsies, 449 (62.6% had fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC, 31 (4.3% had core needle biopsy (CNB, while 14 (2.0% had both FNAC and CNB done prior to excision biopsy. 251 (35% had neither FNAC nor CNB. The incidence of fibroadenoma decreased with increasing age and the incidence of fibrocystic changes and papilloma increased with increasing age. There was no association of age with phylloides tumour. The incidence of unexpected malignancy increased with increasing age. The incidence rates were 0.3%, 4.5%, 19.4%, 29.7% and 29.6% for the age group below 30, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59 and above 60 years of age respectively. Of the 59 malignant lesions, FNAC was performed on 47 (79.7% and CNB on 16 (27.1%. 9 had both FNAC and CNB and 3 had neither FNAC nor CNB. Out of the 56 lesions where FNAC/CNB were done, 23 (41.1% were reported as benign, 20 (35.7% as suspicious, 4 (7.1% as atypical, 5 (8.9% as inadequate, 2 (3.6% as equivocal and 2 (3.6% as lymphoid lesions. Out of the 23 prior biopsies reported as

  1. Development of a Support Vector Machine - Based Image Analysis System for Focal Liver Lesions Classification in Magnetic Resonance Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatos, I; Tsantis, S; Kagadis, G; Karamesini, M; Skouroliakou, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The design and implementation of a computer-based image analysis system employing the support vector machine (SVM) classifier system for the classification of Focal Liver Lesions (FLLs) on routine non-enhanced, T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. Materials and Methods: The study comprised 92 patients; each one of them has undergone MRI performed on a Magnetom Concerto (Siemens). Typical signs on dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and biopsies were employed towards a three class categorization of the 92 cases: 40-benign FLLs, 25-Hepatocellular Carcinomas (HCC) within Cirrhotic liver parenchyma and 27-liver metastases from Non-Cirrhotic liver. Prior to FLLs classification an automated lesion segmentation algorithm based on Marcov Random Fields was employed in order to acquire each FLL Region of Interest. 42 texture features derived from the gray-level histogram, co-occurrence and run-length matrices and 12 morphological features were obtained from each lesion. Stepwise multi-linear regression analysis was utilized to avoid feature redundancy leading to a feature subset that fed the multiclass SVM classifier designed for lesion classification. SVM System evaluation was performed by means of leave-one-out method and ROC analysis. Results: Maximum accuracy for all three classes (90.0%) was obtained by means of the Radial Basis Kernel Function and three textural features (Inverse- Different-Moment, Sum-Variance and Long-Run-Emphasis) that describe lesion's contrast, variability and shape complexity. Sensitivity values for the three classes were 92.5%, 81.5% and 96.2% respectively, whereas specificity values were 94.2%, 95.3% and 95.5%. The AUC value achieved for the selected subset was 0.89 with 0.81 - 0.94 confidence interval. Conclusion: The proposed SVM system exhibit promising results that could be utilized as a second opinion tool to the radiologist in order to decrease the time/cost of diagnosis and the need for patients to undergo invasive

  2. Electrochemical DNA biosensors based on platinum nanoparticles combined carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ningning; Chang Zhu; He Pingang; Fang Yuzhi

    2005-01-01

    Platinum nanoparticles were used in combination with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for fabricating sensitivity-enhanced electrochemical DNA biosensor. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and platinum nanoparticles were dispersed in Nafion, which were used to fabricate the modification of the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface. Oligonucleotides with amino groups at the 5' end were covalently linked onto carboxylic groups of MWCNTs on the electrode. The hybridization events were monitored by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) measurement of the intercalated daunomycin. Due to the ability of carbon nanotubes to promote electron-transfer reactions, the high catalytic activities of platinum nanoparticles for chemical reactions, the sensitivity of presented electrochemical DNA biosensors was remarkably improved. The detection limit of the method for target DNA was 1.0 x 10 -11 mol l -1

  3. DNA origami-based nanoribbons: assembly, length distribution, and twist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungmann, Ralf; Scheible, Max; Kuzyk, Anton; Pardatscher, Guenther; Simmel, Friedrich C [Lehrstuhl fuer Bioelektronik, Physik-Department and ZNN/WSI, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4a, 85748 Garching (Germany); Castro, Carlos E, E-mail: simmel@ph.tum.de [Labor fuer Biomolekulare Nanotechnologie, Physik-Department and ZNN/WSI, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4a, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-07-08

    A variety of polymerization methods for the assembly of elongated nanoribbons from rectangular DNA origami structures are investigated. The most efficient method utilizes single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides to bridge an intermolecular scaffold seam between origami monomers. This approach allows the fabrication of origami ribbons with lengths of several micrometers, which can be used for long-range ordered arrangement of proteins. It is quantitatively shown that the length distribution of origami ribbons obtained with this technique follows the theoretical prediction for a simple linear polymerization reaction. The design of flat single layer origami structures with constant crossover spacing inevitably results in local underwinding of the DNA helix, which leads to a global twist of the origami structures that also translates to the nanoribbons.

