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Sample records for distorted toroidal coils

  1. Distortion of magnetic field lines caused by radial displacements of ITER toroidal field coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoskov, V.M., E-mail: sytch@niiefa.spb.su [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Gribov, Y.V. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Lamzin, E.A.; Sytchevsky, S.E. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    An assessment of distortions of ideal (circle) field lines caused by random radial displacements of the TF coils by |∆R| ≤ 5 mm has been performed from the statistical analysis assuming a uniform probability density function for displacements.

  2. Supporting device for Toroidal coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Takao.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the response of a toroidal coil supporting device upon earthquakes and improve the earthquake proofness in a tokamak type thermonuclear device. Constitution: Structural materials having large longitudinal modulus and enduring great stresses, for example, stainless steels are used as the toroidal coil supporting legs and heat insulating structural materials are embedded in a nuclear reactor base mats below the supporting legs. Furthermore, heat insulating concretes are spiked around the heat insulating structural materials to prevent the intrusion of heat to the toroidal coils. The toroidal coils are kept at cryogenic state and superconductive state for the conductors. In this way, the period of proper vibrations of the toroidal coils and the toroidal coil supporting structures can be shortened thereby decreasing the seismic response. Furthermore, since the strength of the supporting legs is increased, the earthquake proofness of the coils can be improved. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. TFTR toroidal field coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.E.; Punchard, W.F.B.

    1977-01-01

    The design of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Toroidal Field (TF) magnetic coils is described. The TF coil is a 44-turn, spiral-wound, two-pancake, water-cooled configuration which, at a coil current of 73.3 kiloamperes, produces a 5.2-Tesla field at a major radius of 2.48 meters. The magnetic coils are installed in titanium cases, which transmit the loads generated in the coils to the adjacent supporting structure. The TFTR utilizes 20 of these coils, positioned radially at 18 0 intervals, to provide the required toroidal field. Because it is very highly loaded and subject to tight volume constraints within the machine, the coil presents unique design problems. The TF coil requirements are summarized, the coil configuration is described, and the problems highlighted which have been encountered thus far in the coil design effort, together with the development tests which have been undertaken to verify the design

  4. NCSX Toroidal Field Coil Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalish M; Rushinski J; Myatt L; Brooks A; Dahlgren F; Chrzanowski J; Reiersen W; Freudenberg K.

    2005-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is an experimental device whose design and construction is underway at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The primary coil systems for the NCSX device consist of the twisted plasma-shaping Modular Coils, the Poloidal Field Coils, and the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. The TF Coils are D-shaped coils wound from hollow copper conductor, and vacuum impregnated with a glass-epoxy resin system. There are 18 identical, equally spaced TF coils providing 1/R field at the plasma. They operate within a cryostat, and are cooled by LN2, nominally, to 80K. Wedge shaped castings are assembled to the inboard face of these coils, so that inward radial loads are reacted via the nesting of each of the coils against their adjacent partners. This paper outlines the TF Coil design methodology, reviews the analysis results, and summarizes how the design and analysis support the design requirements

  5. BPX toroidal field coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitzenvoeder, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the toroidal field (TF) coil system of the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX) which consists of (18) beryllium copper magnets arrayed in a wedged configuration with a major radius of 2.6 meters and a field strength capability on axis of 9.0 Tesla. The toroidal array is constructed from six (3)-coil modules to facilitate remote recovery in the event of a magnet failure after nuclear activation precludes hands-on servicing. The magnets are of a modified Bitter plate design with partial cases of type 316-LN stainless steel welded with Inconel 182 weld wire. The coil turn plates are fabricated from CDA C17510 beryllium copper with optimized mechanical, thermal, and electrical characteristics. joints within the turns and between turns are made by welding with C17200 filler wire. Cryogenic cooling is employed to reduce power dissipation and to enhance performance. The magnets are cooled between experimental pulses by pressurized liquid nitrogen flowing through channels in the edges of the coil turns. This arrangement makes possible one full-power pulse per hour. Electrical insulation consists of polyimide-glass sheets bonded in place with vacuum-pressure impregnated epoxy/glass

  6. Bow-shaped toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonanos, P.

    1981-05-01

    Design features of Bow-Shaped Toroidal Field Coils are described and compared with circular and D shaped coils. The results indicate that bow coils can produce higher field strengths, store more energy and be made demountable. The design offers the potential for the production of ultrahigh toroidal fields. Included are representative coil shapes and their engineering properties, a suggested structural design and an analysis of a specific case

  7. PDX toroidal field coils stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodem, Z.D.; Smith, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A method used in the stress analysis of the PDX toroidal field coil is developed. A multilayer coil design of arbitrary dimensions in the shape of either a circle or an oval is considered. The analytical model of the coil and the supporting coil case with connections to the main support structure is analyzed using the finite element technique. The three dimensional magnetic fields and the non-uniform body forces which are a loading condition on a coil due to toroidal and poloidal fields are calculated. The method of analysis permits rapid and economic evaluations of design changes in coil geometry as well as in coil support structures. Some results pertinent to the design evolution and their comparison are discussed. The results of the detailed stress analysis of the final coil design due to toroidal field, poloidal field and temperature loads are presented

  8. OCLATOR (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1980-02-01

    A new approach to construct a tokamak-type reactor(s) is presented. Basically the return conductors of toroidal field coils are eliminated and the toroidal field coil is replaced by one single large coil, around which there will be placed several tokamaks or other toroidal devices. The elimination of return conductors should, in addition to other advantages, improve the accessibility and maintainability of the tokamaks and offer a possible alternative to the search for special materials to withstand large neutron wall loading, as the frequency of changeover would be increased due to minimum downtime. It also makes it possible to have a low aspect ratio tokamak which should improve the ..beta.. limit, so that a low toroidal magnetic field strength might be acceptable, meaning that the NbTi superconducting wire could be used. This system is named OCLATOR (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor).

  9. Device for supporting a toroidal coil in a toroidal type nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Hakaru; Sato, Hiroshi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To easily manufacture a center block having a strength sufficient to withstand an electromagnetic force exerted on the center of toroidal of a toroidal coil and to increase its reliability. Structure: In a device for supporting toroidal coils wherein the electromagnetic force exerted on the center of toroidal of a plurality of toroidal coils arranged in toroidal fashion, the contact surface between the toroidal coil and the center block is arranged parallel to the center axis of toroidal so as to receive the electromagnetic force exerted on the center of toroidal of the toroidal coil as the component of force in a radial direction. (Taniai, N.)

  10. Discussion of discrete D shape toroidal coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiho, Katsuyuki; Ohara, Takeshi; Agatsuma, Ko; Onishi, Toshitada

    1988-01-01

    A novel design for a toroidal coil, called the D shape coil, was reported by J. File. The coil conductors are in pure tension and then subject to no bending moment. This leads to a smaller number of emf supports in a simpler configuration than that with the conventional toroidal coil of circular cross-section. The contours of the D shape are given as solutions of a differential equation. This equation includes the function of the magnetic field distribution in the conductor region which is inversely proportional to the winding radius. It is therefore important to use the exact magnetic field distribution. However the magnetic field distribution becomes complicated when the D shape toroidal coil is comprised of discrete coils and also depends on the D shape configuration. A theory and a computer program for designing the practical pure-tension toroidal coil are developed. Using this computer code, D shape conductors are calculated for various numbers of discrete coils and the results are compared. Electromagnetic forces in the coils are also calculated. It is shown that the hoop stress in the conductors depends only on the total ampere-turns of the coil when the contours of the D shape are similar. (author)

  11. OCLATOR (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1980-02-01

    A new approach to construct a tokamak-type reactor(s) is presented. Basically the return conductors of toroidal field coils are eliminated and the toroidal field coil is replaced by one single large coil, around which there will be placed several tokamaks or other toroidal devices. The elimination of return conductors should, in addition to other advantages, improve the accessibility and maintainability of the tokamaks and offer a possible alternative to the search for special materials to withstand large neutron wall loading, as the frequency of changeover would be increased due to minimum downtime. It also makes it possible to have a low aspect ratio tokamak which should improve the β limit, so that a low toroidal magnetic field strength might be acceptable, meaning that the NbTi superconducting wire could be used. This system is named OCLATOR

  12. Progress on large superconducting toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Luton, J.N.; Thompson, P.B.; Beard, D.S.

    1979-01-01

    Large superconducting toroidal field coils of competing designs are being produced by six major industrial teams. In the US, teams headed by General Dynamics Convair, General Electric, and Westinghouse are under contract to design and fabricate one coil each to specifications established by the Large Coil Program. A facility for testing 6 coils in a toroidal array at fields to 8 to 12 tesla is under construction at Oak Ridge. Through an international agreement, EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland will produce one coil each for testing with the US coils. Each test coil will have a 2.5 x 3.5 m D-shape winding bore and is designed to operate at a current of 10 to 18 kA at a peak field of 8T while subjected to pulsed fields of 0.14 T applied in 1.0 s. There are significant differences among the six coil designs: five use NbTi, one Nb 3 Sn; three are cooled by pool boiling helium, three by forced flow; five have welded or bolted stainless steel coil cases, one has aluminum plate structure. All are designed to be cryostable at 8T, with structural margin for extended operation. The three US coil teams are almost or completely finished with detailed design and are now procuring materials and setting up manufacturing equipment. The non-US teams are at various stages of verification testing and design. The GDC and GE coils are scheduled for delivery in the spring of 1981 and the others will be completed a year later. The 11-m diameter vessel at the test facility has been completed and major components of the test stand are being procured. Engineering and procurement to upgrade the helium liquifier-refrigerator system are under way

  13. Design considerations for ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, S.S.; Lousteau, D.C.; Miller, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a new tokamak design project with joint participation from Europe, Japan, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R.), and the United States. This paper describes a magnetic and mechanical design methodology for toroidal field (TF) coils that employs Nb 3 Sn superconductor technology. Coil winding is sized by using conductor concepts developed for the U.S. TIBER concept. Manifold concepts are presented for the complete cooling system. Also included are concepts for the coil structural arrangement. The effects of in-plane and out-of-plane loads are included in the design considerations for the windings and case. Concepts are presented for reacting these loads with a minimum amount of additional structural material. Concepts discussed in this paper could be considered for the ITER TF coils

  14. General Atomic's superconducting toroidal field coil concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcorn, J.; Purcell, J.

    1978-01-01

    General Atomic's concept for a superconducting toroidal field coil is presented. The concept is generic for large tokamak devices, while a specific design is indicated for a 3.8 meter (major radius) ignition/burn machine. The concept utilizes bath cooled NbTi conductor to generate a peak field of 10 tesla at 4.2 K. The design is simple and straightforward, requires a minimum of developmental effort, and draws extensively upon the perspective of past experience in the design and construction of large superconducting magnets for high energy physics. Thus, the primary emphasis is upon economy, reliability, and expeditious construction scheduling. (author)

  15. Structural design of the superconducting toroidal field coils for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, F.M.G.; Sborchia, C.; Thome, R.J.; Malkov, A.; Titus, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    Structural design issues and features of the superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will be discussed. Selected analyses of the structural and mechanical behavior of the ITER TF coils will also be presented. (orig.)

  16. Tokamak with liquid metal toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawa, T.; Schaffer, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. Electric current is passed through the liquid metal over a conductive path linking the toroidal space to produce a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof

  17. Resistive demountable toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Jacobsen, R.A.; Kalnavarns, J.; Masson, L.S.; Sekot, J.P.

    1981-07-01

    Readily demountable TF (toroidal-field) coils allow complete access to the internal components of a tokamak reactor for maintenance of replacement. The requirement of readily demountable joints dictates the use of water-cooled resistive coils, which have a host of decisive advantages over superconducting coils. Previous papers have shown that resistive TF coils for tokamak reactors can operate in the steady state with acceptable power dissipation (typically, 175 to 300 MW). This paper summarizes results of parametric studies of size optimization of rectangular TF coils and of a finite-element stress analysis, and examines several candidate methods of implementing demountable joints for rectangular coils constructed of plate segments

  18. Fabrication of the KSTAR toroidal field coil structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, C.H.; Sa, J.W.; Park, H.K.; Hong, K.H.; Shin, H.; Kim, H.T.; Bak, J.S.; Lee, G.S.; Kwak, J.H.; Moon, H.G.; Yoon, H.H.; Lee, J.W.; Lee, S.K.; Song, J.Y.; Nam, K.M.; Byun, S.E.; Kim, H.C.; Ha, E.T.; Ahn, H.J.; Kim, D.S.; Lee, J.S.; Park, K.H.; Hong, C.D.

    2005-01-01

    The KSTAR toroidal field (TF) coil structure is under fabrication upon completion of engineering design and prototype construction. The prototype TF coil structure has been fabricated within allowable tolerances. Encasing of the prototype TF coil (TF00) in the prototype structure has been carried out through major processes involving a coil encasing, an enclosing weld, a vacuum pressure impregnation, and an outer surface machining. During the enclosing weld of the TF00 coil structure, we have measured temperatures and stresses on the coil surface. Assembly test had been performed with the TF00 coil structure. We have chosen Type 316LN as material of the TF coil structure. We used the narrow-gap TIG welding method. Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Company (DHI) will complete the fabrication of the TF coil structure in Feb. 2006. (author)

  19. Bi-2223 HTS winding in toroidal configuration for SMES coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratowicz-Kucewicz, B; Kozak, S; Kozak, J; Wojtasiewicz, G; Majka, M; Janowski, T

    2010-01-01

    Energy can be stored in the magnetic field of a coil. Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) is very promising as a power storage system for load levelling or power stabilizer. However, the strong electromagnetic force caused by high magnetic field and large coil current is a problem in SMES systems. A toroidal configuration would have a much less extensive external magnetic field and electromagnetic forces in winding. The paper describes the design of HTS winding for SMES coil in modular toroid configuration consist of seven Bi-2223 double-pancakes as well as numerical analysis of SMES magnet model using FLUX 3D package. As the results of analysis the paper presents the optimal coil configuration and the parameters such as radius of toroidal magnet, energy stored in magnet and magnetic field distribution.

  20. First ATLAS Barrel Toroid coil casing arrives at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The first of eight 25-metre long coil casings for the ATLAS experiment's barrel toroid magnet system arrived at CERN on Saturday 2 March by road from Heidelberg. This structure will be part of the largest superconducting toroid magnet ever made.   The first coil casing for the toroidal magnets of Atlas arrives at Building 180. This is the start of an enormous three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle. Each of the eight sets of double pancake coils will be housed inside aluminium coil casings, which in turn will be held inside a stainless steel vacuum vessel. A huge construction, the casing that arrived at CERN measures 25 metres in length and 5 metres in width. It weighs 20 tones. And this is just the beginning of the toroid jigsaw: by early April a batch of four double pancake coils, which altogether weighs 65 tones, will arrive from Ansaldo in Italy. The first vacuum vessel will also be arriving from Felguera in Spain this month. It will take about two years for all these 25 m long structures of casings, coils a...

  1. Structural analysis of TFTR toroidal field coil conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.A.

    1975-10-01

    The conceptual design evaluation of the V-shaped toroidal field coils on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor has been performed by detailed structural analysis with the finite element method. The innovation provided by this design and verified in this work is the capability to support toroidal field loads while simultaneously performing the function of twist restraint against the device axial torques resulting from the vertical field loads. The evaluations made for the conceptual design provide predictions for coil deflections and stresses. The results are available for the separate effects from toroidal fields, poloidal fields, and the thermal expansion of the coils as well as for the superposition of the primary loads and the primary plus thermal loads

  2. Modular coils: a promising toroidal-reactor-coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.K.; Furth, H.P.; Johnson, J.L.; Ludescher, C.; Weimer, K.E.

    1981-04-01

    The concept of modular coils originated from a need to find reactor-relevant stellarator windings, but its usefulness can be extended to provide an externally applied, additional rotational transform in tokamaks. Considerations of (1) basic principles of modular coils, (2) types of coils, (3) types of configurations (general, helically symmetric, helically asymmetric, with magnetic well, with magnetic hill), (4) types of rotational transform profile, and (5) structure and origin of ripples are given. These results show that modular coils can offer a wide range of vacuum magnetic field configurations, some of which cannot be obtained with the classical stellarator or torsatron coil configuration

  3. Toroidal field coils for the PDX machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushnell, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the engineering design features of the TF coils for the PDX machine. Included are design details of the electrical insulation, water cooling, and coil segment joint which allows access to the central machine area. A discussion of the problems anticipated in the manufacture and the planned solutions are presented

  4. Structural analysis of the NET toroidal field coils and conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N.; Collier, D.; Gori, R.

    1989-01-01

    The NET toroidal field coils will utilise A15-type superconductor at 4.2 K to generate fields up to 11.5 T. The superconductor strands themselves are sensitive to strain, which causes degradation of their current carrying capacity, and thus the detailed behaviour of the coil conductor must be analysied so that the strian can be minimised. This analysis must include the manufacturing processes of the conductor as well as the normal and abnormal loperational loads. The conductor will be insulated and bonded by glass fibre reinforced epoxy resin, with limited bonding shear strength, and the overall support of the complete coil system must be designed to reduce these shear stresses. The coils will be subjected to pulse loads form the poloidal field coils, and analysis of the slip between the various coil components, such as conductors and the coil case, giving rise to frictional heating and possible loss of superconducting properties is another important factor, which has been investigated by a number of stress analyses. The manufacturing, thermal and normal magnetic loads on the coils and the analysis leading to the proposed structural design are described. In addition to the normal operating conditions, there is a range of abnormal load conditions which could result from electrical or mechanical faults on the coils. The effect of these potential faults has been analysed and the coil design modified to prevent catastrophic structural failure. (author). 13 refs.; 8 figs.; 1 tab

  5. Composite coils for toroidal field coils and method of using same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, R. G.; Trujillo, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    A composite toroidal field (TF) generating means consisting of segmented magnetic coil windings is disclosed. Each coil winding of the TF generating means consists of a copper or copper alloy conductor segment and an aluminum or aluminum alloy conductor segment. The conductor segments are joined at a high strength, low electrical resistance joint and the joint may either be a mechanical or metallurgical one. The use of the aluminum or aluminum alloy conductor segments improves the neutron economy of the reactor with which the TF coil is associated and reduces TF coil nuclear heating and heating gradients, and activation in the TF coils

  6. First assembly phase for the ATLAS toroid coils

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two double-pancake windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. In the first phase of assembly, the two 'pancakes' are packed into their vacuum vessel. This is done using bladders filled with resin and glass microbeads under pressure. The resin is heated and, once cooled, holds the pancakes in place. The operation has to be performed on both sides of the coil, which necessitated a special technique to turn the coils over and then transport them to the heating table. Photos 01, 02, 03: Transporting the coil to the heating table using a special lifting gantry manufactured at JINR-Dubna, Russia in preparation for the 'bladderisation' operation.

  7. Results of ITER toroidal field coil cover plate welding test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Norikiyo; Matsui, Kunihiro; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Nakajima, Hideo; Iijima, Ami; Makino, Yoshinobu

    2012-01-01

    In ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coils, cover plates (CP) are welded to the teeth of the radial plate (RP) to fix conductors in the grooves of the RP. Though the total length of the welds is approximately 1.5 km and the height and width of the RP are 14 and 9 m, respectively, welding deformation of smaller than 1 mm for local out-of-plane distortion and smaller than several millimeters for in-plane deformation is required. Therefore, laser welding is used for CP welding to reduce welding deformation as much as possible. However, the gap in welding joints is expected to be a maximum of 0.5 mm. Thus, a laser welding technique to enable welding of joints with a gap of 0.5 mm in width has been developed. Applying this technology, a CP welding trial using an RP mock-up was successfully performed. The achieved local flatness, that is, the flatness of the cross-section of the RP mock-up, is 0.6 mm. The analysis using inherent strains, which are derived from the welding test using flat plates, also indicates that better local flatness can be achieved if the initial distortion is zero. In addition, the welding deformation of a full-scale RP is evaluated via analysis using the inherent strain. The analytical results show that in-plane deformation is approximately 5 mm and large out-of-plane deformation, consisting of approximately 5 mm-long wave distortion and a twist of approximately 1.5 mm in the RP cross-section, is generated. It is expected that the required profile can be achieved by determining the original geometry of an RP by simulating deformation during welding. It is also expected that the required local flatness of a DP can be achieved, since out-of-plane deformation can be reduced by increasing the number of RPs turned over during CP welding. A more detailed study is required. (author)

  8. First assembly phase for the ATLAS toroid coils

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two double-pancake windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. In the first phase of assembly, the two 'pancakes' are packed into their vacuum vessel. This is done using bladders filled with resin and glass microbeads under pressure. The resin is heated and, once cooled, holds the pancakes in place. The operation has to be performed on both sides of the coil, which necessitated a special technique to turn the coils over and then transport them to the heating table. Photos 01, 02, 03: Use of the overhead travelling crane to hoist the coil up and then tilt it over, the coil frame's metal feet being used as rotational pivots, supporting half the coil's weight. Once it has been turned over, the coil, now with only half the frame, is transported to the heating table using a special lifting gant...

  9. Second Barrel Toroid Coil Installed in ATLAS Cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Tappern, G.

    The second barrel toroid coil was lowered into the ATLAS Cavern on Friday, 26 November. The operation takes approximately five hours of precision crane and winch operations. Before lowering, several checks are made to ensure that no loose items have been left on the coil which would fall during the lowering down the shaft. This is a very difficult, but very important check, with the first coil in position, and partly below the shaft. After changing the winch tooling on Wednesday December 1st, the coil was lifted, rotated and placed into the feet. The girders which support the coil and the Z direction stops had all been pre-set before putting the coil in the feet. The angle is controlled by an inclinometer. When the final adjustments of position have been made, which will locate the coils at the plus/minus two mm level, the connection beams (voussoirs and struts) will be put in place; this requires a complex shimming procedure. This will lock together the two coils into the feet and forms the foundation for th...

  10. Photoelastic analyses of stresses in toroidal magnetic field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pih, H.

    1977-02-01

    Several two-dimensional photoelastic stress analyses were made on models of circular and oval toroidal magnetic field coils for fusion reactors. The circumferential variation of each coil's in-plane magnetic force was simulated by applying different pressures to 16 segmented regions of the inner surface of the models. One special loading fixture was used for the model of each shape and size. Birefringence and isoclinic angles were measured in a transmission polariscope at selected points on the loaded model. Boundary stresses in the cases of known boundary conditions were determined directly from the isochromatics. Separate principal stresses were calculated using the combination of photoelastic information and isopachic data obtained by the electrical analogy method from the solution of Laplace's equation. Comparisons were made between experimental results and those computed using the finite element method. The stress distribution between theoretical and experimental agrees very well, although the finite element method yielded slightly higher stresses than the photoelastic method; further work is needed to resolve this difference. In this investigation several variations of coil geometry and methods of support were evaluated. Based on experimental results, optimum structural designs of toroidal field coils were recommended

  11. Study on usage of fluorocarbon for toroidal field coil cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Hiroshi; Arai, Takashi

    1998-09-01

    In JT-60 machine, usage of fluorocarbon as an alternate coolant to a cooling channel of toroidal field coil (TF coil) in which a crack was detected is investigated. Fluorinert (a registered trademark of 3M) liquid which is one of fluorocarbon was reviewed, and liquid 'FC-43' was found as an appropriate one for TF coils cooling because of its physical properties about boiling point and thermal capacity. Fortunately, Fluorinert does not have impact on the greenhouse effect for the earth under the temperature of its boiling point. And thermal analysis shows that the cooling effectiveness obtained with liquid 'FC-43' for TF coils is rather well. Moreover, corrosion tests were carried out between liquid 'FC-43' and materials used in JT-60 by considering deterioration of TF coils. The test results demonstrate that there is no problem in applying liquid 'FC-43' as a coolant to cooling channel of TF coils. Results obtained above conclude that usage of fluorocarbon is one of the effective means to perform further experiments in JT-60. (author)

  12. Coil extensions improve line shapes by removing field distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradi, Mark S.; Altobelli, Stephen A.; McDowell, Andrew F.

    2018-06-01

    The static magnetic susceptibility of the rf coil can substantially distort the field B0 and be a dominant source of line broadening. A scaling argument shows that this may be a particular problem in microcoil NMR. We propose coil extensions to reduce the distortion. The actual rf coil is extended to a much longer overall length by abutted coil segments that do not carry rf current. The result is a long and nearly uniform sheath of copper wire, in terms of the static susceptibility. The line shape improvement is demonstrated at 43.9 MHz and in simulation calculations.

  13. Results of the ITER toroidal field model coil project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salpietro, E.; Maix, R.

    2001-01-01

    In the scope of the ITER EDA one of the seven largest projects was devoted to the development, manufacture and testing of a Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC). The industry consortium AGAN manufactured the TFMC based on on a conceptual design developed by the ITER EDA EU Home Team. The TFMC was completed and assembled in the test facility TOSKA of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe in the first half of 2001. The first testing phase started in June 2001 and lasted till October 2001. The first results have shown that the main goals of the project have been achieved

  14. Structural analyses of ITER toroidal field coils under fault conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, C.T.J.

    1992-04-01

    ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) is intended to be an experimental thermonuclear tokamak reactor testing the basic physics performance and technologies essential to future fusion reactors. The magnet system of ITER consists essentially of 4 sub-systems, i.e. toroidal field coils (TFCs), poloidal field coils (PFCs), power supplies, and cryogenic supplies. These subsystems do not contain significant radioactivity inventories, but the large energy inventory is a potential accident initiator. The aim of the structural analyses is to prevent accidents from propagating into vacuum vessel, tritium system and cooling system, which all contain significant amounts of radioactivity. As part of design process 3 conditions are defined for PF and TF coils, at which mechanical behaviour has to be analyzed in some detail, viz: normal operating conditions, upset conditions and fault conditions. This paper describes the work carried out by ECN to create a detailed finite element model of 16 TFCs as well as results of some fault condition analyses made with the model. Due to fault conditions, either electrical or mechanical, magnetic loading of TFCs becomes abnormal and further mechanical failure of parts of the overall structure might occur (e.g. failure of coil, gravitational supports, intercoil structure). The analyses performed consist of linear elastic stress analyses and electro-magneto-structural analyses (coupled field analyses). 8 refs.; 5 figs.; 5 tabs

  15. Considerations of coil protection and electrical connection schemes in large superconducting toroidal magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.T.

    1976-03-01

    A preliminary comparison of several different coil protection and electrical connection schemes for large superconducting toroidal magnet systems (STMS) is carried out. The tentative recommendation is to rely on external dump resistors for coil protection and to connect the coils in the toroidal magnet in several parallel loops (e.g., every fourth coil is connected into a single series loop). For the fault condition when a single coil quenches, the quenched coil should be isolated from its loop by switching devices. The magnet, as a whole, should probably be discharged if more than a few coils have quenched

  16. Protection of toroidal field coils using multiple circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, R.J.; Langton, W.G.; Mann, W.R.; Pillsbury, R.D.; Tarrh, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The protection of toroidal field (TF) coils using multiple circuits is described. The discharge of a single-circuit TF system is given for purposes of definition. Two-circuit TF systems are analyzed and the results presented analytically and graphically. Induced currents, maximum discharge voltages, and discharge time constants are compared to the single-circuit system. Three-circuit TF systems are analyzed. In addition to induced currents, maximum discharge voltages, and time constants, several different discharge scenarios are included. The impacts of having discharge rates versus final maximum coil temperatures as requirements are examined. The out-of-plane forces which occur in the three-circuit system are analyzed using an approximate model. The analysis of multiplecircuit TF systems is briefly described and results for a Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) scale device are given based on computer analysis. The advantages and disadvantages of using multiple-circuit systems are summarized and discussed. The primary disadvantages of multiple circuits are the increased circuit complexity and potential for out-of-plane forces. These are offset by the substantial reduction in maximum discharge voltages, as well as other design options which become available when using multiple circuits

  17. Stress analyses of ITER toroidal field coils under fault conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, C.T.J.

    1990-02-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is intended as an experimental thermonuclear tokamak reactor for testing the basic physics, performance and technologies essential to future fusion reactors. The ITER design will be based on extensive new design work, supported by new physical and technological results, and on the great body of experience built up over several years from previous national and international reactor studies. Conversely, the ITER design process should provide the fusion community with valuable insights into what key areas need further development or clarification as we move forward towards practical fusion power. As part of the design process of the ITER toroidal field coils the mechanical behaviour of the magnetic system under fault conditions has to be analysed in more detail. This paper describes the work carried out to create a detailed finite element model of two toroidal field coils as well as some results of linear elastic analyses with fault conditions. The analyses have been performed with the finite element code ANSYS. (author). 5 refs.; 8 figs.; 2 tabs

  18. Design, manufacture and performance of the JET Toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet, M.; Booth, J.; Pohlchen, R.

    1983-01-01

    The JET Toroidal field magnet compromises 32 D shaped coils each 5.7 m high, 3.8 wide and weighing 12 tonnes. The field produced is 3.45 Tesla at 2.9 m radius when operating at the maximum current of 66.5 kA. The coils are wound with water cooled hollow conductor and operate with an equivalent rectangular current pulse length of 20 seconds at full current. A description of the evolution of the design in relation to the constraints imposed is given first. These design constraints included the low aspect ratio of the Torus, the long pulse duration, the large mechanical forces and also the availability of suitable copper conductor sections. The stress analysis of the coil is outlined as well as the cooling requirements and some specific stresses. The construction of the D shaped coils in hard copper presents problems due to the spring back effect of the conductor. The methods adopted to solve these difficulties together with other problems related to the winding process are given. A large number of tests were carried out in order to establish the conditions necessary to obtain reliable brazed joints. During production the non destructive tests for each joint were very severe and included X-ray examination. In order to meet the JET delivery programme, a large effort has been required in terms of production tools and organization of the work at the supplier's works. This effort and the construction schedule is outlined. After assembly on the JET machine the TF coils have been tested and their initial performances in electrical, mechanical and thermal terms are compared with predicted values

  19. Validation of Helium Inlet Design for ITER Toroidal Field Coil

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, C; Hamada, K; Foussat, A; Le Rest, M; Mitchell, N; Decool, P; Savary, F; Sgobba, S; Weiss, K-P

    2014-01-01

    The ITER organization has performed design and its validation tests on a helium inlet structure for the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coil under collaboration with CERN, KIT, and CEA-Cadarache. Detailed structural analysis was performed in order to optimize the weld shape. A fatigue resistant design on the fillet weld between the shell covers and the jacket is an important point on the helium inlet structure. A weld filler material was selected based on tensile test at liquid helium temperature after Nb$_{3}$Sn reaction heat treatment. To validate the design of the weld joint, fatigue tests at 7 K were performed using heat-treated butt weld samples. A pressure drop measurement of a helium inlet mock-up was performed by using nitrogen gas at room temperature in order to confirm uniform flow distribution and pressure drop characteristic. These tests have validated the helium inlet design. Based on the validation, Japanese and European Union domestic agencies, which have responsibilities of the TF coil procurement, a...

  20. Validation of helium inlet design for ITER toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, C.; Seo, K.; Hamada, K.; Foussat, A.; Le Rest, M.; Mitchell, N.; Decool, P.; Savary, F.; Sgobba, S.; Weiss, K.P.

    2014-01-01

    The ITER organization has performed design and its validation tests on a helium inlet structure for the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coil under collaboration with CERN, KIT, and CEA Cadarache. Detailed structural analysis was performed in order to optimize the weld shape. A fatigue resistant design on the fillet weld between the shell covers and the jacket is an important point on the helium inlet structure. A weld filler material was selected based on tensile test at liquid helium temperature after Nb 3 Sn reaction heat treatment. To validate the design of the weld joint, fatigue tests at 7 K were performed using heat-treated butt weld samples. A pressure drop measurement of a helium inlet mock-up was performed by using nitrogen gas at room temperature in order to confirm uniform flow distribution and pressure drop characteristic. These tests have validated the helium inlet design. Based on the validation, Japanese and European Union domestic agencies, which have responsibilities of the TF coil procurement, are preparing the helium inlet mock-up for a qualification test. (authors)

  1. Heat treatment trials for ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Kunihiro; Hemmi, Tsutomu; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Nakajima, Hideo; Kimura, Satoshi; Nakamoto, Kazunari

    2012-01-01

    Cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductors using Nb 3 Sn strands are used in ITER toroidal fields (TF) coils. Heat treatment generates thermal strain in CIC conductors because of the difference in thermal expansion between the Nb 3 Sn strands and the stainless-steel jacket. The elongation/shrinkage of the TF conductor may make it impossible to insert a wound TF conductor into the groove of a radial plate. In addition, it is expected that the deformation of the winding due to heat treatment-based release of the residual force in the jacket may also make it impossible to insert the winding in the groove, and that correcting the winding geometry to allow insertion of the winding may influence the superconducting performance of the TF conductor. The authors performed several trials using heat treatment as the part of activities in Phase II of TF coil procurement aiming to resolve the above-mentioned technical issues, and evaluated the elongations of 0.064, 0.074 and 0.072% for the straight and curved conductors and 1/3-scale double-pancake (DP) winding, respectively. It was confirmed that correction if the deformed winding did not influence the superconducting performance of the conductor. (author)

  2. Qualifying tests for TRIAM-1M superconducting toroidal magnetic field coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanura, Yukio; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Kazuo; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Nagao, Akihiro; Kawasaki, Shoji; Itoh, Satoshi

    1984-09-01

    In the strong toroidal magnetic field experimental facility ''TRIAM-1M'' currently under construction, construction of the superconducting toroidal magnetic field coil and the following qualifying tests conducted on the full-scale superconducting toroidal magnetic field coil actually fabricated are described: (1) coil excitation test, (2) superconducting stability test, (3) external magnetic field application test, and (4) high-speed excitation test. On the basis of these test results, stability was evaluated of the superconducting coil being operated in the tokamak device. In normal tokamak operation, there occurs no normal conduction transition. At the time of plasma disruption, though this transition takes place in part of the coil, the superconducting state is immediately restored. By its electromagnetic force analysis, the superconducting coil is also stable in structure.

  3. Superconducting toroidal field coil current densities for the TFCX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, S.S.; Hooper, R.J.

    1985-04-01

    A major goal of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) study was to minimize the size of the device and achieve lowest cost. Two key factors influencing the size of the device employing superconducting magnets are toroidal field (TF) winding current density and its nuclear heat load withstand capability. Lower winding current density requires larger radial build of the winding pack. Likewise, lower allowable nuclear heating in the winding requires larger shield thickness between the plasma and coil. In order to achieve a low-cost device, it is essential to maximize the winding's current density and nuclear heating withhstand capability. To meet the above objective, the TFCX design specification adopted as goals a nominal winding current density of 3500 A/cm 2 with 10-T peak field at the winding and peak nuclear heat load limits of 1 MW/cm 3 for the nominal design and 50 MW/cm 3 for an advanced design. This study developed justification for these current density and nuclear heat load limits

  4. Suppression of m = 0 in a RFP by toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.; Robertson, S.

    1993-01-01

    The Reversatron RFP is normally operated with the toroidal field coils connected in series. The time-integrated voltage applied to the circuit determines the sum of the fluxes linking each turn but not the flux within each turn. Each winding may have a different flux determined by the external drive and by currents within the plasma. A parallel connection of the field coils results in the flux within each coil being determined by the volt-seconds applied to the windings; thus the toroidal flux is the same within each coil. This configuration suppresses any toroidal variation in the toroidal flux and effectively reduces the level of the m = 0 component of the radial field. The m = 0 fluctuations are expected to arise due to nonlinear coupling of the m = 1 modes. A parallel connection of field coils is impractical due to the low impedance required for driving the coils. The authors have tested the effect of parallel connected coils by adding an auxiliary set of 36 coils. These are connected in parallel but are not connected to any supply. The toroidal flux is generated by the series-connected coils which generate voltage but not current in the parallel-connected coils. With the auxiliary coils, the discharge duration is increased from 500 to 550 μsec, the plasma current is increased from 50 kA to 60 kA, F is more negative, Θ is larger, and there is less shot-to-shot variation in the discharges. The m = 0 fluctuations measured by 43 surface coils are, however, only slightly reduced

  5. Trial manufacture of ITER toroidal field coil radial plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Katsutoshi; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Nakajima, Hideo; Esaki, Koichi; Nagamoto, Yoshifumi; Makino, Yoshinobu

    2012-01-01

    In an ITER toroidal field (TF) coil, tight tolerances of 1 mm in flatness and a few millimeters in profile are required to manufacture a radial plate (RP), although the height and width of the RP are 13 m and 9 m, respectively. In addition, since cover plates (CPs) should be fitted to a groove in the RP with tolerance of 0.5 mm, tight tolerances are also required for the CPs. The authors therefore performed preliminary and full-scale trials to achieve tight tolerances that meet the required RP manufacturing schedule, such as one RP every three weeks. Before the full-scale trials, preliminary trials were performed to optimize machining procedures, welding conditions and assembly procedures for the RP, and the manufacturing processes for the straight and curved CP segments. Based on these preliminary trial results, full-scale RP and CPs were fabricated. The flatness achieved for the RP is 1 mm, except at the top and bottom where gravity support is insufficient. If the gravity support is suitable, it is expected that a flatness of 1 mm is achievable. The profile of the RP was measured to be within the targeted range, better than 2 mm. In addition, most of the CPs fit the corresponding groove of the RP. Although the issue of hot-cracking in the weld still remains, the test results indicate that this problem can be prevented by improving the geometry of the welding joint. Thus, we can conclude that the manufacturing procedures for RP and CP have been demonstrated. (author)

  6. Numerical stress analysis of toroidal coil by three-dimensional finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Hidetomo; Shimamoto, Susumu

    1977-10-01

    A structure analysis program based on finite element method for toroidal coils, developed in JAERI, and its example application to a medium-size tokamak are described. In this application, the effects of material anisotropy, poloidal field and spring constant value were studied, and also the influence of toroidal coil failure on the peak stress. The following were revealed. The effect of anisotropy on the peak stress in reinforcement must be considered. The effect of poloidal field on the peak stress is small compared with that of toroidal field. The spring constant value between coil and support does not much influence the peak stress value, The peak stress in reinforcement rises with increasing number of failed coils. In the case of 2000 nodes on the structure, CPU time with the program is about 40 min. (auth.)

  7. Project status of manufacturing of European toroidal coils ITER. Validation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pando, F.; Felipe, A.; Madorran, A.; Pallisa, J.; Dormicch, O.; Valle, N.; D'Urzo, C.; Marin, M.; Pesenti, P.; Lucas, J.; Moreno, N.; Bonito-Oliva, A.; Harrison, R.; Bellesia, B.; Cornelis, M.; Cornella, J.

    2015-01-01

    The toroidal field coils are the ITER magnets responsible for confining the plasma inside the vacuum vessel. The consortium formed by IBERDROLA Ingenieria y Construccion, ASG Superconductors y ELYTT Energy is the responsible for the supply of 10 coils that the european agency F4E has to supply for the ITER project. At present, the coils are been manufactured in La Spezia (Italy), after the qualification of all the manufacturing process and the sucessfull manufacturing of a full scale prototype. (Author)

  8. Some analytical results for toroidal magnetic field coils with elongated minor cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raeder, J.

    1976-09-01

    The problem of determining the shape of a flexible current filament forming part of an ideal toroidal magnetic field coil is solved in a virtually analytical form. Analytical formulae for characteristic coil dimensions, stored magnetic energies, inductances and forces are derived for the so-called D-coils. The analytically calculated inductances of ideal D-coils are compared with numerically calculated ones for the case of finite numbers of D-shaped current filaments. Finally, the magnetic energies stored in ideal rectangular, elliptic and D-coils are compared. (orig.) [de

  9. Design of superconducting toroidal magnet coils and testing facility in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luton, J.N.; Haubenreich, P.N.; Thompson, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    In the U.S. Large Coil Program, three industrial teams are presently designing test coils to general specifications prepared by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory with guidance from USERDA. Each test coil is approximately half the bore size of reactor coils, being oval or D-shaped, with a bore of 2.5 x 3.5 m. The dimensions and operating requirements of the coils are identical for all test coils. The coils are designed to produce a peak field of at least 8 tesla at the winding of a selected coil operated at its design current. This condition is met when the selected coil is operated in a compact toroidal array of 6 coils, with the other five coils being operated at 0.8 of their design current. The six coils are of three different designs. Both pool boiling and forced flow designs are included. The coils are housed in a single large vacuum chamber for economy and testing convenience. Auxiliary coils provide a pulse field over the test coil winding volume. This auxiliary system is designed to produce a pulse field which rises to a peak of 0.14 T in 1 sec. With the exception of material damage due to neutron irradiation, all reactor requirements and environments will be either duplicated, approximated, or simulated. The test facility is being designed to accept coils producing up to 12 tesla in later phases of the program

  10. Stress distributions of coils for toroidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajita, Tateo; Miyamoto, Kenro.

    1976-01-01

    The stress distributions of a D shaped coil and a circular coil are computed by the finite element method. The dependences of the stress distribution on the geometrical parameters of the stress distribution on the geometrical parameters of the coils and supporting methods are examined. The maximum amount of the stress in the D shaped coil is not much smaller than that of the circular one. However, the stress distribution of the D shaped coil becomes much more uniform. The supporting method has as much effect as the geometrical parameters of the coil on the stress distribution. (auth.)

  11. Pure tension superconducting toroidal-field coil system design studies for the Argonne Experimental Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Purcell, J.R.; Demichele, D.W.; Turner, L.R.

