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Sample records for diterpenoid-degrading bacterium pseudomonas

  1. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  2. Genome Sequence of the Mycorrhizal Helper Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the mycorrhizal helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8. This is the first genome of a mycorrhizal helper bacterium. The draft genome contains 6,952,353 bp and is predicted to encode 6,317 open reading frames. Comparative genomic analyses will help to identify helper traits.

  3. Genome Sequence of the Mycorrhizal Helper Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, A; Gross, H; Morin, E; Karpinets, T; Utturkar, S; Mehnaz, S; Martin, F; Frey-Klett, P; Labbé, J

    2014-01-09

    We report the draft genome sequence of the mycorrhizal helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8. This is the first genome of a mycorrhizal helper bacterium. The draft genome contains 6,952,353 bp and is predicted to encode 6,317 open reading frames. Comparative genomic analyses will help to identify helper traits.

  4. Pseudomonas chloritidismutans sp. nov., a non-denitrifying chlorate-reducing bacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterink, A.F.W.M.; Jonker, A.B.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped, dissimilatory chlorate-reducing bacterium, strain AW-1(T), was isolated from biomass of an anaerobic chlorate-reducing bioreactor. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence showed 100␜equence similarity to Pseudomonas stutzeri DSM 50227 and

  5. Active efflux systems in the solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the research presented in this thesis was to study the molecular mechanisms of organic solvent tolerance in Pseudomonas putida S12. This bacterium is capable of growth at saturated solvent concentrations, which are lethal to normal bacteria. Organic solve

  6. Genome sequence of the mycorrhizal helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deveau, Aurelie [French National Insitute for Agricultural Research (INRA); Grob, Harald [University of Bonn, Germany; Morin, Emmanuelle [INRA, Nancy, France; Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; Mehnaz, Samina [University of the Punjab, Pakistan; Kurz, Sven [University of Bonn, Germany; Martin, Francis [INRA, Nancy, France; Frey-Klett, Pascale [INRA, Nancy, France; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the mycorrhiza helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8 . Several traits which could be involved in the mycorrhiza helper ability of the bacterial strain such as multiple secretion systems, auxin metabolism and phosphate mobilization were evidenced in the genome.

  7. Active efflux systems in the solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the research presented in this thesis was to study the molecular mechanisms of organic solvent tolerance in Pseudomonas putida S12. This bacterium is capable of growth at saturated solvent concentrations, which are lethal to normal bacteria. Organic

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Cyanide-Utilizing Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain NCIMB 11764

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We report here the 6.97-Mb draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain NCIMB 11764, which is capable of growth on cyanide as the sole nitrogen source. The draft genome sequence allowed the discovery of several genes implicated in enzymatic cyanide turnover and provided additional information contributing to a better understanding of this organism's unique cyanotrophic ability. This is the first sequenced genome of a cyanide-assimilating bacterium.

  9. Draft genome sequence of the cyanide-utilizing bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain NCIMB 11764.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilo, Claudia A; Benedik, Michael J; Kunz, Daniel A; Dong, Qunfeng

    2012-12-01

    We report here the 6.97-Mb draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain NCIMB 11764, which is capable of growth on cyanide as the sole nitrogen source. The draft genome sequence allowed the discovery of several genes implicated in enzymatic cyanide turnover and provided additional information contributing to a better understanding of this organism's unique cyanotrophic ability. This is the first sequenced genome of a cyanide-assimilating bacterium.

  10. Biological control and endophytism of the olive root bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7

    OpenAIRE

    Maldonado González, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Olive (Olea europaea L.) has always been a fundamental crop in the Mediterranean Basin. Driven by the fact, among others, that an increasing number of scientific reports highlight the benefits that olive oil consumption has for human health, olive tree cultivation has spread worldwide to other regions with Mediterranean-type climate. Two relevant pathogens affecting olive trees are the hemibiotrophic soil-borne fungus Verticillium dahliae and the bacterium Pseudomonas savastano...

  11. Copper homeostasis networks in the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Julia; Novoa-Aponte, Lorena; Argüello, José M

    2017-07-31

    Bacterial copper (Cu(+)) homeostasis enables both precise metallation of diverse cuproproteins and control of variable metal levels. To this end, protein networks mobilize Cu(+) to cellular targets with remarkable specificity. However, the understanding of these processes is rather fragmented. Here, we use genome-wide transcriptomic analysis by RNA-Seq to characterize the response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to external 0.5 mM CuSO4, a condition that did not generate pleiotropic effects. Pre-steady (5 min) and steady state (2 h) Cu(+) fluxes, resulted in distinct transcriptome landscapes. Cells quickly responded to Cu(2+) stress by slowing down metabolism. This was restored once steady state was reached. Specific Cu(+) homeostasis genes were strongly regulated in both conditions. Our systemwide analysis revealed induction of three Cu(+) efflux systems (a P1B-ATPase, a porin and a resistance-nodulation-division (RND) system), and of a putative Cu(+) binding periplasmic chaperone and the unusual presence of two cytoplasmic CopZ proteins. Both CopZ chaperones could bind Cu(+) with high affinity. Importantly, novel transmembrane transporters likely mediating Cu(+) influx were among those largely repressed upon Cu(+) stress. Compartmental Cu(+) levels appear independently controlled; the cytoplasmic Cu(+) sensor CueR controls cytoplasmic chaperones and plasma membrane transporters; while CopR/S responds to periplasmic Cu(+) Analysis of ΔcopR and ΔcueR mutant strains revealed a CopR regulon composed of genes involved in periplasmic Cu(+) homeostasis and its putative DNA recognition sequence. In conclusion our study established a system-wide model of a network of sensors/regulators, soluble chaperones, and influx/efflux transporters that control theCu(+) levels in P. aeruginosa compartments. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  12. Pseudomonas glareae sp. nov., a marine sediment-derived bacterium with antagonistic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Lyudmila A; Tanaka, Naoto; Svetashev, Vassilii I; Mikhailov, Valery V

    2015-06-01

    An aerobic, Gram-negative, motile, rod-shaped bacterium designated KMM 9500(T) was isolated from a sediment sample collected from the Sea of Japan seashore. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis affiliated strain KMM 9500(T) to the genus Pseudomonas as a distinct subline clustered with Pseudomonas marincola KMM 3042(T) and Pseudomonas segetis KCTC 12331(T) sharing the highest similarities of 98 and 97.9 %, respectively. Strain KMM 9500(T) was characterized by mainly possessing ubiquinone Q-9, and by the predominance of C18:1 ω7c, C16:1 ω7c, and C16:0 followed by C12:0 in its fatty acid profile. Polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unknown aminophospholipid, and unknown phospholipids. Strain KMM 9500(T) was found to inhibit growth of Gram-negative and Gram-positive indicatory microorganisms. Based on the phylogenetic analysis and distinctive phenotypic characteristics, strain 9500(T) is concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas glareae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the species is strain KMM 9500(T) (=NRIC 0939(T)).

  13. The complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jin; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Zhenyu; Heikkila, John J; Glick, Bernard R

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs) were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated "housekeeping" genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup.

  14. The complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Duan

    Full Text Available The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated "housekeeping" genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup.

  15. Draft whole genome sequence of the cyanide-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Almagro, Víctor M; Acera, Felipe; Igeño, Ma Isabel; Wibberg, Daniel; Roldán, Ma Dolores; Sáez, Lara P; Hennig, Magdalena; Quesada, Alberto; Huertas, Ma José; Blom, Jochen; Merchán, Faustino; Escribano, Ma Paz; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Estepa, Jessica; Guijo, Ma Isabel; Martínez-Luque, Manuel; Macías, Daniel; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Becerra, Gracia; Ramirez, Silvia; Carmona, Ma Isabel; Gutiérrez, Oscar; Manso, Isabel; Pühler, Alfred; Castillo, Francisco; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Schlüter, Andreas; Blasco, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 is a Gram-negative bacterium able to tolerate cyanide and to use it as the sole nitrogen source. We report here the first draft of the whole genome sequence of a P. pseudoalcaligenes strain that assimilates cyanide. Three aspects are specially emphasized in this manuscript. First, some generalities of the genome are shown and discussed in the context of other Pseudomonadaceae genomes, including genome size, G + C content, core genome and singletons among other features. Second, the genome is analysed in the context of cyanide metabolism, describing genes probably involved in cyanide assimilation, like those encoding nitrilases, and genes related to cyanide resistance, like the cio genes encoding the cyanide insensitive oxidases. Finally, the presence of genes probably involved in other processes with a great biotechnological potential like production of bioplastics and biodegradation of pollutants also is discussed.

  16. Antibiotic stress selects against cooperation in the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasse, Marie; Noble, Robert J.; Akhmetzhanov, Andrei R.; Torres-Barceló, Clara; Gurney, James; Benateau, Simon; Gougat-Barbera, Claire; Kaltz, Oliver; Hochberg, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    Cheats are a pervasive threat to public goods production in natural and human communities, as they benefit from the commons without contributing to it. Although ecological antagonisms such as predation, parasitism, competition, and abiotic environmental stress play key roles in shaping population biology, it is unknown how such stresses generally affect the ability of cheats to undermine cooperation. We used theory and experiments to address this question in the pathogenic bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although public goods producers were selected against in all populations, our competition experiments showed that antibiotics significantly increased the advantage of nonproducers. Moreover, the dominance of nonproducers in mixed cultures was associated with higher resistance to antibiotics than in either monoculture. Mathematical modeling indicates that accentuated costs to producer phenotypes underlie the observed patterns. Mathematical analysis further shows how these patterns should generalize to other taxa with public goods behaviors. Our findings suggest that explaining the maintenance of cooperative public goods behaviors in certain natural systems will be more challenging than previously thought. Our results also have specific implications for the control of pathogenic bacteria using antibiotics and for understanding natural bacterial ecosystems, where subinhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials frequently occur. PMID:28049833

  17. Degradation of Reactive Black 5 dye by a newly isolated bacterium Pseudomonas entomophila BS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sana; Malik, Abdul

    2016-03-01

    The textile and dye industries are considered as one of the major sources of environmental pollution. The present study was conducted to investigate the degradation of the azo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB 5) using a bacterium isolated from soil samples collected around a textile industry. The bacterial strain BS1 capable of degrading RB 5 was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas entomophila on the basis of 16S rDNA sequencing. The effects of different parameters on the degradation of RB 5 were studied to find out the optimal conditions required for maximum degradation, which was 93% after 120 h of incubation. Static conditions with pH in the range of 5-9 and a temperature of 37 °C were found to be optimum for degrading RB 5. Enzyme assays demonstrated that P. entomophila possessed azoreductase, which played an important role in degradation. The enzyme was dependent on flavin mononucleotide and NADH for its activity. Furthermore, a possible degradation pathway of the dye was proposed through gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analysis, which revealed that the metabolic products were naphthalene-1,2-diamine and 4-(methylsulfonyl) aniline. Thus the ability of this indigenous bacterial isolate for simultaneous decolorization and degradation of the azo dye signifies its potential application for treatment of industrial wastewaters containing azo dyes.

  18. Biodegradation of acephate and methamidophos by a soil bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain Is-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramu, Sasikala; Seetharaman, Barathi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize a new acephate-degrading bacteria from agricultural soil and to investigate its biodegradation ability and pathway of degradation. A bacterial strain Is-6, isolated from agriculture soil could completely degrade and utilize acephate as the sole carbon, phosphorus and energy sources for growth in M9 medium. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence and phenotypic analysis suggested that the strain Is-6 was belonging to the genus Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Strain Is-6 could completely degrade acephate (50 mg L(-1)) and its metabolites within 96 h were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analyses. When exposed to the higher concentration, the strain Is-6 showed 92% degradation of acephate (1000 mg L(-1)) within 7 days of incubation. It could also utilize dimethoate, parathion, methyl parathion, chlorpyrifos and malathion. The inoculation of strain Is-6 (10(7) cells g(-1)) to acephate (50 mg Kg(-1))-treated soil resulted in higher degradation rate than in noninoculated soils. These results highlight the potential of this bacterium to be used in the cleanup of contaminated pesticide waste in the environment.

  19. Toxicity of Phenol and Salt on the Phenol-Degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Phenolic compounds, phenol and phenol derivatives are environmental contaminants in some industrial effluents. Entrance of such substances into the environment causes severe environmental pollution, especially pollution of water resources. Biological treatment is a method that uses the potential of microorganisms to clean up contaminated environments. Among microorganisms, bacteria play an important role in treating wastewater contaminated with phenol. Objectives This study aimed to examine the effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on degradation of phenol in wastewater contaminated with this pollutant. Methods In this method, the growth rate of P. aeruginosa bacteria was investigated using different concentrations of salt and phenol. This is an experimental study conducted as a pilot in a batch reactor with different concentrations of phenol (25, 50, 100, 150, 300 and 600 mg L-1 and salt (0%, 0.5%, 1%, 2.5% and 5% during 9, 12 and 15 hours. During three days, from 5 experimental and 3 control samples, 18 samples were taken a day forming a sample size of 54 samples for each phenol concentration. Given the number of phenol concentrations (n = 6, a total of 324 samples were analyzed using a spectrophotometer at a wavelength of 600 nm. Results The phenol concentration of 600 mg L-1 was toxic for P. aeruginosa. However, at a certain concentration, it acts as a carbon source for P. aeruginosa. During investigations, it was found that increasing the concentration of phenol increases the rate of bacteria growth. The highest bacteria growth rate occurred was at the salt concentration of zero and phenol concentration of 600 mg L-1. Conclusions The findings of the current study indicate that at high concentrations of salt, the growth of bacteria reduces so that it stops at a concentration of 50 mg L-1 (5%. Thus, the bacterium is halotolerant or halophilic. With an increase in phenol concentration, the growth rate increased. Phenol toxicity appears

  20. Effects of an algicidal bacterium Pseudomonas mendocina on the growth and antioxidant system of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shunyu; Tang, Dongshan; Liu, Yongding

    2009-08-01

    Evident effect of an algicidal bacterium Pseudomonas mendocina on the growth and antioxidant system of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae was detected in this experiment. Seven parameters including the chlorophyll a contents, Fv/Fm values, reactive oxygen species (ROS), malonaldehyde (MDA), catalase (CAT), peroxide dismutase (POD), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were tested in the cyanobacterium A. flos-aquae cells after inoculation with the algicidal bacterium Pseudomonas mendocina DC10. It was shown from the experiment that the growth of the treated cyanobacterium A. flos-aquae was significantly restrained, which was expressed as great reductions in the chlorophyll a contents and Fv/Fm values. At the same time, the treated cyanobacterial cells exhibited an obvious increase in the production of ROS and MDA compared with the control. CAT and POD activities in the treated group kept at high level, however, they both reduced significantly on day 6. SOD activities in the treated A. flos-aquae showed obvious declines after inoculation, and great augmentations on day 3 and 4, thereafter, they kept in a declining tendency. The results showed the oxidative stresses induced by the bacterium could be a killing agent of the cyanobacterium A. flos-aquae cells.

  1. Recombineering and stable integration of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae 61 hrp/hrc cluster into the genome of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, William J; Thireault, Caitlin A; Kimbrel, Jeffrey A; Chang, Jeff H

    2009-12-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use a type III secretion system (T3SS) to establish associations with their hosts. The T3SS is a conduit for direct injection of type-III effector proteins into host cells, where they manipulate the host for the benefit of the infecting bacterium. For plant-associated pathogens, the variations in number and amino acid sequences of type-III effectors, as well as their functional redundancy, make studying type-III effectors challenging. To mitigate this challenge, we developed a stable delivery system for individual or defined sets of type-III effectors into plant cells. We used recombineering and Tn5-mediated transposition to clone and stably integrate, respectively, the complete hrp/hrc region from Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae 61 into the genome of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1. We describe our development of Effector-to-Host Analyzer (EtHAn), and demonstrate its utility for studying effectors for their in planta functions.

  2. Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344, a cyanide-degrading bacterium with by-product (polyhydroxyalkanoates) formation capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso Cobos, Isabel; Ibáñez García, María Isabel; de la Peña Moreno, Fernando; Sáez Melero, Lara Paloma; Luque-Almagro, Víctor Manuel; Castillo Rodríguez, Francisco; Roldán Ruiz, María Dolores; Prieto Jiménez, María Auxiliadora; Moreno Vivián, Conrado

    2015-06-10

    Cyanide is one of the most toxic chemicals produced by anthropogenic activities like mining and jewelry industries, which generate wastewater residues with high concentrations of this compound. Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 is a model microorganism to be used in detoxification of industrial wastewaters containing not only free cyanide (CN(-)) but also cyano-derivatives, such as cyanate, nitriles and metal-cyanide complexes. Previous in silico analyses suggested the existence of genes putatively involved in metabolism of short chain length (scl-) and medium chain length (mcl-) polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) located in three different clusters in the genome of this bacterium. PHAs are polyesters considered as an alternative of petroleum-based plastics. Strategies to optimize the bioremediation process in terms of reducing the cost of the production medium are required. In this work, a biological treatment of the jewelry industry cyanide-rich wastewater coupled to PHAs production as by-product has been considered. The functionality of the pha genes from P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 has been demonstrated. Mutant strains defective in each proposed PHA synthases coding genes (Mpha(-), deleted in putative mcl-PHA synthases; Spha(-), deleted in the putative scl-PHA synthase) were generated. The accumulation and monomer composition of scl- or mcl-PHAs in wild type and mutant strains were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The production of PHAs as by-product while degrading cyanide from the jewelry industry wastewater was analyzed in batch reactor in each strain. The wild type and the mutant strains grew at similar rates when using octanoate as the carbon source and cyanide as the sole nitrogen source. When cyanide was depleted from the medium, both scl-PHAs and mcl-PHAs were detected in the wild-type strain, whereas scl-PHAs or mcl-PHAs were accumulated in Mpha(-) and Spha(-), respectively. The scl-PHAs were identified as homopolymers of 3

  3. Denitrification activity of the bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ASM-2-3 isolated from the Ariake Sea tideland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariminiaae-Hamedaani, Hamid-Reza; Kanda, Kohzo; Kato, Fumio

    2004-01-01

    A new denitrifying bacterium strain ASM-2-3 was isolated from the Ariake Sea tideland, Japan. The isolate had the capability to fully remove as high as 225.8 mg nitrate-nitrogen.l(-1) under stationary culture conditions without accumulation of nitrite as an intermediate. From biochemical tests and 16S rDNA sequencing analysis, the genus of the bacterium was identified as Pseudomonas and close to stutzeri species. The nitrate removal efficiency of the isolate was faster than that of the control strain Pseudomonas stutzeri NBRC 14165, using succinate as the sole carbon source. The isolate could grow in up to 10% (w/v) of NaCl containing medium. The enzymatic tests showed that the activity of enzymes responsible for the reduction of nitrate and nitrite in strain ASM-2-3 was 1.4 and 2.3 times higher than that of the control strain. The feasibility of application of the isolate strain ASM-2-3 in a packed bed bioreactor was investigated for 40 d.

  4. Siderophore-mediated iron acquisition in the entomopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas entomophila L48 and its close relative Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthijs, Sandra; Laus, Georges; Meyer, Jean-Marie; Abbaspour-Tehrani, Kourosch; Schäfer, Mathias; Budzikiewicz, Herbert; Cornelis, Pierre

    2009-12-01

    Pseudomonas entomophila L48 is a recently identified entomopathogenic bacterium which, upon ingestion, kills Drosophila melanogaster, and is closely related to P. putida. The complete genome of this species has been sequenced and therefore a genomic, genetic and structural analysis of the siderophore-mediated iron acquisition was undertaken. P. entomophila produces two siderophores, a structurally new and unique pyoverdine and the secondary siderophore pseudomonine, already described in P. fluorescens species. Structural analysis of the pyoverdine produced by the closely related P. putida KT2440 showed that this strain produces an already characterised pyoverdine, but different from P. entomophila, and no evidence was found for the production of a second siderophore. Growth stimulation assays with heterologous pyoverdines demonstrated that P. entomophila is able to utilize a large variety of structurally distinct pyoverdines produced by other Pseudomonas species. In contrast, P. putida KT2440 is able to utilize only its own pyoverdine and the pyoverdine produced by P. syringae LMG 1247. Our data suggest that although closely related, P. entomophila is a more efficient competitor for iron than P. putida.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas hussainii Strain MB3, a Denitrifying Aerobic Bacterium Isolated from the Rhizospheric Region of Mangrove Trees in the Andaman Islands, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Shubham K; Saxena, Rituja; Mittal, Parul; Gupta, Ankit; Sharma, Vineet K

    2017-02-02

    The genome sequence of Pseudomonas hussainii MB3, isolated from the rhizospheric region of mangroves in the Andaman Islands, is comprised of 3,644,788 bp and 3,159 protein coding genes. Draft genome analysis indicates that MB3 is an aerobic bacterium capable of performing assimilatory sulfate reduction, dissimilatory nitrate reduction, and denitrification.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Phosphate-Solubilizing Bacterium Pseudomonas argentinensis Strain SA190 Isolated from the Desert Plant Indigofera argentea

    KAUST Repository

    Lafi, Feras Fawzi

    2016-12-23

    Pseudomonas argentinensis strain SA190 is a plant endophytic-inhabiting bacterium that was isolated from root nodules of the desert plant Indigofera argentea collected from the Jizan region of Saudi Arabia. Here, we report the genome sequence of SA190, highlighting several functional genes related to plant growth-promoting activity, environment adaption, and antifungal activity.

  7. Responses of a soil bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 to commercial metal oxide nanoparticles compared with responses to metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimkpa, Christian O., E-mail: cdimkpa@usu.edu [Department of Biological Engineering, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 (United States); Calder, Alyssa; Britt, David W. [Department of Biological Engineering, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 (United States); McLean, Joan E. [Utah Water Research Laboratory, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 (United States); Anderson, Anne J. [Department of Biology, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    The toxicity of commercially-available CuO and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) to pathogenic bacteria was compared for a beneficial rhizosphere isolate, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6. The NPs aggregated, released ions to different extents under the conditions used for bacterial exposure, and associated with bacterial cell surface. Bacterial surface charge was neutralized by NPs, dependent on pH. The CuO NPs were more toxic than the ZnO NPs. The negative surface charge on colloids of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was reduced by Cu ions but not by CuO NPs; the EPS protected cells from CuO NPs-toxicity. CuO NPs-toxicity was eliminated by a Cu ion chelator, suggesting that ion release was involved. Neither NPs released alkaline phosphatase from the cells' periplasm, indicating minimal outer membrane damage. Accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species was correlated with CuO NPs lethality. Environmental deposition of NPs could create niches for ion release, with impacts on susceptible soil microbes. - Highlights: > Toxicity of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) was evaluated in a beneficial bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 (PcO6). > Aggregated commercial CuO and ZnO NPs released Cu and Zn ions and changed bacterial surface charge, depending on pH. > The NPs were toxic to PcO6 through NP-specific, but also ion release mechanisms. > Reactive oxygen species were produced by CuO NP and Cu ion at lethal concentrations, but bacterial EPS protected against Cu. > The periplasmic marker, alkaline phosphate, activity was increased by the NPs and ions. - Aggregated CuO and ZnO nanoparticles release ions and cause different toxicities in a beneficial soil bacterium.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Se(IV)-Reducing Bacterium Pseudomonas migulae ES3-33

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xuanji; Kot, Witold; Wang, Dan;

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas migulae ES3-33 is a Gram-negative strain that strongly reduces Se(IV) and was isolated from a selenium mining area in Enshi, southwest China. Here we present the draft genome of this strain containing potential genes involved in selenite reduction and a large number of genes encoding...

  9. Physiological and biochemical characterization of a novel nicotine-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas geniculata N1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanghui Liu

    Full Text Available Management of solid wastes with high nicotine content, such as those accumulated during tobacco manufacturing, poses a major challenge, which can be addressed by using bacteria such as Pseudomonas and Arthrobacter. In this study, a new species of Pseudomonas geniculata, namely strain N1, which is capable of efficiently degrading nicotine, was isolated and identified. The optimal growth conditions for strain N1 are a temperature of 30°C, and a pH 6.5, at a rotation rate of 120 rpm min(-1 with 1 g l(-1 nicotine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. Myosmine, cotinine, 6-hydroxynicotine, 6-hydroxy-N-methylmyosmine, and 6-hydroxy-pseudooxynicotine were detected as the five intermediates through gas chromatography-mass and liquid chromatography-mass analyses. The identified metabolites were different from those generated by Pseudomonas putida strains. The analysis also highlighted the bacterial metabolic diversity in relation to nicotine degradation by different Pseudomonas strains.

  10. Evolutionary history of the phl gene cluster in the plant-associated bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moynihan, J.A.; Morrissey, J.P.; Coppoolse, E.; Stiekema, W.J.; O'Gara, F.; Boyd, E.F.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is of agricultural and economic importance as a biological control agent largely because of its plant-association and production of secondary metabolites, in particular 2, 4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2, 4-DAPG). This polyketide, which is encoded by the eight gene phl cluster,

  11. Description of Pseudomonas gregormendelii sp. nov., a Novel Psychrotrophic Bacterium from James Ross Island, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosina, Marcel; Švec, Pavel; Černohlávková, Jitka; Barták, Miloš; Snopková, Kateřina; De Vos, Paul; Sedláček, Ivo

    2016-07-01

    During the microbiological research performed within the scope of activities of Czech expeditions based at the Johann Gregor Mendel Station at James Ross Island, Antarctica, two psychrotrophic gram-stain negative non-fluorescent strains CCM 8506T and CCM 8507 from soil were extensively characterized using genotypic and phenotypic methods. Initial characterization using ribotyping with HindIII restriction endonuclease and phenotyping implies that both isolates belong to a single Pseudomonas species. Sequencing of rrs, rpoB, rpoD and glnA genes of strain CCM 8506(T) confirmed affiliation of investigated strains within the genus Pseudomonas. Further investigation using automated ribotyping with EcoRI (RiboPrinter(®) Microbial Characterisation System), whole-cell protein profiling using the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer system, extensive biochemical testing and DNA-DNA hybridization experiments confirmed that both investigated strains are members of a single taxon which is clearly separated from all hitherto described Pseudomonas spp. Based on all findings, we describe a novel species Pseudomonas gregormendelii sp. nov. with the type strain CCM 8506(T) (=LMG 28632T).

  12. Rapid biodegradation and decolorization of Direct Orange 39 (Orange TGLL) by an isolated bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BCH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Jyoti P; Phugare, Swapnil S; Dhanve, Rhishikesh S; Jadhav, Shekhar B

    2010-06-01

    A newly isolated novel bacterium from sediments contaminated with dyestuff was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BCH by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The bacterium was extraordinarily active and operative over a wide rage of temperature (10-60 degrees C) and salinity (5-6%), for decolorization of Direct Orange 39 (Orange TGLL) at optimum pH 7. This strain was capable of decolorizing Direct Orange 39; 50 mg l(-1) within 45 +/- 5 min, with 93.06% decolorization, while maximally it could decolorize 1.5 g l(-1) of dye within 48 h with 60% decolorization. Analytical studies as, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR, HPLC were employed to confirm the biodegradation of dye and formation of new metabolites. Induction in the activities of lignin peroxidases, DCIP reductase as well as tyrosinase was observed, indicating the significant role of these enzymes in biodegradation of Direct Orange 39. Toxicity studies with Phaseolus mungo and Triticum aestivum revealed the non-toxic nature of degraded metabolites.

  13. No apparent costs for facultative antibiotic production by the soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1.

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    Paolina Garbeva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many soil-inhabiting bacteria are known to produce secondary metabolites that can suppress microorganisms competing for the same resources. The production of antimicrobial compounds is expected to incur fitness costs for the producing bacteria. Such costs form the basis for models on the co-existence of antibiotic-producing and non-antibiotic producing strains. However, so far studies quantifying the costs of antibiotic production by bacteria are scarce. The current study reports on possible costs, for antibiotic production by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1, a soil bacterium that is induced to produce a broad-spectrum antibiotic when it is confronted with non-related bacterial competitors or supernatants of their cultures. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured the possible cost of antibiotic production for Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 by monitoring changes in growth rate with and without induction of antibiotic production by supernatant of a bacterial competitor, namely Pedobacter sp.. Experiments were performed in liquid as well as on semi-solid media under nutrient-limited conditions that are expected to most clearly reveal fitness costs. Our results did not reveal any significant costs for production of antibiotics by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1. Comparison of growth rates of the antibiotic-producing wild-type cells with those of non-antibiotic producing mutants did not reveal costs of antibiotic production either. SIGNIFICANCE: Based on our findings we propose that the facultative production of antibiotics might not be selected to mitigate metabolic costs, but instead might be advantageous because it limits the risk of competitors evolving resistance, or even the risk of competitors feeding on the compounds produced.

  14. Pseudomonas coleopterorum sp. nov., a cellulase-producing bacterium isolated from the bark beetle Hylesinus fraxini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Esther; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha H; Fabryová, Anna; Igual, José M; Benada, Oldrich; Mateos, Pedro F; Peix, Alvaro; Kolařík, Miroslav; García-Fraile, Paula

    2015-09-01

    We isolated a strain coded Esc2Am(T) during a study focused on the microbial diversity of adult specimens of the bark beetle Hylesinus fraxini. Its 16S rRNA gene sequence had 99.4% similarity with respect to its closest relative, Pseudomonas rhizosphaerae IH5(T). The analysis of partial sequences of the housekeeping genes rpoB, rpoD and gyrB confirmed that strain Esc2Am(T) formed a cluster with P. rhizosphaerae IH5(T) clearly separated from the remaining species of the genus Pseudomonas. Strain Esc2Am(T) had polar flagella and could grow at temperatures from 4 °C to 30 °C. The respiratory quinone was Q9 and the main fatty acids were C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c in summed feature 8 and C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c in summed feature 3. DNA-DNA hybridization results showed 51% relatedness with respect to P. rhizosphaerae IH5(T). Oxidase, catalase and urease-positive, the arginine dihydrolase system was present but nitrate reduction and β-galactosidase production were negative. Aesculin hydrolysis was positive. Based on the results from the genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic analyses, we propose the classification of strain Esc2Am(T) as representing a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which we propose the name Pseudomonas coleopterorum sp. nov. The type strain is Esc2Am(T) ( = LMG 28558(T)= CECT 8695(T)).

  15. Pseudomonas yamanorum sp. nov., a psychrotolerant bacterium isolated from a subantarctic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnau, Víctor Gonzalo; Sánchez, Leandro Arturo; Delgado, Osvaldo Daniel

    2015-02-01

    A psychrotolerant strain, 8H1(T), was isolated from soil samples collected in Isla de los Estados, Ushuaia, Argentina. Cells were Gram-negative, aerobic, straight rods, occurring singly or in pairs, non-spore-forming and motile by means of two polar flagella. The isolate was able to grow in the range 4-35 °C, with optimum growth at 28 °C. The predominant cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω6c and/or C16 : 1ω7c), C16 : 0 and summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω6c and/or C18 : 1ω7c). The polar lipid pattern of strain 8H1(T) comprised phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and an unknown phospholipid. Ubiquinone 9 (Q-9) was the predominant lipoquinone. The DNA G+C content was 59.8 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogeny suggested the affiliation of strain 8H1(T) to the 'Pseudomonas fluorescens group', displaying ≥98.5 % sequence similarity to 29 type strains. A multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) study performed by concatenating 16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoD and rpoB gene sequences showed that isolate 8H1(T) could be discriminated from closely related species of the genus Pseudomonas and placed in the 'Pseudomonas gessardii subgroup', including the species with the highest MLSA sequence similarities: Pseudomonas brenneri (96.2 %), P. gessardii (96.1 %), P. proteolytica (96.0 %), P. meridiana (96.0 %) and P. mucidolens (95.4 %). DNA-DNA hybridization analysis between 8H1(T) and the type strains of these closely related species revealed relatedness values of 27.0, 8.8, 41.2, 39.7 and 46.1 %, respectively. These results, together with differences in several phenotypic features, support the classification of a novel species, for which the name Pseudomonas yamanorum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 8H1(T) ( = DSM 26522(T) = CCUG 63249(T) = LMG 27247(T)).

  16. Soil components mitigate the antimicrobial effects of silver nanoparticles towards a beneficial soil bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calder, Alyssa J. [Department of Biological Engineering, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 (United States); Dimkpa, Christian O. [Department of Biological Engineering, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 (United States); Department of Biology, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 (United States); McLean, Joan E. [Utah Water Research Laboratory, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 (United States); Britt, David W. [Department of Biological Engineering, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 (United States); Johnson, William [Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Anderson, Anne J., E-mail: anne.anderson@usu.edu [Department of Biology, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are widely used for their antimicrobial activity and consequently the particles will become environmental contaminants. This study evaluated in sand and soil matrices the toxicity of 10 nm spherical Ag NPs (1 and 3 mg Ag/L) toward a beneficial soil bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6. In sand, both NP doses resulted in loss in bacterial culturability whereas in a loam soil, no cell death was observed. Amendments of sand with clays (30% v/v kaolinite or bentonite) did not protect the bacterium when challenged with Ag NPs. However, culturability of the bacterium was maintained when the Ag NP-amended sand was mixed with soil pore water or humic acid. Imaging by atomic force microscopy revealed aggregation of single nanoparticles in water, and their embedding into background material when suspended in pore water and humic acids. Zeta potential measurements supported aggregation and surface charge modifications with pore water and humic acids. Measurement of soluble Ag in the microcosms and geochemical modeling to deduce the free ion concentration revealed bacterial culturability was governed by the predicted free Ag ion concentrations. Our study confirmed the importance of Ag NPs as a source of ions and illustrated that processes accounting for protection in soil against Ag NPs involved distinct NP- and ion-effects. Processes affecting NP bioactivity involved surface charge changes due to sorption of Ca{sup 2+} from the pore water leading to agglomeration and coating of the NPs with humic acid and other organic materials. Removal of bioactive ions included the formation of soluble Ag complexes with dissolved organic carbon and precipitation of Ag ions with chloride in pore water. We conclude that mitigation of toxicity of Ag NPs in soils towards a soil bacterium resides in several interactions that differentially involve protection from the Ag NPs or the ions they produce. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silver nanoparticles

  17. Biodegradation of reactive textile dye Red BLI by an isolated bacterium Pseudomonas sp. SUK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyani, D C; Patil, P S; Jadhav, J P; Govindwar, S P

    2008-07-01

    A novel bacterial strain capable of decolorizing reactive textile dye Red BLI is isolated from the soil sample collected from contaminated sites of textile industry from Solapur, India. The bacterial isolate was identified as Pseudomonas sp. SUK1 on the basis of 16S rDNA analysis. The Pseudomonas sp. SUK1 decolorized Red BLI (50 mg l(-1)) 99.28% within 1h under static anoxic condition at pH range from 6.5 to 7.0 and 30 degrees C. This strain has ability to decolorize various reactive textile dyes. UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR and TLC analysis of samples before and after dye decolorization in culture medium confirmed decolorization of Red BLI. A significant increase in the activities of aminopyrine N-demethylase and NADH-DCIP reductase in cells obtained after decolorization indicates involvement of these enzymes in the decolorization process. Phytotoxicity testing with the seeds of Sorghum vulgare and Phaseolus mungo, showed more sensitivity towards the dye, while the products obtained after dye decolorization does not have any inhibitory effects.

  18. Does S-metolachlor affect the performance of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP as bioaugmentation bacterium for atrazine-contaminated soils?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina A Viegas

    Full Text Available Atrazine (ATZ and S-metolachlor (S-MET are two herbicides widely used, often as mixtures. The present work examined whether the presence of S-MET affects the ATZ-biodegradation activity of the bioaugmentation bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP in a crop soil. S-MET concentrations were selected for their relevance in worst-case scenarios of soil contamination by a commercial formulation containing both herbicides. At concentrations representative of application of high doses of the formulation (up to 50 µg g(-1 of soil, corresponding to a dose approximately 50× higher than the recommended field dose (RD, the presence of pure S-MET significantly affected neither bacteria survival (~10(7 initial viable cells g(-1 of soil nor its ATZ-mineralization activity. Consistently, biodegradation experiments, in larger soil microcosms spiked with 20× or 50 × RD of the double formulation and inoculated with the bacterium, revealed ATZ to be rapidly (in up to 5 days and extensively (>96% removed from the soil. During the 5 days, concentration of S-MET decreased moderately to about 60% of the initial, both in inoculated and non-inoculated microcosms. Concomitantly, an accumulation of the two metabolites S-MET ethanesulfonic acid and S-MET oxanilic acid was found. Despite the dissipation of almost all the ATZ from the treated soils, the respective eluates were still highly toxic to an aquatic microalgae species, being as toxic as those from the untreated soil. We suggest that this high toxicity may be due to the S-MET and/or its metabolites remaining in the soil.

  19. Interaction of Pb(II) and biofilm associated extracellular polymeric substances of a marine bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes NP103

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Supriya; Mangwani, Neelam; Das, Surajit

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3D EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to evaluate the interaction of biofilm associated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of a marine bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes NP103 with lead [Pb(II)]. EEM fluorescence spectroscopic analysis revealed the presence of one protein-like fluorophore in the EPS of P. pseudoalcaligenes NP103. Stern-Volmer equation indicated the existence of only one binding site (n = 0.789) in the EPS of P. pseudoalcaligenes NP103. The interaction of Pb(II) with EPS was spontaneous at room temperature (∆ G = - 2.78 kJ/K/mol) having binding constant (Kb) of 2.59 M- 1. ATR-FTIR analysis asserted the involvement of various functional groups such as sulphydryl, phosphate and hydroxyl and amide groups of protein in Pb(II) binding. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy analysis displayed reduced growth of biofilm with altered surface topology in Pb(II) supplemented medium. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis revealed the entrapment of Pb in the EPS. Uronic acid, a characteristic functional group of biofilm, was observed in 1H NMR spectroscopy. The findings suggest that biofilm associated EPS are perfect organic ligands for Pb(II) complexation and may significantly augment the bioavailability of Pb(II) in the metal contaminated environment for subsequent sequestration.

  20. Isolation, plant colonization potential, and phenanthrene degradation performance of the endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. Ph6-gfp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Liu, Juan; Gao, Yanzheng; Jin, Li; Gu, Yujun; Wang, Wanqing

    2014-06-01

    This investigation provides a novel method of endophyte-aided removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from plant bodies. A phenanthrene-degrading endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. Ph6 was isolated from clover (Trifolium pratense L.) grown in a PAH-contaminated site. After being marked with the GFP gene, the colonization and distribution of strain Ph6-gfp was directly visualized in plant roots, stems, and leaves for the first time. After ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) roots inoculation, strain Ph6-gfp actively and internally colonized plant roots and transferred vertically to the shoots. Ph6-gfp had a natural capacity to cope with phenanthrene in vitro and in planta. Ph6-gfp degraded 81.1% of phenanthrene (50 mg.L-1) in a culture solution within 15 days. The inoculation of plants with Ph6-gfp reduced the risks associated with plant phenanthrene contamination based on observations of decreased concentration, accumulation, and translocation factors of phenanthrene in ryegrass. Our results will have important ramifications in the assessment of the environmental risks of PAHs and in finding ways to circumvent plant PAH contamination.

  1. Kinetic analysis and bacterium metabolization of α-pinene by a novel identified Pseudomonas sp.strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuowei Cheng; Pengfei Sun; Yifeng Jiang; Lili Zhang; Jianmeng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Biodegradation has become a popular alternative remediation technology for its economic and ecological advantages.An aerobic bacterium (strain ZW) capable of degrading α-pinene was isolated from a biofilter by a selective enrichment.Based on the 16S rRNA gene analysis and physiochemical properties,this strain was identified as Pseudomonas veronii.Under the optimized condition achieved by the response surface methodology (RSM),as well as pH 6.82,temperature 26.3°C and NaCl concentration 1.36%,almost 100%α-pinene could be removed within 45 hr.Enzymatic biodegradation by the crude intracellular enzyme could be described well by the Michaelis-Menten model in which the maximum degradation rate Vmax and the half-saturation constant Km were calculated to be 0.431 mmol/(L.min) and 0.169 mmol/L,respectively.Activity assay of catechol suggested that the strain ZW possessed a catechol1,2-dioxygenase and could decompose benzene-ring through ortho ring cleavage.Based on the identified intermediates by GC/MS,a new metabolic pathway was proposed,in which the final metabolites were some simpler organic and inorganic compounds.The present work demonstrated that the strain ZW would have a great application prospect for the remediation of α-pinene-contaminated environment.

  2. Simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification by the marine origin bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ADN-42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ruofei; Liu, Tianqi; Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Huang, Jianyu; Wang, Aijie

    2015-02-01

    Recent research has highlighted the existence of some bacteria that are capable of performing heterotrophic nitrification and have a phenomenal ability to denitrify their nitrification products under aerobic conditions. A high-salinity-tolerant strain ADN-42 was isolated from Hymeniacidon perleve and found to display high heterotrophic ammonium removal capability. This strain was identified as Pseudomonas sp. via 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Gene cloning and sequencing analysis indicated that the bacterial genome contains N2O reductase function (nosZ) gene. NH3-N removal rate of ADN-42 was very high. And the highest removal rate was 6.52 mg/L · h in the presence of 40 g/L NaCl. Under the condition of pure oxygen (DO >8 mg/L), NH3-N removal efficiency was 56.9 %. Moreover, 38.4 % of oxygen remained in the upper gas space during 72 h without greenhouse gas N2O production. Keeping continuous and low level of dissolved oxygen (DO <3 mg/L) was helpful for better denitrification performance. All these results indicated that the strain has heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification abilities, which guarantee future application in wastewater treatment.

  3. Impact of a Recombinant Biocontrol Bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78, on Microbial Community in Tomato Rhizosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Gi Kong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78 is an effective biocontrol agent for soil-borne fungal diseases. We previously constructed a P43-gfp tagged biocontrol bacteria P. fluorescens pc78-48 to investigate bacterial traits in natural ecosystem and the environmental risk of genetically modified biocontrol bacteria in tomato rhizosphere. Fluctuation of culturable bacteria profile, microbial community structure, and potential horizontal gene transfer was investigated over time after the bacteria treatment to the tomato rhizosphere. Tagged gene transfer to other organisms such as tomato plants and bacteria cultured on various media was examined by polymerase chain reaction, using gene specific primers. Transfer of chromosomally integrated P43-gfp from pc78 to other organisms was not apparent. Population and colony types of culturable bacteria were not significantly affected by the introduction of P. fluorescens pc78 or pc78-48 into tomato rhizosphere. Additionally, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles were investigated to estimate the influence on the microbial community structure in tomato rhizosphere between non-treated and pc78-48-treated samples. Interestingly, rhizosphere soil treated with strain pc78-48 exhibited a significantly different bacterial community structure compared to that of non-treated rhizosphere soil. Our results suggest that biocontrol bacteria treatment influences microbial community in tomato rhizosphere, while the chromosomally modified biocontrol bacteria may not pose any specific environmental risk in terms of gene transfer.

  4. Impact of a Recombinant Biocontrol Bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78, on Microbial Community in Tomato Rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Hyun Gi; Kim, Nam Hee; Lee, Seung Yeup; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78 is an effective biocontrol agent for soil-borne fungal diseases. We previously constructed a P43-gfp tagged biocontrol bacteria P. fluorescens pc78-48 to investigate bacterial traits in natural ecosystem and the environmental risk of genetically modified biocontrol bacteria in tomato rhizosphere. Fluctuation of culturable bacteria profile, microbial community structure, and potential horizontal gene transfer was investigated over time after the bacteria treatment to the tomato rhizosphere. Tagged gene transfer to other organisms such as tomato plants and bacteria cultured on various media was examined by polymerase chain reaction, using gene specific primers. Transfer of chromosomally integrated P43-gfp from pc78 to other organisms was not apparent. Population and colony types of culturable bacteria were not significantly affected by the introduction of P. fluorescens pc78 or pc78-48 into tomato rhizosphere. Additionally, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles were investigated to estimate the influence on the microbial community structure in tomato rhizosphere between non-treated and pc78-48-treated samples. Interestingly, rhizosphere soil treated with strain pc78-48 exhibited a significantly different bacterial community structure compared to that of non-treated rhizosphere soil. Our results suggest that biocontrol bacteria treatment influences microbial community in tomato rhizosphere, while the chromosomally modified biocontrol bacteria may not pose any specific environmental risk in terms of gene transfer.

  5. Getting the ecology into interactions between plants and the plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. H. Gera eHol

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR are increasingly appreciated for their contributions to primary productivity through promotion of growth and triggering of induced systemic resistance in plants. Here we focus on the beneficial effects of one particular species of PGPR (Pseudomonas fluorescens on plants through induced plant defence. This model organism has provided much understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of PGPR-induced plant defence. However, this knowledge can only be appreciated at full value once we know to what extent these mechanisms also occur under more realistic, species-diverse conditions as are occurring in the plant rhizosphere. To provide the necessary ecological context, we review the literature to compare the effect of P. fluorescens on induced plant defence when it is present as a single species or in combination with other soil dwelling species. Specifically, we discuss combinations with other plant mutualists (bacterial or fungal, plant pathogens (bacterial or fungal, bacterivores (nematode or protozoa and decomposers. Synergistic interactions between P. fluorescens and other plant mutualists are much more commonly reported than antagonistic interactions. Recent developments have enabled screenings of P. fluorescens genomes for defence traits and this could help with selection of strains with likely positive interactions on biocontrol. However, studies that examine the effects of multiple herbivores, pathogens, or herbivores and pathogens together on the effectiveness of PGPR to induce plant defences are underrepresented and we are not aware of any study that has examined interactions between P. fluorescens and bacterivores or decomposers. As co-occurring soil organisms can enhance but also reduce the effectiveness of PGPR, a better understanding of the biotic factors modulating P. fluorescens -plant interactions will improve the effectiveness of introducing P. fluorescens to enhance plant production

  6. A Cyanide-Induced 3-Cyanoalanine Nitrilase in the Cyanide-Assimilating Bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes Strain CECT 5344.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acera, Felipe; Carmona, María Isabel; Castillo, Francisco; Quesada, Alberto; Blasco, Rafael

    2017-05-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 is a bacterium able to assimilate cyanide as a sole nitrogen source. Under this growth condition, a 3-cyanoalanine nitrilase enzymatic activity was induced. This activity was encoded by nit4, one of the four nitrilase genes detected in the genome of this bacterium, and its expression in Escherichia coli enabled the recombinant strain to fully assimilate 3-cyanoalanine. P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 showed a weak growth level with 3-cyanoalanine as the N source, unless KCN was also added. Moreover, a nit4 knockout mutant of P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 became severely impaired in its ability to grow with 3-cyanoalanine and cyanide as nitrogen sources. The native enzyme expressed in E. coli was purified up to electrophoretic homogeneity and biochemically characterized. Nit4 seems to be specific for 3-cyanoalanine, and the amount of ammonium derived from the enzymatic activity doubled in the presence of exogenously added asparaginase activity, which demonstrated that the Nit4 enzyme had both 3-cyanoalanine nitrilase and hydratase activities. The nit4 gene is located downstream of the cyanide resistance transcriptional unit containing cio1 genes, whose expression levels are under the positive control of cyanide. Real-time PCR experiments revealed that nit4 expression was also positively regulated by cyanide in both minimal and LB media. These results suggest that this gene cluster including cio1 and nit4 could be involved both in cyanide resistance and in its assimilation by P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344.IMPORTANCE Cyanide is a highly toxic molecule present in some industrial wastes due to its application in several manufacturing processes, such as gold mining and the electroplating industry. The biodegradation of cyanide from contaminated wastes could be an attractive alternative to physicochemical treatment. P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 is a bacterial strain able to assimilate cyanide under alkaline conditions, thus

  7. Novel Essential Role of Ethanol Oxidation Genes at Low Temperature Revealed by Transcriptome Analysis in the Antarctic Bacterium Pseudomonas extremaustralis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribelli, Paula M.; Solar Venero, Esmeralda C.; Ricardi, Martiniano M.; Gómez-Lozano, Maria; Raiger Iustman, Laura J.; Molin, Søren; López, Nancy I.

    2015-01-01

    Temperature is one of the most important factors for bacterial growth and development. Cold environments are widely distributed on earth, and psychrotolerant and psychrophilic microorganisms have developed different adaptation strategies to cope with the stress derived from low temperatures. Pseudomonas extremaustralis is an Antarctic bacterium able to grow under low temperatures and to produce high amounts of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). In this work, we analyzed the genome-wide transcriptome by RNA deep-sequencing technology of early exponential cultures of P. extremaustralis growing in LB (Luria Broth) supplemented with sodium octanoate to favor PHA accumulation at 8°C and 30°C. We found that genes involved in primary metabolism, including tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) related genes, as well as cytochromes and amino acid metabolism coding genes, were repressed at low temperature. Among up-regulated genes, those coding for transcriptional regulatory and signal transduction proteins were over-represented at cold conditions. Remarkably, we found that genes involved in ethanol oxidation, exaA, exaB and exaC, encoding a pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent ethanol dehydrogenase, the cytochrome c550 and an aldehyde dehydrogenase respectively, were up-regulated. Along with RNA-seq experiments, analysis of mutant strains for pqqB (PQQ biosynthesis protein B) and exaA were carried out. We found that the exaA and pqqB genes are essential for growth under low temperature in LB supplemented with sodium octanoate. Additionally, p-rosaniline assay measurements showed the presence of alcohol dehydrogenase activity at both 8°C and 30°C, while the activity was abolished in a pqqB mutant strain. These results together with the detection of ethanol by gas chromatography in P. extremaustralis cultures grown at 8°C support the conclusion that this pathway is important under cold conditions. The obtained results have led to the identification of novel components involved

  8. Antiadhesive activity of the biosurfactant pseudofactin II secreted by the Arctic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BD5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janek Tomasz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudofactin II is a recently identified biosurfactant secreted by Pseudomonas fluorescens BD5, the strain obtained from freshwater from the Arctic Archipelago of Svalbard. Pseudofactin II is a novel compound identified as cyclic lipopeptide with a palmitic acid connected to the terminal amino group of eighth amino acid in peptide moiety. The C-terminal carboxylic group of the last amino acid forms a lactone with the hydroxyl of Thr3. Adhesion is the first stage of biofilm formation and the best moment for the action of antiadhesive and anti-biofilm compounds. Adsorption of biosurfactants to a surface e.g. glass, polystyrene, silicone modifies its hydrophobicity, interfering with the microbial adhesion and desorption processes. In this study the role and applications of pseudofactin II as a antiadhesive compound has been investigated from medicinal and therapeutic perspectives. Results Pseudofactin II lowered the adhesion to three types of surfaces (glass, polystyrene and silicone of bacterial strains of five species: Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus hirae, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Proteus mirabilis and two Candida albicans strains. Pretreatment of a polystyrene surface with 0.5 mg/ml pseudofactin II inhibited bacterial adhesion by 36-90% and that of C. albicans by 92-99%. The same concentration of pseudofactin II dislodged 26-70% of preexisting biofilms grown on previously untreated surfaces. Pseudofactin II also caused a marked inhibition of the initial adhesion of E. faecalis, E. coli, E. hirae and C. albicans strains to silicone urethral catheters. The highest concentration tested (0.5 mg/ml caused a total growth inhibition of S. epidermidis, partial (18-37% inhibition of other bacteria and 8-9% inhibition of C. albicans growth. Conclusion Pseudofactin II showed antiadhesive activity against several pathogenic microorganisms which are potential biofilm formers on catheters, implants and internal

  9. Pyoverdine synthesis by the Mn(II-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Lundquist Parker

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When iron-starved, the Mn(II-oxidizing bacteria Pseudomonas putida strains GB-1 and MnB1 produce pyoverdines (PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1, siderophores that both influence iron uptake and inhibit manganese(II oxidation by these strains. To explore the properties and genetics of a PVD that can affect manganese oxidation, LC-MS/MS and various siderotyping techniques were used to identify the peptides of PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1 as being (for both PVDs: chromophore-Asp-Lys-OHAsp-Ser-Gly-aThr-Lys-cOHOrn, resembling a structure previously reported for P. putida CFML 90-51, which does not oxidize Mn. All three strains also produced an azotobactin and a sulfonated PVD, each with the peptide sequence above, but with unknown regulatory or metabolic effects. Bioinformatic analysis of the sequenced genome of P. putida GB-1 suggested that a particular non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, coded by the operon PputGB1_4083-4086, could produce the peptide backbone of PVDGB-1. To verify this prediction, plasmid integration disruption of PputGB1_4083 was performed and the resulting mutant failed to produce detectable PVD. In silico analysis of the modules in PputGB1_4083-4086 predicted a peptide sequence of Asp-Lys-Asp-Ser-Ala-Thr-Lsy-Orn, which closely matches the peptide determined by MS/MS. To extend these studies to other organisms, various Mn(II-oxidizing and non-oxidizing isolates of P. putida, P. fluorescens, P. marincola, P. fluorescens-syringae group, P. mendocina-resinovorans group and P. stutzerii group were screened for PVD synthesis. The PVD producers (12 out of 16 tested strains were siderotyped and placed into four sets of differing PVD structures, some corresponding to previously characterized PVDs and some to novel PVDs. These results combined with previous studies suggested that the presence of OHAsp or the flexibility of the pyoverdine polypeptide may enable efficient binding of Mn(III.

  10. The biocontrol endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 induces systemic defense responses in aerial tissues upon colonization of olive roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eGómez-Lama Cabanás

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7, a native olive root endophyte and effective biocontrol agent (BCA against Verticillium wilt of olive, is able to trigger a broad range of defense responses in root tissues of this woody plant. In order to elucidate whether strain PICF7 also induces systemic defense responses in above-ground organs, aerial tissues of olive plants grown under non-gnotobiotic conditions were collected at different time points after root bacterization with this endophytic BCA. A suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH cDNA library, enriched in up-regulated genes, was generated. This strategy enabled the identification of 376 ESTs (99 contigs and 277 singlets, many of them related to response to different stresses. Five ESTs, involved in defense responses, were selected to carry out time-course quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR experiments aiming to: (i validate the induction of these genes, and (ii shed light on their expression pattern along time (from 1 to 15 days. Induction of olive genes potentially coding for lypoxigenase 2, catalase, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase and phenylananine ammonia-lyase was thus confirmed at some time points. Computational analysis also revealed that different transcription factors were up-regulated in olive aerial tissues (i.e. jerf, bHLH, WRKYs, as previously reported for roots. Results confirmed that root colonization by this endophytic bacterium does not only trigger defense responses in this organ but also mount a wide array of systemic defense responses in distant tissues (stems, leaves. This sheds light on how olive plants respond to the ‘non-hostile’ colonization by a bacterial endophyte and how induced defense response can contribute to the biocontrol activity of strain PICF7.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain BMS12, a Plant Growth-Promoting and Protease-Producing Bacterium, Isolated from the Rhizosphere Sediment of Phragmites karka of Chilika Lake, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Samir R; Panda, Ananta Narayan; Ray, Lopamudra; Sahu, Neha; Mishra, Gayatri; Jadhao, Sudhir; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Adhya, Tapan Kumar; Rastogi, Gurdeep; Pattnaik, Ajit Kumar; Raina, Vishakha

    2016-06-30

    We report the 4.51 Mb draft genome of Pseudomonas sp. strain BMS12, a Gram-negative bacterium in the class of Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from the rhizospheric sediment of Phragmites karka, an invasive weed in Chilika Lake, Odisha, India. The Pseudomonas sp. strain BMS12 is capable of producing proteases and is also an efficient plant growth promoter that can be useful for various phytoremedial and industrial applications.

  12. Significant reduction in toxicity, BOD, and COD of textile dyes and textile industry effluent by a novel bacterium Pseudomonas sp. LBC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telke, Amar A; Kim, Seon-Won; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2012-03-01

    The 16S rRNA sequence analysis and biochemical characteristics were confirmed that the isolated bacterium is Pseudomonas sp. LBC1. The commonly used textile dye, Direct Brown MR has been used to study the fate of biodegradation. Pseudomonas sp. LBC1 showed 90% decolorization of Direct Brown MR (100 mg/L) and textile industry effluent with significant reduction in COD and BOD. The optimum condition for decolorization was 7.0 pH and 40°C. Significant increase in a activity of extracellular laccase suggested their possible involvement in decolorization of Direct Brown MR. Biodegradation metabolites viz. 3,6-dihydroxy benzoic acid, 2-hydroxy-7-aminonaphthol-3-sulfonic acid, and p-dihydroperoxybenzene were identified on the basis of mass spectra and using the 1.10 beta Shimadzu NIST GC-MS library. The Direct Brown MR and textile industry effluent were toxic to Sorghum bicolor and Vigna radiata plants as compared to metabolites obtained after decolorization. The Pseudomonas sp. LBC1 could be useful strain for decolorization and detoxification of textile dyes as well as textile industry effluent.

  13. Sequential interactions of silver-silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO2NC) with cell wall, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple antibiotic-resistant bacterium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anas, A.; Jiya, J.; Rameez, M.J.; Anand, P.B.; Anantharaman, M.R.; Nair, S.

    The study was carried out to understand the effect of silver-silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO sub(2)NC) on the cell wall integrity, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple drug-resistant bacterium Bacterial sensitivity...

  14. Microarray-mediated transcriptome analysis of the tributyltin (TBT)-resistant bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa 25W in the presence of TBT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Santosh K; Tokashiki, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Satoru

    2006-04-01

    The tributyltin (TBT)-resistant bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 25W, which was isolated in seawater from the Arabian Sea, was subjected to transcriptome analysis in the presence of high concentrations of TBT. Only slight effects were observed at TBT concentration of 50 microM, but exposure to 500 microM resulted in the upregulation of 6 genes and the downregulation of 75. Among the 75 downregulated genes, 53% (40 out of 75) were of hypothetical function, followed by 14 transcriptional regulation- and translation-associated genes. The results of this study indicated that although the 25W strain was highly resistant to TBT, high concentrations of TBT result in toxic effect on the transcriptional and translational levels. The target genes likely belong to a specific category of transcription- and translation-associated genes rather than to other gene categories.

  15. A functional gene cluster for toxoflavin biosynthesis in the genome of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxoflavin is a broad-spectrum toxin best known for its role in virulence of Burkholderia glumae, which causes panicle blight of rice. A gene cluster containing homologs of toxoflavin biosynthesis genes (toxA-E) of B. glumae is present in the genome of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, a biological contr...

  16. Molecular stress responses to nano-sized zero-valent iron (nZVI particles in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ludovica Saccà

    Full Text Available Nanotoxicological studies were performed in vitro using the common soil bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri to assess the potentially toxic impact of commercial nano-sized zero-valent iron (nZVI particles, which are currently used for environmental remediation projects. The phenotypic response of P. stutzeri to nZVI toxicity includes an initial insult to the cell wall, as evidenced by TEM micrographs. Transcriptional analyses using genes of particular relevance in cellular activity revealed that no significant changes occurred among the relative expression ratios of narG, nirS, pykA or gyrA following nZVI exposure; however, a significant increase in katB expression was indicative of nZVI-induced oxidative stress in P. stutzeri. A proteomic approach identified two major defence mechanisms that occurred in response to nZVI exposure: a downregulation of membrane proteins and an upregulation of proteins involved in reducing intracellular oxidative stress. These biomarkers served as early indicators of nZVI response in this soil bacterium, and may provide relevant information for environmental hazard assessment.

  17. Isolation, molecular characterization and growth-promotion activities of a cold tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas sp. NARs9 (MTCC9002) from the Indian Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Pankaj K; Mishra, Smita; Bisht, Shekhar C; Selvakumar, G; Kundu, S; Bisht, J K; Gupta, Hari Shankar

    2009-01-01

    A bacterium that grows and expresses plant growth promotion traits at 4 degrees C was isolated from the rhizospheric soil of Amaranth, cultivated at a high altitude location in the North Western Indian Himalayas. The isolate was Gram negative and the cells appeared as rods (2.91 x 0.71 microm in size). It grew at temperatures ranging from 4 to 30 degrees C, with a growth optimum at 28 degrees C. It exhibited tolerance to a wide pH range (5-10; optimum 8.0) and salt concentrations up to 6% (wt/vol). Although it was sensitive to Rifampicin (R 20 microg mi-1), Gentamicin (G 3 microg mi-1), and Streptomycin (S 5 microg mi-1), it showed resistance to higher concentrations of Ampicillin (A 500 microg mi-1), Penicillin (P 300 microg mi-1), Polymixin B sulphate (Pb 100 microg mi-1) and Chloramphenicol (C 200 microg mi-1). The 16S rRNA sequence analysis revealed maximum identity with Pseudomonas lurida. The bacterium produced indole Acetic Acid (IAA) and solubilizes phosphate at 4, 15 and 28 degrees C. It also retained its ability to produce rhamnolipids and siderophores at 15 degrees C. Seed bacterization with the isolate enhanced the germination, shoot and root lengths of thirty-day-old wheat seedlings by 19.2, 30.0 & 22.9% respectively, as compared to the un-inoculated controls.