  4. DNA origami-based nanoribbons: assembly, length distribution, and twist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungmann, Ralf; Scheible, Max; Kuzyk, Anton; Pardatscher, Guenther; Simmel, Friedrich C; Castro, Carlos E

    2011-01-01

    A variety of polymerization methods for the assembly of elongated nanoribbons from rectangular DNA origami structures are investigated. The most efficient method utilizes single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides to bridge an intermolecular scaffold seam between origami monomers. This approach allows the fabrication of origami ribbons with lengths of several micrometers, which can be used for long-range ordered arrangement of proteins. It is quantitatively shown that the length distribution of origami ribbons obtained with this technique follows the theoretical prediction for a simple linear polymerization reaction. The design of flat single layer origami structures with constant crossover spacing inevitably results in local underwinding of the DNA helix, which leads to a global twist of the origami structures that also translates to the nanoribbons.

  5. Spreadsheet-based program for alignment of overlapping DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbazhagan, R; Gabrielson, E

    1999-06-01

    Molecular biology laboratories frequently face the challenge of aligning small overlapping DNA sequences derived from a long DNA segment. Here, we present a short program that can be used to adapt Excel spreadsheets as a tool for aligning DNA sequences, regardless of their orientation. The program runs on any Windows or Macintosh operating system computer with Excel 97 or Excel 98. The program is available for use as an Excel file, which can be downloaded from the BioTechniques Web site. Upon execution, the program opens a specially designed customized workbook and is capable of identifying overlapping regions between two sequence fragments and displaying the sequence alignment. It also performs a number of specialized functions such as recognition of restriction enzyme cutting sites and CpG island mapping without costly specialized software.

  6. Intercalation of a Zn(II) complex containing ciprofloxacin drug between DNA base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Asadian, Ali Ashraf; Mahdavi, Mryam

    2017-11-02

    In this study, an attempt has been made to study the interaction of a Zn(II) complex containing an antibiotic drug, ciprofloxacin, with calf thymus DNA using spectroscopic methods. It was found that Zn(II) complex could bind with DNA via intercalation mode as evidenced by: hyperchromism in UV-Vis spectrum; these spectral characteristics suggest that the Zn(II) complex interacts with DNA most likely through a mode that involves a stacking interaction between the aromatic chromophore and the base pairs of DNA. DNA binding constant (K b = 1.4 × 10 4 M -1 ) from spectrophotometric studies of the interaction of Zn(II) complex with DNA is comparable to those of some DNA intercalative polypyridyl Ru(II) complexes 1.0 -4.8 × 10 4 M -1 . CD study showed stabilization of the right-handed B form of DNA in the presence of Zn(II) complex as observed for the classical intercalator methylene blue. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH DNA-MB, indicating that it binds to DNA in strong competition with MB for the intercalation.

  7. Exploring the Feasibility of a DNA Computer: Design of an ALU Using Sticker-Based DNA Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Mayukh; Ghosal, Prasun; Mohanty, Saraju P

    2017-09-01

    Since its inception, DNA computing has advanced to offer an extremely powerful, energy-efficient emerging technology for solving hard computational problems with its inherent massive parallelism and extremely high data density. This would be much more powerful and general purpose when combined with other existing well-known algorithmic solutions that exist for conventional computing architectures using a suitable ALU. Thus, a specifically designed DNA Arithmetic and Logic Unit (ALU) that can address operations suitable for both domains can mitigate the gap between these two. An ALU must be able to perform all possible logic operations, including NOT, OR, AND, XOR, NOR, NAND, and XNOR; compare, shift etc., integer and floating point arithmetic operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division). In this paper, design of an ALU has been proposed using sticker-based DNA model with experimental feasibility analysis. Novelties of this paper may be in manifold. First, the integer arithmetic operations performed here are 2s complement arithmetic, and the floating point operations follow the IEEE 754 floating point format, resembling closely to a conventional ALU. Also, the output of each operation can be reused for any next operation. So any algorithm or program logic that users can think of can be implemented directly on the DNA computer without any modification. Second, once the basic operations of sticker model can be automated, the implementations proposed in this paper become highly suitable to design a fully automated ALU. Third, proposed approaches are easy to implement. Finally, these approaches can work on sufficiently large binary numbers.