    1975-11-01

    As part of the Argonne Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor (TEPR) design studies, a toroidal field (TF) coil system has been designed. NbTi was chosen as the most suitable superconductor and 8T was regarded as a practical peak field level in this study. The 16-coil design was chosen as a reasonable compromise between 2 percent field ripple and 3 m access gap. To minimize the coil structure and the bending moments on the conductor, a pure tension coil shape is necessary. A correct approach for determining the pure tension coil profile in a bumpy TF coil system is given. Verification of the pure tension coil by a three-dimensional stress analysis is presented. For coil quench protection, a series-connected scheme is proposed

  12. Photoelastic and analytical investigation of stress in toroidal magnetic field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pih, H.; Gray, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A series of two-dimensional photoelastic stress analyses on circular and oval toroidal magnetic field coils for fusion reactors were made. The circumferential variation of the coil's magnetic force was simulated by applying different pressures to sixteen segmented regions of the inner surface of the models. Isochromatics and isoclinics were measured at selected points on the loaded model in a transmission polariscope using a microphotometer. Separate principal stresses were obtained using the combination of photoelastic information and isopachic data measured from the solution of Laplace's equation by the electrical analog method. Analysis of the same coil geometries, loadings, and boundary conditions were made using the finite element method. General agreement between theory and experiment was realized. From this investigation several variations of coil geometry and methods of support were evaluated. Based upon this experiment, suggestions for optimum structural design of toroidal field coils are presented

  13. Effect of eddy currents in the toroidal field coils of a tokamak with an air-core transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Keiji; Kobayashi, Tomofumi; Tamura, Sanae

    1975-02-01

    The effect of eddy currents in the copper parts of the toroidal field coils is evaluated for a tokamak with the air-core transformer windings located inside the bore of the toroidal field coils. By introducing appropriate weights to the solutions obtained for a simplified cylindrical model, calculation is made of the induction toroidal electric field on the plasma axis in the presence of the eddy currents. The result shows that, to reduce the influence of the eddy currents on the induction one-turn voltage to the permissible level, it is necessary to choose the optimal number of turns and shape of the single conductor of the toroidal field coil. (auth.)

  14. Toroidal field magnet and poloidal divertor field coil systems adapted to reactor requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppendoerfer, W.

    1985-01-01

    ASDEX Upgrade is a tokamak experiment with external poloidal field coils, that is now under construction at IPP Garching. It can produce elongated single-null (SN), double-null (DN) and limiter (L) configurations. The SN is the reference configuration with asymmetric load distributions in the poloidal field (PF) system and the toroidal field (TF) magnet. Plasma control and stabilization requires a rigid passive conductor close to the plasma. The design principles of the coils and support structure are described. (orig.)

  15. The ASDEX upgrade toroidal field magnet and poloidal divertor field coil system adapted to reactor requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppendoerfer, W.; Blaumoser, M.; Ennen, K.; Gruber, J.; Gruber, O.; Jandl, O.; Kaufmann, M.; Kollotzek, H.; Kotzlowski, H.; Lackner, E.; Lackner, K.; Larcher, T. von; Noterdaeme, J.M.; Pillsticker, M.; Poehlchen, R.; Preis, H.; Schneider, H.; Seidel, U.; Sombach, B.; Speth, E.; Streibl, B.; Vernickel, H.; Werner, F.; Wesner, F.; Wieczorek, A.

    1986-01-01

    ASDEX Upgrade is a tokamak experiment with external poloidal field coils that is now under construction at IPP Garching. It can produce elongated single-null (SN), double-null (DN) , and limiter (L) configurations. The SN is the reference configuration with asymmetric load distributions in the poloidal field (PF) system and the toroidal field (TF) magnet. Plasma control and stabilization require a rigid passive conductor close to the plasma. The design principles of the coils and support structure are described. (orig.)

  16. Resistive toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnavarns, J.; Jassby, D.L.

    1980-11-01

    This paper analyzes the optimization of the geometry of resistive TF coils of rectangular bore for tokamak fusion test reactors and practical neutron generators. In examining the trade-offs between geometric parameters and magnetic field for reactors giving a specified neutron wall loading, either the resistive power loss or the lifetime coil cost can be minimized. Aspects of cooling, magnetic stress, and construction are addressed for several reference designs. Bending moment distributions in closed form have been derived for rectangular coils on the basis of the theory of rigid frames. Candidate methods of fabrication and of implementing demountable joints are summarized

  17. Steady-state resistive toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnavarns, J.; Jassby, D.L.

    1979-12-01

    If spatially-averaged values of the beta ratio can reach 5 to 10% in tokamaks, as now seems likely, resistive toroidal-field coils may be advantageous for use in reactors intended for fusion-neutron applications. The present investigation has parameterized the design of steady-state water-cooled copper coils of rectangular cross section in order to maximize figures of merit such as the ratio of fusion neutron wall loading to coil power dissipation. Four design variations distinguished by different ohmic-heating coil configurations have been examined. For a wall loading of 0.5 MW/m 2 , minimum TF-coil lifetime costs (including capital and electricity costs) are found to occur with coil masses in the range 2400 to 4400 tons, giving 200 to 250 MW of resistive dissipation, which is comparable with the total power drain of the other reactor subsystems

  18. Remote replacement of TF [toroidal field] and PF [poloidal field] coils for the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.; Watkin, D.C.; Hollis, M.J.; DePew, R.E.; Kuban, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The use of deuterium-tritium fuel in the Compact Ignition Tokamak will require applying remote handling technology for ex-vessel maintenance and replacement of machine components. Highly activated and contaminated components of the fusion devices auxiliary systems, such as diagnostics and RF heating, must be replaced using remotely operated maintenance equipment in the test cell. In-vessel remote maintenance included replacement of divertor and first wall hardware, faraday shields, and for an in-vessel inspection system. Provision for remote replacement of a vacuum vessel sector, toroidal field coil or poloidal field ring coil was not included in the project baseline. As a result of recent coil failures experienced at a number of facilities, the CIT project decided to reconsider the question of remote recovery from a coil failure and, in January of 1990, initiated a coil replacement study. This study focused on the technical requirements and impact on fusion machine design associated with remote recovery from any coil failure

  19. Tore-Supra: a Tokamak with superconducting toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck, B.

    1987-07-01

    Tore Supra is a tokamak under construction on the site of Cen Cadarache by the Euratom-CEA Association. The machine technology integrates all problems related to the fabrication and the operation of large superconducting coils and of the associated cryogenic system. Tore Supra will provide a significant experience to prepare the next generation of machines for plasma physics and controlled fusion. Tore Supra is specially designed to implement a large physics program. The superconducting coils make possible the study of plasma confinement in long pulses (more than 60s), the impurities and the stability, and the efficiency of additional heating sources (neutral particle beams and radio frequency heating). The opportunity is taken to recall the particular features and requirements of the superconducting coils of the large future tokamaks in order to point out the problems that have to be faced by any new material (superconducting or not)

  20. Helical coil alignment in the advanced toroidal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.J.; Cole, M.J.; Johnson, R.L.; Nelson, B.E.; Warwick, J.E.; Whitson, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of the helical coil design concept, detailed descriptions of the method for installation and alignment, and discussions of segment installation and alignment equipment. Alignment is accomplished by optical methods using electronic theodolites connected to a microcomputer to form a coordinate measurement system. The coordinate measurement system is described in detail, along with target selection and fixturing for manipulation of the helical coil segments during installation. In addition, software is described including vendor-supplied software used in the coordinate measurement system and in-house-developed software used to calibrate segment and positioning fixture motion. 2 refs., 8 figs

  1. The Pre-compression System of the Toroidal Field Coils in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaster, J.; Jong, C.; Vollmann, T.; Ferrari, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Toroidal Field (TF) coils of ITER will undergo out-of-plane forces caused by the machine poloidal fields required to maintain the toroidal stability of the plasma. These forces will be supported against overturning moments by links between the coils. In turn, these links consist of the Inner Intercoil Structure (IIC), which are composed by 2 sets of 4 poloidal shear keys inserted in slots between adjacent coils placed at the top and bottom part of the inboard leg, and the Outer Intercoil Structure (OIS) formed by 4 bands of shear panels at the outboard leg. The magnetic forces during energization of ITER would cause at IIC locations a toroidal gap between adjacent TF coils of 0.35 mm; during plasma operation this value could reach >1 mm causing a loosening of the keys and intensifying stress concentrations. This undesired effect will be suppressed by the application of a centripetal force of 70 MN per coil (35 MN at both the bottom and top part of the inboard leg of each of the 18 TF coils) that will be provided by 2 sets of 3 fibre-glass epoxy composite rings submitted to a toroidal hoop force of 100 MN per set. The calculated maximum stress in the rings will occur during the installation phase at room temperature, where the maximum radial elongation (∼ 25 mm) is required, and it will be less than 30% of its ultimate stress. The imposed elongation to reach that force and the lower Young modulus of the composite compared with the stainless steel one will ease component tolerances and/or settlement effects in the final assembly. (author)

  2. The pre-compression system of the toroidal field coils in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaster, J.; Ferrari, M.; Jong, C.; Vollmann, T.

    2007-01-01

    The toroidal field (TF) coils of ITER will undergo out-of-plane forces caused by the poloidal fields required to confine the plasma. These forces will be supported against overturning moments by links between the coils. In turn, these links consist of the inner intercoil structure (IIC), which is composed of two pairs (placed at the top and bottom part of the inboard leg) of four sets of poloidal shear keys inserted in slots between adjacent coils, and the outer intercoil structure (OIS) formed by four bands of shear panels on the outboard leg. The magnetic forces during energization of ITER would cause at IIC locations at toroidal gap between adjacent TF coils of 0.35 mm; during plasma operation this value could reach >1 mm causing a loosening of the keys and intensifying stress concentrations. This undesired effect will be suppressed by the application of a centripetal force of 70 MN/coil (35 MN at both the bottom and top part of the inboard leg of each of the 18 TF coils) that will be provided by two sets of three glass fibre/epoxy composite rings submitted to a toroidal hoop force of 100 MN/set. The calculated maximum stress in the rings will occur during the installation phase at room temperature, where the maximum radial elongation (∼25 mm) is required, and it reaches 1/5 of the composite presently estimated ultimate stress. The imposed elongation to reach that force and the lower Young's modulus of the composite compared with that of stainless steel will ease component tolerances and/or settlement effects in the final assembly. The paper describes the evolution in the design of the pre-compression system, from the conceptual phase when two circular cross-sections rings were considered to the present definitive one with three rectangular cross-section rings

  3. Evaluation of mechanical strength of the joints in JT-60 toroidal field coil conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Ohkubo, Monoru; Sasajima, Hiroshi

    1980-04-01

    Toroidal field (TF) coils of JT-60 produce a toroidal field of 45 kG at a plasma axis, they have an inner bore of 3.90 m and a weight of about 80 metric tons per coil. Eighteen TF coils are located around a torus axis at regular intervals. TF coil conductors are mostly jointed by high frequency induction brazing, the rest jointed by welding. In deciding the details of the jointing procedures, the conductor size and the requested mechanical strength are mainly taken into consideration. Described are non-destructive inspection methods for the brazed joints, strength evaluation, and the inspection criteria. Ultrasonic testing method is found to be the most effective in evaluation of mechanical properties of the brazed joints especially in terms of fatigue strength. In section 1, specifications of the TF coils are given. In section 2, the ultrasonic inspection method and the detectability of this apparatus are described in detail, the defects of known size are compared with the indication values and display figures. The apparatus developed for JT-60 is operated automatically also recording the inspectionresults. In section 3, mechanical strength of the brazed joints with initial defects is discussed on the basis of Fracture Mechanics theory and results of the fatigue crack growth test. The inspection criteria in accordance with the descriptions of section 2 and 3 are given in section 4. (author)

  4. Toroid field coil shear key installation study, DOE task No. 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.E.; Meier, R.W.; Yuen, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Concepts for fitting and installation of the scissor keys, triangular keys, and truss keys in the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) Coil Assembly were developed and evaluated. In addition, the process of remote removal and replacement of a failed TF coil was considered. Two concepts were addressed: central solenoid installed last (Naka Option 1) and central solenoid installed first (Naka Option 2). In addition, a third concept was developed which utilized the favorable features of both concepts. A time line for installation was estimated for the Naka Option 1 concept

  5. Highlights from the assembly of the helical field coils for the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    The helical field (HF) coils in the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) device consist of a set of 24 identical segments connected to form a continuous pair of helical coils wrapped around a toroidal vacuum vessel. Each segment weighs approximately 1364 kg (3000 lb) and is composed of 14 water-cooled copper plate conductors bolted to a cast stainless steel structural support member with a T-shape cross section (known as the structural tee). The segment components are electrically insulated with Kapton adhesive tape, G-10, Tefzel, and rubber to withstand 2.5 kV. As a final insulator and structural support, the entire segment is vacuum impregnated with epoxy. This paper offers a brief overview of the processes used to assemble the component parts into a completed segment, including identification of items that required special attention. 4 figs

  6. High current superconductors for tokamak toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietz, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    Conductors rated at 10,000 A for 8 T and 4.2 K are being purchased for the first large coil segment tests at ORNL. Requirements for these conductors, in addition to the high current rating, are low pulse losses, cryostatic stability, and acceptable mechanical properties. The conductors are required to have losses less than 0.4 W/m under pulsed fields of 0.5 T with a rise time of 1 sec in an ambient 8-T field. Methods of calculating these losses and techniques for verifying the performance by direct measurement are discussed. Conductors stabilized by two different cooling methods, pool boiling and forced helium flow, have been proposed. Analysis of these conductors is presented and a proposed definition and test of stability is discussed. Mechanical property requirements, tensile and compressive, are defined and test methods are discussed

  7. About the Toroidal Magnetic Field of a Tokamak Burning Plasma Experiment with Superconducting Coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzucato, E.

    2002-01-01

    In tokamaks, the strong dependence on the toroidal magnetic field of both plasma pressure and energy confinement is what makes possible the construction of small and relatively inexpensive burning plasma experiments using high-field resistive coils. On the other hand, the toroidal magnetic field of tokamaks using superconducting coils is limited by the critical field of superconductivity. In this article, we examine the relative merit of raising the magnetic field of a tokamak plasma by increasing its aspect ratio at a constant value of the peak field in the toroidal magnet. Taking ITER-FEAT as an example, we find that it is possible to reach thermonuclear ignition using an aspect ratio of approximately 4.5 and a toroidal magnetic field of 7.3 T. Under these conditions, fusion power density and neutron wall loading are the same as in ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor], but the normalized plasma beta is substantially smaller. Furthermore, such a tokamak would be able to reach an energy gain of approximately 15 even with the deterioration in plasma confinement that is known to occur near the density limit where ITER is forced to operate

  8. Compensation of the flux modulation distortion using an additional coil in a loudspeaker unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonello, Niccoló; Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2014-01-01

    the compensation coil is derived. The compensation technique consists on feeding the compensation coil and voice coil with filtered versions of the wanted audio signal. Simulations show that a significant reduction in flux modulation distortion can be achieved with this technique. A simple magnetic circuit has......Flux modulation is one of the main causes of distortion in electrodynamic loudspeaker units. A new compensation technique that eliminates this type of non-linearity using an additional compensation coil in the speaker unit is presented. An equivalent circuit model of the device including...

  9. Elastic-plastic analysis of the toroidal field coil inner leg of the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horie, T.

    1987-07-01

    Elastic-plastic analyses were made for the inner leg of the Compact Ignition Tokamak toroidal field (TF) coil, which is made of copper-Inconel composite material. From the result of the elastic-plastic analysis, the effective Young's moduli of the inner leg were determined by the analytical equations. These Young's moduli are useful for the three-dimensional, elastic, overall TF coil analysis. Comparison among the results of the baseline design (R = 1.324 m), the bucked pressless design, the 1.527-m major radius design, and the 1.6-m major radius design was also made, based on the elastic-plastic TF coil inner leg analyses

  10. A code for calculating force and temperature of a bitter plate type toroidal field coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, U.

    1989-01-01

    To assist the design effort of the TF coils for CIT, a set of programs was developed to calculate the transient spatial distribution of the current density, the temperature and the forces in the TF coil conductor region. The TF coils are of the Bitter (disk) type design and therefore have negligible variation of current density in the toroidal direction. During the TF pulse, voltages are induced which cause the field and current to diffuse in the minor radial direction. This penetration, combined with the increase of resistance due to the temperature rise determines the distribution of the current. After the current distribution has been determined, the in-plane (TF-TF) and the out-of-plane (TF-PF) forces in the conductor are computed. The predicted currents and temperatures have been independently corroborated using the SPARK code which has been modified for this type of problem. 6 figs

  11. Design considerations for ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, S.S.; Lousteau, D.C.; Miller, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a new tokamak design project with joint participation from Europe, Japan, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), and the United States. This paper describes a magnetic and mechanical design methodology for toroidal field (TF) coils that employs Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor technology. Coil winding is sized by using conductor concepts developed for the US TIBER concept. The nuclear heating generated during operation is removed from the windings by helium flowing through the conductor. The heat in the coil case is removed through a separate cooling circuit operating at approximately 20 K. Manifold concepts are presented for the complete coil cooling system. Also included are concepts for the coil structural arrangement. The effects of in-plane and out-of-plane loads are included in the design considerations for the windings and case. Concepts are presented for reacting these loads with a minimum amount of additional structural material. Concepts discussed in this paper could be considered for the ITER TF coils. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  12. STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF THE DIII-D TOROIDAL FIELD COIL TO INCREASED LATERAL LOADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    REIS, E.E; CHIN, E.

    2004-03-01

    OAK-B135 Recent calibration shots in which full toroidal field (TF) coil current interacted with the maximum poloidal field coils have produced increased lateral loads on the outer sections of the TF-coil. The increased lateral loads have resulted in deflections that have been sufficient to cause the TF-coil to contact adjacent equipment and produce a transient short to ground within the coil. The six outer turns of each TF-coil bundle are clamped together by insulated preloaded studs to provide increased bending stiffness. These sections of the outer bundles depend on friction to react the lateral loads as a bundle rather than six individual turns. A major concern is that the increased loads will produce slip between turns resulting in excessive lateral deflections and possible damage to the insulating sleeve on the preloaded studs. A finite element structural model of the TF-coil was developed for the calculation of deflections and the shear load distribution throughout the coil for the applied lateral loads from a full current calibration shot. The purpose of the updated structural model is to correlate the applied lateral loads to the total shear force between the unbonded sections of the outer turns. An allowable integrated lateral load applied to the outer turns is established based on the maximum shear force that can be reacted by friction. A program that calculates the magnetic fields and integrated lateral load along the outer turns can be incorporated into the plasma control system. The integrated load can then be compared to the calculated allowable value prior to execution of calibration shots. Calibration shots with a calculated total lateral load greater than the allowable value will be prevented

  13. Mechanical stress calculations for toroidal field coils by the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soell, M.; Jandl, O.; Gorenflo, H.

    1976-09-01

    After discussing fundamental relationships of the finite element method, this report describes the calculation steps worked out for mechanical stress calculations in the case of magnetic forces and forces produced by thermal expansion or compression of toroidal field coils using the SOLID SAP IV computer program. The displacement and stress analysis are based on the 20-node isoparametric solid element. The calculation of the nodal forces produced by magnetic body forces are discussed in detail. The computer programs, which can be used generally for mesh generation and determination of the nodal forces, are published elsewhere. (orig.) [de

  14. Development of high-mechanical strength electrical insulations for tokamak toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, C.

    1977-01-01

    The electrical insulation for the TF (Toroidal Field) coils is subjected to a high interlaminar shear, tensile and compressive stresses. Two candidate epoxy/glass fiber systems using prepreg and vacuum impregnation techniques were evaluated. Specimens were prepared and processed under controlled conditions to simulate specification manufacturing procedures. The strengths of the insulation were measured in interlaminar shear, tension, compression, and combined shear and compression statically. Shear modulus determinations were also made. Various techniques of surface treatments to increase bond strengths with three resin primers were tested

  15. Compensation of the ux modulation distortion using an additional coil in a loudspeaker unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonello, Niccoló; Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2014-01-01

    Flux modulation is one of the main causes of distortion in electrodynamic loudspeaker units. A new com- pensation technique that eliminates this type of non-linearity using an additional compensation coil in the speaker unit is presented. An equivalent circuit model of the device including...... the compensation coil is de- rived. The compensation technique consists on feeding the compensation coil and voice coil with ltered versions of the wanted audio signal. Simulations show that a signicant reduction in ux modulation distor- tion can be achieved with this technique. A simple magnetic circuit has been...

  16. Analytical study of cover plate welding deformation of the radial plate of the ITER toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmori, Junji; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Hasegawa, Mitsuru

    2009-09-01

    The winding pack (WP) of the Toroidal Field (TF) coil of ITER consists of 7 double-pancakes (DPs). In the DP, the conductor is embedded in a groove of a radial plate (RP), and cover plates (CP) are welded to the RP teeth to fix the conductors in the RP groove. The dimensions of the DP are 15 m in height and 9 m in width while the tolerances of the DP are very severe, such as a flatness of 2 mm and an in-plane deviation of a few millimeters. It is therefore required to reduce the deformation of the DP by CP welding. In order to estimate welding deformation, the authors apply an analytical method in which the CP welding deformation of the DP can be calculated using inherent strain evaluated from welding deformation measured using a RP mock-up. Calculated results indicate that out-of-plane distortion can be kept to within required tolerances, but in-plane deformation is larger than allowed when welding thickness is 2.5 mm. The in-plane deformation is mainly caused by the bending of the curved RP region. Therefore, reducing the welding thickness at the curved region emerges as the most promising solution of this issue. Calculated results assuming a welding thickness of 1 mm at the curved region show that the in-plane deformation conforms to required tolerances. Furthermore, since the maximum out-of-plane deformation is within tolerances but marginal, an alternative design in which the number of welding lines is half that of the reference design, is proposed not only to improve the out-of-plane distortion but also to simplify the manufacture of the DP. It is found that the alternative design is effective in reducing welding distortion. (author)

  17. First full-size ATLAS barrel toroid coil successfully tested up to 22 kA at 4 T

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; Benoit, P; Berriaud, C P; Broggi, F; Deront, L; Foussat, A; Junker, S; ten Kate, H H J; Kopeykin, N; Olesen, G; Olyunin, A; Pengo, R; Rabbers, J J; Ravat, S; Rey, J M; Sbrissa, E; Shugaev, I; Stepanov, V; Védrine, P; Volpini, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    The Superconducting Barrel Toroid is providing (together with the two End-Cap Toroids not presented here) the magnetic field for the muon detectors in the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC at CERN. The toroid with outer dimensions of 25 m length and 20 m diameter, is built up from 8 identical racetrack coils. The coils with 120 turns each are wound with an aluminum stabilized NbTi conductor and operate at 20.5 kA at 3.9 T local field in the windings and is conduction cooled at 4.8 K by circulating forced flow helium in cooling tubes attached to the cold mass. The 8 coils of 25 m * 5 m are presently under construction and the first coils have already been fully integrated and tested. Meanwhile the assembly of the toroid 100 m underground in the ATLAS cavern at CERN has started. The 8 coils are individually tested on surface before installation. In this paper the test of the first coil, unique in size and manufacturing technology, is described in detail and the results are compared to the previous experience with the...

  18. Supporting structures of the toroidal field coils of intor-net

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farfaletti-Casali, F.; Biggio, M.; Macco, A.; Perfumo, A.; Reale, M.

    1984-01-01

    The design of the toroidal field (TF) coil supporting structures for INTOR-NET Phase 2A (European Configuration) is described. In order to identify the proposed design several preliminary evaluations were performed. These evaluations indicated that suitable supporting structures are those shown in the annexed figures, where each coil is guided and centered by a separate reinforcing structure, on which the intercoil structures are attached. A simplified structural analysis was carried out considering only the cyclic out-of-plane loads due to the poloidal field, acting on the coils, since this constitutes the most critical loading condition due to its impact on the fatigue behavior of the material. This analysis was performed with finite element method for displacements and stresses calculations by using the SAP IV-code. The calcaulation model was made with the aid of the GIFTS system. The results show that the maximum equivalent stress does not exceed the stress limit assumed in the INTOR specifications for stainless steel (AISI 316 type) at cryogenic temperature and under cyclic loading, for the operating conditions of INTOR. Consequently the proposed concept for the support of the TF coils can be considered a workable scheme. Further detailed analysis must be done, so as to demonstrate the complete feasibility of the system. (orig.)

  19. Stress analysis of the conceptual design configurations of constant tension D-shaped superconducting toroidal field coils for TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernades, R.; Smith, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Conceptual design configurations of D-shaped toroidal field coils applicable to the TNS program are studied under the action of the toroidal field loading condition and the vertical field loading condition, but not the fault condition. Although the analysis is specific to an 8 Tesla design using a niobium titanium superconductor, the results can be extended to a coil with a different conductor material and subjected to a field of different magnitude provided the condition of linear elasticity is not violated. The analysis technique used is the finite element method, with three dimensional finite elements defined in the ANSYS computer code, and supplemented by closed form analytical solutions

  20. Mechanical testing and development of the helical field coil joint for the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.E.; Bryan, W.E.; Goranson, P.L.; Warwick, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    The helical field (HF) coil set for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is an M = 12, l = 2, constant-ratio torsatron winding consisting of 2 coils, each with 14 turns of heavy copper conductor. The coils are divided into 24 identical segments to facilitate fabrication and minimize the assembly schedule. The segments are connected across through-bolted lap joints that must carry up to 124,000 A per turn for 5 s or 62,500 A steady-state. In addition, the joints must carry the high magnetic and thermal loads induced in the conductor and still fit within the basic 140- by 30-mm copper envelope. Extensive testing and development were undertaken to verify and refine the basic joint design. Tests included assembly force and clamping force for various types of misalignment; joint resistance as a function of clamping force; clamp bolt relaxation due to thermal cycling; fatigue testing of full-size, multiturn joint prototypes; and low-cycle fatigue and tensile tests of annealed CDA102 copper. The required performance parameters and actual test results, as well as the final joint configuration, are presented. 2 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  1. The First ATLAS Barrel Toroid Coil Successfully Tested in Hall 180

    CERN Multimedia

    Rabbers, J J

    2004-01-01

    The first Barrel Toroid coil has been successfully tested with magnetic mirror at nominal current I=20.5 kA, up to a maximum current Imax=22 kA. After 14 days of cooling down, BT1 reached 4.5 Kelvin and the test program started on September 2nd. First the instrumentation and safety systems of the coil were tested at relatively low operating currents, up to 5 kA. Since all the systems and the coil were performing well, the current was increased by steps in several runs, while monitoring and evaluating the temperatures, voltages and mechanics. On early Wednesday morning September 8th the current was ramped up to 22 kA, shown by the red curve in the picture shown below: Thereafter the current was ramped down by a slow dump, where the stored energy of about 130 MJ is dissipated in a resistor/diode ramp down unit. This is the regular way of ramping down the current, which takes about one hour. Thereafter the current was ramped up to 22 kA for a second time, this time a so-called fast dump was initiated, ...

  2. Mechanical design of the coils encapsulated of toroidal field of Tokamak TPM1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldino H, U.; Francois L, J. L.

    2014-10-01

    The TPM1 is a small Tokamak that belongs to the Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Aplicadas y Tecnologia Avanzada of Instituto Politecnico Nacional (CICATA-IPN); the project is under construction. Currently it has the vacuum chamber, and is intended that the machine can operate with electric pulses of 10 ms to study the behavior of plasmas in order to provide knowledge in the field of nuclear fusion by magnetic confinement. To achieve this goal is necessary to design the toroidal field coils which operate the Tokamak. This paper presents an analysis which was performed to obtain the correct configuration of coils depending on design parameters for operation of the machine. Once determined this configuration, an analysis of electromagnetic forces present in normal machine operation on one coil was conducted, this to know the stresses in the encapsulation of the same. Considering the pulsed operation, a thickness of 5 mm is determined in the encapsulated, considering fatigue failure based on studies of fatigue failures in epoxy resins. (Author)

  3. Thermal and electrical joint test for the helical field coils in the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.L.; Johnson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Initial feasibility studies of a number of configurations for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) resulted in the selection of a resistive copper continuous-coil torsatron as the optimum device considering the physics program, cost, and schedule. Further conceptual design work was directed toward optimization of this configuration and, if possible, a shorter schedule. It soon became obvious that in order to shorten the schedule, a number of design and fabrication activities should proceed in parallel. This was most critical for the vacuum vessel and the helical field (HF) coils. If the HF coils were wound in place on a completed vacuum vessel, the overall schedule would be significantly (greater than or equal to12 months) longer. The approach of parallel scheduel paths requires that the HF coils be segmented into parts of less than or equal to180 0 of poloidal angle and that joints be made on a turn-by-turn basis when the segments are installed. It was obvious from the outset that the compact and complex geometry of the joint design presented a special challenge in the areas of reliability, assembly, maintenance, disassembly, and cost. Also, electrical, thermal, and force excursions are significant for these joints. A number of soldered, welded, brazed, electroplated, and bolted joints were evaluated. The evaluations examined fabrication feasibility and complexity, thermal-electrical performance at approximately two-thirds of the steady-state design conditions, and installation and assembly processes. Results of the thermal-electrical tests were analyzed and extrapolated to predict performance at peak design parameters. The final selection was a lap-type joint clamped with insulated bolts that pass through the winding packing. 3 refs., 4 figs

  4. Four giga joule flywheel motor-generator for JT-60 toroidal field coil power supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsukawa, T.; Kanke, M.; Shimada, R.; Yoshida, Y.; Yamashita, K.; Nakayama, T.

    1986-01-01

    A fusion test reactor often needs motor-generators as a power source in order to reduce disturbances to utility lines. The toroidal field coil power supply system of JT-60 also adopted a motor-generator for this purpose. The motor-generator started operation in April, 1985 at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute together with the whole system. The motor-generator has several special features both electrically and mechanically. One electrical feature is that it is used as a pulse source of large current and power for periodic short-time duty. A mechanical feature is that a large flywheel is directly coupled to the motor-generator shaft and operated intermittently and at high speed. Therefore detailed investigations were carried out concerning constitution, characteristics as well as the coordination with the system performance. This paper describes the outlines of the flywheel motor-generator and discusses several topics

  5. Structural characteristics of proposed ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] TF [toroidal field] coil conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, C.R.; Miller, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of transverse loading on a cable-in-conduit conductor which has been proposed for the toroidal field coils of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The primary components of this conductor are a loose cable of superconducting wires, a thin-wall tube for helium containment, and a U-shaped structural channel. A method is given where the geometry of this conductor can be optimized for a given set of operating conditions. It is shown, using finite-element modeling, that the structural channel is effective in supporting loads due to transverse forces and internal pressure. In addition, it is shown that the superconducting cable is effectively shielded from external transverse loads that might otherwise degrade its current carrying capacity. 10 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  6. The forming of a superconductor cable during the winding of a large toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messemer, G.; Zehlein, H.

    1984-01-01

    The feasible range for the tension force which acts on a superconductor cable during the winding of a large D-shaped toroidal field coil depends strongly on the mechanical properties of the cable, on the geometry of the winding pack and on the arrangement of the equipment. The upper limit is imposed by possible damage within the cable. The lower limit is set by the need to assure enough compaction and to overcome the friction forces between the layers. Within this 'corridor' optimal control of elastic prestresses is desirable: this may be chosen with regard to the residual stresses and/or the elastic springback after removal of the coil former. This paper presents a simplified elastica conductor model built by a finite chain of intervals with constant bending moment and curvature. This paper describes the discrete model as well as the iterative shooting method, which finds the equilibrium shape of the conductor. The distributions of bending moment and shear forces around the D-shaped contour, as well as along the conductor, are given. Desirable improvements are outlined. In particular, the possibility of mitigating the stress concentration effect by supporting rollers suitably placed along the 'free' conductor near the bobbin is discussed. (author)

  7. Basic study on weldability and machinability of structural materials for ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, M.; Shimizu, K.; Urata, K.; Kimura, M.; Kadowaki, H.; Okamoto, M.; Nakajima, H.; Hamada, K.; Okuno, K.

    2006-01-01

    The toroidal field (TF) coils for ITER are very large components. The main structural component of the coil is the coil case, which requires a massive complex geometry with high fabrication accuracy to attain the required magnetic performance for plasma operations. To provide high mechanical strength and toughness at cryogenic temperature, the structural components employ high-strength austenite stainless steels that have been specially developed for ITER. However, one of the main drawbacks of using those materials is the difficulty of manufacturing capabilities. A manufacturing study has been conducted to examine welding and machining capabilities for JJ1 and ST-SS316LN, to be employed for TF coil structural components. Both materials include a high nitrogen content up to around 0.2%, which makes welding and machining difficult compared with conventional stainless steels. Electron beam welding conditions were studied for the JJ1 material. The applicable welding condition was found for a bead length of up to about 300 mm in the case of 40 mm thick plates. No optimal condition was found for plates thicker than 40 mm. An additional experimental study was also conducted to explore suitable welding conditions for different welding positions and directions. It was found that the appearance of defects depends on the welding positions and directions. A wider range of welding conditions was found for cases in the vertical upward direction, as opposed to those in the vertical downward and horizontal directions. Based on those results, a verification test up to 900 mm in length was conducted. The test results showed that vertical upward EB welding should be used for the coil case wherever possible. With respect to TIG welding, an average deposition rate as high as 26 g/min (i.e. the filler wire supplying speed of 3,000 mm/min) was achieved. A series of tests have been conducted to examine machinability of JJ1 and ST-SS316LN. Various types of milling tools, including face

  8. Numerical analyses of magnetic field and force in toroidal superconducting magnetic energy storage using unit coils (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamaru, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Amemiya, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is more useful than other systems of electric energy storage because of its larger amounts of stored energy and its higher efficiency. There are two types of SMES. One is the solenoid type and the other is the toroidal type. Some models of solenoid-type SMES are designed in the U.S. and in Japan. But the large scale SMES causes a high magnetic field in the living environment, and causes the erroneous operation of electronic equipment. The authors studied some suitable designs of magnetic shielding for the solenoidal-type SMES to reduce the magnetic field in the living environment. The toiroidal type SMES is studied in this article. The magnetic leakage flux of the toiroidal-type SMES is generally lower than that of the solenoid-type SMES. The toroidal-type SMES is constructed of unit coils, which are convenient for construction. The magnetic leakage flux occurs between unit coils. The electromagnetic force of the coils is very strong. Therefore analyses of the leakage flux and electromagnetic force are important to the design of SMES. The authors studied the number, radius, and length of unit coils. The storage energy is 5 G Wh. The numerical analyses of magnetic fields in the toroidal type SMES are obtained by analytical solutions. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  9. Finite element and node point generation computer programs used for the design of toroidal field coils in tokamak fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.A.

    1975-06-01

    The structural analysis of toroidal field coils in Tokamak fusion machines can be performed with the finite element method. This technique has been employed for design evaluations of toroidal field coils on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), the Poloidal Diverter Experiment (PDX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The application of the finite element method can be simplified with computer programs that are used to generate the input data for the finite element code. There are three areas of data input where significant automation can be provided by supplementary computer codes. These concern the definition of geometry by a node point mesh, the definition of the finite elements from the geometric node points, and the definition of the node point force/displacement boundary conditions. The node point forces in a model of a toroidal field coil are computed from the vector cross product of the coil current and the magnetic field. The computer programs named PDXNODE and ELEMENT are described. The program PDXNODE generates the geometric node points of a finite element model for a toroidal field coil. The program ELEMENT defines the finite elements of the model from the node points and from material property considerations. The program descriptions include input requirements, the output, the program logic, the methods of generating complex geometries with multiple runs, computational time and computer compatibility. The output format of PDXNODE and ELEMENT make them compatible with PDXFORC and two general purpose finite element computer codes: (ANSYS) the Engineering Analysis System written by the Swanson Analysis Systems, Inc., and (WECAN) the Westinghouse Electric Computer Analysis general purpose finite element program. The Fortran listings of PDXNODE and ELEMENT are provided

  10. Analysis and test to predict the fatigue life of the ISX-B toroidal field coils' finger joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Toole, J.A.; Ojalvo, I.U.; Raynor, G.E.; Zatz, I.J.; Johnson, N.E.; Walls, J.C.; Nelson, B.E.; Cain, W.D.; Walstrom, P.L.; Pearce, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    A new and more rigorous structural evaluation of the ISX toroidal field (TF) coil fingers joints was undertaken to assess the effects of high-/beta/ operation of ISX-B. A new poloidal field (PF) coil set which allows high-/beta/ operation and produces larger out-of-plane loads on the TF coils was installed as part of the change to ISX-B. It was determined that the iron core significantly affects the out-of-plane load distribution and forces were calculated using the GFUN-3D code which considers 3-D iron core effects. These loads were applied to a half-symmetric finite element NASTRAN code model in which the TF coils were modeled as a string of beam elements. 8 refs

  11. Characterization of high temperature superconductor cables for magnet toroidal field coils of the DEMO fusion power plant

    CERN Document Server

    Bayer, Christoph M

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear fusion is a key technology to satisfy the basic demand for electric energy sustainably. The official EUROfusion schedule foresees a first industrial DEMOnstration Fusion Power Plant for 2050. In this work several high temperature superconductor sub-size cables are investigated for their applicability in large scale DEMO toroidal field coils. Main focus lies on the electromechanical stability under the influence of high Lorentz forces at peak magnetic fields of up to 12 T.

  12. Characterization of high temperature superconductor cables for magnet toroidal field coils of the DEMO fusion power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Christoph M.

    2017-05-01

    Nuclear fusion is a key technology to satisfy the basic demand for electric energy sustainably. The official EUROfusion schedule foresees a first industrial DEMOnstration Fusion Power Plant for 2050. In this work several high temperature superconductor sub-size cables are investigated for their applicability in large scale DEMO toroidal field coils. Main focus lies on the electromechanical stability under the influence of high Lorentz forces at peak magnetic fields of up to 12 T.

  13. Basic analysis of weldability and machinability of structural materials for ITER Toroidal Field coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, Masanori [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Konan 2-16-5, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8215 (Japan)], E-mail: masanori_onozuka@mnes-us.com; Shimizu, Katsusuke; Urata, Kazuhiro; Kimura, Masahiro; Kadowaki, Hirokazu; Okamoto, Mamoru [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Konan 2-16-5, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8215 (Japan); Nakajima, Hideo; Hamada, Kazuya; Okuno, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Mukouyama 801-1, Naka-shi, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2007-10-15

    A manufacturing study has been conducted to examine the welding and machining capabilities for strengthened austenitic stainless steels with a high nitrogen content, JJ1 and ST-SS316LN, to be employed for ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coil structural components. It was found that the applicable EB welding condition for JJ1 was limited to up to 40 mm thick plates. A wider range of welding conditions was found in the vertical upward direction. Based on those results, a verification test up to 900 mm in length was successfully conducted. With respect to TIG welding, an average deposition rate of 26 g/min (i.e. the filler wire supplying speed of 3000 mm/min) was achieved. In addition to the welding tests, a series of machining tests has been conducted to examine the machinability of JJ1 and ST-SS316LN. Various types of machining tools were examined. In practical application, the cutting speed should be low to extend the tool life. At a cutting speed of 40 m/min, a tool life of more than 2 h (at a traveling distance of up to 9 m) was attained. The degree of cutter wear after 30 min of operation, at a cutting speed of 40 m/min, was found to be around 0.1 mm, which is within an acceptable range.

  14. Development of optimum manufacturing technologies of radial plates for the ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, H.; Hamada, K.; Okuno, K.; Abe, K.; Shimizu, T.; Kakui, H.; Yamaoka, H.; Maruyama, N.; Takayanagi, T.

    2007-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency is studying rational manufacturing method and developing the optimum manufacturing technologies of the radial plates used in the toroidal field coils for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in collaboration with the Japanese industries. Three sector form pieces were cut by plasma cutting machine from a hot rolled plate without any difficulties and one of them was machined to a 1.32-m long curved segment of the radial plate having the same size as the actual one. However, unacceptable large deformation about 5 mm flatness, which was not observed in 1-m long straight radial plate, was found after intermediate machining. Since it would be caused by groove direction against the hot rolled direction and/or curved shape of grooves, two trial manufactures of 0.4-m long straight radial plates have been performed to clarify the cause of the large deformation. Detailed investigation showed that the large deformation could be avoided if the groove direction would have been parallel to a rolling direction of the plate. Welding trials by using fiber laser technique was also performed and penetration of 15 mm could be obtained in a welding speed of 0.1 m/min at 5 kW laser power. An optimum manufacturing method has been proposed based on the development of manufacturing technologies

  15. Irradiation and testing of compact ignition tokamak toroidal field coil insulation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemoto, G.K.; Sherick, M.J.; Sparks, D.C.

    1990-05-01

    This report documents the results of an irradiation and testing program performed on behalf of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. in support of the Compact Ignition Tokamak Research and Development program. The purpose of the irradiation and testing program was to determine the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on the mechanical and electrical properties of candidate toroidal field coil insulation materials. Insulation samples were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in a large I-hole. The insulation samples were irradiated within a lead shield to reduce exposure to gamma radiation to better approximate the desired ration of neutron to gamma exposure. Two different exposure levels were specified for the insulation samples. To accomplish this, the samples were encapsulated in two separate aluminum capsules; the capsules positioned at the ATR core mid-plane and at the top of the fueled region to take advantage of the axial cosine distribution of the neutron and gamma flux; and by varying the length of irradiation time of the two capsules. Disassembly of the irradiated capsules and testing of the insulation samples were performed at the Test Reactor Area (TRA) Hot Cell Facilities. Testing of the samples included shear compression static, shear compression fatigue, flexure static, and electrical resistance measurements

  16. Fabrication of Nb3Sn cables for ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isono, Takaaki; Tsutsumi, Fumiaki; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Kunihiro; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Nakajima, Hideo; Ishibashi, Tatsuji; Sato, Go; Chida, Kenji; Suzuki, Rikio; Tanji, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Cable-in-conduit conductors for ITER toroidal field (TF) coils will be operated at 68 kA and 11.8 T. The cable is composed of 1,422 strands with a diameter of 0.82 mm. There were two options for initial procurement. For option 2, the twist pitches at lower stages are longer than in option 1. Trials were performed to assess the feasibility of these options. In the trials for option 1, the nominal outer diameter of sub-cables and reduction schedule of final cables were evaluated and finalized. In the trials for option 2, problems were encountered at the third stage cabling. These problems were resolved through increasing the die size in that stage and improving the tension balance of the second-stage cables to reduce friction between the die and the cable, and also through avoiding loose twisting at both edges of the third cables. Option 2 was finally selected in 2009 based on superconducting performance enhancement of the cable. After the qualification of the fabrication procedure using fabrication of a 760-m dummy cable and a 415-m superconducting cable, mass production of the cables started in March 2010. (author)

  17. Field load and displacement boundary condition computer program used for the finite element analysis and design of toroidal field coils in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.A.