  18. Pseudomonas sp. ZXY-1, a newly isolated and highly efficient atrazine-degrading bacterium, and optimization of biodegradation using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinyue; Wang, Li; Ma, Fang; Bai, Shunwen; Yang, Jixian; Qi, Shanshan

    2017-04-01

    Atrazine, a widely used herbicide, is increasing the agricultural production effectively, while also causing great environmental concern. Efficient atrazine-degrading bacterium is necessary to removal atrazine rapidly to keep a safe environment. In the present study, a new atrazine-degrading strain ZXY-1, identified as Pseudomonas, was isolated. This new isolated strain has a strong ability to biodegrade atrazine with a high efficiency of 9.09mg/L/hr. Temperature, pH, inoculum size and initial atrazine concentration were examined to further optimize the degradation of atrazine, and the synthetic effect of these factors were investigated by the response surface methodology. With a high quadratic polynomial mathematical model (R(2)=0.9821) being obtained, the highest biodegradation efficiency of 19.03mg/L/hr was reached compared to previous reports under the optimal conditions (30.71°C, pH7.14, 4.23% (V/V) inoculum size and 157.1mg/L initial atrazine concentration). Overall, this study provided an efficient bacterium and approach that could be potentially useful for the bioremediation of wastewater containing atrazine. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Display of a thermostable lipase on the surface of a solvent-resistant bacterium, Pseudomonas putida GM730, and its applications in whole-cell biocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Seok-Joon

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole-cell biocatalysis in organic solvents has been widely applied to industrial bioprocesses. In two-phase water-solvent processes, substrate conversion yields and volumetric productivities can be limited by the toxicity of solvents to host cells and by the low mass transfer rates of the substrates from the solvent phase to the whole-cell biocatalysts in water. Results To solve the problem of solvent toxicity, we immobilized a thermostable lipase (TliA from Pseudomonas fluorescens on the cell surface of a solvent-resistant bacterium, Pseudomonas putida GM730. Surface immobilization of enzymes eliminates the mass-transfer limitation imposed by the cell wall and membranes. TliA was successfully immobilized on the surface of P. putida cells using the ice-nucleation protein (INP anchoring motif from Pseudomonas syrinage. The surface location was confirmed by flow cytometry, protease accessibility and whole-cell enzyme activity using a membrane-impermeable substrate. Three hundred and fifty units of whole-cell hydrolytic activity per gram dry cell mass were obtained when the enzyme was immobilized with a shorter INP anchoring motif (INPNC. The surface-immobilized TliA retained full enzyme activity in a two-phase water-isooctane reaction system after incubation at 37°C for 12 h, while the activity of the free form enzyme decreased to 65% of its initial value. Whole cells presenting immobilized TliA were shown to catalyze three representative lipase reactions: hydrolysis of olive oil, synthesis of triacylglycerol and chiral resolution. Conclusion In vivo surface immobilization of enzymes on solvent-resistant bacteria was demonstrated, and appears to be useful for a variety of whole-cell bioconversions in the presence of organic solvents.

  20. Genome mining and metabolic profiling of the rhizosphere bacterium Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52 for antimicrobial compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menno evan der Voort

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The plant microbiome represents an enormous untapped resource for discovering novel genes and bioactive compounds. Previously, we isolated Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52 from the rhizosphere of sugar beet plants grown in a soil suppressive to the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani and showed that its antifungal activity is, in part, attributed to the production of the chlorinated 9-amino-acid lipopeptide thanamycin (Mendes et al. 2011. Science. To get more insight into its biosynthetic repertoire, the genome of Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52 was sequenced and subjected to in silico, mutational and functional analyses. The sequencing revealed a genome size of 6.3 Mb and 5,579 predicted ORFs. Phylogenetic analysis placed strain SH-C52 within the Pseudomonas corrugata clade. In silico analysis for secondary metabolites revealed a total of six nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS gene clusters, including the two previously described NRPS clusters for thanamycin and the 2-amino acid antibacterial lipopeptide brabantamide. Here we show that thanamycin also has activity against an array of other fungi and that brabantamide A exhibits anti-oomycete activity and affects phospholipases of the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Most notably, mass spectrometry led to the discovery of a third LP, designated thanapeptin, with a 22-amino-acid peptide moiety. Seven structural variants of thanapeptin were found with varying degrees of activity against P. infestans. Of the remaining four NRPS clusters, one was predicted to encode for yet another and unknown lipopeptide with a predicted peptide moiety of 8-amino acids. Collectively, these results show an enormous metabolic potential for Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52, with at least three structurally diverse lipopeptides, each with a different antimicrobial activity spectrum.

  1. Decolorization and detoxification of Congo red and textile industry effluent by an isolated bacterium Pseudomonas sp. SU-EBT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telke, Amar A; Joshi, Swati M; Jadhav, Sheetal U; Tamboli, Dhawal P; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2010-04-01

    The 16S rRNA sequence and biochemical characteristics revealed the isolated organism as Pseudomonas sp. SU-EBT. This strain showed 97 and 90% decolorization of a recalcitrant dye, Congo red (100 mg l(-1)) and textile industry effluent with 50% reduction in COD within 12 and 60 h, respectively. The optimum pH and temperature for the decolorization was 8.0 and 40 degrees C, respectively. Pseudomonas sp. SU-EBT was found to tolerate the dye concentration up to 1.0 g l(-1). Significant induction in the activity of intracellular laccase suggested its involvement in the decolorization of Congo red. The metabolites formed after decolorization of Congo red, such as p-dihydroxy biphenyl, 8-amino naphthol 3-sulfonic acid and 3-hydroperoxy 8-nitrosonaphthol were characterized using FTIR and GC-MS. Phytotoxicity study revealed nontoxic nature of the degradation metabolites to Sorghum bicolor, Vigna radiata, Lens culinaris and Oryza sativa plants as compared to Congo red and textile industry effluent. Pseudomonas sp. SU-EBT decolorized several individual textile dyes, dye mixtures and textile industry effluent, thus it is a useful strain for the development of effluent treatment methods in textile processing industries.

  2. Comparative genome analysis of Pseudomonas knackmussii B13, the first bacterium known to degrade chloroaromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Ryo; Bertelli, Claire; Benaglio, Paola; Canton, Jonas; De Coi, Nicoló; Gharib, Walid H; Gjoksi, Bebeka; Goesmann, Alexander; Greub, Gilbert; Harshman, Keith; Linke, Burkhard; Mikulic, Josip; Mueller, Linda; Nicolas, Damien; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc; Rivolta, Carlo; Roggo, Clémence; Roy, Shantanu; Sentchilo, Vladimir; Siebenthal, Alexandra Von; Falquet, Laurent; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas knackmussii B13 was the first strain to be isolated in 1974 that could degrade chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. This discovery was the prologue for subsequent characterization of numerous bacterial metabolic pathways, for genetic and biochemical studies, and which spurred ideas for pollutant bioremediation. In this study, we determined the complete genome sequence of B13 using next generation sequencing technologies and optical mapping. Genome annotation indicated that B13 has a variety of metabolic pathways for degrading monoaromatic hydrocarbons including chlorobenzoate, aminophenol, anthranilate and hydroxyquinol, but not polyaromatic compounds. Comparative genome analysis revealed that B13 is closest to Pseudomonas denitrificans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The B13 genome contains at least eight genomic islands [prophages and integrative conjugative elements (ICEs)], which were absent in closely related pseudomonads. We confirm that two ICEs are identical copies of the 103 kb self-transmissible element ICEclc that carries the genes for chlorocatechol metabolism. Comparison of ICEclc showed that it is composed of a variable and a 'core' region, which is very conserved among proteobacterial genomes, suggesting a widely distributed family of so far uncharacterized ICE. Resequencing of two spontaneous B13 mutants revealed a number of single nucleotide substitutions, as well as excision of a large 220 kb region and a prophage that drastically change the host metabolic capacity and survivability.

  3. Stimulation of diesel degradation and biosurfactant production by aminoglycosides in a novel oil-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas luteola PRO23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanasković Iva M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation is promising technology for dealing with oil hydrocarbons contamination. In this research growth kinetics and oil biodegradation efficiency of Pseudomonas luteola PRO23, isolated from crude oil-contaminated soil samples, were investigated under different concentrations (5, 10 and 20 g/L of light and heavy crude oil. More efficient biodegradation and more rapid adaptation and cell growth were obtained in conditions with light oil. The 5 to 10 g/L upgrade of light oil concentration stimulated the microbial growth and the biodegradation efficiency. Further upgrade of light oil concentration and the upgrade of heavy oil concentration both inhibited the microbial growth, as well as biodegradation process. Aminoglycosides stimulated biosurfactant production in P. luteola in the range of sub-inhibitory concentrations (0.3125, 0.625 μg/mL. Aminoglycosides also induced biofilm formation. The production of biosurfactants was the most intense during lag phase and continues until stationary phase. Aminoglycosides also induced changes in P. luteola growth kinetics. In the presence of aminoglycosides this strain degraded 82% of diesel for 96 h. These results indicated that Pseudomonas luteola PRO23 potentially can be used in bioremediation of crude oil-contaminated environments and that aminoglycosides could stimulate this process. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR31080

  4. Genetic responses induced in olive roots upon colonization by the biocontrol endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Schilirò

    Full Text Available Knowledge on the genetic basis underlying interactions between beneficial bacteria and woody plants is still very limited, and totally absent in the case of olive. We aimed to elucidate genetic responses taking place during the colonization of olive roots by the native endophyte Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7, an effective biocontrol agent against Verticillium wilt of olive. Roots of olive plants grown under non-gnotobiotic conditions were collected at different time points after PICF7 inoculation. A Suppression Subtractive Hybridization cDNA library enriched in induced genes was generated. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis validated the induction of selected olive genes. Computational analysis of 445 olive ESTs showed that plant defence and response to different stresses represented nearly 45% of genes induced in PICF7-colonized olive roots. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis confirmed induction of lipoxygenase, phenylpropanoid, terpenoids and plant hormones biosynthesis transcripts. Different classes of transcription factors (i.e., bHLH, WRKYs, GRAS1 were also induced. This work highlights for the first time the ability of an endophytic Pseudomonas spp. strain to mount a wide array of defence responses in an economically-relevant woody crop such as olive, helping to explain its biocontrol activity.

  5. Purification, crystal structure and antimicrobial activity of phenazine-1-carboxamide produced by a growth-promoting biocontrol bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa MML2212.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugaiah, V; Mathivanan, N; Varghese, B

    2010-02-01

    To purify and characterize an antimicrobial compound produced by a biocontrol bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa MML2212, and evaluate its activity against rice pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain MML2212 isolated from the rice rhizosphere with wide-spectrum antimicrobial activity was cultured in Kings'B broth using a fermentor for 36 h. The extracellular metabolites were isolated from the fermented broth using ethyl acetate extraction and purified by two-step silica-gel column chromatography. Three fractions were separated, of which a major compound was obtained in pure state as yellow needles. It was crystallized after dissolving with chloroform followed by slow evaporation. It is odourless with a melting point of 220-222 degrees C. It was soluble in most of the organic solvents and poorly soluble in water. The molecular mass of purified compound was estimated as 223.3 by mass spectral analysis. Further, it was characterized by IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectral analyses. The crystal structure of the compound was elucidated for the first time by X-ray diffraction study and deposited in the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (http://www.ccde.com.ac.uk) with the accession no. CCDC 617344. The crystal compound was undoubtedly identified as phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN) with the empirical formula of C(13)H(9)N(3)O. As this is the first report on the crystal structure of PCN, it provides additional information to the structural chemistry. Furthermore, the present study reports the antimicrobial activity of purified PCN on major rice pathogens, R. solani and X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Therefore, the PCN can be developed as an ideal agrochemical candidate for the control of both sheath blight and bacterial leaf blight diseases of rice.

  6. Population Structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lutz Wiehlmann; Gerd Wagner; Nina Cramer; Benny Siebert; Peter Gudowius; Gracia Morales; Thilo Köhler; Christian van Delden; Christian Weinel; Peter Slickers; Burkhard Tümmler

    2007-01-01

    The metabolically versatile Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhabits terrestrial, aquatic, animal-, human-, and plant-host-associated environments and is an important causative agent...

  7. Effect of wheat roots infected with the pathogenic fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici on gene expression of the biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Matthieu; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Guillerm-Erckelboudt, Anne-Yvonne; Boutin, Morgane; Guernec, Gregory; Sarniguet, Alain

    2009-12-01

    Traits contributing to the competence of biocontrol bacteria to colonize plant roots are often induced in the rhizosphere in response to plant components. These interactions have been studied using the two partners in gnotobiotic systems. However, in nature, beneficial or pathogenic fungi often colonize roots. Influence of these plant-fungus interactions on bacterial behavior remains to be investigated. Here, we have examined the influence of colonization of wheat roots by the take-all fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici on gene expression of the biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp. Bacteria were inoculated onto healthy, early G. graminis var. tritici-colonized and necrotic roots and transcriptomes were compared by shotgun DNA microarray. Pf29Arp decreased disease severity when inoculated before the onset of necrosis. Necrotic roots exerted a broader effect on gene expression compared with early G. graminis var. tritici-colonized and healthy roots. A gene encoding a putative type VI secretion system effector was only induced in necrotic conditions. A common pool of Pf29Arp genes differentially expressed on G. graminis var. tritici-colonized roots was related to carbon metabolism and oxidative stress, with a highest fold-change with necrosis. Overall, the data showed that the association of the pathogenic fungus with the roots strongly altered Pf29Arp adaptation with differences between early and late G. graminis var. tritici infection steps.

  8. The structure of a calcium-dependent phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C from Pseudomonas sp. 62186, the first from a Gram-negative bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Olga V; Blagova, Elena; Lebedev, Andrey A; Nørgaard, Allan; Segura, Dorotea R; Blicher, Thomas H; Brask, Jesper; Wilson, Keith S

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial phosphoinositide-specific phospholipases C (PI-PLCs) are the smallest members of the PI-PLC family, which includes much larger mammalian enzymes responsible for signal transduction as well as enzymes from protozoan parasites, yeast and plants. Eukaryotic PI-PLCs have calcium in the active site, but this is absent in the known structures of Gram-positive bacteria, where its role is instead played by arginine. In addition to their use in a number of industrial applications, the bacterial enzymes attract special interest because they can serve as convenient models of the catalytic domains of eukaryotic enzymes for in vitro activity studies. Here, the structure of a PI-PLC from Pseudomonas sp. 62186 is reported, the first from a Gram-negative bacterium and the first of a native bacterial PI-PLC with calcium present in the active site. Solution of the structure posed particular problems owing to the low sequence identity of available homologous structures. Its dependence on calcium for catalysis makes this enzyme a better model for studies of the mammalian PI-PLCs than the previously used calcium-independent bacterial PI-PLCs.

  9. The Sensor Kinase GacS Negatively Regulates Flagellar Formation and Motility in a Biocontrol Bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Soo Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The GacS/GacA two component system regulates various traits related to the biocontrol potential of plant-associated pseudomonads. The role of the sensor kinase, GacS, differs between strains in regulation of motility. In this study, we determined how a gacS mutation changed cell morphology and motility in Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6. The gacS mutant cells were elongated in stationary-phase compared to the wild type and the complemented gacS mutant, but cells did not differ in length in logarithmic phase. The gacS mutant had a two-fold increase in the number of flagella compared with the wild type strain; flagella number was restored to that of the wild type in the complemented gacS mutant. The more highly flagellated gacS mutant cells had greater swimming motilities than that of the wild type strain. Enhanced flagella formation in the gacS mutant correlated with increased expression of three genes, fleQ, fliQ and flhF, involved in flagellar formation. Expression of these genes in the complemented gacS mutant was similar to that of the wild type. These findings show that this root-colonizing pseudomonad adjusts flagella formation and cell morphology in stationary-phase using GacS as a major regulator.

  10. Degradation of polyurethane by bacterium isolated from soil and assessment of polyurethanolytic activity of a Pseudomonas putida strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yu-Huei; Shih, Yang-hsin; Lai, Yen-Chun; Liu, Yuan-Zan; Liu, Ying-Tong; Lin, Nai-Chun

    2014-01-01

    The increasing usage and the persistence of polyester polyurethane (PU) generate significant sources of environmental pollution. The effective and environmental friendly bioremediation techniques for this refractory waste are in high demand. In this study, three novel PU degrading bacteria were isolated from farm soils and activated sludge. Based upon 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence blast, their identities were determined. Particularly robust activity was observed in Pseudomonas putida; it spent 4 days to degrade 92% of Impranil DLN(TM) for supporting its growth. The optimum temperature and pH for DLN removal by P. putida were 25 °C and 8.4, respectively. The degradation and transformation of DLN investigated by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy show the decrease in ester functional group and the emergence of amide group. The polyurethanolytic activities were both presented in the extracellular fraction and in the cytosol. Esterase activity was detected in the cell lysate. A 45-kDa protein bearing polyurethanolytic activity was also detected in the extracellular medium. This study presented high PU degrading activity of P. putida and demonstrated its responsible enzymes during the PU degradation process, which could be applied in the bioremediation and management of plastic wastes.

  11. Potential application of aerobic denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 in nitrogen oxides (NOx) removal from flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Maosheng; Li, Can; Liu, Shufeng; Gui, Mengyao; Ni, Jinren

    2016-11-15

    Conventional biological removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from flue gas has been severely restricted by the presence of oxygen. This paper presents an efficient alternative for NOx removal at varying oxygen levels using the newly isolated bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 which was capable of aerobic and anoxic denitrification. Interestingly, nitric oxide (NO), as the obligatory intermediate, was negligibly accumulated during nitrate and nitrite reduction. Moreover, normal nitrate reduction with decreasing NO accumulation was realized under O2 concentration ranging from 0 to 100%. Reverse transcription and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis revealed that high efficient NO removal was attributed to the coordinate regulation of gene expressions including napA (for periplasmic nitrate reductase), nirS (for cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase) and cnorB (for NO reductase). Further batch experiments demonstrated the immobilized strain PCN-2 possessed high capability of removing NO and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at O2 concentration of 0-10%. A biotrickling filter established with present strain achieved high NOx removal efficiencies of 91.94-96.74% at inlet NO concentration of 100-500ppm and O2 concentration of 0-10%, which implied promising potential applications in purifying NOx contaminated flue gas.

  12. [Quorum sensing systems of regulation, synthesis of phenazine antibiotics, and antifungal (corrected) activity in rhizospheric bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis 449].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselova, M a; Klein, Sh; Bass, I A; Lipasova, V A; Metlitskaia, A Z; Ovadis, M I; Chernin, L S; Khmel', I A

    2008-12-01

    Strain Pseudomonas chlororaphis 449, an antagonist of a broad spectrum of phytopathogenic microorganisms isolated from the maize rhizosphere, was shown to produce three phenazine antibiotics: phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), 2-hydroxylphenazine-1-carboxylic acid (2-OH-PCA), and 2-hydroxylphenazine (2-OH-PHZ). Two Quorum Sensing (QS) systems of regulation were identified: PhzIR and CsaI/R. Genes phzI and csaI were cloned and sequenced. Cells of strain 449 synthesize at least three types of AHL: N-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-AHL), N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-AHL), and N-(3-oxo-hexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (30C6-AHL). Transposon mutagenesis was used to generate mutants of strain 449 deficient in synthesis of phenazines, which carried inactivated phzA and phzB genes of the phenazine operon and gene phzO. Mutations phzA- and phzB-caused a drastic reduction in the antagonistic activity of bacteria toward phytopathogenic fungi. Both mutants lost the ability to protect cucumber and leguminous plants against phytopathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. These results suggest a significant role of phenazines in the antagonistic activity of P. chlororaphis 449.

  13. Biosurfactant-producing bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa MA01 isolated from spoiled apples: physicochemical and structural characteristics of isolated biosurfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Habib; Hamedi, Mir Manochehr; Lotfabad, Tayebe Bagheri; Zahiri, Hossein Shahbani; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Masoomi, Fatemeh; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Ortiz, Antonio; Amanlou, Massoud; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari

    2012-02-01

    An extensive investigation was conducted to isolate indigenous bacterial strains with outstanding performance for biosurfactant production from different types of spoiled fruits, food-related products and food processing industries. An isolate was selected from 800 by the highest biosurfactant yield in soybean oil medium and it was identified by 16S rRNA and the two most relevant hypervariable regions of this gene; V3 and V6 as Pseudomonas aeruginosa MA01. The isolate was able to produce 12 g/l of a glycolipid-type biosurfactant and generally less efficient to emulsify vegetable oils compared to hydrocarbons and could emulsify corn and coconut oils more than 50%. However, emulsification index (E(24)) of different hydrocarbons including hexane, toluene, xylene, brake oil, kerosene and hexadecane was between 55.8% and 100%. The surface tension of pure water decreased gradually with increasing biosurfactant concentration to 32.5 mNm(-1) with critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of 10.1mg/l. Among all carbon substrates examined, vegetable oils were the most effective on biosurfactant production. Two glycolipid fractions were purified from the biosurfactant crude extracts, and FTIR and ES-MS were used to determine the structure of these compounds. The analysis indicated the presence of three major monorhamnolipid species: R(1)C(10)C(10), R(1)C(10)C(12:1), and R(1)C(10)C(12); as well as another three major dirhamnolipid species: R(2)C(10)C(10), R(2)C(10)C(12:1), and R(2)C(10)C(12). The strain sweep experiment for measuring the linear viscoelastic of biosurfactant showed that typical behavior characteristics of a weak viscoelastic gel, with storage modulus greater than loss modulus at all frequencies examined, both showing some frequency dependence.

  14. Heterotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas saponiphila and sunlight as impact factors on organo-mineral colloids transformations in boreal humic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinikova, Olga; Drozdova, Olga; Shirokova, Liudmila; Lapitskiy, Sergey; Bychkov, Andrew; Pokrovsky, Oleg

    2017-04-01

    Two of the main factors of carbon balance in high latitudes, known to govern the CO2 flux from the lakes and rivers to the atmosphere, are bacterial mineralization (respiration) of allochthonous dissolved organic matter (DOM) and photochemical degradation of DOM. Yet, in contrast to large numbers of experimental and field studies on these factors impact on the utilization of DOM of different origin, the fate of metals bound to colloids during bacterial processing of DOM and behavior of trace element (TE) during photodegradation of DOM remains poorly constrained. This is especially important in view of essentially organic and organo-mineral colloidal status of TE in most boreal waters. To answer this questions, a monoculture of Pseudomonas saponiphila from a boreal creek in NW Karelia (Russia) was separated and allowed to interact with boreal peat leachate in nutrient-free media. We quantified colloidal transformation of the peat leachate during 5-days activity of live bacteria using 3 kDa, 50 kDa Amicon® centrifugal filtration and 0.45 µm syringe filtration. The total net decrease of the concentration of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) over 93 h of exposure was within 5% of the initial value for all fractions except low molecular weight one (exposure, the DOM in stream photodegraded in a much smaller degree than that in the bog water with 25 and 60% removal of initial DOC, respectively. Specific UV absorption (SUVA254) decreased by a factor of 1.75 and 5 over 200 h of exposure in stream and bog water, respectively. The removal of Fe and Al occurred only in the bog water (90 % and 50% respectively, over 5 days of reaction), whereas no detectable decrease of Al and Fe concentration (sunlight exposure. We acknowledge support from a RFBR research projects №№ 16-55-150002 HЦHИ_a, 15-05-05000_a, 14-05-00430_a, 16-05-00542_a. Experimental study was supported by RSF № 14-50-00029.

  15. Apoplastic polyamine oxidation plays different roles in local responses of tobacco to infection by the necrotrophic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and the biotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas viridiflava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, María; Maiale, Santiago Javier; Rossi, Franco Rubén; Romero, Matías Fernando; Rivas, Elisa Isabel; Gárriz, Andrés; Ruiz, Oscar Adolfo; Pieckenstain, Fernando Luis

    2008-08-01

    The role of polyamine (PA) metabolism in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) defense against pathogens with contrasting pathogenic strategies was evaluated. Infection by the necrotrophic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum resulted in increased arginine decarboxylase expression and activity in host tissues, as well as putrescine and spermine accumulation in leaf apoplast. Enhancement of leaf PA levels, either by using transgenic plants or infiltration with exogenous PAs, led to increased necrosis due to infection by S. sclerotiorum. Specific inhibition of diamine and PA oxidases attenuated the PA-induced enhancement of leaf necrosis during fungal infection. When tobacco responses to infection by the biotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas viridiflava were investigated, an increase of apoplastic spermine levels was detected. Enhancement of host PA levels by the above-described experimental approaches strongly decreased in planta bacterial growth, an effect that was blocked by a PA oxidase inhibitor. It can be concluded that accumulation and further oxidation of free PAs in the leaf apoplast of tobacco plants occurs in a similar, although not identical way during tobacco defense against infection by microorganisms with contrasting pathogenesis strategies. This response affects the pathogen's ability to colonize host tissues and results are detrimental for plant defense against necrotrophic pathogens that feed on necrotic tissue; on the contrary, this response plays a beneficial role in defense against biotrophic pathogens that depend on living tissue for successful host colonization. Thus, apoplastic PAs play important roles in plant-pathogen interactions, and modulation of host PA levels, particularly in the leaf apoplast, may lead to significant changes in host susceptibility to different kinds of pathogens.

  16. Apoplastic Polyamine Oxidation Plays Different Roles in Local Responses of Tobacco to Infection by the Necrotrophic Fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and the Biotrophic Bacterium Pseudomonas viridiflava1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, María; Maiale, Santiago Javier; Rossi, Franco Rubén; Romero, Matías Fernando; Rivas, Elisa Isabel; Gárriz, Andrés; Ruiz, Oscar Adolfo; Pieckenstain, Fernando Luis

    2008-01-01

    The role of polyamine (PA) metabolism in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) defense against pathogens with contrasting pathogenic strategies was evaluated. Infection by the necrotrophic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum resulted in increased arginine decarboxylase expression and activity in host tissues, as well as putrescine and spermine accumulation in leaf apoplast. Enhancement of leaf PA levels, either by using transgenic plants or infiltration with exogenous PAs, led to increased necrosis due to infection by S. sclerotiorum. Specific inhibition of diamine and PA oxidases attenuated the PA-induced enhancement of leaf necrosis during fungal infection. When tobacco responses to infection by the biotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas viridiflava were investigated, an increase of apoplastic spermine levels was detected. Enhancement of host PA levels by the above-described experimental approaches strongly decreased in planta bacterial growth, an effect that was blocked by a PA oxidase inhibitor. It can be concluded that accumulation and further oxidation of free PAs in the leaf apoplast of tobacco plants occurs in a similar, although not identical way during tobacco defense against infection by microorganisms with contrasting pathogenesis strategies. This response affects the pathogen's ability to colonize host tissues and results are detrimental for plant defense against necrotrophic pathogens that feed on necrotic tissue; on the contrary, this response plays a beneficial role in defense against biotrophic pathogens that depend on living tissue for successful host colonization. Thus, apoplastic PAs play important roles in plant-pathogen interactions, and modulation of host PA levels, particularly in the leaf apoplast, may lead to significant changes in host susceptibility to different kinds of pathogens. PMID:18583531

  17. Endophytic Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens RG11 May Transform Tryptophan to Melatonin and Promote Endogenous Melatonin Levels in the Roots of Four Grape Cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yaner; Jiao, Jian; Fan, Xiucai; Sun, Haisheng; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Jianfu; Liu, Chonghuai

    2017-01-01

    Endophytes have been verified to synthesize melatonin in vitro and promote abiotic stress-induced production of endogenous melatonin in grape (Vitis vinifera L.) roots. This study aimed to further characterize the biotransformation of tryptophan to melatonin in the endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens RG11 and to investigate its capacity for enhancing endogenous melatonin levels in the roots of different grape cultivars. Using ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry combined with 15N double-labeled L-tryptophan as the precursor for melatonin, we detected isotope-labeled 5-hydroxytryptophan, serotonin, N-acetylserotonin, and melatonin, but tryptamine was not detected during the in vitro incubation of P. fluorescens RG11. Furthermore, the production capacity of these four compounds peaked during the exponential growth phase. RG11 colonization increased the endogenous levels of 5-hydroxytryptophan, N-acetylserotonin, and melatonin, but reduced those of tryptamine and serotonin, in the roots of the Red Globe grape cultivar under salt stress conditions. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that RG11 reduced the transcription of grapevine tryptophan decarboxylase and serotonin N-acetyltransferase genes when compared to the un-inoculated control. These results correlated with decreased reactive oxygen species bursts and cell damage, which were alleviated by RG11 colonization under salt stress conditions. Additionally, RG11 promoted plant growth and enhanced the levels of endogenous melatonin in different grape cultivars. Intraspecific variation in the levels of melatonin precursors was found among four grape cultivars, and the associated root crude extracts appeared to significantly induce RG11 melatonin biosynthesis in vitro. Overall, this study provides useful information that enhances the existing knowledge of a potential melatonin synthesis pathway in rhizobacteria, and it reveals plant–rhizobacterium interactions that affect

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. UK4, a Model Organism for Studies of Functional Amyloids in Pseudomonas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueholm, Morten Simonsen; Danielsen, Heidi Nolsøe; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present the complete genome of Pseudomonas sp. UK4. This bacterium was the first Pseudomonas strain shown to produce functional amyloids, and it represents a model organism for studies of functional amyloids in Pseudomonas (Fap).......Here, we present the complete genome of Pseudomonas sp. UK4. This bacterium was the first Pseudomonas strain shown to produce functional amyloids, and it represents a model organism for studies of functional amyloids in Pseudomonas (Fap)....

  19. Soil bacterium Pseudomonas sp.593 synthesizes phosphatidylcholine via phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway%土壤假单胞菌593使用Pcs途径合成磷酯酰胆碱

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊敏; 吴彬; 何火光; 李洋; 王行国

    2011-01-01

    [Objective]Prokaryotes synthesize phosphotidylcholine by using phospholipid N-methylation or phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway or both.To confirm which pathway the soil bacterium Pseudomonas sp.593 utilizes, we tested its phosphotidylcholine synthesis, cloned the pcs gene encoding phosphatidylcholine synthase, examined Pcs activity, and constructed a pcs- mutant.[Methods]To clone the pcs gene from Pseudomonas sp.593 genomic DNA, we firstly aligned amino acid sequences of phosphatidylcholine synthases in different pseudomonas strains reported in databases.Then we designed degenerate primers based on two amino acid segments conserved in sequences of phosphatidylcholine synthases.A partial fragment of the pcs gene was finally amplified from Pseudomonas sp.593 genomic DNA.The amplified partial fragment was labeled with digoxigenin-dUTP ( DIG) as a probe, sub-cloning library of Pseudomonas sp.593 genomic DNA was prepared and then screened using DIG-labelled probe via in situ colony hybridization.DNA homologous recombination in vivo was preformed to delete pcs gene of Pseudomonas sp.593.Thinlayer chromatography ( TLC) assay was used to analyze total phospholipids, detect phosphotidylcholine content and determine pcs gene activity.[Results]TLC analysis revealed that Pseudomonas sp.593 growing in the M9 or LB medium with choline was able to synthesize phosphotidylcholine, but wasn't without addition of choline.A 894 bp DNA fragment coded a protein with phosphatidylcholine synthase activity was cloned from Pseudomonas sp.593.The pcs- mutant obtained from in vivo mutagenesis was unable to form phosphotidylcholine, no matter choline was presented in the medium or not.[Conclusion]Phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway is a sole way for phosphotidylcholine synthesis in soil bacterium Pseudomonas sp.593 or other Pseudomonas strains.%[目的]原核生物有两条代谢途径N-甲基化途径(Pmt途径)和磷脂酰胆碱合酶途径(Pcs途径)合成磷脂酰胆碱(Pc).本文对土壤细菌Pseudomonas

  20. Heavy-metal resistance of a France vineyard soil bacterium, Pseudomonas mendocina strain S5.2, revealed by whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Teik Min; Yin, Wai-Fong; Mondy, Samuel; Grandclément, Catherine; Dessaux, Yves; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2012-11-01

    Here we present the draft genome of Pseudomonas mendocina strain S5.2, possessing tolerance to a high concentration of copper. In addition to being copper resistant, the genome of P. mendocina strain S5.2 contains a number of heavy-metal-resistant genes known to confer resistance to multiple heavy-metal ions.

  1. High quality draft genome sequence of the type strain of Pseudomonas lutea OK2(T), a phosphate-solubilizing rhizospheric bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yunyoung; Park, Gun-Seok; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas lutea OK2(T) (=LMG 21974(T), CECT 5822(T)) is the type strain of the species and was isolated from the rhizosphere of grass growing in Spain in 2003 based on its phosphate-solubilizing capacity. In order to identify the functional significance of phosphate solubilization in Pseudomonas Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, we describe here the phenotypic characteristics of strain OK2(T) along with its high-quality draft genome sequence, its annotation, and analysis. The genome is comprised of 5,647,497 bp with 60.15 % G + C content. The sequence includes 4,846 protein-coding genes and 95 RNA genes.

  2. Toxicity of fungal-generated silver nanoparticles to soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a rhizospheric bacterium responsible for plant protection and bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Indarchand R. [Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, S.G.B. Amravati University, Amravati 444602, Maharashtra (India); Department of Biotechnology, Institute of Science, Nipat Niranjan Nagar, Caves Road, Aurangabad 431004, Maharashtra (India); Anderson, Anne J. [Department of Biology, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84321 (United States); Rai, Mahendra, E-mail: mahendrarai@sgbau.ac.in [Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, S.G.B. Amravati University, Amravati 444602, Maharashtra (India); Laboratório de Química Biológica, Instituto de Química, UNICAMP, Cidade Universitária “Zefferino Vaz” Barão Geraldo, CEP 13083-970, Caixa Postal 6150, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • This study incorporates the mycosynthesis of AgNPs and their characterisation by various methods. • A first attempt demonstrating the toxicity assessment of AgNPs on beneficial soil microbe. • Use of biosensor in Pseudomonas putida KT2440, gave accurate antimicrobial results. - Abstract: Silver nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention due to their beneficial properties. But toxicity issues associated with them are also rising. The reports in the past suggested health hazards of silver nanoparticles at the cellular, molecular, or whole organismal level in eukaryotes. Whereas, there is also need to examine the exposure effects of silver nanoparticle to the microbes, which are beneficial to humans as well as environment. The available literature suggests the harmful effects of physically and chemically synthesised silver nanoparticles. The toxicity of biogenically synthesized nanoparticles has been less studied than physically and chemically synthesised nanoparticles. Hence, there is a greater need to study the toxic effects of biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles in general and mycosynthesized nanoparticles in particular. In the present study, attempts have been made to assess the risk associated with the exposure of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles on a beneficial soil microbe Pseudomonas putida. KT2440. The study demonstrates mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterisation by UV–vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, X-ray diffraction, nanosight LM20 – a particle size distribution analyzer and TEM. Silver nanoparticles obtained herein were found to exert the hazardous effect at the concentration of 0.4 μg/ml, which warrants further detailed investigations concerning toxicity.

  3. Interaction between the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CHA0, its genetic derivatives and vermiculite: Effects on chemical, mineralogical and mechanical properties of vermiculite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Using bacteria of the strain Pseudomonas fluorescens wild type CHA0 and its genetic derivative strains CHA77, CHA89, CHA400, CHA631 and CHA661 (which differ in one gene only) the changes in chemical, mineralogical and rheological properties of the clay mineral vermiculite affected by microbial activity were studied in order to test whether the individually different production of metabolites by the genetically engineered strains may alter the clay mineral vermiculite in distinct ways. With the novel strategy of working with living wild type bacteria, their genetic derivatives and clay, the following properties of the mineral altered by the various strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens were determined: grain size, X-Ray diffraction pattern, intercrystalline swelling with glycerol, layer charge, CEC, BET surface and uptake of trace elements. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to determine the changes in major, minor and trace elements of the clay vermiculite affected by microbial activity. Among all analyzed trace elements, Fe, Mn and Cu are the most interesting. Fe and Mn are taken up from the clay mineral by all bacterial strains whereas Cu is only removed from vermiculite by strains CHA0, CHA77, CHA400 and CHA661. The latter mentioned strains all produce the antibiotics 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol and monoacetylphloroglucinol which can complex Cu efficiently. Therefore the alteration of only one gene of the bacteria is causing significant effects on the clay mineral.

  4. The stack: a new bacterial structure analyzed in the Antarctic bacterium Pseudomonas deceptionensis M1(T by transmission electron microscopy and tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Delgado

    Full Text Available In recent years, improvements in transmission electron microscopy (TEM techniques and the use of tomography have provided a more accurate view of the complexity of the ultrastructure of prokaryotic cells. Cryoimmobilization of specimens by rapid cooling followed by freeze substitution (FS and sectioning, freeze fracture (FF and observation of replica, or cryoelectron microscopy of vitreous sections (CEMOVIS now allow visualization of biological samples close to their native state, enabling us to refine our knowledge of already known bacterial structures and to discover new ones. Application of these techniques to the new Antarctic cold-adapted bacterium Pseudomonasdeceptionensis M1(T has demonstrated the existence of a previously undescribed cytoplasmic structure that does not correspond to known bacterial inclusion bodies or membranous formations. This structure, which we term a "stack", was mainly visualized in slow growing cultures of P. deceptionensis M1(T and can be described as a set of stacked membranous discs usually arranged perpendicularly to the cell membrane, but not continuous with it, and found in variable number in different locations within the cell. Regardless of their position, stacks were mostly observed very close to DNA fibers. Stacks are not exclusive to P. deceptionensis M1(T and were also visualized in slow-growing cultures of other bacteria. This new structure deserves further study using cryoelectron tomography to refine its configuration and to establish whether its function could be related to chromosome dynamics.

  5. Inhibition of Aspergillus fumigatus and Its Biofilm by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Dependent on the Source, Phenotype and Growth Conditions of the Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jose A G; Penner, John C; Moss, Richard B; Haagensen, Janus A J; Clemons, Karl V; Spormann, Alfred M; Nazik, Hasan; Cohen, Kevin; Banaei, Niaz; Carolino, Elisabete; Stevens, David A

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus (Af) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) are leading fungal and bacterial pathogens, respectively, in many clinical situations. Relevant to this, their interface and co-existence has been studied. In some experiments in vitro, Pa products have been defined that are inhibitory to Af. In some clinical situations, both can be biofilm producers, and biofilm could alter their physiology and affect their interaction. That may be most relevant to airways in cystic fibrosis (CF), where both are often prominent residents. We have studied clinical Pa isolates from several sources for their effects on Af, including testing involving their biofilms. We show that the described inhibition of Af is related to the source and phenotype of the Pa isolate. Pa cells inhibited the growth and formation of Af biofilm from conidia, with CF isolates more inhibitory than non-CF isolates, and non-mucoid CF isolates most inhibitory. Inhibition did not require live Pa contact, as culture filtrates were also inhibitory, and again non-mucoid>mucoid CF>non-CF. Preformed Af biofilm was more resistant to Pa, and inhibition that occurred could be reproduced with filtrates. Inhibition of Af biofilm appears also dependent on bacterial growth conditions; filtrates from Pa grown as biofilm were more inhibitory than from Pa grown planktonically. The differences in Pa shown from these different sources are consistent with the extensive evolutionary Pa changes that have been described in association with chronic residence in CF airways, and may reflect adaptive changes to life in a polymicrobial environment.

  6. Toxicity of fungal-generated silver nanoparticles to soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a rhizospheric bacterium responsible for plant protection and bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Indarchand R; Anderson, Anne J; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-04-09

    Silver nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention due to their beneficial properties. But toxicity issues associated with them are also rising. The reports in the past suggested health hazards of silver nanoparticles at the cellular, molecular, or whole organismal level in eukaryotes. Whereas, there is also need to examine the exposure effects of silver nanoparticle to the microbes, which are beneficial to humans as well as environment. The available literature suggests the harmful effects of physically and chemically synthesised silver nanoparticles. The toxicity of biogenically synthesized nanoparticles has been less studied than physically and chemically synthesised nanoparticles. Hence, there is a greater need to study the toxic effects of biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles in general and mycosynthesized nanoparticles in particular. In the present study, attempts have been made to assess the risk associated with the exposure of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles on a beneficial soil microbe Pseudomonas putida. KT2440. The study demonstrates mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterisation by UV-vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, X-ray diffraction, nanosight LM20--a particle size distribution analyzer and TEM. Silver nanoparticles obtained herein were found to exert the hazardous effect at the concentration of 0.4 μg/ml, which warrants further detailed investigations concerning toxicity.

  7. Nitrogen-removal efficiency of a novel aerobic denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas stutzeri strain ZF31, isolated from a drinking-water reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tinglin; Guo, Lin; Zhang, Haihan; Su, Junfeng; Wen, Gang; Zhang, Kai

    2015-11-01

    An aerobic denitrifier, identified as Pseudomonas stutzeri strain ZF31, was isolated from the Zhoucun drinking-water reservoir. Strain ZF31 removed 97% of nitrate nitrogen after 16h, without nitrite accumulation. Sequence amplification indicated the presence of the denitrification genes napA, nirS, norB, and nosZ. Nitrogen balance analysis revealed that approximately 75% of the initial nitrogen was removed as gas products. Response surface methodology (RSM) experiments showed that maximum removal of total nitrogen (TN) occurred at pH 8.23, a C/N ratio of 6.68, temperature of 27.72°C, and with shaking at 54.15rpm. The TN removal rate at low C/N ratio (i.e., 3) and low temperature (i.e., 10°C) was 73.30% and 60.08%, respectively. These results suggest that strain ZF31 has potential applications for the bioremediation of slightly polluted drinking-water reservoirs.

  8. Genome-wide investigation and functional characterization of the β-ketoadipate pathway in the nitrogen-fixing and root-associated bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Lizhao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soil microorganisms are mainly responsible for the complete mineralization of aromatic compounds that usually originate from plant products or environmental pollutants. In many cases, structurally diverse aromatic compounds can be converted to a small number of structurally simpler intermediates, which are metabolized to tricarboxylic acid intermediates via the β-ketoadipate pathway. This strategy provides great metabolic flexibility and contributes to increased adaptation of bacteria to their environment. However, little is known about the evolution and regulation of the β-ketoadipate pathway in root-associated diazotrophs. Results In this report, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the benzoate and 4-hydroxybenzoate catabolic pathways of Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501, with a focus on the functional characterization of the β-ketoadipate pathway. The P. stutzeri A1501 genome contains sets of catabolic genes involved in the peripheral pathways for catabolism of benzoate (ben and 4-hydroxybenzoate (pob, and in the catechol (cat and protocatechuate (pca branches of the β-ketoadipate pathway. A particular feature of the catabolic gene organization in A1501 is the absence of the catR and pcaK genes encoding a LysR family regulator and 4-hydroxybenzoate permease, respectively. Furthermore, the BenR protein functions as a transcriptional activator of the ben operon, while transcription from the catBC promoter can be activated in response to benzoate. Benzoate degradation is subject to carbon catabolite repression induced by glucose and acetate in A1501. The HPLC analysis of intracellular metabolites indicated that low concentrations of 4-hydroxybenzoate significantly enhance the ability of A1501 to degrade benzoate. Conclusions The expression of genes encoding proteins involved in the β-ketoadipate pathway is tightly modulated by both pathway-specific and catabolite repression controls in A1501. This strain provides an ideal

  9. Inhibition of Aspergillus fumigatus and Its Biofilm by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Dependent on the Source, Phenotype and Growth Conditions of the Bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A G Ferreira

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus (Af and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa are leading fungal and bacterial pathogens, respectively, in many clinical situations. Relevant to this, their interface and co-existence has been studied. In some experiments in vitro, Pa products have been defined that are inhibitory to Af. In some clinical situations, both can be biofilm producers, and biofilm could alter their physiology and affect their interaction. That may be most relevant to airways in cystic fibrosis (CF, where both are often prominent residents. We have studied clinical Pa isolates from several sources for their effects on Af, including testing involving their biofilms. We show that the described inhibition of Af is related to the source and phenotype of the Pa isolate. Pa cells inhibited the growth and formation of Af biofilm from conidia, with CF isolates more inhibitory than non-CF isolates, and non-mucoid CF isolates most inhibitory. Inhibition did not require live Pa contact, as culture filtrates were also inhibitory, and again non-mucoid>mucoid CF>non-CF. Preformed Af biofilm was more resistant to Pa, and inhibition that occurred could be reproduced with filtrates. Inhibition of Af biofilm appears also dependent on bacterial growth conditions; filtrates from Pa grown as biofilm were more inhibitory than from Pa grown planktonically. The differences in Pa shown from these different sources are consistent with the extensive evolutionary Pa changes that have been described in association with chronic residence in CF airways, and may reflect adaptive changes to life in a polymicrobial environment.

  10. Isolation and characterization of a novel paraffin wax-degrading bacterium, Pseudomonas sp strain PW-1, from petroleum-contaminated sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y L; Liu, Z; Liu, T

    2016-06-10

    An isolate capable of degrading paraffin wax was isolated from petroleum-contaminated sites in Daqing, China, and identified as Pseudomonas sp strain PW-1 by analyzing the 16S rDNA sequence (GenBank accession No.: KF529529) as well as the biochemical and physiological characteristics. The optimized degradation conditions of the isolate were as follows: FeSO4 metal ion concentration of 0.01 g, temperature of 30°C, (NH4)2SO4 nitrogen source concentration of 1.5 g/L, and a carbon: nitrogen ratio of 10:1. Response surface methodology-based analysis of the culture time, inoculation amount, and initial pH of the medium revealed that the optimal theoretical conditions were a culture time of 11.16 days, inoculation amount of 3.13%, and an initial pH of 9.29. The theoretical degradation rate was up to 54.68% under the optimal conditions. Taking into account the experimental conditions of a laboratory, 11.2 days of cultivating time, 3% inoculum, and a medium initial pH of 9.3 were used in practical settings. Experimental results showed that the degradation rate of paraffin wax was 52.85%, which demonstrated that this strain could degrade 1050 mg paraffin wax, using it as the sole carbon source, in a 1000-mL minimal salts medium. These results indicate that the strain PW1 can be used for application in oil wells with paraffin deposition problems in order to enhance oil recovery.

  11. Modulation of behaviour and virulence of a high alginate expressing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain from cystic fibrosis by oral commensal bacterium Streptococcus anginosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Richard D; Qureshi, Muhammad R; Whiley, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airways harbour complex and dynamic polymicrobial communities that include many oral bacteria. Despite increased knowledge of CF airway microbiomes the interaction between established CF pathogens and other resident microbes and resulting impact on disease progression is poorly understood. Previous studies have demonstrated that oral commensal streptococci of the Anginosus group (AGS) can establish chronic pulmonary infections and become numerically dominant in CF sputa indicating that they play an important role in CF microbiome dynamics. In this study a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (DWW2) of the mucoid alginate overproducing phenotype associated with chronic CF airway infection and a strain of the oral commensal AGS species Streptococcus anginosus (3a) from CF sputum were investigated for their ability to co-exist and their responses to biofilm co-culture. Bacteria in biofilms were quantified, pyocyanin expression by DWW2 was measured and the effect of AGS strain 3a on reversion of DWW2 to a non-mucoidal phenotype investigated. The virulence of DWW2, 3a and colony variant phenotypes of DWW2 in mono- and co-culture were compared in a Galleria mellonella infection model. Co-culture biofilms were formed in normoxic, hypercapnic (10% CO2) and anoxic atmospheres with the streptococcus increasing in number in co-culture, indicating that these bacteria would be able to co-exist and thrive within the heterogeneous microenvironments of the CF airway. The streptococcus caused increased pyocyanin expression by DWW2 and colony variants by stimulating reversion of the mucoid phenotype to the high pyocyanin expressing non-mucoid phenotype. The latter was highly virulent in the infection model with greater virulence when in co-culture with the streptococcus. The results of this study demonstrate that the oral commensal S. anginosus benefits from interaction with P. aeruginosa of the CF associated mucoid phenotype and modulates the behaviour of the

  12. Dynamics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Genome Evolution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalai Mathee; Giri Narasimhan; Camilo Valdes; Xiaoyun Qiu; Jody M. Matewish; Michael Koehrsen; Antonis Rokas; Chandri N. Yandava; Reinhard Engels; Erliang Zeng; Raquel Olavarietta; Melissa Doud; Roger S. Smith; Philip Montgomery; Jared R. White; Paul A. Godfrey; Chinnappa Kodira; Bruce Birren; James E. Galagan; Stephen Lory

    2008-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to thrive in diverse environments that includes humans with a variety of debilitating diseases or immune deficiencies...

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The opportunistic gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is implicated in many chronic infections and is readily isolated from chronic wounds, medical devices, and the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa is believed to persist in the host organism due to its capacity to form...... (PMNs). In this chapter, the interplay between P. aeruginosa and the PMNs in chronic infections is discussed with focus on the role of rhamnolipids and extracellular DNA....

  14. A Mathematical model to investigate quorum sensing regulation and its heterogenecity in pseudomonas syringae on leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is a plant-pathogen, which through quorum sensing (QS), controls virulence. In this paper, by means of mathematical modeling, we investigate QS of this bacterium when living on leaf surfaces. We extend an existing stochastic model for the formation of Pseudomonas s...

  15. Antagonistic Activity and Mode of Action of Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid, Produced by Marine Bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA31x, Against Vibrio anguillarum In vitro and in a Zebrafish In vivo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linlin; Tian, Xueying; Kuang, Shan; Liu, Ge; Zhang, Chengsheng; Sun, Chaomin

    2017-01-01

    Phenazine and its derivatives are very important secondary metabolites produced from Pseudomonas spp. and have exhibited broad-spectrum antifungal and antibacterial activities. However, till date, there are few reports about marine derived Pseudomonas and its production of phenazine metabolites. In this study, we isolated a marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA31x which produced natural product inhibiting the growth of Vibrio anguillarum C312, one of the most serious bacterial pathogens in marine aquaculture. Combining high-resolution electro-spray-ionization mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses, the functional compound against V. anguillarum was demonstrated to be phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), an important phenazine derivative. Molecular studies indicated that the production of PCA by P. aeruginosa PA31x was determined by gene clusters phz1 and phz2 in its genome. Electron microscopic results showed that treatment of V. anguillarum with PCA developed complete lysis of bacterial cells with fragmented cytoplasm being released to the surrounding environment. Additional evidence indicated that reactive oxygen species generation preceded PCA-induced microbe and cancer cell death. Notably, treatment with PCA gave highly significant protective activities against the development of V. anguillarum C312 on zebrafish. Additionally, the marine derived PCA was further found to effectively inhibit the growth of agricultural pathogens, Acidovorax citrulli NP1 and Phytophthora nicotianae JM1. Taken together, this study reveals that marine Pseudomonas derived PCA carries antagonistic activities against both aquacultural and agricultural pathogens, which broadens the application fields of PCA. PMID:28289406

  16. Novel Targets for Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes infection in all parts of the human body. The bacterium is naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics. In addition to resistance mechanisms such as efflux pumps, the ability to form aggregates, known as biofilm, further reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa’s...

  17. Pseudomonas Exotoxin A: optimized by evolution for effective killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eMichalska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas Exotoxin A (PE is the most toxic virulence factor of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review describes current knowledge about the intoxication pathways of PE. Moreover, PE represents a remarkable example for pathoadaptive evolution, how bacterial molecules have been structurally and functionally optimized under evolutionary pressure to effectively impair and kill their host cells.

  18. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phelps, T. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.

  19. Plant growth promotion by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, X.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a Gram-negative rod shaped bacterium that has a versatile metabolism and is widely spread in soil and water. P. fluorescens strain SBW25 (Pf.SBW25) is a well-known model strain to study bacterial evolution, plant colonization and biocontrol of plant diseases. It produces t

  20. Pseudomonas - Fact Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2012-01-01

    Fact sheet on Pseudomonas, including:What is Pseudomonas?What infections does it cause?Who is susceptible to pseudomonas infection?How will I know if I have pseudomonas infection?How can Pseudomonas be prevented from spreading?How can I protect myself from Pseudomonas?How is Pseudomonas infection treated?

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing modulates immune responses: An updated review article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariminik, Ashraf; Baseri-Salehi, Majid; Kheirkhah, Babak

    2017-07-08

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterium which induces some complications in immunocompromised patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a quorum-sensing using bacterium which regulates its genes expression. The bacterium uses two famous pathways for quorum sensing entitled LasI/LasR and RhlI/RhlR systems. It has been documented that the bacteria which use quorum sensing are able to overcome immune responses. This review article aims to present recent information regarding the effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems on the host immune responses. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of fungal trehalose and bacterial thiamine in the improved survival and growth of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor S238N and the helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, A; Brulé, C; Palin, B; Champmartin, D; Rubini, P; Garbaye, J; Sarniguet, A; Frey-Klett, P

    2010-08-01

    The mycorrhiza helper bacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8 enhances the establishment of Laccaria bicolor S238N ectomycorrhizae by improving the pre-symbiotic growth and survival of the fungus. Nothing is known about the effect of the ectomycorrhizal fungus on the helper bacteria or the molecules that are involved in the interaction. In this study, we have monitored the population density of the helper strain P. fluorescens BBc6R8 in soils inoculated with L. bicolor and in control soils and found that the ectomycorhizal fungus improves the survival of the helper bacteria. We investigated the identity of the fungal and bacterial metabolites involved in this reciprocal growth-promoting effect using a combination of growth measurements, chemoattractant assays, HPLC and in silico genome analyses. We showed that trehalose, a disaccharide that accumulates to high levels in the fungal hyphae, chemoattracted and promoted the growth of the helper bacteria. Meanwhile, P. fluorescens BBc6R8 produced thiamine at concentrations that enhanced the fungal growth in vitro. Altogether our data indicate that the interaction between the two microorganisms is beneficial for both species and relies, at least in part, on trophic mutualism.

  3. Mining Genomes of Biological Control Strains of Pseudomonas spp.: Unexpected Gems and Tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 suppresses numerous soilborne plant diseases and produces an array of structurally-characterized secondary metabolites that are toxic to plant pathogenic bacteria, fungi and Oomycetes. Biosynthetic gene clusters for these metabolites compose nea...

  4. The biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp strain affects the pathogenesis-related gene expression of the take-all fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici on wheat roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daval, Stéphanie; Lebreton, Lionel; Gazengel, Kévin; Boutin, Morgane; Guillerm-Erckelboudt, Anne-Yvonne; Sarniguet, Alain

    2011-12-01

    The main effects of antagonistic rhizobacteria on plant pathogenic fungi are antibiosis, fungistasis or an indirect constraint through the induction of a plant defence response. To explore different biocontrol mechanisms, an in vitro confrontation assay was conducted with the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp as a biocontrol agent of the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) on wheat roots. In parallel with the assessment of disease extension, together with the bacterial and fungal root colonization rates, the transcript levels of candidate fungal pathogenicity and plant-induced genes were monitored during the 10-day infection process. The bacterial inoculation of wheat roots with the Pf29Arp strain reduced the development of Ggt-induced disease expressed as attack frequency and necrosis length. The growth rates of Ggt and Pf29Arp, monitored through quantitative polymerase chain reaction of DNA amounts with a part of the Ggt 18S rDNA gene and a specific Pf29Arp strain detection probe, respectively, increased throughout the interactions. Bacterial antagonism and colonization had no significant effect on root colonization by Ggt. The expression of fungal and plant genes was quantified in planta by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction during the interactions thanks to the design of specific primers and an innovative universal reference system. During the early stages of the tripartite interaction, several of the fungal genes assayed were down-regulated by Pf29Arp, including two laccases, a β-1,3-exoglucanase and a mitogen-activated protein kinase. The plant host glutathione-S-transferase gene was induced by Ggt alone and up-regulated by Pf29Arp bacteria in interaction with the pathogen. We conclude that Pf29Arp antagonism acts through the alteration of fungal pathogenesis and probably through the activation of host defences.

  5. Novel Targets for Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes infection in all parts of the human body. The bacterium is naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics. In addition to resistance mechanisms such as efflux pumps, the ability to form aggregates, known as biofilm, further reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa’s suscep......Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes infection in all parts of the human body. The bacterium is naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics. In addition to resistance mechanisms such as efflux pumps, the ability to form aggregates, known as biofilm, further reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa......’s susceptibility to antibiotics. The presence of such biofilms is acknowledged to equal a persistent infection due to their inherent high tolerance to all antimicrobials and immune cells. In this chapter we discuss the mechanisms of biofilm tolerance. The latest biofilm research is reviewed and future treatment...

  6. Identification of quorum-sensing regulated proteins in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arevalo-Ferro, C.; Hentzer, Morten; Reil, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen which is responsible for severe nosocomial infections in immunocompromised patients and is the major pathogen in cystic fibrosis. The bacterium utilizes two interrelated quorum-sensing (QS) systems, which rely...

  7. Dynamics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa genome evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Mathee, Kalai; Narasimhan, Giri; Valdes, Camilo; Qiu, Xiaoyun; Matewish, Jody M.; Koehrsen, Michael; Rokas, Antonis; Yandava, Chandri N.; Engels, Reinhard; Zeng, Erliang; Olavarietta, Raquel; Doud, Melissa; Smith, Roger S.; Montgomery, Philip; White, Jared R.

    2008-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to thrive in diverse environments that includes humans with a variety of debilitating diseases or immune deficiencies. Here we report the complete sequence and comparative analysis of the genomes of two representative P. aeruginosa strains isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients whose genetic disorder predisposes them to infections by this pathogen. The comparison of the genomes of the two CF strains...

  8. Hydrolytic potential of a psychrotrophic Pseudomonas isolated from refrigerated raw milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula F. Corrêa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The production of extracellular hydrolases by a psychrotrophic bacterium isolated from refrigerated raw milk, and identified as a Pseudomonas sp. belonging to the Pseudomonas jenssenii group, was studied. This bacterium produced proteolytic and lipolytic enzymes in all media investigated (skim milk, cheese whey, casein broth, and tryptone soy broth. High levels of α-glucosidase were produced in skim milk broth. Hydrolytic enzymes detected in skim milk broth are of particular concern, indicating that these enzymes could be produced by Pseudomonas sp. during the cold storage of raw milk, contributing to the spoilage problem in milk and dairy products.

  9. 深海细菌 Pseudomonas sp.bIp-2黑色素生成条件研究及其 hppD基因的克隆%Studies on the melanin production and gene cloning of hppD from the deep-sea bacterium Pseudomonas sp.bIp-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦海镧; 于丽波; 易志伟; 汤熙翔

    2014-01-01

    A melanin-producing strain was isolated from deep-sea sediment of the Atlantic Ocean and identified as Pseudomonas sp.bIp-2 by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.The study of growth and melanin production with varied culture conditions show that the melanin production in strain bIp-2 is growth-associated.The maximum yield of pig-ment was obtained after the culture attained the stationary growth phase.The temperature range for growth is 4~37℃ with optimal growth at 37℃,and the maximum melanin production was observed at 28℃.The pH range for growth is 6.0~9.0,with both optimal growth and melanin formation both being at pH 7.0.Strain bIp-2 grew in 1%~9%NaCl with a maximum melanin production at 5%NaCl.Low concentration of Fe(II)(0.05 mmol/dm3 ) can improve the production of melanin.Fe2+of more than 0.20 mmol/dm3 suppressed the melanin production and Fe2+of more than 1 .00 mmol/dm3 completely inhibited the growth of the strain.Cu2+of 0.1 mmol/dm3 had no effect to the melanin production and Cu2+of more than 0.5 mmol/dm3 inhibited the formation of melanin.Cu2+over 1 .0 mmol/dm3 completely inhibited the growth of the strain.A 1 087 bp fragment of the full-length hppD gene was amplified from the strain bIp-2.The hppD gene encoded an amino acid sequence sharing a 97%similarity with the HPPD from Pseudomonas stutzeri RCH2.These results laid a foundation to the study of the synthesis,applica-tion and ecological effect of the melanin from Pseudomonas sp.bIp-2.%从大西洋深海沉积物中分离得到1株产黑色素细菌bIp-2,16S rRNA基因序列分析表明该菌隶属于假单胞菌属(Pseudomonas),与施氏假单胞菌(P.stutzeri)有最高的16S rRNA基因序列相似性(99%).进一步对该菌的生长及产黑色素条件进行了初步研究,结果表明bIp-2在稳定生长期后期才开始大量积累黑色素;bIp-2可在4~37℃的温度范围下生长,最适生长温度为37℃,在28℃具有最高的黑色素产量;bIp-2生长的p

  10. Degradation of 1,3-dichloropropene by Pseudomonas cichorii 170

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelarends, G.J.; Wilkens, M.; Larkin, M.J.; Elsas, van J.D.; Janssen, D.B.

    1998-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas cichorii 170, isolated from soil that was repeatedly treated with the nematocide 1,3-dichloropropene, could utilize low concentrations of 1,3-dichloropropene as a sole carbon and energy source. Strain 170 was also able to grow on 3-chloroallyl alcohol, 3- chlo

  11. Degradation of 1,3-dichloropropene by Pseudomonas cichorii 170

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Wilkens, Marga; Larkin, Michael J.; Elsas, Jan Dirk van; Janssen, Dick B.