  8. Evaluation of DNA Extraction Methods Suitable for PCR-based Detection and Genotyping of Clostridium botulinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auricchio, Bruna; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Fiore, Alfonsina

    2013-01-01

    in terms of cost, time, labor, and supplies. Eleven botulinum toxin–producing clostridia strains and 25 samples (10 food, 13 clinical, and 2 environmental samples) naturally contaminated with botulinum toxin–producing clostridia were used to compare 4 DNA extraction procedures: Chelex® 100 matrix, Phenol......Sufficient quality and quantity of extracted DNA is critical to detecting and performing genotyping of Clostridium botulinum by means of PCR-based methods. An ideal extraction method has to optimize DNA yield, minimize DNA degradation, allow multiple samples to be extracted, and be efficient...

  9. Feasibility of using DNA-immobilized nanocellulose-based immunoadsorbent for systemic lupus erythematosus plasmapheresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Changgang; Carlsson, Daniel O; Mihranyan, Albert

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this project was to study the feasibility of using a DNA-immobilized nanocellulose-based immunoadsorbent for possible application in medical apheresis such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment. Calf thymus DNA was bound to high surface area nanocellulose membrane at varying concentrations using UV-irradiation. The DNA-immobilized samples were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and phosphorus elemental analysis. The anti-ds-DNA IgG binding was tested in vitro using ELISA. The produced sample showed high affinity in vitro to bind anti-ds-DNA-antibodies from mice, as much as 80% of added IgG was bound by the membrane. Furthermore, the binding efficiency was quantitatively dependent on the amount of immobilized DNA onto nanocellulose membrane. The described nanocellulose membranes are interesting immunoadsorbents for continued clinical studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Performance of various density functionals for the hydrogen bonds in DNA base pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijst, T.; Fonseca Guerra, C.; Swart, M.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the performance of seven popular density functionals (B3LYP, BLYP, BP86, mPW, OPBE, PBE, PW91) for describing the geometry and stability of the hydrogen bonds in DNA base pairs. For the gas-phase situation, the hydrogen-bond lengths and strengths in the DNA pairs have been

  11. MitBASE : a comprehensive and integrated mitochondrial DNA database. The present status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attimonelli, M.; Altamura, N.; Benne, R.; Brennicke, A.; Cooper, J. M.; D'Elia, D.; Montalvo, A.; Pinto, B.; de Robertis, M.; Golik, P.; Knoop, V.; Lanave, C.; Lazowska, J.; Licciulli, F.; Malladi, B. S.; Memeo, F.; Monnerot, M.; Pasimeni, R.; Pilbout, S.; Schapira, A. H.; Sloof, P.; Saccone, C.

    2000-01-01

    MitBASE is an integrated and comprehensive database of mitochondrial DNA data which collects, under a single interface, databases for Plant, Vertebrate, Invertebrate, Human, Protist and Fungal mtDNA and a Pilot database on nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis in Saccharomyces

  12. Sex determination based on amelogenin DNA by modified electrode with gold nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloum-Ardakani, Mohammad; Rajabzadeh, Nooshin; Benvidi, Ali; Heidari, Mohammad Mehdi

    2013-12-15

    We have developed a simple and renewable electrochemical biosensor based on carbon paste electrode (CPE) for the detection of DNA synthesis and hybridization. CPE was modified with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), which are helpful for immobilization of thiolated bioreceptors. AuNPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thiolated single-stranded DNA (SH-ssDNA) of the amelogenin gene was formed on CPE. The immobilization of the probe and its hybridization with the target DNA was optimized using different experimental conditions. The modified electrode was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The electrochemical response of ssDNA hybridization and DNA synthesis was measured using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) with methylene blue (MB) as an electroactive indicator. The new biosensor can distinguish between complementary and non-complementary strands of amelogenin ssDNA. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood and was detected based on changes in the MB reduction signal. These results demonstrated that the new biosensor could be used for sex determination. The proposed biosensor in this study could be used for detection and discrimination of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products of amelogenin DNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. DNA isolation by galactoacrylate-based nano-poly(HEMA-co-Gal-OPA) nanopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkcan Kayhan, Ceren; Zeynep Ural, Fulden; Koruyucu, Meryem; Gül Salman, Yeşim; Uygun, Murat; Aktaş Uygun, Deniz; Akgöl, Sinan; Denizli, Adil