    1975-06-01

    The design evaluation of toroidal field coils on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), the Poloidal Diverter Experiment (PDX) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been performed by structural analysis with the finite element method. The technique employed has been simplified with supplementary computer programs that are used to generate the input data for the finite element computer program. Significant automation has been provided by computer codes in three areas of data input. These are the definition of coil geometry by a mesh of node points, the definition of finite elements via the node points and the definition of the node point force/displacement boundary conditions. The computer programs by name that have been used to perform the above functions are PDXNODE, ELEMENT and PDXFORC. The geometric finite element modeling options for toroidal field coils provided by PDXNODE include one-fourth or one-half symmetric sections of circular coils, oval shaped coils or dee-shaped coils with or without a beveled wedging surface. The program ELEMENT which defines the finite elements for input to the finite element computer code can provide considerable time and labor savings when defining the model of coils of non-uniform cross-section or when defining the model of coils whose material properties are different in the R and THETA directions due to the laminations of alternate epoxy and copper windings. The modeling features provided by the program ELEMENT have been used to analyze the PLT and the TFTR toroidal field coils with integral support structures. The computer program named PDXFORC is described. It computes the node point forces in a model of a toroidal field coil from the vector crossproduct of the coil current and the magnetic field. The model can be of one-half or one-fourth symmetry to be consistent with the node model defined by PDXNODE, and the magnetic field is computed from toroidal or poloidal coils

  18. Development of Optimum Manufacturing Technologies of Radial Plates for the ITER Toroidal Field Coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, H.; Hamada, K.; Okuno, K.; Abe, K.; Kakui, H.; Yamaoka, H.; Maruyama, N.

    2006-01-01

    A stainless steel structure called a radial plate is used in the toroidal field (TF) coils of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in order to support large electromagnetic force generated in the conductors. It is a 13.7 m x 8.7 m D-shaped plate having 11 grooves on each side in which conductors are wound. Although severe dimensional accuracy, for example flatness within 2 mm, and tight schedule that all radial plates for 9 TF coils (63 plates) have to be manufactured in about 4 years are required in manufacture of the radial plates, there are no industries in the world who have manufactured a large complicated structure like the radial plate with high accuracy. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been studying rational manufacturing method and developing the optimum manufacturing technologies of the radial plates in order to satisfy the above requirements in collaboration with the Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). Several trial manufactures of radial plates have been performed to clarify the following key points: · Effect of nitrogen content in material on machinability · Effect of cutting direction of a piece on deformation caused by machining · Effect of machining shape (curve or straight) on machining condition · Effect of laser welding technique on penetration and welding deformation Three different 316LN materials having nitrogen content of 0.12 %, 0.17%, and 0.20% were used to investigate nitrogen content effect on machinability. Machinability of lower nitrogen content material was slightly better than that of higher nitrogen content material. Three sectoral pieces were cut by plasma cutting technique from a hot rolled plate without any difficulties and one of them was machined to a curved segment of the radial plate having the same size as actual one. However, unacceptable large deformation over 5 mm flatness was found during machining which would be caused by curved shape of grooves and/or cutting direction

  19. Mechanical design of the coils encapsulated of toroidal field of Tokamak TPM1; Diseno mecanico del encapsulado de las bobinas de campo toroidal del Tokamak TPM1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldino H, U.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: ucaldino@outlook.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The TPM1 is a small Tokamak that belongs to the Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Aplicadas y Tecnologia Avanzada of Instituto Politecnico Nacional (CICATA-IPN); the project is under construction. Currently it has the vacuum chamber, and is intended that the machine can operate with electric pulses of 10 ms to study the behavior of plasmas in order to provide knowledge in the field of nuclear fusion by magnetic confinement. To achieve this goal is necessary to design the toroidal field coils which operate the Tokamak. This paper presents an analysis which was performed to obtain the correct configuration of coils depending on design parameters for operation of the machine. Once determined this configuration, an analysis of electromagnetic forces present in normal machine operation on one coil was conducted, this to know the stresses in the encapsulation of the same. Considering the pulsed operation, a thickness of 5 mm is determined in the encapsulated, considering fatigue failure based on studies of fatigue failures in epoxy resins. (Author)

  20. Project status of manufacturing of European toroidal coils ITER. Validation tests; Estado del proyecto de fabricacion de las bobinas toroidales european para el ITER. Ensayos de validacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pando, F.; Felipe, A.; Madorran, A.; Pallisa, J.; Dormicch, O.; Valle, N.; D' Urzo, C.; Marin, M.; Pesenti, P.; Lucas, J.; Moreno, N.; Bonito-Oliva, A.; Harrison, R.; Bellesia, B.; Cornelis, M.; Cornella, J.

    2015-07-01

    The toroidal field coils are the ITER magnets responsible for confining the plasma inside the vacuum vessel. The consortium formed by IBERDROLA Ingenieria y Construccion, ASG Superconductors y ELYTT Energy is the responsible for the supply of 10 coils that the european agency F4E has to supply for the ITER project. At present, the coils are been manufactured in La Spezia (Italy), after the qualification of all the manufacturing process and the sucessfull manufacturing of a full scale prototype. (Author)

  1. Analysis of quench-vent pressures for present design of ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] TF [toroidal field] coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a new tokamak design project with joint participation from Japan, the European Community, the Union of the Soviet Union, and the United States. This paper examines the effects of a quench within the toroidal field (TF) coils based on current ITER design. It is a preliminary, rough analysis. Its intent is to assist ITER designers while more accurate computer codes are being developed and to provide a check against these more rigorous solutions. Rigorous solutions to the quench problem are very complex involving three-dimensional heat transfer, extreme changes in heat capacities and copper resistivity, and varying flow dynamics within the conductors. This analysis addresses all these factors in an approximate way. The result is much less accurate than a rigorous analysis. Results here could be in error as much as 30 to 40 percent. However, it is believed that this paper can still be very useful to the coil designer. Coil pressures and temperatures vs time into a quench are presented. Rate of helium vent, energy deposition in the coil, and depletion of magnetic stored energy are also presented. Peak pressures are high (about 43 MPa). This is due to the very long vent path length (446 m), small hydraulic diameters, and high current densities associated with ITER's cable-in-conduit design. The effects of these pressures as well as the ability of the coil to be self protecting during a quench are discussed. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. Zero Quantum Nuclear Magnetic Resonance experiments utilizing a toroid cell and coil

    OpenAIRE

    Bebout, William Roach

    1989-01-01

    Over the past ten to fifteen years the area of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy has seen tremendous growth. For example, in conjunction with multiple quantum NMR, molecular structural mapping of a compound can be easily performed in a two dimensional (2D) experiment. However, only two kinds of detector coils have been typically used in NMR studies. These are the solenoid coil and the Helmholtz coil. The solenoid coil was very popular with the permanent and e...

  3. Experimental and calculating study on the stressed state of superconducting coils of toroidal field in the T-15 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaulina, I.G.; Gusev, S.V.; Sivkova, G.N.

    1987-01-01

    Results of calculational and experimental atudy of stress-deformed state of superconducting coils of the T-15 tokamak toroidal field are presented. The calculations are made using the method of finite elements and refined theory of cores. Experimental studies were carried out using elastic tensometric model of polymer materials. Test results are compared with the calculational results. Divergence between calculational and experimental values of displacement of characteristic points in the unit does not exceed 20 %. Results of model studies confirm the expediency of the calculational model used for designing SOTP unit for the T-15 tokamak

  4. Superconducting toroidal field coil power supply and protection system for NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    A power supply and quench protection system is proposed in which alternate coils are connected in series to produce two separate circuits, each with 8 coils. Both circuits are provided with power supplies comprising rectifier transformers and thyristor equipped Graetz bridges, which are operated at maximum forward voltage (125 V) to charge the coils to 24 kA, 17.75 GJ in ≅ 2 hours and are fully inverted for scheduled discharges. Pulsed firing of the thyristors allows the same power supplies to be used to maintain the currents against resistive losses, without increasing the reactive power consumption or harmonic current generation. Rapid discharges are initiated by opening d.c. circuit breakers to introduce discharge resistors between the coils of each circuit. The maximum possible value of peak voltage-to-ground is then limited to 2.25 times the discharge voltage applied to each coil. A 5 kV discharge voltage allows the coils to be discharged with a time constant of 18.5 s, which is sufficiently rapid to limit the quench ''hot spot'' temperature to 68 K. The coil connections impose sufficient symmetry on the coil current distribution to ensure that no out-of-plane forces are produced on the coils. Even if one circuit breaker fails to interrupt, the variation of coil currents is sufficiently small that the resulting symmetric variation of radial centring forces is acceptable

  5. PC-based package for interactive assessment of MHD equilibrium and poloidal field coil design in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelleher, W.P.

    1987-01-01

    In the assessment of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and Poloidal Field Coil (PFC) arrangement for toroidal axisymmetric geometry, the Grad-Shafranov equation must be solved, either analytically or numerically. Existing numerical tools have been developed primarily for mainframe usage and can prove cumbersome for screening assessments and parametric evaluations. The objective of this thesis was to develop a personal computer (PC)-based calculational tool for assessing MHD/PFC problems in a highly interactive mode, well suited for scoping studies. The approach adopted involves a two-step process: first the MHD equilibrium is calculated and then the PFC arrangement, consistent with the equilibrium, is determined in an interactive design environment. The PC-based system developed consists of two programs: (1) PCEQ, which solve the MHD equilibrium problem and (2) PFDE-SIGN, which is employed to arrive at a PFC arrangement. PCEQ provides an output file including, but not limited to, the following: poloidal beta, total beta, safety factors, q, on axis and on edge. PCEQ plots the following contours and/or profiles: flux, pressure and toroidal current density, safety factor, and ratio of plasma toroidal field to vacuum field

  6. Quench and safety tests on a toroidal field coil of Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciazynski, D.; Cure, C.; Duchateau, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    As a part of the safety analysis of the magnet, three quenches have been initiated in one of the TF coils in the Saclay test facility. While transporting a given current, the coil is insulated from the refrigerator: the temperatures of the helium and of the coil increase slowly on account of thermal losses. At the current sharing temperature a quench rapidly propagates and the protection system makes the coil discharge in the dump resistor. At three levels of current, electrical, thermal and hydraulic measurements have been performed. All these results are taken into account for the safety design of TORE SUPRA

  7. Design and manufacture of a D-shape coil-based toroid-type HTS DC reactor using 2nd generation HTS wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwangmin, E-mail: kwangmin81@gmail.com [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Go, Byeong-Soo; Sung, Hae-Jin; Park, Hea-chul; Kim, Seokho [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sangjin [Uiduk University, Gyeongju 780-713 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Yoon-Su; Oh, Yunsang [Vector Fields Korea Inc., Pohang 790-834 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Minwon [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, In-Keun, E-mail: yuik@changwon.ac.kr [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The authors designed and fabricated a D-shape coil based toroid-type HTS DC reactor using 2G GdBCO HTS wires. • The toroid-type magnet consisted of 30 D-shape double pancake coil (DDC)s. The total length of the wire was 2.32 km. • The conduction cooling method was adopted for reactor magnet cooling. • The maximum cooling temperature of reactor magnet is 5.5 K. • The inductance was 408 mH in the steady-state condition (300 A operating). - Abstract: This paper describes the design specifications and performance of a real toroid-type high temperature superconducting (HTS) DC reactor. The HTS DC reactor was designed using 2G HTS wires. The HTS coils of the toroid-type DC reactor magnet were made in the form of a D-shape. The target inductance of the HTS DC reactor was 400 mH. The expected operating temperature was under 20 K. The electromagnetic performance of the toroid-type HTS DC reactor magnet was analyzed using the finite element method program. A conduction cooling method was adopted for reactor magnet cooling. Performances of the toroid-type HTS DC reactor were analyzed through experiments conducted under the steady-state and charge conditions. The fundamental design specifications and the data obtained from this research will be applied to the design of a commercial-type HTS DC reactor.

  8. Comparison of edge plasma perturbation during ELM control using one vs. two toroidal rows of RMP coils in ITER similar shaped plasmas on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenstermacher, M.E., E-mail: fenstermacher@fusion.gat.co [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Evans, T.E.; Osborne, T.H.; Schaffer, M.J.; DeGrassie, J.S.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R.J. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Moyer, R.A. [University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Large Type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) were suppressed by n = 3 resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) from a set of internal coils in plasmas with an ITER similar shape at the ITER pedestal collisionality, nu{sub e}*approx0.1 and low edge safety factor (q{sub 95} approx 3.6), with either a single toroidal row of the internal RMP coils or two poloidally separated rows of coils. ELM suppression with a single row of internal coils was achieved at approximately the same q{sub 95} surface-averaged perturbation field as with two rows of coils, but required higher current per coil. Maintaining complete suppression of ELMs using n = 3 RMPs from a single toroidal row of internal coils was less robust to variations in input neutral beam injection torque than previous ELM suppression cases using both rows of internal coils. With either configuration of RMP coils, maximum ELM size is correlated with the width of the edge region having good overlap of the magnetic islands from vacuum field calculations.

  9. Performance of cable-in-conduit conductors in ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] toroidal field coils with varying heat loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, J.A.; Wong, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The toroidal field (TF) coils in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will operate with varying heat loads generated by ac losses and nuclear heating. The total heat load is estimated to be 2 kW per TF coil under normal operation and can be higher for different operating scenarios. Ac losses are caused by ramping the poloidal field (PF) for plasma initiation, burn, and shutdown; nuclear heating results from neutrons that penetrate into the coil past the shield. Present methods to reduce or eliminate these losses lead to larger and more expensive machines, which are unacceptable with today's budget constraints. A suitable solution is to design superconductors that operate with high heat loads. The cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) can operate with high heat loads. One CICC design is analyzed for its thermal performance using two computer codes developed at LLNL. One code calculates the steady state flow conditions along the flow path, while the other calculates the transient conditions in the flow. We have used these codes to analyze the superconductor performance during the burn phase of the ITER plasma. The results of these analyses give insight to the choice of flow rate on superconductor performance. 4 refs., 5 figs

  10. Statistical analysis of the Nb3Sn strand production for the ITER toroidal field coils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vostner, A.; Jewell, M.C.; Pong, I.; Sullivan, N.; Devred, A.; Bessette, D.; Bevillard, G.; Mitchell, N.; Romano, G.; Zhou, Chao

    2017-01-01

    The ITER toroidal field (TF) strand procurement initiated the largest Nb3Sn superconducting strand production hitherto. The industrial-scale production started in Japan in 2008 and finished in summer 2015. Six ITER partners (so-called Domestic Agencies, or DAs) are in charge of the procurement and

  11. Status of the cold test facility for the JT-60SA tokamak toroidal field coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Maksoud, Walid, E-mail: walid.abdelmaksoud@cea.fr; Bargueden, Patrick; Bouty, André; Dispau, Gilles; Donati, André; Eppelle, Dominique; Genini, Laurent; Guiho, Patrice; Guihard, Quentin; Joubert, Jean-Michel; Kuster, Olivier; Médioni, Damien; Molinié, Frédéric; Sinanna, Armand; Solenne, Nicolas; Somson, Sébastien; Vieillard, Laurence

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The 5 K cryogenic loop includes a 500 W refrigerator and a She cold pump. • The coils are energized thanks to a 25.7 kA power supply and HTS current leads. • Temperature margin tests between 5 K and 7.5 K will be made on each coil. • A magnet safety system protects each double pancake of the coil in case of quench. • Instrumentation is monitored on a 1 Hz to 10 kHz fast acquisition system. - Abstract: JT-60SA is a fusion experiment which is jointly constructed by Japan and Europe and which shall contribute to the early realization of fusion energy, by providing support to the operation of ITER, and by addressing key physics issues for ITER and DEMO. In order to achieve these goals, the existing JT-60U experiment will be upgraded to JT-60SA by using superconducting coils. The 18 TF coils of the JT-60SA device will be provided by European industry and tested in a Cold Test Facility (CTF) at CEA Saclay. The coils will be tested at the nominal current of 25.7 kA and will be cooled with supercritical helium between 5 K and 7.5 K to check the temperature margin against a quench. The main objective of these tests is to check the TF coils performance and hence mitigate the fabrication risks. The most important components of the facility are: a 11.5 m × 6.5 m large cryostat in which the TF coils will be thermally insulated by vacuum; a 500 W helium refrigerator and a valve box to cool the coils down to 5 K and circulate 24 g/s of supercritical helium through the winding pack and through the casing; a power supply and HTS current leads to energize the coil; the control and instrumentation equipment (sensors, PLC's, supervision system, fast data acquisition system, etc.) and the Magnet Safety System (MSS) that protects the coils in case of quench. The paper will give an overview of the design of this large facility and the status of its realization.

  12. Distortion

    OpenAIRE

    Schultz, Isabella Odorico; Zmylon, Nanna Nielsen; Britze, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the audience’s perception of the music festival Distortion. By conducting a field-study focusing on the subject’s perception of Distortion, their perception of the Distortion-attendants, and their perception on the promotion of Distortion, the paper will relate the audience perception to the promotion of the event. Using the group’s own research on the promotion of Distortion, the paper points out both the consistencies and the inconsistencies between the promotion and...

  13. ITER toroidal field model coil (TFMC). Test and analysis summary report (testing handbook) chapter 3 TOSKA FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulbricht, A.

    2001-05-01

    In the frame of a contract between the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) Director and the European Home Team Director was concluded the extension of the TOSKA facility of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe as test bed for the ITER toroidal field model coil (TFMC), one of the 7 large research and development projects of the ITER EDA (Engineering Design Activity). The report describes the work and development, which were performed together with industry to extend the existing components and add new components. In this frame a new 2 kW refrigerator was added to the TOSKA facility including the cold lines to the Helium dewar in the TOSKA experimental area. The measuring and control system as well as data acquisition was renewed according to the state-of-the-art. Two power supplies (30 kA, 50 kA) were switched in parallel across an Al bus bar system and combined with an 80 kA dump circuit. For the test of the TFMC in the background field of the EURATOM LCT coil a new 20 kA power supply was taken into operation with the existing 20 kA discharge circuit. Two forced flow cooled 80 kA current leads for the TFMC were developed. The total lifting capacity for loads in the TOSKA building was increased by an ordered new 80 t crane with a suitable cross head (125 t lifting capacity +5 t net mass) to 130 t for assembling and installation of the test arrangement. Numerous pre-tests and development and adaptation work was required to make the components suitable for application. The 1.8 K test of the EURATOM LCT coil and the test of the W 7-X prototype coil count to these tests as overall pre-tests. (orig.)

  14. Configuration development of a hydraulic press for preloading the toroidal field coils of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) is part of a national design team that is developing the conceptual design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). To achieve a compact device with the minimum major radius, a vertical preload system is being developed to react the vertical separating force normally carried by the inboard leg of the toroidal field (TF) coils. The preload system is in the form of a hydraulic press. Challenges in the design include the development of hydraulic and structural systems for very large force requirements, which could interface with the CIT machine, while allowing maximum access to the top, bottom, and radial periphery of the machine. Maximum access is necessary for maintenance, diagnostics, instrumentation, and control systems. Materials used in the design must function in the nuclear environment and in the presence of high magnetic fields. This paper presents the configuration development of the hydraulic press used to vertically preload the CIT device

  15. Situation of the project of manufacture of 10 european toroidal coils for ITER; Situacion del proyecto de fabricacion de 10 bobinas toroidales europeas para el ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felipe, A.; Mrenio, A.; Pando, F.; Pallisa, J.; Merino, O.; Condado, J. P.; Madorran, A.; Dormicchi, O.; Valle, N.; Presenti, P.; Durzo, C.; Pittaluga, S.; Lucas, J.; Ruiz de Villa, E.; Harrison, R.; Cornelis, M.; Cornella, J.; Poncet, L.; Bonito-Oliva, A.

    2013-07-01

    The toroidal coils are part of the magnetic confinement system, of tool of plasma ITER being them making a significant technological challenge since there is no previous experience of manufacture of similar dimensions superconducting coils (14 m X 9 m). F4E, is the agency responsible for making 10 of these coils, having awarded to the consortium of Iberdrola Ingenieria, ASG Superconductors and Elytt Energy making them. This project is now in the process of manufacture of the first Double Pancake prototype that will serve as a qualification of the manufacturing process.

  16. Acceleration of calculation of nuclear heating distributions in ITER toroidal field coils using hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Polunovskiy, Eduard; Loughlin, Michael J.; Grove, Robert E.; Sawan, Mohamed E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Assess the detailed distribution of the nuclear heating among the components of the ITER toroidal field coils. • Utilize the FW-CADIS method to dramatically accelerate the calculation of detailed nuclear analysis. • Compare the efficiency and reliability of the FW-CADIS method and the MCNP weight window generator. - Abstract: Because the superconductivity of the ITER toroidal field coils (TFC) must be protected against local overheating, detailed spatial distribution of the TFC nuclear heating is needed to assess the acceptability of the designs of the blanket, vacuum vessel (VV), and VV thermal shield. Accurate Monte Carlo calculations of the distributions of the TFC nuclear heating are challenged by the small volumes of the tally segmentations and by the thick layers of shielding provided by the blanket and VV. To speed up the MCNP calculation of the nuclear heating distribution in different segments of the coil casing, ground insulation, and winding packs of the ITER TFC, the ITER Organization (IO) used the MCNP weight window generator (WWG). The maximum relative uncertainty of the tallies in this calculation was 82.7%. In this work, this MCNP calculation was repeated using variance reduction parameters generated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) code and both MCNP calculations were compared in terms of computational efficiency and reliability. Even though the ADVANTG MCNP calculation used less than one-sixth of the computational resources of the IO calculation, the relative uncertainties of all the tallies in the ADVANTG MCNP calculation were less than 6.1%. The nuclear heating results of the two calculations were significantly different by factors between 1.5 and 2.3 in some of the segments of the furthest winding pack turn from the plasma neutron source. Even though the nuclear heating in this turn may not affect the ITER design because it is much smaller than the nuclear heating in the

  17. Acceleration of calculation of nuclear heating distributions in ITER toroidal field coils using hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M., E-mail: ibrahimam@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Polunovskiy, Eduard; Loughlin, Michael J. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon Sur Verdon, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance (France); Grove, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Sawan, Mohamed E. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Assess the detailed distribution of the nuclear heating among the components of the ITER toroidal field coils. • Utilize the FW-CADIS method to dramatically accelerate the calculation of detailed nuclear analysis. • Compare the efficiency and reliability of the FW-CADIS method and the MCNP weight window generator. - Abstract: Because the superconductivity of the ITER toroidal field coils (TFC) must be protected against local overheating, detailed spatial distribution of the TFC nuclear heating is needed to assess the acceptability of the designs of the blanket, vacuum vessel (VV), and VV thermal shield. Accurate Monte Carlo calculations of the distributions of the TFC nuclear heating are challenged by the small volumes of the tally segmentations and by the thick layers of shielding provided by the blanket and VV. To speed up the MCNP calculation of the nuclear heating distribution in different segments of the coil casing, ground insulation, and winding packs of the ITER TFC, the ITER Organization (IO) used the MCNP weight window generator (WWG). The maximum relative uncertainty of the tallies in this calculation was 82.7%. In this work, this MCNP calculation was repeated using variance reduction parameters generated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) code and both MCNP calculations were compared in terms of computational efficiency and reliability. Even though the ADVANTG MCNP calculation used less than one-sixth of the computational resources of the IO calculation, the relative uncertainties of all the tallies in the ADVANTG MCNP calculation were less than 6.1%. The nuclear heating results of the two calculations were significantly different by factors between 1.5 and 2.3 in some of the segments of the furthest winding pack turn from the plasma neutron source. Even though the nuclear heating in this turn may not affect the ITER design because it is much smaller than the nuclear heating in the

  18. Transverse magnetic field penetration through the JET toroidal coil and support structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core, W.G.F.; Noll, P.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the results of a study of transverse magnetic field penetration through the JET magnetic field coil systems and supporting structures. The studies were carried out during the initial JET design phase (1973-78) and were part of a major radius compression plasma heating feasibility study. In view of the interest in this problem the authors have decided to re-issue the original work as a JET report. The material basically remains unchanged although better estimates of the penetration times have been obtained and typographical errors which occurred in the original have been corrected. (author)

  19. Configuration development of a hydraulic press for preloading the toroidal field coils of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) is part of a national design team that is developing the conceptual design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). To achieve a compact device with the minimum major radius, a vertical preload system is being developed to react the vertical separating force normally carried by the inboard leg of the toroidal field (TF) coils. The preload system is in the form of a hydraulic press. Challenges in the design include the development of hydraulic and structural systems for very large force requirements, which could interface with the CIT machine, while allowing maximum access to the top, bottom, and radial periphery of the machine. Maximum access is necessary for maintenance, diagnostics, instrumentation, and control systems. Materials used in the design must function in the nuclear environment and in the presence of high magnetic fields. The structural system developed is an arrangement in which the CIT device is installed in the jaws of the press. Large built-up beams above and below the CIT span the machine and deliver the vertical force to the center cylinder formed by the inboard legs of the TF coils. During the conceptual design study, the vertical force requirement has ranged between 25,000 and 52,000 t. The access requirement on top and bottom limits the width of the spanning beams. Nonmagnetic steel materials are also required because of operation in the high magnetic fields. In the hydraulic system design for the press, several options are being explored. These range from small-diameter jacks operating at very high pressure [228 MPa (33 ksi)] to large-diameter jacks operating at pressures up to 69 MPa (10 ksi). Configurations with various locations for the hydraulic cylinders have also been explored. The nuclear environment and maintenance requirements are factors that affect cylinder location. This paper presents the configuration development of the hydraulic press used to vertically preload the CIT device

  20. Technical aspects and manufacturing methods for JT-60SA toroidal field coil casings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.rossi@enea.it [ENEA, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Cucchiaro, A.; Brolatti, G.; Cocilovo, V.; Ginoulhiac, G.; Polli, G. [ENEA, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Gabriele, M.; Di Muzio, F. [Walter Tosto, Via Erasmo Piaggio, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Philips, G.; Tomarchio, V. [JT-60SA European Home Team, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A contract between ENEA and Walter Tosto started on July 2012 for the construction of 18 TF coil casings for JT-60SA. • Design and manufacturing of mock-ups representative of straight and curved legs of the casings have been completed. • Final design of the casings has been completed and manufacturing activities have already started and are ongoing. • The completion of the first three casings will be completed within the end of 2013 and the production of all the 18 casings is foreseen by the end of 2015. - Abstract: JT-60SA is a superconducting tokamak machine to be assembled in Naka site, Japan, designed to contribute to the early realization of fusion energy by supporting the exploitation of ITER and research toward DEMO. In the frame of the Broader Approach Agreement a contract between ENEA and Walter Tosto (Chieti, Italy) started on July 2012 for the construction of 18 TF coil casings for JT-60SA. Two different sets of 9 casings each will be progressively delivered, from 2013 to the end of 2015, to ASG Superconductors (Genoa, Italy) and to Alstom (Belfort, France), where the integration of the winding pack into the casing will be carried out. Each TF coil casing (height 7.5 m and width 4.5 m) consists of four main components: one “Straight Leg Outboard” and one “Curved Leg Outboard” both with their own covers, “Straight Leg Inboard” and “Curved Leg Inboard”. The casing components are segmented in forgings and plates made of FM316LNL. The straight leg outboard is composed of two wings welded to a central core and two elbows welded at the ends with a cooling channel installed inside. Elbows of straight leg outboard are segmented in two half-elbows machined from 1 rough forging and welded to the central core made by plate. Welding of wings to the central core is performed in EBW (electron beam welding) and the straight part is welded to the elbows by NGTIG (TIG narrow gap) process. The curved leg outboard is composed of two

  1. Technical aspects and manufacturing methods for JT-60SA toroidal field coil casings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Paolo; Cucchiaro, A.; Brolatti, G.; Cocilovo, V.; Ginoulhiac, G.; Polli, G.; Gabriele, M.; Di Muzio, F.; Philips, G.; Tomarchio, V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A contract between ENEA and Walter Tosto started on July 2012 for the construction of 18 TF coil casings for JT-60SA. • Design and manufacturing of mock-ups representative of straight and curved legs of the casings have been completed. • Final design of the casings has been completed and manufacturing activities have already started and are ongoing. • The completion of the first three casings will be completed within the end of 2013 and the production of all the 18 casings is foreseen by the end of 2015. - Abstract: JT-60SA is a superconducting tokamak machine to be assembled in Naka site, Japan, designed to contribute to the early realization of fusion energy by supporting the exploitation of ITER and research toward DEMO. In the frame of the Broader Approach Agreement a contract between ENEA and Walter Tosto (Chieti, Italy) started on July 2012 for the construction of 18 TF coil casings for JT-60SA. Two different sets of 9 casings each will be progressively delivered, from 2013 to the end of 2015, to ASG Superconductors (Genoa, Italy) and to Alstom (Belfort, France), where the integration of the winding pack into the casing will be carried out. Each TF coil casing (height 7.5 m and width 4.5 m) consists of four main components: one “Straight Leg Outboard” and one “Curved Leg Outboard” both with their own covers, “Straight Leg Inboard” and “Curved Leg Inboard”. The casing components are segmented in forgings and plates made of FM316LNL. The straight leg outboard is composed of two wings welded to a central core and two elbows welded at the ends with a cooling channel installed inside. Elbows of straight leg outboard are segmented in two half-elbows machined from 1 rough forging and welded to the central core made by plate. Welding of wings to the central core is performed in EBW (electron beam welding) and the straight part is welded to the elbows by NGTIG (TIG narrow gap) process. The curved leg outboard is composed of two

  2. Intelligent shell feedback control in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch with partial coverage of the toroidal surface by a discrete active coil array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    An active feedback system is required for long pulse operation of the reversed field pinch (RFP) device to suppress resistive wall modes (RWMs). A general feature of a feedback system using a discrete active coil array is a coupling effect which arises when a set of side band modes determined by the number of active coils is produced. Recent results obtained on the EXTRAP T2R RFP demonstrated the suppression of independent m = 1 RWMs using an active feedback system with a two-dimensional array of discrete active coils in the poloidal and toroidal directions. One of the feedback algorithms used is the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Active feedback systems having different number of active coils in the poloidal (Mc) and toroidal (Nc) directions (Mc × Nc = 2 × 32 and Mc × Nc = 4 × 16) are studied. Different side band effects are seen for these configurations. A significant prolongation of the plasma discharge is achieved for the intelligent shell feedback scheme using the 2 × 32 active coil configuration. This is attributed to the side band sets including only one of the dominant unstable RWMs and avoiding coupling to resonant modes. Analog proportional-integral-derivative controllers are used in the feedback system. Regimes with different values of the proportional gain are studied. The requirement of the proportional-integral control for low proportional gain and proportional-derivative control for high proportional gain is seen in the experiments.

  3. Toroidal field coil design concept and structural support system for CTHR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chianese, R. B.; Kelly, J. L.; Ruck, G. W.

    1980-09-01

    The CTHR conceptual design consists of a magnetically confined (tokamak) fusion reactor fitted with a fertile uranium blanket. The fusion driver concept was based on an ignited plasma. All concepts and parameters were selected on the basis that technical feasibility would be achieved by 1995 to assure a viable commercial operation in the early to mid-21st century. The reactor was designed to achieve good fissile fuel production, with electricity production being a second order priority. However, the resulting concepts that evolved were all excellent power producers which significantly improved the economic performance. The subsystems discussed in the following paragraphs provide a background of the application for the TF coil design described in this report.

  4. Toroidal field coil design concept and structural support system for CTHR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chianese, R.B.; Kelly, J.L.; Ruck, G.W.

    1980-09-01

    The CTHR conceptual design consists of a magnetically confined (tokamak) fusion reactor fitted with a fertile uranium blanket. The fusion driver concept was based on an ignited plasma. All concepts and parameters were selected on the basis that technical feasibility would be achieved by 1995 to assure a viable commercial operation in the early to mid-21st century. The reactor was designed to achieve good fissile fuel production, with electricity production being a second order priority. However, the resulting concepts that evolved were all excellent power producers which significantly improved the economic performance. The subsystems discussed in the following paragraphs provide a background of the application for the TF coil design described in this report

  5. A novel approach to calculate inductance and analyze magnetic flux density of helical toroidal coil applicable to Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage systems (SMES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh Pahlavani, M.R.; Shoulaie, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, formulas are proposed for the self and mutual inductance calculations of the helical toroidal coil (HTC) by the direct and indirect methods at superconductivity conditions. The direct method is based on the Neumann's equation and the indirect approach is based on the toroidal and the poloidal components of the magnetic flux density. Numerical calculations show that the direct method is more accurate than the indirect approach at the expense of its longer computational time. Implementation of some engineering assumptions in the indirect method is shown to reduce the computational time without loss of accuracy. Comparison between the experimental measurements and simulated results for inductance, using the direct and the indirect methods indicates that the proposed formulas have high reliability. It is also shown that the self inductance and the mutual inductance could be calculated in the same way, provided that the radius of curvature is >0.4 of the minor radius, and that the definition of the geometric mean radius in the superconductivity conditions is used. Plotting contours for the magnetic flux density and the inductance show that the inductance formulas of helical toroidal coil could be used as the basis for coil optimal design. Optimization target functions such as maximization of the ratio of stored magnetic energy with respect to the volume of the toroid or the conductor's mass, the elimination or the balance of stress in some coordinate directions, and the attenuation of leakage flux could be considered. The finite element (FE) approach is employed to present an algorithm to study the three-dimensional leakage flux distribution pattern of the coil and to draw the magnetic flux density lines of the HTC. The presented algorithm, due to its simplicity in analysis and ease of implementation of the non-symmetrical and three-dimensional objects, is advantageous to the commercial software such as ANSYS, MAXWELL, and FLUX. Finally, using the

  6. Electro-magneto-structural analysis of toroidal coils using finite element method with application of composite theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miya, Kenzo; Ogawa, Yuichi; Hamada, Taiji; Watanabe, Takayuki; Tagata, Kazunori.

    1985-01-01

    Application of superconducting magnets to magnetic confinement fusion reactors is necessary to generate as strong magnetic field as possible since a huge amount of electrical power is consumed if normal conducting magnets are used. And the strong field from the superconducting magnets generates very large electromagnetic force into structural components. It is thus required to establish a design guideline for the superconducting magnet structures. Development of a computer code to calculate stress-strain state in the complex interior of the magnet could serve the requirements. In this paper mathematical formulations available for the finite element implementation are presented to solve detailed stress and strain in layered components of the magnets. The formulations are based on the composite theory of layered structures. Examples of numerical analysis are presented for electromagnetomechanical analysis of toroidal coils of the R-machine which has been discussed and promoted by Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University. The numerical results are compared with those obtained from the beam-shell model. Significant differences are found at some portions between them indicating validity of the present code ''MAGCOMP''. Detailed stress distributions are shown for each component, which would be furthermore available to analysis and evaluation of quench phenomena. (author)

  7. Estimation of toroidal field coil stresses from magnetic loads in FER and NET using analytic methods and improved computer subroutine for TFC stress estimation in TRESCODE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riemer, B.W.; Miki, Nobuharu; Hashizume, Takashi.

    1988-06-01

    This report describes the comparison of TF coil stresses in NET and FER. The analyses focus on the straight part of the inner legs, since it is this part of the coil which most directly influences the radial build of the machine. NET's TF coils are wedged together and the centering force on each of the coils is reacted by toroidal compression of the inner legs. The forces that act out of the plane of each coil are reacted by friction between adjacent inner legs such that the set of legs behave much like a cylinder under torsion. In contrast, the FER device employs a bucking cylinder to react the centering load, which incurs a penalty in radial thickness, and the out of plane forces are reacted by the use of shear keys between adjacent inner legs. Analytic techniques or ''hand methods'' have been used to estimate and compare the strains and stresses at the inner leg mid-plane section resulting from both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetic forces. Such techniques forced a more thorough understanding of the structural behavior of the coils. The amount of effort in analyzing the NET coil is greater than for FER as the reaction of centering load in its wedged design is more complex, and because it was found that friction plays a very important part in determining the coil stresses. The FER coil is simpler in this regard, and a ''hand estimation'' of its coil stresses was straightfoward. In this report, the program written to perform these analyses is also described. It was desired to provide new capabilities to the original TF stress subroutine in TRESCODE and to review and improve it where possible. This has been accomplished, and subroutines are now available for use in JAERI's system code, TRESCODE. It is hoped that the inner leg radial thickness can be better optimized by using the program. (author)

  8. Effect of plasma current breakaway on the operating stability of the superconducting coil of the toroidal magnetic field in the T-10M installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostenko, A.I.; Kravchenko, M.Yu.; Monoszon, N.A.; Trokhachev, G.V.

    1979-01-01

    The method and calculation results of stability of a superconducting coil of the toroidal magnetic field in the T-10M installation to plasma current breakaway are presented. The calculations were performed for two values of the magnetic field induction in the centre of the plasma cross section: 3.5 and 5 T. The calculation of energy losses and heating of the superconducting coil was performed assuming the plasma current in case of breakaway decreases to zero with an infinite rate, so that the estimations obtained are maxiaum. It is shown that in case of 3.5 T induction the superconducting coil exhibits resistance to plasma current breakaways, and in case of 5 T it is necessary to use electromagnetic screening to provide stability

  9. A personal-computer-based package for interactive assessment of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and poloidal field coil design in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelleher, W.P.; Steiner, D.

    1989-01-01

    A personal-computer (PC)-based calculational approach assesses magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and poloidal field (PF) coil arrangement in a highly interactive mode, well suited for tokamak scoping studies. The system developed involves a two-step process: the MHD equilibrium is calculated and then a PF coil arrangement, consistent with the equilibrium is determined in an interactive design environment. In this paper the approach is used to examine four distinctly different toroidal configurations: the STARFIRE rector, a spherical torus (ST), the Big Dee, and an elongated tokamak. In these applications the PC-based results are benchmarked against those of a mainframe code for STARFIRE, ST, and Big Dee. The equilibrium and PF coil arrangement calculations obtained with the PC approach agree within a few percent with those obtained with the mainframe code

  10. Toroid magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Because of its exceptional size, it was not feasible to assemble and test the Barrel Toroid - made of eight coils - as an integrated toroid on the surface, prior to its final installation underground in LHC interaction point 1. It was therefore decided to test these eight coils individually in a dedicated test facility.

  11. Localization of Electrical Insulation Failures in Superconducting Collared Coils by Analysis of the Distortion of a Pulsed Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Komorowski, P A

    2000-01-01

    The localization of possible electrical faults in superconducting accelerator magnets may, in most cases, be a complex, expensive and time-consuming process. In particular, inter-turn short circuits and failures of the ground insulation are well detectable when the magnet is collared, but often disappear after disassembly for repair due to the release of the pre-stress in the coils. The fault localization method presented in this paper is based on the measurement and analysis of the magnetic field generated inside the magnet aperture by a high voltage pulse. The presence of the fault modifies the distribution of the current in the coils and produces a distortion of the magnetic field. The described method aims at locating both the longitudinal and azimuthal position of the fault-affected area. The test method, the transient case FEM models and the implemented experimental set-up are presented and discussed for the LHC dipole models.

  12. Proposal for the renegotiation of a contract for the supply of eight coil casings for the barrel toroid magnet of the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns the renegotiation of a contract for the supply of eight coil casings for the Barrel Toroid Magnet of the ATLAS detector. The proposal for the award of a contract with ABB ENERTECH (CH) was presented to Finance Committee for information in September 1998 (CERN/FC/4089). In view of the developments outlined in this document, the Finance Committee is invited to agree to the renegotiation of a contract with ALSTOM SWITZERLAND (CH), for the supply of eight coil casings for the ATLAS Barrel Toroid Magnet for a total Ex-works price of 12 580 000 Swiss francs, subject to revision after 31 July 2001, with an option for an extra coil casing for an additional Ex-works price of 1 525 000 Swiss francs, subject to revision after 31 July 2001, bringing the total amount for the supply to 14 105 000 Swiss francs, subject to revision after 31 July 2001. The total amount of the contract, including transport to the integration site, will not exceed 14 490 000 Swiss francs, subject to revision after 31 July...

  13. Toroidal Thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Teruhiro; Shizuoka, Yoshihide.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the shielding capacity of a current breaker for a current transformer coil and to facilitate the manufacture and the assembly of the current transformer coil. Constitution: A first current transformer coil is provided between a vacuum container for enclosing a plasma and a toroidal magnetic field coil, and a secon current transformer coil is provided outside the toroidal magnetic field coil. The rise of the plasma current is performed by the variation in the current of the coil of the first transformer having high electromagnetic coupling with the plasma current, and the variation in the magnetic flux necessary for maintaining the plasma is performed by the variation in the current of the second transformer coil. In this manner, the current shielding capacity of the first transformer coil can be reduced to decrease the number of coil turns, thereby facilitating the manufacture and assembly. (Seki, T.)

  14. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 32, Coil assembly documentation. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    This document is intended to address the contract requirement for providing coil assembly documentation, as required in the applicable Statement of Work: 'Provide preliminary procedures and preliminary design and supporting analysis of the equipment, fixtures, and hardware required to integrate and align the impregnated coil assemblies with the coil cases and intercoil structure. Each of the three major processes associated with the coil case and intercoil structure (ICS), TF Case Fabrication, Coil Preparation for Case Assembly are examined in detail. The specific requirements, processes, equipment, and technical concerns for each of these assembly processes is presented

  15. Exploring the limits of a very large Nb3Sn conductor: the 80 kA conductor of the ITER toroidal field model coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, J.L.; Ciazynski, D.; Guerber, O.; Park, S.H.; Zani, L.