    1998-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas cichorii 170, isolated from soil that was repeatedly treated with the nematocide 1,3-dichloropropene, could utilize low concentrations of 1,3-dichloropropene as a sole carbon and energy source, Strain 170 was also able to grow on 3-chloroallyl alcohol, 3-chlor

  12. The Transcriptional Landscape of the Production Organism Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arrigo, Isotta

    Bacterial cell factories represent a valid alternative to fossil fuel-based production. A promising bacterium that can be optimized as cell factory is Pseudomonas putida. However, its development in bioproduction applications poses some challenges including a clear understanding of the bacterial ...

  13. Disruption of transporters affiliated with enantio-pyochelin biosynthesis gene cluster of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 has pleiotropic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (formerly Pseudomonas fluorescens) is a biocontrol bacterium that produces the siderophore enantio-pyochelin under conditions of iron starvation in a process that is often accompanied by the secretion of its biosynthesis intermediates, salicylic acid and dihydroaeruginoic ...

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Strain Rhodococcus kyotonensis KB10, a Potential Biodegrading and Antibacterial Bacterium Isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chi Eun; Jo, Sung Hee

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus kyotonensis KB10 is an endophytic bacterium isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. The organism showed mild antibacterial activity against the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. This study reports the genome sequence of R. kyotonensis KB10. This bacterium contains an ectoine biosynthesis gene cluster and has the potential to degrade nitroaromatic compounds. The identified bacterium may be a suitable biocontrol agent and degrader of environmental pollutants. PMID:27389269

  15. Pseudomonas matsuisoli sp. nov., isolated from a soil sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yao; Hameed, Asif; Hung, Mei-Hua; Liu, You-Cheng; Hsu, Yi-Han; Young, Li-Sen; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2015-03-01

    An aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped and polar-flagellated bacterium, designated strain CC-MHH0089(T), was isolated from a soil sample taken on Matsu Island (Taiwan). Strain CC-MHH0089(T) grew at 15-30 °C and pH 5.0-10.0 and tolerated ≤8 % (w/v) NaCl. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed high pairwise sequence similarity to Pseudomonas azotifigens 6H33b(T) (97.3 %) and Pseudomonas balearica SP1402(T) (96.7 %) and lower sequence similarity to other strains (Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas matsuisoli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-MHH0089(T) ( = BCRC 80771(T) = JCM 30078(T)).

  16. Effects of photoperiod on growth of and denitrification by Pseudomonas chlororaphis in the root zone of Glyceria maxima, studied in a gnotobiotic microcosm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Wijlhuizen, A.G.; Blom, C.W.P.M.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The emergent macrophyte Glyceria maxima was subjected to different photoperiods and grown with ammonium or nitrate as nitrogen source in presterilized microcosms with spatially separated root and non-root compartments. The microcosms were inoculated with the denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas

  17. Bioleaching of copper oxide ore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, M. A.; Irannajad, M.; Azadmehr, A. R.; Meshkini, M.

    2013-12-01

    Bioleaching is an environmentally friendly method for extraction of metal from ores. In this study, bioleaching of copper oxide ore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a heterotrophic bacterium that can produce various organic acids in an appropriate culture medium, and these acids can operate as leaching agents. The parameters, such as particle size, glucose percentage in the culture medium, bioleaching time, and solid/liquid ratio were optimized. Optimum bioleaching conditions were found as follows: particle size of 150-177 μm, glucose percentage of 6%, bioleaching time of 8 d, and solid/liquid ratio of 1:80. Under these conditions, 53% of copper was extracted.

  18. Producción equina en Argentina afectada por Pseudomonas aeruginosa : Abortos, infecciones genitales y portadores

    OpenAIRE

    Monteverde, José J.

    1980-01-01

    El microorganismo patogénico Ps. aeruginosa, también designado como "Bacilo del pus azul" , Bacillus pyocyaneous, Bacterium aeruginosum, Pseudomonas pyocyaneous, Bacterium pyocyaneum, Pseudomonas pyocyanea, es conocido desde el año 1882 como responsable de cuadros patológicos en el hombre y los animales, estando ampliamente difundido en la naturaleza. En esta comunicación se presenta información que puede interesar a quienes actúan en el campo de la patología de la raza Sangre Pura ...

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-08-11

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work.

  20. Genomic plasticity and catabolic potential of Pseudomonas cepacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lessie, T.G.

    1996-04-01

    The primary goal of this project was to gain information about the size and organization of the genome of Burkholderia cepacia (formerly Pseudomonas cepacia), a microbe which continues to attract attention because of its extraordinary degradative abilities and potential as an agent of bioremediation. This bacterium is no longer considered to be a member of genus Pseudomonas nor does it belong in the gamma-subclass of the proteobacteria, in which the authentic pseudomonads are grouped. It belongs in the less well characterized beta-subclass of the proteobacteria. Technology for manipulation of large DNA fragments developed by Cantor was used to demonstrate that chromosomal multiplicity, a characteristic yet to be observed in a gamma-subclass bacterium, is common among B. cepacia strains. A derivative of Tn5 suitable for determining the chromosomal locations of various B. cepacia genes was also constructed.

  1. Membrane-bound respiratory chain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown aerobically.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsushita, K.; Yamada, M.; Shinagawa, E; Adachi, O; Ameyama, M

    1980-01-01

    The electron transport chain of the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, grown aerobically, contained a number of primary dehydrogenases and respiratory components (soluble flavin, bound flavin, coenzyme Q9, heme b, heme c, and cytochrome o) in membrane particles of the organism. Cytochrome o, about 50% of the b-type cytochrome, seemed to function as a terminal oxidase in the respiratory chain. The electron transport chain of P. aeruginosa grown aerobically was suggested to be line...

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... and/or help treat infections? What is a Pseudomonas infection? Pseudomonas infection is caused by strains of ...

  3. Chemical and Metabolic Aspects of Antimetabolite Toxins Produced by Pseudomonas syringae Pathovars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Arrebola

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae is a phytopathogenic bacterium present in a wide variety of host plants where it causes diseases with economic impact. The symptoms produced by Pseudomonas syringae include chlorosis and necrosis of plant tissues, which are caused, in part, by antimetabolite toxins. This category of toxins, which includes tabtoxin, phaseolotoxin and mangotoxin, is produced by different pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae. These toxins are small peptidic molecules that target enzymes of amino acids’ biosynthetic pathways, inhibiting their activity and interfering in the general nitrogen metabolism. A general overview of the toxins’ chemistry, biosynthesis, activity, virulence and potential applications will be reviewed in this work.

  4. Pseudomonas screening assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalit, Ruth (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method for the detection of Pseudomonas bacteria is described where an Azurin-specific antibody is employed for detecting the presence of Azurin in a test sample. The detection of the presence of Azurin in the sample is a conclusive indicator of the presence of the Pseudomonas bacteria since the Azurin protein is a specific marker for this bacterial strain.

  5. Monocyte Profiles in Critically Ill Patients With Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-02

    Pseudomonas Infections; Pseudomonas Septicemia; Pseudomonas; Pneumonia; Pseudomonal Bacteraemia; Pseudomonas Urinary Tract Infection; Pseudomonas Gastrointestinal Tract Infection; Sepsis; Sepsis, Severe; Critically Ill

  6. Anaerobic oxidation of 2-chloroethanol under denitrifying conditions by Pseudomonas stutzeri

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, J.A.; Stams, A.J.M.; Schraa, G.; Ballerstedt, H.; Bont, de J.A.M.; Gerritse, J.

    2003-01-01

    A bacterium that uses 2-chloroethanol as sole energy and carbon source coupled to denitrification was isolated from 1,2-dichloroethane-contaminated soil. Its 16 S rDNA sequence showed 98% similarity with the type strain of Pseudomonas stutzeri (DSM 5190) and the isolate was tentatively identified as

  7. Anaerobic degradation of long-chain alkylamines by a denitrifying Pseudomonas stutzeri

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, P.D.; Ginkel, van C.G.; Plugge, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    The anaerobic degradation of tetradecylamine and other long-chain alkylamines by a newly isolated denitrifying bacterium was studied. Strain ZN6 was isolated from a mixture of soil and active sludge and was identified as representing Pseudomonas stutzeri, based on partial 16S rRNA gene sequence anal

  8. Bactericidal antibody response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa by adults with urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, D L; Ourth, D D

    1979-01-01

    In this investigation we found that adults with upper urinary tract infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa produced serum antibodies with bactericidal activity against the bacterium. Seventeen of 20 infected adults showed bactericidal activity with a titer range of 1:10 to 1:10,000. PMID:117024

  9. Establishment of oxidative D-xylose metabolism in Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijnen, J.P.; Winde, J.H.de; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative D-xylose catabolic pathway of Caulobacter crescentus, encoded by the xylXABCD operon, was expressed in the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12. This engineered transformant strain was able to grow on D-xylose as a sole carbon source with a biomass yield of 53% (based on g [d

  10. Role of quorum sensing by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in microbial keratitis and cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willcox, M.D.P.; Zhu, H.; Conibear, T.C.R.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous bacterium that causes opportunistic infections in a range of host tissues and organs. Infections by P. aeruginosa are difficult to treat and hence there is interest in the development of effective therapeutics. One of the key mechanisms that P. aeruginosa us...

  11. Oxygen uptake kinetics of Pseudomonas chlororaphis grown in glucose- or glutamate-limited continuous cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Oxygen uptake and glucose and glutamate oxidation kinetics of the heterotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis grown in glucose- or glutamate-limited cultures under oxygen-saturating or oxygen-limiting conditions were determined. Km values for oxygen were 1.4– 5.6 UM. Only in the case of glucose

  12. Case of indolent endocarditis due to Pseudomonas stutzeri with genetic evidence of relapse after 4 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, David; Podglajen, Isabelle; Aubert, Agnès; Buu-Hoï, Annie; Diebold, Benoit; Mainardi, Jean-Luc

    2009-02-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri, a gram-negative bacterium, is a common inhabitant of soil and water. We report an unusual case of a relapse of infective endocarditis due to P. stutzeri 4 years after the initial episode. The identity of the strains was proven by genomic analysis.

  13. Engineering Pseudomonas putida S12 for efficient utilization of D-Xylose and L-Arabinose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijnen, J.P.; Winde, J.H. de; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    The solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12 was engineered to utilize xylose as a substrate by expressing xylose isomerase (XylA) and xylulokinase (XylB) from Escherichia coli. The initial yield on xylose was low (9% [g CDW g substrate−1], where CDW is cell dry weight), and the growth rate

  14. C1 compounds as auxiliary substrate for engineered Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, F.W.; Winde, J.H. de; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    The solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12 was engineered to efficiently utilize the C1 compounds methanol and formaldehyde as auxiliary substrate. The hps and phi genes of Bacillus brevis, encoding two key steps of the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathway, were introduced to construct a

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis PCL1601, Displaying Biocontrol against Soilborne Phytopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vida, Carmen; de Vicente, Antonio; Cazorla, Francisco M

    2017-04-06

    In this study, we present the draft genome sequence of the bacterial strain Pseudomonas chlororaphis PCL1601. This bacterium was isolated from the rhizosphere of healthy avocado trees and displayed antagonistic and biological control activities against different soilborne phytopathogenic fungi and oomycetes. Copyright © 2017 Vida et al.

  16. Phloroglucinol functions as an intracellular and intercellular chemical messenger influencing gene expression in Pseudomonas protegens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteria can be both highly communicative and highly competitive in natural habitats and antibiotics are thought to play a role in both of these processes. The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 produces a spectrum of antibiotics, two of which, pyoluteorin and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAP...

  17. Gene expression profiling in viable but not culturable (VBNC) cells of Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas syringae infects diverse crop plants and comprises at least 50 different pathovar strains with different host ranges. One of our objectives is related to understanding molecular mechanisms of stress tolerance in alfalfa, the most widely grown forage crop in the wo...

  18. Genomics-guided discovery of secondary metabolites and their regulation in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a well-characterized rhizosphere bacterium known for its production of a diverse spectrum of secondary metabolites and its capacity to suppress plant diseases caused by soilborne fungal, bacterial and oomycete pathogens. Metabolites produced by Pf-5 include 2,4-...

  19. The rare codon AGA is involved in regulation of pyoluteorin biosynthesis in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 can colonize root and seed surfaces of many plants, protecting them from infection by plant pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. This capacity to suppress disease is attributed in part to Pf-5’s production of a large spectrum of antibiotics, which is controll...

  20. Phloroglucinol functions as an intercellular chemical messenger with broad transcriptional effects in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteria can be both highly communicative and highly competitive in the rhizosphere and antibiotics play a role in both of these processes. Among the large spectrum of antibiotics produced by the rhizosphere bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, two—pyoluteorin and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG)...

  1. Rhizoplane colonisation of peas by Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae and a deleterious Pseudomonas putida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berggren, I.; Alstrom, S.; Vuurde, van J.W.L.; Martensson, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain angstrom 313, a deleterious rhizosphere bacterium, reduced pea nitrogen content when inoculated alone or in combination with Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae on plants in the presence of soil under greenhouse conditions. When plants were grown gnotobiotically in liquid me

  2. Diversity among Pseudomonas syringae strains originating from fruit trees in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Žarko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae is a widespread and economically important plant pathogen, one found on a number of hosts, including fruit trees, field crops, vegetables, and ornamental plants. This bacterium has been experimentally identified as a parasite of pear, apple, apricot, peach, cherry, sour cherry, plum, and raspberry. The present study was designed to establish differences between strains isolated from fruit trees in Serbia. The pathogenic and biochemical characteristics of isolates were studied. The BOX-PCR method was used to generate genomic fingerprints of Pseudomonas syringae isolates and to identify strains that were previously not distinguishable by other classification methods. Different Bacillus sp. strains were tested for in vitro inhibitory activity against Pseudononas syringae isolates. Bacillus sp. strains show inhibitory activity only against P. syringae isolates that originated from peach. The obtained results demonstrate that the population of the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae from the fruit trees in Serbia is very diverse.

  3. Pseudomonas salegens sp. nov., a halophilic member of the genus Pseudomonas isolated from a wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Shahinpei, Azadeh; Sepahy, Abbas Akhavan; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Seyedmahdi, Shima Sadat; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-endospore-forming, non-pigmented, rod-shaped, slightly halophilic bacterium, designated GBPy5(T), was isolated from aquatic plants of the Gomishan wetland, Iran. Cells of strain GBPy5(T) were motile. Growth occurred with between 1 and 10% (w/v) NaCl and the isolate grew optimally with 3% (w/v) NaCl. The optimum pH and temperature for growth of the strain were pH 8.0 and 30 °C, respectively, while it was able to grow over a pH range of 6.5-9.0 and a temperature range of 4-35 °C. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, revealed that strain GBPy5(T) is a member of the genus Pseudomonas forming a monophyletic branch. The novel strain exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 95.4% with type strains of Pseudomonas guariconensis PCAVU11(T) and Pseudomonas sabulinigri J64(T), respectively. The major cellular fatty acids of the isolate were C18:1ω7c (37.8%), C16:0 (14.9%), C16:1ω7c (12.9%), C12:0 3-OH (7.1%) and C12:0 (7.0%). The polar lipid pattern of strain GBPy5(T) comprised phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and one phospholipid. Ubiquinone 9 (Q-9) was the predominant lipoquinone. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain GBPy5(T) was 59.2 mol%. On the basis of the phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain GBPY5(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas salegens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GBPy5(T) ( = IBRC-M 10762(T) = CECT 8338(T)).

  4. Pseudomonas soli sp. nov., a novel producer of xantholysin congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Javier; García-López, Marina; Carmona, Cristina; Sousa, Thiciana da S; de Pedro, Nuria; Cautain, Bastien; Martín, Jesús; Vicente, Francisca; Reyes, Fernando; Bills, Gerald F; Genilloud, Olga

    2014-09-01

    A chemoorganotrophic Gram-negative bacterium was isolated by means of a diffusion sandwich system from a soil sample from the Sierra Nevada National Park, Spain. Strain F-279,208(T) was oxidase and catalase positive, strictly aerobic, non-spore-forming and motile by single polar flagellum. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD genes revealed that strain F-279,208(T) belongs to the Pseudomonas putida group with Pseudomonas mosselii and Pseudomonas entomophila as its closest relatives. DNA-DNA hybridization assays and phenotypic traits confirmed that this strain belongs to a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas soli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is F-279,208(T) (=DSM 28043(T)=LMG 27941(T)), and during fermentation it produces xantholysins, a family of lipodepsipeptides. The major compound, xantholysin A, showed an interesting activity in a RCC4 kidney tumor cell line with inactivation of VHL linked with the HIF pathway, without any cytotoxic effects against other human tumor cell lines tested including, liver, pancreas and breast.

  5. Complete genome of Pseudomonas sp. strain L10.10, a psychrotolerant biofertilizer that could promote plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See-Too, Wah Seng; Lim, Yan-Lue; Ee, Robson; Convey, Peter; Pearce, David A; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok Gan

    2016-03-20

    Pseudomonas sp. strain L10.10 (=DSM 101070) is a psychrotolerant bacterium which was isolated from Lagoon Island, Antarctica. Analysis of its complete genome sequence indicates its possible role as a plant-growth promoting bacterium, including nitrogen-fixing ability and indole acetic acid (IAA)-producing trait, with additional suggestion of plant disease prevention attributes via hydrogen cyanide production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Bioactivities by a crude extract from the Greenlandic Pseudomonas sp. In5 involves the nonribosomal peptides, nunamycin and nunapeptin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Jensen, Helle; Venditto, Vincent J.;

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive microbial metabolites provide a successful source of novel compounds with pharmaceutical potentials. The bacterium Pseudomonas sp. In5 is a biocontrol strain isolated from a plant disease suppressive soil in Greenland, which produces two antimicrobial nonribosomal peptides (NRPs......), nunapeptin and nunamycin. In this study, we used in vitro antimicrobial and anticancer bioassays to evaluate the potential bioactivities of both a crude extract derived from Pseudomonas sp. In5 and NRPs purified from the crude extract....

  7. Lactococcus lactis - a diploid bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Ole; Hansen, Flemming G.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    In contrast to higher eukaryotes, bacteria are haploid, i.e. they store their genetic information in a single chromosome, which is then duplicated during the cell cycle. If the growth rate is sufficiently low, the bacterium is born with only a single copy of the chromosome, which gets duplicated...... before the bacterium divides. Fast-growing bacteria have overlapping rounds of replication, and can contain DNA corresponding to more than four genome equivalents. However, the terminus region of the chromosome is still present in just one copy after division, and is not duplicated until right before...... the next division. Thus, the regions of the chromosome that are the last to be replicated are haploid even in fast-growing bacteria. In contrast to this general rule for bacteria, we found that Lactococcus lactis, a bacterium which has been exploited for thousands of years for the production of fermented...

  8. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  9. Pseudomonas hunanensis sp. nov., isolated from soil subjected to long-term manganese pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Li, Bai-Yuan; Wang, Hai-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Qiang

    2014-07-01

    A Gram-negative, polar flagella, rod-shaped bacterium LV (T) was isolated from a soil sample subjected to long-term manganese pollution in Hunan Province, China. Cells grow optimally on Luria-Bertani agar medium at 30 °C in the presence of 0-5.0 % (w/v) NaCl and pH 7-8. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain LV (T) belonged to the genus Pseudomonas, with sequence similarity values of 98.6, 98.2, 98.7, and 97.3 % to Pseudomonas monteilii BCRC 17520 (T) , Pseudomonas putida BCRC 10459 (T) , Pseudomonas plecoglossicida BCRC 17517 (T) , and Pseudomonas asplenii BCRC 17131 (T) , respectively. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the five strains was Pseudomonas. Thus, strain LV (T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas hunanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LV (T) (=CICC 10558(T) = NCCB 100446(T)).

  10. Glycopeptide dendrimers as Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Bergmann, Myriam; Darbre, Tamis

    2013-06-01

    Synthetic glycopeptide dendrimers composed of a branched oligopeptide tree structure appended with glycosidic groups at its multiple N-termini were investigated for binding to the Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectins LecB and LecA. These lectins are partly responsible for the formation of antibiotic resistant biofilms in the human pathogenic bacterium P. aeruginosa, which causes lethal airway infections in immune-compromised and cystic fibrosis patients. Glycopeptide dendrimers with high affinity to the lectins were identified by screening of combinatorial libraries. Several of these dendrimers, in particular the LecB specific glycopeptide dendrimers FD2 and D-FD2 and the LecA specific glycopeptide dendrimers GalAG2 and GalBG2, also efficiently block P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and induce biofilm dispersal in vitro. Structure-activity relationship and structural studies are reviewed, in particular the observation that multivalency is essential to the anti-biofilm effect in these dendrimers.

  11. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas...

  12. Rhizoxin analogs, orfamide A and chitinase production contribute to the toxicity of Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 to Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a soil bacterium that was first described for its activity in biological control of plant diseases and has since been shown to be lethal to certain insects. Among these is the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a well-established model organism for studies evalu...

  13. Virulence determinants of Pseudomonas syringae strains isolated from grasses in the context of a small type III effector repertoire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dudnik, Alexey; Dudler, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas syringae is pathogenic to a large number of plant species. For host colonization and disease progression, strains of this bacterium utilize an array of type III-secreted effectors and other virulence factors, including small secreted molecules such as syringolin A, a pepti...

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of the Triclosan- and Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain B10W Isolated from Municipal Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chuanqing; Nelson, Matthew; Cao, Guangxiang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the triclosan- and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain B10W, obtained from municipal wastewater in Hawaii. The bacterium has a 6.7-Mb genome, contains 6,391 coding sequences and 78 RNAs, with an average G+C content of 66.2 mol%. PMID:28104659

  15. TrgI, toluene repressed gene I, a novel gene involved in toluene-tolerance in Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, R.J.M.; Ballerstedt, H.; Ruijssenaars, H.; Bont, J.A.M. de; Winde, J.H. de; Wery, J.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is well known for its remarkable solvent tolerance. Transcriptomics analysis of this bacterium grown in toluene-containing chemostats revealed the differential expression of 253 genes. As expected, the genes encoding one of the major solvent tolerance mechanisms, the solvent e

  16. TrgI, toluene repressed gene I, a novel gene involved in toluene-tolerance in Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, R.J.M.; Ballerstedt, H.; Ruijssenaars, H.; Bont, J.A.M. de; Winde, J.H. de; Wery, J.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is well known for its remarkable solvent tolerance. Transcriptomics analysis of this bacterium grown in toluene-containing chemostats revealed the differential expression of 253 genes. As expected, the genes encoding one of the major solvent tolerance mechanisms, the solvent e

  17. TrgI, toluene repressed gene I, a novel gene involved in toluene-tolerance in Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, R.J.M.; Ballerstedt, H.; Ruijssenaars, H.; De Bont, J.A.M.; De Winde, J.H.; Wery, J.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is well known for its remarkable solvent tolerance. Transcriptomics analysis of this bacterium grown in toluene-containing chemostats revealed the differential expression of 253 genes. As expected, the genes encoding one of the major solvent tolerance mechanisms, the solvent e

  18. Draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas mosselii Gil3, isolated from catfish and antagonistic against hypervirulent Aeromonas hydrophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas mosselii Gil3 was isolated from a catfish that survived from lethal challenge with hypervirulent Aeromonas hydrophila (vAh). When assayed in vitro, the bacterium showed antagonism against vAh. Sequence analysis revealed that the genome of P. mosselii Gil3 encodes numerous aromatic metabo...

  19. Expression of the recA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO is inducible by DNA-damaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.V.; Kokjohn, T.A.

    1988-05-01

    Western (immunoblot) analysis using Escherichia coli anti-RecA antiserum revealed that expression of the RecA protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO is induced upon exposure of the bacterium to UV irradiation or norfloxacin, a quinolone related to nalidixic acid.

  20. Alkaline cyanide biodegradation by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Almagro, V M; Blasco, R; Huertas, M J; Martínez-Luque, M; Moreno-Vivián, C; Castillo, F; Roldán, M D

    2005-02-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 uses cyanide, cyanate, beta-cyanoalanine, and other cyanoderivatives as nitrogen sources under alkaline conditions, which prevents volatile HCN (pK(a) 9.2) formation. The cyanide consumed by this strain is stoichiometrically converted into ammonium. In addition, this bacterium grows with the heavy metal, cyanide-containing waste water generated by the jewellery industry, and is also a cyanide-resistant strain which induces an alternative oxidase and a siderophore-based mechanism for iron acquisition in the presence of cyanide. The detection of cyanase and beta-cyanoalanine nitrilase activities in cyanide-induced cells suggests their implication in the cyanide degradation pathway.

  1. Molybdate Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by an Antarctic Bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo6+ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue. Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries.

  2. Molybdate reduction to molybdenum blue by an Antarctic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S A; Shukor, M Y; Shamaan, N A; Mac Cormack, W P; Syed, M A

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo⁶⁺ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries.

  3. Physiological engineering of Pseudomonas aurantiaca antimicrobial activity: effects of sodium chloride treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Rozenfelde

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of sodium chloride (NaCl treatment on the antifungal activity of the bacterium Pseudomonas aurantiaca, a producer of biopesticide for vegetable plants, was investigated. It was shown that an increase in the NaCl concentration in incubation solutions from 1 M to 3 M led to a significant increase in the antifungal activity of this bacterium. Antifungal activity continued to increase with prolonged treatment of bacteria in fresh nutrient medium from 72 h to 96 h. These findings could be very important for the further development of biotechnological processes directed not only to the production of new active biopesticides but also of other valuable resources.

  4. Insight into the Interaction between Plants and Associated Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akansha Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent Pseudomonas are known for their plant growth promoting and disease protection abilities. In past years, a number of studies have focused on how these bacteria suppress disease and induce resistance. They are known to produce antibiotics and siderophores, promote growth, and induce systemic resistance in the host plant. This bacterium has come out as a model organism for ecological studies going on in rhizosphere and for studying plant-beneficial microbe interaction. This review focuses on the current state of knowledge on biocontrol potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas strains and the mechanisms adopted by them.

  5. Genome Analysis of Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1751: A Rhizobacterium that Controls Root Diseases and Alleviates Salt Stress for Its Plant Host

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1751 is a rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium isolated from the rhizosphere of a greenhouse-grown tomato plant in Uzbekistan. It controls several plant root diseases caused by Fusarium fungi through the mechanism of competition for nutrients and niches (CNN). This mechanism does not rely on the production of antibiotics, so it avoids the concerns of resistance development and is environmentally safe. Additionally, this bacterium promotes plant growth by alleviating s...

  6. Complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PICF7, an indigenous root endophyte from olive (Olea europaea L.) and effective biocontrol agent against Verticillium dahliae

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PICF7 is a native endophyte of olive roots. Previous studies have shown this motile, Gram-negative, non-sporulating bacterium is an effective biocontrol agent against the soil-borne fungus Verticillium dahliae, the causal agent of one of the most devastating diseases for olive (Olea europaea L.) cultivation. Here, we announce and describe the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PICF7 consisting of a circular chromosome of 6,136,735 bp that...

  7. Identification of a siderophore-producing bacterium Pseudomonas putida A3 and its growth-promoting effects on cucumber seedlings%高产嗜铁素恶臭假单胞菌A3菌株的鉴定及其对黄瓜的促生作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艳萍; 滕松山; 赵蕾

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial strain A3 with high ability of producing siderophore was isolated from rhizosphere of greenhouse vegetables.The relative siderophore content was measured by chrome azurol S(CAS) assay and was identified using the Shenker's test.The results show that the relative siderophore content is 93.40% and the type is a kind of carboxylate type siderophore.In addition,the strain A3 also has a high ability of solubilizing phosphate and is able to produce indol-3-acetic(IAA) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate(ACC) deaminase under different substrates.According to the morphological,physiological-biochemical properties,API system and the 16S rRNA sequence analysis,the strain A3 is identified as Pseudomonas putida.The results from solution culture experiments reveals that compared to other treatments,the growth of cucumber seedlings is increased under the treatment of siderophore filtrate of strain A3 with 50 μmol/L FeCl3 in iron deficiency Hoagland solution,especially for shoot height,root length,leaf length,fresh mass and total leaf chlorophyll content.These may provide strong evidence that the siderophore produced by P.putida A3 is helpful to the growth promotion of cucumber seedlings under low iron conditions.%从大棚蔬菜根际土中分离到一株嗜铁素高产菌株A3,铬天青(CAS)法定量检测其嗜铁素相对含量达93.40%,Shenker's实验确定为羧酸型嗜铁素。在不同底物诱导下,该菌株可不同程度地产生吲哚乙酸(IAA)及1-氨基环丙烷-1-羧酸(ACC)脱氨酶,并具有一定的溶磷能力。根据形态特征、生理生化、API系统及16S rRNA基因序列分析,将菌株A3鉴定为恶臭假单胞菌(Pseudomonas putida)。在缺铁Hoagland营养液中添加难溶性铁及菌株A3嗜铁素发酵滤液的处理组,能够显著提高黄瓜幼苗的株高、根长、叶长、鲜重及叶绿素含量,表明菌株A3产生的嗜铁素在低铁条件下对黄瓜幼苗具有促生作用。

  8. Biodegradation and detoxification of reactive textile dye by isolated Pseudomonas sp. SUK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyani, Dayanad C; Telke, Amar A; Govindwar, Sanjay P; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2009-03-01

    An isolated bacterium from a textile disposal site, Pseudomonas sp. SUK1, has the ability to decolorize the reactive textile dyes and methyl orange. This bacterium showed the potential to decolorize the textile dye Reactive Blue 59 at a high concentration (5 g/L(-1)), which is frequently used in the textile industry of Solapur, India. Induction in the activities of lignin peroxidase, azoreductase, and dichlorophenol indophenol reductase was observed during the decolorization of Methyl Orange and Reactive Blue 59. Methyl Orange (as model azo dye) was used to understand the mechanism of biodegradation by Pseudomonas sp. SUK1. The final product was identified as 1,4-benzenediamine, N, N-dimethyl by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Microbial and phytotoxicity studies revealed the nontoxic nature of the products of Reactive Blue 59.

  9. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    circulatory collapse, and leucopenia . These observations were similar to those made in Pseudomonas infections. This work resulted in great stimulation...Sensakovic and Bartell (1974) reported that a toxic slime fraction caused leucopenia in mice, and the relative contribution of these factors and of exotoxin...A to leucopenia remains to be determined. Finally. the low incidence of leucocidin producing strains argue against any significant importance of

  10. Plasmid-mediated Detoxification of Mycotoxin Zearalenone in Pseudomonas Sp. ZEA-1

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The Pseudomonas sp. Strain ZEA-1 was isolated from rhizosphere of corn plant by an enrichment technique showed capability of utilizing zearalenone as the sole source of carbon. The bacterium rapidly utilized zearalenone beyond 200 µg/ml and showed prolific growth in a minimal medium containing 100 µg/ml zearalenone source. The course of ZEA degradation as well as the formation of its metabolites was observed by UV Spectrophotometer and thin layer chromatography analysis. Toxicity of biotransf...

  11. Reciprocal Regulation of Pyoluteorin Production with Membrane Transporter Gene Expression in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Pyoluteorin is a chlorinated polyketide antibiotic secreted by the rhizosphere bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. Genes encoding enzymes and transcriptional regulators involved in pyoluteorin production are clustered in the genome of Pf-5. Sequence analysis of genes adjacent to the known pyoluteorin biosynthetic gene cluster revealed the presence of an ABC transporter system. We disrupted two putative ABC transporter genes by inserting transcriptional fusions to an ice nucleation reporte...

  12. Mobile genetic elements in the genome of the beneficial rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 is a plant-associated bacterium that inhabits the rhizosphere of a wide variety of plant species and and produces secondary metabolites suppressive of fungal and oomycete plant pathogens. The Pf-5 genome is rich in features consistent with its commensal lifestyle, and its sequence has revealed attributes associated with the strain's ability to compete and survive in the dynamic and microbiologically complex rhizosphere habitat. In this study, w...

  13. Pseudomonas putida—a versatile host for the production of natural products

    OpenAIRE

    Loeschcke, Anita; Thies, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthesis of natural products by heterologous expression of biosynthetic pathways in amenable production strains enables biotechnological access to a variety of valuable compounds by conversion of renewable resources. Pseudomonas putida has emerged as a microbial laboratory work horse, with elaborated techniques for cultivation and genetic manipulation available. Beyond that, this bacterium offers several particular advantages with regard to natural product biosynthesis, notably a vers...

  14. Boolean network model of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallidis, Stylianos E; Karafyllidis, Ioannis G

    2014-09-01

    To coordinate their behavior and virulence and to synchronize attacks against their hosts, bacteria communicate by continuously producing signaling molecules (called autoinducers) and continuously monitoring the concentration of these molecules. This communication is controlled by biological circuits called quorum sensing (QS) circuits. Recently QS circuits and have been recognized as an alternative target for controlling bacterial virulence and infections without the use of antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects insects, plants, animals and humans and can cause acute infections. This bacterium has three interconnected QS circuits that form a very complex and versatile QS system, the operation of which is still under investigation. Here we use Boolean networks to model the complete QS system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and we simulate and analyze its operation in both synchronous and asynchronous modes. The state space of the QS system is constructed and it turned out to be very large, hierarchical, modular and scale-free. Furthermore, we developed a simulation tool that can simulate gene knock-outs and study their effect on the regulons controlled by the three QS circuits. The model and tools we developed will give to life scientists a deeper insight to this complex QS system.

  15. The algae-lytic ability of bacterium DC10 and the influence of environmental factors on the ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Shunyu; LIU Yongding; SHEN Yinwu; LI Genbao

    2005-01-01

    A lysing-bacterium DC10, isolated from Dianchi Lake of Yunnan Province, was characterized to be Pseudomonas sp. It was able to lyse some algae well, such as Microcystis viridis, Selenastrum capricornutum, and so on. In this study, it was shown that the bacterium lysed the algae by releasing a substance; the best lytic effects were achieved at Iow temperatures and in the dark. Different concentrations of CaCI2 and NaNO3 influenced the lytic effects;the ability to lyse algae decreased in the following order: pH 4 > pH 9 > pH 7 > pH 5.5. It was significant to develop a special technology with this kind of bacterium for controlling the bloomforming planktonic microalgae.

  16. Isolation and evaluation of potent Pseudomonas species for bioremediation of phorate in amended soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariyal, Monu; Gupta, V K; Jindal, Vikas; Mandal, Kousik

    2015-12-01

    Use of phorate as a broad spectrum pesticide in agricultural crops is finding disfavor due to persistence of both the principal compound as well as its toxic residues in soil. Three phorate utilizing bacterial species (Pseudomonas sp. strain Imbl 4.3, Pseudomonas sp. strain Imbl 5.1, Pseudomonas sp. strain Imbl 5.2) were isolated from field soils. Comparative phorate degradation analysis of these species in liquid cultures identified Pseudomonas sp. strain Imbl 5.1 to cause complete metabolization of phorate during seven days as compared to the other two species in 13 days. In soils amended with phorate at different levels (100, 200, 300 mg kg(-1) soil), Pseudomonas sp. strain Imbl 5.1 resulted in active metabolization of phorate by between 94.66% and 95.62% establishing the same to be a potent bacterium for significantly relieving soil from phorate residues. Metabolization of phorate to these phorate residues did not follow the first order kinetics. This study proves that Pseudomonas sp. strain Imbl 5.1 has huge potential for active bioremediation of phorate both in liquid cultures and agricultural soils.

  17. Novel small protein identification and quantitative proteomic analysis in Pseudomonas putida KT-­2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaochen

    .This thesis investigated an industrial bacterium, Pseudomonas putida KT-2440, in two aspects. First, the research focused on discovering novel small proteins (s-proteins) in the bacterium. With large-scale approaches for gene identification, groups of novel s-proteins were identified and validated from...... the genome, transcriptome and proteome of the bacterium. The application of new research approach, ribosome profiling, enabled us to analysis novel open reading frames (ORFs) from different standpoint. Second, by quantitative proteomic approach, the differential expressions of genes were analyzed at proteome...... level under different environmental conditions. The results yield insights intothe adaptation of P. putida KT-2440 in different environments.Based on bioinformatic, proteomic and transcriptomic approaches, global gene expression was analyzed on both transcriptional and translational levels. Our research...

  18. Pseudomonas genomes: diverse and adaptable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silby, Mark W; Winstanley, Craig; Godfrey, Scott A C; Levy, Stuart B; Jackson, Robert W

    2011-07-01

    Members of the genus Pseudomonas inhabit a wide variety of environments, which is reflected in their versatile metabolic capacity and broad potential for adaptation to fluctuating environmental conditions. Here, we examine and compare the genomes of a range of Pseudomonas spp. encompassing plant, insect and human pathogens, and environmental saprophytes. In addition to a large number of allelic differences of common genes that confer regulatory and metabolic flexibility, genome analysis suggests that many other factors contribute to the diversity and adaptability of Pseudomonas spp. Horizontal gene transfer has impacted the capability of pathogenic Pseudomonas spp. in terms of disease severity (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and specificity (Pseudomonas syringae). Genome rearrangements likely contribute to adaptation, and a considerable complement of unique genes undoubtedly contributes to strain- and species-specific activities by as yet unknown mechanisms. Because of the lack of conserved phenotypic differences, the classification of the genus has long been contentious. DNA hybridization and genome-based analyses show close relationships among members of P. aeruginosa, but that isolates within the Pseudomonas fluorescens and P. syringae species are less closely related and may constitute different species. Collectively, genome sequences of Pseudomonas spp. have provided insights into pathogenesis and the genetic basis for diversity and adaptation.

  19. [Pseudomonas aeruginosa in dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morand, A; Morand, J-J

    2017-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacillus characterized by its greenish color and sweetish smell, is at the origin of potentially severe forms of dermatosis, such as ecthyma gangrenosum which marks immunosuppression or reveals blood-poisoning, especially in children. It frequently colonizes chronic wounds and serious burns, and spongiotic or acantholytic dermatosis, especially when severe or localized in skinfolds. It requires special care because of its high resistance to antibiotics and antiseptics. It can also involve folliculitis favored by water sports or a nail disorder (chloronychia). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Population structure and diversity of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid producing fluorescent pseudomonas spp. from dryland cereal fields of central Washington State (U.S.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certain strains of the rhizosphere bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens contain the phenazine biosynthesis operon (phzABCEDF) and produce redox-active phenazine antibiotics that suppress a wide variety of soilborne plant pathogens. In 2007 and 2008 we isolated 412 phenazine-producing (Phz+) fluorescent...

  1. Antivirulence activity of azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eImperi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics represent our bulwark to combat bacterial infections, but the spread of antibiotic resistance compromises their clinical efficacy. Alternatives to conventional antibiotics are urgently needed in order to complement the existing antibacterial arsenal. The macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM provides a paradigmatic example of an unconventional antibacterial drug. Besides its growth-inhibiting activity, AZM displays potent anti-inflammatory properties, as well as antivirulence activity on some intrinsically resistant bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this bacterium, the antivirulence activity of AZM mainly relies on its ability to interact with the ribosome, resulting in direct and/or indirect repression of specific subsets of genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and intrinsic antibiotic resistance. Both clinical experience and clinical trials have shown the efficacy of AZM in the treatment of chronic pulmonary infections caused by P. aeruginosa. The aim of this review is to combine results from laboratory studies with evidence from clinical trials in order to unify the information on the in vivo mode of action of AZM in P. aeruginosa infection.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display...... a remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because...... the use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  3. Pseudomonas A1 influences the formation of hydroxyapatite and degrades bioglass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulou, E. [Laboratory of General Microbiology, Section of Genetics, Development and Molecular Biology, School of Biology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Papadopoulou, L. [School of Geology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Paraskevopoulos, K.M. [Physics Department Solid State Physics Section, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Koidis, P. [Department of Fixed Prosthesis and Implant Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Sivropoulou, A., E-mail: asivropo@bio.auth.g [Laboratory of General Microbiology, Section of Genetics, Development and Molecular Biology, School of Biology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

    2009-12-15

    Bacterial infections frequently lead to hard tissue destructions. The purpose of the present study was to address the question as to how the bacteria destroy hard tissues with the use of an in vitro system. A bacterium was isolated from a solution simulating body fluid which was identified as Pseudomonas A1, and is able to solubilize tricalcium phosphate when it grows in IP broth. The presence of Pseudomonas A1 resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of the formation of hydroxyapatite layer, on the surface of bioglass specimens immersed in SBF solution, in contrast to the control. When the bioglass specimens were immersed in IP broth without Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, so as to be present the appropriate inorganic ions for the survival of Pseudomonas but the only source of phosphate be derived from bioactive glass specimens, the formation of hydroxyapatite layer was not observed in any specimen. Additionally the presence of Pseudomonas resulted in 93.4% (w/w) and 85.9% (w/w) reduction on the surface composition of Ca and P, respectively, and further the rate of the decrease of specimen's weight was almost 50% higher in the presence of Pseudomonas compared with the control.

  4. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa cervical osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeet Kumar Meher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine and is usually seen in the background of intravenous drug use and immunocompromised state. Very few cases of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa have been reported in otherwise healthy patients. This is a case presentation of a young female, who in the absence of known risk factors for cervical osteomyelitis presented with progressively worsening neurological signs and symptoms.

  5. Determination Pattern of Antimicrobial Resistance of Pseudomonas Isolated from Patients in a University Tertiary Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Hasani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pseudomonas are ubiquitous bacteria widely present in nature. However, they have emerged as an opportunistic pathogen for humans. This bacterium is accountable for many localized and disseminated diseases, especially wounds in burn patients, respiratory infections, septicemia and bacteremia. Among all Pseudomonas species, P. aeruginosa is one of the important and most virulent species in hospital settings, while other pathogenic species include stutzeri, putida and fluorescence. The aim of this study was to assess pattern of antibiotic resistance in these bacteria isolated from a University teaching and treatment center. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 99 Pseudomonas strains (68 strains P. aeruginosa and 31 other Pseudomonas species isolated from various clinical specimens. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility test was performed using the disc agar diffusion method according to CLSI recommendations. In this study, among various clinical specimens sent to microbiology laboratory, wound (59.59% was found as a major source of Pseudomonas spp. Among various wards, Pseudomonas spp. was isolated more from patients admitted to burns ward (48.48%. Antibiotic susceptibility assay results revealed non susceptibility pattern towards most of the antibiotics; however, among all antibiotics tested, most common resistance was observed towards ceftazidime (76.76%. The results of this study shows the presence of Pseudomonas infection in the hospital setting and their developed resistance towards many conventional antibiotics, which is a concern at this treatment center. Thus, there exist a need for evaluation of careful and accurate measurement of resistance and assessment of exact drug administration policies. Therefore, to control the infection and prevent from increased prevalence of resistant strains appropriate resolution should be followed.

  6. Oxylipins produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa promote biofilm formation and virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Eriel; Campos-Gómez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The oxygenation of unsaturated fatty acids by dioxygenases occurs in all kingdoms of life and produces physiologically important lipids called oxylipins. The biological roles of oxylipins have been extensively studied in animals, plants, algae and fungi, but remain largely unidentified in prokaryotes. The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa displays a diol synthase activity that transforms several monounsaturated fatty acids into mono- and di-hydroxylated derivatives. Here we show that oxylipins derived from this activity inhibit flagellum-driven motility and upregulate type IV pilus-dependent twitching motility of P. aeruginosa. Consequently, these oxylipins promote bacterial organization in microcolonies, increasing the ability of P. aeruginosa to form biofilms in vitro and in vivo (in Drosophila flies). We also demonstrate that oxylipins produced by P. aeruginosa promote virulence in Drosophila flies and lettuce. Our study thus uncovers a role for prokaryotic oxylipins in the physiology and pathogenicity of bacteria. PMID:27929111

  7. Magnetic fields suppress Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and enhance ciprofloxacin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, H M H N; Nguyen, D; Mogarala, S; Osiñski, M; Smyth, H D C

    2015-01-01

    Due to the refractory nature of pathogenic microbial biofilms, innovative biofilm eradication strategies are constantly being sought. Thus, this study addresses a novel approach to eradicate Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNP), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), and magnetic fields were systematically evaluated in vitro for their relative anti-biofilm contributions. Twenty-four-hour biofilms exposed to aerosolized MNPs, Cipro, or a combination of both, were assessed in the presence or absence of magnetic fields (Static one-sided, Static switched, Oscillating, Static + oscillating) using changes in bacterial metabolism, biofilm biomass, and biofilm imaging. The biofilms exposed to magnetic fields alone exhibited significant metabolic and biomass reductions (p biofilms were treated with a MNP/Cipro combination, the most significant metabolic and biomass reductions were observed when exposed to static switched magnetic fields (p biofilms to a static switched magnetic field alone, or co-administration with MNP/Cipro/MNP + Cipro appears to be a promising approach to eradicate biofilms of this bacterium.

  8. Antibiofilm and anti-infection of a marine bacterial exopolysaccharide against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimei eWu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms and produces virulence factors, thus leading to major problems in many fields, such as clinical infection, food contamination and marine biofouling. In this study, we report the purification and characterization of an exopolysaccharide EPS273 from the culture supernatant of marine bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri 273. The exopolysaccharide EPS273 not only effectively inhibits biofilm formation but also disperses preformed biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. High performance liquid chromatography traces of the hydrolyzed polysaccharides shows that EPS273 primarily consists of glucosamine, rhamnose, glucose and mannose. Further investigation demonstrates that EPS273 reduces the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin, exoprotease and rhamnolipid, and the virulence of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to human lung cells A549 and zebrafish embryos is also obviously attenuated by EPS273. In addition, EPS273 also greatly reduces the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and extracellular DNA (eDNA, which are important factors for biofilm formation. Furthermore, EPS273 exhibits strong antioxidant potential by quenching hydroxyl and superoxide anion radicals. Notably, the antibiofouling activity of EPS273 is observed in the marine environment up to two weeks according to the amounts of bacteria and diatoms in the glass slides submerged in the ocean. Taken together, the properties of EPS273 indicate that it has a promising prospect in combating bacterial biofilm-associated infection, food-processing contamination and marine biofouling.

  9. Pseudomonas extremaustralis sp. nov., a Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) producer isolated from an antarctic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Nancy I; Pettinari, M Julia; Stackebrandt, Erko; Tribelli, Paula M; Põtter, Markus; Steinbüchel, Alexander; Méndez, Beatriz S

    2009-11-01

    A Gram-negative, mobile, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacterium (strain 14-3(T)) was isolated from a temporary pond in Antarctica. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain 14-3(T) was shown to belong to the genus Pseudomonas sensu stricto. Physiological and biochemical tests supported the phylogenetic affiliation. Strain 14-3(T) is closely related to Pseudomonas veronii DSM 11331(T), sharing 99.7% sequence similarity. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments between the two strains showed only moderate reassociation similarity (35.1%). Tests for arginine dihydrolase and nitrate reduction were positive, while those for denitrification, indol production, glucose acidification, urease, ss-galactosidase, esculin, caseine and gelatin hydrolysis were negative. Growth of this bacterium occurred in a range from 4 to 37 degrees C but not at 42 degrees C. It accumulated poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) when grown on sodium octanoate medium. Strain 14-3(T) therefore represents the type strain of a new species, for which the name Pseudomonas extremaustralis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain 14-3(T) has been deposited as DSM 17835(T) and as CIP 109839(T).

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF THE BACTERIUM TOMATO STEM CANKER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goner A. Shaker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseased tomato samples were collected from green house was evaluated for isolation, pathogenicity and biochemical tests. The symptoms of the infected tomato plants were as sudden wilting after curled on leaves and necrotic streak regions developed at the crown and base of the stem and the cavities deepen and expand up and down, brown discoloration and necrosis occurring on xylem and phloem vasculer. All of ages of tomato plant were susceptible to bacteria when the weather condition favorable and immediately, seen collapse symptom on tomato plant at once fail and die. The bacterium was isolated from diseased plant in all regions on nutrient Agar; a yellow bacterium was isolated from infected tomato plant in green houses and fields in Abu-Ghraib, Rashiedia and Qanat Al-Geiaysh nurseries in Baghdad provinces of Iraq. The bacterium was found gram positive, rod-shaped, non-motile and capable an aerobic growth and based on the morphological and biochemical characteristics revealed that this bacterium belongs to: Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. (smith pathogenicity and hypersensitivity of the bacterium Cmm showed the disease index were 18.33, 6.66, 16.66, 5, 0% for tomato seedlings were inoculated treatments as the wounding roots, without wounding roots, crown of the stem, petiole and control respectively.

  11. Outer Membrane Protein D Gene in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa and its Role in Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Motaghi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of nosocomial infection. OprD protein is a specific protein regulating the uptake of carbapenem antibiotic. Loss of OprD is the main mechanism of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa resistance to carbapenem. In this study, the presence of OprD gene is investigated in isolated Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in burn patients of Ghotboddin hospital in Shiraz. Material & Methods: 66 Pseudomonas Aeruginosa were isolated from wound specimens of 250 burn patients. Strain characteristics were confirmed by biochemical tests. Antibiogram was done via disc diffusion method. Finally, OprD gene was investigated by PCR. Results: Isolated Pseudomonas Aeruginosa showed more sensitivity to chloramphenicol and colicitin and more resistance  to ciprofloxacin, gentamycin, cefotaxim, ceftazidin, imipenem, meropenem, and erythromycin. 61 percent of isolates were positive for OprD gene by PCR. Conclusion: The findings of this study revealed that Colicitin and chloramphenicol are more effective in treatment of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa infections in burn patients, and deletion and mutation in OprD gene cause bacterium resistance to carbapenem antibiotic.

  12. Pseudomonas granadensis sp. nov., a new bacterial species isolated from the Tejeda, Almijara and Alhama Natural Park, Granada, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Javier; García-López, Marina; Bills, Gerald F; Genilloud, Olga

    2015-02-01

    During the course of screening bacterial isolates as sources of as-yet unknown bioactive compounds with pharmaceutical applications, a chemo-organotrophic, Gram-negative bacterium was isolated from a soil sample taken from the Tejeda, Almijara and Alhama Natural Park, Granada, Spain. Strain F-278,770(T) was oxidase- and catalase-positive, aerobic, with a respiratory type of metabolism with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor, non-spore-forming and motile by one polar flagellum, although some cells had two polar flagella. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD genes revealed that strain F-278,770(T) belongs to the Pseudomonas koreensis subgroup (Pseudomonas fluorescens lineage), with Pseudomonas moraviensis, P. koreensis, P. baetica and P. helmanticensis as its closest relatives. Chemotaxonomic traits such as polar lipid and fatty acid compositions and G+C content of genomic DNA corroborated the placement of strain F-278,770(T) in the genus Pseudomonas. DNA-DNA hybridization assays and phenotypic traits confirmed that this strain represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas granadensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is F-278,770(T) ( = DSM 28040(T) = LMG 27940(T)).

  13. Aerobic degradation of highly chlorinated polychlorobiphenyls by a marine bacterium, Pseudomonas CH07

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    De, J.; Ramaiah, N.; Sarkar, A.

    -703. 27. Williams, W.A., Lobos, J.H. & Cheetham, W.E. 1997 A phylogenetic analysis of aerobic polychlorinated biphenyl-degrading bacteria. International Journal of Systematic Bacteriology 47(1), 207-10. Table 1. Biochemical characteristics of CH07...

  14. Hot Tub Rash (Pseudomonas Dermatitis/Folliculitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español [PDF - 1 page] "Hot Tub Rash" ( Pseudomonas Dermatitis / Folliculitis) If contaminated water comes in contact ... is often caused by infection with the germ Pseudomonas aeruginosa . This germ is common in the environment ( ...

  15. Pseudomonas salina sp. nov., isolated from a salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Ying; Hou, Ting-Ting; Liu, Hong-Can; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Wang, Fang; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2015-09-01

    A Gram-staining-negative, facultatively aerobic bacterium, strain XCD-X85(T), was isolated from Xiaochaidan Lake, a salt lake (salinity 9.9%, w/v) in Qaidam basin, Qinghai province, China. Its taxonomic position was determined by using a polyphasic approach. Cells of strain XCD-X85(T) were non-endospore-forming rods, 0.4-0.6 μm wide and 1.0-1.6 μm long, and motile by means of a single polar flagellum. Strain XCD-X85(T) was catalase- and oxidase-positive. Growth was observed in the presence of 0-12.0% (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 1.0-2.0%) and at 4-35 °C (optimum, 25-30 °C) and pH 6.5-10.5 (optimum, pH 8.0-8.5). Strain XCD-X85(T) contained (>10%) summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c), C12 : 0, C16 : 0 and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) as the predominant fatty acids. The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 9 (Q-9). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. The DNA G+C content was 57.4 mol%. Phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain XCD-X85(T) was associated with the genus Pseudomonas, and showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities to Pseudomonas pelagia CL-AP6(T) (99.0%) and Pseudomonas bauzanensis BZ93(T) (96.8%). DNA-DNA relatedness of strain XCD-X85T to P. pelagia JCM 15562(T) was 19 ± 1%. On the basis of the data presented above, it is concluded that strain XCD-X85(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas salina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XCD-X85(T) ( = CGMCC 1.12482(T) = JCM 19469(T)).

  16. Quorum sensing and policing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa social cheaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meizhen; Schaefer, Amy L; Dandekar, Ajai A; Greenberg, E Peter

    2015-02-17

    The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that uses a quorum sensing signal cascade to activate expression of dozens of genes when sufficient population densities have been reached. Quorum sensing controls production of several key virulence factors, including secreted proteases such as elastase. Cooperating groups of bacteria growing on protein are susceptible to social cheating by quorum-sensing defective mutants. A possible way to restrict cheater emergence is by policing where cooperators produce costly goods to sanction or punish cheats. The P. aeruginosa LasR-LasI quorum sensing system controls genes including those encoding proteases and also those encoding a second quorum-sensing system, the RhlR-RhlI system, which controls numerous genes including those for cyanide production. By using RhlR quorum sensing mutants and cyanide synthesis mutants, we show that cyanide production is costly and cyanide-producing cooperators use cyanide to punish LasR-null social cheaters. Cooperators are less susceptible to cyanide than are LasR mutants. These experiments demonstrate policing in P. aeruginosa, provide a mechanistic understanding of policing, and show policing involves the cascade organization of the two quorum sensing systems in this bacterium.

  17. Sequencing and Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage JG004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunk Boyke

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phages could be an important alternative to antibiotics, especially for treatment of multiresistant bacteria as e.g. Pseudomonas aeruginosa. For an effective use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents, it is important to understand phage biology but also genes of the bacterial host essential for phage infection. Results We isolated and characterized a lytic Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage, named JG004, and sequenced its genome. Phage JG004 is a lipopolysaccharide specific broad-host-range phage of the Myoviridae phage family. The genome of phage JG004 encodes twelve tRNAs and is highly related to the PAK-P1 phage genome. To investigate phage biology and phage-host interactions, we used transposon mutagenesis of the P. aeruginosa host and identified P. aeruginosa genes, which are essential for phage infection. Analysis of the respective P. aeruginosa mutants revealed several characteristics, such as host receptor and possible spermidine-dependance of phage JG004. Conclusions Whole genome sequencing of phage JG004 in combination with identification of P. aeruginosa host genes essential for infection, allowed insights into JG004 biology, revealed possible resistance mechanisms of the host bacterium such as mutations in LPS and spermidine biosynthesis and can also be used to characterize unknown gene products in P. aeruginosa.

  18. Study on Antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas aeruginosa NO4 Strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ji Young; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    As important human and veterinary medicines, antibiotics are being produced and consumed in large quantities around the world. For example, more than 50 million pounds (22,000 tons) of antibiotics are produced in the U.S. each year and annual production in Germany is about 2,000 tons. Antibiotics are low molecular weight microbial metabolites that at low concentrations inhibit the growth of other microorganisms. Resistant bacteria may also spread and become broader infection-control problems, not only within health care institutions, but in communities as well. Clinically important bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a common cause of infection among hospitalized patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of opportunistic infections among immunocompromised individuals. The spread of this organism in health care settings is often difficult to control due to the presence of multiple intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we isolated novel bacterium which had strong antagonistic activity and separated antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas sp., and analyzed characteristics and molecular weight of the antibiotic compound

  19. Expression, purification, and characterization of formaldehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wangluo; Chen, Shuai; Liao, Yuanping; Wang, Dingli; Ding, Jianfeng; Wang, Yingming; Ran, Xiaoyuan; Lu, Daru; Zhu, Huaxing

    2013-12-01

    As a member of zinc-containing medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase family, formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH) can oxidize toxic formaldehyde to less active formate with NAD(+) as a cofactor and exists in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Most FDHs are well known to be glutathione-dependent in the catalysis of formaldehyde oxidation, but the enzyme from Pseudomonas putida is an exception, which is independent of glutathione. To identify novel glutathione-independent FDHs from other bacterial strains and facilitate the corresponding structural and enzymatic studies, high-level soluble expression and efficient purification of these enzymes need to be achieved. Here, we present molecular cloning, expression, and purification of the FDH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium causing opportunistic human infection. The FDH of P. aeruginosa shows high sequence identity (87.97%) with that of P. putida. Our results indicated that coexpression with molecular chaperones GroES, GroEL, and Tig has significantly attenuated inclusion body formation and improved the solubility of the recombinant FDH in Escherichiacoli cells. A purification protocol including three chromatographic steps was also established to isolate the recombinant FDH to homogeneity with a yield of ∼3.2 mg from 1L of cell culture. The recombinant P. aeruginosa FDH was properly folded and biologically functional, as demonstrated by the mass spectrometric, crystallographic, and enzymatic characterizations of the purified proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Anthranilate degradation by a cold-adapted Pseudomonas sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dockyu; Yoo, Miyoun; Kim, Eungbin; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2015-03-01

    An alpine soil bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain PAMC 25931 was characterized as eurypsychrophilic (both psychrophilic and mesotolerant) with a broad temperature range of 5-30 °C both for anthranilate (2-aminobenzoate) degradation and concomitant cell growth. Two degradative gene clusters (antABC and catBCA) were detected from a fosmid clone in the PAMC 25931 genomic library; each cluster was confirmed to be specifically induced by anthranilate. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant AntABC (anthranilate 1,2-dioxygenase, AntDO) converted anthranilate into catechol, exhibiting strict specificity toward anthranilate. Recombinant CatA (catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, C12O) from the organism was active over a broad temperature range (5-37 °C). However, CatA rapidly lost the enzyme activity when incubated at above 25 °C. For example, 1 h-preincubation at 37 °C resulted in 100% loss of enzyme activity, while a counterpart from mesophilic Pseudomonas putida mt-2 did not show any negative effect on the initial enzyme activity. These results suggest that CatA is a new cold-adapted thermolabile enzyme, which might be a product through the adaptation process of PAMC 25931 to naturally cold environments and contribute to its ability to grow on anthranilate there.

  1. Responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji eMorita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa often are hard to treat; inappropriate chemotherapy readily selects multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa. This organism can be exposed to a wide range of concentrations of antimicrobials during treatment; learning more about the responses of P. aeruginosa to antimicrobials is therefore important. We review here responses of the bacterium P. aeruginosa upon exposure to antimicrobials at levels below the inhibitory concentration.Carbapenems (e.g., imipenem have been shown to induce the formation of thicker and more robust biofilms, while fluoroquinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin and aminoglycosides (e.g., tobramycin have been shown to induce biofilm formation. Ciprofloxacin also has been demonstrated to enhance the frequency of mutation to carbapenem resistance. Conversely, although macrolides (e.g., azithromycin typically are not effective against P. aeruginosa because of the pseudomonal outer-membrane impermeability and efflux, macrolides do lead to a reduction in virulence factor production. Similarly, tetracycline is not very effective against this organism, but is known to induce the type-III secretion system and consequently enhance cytotoxicity of P. aeruginosa in vivo. Of special note are the effects of antibacterials and disinfectants on pseudomonal efflux systems. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of protein synthesis inhibitors (aminoglycosides, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, etc. induce the MexXY multidrug efflux system. This response is known to be mediated by interference with the translation of the leader peptide PA5471.1, with consequent effects on expression of the PA5471 gene product. Additionally, induction of the MexCD-OprJ multidrug efflux system is observed upon exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of disinfectants such as chlorhexidine and benzalkonium. This response is known to be dependent upon the AlgU stress response factor.Altogether, these biological responses of P. aeruginosa

  2. Magnetite nanoparticle aided immobilization of Pseudomonas sp. GBS.5 for carbazole degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poorva Mehndiratta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Pseudomonas sp. GBS.5 is a newly isolated biosurfactant producing and carbazole degrading bacterium. In the present study, this bacterium was coated with magnetite nanoparticles, synthesized using co-precipitation method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM studies confirmed the coating of the bacterial surface with these nanoparticles. Degradation activity of the coated cells obtained was 1.4 ppm/min as compared to 0.32 ppm/min for free cells and could be reused for five different cycles. These results indicate that magnetite nanoparticle can be efficiently used for the immobilization of biosurfactant producing bacteria involved in the degradation of polyaromatic compounds.