    2017-10-01

    Isolation of DNA is one of the important processes for biotechnological applications such as investigation of DNA structures and functions, recombinant DNA preparations, identification of genetic factors and diagnosis and treatment of genetic disorders. The aim of this study was to synthesis and characterizes the galactoacrylate based nanopolymers with high surface area and to investigate the usability of these synthesized nanopolymers for DNA isolation studies. Nanopolymers were synthesized by the surfactant free emulsion polymerization technique by using the monomers of 2-hydroxyl ethylmethacrylate and 6-O-(2 ' -hydroxy-3 ' -acryloyloxypropyl)-1,2:3,4-di-O-isopropylidene-α-D-galactopyranose. Galactoacrylate origin of these newly synthesized nanopolymers increased the interaction between DNA and nanopolymers. Prepared nanopolymers were characterized by SEM, FT-IR and ZETA sizer analysis. Synthesized nanopolymers were spherical, and their average particle size was about 246.8 nm. Adsorption of DNA onto galactoacrylate based nanopolymers was investigated by using different pHs, temperatures, ionic strength, DNA concentrations and desorption studies and maximum DNA adsorption was found to be as 567.12 mg/g polymer at 25 °C, in pH 5.0 acetate buffer. Reusability was investigated for 5 successive reuse and DNA adsorption capacity decreased only about 10% at the end of the 5th reuse.

  14. A neutral glyoxal gel electrophoresis method for the detection and semi-quantitation of DNA single-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachkowski, Brian; Nakamura, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Single-strand breaks are among the most prevalent lesions found in DNA. Traditional electrophoretic methods (e.g., the Comet assay) used for investigating these lesions rely on alkaline conditions to denature DNA prior to electrophoresis. However, the presence of alkali-labile sites in DNA can result in the introduction of additional single-strand breaks upon alkali treatment during DNA sample processing. Herein, we describe a neutral glyoxal gel electrophoresis assay which is based on alkali-free DNA denaturation and is suitable for qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses of single-strand breaks in DNA isolated from different organisms.

  15. Mitochondrial base excision repair assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    The main source of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage is reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during normal cellular metabolism. The main mtDNA lesions generated by ROS are base modifications, such as the ubiquitous 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) lesion; however, base loss and strand breaks may also occur....... Many human diseases are associated with mtDNA mutations and thus maintaining mtDNA integrity is critical. All of these lesions are repaired primarily by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. It is now known that mammalian mitochondria have BER, which, similarly to nuclear BER, is catalyzed by DNA...... glycosylases, AP endonuclease, DNA polymerase (POLgamma in mitochondria) and DNA ligase. This article outlines procedures for measuring oxidative damage formation and BER in mitochondria, including isolation of mitochondria from tissues and cells, protocols for measuring BER enzyme activities, gene...

  16. A colorimetric platform for sensitively differentiating telomere DNA with different lengths, monitoring G-quadruplex and dsDNA based on silver nanoclusters and unmodified gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Fei; Chen, Zeqiu; You, Jinmao; Song, Cuihua

    2018-05-01

    Human telomere DNA plays a vital role in genome integrity control and carcinogenesis as an indication for extensive cell proliferation. Herein, silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) templated by polymer and unmodified gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are designed as a new colorimetric platform for sensitively differentiating telomere DNA with different lengths, monitoring G-quadruplex and dsDNA. Ag NCs can produce the aggregation of Au NPs, so the color of Au NPs changes to blue and the absorption peak moves to 700 nm. While the telomere DNA can protect Au NPs from aggregation, the color turns to red again and the absorption band blue shift. Benefiting from the obvious color change, we can differentiate the length of telomere DNA by naked eyes. As the length of telomere DNA is longer, the variation of color becomes more noticeable. The detection limits of telomere DNA containing 10, 22, 40, 64 bases are estimated to be 1.41, 1.21, 0.23 and 0.22 nM, respectively. On the other hand, when telomere DNA forms G-quadruplex in the presence of K+, or dsDNA with complementary sequence, both G-quadruplex and dsDNA can protect Au NPs better than the unfolded telomere DNA. Hence, a new colorimetric platform for monitoring structure conversion of DNA is established by Ag NCs-Au NPs system, and to prove this type of application, a selective K+ sensor is developed.

  17. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) based assessment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-05-07

    May 7, 2014 ... Knowledge of genetic distances between genotypes is important for efficient organization and conservation of ... after maize, wheat, and pearl millet (FAO, 2006). Sor- ... properties, which tend to reduce the nutritional quality of sorghum .... extraction. The DNA extraction buffer was modified from Jhingan.