    2003-01-01

    In Phase II experiment of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC) the operation limits of its 80 kA Nb 3 Sn conductor were explored. To increase the magnetic field on the conductor, the TFMC was tested in presence of another large coil: the EURATOM-LCT coil. Under these conditions the maximum field reached on the conductor, was around 10 tesla. This exploration has been performed at constant current, by progressively increasing the coil temperature and monitoring the coil voltage drop in the current sharing regime. Such an operation was made possible thanks to the very high stability of the conductor. The aim of these tests was to compare the critical properties of the conductor with expectations and assess the ITER TF conductor design. These expectations are based on the documented critical field and temperature dependent properties of the 720 superconducting strands which compose the conductor. In addition the conductor properties are highly dependent on the strain, due to the compression appearing on Nb 3 Sn during the heat treatment of the pancakes and related to the differential thermal compression between Nb 3 Sn and the stainless steel jacket. No precise model exists to predict this strain, which is therefore the main information, which is expected from these tests. The method to deduce this strain from the different tests is presented, including a thermalhydraulic analysis to identify the temperature of the critical point and a careful estimation of the field map across the conductor. The measured strain has been estimated in the range -0.75% to -0.79 %. This information will be taken into account for ITER design and some adjustment of the ITER conductor design is under examination. (authors)

  16. Toroidal simulation magnet tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walstrom, P.L.; Domm, T.C.

    1975-01-01

    A number of different schemes for testing superconducting coils in a simulated tokamak environment are analyzed for their merits relative to a set of test criteria. Two of the concepts are examined in more detail: the so-called cluster test scheme, which employs two large background field coils, one on either side of the test coil, and the compact torus, a low-aspect ratio toroidal array of a small number of coils in which all of the coils are essentially test coils. Simulation of the pulsed fields of the tokamak is discussed briefly

  17. Samus Toroid Installation Fixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stredde, H.; /Fermilab

    1990-06-27

    The SAMUS (Small Angle Muon System) toroids have been designed and fabricated in the USSR and delivered to D0 ready for installation into the D0 detector. These toroids will be installed into the aperture of the EF's (End Toroids). The aperture in the EF's is 72-inch vertically and 66-inch horizontally. The Samus toroid is 70-inch vertically by 64-inch horizontally by 66-inch long and weighs approximately 38 tons. The Samus toroid has a 20-inch by 20-inch aperture in the center and it is through this aperture that the lift fixture must fit. The toroid must be 'threaded' through the EF aperture. Further, the Samus toroid coils are wound about the vertical portion of the aperture and thus limit the area where a lift fixture can make contact and not damage the coils. The fixture is designed to lift along a surface adjacent to the coils, but with clearance to the coil and with contact to the upper steel block of the toroid. The lift and installation will be done with the 50 ton crane at DO. The fixture was tested by lifting the Samus Toroid 2-inch off the floor and holding the weight for 10 minutes. Deflection was as predicted by the design calculations. Enclosed are sketches of the fixture and it relation to both Toroids (Samus and EF), along with hand calculations and an Finite Element Analysis. The PEA work was done by Kay Weber of the Accelerator Engineering Department.

  18. An interim report on the materials and selection criteria analysis for the Compact Ignition Tokamak Toroidal Field Coil Turn-to-Turn Insulation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, V.W.; Dooley, J.B.; Hubrig, J.G.; Janke, C.J.; McManamy, T.J.; Welch, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    Design criteria for the Compact Ignition Tokamak, Toroidal-Field (TF) Coil, Turn-to-Turn Insulation System require an insulation sheet and bonding system that will survive cryogenic cycling in a radiation environment and maintain structural integrity during exposure to the significant compressive and shear loads associated with each operating cycle. For thermosetting resin systems, a complex interactive dependency exists between optimum peak value, in-service property performance capabilities of candidate generic materials; key handling and processing parameters required to achieve their optimum in-service property performance as an insulation system; and suitability of their handling and processing parameters as a function of design configuration and assembly methodology. This dependency is assessed in a weighted study matrix in which two principal programmatic approaches for the development of the TF Coil Subassembly Insulation System have been identified. From this matrix study, two viable approaches to the fabrication of the insulation sheet were identified: use of a press-formed sheet bonded in place with epoxy for mechanical bonding and tolerance take-up and formation of the insulation sheet by placement of dry cloth and subsequent vacuum pressure impregnation. Laboratory testing was conducted to screen a number of combinations of resins and hardeners on a generic basis. These combinations were chosen for their performance in similar applications. Specimens were tested to screen viscosity, thermal-shock tolerance, and cryogenic tolerance. Cryogenic shock and cryogenic temperature proved to be extremely lethal to many combinations of resin, hardener, and cure. Two combinations survived: a heavily flexibilized bisphenol A resin with a flexibilized amine hardener and a bisphenol A resin with cycloaliphatic amine hardener. 7 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs

  19. Toroidal nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yutaka; Kasahara, Tatsuo; Takizawa, Teruhiro.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To design a device so as to be formed into a large-size and to arrange ports, through which neutral particles enter, in inclined fashion. Structure: Toroidal coils are wound about vacuum vessels which are divided into plural number. In the outer periphery of the vacuum vessels, ports are disposed inclined in the peripheral direction of the vacuum vessels and communicated with the vacuum vessels, and wall surfaces opposed to the ports of the toroidal coils adjacent at least the inclined sides of the ports are inclined substantially simularly to the port wall surfaces. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. Toroidal drift magnetic pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canobbio, E.

    1977-01-01

    A set of azimuthal coils which carry properly dephased rf-currents in the KHz frequency range can be used to heat toroidal plasmas by perpendicular Landau damping of subsonic Alfven waves. The heating mechanism and the rf-field structure are discussed in some detail

  1. Water cooling coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, S; Ito, Y; Kazawa, Y

    1975-02-05

    Object: To provide a water cooling coil in a toroidal nuclear fusion device, in which coil is formed into a small-size in section so as not to increase dimensions, weight or the like of machineries including the coil. Structure: A conductor arranged as an outermost layer of a multiple-wind water cooling coil comprises a hollow conductor, which is directly cooled by fluid, and as a consequence, a solid conductor disposed interiorly thereof is cooled indirectly.

  2. Superconducting endcap toroid design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walters, C.R.; Baynham, D.E.; Holtom, E.; Coombs, R.C.

    1992-10-01

    The Atlas Experiment proposed for the LHC machine will use toroidal magnet systems to achieve high muon momentum resolutions. One of the options under consideration is an air cored superconducting toroidal magnet system consisting of a long barrel toroid with small and cap toroids inserted in it to provide high resolution at high pseudorapidity. The design of the barrel toroid has been studied over the past two years and the design outline is given in a Saclay Report. More recently consideration has been given to an end cap toroid system which is based on air cored superconducting coils. This report presents the basic engineering design of such a system, the proposals for fabrication, assembly and installation, and an outline cost estimate for one end cap is presented in Appendix 1.

  3. NCSX Trim Coil Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalish, M.; Brooks, A.; Rushinski, J.; Upcavage, R.

    2009-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory before work was stopped in 2008. The objective of this experiment was to develop the stellarator concept and evaluate it's potential as a model for future fusion power plants. Stellarator design requires very precisely positioned Modular Coils of complex shape to form 3D plasmas. In the design of NCSX, Trim Coils were required to compensate for both the positioning of the coils during assembly and the fabrication tolerances of the Modular Coils. Use of the Trim Coils allowed for larger tolerances increasing ease of assembly and decreasing overall cost. A set of Trim coils was developed to suppress the toroidal flux in island regions due to misalignment, magnetic materials, and eddy currents. The requirement imposed upon the design forced the toroidal flux in island regions below 10% of the total toroidal flux in the plasma. An analysis was first performed to evaluate candidate Trim Coil configurations iterating both the size, number, and position of the coils. The design was optimized considering both performance and cost while staying within the tight restraints presented by the space limited geometry. The final design of the Trim Coils incorporated a 48 Coil top bottom symmetric set. Fabrication costs were minimized by having only two coil types and using a planar conventional design with off the shelf commercial conductor. The Trim Coil design incorporated supports made from simple structural shapes assembled together in a way which allowed for adjustment as well as accommodation for the tolerance build up on the mating surfaces. This paper will summarize the analysis that led to the optimization of the Trim Coils set, the trim coil mechanical design, thermal and stress analysis, and the design of the supporting Trim Coil structure

  4. Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a new magnetic confinement plasma device under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that will lead to improvements in toroidal magnetic fusion reactors. The ATF is a type of stellerator, known as a ''torsatron'' which theoretically has the capability to operate at greater than or equal to8% beta in steady state. The ATF plasma has a major radius of 2.1 m, an average minor radius of 0.3 m, and a field of 2 T for a 2 s duration or 1 T steady state. The ATF device consists of a helical field (HF) coil set, a set of poloidal field (PF) coils, an exterior shell structure to support the coils, and a thin, helically contoured vacuum vessel inside the coils. The ATF replaces the Impurities Studies Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at ORNL and will use the ISX-B auxiliary systems including 4 MW of electron cyclotron heating. The ATF is scheduled to start operation in late 1986. An overview of the ATF device is presented, including details of the construction process envisioned. 9 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a new magnetic plasma confinement device, under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which will lead to improvements in toroidal magnetic fusion reactors. ATF is a type of stellarator known as a torsatron which theoretically has the capability at greater than or equal to8% beta in steady state. The ATF plasma has a major radius of 2.1 m, an average minor radius of 0.3 m, and a field of 2 T for a 5-s duration or 1 T steady state. The ATF device consists of a helical field (HF) coil set, a set of poloidal field (PF) coils, an exterior shell structure to support the coils, and a thin helically contoured vacuum vessel inside the coils. The ATF replaces the ISX-B tokamak at ORNL and will use the ISX-B auxiliary systems including 4 MW of neutral injection heating and 0.2 MW of electron cyclotron heating. ATF device is scheduled to start operation in the fall of 1986. An overview of the ATF device is presented including details of the construction process envisioned

  6. Lowering the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN will consist of eight toroid magnets, the first of which was lowered into the cavern in these images on 26 October 2004. The coils are supported on platforms where they will be attached to form a giant torus. The platforms will hold about 300 tonnes of ATLAS' muon chambers and will envelop the inner detectors.

  7. TOROID II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    three axis fluxgate magnetometer , CMOS sun and star sensors, and a Kalman filter. The work and tasks that have been accomplished on the TOROID... magnetometer . The problem was found to be a missing ferrite bead which connects the 12V power supply to the op-amps which are used to appropriately...establish an overall operational timeline for TOROID. Testing and calibration was performed on the three-axis magnetometer which is primary attitude

  8. Quench propagation and protection analysis of the ATLAS Toroids

    OpenAIRE

    Dudarev, A; Gavrilin, A V; ten Kate, H H J; Baynham, D Elwyn; Courthold, M J D; Lesmond, C

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS superconducting magnet system consists of the Barrel Toroid, two End Cap Toroids and the Central Solenoid. However, the Toroids of eight coils each are magnetically separate systems to the Central Solenoid. The Toroids are electrically connected in series and energized by a single power supply. The quench protection system is based on the use of relatively small external dump resistances in combination with quench-heaters activated after a quench event detection to initiate the inte...

  9. Large coil task and results of testing US coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.

    1986-01-01

    The United States, EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland have collaborated since 1978 in development of superconducting toroidal field coils for fusion reactor applications. The United States provided a test facility nd three coils; the other participants, one coil each. All coils have the same interface dimensions and performance requirements (stable at 8 T), but internal design was decided by each team. Two US coil teams chose bath-cooled NbTi, 10-kA conductors. One developed a Nb 3 Sn conductor, cooled by internal flow, rated at 18 kA. All US coils have diagnostic instrumentation and imbedded heaters that enable stability tests and simulated nuclear heating experiments. In single-coil tests, each coil operated at full current in self-field (6.4 T). In six-coil tests that began in July 1986, one US coil and the Japanese coil hve been successfully operated at full current at 8 T. The other coils have operated as background coils while awaiting their turn as test coil. Coil tests have been informative and results gratifying. The facility has capably supported coil testing and its operation has provided information that will be useful in designing future fusion systems. Coil capabilities beyond nominal design points will be determined

  10. Fast Dump of the ATLAS Toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; Volpini, Giovanni; Dudarev, Alexey; Kate, Herman Ten

    2010-01-01

    The toroidal magnet system of the ATLAS Detector at CERN consists of a Barrel Toroid (BT) and two End Cap Toroids (ECT-A and ECT-C). Each toroid is built up from eight racetrack coils wound with an aluminum stabilized NbTi conductor and indirectly cooled by forced flow liquid helium. The three toroids operate in series at 20.5 kA with a total stored energy of 1.5 GJ. In order to verify the reliability and effectiveness of the quench protection system, series of fast dump tests have been performed first of the single toroids and finally of the entire toroidal magnet system. In this paper a model to simulate the fast dump of the ATLAS toroids in single mode operation and in full system configuration is presented. The model is validated through comparison with measured data extracted from the ramp-and-quench runs. The calculated energy dissipation in the various coils is in very good agreement (within 1-2\\%) with the enthalpy changes estimated from the temperature measurements of the different parts of the cold ...

  11. Toroidal helical quartz forming machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, K.W.; Cole, T.R.

    1977-01-01

    The Scyllac fusion experimental machine used 10 cm diameter smooth bore discharge tubes formed into a simple toroidal shape prior to 1974. At about that time, it was discovered that a discharge tube was required to follow the convoluted shape of the load coil. A machine was designed and built to form a fused quartz tube with a toroidal shape. The machine will accommodate quartz tubes from 5 cm to 20 cm diameter forming it into a 4 m toroidal radius with a 1 to 5 cm helical displacement. The machine will also generate a helical shape on a linear tube. Two sets of tubes with different helical radii and wavelengths have been successfully fabricated. The problems encountered with the design and fabrication of this machine are discussed

  12. Startup of large coil test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; Fietz, W.A.; Luton, J.N.; May, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is being used to test superconducting toroidal field coils about one-third the size of those for INTOR. Data were obtained on performance of refrigerator, helium distribution, power supplies, controls, and data acquisition systems and on the acoustic emission, voltages, currents, and mechanical strains during charging and discharging the coils. (author)

  13. Novel method of aligning ATF-1 coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, J.A.; Harris, J.H.; Neilson, G.H.; Jernigan, T.C.

    1983-08-01

    The coils for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF-1) torsatron may be easily aligned before the machine is placed under vacuum. This is done by creating nulls in the magnetic field by energizing the coils in various configurations. All of the nulls in vertical bar B vector vertical bar occur on the z-axis. When the nulls coincide, the coils are properly aligned

  14. Spherical tokamak without external toroidal fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaw, P.K.; Avinash, K.; Srinivasan, R.

    2001-01-01

    A spherical tokamak design without external toroidal field coils is proposed. The tokamak is surrounded by a spheromak shell carrying requisite force free currents to produce the toroidal field in the core. Such equilibria are constructed and it is indicated that these equilibria are likely to have robust ideal and resistive stability. The advantage of this scheme in terms of a reduced ohmic dissipation is pointed out. (author)

  15. Numerical determination of axisymmetric toroidal magnetohydrodynamic equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.L.; Dalhed, H.E.; Greene, J.M.

    1978-07-01

    Numerical schemes for the determination of stationary axisymmetric toroidal equilibria appropriate for modeling real experimental devices are given. Iterative schemes are used to solve the elliptic nonlinear partial differential equation for the poloidal flux function psi. The principal emphasis is on solving the free boundary (plasma-vacuum interface) equilibrium problem where external current-carrying toroidal coils support the plasma column, but fixed boundary (e.g., conducting shell) cases are also included. The toroidal current distribution is given by specifying the pressure and either the poloidal current or the safety factor profiles as functions of psi. Examples of the application of the codes to tokamak design at PPPL are given

  16. Toroidal field ripple effects in large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Tsang, K.T.; Callen, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    In an experimental power reactor, the ripple produced by the finite number of toroidal field coils destroys the ideal axisymmetry of the configuration and is responsible for additional particle trapping, loss regions and plasma transport. The effects of toroidal field ripple on the plasma transport coefficient, the loss of alpha particles and energetic injection ions, and the relaxation of toroidal flows are investigated in a new and systematic way. The relevant results are applied to the ORNL-EPR reference design; the maximum ripple there of about 2.2 percent at the outer edge of the plasma column is found to be tolerable from plasma physics considerations

  17. Equilibrium field coil concepts for INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, D.J.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Brown, T.G.

    1981-08-01

    Methods are presented for reducing ampere-turn requirements in the EF coil system. It is shown that coil currents in an EF coil system external to the toroidal field coils can be substantially reduced by relaxing the triangularity of a D-shaped plasma. Further reductions are realized through a hybrid EF coil system using both internal and external coils. Equilibrium field coils for a poloidally asymmetric, single-null INTOR configuration are presented. It is shown that the shape of field lines in the plasma scrapeoff region and divertor channel improves as triangularity is reduced, but it does so at the possible expense of achievable stable beta values

  18. ATLAS barrel toroid integration and test area in building 180

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two 'double-pancake' windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. The barrel toroid is being assembled in building 180 on the Meyrin site. In the first phase of assembly, the coils are packed into their aluminium-alloy casing. These photos show the double-pancake coils from ANSALDO and the coil casings from ALSTOM. In the foreground is the tooling from COSMI used to turn over the coil casings during this first phase. In the right background is the yellow lifting gantry manufactured at JINR-Dubna, Russia which will transport the coil casings to a heating table for prestressing. Two test benches with magnetic mirror are also visible.

  19. First ATLAS Barrel Toroid Coil Passes Test

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    First they secured anything magnetic: metal tools, nuts and bolts, tables. Then they cleared the magnet assembly building, as big as an airplane hangar, and locked it tight. Before turning on the magnet for its maiden test, they waited till the dead of night so no one else would be around.

  20. ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet reached nominal field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

     On 9 November the barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas, with an electrical current of 21 000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils as shown on this graph

  1. Large coil program support structure conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litherland, P.S.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the Large Coil Program (LCP) is to perform tests on both pool boiling and force cooled superconducting toroidal field coils. The tests will attempt to approximate conditions anticipated in an ignition tokamak. The test requirements resulted in a coil support design which accommodates up to six (6) test coils and is mounted to a structure capable of resisting coil interactions. The steps leading to the present LCP coil support structure design, details on selected structural components, and the basic assembly sequence are discussed

  2. Pulse coil concepts for the LCP Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.E.; Burn, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    The pulse coils described in this paper are resistive copper magnets driven by time-varying currents. They are included in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) portion of the Large Coil Program (LCP) to simulate the pulsed field environment of the toroidal coils in a tokamak reactor. Since TNS (a 150 sec, 5MA, igniting tokamak) and the Oak Ridge EPR (Experimental Power Reactor) are representative of the first tokamaks to require the technology developed in LCP, the reference designs for these machines, especially TNS, are used to derive the magnetic criteria for the pulse coils. This criteria includes the magnitude, distribution, and rate of change of pulsed fields in the toroidal coil windings. Three pulse coil concepts are evaluated on the basis of magnetic criteria and factors such as versatility of design, ease of fabrication and cost of operation. The three concepts include (1) a pair of poloidal coils outside the LCTF torus, (2) a single poloidal coil threaded through the torus, and (3) a pair of vertical axis coil windings inside the bore of one or more of the toroidal test coils

  3. Superconducting magnets for toroidal fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.

    1980-01-01

    Fusion reactors will soon be employing superconducting magnets to confine plasma in which deuterium and tritium (D-T) are fused to produce usable energy. At present there is one small confinement experiment with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils: Tokamak 7 (T-7), in the USSR, which operates at 4 T. By 1983, six different 2.5 x 3.5-m D-shaped coils from six manufacturers in four countries will be assembled in a toroidal array in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing at fields up to 8 T. Soon afterwards ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT-P) will begin operation at Oak Ridge with superconducting TF coils. At the same time there will be tokamaks with superconducting TF coils 2 to 3 m in diameter in the USSR and France. Toroidal field strength in these machines will range from 6 to 9 T. NbTi and Nb 3 Sn, bath cooling and forced flow, cryostable and metastable - various designs are being tried in this period when this new application of superconductivity is growing and maturing

  4. The Swiss LCT-coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vecsey, G.; Benz, H.; Horvath, I.

    1985-01-01

    With delivery of the coil to ORNL on February 4, 1984, the second phase of the Swiss Large Coil Program - design and construction - was terminated. Mainlines of the Swiss design concept are summarized and related to theoretical calculations, experimental results of the supporting program, fabricational experience and first successful test results. An attempt is made to draw preliminary conclusions with regard to the design of future toroidal systems such as NET

  5. Mechanical Commissioning of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Foussat, A; Dudarev, A; Bajas, H; Védrine, P; Berriaud, C; Sun, Z; Sorbi, M

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is a general-purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Its features include the 4 T Barrel Toroid magnet, the largest superconducting magnet (25 m long, 20 m diameter) that provides the magnetic field for the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The coils integrated at CERN, were tested individually at maximum current of 22 kA in 2005. Following the mechanical assembly of the Barrel Toroid in the ATLAS underground cavern, the test of the full Barrel Toroid was performed in October 2006. Further tests are foreseen at the end 2007 when the system will include the two End Cap Toroids (ECT). The paper gives an overview of the good mechanical test results achieved in comparison with model predictions and the experience gained in the mechanical behavior of the ATLAS Toroidal coils is discussed.

  6. Plasma Discharge in Toroidal System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usada, Widdi; Suryadi; Purwadi, Agus; Kasiyo

    1996-01-01

    A toroidal discharge apparatus has been made as an initial research in magnetic confinement system. This system consists of a capacitor, a RF source, an igniter system, a primary coil, a torus, and completed by Rogowski probe as a current detector. In this system, the discharge occurs when the minimum voltage is operated at 5 kV. The experiment result shows that the coupling factor is 0.35, it is proved that there is an equality between estimated and measurement results of the primary inductance i.e 8.5 μH

  7. Large Coil Program magnetic system design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, S.D.; Johnson, N.E.

    1977-01-01

    The primary objective of the Large Coil Program (LCP) is to demonstrate the reliable operation of large superconducting coils to provide a basis for the design principles, materials, and fabrication techniques proposed for the toroidal magnets for the THE NEXT STEP (TNS) and other future tokamak devices. This paper documents a design study of the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) in which the structural response of the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils and the supporting structure was evaluated under simulated reactor conditions. The LCP test facility structural system consists of six TF Coils, twelve coil-to-coil torsional restraining beams (torque rings), a central bucking post with base, and a Pulse Coil system. The NASTRAN Finite Element Structural Analysis computer Code was utilized to determine the distribution of deflections, forces, and stresses for each of the TF Coils, torque rings, and the central bucking post. Eleven load conditions were selected to represent probable test operations. Pulse Coils suspended in the bore of the test coil were energized to simulate the pulsed field environment characteristic of the TNS reactor system. The TORMAC Computer Code was utilized to develop the magnetic forces in the TF Coils for each of the eleven loading conditions examined, with or without the Pulse Coils energized. The TORMAC computer program output forces were used directly as input load conditions for the NASTRAN analyses. Results are presented which demonstrate the reliability of the LCTF under simulated reactor operating conditions

  8. Mechanical design and construction qualification program on ITER correction coils structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foussat, A., E-mail: arnaud.foussat@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Weiyue, Wu; Jing, Wei; Shuangsong, Du [Academy of Science Institute of Plasma Physics, PO 1126, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Sgobba, S. [European Center for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Hongwei, Li [China International Nuclear Fusion Energy Program Execution Center, Ministry of Science and Technology, 15B Fuxing Rd., Beijing 100862 (China); Libeyre, Paul; Jong, Cornelis; Klofac, Kamil; Mitchell, Neil [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2014-04-01

    The ITER Magnet system consists of 4 main coils sub-systems, i.e. 18 toroidal field coils (TFC), a central solenoid (CS), 6 poloidal field coils (PF) and 3 sets of correction coils (CC). The ITER fusion project has selected the stainless steel 316LN as main material for the magnet structure. The CC contribute to reducing the range of magnetic error fields created by imperfections in the location and geometry of the other coils used to confine, heat, and shape the plasma. During plasma operation, a large number of loading condition scenarios have been considered and structural analysis performed on key items like Cable-In-Conduit Conductor and the coil case. The results obtained are used for both static and fatigue structural assessment defining the present baseline design. For the construction of the structural cases, welding techniques such as GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) and techniques resulting in low distortion and shrinkage like EBW (Electron Beam Welding) or Laser Beam Welding (LBW) with filler metal wire have been selected. Those methods are considered for future qualifications to guarantee proper weld parameters and specified weld properties. In order to determine the strength and fracture toughness of 316LN stainless steel welds with respect to design criteria, some mechanical tests have been carried out at 7 K (or 77 K), and room temperature.

  9. Test facility for PLT TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearney, J.; File, J.; Dreskin, S.

    1975-01-01

    Past experience with the model C stellerator and other toroidal field devices indicates that mechanical and electrical tests of a toroidal field coil prior to maximum field operation of the device is prudent and desirable. This paper describes a test program for the PLT-TF coils. The test stand consists of one test coil, two background coils and a steel supporting structure. The three coil configuration produces a 67.5 kG field at the inner conductor (38 kG at the bore center) and simulates a 1/R field distribution in the bore of the test coil. The resolution of the field force system and resultant stresses within the test structure are discussed. A test procedure is described which maximizes the information obtained from a 100,000 pulse program

  10. Feedback control of resistive wall modes in toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Q.

    2002-01-01

    Active feedback of resistive wall modes is investigated using cylindrical theory and toroidal calculations. For tokamaks, good performance is obtained by using active coils with one set of coils in the poloidal direction and sensors detecting the poloidal field inside the first wall, located at the outboard mid-plane. With suitable width of the feedback coil such a system can give robust control with respect to variations in plasma current, pressure and rotation. Calculations are shown for ITER-like geometry with a double wall. The voltages and currents in the active coils are well within the design limits for ITER. Calculations for RFP's are presented for a finite number of coils both in the poloidal and toroidal directions. With 4 coils in the poloidal and 24 coils in the toroidal direction, all non-resonant modes can be stabilized both at high and low theta. Several types of sensors, including radial and internal poloidal or toroidal sensors, can stabilize the RWM, but poloidal sensors give the most robust performance. (author)

  11. Development of a new error field correction coil (C-coil) for DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.I.; Scoville, J.T.

    1995-12-01

    The C-coil recently installed on the DIII-D tokamak was developed to reduce the error fields created by imperfections in the location and geometry of the existing coils used to confine, heat, and shape the plasma. First results from C-coil experiments include stable operation in a 1.6 MA plasma with a density less than 1.0 x 10 13 cm -3 , nearly a factor of three lower density than that achievable without the C-coil. The C-coil has also been used in magnetic braking of the plasma rotation and high energy particle confinement experiments. The C-coil system consists of six individual saddle coils, each 60 degree wide toroidally, spanning the midplane of the vessel with a vertical height of 1.6 m. The coils are located at a major radius of 3.2 m, just outside of the toroidal field coils. The actual shape and geometry of each coil section varied somewhat from the nominal dimensions due to the large number of obstructions to the desired coil path around the already crowded tokamak. Each coil section consists of four turns of 750 MCM insulated copper cable banded with stainless steel straps within the web of a 3 in. x 3 in. stainless steel angle frame. The C-coil structure was designed to resist peak transient radial forces (up to 1,800 Nm) exerted on the coil by the toroidal and ploidal fields. The coil frames were supported from existing poloidal field coil case brackets, coil studs, and various other structures on the tokamak

  12. Next generation toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Shoichi

    1998-10-01

    A general survey of the possible approach for the next generation toroidal devices was made. Either surprisingly or obviously (depending on one's view), the technical constraints along with the scientific considerations lead to a fairly limited set of systems for the most favorable approach for the next generation devices. Specifically if the magnetic field strength of 5 T or above is to be created by superconducting coils, it imposes minimum in the aspect ratio for the tokamak which is slightly higher than contemplated now for ITER design. The similar technical constraints make the minimum linear size of a stellarator large. Scientifically, it is indicated that a tokamak of 1.5 times in the linear dimension should be able to produce economically, especially if a hybrid reactor is allowed. For the next stellarator, it is strongly suggested that some kind of helical axis is necessary both for the (almost) absolute confinement of high energy particles and high stability and equilibrium beta limits. The author still favors a heliac most. Although it may not have been clearly stated in the main text, the stability afforded by the shearless layer may be exploited fully in a stellarator. (author)

  13. Next generation toroidal devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Shoichi [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1998-10-01

    A general survey of the possible approach for the next generation toroidal devices was made. Either surprisingly or obviously (depending on one`s view), the technical constraints along with the scientific considerations lead to a fairly limited set of systems for the most favorable approach for the next generation devices. Specifically if the magnetic field strength of 5 T or above is to be created by superconducting coils, it imposes minimum in the aspect ratio for the tokamak which is slightly higher than contemplated now for ITER design. The similar technical constraints make the minimum linear size of a stellarator large. Scientifically, it is indicated that a tokamak of 1.5 times in the linear dimension should be able to produce economically, especially if a hybrid reactor is allowed. For the next stellarator, it is strongly suggested that some kind of helical axis is necessary both for the (almost) absolute confinement of high energy particles and high stability and equilibrium beta limits. The author still favors a heliac most. Although it may not have been clearly stated in the main text, the stability afforded by the shearless layer may be exploited fully in a stellarator. (author)

  14. The IEA Large Coil Task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, D.S.; Klose, W.; Shimamoto, S.; Vecsey, G.

    1988-01-01

    A multinational program of cooperative research, development, demonstrations, and exchanges of information on superconducting magnets for fusion was initiated in 1977 under an IEA agreement. The first major step in the development of TF magnets was called the Large Coil Task. Participants in LCT were the U.S. DOE, EURATOM, JAERI, and the Departement Federal de l'Interieur of Switzerland. The goals of LCT were to obtain experimental data, to demonstrate reliable operation of large superconducting coils, and to prove design principles and fabrication techniques being considered for the toroidal magnets of thermonuclear reactors. These goals were to be accomplished through coordinated but largely independent design, development, and construction of six test coils, followed by collaborative testing in a compact toroidal test array at fields of 8 T and higher. Under the terms of the IEA Agreement, the United States built and operated the test facility at Oak Ridge and provided three test coils. The other participants provided one coil each. Information on design and manufacturing and all test data were shared by all. The LCT team of each participant included a government laboratory and industrial partners or contractors. The last coil was completed in 1985, and the test assembly was completed in October of that year. Over the next 23 months, the six-coil array was cooled down and extensive testing was performed. Results were gratifying, as tests achieved design-point performance and well beyond. (Each coil reached a peak field of 9 T.) Experiments elucidated coil behavior, delineated limits of operability, and demonstrated coil safety. (orig./KP)

  15. Form coefficient of helical toroidal solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amelin, V.Z.; Kunchenko, V.B.

    1982-01-01

    For toroidal solenoids with continuous spiral coil, winded according to the laws of equiinclined and simple cylindrical spirals with homogeneous, linearly increasing to the coil periphery and ''Bitter'' distribution of current density, the analytical expressions for the dependence between capacity consumed and generated magnetic field, expressions for coefficients of form similar to Fabry coefficient for cylindrical solenoids are obtained and dependence of the form coefficient and relative volume of solenoid conductor on the number of revolutions of screw line per one circumvention over the large torus radius is also investigated. Analytical expressions of form coefficients and graphical material permit to select the optimum geometry as to capacity consumed both for spiral (including ''force-free'') and conventional toroidal solenoids of magnetic systems in thermonulear installations

  16. A coil test facility for the cryogenic tests of the JT-60SA TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantant, M.; Genini, L.; Bayetti, P.; Millet, F.; Wanner, M.; Massaut, V.; Corte, A. Della; Ardelier-Desage, F.; Catherine-Dumont, V.; Dael, A.; Decool, P.; Donati, A.; Duchateau, J.L.; Garibaldi, P.; Girard, S.; Hatchressian, J.C.; Fejoz, P.; Jamotton, P.; Jourdheuil, L.; Juster, F.P.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the Broader Approach Activities, the EU will deliver to Japan the 18 superconducting coils, which constitute the JT-60SA Toroidal field magnet. These 18 coils, manufactured by France and Italy, will be cold tested before shipping to Japan. For this purpose, the European Joint Undertaking for ITER, the Development of Fusion Energy ('Fusion for Energy', F4E) and the European Voluntary Contributors are collaborating to design and set-up a coil test facility (CTF) and to perform the acceptance test of the 18 JT-60SA Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The test facility is designed to test one coil at a time at nominal current and cryogenic temperature. The test of the first coil of each manufacturer includes a quench triggered by increasing the temperature. The project is presently in the detailed design phase.

  17. TORFA - toroidal reactor for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1980-09-01

    The near-term goal of the US controlled fusion program should be the development, for practical applications, of an intense, quasi-steady, reliable 14-MeV neutron source with an electrical utilization efficiency at least 10 times larger than the value characterizing beam/solid-target neutron generators. This report outlines a method for implementing that goal, based on tokamak fusion reactors featuring resistive toroidal-field coils designed for ease of demountability

  18. Large superconducting coil fabrication development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.L.; Allred, E.L.; Anderson, W.C.; Burn, P.B.; Deaderick, R.I.; Henderson, G.M.; Marguerat, E.F.

    1975-01-01

    Toroidal fields for some fusion devices will be produced by an array of large superconducting coils. Their size, space limitation, and field requirements dictate that they be high performance coils. Once installed, accessibility for maintenance and repairs is severely restricted; therefore, good reliability is an obvious necessity. Sufficient coil fabrication will be undertaken to develop and test methods that are reliable, fast, and economical. Industrial participation will be encouraged from the outset to insure smooth transition from development phases to production phases. Initially, practice equipment for three meter bore circular coils will be developed. Oval shape coil forms will be included in the practice facility later. Equipment that is more automated will be developed with the expectation of winding faster and obtaining good coil quality. Alternate types of coil construction, methods of winding and insulating, will be investigated. Handling and assembly problems will be studied. All technology developed must be feasible for scaling up when much larger coils are needed. Experimental power reactors may need coils having six meter or larger bores

  19. ATLAS: Full power for the toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 9th of November was a memorable day for ATLAS. Just before midnight, the gigantic Barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas in the coil windings, with an electrical current of 21000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils (as seen on the graph). This achievement was obtained after several weeks of commissioning. The ATLAS Barrel Toroid was first cooled down for about six weeks in July-August to -269°C (4.8 K) and then powered up step-by-step in successive test sessions to 21 kA. This is 0.5 kA above the current required to produce the nominal magnetic field. Afterwards, the current was safely switched off and the stored magnetic energy of 1.1 gigajoules was dissipated in the cold mass, raising its temperature to a safe -218°C (55 K). 'We can now say that the ATLAS Barrel Toroid is ready for physics,' said Herman ten Kate, project leader for the ATLAS magnet system. The ATLAS barrel toroid magnet is the result of a close collaboration between the magnet la...

  20. An important step for the ATLAS toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment's prototype toroid coil arrives at CERN from the CEA laboratory in Saclay on 6 October. The world's largest superconducting toroid magnet is under construction for the ATLAS experiment. A nine-metre long fully functional prototype coil was delivered to CERN at the beginning of October and has since been undergoing tests in the West Area. Built mainly by companies in France and Italy under the supervision of engineers from the CEA-Saclay laboratory near Paris and Italy's INFN-LASA, the magnet is a crucial step forward in the construction of the ATLAS superconducting magnet system. Unlike any particle detector that has gone before, the ATLAS detector's magnet system consists of a large toroidal system enclosing a small central solenoid. The barrel part of the toroidal system will use eight toroid coils, each a massive 25 metres in length. These will dwarf the largest toroids in the world when ATLAS was designed, which measure about six metres. So the ATLAS collaboration decided to build a...

  1. Effects of Resonant Helical Field on Toroidal Field Ripple in IR-T1 Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavipour, B.; Salar Elahi, A.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2018-02-01

    The toroidal magnetic field which is created by toroidal coils has the ripple in torus space. This magnetic field ripple has an importance in plasma equilibrium and stability studies in tokamak. In this paper, we present the investigation of the interaction between the toroidal magnetic field ripple and resonant helical field (RHF). We have estimated the amplitude of toroidal field ripples without and with RHF (with different q = m/n) ( m = 2, m = 3, m = 4, m = 5, m = 2 & 3, n = 1) using “Comsol Multiphysics” software. The simulations show that RHF has effects on the toroidal ripples.

  2. Calculation of modification to the toroidal magnetic field of the Tokamak Novillo. Part II; Calculo de modificacion al campo magnetico toroidal del Tokamak nivillo. Parte II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendez L, L.; Chavez A, E.; Colunga S, S.; Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Gaytan G, E

    1992-03-15

    In a cylindrical magnetic topology. the confined plasma experiences 'classic' collisional transport phenomena. When bending the cylinder with the purpose of forming a toro, the magnetic field that before was uniform now it has a radial gradient which produces an unbalance in the magnetic pressure that is exercised on the plasma in the transverse section of the toro. This gives place to transport phenomena call 'neo-classicist'. In this work the structure of the toroidal magnetic field produced by toroidal coils of triangular form, to which are added even of coils of compensation with form of half moon is analyzed. With this type of coils it is looked for to minimize the radial gradient of the toroidal magnetic field. The values and characteristics of B (magnetic field) in perpendicular planes to the toro in different angular positions in the toroidal direction, looking for to cover all the cases of importance are exhibited. (Author)

  3. New Toroid shielding design

    CERN Multimedia

    Hedberg V

    On the 15th of June 2001 the EB approved a new conceptual design for the toroid shield. In the old design, shown in the left part of the figure above, the moderator part of the shielding (JTV) was situated both in the warm and cold areas of the forward toroid. It consisted both of rings of polyethylene and hundreds of blocks of polyethylene (or an epoxy resin) inside the toroid vacuum vessel. In the new design, shown to the right in the figure above, only the rings remain inside the toroid. To compensate for the loss of moderator in the toroid, the copper plug (JTT) has been reduced in radius so that a layer of borated polyethylene can be placed around it (see figure below). The new design gives significant cost-savings and is easier to produce in the tight time schedule of the forward toroid. Since the amount of copper is reduced the weight that has to be carried by the toroid is also reduced. Outgassing into the toroid vacuum was a potential problem in the old design and this is now avoided. The main ...

  4. Alfven continuum with toroidicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riyopoulos, S.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1985-06-01

    The symmetry property of the MHD wave propagation operator is utilized to express the toroidal eigenmodes as a superposition of the mutually orthogonal cylindrical modes. Because of the degeneracy among cylindrical modes with the same frequency but resonant surfaces of different helicity the toroidal perturbation produces a zeroth order mixing of the above modes. The toroidal eigenmodes of frequency ω 0 2 have multiple resonant surfaces, with each surface shifted relative to its cylindrical position and carrying a multispectral content. Thus a single helicity toroidal antenna of frequency ω 0 couples strongly to all different helicity resonant surfaces with matching local Alfven frequency. Zeroth order coupling between modes in the continuum and global Alfven modes also results from toroidicity and degeneracy. Our perturbation technique is the MHD counterpart of the quantum mechanical methods and is applicable through the entire range of the MHD spectrum

  5. Moving toroidal limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari; Miyahara, Akira.

    1983-06-01

    The concept of the limiter-divertor proposed by Mirnov is extended to a toroidal limiter-divertor (which we call moving toroidal limiter) using the stream of ferromagnetic balls coated with a low Z materials such as plastics, graphite and ceramics. An important advantage of the use of the ferromagnetic materials would be possible soft landing of the balls on a catcher, provided that the temperature of the balls is below Curie point. Moreover, moving toroidal limiter would work as a protector of the first wall not only against the vertical movement of plasma ring but also against the violent inward motion driven by major disruption because the orbit of the ball in the case of moving toroidal limiter distributes over the small major radius side of the toroidal plasma. (author)

  6. Large coil test facility conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelms, L.W.; Thompson, P.B.; Mann, T.L.

    1978-02-01

    In the development of a superconducting toroidal field (TF) magnet for The Next Step (TNS) tokamak reactor, several different TF coils, about half TNS size, will be built and tested to permit selection of a design and fabrication procedure for full-scale TNS coils. A conceptual design has been completed for a facility to test D-shaped TF coils, 2.5 x 3.5-m bore, operating at 4-6 K, cooled either by boiling helium or by forced-flow supercritical helium. Up to six coils can be accommodated in a toroidal array housed in a single vacuum tank. The principal components and systems in the facility are an 11-m vacuum tank, a test stand providing structural support and service connections for the coils, a liquid nitrogen system, a system providing helium both as saturated liquid and at supercritical pressure, coils to produce a pulsed vertical field at any selected test coil position, coil power supplies, process instrumentation and control, coil diagnostics, and a data acquisition and handling system. The test stand structure is composed of a central bucking post, a base structure, and two horizontal torque rings. The coils are bolted to the bucking post, which transmits all gravity loads to the base structure. The torque ring structure, consisting of beams between adjacent coils, acts with the bucking structure to react all the magnetic loads that occur when the coils are energized. Liquid helium is used to cool the test stand structure to 5 K to minimize heat conduction to the coils. Liquid nitrogen is used to precool gaseous helium during system cooldown and to provide thermal radiation shielding

  7. Validation of special processes for the integration activities of the JT-60SA TF coils manufactured in Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polli, Gian Mario, E-mail: gianmario.polli@enea.it [ENEA, UT-FUS, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati (Italy); Cucchiaro, Antonio; Cocilovo, Valter [ENEA, UT-FUS, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati (Italy); Drago, Giovanni; Pesenti, Paolo; Cuneo, Stefano; Terzi, Franco [ASG Superconductors, Corso Perrone 73 r, Genova (Italy); Phillips, Guy; Tomarchio, Valerio [JT-60SA European Home Team, 85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Insertion. • Casing welding. • Casing embedding. - Abstract: In the framework of the Broader Approach Agreement for the construction of the JT-60SA tokamak, ENEA provides 9 of the 18 toroidal field (TF) coils of the JT-60SA magnet system. The 9 coils are being manufactured by ASG superconductors in Genoa under the supervision of ENEA in collaboration with the JT-60SA European home team. The manufacturing is composed of two main steps: one concerning winding pack assembly and impregnation, and the other devoted to the integration into the casing structure and associated final coil preparation. This paper describes the results of the validation activities set-up for the integration phase. Specifically, welding of casing components has been retained particularly critical for at least three reasons: (i) during welding the WP may be damaged by the intense heating; (ii) distortion caused by heating may determine incorrect coil geometry and then field errors; and (iii) flaws may reduce structural strength and then the overall lifetime of the machine. Similarly, final embedding has been demonstrated on a 1 m long mock-up of the coil. Main results and lessons learned are here described.