  3. Biofilm lifestyle enhances diesel bioremediation and biosurfactant production in the Antarctic polyhydroxyalkanoate producer Pseudomonas extremaustralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribelli, Paula M; Di Martino, Carla; López, Nancy I; Raiger Iustman, Laura J

    2012-09-01

    Diesel is a widely distributed pollutant. Bioremediation of this kind of compounds requires the use of microorganisms able to survive and adapt to contaminated environments. Pseudomonas extremaustralis is an Antarctic bacterium with a remarkable survival capability associated to polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) production. This strain was used to investigate the effect of cell growth conditions--in biofilm versus shaken flask cultures--as well as the inocula characteristics associated with PHAs accumulation, on diesel degradation. Biofilms showed increased cell growth, biosurfactant production and diesel degradation compared with that obtained in shaken flask cultures. PHA accumulation decreased biofilm cell attachment and enhanced biosurfactant production. Degradation of long-chain and branched alkanes was observed in biofilms, while in shaken flasks only medium-chain length alkanes were degraded. This work shows that the PHA accumulating bacterium P. extremaustralis can be a good candidate to be used as hydrocarbon bioremediation agent, especially in extreme environments.

  4. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by Pseudomonas veronii AS41G inhabiting Annona squamosa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Syed; Satish, Sreedharamurthy

    2015-11-05

    Biogenic principles to nanotechnology have generated tremendous attention in recent past owing eco friendly benign process for synthesis of nanoparticles. Present investigation reports extracellular synthesis of gold nanoparticles using cell free supernatant of Pseudomonas veronii AS 41G, a novel endophyte isolated from Annona squamosa L. Gold nanoparticles formation was confirmed with UV-Visible spectrophotometer. FTIR analysis predicted various functional groups responsible for reduction of metal salts and stabilization of gold nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were crystalline in nature as shown in XRD pattern. TEM analysis revealed morphological characteristics of nanoparticles with different size. Thus the present study attributes for facile process for synthesis of gold nanoparticles as an alternative for conventional methods. The study also highlights the new role of novel bacterium Pseudomonas veronii AS41G which will be very valuable as a record for the researchers working on it.

  5. Antifungal Activity of Selected Indigenous Pseudomonas and Bacillus from the Soybean Rhizosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. García

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to isolate and select indigenous soil Pseudomonas and Bacillus bacteria capable of developing multiple mechanisms of action related to the biocontrol of phytopathogenic fungi affecting soybean crops. The screening procedure consisted of antagonism tests against a panel of phytopathogenic fungi, taxonomic identification, detection by PCR of several genes related to antifungal activity, in vitro detection of the antifungal products, and root colonization assays. Two isolates, identified and designated as Pseudomonas fluorescens BNM296 and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BNM340, were selected for further studies. These isolates protected plants against the damping-off caused by Pythium ultimum and were able to increase the seedling emergence rate after inoculation of soybean seeds with each bacterium. Also, the shoot nitrogen content was higher in plants when seeds were inoculated with BNM296. The polyphasic approach of this work allowed us to select two indigenous bacterial strains that promoted the early development of soybean plants.

  6. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to tracheal cells injured by influenza infection or by endotracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramphal, R; Small, P M; Shands, J W; Fischlschweiger, W; Small, P A

    1980-02-01

    Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to normal, injured, and regenerating tracheal mucosa was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Uninfected and influenza-infected murine tracheas were exposed to six strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from human sources and one strain of platn origin. All of the strains tested adhered to desquamating cells of the infected tracheas, but not to normal mucosa, the basal cell layer, or the regenerating epithelium. Adherence increased when the incubation time of the bacteria with the trachea was prolonged. Strains isolated from human tracheas appeared to adhere better than strains derived from the urinary tract. After endotracheal intubation of ferrets, P. aeruginosa adhered only to the injured cells and to areas of exposed basement membrane. We call this phenomenon "opportunistic adherence" and propose that alteration of the cell surfaces or cell injury facilitates the adherence of this bacterium and that adherence to injured cells may be a key to the pathogenesis of opportunistic Pseudomonas infections.

  7. Antifungal activity of selected indigenous pseudomonas and bacillus from the soybean rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, M; Yaryura, P M; Montecchia, M S; Hernández, A I; Correa, O S; Pucheu, N L; Kerber, N L; García, A F

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate and select indigenous soil Pseudomonas and Bacillus bacteria capable of developing multiple mechanisms of action related to the biocontrol of phytopathogenic fungi affecting soybean crops. The screening procedure consisted of antagonism tests against a panel of phytopathogenic fungi, taxonomic identification, detection by PCR of several genes related to antifungal activity, in vitro detection of the antifungal products, and root colonization assays. Two isolates, identified and designated as Pseudomonas fluorescens BNM296 and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BNM340, were selected for further studies. These isolates protected plants against the damping-off caused by Pythium ultimum and were able to increase the seedling emergence rate after inoculation of soybean seeds with each bacterium. Also, the shoot nitrogen content was higher in plants when seeds were inoculated with BNM296. The polyphasic approach of this work allowed us to select two indigenous bacterial strains that promoted the early development of soybean plants.

  8. pltM is important in the phloroglucinol-mediated crosstalk between biosynthetic gene clusters for the antibiotics 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol and pyoluteorin in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a well-characterized rhizosphere bacterium known for its production of a diverse spectrum of antimicrobial secondary metabolites. The production of two of these metabolites, 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) and pyoluteorin, is coordinately regulated. Each of...

  9. Crystal structure of the electron transfer complex rubredoxin rubredoxin reductase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Crude oil spills represent a major ecological threat because of the chemical inertness of the constituent n-alkanes. The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the few bacterial species able to metabolize such compounds. Three chromosomal genes, rubB, rubA1, and rubA2 coding for an NAD(P)H:rubredoxin reductase (RdxR) and two rubredoxins (Rdxs) are indispensable for this ability. They constitute an electron transport (ET) pathway that shuttles reducing equivalents from carbon...

  10. Crystal structure of the electron transfer complex rubredoxin–rubredoxin reductase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Crude oil spills represent a major ecological threat because of the chemical inertness of the constituent n-alkanes. The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the few bacterial species able to metabolize such compounds. Three chromosomal genes, rubB, rubA1, and rubA2 coding for an NAD(P)H:rubredoxin reductase (RdxR) and two rubredoxins (Rdxs) are indispensable for this ability. They constitute an electron transport (ET) pathway that shuttles reducing equivalents from carbon...

  11. Dual Effect of the Cubic Ag₃PO₄ Crystal on Pseudomonas syringae Growth and Plant Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Kyung Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously found that the antibacterial activity of silver phosphate crystals on Escherichia coli depends on their structure. We here show that the cubic form of silver phosphate crystal (SPC can also be applied to inhibit the growth of a plant-pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae bacterium. SPC pretreatment resulted in reduced in planta multiplication of P. syringae. Induced expression of a plant defense marker gene PR1 by SPC alone is suggestive of its additional plant immunity-stimulating activity. Since SPC can simultaneously inhibit P. syringae growth and induce plant defense responses, it might be used as a more effective plant disease-controlling agent.

  12. Interference of Pseudomonas aeruginosa signalling and biofilm formation for infection control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Høiby, Niels;

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the best described bacterium with regards to quorum sensing (QS), in vitro biofilm formation and the development of antibiotic tolerance. Biofilms composed of P. aeruginosa are thought to be the underlying cause of many chronic infections, including those in wounds...... and in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. In this review, we provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in QS, QS-enabled virulence, biofilm formation and biofilm-enabled antibiotic tolerance. We now have substantial knowledge of the multicellular behaviour of P. aeruginosa in vitro. A major...

  13. Interaction of the psychrotroph Pseudomonas fluorescens In5 with phytopathogens in cold soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Olsson, Stefan; Stougaard, Peter

    is disease suppressive owing to the presence of diverse antimicrobial microorganisms. Using culture-based approaches, the psychrotroph Pseudomonas fluorescens In5 was previously isolated from the soil microbiome. The aim of this study is to unravel key biocontrol traits underpinning the antagonistic activity...... of this cold-active bacterium against phytopathogens. Method: A combination of different technologies including genomics, transcriptomics and metabolomics are being used to explore the interaction of the psychrotroph P. fluorescens In5 in dual-culture with diverse plant pathogens. To date, molecular genetics...

  14. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa.

  15. Degradation of 4-chloro-3-nitrophenol via a novel intermediate, 4-chlororesorcinol by Pseudomonas sp. JHN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Pankaj Kumar; Srivastava, Alok; Singh, Vijay Pal

    2014-03-01

    A 4-chloro-3-nitrophenol (4C3NP)-mineralizing bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. JHN was isolated from a waste water sample collected from a chemically-contaminated area, India by an enrichment method. Pseudomonas sp. JHN utilized 4C3NP as a sole carbon and energy source and degraded it with the release of stoichiometric amounts of chloride and nitrite ions. Gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected 4-chlororesorcinol as a major metabolite of the 4C3NP degradation pathway. Inhibition studies using 2,2'-dipyridyl showed that 4-chlororesorcinol is a terminal aromatic compound in the degradation pathway of 4C3NP. The activity for 4C3NP-monooxygenase was detected in the crude extracts of the 4C3NP-induced JHN cells that confirmed the formation of 4-chlororesorcinol from 4C3NP. The capillary assay showed that Pseudomonas sp. JHN exhibited chemotaxis toward 4C3NP. The bioremediation capability of Pseudomonas sp. JHN was monitored to carry out the microcosm experiments using sterile and non-sterile soils spiked with 4C3NP. Strain JHN degraded 4C3NP in sterile and non-sterile soil with same degradation rates. This is the first report of (i) bacterial degradation and bioremediation of 4C3NP, (ii) formation of 4-chlororesorcinol in the degradation pathway of 4C3NP, (iii) bacterial chemotaxis toward 4C3NP.

  16. Zymomonas mobilis: a bacterium for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baratti, J.C.; Bu' Lock, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis is a facultative anaerobic gram negative bacterium first isolated in tropical countries from alcoholic beverages like the African palm wine, the Mexican pulque and also as a contaminant of cider (cider sickness) or beer in the European countries. It is one of the few facultative anaerobic bacteria degrading glucose by the Entner-Doudoroff pathway usually found in strictly aerobic microorganisms. Some work was devoted to this bacterium in the 50s and 60s and was reviewed by Swings and De Ley in their classical paper published in 1977. During the 70s there was very little work on the bacterium until 1979 and the first report by the Australian group of P.L. Rogers on the great potentialities of Z. mobilis for ethanol production. At that time the petroleum crisis had led the developed countries to search for alternative fuel from renewable resources. The Australian group clearly demonstrated the advantages of the bacterium compared to the yeasts traditionally used for the alcoholic fermentation. As a result, there was a considerable burst in the Zymomonas literature which started from nearly zero in the late 70s to attain 70 papers published in the field in 1984. In this article, papers published from 1982 to 1986 are reviewed.

  17. The Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal (PQS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sams, Thomas; Baker, Ysobel; Hodgkinson, James

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistichuman pathogen that routinely appears near the top ofpublic health threat lists worldwide. P. aeruginosa causes in-fections by secreting a wealth of exceptionally active exo-products, leading to tissue damage. The synthesis of manyof these virulence factors...

  18. Identification of copper-induced genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens and use of a reporter strain to monitor bioavailable copper in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tom-Petersen, Andreas; Hosbond, Carsten; Nybroe, Ole

    2001-01-01

    negatively affect the bacterial soil community. In this study, our goal was to develop a specific and stable Cu reporter construction harboured by an indigenous soil bacterium to measure bioavailability of Cu in soil. Following mutagenesis of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain DF57 with a Tn5::luxAB promoter...... probe transposon, we identified four mutants with elevated luxAB expression in response to Cu. Two of the mutated loci encoded proteins homologous to Cop proteins conferring Cu resistance to Pseudomonas syringae, while a third displayed homology to metal-transporting ATPases. In the fourth mutant, DF57...

  19. Genome sequence reveals that Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 possesses a large and diverse array of systems for rhizosphere function and host interaction

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Redondo-Nieto et al.: Genome sequence reveals that Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 possesses a large and diverse array of systems for rhizosphere function and host interaction. BMC Genomics 2013 14:54.The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/14/54 Background: Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) isolated from the sugar-beet rhizosphere. This bacterium has been extensiv...

  20. Identification of a denitrifying bacterium and verification of its anaerobic ammonium oxidation ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU; Baolan; ZHENG; Ping; LI; Jinye; XU; Xiangyang; JIN; Rencun

    2006-01-01

    A strain D3 of denitrifying bacterium was isolated from an anammox reactor, and identified as Pseudomonas mendocina based on the morphological and physiological assay, Vitek test,Biolog test, (G+C) mol% content, and 16S rDNA phylogenetic analysis. As a typical denitrifying bactration of 88.5 mg N/L. The optimal pH and growth temperature were 7.84 and 34.9℃, respectively.Strain D3 was able to oxidize ammonia under anaerobic condition. The maximum nitrate and ammoof ammonia to nitrate was 1:1.91. Electron microscopic observation revealed peculiar cell inclusions in strain D3. Because of its relation to anammox activity, strain D3 was presumed to be anammoxosome.The present investigation proved that denitrifying bacteria have the anammox ability, and the results have engorged the range of anammox populations.

  1. Phosphatidylcholine synthesis is essential for HrpZ harpin secretion in plant pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae and non-pathogenic Pseudomonas sp. 593.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Min; Long, Deliang; He, Huoguang; Li, Yang; Li, Yadong; Wang, Xingguo

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae van Hall is important phytopathogenic bacterium of stone fruit trees, and able to elicit hypersensitive response (HR) in nonhost plants. The HrpZ, secreted via type III secretion system (T3SS) to the extracellular space of the plant, is a T3SS-dependent protein and a sole T3SS effector able to induce the host defense response outside host cells. We deleted the phosphatidylcholine synthase gene (pcs) of P. syringae pv. syringae van Hall CFCC 1336, and found that the 1336 pcs(-) mutant was unable to synthesize phosphatidylcholine and elicit a typical HR in soybean. Further studies showed that the 1336 pcs(-) mutant was unable to secrete HrpZ harpin but could express HrpZ protein in cytoplasm as effectively as the wild type. To confirm if phosphatidylcholine affects HrpZ harpin secretion, we introduced the hrpZ gene into the soil-dwelling bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 593 and the 593 pcs(-) mutant, which were unable to express HrpZ harpin and elicit HR in tobacco or soybean. Western blotting and HR assay showed that the 593H not only secreted HrpZ harpin but also caused a strong HR in tobacco and soybean. In contrast, the 593 pcs(-)H only expressed HrpZ protein in its cytoplasm at the wild type level, but did not secrete HrpZ harpin or elicit HR reaction. Our results demonstrate that phosphatidylcholine is essential for the secretion of HrpZ harpin in P. syringae pv. syringae van Hall and other Pseudomonas strains.

  2. Description of Pseudomonas asuensis sp. nov. from biological soil crusts in the Colorado plateau, United States of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Gundlapally Sathyanarayana; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    A Gram-negative, aerobic, non spore-forming, non-motile, rod-shaped, yellow pigmented bacterium CP155-2(T) was isolated from a biological soil crusts sample collected in the Colorado plateau, USA and subjected to polyphasic taxonomic characterization. Strain CP155-2(T) contained summed feature 3 (C(16:1)ω5c/C(16:1)ω7c) and C(18:1)ω7c as major fatty acids and diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG) along with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) as major polar lipids. Based on these characteristics CP155-2(T) was assigned to the genus Pseudomonas. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence further confirmed the affiliation of CP155-2(T) to the genus Pseudomonas and showed a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of less than 98.7% with already described species of the genus. Pseudomonas luteola, Pseudomonas zeshuii, and Pseudomonas duriflava were identified as the closest species of the genus Pseudomonas with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 98.7%, 98.6%, and 96.9%, respectively. The values for DNA¨CDNA relatedness between CP155-2(T) and Pseudomonas luteola and Pseudomonas zeshuii were 23% and 14% respectively a value below the 70% threshold value, indicating that strain CP155-2(T) belongs to a novel taxon of the genus Pseudomonas lineage. The novel taxon status was strengthened by a number of phenotypic differences wherein CP155-2(T) was positive for oxidase, negative for gelatin hydrolysis, could utilize D-cellobiose, D-raffinose, L-rhamnose, D-sorbitol but not L-aspartic acid and L-glutamic acid. Based on the collective differences strain CP155-2(T) exhibited, it was identified as a novel species and the name Pseudomonas asuensis sp. nov. was proposed. The type strain of Pseudomonas asuensis sp. nov. is CP155-2(T) (DSM 17866(T) =ATCC BAA-1264(T) =JCM13501(T) =KCTC 32484(T)).

  3. Cyanide production by Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askeland, R A; Morrison, S M

    1983-06-01

    Of 200 water isolates screened, five strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens and one strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cyanogenic. Maximum cyanogenesis by two strains of P. fluorescens in a defined growth medium occurred at 25 to 30 degrees C over a pH range of 6.6 to 8.9. Cyanide production per cell was optimum at 300 mM phosphate. A linear relationship was observed between cyanogenesis and the log of iron concentration over a range of 3 to 300 microM. The maximum rate of cyanide production occurred during the transition from exponential to stationary growth phase. Radioactive tracer experiments with [1-14C]glycine and [2-14C]glycine demonstrated that the cyanide carbon originates from the number 2 carbon of glycine for both P. fluorescens and P. aeruginosa. Cyanide production was not observed in raw industrial wastewater or in sterile wastewater inoculated with pure cultures of cyanogenic Pseudomonas strains. Cyanide was produced when wastewater was amended by the addition of components of the defined growth medium.

  4. Biogenesis of antibacterial silver nanoparticles using the endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus isolated from Garcinia xanthochymus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Swetha Sunkar; C Valli Nachiyar

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To synthesize the ecofriendly nanoparticles, which is viewed as an alternative to the chemical method which initiated the use of microbes like bacteria and fungi in their synthesis. Methods: The current study uses the endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus isolated from the Garcinia xanthochymus to synthesize the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The AgNPs were synthesized by reduction of silver nitrate solution by the endophytic bacterium after incubation for 3-5 d at room temperature. The synthesis was initially observed by colour change from pale white to brown which was confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The AgNPs were further characterized using FTIR, SEM-EDX and TEM analyses. Results:The synthesized nanoparticles were found to be spherical with the size in the range of 20-40 nm which showed a slight aggregation. The energy-dispersive spectra of the nanoparticle dispersion confirmed the presence of elemental silver. The AgNPs were found to have antibacterial activity against a few pathogenic bacteria like Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Conclusions:The endophytic bacteria identified as Bacillus cereus was able to synthesize silver nanoparticles with potential antibacterial activity.

  5. Data supporting functional diversity of the marine bacterium Cobetia amphilecti KMM 296

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Balabanova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Data is presented in support of functionality of hyper-diverse protein families encoded by the Cobetia amphilecti KMM 296 (formerly Cobetia marina KMM 296 genome (“The genome of the marine bacterium Cobetia marina KMM 296 isolated from the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus (Dunker, 1853” [1] providing its nutritional versatility, adaptability and biocontrol that could be the basis of the marine bacterium evolutionary and application potential. Presented data include the information of growth and biofilm-forming properties of the food-associated isolates of Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Listeria, Salmonella and Staphylococcus under the conditions of their co-culturing with C. amphilecti KMM 296 to confirm its high inter-species communication and anti-microbial activity. Also included are the experiments on the crude petroleum consumption by C. amphilecti KMM 296 as the sole source of carbon in the presence of sulfate or nitrate to ensure its bioremediation capacity. The multifunctional C. amphilecti KMM 296 genome is a promising source for the beneficial psychrophilic enzymes and essential secondary metabolites.

  6. Isolation and identification of the acetonitrile-degrading Pseudomonas from the Ab-anbar-e Ganjali Khan in Kerman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narjes Ramezani–pour

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nitriles are toxic and hazardous compounds for all organisms which are produced enormously by human being and cause environment pollution. Biodegradation is the best method for Nitrile elimination in sewage. The aim of this study was isolation and identification of native bacteria Acetonitrile-degrading from the sewage of the city of Kerman. Materials and methods: The enrichment and screening of Acetonitrile degrading bacteria was performed in a specific medium containing 1 % Acetonitrile as sole carbon and nitrogen source. Enzyme activity and ammonium production was determined in growth medium using a modification of the phenol/hypochlorite method. Identification of the isolates was undertaken using microbial - biochemical and molecular tests. The optimization of enzyme production was examined. The amount of nitrile and acid were also determined by gas chromatography. Results: Among three isolated nitrile hydrolyzing producing species (FA3, FA8 and AB19, FA8 isolate showed maximum enzyme productivity. The results of characteristic tests showed that these bacteria belonged to the Pseudomonas sp. Moreover, 16S rRNA sequencing and phylogenetic analyses exhibited that FA11, FA8 and AB19 strains were similar to Pseudomonas Otitidis and Pseudomonas geniculate with 99, 100% homology, respectively. Results of medium optimization of Pseudomonas FA8 strain showed that glucose (10 gL-1 and yeast extract (5 gL-1 in neutral medium strongly supported enzyme production. Gas chromatography results showed that FA8 produced 58% acetic acid at 48 h of incubation. Discussion and conclusion: The results demonstrated that Pseudomonas FA8 isolated bacterium is a suitable candidate for degradation of Acetonitrile. This bacterium could be used for treatment of industrial wastewater and sites that contaminated with Acetonitrile.

  7. A Review of the Studies and Interactions of Pseudomonas syringae Pathovars on Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto J. Valencia-Botín

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wheat is affected by some pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae and by other Pseudomonas species. Of these, P. syringae pv. syringae is the major one responsible for reduction. Recent studies have been made to characterize and identify the pathogen and to determine its aggressiveness and the pattern of colonization in seed and its effects on seed yield, yield components, and source-sink relationships during postanthesis. It was found that the reduction in the aerial biomass production is the best way to evaluate the aggressiveness of this bacterium, and the spray inoculation is good tool to make evaluations at seedling stage. The characterization of bacteria fingerprintings with molecular markers such as RAPD-PCR, ERIC, and REP-PCR is available. Genomic evolution has been elucidated with next-generation genome sequencing. Also, the colonization pattern shows that, early on, microcolonies are frequently detected in the aleurone layer, later in the endosperm and finally close to the crease and even in some cells of the embryo itself. In the wheat cultivars Seri M82 and Rebeca F2000 seed yield and its components are negatively affected. In general, P. syringae pv. syringae reduces the plant height, seed yield, and yield components, as well as the growth of most organs. When this bacterium attacks, the stems are the predominant sink organs and the leaf laminae and panicles are the predominant source organs.

  8. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déziel Eric

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14. Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center. Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to

  9. Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola isolated from weeds in bean crop fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Sanz, A M; Rodicio, M R; González, A J

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, the causative agent of halo blight in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), was isolated from weeds associated with bean crops in Spain. The bacterium was recovered from Fumaria sp, Mercurialis annua, Solanum nigrum and Sonchus oleraceus. Ps. s. pv. phaseolicola had previously been isolated from leguminous plants and S. nigrum, but to our knowledge, this is the first time it was recovered from the other three species. The isolates were phenotypically and genetically characterized, and they were compared with isolates recovered from common beans. Five different genotypic profiles were detected by PmeI-PFGE, two of them being of new description. Weed isolates were as pathogenic on bean plants as bean isolates, but they were not pathogenic on S. nigrum. Regarding the survival of the pathogen in weeds, Ps. s. pv. phaseolicola was isolated from So. oleraceus 11 weeks after the end of the bean crop. These results strongly support the idea of weeds as a potential source of inoculum for halo blight in bean. It has traditionally been considered that the main source of inoculum of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola causing halo blight disease in Phaseolus vulgaris are the bean seeds, and that the host range of the bacterium is almost restricted to leguminous plants. In this study, the bacterium was recovered from four nonleguminous weed species collected in bean fields, and its permanence in weeds for at least 11 weeks after the harvesting of the beans was demonstrated. We have also proved that the strains isolated from weeds were pathogenic on bean plants. Accordingly, the host range of Ps. s. pv. phaseolicola could be broader than previously thought and weeds appear to be acting as a reservoir of the pathogen until the next crop. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Swimming Efficiency of Bacterium Escherichia Coli

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, S; Wu, X L; Yeung, C; Chattopadhyay, Suddhashil; Moldovan, Radu; Yeung, Chuck

    2005-01-01

    We use in vivo measurements of swimming bacteria in an optical trap to determine fundamental properties of bacterial propulsion. In particular, we determine the propulsion matrix, which relates the angular velocity of the flagellum to the torques and forces propelling the bacterium. From the propulsion matrix dynamical properties such as forces, torques, swimming speed and power can be obtained from measurements of the angular velocity of the motor. We find significant heterogeneities among different individuals even though all bacteria started from a single colony. The propulsive efficiency, defined as the ratio of the propulsive power output to the rotary power input provided by the motors, is found to be 0.2%.

  11. Isolation of a Bacterium Strain Degraded Agar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    One in 58 strains of bacteria isolated from the compost showed clear colonies after a few days of growth on the plates containing medium made of only agar and water.Water suspension contained only agar (2 and 8g·L -1 ) with two controls (normal saline,LB medium) was inoculated with the bacterium BR5-1 to see whether there was an increasement of the alive bacteria concentration after 48 h of the growth.The results showed that there was a significant rising of the alive bacteria concentration in the agar susp...

  12. Pseudomonas-follikulitis efter badning i spabad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall Pallesen, Kristine Appel; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Mørtz, Charlotte Gotthard

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of folliculitis. Pseudomonas folliculitis can develop after contact with contaminated water from swimming pools, hot tubs and spa baths. Systemic therapy may be indicated in patients with widespread lesions, systemic symptoms or in immunosuppressed patients...

  13. Genomics of Secondary Metabolism in Pseudomonas spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas is a heterogeneous genus of bacteria known for its ubiquity in natural habitats and its prolific production of secondary metabolites. The structurally diverse chemical structures produced by Pseudomonas spp. result from biosynthetic processes with unusual features that have revealed no...

  14. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by Vitexin: A combinatorial study with azithromycin and gentamicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manash C.; Sandhu, Padmani; Gupta, Priya; Rudrapaul, Prasenjit; de, Utpal C.; Tribedi, Prosun; Akhter, Yusuf; Bhattacharjee, Surajit

    2016-03-01

    Microbial biofilm are communities of surface-adhered cells enclosed in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Extensive use of antibiotics to treat biofilm associated infections has led to the emergence of multiple drug resistant strains. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recognised as a model biofilm forming pathogenic bacterium. Vitexin, a polyphenolic group of phytochemical with antimicrobial property, has been studied for its antibiofilm potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin. Vitexin shows minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) at 260 μg/ml. It’s antibiofilm activity was evaluated by safranin staining, protein extraction, microscopy methods, quantification of EPS and in vivo models using several sub-MIC doses. Various quorum sensing (QS) mediated phenomenon such as swarming motility, azocasein degrading protease activity, pyoverdin and pyocyanin production, LasA and LasB activity of the bacteria were also evaluated. Results showed marked attenuation in biofilm formation and QS mediated phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in presence of 110 μg/ml vitexin in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin separately. Molecular docking of vitexin with QS associated LuxR, LasA, LasI and motility related proteins showed high and reasonable binding affinity respectively. The study explores the antibiofilm potential of vitexin against P. aeruginosa which can be used as a new antibiofilm agent against microbial biofilm associated pathogenesis.

  15. Complete genome sequence of the lytic Pseudomonas fluorescens phage ϕIBB-PF7A

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    Kropinski Andrew M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phage ϕIBB-PF7A is a T7-like bacteriophage capable of infecting several Pseudomonas fluorescens dairy isolates and is extremely efficient in lysing this bacterium even when growing in biofilms attached to surfaces. This work describes the complete genome sequence of this phage. Results The genome consists of a linear double-stranded DNA of 40,973 bp, with 985 bp long direct terminal repeats and a GC content of approximately 56%. There are 52 open reading frames which occupy 94.6% of the genome ranging from 137 to 3995 nucleotides. Twenty eight (46.7% of the proteins encoded by this virus exhibit sequence similarity to coliphage T7 proteins while 34 (81.0% are similar to proteins of Pseudomonas phage gh-1. Conclusions That this phage is closely related to Pseudomonas putida phage gh-1 and coliphage T7 places it in the "T7-like viruses" genus of the subfamily Autographivirinae within the family Podoviridae. Compared to the genome of gh-1, the sequence of ϕIBB-PF7A is longer and contains more genes with unassigned function and lacks a few potentially essential and non-essential T7 genes, such as gene1.1, 3.8, and 7.

  16. Cadmium-regulated gene fusions in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossbach, S; Kukuk, M L; Wilson, T L; Feng, S F; Pearson, M M; Fisher, M A

    2000-08-01

    To study the mechanisms soil bacteria use to cope with elevated concentrations of heavy metals in the environment, a mutagenesis with the lacZ-based reporter gene transposon Tn5B20 was performed. Random gene fusions in the genome of the common soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain ATCC 13525 were used to create a bank of 5,000 P. fluorescens mutants. This mutant bank was screened for differential gene expression in the presence of the toxic metal cadmium. Fourteen mutants were identified that responded with increased or reduced gene expression to the presence of cadmium. The mutants were characterized with respect to their metal-dependent gene expression and their metal tolerance. Half the identified mutants reacted with differential gene expression specifically to the metal cadmium, whereas some of the other mutants also responded to elevated concentrations of copper and zinc ions. One of the mutants, strain C8, also showed increased gene expression in the presence of the solvent ethanol, but otherwise no overlap between cadmium-induced gene expression and general stress response was detected. Molecular analysis of the corresponding genetic loci was performed using arbitrary polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA sequencing and comparison of the deduced protein products with sequences deposited in genetic databases. Some of the genetic loci targeted by the transposon did not show any similarities to any known genes; thus, they may represent 'novel' loci. The hypothesis that genes that are differentially expressed in the presence of heavy metals play a role in metal tolerance was verified for one of the mutants. This mutant, strain C11, was hypersensitive to cadmium and zinc ions. In mutant C11, the transposon had inserted into a genetic region displaying similarity to genes encoding the sensor/regulator protein pairs of two-component systems that regulate gene expression in metal-resistant bacteria, including czcRS of Ralstonia eutropha, czrRS of Pseudomonas

  17. Biodegradation of heavy oils by halophilic bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruixia Hao; Anhuai Lu

    2009-01-01

    A halophilic bacterial strain TM-1 was isolated from the reservoir of the Shengli oil field in East China. Strain TM-1, which was found to be able to degrade crude oils, is a gram-positive non-motile bacterium with a coccus shape that can grow at temperatures of up to 58 ℃ and in 18% NaCl solution. Depending on the culture conditions, the organism may occur in tetrads. In addition, strain TM-1 pro-duced acid from glucose without gas formation and was catalase-negative. Furthermore, strain TM-I was found to be a facultative aer-obe capable of growth under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, it produced butylated hydroxytoluene, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid-bis ester and dibutyl phthalate and could use different organic substrates. Laboratory studies indicated that strain TM-1 affected different heavy oils by degrading various components and by changing the chemical properties of the oils. In addition, growth of the bacterium in heavy oils resulted in the loss of aromatic hydrocarbons, resins and asphaltenes, and enrichment with light hydrocarbons and an overall redistribution of these hydrocarbons.

  18. Risk assessment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Kristina D; Gerba, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    P. aeruginosa is part of a large group of free-living bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment. This organism is often found in natural waters such as lakes and rivers in concentrations of 10/100 mL to >1,000/100 mL. However, it is not often found in drinking water. Usually it is found in 2% of samples, or less, and at concentrations up to 2,300 mL(-1) (Allen and Geldreich 1975) or more often at 3-4 CFU/mL. Its occurrence in drinking water is probably related more to its ability to colonize biofilms in plumbing fixtures (i.e., faucets, showerheads, etc.) than its presence in the distribution system or treated drinking water. P. aeruginosa can survive in deionized or distilled water (van der Jooij et al. 1982; Warburton et al. 1994). Hence, it may be found in low nutrient or oligotrophic environments, as well as in high nutrient environments such as in sewage and in the human body. P. aeruginosa can cause a wide range of infections, and is a leading cause of illness in immunocompromised individuals. In particular, it can be a serious pathogen in hospitals (Dembry et al. 1998). It can cause endocarditis, osteomyelitis, pneumonia, urinary tract infections, gastrointestinal infections, and meningitis, and is a leading cause of septicemia. P. aeruginosa is also a major cause of folliculitis and ear infections acquired by exposure to recreational waters containing the bacterium. In addition, it has been recognized as a serious cause of keratitis, especially in patients wearing contact lenses. P. aeruginosa is also a major pathogen in burn and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and causes a high mortality rate in both populations (MOlina et al. 1991; Pollack 1995). P. aeruginosa is frequently found in whirlpools and hot tubs, sometimes in 94-100% of those tested at concenrations of Price and Ahearn 1988). Many outbreaks of folliculitis and ear infections have been reportedly associated with the use of whirlpools and hot tubs that contain P. aeruginosa (Ratnam et al

  19. From dirt to industrial applications: Pseudomonas putida as a Synthetic Biology chassis for hosting harsh biochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikel, Pablo I; Chavarría, Max; Danchin, Antoine; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2016-10-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida is endowed with a central carbon metabolic network capable of fulfilling high demands of reducing power. This situation arises from a unique metabolic architecture that encompasses the partial recycling of triose phosphates to hexose phosphates-the so-called EDEMP cycle. In this article, the value of P. putida as a bacterial chassis of choice for contemporary, industrially-oriented metabolic engineering is addressed. The biochemical properties that make this bacterium adequate for hosting biotransformations involving redox reactions as well as toxic compounds and intermediates are discussed. Finally, novel developments and open questions in the continuous quest for an optimal microbial cell factory are presented at the light of current and future needs in the area of biocatalysis.

  20. Successful antibiotic treatment of Pseudomonas stutzeri-induced peritonitis without peritoneal dialysis catheter removal in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Wook Park

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas stutzeri is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped, motile, single polar-flagellated, soil bacterium that was first isolated from human spinal fluid and is widely distributed in the environment. It was isolated as an uncommon opportunistic pathogen from humans, and a few cases of P. stutzeri-induced peritonitis have been reported in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD. Catheter removal with antibiotic treatment is generally recommended because peritonitis by Pseudomonas species is commonly associated with catheter-related infection. Here, we describe the first case of P. stutzeri-induced peritonitis in an 82-year-old woman in Korea. She had received two antipseudomonal antibiotics, an aminoglycoside (isepamicin, Yuhan corporation, Seoul, Korea and a fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin, and was successfully treated without removal of the CAPD catheter.

  1. The clonal antibody response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa heat shock protein is highly diverse in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulanova, M; Petersen, T D; Ciofu, O;

    1997-01-01

    The GroEL protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa belongs to the bacterial 60-65 kDa heat shock protein family. A strong antibody response to GroEL has been found in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic pulmonary infection caused by P. aeruginosa. Clonotypes of IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies against Gro...... antibody clones against GroEL. The appearance of new clones with time reflected the long duration of the chronic infection. A striking addition of new clonotypes during the observation period occurred when a new unrelated bacterium (Burkholderia cepacia) had become established as a cause of the pulmonary...

  2. Fructooligosacharides reduce Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 pathogenicity through distinct mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-González, Mercedes; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; López-Posadas, Rocío; Pacheco, Daniel; Krell, Tino; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Abdelali, Daddaoua

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is ubiquitously present in the environment and acts as an opportunistic pathogen on humans, animals and plants. We report here the effects of the prebiotic polysaccharide inulin and its hydrolysed form FOS on this bacterium. FOS was found to inhibit bacterial growth of strain PAO1, while inulin did not affect growth rate or yield in a significant manner. Inulin stimulated biofilm formation, whereas a dramatic reduction of the biofilm formation was observed in the presence of FOS. Similar opposing effects were observed for bacterial motility, where FOS inhibited the swarming and twitching behaviour whereas inulin caused its stimulation. In co-cultures with eukaryotic cells (macrophages) FOS and, to a lesser extent, inulin reduced the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α. Western blot experiments indicated that the effects mediated by FOS in macrophages are associated with a decreased activation of the NF-κB pathway. Since FOS and inulin stimulate pathway activation in the absence of bacteria, the FOS mediated effect is likely to be of indirect nature, such as via a reduction of bacterial virulence. Further, this modulatory effect is observed also with the highly virulent ptxS mutated strain. Co-culture experiments of P. aeruginosa with IEC18 eukaryotic cells showed that FOS reduces the concentration of the major virulence factor, exotoxin A, suggesting that this is a possible mechanism for the reduction of pathogenicity. The potential of these compounds as components of antibacterial and anti-inflammatory cocktails is discussed.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: assessment of risk from drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardalo, C; Edberg, S C

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an ubiquitous environmental bacterium. It can be recovered, often in high numbers, in common food, especially vegetables. Moreover, it can be recovered in low numbers in drinking water. A small percentage of clones of P. aeruginosa possesses the required number of virulence factors to cause infection. However, P. aeruginosa will not proliferate on normal tissue but requires previously organs. Further narrowing the risk to human health is that only certain specific hosts are at risk, including patients with profound neutropenia, cystic fibrosis, severe burns, and those subject to foreign device installation. Other than these very well-defined groups, the general population is refractory to infection with P. aeruginosa. Because of its ubiquitous nature, it is not only not practical to eliminate P. aeruginosa from our food and drinking water, but attempts to do so would produce disinfection byproducts more hazardous than the species itself. Moreover, because there is no readily available sensitive and specific means to detect and identify P. aeruginosa available in the field, any potential regulation governing its control would not have a defined laboratory test measure of outcome. Accordingly, attempts to regulate P. aeruginosa in drinking water would not yield public health protection benefits and could, in fact, be counterproductive in this regard.

  4. A Network Biology Approach to Denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arat, Seda; Bullerjahn, George S.; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete) denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO2), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O). This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3), and phosphate (PO4) suggests that PO4 concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO4 on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N2O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA). Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide. PMID:25706405

  5. Electrochemical reduction of oxygen catalyzed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournet, Amandine [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, LU49, Adhesion bacterienne et formation de biofilms, 35 chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France)] [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS UMR5503, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Berge, Mathieu; Roques, Christine [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, LU49, Adhesion bacterienne et formation de biofilms, 35 chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France); Bergel, Alain [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS UMR5503, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Delia, Marie-Line, E-mail: marieline.delia@ensiacet.f [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS UMR5503, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France)

    2010-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has already been shown to catalyze oxidation processes in the anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell. The present study focuses on the reverse capacity of the bacterium, i.e. reduction catalysis. Here we show that P. aeruginosa is able to catalyze the electrochemical reduction of oxygen. The use of cyclic voltammetry showed that, for a given range of potential values, the current generated in the presence of bacteria could reach up to four times the current obtained without bacteria. The adhesion of bacteria to the working electrode was necessary for the catalysis to be observed but was not sufficient. The electron transfer between the working electrode and the bacteria did not involve mediator metabolites like phenazines. The transfer was by direct contact. The catalysis required a certain contact duration between electrodes and live bacteria but after this delay, the metabolic activity of cells was no longer necessary. Membrane-bound proteins, like catalase, may be involved. Various strains of P. aeruginosa, including clinical isolates, were tested and all of them, even catalase-defective mutants, presented the same catalytic property. P. aeruginosa offers a new model for the analysis of reduction catalysis and the protocol designed here may provide a basis for developing an interesting tool in the field of bacterial adhesion.

  6. Global genotype-phenotype correlations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Pommerenke

    Full Text Available Once the genome sequence of an organism is obtained, attention turns from identifying genes to understanding their function, their organization and control of metabolic pathways and networks that determine its physiology. Recent technical advances in acquiring genome-wide data have led to substantial progress in identifying gene functions. However, we still do not know the function of a large number of genes and, even when a gene product has been assigned to a functional class, we cannot normally predict its contribution to the phenotypic behaviour of the cell or organism--the phenome. In this study, we assessed bacterial growth parameters of 4030 non-redundant PA14 transposon mutants in the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The genome-wide simultaneous analysis of 119 distinct growth-related phenotypes uncovered a comprehensive phenome and provided evidence that most genotypes are not phenotypically isolated but rather define specific complex phenotypic clusters of genotypes. Since phenotypic overlap was demonstrated to reflect the relatedness of genotypes on a global scale, knowledge of an organism's phenome might significantly contribute to the advancement of functional genomics.

  7. Nitrate dependent salicylate degradation by Pseudomonas butanovora under anaerobic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesseru, P.; Kiss, I.; Bihari, Z.; Pal, K.; Portoeroe, P.; Polyak, B. [Bay Zoltan Foundation for Applied Research, Szeged (Hungary). Inst. for Biotechnology

    2005-05-01

    Nitrate-dependent salicylate degradation by the denitrifying Pseudomonas butanovora was investigated and the molar ratio of the cometabolism under anaerobic circumstances was determined. The bacterium was able to utilize salicylate as an electron donor for the reduction of nitrate. Salicylate was eliminated via catechol, which is degraded by means of catechol 2,3-oxygenases (meta-cleavage), forming 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde. The molar ratios of NO{sub 3}{sup -}-N:salicylate existing during the experiment accorded well with the assumed 1:1 molar ratio. The tolerances of the growth, the salicylate degradation and the denitrification of P. butanovora to various heavy metal ions were also studied. Although the strain was tolerant to Pb{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} up to 1 mM in complete medium, salicylate utilization took place only up to a concentration of 0.1 mM for both heavy metal ions. Of the heavy metal ions investigated, Cd{sup 2+} (at a concentration of 0.05 mM) displayed the highest inhibitory effect on salicylate degradation by P. butanovora. (author)

  8. Proteolytic regulation of alginate overproduction in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damron, F Heath; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2012-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium, is a significant opportunistic pathogen associated with skin and soft tissue infections, nosocomial pneumonia and sepsis. In addition, it can chronically colonize the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Overproduction of the exopolysaccharide called alginate provides P. aeruginosa with a selective advantage and facilitates survival in the CF lung. The in vitro phenotype of alginate overproduction observed on solid culture media is referred to as mucoid. Expression of the alginate machinery and biosynthetic enzymes are controlled by the extracytoplasmic sigma factor, σ(22) (AlgU/T). The key negative regulator of both σ(22) activity and the mucoid phenotype is the cognate anti-sigma factor MucA. MucA sequesters σ(22) to the inner membrane inhibiting the sigma factor's transcriptional activity. The well-studied mechanism for transition to the mucoid phenotype is mutation of mucA, leading to loss of MucA function and therefore activation of σ(22) . Recently, regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) has been recognized as a mechanism whereby proteolysis of the anti-sigma factor MucA leads to active σ(22) allowing P. aeruginosa to respond to environmental stress conditions by overproduction of alginate. The goal of this review is to illuminate the pathways leading to RIP that have been identified and proposed.

  9. Identification of small molecule inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S using a yeast phenotypic screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Arnoldo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that is a key factor in the mortality of cystic fibrosis patients, and infection represents an increased threat for human health worldwide. Because resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics is increasing, new inhibitors of pharmacologically validated targets of this bacterium are needed. Here we demonstrate that a cell-based yeast phenotypic assay, combined with a large-scale inhibitor screen, identified small molecule inhibitors that can suppress the toxicity caused by heterologous expression of selected Pseudomonas aeruginosa ORFs. We identified the first small molecule inhibitor of Exoenzyme S (ExoS, a toxin involved in Type III secretion. We show that this inhibitor, exosin, modulates ExoS ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in vitro, suggesting the inhibition is direct. Moreover, exosin and two of its analogues display a significant protective effect against Pseudomonas infection in vivo. Furthermore, because the assay was performed in yeast, we were able to demonstrate that several yeast homologues of the known human ExoS targets are likely ADP-ribosylated by the toxin. For example, using an in vitro enzymatic assay, we demonstrate that yeast Ras2p is directly modified by ExoS. Lastly, by surveying a collection of yeast deletion mutants, we identified Bmh1p, a yeast homologue of the human FAS, as an ExoS cofactor, revealing that portions of the bacterial toxin mode of action are conserved from yeast to human. Taken together, our integrated cell-based, chemical-genetic approach demonstrates that such screens can augment traditional drug screening approaches and facilitate the discovery of new compounds against a broad range of human pathogens.

  10. Pseudomonas sihuiensis sp. nov., isolated from a forest soil in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Wen, Junlin; Chang, Ming; Yang, Guiqin; Zhou, Shungui

    2014-04-01

    A Gram-stain negative, motile, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain WM-2(T), was isolated from a forest soil in Sihui City, South China, and characterized by means of a polyphasic approach. Growth occurred with 0-5 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 0-1 %) and at pH 5.0-10.5 (optimum pH 8.5) and 4-40 °C (optimum 30 °C) in Luria-Bertani medium. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses showed that strain WM-2(T) is a member of the genus Pseudomonas and most closely related to P. guguanensis, P. oleovorans subsp. lubricantis, P. toyotomiensis, P. alcaliphila and P. mendocina with 97.1-96.6 % sequence similarities. In terms of gyrB and rpoB gene sequences, strain WM-2(T) showed the highest similarity with the type strains of the species P. toyotomiensis and P. alcaliphila. The DNA-DNA relatedness values of strain WM-2(T) with P. guguanensis and P. oleovorans subsp. lubricantis was 48.7 and 37.2 %, respectively. Chemotaxonomic characteristics (the main ubiquinone Q-9, major fatty acids C18:1 ω7c/C18:1 ω6c, C16:0 and C16:1 ω7c/C16:1 ω6c and DNA G+C content 65.2 ± 0.7 mol%) were similar to those of members of the genus Pseudomonas. Polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, an unknown aminophospholipid, an unknown phospholipid and five unknown lipids. According to the results of polyphasic analyses, strain WM-2(T) represents a novel species in the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas sihuiensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is WM-2(T) (=KCTC 32246(T)=CGMCC 1.12407(T)).

  11. Fluctuation-Enhanced Sensing of Bacterium Odors

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Hung-Chih; King, Maria D; Kwan, Chiman

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the possibility to detect and identify bacteria by sensing their odor via fluctuation-enhanced sensing with commercial Taguchi sensors. The fluctuations of the electrical resistance during exposure to different bacterial odors, Escherichia coli and anthrax-surrogate Bacillus subtilis, have been measured and analyzed. In the present study, the simplest method, the measurement and analysis of power density spectra was used. The sensors were run in the normal heated and the sampling-and-hold working modes, respectively. The results indicate that Taguchi sensors used in these fluctuation-enhanced modes are effective tools of bacterium detection and identification even when they are utilizing only the power density spectrum of the stochastic sensor signal.

  12. Diffusion of magnetotactic bacterium in rotating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebers, A., E-mail: aceb@tesla.sal.l [Department of Physics, University of Latvia, Zellu 8, Ri-bar ga, LV-1002 (Latvia)

    2011-02-15

    Swimming trajectory of a magnetotactic bacterium in a rotating magnetic field is a circle. Random reversals of the direction of the bacterium motion induces a random walk of the curvature center of the trajectory. In assumption of the distribution of the switching events according to the Poisson process the diffusion coefficient is calculated in dependence on the frequency of the rotating field and the characteristic time between the switching events. It is confirmed by the numerical simulation of the random walk of the bacterium in the rotating magnetic field. - Research highlights: Random switching of the flagella leads to diffusion of a bacterium in the field. Mean square displacement of the curvature center is proportional to time. Diffusion coefficient depends on the period of a rotating field. At zero frequency diffusion coefficient is the same as for a tumbling bacterium.

  13. The chemical formula of a magnetotactic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh, Mohit; Das, Sayoni; Mishra, Prashant; Mittal, Aditya

    2012-05-01

    Elucidation of the chemical logic of life is one of the grand challenges in biology, and essential to the progress of the upcoming field of synthetic biology. Treatment of microbial cells explicitly as a "chemical" species in controlled reaction (growth) environments has allowed fascinating discoveries of elemental formulae of a few species that have guided the modern views on compositions of a living cell. Application of mass and energy balances on living cells has proved to be useful in modeling of bioengineering systems, particularly in deriving optimized media compositions for growing microorganisms to maximize yields of desired bio-derived products by regulating intra-cellular metabolic networks. In this work, application of elemental mass balance during growth of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense in bioreactors has resulted in the discovery of the chemical formula of the magnetotactic bacterium. By developing a stoichiometric equation characterizing the formation of a magnetotactic bacterial cell, coupled with rigorous experimental measurements and robust calculations, we report the elemental formula of M. gryphiswaldense cell as CH(2.06)O(0.13)N(0.28)Fe(1.74×10(-3)). Remarkably, we find that iron metabolism during growth of this magnetotactic bacterium is much more correlated individually with carbon and nitrogen, compared to carbon and nitrogen with each other, indicating that iron serves more as a nutrient during bacterial growth rather than just a mineral. Magnetotactic bacteria have not only invoked some interest in the field of astrobiology for the last two decades, but are also prokaryotes having the unique ability of synthesizing membrane bound intracellular organelles. Our findings on these unique prokaryotes are a strong addition to the limited repertoire, of elemental compositions of living cells, aimed at exploring the chemical logic of life.

  14. Enhanced bactericidal potency of nanoliposomes by modification of the fusion activity between liposomes and bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma YF

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Yufan Ma,1 Zhao Wang,1,2 Wen Zhao,1 Tingli Lu,1 Rutao Wang,1,2 Qibing Mei,1 Tao Chen1–3 1Key Laboratory for Space Bioscience and Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, People's Republic of China; 2Shaanxi Liposome Research Center, Xi'an, Shaanxi, People's Republic of China; 3Xi'an Libang Pharmaceuticals Co, Ltd, Xi'an, People's Republic of China Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a good model of antibiotic resistance. These organisms have an outer membrane with a low level of permeability to drugs that is often combined with multidrug efflux pumps, enzymatic inactivation of the drug, or alteration of its molecular target. The acute and growing problem of antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas to conventional antibiotics made it imperative to develop new liposome formulations to overcome these mechanisms, and investigate the fusion between liposome and bacterium. Methods: The rigidity, stability and charge properties of phospholipid vesicles were modified by varying the cholesterol, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE, and negatively charged lipids 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol sodium salt (DMPG, 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phopho-L-serine sodium salt (DMPS, 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate monosodium salt (DMPA, nature phosphatidylserine sodium salt from brain and nature phosphatidylinositol sodium salt from soybean concentrations in liposomes. Liposomal fusion with intact bacteria was monitored using a lipid-mixing assay. Results: It was discovered that the fluid liposomes-bacterium fusion is not dependent on liposomal size and lamellarity. A similar degree of fusion was observed for liposomes with a particle size from 100 to 800 nm. The fluidity of liposomes is an essential pre-request for liposomes fusion with bacteria. Fusion was almost completely inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol into fluid liposomes. The increase in the

  15. Growth of genetically engineered Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida in soil and rhizosphere.

    OpenAIRE

    Yeung, K H; Schell, M A; Hartel, P G

    1989-01-01

    The effect of the addition of a recombinant plasmid containing the pglA gene encoding an alpha-1,4-endopolygalacturonase from Pseudomonas solanacearum on the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida in soil and rhizosphere was determined. Despite a high level of polygalacturonase production by genetically engineered P. putida and P. aeruginosa, the results suggest that polygalacturonase production had little effect on the growth of these strains in soil or rhizosphere.

  16. Silver against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Kirketerp-Møller, K.; Kristiansen, S.

    2007-01-01

    Silver has been recognized for its antimicrobial properties for centuries. Most studies on the antibacterial efficacy of silver, with particular emphasis on wound healing, have been performed on planktonic bacteria. Our recent studies, however, strongly suggest that colonization of wounds involves...... bacteria in both the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. The action of silver on mature in vitro biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a primary pathogen of chronic infected wounds, was investigated. The results show that silver is very effective against mature biofilms of P. aeruginosa......, but that the silver concentration is important. A concentration of 5-10 ig/mL silver sulfadiazine eradicated the biofilm whereas a lower concentration (1 ig/mL) had no effect. The bactericidal concentration of silver required to eradicate the bacterial biofilm was 10-100 times higher than that used to eradicate...

  17. Genome-wide search reveals a novel GacA-regulated small RNA in Pseudomonas species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Elisabeth

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small RNAs (sRNAs are widespread among bacteria and have diverse regulatory roles. Most of these sRNAs have been discovered by a combination of computational and experimental methods. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium and opportunistic human pathogen, the GacS/GacA two-component system positively controls the transcription of two sRNAs (RsmY, RsmZ, which are crucial for the expression of genes involved in virulence. In the biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, three GacA-controlled sRNAs (RsmX, RsmY, RsmZ regulate the response to oxidative stress and the expression of extracellular products including biocontrol factors. RsmX, RsmY and RsmZ contain multiple unpaired GGA motifs and control the expression of target mRNAs at the translational level, by sequestration of translational repressor proteins of the RsmA family. Results A combined computational and experimental approach enabled us to identify 14 intergenic regions encoding sRNAs in P. aeruginosa. Eight of these regions encode newly identified sRNAs. The intergenic region 1698 was found to specify a novel GacA-controlled sRNA termed RgsA. GacA regulation appeared to be indirect. In P. fluorescens CHA0, an RgsA homolog was also expressed under positive GacA control. This 120-nt sRNA contained a single GGA motif and, unlike RsmX, RsmY and RsmZ, was unable to derepress translation of the hcnA gene (involved in the biosynthesis of the biocontrol factor hydrogen cyanide, but contributed to the bacterium's resistance to hydrogen peroxide. In both P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens the stress sigma factor RpoS was essential for RgsA expression. Conclusion The discovery of an additional sRNA expressed under GacA control in two Pseudomonas species highlights the complexity of this global regulatory system and suggests that the mode of action of GacA control may be more elaborate than previously suspected. Our results also confirm that

  18. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A MOLYBDENUM-REDUCING, PHENOL- AND CATECHOL-DEGRADING PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA STRAIN AMR-12 IN SOILS FROM EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abd. AbdEl-Mongy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sites contaminated with both heavy metals and organic xenobiotic pollutants warrants the effective use of either a multitude of bacterial degraders or bacteria having the capacity to detoxify numerous toxicants simultaneously. A molybdenum-reducing bacterium with the capacity to degrade phenolics is reported. Molybdenum (sodium molybdate reduction was optimum between pH 6.0 and 7.0 and between 20 and 30 °C. The most suitable electron donor was glucose. A narrow range of phosphate concentrations between 5.0 and 7.5 mM was required for optimal reduction, while molybdate between 20 and 30 mM were needed for optimal reduction. The scanning absorption spectrum of the molybdenum blue produced indicated that Mo-blue is a reduced phosphomolybdate. Molybdenum reduction was inhibited by the heavy metals mercury, silver and chromium. Biochemical analysis identified the bacterium as Pseudomonas putida strain Amr-12. Phenol and phenolics cannot support molybdenum reduction. However, the bacterium was able to grow on the phenolic compounds (phenol and catechol with observable lag periods. Maximum growth on phenol and catechol occurred around the concentrations of 600 mg∙L-1. The ability of this bacterium to detoxify molybdenum and grown on toxic phenolic makes this bacterium an important tool for bioremediation.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: resistance to the max

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Poole, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to a variety of antimicrobials and can develop resistance during anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy both of which compromise treatment of infections caused by this organism...

  20. Pseudomonas Lipopeptide Biosurfactants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Lise

    of the Pseudomonas lipopeptides belonging to different structural groups on important biodegradation parameters, mainly; solubilization and emulsification of hydrophobic pollutants (alkanes and PAHs) and increase of cell surface hydrophobicity of bacterial degraders. Ultimately, it was tested if these parameters led......Pseudomonas lipopetide biosurfactants are amphiphilic molecules with a broad range of natural functions. Due to their surface active properties, it has been suggested that Pseudomonas lipopetides potentially play a role in biodegradation of hydrophobic compounds and have essential functions...... in biofilm formation, however, detailed studies of these roles have not yet been carried out. The overall aim of this PhD project was therefore to elucidate in more depth the roles played by Pseudomonas lipopetides in pollutant biodegradation and biofilm formation. This study investigated the effect...

  1. Pseudomonas Lipopeptide Biosurfactants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Lise

    lipopetide biosurfactants in pollutant biodegradation and natural roles in biofilm formation. The work presented is a combination of environmental microbiology and exploiting genetic manipulation of pure cultures to achieve insightinto the effects and mechanisms of lipopeptides on microbial processes......Pseudomonas lipopetide biosurfactants are amphiphilic molecules with a broad range of natural functions. Due to their surface active properties, it has been suggested that Pseudomonas lipopetides potentially play a role in biodegradation of hydrophobic compounds and have essential functions...

  2. OXIDATION OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS BY PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400 AND PSEUDOMONAS PSEUDOALCALIGENES KF707

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biphenyl-grown cells and cell extracts prepared from biphenyl-grown cells of Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 oxidize a much wider range of chlorinated biphenyls than do analogous preparations from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707. These results are attributed to differences in th...

  3. Biodesulfurization of dibenzothiophene by immobilized cells of Pseudomonas stutzeri UP-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yingfei Hou; Ying Kong; Jinrong Yang; Jianhui Zhang; Deqing Shi; Wei Xin [China University of Petroleum (East China), Shandong (China). College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    2005-10-01

    Immobilization of the bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri UP-1 was isolated from soil and sewage in the Shengli Oilfield. Biodesulfurization (BDS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT) was carried out using immobilized P. stutzeri UP-1 (CGMCC No. 0974) in model system. The results show that sodium alginate (SA) is an appropriate material of immobilization. The optimized operation immobilization condition was 4{sup o}C; the concentration of SA was 3% (w/v); and the ratio of SA (ml) to cells (g) was 20. The stability and life-time of immobilized cells were much better than those of the non-immobilized cells. The life-time of immobilized cells could reach 600 h by reactivation. 10 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Interactions between polymorphonuclear leukocytes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms on silicone implants in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gennip, Maria; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Chronic infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa persist because the bacterium forms biofilms that are tolerant to antibiotic treatment and the host immune response. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to visualize biofilm development in vivo following...... intraperitoneal inoculation of mice with bacteria growing on hollow silicone tubes, as well as to examine the interaction between these bacteria and the host innate immune response. Wild-type P. aeruginosa developed biofilms within 1 day that trapped and caused visible cavities in polymorphonuclear leukocytes...... (PMNs). In contrast, the number of cells of a P. aeruginosa rhlA mutant that cannot produce rhamnolipids was significantly reduced on the implants by day 1, and the bacteria were actively phagocytosed by infiltrating PMNs. In addition, we identified extracellular wire-like structures around the bacteria...

  5. Structure of the O polysaccharide and serological classification of Pseudomonas syringae pv. ribicola NCPPB 1010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovod, V V; Zdorovenko, E L; Shashkov, A S; Kocharova, N A; Knirel, Y A

    2000-04-01

    The O polysaccharide (OPS) moiety of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of a phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. ribicola NCPPB 1010 was studied by sugar and methylation analyses, Smith degradation, and 1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy, including 2D COSY, TOCSY, NOESY and H-detected 1H,13C HMQC experiments. The OPS structure was elucidated, and shown to be composed of branched pentasaccharide repeating units (O repeats) of two types, major (1) and minor (2), differing in the position of substitution of one of the rhamnose residues. Both O repeats form structurally homogeneous blocks within the same polysaccharide molecule. Although P. syringae pv. ribicola NCPPB 1010 demonstrates genetic relatedness and similarity in the OPS chemical structure to some other P. syringae pathovars, it did not cross-react with any OPS-specific mAbs produced against heterologous P. syringae strains. Therefore, we propose to classify P. syringae pv. ribicola NCPPB 1010 in a new serogroup, O8.

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mastitis in two goats associated with an essential oil-based teat dip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, E Jane; Wilson, David J

    2016-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that has been associated with mastitis in dairy animals, including goats. Often, the environmental sources of the bacteria are water-related (such as hoses and muddy pastures). Mastitis attributable to P. aeruginosa was identified in 2 goats in a small herd. Efforts were made to identify environmental sources of the pathogen. Multiple samples from the goats' environment were cultured, including water from the trough, bedding, the hose used to wash udders, and the teat dip and teat dip containers. The bacterium was isolated from the teat dip and the teat dip container. The teat dip consisted of water, liquid soap, and several drops of essential oils (including tea tree, lavender, and peppermint). This case illustrates a potential problem that may arise as a result of the use of unconventional ingredients in teat dips. The use of alternative products by goat producers is likely to increase in the future. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. Bioremediation of Petroleum hydrocarbon by using Pseudomonas species isolated from Petroleum contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A newly isolated strain Pseudomonas fluorescens (Accession number KF 279042.1 have potential in diesel degradation and can be recommended for bioremediation of sites that are contaminated with diesel. This bacterium was characterized on the basis of microbiological, biochemical and molecular analysis. Bacterial growth optimization was studied based on carbon source, nitrogen source, pH and temperature. The strain was selected based on its ability to show growth in medium containing diesel. In addition, optimum temperature and pH for increased growth by the isolate were found to be 37oC and pH 8.0 indicating the maximum utilization of diesel. At the same time, production of protease and urease enzymes during the utilization of diesel was also assayed following the standard procedures.