  18. DNA fingerprinting based on simple sequence repeat (SSR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New varieties of sugarcane are protected using morphological descriptors, which have limitations in identifying morphologically similar cultivars. Development of a reliable DNA fingerprint system for identification of new varieties would contribute greatly to the breeding of these species. Microsatellite markers are tools with ...

  19. SSR marker based DNA fingerprinting and diversity study in rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The genetic diversity and DNA fingerprinting of 15 elite rice genotypes using 30 SSR primers on chromosome numbers 7-12 was investigated. The results revealed that all the primers showed distinct polymorphism among the cultivars studied indicating the robust nature of microsatellites in revealing polymorphism. Cluster ...

  20. [Under what conditions does G.C Watson-Crick DNA base pair acquire all four configurations characteristic for A.T Watson-Crick DNA base pair?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovarets', O O

    2013-01-01

    At the MP2/6-311++G(2df,pd)//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory it was established for the first time, that the Löwdin's G*.C* DNA base pair formed by the mutagenic tautomers can acquire, as the A-T Watson-Crick DNA base pair, four biologically important configurations, namely: Watson-Crick, reverse Watson-Crick, Hoogsteen and reverse Hoogsteen. This fact demonstrates rather unexpected role of the tautomerisation of the one of the Watson-Crick DNA base pairs, in particular, via double proton transfer: exactly the G.C-->G*.C* tautomerisation allows to overcome steric hindrances for the implementation of the above mentioned configurations. Geometric, electron-topological and energetic properties of the H-bonds that stabilise the studied pairs, as well as the energetic characteristics of the latters are presented.

  1. One-Dimensional Multichromophor Arrays Based on DNA: From Self-Assembly to Light-Harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensslen, Philipp; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2015-10-20

    Light-harvesting complexes collect light energy and deliver it by a cascade of energy and electron transfer processes to the reaction center where charge separation leads to storage as chemical energy. The design of artificial light-harvesting assemblies faces enormous challenges because several antenna chromophores need to be kept in close proximity but self-quenching needs to be avoided. Double stranded DNA as a supramolecular scaffold plays a promising role due to its characteristic structural properties. Automated DNA synthesis allows incorporation of artificial chromophore-modified building blocks, and sequence design allows precise control of the distances and orientations between the chromophores. The helical twist between the chromophores, which is induced by the DNA framework, controls energy and electron transfer and thereby reduces the self-quenching that is typically observed in chromophore aggregates. This Account summarizes covalently multichromophore-modified DNA and describes how such multichromophore arrays were achieved by Watson-Crick-specific and DNA-templated self-assembly. The covalent DNA systems were prepared by incorporation of chromophores as DNA base substitutions (either as C-nucleosides or with acyclic linkers as substitutes for the 2'-deoxyribofuranoside) and as DNA base modifications. Studies with DNA base substitutions revealed that distances but more importantly relative orientations of the chromophores govern the energy transfer efficiencies and thereby the light-harvesting properties. With DNA base substitutions, duplex stabilization was faced and could be overcome, for instance, by zipper-like placement of the chromophores in both strands. For both principal structural approaches, DNA-based light-harvesting antenna could be realized. The major disadvantages, however, for covalent multichromophore DNA conjugates are the poor yields of synthesis and the solubility issues for oligonucleotides with more than 5-10 chromophore

  2. Robust embryo identification using first polar body single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treff, Nathan R; Su, Jing; Kasabwala, Natasha; Tao, Xin; Miller, Kathleen A; Scott, Richard T

    2010-05-01

    This study sought to validate a novel, minimally invasive system for embryo tracking by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting of the first polar body. First polar body-based assignments of which embryos implanted and were delivered after multiple ET were 100% consistent with previously validated embryo DNA fingerprinting-based assignments. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nanostructured ZnO-based biosensor: DNA immobilization and hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mishaal Mohammed