  8. Air core poloidal magnetic field system for a toroidal plasma producing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.B.

    1978-01-01

    A poloidal magnetics system for a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration is provided that reduces both the total volt-seconds requirement and the magnitude of the field change at the toroidal field coils. The system utilizes an air core transformer wound between the toroidal field (TF) coils and the major axis outside the TF coils. Electric current in the primary windings of this transformer is distributed and the magnetic flux returned by air core windings wrapped outside the toroidal field coils. A shield winding that is closely coupled to the plasma carries a current equal and opposite to the plasma current. This winding provides the shielding function and in addition serves in a fashion similar to a driven conducting shell to provide the equilibrium vertical field for the plasma. The shield winding is in series with a power supply and a decoupling coil located outside the TF coil at the primary winding locations. The present invention requires much less energy than the usual air core transformer and is capable of substantially shielding the toroidal field coils from poloidal field flux

  9. Progress in the design of a superconducting toroidal magnet for the ATLAS detector on LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baze, J.M.; Berriaud, C.; Cure, C.

    1996-01-01

    The toroidal system consists of three air core superconducting toroids. The barrel toroid covers the central region over a length of 26 m with an inner bore of 9.4 m and an outer diameter of 19.5 m. The two end cap toroids are inserted in the barrel at each end over a length of 5.6 m with an inner bore of 1.26 m. Each toroid consists of eight flat coils assembled around the beam axis and carrying 3 MAt each. The present paper describes the barrel toroid. Features of the design which are presented include the electromagnetic design, field and forces calculations, the basic concept of indirectly cooled aluminium conductor and monolithic fully impregnated winding, the description of the alu-alloy mechanical structure, the thermal analysis and the quench protection. Cryogenics principles, cryostat and toroid assembly procedures are summarized. Unsymmetric loadings, fault sensing and stability are discussed, in relation with the requirements of transparency

  10. Design features of HTMR-Hybrid Toroidal Magnet Tokamak Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosatelli, F.; Avanzini, P.G.; Brunelli, B.; Derchi, D.; Magnasco, M.; Grattarola, M.; Peluffo, M.; Raia, G.; Zampaglione, V.

    1985-01-01

    The HTMR (Hybrid Toroidal Magnet Tokamak Reactor) conceptual design is aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of a Tokamak reactor which could fulfill the scientific and technological objectives expected from next generation devices (e.g. INTOR-NET) with size and costs as small as possible. An hybrid toroidal field magnet, made up by copper and superconducting coils, seems to be a promising solution, allowing a considerable flexibility in machine performances, so as to gain useful margins in front of the uncertainties in confinement time scaling laws and beta and plasma density limits. In this paper the authors describe the optimization procedure for the hybrid magnet configuration, the main design features of HTMR and the preliminary mechanical calculations of the superconducting toroidal coils

  11. Design features of HTMR-hybrid toroidal magnet tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosatelli, F.; Avanzini, P.G.; Derchi, D.; Magnasco, M.; Grattarola, M.; Peluffo, M.; Raia, G.; Brunelli, B.; Zampaglione, V.

    1984-01-01

    The HTMR (Hybrid Toroidal Magnet Tokamak Reactor) conceptual design is aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of a Tokamak reactor which could fulfil the scientific and technological objectives expected from next generation devices with size and costs as small as possible. A hybrid toroidal field magnet, made up by copper and superconducting coils, seems to be a promising solution, allowing a considerable flexibility in machine performances, so as to gain useful margins in front of the uncertainties in confinement time scaling laws and beta and plasma density limits. The optimization procedure for the hybrid magnet, configuration, the main design features of HTMR and the preliminary mechanical calculations of the superconducting toroidal coils are described. (author)

  12. The Normal Zone Propagation in ATLAS B00 Model Coil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxman, E.W.; Dudarev, A.V.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.

    2002-01-01

    The B00 model coil has been successfully tested in the ATLAS Magnet Test Facility at CERN. The coil consists of two double pancakes wound with aluminum stabilized cables of the barrel- and end-cap toroids conductors for the ATLAS detector. The magnet current is applied up to 24 kA and quenches are

  13. Design and Fabrication of the KSTAR Poloidal Field Coil Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H. K.; Choi, C. H.; Sa, J. W.

    2005-01-01

    The KSTAR magnet system consists of 16 toroidal field(TF) coils. 4 pairs of central solenoid(CS) coils, and 3 pairs of outer poloidal field(PF) coils. The TF coils are encased in a structure to enhance mechanical stability. The CS coil structure is supported on top of the TF coil structure and supplies a vertical compression of 15 MN to prevent lateral movement due to a repulsive force between the CS coils. The PF coil system is vertically symmetry to the machine mid-plane and consists of 6 coils and 80 support structures(i.e, 16 for PF5, 32 for PF6 and 32 fort PF7). All PF coil structures should absorb the thermal contraction difference between TF coil structure and PF coils due to cool down and endure the vertical and radial magnetic forces due to current charging. In order to satisfy these structural requirements. the PF5 coil structure is designed base on hinges and both of PF6 and PF7 coil structures based on flexible plates. The PF coil structures are assembled on the TF coil structure with an individual basement that is welded on the TF coil structure

  14. Mechanical behavior of the ATLAS B0 model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Foussat, A; Acerbi, E; Alessandria, F; Berthier, R; Broggi, F; Daël, A; Dudarev, A; Mayri, C; Miele, P; Reytier, M; Rossi, L; Sorbi, M; Sun, Z; ten Kate, H H J; Vanenkov, I; Volpini, G

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS B0 model coil has been developed and constructed to verify the design parameters and the manufacture techniques of the Barrel Toroid coils (BT) that are under construction for the ATLAS Detector. Essential for successful operation is the mechanical behavior of the superconducting coil and its support structure. In the ATLAS magnet test facility, a magnetic mirror is used to reproduce in the model coil the electromagnetic forces of the BT coils when assembled in the final Barrel Toroid magnet system. The model coil is extensively equipped with mechanical instrumentation to monitor stresses and force levels as well as contraction during a cooling down and excitation up to nominal current. The installed set up of strain gauges, position sensors and capacitive force transducers is presented. Moreover the first mechanical results in terms of expected main stress, strain and deformation values are presented based on detailed mechanical analysis of the design. (7 refs).

  15. Calculation of modification to the toroidal magnetic field of the Tokamak Novillo. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melendez L, L.; Chavez A, E.; Colunga S, S.; Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Gaytan G, E.

    1992-03-01

    In a cylindrical magnetic topology. the confined plasma experiences 'classic' collisional transport phenomena. When bending the cylinder with the purpose of forming a toro, the magnetic field that before was uniform now it has a radial gradient which produces an unbalance in the magnetic pressure that is exercised on the plasma in the transverse section of the toro. This gives place to transport phenomena call 'neo-classicist'. In this work the structure of the toroidal magnetic field produced by toroidal coils of triangular form, to which are added even of coils of compensation with form of half moon is analyzed. With this type of coils it is looked for to minimize the radial gradient of the toroidal magnetic field. The values and characteristics of B (magnetic field) in perpendicular planes to the toro in different angular positions in the toroidal direction, looking for to cover all the cases of importance are exhibited. (Author)

  16. Heat characteristic analysis of a conduction cooling toroidal-type SMES magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.M.; Kim, A.R.; Kim, J.G.; Kim, D.W.; Park, M.; Yu, I.K.; Eom, B.Y.; Sim, K.; Kim, S.H.; Shon, M.H.; Kim, H.J.; Bae, H.J.; Seong, K.C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzed the heat characteristics of a conduction cooling toroidal-type SMES magnet. The authors designed and manufactured a conduction cooling toroidal-type SMES magnet which consists of 30 double pancake coils. One (a single pancake coil) of a double pancake coil is arranged at an angle of 6 o from each other. The shape of the toroidal-type SMES magnet was designed by a 3D CAD program. The heat invasion was investigated under no-load condition and the thermal characteristic of the toroidal-type SMES magnet was analyzed using the Finite Elements Method program. Both the analyzed and the experiment results are compared and discussed in detail.

  17. Commissioning Test of ATLAS End-Cap Toroidal Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; Foussat, A; Benoit, P; Jeckel, M; Olyunin, A; Kopeykin, N; Stepanov, V; Deront, L; Olesen, G; Ponts, X; Ravat, S; Sbrissa, K; Barth, J; Bremer, J; Delruelle, J; Metselaar, J; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O; Buskop, J; Baynham, D E; Carr, F S; Holtom, E

    2009-01-01

    The system of superconducting toroids in the ATLAS experiment at CERN consists of three magnets. The Barrel Toroid was assembled and successfully tested in 2006. Next, two End-Cap Toroids have been tested on surface at 77 K and installed in the cavern, 100-m underground. The End Cap Toroids are based on Al stabilized Nb-Ti/Cu Rutherford cables, arranged in double pancake coils and conduction cooled at 4.6 K. The nominal current is 20.5 kA at 4.1 T peak field in the windings and the stored energy is 250 MJ per toroid. Prior to final testing of the entire ATLAS Toroidal system, each End Cap Toroid passed a commissioning test up to 21 kA to guarantee a reliable performance in the final assembly. In this paper the test results are described. It includes the stages of test preparation, isolation vacuum pumping and leak testing, cooling down, step-by-step charging to full current, training quenches and quench recovery. By fast discharges the quench detection and protection system was checked to demonstrate a safe e...

  18. The IEA large coil task test results in IFSMTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubell, M.S.; Clinard, J.A.; Dresner, L.

    1987-01-01

    The Large Coil Task (LCT) is an international collaboration of the United States, EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland to develop large superconducting magnets for fusion reactors. The testing phase of LCT was completed on September 3, 1987. All six coils exceeded the design goals, both as single coils and in six-coil toroidal tests. In addition, a symmetric torus test was performed in which a maximum field of 9 T was reached in all coils simultaneously. These are by far the largest magnets (either in size, weight, or stored energy) ever to achieve such a field. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Tight aspect ratio tokamak power reactor with superconducting TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, S.; Tobita, K.; Konishi, S.; Ando, T.; Hiroki, S.; Kuroda, T.; Yamauchi, M.; Azumi, M.; Nagata, M.

    2003-01-01

    Tight aspect ratio tokamak power reactor with super-conducting toroidal field (TF) coils has been proposed. A center solenoid coil system and an inboard blanket were discarded. The key point was how to find the engineering design solution of the TF coil system with the high field and high current density. The coil system with the center post radius of less than 1 m can generate the maximum field of ∼ 20 T. This coil system causes a compact reactor concept, where the plasma major and minor radii of 3.75 m and 1.9 m, respectively and the fusion power of 1.8 GW. (author)

  20. Manufacturing of Nb3Sn Sample Conductor for CFETR Central Solenoid Model Coil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, Jing Gang; Wu, Yu; Xiang, Bing Lun; Dai, Chao; Mao, Zhe Hua; Jin, Huan; Liao, Guo Jun; Liu, Fang; Xue, Tianjun; Wei, Zhou Rong; Devred, Arnaud; Nijhuis, Arend; Zhou, Chao

    2017-01-01

    China fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR) is a new tokamak device, whose magnet system includes the toroidal field, central solenoid (CS), and poloidal field coils. In order to develop the manufacturing process for the full-size CS coil, the CS model coil (CSMC) project was launched first. The

  1. Design of the coolant system for the Large Coil Test Facility pulse coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridgman, C.; Ryan, T.L.

    1983-01-01

    The pulse coils will be a part of the Large Coil Test Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, which is designed to test six large tokamak-type superconducting coils. The pulse coil set consists of two resistive coaxial solenoid coils, mounted so that their magnetic axis is perpendicular to the toroidal field lines of the test coil. The pulse coils provide transient vertical fields at test coil locations to simulate the pulsed vertical fields present in tokamak devices. The pulse coils are designed to be pulsed for 30 s every 150 s, which results in a Joule heating of 116 kW per coil. In order to provide this capability, the pulse coil coolant system is required to deliver 6.3 L/s (100 gpm) of subcooled liquid nitrogen at 10-atm absolute pressure. The coolant system can also cool down each pulse coil from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature. This paper provides details of the pumping and heat exchange equipment designed for the coolant system and of the associated instrumentation and controls

  2. Measurement of toroidal plasma current in RF heated helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besshou, Sakae

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the measurement of toroidal plasma current by a semiflexible Rogowski coil in a helical vacuum chamber. A Rogowski coil measures the toroidal plasma current with a resolution of 0.1 kA, frequency range of up to 1 kHz and sensitivity of 6.5 x 10 -9 V · s/A. We measured the spontaneous toroidal plasma current (from -1.2 to +1.2 kA) under electron cyclotron resonance heating at 0.94 T toroidal field in the Heliotron-E device. We found that the measured direction of toroidal plasma current changes its sign as in the predicted behavior of a neoclassical diffusion-driven bootstrap current, depending on the horizontal position of the plasma column. We explain the observed plasma currents in terms of the compound phenomenon of an ohmic current and a neoclassical diffusion-driven current. The magnitude of the neoclassical current component is smaller than the value predicted by a collisionless neoclassical theory. (author)

  3. Startup of Large Coil Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; Fietz, W.A.; Luton, J.N.; May, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is being used to test superconducting toroidal field coils about one-third the size of those for INTOR. Eventually, six different coils from four countries will be tested. Operations began in 1983 with acceptance testing of the helium refrigerator/liquefier system. Comprehensive shakedown of the facility and tests with the first three coils (from Japan, the United States, and Switzerland) were successfully accomplished in the summer of 1984. Currents up to 10,200 A and fields up to 6.4 T were reached. Data were obtained on performance of refrigerator, helium distribution, power supplies, controls, and data acquisition systems and on the acoustic emission, voltages, currents, and mechanical strains during charging and discharging the coils

  4. Startup of Large Coil Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; Fietz, W.A.; Luton, J.N.; May, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is being used to test superconducting toroidal field coils about one-third the size of those for INTOR. Eventually, six different coils from four countries will be tested. Operations began in 1983 with acceptance testing of the helium refrigerator/liquefier system. Comprehensive shakedown of the facility and tests with the first three coils (from Japan, the United States, and Switzerland) were successfully accomplished in the summer of 1984. Currents up to 10,200 A and fields up to 6.4 T were reached. Data were obtained on performance of refrigerator, helium distribution, power supplies, controls, and data acquisition systems and on the acoustic emission, voltages, currents, and mechanical strains during charging and discharging the coils

  5. Gradient coil system for nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frese, G.; Siebold, H.

    1984-01-01

    A gradient coil system for an image-generating, nuclear magnetic resonance tomographic apparatus, particularly a zeugmatographic apparatus. The gradient coil system is arranged on a support body of rotational symmetry, illustratively a hollow cylindrical support body, having an axis which extends along the z-direction of an x, y, z coordinate system which has an origin in the center of imaging region. The gradient coil system contains two pairs of toroidal individual coils which are arranged symmetrically with respect to an x-y plane which extends through the center of the imaging region and which are arranged perpendicular to the z-axis. The direction of current flow in the individual coils of a coil pair is opposite to the direction of flow in the individual coils of the other coil pair. Moreover, further sets of coils are provided for generating field gradient Gx in the x-direction, and Gy in the y-direction. The hollow cylindrical shape of the support body on which the individual coils are arranged permit an imaging region having a substantially spherical volume with a substantially constant field gradient Gz to be achieved. Each of the coils has a predetermined linkage factor which corresponds to the product of the current flowing through the number of coil turns of the coil. Those coils which are arranged further from the plane of symmetry have a substantially larger linkage factor than the coils which are nearer to the plane of symmetry

  6. Hybrid equilibrium field coils for the ORNL TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J; Dory, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    In this study, we make a comparative study of the power supplies required by interior and exterior [to the toroidal field (TF) coils] equilibrium field coils that are separately appropriate for high-β, D-shaped plasmas in TNS. It is shown that the interior coils need power supplies that are an order of magnitude below those required by the exterior coils (while the latter case is much less difficult to build than the former). A hybrid EF coil concept is proposed that combines the interior and the exterior coils to retain their advantages in avoiding large interior coils while lowering the power supplied to the exterior coils by an order of magnitude

  7. Superconducting coil design for a tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Wang, S.T.; Smelser, P.

    1977-01-01

    Superconducting toroidal field (TF) and polodial-field (PF) coils have been designed for the proposed Argonne National Laboratory experimental power reactor (EPR). Features of the design include: (1) Peak field of 8 T at 4.2 K or 10 T at 3.0 K. (2) Constant-tension shape for the TF coils, corrected for the finite number (16) of coils. (3) Analysis of errors in coil alignment. (4) Comparison of safety aspects of series-connected and parallel-connected coils. (5) A 60 kA sheet conductor of NbTi with copper stabilizer and stainless steel for support. (6) Superconducting PF coils outside the TF coils. (7) The TF coils shielded from pulsed fields by high-purity aluminum

  8. Relativistic stars with purely toroidal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Kenta; Yoshida, Shijun

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the effects of the purely toroidal magnetic field on the equilibrium structures of the relativistic stars. The basic equations for obtaining equilibrium solutions of relativistic rotating stars containing purely toroidal magnetic fields are derived for the first time. To solve these basic equations numerically, we extend the Cook-Shapiro-Teukolsky scheme for calculating relativistic rotating stars containing no magnetic field to incorporate the effects of the purely toroidal magnetic fields. By using the numerical scheme, we then calculate a large number of the equilibrium configurations for a particular distribution of the magnetic field in order to explore the equilibrium properties. We also construct the equilibrium sequences of the constant baryon mass and/or the constant magnetic flux, which model the evolution of an isolated neutron star as it loses angular momentum via the gravitational waves. Important properties of the equilibrium configurations of the magnetized stars obtained in this study are summarized as follows: (1) For the nonrotating stars, the matter distribution of the stars is prolately distorted due to the toroidal magnetic fields. (2) For the rapidly rotating stars, the shape of the stellar surface becomes oblate because of the centrifugal force. But, the matter distribution deep inside the star is sufficiently prolate for the mean matter distribution of the star to be prolate. (3) The stronger toroidal magnetic fields lead to the mass shedding of the stars at the lower angular velocity. (4) For some equilibrium sequences of the constant baryon mass and magnetic flux, the stars can spin up as they lose angular momentum.

  9. Induction Motor with Switchable Number of Poles and Toroidal Winding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUNTEANU, A.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of an induction motor provided with toroidal stator winding. The ring-type coils offer a higher versatility in obtaining a different number of pole pairs by means of delta/star and series/parallel connections respectively. As consequence, the developed torque can vary within large limits and the motor can be utilized for applications that require, for example, high load torque values for a short time. The study involves experimental tests and FEM simulation for an induction machine with three configurations of pole pairs. The conclusions attest the superiority of the toroidal winding for certain applications such as electric vehicles or lifting machines.

  10. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  11. Investigations of toroidal wave numbers of the kink instabilities in a toroidal pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamajima, Takataro; Irisawa, Juichi; Tsukada, Tokuaki; Sugito, Osamu; Maruyama, Hideaki

    1979-01-01

    The axial toroidal wave numbers of the kink instability of toroidal pinch plasma were measured and investigated with a specially designed coil, and the results were compared with the MHD theory. The schematic figure and the particulars of the experimental apparatus are briefly illustrated in the first part. The method of generating theta-Z pinch plasma, the wave form of the magnetic flux density in Z-direction and the plasma current are also explained. The 360 deg stereoscopic framing photographs were taken with an image converter camera at the intervals of 0.5 μs after the initiation of the main electric discharge in Z-circuit. From these photographs, the growth of the kink instability was observed. The measured magnetic field distribution at t = 2 μs is presented. In the second part, the radial displacement of plasma and toroidal wave number were measured from the above framing photographs. Then the spectra of plasma displacement were analyzed by the Fourier analysis. The measured results of toroidal wave number was analyzed by both the skin current model and the diffuse current model. Many new results obtained from the present study were mainly derived from the observation of the framing photographs, and they are summarized in the final part of this paper. (Aoki, K.)

  12. Toroidal Extrap Equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, J.

    1982-04-01

    Ideal MHD-equilibria for the toroidal EXTRAP configuration have been computed with an equilibrium code. The free-boundary prob- lem is solved by using the condition that the current density is proportional to r on a flux surface. It is found that the toroidal Z-pinch, initially induced in the central zero-field region of a transverse octupole field, drifts radially outwards producing an inverse -D shaped cross-section. The plasma current of this high- beta equilibrium may be increased if the plasma is pushed back by altering the external confining magnetic field as demonstrated. (Author)

  13. COMPASS magnetic field coils and structure systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossland, R.T.; Booth, J.A.; Hayward, R.J.; Keogh, P.; Pratt, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    COMPASS is a new experimental toroidal assembly of compact design and with a wide range of physics objectives. It is required to operate either as a Tokamak or as a Reversed Field Pinch with interchangeable circular and dee-section vacuum vessels. The Toroidal field is produced by 16 rectangular coils of 4 turns with tapered conductors on the inside which nest together to form a vault to resist the centering forces. The coils are designed to produce a maximum field on axis of 2.1T which requires a current of 91 kA per turn. Two central solenoids and five pairs of coils symmetrically positioned above and below the machine equator provide the poloidal field. Both coil systems are supported form a mechanical support structure which surrounds the machine. This is primarily designed to resist out-of-plane forces on the TF coils but also acts as the base support for the PF coils and vacuum vessels. An illustration of the COMPASS Load Assembly is given and shows the D-shaped vacuum vessel, the major components and the various field windings

  14. Analytical solution of the toroidal constant tension solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gralnick, S.L.; Tenney, F.H.

    1975-01-01

    The coil shape is determined by requiring that the curvature of the flexible conductor be proportional to the distance from the toroidal axis. The resulting second order differential equation for the coil coordinates can be integrated once but for the second and final integration no closed form has been found and the integration has been done numerically. This solution of this differential equation is analytical in terms of an absolutely and uniformly convergent infinite series. The series converges quite rapidly and in practice ignoring all but the first five terms of the series introduces an error of less than 2 percent

  15. A method for external measurement of toroidal equilibrium parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunsell, P.; Hellblom, G.; Brynolf, J.

    1992-01-01

    A method has been developed for determining from external magnetic field measurements the horizontal shift, the vertical shift and the poloidal field asymmetry parameter (Λ) of a toroidal plasma in force equilibrium. The magnetic measurements consist of two toroidal differential flux loops, giving the average vertical magnetic field and the average radial magnetic field respectively, together with cosine-coils for obtaining the m=1 cosine harmonic of the external poloidal magnetic field component. The method is used to analyse the evolution of the toroidal equilibrium during reversed-field pinch discharges in the Extrap T1-U device. We find that good equilibrium control is needed for long plasma pulses. For non-optimized externally applied vertical fields, the diagnostic clearly shows a horizontal drift motion of the pinch resulting in earlier discharge termination. (au)

  16. Amplifier Distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeports, David

    2006-12-01

    By definition, a high fidelity amplifier's instantaneous output voltage is directly proportional to its instantaneous input voltage. While high fidelity is generally valued in the amplification of recorded music, nonlinearity, also known as distortion, is desirable in the amplification of some musical instruments. In particular, guitar amplifiers exploit nonlinearity to increase both the harmonic content and sustain of a guitar's sound. I will discuss how both modifications in sound result from saturation of triode tubes and transistors. Additionally, I will describe the difference in the symmetry of saturation curves for transistors and tubes and the reason why tube guitar amplifiers are generally considered to be superior to solid-state amplifiers. Finally, I will discuss attempts to use solid-state electronics to replicate the sound of tube amplifiers.

  17. Closed expressions for the magnetic field of toroidal multipole configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, G.V.

    1983-04-01

    Closed analytic expressions for the vector potential and the magnetic field for the lower order toroidal multipoles are presented. These expressions can be applied in the study of tokamak plasma cross section shaping. An example of such an application is included. These expressions also allow the vacuum fields required for plasma equilibrium to be specified in a general form independent of a particular coil configuration

  18. Barrel Toroid fully charged to nominal field, and it works!

    CERN Multimedia

    Herman ten Kate

    After a few weeks of testing up to intermediate currents, finally, on Thursday evening November 9, the current in the Barrel Toroid was pushed up to its nominal value of 20500 A and even 500 A beyond this value to prove that we have some margin. It went surprisingly well. Of course, the 8 coils forming the toroid were already tested individually at the surface but still, some surprise may have come from those parts added to the toroid in the cavern for the first time like the 8 cryoring sections linking the coils as well as the valve box at the bottom in sector 13 regulating the helium flow or the current lead cryostat on the top in sector 5. No training quenches, nothing to worry about, and the test was concluded with a fast dump triggered at 00:40 in the very early morning of November 10. (left) The toroid current during the evening and night of November 9. (right) The test crew oscillated between fear and hope while looking at the control panels as the current approached 21kA. Big relief was in the...

  19. ATLAS End Cap Toroid Magnets cold mass design and manufacturing status

    CERN Document Server

    Baynham, D Elwyn; Carr, F S; Densham, C J; Holtom, E; Morrow, D; Towndrow, E F; Luijckx, G; Geerinck, J

    2004-01-01

    The End Cap Toroid Magnets for the ATLAS experiment at LHC, CERN will contain eight racetrack coils mounted as a single cold mass in a cryostat vessel of approximately 10 m diameter. This paper presents the engineering design of the cold mass and gives the status of the industrial production. The cold mass mechanical structure consisting of 8 coils and keystone boxes is described. Coil fabrication from component assembly, coil winding to final impregnation will be reviewed. The design and industrial manufacture of the keystone box elements is given. The cold mass assembly methods and status are described. 3 Refs.

  20. Heating in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoepfel, H.; Mazzitelli, G.

    1984-01-01

    The article is a rather detailed report on the highlights in the area of the ''Heating in toroidal plasmas'', as derived from the presentations and discussions at the international symposium with the same name, held in Rome, March 1984. The symposium covered both the physics (experiments and theory) and technology of toroidal fusion plasma heating. Both large fusion devices (either already in operation or near completion) requiring auxiliary heating systems at the level of tens of megawatts, as well as physics of their heating processes and their induced side effects (as studied on smaller devices), received attention. Substantial progress was reported on the broad front of auxiliary plasma heating and Ohmic heating. The presentation of the main conclusions of the symposium is divided under the following topics: neutral-beam heating, Alfven wave heating, ion cyclotron heating, lower hybrid heating, RF current drive, electron cyclotron heating, Ohmic heating and special contributions

  1. Heating in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canobbio, E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reports on the 2nd Joint Grenoble-Varenna International Symposium on Heating in Toroidal Plasmas, held at Como, Italy, from the 3-12 September 1980. Important problems in relation to the different existing processes of heating. The plasma were identified and discussed. Among others, the main processes discussed were: a) neutral beam heating, b) ion-(electron)-cyclotron resonance heating, c) hybrid resonance and low frequency heating

  2. Structure design of the Westinghouse superconducting magnet for the Large Coil Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domeisen, F.N.; Hackworth, D.T.; Stuebinger, L.R.

    1978-01-01

    In the on-going development of superconducting toroidal field coils for tokamak reactors, the Large Coil Program (LCP) managed by Union Carbide Corporation will include the design, fabrication, and testing of large superconducting coils to determine their feasibility for use in the magnetic fusion energy effort. Structural analysis of the large coil is essential to ensure adequate safety in the test coil design and confidence in the scalability of the design. This paper will discuss the action of tensile and shear loads on the various materials used in the coil. These loads are of magnetic and thermal origin

  3. A simple toroidal shell model for the study of feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes in a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhang, Hogun

    2008-01-01

    A study is conducted on the feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes (RWMs) in a tokamak plasma using a toroidal shell model. An analytically tractable form of the RWM dispersion relation is derived in the presence of a set of discrete feedback coil currents. A parametric study is carried out to optimize the feedback system configuration. It is shown that the total toroidal angle of a resistive wall spanned by the feedback coils and the poloidal angular extent of a feedback coil are crucial parameters to determine the efficacy of the feedback system

  4. Design description of the vacuum vessel for the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipley, K.K.; Nelson, B.E.; Vinyard, L.M.; Williamson, D.F.

    1983-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) will be a stellarator experiment to investigate improvements in toroidal confinement. The vacuum vessel for this facility will provide the appropriate evacuated region for plasma containment within the helical field (HF) coils. The vessel is designed to provide the maximum reasonable volume inside the HF coils and to provide the maximum reasonable access for future diagnostics. The vacuum vessel design is at an early phase and all of the details have not been completed. The heat transfer analysis and stress analysis completed during the conceptual design indicate that the vessel will not change drastically

  5. Generation of stable mixed-compact-toroid rings by inducing plasma currents in strong E rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, R.; Taggart, D.P.; Parker, M.R.; Fleischmann, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    In the RECE-Christa device, hybrid-type compact toroid rings are generated by inducing large toroidal plasma currents I rho in strong electron rings using a thin induction coil positioned along the ring axis. Starting from field-reversal values δ ο = 50 - 120 percent of the original pure fast-electron ring, the induced plasma current I rho raises δ to a maximum value of up to 240 percent with I rho contributing more than 50 percent of the total ring current. Quite interestingly, the generated hybrid compact toroid configurations appear gross-stable during the full I rho pulse length (half-amplitude width about 100 μs)

  6. Productive international collaboration in the large coil task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Komarek, P.; Shimamoto, S.; Vecsey, G.

    1987-01-01

    The Large Coil Task (LCT), initiated in 1977, has been very productive of useful technical information about superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil design and manufacture. Moreover, it has demonstrated close international collaboration in fusion technology development, including integration of large components built in four different countries. Each of six 40-t test coils was designed and produced by a major industrial team, with government laboratory guidance, to a common set of specifications. The six were assembled into a toroidal array for testing in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge. Testing was done by a team of representatives of EURATOM, Japan, Switzerland, and the United States, with each participant having full access to all data. Coils were thoroughly instrumented, enabling penetrating analysis of behavior

  7. Toroidal Plasma Thruster for Interplanetary and Interstellar Space Flights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Zakharov, L.E.; Gorelenkova, M.V.

    2001-01-01

    This work involves a conceptual assessment for using the toroidal fusion reactor for deep space interplanetary and interstellar missions. Toroidal thermonuclear fusion reactors, such as tokamaks and stellarators, are unique for space propulsion, allowing for a design with the magnetic configuration localized inside toroidal magnetic field coils. Plasma energetic ions, including charged fusion products, can escape such a closed configuration at certain conditions, a result of the vertical drift in toroidal rippled magnetic field. Escaping particles can be used for direct propulsion (since toroidal drift is directed one way vertically) or to create and heat externally confined plasma, so that the latter can be used for propulsion. Deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons with an energy of 14.1 MeV also can be used for direct propulsion. A special design allows neutrons to escape the shield and the blanket of the tokamak. This provides a direct (partial) conversion of the fusion energy into the directed motion of the propellant. In contrast to other fusion concepts proposed for space propulsion, this concept utilizes the natural drift motion of charged particles out of the closed magnetic field configuration

  8. Elastic stability and vibration of toroidal magnets for fusion reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, F.C.; Swanson, C.

    1975-09-01

    The vibration and elastic stability of a set of discrete superconducting toroidal field magnets arranged to form a ''bumpy'' torus is examined. The mutual destabilizing magnetic forces between magnet pairs are calculated using a numerical differential inductance technique. It is shown that the mutual attractive magnetic forces can produce elastic buckling of the entire toroidal set. The vibration modes of the set are also found as functions of the coil current. The response of the set of magnets to an earthquake type motion of the toroidal base is calculated. The calculations have been incorporated in a computer code which accompanies the report. Measurements are made of the lateral stiffness of a flexible, planar, superconducting coil between two rigid coils in series. These tests show a dramatic decrease in the natural bending frequency with subsequent elastic instability or ''buckling'' at a critical value of the current in the coils. These observations support a magnetoelastic analysis which shows that proposed designs, of toroidal field coils for Tokamak fusion reactors, have insufficient lateral support for mechanical stability of the magnets

  9. Strength-limited magnetic field intensity of toroidal magnet systems fabricated or the base of layer-by-layer shrouded solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinnko, Yu.A.

    1982-01-01

    The possibilities, as to the ultimate magnetic field strength, of tokamak magnet systems made on the base of layer-by-laeyer shrouded coils are considered numerically. The toroidal magnet system is considered which consists of N skewe, layer-by-layer shrouded, equistrong coils in the ideal torus approximation. The dependences of the ragnetic field strength on the internal- and external torus radii, pulse duration and aspect ratio for copper coils shrouded with fiberglass are calculated as an example. The analysis of the obtained results shows that using of the layer-by-layer shrouding scheme for toroidal solenoid coils leads to a considerable growth of the ultimate magnetic field strengths in a wide duration range. For example, the limiting field strength along the toroidal solenoid axis of the considered type inside the ''FT'' installation toroidal solenoid at equivalent field pulse duration of approximately 0.3 s reaches H 0 =1.3zx10 7 A/m

  10. OCLATOR II (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1980-03-01

    Following the general description of OCLATOR (I), more thoughts are presented here. It suggests that the blanket may not be changed for the plant lifetime. Also miniaturization of OCLATOR is discussed, especially if the ripple turbulence could be improved upon the presently set limit which applies to a large number of ripples

  11. Toroidal rotation studies in KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. G.; Lee, H. H.; Yoo, J. W.; Kim, Y. S.; Ko, W. H.; Terzolo, L.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.; KSTAR Team

    2014-10-01

    Investigation of the toroidal rotation is one of the most important topics for the magnetically confined fusion plasma researches since it is essential for the stabilization of resistive wall modes and its shear plays an important role to improve plasma confinement by suppressing turbulent transport. The most advantage of KSTAR tokamak for toroidal rotation studies is that it equips two main diagnostics including the high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) and charge exchange spectroscopy (CES). Simultaneous core toroidal rotation and ion temperature measurements of different impurity species from the XICS and CES have shown in reasonable agreement with various plasma discharges in KSTAR. It has been observed that the toroidal rotation in KSTAR is faster than that of other tokamak devices with similar machine size and momentum input. This may due to an intrinsically low toroidal field ripple and error field of the KSTAR device. A strong braking of the toroidal rotation by the n = 1 non-resonant magnetic perturbations (NRMPs) also indicates these low toroidal field ripple and error field. Recently, it has been found that n = 2 NRMPs can also damp the toroidal rotation in KSTAR. The detail toroidal rotation studies will be presented. Work supported by the Korea Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning under the KSTAR project.

  12. Neoclassical transport in toroidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wobig, H.

    1992-01-01

    The neoclassical theory of general toroidal equilibria is reformulated. The toroidal equilibrium of tokamaks and stellarators are described in Hamada coordinates. The relevant geometrical parameters are identified and it is shown how the reduction of Pfirsch-Schluter currents affects neoclassical transport and bootstrap effects. General flux-friction relations between thermodynamic forces and fluxes are derived. In drift-kinetic approximation the neoclassical transport coefficients are Onsager symmetric. Since a toroidal loop voltage is included, the theory is valid for all toroidal systems. (Author)

  13. New method to design stellarator coils without the winding surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Caoxiang; Hudson, Stuart R.; Song, Yuntao; Wan, Yuanxi

    2018-01-01

    Finding an easy-to-build coils set has been a critical issue for stellarator design for decades. Conventional approaches assume a toroidal ‘winding’ surface, but a poorly chosen winding surface can unnecessarily constrain the coil optimization algorithm, This article presents a new method to design coils for stellarators. Each discrete coil is represented as an arbitrary, closed, one-dimensional curve embedded in three-dimensional space. A target function to be minimized that includes both physical requirements and engineering constraints is constructed. The derivatives of the target function with respect to the parameters describing the coil geometries and currents are calculated analytically. A numerical code, named flexible optimized coils using space curves (FOCUS), has been developed. Applications to a simple stellarator configuration, W7-X and LHD vacuum fields are presented.

  14. Parametric design studies of toroidal magnetic energy storage units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, J. Stephen

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) units have a number of advantages as storage devices. Electrical current is the input, output and stored medium, allowing for completely solid-state energy conversion. The magnets themselves have no moving parts. The round trip efficiency is higher than those for batteries, compressed air or pumped hydro. Output power can be very high, allowing complete discharge of the unit within a few seconds. Finally, the unit can be designed for a very large number of cycles, limited basically by fatigue in the structural components. A small systems code was written to produce and evaluate self-consistent designs for toroidal superconducting energy storage units. The units can use either low temperature or high temperature superconductors. The coils have D shape where the conductor and its stabilizer/structure is loaded only in tension and the centering forces are borne by a bucking cylinder. The coils are convectively cooled from a cryogenic reservoir in the bore of the coils. The coils are suspended in a cylindrical metal shell which protects the magnet during rail, automotive or shipboard use. It is important to note that the storage unit does not rely on its surroundings for structural support, other than normal gravity and inertial loads. Designs are presented for toroidal energy storage units produced by the systems code. A wide range of several parameters have been considered, resulting in units storing from 1 MJ to 72 GJ. Maximum fields range from 5 T to 20 T. The masses and volumes of the coils, bucking cylinder, coolant, insulation and outer shell are calculated. For unattended use, the allowable operating time using only the boiloff of the cryogenic fluid for refrigeration is calculated. For larger units, the coils were divided into modules suitable for normal truck or rail transport.

  15. Parametric design studies of toroidal magnetic energy storage units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herring, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) units have a number of advantages as storage devices. Electrical current is the input, output and stored medium, allowing for completely solid-state energy conversion. The magnets themselves have no moving parts. The round-trip efficiency is higher than those for batteries, compressed air or pumped hydro. Output power can be very high, allowing complete discharge of the unit within a few seconds. Finally, the unit can be designed for a very large number of cycles, limited basically by fatigue in the structural components. A small systems code has been written to produce and evaluate self-consistent designs for toroidal superconducting energy storage units. The units can use either low temperature or high temperature superconductors. The coils have 'D' shape where the conductor and its stabilizer/structure is loaded only in tension and the centering forces are borne by a bucking cylinder. The coils are convectively cooled from a cryogenic reservoir in the bore of the coils. The coils are suspended in a cylindrical metal shell which protects the magnet during rail, automotive or shipboard use. It is important to note that the storage unit does not rely on its surroundings for structural support, other than normal gravity and inertial loads. This paper presents designs for toroidal energy storage units produced by the systems code. A wide range of several parameters have been considered, resulting in units storing from 1 MJ to 72 GJ. Maximum fields range from 5 t to 20 T. The masses and volumes of the coils, bucking cylinder, coolant, insulation and outer shell are calculated. For unattended use, the allowable operating time using only the boiloff of the cryogenic fluid for refrigeration is calculated. For larger units, the coils have been divided into modules suitable for normal truck or rail transport. 8 refs., 5 tabs

  16. Design study of toroidal magnets for tokamak experimental power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stekly, Z.J.J.; Lucas, E.J.

    1976-12-01

    This report contains the results of a six-month study of superconducting toroidal field coils for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to be built in the late 1980s. The designs are for 8 T and 12 T maximum magnetic field at the superconducting winding. At each field level two main concepts were generated; one in which each of the 16 coils comprising the system has an individual vacuum vessel and the other in which all the coils are contained in a single vacuum vessel. The coils have a D shape and have openings of 11.25 m x 7.5 m for the 8 T coils and 10.2 m x 6.8 m for the 12 T coils. All the designs utilize rectangular cabled conductor made from copper stabilized Niobium Titanium composite which operates at 4.2 K for the 8 T design and at 2.5 K for the 12 T design. Manufacturing procedures, processes and schedule estimates are also discussed

  17. Quantum mechanics of toroidal anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, G.N.

    1990-01-01

    We consider a toroidal solenoid with an electric charge attached to it. It turns out that statistical properties of the wave function describing interacting toroidal anions depend on both their relative position and orientation. The influence of the particular gauge choice on the exchange properties of the wave function is studied. 30 refs.; 6 figs

  18. TEXT poloidal coil systems power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchins, S.H.; Brower, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    TEXT is a convertional iron core tokamak which will have a toroidal field of 3.0 Tesla produced by room temperature copper coils and a maximum plasma current pulse of 400 kA induced by a 40 turn Ohmic Heating coil. The major radius is 100 cm and the minor radius of the plasma is 28 cm. The machine is intended for basic research in tokamak plasma physics and atomic physics and is designed primarily to provide a stable hot plasma, extremely good diagnostic access, and reliable operation. The discharge pulse length will be 300 msec and the repetition period 120 seconds. Power for the toroidal field coils and for the ohmic heating supply is provided by a 100 MVA energy storage alternator. The vertical field, horizontal field, fast positioning, and discharge cleaning power supply systems are powered from the Tokamak Laboratory power mains. The ohmic heating power system consists of an SCR controlled premagnetizing supply and commutation circuit, the main ohmic heating capacitor bank to provide plasma breakdown and current rise, and an SCR controlled power supply which sustains plasma current during the 300 ms pulse. The vertical field power system uses a small capacitor bank and an SCR controlled supply. The horizontal field has a reversible SCR controlled supply, and the fast positioning coils are powered by bipolar output transistor controlled supplies. This paper describes the loads, required wave forms, and the specifications for these power supply systems

  19. Tolerance Evaluation of Poloidal Shear Keys for ITER TF Coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Youkun; Neil, M.; Cees Jong

    2006-01-01

    There are 18 ITER Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. Unlike the other ITER coils, these coils are structurally linked. These links consist of friction between the coil legs in the central vault formed by the inner straight legs of the coils, four outer inter-coil structures (OIS) and one inner inter-coil structure (IIS). The OIS consists essentially of bands around all 18 coils to provide shear support by forming shear panels with the coil case, and the IIS consists of poloidal circular keys placed directly between the coil cases. Global analysis of the 'perfect' coil shape has shown high stresses in the IIS, in the poloidal keyways. Optimization has successfully reduced these stresses to acceptable values as regards the expected fatigue resistance. However it is necessary to confirm that the stresses are still acceptable when realistic values of geometry variations are included (i.e. the effect of coil and case tolerances). Because of the extensive mechanical links between coils the poloidal key stresses can also be affected by tolerances elsewhere in the case. As the first step in assessment of the possible variations in stresses, a substructure technique is being used to develop a local model of the key region. The result of geometry variations between individual coils is a loss in the 18 fold symmetry used to simplify previous analyses. With the new and optimized model it should be possible to relax the 18-fold symmetry, but a full analysis of all 18 coils is still not possible. Systematic ways of representing the tolerance variation in the finite element model have been developed so that parametric studies can be undertaken without a full reconstruction of the model. (author)

  20. Dual levitated coils for antihydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, J. D.; Ordonez, C. A.

    2013-04-01

    Two coaxial superconducting magnetic coils that carry currents in the same direction and that are simultaneously levitated may serve for antihydrogen plasma confinement. The configuration may be suitable for use by a collaboration at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator facility to test fundamental symmetries between the properties of hydrogen and antihydrogen. Nested Penning traps are currently used to confine recombining antihydrogen plasma. Symmetry studies require the production of sufficiently cold antihydrogen. However, plasma drifts within nested Penning traps can increase the kinetic energy of antiprotons that form antihydrogen atoms. Dual levitated coils may serve to confine relatively large, cold, dense non-drifting recombining antihydrogen plasmas. A minimum-B magnetic field that is produced by the coils could provide for atom trapping. A toroidal plasma is confined between the coils. High density plasmas may be possible, by allowing plasma pressure to balance mechanical pressure to keep the coils apart. Progress is reported on theoretical and experimental efforts. The theoretical effort includes the development of a classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulation of confinement. The experimental effort includes levitation of a NdFeB permanent ring magnet, which produces a magnetic field that is qualitatively similar to the field that would be produced by the two coaxial superconducting magnetic coils. Liquid-nitrogen-cooled Bi-2223 high-temperature-superconducting components, with a critical temperature of 108 K, were used to levitate the ring magnet. An issue concerning keeping the plane of the levitated ring horizontal is discussed.