  8. Complete genome sequence of the plant commensal Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Ian T; Press, Caroline M; Ravel, Jacques; Kobayashi, Donald Y; Myers, Garry S A; Mavrodi, Dmitri V; DeBoy, Robert T; Seshadri, Rekha; Ren, Qinghu; Madupu, Ramana; Dodson, Robert J; Durkin, A Scott; Brinkac, Lauren M; Daugherty, Sean C; Sullivan, Stephen A; Rosovitz, Mary J; Gwinn, Michelle L; Zhou, Liwei; Schneider, Davd J; Cartinhour, Samuel W; Nelson, William C; Weidman, Janice; Watkins, Kisha; Tran, Kevin; Khouri, Hoda; Pierson, Elizabeth A; Pierson, Leland S; Thomashow, Linda S; Loper, Joyce E

    2005-07-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 is a plant commensal bacterium that inhabits the rhizosphere and produces secondary metabolites that suppress soilborne plant pathogens. The complete sequence of the 7.1-Mb Pf-5 genome was determined. We analyzed repeat sequences to identify genomic islands that, together with other approaches, suggested P. fluorescens Pf-5's recent lateral acquisitions include six secondary metabolite gene clusters, seven phage regions and a mobile genomic island. We identified various features that contribute to its commensal lifestyle on plants, including broad catabolic and transport capabilities for utilizing plant-derived compounds, the apparent ability to use a diversity of iron siderophores, detoxification systems to protect from oxidative stress, and the lack of a type III secretion system and toxins found in related pathogens. In addition to six known secondary metabolites produced by P. fluorescens Pf-5, three novel secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters were also identified that may contribute to the biocontrol properties of P. fluorescens Pf-5.

  9. The plant growth-promoting effect of the nitrogen-fixing endophyte Pseudomonas stutzeri A15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Van T K; Rediers, Hans; Ghequire, Maarten G K; Nguyen, Hiep H; De Mot, René; Vanderleyden, Jos; Spaepen, Stijn

    2017-04-01

    The use of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria as a sustainable alternative for chemical nitrogen fertilizers has been explored for many economically important crops. For one such strain isolated from rice rhizosphere and endosphere, nitrogen-fixing Pseudomonas stutzeri A15, unequivocal evidence of the plant growth-promoting effect and the potential contribution of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is still lacking. In this study, we investigated the effect of P. stutzeri A15 inoculation on the growth of rice seedlings in greenhouse conditions. P. stutzeri A15 induced significant growth promotion compared to uninoculated rice seedlings. Furthermore, inoculation with strain A15 performed significantly better than chemical nitrogen fertilization, clearly pointing to the potential of this bacterium as biofertilizer. To assess the contribution of BNF to the plant growth-promoting effect, rice seedlings were also inoculated with a nitrogen fixation-deficient mutant. Our results suggest that BNF (at best) only partially contributes to the stimulation of plant growth.

  10. Experimental evolution of aging in a bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stearns Stephen C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aging refers to a decline in reproduction and survival with increasing age. According to evolutionary theory, aging evolves because selection late in life is weak and mutations exist whose deleterious effects manifest only late in life. Whether the assumptions behind this theory are fulfilled in all organisms, and whether all organisms age, has not been clear. We tested the generality of this theory by experimental evolution with Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium whose asymmetric division allows mother and daughter to be distinguished. Results We evolved three populations for 2000 generations in the laboratory under conditions where selection was strong early in life, but very weak later in life. All populations evolved faster growth rates, mostly by decreasing the age at first division. Evolutionary changes in aging were inconsistent. The predominant response was the unexpected evolution of slower aging, revealing the limits of theoretical predictions if mutations have unanticipated phenotypic effects. However, we also observed the spread of a mutation causing earlier aging of mothers whose negative effect was reset in the daughters. Conclusion Our results confirm that late-acting deleterious mutations do occur in bacteria and that they can invade populations when selection late in life is weak. They suggest that very few organisms – perhaps none- can avoid the accumulation of such mutations over evolutionary time, and thus that aging is probably a fundamental property of all cellular organisms.

  11. Sigma factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Eric; Sanschagrin, François; Levesque, Roger C

    2008-01-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as in most bacterial species, the expression of genes is tightly controlled by a repertoire of transcriptional regulators, particularly the so-called sigma (sigma) factors. The basic understanding of these proteins in bacteria has initially been described in Escherichia coli where seven sigma factors are involved in core RNA polymerase interactions and promoter recognition. Now, 7 years have passed since the completion of the first genome sequence of the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. Information from the genome of P. aeruginosa PAO1 identified 550 transcriptional regulators and 24 putative sigma factors. Of the 24 sigma, 19 were of extracytoplasmic function (ECF). Here, basic knowledge of sigma and ECF proteins was reviewed with particular emphasis on their role in P. aeruginosa global gene regulation. Summarized data are obtained from in silico analysis of P. aeruginosasigma and ECF including rpoD (sigma(70)), RpoH (sigma(32)), RpoF (FliA or sigma(28)), RpoS (sigma(S) or sigma(38)), RpoN (NtrA, sigma(54) or sigma(N)), ECF including AlgU (RpoE or sigma(22)), PvdS, SigX and a collection of uncharacterized sigma ECF, some of which are implicated in iron transport. Coupled to systems biology, identification and functional genomics analysis of P. aeruginosasigma and ECF are expected to provide new means to prevent infection, new targets for antimicrobial therapy, as well as new insights into the infection process.

  12. Use of silica-encapsulated Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4 in biodegradation of novel hydrocarbon ring structures found in hydraulic fracturing waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aukema, Kelly G; Kasinkas, Lisa; Aksan, Alptekin; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2014-08-01

    The most problematic hydrocarbons in hydraulic fracturing (fracking) wastewaters consist of fused, isolated, bridged, and spiro ring systems, and ring systems have been poorly studied with respect to biodegradation, prompting the testing here of six major ring structural subclasses using a well-characterized bacterium and a silica encapsulation system previously shown to enhance biodegradation. The direct biological oxygenation of spiro ring compounds was demonstrated here. These and other hydrocarbon ring compounds have previously been shown to be present in flow-back waters and waters produced from hydraulic fracturing operations. Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4, containing naphthalene dioxygenase, was selected for its broad substrate specificity, and it was demonstrated here to oxidize fundamental ring structures that are common in shale-derived waters but not previously investigated with this or related enzymes. Pseudomonas sp. NCIB 9816-4 was tested here in the presence of a silica encasement, a protocol that has previously been shown to protect bacteria against the extremes of salinity present in fracking wastewaters. These studies demonstrate the degradation of highly hydrophobic compounds by a silica-encapsulated model bacterium, demonstrate what it may not degrade, and contribute to knowledge of the full range of hydrocarbon ring compounds that can be oxidized using Pseudomonas sp. NCIB 9816-4.

  13. Use of Silica-Encapsulated Pseudomonas sp. Strain NCIB 9816-4 in Biodegradation of Novel Hydrocarbon Ring Structures Found in Hydraulic Fracturing Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aukema, Kelly G.; Kasinkas, Lisa; Aksan, Alptekin

    2014-01-01

    The most problematic hydrocarbons in hydraulic fracturing (fracking) wastewaters consist of fused, isolated, bridged, and spiro ring systems, and ring systems have been poorly studied with respect to biodegradation, prompting the testing here of six major ring structural subclasses using a well-characterized bacterium and a silica encapsulation system previously shown to enhance biodegradation. The direct biological oxygenation of spiro ring compounds was demonstrated here. These and other hydrocarbon ring compounds have previously been shown to be present in flow-back waters and waters produced from hydraulic fracturing operations. Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4, containing naphthalene dioxygenase, was selected for its broad substrate specificity, and it was demonstrated here to oxidize fundamental ring structures that are common in shale-derived waters but not previously investigated with this or related enzymes. Pseudomonas sp. NCIB 9816-4 was tested here in the presence of a silica encasement, a protocol that has previously been shown to protect bacteria against the extremes of salinity present in fracking wastewaters. These studies demonstrate the degradation of highly hydrophobic compounds by a silica-encapsulated model bacterium, demonstrate what it may not degrade, and contribute to knowledge of the full range of hydrocarbon ring compounds that can be oxidized using Pseudomonas sp. NCIB 9816-4. PMID:24907321

  14. Visualization and modeling of the colonization dynamics of a bioluminscent bacterium in variably saturated, translucent quartz sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockhold, M. L.; Yarwood, R. R.; Niemet, M. R.; Bottomley, Peter J.; Brockman, Fred J.; Selker, John S.

    2007-06-01

    An experimental and numerical investigation was conducted to study the colonization dynamics of a bioluminescent bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44, during growth in a porous medium under steady, variably saturated flow conditions. Experiments were conducted in a thin-slab light transmission chamber filled with uniform, translucent quartz sand. Steady, variably saturated flow conditions were established using drip emitters mounted on the top of the chamber, with glucose applied through a central dripper located directly above an inoculated region of the chamber. Periodic pulses of salicylate and a dye tracer were applied to induce bioluminescence of the bacterium to monitor colony expansion and to track changes in the hydraulic and transport properties of the sand. Changes in the apparent water saturation of the sand were quantified by monitoring light transmission through the chamber with a CCD camera. The colonized region expanded laterally by about 15 cm, and upward against the flow by 7-8 cm during the 6-day experiment while apparent saturations in the colonized region decreased by 7-9% and the capillary fringe dropped by ~5 cm. The observed data were reproduced approximately using a numerical model that accounted for the processes of water flow, solute and bacterial transport, cell growth and accumulation, glucose and oxygen consumption, and gas diffusion and exchange. The results of this study illustrate some of the complexities associated with coupled flow, reactive transport, and biological processes in variably saturated porous media, which are not readily observable using other experimental techniques.

  15. A mycorrhiza helper bacterium enhances ectomycorrhizal and endomycorrhizal symbiosis of Australian Acacia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duponnois, R; Plenchette, C

    2003-04-01

    The aims of this study were to test the effects of a mycorrhiza helper bacterium (MHB), Pseudomonas monteilii strain HR13 on the mycorrhization of (1) an Australian Acacia, A. holosericea, by several ectomycorrhizal fungi or one endomycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices, and (2) several Australian Acacia species by Pisolithus alba strain IR100 under glasshouse conditions. Bacterial inoculant HR13 significantly promoted ectomycorrhizal colonization for all the Acacia species, from 45.8% ( A. mangium) to 70.3% ( A. auriculiformis). A stimulating effect of HR13 on the ectomycorrhizal establishment was recorded with all the fungal isolates (strains of Pisolithus and Scleroderma). The same effect of bacteria on the frequency of endomycorrhizal colonization of A. holosericea seedlings by G. intraradices with vesicles and hyphae frequencies was recorded. The stimulation of saprophytic fungal growth by MHB is usually the main mechanism that could explain this bacterial effect on mycorrhizal establishment. MHB could stimulate the production of phenolic compounds such as hypaphorine and increase the aggressiveness of the fungal symbiont. However, no significant effect of MHB on fungal growth was recorded with Scleroderma isolates under axenic conditions but positive bacterial effects were observed with Pisolithus strains. From a practical viewpoint, it appears that MHB could stimulate the mycorrhizal colonization of Australian Acacia species with ectomycorrhizal or endomycorrhizal fungi, and could also facilitate controlled mycorrhization in nursery practices where Acacia species are grown for forestation purposes.

  16. Pangenome Evolution in the Marine Bacterium Alteromonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pérez, Mario; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2016-06-03

    We have examined a collection of the free-living marine bacterium Alteromonas genomes with cores diverging in average nucleotide identities ranging from 99.98% to 73.35%, i.e., from microbes that can be considered members of a natural clone (like in a clinical epidemiological outbreak) to borderline genus level. The genomes were largely syntenic allowing a precise delimitation of the core and flexible regions in each. The core was 1.4 Mb (ca. 30% of the typical strain genome size). Recombination rates along the core were high among strains belonging to the same species (37.7-83.7% of all nucleotide polymorphisms) but they decreased sharply between species (18.9-5.1%). Regarding the flexible genome, its main expansion occurred within the boundaries of the species, i.e., strains of the same species already have a large and diverse flexible genome. Flexible regions occupy mostly fixed genomic locations. Four large genomic islands are involved in the synthesis of strain-specific glycosydic receptors that we have called glycotypes. These genomic regions are exchanged by homologous recombination within and between species and there is evidence for their import from distant taxonomic units (other genera within the family). In addition, several hotspots for integration of gene cassettes by illegitimate recombination are distributed throughout the genome. They code for features that give each clone specific properties to interact with their ecological niche and must flow fast throughout the whole genus as they are found, with nearly identical sequences, in different species. Models for the generation of this genomic diversity involving phage predation are discussed.

  17. Genotypische diversiteit en rhizosfeerkolonisatie van DAPG-producerende Pseudomonas spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergsma-Vlami, M.

    2009-01-01

    Het antibioticum 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) speelt een belangrijke rol in biologische bestrijding van verschillende plantenpathogenen door fluorescerende Pseudomonas-soorten. DAPG-producerende Pseudomonas-stammen zijn effectief in biologische bestrijding, maar hun saprofytisch vermogen is vaa

  18. Pseudomonas songnenensis sp. nov., isolated from saline and alkaline soils in Songnen Plain, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Pan, Yuanyuan; Wang, Kaibiao; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Shuang; Fu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Cheng; Jiang, Juquan

    2015-03-01

    The strain NEAU-ST5-5(T) was isolated from the saline and alkaline soil in Songnen Plain, North East of China. The bacterium was found to be aerobic, Gram-stain negative, rod-shaped and motile by means of several polar flagella. It forms yellow-orange colonies with a radial wrinkled surface. Phylogenetic analyses based on the separate 16S rRNA gene sequences and concatenated 16S rRNA, gyrB and rpoD gene sequences indicated that it belongs to the genus Pseudomonas in the class Gammaproteobacteria. Strain NEAU-ST5-5(T) shows gene sequence similarities of 98.8-97.1 % for 16S rRNA, 90.5-78.4 % for gyrB and 90.4-71.1 % for rpoD with type strains of the closely related species of the genus Pseudomonas, respectively. DNA-DNA hybridization relatedness between strain NEAU-ST5-5(T) and type strains of the most closely related species, Pseudomonas stutzeri DSM 5190(T), P. xanthomarina DSM 18231(T), P. kunmingensis CGMCC 1.12273(T), P. alcaliphila DSM 17744(T) and P. oleovorans subsp. lubricantis DSM 21016(T) were 43 ± 1 to 25 ± 2 %. The major fatty acids (>10 %) were determined to be C18:1 ω7c/C18:1 ω6c, C16:1 ω7c/C16:1 ω6c and C16:0, the predominant respiratory quinone was identified as ubiquinone 9 and polar lipids were found to consist of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, one unknown phospholipid, one unidentified aminophospholipid and one unknown lipid. The genotypic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic analysis indicated that strain NEAU-ST5-5(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas songnenensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NEAU-ST5-5(T) (=ACCC 06361(T) = DSM 27560(T)).

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, Lawrence R; Isabella, Vincent M; Lewis, Kim

    2014-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous organism that is the focus of intense research because of its prominent role in disease. Due to its relatively large genome and flexible metabolic capabilities, this organism exploits numerous environmental niches. It is an opportunistic pathogen that sets upon the human host when the normal immune defenses are disabled. Its deadliness is most apparent in cystic fibrosis patients, but it also is a major problem in burn wounds, chronic wounds, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, surface growth on implanted biomaterials, and within hospital surface and water supplies, where it poses a host of threats to vulnerable patients (Peleg and Hooper, N Engl J Med 362:1804-1813, 2010; Breathnach et al., J Hosp Infect 82:19-24, 2012). Once established in the patient, P. aeruginosa can be especially difficult to treat. The genome encodes a host of resistance genes, including multidrug efflux pumps (Poole, J Mol Microbiol Biotechnol 3:255-264, 2001) and enzymes conferring resistance to beta-lactam and aminoglycoside antibotics (Vahdani et al., Annal Burns Fire Disast 25:78-81, 2012), making therapy against this gram-negative pathogen particularly challenging due to the lack of novel antimicrobial therapeutics (Lewis, Nature 485: 439-440, 2012). This challenge is compounded by the ability of P. aeruginosa to grow in a biofilm, which may enhance its ability to cause infections by protecting bacteria from host defenses and chemotherapy. Here, we review recent studies of P. aeruginosa biofilms with a focus on how this unique mode of growth contributes to its ability to cause recalcitrant infections.

  20. The chitinase C gene PsChiC from Pseudomonas sp. and its synergistic effects on larvicidal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanfang Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas sp. strain TXG6-1, a chitinolytic gram-negative bacterium, was isolated from a vegetable field in Taixing city, Jiangsu Province, China. In this study, a Pseudomonas chitinase C gene (PsChiC was isolated from the chromosomal DNA of this bacterium using a pair of specific primers. The PsChiC gene consisted of an open reading frame of 1443 nucleotides and encoded 480 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 51.66 kDa. The deduced PsChiC amino acid sequence lacked a signal sequence and consisted of a glycoside hydrolase family 18 catalytic domain responsible for chitinase activity, a fibronectin type III-like domain (FLD and a C-terminal chitin-binding domain (ChBD. The amino acid sequence of PsChiCshowed high sequence homology (> 95% with chitinase C from Serratia marcescens. SDS-PAGE showed that the molecular mass of chitinase PsChiC was 52 kDa. Chitinase assays revealed that the chitobiosidase and endochitinase activities of PsChiCwere 51.6- and 84.1-fold higher than those of pET30a, respectively. Although PsChiC showed little insecticidal activity towards Spodoptera litura larvae, an insecticidal assay indicated that PsChiC increased the insecticidal toxicity of SpltNPV by 1.78-fold at 192 h and hastened death. These results suggest that PsChiC from Pseudomonas sp. could be useful in improving the pathogenicity of baculoviruses.

  1. Characterization of a sodium dodecyl sulphate-degrading Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY15 from Antarctic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmi, M I E; Hussin, W S W; Aqlima, A; Syed, M A; Ruberto, L; MacCormack, W P; Shukor, M Y

    2013-11-01

    A bacterium capable of biodegrading surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) was isolated from Antarctic soil. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY15 based on carbon utilization profiles using Biolog GN plates and partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny. Growth characteristic studies showed that the bacterium grew optimally at 10 degrees C, 7.25 pH, 1 g l(-1) SDS as a sole carbon source and 2 g l(-1) ammonium sulphate as nitrogen source. Growth was completely inhibited at 5 g l(-1) SDS. At a tolerable initial concentration of 2 g l(-1), approximately 90% of SDS was degraded after an incubation period of eight days. The best growth kinetic model to fit experimental data was the Haldane model of substrate inhibition with a correlation coefficient value of 0.97. The maximum growth rate was 0.372 hr(-1) while the saturation constant or half velocity constant (Ks) and inhibition constant (Ki), were 0.094% and 11.212 % SDS, respectively. Other detergent tested as carbon sources at 1 g l(-1) was Tergitol NP9, Tergitol 15S9, Witconol 2301 (methyl oleate), sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), benzethonium chloride, and benzalkonium chloride showed Tergitol NP9, Tergitol 15S9, Witconol 2301 and the anionic SDBS supported growth with the highest growth exhibited by SDBS.

  2. Constitutive arsenite oxidase expression detected in arsenic-hypertolerant Pseudomonas xanthomarina S11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koechler, Sandrine; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Goulhen-Chollet, Florence; Heinrich-Salmeron, Audrey; Jost, Bernard; Lièvremont, Didier; Philipps, Muriel; Plewniak, Frédéric; Bertin, Philippe N; Lett, Marie-Claire

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas xanthomarina S11 is an arsenite-oxidizing bacterium isolated from an arsenic-contaminated former gold mine in Salsigne, France. This bacterium showed high resistance to arsenite and was able to oxidize arsenite to arsenate at concentrations up to 42.72 mM As[III]. The genome of this strain was sequenced and revealed the presence of three ars clusters. One of them is located on a plasmid and is organized as an "arsenic island" harbouring an aio operon and genes involved in phosphorous metabolism, in addition to the ars genes. Neither the aioXRS genes nor a specific sigma-54-dependent promoter located upstream of aioBA genes, both involved in regulation of arsenite oxidase expression in other arsenite-oxidizing bacteria, could be identified in the genome. This observation is in accordance with the fact that no difference was observed in expression of arsenite oxidase in P. xanthomarina S11, whether or not the strain was grown in the presence of As[III].

  3. Anaerobic degradation of long-chain alkylamines by a denitrifying Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong D; van Ginkel, Cornelis G; Plugge, Caroline M

    2008-10-01

    The anaerobic degradation of tetradecylamine and other long-chain alkylamines by a newly isolated denitrifying bacterium was studied. Strain ZN6 was isolated from a mixture of soil and active sludge and was identified as representing Pseudomonas stutzeri, based on partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Strain ZN6 was a mesophilic, motile, Gram-negative rod-shaped bacterium and was able to grow on a variety of compounds including even-numbered primary fatty amines with alkyl chains ranging from C(4) to C(18) coupled to nitrate reduction. Alkylamines were used as sole carbon, energy and nitrogen source and were completely mineralized. Nitrate was dissimilated by ZN6 to nitrite. When strain ZN6 was grown under nitrate limitation, nitrite was slowly dissimilated further. When cocultivated with the complete denitrifier Castellaniella defragens ZN3, anaerobic degradation under denitrifying of alkylamines by strain ZN6 was slightly faster. Strain ZN3 is a complete denitrifier, unable to convert tetradecylamine, and was copurified from the same enrichment culture as strain ZN6. The proposed pathway for the degradation of alkylamines in strain ZN6 starts with C-N cleavages to alkanals and further oxidation to the corresponding fatty acids.

  4. Uranium biomineralization by a metal resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from contaminated mine waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Sangeeta [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Sar, Pinaki, E-mail: sarpinaki@yahoo.com [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2011-02-15

    Uranium biomineralization by a metal-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from uranium mine waste was characterized for its potential in bioremediation. Uranium resistance, its cellular localization and chemical nature of uranium-bacteria interaction were elucidated. Survival and uranium biomineralization from mine water were investigated using microcosm experiments. The selected bacterium showed U resistance and accumulation (maximum of 275 mg U g{sup -1} cell dry wt.) following incubation in 100 mg U L{sup -1}, pH 4.0, for 6 h. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that bioaccumulated uranium was deposited within the cell envelope as needle shaped U-phosphate compounds that attain crystallinity only at pH 4.0. A synergistic involvement of deprotonated phosphate and carboxyl moieties in facilitating bioprecipitation of uranium was evident from FTIR analysis. Based on these findings we attribute the localized U sequestration by this bacterium as innocuous complex to its possible mechanism of uranium resistance. Microcosm data confirmed that the strain can remove soluble uranium (99%) and sequester it as U oxide and phosphate minerals while maintaining its viability. The study showed that indigenous bacteria from contaminated site that can survive uranium and other heavy metal toxicity and sequester soluble uranium as biominerals could play important role in uranium bioremediation.

  5. A Pseudomonas putida strain genetically engineered for 1,2,3-trichloropropane bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samin, Ghufrana; Pavlova, Martina; Arif, M Irfan; Postema, Christiaan P; Damborsky, Jiri; Janssen, Dick B

    2014-09-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a toxic compound that is recalcitrant to biodegradation in the environment. Attempts to isolate TCP-degrading organisms using enrichment cultivation have failed. A potential biodegradation pathway starts with hydrolytic dehalogenation to 2,3-dichloro-1-propanol (DCP), followed by oxidative metabolism. To obtain a practically applicable TCP-degrading organism, we introduced an engineered haloalkane dehalogenase with improved TCP degradation activity into the DCP-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas putida MC4. For this purpose, the dehalogenase gene (dhaA31) was cloned behind the constitutive dhlA promoter and was introduced into the genome of strain MC4 using a transposon delivery system. The transposon-located antibiotic resistance marker was subsequently removed using a resolvase step. Growth of the resulting engineered bacterium, P. putida MC4-5222, on TCP was indeed observed, and all organic chlorine was released as chloride. A packed-bed reactor with immobilized cells of strain MC4-5222 degraded >95% of influent TCP (0.33 mM) under continuous-flow conditions, with stoichiometric release of inorganic chloride. The results demonstrate the successful use of a laboratory-evolved dehalogenase and genetic engineering to produce an effective, plasmid-free, and stable whole-cell biocatalyst for the aerobic bioremediation of a recalcitrant chlorinated hydrocarbon. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. RNAi screen reveals an Abl kinase-dependent host cell pathway involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa internalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia F Pielage

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Internalization of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by non-phagocytic cells is promoted by rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton, but the host pathways usurped by this bacterium are not clearly understood. We used RNAi-mediated gene inactivation of approximately 80 genes known to regulate the actin cytoskeleton in Drosophila S2 cells to identify host molecules essential for entry of P. aeruginosa. This work revealed Abl tyrosine kinase, the adaptor protein Crk, the small GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42, and p21-activated kinase as components of a host signaling pathway that leads to internalization of P. aeruginosa. Using a variety of complementary approaches, we validated the role of this pathway in mammalian cells. Remarkably, ExoS and ExoT, type III secreted toxins of P. aeruginosa, target this pathway by interfering with GTPase function and, in the case of ExoT, by abrogating P. aeruginosa-induced Abl-dependent Crk phosphorylation. Altogether, this work reveals that P. aeruginosa utilizes the Abl pathway for entering host cells and reveals unexpected complexity by which the P. aeruginosa type III secretion system modulates this internalization pathway. Our results furthermore demonstrate the applicability of using RNAi screens to identify host signaling cascades usurped by microbial pathogens that may be potential targets for novel therapies directed against treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections.

  7. [In vitro control of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Gaeumannomyces graminis by bacteria of the fluorescent Pseudomonas group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Y E; Laich, F S; Navarro, C A

    1993-01-01

    Thirty six fluorescent Pseudomonas isolates were obtained from the rhizosphere of sunflower plants. By antibiosis tests, the six more efficient strains in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum growth inhibition, were selected. Simultaneously, twenty three fluorescent Pseudomonas isolates were recuperated from the rhizosphere of wheat plants and the five most efficient strains in growth inhibition of the fungi Gaeumannomyces graminis were selected. The strains selected from the rhizosphere of sunflower plants had no antagonistic effect on G. graminis and the bacteria isolated from the wheat rhizosphere showed no fungistatic activity on S. sclerotiorum. These results suggest the existence of a certain degree of plant bacteria pathogenic specificity. Among the selected bacteria, the strain FF5 of P. fluorescens originated the major inhibiting halo in vitro against S. sclerotiorum (Figure 1). In liquid culture medium this bacterium produces an antifungal substance that promotes lysis of fungi mycelium (Figure 2) and inhibition of ascospore germination and is not inhibited by the presence of Fe+3 in the culture medium (Table 1). Its synthesis is not associated with the production of fluorescein. Its action is not enzymatic because it is a substance of low molecular weight (< 2000), resistant to autoclave sterilization and photo-stable. The amount of NH4+ and the high pH values produced by the FF5 strain in the liquid culture medium (Table 2) are not responsible for the antifungalal action.

  8. TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins and siderophore utilization in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartney, Sierra L; Mazurier, Sylvie; Kidarsa, Teresa A; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Lemanceau, Philippe; Loper, Joyce E

    2011-04-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 produces two siderophores, a pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin, and its proteome includes 45 TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins, which commonly function in uptake of siderophores and other substrates from the environment. The 45 proteins share the conserved β-barrel and plug domains of TonB-dependent proteins but only 18 of them have an N-terminal signaling domain characteristic of TonB-dependent transducers (TBDTs), which participate in cell-surface signaling systems. Phylogenetic analyses of the 18 TBDTs and 27 TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs), which lack the N-terminal signaling domain, suggest a complex evolutionary history including horizontal transfer among different microbial lineages. Putative functions were assigned to certain TBDRs and TBDTs in clades including well-characterized orthologs from other Pseudomonas spp. A mutant of Pf-5 with deletions in pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin biosynthesis genes was constructed and characterized for iron-limited growth and utilization of a spectrum of siderophores. The mutant could utilize as iron sources a large number of pyoverdines with diverse structures as well as ferric citrate, heme, and the siderophores ferrichrome, ferrioxamine B, enterobactin, and aerobactin. The diversity and complexity of the TBDTs and TBDRs with roles in iron uptake clearly indicate the importance of iron in the fitness and survival of Pf-5 in the environment.

  9. Survival of a Rifampicin-Resistant Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain in Nine Mollisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tami L. Stubbs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens strain D7 (P.f. D7 is a naturally occurring soil bacterium that shows promise as a biological herbicide to inhibit growth of annual grass weeds, including downy brome (Bromus tectorum L., in crop- and rangelands. Pseudomonas fluorescens strain D7rif (P.f. D7rif is a rifampicin-resistant strain of P.f. D7. One of the greatest obstacles to successful biological weed control is survival of the organism under field conditions. Nine soils in the taxonomic order of Mollisols, collected from downy brome-infested areas of the Western and Central United States, were inoculated with P.f. D7rif and incubated in the laboratory to determine the effects of soil type, soil properties, incubation temperature, and soil water potential on survival of P.f. D7rif over 63 days. Silt loam soils from Lind, Washington, and Moro, Oregon, sustained the highest P.f. D7rif populations, and recovery was the lowest from Pendleton, Oregon soil. Survival and recovery of P.f. D7rif varied with soil type and temperature but not with the two soil water potentials tested. After 63 days, P.f. D7rif was recovered at levels greater than log 5.5 colony forming units (CFU g−1 soil from five of the nine test soils, a level adequate to suppress downy brome under field or range conditions.

  10. Choosing an Appropriate Infection Model to Study Quorum Sensing Inhibition in Pseudomonas Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelina Papaioannou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria, although considered for decades to be antisocial organisms whose sole purpose is to find nutrients and multiply are, in fact, highly communicative organisms. Referred to as quorum sensing, cell-to-cell communication mechanisms have been adopted by bacteria in order to co-ordinate their gene expression. By behaving as a community rather than as individuals, bacteria can simultaneously switch on their virulence factor production and establish successful infections in eukaryotes. Understanding pathogen-host interactions requires the use of infection models. As the use of rodents is limited, for ethical considerations and the high costs associated with their use, alternative models based on invertebrates have been developed. Invertebrate models have the benefits of low handling costs, limited space requirements and rapid generation of results. This review presents examples of such models available for studying the pathogenicity of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Quorum sensing interference, known as quorum quenching, suggests a promising disease-control strategy since quorum-quenching mechanisms appear to play important roles in microbe-microbe and host-pathogen interactions. Examples of natural and synthetic quorum sensing inhibitors and their potential as antimicrobials in Pseudomonas-related infections are discussed in the second part of this review.

  11. [Extraction, Purification and Identification of a Dexamethasone-degrading Enzymes Generated by Pseudomonas Alcaligenes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lili; Yang, Zhibang; Yang, Qian; Shi, Zhongquan; Deng, Xichuan

    2015-10-01

    In this research a strain of isolated Pseudomonas alcaligenes which causes degradation of dexamethasone was acclimated further and its proteins of every position in the bacterium were separated by the osmotic shock method. The separated intracellular proteins which had the highest enzyme activity were extracted by the salting out with ammonium sulfate and were purified with the cation exchange chromatography and gel chromatography. The purified proteins which was active to cause degradation of dexamethasone had been detected were cut with enzyme and were analyzed with mass spectrometry. The results showed that the degradation rate to dexamethasone by acclimated Pseudomonas alcaligenes were increased from 23.63% to 52.84%. The degrading enzymes were located mainly in the intracellular of the bacteria and its molecular weight was about 41 kD. The specific activity of the purified degrading enzymes were achieved to 1.02 U x mg(-1). Its 5-peptide amino acid sequences were consistent with some sequences of the isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase. The protein enzyme may be a new kind degrading enzyme of steroidal compounds. Our experimental results provided new strategies for cleanup of dexamethasone in water environment with microbial bioremediation technique.

  12. Choosing an appropriate infection model to study quorum sensing inhibition in Pseudomonas infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Evelina; Utari, Putri Dwi; Quax, Wim J

    2013-09-23

    Bacteria, although considered for decades to be antisocial organisms whose sole purpose is to find nutrients and multiply are, in fact, highly communicative organisms. Referred to as quorum sensing, cell-to-cell communication mechanisms have been adopted by bacteria in order to co-ordinate their gene expression. By behaving as a community rather than as individuals, bacteria can simultaneously switch on their virulence factor production and establish successful infections in eukaryotes. Understanding pathogen-host interactions requires the use of infection models. As the use of rodents is limited, for ethical considerations and the high costs associated with their use, alternative models based on invertebrates have been developed. Invertebrate models have the benefits of low handling costs, limited space requirements and rapid generation of results. This review presents examples of such models available for studying the pathogenicity of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Quorum sensing interference, known as quorum quenching, suggests a promising disease-control strategy since quorum-quenching mechanisms appear to play important roles in microbe-microbe and host-pathogen interactions. Examples of natural and synthetic quorum sensing inhibitors and their potential as antimicrobials in Pseudomonas-related infections are discussed in the second part of this review.

  13. Proteomic characterization of the outer membrane vesicle of Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chi-Won; Park, Edmond Changkyun; Yun, Sung Ho; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Lee, Yeol Gyun; Hong, Yeonhee; Park, Kyeong Ryang; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Gun-Hwa; Kim, Seung Il

    2014-10-03

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are produced by various pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. In this study, we isolated OMVs from a representative soil bacterium, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, which has a biodegradative activity toward various aromatic compounds. Proteomic analysis identified the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) OprC, OprD, OprE, OprF, OprH, OprG, and OprW as major components of the OMV of P. putida KT2440. The production of OMVs was dependent on the nutrient availability in the culture media, and the up- or down-regulation of specific OMPs was observed according to the culture conditions. In particular, porins (e.g., benzoate-specific porin, BenF-like porin) and enzymes (e.g., catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, benzoate dioxygenase) for benzoate degradation were uniquely found in OMVs prepared from P. putida KT2440 that were cultured in media containing benzoate as the energy source. OMVs of P. putida KT2440 showed low pathological activity toward cultured cells that originated from human lung cells, which suggests their potential as adjuvants or OMV vaccine carriers. Our results suggest that the protein composition of the OMVs of P. putida KT2440 reflects the characteristics of the total proteome of P. putida KT2440.

  14. Production and optimization of curdlan produced by Pseudomonas sp. QL212.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Zhu, Ying; Li, Yumei; Bao, Jie; Fan, Xiangyu; Qu, Yanhong; Wang, Yiwei; Hu, Zhiheng; Li, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Curdlan is a polysaccharide that consists of β-1,3-linked glucose residues. A polysaccharide-producing bacterium isolated from soil samples was identified as Pseudomonas sp. QL212. The polysaccharide was purified to homogeneity via sequential ethanol precipitation, deproteinization, CM ion-exchange, and gel chromatography sequentially. Analysis of the purified polysaccharide revealed that it consisted of many glucosyl residues, and its molecular weight was only 6.18×10(5)Da. This low molecular weight endowed it with excellent solubility. Infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis confirmed that the polysaccharide was curdlan. Single-factor and Response surface methodology experiments were used to optimize the culture medium and conditions. The optimal culture conditions consisted of seed culture age of 12h, and an incubation temperature of 30°C, with 10% inoculum and a total fluid volume of 75mL in a 250-mL Erlenmeyer flask. The maximum curdlan yield of about 5.92gL(-1) was achieved with an optimal medium consisting of 30.11gL(-1) of sucrose, 5.94gL(-1) of yeast extract, and an initial pH of 8.03. To our best knowledge, this is the highest reported yield of curdlan produced by Pseudomonas sp., and the curdlan production medium components were much simpler than those in previous reports.

  15. Antagonistic intestinal microflora produces antimicrobial substance inhibitory to Pseudomonas species and other spoilage organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatew, Bayissa; Delessa, Tenagne; Zakin, Vered; Gollop, Natan

    2011-10-01

    Chicken intestine harbors a vast number of bacterial strains. In the present study, antimicrobial substance produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of healthy chicken was detected, characterized, and purified. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the bacteria were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum vN. The antimicrobial substance produced by this bacterium was designated vN-1 and exhibited a broad-spectrum of activity against many important pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Erwinia amylovova. vN-1 was determined to be thermostable, insensitive to pH values ranging from 2.0 to 8.0, resistant to various organic solvents and to enzymatic inactivation. The inhibition kinetics displayed a bactericidal mode of action. This study revealed an antimicrobial substance with low molecular mass of less than 1 kDa as determined by ultrafiltration and having features not previously reported for LAB isolated from chicken intestines. The detection of this antimicrobial substance addresses an important aspect of biotechnological control agents of spoilage caused by Pseudomonas spp. and promises the possibility for preservation of refrigerated poultry meat. Practical Application:  The newly characterized antimicrobial substance and designated as vN-1 may have the potential to be used in food preservation.

  16. Fructooligosacharides reduce Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 pathogenicity through distinct mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Ortega-González

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is ubiquitously present in the environment and acts as an opportunistic pathogen on humans, animals and plants. We report here the effects of the prebiotic polysaccharide inulin and its hydrolysed form FOS on this bacterium. FOS was found to inhibit bacterial growth of strain PAO1, while inulin did not affect growth rate or yield in a significant manner. Inulin stimulated biofilm formation, whereas a dramatic reduction of the biofilm formation was observed in the presence of FOS. Similar opposing effects were observed for bacterial motility, where FOS inhibited the swarming and twitching behaviour whereas inulin caused its stimulation. In co-cultures with eukaryotic cells (macrophages FOS and, to a lesser extent, inulin reduced the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α. Western blot experiments indicated that the effects mediated by FOS in macrophages are associated with a decreased activation of the NF-κB pathway. Since FOS and inulin stimulate pathway activation in the absence of bacteria, the FOS mediated effect is likely to be of indirect nature, such as via a reduction of bacterial virulence. Further, this modulatory effect is observed also with the highly virulent ptxS mutated strain. Co-culture experiments of P. aeruginosa with IEC18 eukaryotic cells showed that FOS reduces the concentration of the major virulence factor, exotoxin A, suggesting that this is a possible mechanism for the reduction of pathogenicity. The potential of these compounds as components of antibacterial and anti-inflammatory cocktails is discussed.

  17. Prevalence and analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in chinchillas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoyama Naoki

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger are popular as pets and are often used as laboratory animals for various studies. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major infectious agent that causes otitis media, pneumonia, septicaemia enteritis, and sudden death in chinchillas. This bacterium is also a leading cause of nosocomial infections in humans. To prevent propagation of P. aeruginosa infection among humans and animals, detailed characteristics of the isolates, including antibiotic susceptibility and genetic features, are needed. In this study, we surveyed P. aeruginosa distribution in chinchillas bred as pets or laboratory animals. We also characterized the isolates from these chinchillas by testing for antibiotic susceptibility and by gene analysis. Results P. aeruginosa was isolated from 41.8% of the 67 chinchillas included in the study. Slide agglutination and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis discriminated 5 serotypes and 7 unique patterns, respectively. For the antibiotic susceptibility test, 40.9% of isolates were susceptible to gentamicin, 77.3% to ciprofloxacin, 77.3% to imipenem, and 72.7% to ceftazidime. DNA analyses confirmed that none of the isolates contained the gene encoding extended-spectrum β-lactamases; however, 2 of the total 23 isolates were found to have a gene similar to the pilL gene that has been identified in the pathogenicity island of a clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa. Conclusions P. aeruginosa is widely spread in chinchillas, including strains with reduced susceptibility to the antibiotics and highly virulent strains. The periodic monitoring should be performed to help prevent the propagation of this pathogen and reduce the risk of infection from chinchillas to humans.

  18. Screening and Characterization of Proline Dehydrogenase Flavoenzyme Producing Pseudomonas Entomophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Shahbaz- Mohammadi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Proline dehydrogenase (ProDH; 1.5.99.8 plays an important role in specific determination of plasma proline level in biosensor and diagnostic kits. The goal of this research was to isolate and characterize ProDH enzyme from Iranian soil microorganisms.Materials and Methods: Screening of L-proline degradative enzymes from soil samples was carried out employing enrichment culture techniques. The isolate was characterized by biochemical reactions and specific PCR amplification. The target ProDH was purified and the effects of pH and temperature on the activity and stability were also tested.Results: Among the 250 isolates recovered from 40 soil samples, only one strain characterized as Pseudomonas entomophila displayed the highest enzyme activity toward L-proline (350 U/l than others. The enzyme of interest was identified as a ProDH and had Km value of 32 mM for L-proline. ProDH exhibited its best activity at temperature range of 25 to 35°C and its highest activity was achieved at 30°C. It was almost stable at temperatures between 25-30°C for 2 hours. The optimum pH activity of ProDH reaction was 8.5 and its activity was stable in pH range of 8.0-9.0 upto 24 hours. The enzyme was purified with a yield of 8.5% and a purification factor of 37.7. The molecular mass of the purified ProDH was about 40 kDa, and determined to be a monomeric protein."nConclusion: This is the first report concerning the ProDH production by a P. entomophila bacterium isolated from soil sample.

  19. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed.......Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....

  20. Plant growth promoting potential of pseudomonas sp. SP0113 isolated from potable water from a closed water well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemieniecki Wojciech Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas sp. SP0113 strain from a partially closed aquatic environment was identified as a plant growth promoting bacterium (PGPB. Laboratory tests revealed that PS0113 has multiple plant growth promoting traits, including mineral phosphate solubilizing ability, ammonifying ability that increases nitrogen availability for plants via the root system, and phosphatase activity that plays an important role in organic phosphorus mineralization. Tricalcium phosphate (Ca3(PO42 solubilizing ability was described as average (2-3 mm after 7 days of incubation and as high (>3 mm after 14 days of incubation. The analyzed bacterium was an antagonist of major crop pathogenic fungi. A high degree of pathogen growth inhibition was reported with regard to Rhizoctonia solani (38%, whereas the tested strain's ability to inhibit the growth of fungi of the genera Fusarium and Microdochium nivalis was somewhat lower at 20-29%. The bacterium proliferated in Roundup 360 SL solutions with concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 10 mg•ml-1.

  1. Diversity and Abundance of Ice Nucleating Strains of Pseudomonas syringae in a Freshwater Lake in Virginia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Renée B.; Vinatzer, Boris A.; Schmale, David G.

    2017-01-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is found in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic environments. Some strains of P. syringae express an ice nucleation protein (hereafter referred to as Ice+) allowing them to catalyze the heterogeneous freezing of water. Though P. syringae has been sampled intensively from freshwater sources in France, little is known about the genetic diversity of P. syringae in natural aquatic habitats in North America. We collected samples of freshwater from three different depths in Claytor Lake, Virginia, USA between November 2015 and June 2016. Samples were plated on non-selective medium (TSA) and on medium selective for Pseudomonas (KBC) and closely related species to estimate the total number of culturable bacteria and of Pseudomonas, respectively. A droplet freezing assay was used to screen colonies for the Ice+ phenotype. Ice+ colonies were then molecularly identified based on the cts (citrate synthase) gene and the 16S rDNA gene. Phylogenetic analysis of cts sequences showed a surprising diversity of phylogenetic subgroups of P. syringae. Frequencies of Ice+ isolates on P. syringae selective medium ranged from 0 to 15% per sample with the highest frequency being found in spring. Our work shows that freshwater lakes can be a significant reservoir of Ice+ P. syringae. Future work is needed to determine the contribution of P. syringae from freshwater lakes to the P. syringae populations present in the atmosphere and on plants and, in particular, if freshwater lakes could be an inoculum source of P. syringae-caused plant disease outbreaks.

  2. Comparative genomic and functional analyses: unearthing the diversity and specificity of nematicidal factors in Pseudomonas putida strain 1A00316

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Jing, Xueping; Peng, Wen-Lei; Nie, Qiyu; Zhai, Yile; Shao, Zongze; Zheng, Longyu; Cai, Minmin; Li, Guangyu; Zuo, Huaiyu; Zhang, Zhitao; Wang, Rui-Ru; Huang, Dian; Cheng, Wanli; Yu, Ziniu; Chen, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Jibin

    2016-01-01

    We isolated Pseudomonas putida (P. putida) strain 1A00316 from Antarctica. This bacterium has a high efficiency against Meloidogyne incognita (M. incognita) in vitro and under greenhouse conditions. The complete genome of P. putida 1A00316 was sequenced using PacBio single molecule real-time (SMRT) technology. A comparative genomic analysis of 16 Pseudomonas strains revealed that although P. putida 1A00316 belonged to P. putida, it was phenotypically more similar to nematicidal Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens) strains. We characterized the diversity and specificity of nematicidal factors in P. putida 1A00316 with comparative genomics and functional analysis, and found that P. putida 1A00316 has diverse nematicidal factors including protein alkaline metalloproteinase AprA and two secondary metabolites, hydrogen cyanide and cyclo-(l-isoleucyl-l-proline). We show for the first time that cyclo-(l-isoleucyl-l-proline) exhibit nematicidal activity in P. putida. Interestingly, our study had not detected common nematicidal factors such as 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) and pyrrolnitrin in P. putida 1A00316. The results of the present study reveal the diversity and specificity of nematicidal factors in P. putida strain 1A00316. PMID:27384076

  3. Ice nucleators, bacterial cells and Pseudomonas syringae in precipitation at Jungfraujoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopelli, Emiliano; Conen, Franz; Guilbaud, Caroline; Zopfi, Jakob; Alewell, Christine; Morris, Cindy E.

    2017-03-01

    Ice nucleation is a means by which the deposition of an airborne microorganism can be accelerated under favourable meteorological conditions. Analysis of 56 snow samples collected at the high-altitude observatory Jungfraujoch (3580 m a.s.l.) revealed an order-of-magnitude-larger dynamic range of ice-nucleating particles active at -8 °C (INPs-8) compared to the total number of bacterial cells (of which on average 60 % was alive). This indicates a shorter atmospheric residence time for INPs-8. Furthermore, concentrations of INPs-8 decreased much faster, with an increasing fraction of water precipitated from the air mass prior to sampling, than the number of total bacterial cells. Nevertheless, at high wind speeds (> 50 km h-1) the ratio of INPs-8 to total bacterial cells largely remained in a range between 10-2 and 10-3, independent of prior precipitation, likely because of recent injections of particles in regions upwind. Based on our field observations, we conclude that ice nucleators travel shorter legs of distance with the atmospheric water cycle than the majority of bacterial cells. A prominent ice-nucleating bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae, has been previously supposed to benefit from this behaviour as a means to spread via the atmosphere and to colonise new host plants. Therefore, we targeted this bacterium with a selective cultivation approach. P. syringae was successfully isolated for the first time at such an altitude in 3 of 13 samples analysed. Colony-forming units of this species constituted a minor fraction (10-4) of the numbers of INPs-8 in these samples. Overall, our findings expand the geographic range of habitats where this bacterium has been found and corroborate theories on its robustness in the atmosphere and its propensity to spread to colonise new habitats.

  4. Regulatory tasks of the phosphoenolpyruvate-phosphotransferase system of Pseudomonas putida in central carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarría, Max; Kleijn, Roelco J; Sauer, Uwe; Pflüger-Grau, Katharina; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2012-01-01

    Two branches of the phosphoenolpyruvate-phosphotransferase system (PTS) operate in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440. One branch encompasses a complete set of enzymes for fructose intake (PTS(Fru)), while the other (N-related PTS, or PTS(Ntr)) controls various cellular functions unrelated to the transport of carbohydrates. The potential of these two systems for regulating central carbon catabolism has been investigated by measuring the metabolic fluxes of isogenic strains bearing nonpolar mutations in PTS(Fru) or PTS(Ntr) genes and grown on either fructose (a PTS substrate) or glucose, the transport of which is not governed by the PTS in this bacterium. The flow of carbon from each sugar was distinctly split between the Entner-Doudoroff, pentose phosphate, and Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathways in a ratio that was maintained in each of the PTS mutants examined. However, strains lacking PtsN (EIIA(Ntr)) displayed significantly higher fluxes in the reactions of the pyruvate shunt, which bypasses malate dehydrogenase in the TCA cycle. This was consistent with the increased activity of the malic enzyme and the pyruvate carboxylase found in the corresponding PTS mutants. Genetic evidence suggested that such a metabolic effect of PtsN required the transfer of high-energy phosphate through the system. The EIIA(Ntr) protein of the PTS(Ntr) thus helps adjust central metabolic fluxes to satisfy the anabolic and energetic demands of the overall cell physiology. This study demonstrates that EIIA(Ntr) influences the biochemical reactions that deliver carbon between the upper and lower central metabolic domains for the consumption of sugars by P. putida. These findings indicate that the EIIA(Ntr) protein is a key player for orchestrating the fate of carbon in various physiological destinations in this bacterium. Additionally, these results highlight the importance of the posttranslational regulation of extant enzymatic complexes for increasing the robustness of the

  5. Diversity of small RNAs expressed in Pseudomonas species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez-Lozano, Mara; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Molina-Santiago, Carlos;

    2015-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revealed several hundreds of previously undetected small RNAs (sRNAs) in all bacterial species investigated, including strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas syringae. Nonetheless, only little is known about the extent of conservation of...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3415 - Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents. 866.3415... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3415 Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents. (a) Identification. Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents are devices...

  7. Pseudomonas sp. BUP6, a novel isolate from Malabari goat produces an efficient rhamnolipid type biosurfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priji, Prakasan; Sajith, Sreedharan; Unni, Kizhakkepowathial Nair; Anderson, Robin C; Benjamin, Sailas

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the characteristics of a biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas sp. BUP6, a rumen bacterium, and optimization of parameters required for its production. Initial screening of five parameters (pH, temperature, agitation, incubation, and substrate concentration) was carried out employing Plackett-Burman design, which reduced the number of parameters to 3 (pH, temperature, and incubation) according to their significance on the yield of biosurfactant. A suitable statistical model for the production of biosurfactant by Pseudomonas sp. BUP6 was established according to Box-Behnken design, which resulted in 11% increase (at pH 7, 35 °C, incubation 75 h) in the yield (2070 mg L(-1) ) of biosurfactant. The biosurfactant was found stable at a wide range of pH (3-9) with 48 mg L(-1) critical micelle concentration; and maintained over 90% of its emulsification ability even after boiling and in presence of sodium chloride (0.5%). The highest cell hydrophobicity (37%) and emulsification (69%) indices were determined with groundnut oil and kerosene, respectively. The biosurfactant was found to inhibit the growth and adhesion of E. coli and S. aureus significantly. From the phytotoxicity studies, the biosurfactant did not show any adverse effect on the germinating seeds of rice and green gram. The structural characterization of biosurfactant employing orcinol method, thin layer chromatography and FT-IR indicated that it is a rhamnolipid (glycolipid). Thus, Pseudomonas sp. BUP6, a novel isolate from Malabari goat is demonstrated as a producer of an efficient rhamnolipid type biosurfactant suitable for application in various industries.

  8. Pseudomonas hussainii sp. nov., isolated from droppings of a seashore bird, and emended descriptions of Pseudomonas pohangensis, Pseudomonas benzenivorans and Pseudomonas segetis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Asif; Shahina, Mariyam; Lin, Shih-Yao; Liu, You-Cheng; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2014-07-01

    Two Gram-staining-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacterial strains that are motile by a monopolar flagellum, designated CC-AMH-11(T) and CC-AMHZ-5, were isolated from droppings of a seashore bird off the coast of Hualien, Taiwan. The strains showed 99.7% mutual pairwise 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, while exhibiting Pseudomonas (95.7-95.9% similarity with type species, Pseudomonas aeruginosa LMG 1242T), and formed a distinct co-phyletic lineage in the phylogenetic trees. The common major fatty acids (>5% of the total) were C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c (summed feature 8), C16 : 1ω6c and/or C16 : 1ω7c (summed feature 3), C16 : 0 and C12 : 0. Phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylserine, an unidentified lipid and an unidentified phospholipid were detected as common polar lipids. The DNA G+C contents of strains CC-AMH-11(T) and CC-AMHZ-5 were 61.1 and 61.6 mol%, respectively. The common major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 9 (Q-9), and the predominant polyamine was putrescine. The DNA-DNA hybridization obtained between the two strains was 79.0% (reciprocal value 89.4% using CC-AMHZ-5 DNA as the probe). The very high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and DNA-DNA relatedness and the poorly distinguishable phenotypic features witnessed between CC-AMH-11(T) and CC-AMHZ-5 suggested unambiguously that they are two distinct strains of a single genomic species. However, the strains also showed several genotypic and phenotypic characteristics that distinguished them from other closely related species of Pseudomonas. Thus, the strains are proposed to represent a novel species of Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas hussainii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-AMH-11(T) ( = JCM 19513(T) = BCRC 80696(T)); a second strain of the same species is CC-AMHZ-5 ( = JCM 19512 = BCRC 80697). In addition, emended descriptions of the species Pseudomonas pohangensis, Pseudomonas benzenivorans and

  9. No apparent costs for facultative antibiotic production by the soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbeva, P.V.; Tyc, O.; Remus-Emsermann, M.N.P.; Van der Wal, A.; Vos, M.; Silby, M.W.; De Boer, W.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Many soil-inhabiting bacteria are known to produce secondary metabolites that can suppress microorganisms competing for the same resources. The production of antimicrobial compounds is expected to incur fitness costs for the producing bacteria. Such costs form the basis for models on the

  10. No apparent costs for facultative antibiotic production by the soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbeva, P.V.; Tyc, O.; Remus-Emsermann, M.N.P.; Van der Wal, A.; Vos, M.; Silby, M.W.; De Boer, W.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Many soil-inhabiting bacteria are known to produce secondary metabolites that can suppress microorganisms competing for the same resources. The production of antimicrobial compounds is expected to incur fitness costs for the producing bacteria. Such costs form the basis for models on the

  11. Genome Analysis of Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1751: A Rhizobacterium that Controls Root Diseases and Alleviates Salt Stress for Its Plant Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Shu-Ting; Chang, Hsing-Hua; Egamberdieva, Dilfuza; Kamilova, Faina; Lugtenberg, Ben; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1751 is a rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium isolated from the rhizosphere of a greenhouse-grown tomato plant in Uzbekistan. It controls several plant root diseases caused by Fusarium fungi through the mechanism of competition for nutrients and niches (CNN). This mechanism does not rely on the production of antibiotics, so it avoids the concerns of resistance development and is environmentally safe. Additionally, this bacterium promotes plant growth by alleviating salt stress for its plant host. To investigate the genetic mechanisms that may explain these observations, we determined the complete genome sequence of this bacterium, examined its gene content, and performed comparative genomics analysis with other Pseudomonas strains. The genome of P. fluorescens PCL1751 consisted of one circular chromosome that is 6,143,950 base-pairs (bp) in size; no plasmid was found. The annotation included 19 rRNA, 70 tRNA, and 5,534 protein-coding genes. The gene content analysis identified a large number of genes involved in chemotaxis and motility, colonization of the rhizosphere, siderophore biosynthesis, and osmoprotectant production. In contrast, the pathways involved in the biosynthesis of phytohormones or antibiotics were not found. Comparison with other Pseudomonas genomes revealed extensive variations in their genome size and gene content. The presence and absence of secretion system genes were highly variable. As expected, the synteny conservation among strains decreased as a function of phylogenetic divergence. The integration of prophages appeared to be an important driver for genome rearrangements. The whole-genome gene content analysis of this plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) provided some genetic explanations to its phenotypic characteristics. The extensive and versatile substrate utilization pathways, together with the presence of many genes involved in competitive root colonization, provided further support for the finding

  12. Genome Analysis of Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1751: A Rhizobacterium that Controls Root Diseases and Alleviates Salt Stress for Its Plant Host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ting Cho

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1751 is a rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium isolated from the rhizosphere of a greenhouse-grown tomato plant in Uzbekistan. It controls several plant root diseases caused by Fusarium fungi through the mechanism of competition for nutrients and niches (CNN. This mechanism does not rely on the production of antibiotics, so it avoids the concerns of resistance development and is environmentally safe. Additionally, this bacterium promotes plant growth by alleviating salt stress for its plant host. To investigate the genetic mechanisms that may explain these observations, we determined the complete genome sequence of this bacterium, examined its gene content, and performed comparative genomics analysis with other Pseudomonas strains. The genome of P. fluorescens PCL1751 consisted of one circular chromosome that is 6,143,950 base-pairs (bp in size; no plasmid was found. The annotation included 19 rRNA, 70 tRNA, and 5,534 protein-coding genes. The gene content analysis identified a large number of genes involved in chemotaxis and motility, colonization of the rhizosphere, siderophore biosynthesis, and osmoprotectant production. In contrast, the pathways involved in the biosynthesis of phytohormones or antibiotics were not found. Comparison with other Pseudomonas genomes revealed extensive variations in their genome size and gene content. The presence and absence of secretion system genes were highly variable. As expected, the synteny conservation among strains decreased as a function of phylogenetic divergence. The integration of prophages appeared to be an important driver for genome rearrangements. The whole-genome gene content analysis of this plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR provided some genetic explanations to its phenotypic characteristics. The extensive and versatile substrate utilization pathways, together with the presence of many genes involved in competitive root colonization, provided further support

  13. Bacterial Feeders, the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the Flagellate Cercomonas longicauda, have different Effects on Outcome of Competition among the Pseudomonas Biocontrol Strains CHA0 and DSS73

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Annette; Nybroe, Ole; Winding, Anne;

    2009-01-01

    selective feeding flagellate Cercomonas longicauda versus the non-selective feeding nematode Caenorhabditis elegans) influence the abundance of two bacteria that compete for resources in simple model communities. Microcosms consisted of either one gfp-tagged bacterial strain (Pseudomonas fluorescens DSM......50090 or one of two biocontrol strains P. fluorescens CHA0 or Pseudomonas sp. DSS73) or combinations of two bacterial strains. DSM50090 is a suitable food bacterium, DSS73 is of intermediate food quality, and CHA0 is inedible to the bacterial feeders. Bacterial and protozoan cell numbers were measured......How bacterial feeding fauna affects colonization and survival of bacteria in soil is not well understood, which constrains the applicability of bacterial inoculants in agriculture. This study aimed to unravel how food quality of bacteria and bacterial feeders with different feeding habits (the...

  14. Complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PICF7, an indigenous root endophyte from olive (Olea europaea L.) and effective biocontrol agent against Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Pedro Manuel; Ruano-Rosa, David; Schilirò, Elisabetta; Prieto, Pilar; Ramos, Cayo; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PICF7 is a native endophyte of olive roots. Previous studies have shown this motile, Gram-negative, non-sporulating bacterium is an effective biocontrol agent against the soil-borne fungus Verticillium dahliae, the causal agent of one of the most devastating diseases for olive (Olea europaea L.) cultivation. Here, we announce and describe the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PICF7 consisting of a circular chromosome of 6,136,735 bp that encodes 5,567 protein-coding genes and 88 RNA-only encoding genes. Genome analysis revealed genes predicting factors such as secretion systems, siderophores, detoxifying compounds or volatile components. Further analysis of the genome sequence of PICF7 will help in gaining insights into biocontrol and endophytism.

  15. Transfer of Pseudomonas flectens Johnson 1956 to Phaseolibacter gen. nov., in the family Enterobacteriaceae, as Phaseolibacter flectens gen. nov., comb. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Malka; Fridman, Svetlana; Aizenberg-Gershtein, Yana; Izhaki, Ido

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas flectens Johnson 1956, a plant-pathogenic bacterium on the pods of the French bean, is no longer considered to be a member of the genus Pseudomonas sensu stricto. A polyphasic approach that included examination of phenotypic properties and phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA, rpoB and atpD gene sequences supported the transfer of Pseudomonas flectens Johnson 1956 to a new genus in the family Enterobacteriaceae as Phaseolibacter flectens gen. nov., comb. nov. Two strains of Phaseolibacter flectens were studied (ATCC 12775(T) and LMG 2186); the strains shared 99.8 % sequence similarity in their 16S rRNA genes and the housekeeping gene sequences were identical. Strains of Phaseolibacter flectens shared 96.6 % or less 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with members of different genera in the family Enterobacteriaceae and only 84.7 % sequence similarity with Pseudomonas aeruginosa LMG 1242(T), demonstrating that they are not related to the genus Pseudomonas. As Phaseolibacter flectens formed an independent phyletic lineage in all of the phylogenetic analyses, it could not be affiliated to any of the recognized genera within the family Enterobacteriaceae and therefore was assigned to a new genus. Cells were Gram-negative, straight rods, motile by means of one or two polar flagella, fermentative, facultative anaerobes, oxidase-negative and catalase-positive. Growth occurred in the presence of 0-60 % sucrose. The DNA G+C content of the type strain was 44.3 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic properties and phylogenetic distinctiveness, Pseudomonas flectens Johnson 1956 is transferred to the novel genus Phaseolibacter gen. nov. as Phaseolibacter flectens gen. nov., comb. nov. The type strain of Phaseolibacter flectens is ATCC 12775(T) = CFBP 3281(T) = ICMP 745(T) = LMG 2187(T) = NCPPB 539(T).