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical DNA biosensor was successfully fabricated by using (3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES with zinc oxide (ZnO nanorods synthesized using microwave-assisted chemical bath deposition method on thermally oxidized SiO2 thin films. The structural quality and morphology of the ZnO nanorods were determined by employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD, which show a hexagonal wurtzite structure with a preferred orientation along the (101 direction. The surface of the SiO2 thin films was chemically modified with ZnO. Label-free detection DNA immobilization and hybridization were performed using potassium hexacyanoferrate with cyclic voltammetry (CV measurements. The capacitance, permittivity, and conductivity profiles of the fabricated sensor clearly indicate DNA immobilization and hybridization. Results show that the capacitance values of bare, ZnO- modified surface immobilization, and target DNA hybridization were 46×10−12F, 47×10−8F, 27μF, and 17μF, respectively, at 1Hz. The permittivity measurement increased from 3.94×103 to 251×103 and 165×103 at the frequency range of approximately 200 to 1Hz for bare and DNA immobilization and hybridization, respectively. The measured conductivity values for the bare, ZnO, immobilized, and hybridization device were 2.4×10−9, 10×10−8, 1.6×10−7, and 1.3×10−7Scm−1, respectively. Keywords: Zinc oxide, Biosensor, Capacitance, Permittivity, Conductivity

  4. An effective approach of lesion segmentation within the breast ultrasound image based on the cellular automata principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Cheng, H D; Huang, Jianhua; Zhang, Yingtao; Tang, Xianglong

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a novel lesion segmentation within breast ultrasound (BUS) image based on the cellular automata principle is proposed. Its energy transition function is formulated based on global image information difference and local image information difference using different energy transfer strategies. First, an energy decrease strategy is used for modeling the spatial relation information of pixels. For modeling global image information difference, a seed information comparison function is developed using an energy preserve strategy. Then, a texture information comparison function is proposed for considering local image difference in different regions, which is helpful for handling blurry boundaries. Moreover, two neighborhood systems (von Neumann and Moore neighborhood systems) are integrated as the evolution environment, and a similarity-based criterion is used for suppressing noise and reducing computation complexity. The proposed method was applied to 205 clinical BUS images for studying its characteristic and functionality, and several overlapping area error metrics and statistical evaluation methods are utilized for evaluating its performance. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can handle BUS images with blurry boundaries and low contrast well and can segment breast lesions accurately and effectively.

  5. Transsphenoidal Approach in Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery for Skull Base Lesions: What Radiologists and Surgeons Need to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Garrigós, Elena; Arenas-Jiménez, Juan José; Monjas-Cánovas, Irene; Abarca-Olivas, Javier; Cortés-Vela, Jesús Julián; De La Hoz-Rosa, Javier; Guirau-Rubio, Maria Dolores

    2015-01-01

    In the last 2 decades, endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery has become the most popular choice of neurosurgeons and otolaryngologists to treat lesions of the skull base, with minimal invasiveness, lower incidence of complications, and lower morbidity and mortality rates compared with traditional approaches. The transsphenoidal route is the surgical approach of choice for most sellar tumors because of the relationship of the sphenoid bone to the nasal cavity below and the pituitary gland above. More recently, extended approaches have expanded the indications for transsphenoidal surgery by using different corridors leading to specific target areas, from the crista galli to the spinomedullary junction. Computer-assisted surgery is an evolving technology that allows real-time anatomic navigation during endoscopic surgery by linking preoperative triplanar radiologic images and intraoperative endoscopic views, thus helping the surgeon avoid damage to vital structures. Preoperative computed tomography is the preferred modality to show bone landmarks and vascular structures. Radiologists play an important role in surgical planning by reporting extension of sphenoid pneumatization, recesses and septations of the sinus, and other relevant anatomic variants. Radiologists should understand the relationships of the sphenoid bone and skull base structures, anatomic variants, and image-guided neuronavigation techniques to prevent surgical complications and allow effective treatment of skull base lesions with the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach. ©RSNA, 2015.

  6. UV-Visible Spectroscopy-Based Quantification of Unlabeled DNA Bound to Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, Brandi L; Hutchison, James E

    2016-12-20

    DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles have been increasingly applied as sensitive and selective analytical probes and biosensors. The DNA ligands bound to a nanoparticle dictate its reactivity, making it essential to know the type and number of DNA strands bound to the nanoparticle surface. Existing methods used to determine the number of DNA strands per gold nanoparticle (AuNP) require that the sequences be fluorophore-labeled, which may affect the DNA surface coverage and reactivity of the nanoparticle and/or require specialized equipment and other fluorophore-containing reagents. We report a UV-visible-based method to conveniently and inexpensively determine the number of DNA strands attached to AuNPs of different core sizes. When this method is used in tandem with a fluorescence dye assay, it is possible to determine the ratio of two unlabeled sequences of different lengths bound to AuNPs. Two sizes of citrate-stabilized AuNPs (5 and 12 nm) were functionalized with mixtures of short (5 base) and long (32 base) disulfide-terminated DNA sequences, and the ratios of sequences bound to the AuNPs were determined using the new method. The long DNA sequence was present as a lower proportion of the ligand shell than in the ligand exchange mixture, suggesting it had a lower propensity to bind the AuNPs than the short DNA sequence. The ratio of DNA sequences bound to the AuNPs was not the same for the large and small AuNPs, which suggests that the radius of curvature had a significant influence on the assembly of DNA strands onto the AuNPs.