  1. TFTR Mirnov coil analysis at plasma start-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harley, T.R.; Buchenauer, D.A.; Coonrod, J.; McGuire, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    The methods for finding poloidal and toroidal numbers of MHD oscillations from Mirnov coils are reviewed and modified. Examples of various MHD phenomena occurring during start-up on TFTR are illustrated. It is found that the MHD mode structure best fits a model with the toroidal correction included. A new algorithm which finds m,n numbers can accommodate toroidal effects which are manifested in the phase data. The algorithm can find m,n numbers with a given toroidal correction parameter lambda', (lambda' = 0 → cylindrical). This algorithm is also used to find the optimal value of lambda' automatically, eliminating the need for ''guesswork.'' The algorithm finds the best parameters to the fit much faster than more conventional computational techniques. 9 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs

  2. The Superconducting Toroid for the New International AXion Observatory (IAXO)

    CERN Document Server

    Shilon, I.; Silva, H.; Wagner, U.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    IAXO, the new International AXion Observatory, will feature the most ambitious detector for solar axions to date. Axions are hypothetical particles which were postulated to solve one of the puzzles arising in the standard model of particle physics, namely the strong CP (Charge conjugation and Parity) problem. This detector aims at achieving a sensitivity to the coupling between axions and photons of one order of magnitude beyond the limits of the current detector, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). The IAXO detector relies on a high-magnetic field distributed over a very large volume to convert solar axions to detectable X-ray photons. Inspired by the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroids, a large superconducting toroid is being designed. The toroid comprises eight, one meter wide and twenty one meters long racetrack coils. The assembled toroid is sized 5.2 m in diameter and 25 m in length and its mass is about 250 tons. The useful field in the bores is 2.5 T while the peak magnetic field in the windings is 5....

  3. Progress in the construction of the B0 model of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Acerbi, E; Ambrosio, G; Baccaglioni, G; Broggi, F; Rossi, L; Sorbi, M; Volpini, G

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS Barrel Toroid air-core magnet (BT) will be composed by 8 superconducting coils, each one 25 m long and 5 m wide. In order to validate the technologies and manufacturing processes, a smaller model (9 m long) of one BT coil, named B0, is now under construction. This paper presents a general overview of the B0 project status, with special regard to the components for which the LASA Lab. is responsible: (a) the aluminium-clad NbTi conductor; (b) the double coils winding and impregnation; (c) the components of the cryostat (vacuum chamber, thermal shield and suspension rod). (6 refs).

  4. Conceptual Design of Alborz Tokamak Poloidal Coils System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardani, M.; Amrollahi, R.

    2013-04-01

    The Alborz tokamak is a D-shape cross section tokamak that is under construction in Amirkabir University of Technology. One of the most important parts of tokamak design is the design of the poloidal field system. This part includes the numbers, individual position, currents and number of coil turns of the magnetic field coils. Circular cross section tokamaks have Vertical Field system but since the elongation and triangularity of plasma cross section shaping are important in improving the plasma performance and stability, the poloidal field coils are designed to have a shaped plasma configuration. In this paper the design of vertical field system and the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium of axisymmetric plasma, as given by the Grad-Shafranov equation will be discussed. The poloidal field coils system consists of 12 circular coils located symmetrically about the equator plane, six inner PF coils and six outer PF coils. Six outer poloidal field coils (PF) are located outside of the toroidal field coils (TF), and six inner poloidal field coils are wound on the inner legs and are located outside of a vacuum vessel.

  5. Pareto optimal design of sectored toroidal superconducting magnet for SMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhunia, Uttam, E-mail: ubhunia@vecc.gov.in; Saha, Subimal; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The optimization approach minimizes both the magnet size and necessary cable length of a sectored toroidal SMES unit. • Design approach is suitable for low temperature superconducting cable suitable for medium size SMES unit. • It investigates coil parameters with respect to practical engineering aspects. - Abstract: A novel multi-objective optimization design approach for sectored toroidal superconducting magnetic energy storage coil has been developed considering the practical engineering constraints. The objectives include the minimization of necessary superconductor length and torus overall size or volume, which determines a significant part of cost towards realization of SMES. The best trade-off between the necessary conductor length for winding and magnet overall size is achieved in the Pareto-optimal solutions, the compact magnet size leads to increase in required superconducting cable length or vice versa The final choice among Pareto optimal configurations can be done in relation to other issues such as AC loss during transient operation, stray magnetic field at outside the coil assembly, and available discharge period, which is not considered in the optimization process. The proposed design approach is adapted for a 4.5 MJ/1 MW SMES system using low temperature niobium–titanium based Rutherford type cable. Furthermore, the validity of the representative Pareto solutions is confirmed by finite-element analysis (FEA) with a reasonably acceptable accuracy.

  6. Pareto optimal design of sectored toroidal superconducting magnet for SMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhunia, Uttam; Saha, Subimal; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The optimization approach minimizes both the magnet size and necessary cable length of a sectored toroidal SMES unit. • Design approach is suitable for low temperature superconducting cable suitable for medium size SMES unit. • It investigates coil parameters with respect to practical engineering aspects. - Abstract: A novel multi-objective optimization design approach for sectored toroidal superconducting magnetic energy storage coil has been developed considering the practical engineering constraints. The objectives include the minimization of necessary superconductor length and torus overall size or volume, which determines a significant part of cost towards realization of SMES. The best trade-off between the necessary conductor length for winding and magnet overall size is achieved in the Pareto-optimal solutions, the compact magnet size leads to increase in required superconducting cable length or vice versa The final choice among Pareto optimal configurations can be done in relation to other issues such as AC loss during transient operation, stray magnetic field at outside the coil assembly, and available discharge period, which is not considered in the optimization process. The proposed design approach is adapted for a 4.5 MJ/1 MW SMES system using low temperature niobium–titanium based Rutherford type cable. Furthermore, the validity of the representative Pareto solutions is confirmed by finite-element analysis (FEA) with a reasonably acceptable accuracy

  7. Cryogenic Characteristics of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid Superconducting Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Pengo, R; Delruelle, N; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Passardi, Giorgio; Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS, one of the experiments of the LHC accelerator under commissioning at CERN, is equipped with a large superconducting magnet the Barrel Toroid (BT) that has been tested at nominal current (20500 A). The BT is composed of eight race-track superconducting coils (each one weights about 45 tons) forming the biggest air core toroidal magnet ever built. By means of a large throughput centrifugal pump, a forced flow (about 10 liter/second at 4.5 K) provides the indirect cooling of the coils in parallel. The paper describes the results of the measurements carried out on the complete cryogenic system assembled in the ATLAS cavern situated 100 m below the ground level. The measurements include, among other ones, the static heat loads, i.e., with no or constant current in the magnet, and the dynamic ones, since additional heat losses are produced, during the current ramp-up or slow dump, by eddy currents induced on the coil casing.

  8. Engineering status of the superconducting end cap toroid magnets for the ATLAS experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Baynham, D Elwyn; Carr, F S; Courthold, M J D; Cragg, D A; Densham, C J; Evans, D; Holtom, E; Rochford, J; Sole, D; Towndrow, Edwin F; Warner, G P

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at LHC, CERN will utilise a large, superconducting, air-cored toroid magnet system for precision muon measurements. The magnet system will consist of a long barrel and two end-cap toroids. Each end-cap toroid will contain eight racetrack coils mounted as a single cold mass in cryostat vessel of ~10 m diameter. The project has now moved from the design/specification stage into the fabrication phase. This paper presents the engineering status of the cold masses and vacuum vessels that are under fabrication in industry. Final designs of cold mass supports, cryogenic systems and control/protection systems are presented. Planning for toroid integration, test and installation is described. (3 refs).

  9. Eddy current calculations for the Tore Supra toroidal field magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, J.

    1983-01-01

    An outline is given of the calculation of the eddy currents in the magnetic structures of a Tokamak, which can be assimilated to thin conductors, so that the three-dimensional problem can be reduced mathematically to a two-dimensional one, the variables being two orthogonal coordinates of the considered surface. A finite element method has been used in order to treat the complicated geometry of the set of the 18 toroidal field coil casings and mechanical structures of Tore Supra. This eddy current code has been coupled with an axisymmetric equilibrium code in order to simulate typical phases of a Tokamak discharge (plasma current rise, additional heating, disruption, cleaning discharge) and the losses in the toroidal field magnet have thus been calculated. (author)

  10. Thermal and hydraulic analyses of TFTR cooling water system and magnetic field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.Y.

    1975-10-01

    The TFTR toroidal field coils, ohmic heating, hybrid and equilibrium field coils are cooled by water from the machine area cooling water system. The system has the following major equipment and capacities: flow rate of 3600 gpm; ballast tank volume of 5500 gal; pumps of 70.4 m head; chiller refrigeration rating of 3300 tons and connecting pipe of 45.7 cm I.D. The performance of the closed loop system was analyzed and found to be adequate for the thermal loads. The field coils were analyzed with detailed thermal and hydraulic models, including a simulation of the complete water cooling loop. Under the nominal operating mode of one second of toroidal field flat top time and 300 seconds of pulse cycle time, the maximum temperature for the TF coils is 53 0 C; for the OH coils 46 0 C and for the EF coils 39 0 C, which are well below the coil design limit of 120 0 C. The maximum TF coil coolant temperature is 33 0 C which is below the coolant design limit of 100 0 C. The overall pressure loss of the system is below 6.89 x 10 5 Pa (100 psi). With the given chiller refrigeration capacity, the TF coils can be operated to yield up to 4 seconds of flat top time. The TF coils can be operated on a steady state basis at up to 20% of the pulsed duty design current rating of 7.32 kA/coil

  11. Grinding Inside A Toroidal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Walter; Adams, James F.; Burley, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    Weld lines ground smooth within about 0.001 in. Grinding tool for smoothing longitudinal weld lines inside toroidal cavity includes curved tunnel jig to guide grinding "mouse" along weld line. Curvature of tunnel jig matched to shape of toroid so grinding ball in mouse follows circular arc of correct radius as mouse is pushed along tunnel. Tool enables precise control of grindout shape, yet easy to use.

  12. Equivelar toroids with few flag-orbits

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, José; Montero, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    An $(n+1)$-toroid is a quotient of a tessellation of the $n$-dimensional Euclidean space with a lattice group. Toroids are generalizations of maps in the torus on higher dimensions and also provide examples of abstract polytopes. Equivelar toroids are those that are induced by regular tessellations. In this paper we present a classification of equivelar $(n+1)$-toroids with at most $n$ flag-orbits; in particular, we discuss a classification of $2$-orbit toroids of arbitrary dimension.

  13. Tunable plasmonic toroidal terahertz metamodulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerislioglu, Burak; Ahmadivand, Arash; Pala, Nezih

    2018-04-01

    Optical modulators are essential and strategic parts of micro- and nanophotonic circuits to encode electro-optical signals in the optical domain. Here, by using arrays of multipixel toroidal plasmonic terahertz (THz) metamolecules, we developed a functional plasmonic metamodulator with high efficiency and tunability. Technically, the dynamic toroidal dipole induces nonradiating charge-current arrangements leading to have an exquisite role in defining the inherent spectral features of various materials. By categorizing in a different family of multipoles far from the traditional electromagnetic multipoles, the toroidal dipole corresponds to poloidal currents flowing on the surface of a closed-loop torus. Utilizing the sensitivity of the optically driven toroidal momentum to the incident THz beam power and by employing both numerical tools and experimental analysis, we systematically studied the spectral response of the proposed THz plasmonic metadevice. In this Rapid Communication, we uncover a correlation between the existence and the excitation of the toroidal response and the incident beam power. This mechanism is employed to develop THz toroidal metamodulators with a strong potential to be employed for practical advanced and next-generation communication, filtering, and routing applications.

  14. Influence of external toroidal flux on low-aspect-ratio toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuno, S.; Natori, M.; Kamitani, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the HIST device, the external flux is generated by two kinds of currents: the current I s flowing along the symmetry axis and the bias coil current I D . The influence of the external flux on the MHD equilibrium and stability of the low-aspect-ratio toroidal plasma in the HIST device is investigated numerically. Equilibrium configurations of the low-aspect-ratio toroidal plasma in the HIST device are numerically determined by means of the combination of FDM and BEM. The influence of I s and I D on their stability is also investigated by using the Mercier criterion. The results of computations show that the Mercier limit decreases to zero with increasing I s and with decreasing I D . Moreover, either a further increase in I s or a further decrease in I D raises the Mercier limit considerably. Besides, the equilibrium configuration in the HIST device changes its state from spheromak through ultra-low q to tokamak with increasing I s and with decreasing I D . (author)

  15. Constraints on the scale of toroidal-fusion experiments with application to the design of a helical-axis stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noterdaeme, J.M.

    1983-05-01

    Applying the constraints to the design of a helical axis stellarator we find a limit on the combination of toroidal field, current density and major radius. Another major constraint for this concept is the ability to obtain the plasma physics parameters dictated by similarity considerations. This depends on the heating method used. A minimum scale experiment with 2 periods and no linkage of the toroidal and poloidal coils, would have a major radius of 1.2m, a toroidal field of 3.5T and 2MW of ECRH power (for β = 1% nu 2 = 10)

  16. System and method of operating toroidal magnetic confinement devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Morrell S.; Jardin, Stephen C.; Stix, Thomas H.; Grimm, deceased, Ray C.; Manickam, Janardhan; Okabayashi, Michio

    1987-01-01

    For toroidal magnetic confinement devices the second region of stability against ballooning modes can be accessed with controlled operation. Under certain modes of operation, the first and second stability regions may be joined together. Accessing the second region of stability is accomplished by forming a bean-shaped plasma and increasing the indentation until a critical value of indentation is reached. A pusher coil, located at the inner-major-radius side of the device, is engaged to form a bean-shaped poloidal cross-section in the plasma.

  17. Vortex-vortex interactions in toroidally trapped Bose-Einstein condensates

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, T.; Santos, L.; Sanpera, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the vortex dynamics and vortex-vortex interactions in Bose-Einstein condensates confined in toroidal traps. We show that this particular geometry strongly distorts the vortex dynamics. The numerically calculated vortex trajectories are well explained by an analytical calculation based on image method and conformal mapping. Finally, the dissipation effects are discussed.

  18. Unraveling double stranded alpha-helical coiled coils: an x-ray diffraction study on hard alpha-keratin fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreplak, L; Doucet, J; Briki, F

    2001-04-15

    Transformations of proteins secondary and tertiary structures are generally studied in globular proteins in solution. In fibrous proteins, such as hard alpha-keratin, that contain long and well-defined double stranded alpha-helical coiled coil domains, such study can be directly done on the native fibrous tissue. In order to assess the structural behavior of the coiled coil domains under an axial mechanical stress, wide angle x-ray scattering and small angle x-ray scattering experiments have been carried out on stretched horse hair fibers at relative humidity around 30%. Our observations of the three major axial spacings as a function of the applied macroscopic strain have shown two rates. Up to 4% macroscopic strain the coiled coils were slightly distorted but retained their overall conformation. Above 4% the proportion of coiled coil domains progressively decreased. The main and new result of our study is the observation of the transition from alpha-helical coiled coils to disordered chains instead of the alpha-helical coiled coil to beta-sheet transition that occurs in wet fibers.

  19. Quench detection system of the EURATOM coil for the Large Coil Task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noether, G.; Gauss, S.; Maurer, W.; Siewerdt, L.; Ulbricht, A.; Wuechner, F.

    1989-01-01

    A special quench detection system has been developed for the EURATOM Large Coil Task (LCT) coil. The system is based on a bridge circuit which uses a special 'two in hand' winding technique for the pancakes of the EURATOM LCT coil. The electronic circuit was designed in a fail safe way to prevent failure of the quench detector due to failure of one of its components. A method for quick balancing of the quench detection system in a large toroidal magnet system was applied. The quench detection system worked very reliably during the experimental phase of the LCT and was within the quench detection level setting of 50 mV, i.e. the system was not sensitive to poloidal field transients at or below this level. Non-electrical methods for quench detection were also investigated. (author)

  20. Manufacturing aspects of the ATLAS barrel toroid double pancakes

    CERN Document Server

    Drago, G; Gagliardi, P; Laurenti, A; Marabotto, R; Penco, R

    2002-01-01

    In 1999 INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) ordered to ANSALDO the manufacturing of 16 double pancakes for the ATLAS BARREL TOROID. In July 2001 four Double Pancakes have already been completed and shipped to the integration site. In this paper the main aspects of the manufacturing of the largest superconducting coils ever built (5*25 m) are described. The main phases of the manufacturing procedure are reviewed starting from the conductor preparation to the VPI impregnation, including references to the materials used as well as to the relevant customer's requirements. In particular the special winding form and the winding technique are treated. For each phase the most critical aspects and the relevant solutions are pointed out. Particular details about the technical solutions adopted for the impregnation and curing of the Double Pancake, which could not be performed inside an autoclave due to the huge dimension of the coil itself, are reported. Finally the methods used for the dimensional and electri...

  1. TIBER-II TF [toroidal-field] winding pack design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, J.A.; Miller, J.R.; Slack, D.S.; Summers, L.T.

    1987-01-01

    The superconducting, toroidal-field (TF) coils in the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Engineering Reactor (TIBER II) are designed with cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) using Nb 3 Sn composite strands. To design the CICC winding pack, we used an optimization technique that maximizes the conductor stability without violating the constraints imposed by the structure, electrical insulation, quench protection, and fabrication technique. Detailed helium-properties codes calculate the heat removal along a flow path, and detailed field calculations determine the temperature, current, and stability margins. The conductor sheath is designed as distributed structure to partially support the combined in-plane and out-of-plane loads generated within the winding pack. Pancakes of the coil are wound, reacted, and insulated before being potted in the case. This design is aggressive but fully consistent with good engineering practice. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Conception of Brownian coil

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jiayuan

    2018-01-01

    This article proposes a conception of Brownian coil. Brownian coil is a tiny coil with the same size of pollen. Once immersed into designed magnetic field and liquid, the coil will be moved and deformed macroscopically, due to the microscopic thermodynamic molecular collisions. Such deformation and movement will change the magnetic flux through the coil, by which an ElectroMotive Force (EMF) is produced. In this work, Brownian heat exchanger and Brownian generator are further designed to tran...

  3. A tokamak with nearly uniform coil stress based on virial theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, H.

    2002-01-01

    A novel tokamak concept with a new type of toroidal field (TF) coils and a central solenoid (CS) whose stress is much reduced to a theoretical limit determined by the virial theorem has been devised. Recently, we had developed a tokamak with force-balanced coils (FBCs) which are multi-pole helical hybrid coils combining TF coils and a CS coil. The combination reduces the net electromagnetic force in the direction of major radius. In this work, we have extended the FBC concept using the virial theorem. High-field coils should accordingly have same averaged principal stresses in all directions, whereas conventional FBC reduces stress in the toroidal direction only. Using a shell model, we have obtained the poloidal rotation number of helical coils which satisfy the uniform stress condition, and named the coil as virial-limited coil (VLC). VLC with circular cross section of aspect ratio A=2 reduces maximum stress to 60% compared with that of TF coils. In order to prove the advantage of VLC concept, we have designed a small VLC tokamak Todoroki-II. The plasma discharge in Todoroki-II will be presented. (author)

  4. Tearing modes in toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.W.; Cowley, S.C.; Hastie, R.J.; Hender, T.C.; Hood, A.; Martin, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    The separation of the cylindrical tearing mode stability problem into a resistive resonant layer calculation and an external marginal ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) calculation (Δ' calculation) is generalized to axisymmetric toroidal geometry. The general structure of this separation is analyzed and the marginal ideal MHD information (the toroidal generalization of Δ') required to discuss stability is isolated. This can then, in principle, be combined with relevant resonant layer calculations to determine tearing mode growth rates in realistic situations. Two examples are given: the first is an analytic treatment of toroidally coupled (m = 1, n = 1) and (m = 2, n = 1) tearing modes in a large aspect ratio torus; the second, a numerical treatment of the toroidal coupling of three tearing modes through finite pressure effects in a large aspect ratio torus. In addition, the use of a coupling integral approach for determining the stability of coupled tearing modes is discussed. Finally, the possibility of using initial value resistive MHD codes in realistic toroidal geometry to determine the necessary information from the ideal MHD marginal solution is discussed

  5. A large stellarator based on modular coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamberger, S.M.; Sharp, L.E.; Petersen, L.F.

    1979-06-01

    Although stellarators offer some considerable advantages over tokamaks, difficulties arise in designing large devices due, for instance, to poor plasma access as well as to constructional electromechanical and maintenance problems associated with continous helical windings. This paper describes a design for a fairly large device (major radius 2.1m), based on a set of discrete coil modules arranged in a toroidal configuration to provide the required closed magnetic surfaces, having gaps for unobstructed access to the plasma for diagnostics, etc, and allowing for easy removal for maintenance

  6. High current density toroidal pinch discharges with weak toroidal fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunsell, P.; Brzozowski, J.; Drake, J.R.; Hellblom, G.; Kaellne, E.; Mazur, S.; Nordlund, P.

    1990-01-01

    Toroidal discharges in the ultralow q regime (ULQ) have been studied in the rebuilt Extrap TI device. ULQ discharges are sustained for pulse lengths exceeding 1 ms, which corresponds to more than 10 resistiv shell times. Values for the safety factor at the vacuum vessel wall are between rational values: 1/(n+1) -2 . The magnetic fluctuation level increases during the transition between rational values of q(a). For very low values of q(a), the loop voltage increases and the toroidal field development in the discharge exhibits the characteristic behaviour of the setting-up phase of a field reversed pinch. (author) 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 tab

  7. Designing a Sine-Coil for Measurement of Plasma Displacements in IR-T1 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorshid, Pejman; Razavi, M.; Molaii, M.; Ghoranneviss, M.; TalebiTaher, A.; Arvin, R.; Mohammadi, S.; NikMohammadi, A.

    2008-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the plasma position in the IR-T1 tokamak in toroidal coordinates is developed. A sine-coil, which is a Rogowski coil with a variable wiring density is designed and fabricated for this purpose. An analytic solution of the Biot-Savart law, which is used to calculate magnetic fields created by toroidal plasma current, is presented. Results of calculations are compared with the experimental data obtained in no-plasma shots with a toroidal current-carrying coil positioned inside the vessel to simulate the plasma movements. The results are shown a good linear behavior of plasma position measurements. The error is less than 2.5% and it is compared with other methods of measurements of the plasma position. This method will be used in the feedback position control system and tests of feedback controller parameters are ongoing

  8. Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnack, Dalton D

    2006-05-16

    This document reports the successful completion of the OFES Theory Milestone for FY2005, namely, Perform parametric studies to better understand the edge physics regimes of laboratory experiments. Simulate at increased resolution (up to 20 toroidal modes), with density evolution, late into the nonlinear phase and compare results from different types of edge modes. Simulate a single case including a study of heat deposition on nearby material walls. The linear stability properties and nonlinear evolution of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in tokamak plasmas are investigated through numerical computation. Data from the DIII-D device at General Atomics (http://fusion.gat.com/diii-d/) is used for the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria, but edge parameters are varied to reveal important physical effects. The equilibrium with very low magnetic shear produces an unstable spectrum that is somewhat insensitive to dissipation coefficient values. Here, linear growth rates from the non-ideal NIMROD code (http://nimrodteam.org) agree reasonably well with ideal, i.e. non-dissipative, results from the GATO global linear stability code at low toroidal mode number (n) and with ideal results from the ELITE edge linear stability code at moderate to high toroidal mode number. Linear studies with a more realistic sequence of MHD equilibria (based on DIII-D discharge 86166) produce more significant discrepancies between the ideal and non-ideal calculations. The maximum growth rate for the ideal computations occurs at toroidal mode index n=10, whereas growth rates in the non-ideal computations continue to increase with n unless strong anisotropic thermal conduction is included. Recent modeling advances allow drift effects associated with the Hall electric field and gyroviscosity to be considered. A stabilizing effect can be observed in the preliminary results, but while the distortion in mode structure is readily apparent at n=40, the growth rate is only 13% less than the non-ideal MHD

  9. Toroidal Trivelpiece-Gould modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoessel, F.P.

    1979-01-01

    Electron plasma waves are treated in quasi-electrostatic approximation in a toroidal cavity of rectangular cross-section in an infinitely strong azimuthal magnetic field. The differential equation for the electrostatic potential, derived from fluid equations, can be separated using cylindrical coordinates. The eigenvalue problem for the radial dependence is solved numerically by a shooting method. Eigenvalues are given for different aspect ratios. Comparison with appropriate modes of the straight geometry shows that the toroidal frequencies generally lie some percent above those for the straight case. Plots of the eigenfunctions demonstrate clearly the influence of toroidicity. The deviation from symmetry (which should appear for straight geometry) depends not only on the aspect ratio but also strongly on the mode numbers. (author)

  10. MHD equilibrium with toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.

    1987-03-01

    The present work attempts to formulate the equilibrium of axisymmetric plasma with purely toroidal flow within ideal MHD theory. In general, the inertial term Rho(v.Del)v caused by plasma flow is so complicated that the equilibrium equation is completely different from the Grad-Shafranov equation. However, in the case of purely toroidal flow the equilibrium equation can be simplified so that it resembles the Grad-Shafranov equation. Generally one arbitrary two-variable functions and two arbitrary single variable functions, instead of only four single-variable functions, are allowed in the new equilibrium equations. Also, the boundary conditions of the rotating (with purely toroidal fluid flow, static - without any fluid flow) equilibrium are the same as those of the static equilibrium. So numerically one can calculate the rotating equilibrium as a static equilibrium. (author)

  11. Vacuum magnetic field and modular coil system of the advanced stellarator Wendelstein VII-AS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, F.; Kisslinger, J.; Wobig, H.

    1982-06-01

    The vacuum field and the modular coils of the advanced stellarator WENDELSTEIN VII-AS are described. Each of the five field periods contains 9 different twisted coils, one of them with increased dimensions and current in order to provide sufficient access. The standard vacuum field configuration (B=3 T, t=0.39, aspect ratio approx. equal to 10, low shear, and magnetic well) can be varied by toroidal and vertical fields, or by changing independently the current in the large special coils. From a study of magnetic field perturbations some estimates are derived for the admissible coil tolerances. (orig.)

  12. Extension of TFTR operations to higher toroidal field levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolley, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    For the past year, TFTR has sometimes operated at extended toroidal field (TF) levels. The extension to 5.6 Tesla (79 kA) was crucial for TFTR's November 1994 10.7 MW DT fusion power record. The extension to 6.0 Tesla (85 kA) was commissioned on 9 September 1995. There are several reasons that one could expect the TF coils to survive the higher stresses that develop at higher fields. They were designed to operate at 5.2 Tesla with a vertical field of 0.5 Tesla, whereas the actual vertical field needed for the plasma does not exceed 0.35 Tesla. Their design specification explicitly required they survive some pulses at 6.0 Tesla. TF coil mechanical analysis computer models available during coil design were crude, leading to conservative design. And design analyses also had to consider worst-case misoperations that TFTR's real time Coil Protection Calculators (CPCs) now positively prevent from occurring

  13. Compact toroid refueling of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouge, M.J.; Hogan, J.T.; Milora, S.L.; Thomas, C.E.

    1988-04-01

    The feasibility of refueling fusion reactors and devices such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) with high-velocity compact toroids is investigated. For reactors with reasonable limits on recirculating power, it is concluded that the concept is not economically feasible. For typical ITER designs, the compact toroid fueling requires about 15 MW of electrical power, with about 5 MW of thermal power deposited in the plasma. At these power levels, ideal ignition (Q = ∞) is not possible, even for short-pulse burns. The pulsed power requirements for this technology are substantial. 6 ref., 1 figs

  14. Prandtl number of toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.; Fukuyama, A.; Yagi, M.; Azumi, M.

    1993-06-01

    Theory of the L-mode confinement in toroidal plasmas is developed. The Prandtl number, the ratio between the ion viscosity and the thermal conductivity is obtained for the anomalous transport process which is caused by the self-sustained turbulence in the toroidal plasma. It is found that the Prandtl number is of order unity both for the ballooning mode turbulence in tokamaks and for the interchange mode turbulence in helical system. The influence on the anomalous transport and fluctuation level is evaluated. Hartmann number and magnetic Prandtl number are also discussed. (author)

  15. Structural design of the superconducting Poloidal Field coils for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, T.G.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment concept design uses superconducting coils made from cable-in-conduit conductor to accomplish both magnetic confinement and plasma initiation. The Poloidal Field (PF) magnet system is divided into two subsystems, the central solenoid and the outer ring coils, the latter is focus of this paper. The eddy current heating from the pulsed operation is excessive for a case type construction; therefore, a ''no case'' design has been chosen. This ''no case'' design uses the conductor conduit as the primary structure and the electrical insulation (fiberglass/epoxy wrap) as a structural adhesive. The model integrates electromagnetic analysis and structural analysis into the finite element code ANSYS to solve the problem. PF coil design is assessed by considering a variety of coil current wave forms, corresponding to various operating modes and conditions. The structural analysis shows that the outer ring coils are within the requirements of the fatigue life and fatigue crack growth requirements. The forces produced by the Toroidal Field coils on the PF coils have little effect on the maximum stresses in the PF coils. In addition in an effort to reduce the cost of the coils new elongated PF coils design was proposed which changes the aspect ratio of the outer ring coils to reduce the number of turns in the coils. The compressive stress in the outer ring coils is increased while the tensile stress is decreased

  16. Poloidal and toroidal heat flux distribution in the CCT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.L.; Dhir, V.K.; Taylor, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Plasma heat flux to the Faraday shield panels of the UCLA Continuous Current Tokamak (CCT) has been measured calorimetrically in order to identify the dominant parameters affecting the spatial distribution of heat deposition. Three heating methods were investigated: audio frequency discharge cleaning, RF heating, and AC ohmic. Significant poloidal asymmetry is present in the heat flux distribution. On the average, the outer panels received 25-30% greater heat flux than the inner ones, with the ratio of maximum to minimum values attaining a difference of more than a factor of 2. As a diagnostic experiment the current to a selected toroidal field coil was reduced in order to locally deflect the toroidal field lines outward in a ripple-like fashion. Greatly enhanced heat deposition (up to a factor of 4) was observed at this location on the outside Faraday panels. The enhancement was greatest for conditions of low toroidal field and low neutral pressure, leading to low plasma densities, for which Coulomb collisions are the smallest. An exponential model based on a heat flux e-folding length describes the experimentally found localization of thermal energy quite adequately. (orig.)

  17. Proposals for cold testing of the ITER TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libeyre, P.; Ciazynski, D.; Dolgetta, N.; Duchateau, J.L.; Lyraud, C.; Kircher, F.; Schild, T.; Fietz, W.H.; Zahn, G.

    2005-01-01

    The ITER Toroidal Field (TF) magnet system will be made of 18 coils using Nb 3 Sn as superconducting material. These coils will operate at a maximum field of 11.8 T for a nominal current of 68 kA carried by a dual channel cable-in-conduit conductor cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium at 4.5 K. In each coil, seven 760 m conductor lengths wound in double pancakes will be connected to each other by low resistance joints. As a final step of the reception tests, it is proposed to perform cold tests of these coils at liquid helium temperature after completion of their manufacture. The testing shall include high voltage tests to check the quality of the insulation, leak tests and pressure drop measurements of the hydraulic circuits as well as measurement of the joint resistances. Testing the coils up to nominal current is a discussed option, addressing on one hand measurement of the electrical performances in self field and on the other hand the mechanical behaviour of the coils. To perform these tests, a dedicated test facility has to be built, allowing possible simultaneous testing of two coils, assembled together in a twin coil configuration, similarly to their assembly in the torus. (authors)

  18. Proposals for cold testing of the ITER TF coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libeyre, P.; Ciazynski, D.; Dolgetta, N.; Duchateau, J.L.; Lyraud, C. [Association Euratom/CEA Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee (DRFC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Kircher, F.; Schild, T. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules, de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee, 91- Gif sur Yvette (France); Fietz, W.H.; Zahn, G. [Association Euratom-Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The ITER Toroidal Field (TF) magnet system will be made of 18 coils using Nb{sub 3}Sn as superconducting material. These coils will operate at a maximum field of 11.8 T for a nominal current of 68 kA carried by a dual channel cable-in-conduit conductor cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium at 4.5 K. In each coil, seven 760 m conductor lengths wound in double pancakes will be connected to each other by low resistance joints. As a final step of the reception tests, it is proposed to perform cold tests of these coils at liquid helium temperature after completion of their manufacture. The testing shall include high voltage tests to check the quality of the insulation, leak tests and pressure drop measurements of the hydraulic circuits as well as measurement of the joint resistances. Testing the coils up to nominal current is a discussed option, addressing on one hand measurement of the electrical performances in self field and on the other hand the mechanical behaviour of the coils. To perform these tests, a dedicated test facility has to be built, allowing possible simultaneous testing of two coils, assembled together in a twin coil configuration, similarly to their assembly in the torus. (authors)

  19. Toroidal current asymmetry in tokamak disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, H. R.

    2014-10-01

    It was discovered on JET that disruptions were accompanied by toroidal asymmetry of the toroidal plasma current I ϕ. It was found that the toroidal current asymmetry was proportional to the vertical current moment asymmetry with positive sign for an upward vertical displacement event (VDE) and negative sign for a downward VDE. It was observed that greater displacement leads to greater measured I ϕ asymmetry. Here, it is shown that this is essentially a kinematic effect produced by a VDE interacting with three dimensional MHD perturbations. The relation of toroidal current asymmetry and vertical current moment is calculated analytically and is verified by numerical simulations. It is shown analytically that the toroidal variation of the toroidal plasma current is accompanied by an equal and opposite variation of the toroidal current flowing in a thin wall surrounding the plasma. These currents are connected by 3D halo current, which is π/2 radians out of phase with the n = 1 toroidal current variations.

  20. The complex and unique ATLAS Toroid family

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Big parts for the toroid magnets that will be used in the ATLAS experiment have been continuously arriving at CERN since March. These structures will create the largest superconducting toroid magnet ever.

  1. Design of the pancake-winding central solenoid coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Nishi, Masataka; Tsuji, Hirosi

    1995-01-01

    There was a debate over whether a pancake-winding or layer-winding technique is more appropriate for the Central Solenoid (CS) coil for ITER superconducting magnet. The layer-winding CS has the advantage of homogeneous winding supporting the TF centering force without weak joints, but has many difficulties during manufacturing and quality control. On other hand, the pancake-winding has the advantage of better quality control during manufacturing and module testing but has difficulties with joints and feeders, and pipes located in the load path of the bucking force from the toroidal field coils. The compact joints, reinforcement by preformed amour, sharp bending, and double seals are applied to the design of pancake-winding CS coil and demonstrated by hardware developments. The pancake-winding CS coil by using modified existing technology is compatible with the bucking concept of the ITER magnet system. (author)

  2. Predictions of toroidal rotation and torque sources arising in non-axisymmetric perturbed magnetic fields in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, M.; Satake, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Shinohara, K.; Yoshida, M.; Narita, E.; Nakata, M.; Aiba, N.; Shiraishi, J.; Hayashi, N.; Matsunaga, G.; Matsuyama, A.; Ide, S.

    2017-11-01

    Capabilities of the integrated framework consisting of TOPICS, OFMC, VMEC and FORTEC-3D, have been extended to calculate toroidal rotation in fully non-axisymmetric perturbed magnetic fields for demonstrating operation scenarios in actual tokamak geometry and conditions. The toroidally localized perturbed fields due to the test blanket modules and the tangential neutral beam ports in ITER augment the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) substantially, while do not significantly influence losses of beam ions and alpha particles in an ITER L-mode discharge. The NTV takes up a large portion of total torque in ITER and fairly decelerates toroidal rotation, but the change in toroidal rotation may have limited effectiveness against turbulent heat transport. The error field correction coils installed in JT-60SA can externally apply the perturbed fields, which may alter the NTV and the resultant toroidal rotation profiles. However, the non-resonant n=18 components of the magnetic fields arising from the toroidal field ripple mainly contribute to the NTV, regardless of the presence of the applied field by the coil current of 10 kA , where n is the toroidal mode number. The theoretical model of the intrinsic torque due to the fluctuation-induced residual stress is calibrated by the JT-60U data. For five JT-60U discharges, the sign of the calibration factor conformed to the gyrokinetic linear stability analysis and a range of the amplitude thereof was revealed. This semi-empirical approach opens up access to an attempt on predicting toroidal rotation in H-mode plasmas.

  3. X-ray imaging with toroidal mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Sadao; Sakayanagi, Yoshimi

    1978-01-01

    X-ray imaging is made with a single toroidal mirror or two successive toroidal mirrors. Geometrical images at the Gaussian image plane are described by the ray trace. Application of a single toroidal mirror to small-angle scattering is presented. (author)

  4. Onsager relaxation of toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samain, A.; Nguyen, F.

    1997-01-01

    The slow relaxation of isolated toroidal plasmas towards their thermodynamical equilibrium is studied in an Onsager framework based on the entropy metric. The basic tool is a variational principle, equivalent to the kinetic equation, involving the profiles of density, temperature, electric potential, electric current. New minimization procedures are proposed to obtain entropy and entropy production rate functionals. (author)

  5. Particle simulations in toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydemir, A.Y.

    1992-09-01

    A computational tool to be used in kinetic simulations of toroidal plasmas is being developed. The initial goal of the project is to develop an electrostatic gyrokinetic model for studying transport and stability problems in tokamaks. In this brief report, preliminary results from the early stages of this effort are presented

  6. Hybrid winding concept for toroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Andersen, Thomas; Knott, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    and placement machinery. This opens up the possibility for both an automated manufacturing process and an automated production process of toroidal magnetics such as power inductors, filtering inductors, air core inductors, transformers etc. Both the proposed hybrid and the common wire wound winding...

  7. Collapse analysis of toroidal shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomares, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a study performed to determine the collapse characteristics of a toroidal shell using finite element method (FEM) analysis. The study also included free drop testing of a quarter scale prototype to verify the analytical results. The full sized toroidal shell has a 24-inch toroidal diameter with a 24-inch tubal diameter. The shell material is type 304 strainless steel. The toroidal shell is part of the GE Model 2000 transportation packaging, and acts as an energy absorbing device. The analyses performed were on a full sized and quarter scaled models. The finite element program used in all analyses was the LIBRA code. The analytical procedure used both the elasto-plastic and large displacement options within the code. The loading applied in the analyses corresponded to an impact of an infinite rigid plane oriented normal to the drop direction vector. The application of the loading continued incrementally until the work performed by the deforming structure equalled the kinetic energy developed in the free fall. The comparison of analysis and test results showed a good correlation

  8. Role of the large coil program in the development of superconducting magnets for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Luton, J.N.; Thompson, P.B.

    1978-01-01

    Three U.S. industrial teams are designing and will build one coil each to a common set of specifications. Coil specifications and test conditions were chosen to insure maximum relevance to fusion program needs. Each test coil will have a 2.5 x 3.5 m D-shape bore, will contain about 7 MA-turns, and must operate at a peak field of 8 T while subjected to pulsed fields up to 0.14 T in a test stand that can accommodate up to 6 coils in a compact toroidal array. Coils by General Dynamics/Convair and General Electric will use different NbTi conductors cooled by pool-boiling helium. The Westinghouse coil will use Nb 3 Sn cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium. These coils will be delivered in 1980 and 1981 for testing in the Large Coil Test Facility at Oak Ridge in a compact toroidal array with three coils from outside the U.S. These will be produced by EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland for testing under an International Energy Agency agreement

  9. Results of the international Large Coil Task: a milestone for superconducting magnets in fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresner, L.; Fietz, W.A.; Gauss, S.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the Large Coil Task (LCT) was to demonstrate the reliable operation of large superconducting toroidal field coils and to prove the design principles and fabrication techniques to be applied for the magnets in a tokamak experimental power reactor. This has been achieved by an international development effort involving the US DOE, EURATOM, JAERI and the Swiss government. Six different D-shaped test coils were separately designed, developed and constructed by the LCT participants, then extensively tested together in a compact toroidal array. Detailed information on coil design and manufacture and all test data were shared among the LCT participants. The full six-coil array tests were carried out in a continuous period from the beginning of 1986 until September 1987. Beside the originally planned tests to reach an 8 T design point performance, the tests went well beyond this goal, reaching 9 T peak field in each coil. The experiments also delineated the limits of operability and demonstrated the coil safety under abnormal conditions. For fusion application the transient a.c. field behaviour in the coils was also of great interest. Three of the coils have been tested in this respect and showed excellent performance, with loss values in agreement with the theoretical predictions. (author)

  10. Procedures for parametric studies of costs of superconducting toroidal test assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.B.