  16. Induced systemic resistance by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Loon, L.C. van

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. have been studied for decades for their plant growth-promoting effects through effective suppression of soilborne plant diseases. The modes of action that play a role in disease suppression by these bacteria include siderophore-mediated competition for iron, antibiosis,

  17. strains of pseudomonas aeruginosa and bacillus cereus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    sense mutation with beneficial effects of increased petroleum degradation. The amino acids requirement for growth could thus be used as a genetic marker for organisms that are subjected to ... Fluorescence under UV light: The inoculated plates .... acid treated Pseudomonas aeruginosa; + = growth; - = all other amino.

  18. Targeting quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    alternative antibacterial strategies. Here, we review state of the art research of quorum sensing inhibitors against the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is found in a number of biofilm-associated infections and identified as the predominant organism infecting the lungs of cystic...

  19. Biodegradation of chlorpyrifos by bacterial genus Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Razia Alam; Rafique, Mazhar; Rehman, Abdul; Munis, Muhammad Farooq Hussain; Rehman, Shafiq Ur; Chaudhary, Hassan Javed

    2016-02-01

    Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphorus pesticide commonly used in agriculture. It is noxious to a variety of organisms that include living soil biota along with beneficial arthropods, fish, birds, humans, animals, and plants. Exposure to chlorpyrifos may cause detrimental effects as delayed seedling emergence, fruit deformities, and abnormal cell division. Contamination of chlorpyrifos has been found about 24 km from the site of its application. There are many physico-chemical and biological approaches to remove organophosphorus pesticides from the ecosystem, among them most promising is biodegradation. The 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) and diethylthiophosphate (DETP) as primary products are made when chlorpyrifos is degraded by soil microorganisms which further break into nontoxic metabolites as CO(2), H(2)O, and NH(3). Pseudomonas is a diversified genus possessing a series of catabolic pathways and enzymes involved in pesticide degradation. Pseudomonas putida MAS-1 is reported to be more efficient in chlorpyrifos degradation by a rate of 90% in 24 h among Pseudomonas genus. The current review analyzed the comparative potential of bacterial species in Pseudomonas genus for degradation of chlorpyrifos thus, expressing an ecofriendly approach for the treatment of environmental contaminants like pesticides.

  20. New Pseudomonas spp. Are Pathogenic to Citrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Beiki

    Full Text Available Five putative novel Pseudomonas species shown to be pathogenic to citrus have been characterized in a screening of 126 Pseudomonas strains isolated from diseased citrus leaves and stems in northern Iran. The 126 strains were studied using a polyphasic approach that included phenotypic characterizations and phylogenetic multilocus sequence analysis. The pathogenicity of these strains against 3 cultivars of citrus is demonstrated in greenhouse and field studies. The strains were initially grouped phenotypically and by their partial rpoD gene sequences into 11 coherent groups in the Pseudomonas fluorescens phylogenetic lineage. Fifty-three strains that are representatives of the 11 groups were selected and analyzed by partial sequencing of their 16S rRNA and gyrB genes. The individual and concatenated partial sequences of the three genes were used to construct the corresponding phylogenetic trees. The majority of the strains were identified at the species level: P. lurida (5 strains, P. monteilii (2 strains, P. moraviensis (1 strain, P. orientalis (16 strains, P. simiae (7 strains, P. syringae (46 strains, distributed phylogenetically in at least 5 pathovars, and P. viridiflava (2 strains. This is the first report of pathogenicity on citrus of P. orientalis, P. simiae, P. lurida, P. moraviensis and P. monteilii strains. The remaining 47 strains that could not be identified at the species level are considered representatives of at least 5 putative novel Pseudomonas species that are not yet described.

  1. Isolation and characterization of arsenite oxidizing Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-08

    Mar 8, 2010 ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 9(10), pp. 1493-1498, 8 .... Industrial wastewater samples were collected in screw capped sterilized bottles from .... similarity), Pseudomonas alcaliphila strain Q1-3 EU. 144361.1 (gi/ ...

  2. Extracytoplasmic function sigma factors in Pseudomonas syringae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Kristoffer; Oguiza, J.A.; Ussery, D.W.

    2005-01-01

    Genome analyses of the plant pathogens Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, pv. syringae B728a and pv. phaseolicola 1448A reveal fewer extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors than in related Pseudomonads with different lifestyles. We highlight the presence of a P. syringae-specific ECF...

  3. Pseudomonas sepsis with Noma: an association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, S; Tullu, M S; Lahiri, K R; Deshmukh, C T

    2005-08-01

    We report here a 2.5-year-old male child with community-acquired Pseudomonal sepsis showing the characteristic lesions of ecthyma gangrenosum. The child had development of gangrenous changes of the nose and face - the 'cancrum oris' or 'Noma'. We highlight the possible association of Pseudomonas sepsis and Noma, with malnutrition playing a central role in causing both the diseases.

  4. New Pseudomonas spp. Are Pathogenic to Citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiki, Farid; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Rahimian, Heshmat; Lalucat, Jorge; García-Valdés, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Five putative novel Pseudomonas species shown to be pathogenic to citrus have been characterized in a screening of 126 Pseudomonas strains isolated from diseased citrus leaves and stems in northern Iran. The 126 strains were studied using a polyphasic approach that included phenotypic characterizations and phylogenetic multilocus sequence analysis. The pathogenicity of these strains against 3 cultivars of citrus is demonstrated in greenhouse and field studies. The strains were initially grouped phenotypically and by their partial rpoD gene sequences into 11 coherent groups in the Pseudomonas fluorescens phylogenetic lineage. Fifty-three strains that are representatives of the 11 groups were selected and analyzed by partial sequencing of their 16S rRNA and gyrB genes. The individual and concatenated partial sequences of the three genes were used to construct the corresponding phylogenetic trees. The majority of the strains were identified at the species level: P. lurida (5 strains), P. monteilii (2 strains), P. moraviensis (1 strain), P. orientalis (16 strains), P. simiae (7 strains), P. syringae (46 strains, distributed phylogenetically in at least 5 pathovars), and P. viridiflava (2 strains). This is the first report of pathogenicity on citrus of P. orientalis, P. simiae, P. lurida, P. moraviensis and P. monteilii strains. The remaining 47 strains that could not be identified at the species level are considered representatives of at least 5 putative novel Pseudomonas species that are not yet described.

  5. High pressure inactivation of Pseudomonas in black truffle - comparison with Pseudomonas fluorescens in tryptone soya broth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestra, Patricia; Verret, Catherine; Cruz, Christian; Largeteau, Alain; Demazeau, Gerard; El Moueffak, Abdelhamid

    2010-03-01

    Pseudomonas is one of the most common genera in black Perigord truffle. Its inactivation by high pressure (100-500 MPa/10 min) applied on truffles at sub-zero or low temperatures was studied and compared with those of Pseudomonas fluorescens in tryptone soya broth. Pressurization of truffles at 300 MPa/4 °C reduced the bacterial count of Pseudomonas by 5.3 log cycles. Higher pressures of 400 or 500 MPa, at 4 °C or 20 °C, allowed us to slightly increase the level of destruction to the value of ca. 6.5 log cycles but did not permit us to completely inactivate Pseudomonas. The results showed a residual charge of about 10 CFU/g. Pressure-shift freezing of truffles, which consists in applying a pressure of 200 MPa/-18 °C for 10 min and then quickly releasing this pressure to induce freezing, reduced the population of Pseudomonas by 3.3 log cycles. The level of inactivation was higher than those obtained with conventional freezing. Endogenous Pseudomonas in truffle was shown to be more resistant to high pressure treatments than P. fluorescens used for inoculation of broths.

  6. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2013-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  7. Natriuretic peptides modify Pseudomonas fluorescens cytotoxicity by regulating cyclic nucleotides and modifying LPS structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feuilloley Marc GJ

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nervous tissues express various communication molecules including natriuretic peptides, i.e. Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP and C-type Natriuretic Peptide (CNP. These molecules share structural similarities with cyclic antibacterial peptides. CNP and to a lesser extent BNP can modify the cytotoxicity of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The psychrotrophic environmental species Pseudomonas fluorescens also binds to and kills neurons and glial cells, cell types that both produce natriuretic peptides. In the present study, we investigated the sensitivity of Pseudomonas fluorescens to natriuretic peptides and evaluated the distribution and variability of putative natriuretic peptide-dependent sensor systems in the Pseudomonas genus. Results Neither BNP nor CNP modified P. fluorescens MF37 growth or cultivability. However, pre-treatment of P. fluorescens MF37 with BNP or CNP provoked a decrease of the apoptotic effect of the bacterium on glial cells and an increase of its necrotic activity. By homology with eukaryotes, where natriuretic peptides act through receptors coupled to cyclases, we observed that cell-permeable stable analogues of cyclic AMP (dbcAMP and cyclic GMP (8BcGMP mimicked the effect of BNP and CNP on bacteria. Intra-bacterial concentrations of cAMP and cGMP were measured to study the involvement of bacterial cyclases in the regulation of P. fluorescens cytotoxicity by BNP or CNP. BNP provoked an increase (+49% of the cAMP concentration in P. fluorescens, and CNP increased the intra-bacterial concentrations of cGMP (+136%. The effect of BNP and CNP on the virulence of P. fluorescens was independent of the potential of the bacteria to bind to glial cells. Conversely, LPS extracted from MF37 pre-treated with dbcAMP showed a higher necrotic activity than the LPS from untreated or 8BcGMP-pre-treated bacteria. Capillary electrophoresis analysis suggests that these different effects of the LPS may be due

  8. Frequency of blaKHM-1, blaIMP-1,2 and blaSPM-1 genes in clinical isolates of metallo β-lactamase producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in hospitalized burned patients in Ghotbeddin Shirazi Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. RostamPour

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metallo-β-lactamase (MBL producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important gram negative opportunistic bacterium in hospitals which its increasing number is of clinicians’ concerns. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of blaIMP-1, blaIMP-2, blaSPM-1 and blaKHM-1 genes in clinical isolates of MBL producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in hospitalized burned patients in Ghotbeddin Shirazi Center. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 210 burn wound samples from 2012 to 2013. Sensitivity of confirmed Pseudomonas aeruginosa was examined for standard antimicrobial agents using disk diffusion method. Detection of MBL producing isolates was performed by the double disk synergy test (DDST and the desired genes were detected by PCR. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test. Findings: By the phenotypic methods, 42 isolates (20% were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa that were resistant to the most studied antibiotics including Carbapenem (100% and were only sensitive to Colicitin (100%. 26 isolates (61.9% were identified as MBL producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa. 9 isolates (34.61% carried the blaIMP-2 and blaKHM-1 genes. The blaIMP-1 and blaSPM-1 genes were not found in any of the isolates. Conclusion: With regards to the results, it is suggested to periodically study the reasons for antibiotic resistance in each center.

  9. The physiology of the filamentous bacterium Microthrix parvicella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slijkhuis, H.

    1983-01-01

    A study has been made of the physiology of Microthrix parvicella. This filamentous bacterium often causes poor settleability of activated sludge in oxidation ditches supplied with domestic sewage. The organism was found to utilize only long chain fatty acids (preferably in esterified form) as carbon

  10. Genome of a mosquito-killing bacterium decoded

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Researchers with the CAS Wuhan Institute of Virology (WHIOV) recently completed the genome sequencing of a mosquitocidal bacterium Bacillus shaericus C3-41. The feat, first of its kind in China, is expected to further promote the bio-control studies of mosquitoes.

  11. Antagonistic bioactivity of an endophytic bacterium H-6

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-13

    Sep 13, 2010 ... 2Yichun University, Yichun, Jiangxi 336000, People's Republic of China. Accepted 5 ... Mountain, China. ... endophytic bacteria is a way of controlling plant diseases ... the endophytic bacterium strain H-6 was identified through ... liquid medium at 28°C for 3 - 5 days with constant shaking. ..... interactions.

  12. The physiology of the filamentous bacterium Microthrix parvicella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slijkhuis, H.

    1983-01-01

    A study has been made of the physiology of Microthrix parvicella. This filamentous bacterium often causes poor settleability of activated sludge in oxidation ditches supplied with domestic sewage. The organism was found to utilize only long chain fatty acids (preferably in

  13. Aspergillus triggers phenazine production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib

    Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen, commonly infecting cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Aspergilli, especially Aspergillus fumigatus, are also frequently isolated from CF patients. Our aim was to examine the possible interaction between P. aeruginosa and different...... Aspergillus species. Methods: A suspension of fungal spores was streaked onto WATM agar plates. After 24 hours incubation at 37 °C, a P. aeruginosa overnight culture was streaked out perpendicular to the fungal streak. The plates were incubated at 37 °C for five days, examined and plugs were extracted...... in the contact area of A. niger, A. flavus, A. oryzae, but not A. fumigatus. In addition, other metabolites with UV chromophores similar to the phenazines were only found in the contact zone between Aspergillus and Pseudomonas. No change in secondary metabolite profiles were seen for the Aspergilli, when...

  14. Biodegradation of resorcinol by Pseudomonas sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Hajizadeh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the ability of Pseudomonas sp. isolated from East Azarbaijan, Iran in bioremediation of resorcinol. Methods: Resorcinol biodegradation was evaluated using spectrophotometry and confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Results: This isolate was able to remove up to 37.12% of resorcinol from contaminated water. Reusability experiments had confirmed the biodegradation process which produced seven intermediate compounds. These intermediates were characterized by gas chromatographymass spectroscopy technique. The products of resorcinol biodegradation were apparently 1, 4-cyclohexadiene, nonadecene, 2-heptadecanone, 1-isopropyl-2-methoxy-4-methylbenzene, hexadecanoic acid, 9-octadecenoic acid, phenol and 5-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl. Conclusions: The findings revealed that Pseudomonas sp. is able to degrade resorcinol. Because of being an indigenous organism, this isolate is more compatible with the climate of the northwest region of Iran and possibly will be used for degradation of other similar aromatic compounds.

  15. Biodegradation of resorcinol byPseudomonas sp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nader Hajizadeh; Najibeh Shirzad; Ali Farzi; Mojtaba Salouti; Azra Momeni

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective:To investigate the ability ofPseudomonas sp. isolated from East Azarbaijan, Iran in bioremediation of resorcinol. Methods: Resorcinol biodegradation was evaluated using spectrophotometry and confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Results:This isolate was able to remove up to 37.12% of resorcinol from contaminated water. Reusability experiments had confirmed the biodegradation process which produced seven intermediate compounds. These intermediates were characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy technique. The products of resorcinol biodegradation were apparently 1, 4-cyclohexadiene, nonadecene, 2-heptadecanone, 1-isopropyl-2-methoxy-4-methylbenzene, hexadecanoic acid, 9-octadecenoic acid, phenol and 5-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl). Conclusions: The findings revealed thatPseudomonas sp. is able to degrade resorcinol. Because of being an indigenous organism, this isolate is more compatible with the climate of the northwest region of Iran and possibly will be used for degradation of other similar aromatic compounds.

  16. Antibiofilm activity of an exopolysaccharide from marine bacterium Vibrio sp. QY101.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Jiang

    Full Text Available Bacterial exopolysaccharides have always been suggested to play crucial roles in the bacterial initial adhesion and the development of complex architecture in the later stages of bacterial biofilm formation. However, Escherichia coli group II capsular polysaccharide was characterized to exert broad-spectrum biofilm inhibition activity. In this study, we firstly reported that a bacterial exopolysaccharide (A101 not only inhibits biofilm formation of many bacteria but also disrupts established biofilm of some strains. A101 with an average molecular weight of up to 546 KDa, was isolated and purified from the culture supernatant of the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. QY101 by ethanol precipitation, iron-exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. High performance liquid chromatography traces of the hydrolyzed polysaccharides showed that A101 is primarily consisted of galacturonic acid, glucuronic acid, rhamnose and glucosamine. A101 was demonstrated to inhibit biofilm formation by a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria without antibacterial activity. Furthermore, A101 displayed a significant disruption on the established biofilm produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but not by Staphylococcus aureus. Importantly, A101 increased the aminoglycosides antibiotics' capability of killing P. aeruginosa biofilm. Cell primary attachment to surfaces and intercellular aggregates assays suggested that A101 inhibited cell aggregates of both P. aeruginosa and S. aureus, while the cell-surface interactions inhibition only occurred in S. aureus, and the pre-formed cell aggregates dispersion induced by A101 only occurred in P. aeruginosa. Taken together, these data identify the antibiofilm activity of A101, which may make it potential in the design of new therapeutic strategies for bacterial biofilm-associated infections and limiting biofilm formation on medical indwelling devices. The found of A101 antibiofilm activity may also promote a

  17. Ethylene Glycol Metabolism by Pseudomonas putida

    OpenAIRE

    Mückschel, Björn; Simon, Oliver; Klebensberger, Janosch; Graf, Nadja; Rosche, Bettina; Altenbuchner, Josef; Pfannstiel, Jens; Huber, Armin; Hauer, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the metabolism of ethylene glycol in the Pseudomonas putida strains KT2440 and JM37 by employing growth and bioconversion experiments, directed mutagenesis, and proteome analysis. We found that strain JM37 grew rapidly with ethylene glycol as a sole source of carbon and energy, while strain KT2440 did not grow within 2 days of incubation under the same conditions. However, bioconversion experiments revealed metabolism of ethylene glycol by both strains, with the...

  18. [Clinical features of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlangue, J; Brissaud, O; Labrèze, C

    2006-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous environmental organism usually considered as opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised subjects. However it can produce disease in healthy children, mainly on moist body sites. Familial, community and nosocomial outbreaks of cutaneous infections have been reported. Ecthyma gangrenosum is possible without bacteremia. P. aeruginosa is also the most common cause of otitis externa in swimmers and osteomyelitis after puncture wound of the foot.

  19. Using Pseudomonas spp. for Integrated Biological Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, Virginia O; Stack, James P

    2007-02-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas spp. have been studied for decades as model organisms for biological control of plant disease. Currently, there are three commercial formulations of pseudomonads registered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for plant disease suppression, Bio-Save 10 LP, Bio-Save 11 LP, and BlightBan A506. Bio-Save 10 LP and Bio-Save 11 LP, products of Jet Harvest Solutions, Longwood, FL, contain Pseudomonas syringae strains ESC-10 and ESC-11, respectively. These products are applied in packinghouses to prevent postharvest fungal diseases during storage of citrus, pome, stone fruits, and potatoes. BlightBan A506, produced by NuFarm Americas, Burr Ridge, IL, contains P. fluorescens strain A506. BlightBan A506 is applied primarily to pear and apple trees during bloom to suppress the bacterial disease fire blight. Combining BlightBan A506 with the antibiotic streptomycin improves control of fire blight, even in areas with streptomycin-resistant populations of the pathogen. BlightBan A506 also may reduce fruit russet and mild frost injury. These biocontrol products consisting of Pseudomonas spp. provide moderate to excellent efficacy against multiple production constraints, are relatively easy to apply, and they can be integrated with conventional products for disease control. These characteristics will contribute to the adoption of these products by growers and packinghouses.

  20. Nitrogen Removal Characteristics of Pseudomonas putida Y-9 Capable of Heterotrophic Nitrification and Aerobic Denitrification at Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cold-adapted bacterium Pseudomonas putida Y-9 was investigated and exhibited excellent capability for nitrogen removal at 15°C. The strain capable of heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification could efficiently remove ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite at an average removal rate of 2.85 mg, 1.60 mg, and 1.83 mg NL−1 h−1, respectively. Strain Y-9 performed nitrification in preference to denitrification when ammonium and nitrate or ammonium and nitrite coexisted in the solution. Meantime, the presence of nitrate had no effect on the ammonium removal rate of strain Y-9, and yet the presence of high concentration of nitrite would inhibit the cell growth and decrease the nitrification rate. The experimental results indicate that P. putida Y-9 has potential application for the treatment of wastewater containing high concentrations of ammonium along with its oxidation products at low temperature.

  1. Biofilms and Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) Signaling: Lessons from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Other Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Martina; Filloux, Alain

    2016-06-10

    The cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) second messenger represents a signaling system that regulates many bacterial behaviors and is of key importance for driving the lifestyle switch between motile loner cells and biofilm formers. This review provides an up-to-date compendium of c-di-GMP pathways connected to biofilm formation, biofilm-associated motilities, and other functionalities in the ubiquitous and opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa This bacterium is frequently adopted as a model organism to study bacterial biofilm formation. Importantly, its versatility and adaptation capabilities are linked with a broad range of complex regulatory networks, including a large set of genes involved in c-di-GMP biosynthesis, degradation, and transmission.

  2. Control of the root-rot and root-knot disease complex by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: impact of bacterial rhizosphere colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Siddiqui

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The potential of 3 Pseudomonas aeriuginosa strains as biocontrol agents of rootinfecting fungi Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani and Rhizoctonia solani and the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica was tested on chili and uridbean under greenhouse conditions. All the three strains significantly reduced nematode populations in soil, invasion, multiplication and gall formation due to M.javanica. Root infection by fungi was also effectively suppressed following P.aeruginosa application. Bacterial antagonists exhibited better biocontrol and growth promoting activity in 15-day-old plants than did those harvested at 30 or 45 days. Population of the bacterium in the rhizosphere declined rapidly after 15 days of nematode inoculation. Strain Pa-5 showed maximum nodulation in 15-day-old samplings while strain Pa-7 showed highest number of nodules in 30 and 45-day-old uridbean plants.

  3. Novel Path Towards Colistin Resistance In Pseudomonas Aeruginosa During Chronic Infection Involves Polymorphisms In Uncharacterized Glycosyltransferase Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Grith Miriam Maigaard; Jelsbak, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Antibiotic resistance development in the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an increasing problem. The effect of colistin, one of the few last resort drugs commonly given to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, is dependent on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure. We have....... The results indicate that this glycosyltransferase polymorphism is needed for the clinical strain to be fully virulent. However, introducing the SNP into PAO1 did not result in altered phenotypes. These results reveal this uncharacterized glycosyltransferase as a novel in vivo path to colistin resistance...... by LPS modification. Conclusions: Colistin resistance development in vivo occurs via multiple paths. Here a novel pathway for the development of colistin resistance was described. It involves mutations in a hitherto uncharacterized glycosyltransferase....

  4. Semi-continuous production of 2-keto-gluconic acid by Pseudomonas fluorescens AR4 from rice starch hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen-Jing; Zhou, Yan-Zheng; Zhou, Qiang; Cui, Feng-Jie; Yu, Shi-Lian; Sun, Lei

    2012-04-01

    2-Keto-gluconic acid (2KGA) was produced in a semi-continuous process using Pseudomonas fluorescens AR4 and rice starch hydrolysate (RSH). The bacterium was cultured in medium with an initial glucose concentration of 170g/L supplied as RSH. Once the glucose level had dropped to 20g/L, 60% of the culture volume was replaced with fresh medium containing 190g/L of glucose in the form of RSH. After an additional two cycles of growth and media replacement, a total of 476.88g/L of glucose was consumed and 444.96g/L of 2KGA was produced. A total productivity of 6.74g/L and a yield of 0.93g/g were obtained. These findings suggest that P. fluorescens AR4 is suitable for the production of commercially acceptable levels of 2KGA in semi-continuous culture.

  5. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of a Novel Cold-Adapted Lipase Gene from Strain Iip35 (Pseudomonas sp.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cai-hong; GUO Run-fang; YU Hong-wei; JIA Ying-min

    2008-01-01

    A combination method of the usual-PCR and reverse-PCR for the cloning of a novel lipase gene directly from the total genomic DNA of strain lip35 (Pseudomonas sp.) is described, whereby a lipase gene (lip) was cloned directly from genomic DNA. The sequence data have been deposited in the GenBank and EMBL data bank with the accession number EU414288. The nucleotide sequence showed a major open reading frame encoding a 59-kDa protein of 566 amino acid residues, which contained a lipase consensus sequence GXSXG. The lipase lip had 74 and 70% homologies with the Upases of an uncultured bacterium and P.fluorescens PfO-1, respectively, but it did not show any overall homology with lipases from other origins. The functional lipase was obtained when the lip gene was expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115.

  6. Overexpression of rice OsLOL2 gene confers disease resistance in tobacco to Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tabaci

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khizar Hayat Bhatti; Chunxiao Xu; Jiahe Wu; Chaozu He

    2008-01-01

    LSD1-related proteins of Arabidopsis with LSD1-like zinc finger domains regulate disease resistance and programmed cell death(PCD). We cloned a rice OsLOL2 gene, orthologous to LSDI of Arabidopsis and expressed it in a tobacco plant. Transgenic tobacco lines displayed enhanced disease resistance to a virulent bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pst). RT-PCR analysis showed that overexpression of OsLOL2 in transgenic tobacco lines resulted in upregulation of two pathogenesis-related (PR) protein genes, PR2 and PR5. Our results suggest that overexpression of OsLOL2 in transgenic tobacco enhances the resistance through the induction of PR pro-teins and hypersensitive response-like reaction.

  7. Ciprofloxacin plus erythromycin or ambroxol ameliorates endotracheal tube-associated Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chen; Du, Lizhong; Yu, Jialin; Lu, Qi; He, Yu; Ran, Tao

    2015-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a multi-drug resistant bacterium, with its biofilm-growing mucoid (alginate-producing) strains being particularly resistant. As atomized drug administration is a common practice in pediatric patients, we compared the effect of inhalational therapy with erythromycin plus ciprofloxacin, with that of ambroxol plus ciprofloxacin, against biofilm producing strains of P. aeruginosa. Both combined treatment regimens were associated with a significant reduction in bacterial counts in endotracheal (ET) tubes and lungs, as compared to that observed with ambroxol and erythromycin monotherapies (PCiprofloxacin plus ambroxol appeared to have a higher efficacy than ciprofloxacin plus erythromycin, both in lowering bacterial counts (Pciprofloxacin could eliminate P. aeruginosa biofilms. When combined with ciprofloxacin, ambroxol outperformed erythromycin in eradicating P. aeruginosa biofilm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. An altered Pseudomonas diversity is recovered from soil by using nutrient-poor Pseudomonas-selective soil extract media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagot, N.; Nybroe, O.; Nielsen, P.

    2001-01-01

    . Several of these analyses showed that the amount of Casamino Acids significantly influenced the diversity of the recovered Pseudomonas isolates. Furthermore, the data suggested that specific Pseudomonas subpopulations were represented on the nutrient-poor media. The NAA 1:100 medium, containing ca. 15 mg......We designed five Pseudomonas-selective soil extract NAA media containing the selective properties of trimethoprim and sodium lauroyl sarcosine and 0 to 100% of the amount of Casamino Acids used in the classical Pseudomonas-selective Gould's S1 medium. All of the isolates were confirmed...

  9. Isolation,Identification of a Cellulose-degrading Bacterium and Analysis the Properties of Its Enzyme%一株降解纤维素细菌的分离、鉴定及酶学性质分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冠杰; 刘莹莹; 甄静; 王继雯; 慕琦

    2015-01-01

    为了得到能高效降解纤维素的细菌,以纤维素粉为唯一碳源,从土壤中分离出一株能降解纤维素的细菌,通过分子生物学研究,鉴定其为假单胞菌属(Pseudomonas sp.);并研究了温度和pH对其酶活的影响.结果表明,在pH 7.0、40℃时,其酶活最高,CMC酶活最高达31.36 U/mL,为进一步扩大纤维素降解菌种的筛选和应用范围奠定了基础.%In order to get cellulose degrading bacteria,the selective culture method was utilized. As a result,a cellulose-degradation bacterium was separated from soil using the medium with cellulose powder as the sole carbon source. The bacterium was identified as Pseudomonas sp. by the method of molecular biology. The enzyme activity on CMC was higher than that on filter paper. The optimal conditions for the enzymatic reaction were 40℃and pH 7.0. This research makes a foundation of expanding the selection and application scope of cellulose-degradation strains for further screening.

  10. Degradation of phenanthrene and pyrene using genetically engineered dioxygenase producing Pseudomonas putida in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardani Gashtasb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation use to promote degradation and/or removal of contaminants into nonhazardous or less-hazardous substances from the environment using microbial metabolic ability. Pseudomonas spp. is one of saprotrophic soil bacterium and can be used for biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs but this activity in most species is weak. Phenanthrene and pyrene could associate with a risk of human cancer development in exposed individuals. The aim of the present study was application of genetically engineered P. putida that produce dioxygenase for degradation of phenanthrene and pyrene in spiked soil using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method. The nahH gene that encoded catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C23O was cloned into pUC18 and pUC18-nahH recombinant vector was generated and transformed into wild P. putida, successfully. The genetically modified and wild types of P. putida were inoculated in soil and pilot plan was prepared. Finally, degradation of phenanthrene and pyrene by this bacterium in spiked soil were evaluated using HPLC measurement technique. The results were showed elimination of these PAH compounds in spiked soil by engineered P. putida comparing to dishes containing natural soil with normal microbial flora and inoculated autoclaved soil by wild type of P. putida were statistically significant (p0.05 but it was few impact on this process (more than 2%. Additional and verification tests including catalase, oxidase and PCR on isolated bacteria from spiked soil were indicated that engineered P. putida was alive and functional as well as it can affect on phenanthrene and pyrene degradation via nahH gene producing. These findings indicated that genetically engineered P. putida generated in this work via producing C23O enzyme can useful and practical for biodegradation of phenanthrene and pyrene as well as petroleum compounds in polluted environments.

  11. Inhibitory activity of Iranian plant extracts on growth and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansouri, S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a drug resistance opportunistic bacterium. Biofilm formation is key factor for survivalof P. aeruginosa in various environments. Polysaccharides may be involved in biofilm formation. The purpose of thisstudy was to evaluate antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activities of seven plant extracts with known alpha-glucosidaseinhibitory activities on different strains of P. aeruginosa.Methodology and results: Plants were extracted with methanol by the maceration method. Antimicrobial activities weredetermined by agar dilution and by growth yield as measured by OD560nm of the Luria Bertani broth (LB culture with orwithout extracts. In agar dilution method, extracts of Quercus infectoria inhibited the growth of all, while Myrtuscommunis extract inhibited the growth of 3 out of 8 bacterial strains with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of 1000μg/mL. All extracts significantly (p≤0.003 reduced growth rate of the bacteria in comparison with the control withoutextracts in LB broth at sub-MIC concentrations (500 μg/mL. All plant extracts significantly (p≤0.003 reduced biofilmformation compared to the controls. Glycyrrhiza glabra and Q. infectoria had the highest anti-biofilm activities. Nocorrelation between the alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity with growth or the intensity of biofilm formation was found.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: Extracts of Q. infectoria and M. communis had the most antimicrobial,while Q. infectoria and G. glabra had the highest anti-biofilm activities. All plant extracts had anti-biofilm activities withmarginal effect on growth, suggesting that the mechanisms of these activities are unrelated to static or cidal effects.Further work to understand the relation between antimicrobial and biofilm formation is needed for development of newmeans to fight the infectious caused by this bacterium in future.

  12. High quality draft genome sequences of Pseudomonas fulva DSM 17717(T), Pseudomonas parafulva DSM 17004(T) and Pseudomonas cremoricolorata DSM 17059(T) type strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Arantxa; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Mulet, Magdalena; Gomila, Rosa M; Reddy, T B K; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; García-Valdés, Elena; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos; Lalucat, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas has the highest number of species out of any genus of Gram-negative bacteria and is phylogenetically divided into several groups. The Pseudomonas putida phylogenetic branch includes at least 13 species of environmental and industrial interest, plant-associated bacteria, insect pathogens, and even some members that have been found in clinical specimens. In the context of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project, we present the permanent, high-quality draft genomes of the type strains of 3 taxonomically and ecologically closely related species in the Pseudomonas putida phylogenetic branch: Pseudomonas fulva DSM 17717(T), Pseudomonas parafulva DSM 17004(T) and Pseudomonas cremoricolorata DSM 17059(T). All three genomes are comparable in size (4.6-4.9 Mb), with 4,119-4,459 protein-coding genes. Average nucleotide identity based on BLAST comparisons and digital genome-to-genome distance calculations are in good agreement with experimental DNA-DNA hybridization results. The genome sequences presented here will be very helpful in elucidating the taxonomy, phylogeny and evolution of the Pseudomonas putida species complex.

  13. Production and characterization of biosurfactant produced by a novel Pseudomonas sp. 2B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparna, A; Srinikethan, G; Smitha, H

    2012-06-15

    Biosurfactant-producing bacteria were isolated from terrestrial samples collected in areas contaminated with petroleum compounds. Isolates were screened for biosurfactant production using Cetyl Tri Ammonium Bromide (CTAB)-Methylene blue agar selection medium and the qualitative drop-collapse test. An efficient bacterial strain was selected based on rapid drop collapse activity and highest biosurfactant production. The biochemical characteristics and partial sequenced 16S rRNA gene of isolate, 2B, identified the bacterium as Pseudomonas sp. Five different low cost carbon substrates were evaluated for their effect on biosurfactant production. The maximum biosurfactant synthesis (4.97 g/L) occurred at 96 h when the cells were grown on modified PPGAS medium containing 1% (v/v) molasses at 30 °C and 150 rpm. The cell free broth containing the biosurfactant could reduce the surface tension to 30.14 mN/m. The surface active compound showed emulsifying activity against a variety of hydrocarbons and achieved a maximum emulsion index of 84% for sunflower oil. Compositional analysis of the biosurfactant reveals that the extracted biosurfactant was a glycolipid type, which was composed of high percentages of lipid (∼65%, w/w) and carbohydrate (∼32%, w/w). Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum of extracted biosurfactant indicates the presence of carboxyl, hydroxyl and methoxyl functional groups. The mass spectra (MS) shows that dirhamnolipid (l-rhamnopyranosyl-l-rhamnopyranosyl-3-hydroxydecanoyl-3-hydroxydecanoate, Rha-Rha-C(10)-C(10)) was detected in abundance with the predominant congener monorhamnolipid (l-rhamnopyranosyl-β-hydroxydecanoyl-β-hydroxydecanoate, Rha-C(10)-C(10)). The crude oil recovery studies using the biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas sp. 2B suggested its potential application in microbial enhanced oil recovery and bioremediation.

  14. The secretion of lecithinase of Pseudomonas alcaligenes S2 was via type II secretion pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Jing; LI Fan; CHEN Sanfeng; LI Jilun

    2005-01-01

    Strain S2 is a lecithin (or phosphatidylcholine)- solubilizing bacterium, which was isolated from the rice rhizosphere in rural areas of Beijing, China. On the basis of a polyphasic study involving phenotypic tests, physiological and biochemical tests, 16S rDNA sequence analysis, G+C content determination and DNA-DNA hybridizations analysis, strain S2 was identified as Pseudomonas alcaligenes. P. alcaligenes S2 was mutagenized with Tn5 and four mutants showing decreased or increased solubilizing ability of lecithin were isolated based on the halo size around colonies on the solid plate supplemented with egg yolk. To characterize the genes of P. alcaligenes S2 involved in solubilization of lecithin, the EcoR I fragments of the chromosomes from the four mutant strains carrying a single transposon were cloned, and the DNA sequences flanking the Tn5 were determined. The Tn5 insertion sites in the mutants M808, M1329 and M1400, showing decreased solubilizing ability of lecithin, were found to be located in the xcpS, xcpX and xcpW , respectively, whose products XcpS, XcpX and XcpW were the components of type II secretion pathway. Complementation of xcpS, xcpX and xcpW could restore the corresponding mutants M808, M1329 and M1400 to solubilize lecithin. The data suggested that mutation in one of these xcp genes would lead to the absence of mature lecithinase secretion into the extracellular medium. The data also indicated that the secretion of lecithin-hydrolyzing enzyme of P. alcaligenes was via type II secretion pathway. In the mutant M20 showing increasing lecithin-hydrolyzing activity, the interrupted gene showed 86% identity with chpA of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, whose product plays an important role in controlling twitching motility of the bacterial cells.

  15. Rock Phosphate Solubilization Mechanisms of One Fungus and One Bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Qi-mei; ZHAO Xiao-rong; ZHAO Zi-juan; LI Bao-guo

    2002-01-01

    Many microorganisms can dissolve the insoluble phosphates like apatite. However, the mechanisms are still not clear. This study was an attempt to investigate the mechanisms of rock phosphate solubilization by an Aspergillus 2TCiF2 and an Arthrobacter1TCRi7. The results indicated that the fungus produced a large amount of organic acids, mainly oxalic acid. The total quantity of the organic acids produced by the fungus was 550 times higher than that by the bacterium. Different organic acids had completely different capacities to solubilize the rock. Oxalic acid and citric acid had stronger capacity to dissolve the rock than malic acid, tartaric acid, lactic acid, acetic acid, malonic acid and succinic acid. The fungus solubilized the rock through excreting both proton and organic acids. The rock solubilization of the bacterium depended on only proton.

  16. A Streamlined Strategy for Biohydrogen Production with an Alkaliphilic Bacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL; Wall, Judy D. [University of Missouri; Mormile, Dr. Melanie R. [Missouri University of Science and Technology; Begemann, Matthew B [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-01-01

    Biofuels are anticipated to enable a shift from fossil fuels for renewable transportation and manufacturing fuels, with biohydrogen considered attractive since it could offer the largest reduction of global carbon budgets. Currently, biohydrogen production remains inefficient and heavily fossil fuel-dependent. However, bacteria using alkali-treated biomass could streamline biofuel production while reducing costs and fossil fuel needs. An alkaliphilic bacterium, Halanaerobium strain sapolanicus, is described that is capable of biohydrogen production at levels rivaling neutrophilic strains, but at pH 11 and hypersaline conditions. H. sapolanicus ferments a variety of 5- and 6- carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose including cellobiose, and forms the end products hydrogen and acetate. Further, it can also produce biohydrogen from switchgrass and straw pretreated at temperatures far lower than any previously reported and in solutions compatible with growth. Hence, this bacterium can potentially increase the efficiency and efficacy of biohydrogen production from renewable biomass resources.

  17. Adhesion and Survival Tools of the Bacterium Deinococcus geothermalis

    OpenAIRE

    Liedert, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The known natural habitats of Deinococcus geothermalis are geothermal springs and deep ocean subsurfaces. The bacterium has also found its way to manmade environments, including paper machines and drinking water distribution systems, from which it is very difficult to remove due to its resistance towards industrial washing procedures, dehydration and even high doses of ionizing radiation. D. geothermalis attaches tightly on industrial, even microbially repellent, surfaces initiating slim...

  18. Biosorption of heavy metals by a marine bacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Anita [Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Bhavnagar 364002, Gujarat (India); Mody, Kalpana [Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Bhavnagar 364002, Gujarat (India)]. E-mail: khmody@csmcri.org; Jha, Bhavanath [Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Bhavnagar 364002, Gujarat (India)

    2005-03-01

    Heavy metal chelation property of exopolysaccharide produced by Enterobacter cloaceae, a marine bacterium, isolated from the West Coast of India, is reported in this paper. The exopolysaccharide demonstrated excellent chelating properties with respect to cadmium (65%) followed by copper (20%) and cobalt (8%) at 100 mg/l heavy metal concentration. However, it could not chelate mercury. A comparative study of the percentage biosorption of the above mentioned metals is presented here.

  19. The Photosynthetic Reaction Center from the Purple Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deisenhofer, Johann; Michel, Hartmut

    1989-09-01

    The history and methods of membrane protein crystallization are described. The solution of the structure of the photosynthetic reaction center from the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis is described, and the structure of this membrane protein complex is correlated with its function as a light-driven electron pump across the photosynthetic membrane. Conclusions about the structure of the photosystem II reaction center from plants are drawn, and aspects of membrane protein structure are discussed.

  20. Initiation of chromosomal replication in predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Makowski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a small Gram-negative predatory bacterium that attacks other Gram-negative bacteria, including many animal, human, and plant pathogens. This bacterium exhibits a peculiar biphasic life cycle during which two different types of cells are produced: non-replicating highly motile cells (the free-living phase and replicating cells (the intracellular-growth phase. The process of chromosomal replication in B. bacteriovorus must therefore be temporally and spatially regulated to ensure that it is coordinated with cell differentiation and cell cycle progression. Recently, B. bacteriovorus has received considerable research interest due to its intriguing life cycle and great potential as a prospective antimicrobial agent. Although we know that chromosomal replication in bacteria is mainly regulated at the initiation step, no data exists about this process in B. bacteriovorus. We report the first characterization of key elements of initiation of chromosomal replication – DnaA protein and oriC region from the predatory bacterium, B. bacteriovorus. In vitro studies using different approaches demonstrate that the B. bacteriovorus oriC (BdoriC is specifically bound and unwound by the DnaA protein. Sequence comparison of the DnaA-binding sites enabled us to propose a consensus sequence for the B. bacteriovorus DnaA box (5’-NN(A/TTCCACA-3’. Surprisingly, in vitro analysis revealed that BdoriC is also bound and unwound by the host DnaA proteins (relatively distantly related from B. bacteriovorus. We compared the architecture of the DnaA–oriC complexes (orisomes in homologous (oriC and DnaA from B. bacteriovorus and heterologous (BdoriC and DnaA from prey, E. coli or P. aeruginosa systems. This work provides important new entry points toward improving our understanding of the initiation of chromosomal replication in this predatory bacterium.

  1. Growth of a Strictly Anaerobic Bacterium on Furfural (2-Furaldehyde)

    OpenAIRE

    Brune, Gerhard; Schoberth, Siegfried M.; Sahm, Hermann

    1983-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterium was isolated from a continuous fermentor culture which converted the organic constituents of sulfite evaporator condensate to methane and carbon dioxide. Furfural is one of the major components of this condensate. This furfural isolate could degrade furfural as the sole source of carbon and energy in a defined mineral-vitamin-sulfate medium. Acetic acid was the major fermentation product. This organism could also use ethanol, lactate, pyruvate, or fumarate and c...

  2. Detecção de metalo-beta-lactamase em Pseudomonas aeruginosa isoladas de pacientes hospitalizados em Goiânia, Estado de Goiás Detection of metallo-beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from hospitalized patients in Goiânia, State of Goiás

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Christina Pereira Santos Gonçalves

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa é uma bactéria frequentemente isolada no ambiente hospitalar. Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o perfil de suscetibilidade de Pseudomonas aeruginosa previamente isoladas de pacientes internados em um hospital de Goiânia (Goiás-Brasil; realizar a triagem fenotípica para a produção de metalo-beta-lactamase e detectar os genes das mesmas pela técnica de "Polimerase Chain Reaction". Foram avaliadas 75 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isoladas no período de janeiro de 2005 a janeiro de 2007. A identificação bioquímica foi realizada pelo sistema API 20E® e o antibiograma pelo método de Kirby-Bauer. Entre os 62 isolados que foram resistentes ao imipenem e à ceftazidima, 35 (56,4% apresentaram produção de metalo-beta-lactamase e em 26 (74,3% destes, foi detectado o gene blaSPM-1. A frequência de Pseudomonas aeruginosa produtoras de metalo-beta-lactamase sugere um maior controle da disseminação de resistência no ambiente hospitalar.Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium frequently isolated from hospital environments. This study had the aims of evaluating the susceptibility profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa previously isolated from patients in a hospital in Goiânia (Goiás, Brazil, performing phenotypic screening for metallo-beta-lactamase production and detecting its genes using the polymerase chain reaction technique. Seventy-five 75 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were evaluated between January 2005 and January 2007. Biochemical identification was performed using the API 20E® system and an antibiogram was produced using the Kirby-Bauer method. Among the 62 isolates that were resistant to imipenem and ceftazidime, 35 (56.4% produced metallo-beta-lactamase, while 26 (74.3% showed the blaSPM-1 gene. The frequency of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that produces metallo-beta-lactamase suggests that greater control over the dissemination of resistance in hospital environments is needed.

  3. Bioenergetics and the role of soluble cytochromes C for alkaline adaptation in gram-negative alkaliphilic Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuno, T; Yumoto, I

    2015-01-01

    Very few studies have been conducted on alkaline adaptation of Gram-negative alkaliphiles. The reversed difference of H(+) concentration across the membrane will make energy production considerably difficult for Gram-negative as well as Gram-positive bacteria. Cells of the alkaliphilic Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas alcaliphila AL15-21(T) grown at pH 10 under low-aeration intensity have a soluble cytochrome c content that is 3.6-fold higher than that of the cells grown at pH 7 under high-aeration intensity. Cytochrome c-552 content was higher (64% in all soluble cytochromes c) than those of cytochrome c-554 and cytochrome c-551. In the cytochrome c-552-dificient mutant grown at pH 10 under low-aeration intensity showed a marked decrease in μ max⁡ [h(-1)] (40%) and maximum cell turbidity (25%) relative to those of the wild type. Considering the high electron-retaining abilities of the three soluble cytochromes c, the deteriorations in the growth of the cytochrome c-552-deficient mutant could be caused by the soluble cytochromes c acting as electron storages in the periplasmic space of the bacterium. These electron-retaining cytochromes c may play a role as electron and H(+) condenser, which facilitate terminal oxidation at high pH under air-limited conditions, which is difficult to respire owing to less oxygen and less H(+).

  4. Use of Cassia alata aqueous extract as a bath treatment to control Pseudomonas anguilliseptica infection in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phumkhachorn Parichat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous extracts of six plants, Andrographis paniculata, Cassia alata, Centella asiatica, Garcinia mangostana, Punica granatum and Psidium guajava, were investigated for their antimicrobial activity and mode of action against Pseudomonas anguilliseptica, an important fish pathogenic bacterium, which is responsible for economic losses in aquaculture worldwide. Among the tested plant extracts, the C. alata aqueous extract had the strongest inhibitory effect and exhibited a bactericidal mode of action against the pathogenic bacterium. When an infection of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus with P. anguilliseptica was induced by intraperitoneal, the median lethal dose (LD50 was determined to be 1.59 x 105 CFU/ml. For the in vivo trial, four different concentrations (25, 50, 75 and 100 ppm of C. alata aqueous extract were used as bath treatment to remedy the infection. The effect of the extract on the infection was dose-dependent and an extract with the concentration of 100 ppm eliminated mortality of the infected fish without producing any adverse effects on the animals. This study suggests that C. alata aqueous extract has the potential to control fish disease caused by P. anguilliseptica.

  5. Removal of toxic Co-EDTA complex by a halophilic solar-salt-pan isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa SPB-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraneeiswaran, A; Shukla, Sudhir K; Subba Rao, T; Prashanth, K

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a promising bioremediation approach was developed to remove [Co(III)-EDTA](-) complex that is generated during the waste management process. Though several studies have been reported on bioremediation of cobalt, the removal of [Co(III)-EDTA](-) complex has not been tested. A [Co(III)-EDTA](-) resistant bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa SPB-1 was isolated from the solar-salt-pan and physical parameters were optimized for its growth. The various studies showed that the removal of [Co(III)-EDTA](-) from the bulk liquid was due to the adsorption of the complex by the biomass. Using absorption/desorption isotherm over a range of pH (1-8), the maximum adsorption of [Co(III)-EDTA](-) was found to be at pH 7.0 and maximum desorption from the biomass occurred at pH 1.0, thus rendering an ion exchange property to P. aeruginosa SPB-1 biomass. P. aeruginosa SPB-1 biomass could be used as bio-resin that showed 80.4±3.27% adsorption capacity up to fourth cycle and the biomass was viable till the ninth cycle with 10.5±7.3% adsorption. Radiation tolerance potential i.e. D10 value for the strain was found to be ~300 Gy, which suggests the potential use of the bacterium in bioremediation of moderately active nuclear waste. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of secondary metabolites in the interaction between Pseudomonas fluorescens and soil microorganisms under iron-limited conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, Aurélie; Gross, Harald; Palin, Béatrice; Mehnaz, Samina; Schnepf, Max; Leblond, Pierre; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Aigle, Bertrand

    2016-08-01

    Microorganisms can be versatile in their interactions with each other, being variously beneficial, neutral or antagonistic in their effect. Although this versatility has been observed among many microorganisms and in many environments, little is known regarding the mechanisms leading to these changes in behavior. In the present work, we analyzed the mechanism by which the soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8 shifts from stimulating the growth of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor S238N to killing the fungus. We show that among the three secondary metabolites produced by the bacterial strain-the siderophores enantio-pyochelin and pyoverdine, and the biosurfactant viscosin-the siderophores are mainly responsible for the antagonistic activity of the bacterium under iron-limited conditions. While the bacterial strain continues to produce beneficial factors, their effects are overridden by the action of their siderophores. This antagonistic activity of the strain P. fluorescens BBC6R8 in iron-depleted environments is not restricted to its influence on L. bicolor, since it was also seen to inhibit the growth of the actinomycete Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877. We show that the strain P. fluorescens BBc6R8 uses different strategies to acquire iron, depending on certain biotic and abiotic factors. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Optimization of environmental parameters for biodegradation of alpha and beta endosulfan in soil slurry by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, M; Hussain, S; Saleem, M

    2008-02-01

    To determine optimal environmental conditions for achieving biodegradation of alpha- and beta-endosulfan in soil slurries following inoculation with an endosulfan degrading strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Parameters that were investigated included soil texture, soil slurry: water ratios, initial inoculum size, pH, incubation temperature, aeration, and the use of exogenous sources of organic and amino acids. The results showed that endosulfan degradation was most effectively achieved at an initial inoculum size of 600 microl (OD = 0 x 86), incubation temperature of 30 degrees C, in aerated slurries at pH 8, in loam soil. Under these conditions, the bacterium removed more than 85% of spiked alpha- and beta-endosulfan (100 mg l(-1)) after 16 days. Abiotic degradation in noninoculated control medium within same incubation period was about 16%. Biodegradation of endosulfan varied in different textured soils, being more rapid in course textured soil than in fine textured soil. Increasing the soil contents in the slurry above 15% resulted in less biodegradation of endosulfan. Exogenous application of organic acids (citric acid and acetic acid) and amino acids (L-methionine and L-cystein) had stimulatory and inhibitory effects, respectively, on biodegradation of endosulfan. The results of this study demonstrated that biodegradation of endosulfan by Ps. aeruginosa in soil sediments enhanced significantly under optimized environmental conditions. Endosulfan is a commonly used pesticide that can contaminate soil, wetlands and groundwater. Our study demonstrates that bioaugmentation of contaminated soils with an endosulfan degrading bacterium under optimized conditions provides an effective bioremediation strategy.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Transmigrates at Epithelial Cell-Cell Junctions, Exploiting Sites of Cell Division and Senescent Cell Extrusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Golovkine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To achieve systemic infection, bacterial pathogens must overcome the critical and challenging step of transmigration across epithelial barriers. This is particularly true for opportunistic pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an agent which causes nosocomial infections. Despite extensive study, details on the mechanisms used by this bacterium to transmigrate across epithelial tissues, as well as the entry sites it uses, remain speculative. Here, using real-time microscopy and a model epithelial barrier, we show that P. aeruginosa employs a paracellular transmigration route, taking advantage of altered cell-cell junctions at sites of cell division or when senescent cells are expelled from the cell layer. Once a bacterium transmigrates, it is followed by a cohort of bacteria using the same entry point. The basal compartment is then invaded radially from the initial penetration site. Effective transmigration and propagation require type 4 pili, the type 3 secretion system (T3SS and a flagellum, although flagellum-deficient bacteria can occasionally invade the basal compartment from wounded areas. In the basal compartment, the bacteria inject the T3SS toxins into host cells, disrupting the cytoskeleton and focal contacts to allow their progression under the cells. Thus, P. aeruginosa exploits intrinsic host cell processes to breach the epithelium and invade the subcellular compartment.

  9. Characterization of Strain Pseudomonas sp.Q1 in Microbial Fuel Cell for Treatment of Quinoline-Contaminated Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Cui-Ping; CHEN Shan-Shan; LIU Guang-Li; ZHANG Ren-Duo; XIE Jian

    2012-01-01

    To find new strain in the microbial fuel cell (MFC) for quinoline removal from wastewater and soil,a facultative anaerobic bacterium strain was isolated from the anode of MFC,utilizing quinoline as the carbon source and electron donor.Based on the 16S rRNA sequence analysis,the bacterium strain was Gram-negative and identified as Pseudomonas sp.Q1 according to its morphology and physiochemical properties.The strain was inoculated into a double-chambered MFC using various quinoline concentratious (0,50,75,86,100,150,200 and 300 mg L-1) combining with 300 mg L-1 glucose as the fuel.Results showed that electricity was generated from the MFC,in which quinoline was degraded simultaneously.The values of Coulombic efficiency (CE) increased with the increase of quinoline concentrations from 0 to 100 mg L-1 then decreased with the increase of quinoline concentration from 100 to 300 mg L-1,and the maximum CE 36.7% was obtained at the quinoline concentration of 100 mg L-1.The cyclic voltammetry analysis suggested that the mechanism of electron transfer was through excreting mediators produced by the strain Q1.The MFC should be a potential method for the treatment of quinoline-contaminated water and soil.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilises its type III secretion system to kill the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd, Hadi; Wretlind, Bengt; Saeed, Amir; Idsund, Eva; Hultenby, Kjell; Sandström, Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a free-living and common environmental bacterium. It is an opportunistic and nosocomial pathogen causing serious human health problems. To overcome its predators, such as macrophages and environmental phagocytes, it utilises different survival strategies, such as the formation of microcolonies and the production of toxins mediated by a type III secretion system (TTSS). The aim of this study was to examine interaction of TTSS effector proteins of P. aeruginosa PA103 with Acanthamoeba castellanii by co-cultivation, viable count, eosin staining, electron microscopy, apoptosis assay, and statistical analysis. The results showed that P. aeruginosa PA103 induced necrosis and apoptosis to kill A. castellanii by the effects of TTSS effector proteins ExoU, ExoS, ExoT, and ExoY. In comparison, Acanthamoeba cultured alone and co-cultured with P. aeruginosa PA103 lacking the known four TTSS effector proteins were not killed. The results are consistent with P. aeruginosa being a strict extracellular bacterium that needs TTSS to survive in the environment, because the TTSS effector proteins are able to kill its eukaryotic predators, such as Acanthamoeba.

  11. Biodecolorization of azo dye Remazol orange by Pseudomonas aeruginosa BCH and toxicity (oxidative stress) reduction in Allium cepa root cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Shekhar B; Surwase, Shripad N; Kalyani, Dayanand C; Gurav, Ranjit G; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2012-11-01

    In this report a textile azo dye Remazol orange was degraded and detoxified by bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa BCH in plain distilled water. This bacterial decolorization performance was found to be pH and temperature dependent with maximum decolorization observed at pH 8 and temperature 30 °C. Bacterium tolerated higher dye concentrations up to 400 mg l(-1). Effect of initial cell mass showed that higher cell mass concentration can accelerate decolorization process with maximum of 92 % decolorization observed at 2.5 g l(-1) cell mass within 6.5 h. Effect of various metal ions showed Mn has inducing effect whereas Zn strongly inhibited the decolorization process at 5 mM concentration. Analysis of biodegradation products carried out with UV-vis spectroscopy, HPTLC and FTIR confirmed the decolorization and degradation of Remazol orange. Possible route for the degradation of dye was proposed based on GC-MS analysis. During toxicological scrutiny in Allium cepa root cells, induction in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and inhibition of catalase (CAT) along with raised levels of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in dye treated samples were detected which conclusively indicated the generation of oxidative stress. Less toxic nature of the dye degraded products was observed after bacterial treatment.

  12. The sigma factor RpoS is required for stress tolerance and environmental fitness of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, Virginia O; Loper, Joyce E

    2005-09-01

    Many micro-organisms exist in natural habitats that are subject to severe or dramatically fluctuating environmental conditions. Such is the case for bacteria inhabiting plant surfaces, where they are exposed to UV irradiation, oxygen radicals, and large fluctuations in temperature and moisture. This study focuses on the role of RpoS, a central regulator of stationary-phase gene expression in bacterial cells, in stress response and environmental fitness of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. Strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium that suppresses plant diseases caused by several plant-pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. Previous studies demonstrated that rpoS was required for osmotic and oxidative stress resistance of Pf-5. The results of this study demonstrate a role for rpoS in tolerance of Pf-5 to freezing, starvation, UV irradiation and desiccation stress. In field studies, an rpoS mutant was compromised in rhizosphere colonization of plants in dry soil, whereas similar rhizosphere populations were established by Pf-5 and an rpoS mutant in well-irrigated soils. RpoS is a key determinant in stress response and environmental fitness of the rhizosphere bacterium P. fluorescens Pf-5.

  13. Impact of fluorochrome stains used to study bacterial transport in shallow aquifers on motility and chemotaxis of Pseudomonas species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toepfer, J Amanda; Ford, Roseanne M; Metge, David; Harvey, Ronald W

    2012-07-01

    One of the most common methods of tracking movement of bacteria in groundwater environments involves a priori fluorescent staining. A major concern in using these stains to label bacteria in subsurface injection-and-recovery studies is the effect they may have on the bacterium's transport properties. Previous studies investigated the impact of fluorophores on bacterial surface properties (e.g. zeta potential). However, no previous study has looked at the impact of fluorescent staining on swimming speed and chemotaxis. It was found that DAPI lowered the mean population swimming speed of Pseudomonas putida F1 by 46% and Pseudomonas stutzeri by 55%. DAPI also inhibited the chemotaxis in both strains. The swimming speeds of P. putida F1 and P. stutzeri were diminished slightly by CFDA/SE, but not to a statistically significant extent. CFDA/SE had no effect on chemotaxis of either strain to acetate. SYBR(®) Gold had no effect on swimming speed or the chemotactic response to acetate for either strain. This research indicates that although DAPI may not affect sorption to grain surfaces, it adversely affects other potentially important transport properties such as swimming and chemotaxis. Consequently, bacterial transport studies conducted using DAPI are biased to nonchemotactic conditions and do not appear to be suitable for monitoring the effect of chemotaxis on bacterial transport in shallow aquifers.

  14. Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry Analysis and Antibacterial Activity of Bluish-Green Pigment from Pseudomonas sp. JJTBVK (KF836502

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bala Verma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted for the isolation of potential bacteria from the desert soil, their molecular identification and prediction of restriction sites of the potential isolate using the bioinformatics tools. Production of the metabolites was done by inoculating in nutrient broth of pH 8.6. Metabolite was bluish-green in color; it was extracted and dried by using methanol and used for partial characterization by using GC-MS spectroscopy. Antibacterial activity was performed with the clinical human pathogenic isolates. The bacterium was identified as Pseudomonas sp.JJTBVK on the basis of 16S rRNA sequencing. The sequence was analyzed for the restriction cleavage sites, which showed that the sequence had various restriction sites for different enzymes. Antibacterial activity (MIC of methanol extract of the bacterial culture broth showed antibacterial activity (MIC, which was 29, 30, 30 and 29 mm for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhi, respectively. GC-MS analysis of the methanol extract showed the presence of naphth [2,3-B] azet-2 (1H -one, 1-phenyl-, which was the characteristic compound showing the antibacterial activity.

  15. Biosynthesis and regulation of cyclic lipopeptides in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de I.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are surfactant and antibiotic metabolites produced by a variety of bacterial genera. For the genus Pseudomonas, many structurally different CLPs have been identified. CLPs play an important role in surface motility of Pseudomonas strains, but also in virulence and

  16. Biosynthesis and regulation of cyclic lipopeptides in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de I.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are surfactant and antibiotic metabolites produced by a variety of bacterial genera. For the genus Pseudomonas, many structurally different CLPs have been identified. CLPs play an important role in surface motility of Pseudomonas strains, but also in virulence and attac

  17. Interactions between biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas and Phytophthora species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, H.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas bacteria produce a wide variety of antimicrobial metabolites, including soap-like compounds referred to as biosurfactants. The results of this thesis showed that biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas bacteria are effective in controlling Phytophthora foot rot disease of black p

  18. Facial Nerve Paralysis seen in Pseudomonas sepsis with ecthyma gangrenosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleyman Ozdemir

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecthyma gangrenosum is a skin lesion which is created by pseudomonas auriginosa. Peripheral facial paralysis and mastoiditis as a rare complication of otitis media induced by pseudomonas auriginosa.In this study, 4 months child who has ecthyma gangrenosum and facial nerve paralysis was reported. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(1.000: 126-130

  19. Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Norwegian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluge, G; Ojeniyi, B; Høiby, N

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Norwegian cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic Pseudomonas lung infection in order to see whether cross-infection might have occurred. METHODS: Isolates from 60 patients were collected during the years 1994-98, and typed by pulsed...

  20. Distribution, diversity, and activity of antibiotic-producing Pseudomonas spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, de J.T.

    2002-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas are potential biocontrol agents of plant diseases caused by various fungi and oomycetes. Antibiotic production is an important trait responsible for the activity of several Pseudomonas strains against plant pathogens. Despite the amount of informati

  1. Distribution, diversity, and activity of antibiotic-producing Pseudomonas spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, de J.T.