  7. Strip biosensor for amplified detection of nerve growth factor-beta based on a molecular translator and catalytic DNA circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Lai, Ting; Mu, Kejie; Zhou, Zheng

    2014-10-07

    We have demonstrated a new visual detection approach based on a molecular translator and a catalytic DNA circuit for the detection of nerve growth factor-beta (NGF-β). In this assay, a molecular translator based on the binding-induced DNA strand-displacement reaction was employed to convert the input protein to an output DNA signal. The molecular translator is composed of a target recognition element and a signal output element. Target recognition is achieved by the binding of the anti-NGF-β antibody to the target protein. Polyclonal anti-NGF-β antibody is conjugated to DNA1 and DNA2. The antibody conjugated DNA1 is initially hybridized to DNA3 to form a stable DNA1/DNA3 duplex. In the presence of NGF-β, the binding of the same target protein brings DNA1 and DNA2 into close proximity, resulting in an increase in their local effective concentration. This process triggers the strand-displacement reaction between DNA2 and DNA3 and releases the output DNA3. The released DNA3 is further amplified by a catalytic DNA circuit. The product of the catalytic DNA circuit is detected by a strip biosensor. This proposed assay has high sensitivity and selectivity with a dynamic response ranging from 10 fM to 10 pM, and its detection limit is 10 fM of NGF-β. This work provides a sensitive, enzyme-free, and universal strategy for the detection of other proteins.

  8. Joint approach based on clinical and imaging features to distinguish non-neoplastic from neoplastic pituitary stalk lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Ye Lee

    Full Text Available Distinguishing non-neoplastic pituitary stalk lesions (non-NPSLs from neoplastic pituitary stalk lesions (NPSLs is a major concern in guiding treatment for a thickened pituitary stalk. Our study aimed to aid provide preoperative diagnostic assistance by combining clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings to distinguish non-NPSLs from NPSLs.We recruited 158 patients with thickened pituitary stalk lesions visible on MRI. Laboratory findings included hypopituitarism, diabetes insipidus (DI, and hyperprolactinemia. MR images were assessed for anterior-posterior thickness (mm, diffuse pituitary stalk thickening, cystic changes, a high T1 signal, and glandular or extrasellar involvement. A diagnostic model was developed using a recursive partitioning logistic regression analysis. The model was validated in an independent dataset comprising 63 patients, and its diagnostic performance was compared with that of the original radiological reports.A univariate analysis found significant associations of DI (P = 0.006, absence of extrasellar involvement (P = 0.002, and lower stalk thickness (P = 0.031 with non-NPSLs. A diagnostic model was created using the following parameters (in order of priority: 1 lack of extrasellar involvement, 2 stalk thickness < 5.3 mm, and 3 presence of DI. The diagnostic performance (area under the curve; AUC of this model in the independent set was 0.813, representing a significant improvement over the original radiological reports (AUC: 0.713, P = 0.029.The joint diagnostic approach based on clinical and imaging-based factors robustly distinguished non-NPSLs from NPSLs. This approach could guide treatment strategies and prevent unnecessary surgery in patients with non-NPSL.

  9. DNA cross-linking by dehydromonocrotaline lacks apparent base sequence preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieben, W Kurt; Coulombe, Roger A

    2004-12-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are ubiquitous plant toxins, many of which, upon oxidation by hepatic mixed-function oxidases, become reactive bifunctional pyrrolic electrophiles that form DNA-DNA and DNA-protein cross-links. The anti-mitotic, toxic, and carcinogenic action of PAs is thought to be caused, at least in part, by these cross-links. We wished to determine whether the activated PA pyrrole dehydromonocrotaline (DHMO) exhibits base sequence preferences when cross-linked to a set of model duplex poly A-T 14-mer oligonucleotides with varying internal and/or end 5'-d(CG), 5'-d(GC), 5'-d(TA), 5'-d(CGCG), or 5'-d(GCGC) sequences. DHMO-DNA cross-links were assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) of 32P endlabeled oligonucleotides and by HPLC analysis of cross-linked DNAs enzymatically digested to their constituent deoxynucleosides. The degree of DNA cross-links depended upon the concentration of the pyrrole, but not on the base sequence of the oligonucleotide target. Likewise, HPLC chromatograms of cross-linked and digested DNAs showed no discernible sequence preference for any nucleotide. Added glutathione, tyrosine, cysteine, and aspartic acid, but not phenylalanine, threonine, serine, lysine, or methionine competed with DNA as alternate nucleophiles for cross-linking by DHMO. From these data it appears that DHMO exhibits no strong base preference when forming cross-links with DNA, and that some cellular nucleophiles can inhibit DNA cross-link formation.