    1976-05-01

    A cost scaling procedure, based on a detailed reference conceptual design, has been developed to determine the effects of variations in the characteristic parameters of superconducting toroidal field coils on project costs. The primary purpose was to provide reasonably simple rational formulae for obtaining approximate costs of a complete installation, focusing on the trends and sensitivities of costs to changes in various parameters such as field strength, coil size, number of coils, and current density rather than establishing absolute costs. No results are included here because early studies applying these procedures are no longer pertinent to the present Superconducting Magnet Development Program. However, planning for the Large Coil Project and the preliminary conceptual design of the Technology Test Assembly with Plasma have employed the techniques described and results will be reported in the appropriate project documents

  11. Electromagnetic hammer removes weld distortions from aluminum tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1965-01-01

    Distortions around weld areas on sheet-aluminum tanks and other structures are removed with a portable electromagnetic hammer. The hammer incorporates a coil that generates a controlled high-energy pulsed magnetic field over localized areas on the metal surface.

  12. A Conceptual Design Study for the Error Field Correction Coil Power Supply in JT-60SA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsukawa, M.; Shimada, K.; Yamauchi, K.; Gaio, E.; Ferro, A.; Novello, L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a conceptual design study for the circuit configuration of the Error Field Correction Coil (EFCC) power supply (PS) to maximize the expected performance with reasonable cost in JT-60SA. The EFCC consists of eighteen sector coils installed inside the vacuum vessel, six in the toroidal direction and three in the poloidal direction, each one rated for 30 kA-turn. As a result, star point connection is proposed for each group of six EFCC coils installed cyclically in the toroidal direction for decoupling with poloidal field coils. In addition, a six phase inverter which is capable of controlling each phase current was chosen as PS topology to ensure higher flexibility of operation with reasonable cost.

  13. HTMR: an experimental tokamak reactor with hybrid copper/superconductor toroidal field magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avanzini, P.G.; Raia, G.; Rosatelli, F.; Zampaglione, V.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of a hybrid configuration superconducting coils/copper coils for a next generation tokamak TF magnet has been investigated. On the basis of this hybrid solution, the conceptual design has been developed for a medium-high toroidal field tokamak reactor (HTMR). The results of this study show the possibility of designing a tokamak reactor with reduced size in comparison with other INTOR like devices, still gaining some margins in front of the uncertainties in the scaling laws for plasma physics parameters and retaining the presence of a blanket with a tritium breeding ratio of about 1

  14. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ

  15. Comparison study of toroidal-field divertors for a compact reversed-field pinch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Two divertor configurations for the Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR) based on diverting the minority (toroidal) field have been reported. A critical factor in evaluating the performance of both poloidally symmetric and bundle divertor configurations is the accurate determination of the divertor connection length and the monitoring of magnetic islands introduced by the divertors, the latter being a three-dimensional effect. To this end the poloidal-field, toroidal-field, and divertor coils and the plasma currents are simulated in three dimensions for field-line tracings in both the divertor channel and the plasma-edge regions. The results of this analysis indicate a clear preference for the poloidally symmetric toroidal-field divertor. Design modifications to the limiter-based CRFPR design that accommodate this divertor are presented

  16. Development work for the Japanese LCT coil and its design and construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Susumu; Ando, Toshinari; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yasukochi, Ko

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes design, verification tests, and construction of the Japanese test coil for the Large Coil Task (LCT). Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) signed on the LCT international agreement under the International Energy Agency (IEA) in 1978, and since then JAERI has been working to develop the Japanese LCT coil to explore the problems of design and construction of tokamak toroidal coil. Based on the common requirements of the LCT, the Japanese LCT coil was designed to be a pool-cooled NbTi fully-stabilized coil whose operating current is 10,220 A at 8 T. Through research and development of the Japanese LCT coil, new advances in the super-conducting coil technology were obtained, such as mechanically and chemically treated conductor surface that has high heat transfer about four times as much as usual ones, nitrogen-strengthened stainless steel that has the yield strength twice as much as usual stainless steel, NbTi filaments those have the critical current density twice as much as those before LCT, and so on. These advances have enabled to construct the Japanese LCT coil and it was completed in the spring of 1982. During the construction of the coil, new fabrication techniques were obtained to wind large current conductor into a mechanically rigid coil and thus to construct a totally stable large coil. (author)

  17. Dual coil ignition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberts, Garlan J.; Qu, Qiuping; Czekala, Michael Damian

    2017-03-28

    A dual coil ignition system is provided. The dual coil ignition system includes a first inductive ignition coil including a first primary winding and a first secondary winding, and a second inductive ignition coil including a second primary winding and a second secondary winding, the second secondary winding connected in series to the first secondary winding. The dual coil ignition system further includes a diode network including a first diode and a second diode connected between the first secondary winding and the second secondary winding.

  18. Structural design of the toroidal configuration of the HTS SMES cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, H.K.; Koh, D.Y.; Ko, J.S.; Kim, H.B.; Hong, Y.J.; Kim, S.H.; Seong, K.C.

    2011-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system is working on around 30 K, because the magnet is made of high temperature superconductor. To maintain the cryogenic temperature, the superconducting coil is cooled by cryogen, helium gas or liquid neon. But there are some weak points in the cryogen cooling system. For example periodic charge of the cryogen and size is big and so on. So, we have designed the conduction cooling system for toroidal configuration HTS SMES. The toroidal type HTS SMES has some merits, so it is very small magnetic field leakage, and magnetic field applied perpendicular to the tape surface can be reduced. Our system has 28 numbers of HTS double pancake coils and they are arrayed toroidal configuration. The toroidal inner radius is 162 mm, and outer radius is 599 mm, and height is about 162 mm. In this study, we have designed the cooling structure and analyzed temperature distribution of cooling path, thermal stress and deformation of the cooling structure.

  19. Biomaterials Made from Coiled-Coil Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conticello, Vincent; Hughes, Spencer; Modlin, Charles

    The development of biomaterials designed for specific applications is an important objective in personalized medicine. While the breadth and prominence of biomaterials have increased exponentially over the past decades, critical challenges remain to be addressed, particularly in the development of biomaterials that exhibit highly specific functions. These functional properties are often encoded within the molecular structure of the component molecules. Proteins, as a consequence of their structural specificity, represent useful substrates for the construction of functional biomaterials through rational design. This chapter provides an in-depth survey of biomaterials constructed from coiled-coils, one of the best-understood protein structural motifs. We discuss the utility of this structurally diverse and functionally tunable class of proteins for the creation of novel biomaterials. This discussion illustrates the progress that has been made in the development of coiled-coil biomaterials by showcasing studies that bridge the gap between the academic science and potential technological impact.

  20. Classification of symmetric toroidal orbifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Maximilian; Ratz, Michael; Torrado, Jesus [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Vaudrevange, Patrick K.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    We provide a complete classification of six-dimensional symmetric toroidal orbifolds which yield N{>=}1 supersymmetry in 4D for the heterotic string. Our strategy is based on a classification of crystallographic space groups in six dimensions. We find in total 520 inequivalent toroidal orbifolds, 162 of them with Abelian point groups such as Z{sub 3}, Z{sub 4}, Z{sub 6}-I etc. and 358 with non-Abelian point groups such as S{sub 3}, D{sub 4}, A{sub 4} etc. We also briefly explore the properties of some orbifolds with Abelian point groups and N=1, i.e. specify the Hodge numbers and comment on the possible mechanisms (local or non-local) of gauge symmetry breaking.

  1. Hollow nanotubular toroidal polymer microrings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyeong; Baek, Kangkyun; Kim, Myungjin; Yun, Gyeongwon; Ko, Young Ho; Lee, Nam-Suk; Hwang, Ilha; Kim, Jeehong; Natarajan, Ramalingam; Park, Chan Gyung; Sung, Wokyung; Kim, Kimoon

    2014-02-01

    Despite the remarkable progress made in the self-assembly of nano- and microscale architectures with well-defined sizes and shapes, a self-organization-based synthesis of hollow toroids has, so far, proved to be elusive. Here, we report the synthesis of polymer microrings made from rectangular, flat and rigid-core monomers with anisotropically predisposed alkene groups, which are crosslinked with each other by dithiol linkers using thiol-ene photopolymerization. The resulting hollow toroidal structures are shape-persistent and mechanically robust in solution. In addition, their size can be tuned by controlling the initial monomer concentrations, an observation that is supported by a theoretical analysis. These hollow microrings can encapsulate guest molecules in the intratoroidal nanospace, and their peripheries can act as templates for circular arrays of metal nanoparticles.

  2. Experimental studies of compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Berkeley Compact Toroid Experiment (BCTX) device is a plasma device with a Marshall-gun generated, low aspect ratio toroidal plasma. The device is capable of producing spheromak-type discharges and may, with some modification, produce low-aspect ratio tokamak configurations. A unique aspect of this experimenal devie is its large lower hybrid (LH) heating system, which consists of two 450MHz klystron tubes generating 20 megawatts each into a brambilla-type launching structure. Successful operation with one klystron at virtually full power (18 MW) has been accomplished with 110 μs pulse length. A second klystron is currently installed in its socket and magnet but has not been added to the RF drive system. This report describes current activities and accomplishments and describes the anticipated results of next year's activity

  3. Prospects for toroidal fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak has refined understanding of the realities of a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning magnetic fusion reactor. An ITER-like tokamak reactor using ITER costs and performance would lead to a cost of electricity (COE) of about 130 mills/kWh. Advanced tokamak physics to be tested in the Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX), coupled with moderate components in engineering, technology, and unit costs, should lead to a COE comparable with best existing fission systems around 60 mills/kWh. However, a larger unit size, ∼2000 MW(e), is favored for the fusion system. Alternative toroidal configurations to the conventional tokamak, such as the stellarator, reversed-field pinch, and field-reversed configuration, offer some potential advantage, but are less well developed, and have their own challenges

  4. Simulation of chain of quenches on toroidal HTS-SMES taking account of thermal and electromagnetic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oga, Y.; Noguchi, S.; Igarashi, H.

    When a temperature rise occurs at a local area inside a coil of toroidal HTS-SMES by any reason, a temperature hotspot which results in a thermal runaway appears at the local area. Subsequently, after appearing the local normal zone in the HTS coil, the transport current of the HTS coil decrease since the resistance of HTS coil appears and the current partially flows into a parallel-connecting shunt resistance. However, if the transport current of the normal-transitioned HTS coil is hardly changed, the temperature on the hotspot would rise more and then the normal zone would spread rapidly. It may cause a serious accident due to high stored energy. Therefore, using the numerical simulation, we have investigated the behaviors of the coil current, the critical current, and the temperature in the superconducting element coils of HTS-SMES. Consequently, the temperature of the superconducting element coils rises up extremely when a large heat is generated at a certain area of one of them by any reason. Moreover, there is a possibility that the shunt resister hardly functions for protection since the coil is burned out due to high inductances and low resistance of the superconducting element coil.

  5. Compact toroids with Alfvenic flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhehui; Tang, X.Z.

    2004-01-01

    The Chandrasekhar equilibria form a class of stationary ideal magnetohydrodynamics equilibria stabilized by magnetic-field-aligned Alfvenic flows. Analytic solutions of the Chandrasekhar equilibria are explicitly constructed for both field-reversed configurations and spheromaks. Favorable confinement property of nested closed flux surfaces and the ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability of the compact toroids are of interest for both magnetic trapping of high energy electrons in astrophysics and confinement of high temperature plasmas in laboratory

  6. The B00 model coil in the ATLAS Magnet Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H H J; Anashkin, O P; Keilin, V E; Lysenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    A 1-m size model coil has been developed to investigate the transport properties of the three aluminum-stabilized superconductors used in the ATLAS magnets. The coil, named B00, is also used for debugging the cryogenic, power and control systems of the ATLAS Magnet Test Facility. The coil comprises two double pancakes made of the barrel toroid and end-cap toroid conductors and a single pancake made of the central solenoid conductor. The pancakes are placed inside an aluminum coil casing. The coil construction and cooling conditions are quite similar to the final design of the ATLAS magnets. The B00 coil is well equipped with various sensors to measure thermal and electrodynamic properties of the conductor inside the coils. Special attention has been paid to the study of the current diffusion process and the normal zone propagation in the ATLAS conductors and windings. Special pick-up coils have been made to measure the diffusion at different currents and magnetic field values. (6 refs).

  7. Superconducting magnetic coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1996-06-11

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  8. Development of toroid-type HTS DC reactor series for HVDC system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangmin; Go, Byeong-Soo; Park, Hea-chul; Kim, Sung-kyu; Kim, Seokho; Lee, Sangjin; Oh, Yunsang; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes design specifications and performance of a toroid-type high-temperature superconducting (HTS) DC reactor. The first phase operation targets of the HTS DC reactor were 400 mH and 400 A. The authors have developed a real HTS DC reactor system during the last three years. The HTS DC reactor was designed using 2G GdBCO HTS wires. The HTS coils of the toroid-type DC reactor magnet were made in the form of a D-shape. The electromagnetic performance of the toroid-type HTS DC reactor magnet was analyzed using the finite element method program. A conduction cooling method was adopted for reactor magnet cooling. The total system has been successfully developed and tested in connection with LCC type HVDC system. Now, the authors are studying a 400 mH, kA class toroid-type HTS DC reactor for the next phase research. The 1500 A class DC reactor system was designed using layered 13 mm GdBCO 2G HTS wire. The expected operating temperature is under 30 K. These fundamental data obtained through both works will usefully be applied to design a real toroid-type HTS DC reactor for grid application.

  9. Equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, D.J.; Miller, J.B.; Rothe, K.E.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1984-04-01

    The Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) isproposed to be an ignition device with a low safety factor (q approx. = 2.0), rf or rf-assisted startup, long inductive burn pulse (approx. 300 s), and an elongated plasma cross section (kappa = 1.6) with moderate triangularity (delta = 0.3). System trade studies have been carried out to assist in choosing an appropriate candidate for TFCX conceptual design. This report describes an important element in these system studies - the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field (PF) coil system and its impact on the choice of machine size. Reference design points for the all-super-conducting toroidal field (TF) coil (TFCX-S) and hybrid (TFCX-H) options are presented that satisfy given PF system criteria, including volt-second requirements during burn, mechanical configuration constraints, maximum field constraints at the superconducting PF coils, and plasma shape parameters. Poloidal coil current waveforms for the TFCX-S and TFCX-H reference designs consistent with the equilibrium requirements of the plasma startup, heating, and burn phases of a typical discharge scenario are calculated. Finally, a possible option for quasi-steady-state operation is discussed

  10. Cooling and dehumidifying coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.V.K.

    1988-01-01

    The operating features of cooling and dehumidifying coils and their constructional details are discussed. The heat transfer relations as applicable to the boiling refrigerant and a single phase fluid are presented. Methods of accounting for the effect of moisture condensation on the air side heat transfer coefficient and the fin effectiveness are explained. The logic flow necessary to analyze direct expansion coils and chilled water coils is discussed

  11. The JET divertor coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, J.R.; Froger, C.; Sborchia, C.

    1989-01-01

    The divertor coil is mounted inside the Jet vacuum vessel and is able to carry 1 MA turns. It is of conventional construction - water cooled copper, epoxy glass insulation -and is contained in a thin stainless steel case. The coil has to be assembled, insulated and encased inside the Jet vacuum vessel. A description of the coil is given, together with technical information (including mechanical effects on the vacuum vessel), an outline of the manufacture process and a time schedule. (author)

  12. Proto-CIRCUS tilted-coil tokamak–torsatron hybrid: Design and construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, A.W.; Doumet, M.; Hammond, K.C. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Kornbluth, Y. [Yeshiva University, New York, NY 10033 (United States); Spong, D.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Sweeney, R. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Volpe, F.A., E-mail: fvolpe@columbia.edu [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • A tokamak-like device with tilted toroidal field (TF) coils needs less plasma current than a conventional tokamak. • Rotational transform is partly generated by external coils. Device can be considered a tokamak–torsatron hybrid. • We designed and constructed the first device of this type. • Tilted TF coils are interlinked to each other, which helps to reduce aspect ratio of plasma. • This is a six-coil generalization of CNT stellarator, also at Columbia University, which features two interlinked coils. - Abstract: We present the field-line modeling, design, and construction of a prototype circular-coil tokamak–torsatron hybrid called Proto-CIRCUS. The device has a major radius R = 16 cm and minor radius a < 5 cm. The six “toroidal field” coils are planar as in a tokamak, but they are tilted. This, combined with induced or driven plasma current, is expected to generate rotational transform, as seen in field-line tracing and equilibrium calculations. The device is expected to operate at lower plasma current than a tokamak of comparable size and magnetic field, which might have interesting implications for disruptions and steady-state operation. Additionally, the toroidal magnetic ripple is less pronounced than in an equivalent tokamak in which the coils are not tilted. The tilted coils are interlocked, resulting in a relatively low aspect ratio, and can be moved, both radially and in tilt angle, between discharges. This capability will be exploited for detailed comparisons between calculations and field-line mapping measurements. Such comparisons will reveal whether this relatively simple concept can generate the expected rotational transform.

  13. Voltage harmonic variation in three-phase induction motors with different coil pitches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshmukh, Ram; Moses, Anthony John; Anayi, Fatih

    2006-01-01

    A pulse-width modulation (PWM) inverter feeding four different chorded three-phase induction motors was tested for low-order odd harmonic voltage component and efficiency at different loads. Total harmonic distortion (THD) due to 3rd, 5th and 9th harmonics was less in a motor with 160 o coil pitch. Particular harmonic order for each coil pitch was suppressed and the efficiency of a 120 o coil pitch motor was increased by 7.5%

  14. Development of toroid-type HTS DC reactor series for HVDC system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwangmin, E-mail: kwangmin81@gmail.com [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Go, Byeong-Soo; Park, Hea-chul; Kim, Sung-kyu; Kim, Seokho [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sangjin [Uiduk University, Gyeongju 780-713 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Yunsang [Vector Fields Korea Inc., Pohang 790-834 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • The authors developed the 400 mH, 400 A class toroid-type HTS DC reactor system. • The target temperature, inductance and operating current are under 20 K at magnet, 400 mH and 400 A, respectively. All target performances of the HTS DC reactor were achieved. • The HTS DC reactor was conducted through the interconnection operation with a LCC type HVDC system. • Now, the authors are studying the 400 mH, 1500 A class toroid-type HTS DC reactor for the next phase HTS DC reactor. - Abstract: This paper describes design specifications and performance of a toroid-type high-temperature superconducting (HTS) DC reactor. The first phase operation targets of the HTS DC reactor were 400 mH and 400 A. The authors have developed a real HTS DC reactor system during the last three years. The HTS DC reactor was designed using 2G GdBCO HTS wires. The HTS coils of the toroid-type DC reactor magnet were made in the form of a D-shape. The electromagnetic performance of the toroid-type HTS DC reactor magnet was analyzed using the finite element method program. A conduction cooling method was adopted for reactor magnet cooling. The total system has been successfully developed and tested in connection with LCC type HVDC system. Now, the authors are studying a 400 mH, kA class toroid-type HTS DC reactor for the next phase research. The 1500 A class DC reactor system was designed using layered 13 mm GdBCO 2G HTS wire. The expected operating temperature is under 30 K. These fundamental data obtained through both works will usefully be applied to design a real toroid-type HTS DC reactor for grid application.

  15. Development of toroid-type HTS DC reactor series for HVDC system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwangmin; Go, Byeong-Soo; Park, Hea-chul; Kim, Sung-kyu; Kim, Seokho; Lee, Sangjin; Oh, Yunsang; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The authors developed the 400 mH, 400 A class toroid-type HTS DC reactor system. • The target temperature, inductance and operating current are under 20 K at magnet, 400 mH and 400 A, respectively. All target performances of the HTS DC reactor were achieved. • The HTS DC reactor was conducted through the interconnection operation with a LCC type HVDC system. • Now, the authors are studying the 400 mH, 1500 A class toroid-type HTS DC reactor for the next phase HTS DC reactor. - Abstract: This paper describes design specifications and performance of a toroid-type high-temperature superconducting (HTS) DC reactor. The first phase operation targets of the HTS DC reactor were 400 mH and 400 A. The authors have developed a real HTS DC reactor system during the last three years. The HTS DC reactor was designed using 2G GdBCO HTS wires. The HTS coils of the toroid-type DC reactor magnet were made in the form of a D-shape. The electromagnetic performance of the toroid-type HTS DC reactor magnet was analyzed using the finite element method program. A conduction cooling method was adopted for reactor magnet cooling. The total system has been successfully developed and tested in connection with LCC type HVDC system. Now, the authors are studying a 400 mH, kA class toroid-type HTS DC reactor for the next phase research. The 1500 A class DC reactor system was designed using layered 13 mm GdBCO 2G HTS wire. The expected operating temperature is under 30 K. These fundamental data obtained through both works will usefully be applied to design a real toroid-type HTS DC reactor for grid application.

  16. Heating of toroidal plasmas by neutral injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stix, T.H.

    1971-08-01

    This paper presents a brief review of the physics of ion acceleration, charge exchange and ionization, trajectories for fast ions in toroidal magnetic fields, and fast-ion thermalization. The injection of fast atoms is found to be a highly competitive method both for heating present-day experimental toroidal plasmas and for bringing full-scale toroidal CTR plasmas to low-density ignition. 13 refs., 9 figs

  17. The normal zone propagation in ATLAS B00 model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Boxman, E W; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The B00 model coil has been successfully tested in the ATLAS Magnet Test Facility at CERN. The coil consists of two double pancakes wound with aluminum stabilized cables of the barrel- and end-cap toroids conductors for the ATLAS detector. The magnet current is applied up to 24 kA and quenches are induced by firing point heaters. The normal zone velocity is measured over a wide range of currents by using pickup coils, voltage taps and superconducting quench detectors. The signals coming from various sensors are presented and analyzed. The results extracted from the various detection methods are in good agreement. It is found that the characteristic velocities vary from 5 to 20 m/s at 15 and 24 kA respectively. In addition, the minimum quench energies at different applied magnet currents are presented. (6 refs).

  18. Observation of plasma toroidal-momentum dissipation by neoclassical toroidal viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W; Sabbagh, S A; Bell, R E; Bialek, J M; Bell, M G; LeBlanc, B P; Kaye, S M; Levinton, F M; Menard, J E; Shaing, K C; Sontag, A C; Yuh, H

    2006-06-09

    Dissipation of plasma toroidal angular momentum is observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment due to applied nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields and their plasma-induced increase by resonant field amplification and resistive wall mode destabilization. The measured decrease of the plasma toroidal angular momentum profile is compared to calculations of nonresonant drag torque based on the theory of neoclassical toroidal viscosity. Quantitative agreement between experiment and theory is found when the effect of toroidally trapped particles is included.

  19. Manufacture of EAST VS In-Vessel Coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Feng; Wu, Yu; Du, Shijun; Jin, Huan; Yu, Min; Han, Qiyang; Wan, Jiansheng; Liu, Bin; Qiao, Jingchun; Liu, Xiaochuan; Li, Chang; Cai, Denggang; Tong, Yunhua

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • ITER like Stainless Steel Mineral Insulation Conductor (SSMIC) used for EAST Tokamak VS In-Vessel Coil manufacture first time. • Research on SSMIC fabrication was introduced in detail. • Two sets totally four single-turn VS coils were manufactured and installed in place symmetrically above and below the mid-plane in the vacuum vessel of EAST. • The manufacture and inspection of the EAST VS coil especially the joint for the SSMIC connection was described in detail. • The insulation resistances of all the VS coils have no significant reduction after endurance test. -- Abstract: In the ongoing latest update round of EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak), two sets of two single-turn Vertical Stabilization (VS) coils were manufactured and installed symmetrically above and below the mid-plane in the vacuum vessel of EAST. The Stainless Steel Mineral Insulated Conductor (SSMIC) developed for ITER In-Vessel Coils (IVCs) in Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science (ASIPP) was used for the EAST VS coils manufacture. Each turn poloidal field VS coil includes three internal joints in the vacuum vessel. The middle joint connects two pieces of conductor which together form an R2.3 m arc segment inside the vacuum vessel. The other two joints connect the arc segment with the two feeders near the port along the toroidal direction to bear lower electromagnetic loads during operation. Main processes and tests include material performances checking, conductor fabrication, joint connection and testing, coil forming, insulation performances measurement were described herein

  20. Femtometer toroidal structures in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forest, J.L.; Pandharipande, V.R.; Pieper, S.C.; Wiringa, R.B.; Schiavilla, R.; Arriaga, A.

    1996-01-01

    The two-nucleon density distributions in states with isospin T=0, spin S=1, and projection M S =0 and ±1 are studied in 2 H, 3,4 He, 6,7 Li, and 16 O. The equidensity surfaces for M S =0 distributions are found to be toroidal in shape, while those of M S =±1 have dumbbell shapes at large density. The dumbbell shapes are generated by rotating tori. The toroidal shapes indicate that the tensor correlations have near maximal strength at r 3 He, 4 He, and 6 Li. The toroidal distribution has a maximum-density diameter of ∼1 fm and a half-maximum density thickness of ∼0.9 fm. Many realistic models of nuclear forces predict these values, which are supported by the observed electromagnetic form factors of the deuteron, and also predicted by classical Skyrme effective Lagrangians, related to QCD in the limit of infinite colors. Due to the rather small size of this structure, it could have a revealing relation to certain aspects of QCD. Experiments to probe this structure and its effects in nuclei are suggested. Pair distribution functions in other T,S channels are also discussed; those in T,S=1,1 have anisotropies expected from one-pion-exchange interactions. The tensor correlations in T,S=0,1 states are found to deplete the number of T,S=1,0 pairs in nuclei and cause a reduction in nuclear binding energies via many-body effects. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  1. A toroidal plasma MHD equilibrium code 'EQUCIR version 1'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninomiya, Hiromasa; Shinya, Kichiro; Kameari, Akihisa.

    1980-10-01

    A new free-boundary toroidal MHD equilibrium code ''EQUCIR version 1'' has been developed. The central problems approached by this code is as follows: 1) The magnetic flux distribution of a plasma at equilibrium is determined in the given external field. 2) A set of circuit equations between the plasma and the external conductors are constructed. These circuit equations and the Grad-Shafranov equation are solved self-consistently and the time evolutions of plasma equilibria and currents in external conductors are determined at the same time. 3) The currents in the external conductors are determined so that the plasma cross-section and plasma parameters are to be maintained with desired ones. It is shown that this code is very useful for study of the tokamak plasma equilibria, for design of the poloidal coil system and for investigation of experimental results. (author)

  2. Structural analysis for the joint of the ITER ELM coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shanwen, E-mail: zhangshanwen123@163.com [College of Mechanical Engineering Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225127 (China); Song, Yuntao; Wang, Zhongwei; Ji, Xiang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 200031 (China); Zhang, Jianfeng [College of Mechanical Engineering Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225127 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The FE sub-model method is feasible and rapid for the joint design. • The components meet the static and fatigue criteria. • Nuclear heat is the key factor for the joint design. - Abstract: The joint is an important component of the Edge Localized Modes (ELM) coils in fusion reactor, which is used to connect the ELM coils. Like the ELM coils, the joints work in an environment with high radiation levels, high temperature and high magnetic field. These joints are mainly subject to nuclear heat from the plasma and cyclic electromagnetic (EM) loads induced by the interaction of ELM coil current with magnetic fields. Take the joint of ITER ELM coil for example. In order to assure the structural integrity of joints under these loads, it is necessary to estimate the strength and fatigue of the joints. As a local model, the joint without ELM coil is investigated by the sub-model method. Results show that the finite element sub-model method is feasible and rapid for the joint design. The maximum magnetic flux intensity occurs in the axial direction for the joint local reference, which parallels with the current and corresponds to the toroidal direction of the ITER. The two areas at the top of the Inconel sleeve appear high temperature. For the joint, the conductor, jacket and sleeve can meet the static and fatigue criteria and the joint design is valid and feasible. The thermal load from the nuclear heat is the key factor for the joint design.

  3. Overview of toroidal momentum transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeters, A.G.; Hornsby, W.A.; Angioni, C.; Hein, T.; Kluy, N.; Strintzi, D.; Tardini, G.; Bortolon, A.; Camenen, Y.; Casson, F.J.; Snodin, A.P.; Szepesi, G.; Duval, B.; Fiederspiel, L.; Idomura, Y.; Mantica, P.; Parra, F.I.; Tala, T.; De Vries, P.; Weiland, J.

    2011-01-01

    Toroidal momentum transport mechanisms are reviewed and put in a broader perspective. The generation of a finite momentum flux is closely related to the breaking of symmetry (parity) along the field. The symmetry argument allows for the systematic identification of possible transport mechanisms. Those that appear to lowest order in the normalized Larmor radius (the diagonal part, Coriolis pinch, E x B shearing, particle flux, and up-down asymmetric equilibria) are reasonably well understood. At higher order, expected to be of importance in the plasma edge, the theory is still under development.

  4. Pellet injection and toroidal confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The proceedings of a technical committee meeting on pellet injection and toroidal confinement, held in Gut Ising, Federal Republic of Germany, 24-26 October, 1988, are given in this report. Most of the major fusion experiments are using pellet injectors; these were reported at this meeting. Studies of confinement, which is favorably affected, impurity transport, radiative energy losses, and affects on the ion temperature gradient instability were given. Studies of pellet ablation and effects on plasma profiles were presented. Finally, several papers described present and proposed injection guns. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Active internal corrector coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.A.; Cottingham, J.; Dahl, P.

    1986-01-01

    Trim or corrector coils to correct main magnet field errors and provide higher multipole fields for beam optics purposes are a standard feature of superconducting magnet accelerator systems. This paper describes some of the design and construction features of powered internal trim coils and a sampling of the test results obtained

  6. Compact stellarator coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomphrey, N.; Berry, L.A.; Boozer, A.H.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental devices to study the physics of high-beta (β>∼4%), low aspect ratio (A<∼4.5) stellarator plasmas require coils that will produce plasmas satisfying a set of physics goals, provide experimental flexibility, and be practical to construct. In the course of designing a flexible coil set for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment, we have made several innovations that may be useful in future stellarator design efforts. These include: the use of Singular Value Decomposition methods for obtaining families of smooth current potentials on distant coil winding surfaces from which low current density solutions may be identified; the use of a Control Matrix Method for identifying which few of the many detailed elements of the stellarator boundary must be targeted if a coil set is to provide fields to control the essential physics of the plasma; the use of Genetic Algorithms for choosing an optimal set of discrete coils from a continuum of potential contours; the evaluation of alternate coil topologies for balancing the tradeoff between physics objective and engineering constraints; the development of a new coil optimization code for designing modular coils, and the identification of a 'natural' basis for describing current sheet distributions. (author)

  7. Liquid rope coiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribe, N.M.; Habibi, M.; Bonn, D.

    2012-01-01

    A thin stream or rope of viscous fluid falling from a sufficient height onto a surface forms a steadily rotating helical coil. Tabletop laboratory experiments in combination with a numerical model for slender liquid ropes reveal that finite-amplitude coiling can occur in four distinct regimes

  8. Molecular basis of coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, Barbara; Bjelic, Saša; Honnappa, Srinivas; Jawhari, Hatim; Jaussi, Rolf; Payapilly, Aishwarya; Jowitt, Thomas; Steinmetz, Michel O; Kammerer, Richard A

    2010-11-16

    Coiled coils are extensively and successfully used nowadays to rationally design multistranded structures for applications, including basic research, biotechnology, nanotechnology, materials science, and medicine. The wide range of applications as well as the important functions these structures play in almost all biological processes highlight the need for a detailed understanding of the factors that control coiled-coil folding and oligomerization. Here, we address the important and unresolved question why the presence of particular oligomerization-state determinants within a coiled coil does frequently not correlate with its topology. We found an unexpected, general link between coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity and trigger sequences, elements that are indispensable for coiled-coil formation. By using the archetype coiled-coil domain of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 as a model system, we show that well-established trimer-specific oligomerization-state determinants switch the peptide's topology from a dimer to a trimer only when inserted into the trigger sequence. We successfully confirmed our results in two other, unrelated coiled-coil dimers, ATF1 and cortexillin-1. We furthermore show that multiple topology determinants can coexist in the same trigger sequence, revealing a delicate balance of the resulting oligomerization state by position-dependent forces. Our experimental results should significantly improve the prediction of the oligomerization state of coiled coils. They therefore should have major implications for the rational design of coiled coils and consequently many applications using these popular oligomerization domains.

  9. World's largest DC flywheel generator for the toroidal field power supply of JAERI's JFT-2M Tokamak nuclear fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Takashi; Nakanishi, Yuji; Horita, Tsuyoshi; Kawase, Chiharu; Oyabu, Isao; Kishimoto, Takeshi.

    1996-01-01

    Mitsubishi Electric has delivered the world's largest DC generator for the toroidal field coil power supply of the JFT-2M Tokamak at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The unit rotates at 225 or 460 rpm, providing a maximum rated output of 2,700 V, 19,000 A and 51.3 MW. The toroidal field is a DC field, so use of a DC generator permits a simpler design consuming less floor space than an AC drive system. The generator was manufactured following extensive studies on commutation, mechanical strength and insulation. (author)

  10. Theoretical and experimental study on the magnetomechanical behavior of superconducting helical coils for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaghi, T.; Miya, K.; Yamada, H.; Takagi, T.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetomechanical behavior of superconducting helical coils for a magnetic fusion reactor was investigated experimentally and theoretically. Deformations of straight and torus type helical coils were caused due to static electromagnetic forces in the liquid helium cryostat and were analysed with the finite element computer code made here. Despite of a large scatter of experimental data due to a non-uniform friction force between the helical coil and the torus of stainless steel, the numerical results are very close to the mean value of the data. Numerical analysis of the force distribution acting on the helical coils was also performed for a Heliotron's coil system to characterize its nature. The force could be categorized conveniently as an extensional force, a tangential force and a toroidal force which correspond respectively to the kind of forces acting on toroidal field coils. Additionally, the effect of mechanical constraint on the magnetomechanical behavior is discussed and shows that the location of the constraint significantly affects the stress distributions in the coils. (orig.)

  11. Modular coils and finite-β operation of a quasi-axially symmetric tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drevlak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Quasi-axially symmetric tokamaks (QA tokamaks) are an extension of the conventional tokamak concept. In these devices the magnetic field strength is independent of the generalized toroidal magnetic co-ordinate even though the cross-sectional shape changes. An optimized plasma equilibrium belonging to the class of QA tokamaks has been proposed by Nuehrenberg. It features the small aspect ratio of a tokamak while allowing part of the rotational transform to be generated by the external field. In this article, two particular aspects of the viability of QA tokamaks are explored, namely the feasibility of modular coils and the possibility of maintaining quasi-axial symmetry in the free-boundary equilibria obtained with the coils found. A set of easily feasible modular coils for the configuration is presented. It was designed using the extended version of the NESCOIL code (MERKEL, P., Nucl. Fusion 27 (1987) 867). Using this coil system, free-boundary calculations of the plasma equilibrium were carried out using the NEMEC code (HIRSHMAN, S.P., VAN RIJ, W.I., MERKEL, P., Comput. Phys. Commun. 43 (1986) 143). It is observed that the effects of finite β and net toroidal plasma current can be compensated for with good precision by applying a vertical magnetic field and by separately adjusting the currents of the modular coils. A set of fully three dimensional (3-D) auxiliary coils is proposed to exert control on the rotational transform in the plasma. Deterioration of the quasi-axial symmetry induced by the auxiliary coils can be avoided by adequate adjustment of the currents in the primary coils. Finally, the neoclassical transport properties of the configuration are examined. It is observed that optimization with respect to confinement of the alpha particles can be maintained at operation with finite toroidal current if the aforementioned corrective measures are used. In this case, the neoclassical behaviour is shown to be very similar to that of a conventional tokamak

  12. Electrostatics of a Family of Conducting Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2009-01-01

    An exact solution is found for the electrostatic potential of a family of conducting charged toroids. The toroids are characterized by two lengths "a" and "b", with "a" greater than or equal to "2b". They are closed, with no hole in the "doughnut". The results are obtained by considering the potential of two equal charges, displaced from the…

  13. Fatigue assessment of central support structure coil jacket of 4.5 MJ SMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, Javed; Bhunia, Uttam; Mondal, Bidhan Chandra; Nandi, Chinmay; Pal, Gautam; Saha, Subimal

    2013-01-01

    The Superconducting coil of 4.5 SMES will be of sector-toroidal type with 8 sectors. The maximum coil current will be 1200 Amperes. During its life time the SMES will be subjected to several cycles of charging and discharging. Thus the structural assessment of coil central support structure and the Liquid Helium Jacket, which comprises of the stress analysis and the fatigue life assessment, is a critical part of the design. In this paper fatigue life assessment of the 4.5 MJ SMES coil central support structure and the Liquid Helium Jacket together with the related stress analysis is presented. Coupled electromagnetic and Structural analysis using the commercial finite element analysis package ANSYS is performed. Considering the cyclic symmetry of the coil assembly, only 1/8th of the assembly is modelled. (author)

  14. Real-time protection of the Ohmic heating coil force limits in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broesch, J.D.; Scoville, J.T.; Hyatt, A.W.; Coon, R.M.

    1997-11-01

    The maximum safe operating limits of the DIII-D tokamak are determined by the force produced in the ohmic heating coil and the toroidal field coil during a plasma pulse. This force is directly proportional to the product of the current in the coils. Historically, the current limits for each coil were set statically before each pulse without regard for the time varying nature of the currents. In order to allow the full time-dependent capability of the ohmic coil to be used, a system was developed for monitoring the product of the currents dynamically and making appropriate adjustments in real time. This paper discusses the purpose, implementation, and results of this work

  15. Toroidal effects on drift wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.; Gray, M.G.; Furnish, G.; Horton, W.

    1992-09-23

    The universal drift instability and other drift instabilities driven by density and temperature gradients in a toroidal system are investigated in both linear and nonlinear regimes via particle simulation. Runs in toroidal and cylindrical geometry show dramatic differences in plasma behavior, primarily due to the toroidicity-induced coupling of rational surfaces through the poloidal mode number m. In the toroidal system studied, the eigenmodes are seen to possess (i) an elongated, nearly global radial extent (ii) a higher growth rate than in the corresponding cylindrical system, (iii) an eigenfrequency nearly constant with radius, (iv) a global temperature relaxation and enhancement of thermal heat conduction. Most importantly, the measured Xi shows an increase with radius and an absolute value on the order of that observed in experiment. On the basis of our observations, we argue that the increase in Xi with radius observed in experiment is caused by the global nature of heat convection in the presence of toroidicity-induced mode coupling.

  16. Toroidal effects on drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.; Gray, M.G.; Furnish, G.; Horton, W.

    1992-01-01

    The universal drift instability and other drift instabilities driven by density and temperature gradients in a toroidal system are investigated in both linear and nonlinear regimes via particle simulation. Runs in toroidal and cylindrical geometry show dramatic differences in plasma behavior, primarily due to the toroidicity-induced coupling of rational surfaces through the poloidal mode number m. In the toroidal system studied, the eigenmodes are seen to possess (i) an elongated, nearly global radial extent (ii) a higher growth rate than in the corresponding cylindrical system, (iii) an eigenfrequency nearly constant with radius, (iv) a global temperature relaxation and enhancement of thermal heat conduction. Most importantly, the measured Xi shows an increase with radius and an absolute value on the order of that observed in experiment. On the basis of our observations, we argue that the increase in Xi with radius observed in experiment is caused by the global nature of heat convection in the presence of toroidicity-induced mode coupling

  17. Commercial applications for COIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Wayne C.; Carroll, David L.; King, D. M.; Fockler, L. A.; Stromberg, D. S.; Sexauer, M.; Milmoe, A.; Sentman, Lee H.

    2000-01-01

    The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is a high power, fiber deliverable tool, which can be used for a number of different industrial applications. COIL is of particular interest because of its short fiber deliverable wavelength, high scaleable continuous wave power, and excellent material interaction properties. In past research the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign identified and decommissioning and decontamination (DD) of nuclear facilities as a primary focus for COIL technology. DD will be a major challenge in the coming decades. The use of a robotically driven fiber delivered cutting/ablation tool in contaminated areas promises to lower risks to workers for the DD mission. Further, the high cutting speed of COIL will significantly reduce the time required to cut contaminated equipment, reducing costs. The high power of COIL will permit the dismantling of thick stacks of piping and equipment as well as reactor vessels. COIL is very promising for the removal of material from contaminated surfaces, perhaps to depths thicker than an inch. Laser cutting and ablation minimizes dust and fumes, which reduces the required number of high efficiency particulate accumulator filters, thus reducing costly waste disposal. Other potential industrial applications for COIL are shipbuilding, automotive manufacturing, heavy machinery manufacturing, tasks requiring underwater cutting or welding, and there appear to be very promising applications for high powers lasers in the oil industry.