    2002-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas are potential biocontrol agents of plant diseases caused by various fungi and oomycetes. Antibiotic production is an important trait responsible for the activity of several Pseudomonas

  2. Verspreiding, diversiteit en activiteit van antibioticaproducerende Pseudomonas spp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, J.T.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas bacteriën zijn potentiële antagonisten van diverse plantenpathogene schimmels en oömyceten. De productie van antibiotica speelt een belangrijke rol in de activiteit van diverse Pseudomonas isolaten tegen plantenpathogenen. Dit artikel is een samenvatting van het proefschrift getiteld 'Di

  3. Suppression of Aspergillus by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib

    Objectives: Cystic fibrosis patients are commonly infected by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but Aspergilli are also frequently isolated. Our aim was to examine the possible interaction between P. aeruginosa and different Aspergillus. Methods: A suspension of 106 fungal spores/ml was streaked onto WATM...... suppressed growth of A. fumigatus, A. niger, A. flavus, A. oryzae, A. terreus and E. nidulans. HPLC and LC-DAD-MS results showed an increase in phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxamide production by P. aeruginosa in the contact area of Aspergillus. Different quinolones were also identified...

  4. Investigating the ability of Pseudomonas fluorescens UW4 to reduce cadmium stress in Lactuca sativa via an intervention in the ethylene biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Lucas J; Macfie, Sheila M

    2016-12-01

    A typical plant response to any biotic or abiotic stress, including cadmium (Cd), involves increased ethylene synthesis, which causes senescence of the affected plant part. Stressed plants can experience reduced ethylene and improved growth if they are inoculated with bacteria that have the enzyme ACC deaminase, which metabolizes the ethylene precursor ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate). We investigated whether one such bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens UW4, reduces the production of ethylene and improves the growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) sown in Cd-contaminated potting material (PRO-MIX® BX). Plants were inoculated with the wild-type P. fluorescens UW4 or a mutant strain that cannot produce ACC deaminase. Cadmium-treated plants contained up to 50 times more Cd than did control plants. In noninoculated plants, Cd induced a 5-fold increase in ethylene concentration. The wild-type bacterium prevented Cd-induced reductions in root biomass but there was no relationship between Cd treatment and ethylene production in inoculated plants. In contrast, when the concentration of ethylene was plotted against the extent of bacterial colonization of the roots, increased colonization with wild-type P. fluorescens UW4 was associated with 20% less ethylene production. Ours is the first study to show that the protective effect of this bacterium is proportional to the quantity of bacteria on the root surface.

  5. Expression profile analysis of the oxygen response in the nitrogen-fixing Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 by genome-wide DNA microarray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DOU YueTan; YAN YongLiang; PING ShuZhen; LU Wei; CHEN Ming; ZHANG Wei; WANG YiPing; JIN Qi; LIN Min

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501, an associative nitrogen-fixing bacterium, was isolated from the rice paddy rhizosphere. This bacterium fixes nitrogen under microaerobic conditions. In this study, ge-nome-wide DNA microarrays were used to analyze the global transcription profile of A1501 under aerobic and microaerobic conditions. The expression of 135 genes was significantly altered by more than 2-fold in response to oxygen stress. Among these genes, 68 were down-regulated under aerobic conditions; these genes included those responsible for nitrogen fixation and denitrification. Sixty-seven genes were up-regulated under aerobic conditions; these genes included sodC, encoding a copper-zinc superoxide dismutase, PST2179, encoding an NAD(P)-dependent oxidoreductase, PST3584, encoding a 2OG-Fe(Ⅱ) oxygenase, and PST3602, encoding an NAD(P)H-flavin oxidoreductase. Addi-tionally, seven genes involved in capsular polysaccharide and antigen oligosaccharide biosynthesis together with 17 genes encoding proteins of unknown function were up-regulated under aerobic con-ditions. The overall analysis suggests that the genes we identified are involved in the protection of the bacterium from oxygen, but the mechanisms of their action remain to be elucidated.

  6. An evaluation of the wilt-causing bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum as a potential biological control agent for the alien Kahili ginger (Hedychium gardnerianum) in Hawaiian forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Kahili ginger (Hedychium gardnerianum) is an invasive weed in tropical forests in Hawaii and elsewhere. Bacterial wilt caused by the ginger strain of Ralstonia(=Pseudomonas) solanacearum systemically infects edible ginger (Zingiber officinale) and ornamental gingers (Hedychium spp.), causing wilt in infected plants. The suitability of R. solanacearum as a biological control agent for kahili ginger was investigated by inoculating seedlings and rooted cuttings of native forest plants, ornamental ginger, and solanaceous species to confirm host specificity. Inoculation via stem injection or root wounding with a bacterial–water suspension was followed by observation for 8 weeks. Inoculations on H. gardnerianum were then carried out in ohia-lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) wet forests of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park to determine the bacterium's efficacy in the field. No native forest or solanaceous species developed wilt or other symptoms during the study. The bacterium caused limited infection near the inoculation site on H. coronarium, Z. zerumbet, Heliconia latispatha, and Musa sapientum. However, infection did not become systemic in any of these species, and normal growth resumed following appearance of initial symptoms. All inoculated H. gardnerianum plants developed irreversible chlorosis and severe wilting 3–4 weeks following inoculation. Systemic infection also caused death and decay of rhizomes. Most plants were completely dead 16–20 weeks following inoculation. The destructiveness of the ginger strain of R. solanacearum to edible ginger has raised questions regarding its use for biological control. However, because locations of kahili ginger infestations are often remote, the risk of contaminating edible ginger plantings is unlikely. The ability of this bacterium to cause severe disease in H. gardnerianum in the field, together with its lack of virulence in other ginger species, contributes to its potential as a biological control agent.

  7. Identification and biological activity of potential probiotic bacterium isolated from the stomach mucus of breast-fed lamb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kiňová Sepov��

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The lactic acid bacterium E isolated from the stomach mucus of breast-fed lamb was identified by sequencing of 16S rDNA fragment and species-specific PCR as Lactobacillus reuteri. Its potential antimicrobial activity and ability to modulate immune system in vitro and in vivo was determined. The growth inhibition of potential pathogens decreased from Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica ser. Minnesota to Escherichia coli. The lowest inhibition activity was observed in the case of Candida albicans. The ability of L. reuteri E to modulate biological activities of human and mouse mononuclear cells was estimated in vitro and in vivo, respectively. The production of IL-1β by monocytes in vitro was significantly induced by L. reuteri E (relative activity 2.47. The ability to modulate biological activities of mononuclear cells by living L. reuteri E cells in vitro in comparison to disintegrated L. reuteri E cells in vivo differed. For example lysozyme activity in vitro was inhibited while in vivo was stimulated (relative activities 0.30 and 1.83, respectively. The peroxidase activity in vitro was stimulated while in vivo was inhibited (relative activities 1.53 and 0.17, respectively. Obtained results indicate that L. reuteri E is potential candidate to be used in probiotic preparations for animals and/or human.

  8. Cloning and sequence analysis of the heat-stable acrylamidase from a newly isolated thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius AUT-01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Minseok; Chambliss, Glenn H

    2013-02-01

    A thermophilic bacterium capable of degrading acrylamide, AUT-01, was isolated from soil collected from a hot spring area in Montana, USA. The thermophilic strain grew with 0.2 % glucose as the sole carbon source and 1.4 mM acrylamide as the sole nitrogen source. The isolate AUT-01 was identified as Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius based on 16S rDNA sequence. An enzyme from the strain capable of transforming acrylamide to acrylic acid was purified by a series of chromatographic columns. The molecular weight of the enzyme was estimated to be 38 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The enzyme activity had pH and temperature optima of 6.2 and 70 ºC, respectively. The influence of different metals and amino acids on the ability of the purified protein to transform acrylamide to acrylic acid was evaluated. The gene from G. thermoglucosidasius encoding the acrylamidase was cloned, sequenced, and compared to aliphatic amidases from other bacterial strains. The G. thermoglucosidasius gene, amiE, encoded a 38 kDa, monomeric, heat-stable amidase that catalysed the cleavage of carbon-nitrogen bonds in acrylamide. Comparison of the amino acid sequence to other bacterial amidases revealed 99 and 82 % similarity to the amino acid sequences of Bacillus stearothermophilus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively.

  9. Identification and biological activity of potential probiotic bacterium isolated from the stomach mucus of breast-fed lamb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepová, H. Kiňová; Dubnicková, M.; Bilková, A.; Bukovský, M.; Bezáková, L.

    2011-01-01

    The lactic acid bacterium E isolated from the stomach mucus of breast-fed lamb was identified by sequencing of 16S rDNA fragment and species-specific PCR as Lactobacillus reuteri. Its potential antimicrobial activity and ability to modulate immune system in vitro and in vivo was determined. The growth inhibition of potential pathogens decreased from Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica ser. Minnesota to Escherichia coli. The lowest inhibition activity was observed in the case of Candida albicans. The ability of L. reuteri E to modulate biological activities of human and mouse mononuclear cells was estimated in vitro and in vivo, respectively. The production of IL-1β by monocytes in vitro was significantly induced by L. reuteri E (relative activity 2.47). The ability to modulate biological activities of mononuclear cells by living L. reuteri E cells in vitro in comparison to disintegrated L. reuteri E cells in vivo differed. For example lysozyme activity in vitro was inhibited while in vivo was stimulated (relative activities 0.30 and 1.83, respectively). The peroxidase activity in vitro was stimulated while in vivo was inhibited (relative activities 1.53 and 0.17, respectively). Obtained results indicate that L. reuteri E is potential candidate to be used in probiotic preparations for animals and/or human. PMID:24031741

  10. Anditalea andensis ANESC-ST--An Alkaliphilic Halotolerant Bacterium Capable of Electricity Generation under Alkaline-Saline Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shi

    Full Text Available A great challenge in wastewater bioremediation is the sustained activity of viable microorganisms, which can contribute to the breakdown of waste contaminants, especially in alkaline pH conditions. Identification of extremophiles with bioremediation capability can improve the efficiency of wastewater treatment. Here, we report the discovery of an electrochemically active alkaliphilic halotolerant bacterium, Anditalea andensis ANESC-ST (=CICC10485T=NCCB 100412T, which is capable of generating bioelectricity in alkaline-saline conditions. A. andensis ANESC-ST was shown to grow in alkaline conditions between pH 7.0-11.0 and also under high salt condition (up to 4 wt% NaCl. Electrical output was further demonstrated in microbial fuel cells (MFCs with an average current density of ~0.5 µA/cm2, even under the harsh condition of 4 wt% NaCl and pH 9.0. Subsequent introduction of secreted extracellular metabolites into MFCs inoculated with Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa yielded enhanced electrical output. The ability of A. andensis ANESC-ST to generate energy under alkaline-saline conditions points towards a solution for bioelectricity recovery from alkaline-saline wastewater. This is the first report of A.andensis ANESC-ST producing bioelectricity at high salt concentration and pH.

  11. Caenorhabditis elegans immune conditioning with the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NCFM enhances gram-positive immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younghoon; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2012-07-01

    Although the immune response of Caenorhabditis elegans to microbial infections is well established, very little is known about the effects of health-promoting probiotic bacteria on evolutionarily conserved C. elegans host responses. We found that the probiotic Gram-positive bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is not harmful to C. elegans and that L. acidophilus NCFM is unable to colonize the C. elegans intestine. Conditioning with L. acidophilus NCFM significantly decreased the burden of a subsequent Enterococcus faecalis infection in the nematode intestine and prolonged the survival of nematodes exposed to pathogenic strains of E. faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus, including multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates. Preexposure of nematodes to Bacillus subtilis did not provide any beneficial effects. Importantly, L. acidophilus NCFM activates key immune signaling pathways involved in C. elegans defenses against Gram-positive bacteria, including the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (via TIR-1 and PMK-1) and the β-catenin signaling pathway (via BAR-1). Interestingly, conditioning with L. acidophilus NCFM had a minimal effect on Gram-negative infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and had no or a negative effect on defense genes associated with Gram-negative pathogens or general stress. In conclusion, we describe a new system for the study of probiotic immune agents and our findings demonstrate that probiotic conditioning with L. acidophilus NCFM modulates specific C. elegans immunity traits.

  12. Ieodoglucomide C and Ieodoglycolipid, New Glycolipids from a Marine-Derived Bacterium Bacillus licheniformis 09IDYM23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareq, Fakir Shahidullah; Lee, Hyi-Seung; Lee, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Jong Seok; Shin, Hee Jae

    2015-05-01

    Chemical examination of the ethyl acetate extract from the fermentation broth of the marine-derived bacterium Bacillus licheniformis resulted in the isolation of two new glycolipids, ieodoglucomide C (1) and ieodoglycolipid (2). The structural characterization of 1 and 2 was achieved by extensive spectroscopic evidence, including 2D NMR experiments. A combination of chemical derivatization techniques followed by NMR studies, LC-MS data analysis and a literature review was deployed for the establishment of the stereo-configurations of 1 and 2. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited good antibiotic properties against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with MICs ranging from 0.01 to 0.05 μM. Furthermore, the antifungal activity of 1 and 2 was evaluated against plant pathogenic fungi Aspergillus niger, Rhizoctonia solani, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum acutatum as well as the human pathogen Candida albicans. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited the mycelial growth of these pathogens with MIC values of 0.03-0.05 μM, revealing that these compounds are good candidates for the development of new fungicides.

  13. In Silico sequence analysis and molecular modeling of the three-dimensional structure of DAHP synthase from Pseudomonas fragi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapas, Satya; Kumar Patel, Girijesh; Dhindwal, Sonali; Tomar, Shailly

    2011-04-01

    The shikimate pathway is involved in production of aromatic amino acids in microorganisms and plants. The enzymes of this biosynthetic pathway are a potential target for the design of antimicrobial compounds and herbicides. 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase (DAHPS) catalyzes the first step of the pathway. The gene encoding DAHPS was cloned and sequenced from Pseudomonas fragi, the bacterium responsible for spoilage of milk, dairy products and meat. Amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence revealed that P. fragi DAHPS (Pf-DAHPS) consists of 448 amino acids with calculated molecular weight of ∼50 kDa and isoelectric point of 5.81. Primary sequence analysis of Pf-DAHPS shows that it has more than 84% identity with DAHPS of other Pseudomonas species, 46% identity with Mycobacterium tuberculosis DAHPS (Mt-DAHPS), the type II DAHPS and less than 11% sequence identity with the type I DAHPS. The three-dimensional structure of Pf-DAHPS was predicted by homology modeling based on the crystal structure of Mt-DAHPS. Pf-DAHPS model contains a (β/α)(8) TIM barrel structure. Sequence alignment, phylogenetic analysis and 3D structure model classifies Pf-DAHPS as a type II DAHPS. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of DAHPS signature motif DxxHxN in Pf-DAHPS. Highly conserved sequence motif RxxxxxxKPRT(S/T) and xGxR present in type II DAHPS were also identified in Pf-DAHPS sequence. High sequence homology of DAHPS within Pseudomonas species points to the option of designing a broad spectrum drug for the genus. Pf-DAHPS 3D model provides molecular insights that may be beneficial in rationale inhibitor design for developing effective food preservative against P. fragi.

  14. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H.K.; Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. OBJECTIVES......: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search May 2008) and PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic...... fibrosis (last search May 2008). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic fibrosis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The authors independently selected trials...

  15. Salt-inducible promoter derivable from a lactic acid bacterium, and its use in a lactic acid bacterium for production of a desired protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Jan Willem; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard; Ledeboer, Adrianus Marinus

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides a salt-inducible promoter present in SEQ ID NO: 10 and derivable from a lactic acid bacterium in isolation from the coding sequence normally controlled by said promoter in a wild-type lactic acid bacterium, with modifications and important parts thereof. Also provided are a

  16. Salt-inducible promoter derivable from a lactic acid bacterium, and its use in a lactic acid bacterium for production of a desired protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Jan Willem; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard; Ledeboer, Adrianus Marinus

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides a salt-inducible promoter present in SEQ ID NO: 10 and derivable from a lactic acid bacterium in isolation from the coding sequence normally controlled by said promoter in a wild-type lactic acid bacterium, with modifications and important parts thereof. Also provided are a re

  17. Biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemi Elham

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dihydrolinalool and terpineol are sources of fragrances that provide a unique volatile terpenoid alcohol of low toxicity and thus are widely used in the perfumery industry, in folk medicine, and in aromatherapy. They are important chemical constituents of the essential oil of many plants. Previous studies have concerned the biotransformation of limonene by Pseudomonas putida. The objective of this research was to study biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The culture preparation was done using such variables as different microbial methods and incubation periods to obtain maximum cells of P. aeruginosa for myrcene biotransformation. Results It was found that myrcene was converted to dihydrolinalool and 2,6-dimethyloctane in high percentages. The biotransformation products were identified by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, ultraviolet (UV analysis, gas chromatography (GC, and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS. Comparison of the different incubation times showed that 3 days was more effective, the major products being 2,6-dimethyloctane (90.0% and α-terpineol (7.7% and comprising 97.7%. In contrast, the main compounds derived for an incubation time of 1.5 days were dihydrolinalool (79.5% and 2,6-dimethyloctane (9.3%, with a total yield of 88.8%.

  18. Growth of Pseudomonas spp. in cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Dalgaard, Paw

    Cottage cheese is a mixture of cheese curd with pH 4.5-4.8 and an uncultured or cultured cream dressing with a pH as high as 7.0. This results in a final product with microenvironments and a bulk pH of about 4.8 to 5.5. As for other lightly preserved foods microbial contamination and growth...... of spoilage microorganisms in cottage cheese can cause undesirable alterations in flavour, odour, appearance and texture. Contamination and growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads including Pseudomonas fragi and Pseudomonas putida has been reported for cottage cheese but the influence of these bacteria......H (4.9-7.0) on growth was quantified using automated absorbance measurements (Bioscreen C). A pronounced reduction of the maximum specific growth rate was observed at pH 4.9 but at pH 5.2 strains grew at 5˚C, 10˚C and 15˚C. Challenge tests at 5-15˚C with cottage cheese (pH 5.2-5.5), and cream dressing...

  19. Ethylene glycol metabolism by Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mückschel, Björn; Simon, Oliver; Klebensberger, Janosch; Graf, Nadja; Rosche, Bettina; Altenbuchner, Josef; Pfannstiel, Jens; Huber, Armin; Hauer, Bernhard

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the metabolism of ethylene glycol in the Pseudomonas putida strains KT2440 and JM37 by employing growth and bioconversion experiments, directed mutagenesis, and proteome analysis. We found that strain JM37 grew rapidly with ethylene glycol as a sole source of carbon and energy, while strain KT2440 did not grow within 2 days of incubation under the same conditions. However, bioconversion experiments revealed metabolism of ethylene glycol by both strains, with the temporal accumulation of glycolic acid and glyoxylic acid for strain KT2440. This accumulation was further increased by targeted mutagenesis. The key enzymes and specific differences between the two strains were identified by comparative proteomics. In P. putida JM37, tartronate semialdehyde synthase (Gcl), malate synthase (GlcB), and isocitrate lyase (AceA) were found to be induced in the presence of ethylene glycol or glyoxylic acid. Under the same conditions, strain KT2440 showed induction of AceA only. Despite this difference, the two strains were found to use similar periplasmic dehydrogenases for the initial oxidation step of ethylene glycol, namely, the two redundant pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent enzymes PedE and PedH. From these results we constructed a new pathway for the metabolism of ethylene glycol in P. putida. Furthermore, we conclude that Pseudomonas putida might serve as a useful platform from which to establish a whole-cell biocatalyst for the production of glyoxylic acid from ethylene glycol.

  20. Review: Lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jerry D; Kocíncová, Dana; Westman, Erin L; Lam, Joseph S

    2009-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes serious nosocomial infections, and an important virulence factor produced by this organism is lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This review summarizes knowledge about biosynthesis of all three structural domains of LPS - lipid A, core oligosaccharide, and O polysaccharides. In addition, based on similarities with other bacterial species, this review proposes new hypothetical pathways for unstudied steps in the biosynthesis of P. aeruginosa LPS. Lipid A biosynthesis is discussed in relation to Escherichia coli and Salmonella, and the biosyntheses of core sugar precursors and core oligosaccharide are summarised. Pseudomonas aeruginosa attaches a Common Polysaccharide Antigen and O-Specific Antigen polysaccharides to lipid A-core. Both forms of O polysaccharide are discussed with respect to their independent synthesis mechanisms. Recent advances in understanding O-polysaccharide biosynthesis since the last major review on this subject, published nearly a decade ago, are highlighted. Since P. aeruginosa O polysaccharides contain unusual sugars, sugar-nucleotide biosynthesis pathways are reviewed in detail. Knowledge derived from detailed studies in the O5, O6 and O11 serotypes is applied to predict biosynthesis pathways of sugars in poorly-studied serotypes, especially O1, O4, and O13/O14. Although further work is required, a full understanding of LPS biosynthesis in P. aeruginosa is almost within reach.

  1. APPLICATION OF PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA AND RHODOCOCCUS SP. BY BIODEGRADATION OF PAH(S, PCB(S AND NEL SOIL SAMPLES FROM THE HAZARDOUS WASTE DUMP IN POZĎÁTKY (CZECH REPUBLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radmila Kucerova

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the project was a laboratory check of biodegradation of soil samples contaminated by PAH(s, PCB(s and NEL from the hazardous waste dump in the Pozďátky locality. For the laboratory check, pure bacterial cultures of Rhodococcus sp. and Pseudomonas putida have been used. It is apparent from the laboratory experiments results that after one-month bacterial leaching, applying the bacterium of Rhodococcus sp. there is a 83 % removal of NEL, a 79 % removal of PAH(s and a 14 % removal of PCB(s. Applying a pure culture of Pseudomonas putida there is a 87 % removal of NEL, a 81 % removal of PAH(s and a 14 % removal of PCB(s.

  2. Surface enhanced Raman scattering for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrift, Will; Bhattacharjee, Arunima; Darvishzadeh-Varcheie, Mahsa; Lu, Ying; Hochbaum, Allon; Capolino, Filippo; Whiteson, Katrine; Ragan, Regina

    2015-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), a biofilm forming bacterium, commonly affects cystic fibrosis, burn victims, and immunocompromised patients. PA produces pyocyanin, an aromatic, redox active, secondary metabolite as part of its quorum sensing signaling system activated during biofilm formation. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors composed of Au nanospheres chemically assembled into clusters on diblock copolymer templates were fabricated and the ability to detect pyocyanin to monitor biofilm formation was investigated. Electromagnetic full wave simulations of clusters observed in scanning electron microcopy images show that the localized surface plasmon resonance wavelength is 696 nm for a dimer with a gap spacing of 1 nm in an average dielectric environment of the polymer and analyte; the local electric field enhancement is on the order of 400 at resonance, relative to free space. SERS data acquired at 785 nm excitation from a monolayer of benzenethiol on fabricated samples was compared with Raman data of pure benzenethiol and enhancement factors as large as 8×109 were calculated that are consistent with simulated field enhancements. Using this system, the limit of detection of pyocyanin in pure gradients was determined to be 10 parts per billion. In SERS data of the supernatant from the time dependent growth of PA shaking cultures, pyocyanin vibrational modes were clearly observable during the logarithmic growth phase corresponding to activation of genes related to biofilm formation. These results pave the way for the use of SERS sensors for the early detection of biofilm formation, leading to reduced healthcare costs and better patient outcomes.

  3. Inhibition of Vibrio anguillarum by Pseudomonas fluorescens AH2, a possible probiotic treatment of fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Melchiorsen, Jette; Spanggaard, Bettina

    1999-01-01

    To study the possible use of probiotics in fish farming, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo antagonism of antibacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens strain AH2 against the fish- pathogenic bacterium Vibrio anguillarum. As iron is important in virulence and bacterial interactions, the effect....... fluorescens AH2 inhibited the growth of V. anguillarum during coculture, independently of the iron concentration, when the initial count of the antagonist was 100 to 1,000 times greater that of the fish pathogen. These in vitro results were successfully repeated in vivo. A probiotic effect in vivo was tested...... by exposing rainbow trout (Oncorynchus mykiss Walbaum) to P. fluorescens AH2 at a density of 10(5) CFU/ml for 5 days before a challenge with V. anguillarum at 10(4) to 10(5) CFU/ml for 1 h. Some fish were also exposed to P. fluorescens AH2 at 10(7) CFU/ml during the 1-h infection. The combined probiotic...

  4. A specific antimicrobial protein CAP-1 from Pseudomonas sp. isolated from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Manman; Liu, Dan; Xu, Feng; Xiao, Liang; Wang, Qianqian; Wang, Beilei; Chang, Yinlong; Zheng, Jiemin; Tao, Xia; Liu, Guoyan; Zhang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    A bacterium strain, designated as CMF-2, was isolated from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata and its culture supernatant exhibited a significant antimicrobial activity. The strain CMF-2 was identified as Pseudomonas sp. based on the morphological, biochemical and physiological characteristics as well as 16S rRNA sequence analysis. In this study, an antimicrobial protein, named as CAP-1, was isolated from the culture of CMF-2 through ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration chromatography. According to the result of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), a major band indicated that the antimicrobial protein had a molecular mass of about 15 kDa, and it was identified as a hypothetical protein by MALDI-TOF-MS analysis and Mascot searching. CAP-1 displayed a broad antimicrobial spectrum against the indicator bacteria and fungus, including Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans, especially some marine-derived microorganisms such as Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio cholera, and Vibrio anguillarum, but showed little impact on tumor cells and normal human cells. The protein CAP-1 remained a stable antimicrobial activity in a wide range of temperature (20-80°C) and pH (2-10) conditions. These results suggested that CAP-1 might have a specific antimicrobial function not due to cytotoxicity.

  5. A gacS deletion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis isolate CHA shapes its virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khady Mayebine Sall

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human opportunistic pathogen, is capable of provoking acute and chronic infections that are associated with defined sets of virulence factors. During chronic infections, the bacterium accumulates mutations that silence some and activate other genes. Here we show that the cystic fibrosis isolate CHA exhibits a unique virulence phenotype featuring a mucoid morphology, an active Type III Secretion System (T3SS, hallmark of acute infections, and no Type VI Secretion System (H1-T6SS. This virulence profile is due to a 426 bp deletion in the 3' end of the gacS gene encoding an essential regulatory protein. The absence of GacS disturbs the Gac/Rsm pathway leading to depletion of the small regulatory RNAs RsmY/RsmZ and, in consequence, to expression of T3SS, while switching off the expression of H1-T6SS and Pel polysaccharides. The CHA isolate also exhibits full ability to swim and twitch, due to active flagellum and Type IVa pili. Thus, unlike the classical scheme of balance between virulence factors, clinical strains may adapt to a local niche by expressing both alginate exopolysaccharide, a hallmark of membrane stress that protects from antibiotic action, host defences and phagocytosis, and efficient T3S machinery that is considered as an aggressive virulence factor.

  6. The prevalence and resistance patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a tertiary care hospital in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lila, Greta; Mulliqi-Osmani, Gjyle; Bajrami, Rrezarta; Kurti, Arsim; Azizi, Elvir; Raka, Lul

    2017-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium that continues to a leading cause of opportunistic nosocomial infections. The rapid increase in drug resistance in clinical isolates of this pathogen is a worldwide concern. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution rate, prevalence and resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa in clinical specimens from the University Clinical Centre of Kosovo (UCCK). During a three-year period, 553 P. aeruginosa isolates were collected from patients admitted to a variety of UCCK units. The P. aeruginosa isolates were identified using standard laboratory procedures, and the susceptibility of the isolates to antimicrobial agents was investigated using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) (2013-2015) guidelines. P. aeruginosa was the second most frequently isolated pathogen. The isolation rate of P. aeruginosa was 7.6%, 10.1% and 8.6% in 2013, 2014 and 2015, respectively. Most clinical samples were from ICU (380, 68.7%). There was a statistically significant difference between ICU and non-ICU (pKosovo and will support the preparation of guidelines and protocols for the prudent use of antibiotics.

  7. A TonB-dependent outer membrane receptor of Pseudomonas fluorescens: virulence and vaccine potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yong-hua; Dang, Wei; Sun, Li

    2012-09-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a Gram-negative bacterium and a common aquaculture pathogen. In this study, we identified from a pathogenic P. fluorescens strain a TonB-dependent outer membrane receptor, TdrA, as a secreted protein and examined its function and vaccine potential. TdrA is composed of 746 residues and possesses conserved structural domains of TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that expression of tdrA was upregulated under conditions of iron starvation and during infection of host cells. Consistently, iron depletion induced increased production of TdrA protein in the outer membrane. Compared to the wild type, a tdrA-knock out mutant (1) was unable to grow in the absence of iron, (2) exhibited drastically attenuated overall bacterial virulence, and (3) was impaired in the ability to establish lethal infection in host tissues. Purified recombinant TdrA (rTdrA), when used as a subunit vaccine to immunize flounder, was able to induce strong protective immunity, including production of serum-specific antibodies that resulted in effective protection against lethal-dose P. fluorescens challenge. Together, these results indicate that TdrA is an outer membrane receptor and a protective immunogen that is likely to be involved in iron acquisition and, as a result, required for optimal bacterial virulence.

  8. Crystal structure of LpxC from Pseudomonas aeruginosa complexed with the potent BB-78485 inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochalkin, Igor; Knafels, John D.; Lightle, Sandra (Pfizer)

    2008-04-02

    The cell wall in Gram-negative bacteria is surrounded by an outer membrane comprised of charged lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules that prevent entry of hydrophobic agents into the cell and protect the bacterium from many antibiotics. The hydrophobic anchor of LPS is lipid A, the biosynthesis of which is essential for bacterial growth and viability. UDP-3-O-(R-3-hydroxymyristoyl)-N-acetylglucosamine deacetylase (LpxC) is an essential zinc-dependant enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of UDP-3-O-(R-3-hydroxymyristoyl)-N-acetylglucosamine to UDP-3-O-(R-3-hydroxymyristoyl)glucosamine and acetate in the biosynthesis of lipid A, and for this reason, LpxC is an attractive target for antibacterial drug discovery. Here we disclose a 1.9 A resolution crystal structure of LpxC from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (paLpxC) in a complex with the potent BB-78485 inhibitor. To our knowledge, this is the first crystal structure of LpxC with a small-molecule inhibitor that shows antibacterial activity against a wide range of Gram-negative pathogens. Accordingly, this structure can provide important information for lead optimization and rational design of the effective small-molecule LpxC inhibitors for successful treatment of Gram-negative infections.

  9. Involvement of type VI secretion system in secretion of iron chelator pyoverdine in Pseudomonas taiwanensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jen; Kuo, Tzu-Yen; Hsieh, Feng-Chia; Chen, Pi-Yu; Wang, Chang-Sheng; Shih, Yu-Ling; Lai, Ying-Mi; Liu, Je-Ruei; Yang, Yu-Liang; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-01-01

    Rice bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is one of the most destructive rice diseases worldwide. Therefore, in addition to breeding disease-resistant rice cultivars, it is desirable to develop effective biocontrol agents against Xoo. Here, we report that a soil bacterium Pseudomonas taiwanensis displayed strong antagonistic activity against Xoo. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry, we identified an iron chelator, pyoverdine, secreted by P. taiwanensis that could inhibit the growth of Xoo. Through Tn5 mutagenesis of P. taiwanensis, we showed that mutations in genes that encode components of the type VI secretion system (T6SS) as well as biosynthesis and maturation of pyoverdine resulted in reduced toxicity against Xoo. Our results indicated that T6SS is involved in the secretion of endogenous pyoverdine. Mutations in T6SS component genes affected the secretion of mature pyoverdine from the periplasmic space into the extracellular medium after pyoverdine precursor is transferred to the periplasm by the inner membrane transporter PvdE. In addition, we also showed that other export systems, i.e., the PvdRT-OpmQ and MexAB-OprM efflux systems (for which there have been previous suggestions of involvement) and the type II secretion system (T2SS), are not involved in pyoverdine secretion. PMID:27605490

  10. Analysis of the swimming activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by using photonic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chia-Han; Chang, Bo-Jui; Huang, Ying-Jung; Fan, Chia-Chieh; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chi, Sien; Hsu, Long

    2005-08-01

    Swimming activity of flagella is a main factor of the motility of bacteria. Flagella expressed on the surface of bacterial species serve as a primary means of motility including swimming. We propose to use optical tweezers to analyze the swimming activity of bacteria. The sample bacteria in the work is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and it is a gram-negative bacterium and often causes leading to burn wound infections, urinary-tract infections, and pneumonia. The single polar flagellum of P. aeruginosa has been demonstrated to be important virulence and colonization factor of this opportunistic pathogen. We demonstrate a gene to regulate the bacterial swimming activity in P. aeruginosa PAO1 by biological method. However, the change of flagellar morphology was not observed by electron microscopy analysis, suggesting that the gene regulates the flagellar rotation that could not be detected by biological method. PFM exhibits a spatial resolution of a few nanometers to detect the relative position of the probe at an acquisition rate over 1 MHz. By binding a probe such as a bead or a quantum dot on the flagella, we expect the rotation of the probe due to the flagella could be detected. It is expected that the study of the swimming activity of P. aeruginosa provide potent method for the pathogenic role of the flagella in P. aeruginosa.

  11. Subinhibitory concentration of kanamycin induces the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type VI secretion system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerith Jones

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium found in natural environments including plants, soils and warm moist surfaces. This organism is also in the top ten of nosocomial pathogens, and prevalent in cystic fibrosis (CF lung infections. The ability of P. aeruginosa to colonize a wide variety of environments in a lasting manner is associated with the formation of a resistant biofilm and the capacity to efficiently outcompete other microorganisms. Here we demonstrate that sub-inhibitory concentration of kanamycin not only induces biofilm formation but also induces expression of the type VI secretion genes in the H1-T6SS cluster. The H1-T6SS is known for its role in toxin production and bacterial competition. We show that the antibiotic induction of the H1-T6SS only occurs when a functional Gac/Rsm pathway is present. These observations may contribute to understand how P. aeruginosa responds to antibiotic producing competitors. It also suggests that improper antibiotic therapy may enhance P. aeruginosa colonization, including in the airways of CF patients.

  12. Purification and Properties of an Extracellular Polyhydroxybutyrate Depolymerase from Pseudomonas mendocina DSWY0601

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan; LI Fan; WANG Zhan-yong; LIU Dong-bo; XIA Hong-mei; LIU Ling-fei; CHEN Shan

    2012-01-01

    An extracellular polyhydroxybutyrate(PHB) depolymerase was purified to homogeneity from the culture supematant of a PHB-degrading bacterium,Pseudomonas mendocina DSWY0601,which was isolated from brewery sewage for the ability to form clear zones on the PHB mineral agar plates.The molecular weight of the purified PHB depolymerase as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) was approximately 59800 at the optimal temperature and pH value being 50℃ and 8.5,respectively.PHB depolymerase was stable in a temperature rangc of 20--50℃ and sensitive to pH value within a pH range of 8.0--9.5.PHB depolymerase degraded poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate(P3/4HB) and poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate(PHBV) but did not degrade poly(lactic acid)(PLA),poly(butylene succinate)(PBS) or poly(caprolactone)(PCL).PHB depolymerase was sensitive to phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride(PMSF),H2O2 and SDS.The main product after enzymatic degradation of PHB was indentified as 3-hydroxbutyrate monomer(3HB) by mass spectrometric analysis,suggesting that PHB depolymerase acted as an exo-type hydrolase.Analysis ofphaZpm gene reveals that PHB depolymerase is a typical denatured short-chain-length PHA(dPHAscL,PHA=polyhydroxyalkanoate)depolymerase containing catalytic domain,linker and substrate-binding domain.

  13. Pentachlorophenol degradation by Pseudomonas stutzeri CL7 in the secondary sludge of pulp and paper mill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santosh Kr.Karn; S.K.Chakrabarty; M.S.Reddy

    2010-01-01

    A pentachlorophenol (PCP) mineralizing bacterium was isolated from the secondary sludge of pulp and paper mill and identified as Pseudomonas stutzeri strain CL7.This isolate used PCP as its sole source of carbon and energy and was capable of degrading this compound as indicated by stoichiometric release of chloride and biomass formation.P.stutzeri (CL7) was able to mineralize a high concentration of PCP (600 mg/L) than any previously reported Pseudomonad with PCP as sole carbon source.As the concentration of PCP increased from 50 to 600 mg/L,the reduction in the cell growth was observed and the PCP degradation was more than 90% in all studied concentrations.This isolate was able to remove 66.8% of PCP from the secondary sludge of pulp and paper mill when supplemented with 100 mg/L of PCP and grown for two weeks.This study showed that the removal efficiency of PCP by CL7 was found to be very effective and can be used in PCP remediation of pulp paper mill waste in the environment.

  14. Comparative genomics of an endophytic Pseudomonas putida isolated from mango orchard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huma Asif

    Full Text Available Abstract We analyzed the genome sequence of an endophytic bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida TJI51 isolated from mango bark tissues. Next generation DNA sequencing and short read de novo assembly generated the 5,805,096 bp draft genome of P. putida TJI51. Out of 6,036 protein coding genes in P. putida TJI51 sequences, 4,367 (72% were annotated with functional specifications, while the remaining encoded hypothetical proteins. Comparative genome sequence analysis revealed that the P. putida TJI51genome contains several regions, not identified in so far sequenced P. putida genomes. Some of these regions were predicted to encode enzymes, including acetylornithine deacetylase, betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, benzoylformate decarboxylase, hydroxyacylglutathione hydrolase, and uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase. The genome of P. putida TJI51 contained three nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene clusters. Genome sequence analysis of P. putidaTJI51 identified this bacterium as an endophytic resident. The endophytic fitness might be linked with alginate, which facilitates bacterial colonization in plant tissues. Genome sequence analysis shed light on the presence of a diverse spectrum of metabolic activities and adaptation of this isolate to various niches.

  15. The genomic basis of adaptation to the fitness cost of rifampicin resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll-Riera, Macarena; Heilbron, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance carries a fitness cost that must be overcome in order for resistance to persist over the long term. Compensatory mutations that recover the functional defects associated with resistance mutations have been argued to play a key role in overcoming the cost of resistance, but compensatory mutations are expected to be rare relative to generally beneficial mutations that increase fitness, irrespective of antibiotic resistance. Given this asymmetry, population genetics theory predicts that populations should adapt by compensatory mutations when the cost of resistance is large, whereas generally beneficial mutations should drive adaptation when the cost of resistance is small. We tested this prediction by determining the genomic mechanisms underpinning adaptation to antibiotic-free conditions in populations of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa that carry costly antibiotic resistance mutations. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that populations founded by high-cost rifampicin-resistant mutants adapted via compensatory mutations in three genes of the RNA polymerase core enzyme, whereas populations founded by low-cost mutants adapted by generally beneficial mutations, predominantly in the quorum-sensing transcriptional regulator gene lasR. Even though the importance of compensatory evolution in maintaining resistance has been widely recognized, our study shows that the roles of general adaptation in maintaining resistance should not be underestimated and highlights the need to understand how selection at other sites in the genome influences the dynamics of resistance alleles in clinical settings. PMID:26763710

  16. Inhibition of Vibrio anguillarum by Pseudomonas fluorescens AH2, a possible probiotic treatment of fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Melchiorsen, Jette; Spanggaard, Bettina;

    1999-01-01

    To study the possible use of probiotics in fish farming, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo antagonism of antibacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens strain AH2 against the fish- pathogenic bacterium Vibrio anguillarum. As iron is important in virulence and bacterial interactions, the effect....... fluorescens AH2 inhibited the growth of V. anguillarum during coculture, independently of the iron concentration, when the initial count of the antagonist was 100 to 1,000 times greater that of the fish pathogen. These in vitro results were successfully repeated in vivo. A probiotic effect in vivo was tested...... by exposing rainbow trout (Oncorynchus mykiss Walbaum) to P. fluorescens AH2 at a density of 10(5) CFU/ml for 5 days before a challenge with V. anguillarum at 10(4) to 10(5) CFU/ml for 1 h. Some fish were also exposed to P. fluorescens AH2 at 10(7) CFU/ml during the 1-h infection. The combined probiotic...

  17. Uranium and thorium sequestration by a Pseudomonas sp.: mechanism and chemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazy, Sufia K; D'Souza, S F; Sar, Pinaki

    2009-04-15

    The mechanism and chemical nature of uranium and thorium sequestration by a Pseudomonas strain was investigated by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) used in the tapping mode elucidated the morphological changes in bacterial cells following uranium and thorium binding. Transmission electron microscopy revealed intracellular sequestration of uranium and thorium throughout the cell cytoplasm with electron dense microprecipitations of accumulated metals. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed the cellular deposition of uranium and thorium. EDX and elemental analysis of sorption solution indicated the binding of uranium and thorium by the bacterial biomass via displacement of cellular potassium and calcium. The strong involvement of cellular phosphate, carboxyl and amide groups in radionuclide binding was ascertained by FTIR spectroscopy. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analyses confirmed cellular sequestration of crystalline uranium and thorium phosphates. Overall results indicate that a combined ion-exchange-complexation-microprecipitation mechanism could be involved in uranium and thorium sequestration by this bacterium. Atomic force microscopy and topography analysis revealed an undamaged cell surface with an increase in cell length, width and height following radionuclide accumulation. The arithmetic average roughness (R(a)) and root mean square (RMS) roughness (R(q)) values indicated an increase in surface roughness following uranium and thorium sequestration.

  18. Structure characterization of phospholipids and lipid A of Pseudomonas putida KT2442.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuqian; Wang, Jianli; Li, Ye; Wang, Biwen; Tao, Guanjun; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2442 is an important bacterium for producing various types of polyhydroxyalkanoate polymers. Phospholipids and lipid A in membranes of P. putida play important roles in stress responses, but detailed structural information of these lipids is not known. In this study, phospholipids and lipid A were isolated from P. putida KT2442, and their structures were analyzed using thin layer chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, and electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry. Major phospholipids in P. putida KT2442 were phosphatidylethanolamine (79.9%), phosphatidylglycero1 (12.7%), and cardiolipin (7.4%), with C16:1 and/or C18:1 acyl chains. Four lipid A species were found in P. putida KT2442: two are hexa-acylated, and the other two are penta-acylated. Compared with lipid A of P. aeruginosa, P. putida lipid A has less hydroxylation on the secondary acyl chains and less modification. Therefore, P. putida lipid A could be used as a base structure to investigate lipid A modification of P. aeruginosa for understanding its pathogenesis.

  19. Interactions between polymorphonuclear leukocytes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms on silicone implants in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gennip, Maria; Christensen, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Morten; Qvortrup, Klaus; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Chronic infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa persist because the bacterium forms biofilms that are tolerant to antibiotic treatment and the host immune response. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to visualize biofilm development in vivo following intraperitoneal inoculation of mice with bacteria growing on hollow silicone tubes, as well as to examine the interaction between these bacteria and the host innate immune response. Wild-type P. aeruginosa developed biofilms within 1 day that trapped and caused visible cavities in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). In contrast, the number of cells of a P. aeruginosa rhlA mutant that cannot produce rhamnolipids was significantly reduced on the implants by day 1, and the bacteria were actively phagocytosed by infiltrating PMNs. In addition, we identified extracellular wire-like structures around the bacteria and PMNs, which we found to consist of DNA and other polymers. Here we present a novel method to study a pathogen-host interaction in detail. The data presented provide the first direct, high-resolution visualization of the failure of PMNs to protect against bacterial biofilms.

  20. Anatomical changes on coffee leaves infected by Pseudomonas syringae pv. garcae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Mateus Rivero Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTAlthough poorly studied, the bacterial halo blight is an important disease in the major coffee-producing states of Brazil. External damage and anatomical changes on leaves were measured in seedlings of Coffea arabica cv. Mundo Novo, susceptible to Pseudomonas syringae pv. garcae, by using histological sections obtained at 10 and 20 days after inoculation (DAI. The changes on the epidermis were smaller than the lesions measured in the mesophyll, irrespective of the evaluated colonization period, showing that the internal damage caused by the bacterium represent twice the damage observed externally. From the inoculation site, lysis occurred on the epidermal cells and on the palisade and spongy parenchyma cells, with strong staining of their cellular contents, as well as abnormal intercellular spaces in the palisade parenchyma, hypertrophy and hyperplasia of mesophyll cells and partial destruction of chloroplasts. Additionally, this study revealed the presence of inclusion bodies in epidermal and mesophyll cells. Bacterial masses were found in the apoplast between and within mesophyll cells. Bacteria were also observed in the bundle sheath and vascular bundles and were more pronounced at 20 DAI, not only near the inoculation site but also in distant areas, suggesting displacement through the vascular system. These results can be useful to understand this plant-pathogen interaction.

  1. Aerobic degradation of tetrachloroethylene by toluene-o-xylene monooxygenase of Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, D; Shim, H; Canada, K; Barbieri, P; Wood, T K

    2000-07-01

    Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) is thought to have no natural source, so it is one of the most difficult contaminants to degrade biologically. This common groundwater pollutant was thought completely nonbiodegradable in the presence of oxygen. Here we report that the wastewater bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1 degrades aerobically 0. 56 micromol of 2.0 micromol PCE in 21 h (Vmax approximately 2.5 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein and KM approximately 34 microM). These results were corroborated by the generation of 0.48 micromol of the degradation product, chloride ions. This degradation was confirmed to be a result of expression of toluene-o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) by P. stutzeri OX1, since cloning and expressing this enzyme in Escherichia coli led to the aerobic degradation of 0.19 micromol of 2.0 micromol PCE and the generation of stoichiometric amounts of chloride. In addition, PCE induces formation of ToMO, which leads to its own degradation in P. stutzeri OX1. Degradation intermediates reduce the growth rate of this strain by 27%.

  2. Tracing explosives in soil with transcriptional regulators of Pseudomonas putida evolved for responding to nitrotoluenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, Junkal; De Las Heras, Aitor; Galvão, Teca Calcagno; De Lorenzo, Víctor

    2008-01-01

    Summary Although different biological approaches for detection of anti‐personnel mines and other unexploded ordnance (UXO) have been entertained, none of them has been rigorously documented thus far in the scientific literature. The industrial 2,4,6 trinitrotoluene (TNT) habitually employed in the manufacturing of mines is at all times tainted with a small but significant proportion of the more volatile 2,4 dinitrotoluene (2,4 DNT) and other nitroaromatic compounds. By using mutation‐prone PCR and DNA sequence shuffling we have evolved in vitro and selected in vivo variants of the effector recognition domain of the toluene‐responsive XylR regulator of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida that responds to mono‐, bi‐ and trinitro substituted toluenes. Re‐introduction of such variants in P. putida settled the transcriptional activity of the cognate promoters (Po and Pu) as a function of the presence of nitrotoluenes in the medium. When strains bearing transcriptional fusions to reporters with an optical output (luxAB, GFP) were spread on soil spotted with nitrotoluenes, the signal triggered by promoter activation allowed localization of the target compounds on the soil surface. Our data provide a proof of concept that non‐natural transcription factors evolved to respond to nitroaromatics can be engineered in soil bacteria and inoculated on a target site to pinpoint the presence of explosives. This approach thus opens new ways to tackle this gigantic humanitarian problem. PMID:21261843

  3. Detection and analysis of chromosomal arsenic resistance in Pseudomonas fluorescens strain MSP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prithivirajsingh, S; Mishra, S K; Mahadevan, A

    2001-02-09

    Pseudomonas fluorescens MSP3 isolated from sea water was resistant to arsenate. This bacterium harbored no plasmids, indicating that arsenic resistance was chromosomally encoded. The chromosomal DNA from MSP3 when transformed onto Escherichia coli DH5alpha using pBluescript exhibited resistance to sodium arsenate and sodium arsenite. Three clones MSA1, MSA2, and MSI3 containing the ars genes were obtained and further subcloning resulted in three fragments of size 2.2, 2.6, and 2.1 kb for pMSA11, pMSA12, and pMSI13, respectively, which contained the genes arsRBC of the arsenic operon. An efflux mechanism of detoxification was observed which was ATP dependent. The resistance mechanism was encoded from a single operon which consisted of an arsenite inducible repressor that regulates the expression of arsenate reductase (ars C) and inner membrane associated arsenite export system encoded by ars B. The chromosomal operon was cloned, sequenced, and found to consist of three cistrons, named as ars R, ars B, and ars C. Southern hybridization and mating experiments confirmed the functioning of the ars genes in the operon, thereby conferring increased resistance to sodium arsenate and sodium arsenite.

  4. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species by tryptophan metabolites helps Pseudomonas aeruginosa escape neutrophil killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genestet, Charlotte; Le Gouellec, Audrey; Chaker, Hichem; Polack, Benoit; Guery, Benoit; Toussaint, Bertrand; Stasia, Marie José

    2014-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for persistent infections in cystic fibrosis patients, suggesting an ability to circumvent innate immune defenses. This bacterium uses the kynurenine pathway to catabolize tryptophan. Interestingly, many host cells also produce kynurenine, which is known to control immune system homeostasis. We showed that most strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis patients produce a high level of kynurenine. Moreover, a strong transcriptional activation of kynA (the first gene involved in the kynurenine pathway) was observed upon contact with immune cells and particularly with neutrophils. In addition, using coculture of human neutrophils with various strains of P. aeruginosa producing no (ΔkynA) or a high level of kynurenine (ΔkynU or ΔkynA pkynA), we demonstrated that kynurenine promotes bacterial survival. In addition, increasing the amount kynurenine inhibits reactive oxygen species production by activated neutrophils, as evaluated by chemiluminescence with luminol or isoluminol or SOD-sensitive cytochrome c reduction assay. This inhibition is due neither to a phagocytosis defect nor to direct NADPH oxidase inhibition. Indeed, kynurenine has no effect on oxygen consumption by neutrophils activated by PMA or opsonized zymosan. Using in vitro reactive oxygen species-producing systems, we showed that kynurenine scavenges hydrogen peroxide and, to a lesser extent, superoxide. Kynurenine׳s scavenging effect occurs mainly intracellularly after bacterial stimulation, probably in the phagosome. In conclusion, the kynurenine pathway allows P. aeruginosa to circumvent the innate immune response by scavenging neutrophil reactive oxygen species production.

  5. Pseudomoniasis phytotherapy: a review on most important Iranian medicinal plants effective on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmani, Mahmoud; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Hassanzadazar, Hassan; Taherikalani, Morovat

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, aerobic bacterium found in water and soil. It is a normal flora in skin and gastrointestinal tract of human beings. P. aeruginosa as an opportunistic pathogen involved in nosocomial infections having multiple pathogenic factors and shows high rate of resistance to different antibiotics. The aim of this study was to identify the most important native medicinal plants of Iran effective on P. aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: All required information was obtained by searching keywords such as P. aeruginosa, medicinal plant extracts or essential oils in published articles in authentic scientific databases such as Science Direct, Wiley-Blackwell, Springer, Google scholar, Scientific Information Database (SID) and Magiran. Results: According to the literature review, our results showed 12 different native medicinal plants were effective against P. aeruginosa in Iran including Eucalyptus camadulensis, Marticaria chamomilla, Ferula gummosa Boiss, Lawsonia inermis, Ocimumgra tissimum, Allium sativum, Satureja hortensis L, Satureja bachtiarica Bunge, Satureja khuzestanica (Jamzad), Thymus daenensis Celak, Thymus carmanicus Jalals and Camellia sinensis. Conclusion: Phytochemical analysis has shown that bioactive compounds of medicinal plants with their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties can be good alternatives for the synthetic medicines in food and drug industry. PMID:28149496

  6. Plant flavonoids target Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 flagella and type III secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Paola; Farias, Gabriela A; Nogales, Joaquina; Prada, Harold; Carvajal, Vivian; Barón, Matilde; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta; Olmedilla, Adela; Gallegos, María-Trinidad

    2013-12-01

    Flavonoids are among the most abundant plant secondary metabolites involved in plant protection against pathogens, but micro-organisms have developed resistance mechanisms to those compounds. We previously demonstrated that the MexAB-OprM efflux pump mediates resistance of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000 to flavonoids, facilitating its survival and the colonization of the host. Here, we have shown that tomato plants respond to Pto infection producing flavonoids and other phenolic compounds. The effects of flavonoids on key traits of this model plant-pathogen bacterium have also been investigated observing that they reduce Pto swimming and swarming because of the loss of flagella, and also inhibited the expression and assembly of a functional type III secretion system. Those effects were more severe in a mutant lacking the MexAB-OprM pump. Our results suggest that flavonoids inhibit the function of the GacS/GacA two-component system, causing a depletion of rsmY RNA, therefore affecting the synthesis of two important virulence factors in Pto DC3000, flagella and the type III secretion system. These data provide new insights into the flavonoid role in the molecular dialog between host and pathogen.

  7. Functional analysis of aromatic biosynthetic pathways in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Henares, M Antonia; García-Salamanca, Adela; Molina-Henares, A Jesús; de la Torre, Jesús; Herrera, M Carmen; Ramos, Juan L; Duque, Estrella

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a non-pathogenic prototrophic bacterium with high potential for biotechnological applications. Despite all that is known about this strain, the biosynthesis of essential chemicals has not been fully analysed and auxotroph mutants are scarce. We carried out massive mini-Tn5 random mutagenesis and screened for auxotrophs that require aromatic amino acids. The biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids was analysed in detail including physical and transcriptional organization of genes, complementation assays and feeding experiments to establish pathway intermediates. There is a single pathway from chorismate leading to the biosynthesis of tryptophan, whereas the biosynthesis of phenylalanine and tyrosine is achieved through multiple convergent pathways. Genes for tryptophan biosynthesis are grouped in unlinked regions with the trpBA and trpGDE genes organized as operons and the trpI, trpE and trpF genes organized as single transcriptional units. The pheA and tyrA gene-encoding multifunctional enzymes for phenylalanine and tyrosine biosynthesis are linked in the chromosome and form an operon with the serC gene involved in serine biosynthesis. The last step in the biosynthesis of these two amino acids requires an amino transferase activity for which multiple tyrB-like genes are present in the host chromosome.

  8. Electricity Generation and Wastewater Treatment of Oil Refinery in Microbial Fuel Cells Using Pseudomonas putida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dip Majumder

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs represent a novel platform for treating wastewater and at the same time generating electricity. Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059, a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days. Our study indicated that the oil refinery wastewater containing 2213 mg/L (ppm chemical oxygen demand (COD could be used as a substrate for electricity generation in the reactor of the MFC. A maximum voltage of 355 mV was obtained with the highest power density of 0.005 mW/cm2 in the third cycle with a maximum current density of 0.015 mA/cm2 in regard to the external resistor of 1000 Ω. A maximum coulombic efficiency of 6 × 10−2% was obtained in the fourth cycle. The removal efficiency of the COD reached 30% as a function of time. Electron transfer mechanism was studied using cyclic voltammetry, which indicated the presence of a soluble electron shuttle in the reactor. Our study demonstrated that oil refinery wastewater could be used as a substrate for electricity generation.

  9. Assessment of acrylamide degradation potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa BAC-6 isolated from industrial effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekar, Vijayashree; Chandrashekar, Chandrika; Shivakumar, Rajath; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Das, Arijit; Gouda, Bhaskar; Rajan, Subbaramiah Sundara

    2014-07-01

    Acrylamide finds diverse industrial applications but is considered an environmental threat because of its neurotoxic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic effects. Certain bacteria enzymatically degrade acrylamide to acrylic acid and ammonia. The present investigation was carried out to isolate and identify an acrylamide-degrading bacterium from industrial effluent. Bacterial growth and extent of acrylamide degradation in the presence of different acrylamide concentrations, nutrients, varied range of pH, and temperature were analyzed. Among the eight acrylamide-degrading isolates, isolate BAC-6 demonstrated the highest degradation, and based upon the partial 16S rDNA sequencing, it was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa BAC-6 grew over a wide range of acrylamide concentrations, but the highest degradation was recorded at 500 mg/L concentration with concomitant cell growth. Among the carbon supplements, mannitol supported the highest growth and degradation. Maximum degradation was reported at neutral pH. A mesophilic temperature range (25-40 °C) facilitated conducive bacterial growth followed by degradation. The highest degradation and bacterial growth were observed at 30 and 35 °C, respectively. Thus, it could be inferred from the present investigation that cultural conditions strongly affected the degradation potential of P. aeruginosa BAC-6 and advocated the utilization of the isolate in bioremediation of sites polluted with acrylamide.

  10. Flagellin delivery by Pseudomonas aeruginosa rhamnolipids induces the antimicrobial protein psoriasin in human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Meyer-Hoffert

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can cause severe infections in patients suffering from disruption or disorder of the skin barrier as in burns, chronic wounds, and after surgery. On healthy skin P. aeruginosa causes rarely infections. To gain insight into the interaction of the ubiquitous bacterium P. aeruginosa and healthy human skin, the induction of the antimicrobial protein psoriasin by P. aeruginosa grown on an ex vivo skin model was analyzed. We show that presence of the P. aeruginosa derived biosurfactant rhamnolipid was indispensable for flagellin-induced psoriasin expression in human skin, contrary to in vitro conditions. The importance of the bacterial virulence factor flagellin as the major inducing factor of psoriasin expression in skin was demonstrated by use of a flagellin-deficient mutant. Rhamnolipid mediated shuttle across the outer skin barrier was not restricted to flagellin since rhamnolipids enable psoriasin expression by the cytokines IL-17 and IL-22 after topical application on human skin. Rhamnolipid production was detected for several clinical strains and the formation of vesicles was observed under skin physiological conditions. In conclusion we demonstrate herein that rhamnolipids enable the induction of the antimicrobial protein psoriasin by flagellin in human skin without direct contact of bacteria and responding cells. Hereby, human skin might control the microflora to prevent colonization of unwanted microbes in the earliest steps before potential pathogens can develop strategies to subvert the immune response.

  11. Characterization of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, Causal Agent of Citrus Blast of Mandarin in Montenegro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanović, Žarko; Perović, Tatjana; Popović, Tatjana; Blagojević, Jovana; Trkulja, Nenad; Hrnčić, Snježana

    2017-02-01

    Citrus blast caused by bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is a very important disease of citrus occuring in many areas of the world, but with few data about genetic structure of the pathogen involved. Considering the above fact, this study reports genetic characterization of 43 P. syringae isolates obtained from plant tissue displaying citrus blast symptoms on mandarin (Citrus reticulata) in Montenegro, using multilocus sequence analysis of gyrB, rpoD, and gap1 gene sequences. Gene sequences from a collection of 54 reference pathotype strains of P. syringae from the Plant Associated and Environmental Microbes Database (PAMDB) was used to establish a genetic relationship with our isolates obtained from mandarin. Phylogenetic analyses of gyrB, rpoD, and gap1 gene sequences showed that P. syringae pv. syringae causes citrus blast in mandarin in Montenegro, and belongs to genomospecies 1. Genetic homogeneity of isolates suggested that the Montenegrian population might be clonal which indicates a possible common source of infection. These findings may assist in further epidemiological studies of this pathogen and for determining mandarin breeding strategies for P. syringae control.

  12. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa type VI secretion phospholipase D effector targets both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feng; Waterfield, Nicholas R; Yang, Jian; Yang, Guowei; Jin, Qi

    2014-05-14

    Widely found in animal and plant-associated proteobacteria, type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) are potentially capable of facilitating diverse interactions with eukaryotes and/or other bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes three distinct T6SS haemolysin coregulated protein (Hcp) secretion islands (H1, H2, and H3-T6SS), each involved in different aspects of the bacterium's interaction with other organisms. Here we describe the characterization of a P. aeruginosa H3-T6SS-dependent phospholipase D effector, PldB, and its three tightly linked cognate immunity proteins. PldB targets the periplasm of prokaryotic cells and exerts an antibacterial activity. Surprisingly, PldB also facilitates intracellular invasion of host eukaryotic cells by activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, revealing it to be a trans-kingdom effector. Our findings imply a potentially widespread T6SS-mediated mechanism, which deploys a single phospholipase effector to influence both prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic hosts.

  13. Electricity generation and wastewater treatment of oil refinery in microbial fuel cells using Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Dip; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Tseng, Min-Jen; Nimje, Vanita Roshan; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chang, Young-Fo; Yang, Tsui-Chu; Chen, Chen-Yen

    2014-09-22

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a novel platform for treating wastewater and at the same time generating electricity. Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059), a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days. Our study indicated that the oil refinery wastewater containing 2213 mg/L (ppm) chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be used as a substrate for electricity generation in the reactor of the MFC. A maximum voltage of 355 mV was obtained with the highest power density of 0.005 mW/cm² in the third cycle with a maximum current density of 0.015 mA/cm² in regard to the external resistor of 1000 Ω. A maximum coulombic efficiency of 6 × 10⁻²% was obtained in the fourth cycle. The removal efficiency of the COD reached 30% as a function of time. Electron transfer mechanism was studied using cyclic voltammetry, which indicated the presence of a soluble electron shuttle in the reactor. Our study demonstrated that oil refinery wastewater could be used as a substrate for electricity generation.