  10. Optimization of DNA Sensor Model Based Nanostructured Graphene Using Particle Swarm Optimization Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hediyeh Karimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been predicted that the nanomaterials of graphene will be among the candidate materials for postsilicon electronics due to their astonishing properties such as high carrier mobility, thermal conductivity, and biocompatibility. Graphene is a semimetal zero gap nanomaterial with demonstrated ability to be employed as an excellent candidate for DNA sensing. Graphene-based DNA sensors have been used to detect the DNA adsorption to examine a DNA concentration in an analyte solution. In particular, there is an essential need for developing the cost-effective DNA sensors holding the fact that it is suitable for the diagnosis of genetic or pathogenic diseases. In this paper, particle swarm optimization technique is employed to optimize the analytical model of a graphene-based DNA sensor which is used for electrical detection of DNA molecules. The results are reported for 5 different concentrations, covering a range from 0.01 nM to 500 nM. The comparison of the optimized model with the experimental data shows an accuracy of more than 95% which verifies that the optimized model is reliable for being used in any application of the graphene-based DNA sensor.

  11. Accommodation of an N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-acetylaminofluorene adduct in the active site of human DNA polymerase ι: Hoogsteen or Watson-Crick base pairing?†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donny-Clark, Kerry; Shapiro, Robert; Broyde, Suse

    2009-01-01

    Bypass across DNA lesions by specialized polymerases is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. Human DNA polymerase ι (polι) is a bypass polymerase of the Y family. Crystal structures of polι suggest that Hoogsteen base pairing is employed to bypass minor groove DNA lesions, placing them on the spacious major groove side of the enzyme. Primer extension studies have shown that polι is also capable of error-free nucleotide incorporation opposite the bulky major groove adduct N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-acetyl-aminofluorene (dG-AAF). We present molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations suggesting that Watson-Crick base pairing could be employed in polι for bypass of dG-AAF. In polι with Hoogsteen paired dG-AAF the bulky AAF moiety would reside on the cramped minor groove side of the template. The Hoogsteen-capable conformation distorts the active site, disrupting interactions necessary for error-free incorporation of dC opposite the lesion. Watson-Crick pairing places the AAF rings on the spacious major groove side, similar to the position of minor groove adducts observed with Hoogsteen pairing. Watson-Crick paired structures show a well-ordered active site, with a near reaction-ready ternary complex. Thus our results suggest that polι would utilize the same spacious region for lesion bypass of both major and minor groove adducts. Therefore, purine adducts with bulk on the minor groove side would use Hoogsteen pairing, while adducts with the bulky lesion on the major groove side would utilize Watson-Crick base pairing as indicated by our MD simulations for dG-AAF. This suggests the possibility of an expanded role for polι in lesion bypass. PMID:19072536

  12. The use of carrier RNA to enhance DNA extraction from microfluidic-based silica monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kirsty J; Thain, Lauren; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Greenman, John; Greenway, Gillian M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2009-10-12

    DNA extraction was carried out on silica-based monoliths within a microfluidic device. Solid-phase DNA extraction methodology was applied in which the DNA binds to silica in the presence of a chaotropic salt, such as guanidine hydrochloride, and is eluted in a low ionic strength solution, such as water. The addition of poly-A carrier RNA to the chaotropic salt solution resulted in a marked increase in the effective amount of DNA that could be recovered (25ng) compared to the absence of RNA (5ng) using the silica-based monolith. These findings confirm that techniques utilising nucleic acid carrier molecules can enhance DNA extraction methodologies in microfluidic applications.

  13. Detection of dopamine in dopaminergic cell using nanoparticles-based barcode DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jeung Hee; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Oh, Byung-Keun; Choi, Jeong Woo

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology-based bio-barcode-amplification analysis may be an innovative approach to dopamine detection. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of this bio-barcode DNA method in detecting dopamine from dopaminergic cells. Herein, a combination DNA barcode and bead-based immunoassay for neurotransmitter detection with PCR-like sensitivity is described. This method relies on magnetic nanoparticles with antibodies and nanoparticles that are encoded with DNA, and antibodies that can sandwich the target