  14. Photosensitized oxidation and inactivation of pyocyanin, a virulence factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reszka, Krzysztof J; Denning, Gerene M; Britigan, Bradley E

    2006-01-01

    Pyocyanin (PyO-) (1-hydroxy-5-methylphenazine) is a cytotoxic compound secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an omnipresent bacterium and a human pathogen. We report that visible light illumination in the presence of rose bengal, or riboflavin, in aerated solutions (pH 7.0-7.2) induces irreversible loss of the pigment's characteristic absorption band at 690 nm, indicating its oxidation. This photobleaching was paralleled by generation of a multiline Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectrum attributed to a PyO(-)-derived radical. The reaction was dependent on the presence of air, sensitizers and light, was inhibited by sodium azide and was unaffected by ethanol. This suggests that PyO- was oxidized largely via singlet oxygen and that hydroxyl radicals were not involved. The photochemically modified pigment was less efficient in oxidizing NAD(P)H and generated less superoxide (by approximately 50%) than the intact PyO-, indicating its partial inactivation. 1-Methoxy-5-methylphenazine, a PyO- analog in which the -O- moiety was replaced by the methoxy group (-OMe), was resistant to oxidation, suggesting that oxidation of PyO- involves its phenolate moiety. These results also suggest that photosensitization could be a potentially useful method for inactivation of PyO- and, possibly, detoxification of superficial wounds (skin, eye) infected with P. aeruginosa.

  15. EXOME SEQUENCING REVEALS PRIMARY IMMUNODEFICIENCIES IN CHILDREN WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA SEPSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Asgari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One out of three pediatric sepsis deaths in high income countries occur in previously healthy children. Primary immunodeficiencies have been postulated to underlie fulminant sepsis, but this concept remains to be confirmed in clinical practice. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is a common bacterium mostly associated with healthcare-related infections in immunocompromised individuals. However, in rare cases, it can cause sepsis in previously healthy children. We used exome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis to systematically search for genetic factors underpinning severe P. aeruginosa infection in the pediatric population. We collected blood samples from 11 previously healthy children, with no family history of immunodeficiency, who presented with severe sepsis due to community-acquired P. aeruginosa bacteremia. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood or tissue samples obtained intravitam or postmortem. We obtained high-coverage exome sequencing data and searched for rare loss-of-function variants. After rigorous filtrations, 12 potentially causal variants were identified. 2 out of 8 (25% fatal cases were found to carry novel pathogenic variants in primary immunodeficiency genes, including BTK and DNMT3B. This study demonstrates that exome sequencing allows to identify rare, deleterious human genetic variants responsible for fulminant sepsis in apparently healthy children. Diagnosing primary immunodeficiencies in such patients is of high relevance to survivors and affected families. We propose that unusually severe and fatal sepsis cases in previously healthy children should be considered for exome/genome sequencing to search for underlying primary immunodeficiencies.

  16. Exome Sequencing Reveals Primary Immunodeficiencies in Children with Community-Acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Samira; McLaren, Paul J; Peake, Jane; Wong, Melanie; Wong, Richard; Bartha, Istvan; Francis, Joshua R; Abarca, Katia; Gelderman, Kyra A; Agyeman, Philipp; Aebi, Christoph; Berger, Christoph; Fellay, Jacques; Schlapbach, Luregn J

    2016-01-01

    One out of three pediatric sepsis deaths in high income countries occur in previously healthy children. Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) have been postulated to underlie fulminant sepsis, but this concept remains to be confirmed in clinical practice. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium mostly associated with health care-related infections in immunocompromised individuals. However, in rare cases, it can cause sepsis in previously healthy children. We used exome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis to systematically search for genetic factors underpinning severe P. aeruginosa infection in the pediatric population. We collected blood samples from 11 previously healthy children, with no family history of immunodeficiency, who presented with severe sepsis due to community-acquired P. aeruginosa bacteremia. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood or tissue samples obtained intravitam or postmortem. We obtained high-coverage exome sequencing data and searched for rare loss-of-function variants. After rigorous filtrations, 12 potentially causal variants were identified. Two out of eight (25%) fatal cases were found to carry novel pathogenic variants in PID genes, including BTK and DNMT3B. This study demonstrates that exome sequencing allows to identify rare, deleterious human genetic variants responsible for fulminant sepsis in apparently healthy children. Diagnosing PIDs in such patients is of high relevance to survivors and affected families. We propose that unusually severe and fatal sepsis cases in previously healthy children should be considered for exome/genome sequencing to search for underlying PIDs.

  17. Potato seed dressing with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RZ9 enhances yield and reduces black scurf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moncef MRABET

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A rhizospheric strain RZ9 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was assessed for in-vitro growth inhibition of Rhizoctonia solani and effectiveness to control black scurf on potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L. of the cultivars Spunta and Nicola, in greenhouse and field experiments. The strain RZ9 inhibited R. solani mycelial growth by more than 60% and completely inhibited the germination of sclerotia from infested potato tubers in in-vitro tests. In greenhouse assays, seed potato treatment with RZ9 cell suspension increased stem length, decreased the relative weight of infected potato tubers (by 67%, and increased the potato yield (by 16% compared to pathogen-inoculated plants for both potato cultivars. In field trials conducted on sandy soils during 2012 and 2013, strain RZ9 reduced black scurf incidence and increased potato yield by an average of 5.3 t ha-1 for ′Spunta′ and 5 t ha-1 for ′Nicola′. This study showed that the selected strain of P. aeruginosa is an efficient bacterium for enhancing yield and reducing black scurf of field-grown potatoes.

  18. Mitochondrial damage contributes to Pseudomonas aeruginosa activation of the inflammasome and is downregulated by autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabir, Majid Sakhi; Hopkins, Lee; Ritchie, Neil D; Ullah, Ihsan; Bayes, Hannah K; Li, Dong; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Lupton, Alison; Puleston, Daniel; Simon, Anna Katharina; Bryant, Clare; Evans, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing family caspase recruitment domain containing 4 (NLRC4) inflammasome can be activated by pathogenic bacteria via products translocated through the microbial type III secretion apparatus (T3SS). Recent work has shown that activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome is downregulated by autophagy, but the influence of autophagy on NLRC4 activation is unclear. We set out to determine how autophagy might influence this process, using the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which activates the NLRC4 inflammasome via its T3SS. Infection resulted in T3SS-dependent mitochondrial damage with increased production of reactive oxygen intermediates and release of mitochondrial DNA. Inhibiting mitochondrial reactive oxygen release or degrading intracellular mitochondrial DNA abrogated NLRC4 inflammasome activation. Moreover, macrophages lacking mitochondria failed to activate NLRC4 following infection. Removal of damaged mitochondria by autophagy significantly attenuated NLRC4 inflammasome activation. Mitochondrial DNA bound specifically to NLRC4 immunoprecipitates and transfection of mitochondrial DNA directly activated the NLRC4 inflammasome; oxidation of the DNA enhanced this effect. Manipulation of autophagy altered the degree of inflammasome activation and inflammation in an in vivo model of P. aeruginosa infection. Our results reveal a novel mechanism contributing to NLRC4 activation by P. aeruginosa via mitochondrial damage and release of mitochondrial DNA triggered by the bacterial T3SS that is downregulated by autophagy.

  19. The genomic basis of adaptation to the fitness cost of rifampicin resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qin; Toll-Riera, Macarena; Heilbron, Karl; Preston, Gail M; MacLean, R Craig

    2016-01-13

    Antibiotic resistance carries a fitness cost that must be overcome in order for resistance to persist over the long term. Compensatory mutations that recover the functional defects associated with resistance mutations have been argued to play a key role in overcoming the cost of resistance, but compensatory mutations are expected to be rare relative to generally beneficial mutations that increase fitness, irrespective of antibiotic resistance. Given this asymmetry, population genetics theory predicts that populations should adapt by compensatory mutations when the cost of resistance is large, whereas generally beneficial mutations should drive adaptation when the cost of resistance is small. We tested this prediction by determining the genomic mechanisms underpinning adaptation to antibiotic-free conditions in populations of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa that carry costly antibiotic resistance mutations. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that populations founded by high-cost rifampicin-resistant mutants adapted via compensatory mutations in three genes of the RNA polymerase core enzyme, whereas populations founded by low-cost mutants adapted by generally beneficial mutations, predominantly in the quorum-sensing transcriptional regulator gene lasR. Even though the importance of compensatory evolution in maintaining resistance has been widely recognized, our study shows that the roles of general adaptation in maintaining resistance should not be underestimated and highlights the need to understand how selection at other sites in the genome influences the dynamics of resistance alleles in clinical settings.

  20. The Facultative Symbiont Rickettsia Protects an Invasive Whitefly against Entomopathogenic Pseudomonas syringae Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Tory A; Hunter, Martha S; Baltrus, David A

    2014-12-01

    Facultative endosymbionts can benefit insect hosts in a variety of ways, including context-dependent roles, such as providing defense against pathogens. The role of some symbionts in defense may be overlooked, however, when pathogen infection is transient, sporadic, or asymptomatic. The facultative endosymbiont Rickettsia increases the fitness of the sweet potato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in some populations through mechanisms that are not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the role of Rickettsia in mediating the interaction between the sweet potato whitefly and Pseudomonas syringae, a common environmental bacterium, some strains of which are pathogenic to aphids. Our results show that P. syringae multiplies within whiteflies, leading to host death, and that whiteflies infected with Rickettsia show a decreased rate of death due to P. syringae. Experiments using plants coated with P. syringae confirmed that whiteflies can acquire the bacteria at a low rate while feeding, leading to increased mortality, particularly when the whiteflies are not infected with Rickettsia. These results suggest that P. syringae may affect whitefly populations in nature and that Rickettsia can ameliorate this effect. This study highlights the possible importance of interactions among opportunistic environmental pathogens and endosymbionts of insects.

  1. Effect of biosurfactants on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in a BioFlux channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz De Rienzo, M A; Stevenson, P S; Marchant, R; Banat, I M

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have indicated that biosurfactants play a role both in maintaining channels between multicellular structures in biofilms and in dispersal of cells from biofilms. A combination of caprylic acid (0.01 % v/v) together with rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v) was applied to biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 9144 and a mixed culture under BioFlux flowthrough conditions and caused disruption of the biofilms. The biofilms were also treated with a combination of rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v) and sophorolipids (0.01 %). Control treatments with PBS 1× had no apparent effect on biofilm disruption. The Gram-positive bacterium (S. aureus ATCC 9144) was more sensitive than P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442 in terms of disruption and viability as shown by Live/Dead staining. Disruption of biofilms of P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442 was minimal. Oxygen consumption by biofilms, after different treatments with biosurfactants, confirms that sophorolipid on its own is unable to kill/inhibit cells of P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442, and even when used in combination with rhamnolipids, under static conditions, no decrease in the cell viability was observed. Cells in biofilms exposed to mono-rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v) showed behaviour typical of exposure to bacteriostatic compounds, but when exposed to di-rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v), they displayed a pattern characteristic of bactericidal compounds.

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation by biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas sp. IR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, M. [Unidad de Biotecnologia del Petroleo, Centro de Biotecnologia, Fundacion Inst. de Estudios Avanzados (IDEA), Caracas (Venezuela); Synthesis and Biotics Div., Indian Oil Corp., Research and Development Center, Haryana (India); Leon, V.; Materano, A.D.S.; Ilzins, O.A.; Galindo-Castro, I.; Fuenmayor, S.L. [Unidad de Biotecnologia del Petroleo, Centro de Biotecnologia, Fundacion Inst. de Estudios Avanzados (IDEA), Caracas (Venezuela)

    2006-03-15

    We characterized a newly isolated bacterium, designated as IR1, with respect to its ability to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and to produce biosurfactants. Isolated IR1 was identified as Pseudomonas putida by analysis of 16S rRNA sequences (99.6% homology). It was capable of utilizing two-, three- and four-ring PAHs but not hexadecane and octadecane as a sole carbon and energy source. PCR and DNA hybridization studies showed that enzymes involved in PAH metabolism were related to the naphthalene dioxygenase pathway. Observation of both tensio-active and emulsifying activities indicated that biosurfactants were produced by IR1 during growth on both water miscible and immiscible substrates. The biosurfactants lowered the surface tension of medium from 54.9 dN cm{sup -1} to 35.4 dN cm{sup -1} and formed a stable and compact emulsion with an emulsifying activity of 74% with diesel oil, when grown on dextrose. These findings indicate that this isolate may be useful for bioremediation of sites contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons. (orig.)

  3. Production of biosurfactants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA 1 isolated in oil environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santa Anna L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential production of rhamnolipid-type biosurfactants is assessed based on the development of a fermentative process with a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1, which was isolated from oil production wastewater in the Northeast of Brazil. These production of molecules using different carbon (n-hexadecane, paraffinic oil, glycerol and babassu oil and nitrogen sources (NaNO3, (NH42SO4 and CH4N2O was studied. The best results were obtained when using glycerol as substrate. A C/N ratio of 60/1 and use of sodium nitrate as nitrogen source resulted in higher production of the rhamnolipid, expressed by rhamnose (3.16 g/L and by the yield in relation to biomass (Yp/x = 0.70 g/g. Additionally, physical-chemical characteristics of the spent broth with and without cells were studied, providing a low critical micelle concentration of 19 mg/L and toxicity values of 13 and 13.8 mg/L using two test organisms, the micro crustacean Daphnia similis and the bacterium Vibrio fisheri (Microtox, respectively.

  4. Characterization of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, Causal Agent of Citrus Blast of Mandarin in Montenegro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanović, Žarko; Perović, Tatjana; Popović, Tatjana; Blagojević, Jovana; Trkulja, Nenad; Hrnčić, Snježana

    2017-01-01

    Citrus blast caused by bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is a very important disease of citrus occuring in many areas of the world, but with few data about genetic structure of the pathogen involved. Considering the above fact, this study reports genetic characterization of 43 P. syringae isolates obtained from plant tissue displaying citrus blast symptoms on mandarin (Citrus reticulata) in Montenegro, using multilocus sequence analysis of gyrB, rpoD, and gap1 gene sequences. Gene sequences from a collection of 54 reference pathotype strains of P. syringae from the Plant Associated and Environmental Microbes Database (PAMDB) was used to establish a genetic relationship with our isolates obtained from mandarin. Phylogenetic analyses of gyrB, rpoD, and gap1 gene sequences showed that P. syringae pv. syringae causes citrus blast in mandarin in Montenegro, and belongs to genomospecies 1. Genetic homogeneity of isolates suggested that the Montenegrian population might be clonal which indicates a possible common source of infection. These findings may assist in further epidemiological studies of this pathogen and for determining mandarin breeding strategies for P. syringae control. PMID:28167885

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adapts its iron uptake strategies in function of the type of infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre eCornelis

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative -Proteobacterium which is known for its capacity to colonize various niches, including some invertebrate and vertebrate hosts, making it one of the most frequent bacteria causing opportunistic infections. P. aeruginosa is able to cause acute as well as chronic infections and it uses different colonization and virulence factors to do so. Infections range from septicemia, urinary infections, burn wound colonization, and chronic colonization of the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Like the vast majority of organisms, P. aeruginosa needs iron to sustain growth. P. aeruginosa utilizes different strategies to take up iron, depending on the type of infection it causes. Two siderophores are produced by this bacterium, pyoverdine and pyochelin, characterized by high and low affinities for iron respectively. P. aeruginosa is also able to utilize different siderophores from other microorganisms (siderophore piracy. It can also take up heme from hemoproteins via two different systems. Under microaerobic or anaerobic conditions, P. aeruginosa is also able to take up ferrous iron via its Feo system using redox-cycling phenazines. Depending on the type of infection, P. aeruginosa can therefore adapt by switching from one iron uptake system to another as we will describe in this short review.

  6. High-Throughput Phenotypic Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Membrane Transport Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Daniel A.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Phillippy, Katherine; Chen, Joan; Ren, Qinghu; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2008-01-01

    The deluge of data generated by genome sequencing has led to an increasing reliance on bioinformatic predictions, since the traditional experimental approach of characterizing gene function one at a time cannot possibly keep pace with the sequence-based discovery of novel genes. We have utilized Biolog phenotype MicroArrays to identify phenotypes of gene knockout mutants in the opportunistic pathogen and versatile soil bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a relatively high-throughput fashion. Seventy-eight P. aeruginosa mutants defective in predicted sugar and amino acid membrane transporter genes were screened and clear phenotypes were identified for 27 of these. In all cases, these phenotypes were confirmed by independent growth assays on minimal media. Using qRT-PCR, we demonstrate that the expression levels of 11 of these transporter genes were induced from 4- to 90-fold by their substrates identified via phenotype analysis. Overall, the experimental data showed the bioinformatic predictions to be largely correct in 22 out of 27 cases, and led to the identification of novel transporter genes and a potentially new histamine catabolic pathway. Thus, rapid phenotype identification assays are an invaluable tool for confirming and extending bioinformatic predictions. PMID:18833300

  7. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. This is a......BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....... This is an update of a previously published review. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search 30...... March 2015). We previously searched PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic fibrosis (last search 30 May 2013). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic...

  8. Influence of plaque-forming bacterium, Rhodobacteraceae sp. on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhangran; Zhang, Jingyan; Lei, Xueqian; Zhang, Bangzhou; Cai, Guanjing; Zhang, Huajun; Li, Yi; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to find out the molecular features, infection process of a special alga plaque-forming microorganism and its potential influence on the biomass of Chlorella vulgaris during the infection process. Direct contact between the algal cell and the bacterium may be the primary steps needed for the bacterium to lyse the alga. Addition of C. vulgaris cells into f/2 medium allowed us obtain the object bacterium. The 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons results showed that the plaque-forming bacterium kept the closest relationship with Labrenzia aggregata IAM 12614(T) at 98.90%. The existence of the bacterium could influence both the dry weight and lipid content of C. vulgaris. This study demonstrated that direct cell wall disruption of C. vulgaris by the bacterium would be a potentially effective method to utilize the biomass of microalgae.

  9. Research Progress and Perspectives of Nitrogen Fixing Bacterium, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, in Monocot Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Eskin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a nitrogen fixing bacterium originally found in monocotyledon sugarcane plants in which the bacterium actively fixes atmosphere nitrogen and provides significant amounts of nitrogen to plants. This bacterium mainly colonizes intercellular spaces within the roots and stems of plants and does not require the formation of the complex root organ like nodule. The bacterium is less plant/crop specific and indeed G. diazotrophicus has been found in a number of unrelated plant species. Importantly, as the bacterium was of monocot plant origin, there exists a possibility that the nitrogen fixation feature of the bacterium may be used in many other monocot crops. This paper reviews and updates the research progress of G. diazotrophicus for the past 25 years but focuses on the recent research development.

  10. Liver abscess associated with an oral flora bacterium Streptococcus anginosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hava Yılmaz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Viridans group Streptococcus, a bacterium of the oral flora has a low-virulence and rarely causes liver abscess. A 40-yearoldmale patient was admitted to the hospital complaining of high fever and malaise. A physical examination revealedpoor oral hygiene; there were caries on many teeth, and he had hepatomegaly. A hepatic abscess was identified inhis abdominal tomography. Streptococcus anginosus was isolated from the drainage material, and the bile ducts werenormal in his MRI cholangiography. An immunocompetent case of liver abscess caused by Streptococcus anginosusoriginated most probably from oral flora is presented here. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2012; 2(1:33-35

  11. Management and treatment of contact lens-related Pseudomonas keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willcox MD

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mark DP WillcoxSchool of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, AustraliaAbstract: Pubmed and Medline were searched for articles referring to Pseudomonas keratitis between the years 2007 and 2012 to obtain an overview of the current state of this disease. Keyword searches used the terms "Pseudomonas" + "Keratitis" limit to "2007–2012", and ["Ulcerative" or "Microbial"] + "Keratitis" + "Contact lenses" limit to "2007–2012". These articles were then reviewed for information on the percentage of microbial keratitis cases associated with contact lens wear, the frequency of Pseudomonas sp. as a causative agent of microbial keratitis around the world, the most common therapies to treat Pseudomonas keratitis, and the sensitivity of isolates of Pseudomonas to commonly prescribed antibiotics. The percentage of microbial keratitis associated with contact lens wear ranged from 0% in a study from Nepal to 54.5% from Japan. These differences may be due in part to different frequencies of contact lens wear. The frequency of Pseudomonas sp. as a causative agent of keratitis ranged from 1% in Japan to over 50% in studies from India, Malaysia, and Thailand. The most commonly reported agents used to treat Pseudomonas keratitis were either aminoglycoside (usually gentamicin fortified with a cephalosporin, or monotherapy with a fluoroquinolone (usually ciprofloxacin. In most geographical areas, most strains of Pseudomonas sp. (≥95% were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, but reports from India, Nigeria, and Thailand reported sensitivity to this antibiotic and similar fluoroquinolones of between 76% and 90%.Keywords: Pseudomonas, keratitis, contact lens

  12. Pseudomonas helmanticensis sp. nov., isolated from forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Cuesta, Maria José; Flores-Félix, José David; Mulas, Rebeca; Rivas, Raúl; Castro-Pinto, Joao; Brañas, Javier; Mulas, Daniel; González-Andrés, Fernando; Velázquez, Encarna; Peix, Alvaro

    2014-07-01

    A bacterial strain, OHA11(T), was isolated during the course of a study of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria occurring in a forest soil from Salamanca, Spain. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain OHA11(T) shared 99.1% similarity with respect to Pseudomonas baetica a390(T), and 98.9% similarity with the type strains of Pseudomonas jessenii, Pseudomonas moorei, Pseudomonas umsongensis, Pseudomonas mohnii and Pseudomonas koreensis. The analysis of housekeeping genes rpoB, rpoD and gyrB confirmed its phylogenetic affiliation to the genus Pseudomonas and showed similarities lower than 95% in almost all cases with respect to the above species. Cells possessed two polar flagella. The respiratory quinone was Q9. The major fatty acids were C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω7c and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c/iso-C15 : 0 2-OH). The strain was oxidase-, catalase- and urease-positive, positive for arginine dihydrolase but negative for nitrate reduction, β-galactosidase production and aesculin hydrolysis. It was able to grow at 31 °C and at pH 11. The DNA G+C content was 58.1 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization results showed values lower than 49% relatedness with respect to the type strains of the seven closest related species. Therefore, the combined genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data support the classification of strain OHA11(T) to a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas helmanticensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is OHA11(T) ( = LMG 28168(T) = CECT 8548(T)).

  13. Isolation and identification of biosurfactant-producing strains from the genus Pseudomonas aeruginosa and antibacterial effects of biosurfactant production in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Ahmady-Asbchin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biosurfactants are amphiphilic biological compounds produced extracellularly or as part of the cell membranes by a variety of microorganisms. Because of their use in various industries, they are of a particular importance. The aim of this study was to identify a strain of bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas aeruginosa biosurfactant producers. Materials and methods: In this study, different samples of oil, water and soil contaminated with oil were prepared. Hemolytic activity, emulsification activity and measurement of surface tension were used and selected strains were identified by biochemical tests. The nature and effect of antibacterial biosurfactant was evaluated for strain selection.Results: In this study, eighty eight bacterial strains were isolated. Twenty four strains were isolated from the isolated strains with hemolytic activity. Among which, 14 strains have emulsification activity more than 70% and at last four strains reached surface tension to be less than 40 mN/m. Selected strain based on biochemical tests was recognized as a Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The nature of biosurfactant was determined by TLC, and proved to be of glycolipid kind. Therefore, the produced biosurfactant of the selected strain had antibacterial activity against six bacterial infectious. Sensitive bacteria to the effects of biosurfactant extract of Pseudomonas aeruginosa83, was Staphylococcus aureus and the most resistant bacteria to these extract, was the Proteus mirabilis. The results of MIC, MBC showed that MIC of the extract in concentration of 63 and 125 mg/ml on Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus respectively. Also, the MBC were extract in concentration of 63 and 125mg/ml on Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus respectively.Discussion and conclusion: Pseudomonas aeruginosa had high potential in reducing the surface tension and biosurfactant extracted had high antibacterial effects. Therefore, it

  14. Functional bacterial amyloid increases Pseudomonas biofilm hydrophobicity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Vad, Brian Stougaard; Dueholm, Morten Simonsen

    2015-01-01

    The success of Pseudomonas species as opportunistic pathogens derives in great part from their ability to form stable biofilms that offer protection against chemical and mechanical attack. The extracellular matrix of biofilms contains numerous biomolecules, and it has recently been discovered...... that in Pseudomonas one of the components includes β-sheet rich amyloid fibrils (functional amyloid) produced by the fap operon. However, the role of the functional amyloid within the biofilm has not yet been investigated in detail. Here we investigate how the fap-based amyloid produced by Pseudomonas affects biofilm...

  15. Stratified growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, E.; Roe, F.; Bugnicourt, A.;

    2004-01-01

    In this study, stratified patterns of protein synthesis and growth were demonstrated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Spatial patterns of protein synthetic activity inside biofilms were characterized by the use of two green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene constructs. One construct...... carried an isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible gfpmut2 gene encoding a stable GFP. The second construct carried a GFP derivative, gfp-AGA, encoding an unstable GFP under the control of the growth-rate-dependent rrnBp(1) promoter. Both GFP reporters indicated that active protein...... of oxygen limitation in the biofilm. Oxygen microelectrode measurements showed that oxygen only penetrated approximately 50 mum into the biofilm. P. aeruginosa was incapable of anaerobic growth in the medium used for this investigation. These results show that while mature P. aeruginosa biofilms contain...

  16. Complement activation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Kharazmi, A; Garred, P

    1993-01-01

    In chronic infections, such as the bronchopulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, bacteria persist despite an intact host immune defense and frequent antibiotic treatment. An important reason for the persistence of the bacteria is their capacity for the biofilm...... mode of growth. In this study we investigated the role of biofilms in activation of complement, a major contributor to the inflammatory process. Complement activation by P. aeruginosa was examined in a complement consumption assay, production of C3 and factor B conversion products assessed by crossed...... immuno-electrophoresis, C5a generation tested by a PMN chemotactic assay, and terminal complement complex formation measured by ELISA. Two of the four assays showed that P. aeruginosa grown in biofilm activated complement less than planktonic bacteria, and all assays showed that activation by intact...

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis masquerading as chronic uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Badami Nagaraj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old male presented with decreased vision in the left eye of 15-day duration after having undergone an uneventful cataract surgery 10 months back. He had been previously treated with systemic steroids for recurrent uveitis postoperatively on three occasions in the same eye. B-scan ultrasonography showed multiple clumplike echoes suggestive of vitreous inflammation. Aqueous tap revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa sensitive to ciprofloxacin. The patient was treated with intravitreal ciprofloxacin and vancomycin along with systemic ciprofloxacin with good clinical response. Even a virulent organism such as P.aeruginosa can present as a chronic uveitis, which, if missed, can lead to a delay in accurate diagnosis and appropriate management.

  18. The immune system vs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Østrup; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    revealed both innate as well as adaptive immune responses to biofilms. On the other hand, measures launched by biofilm bacteria to achieve protection against the various immune responses have also been demonstrated. Whether particular immune responses to biofilm infections exist remains to be firmly...... established. However, because biofilm infections are often persistent (or chronic), an odd situation appears with the simultaneous activation of both arms of the host immune response, neither of which can eliminate the biofilm pathogen, but instead, in synergy, causes collateral tissue damage. Although...... the present review on the immune system vs. biofilm bacteria is focused on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (mainly because this is the most thoroughly studied), many of the same mechanisms are also seen with biofilm infections generated by other microorganisms....

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is due to biofilm-growing mucoid (alginate-producing) strains. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria, embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein...... and DNA. In CF lungs, the polysaccharide alginate is the major part of the P. aeruginosa biofilm matrix. Bacterial biofilms cause chronic infections because they show increased tolerance to antibiotics and resist phagocytosis, as well as other components of the innate and the adaptive immune system....... As a consequence, a pronounced antibody response develops, leading to immune complex-mediated chronic inflammation, dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The chronic inflammation is the major cause of the lung tissue damage in CF. Biofilm growth in CF lungs is associated with an increased frequency...

  20. Occurrence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Kuwait soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Esmaeil; Akbar, Abrar

    2015-02-01

    Environmentally ubiquitous bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa evolved mechanisms to adapt and prevail under diverse conditions. In the current investigation, strains of P. aeruginosa demonstrating high rates of crude oil utilization and tolerance to high concentrations of heavy metals were found in both crude oil-contaminated and uncontaminated sites in Kuwait, and were dominant in the contaminated sites. The incidence of P. aeruginosa in tested soils implies the definitive pattern of crude oil contamination in the selection of the bacterial population in petroleum-contaminated sites in Kuwait. Surprisingly, the unculturable P. aeruginosa in different soil samples showed significant high similarity coefficients based on 16S-RFLP analyses, implying that the unculturable fraction of existing bacterial population in environmental samples is more stable and, hence, reliable for phylogenetic studies compared to the culturable bacteria.

  1. Osmoregulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa under hyperosmotic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, R; Burgoa, R; Flores, E; Hernández, E; Villa, A; Vaca, S

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 strain was found to be able to tolerate 700 mM NaCl. 0.5 mM of the osmoprotectant betaine restablished the growth of this strain in 1200 mM NaCl. Intracellular K+ and glutamate concentrations of P. aeruginosa PAO1 after an hyperosmotic shock (400 mM NaCl) showed a permanent increase. Adition of betaine (0.5 mM) to the medium with NaCl had an inhibitory effect on the intracellular accumulation of glutamate. The results indicate that P. aeruginosa PAO1 resists high NaCl concentrations, K+ accumulation and glutamate synthesis probably being the first mechanisms involved in adaptation to osmotic stress. Also is is demonstrated that betaine modulates intracellular glutamate levels in osmotically stressed P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  2. Rhamnolipid Biosurfactants Produced by Pseudomonas Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Kaskatepe

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Surfactants are chemical products widely used in our daily life in toothpaste and other personal hygiene and cosmetic products, and in several industries. Biosurfactants are surfactants of biological origin that can be produced by microorganisms and have many advantages, such as low toxicity and high biodegradability, compared to synthetic counterparts. Unfortunately, high production costs limit the use of biosurfactants. Low-cost production is the most important factor for biosurfactants to be able to compete in the global market place. This review presents general information on rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas species, as well as on their production and applications. In addition, industrial products and their wastes used for rhamnolipid production are reviewed in detail based on recent studies.

  3. Vesiculation from Pseudomonas aeruginosa under SOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshma Maredia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections can be aggravated by antibiotic treatment that induces SOS response and vesiculation. This leads to a hypothesis concerning association of SOS with vesiculation. To test it, we conducted multiple analyses of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs produced from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild type in which SOS is induced by ciprofloxacin and from the LexA noncleavable (lexAN strain in which SOS is repressed. The levels of OMV proteins, lipids, and cytotoxicity increased for both the treated strains, demonstrating vesiculation stimulation by the antibiotic treatment. However, the further increase was suppressed in the lexAN strains, suggesting the SOS involvement. Obviously, the stimulated vesiculation is attributed by both SOS-related and unrelated factors. OMV subproteomic analysis was performed to examine these factors, which reflected the OMV-mediated cytotoxicity and the physiology of the vesiculating cells under treatment and SOS. Thus, SOS plays a role in the vesiculation stimulation that contributes to cytotoxicity.

  4. Biological Control of Meloidogyne hapla Using an Antagonistic Bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyeong Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We examined the efficacy of a bacterium for biocontrol of the root-knot nematode (RKN Meloidogyne hapla in carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum. Among 542 bacterial isolates from various soils and plants, the highest nematode mortality was observed for treatments with isolate C1-7, which was identified as Bacillus cereus based on cultural and morphological characteristics, the Biolog program, and 16S rRNA sequencing analyses. The population density and the nematicidal activity of B. cereus C1-7 remained high until the end of culture in brain heart infusion broth, suggesting that it may have sustainable biocontrol potential. In pot experiments, the biocontrol efficacy of B. cereus C1-7 was high, showing complete inhibition of root gall or egg mass formation by RKN in carrot and tomato plants, and subsequently reducing RKN damage and suppressing nematode population growth, respectively. Light microscopy of RKN-infected carrot root tissues treated with C1-7 showed reduced formation of gall cells and fully developed giant cells, while extensive gall cells and fully mature giant cells with prominent cell wall ingrowths formed in the untreated control plants infected with RKNs. These histopathological characteristics may be the result of residual or systemic biocontrol activity of the bacterium, which may coincide with the biocontrol efficacies of nematodes in pots. These results suggest that B. cereus C1-7 can be used as a biocontrol agent for M. hapla.

  5. Identification of phenolyl cobamide from the homoacetogenic bacterium Sporomusa ovata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupperich, E; Eisinger, H J; Kräutler, B

    1989-12-22

    Phenolyl cobamide was isolated from cyanide extractions of the anaerobic eubacterium Sporomusa ovata. The proposed corrinoid structure [Co alpha,Co beta-(monocyano,monoaquo)-phenolyl cobamide] has been deduced from 1H NMR, fast-atom-bombardment mass spectroscopy and ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy data. The complete corrinoid resembled p-cresolyl cobamide [Co alpha,Co beta-(monocyano,monoaquo)-p-cresolyl cobamide], which recently has been obtained from cyanide extractions of the same bacterium. The structures and chemical properties of both cobamides with uncoordinated nucleotides differed significantly from those of vitamin B12 [Co alpha-[alpha-(5,6-dimethylbenzimidazolyl)]-Co beta-cyanocobamide]. Sporomusa synthesized coenzymes of phenolyl cobamide and p-cresolyl cobamide in considerable amounts of 400 nmol/g and 1700 nmol/g dry cells, respectively. More than 90% of the complete corrinoid pool of the homoacetogenic bacterium consisted of these two corrinoids, indicating that they are physiologically important coenzymes of the bacterial metabolism.

  6. Pathogenesis of helicobacter pylori infection: Bacterium and host relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić-Milutinović Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of a half of the mankind. Duodenal ulcer is found in 15-25%, t gastric ulcer in 13%, while gastric adenocarcinoma develops in 1% of all infected individuals. Pathogenesis of H. pylori infection is related to the virulence factors of the bacterium, environmental (dietary habits, hygiene, stress and host factors (age, sex, blood type. Colonization of the gastric mucosa is related to the motility of the bacterium, presence of lipopolysacharide (LPS and various bacterial enzymes. Gastric mucosal injury is the result of H. pylori LPS, vacuolization cytotoxin (vacA, cytotoxin associated protein (cagA, heat shock proteins and factors responsible for neutrophil chemotaxis and activity. H. pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa and zones of ectopic gastric epithelium. H. pylori infection is transmitted via oral-oral, fecal-oral and iatrogenic way (during endoscopy. Higher prevalence of the infection is associated with lower socioeconomic level, lack of drinking water, and living in a community. Acute H. pylori gastritis is superficial pangastritis progressing into the chronic phase after 7-10 days. Gastric mucosal atrophy and intestinal metaplasia can develop during the course of H. pylori infection. Clearly defined factors that influence the outcome of H. pylori infection include bacterial strain, distribution of gastritis, acid secretion and gastric mucosal atrophy.

  7. Population Structure of the Fish-Pathogenic Bacterium Flavobacterium psychrophilum▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Pierre; Mondot, Stanislas; Achaz, Guillaume; Bouchenot, Catherine; Bernardet, Jean-François; Duchaud, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is currently one of the main bacterial pathogens hampering the productivity of salmonid farming worldwide, and its control mainly relies on antibiotic treatments. To better understand the population structure of this bacterium and its mode of evolution, we have examined the nucleotide polymorphisms at 11 protein-coding loci of the core genome in a set of 50 isolates. These isolates were selected to represent the broadest possible diversity, originating from 10 different host fish species and four continents. The nucleotide diversity between pairs of sequences amounted to fewer than four differences per kilobase on average, corresponding to a particularly low level of diversity, possibly indicative of a small effective-population size. The recombination rate, however, seemed remarkably high, and as a consequence, most of the isolates harbored unique combinations of alleles (33 distinct sequence types were resolved). The analysis also showed the existence of several clonal complexes with worldwide geographic distribution but marked association with particular fish species. Such an association could reflect preferential routes of transmission and/or adaptive niche specialization. The analysis provided no clues that the initial range of the bacterium was originally limited to North America. Instead, the historical record of the expansion of the pathogen may reflect the spread of a few clonal complexes. As a resource for future epidemiological surveys, a multilocus sequence typing website based on seven highly informative loci is available. PMID:18424537

  8. Caenorhabditis elegans reveals novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Utari, Putri Dwi; Quax, Wim J.

    2013-01-01

    The susceptibility of Caenorhabditis elegans to different virulent phenotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa makes the worms an excellent model for studying host-pathogen interactions. Including the recently described liquid killing, five different killing assays are now available offering superb possibi

  9. Caenorhabditis elegans reveals novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Utari, Putri Dwi; Quax, Wim J.

    2013-01-01

    The susceptibility of Caenorhabditis elegans to different virulent phenotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa makes the worms an excellent model for studying host-pathogen interactions. Including the recently described liquid killing, five different killing assays are now available offering superb possibi

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dose-Response and Bathing Water Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly identified opportunistic pathogen associated with pool acquired bather disease. To better understand why this microorganism poses this protracted problem we recently appraised P. aeruginosa pool risk management. Much is known about the ...

  11. The Enzymes of the Ammonia Assimilation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Camp, Huub J.M. op den; Leenen, Pieter J.M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1980-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is regulated by repression/derepression of enzyme synthesis and by adenylylation/deadenylylation control. High levels of deadenylylated biosynthetically active glutamine synthetase were observed in cultures growing with limiting amounts of nitrogen wh

  12. Outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteraemia in a haematology department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Benjamin Schnack; Christensen, Nikolas; Sørensen, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. In Denmark, an increase in P. aeruginosa isolates from blood cultures from a haematology department prompted a hygienic audit in 2007. METHODS: Blood cultures...

  13. Effect of biosurfactant from two strains of Pseudomonas on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... Two Pseudomonas strains isolated from oil-contaminated soil which produce biosurfactant were studied. .... Refinery, Assam, India, each having a varied level of oil conta- mination. ..... Rapid method for monitoring maximum.

  14. Pseudomonas Folliculitis Associated with Use of Hot Tubs and Spas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Michael L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the history, etiology, diagnosis, histopathology, treatment, and prevention of Pseudomonas Folliculitis, an increasingly common skin infection contracted in hot tubs and, to some extent, in swimming pools. (Author/SM)

  15. The Enzymes of the Ammonia Assimilation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Camp, Huub J.M. op den; Leenen, Pieter J.M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1980-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is regulated by repression/derepression of enzyme synthesis and by adenylylation/deadenylylation control. High levels of deadenylylated biosynthetically active glutamine synthetase were observed in cultures growing with limiting amounts of nitrogen wh

  16. Isolation, purification and properties of lipase from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation, purification and properties of lipase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. ... medium agar containing Tween 80 or olive oil as the only source of carbon. ... through the purification procedure of ammonium sulphate precipitation and diethyl ...

  17. New strategies for genetic engineering Pseudomonas syringae using recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we report that DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced directly into bacteria by electroporation can recombine with the bacterial chromosome. This phenomenon was identified in Pseudomonas syringae and we subsequently found that Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Shigella flexneri are...

  18. Genetic construction of recombinant Pseudomonas chlororaphis for improved glycerol utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study is to improve by genetic engineering the glycerol metabolic capability of Pseudomonas chlororaphis which is capable of producing commercially valuable biodegradable poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) and biosurfactant rhamnolipids (RLs). In the study, glycerol uptake facilitat...

  19. Characterization of Glutamine-Requiring Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Herst, Patricia M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    Revertants were isolated from a glutamine-requiring mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO. One strain showed thermosensitive glutamine requirement and formed thermolabile glutamine synthetase, suggesting the presence of a mutation in the structural gene for glutamine synthetase. The mutation conferri

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dose-Response and Bathing Water Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly identified opportunistic pathogen associated with pool acquired bather disease. To better understand why this microorganism poses this protracted problem we recently appraised P. aeruginosa pool risk management. Much is known about the ...

  1. Shanghai Fever: A Fatal Form of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Enteric Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Pankaj; Mandal, Kartik Chandra; Mukhopadhyay, Madhumita; Debnath, Bidyut

    2015-10-01

    Outcome of pseudomonas enteric fever is unpredictable as multiple systemic lethal complications occur abruptly. A 9-month-old girl with multiple ileal perforations, leukocoria, ecthyma gangrenosum, hemiplegia and a perforated ulcer in the soft palate. Blood culture suggested Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Operative repair of multiple ileal perforations and multidisciplinary management was provided. On 10th post-operative day, patient succumbed to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Early detection and management of complications of P. aeruginosa enteric disease is important.

  2. Spontaneous Nosocomial Pseudomonas aeruginosa Meningitis Presenting as Trismus

    OpenAIRE

    C. J. Parr; J. Wheeler; A. Sharma; Smith, C.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the case of a 78-year-old female receiving adjuvant postsurgical chemotherapy for colon adenocarcinoma who spontaneously developed nosocomial Pseudomonas meningitis causing severe trismus. The patient was initially admitted for ileus, developing neck stiffness and trismus on the thirteenth day of admission. Cerebrospinal fluid grew pansensitive Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was consistent with bilateral subacute infarcts secondary to meningitis. T...

  3. Identification and characterization of peach pathogen Pseudomonas syringae

    OpenAIRE

    Gavrilović, Veljko; Dolovac, Nenad; Trkulja, Nenad; Stevanović, Miloš; Živković, Svetlana; Poštić, Dobrivoj; Ivanović, Žarko

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is economically important plant pathogen, found on a number of hosts including fruit trees, field crops, vegetables and decorative plants. This phytopathogenic bacteria is becoming a quite widespread pathogen on the fruit trees in Serbia, causing significant economic loses. Up to now it was experimentally confirmed as a pathogen on the pear, apple, apricot, cherry, sour cherry, plum trees as well as raspberries. In this study Pseudomonas syringae was identificated as path...

  4. Structure and morphology of magnetite anaerobically-produced by a marine magnetotactic bacterium and a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, N. H. C.; Mann, S.; Bazylinski, D. A.; Lovley, D. R.; Jannasch, H. W.; Frankel, R. B.

    1990-04-01

    Intracellular crystals of magnetite synthesized by cells of the magnetotactic vibroid organism, MV-1, and extracellular crystals of magnetite produced by the non-magnetotactic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium strain GS-15, were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and 57Fe Mo¨ssbauer spectroscopy. The magnetotactic bacterium contained a single chain of approximately 10 crystals aligned along the long axis of the cell. The crystals were essentially pure stoichiometric magnetite. When viewed along the crystal long axis the particles had a hexagonal cross-section whereas side-on they appeared as rectangules or truncated rectangles of average dimension, 53 × 35 nm. These findings are explained in terms of a three-dimensional morphology comprising a hexagonal prism of 110 faces which are capped and truncated by 111 end faces. Electron diffraction and lattice imaging studies indicated that the particles were structurally well-defined single crystals. In contrast, magnetite particles produced by the strain, GS-15 were irregular in shape and had smaller mean dimensions (14 nm). Single crystals were imaged but these were not of high structural perfection. These results highlight the influence of intracellular control on the crystallochemical specificity of bacterial magnetites. The characterization of these crystals is important in aiding the identification of biogenic magnetic materials in paleomagnetism and in studies of sediment magnetization.

  5. An efficient thermotolerant and halophilic biosurfactant-producing bacterium isolated from Dagang oil field for MEOR application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Langping; Richnow, Hans; Yao, Jun; Jain, Anil

    2014-05-01

    Dagang Oil field (Petro China Company Limited) is one of the most productive oil fields in China. In this study, 34 biosurfactant-producing strains were isolated and cultured from petroleum reservoir of Dagang oil field, using haemolytic assay and the qualitative oil-displacement test. On the basis of 16S rDNA analysis, the isolates were closely related to the species in genus Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and Bacillus. One of the isolates identified as Bacillus subtilis BS2 were selected for further study. This bacterium was able to produce a type of biosurfactant with excessive foam-forming properties at 37ºC as well as at higher temperature of 55ºC. The biosurfactant produced by the strain BS2 could reduce the surface tension of the culture broth from 70.87 mN/m to 28.97 mN/m after 8 days of incubation at 37ºC and to 36.15 mN/m after 20 days of incubation at 55ºC, respectively. The biosurfactant showed stability at high temperature (up to 120ºC), a wide range of pH (2 to 12) and salt concentrations (up to 12%) offering potential for biotechnology. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum of extracted biosurfactant tentatively characterized the produced biosurfactant as glycolipid derivative. Elemental analysis of the biosurfactant by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) reveals that the biosurfactant was anionic in nature. 15 days of biodegradation of crude oil suggested a preferential usage of n-alkane upon microbial metabolism of BS2 as a carbon substrate and consequently also for the synthesis of biosurfactants. Core flood studies for oil release indicated 9.6% of additional oil recovery over water flooding at 37ºC and 7.2% of additional oil recovery at 55 ºC. Strain BS2 was characterized as an efficient biosurfactant-producing, thermotolerant and halophillic bacterium and has the potential for application for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) through water flooding in China's oil fields even in situ as adapted to reservoir chemistry and

  6. Gama de hospedeiros e reação de genótipos de tomateiro a Pseudomonas cichorii Host range and genotypes reaction to Pseudomonas cichorii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeu Antônio Fernandes da Silva Júnior

    2009-06-01

    in two commercial tomato fields in the State of São Paulo in 2005. In view of this, studies were carried out in order to determine the host range of Pseudomonas cichorii isolates (IBSBF 2309 and IBSBF 2323, obtained from tomato plants at commercial fields located in the cities of Bragança Paulista and Mogi Guaçú, SP, Brazil. Caserta pumpkin, lettuce, purslane, eggplant, beet, broccoli, carrot, Jimson weed, sunflower, tobacco, scarlet eggplant, melon, cucumber, petunia, green pepper, radish, cabbage, arugula, parsley, and tomato plants were spray-inoculated separately with two isolates of P. cichorii obtained from tomato and one from sunflower (GIR-1. The isolates IBSBF 2309 and IBSBF 2323 were pathogenic to purslane, Jimson weed, sunflower, green pepper, and tomato; GIR-1 was only pathogenic to purslane, Jimson weed, and sunflower, but not pathogenic to green pepper or tomato. In Brazil, no sources of resistance to this bacterium are known within the Lycopersicon genus. The reaction of tomato cultivars to the bacterium is also unknown. Twenty-eight tomato genotypes from the Sakata Seed Sudamerica Ltda. Germplasm Bank were evaluated for their reaction to P. cichorii isolates IBSBF 2309 and IBSBF 2323, using the leaf inoculation method. The highest resistance levels were observed in tomato genotypes AF 11768, AF 2521, AF 11766, AF 11772, AF 229, AF 5719-1, and AF 8162. The genotype AF 5719-1, wich has the Pto gene imparting resistance to P. syringae pv. tomato, showed a good level of resistance to P. cichorii. The identification of genotypes with good levels of resistance to this pathogen is important, since they represent potential resources to be used in tomato breeding programs for incorporation of resistance genes against P. cichorii.

  7. Roseomonas gilardii subsp rosea, a pink bacterium associated with bacteremia: the first case in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srifuengfung, Somporn; Tharavichitkul, Prasit; Pumprueg, Satchana; Tribuddharat, Chanwit

    2007-09-01

    Roseomonas is a pink-pigmented, non-fermentative, gram-negative coccobacillus bacterium. Human infections caused by Roseomonas are very rare. We report the first case of bacteremia associated with Roseomonas gilardii subsp rosea in Thailand. The bacterium was isolated from blood culture and identified by cellular morphology, characteristics of colonies on blood agar, extensive biochemical tests and 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing.

  8. Dense populations of a giant sulfur bacterium in Namibian shelf sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Brinkhoff, T.; Ferdelman, TG

    1999-01-01

    A previously unknown giant sulfur bacterium is abundant in sediments underlying the oxygen minimum zone of the Benguela Current upwelling system. The bacterium has a spherical cell that exceeds by up to 100-fold the biovolume of the largest known prokaryotes. On the basis of 16S ribosomal DNA seq...

  9. Hydrogen production by co-cultures of Lactobacillus and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asada, Yasuo; Ishimi, Katsuhiro [Department of General Education, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Narashinodai, Chiba 274-8501 (Japan); Tokumoto, Masaru; Aihara, Yasuyuki; Oku, Masayo; Kohno, Hideki [Department of Applied Molecular Chemistry, College of Industrial Technology, Nihon University, Izumi-cho, Chiba 275-8575 (Japan); Wakayama, Tatsuki; Miyake, Jun [Research Institute for Cell Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Nakoji, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-0974 (Japan); Tomiyama, Masamitsu [Genetic Diversity Department, National Institute of Agrobiological Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    Hydrogen production with glucose by using co-immobilized cultures of a lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus delbrueckii NBRC13953, and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, in agar gels was studied. Glucose was converted to hydrogen gas in a yield of 7.1mol of hydrogen per mole of glucose at a maximum under illuminated conditions. (author)

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of the Antimicrobial Producers Pseudomonas sp. TAA207 and Pseudomonas sp. TAD18 Isolated from Antarctic Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presta, Luana; Inzucchi, Ilaria; Bosi, Emanuele; Fondi, Marco; Perrin, Elena; Maida, Isabel; Miceli, Elisangela; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Lo Giudice, Angelina; de Pascale, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of the Pseudomonas sp. TAA207 and Pseudomonas sp. TAD18 strains, isolated from Antarctic sediments during a summer campaign near coastal areas of Terra Nova Bay (Antarctica). Genome sequence knowledge allowed the identification of genes associated with the production of bioactive compounds and antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, it will be instrumental for comparative genomics and the fulfillment of both basic and application-oriented investigations. PMID:27469957

  11. Dynamics of development and dispersal in sessile microbial communities: examples from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida model biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, M.; Gjermansen, Morten; Kreft, J.-U.;

    2006-01-01

    Surface-associated microbial communities in many cases display dynamic developmental patterns. Model biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida in laboratory flow-chamber setups represent examples of such behaviour. Dependent on the experimental conditions the bacteria...... organisms do not possess comprehensive genetic programs for biofilm development. Instead the bacteria appear to have evolved a number of different mechanisms to optimize surface colonization, of which they express a subset in response to the prevailing environmental conditions. These mechanisms include...

  12. [Mechanism of cyanide and thiocyanate decomposition by an association of Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas stutzeri strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'eva, N V; Kondrat'eva, T F; Krasil'nikova, E N; Karavaĭko, G I

    2006-01-01

    The intermediate and terminal products of cyanide and thiocyanate decomposition by individual strains of the genus Pseudomonas, P. putida strain 21 and P. stutzeri strain 18, and by their association were analyzed. The activity of the enzymes of nitrogen and sulfur metabolism in these strains was compared with that of the collection strains P. putida VKM B-2187T and P. stutzeri VKM B-975T. Upon the introduction of CN- and SCN- into cell suspensions of strains 18 and 21 in phosphate buffer (pH 8.8), the production of NH4+ was observed. Due to the high rate of their utilization, NH3, NH4+, and CNO- were absent from the culture liquids of P. putida strain 21 and P. stutzeri strain 18 grown with CN- or SCN-. Both Pseudomonas strains decomposed SCN- via cyanate production. The cyanase activity was 0.75 micromol/(min mg protein) for P. putida strain 21 and 1.26 micromol/(min mg protein) for P. stutzeri strain 18. The cyanase activity was present in the cells grown with SCN- but absent in cells grown with NH4+. Strain 21 of P. putida was a more active CN- decomposer than strain 18 of P. stutzeri. Ammonium and CO2 were the terminal nitrogen and carbon products of CN- and SCN- decomposition. The terminal sulfur products of SCN- decomposition by P. stutzeri strain 18 and P. putida strain 21 were thiosulfate and tetrathionate, respectively. The strains utilized the toxic compounds in the anabolism only, as sources of nitrogen (CN- and SCN-) and sulfur (SCN-). The pathway of thiocyanate decomposition by the association of bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas is proposed based on the results obtained.

  13. Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens Species Group Recovery from Human Homes Varies Seasonally and by Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna K Remold

    Full Text Available By shedding light on variation in time as well as in space, long-term biogeographic studies can help us define organisms' distribution patterns and understand their underlying drivers. Here we examine distributions of Pseudomonas in and around 15 human homes, focusing on the P. putida and P. fluorescens species groups. We describe recovery from 10,941 samples collected during up to 8 visits per home, occurring on average 2.6 times per year. We collected a mean of 141 samples per visit, from sites in most rooms of the house, from the surrounding yards, and from human and pet occupants. We recovered Pseudomonas in 9.7% of samples, with the majority of isolates being from the P. putida and P. fluorescens species groups (approximately 62% and 23% of Pseudomonas samples recovered respectively. Although representatives of both groups were recovered from every season, every house, and every type of environment sampled, recovery was highly variable across houses and samplings. Whereas recovery of P. putida group was higher in summer and fall than in winter and spring, P. fluorescens group isolates were most often recovered in spring. P. putida group recovery from soils was substantially higher than its recovery from all other environment types, while higher P. fluorescens group recovery from soils than from other sites was much less pronounced. Both species groups were recovered from skin and upper respiratory tract samples from healthy humans and pets, although this occurred infrequently. This study indicates that even species that are able to survive under a broad range of conditions can be rare and variable in their distributions in space and in time. For such groups, determining patterns and causes of stochastic and seasonal variability may be more important for understanding the processes driving their biogeography than the identity of the types of environments in which they can be found.

  14. Isolation of a bacterium that reductively dechlorinates tetrachloroethene to ethene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maymo-Gatell, X.; Chien, Yueh-tyng; Zinder, S.H. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)] [and others

    1997-06-06

    Tetrachloroethene is a prominent groundwater pollutant that can be reductively dechlorinated by mixed anaerobic microbial populations to the nontoxic product ethene. Strain 195, a coccoid bacterium that dechlorinates tetrachlorethene to ethene, was isolated and characterized. Growth of strain 195 with H{sub 2} and tetrachloroethene as the electron donor and acceptor pair required extracts from mixed microbial cultures. Growth of strain 195 was resistant to ampicillin and vancomycin; its cell wall did not react with a peptidoglycan-specific lectin and its ultrastructure resembled S-layers of Archaea. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence of strain 195 indicated that it is a eubacterium without close affiliation to any known groups. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Genome analysis of the Anerobic Thermohalophilic bacterium Halothermothrix orenii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Anderson, Iain; Lykidis, Athanasios; Hooper, Sean D.; Sun, Hui; Kunin, Victor; Lapidus, Alla; Hugenholtz, Philip; Patel, Bharat; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2008-11-03

    Halothermothirx orenii is a strictly anaerobic thermohalophilic bacterium isolated from sediment of a Tunisian salt lake. It belongs to the order Halanaerobiales in the phylum Firmicutes. The complete sequence revealed that the genome consists of one circular chromosome of 2578146 bps encoding 2451 predicted genes. This is the first genome sequence of an organism belonging to the Haloanaerobiales. Features of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were identified with the presence of both a sporulating mechanism typical of Firmicutes and a characteristic Gram negative lipopolysaccharide being the most prominent. Protein sequence analyses and metabolic reconstruction reveal a unique combination of strategies for thermophilic and halophilic adaptation. H. orenii can serve as a model organism for the study of the evolution of the Gram negative phenotype as well as the adaptation under thermohalophilic conditions and the development of biotechnological applications under conditions that require high temperatures and high salt concentrations.

  16. Characterisation of an unusual bacterium isolated from genital ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursi, J P; van Dyck, E; Ballard, R C; Jacob, W; Piot, P; Meheus, A Z

    1982-02-01

    The preliminary characterisation of an unusual gram-negative bacillus isolated from genital ulcers in Swaziland is reported. Like Haemophilus ducreyi, it is an oxidase positive, nitrate-reductase-positive gram-negative rod that forms streptobacillary chains in some circumstances; it was therefore called the "ducreyi-like bacterium" (DLB). Distinguishing features of DLB are production of alpha-haemolysis on horse-blood agar, stimulation of growth by a microaerophilic atmosphere and by a factor produced by Staphylococcus aureus, a strongly positive porphyrin test, and a remarkable ability to undergo autolysis. DLB had a guanine + cytosine value of c. 50 mole% but it cannot be classified, even at the genus level, until more taxonomic data are obtained.

  17. The domestication of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Matthew J; Jolley, Keith A; Bray, James E; Aerts, Maarten; Vandamme, Peter; Maiden, Martin C J; Marchesi, Julian R; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2014-11-26

    Lactobacillus acidophilus is a Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium that has had widespread historical use in the dairy industry and more recently as a probiotic. Although L. acidophilus has been designated as safe for human consumption, increasing commercial regulation and clinical demands for probiotic validation has resulted in a need to understand its genetic diversity. By drawing on large, well-characterised collections of lactic acid bacteria, we examined L. acidophilus isolates spanning 92 years and including multiple strains in current commercial use. Analysis of the whole genome sequence data set (34 isolate genomes) demonstrated L. acidophilus was a low diversity, monophyletic species with commercial isolates essentially identical at the sequence level. Our results indicate that commercial use has domesticated L. acidophilus with genetically stable, invariant strains being consumed globally by the human population.

  18. A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Hiraga, Kazumi; Takehana, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yamaji, Hironao; Maeda, Yasuhito; Toyohara, Kiyotsuna; Miyamoto, Kenji; Kimura, Yoshiharu; Oda, Kohei

    2016-03-11

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is used extensively worldwide in plastic products, and its accumulation in the environment has become a global concern. Because the ability to enzymatically degrade PET has been thought to be limited to a few fungal species, biodegradation is not yet a viable remediation or recycling strategy. By screening natural microbial communities exposed to PET in the environment, we isolated a novel bacterium, Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6, that is able to use PET as its major energy and carbon source. When grown on PET, this strain produces two enzymes capable of hydrolyzing PET and the reaction intermediate, mono(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalic acid. Both enzymes are required to enzymatically convert PET efficiently into its two environmentally benign monomers, terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Endocytosis-like protein uptake in the bacterium Gemmata obscuriglobus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonhienne, Thierry G A; Sagulenko, Evgeny; Webb, Richard I; Lee, Kuo-Chang; Franke, Josef; Devos, Damien P; Nouwens, Amanda; Carroll, Bernard J; Fuerst, John A

    2010-07-20

    Endocytosis is a process by which extracellular material such as macromolecules can be incorporated into cells via a membrane-trafficking system. Although universal among eukaryotes, endocytosis has not been identified in Bacteria or Archaea. However, intracellular membranes are known to compartmentalize cells of bacteria in the phylum Planctomycetes, suggesting the potential for endocytosis and membrane trafficking in members of this phylum. Here we show that cells of the planctomycete Gemmata obscuriglobus have the ability to uptake proteins present in the external milieu in an energy-dependent process analogous to eukaryotic endocytosis, and that internalized proteins are associated with vesicle membranes. Occurrence of such ability in a bacterium is consistent with autogenous evolution of endocytosis and the endomembrane system in an ancestral noneukaryote cell.

  20. Spoilage potential of Pseudomonas species isolated from goat milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scatamburlo, T M; Yamazi, A K; Cavicchioli, V Q; Pieri, F A; Nero, L A

    2015-02-01

    Pseudomonas spp. are usually associated with spoilage microflora of dairy products due to their proteolytic potential. This is of particular concern for protein-based products, such as goat milk cheeses and fermented milks. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to characterize the proteolytic activity of Pseudomonas spp. isolated from goat milk. Goat milk samples (n=61) were obtained directly from bulk tanks on dairy goat farms (n=12), and subjected to a modified International Organization for Standardization (ISO) protocol to determine the number and proteolytic activity of Pseudomonas spp. Isolates (n=82) were obtained, identified by PCR, and subjected to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with XbaI macro-restriction. Then, the isolates were subjected to PCR to detect the alkaline protease gene (apr), and phenotypic tests were performed to check proteolytic activity at 7°C, 25°C, and 35°C. Mean Pseudomonas spp. counts ranged from 2.9 to 4.8 log cfu/mL, and proteolytic Pseudomonas spp. counts ranged from 1.9 to 4.6 log cfu/mL. All isolates were confirmed to be Pseudomonas spp., and 41 were identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens, which clustered into 5 groups sharing approximately 82% similarity. Thirty-six isolates (46.9%) were positive for the apr gene; and 57 (69.5%) isolates presented proteolytic activity at 7°C, 82 (100%) at 25°C, and 64 (78%) at 35°C. The isolates were distributed ubiquitously in the goat farms, and no relationship among isolates was observed when the goat farms, presence of apr, pulsotypes, and proteolytic activity were taken into account. We demonstrated proteolytic activity of Pseudomonas spp. present in goat milk by phenotypic and genotypic tests and indicated their spoilage potential at distinct temperatures. Based on these findings and the ubiquity of Pseudomonas spp. in goat farm environments, proper monitoring and control of Pseudomonas spp. during production are critical.