  18. Open coil traction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibhute, Pavankumar Janardan

    2012-01-01

    Sliding mechanics have become a popular method for space closure, with the development of preadjusted edgewise appliances. Furthermore, various space closing auxiliaries have been developed and extensively evaluated for their clinical efficiency. Their effectiveness is enhanced with optimum force magnitude and low load deflection rate/force decay. With the advent of nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) springs in orthodontics, load deflection rates have been markedly reduced. To use Ni-Ti springs, clinicians have to depend upon prefabricated closed coil springs. The open coil traction system, or open coil retraction spring, is developed utilizing Ni-Ti open coil springs for orthodontic space closure. This article describes the fabrication and clinical application of the open coil traction system, which has a number of advantages. It sustains a low load deflection rate with optimum force magnitude, and its design is adjustable for a desired length and force level. It is fail-safe for both activation and deactivation (ie, it cannot be overactivated, and the decompression limit of the open coil is controlled by the operator). The open coil traction system can be offset from the mucosa to help reduce soft tissue impingement.

  19. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Leon, Francisco [New York Univ. (NYU), Brooklyn, NY (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    2014-08-01

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of single-phase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014. The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 k

  20. Toroidal bubbles with circulation in ideal hydrodynamics: A variational approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, V.P.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Incompressible, inviscid, irrotational, unsteady flows with circulation Gamma around a distorted toroidal bubble are considered. A general variational principle that determines the evolution of the bubble shape is formulated. For a two-dimensional (2D) cavity with a constant area A, exact...... pseudodifferential equations of motion are derived, based on variables that determine a conformal mapping of the unit circle exterior into the region occupied by the fluid. A closed expression for the Hamiltonian of the 2D system in terms of canonical variables is obtained. Stability of a stationary drifting 2D...... hollow vortex is demonstrated, when the gravity is small, gA(3/2)/Gamma(2)circulation-dominated regime of three-dimensional flows a simplified Lagrangian is suggested, inasmuch as the bubble shape is well described by the center line R(xi,t) and by an approximately circular cross section...

  1. High beta plasma operation in a toroidal plasma producing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.F.

    1978-01-01

    A high beta plasma is produced in a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration by ohmic heating and auxiliary heating. The plasma pressure is continuously monitored and used in a control system to program the current in the poloidal field windings. Throughout the heating process, magnetic flux is conserved inside the plasma and the distortion of the flux surfaces drives a current in the plasma. As a consequence, the total current increases and the poloidal field windings are driven with an equal and opposing increasing current. The spatial distribution of the current in the poloidal field windings is determined by the plasma pressure. Plasma equilibrium is maintained thereby, and high temperature, high beta operation results

  2. Coil spring venting arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCugh, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed

  3. Design of the outer poloidal field coils for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sborchia, C.; Mitchell, N.; Yoshida, K.

    1995-01-01

    The ITER poloidal field (PF) system consists of a central solenoid (CS or PF-1), which is not subject of this paper, and six ring coils using a 40 kA forced flow cooled superconductor. The coils, placed around the toroidal field (TF) system, are used to start-up the plasma with typical ramp-up times of 100 s and burn duration of 1000 s. They also provide control and shaping of the plasma, with small, frequent current variations on a 1-5 s time scale. The magnetic field produced by the coils ranges from about 4.5 to 8 T and the AC losses in the conductor are significant: the largest coils require cooling path lengths up to 1000 m as well as the use of 2 in-hand winding. The field level and high thermal loads make the use of Nb 3 Sn strand attractive. This paper describes the basic design of the six ring (outer) coils developed by the ITER Joint Central Team in collaboration with the four Home Teams. The coil structural material is provided by a thick conductor jacket and by a bonded insulation system. The forces acting on the coils during typical operational scenarios and plasma disruption/vertical instabilities have been evaluated: radial forces are self-reacted by hoop stresses in the ring coil, with tensile stresses up to 300 MPa in the conductor jacket, and the vertical forces are resisted by a discrete support system, with shear stresses up to 10 MPa in the insulation. (orig./WL)

  4. Design and manufacturing status of trim coils for the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riße, K., E-mail: konrad.risse@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Rummel, Th.; Freundt, S.; Dudek, A.; Renard, S.; Bykov, V.; Köppen, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Langish, S.; Neilson, G.H.; Brown, Th.; Chrzanowski, J.; Mardenfeld, M.; Malinowski, F.; Khodak, A.; Zhao, X. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Eksaa, G. [Everson Tesla Inc., Nazareth, PA (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The trim coil system will fine tune the main magnetic field during plasma operation by reducing the magnetic field errors. ► The coil design and operational parameters are fixed, the manufacturing is running. ► The coils are equipped with temperature sensors and a voltage tap system to monitor the coil temperature. ► The max. operational deflection is in the order of 4.5 mm; the max. shearing stress across bond planes is of order 16 MPa. ► Special clamps equipped with elastomeric pads allow fixing the coils on the outer cryostat wall. -- Abstract: The stellarator fusion experiment Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is currently under construction at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Greifswald, Germany. The main magnetic field will be provided by a superconducting magnet system which generates a fivefold toroidal periodic magnetic field. However, unavoidable tolerances can result in small deviations of the magnetic field which disturb the toroidal periodicity. In order to have a tool to influence these field errors five additional normal conducting trim coils were designed to allow fine tuning of the main magnetic field during plasma operation. In the frame of an international cooperation the trim coils will be contributed by the US partners. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has accomplished several tasks to develop the final design ready for manufacturing e.g. detailed manufacturing design for the winding and for the coil connection area. The design work was accompanied by a detailed analysis of resulting forces and moments to prove the design. The manufacturing of the coils is running at Everson Tesla Inc; the first two coils were received at IPP.

  5. Extending the self-assembly of coiled-coil hybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robson Marsden, Hana

    2009-01-01

    Of the various biomolecular building blocks in use in nature, coiled-coil forming peptides are amongst those with the most potential as building blocks for the synthetic self-assembly of nanostructures. Native coiled coils have the ability to function in, and influence, complex systems composed of

  6. Pareto optimal design of sectored toroidal superconducting magnet for SMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Uttam; Saha, Subimal; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-10-01

    A novel multi-objective optimization design approach for sectored toroidal superconducting magnetic energy storage coil has been developed considering the practical engineering constraints. The objectives include the minimization of necessary superconductor length and torus overall size or volume, which determines a significant part of cost towards realization of SMES. The best trade-off between the necessary conductor length for winding and magnet overall size is achieved in the Pareto-optimal solutions, the compact magnet size leads to increase in required superconducting cable length or vice versa The final choice among Pareto optimal configurations can be done in relation to other issues such as AC loss during transient operation, stray magnetic field at outside the coil assembly, and available discharge period, which is not considered in the optimization process. The proposed design approach is adapted for a 4.5 MJ/1 MW SMES system using low temperature niobium-titanium based Rutherford type cable. Furthermore, the validity of the representative Pareto solutions is confirmed by finite-element analysis (FEA) with a reasonably acceptable accuracy.

  7. Quasistatic evolution of compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgro, A.G.; Spencer, R.L.; Lilliequist, C.

    1981-01-01

    Some results are presented of simulations of the post formation evolution of compact toroids. The simulations were performed with a 1-1/2 D transport code. Such a code makes explicit use of the fact that the shapes of the flux surfaces in the plasma change much more slowly than do the profiles of the physical variables across the flux surfaces. Consequently, assuming that the thermodynamic variables are always equilibrated on a flux surface, one may calculate the time evolution of these profiles as a function of a single variable that labels the flux surfaces. Occasionally, during the calculation these profiles are used to invert the equilibrium equation to update the shapes of the flux surfaces. In turn, these shapes imply certain geometric cofficients, such as A = 2 >, which contain the geometric information required by the 1-D equations

  8. Runaway electrons in toroidal discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoepfel, H.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of runaway electrons in toroidal devices are reviewed here, with particular reference to tokamaks. The complex phenomenology of runaway effects, which have been the subject of research for the past twenty years, is organized within the framework of a number of physical models. The mechanisms and rates for runaway production are discussed first, followed by sections on runaway-driven kinetic relaxation processes and runaway orbit confinement. Next, the equilibrium and stability of runaway-dominated discharges are reviewed. Models for runaway production at early times in the discharge and the scaling of runaway phenomena to larger devices are also discussed. Finally, detection techniques and possible applications of runaways are mentioned. (author)

  9. The barrel muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector has acquired its first cosmic event in a magnetic field produced by the barrel toroid magnet.

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A 3-D event display of a cosmic muon event, showing the path of a muon travelling through three layers of the barrel muon spectrometer. Three of the eight coils of the barrel toroid magnet can be seen in the top half of the drawing.

  10. A periodic table of coiled-coil protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutevelis, Efrosini; Woolfson, Derek N

    2009-01-23

    Coiled coils are protein structure domains with two or more alpha-helices packed together via interlacing of side chains known as knob-into-hole packing. We analysed and classified a large set of coiled-coil structures using a combination of automated and manual methods. This led to a systematic classification that we termed a "periodic table of coiled coils," which we have made available at http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/ccplus/search/periodic_table. In this table, coiled-coil assemblies are arranged in columns with increasing numbers of alpha-helices and in rows of increased complexity. The table provides a framework for understanding possibilities in and limits on coiled-coil structures and a basis for future prediction, engineering and design studies.

  11. Fault Analysis of ITER Coil Power Supply System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, In Ho; Jun, Tao; Benfatto, Ivone

    2009-01-01

    The ITER magnet coils are all designed using superconductors with high current carrying capability. The Toroidal Field (TF) coils operate in a steadystate mode with a current of 68 kA and discharge the stored energy in case of quench with using 9 interleaved Fast Discharge Units (FDUs). The Central Solenoid (CS) coils and Poloidal Field (PF) coils operate in a pulse mode with currents of up to 45 kA and require fast variation of currents inducing more than 10 kV during normal operation on the coil terminals using Switching Network (SN) systems (CSs, PF1 and 6) and Booster and VS converters (PF2 to 5), which are series connected to Main converters. SN and FDU systems comprise high current DC circuit breakers and resistors for generating high voltage (SN) and to dissipate magnetic energy (FDUs). High transient voltages can arise due to the switching operation of SN and FD and the characteristics of resistors and stray components of DC distribution systems. Also, faults in power supply control such as shorts or grounding faults can produce higher voltages between terminals and between terminal and ground. Therefore, the design of the coil insulation, coil terminal regions, feeders, feed throughs, pipe breaks and instrumentation must take account of these high voltages during normal and abnormal conditions. Voltage insulation level can be defined and it is necessary to test the coils at higher voltages, to be sure of reliable performance during the lifetime of operation. This paper describes the fault analysis of the TF, CS and PF coil power supply systems, taking account of the stray parameter of the power supply and switching systems and inductively coupled superconducting coil models. Resistor grounding systems are included in the simulation model and all fault conditions such as converter hardware and software faults, switching system hardware and software faults, DC short circuits and single grounding faults are simulated. The occurrence of two successive faults

  12. LHC bending magnet coil

    CERN Multimedia

    A short test version of coil of wire used for the LHC dipole magnets. The high magnetic fields needed for guiding particles around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring are created by passing 12’500 amps of current through coils of superconducting wiring. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC is the largest superconducting installation ever built. The magnetic field must also be extremely uniform. This means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Indeed, nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. Magnet coils are made of copper-clad niobium–titanium cables — each wire in the cable consists of 9’000 niobium–titanium filaments ten times finer than a hair.

  13. Borehole induction coil transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, Gale; Wilt, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A borehole induction coil transmitter which is a part of a cross-borehole electromagnetic field system that is used for underground imaging applications. The transmitter consists of four major parts: 1) a wound ferrite or mu-metal core, 2) an array of tuning capacitors, 3) a current driver circuit board, and 4) a flux monitor. The core is wound with several hundred turns of wire and connected in series with the capacitor array, to produce a tuned coil. This tuned coil uses internal circuitry to generate sinusoidal signals that are transmitted through the earth to a receiver coil in another borehole. The transmitter can operate at frequencies from 1-200 kHz and supplies sufficient power to permit the field system to operate in boreholes separated by up to 400 meters.

  14. Structure of the radial electric field and toroidal/poloidal flow in high temperature toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Katsumi

    2001-01-01

    The structure of the radial electric field and toroidal/poloidal flow is discussed for the high temperature plasma in toroidal systems, tokamak and Heliotron type magnetic configurations. The spontaneous toroidal and poloidal flows are observed in the plasma with improved confinement. The radial electric field is mainly determined by the poloidal flow, because the contribution of toroidal flow to the radial electric field is small. The jump of radial electric field and poloidal flow are commonly observed near the plasma edge in the so-called high confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas in tokamaks and electron root plasma in stellarators including Heliotrons. In general the toroidal flow is driven by the momentum input from neutral beam injected toroidally. There is toroidal flow not driven by neutral beam in the plasma and it will be more significant in the plasma with large electric field. The direction of these spontaneous toroidal flows depends on the symmetry of magnetic field. The spontaneous toroidal flow driven by the ion temperature gradient is in the direction to increase the negative radial electric field in tokamak. The direction of spontaneous toroidal flow in Heliotron plasmas is opposite to that in tokamak plasma because of the helicity of symmetry of the magnetic field configuration. (author)

  15. Compact toroid formation, compression, and acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degnan, J.H.; Peterkin, R.E. Jr.; Baca, G.P.; Beason, J.D.; Bell, D.E.; Dearborn, M.E.; Dietz, D.; Douglas, M.R.; Englert, S.E.; Englert, T.J.; Hackett, K.E.; Holmes, J.H.; Hussey, T.W.; Kiuttu, G.F.; Lehr, F.M.; Marklin, G.J.; Mullins, B.W.; Price, D.W.; Roderick, N.F.; Ruden, E.L.; Sovinec, C.R.; Turchi, P.J.; Bird, G.; Coffey, S.K.; Seiler, S.W.; Chen, Y.G.; Gale, D.; Graham, J.D.; Scott, M.; Sommars, W.

    1993-01-01

    Research on forming, compressing, and accelerating milligram-range compact toroids using a meter diameter, two-stage, puffed gas, magnetic field embedded coaxial plasma gun is described. The compact toroids that are studied are similar to spheromaks, but they are threaded by an inner conductor. This research effort, named MARAUDER (Magnetically Accelerated Ring to Achieve Ultra-high Directed Energy and Radiation), is not a magnetic confinement fusion program like most spheromak efforts. Rather, the ultimate goal of the present program is to compress toroids to high mass density and magnetic field intensity, and to accelerate the toroids to high speed. There are a variety of applications for compressed, accelerated toroids including fast opening switches, x-radiation production, radio frequency (rf) compression, as well as charge-neutral ion beam and inertial confinement fusion studies. Experiments performed to date to form and accelerate toroids have been diagnosed with magnetic probe arrays, laser interferometry, time and space resolved optical spectroscopy, and fast photography. Parts of the experiment have been designed by, and experimental results are interpreted with, the help of two-dimensional (2-D), time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations. When not driven by a second discharge, the toroids relax to a Woltjer--Taylor equilibrium state that compares favorably to the results of 2-D equilibrium calculations and to 2-D time-dependent MHD simulations. Current, voltage, and magnetic probe data from toroids that are driven by an acceleration discharge are compared to 2-D MHD and to circuit solver/slug model predictions. Results suggest that compact toroids are formed in 7--15 μsec, and can be accelerated intact with material species the same as injected gas species and entrained mass ≥1/2 the injected mass

  16. An analysis of plasma ion toroidal rotation during large amplitude MHD activity in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snipes, J.A.; Esch, H.P.L. de; Lazzaro, E.; Stork, D.; Hellermann, M. von; Galvao, R.; Hender, T.C.; Zasche, D.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed study of plasma ion toroidal rotation in JET during large amplitude MHD activity has revealed a strong viscous force that couples plasma ions to MHD modes. Depending on the MHD modes present, this force can couple across all of the plasma cross section, across only the central region, roughly within the q=1 surface, or across only the outer region outside the q=1.5 surface. The force acts to flatten the ion toroidal rotation frequency profile, measured by the JET active charge exchange spectroscopy diagnostic, across the coupled region of plasma. The frequency of rotation in this region agrees with the MHD oscillation frequency measured by magnetic pick-up coils at the wall. The strength of the force between the ions and modes becomes evident during high power NBI when the mode locks and drags the ion toroidal rotation frequency to zero, within the errors of the measurements. The present theories of plasma rotation either ignore MHD effects entirely, consider only moderate n toroidal field ripple, or low n ripple effects. (author) 7 refs., 3 figs

  17. Sacral Theater, a code to simulate the propagation of the superconducting magnet LHC atlas barrel toroid transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastineau, B.

    2000-06-01

    Sacral Theater has been developed for the toroid magnet Atlas of the CERN LHC project. This three dimensional calculations code calculates the propagation of the transition of a superconducting coil in 25 m long hippodrome. Procedures to study low currents have been included. This work is a part of the magnet safety system because the coils protection is made by warmers activating the quench propagation in case of default detection. This allows the complete dissipation of storage energy that can reach 1080 MJ on Atlas. (N.C.)

  18. Stability tests of the Westinghouse coil in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresner, L.; Fehling, D.T.; Lubell, M.S.; Lue, J.W.; Luton, J.N.; McManamy, T.J.; Shen, S.S.; Wilson, C.T.

    1987-09-01

    The Westinghouse coil is one of three forced-flow coils in the six-coil toroidal array of the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is wound with an 18-kA, Nb 3 Sn/Cu, cable-in-conduit superconductor structurally supported by aluminum plates and cooled by 4-K, 15-atm supercritical helium. The coil is instrumented to permit measurement of helium temperature, pressure, and flow rate; structure temperature and strain; field; and normal zone voltage. A resistive heater has been installed to simulate nuclear heating, and inductive heaters have been installed to facilitate stability testing. The coil has been tested both individually and in the six-coil array. The tests covered charging to full design current and field, measuring the current-sharing threshold temperature using the resistive heaters, and measuring the stability margin using the pulsed inductive heaters. At least one section of the conductor exhibits a very broad resistive transition (resistive transition index = 4). The broad transition, though causing the appearance of voltage at relatively low temperatures, does not compromise the stability margin of the coil, which was greater than 1.1 J/cm 3 of strands. In another, nonresistive location, the stability margin was between 1.7 and 1.9 J/cm 3 of strands. The coil is completely stable in operation at 100% design current in both the single- and six-coil modes

  19. Upgrade of DC power supply system in ITER CS model coil test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimono, Mitsugu; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Keita; Kawano, Katsumi; Isono, Takaaki

    2014-03-01

    Objective of the ITER CS Model Coil Test Facility is to evaluate a large scale superconducting conductor for fusion using the Central Solenoid (CS) Model Coil, which can generate a 13T magnetic field in the inner bore with a 1.5 m diameter. The facility is composed of a helium refrigerator / liquefier system, a DC power supply system, a vacuum system and a data acquisition system. The DC power supply system supplies currents to two superconducting coils, the CS Model Coil and an insert coil. A 50-kA DC power supply is installed for the CS Model Coil and two 30 kA DC power supplies are installed for an insert coil. In order to evaluate superconducting performance of a conductor used for ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coils whose operating current is 68 kA, the line for an insert coil is upgraded. A 10 kA DC power supply was added, DC circuit breakers were upgraded, bus bars and current measuring instrument were replaced. In accordance to the upgrade, operation manual was revised. (author)

  20. Distortion dependent intersystem crossing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephansen, Anne Boutrup; Sølling, Theis Ivan

    2017-01-01

    . The effect is observed to increase in the presence of methyl-groups on the pinnacle carbon-atoms, where largest extents of r and p orbital-mixing are observed. This is fully consistent with the time-resolved spectroscopy data: Toluene and p-xylene show evidence for ultrafast triplet formation competing......The competition between ultrafast intersystem crossing and internal conversion in benzene, toluene, and p-xylene is investigated with time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. By exciting to S2 out-of-plane symmetry breaking, distortions are activated at early...... times whereupon spin-forbidden intersystem crossing becomes (partly) allowed. Natural bond orbital analysis suggests that the pinnacle carbon atoms distorting from the aromatic plane change hybridization between the planar Franck-Condon geometry and the deformed (boat-shaped) S2 equilibrium geometry...

  1. On modular stellarator reactor coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, F.; Harmeyer, E.; Kisslinger, J.; Wobig, H.

    1985-01-01

    Modular twisted coils are discussed which produce magnetic fields of the Advanced Stellarator WENDELSTEIN VII-AS type. Reducing the number coils/FP offers advantage for maintenance of coils, but increases the magnetic ripple and B m /B o . Computation of force densities within the coils of ASR and ASB yield local maximum values of about 80 and 180 MN/m 3 , respectively. A system of mutual coil support is being developed. Twisted coils in helical arrangement provide a reactor-sized HELIAC system. In order to reduce the magnetic ripple, a large number of 14 coils/FP in special arrangement is used

  2. Compact toroid formation using barrier fields and controlled reconnection in the TRX-1 field reversed theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, A.L.; Armstrong, W.T.

    1982-01-01

    TRX-1 is a new 20 cm diameter, 1-m long field reversed theta pinch with a magnetic field swing of 10 kG in 3 μsec. It employs z discharge preionization and octopole barrier fields to maximize flux trapping on first half cycle operation. Cusp coils are used at the theta pinch ends to delay reconnection and fast mirror coils are used to trigger reconnection at a time designed to maximize axial heating efficiency and toroid lifetime. These controls are designed to study toroid formation methods which are claimed to be especially efficient by Russian experimenters. Studies have been conducted on flux trapping efficiency, triggered reconnection, and equilibrium and lifetime

  3. Formation of toroidal pre-heat plasma without residual magnetic field for high-beta pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Nagayasu; Tamaru, Ken; Nagata, Akiyoshi.

    1979-01-01

    Formation of toroidal pre-heat plasma was studied. The pre-heat plasma without residual magnetic field was made by chopping the current for pre-heat, A small toroidal-pinch system was used for the experiment. The magnetic field was measured with a magnetic probe. One turn loop was used for the measurement of the toroidal one-turn electric field. A pair of Rogoski coil was used for the measurement of plasma current. The dependence of residual magnetic field on chopping time was measured. By fast chopping of the primary current in the pre-heating circuit, the poloidal magnetic field was reduced to several percent within 5 microsecond. After chopping, no instability was observed in the principal discharge plasma produced within several microsecond. As the conclusion, it can be said that the control of residual field can be made by current chopping. (Kato, T.)

  4. Unified kinetic theory in toroidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitchcock, D.A.; Hazeltine, R.D.

    1980-12-01

    The kinetic theory of toroidal systems has been characterized by two approaches: neoclassical theory which ignores instabilities and quasilinear theory which ignores collisions. In this paper we construct a kinetic theory for toroidal systems which includes both effects. This yields a pair of evolution equations; one for the spectrum and one for the distribution function. In addition, this theory yields a toroidal generalization of the usual collision operator which is shown to have many similar properties - conservation laws, H theorem - to the usual collision operator

  5. Rotating bubble and toroidal nuclei and fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royer, G.; Haddad, F.; Jouault, B.

    1995-01-01

    The energy of rotating bubble and toroidal nuclei predicted to be formed in central heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies is calculated within the generalized rotating liquid drop model. The potential barriers standing in these exotic deformation paths are compared with the three dimensional and plane fragmentation barriers. In the toroidal deformation path of the heaviest systems exists a large potential pocket localised below the plane fragmentation barriers. This might allow the temporary survival of heavy nuclear toroids before the final clusterization induced by the surface and proximity tension. (author)

  6. Analysis of an HTS coil for large scale superconducting magnetic energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Young; Lee, Se Yeon; Choi, Kyeong Dal; Park, Sang Ho; Hong, Gye Won; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Woo Seok [Korea Polytechnic University, Siheung (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ji Kwang [Woosuk University, Wanju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    It has been well known that a toroid is the inevitable shape for a high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil as a component of a large scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system (SMES) because it is the best option to minimize a magnetic field intensity applied perpendicularly to the HTS wires. Even though a perfect toroid coil does not have a perpendicular magnetic field, for a practical toroid coil composed of many HTS pancake coils, some type of perpendicular magnetic field cannot be avoided, which is a major cause of degradation of the HTS wires. In order to suggest an optimum design solution for an HTS SMES system, we need an accurate, fast, and effective calculation for the magnetic field, mechanical stresses, and stored energy. As a calculation method for these criteria, a numerical calculation such as an finite element method (FEM) has usually been adopted. However, a 3-dimensional FEM can involve complicated calculation and can be relatively time consuming, which leads to very inefficient iterations for an optimal design process. In this paper, we suggested an intuitive and effective way to determine the maximum magnetic field intensity in the HTS coil by using an analytic and statistical calculation method. We were able to achieve a remarkable reduction of the calculation time by using this method. The calculation results using this method for sample model coils were compared with those obtained by conventional numerical method to verify the accuracy and availability of this proposed method. After the successful substitution of this calculation method for the proposed design program, a similar method of determining the maximum mechanical stress in the HTS coil will also be studied as a future work.

  7. Analysis of an HTS coil for large scale superconducting magnetic energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Young; Lee, Se Yeon; Choi, Kyeong Dal; Park, Sang Ho; Hong, Gye Won; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Woo Seok; Lee, Ji Kwang

    2015-01-01

    It has been well known that a toroid is the inevitable shape for a high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil as a component of a large scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system (SMES) because it is the best option to minimize a magnetic field intensity applied perpendicularly to the HTS wires. Even though a perfect toroid coil does not have a perpendicular magnetic field, for a practical toroid coil composed of many HTS pancake coils, some type of perpendicular magnetic field cannot be avoided, which is a major cause of degradation of the HTS wires. In order to suggest an optimum design solution for an HTS SMES system, we need an accurate, fast, and effective calculation for the magnetic field, mechanical stresses, and stored energy. As a calculation method for these criteria, a numerical calculation such as an finite element method (FEM) has usually been adopted. However, a 3-dimensional FEM can involve complicated calculation and can be relatively time consuming, which leads to very inefficient iterations for an optimal design process. In this paper, we suggested an intuitive and effective way to determine the maximum magnetic field intensity in the HTS coil by using an analytic and statistical calculation method. We were able to achieve a remarkable reduction of the calculation time by using this method. The calculation results using this method for sample model coils were compared with those obtained by conventional numerical method to verify the accuracy and availability of this proposed method. After the successful substitution of this calculation method for the proposed design program, a similar method of determining the maximum mechanical stress in the HTS coil will also be studied as a future work

  8. Toroidal magnetic field system for a 2-MA reversed-field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melton, J.G.; Linton, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    The engineering design of the toroidal magnetic field (TF) system for a 2-MA Reversed-Field Pinch experiment (ZT-H) is described. ZT-H is designed with major radius 2.15 meters, minor radius 0.40 meters, and a peak toroidal magnetic field of 0.85 Tesla. The requirement for highly uniform fields, with spatial ripple <0.2% leads to a design with 72 equally spaced circular TF coils, located at minor radius 0.6 meters, carrying a maximum current of 9.0 MA. The coils are driven by a 12-MJ capacitor bank which is allowed to ring in order to aid the reversal of magnetic field. A stress analysis is presented, based upon calculated hoop tension, centering force, and overturning moment, treating these as a combination of static loads and considering that the periodic nature of the loading causes little amplification. The load transfer of forces and moments is considered as a stress distribution resisted by the coils, support structures, wedges, and the structural shell

  9. Coil protection calculator for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsala, R.J.; Woolley, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    A new coil protection calculator (CPC) is presented in this paper. It is now being developed for TFTR's magnetic field coils will replace the existing coil fault detector. The existing fault detector sacrifices TFTR operating capability for simplicity. The new CPC will permit operation up to the actual coil limits by accurately and continuously computing coil parameters in real-time. The improvement will allow TFTR to operate with higher plasma currents and will permit the optimization of pulse repetition rates

  10. The design study of the JT-60SU device. No. 3. The superconductor-coils of JT-60SU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushigusa, Kenkichi; Mori, Katsuharu; Nakagawa, Syouji

    1997-03-01

    The superconducting coil systems and the cryogenic system for the JT-60 Super Upgrade (JT-60SU) has been designed. Both Nb 3 Al and NbTi as a superconducting wire material are employed in the toroidal coils (D-shaped 18 coils) to realize a high field magnet with a low cost. Significant reduction of the coil weight (150 tons/coil) without losing the coil rigidity has been achieved by connecting two toroidal coils with shear panels. Validity of this design is confirmed by the detailed structural analysis and thermohydraulic analysis. The poloidal coil system consists of 4 central solenoid coils with (NbTi) 3 Sn and 6 outer equilibrium field coils with NbTi. This system has an enough capability to supply the flux of 170Vs to produce a 10MA discharge with 200s of flat-top and to make various plasma configurations. The construction procedure of the poloidal coil system is also established under the constraint of the JT-60 site. Two sets of race-track shaped superconducting coils mounted on the top of the machine is designed to compensate the error field inside the vessel by supplying helical (m=2/n=1) magnetic field. By using cryogenic system with a 36kW of cooling capacity, the total cold weight of around 4000tons can be cooled down to 4.5K within one month, and steady heat load of 6.5kW and transient heat load of 9.0MJ can be removed within 30 minutes of discharge repetition rate. (author)

  11. Toroidal equilibrium and radial profiles from magnetic measurements in Extrap T1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunsell, Per; Jin Li; Tennfors, Einar

    1991-01-01

    The toroidal equilibrium position in the Extrap T1 toroidal Z-pinch is studied by measuring the currents induced in the external octupole field rings. Radial profiles are obtained by an internal magnetic coil array. From the magnetic field, profiles of current density, plasma pressure, safety factor, resistivity and input power density are deduced. A polynomial model is developed to simulate the measured profiles. The classical ion heat conduction losses in Extrap discharges are calculated using this model and compared to the power input. for polynomials matched to magnetic field profiles measured in present experiments, these losses are small. By varying the coefficients of the polynomials, a region is found where the power input can balance the classical heat conduction losses at higher values of Θ and β o . (Author)

  12. Los Alamos Compact Toroid, fast liner, and High-Density Z-Pinch programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.K.; Hammel, J.E.; Sherwood, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    The compact Toroid and High Density Z-Pinch are two of the plasma configurations presently being studied at Los Alamos. This paper summarizes these two programs along with the recently terminated Fast Liner Program. Included in this discussion is an analysis of compact Toroid formation techniques showing the tearing and reconnection of the fields that separate the spheromak from the radial fields of the coaxial source, and the final equilibrium state of the elongated FRC in the theta-pinch coil. In addition the typical dimensions of the geometry of the Fast Liner experiments are delineated Z-pinch and electrode assembly is displayed as is a graphic of the temporal behavior of the current required for radial equilibrium. Spheromak is examined in terms of formation, gross stability, and equilibrium and field reversed configuration is discussed in terms of gross stability, equilibrium, and confinement scaling

  13. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, William C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

  14. LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Burkhardt, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    The determination of the absolute energy loss due to radiation from impurities in the LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch experiment ZT-S is reported. The measurements show that over half the energy loss is accounted for by this mechanism. Thomson-scattering electron density measurements indicate only a gradual increase in temperature as the filling pressure is reduced, indicating an increased energy loss at lower pressures. Cylindrical and toroidal simulations of the experiment indicate either that a highly radiative pinch boundary or anomalous transport is needed to match the experimental results. New effects on the equilibrium due to plasma flows induced by the toroidal geometry are predicted by the toroidal simulations. The preliminary results on the low-temperature discharge cleaning of the ZT-S torus are reported. A description of the upgrade of the ZT-S experiment and the objectives, construction and theoretical predictions for the new ZT-40 experiment are given. (author)

  15. LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Burkhardt, L.C.

    1978-01-01

    The determination of the absolute energy loss due to radiation from impurities in the LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch experiment ZT-S is reported. The measurements show over half of the energy loss is accounted for by this mechanism. Thomson scattering electron density measurements indicate only a gradual increase in temperature as the filling pressure is reduced indicating an increased energy loss at lower pressures. Cylindrical and toroidal simulations of the experiment indicate either that a highly radiative pinch boundary or anomalous transport are needed to match the experimental results. New effects on the equilibrium due to plasma flows induced by the toroidal geometry are predicted by the toroidal simulations. The preliminary results on the low temperature discharge cleaning of the ZT-S torus are reported. A description of the upgrade of the ZT-S experiment and the objectives, construction and theoretical predictions for the new ZT-40 experiment are given

  16. Influence of toroidal rotation on tearing modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huishan; Cao, Jintao; Li, Ding

    2017-10-01

    Tearing modes stability analysis including toroidal rotation is studied. It is found that rotation affects the stability of tearing modes mainly through the interaction with resistive inner region of tearing mode. The coupling of magnetic curvature with centrifugal force and Coriolis force provides a perturbed perpendicular current, and a return parallel current is induced to affect the stability of tearing modes. Toroidal rotation plays a stable role, which depends on the magnitude of Mach number and adiabatic index Γ, and is independent on the direction of toroidal rotation. For Γ >1, the scaling of growth rate is changed for typical Mach number in present tokamaks. For Γ = 1 , the scaling keeps unchanged, and the effect of toroidal rotation is much less significant, compared with that for Γ >1. National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program and National Science Foundation of China under Grants No. 2014GB106004, No. 2013GB111000, No. 11375189, No. 11075161 and No. 11275260, and Youth Innovation Promotion Association CAS.

  17. Unstable universal drift eigenmodes in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chen, L.

    1979-08-01

    The eigenmode equation describing ballooning collisionless drift instabilities is analyzed both analytically and numerically. A new branch of eigenmodes, which corresponds to quasi-bound states due to the finite toroidicity, is shown to be destabilized by electron Landau damping for typical Tokamak parameters. This branch cannot be understood by the strong coupling approximation. However, the slab-like (Pearlstein-Berk type) branch is found to remain stable and experience enhanced shear damping due to finite toroidicity

  18. Diffusion tensor imaging using multiple coils for mouse brain connectomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouls, John C; Badea, Alexandra; Anderson, Robert B J; Cofer, Gary P; Allan Johnson, G

    2018-04-19

    The correlation between brain connectivity and psychiatric or neurological diseases has intensified efforts to develop brain connectivity mapping techniques on mouse models of human disease. The neural architecture of mouse brain specimens can be shown non-destructively and three-dimensionally by diffusion tensor imaging, which enables tractography, the establishment of a connectivity matrix and connectomics. However, experiments on cohorts of animals can be prohibitively long. To improve throughput in a 7-T preclinical scanner, we present a novel two-coil system in which each coil is shielded, placed off-isocenter along the axis of the magnet and connected to a receiver circuit of the scanner. Preservation of the quality factor of each coil is essential to signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance and throughput, because mouse brain specimen imaging at 7 T takes place in the coil-dominated noise regime. In that regime, we show a shielding configuration causing no SNR degradation in the two-coil system. To acquire data from several coils simultaneously, the coils are placed in the magnet bore, around the isocenter, in which gradient field distortions can bias diffusion tensor imaging metrics, affect tractography and contaminate measurements of the connectivity matrix. We quantified the experimental alterations in fractional anisotropy and eigenvector direction occurring in each coil. We showed that, when the coils were placed 12 mm away from the isocenter, measurements of the brain connectivity matrix appeared to be minimally altered by gradient field distortions. Simultaneous measurements on two mouse brain specimens demonstrated a full doubling of the diffusion tensor imaging throughput in practice. Each coil produced images devoid of shading or artifact. To further improve the throughput of mouse brain connectomics, we suggested a future expansion of the system to four coils. To better understand acceptable trade-offs between imaging throughput and connectivity

  19. Viscous damping of toroidal angular momentum in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, W. M. [Georgia Tech Fusion Research Center, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The Braginskii viscous stress tensor formalism was generalized to accommodate non-axisymmetric 3D magnetic fields in general toroidal flux surface geometry in order to provide a representation for the viscous damping of toroidal rotation in tokamaks arising from various “neoclassical toroidal viscosity” mechanisms. In the process, it was verified that the parallel viscosity contribution to damping toroidal angular momentum still vanishes even in the presence of toroidal asymmetries, unless there are 3D radial magnetic fields.

  20. Low-n shear Alfven spectra in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chance, M.S.

    1985-11-01

    In toroidal plasmas, the toroidal magnetic field is nonuniform over a magnetic surface and causes coupling of different poloidal harmonics. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the toroidicity not only breaks up the shear Alfven continuous spectrum, but also creates new, discrete, toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes with frequencies inside the continuum gaps. Potential applications of the low-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes on plasma heating and instabilities are addressed. 17 refs., 4 figs

  1. Celebrating the Barrel Toroid commissioning

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Jenni

    ATLAS invited Funding Agency representatives and Laboratory Heads directly related to the funding and construction of the Barrel Toroid for a small ceremony on 13th December 2006 at Point 1, in order to mark the successful first full excitation of the BT (see last eNews). On that date, which was during the December CERN Council week, several of the Funding Agency Heads or their representatives could be present, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. Speeches were delivered by the ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni thanking the Funding Partners in the name of the Collaboration, by Magnet Project Leader Herman ten Kate tracing the BT construction history, and by the CERN Director-General Robert Aymar congratulating all those who have contributed to the successful project. Herman ten Kate addressing the delegates. The text of the introductory address by Peter Jenni is reproduced here. "It is a great pleasure for me to welcome you all here...

  2. Anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjabi, A.

    1989-12-01

    When the magnetic moment of particle is conserved, there are three mechanisms which cause anomalous transport. These are: variation of magnetic field strength in flux surface, variation of electrostatic potential in flux surface, and destruction of flux surface. The anomalous transport of different groups of particles resulting from each of these mechanisms is different. This fact can be exploited to determine the cause of transport operative in an experimental situation. This approach can give far more information on the transport than the standard confinement time measurements. To implement this approach, we have developed Monte Carlo codes for toroidal geometries. The equations of motion are developed in a set of non-canonical, practical Boozer co-ordinates by means of Jacobian transformations of the particle drift Hamiltonian equations of motion. Effects of collisions are included by appropriate stochastic changes in the constants of motion. Effects of the loop voltage on particle motions are also included. We plan to apply our method to study two problems: the problem of the hot electron tail observed in edge region of ZT-40, and the energy confinement time in TOKAPOLE II. For the ZT-40 problem three situations will be considered: a single mode in the core, a stochastic region that covers half the minor radius, a stochastic region that covers the entire plasma. A turbulent spectrum of perturbations based on the experimental data of TOKAPOLE II will be developed. This will be used to simulate electron transport resulting from ideal instabilities and resistive instabilities in TOKAPOLE II

  3. Anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjabi, A.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a Monte Carlo method to estimate the transport of different groups of particles for plasmas in toroidal geometries. This method can determine the important transport mechanisms driving the anomalous transport by comparing the numerical results with the experimental data. The important groups of particles whose transport can be estimated by this method include runaway electrons, thermal electrons, both passing and trapped diagnostic beam ions etc. The three basic mechanisms driving the anomalous transport are: spatial variation of magnetic field strength, spatial variation of electrostatic potential within the flux surfaces, and the loss of flux surfaces. The equation of motion are obtained from the drift hamiltonian. The equations of motion are developed in the canonical and in the non-canonical, practical co-ordinates as well. The effects of collisions are represented by appropriate stochastic changes in the constants of motion at each time-step. Here we present the results of application of this method to three cases: superathermal alphas in the rippled field of tokamaks, motion in the magnetic turbulence of takapole II, and transport in the stochastic fields of ZT40. This work is supported by DOE OFE and ORAU HBCU program

  4. Superconducting coil protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, E.L.

    1975-01-01

    The protection system is based on a two-phase construction program. Phase I is the development of a reliable hardwired relay control system with a digital loop utilizing firmware and a microprocessor controller. Phase II is an expansion of the digital loop to include many heretofore unmonitored coil variables. These new monitored variables will be utilized to establish early quench detection and to formulate confirmation techniques of the quench detection mechanism. Established quench detection methods are discussed and a new approach to quench detection is presented. The new circuit is insensitive to external pulsed magnetic fields and the associated induced voltages. Reliability aspects of the coil protection system are discussed with respect to shutdowns of superconducting coil systems. Redundance and digital system methods are presented as related topics

  5. Updating the Design of the Poloidal Field Coils for the ITER Magnet System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Mitchell, N.; Jong, C.; Bessette, D.

    2006-01-01

    The ITER superconducting coil system consists of 18 Toroidal Field coils, six Poloidal Field (PF) coils, six Central Solenoid (CS) modules, 18 Correction Coils and their feeders. The six PF coils are attached to the TF coil cases through flexible plates or sliding supports allowing radial displacements. The PF coils and CS modules provide suitable magnetic fields for plasma shaping and position control. The PF coils use NbTi superconductor, cooled by supercritical helium. This gives a substantial cost saving compared to Nb 3 Sn and the elimination of a reaction heat treatment greatly simplifies the insulation of such large diameter coils. The cable configuration is 6 sub-cables arranged around a central cooling space. The conductors have a heavy square walled stainless steel jacket. The latest parameters of conductor design are evaluated by analysis of the minimum quench energy and hotspot temperature. The PF coils are self supporting as regards the radial magnetic loads. The vertical loads on each PF coil are transmitted to the TF coil cases. Load transmission is through flexible plates for the PF2 to PF5 coils or sliding supports for the PF1 and PF6 coils with fibreslip bearing surfaces. The supports for the PF winding consist of a set of clamping plates and stud bolts. The shape of the clamping plates has been designed to minimize stresses in the winding pack insulation. Bolts are pre-tensioned to keep pressure between the winding pack and clamping plate. Because of the difficulties in replacing the PF coils, the most unreliable component (the coil insulation) is designed with extra redundancy. There are two insulation layers with a thin metal screen in between. By monitoring the voltage of the intermediate screen, it is possible to detect an incipient short, defined as a short in only one of the two insulation layers. Adjustment of the screen voltage level may allow the shot growth to the stopped once it is detected. Alternately the faulty double pancake must

  6. Cryogenic aspects of a demountable toroidal field magnet system for tokamak type fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, S.Y.; Powell, J.; Lehner, J.

    1977-01-01

    A new concept for superconducting Toroidal Field (TF) magnet construction is presented. It is termed the ''Demountable Externally Anchored Low Stress'' (DEALS) magnet system. In contrast to continuous wound conventional superconducting coils, each magnet coil is made from several straight coil segments to form a polygon which can be joined and disjoined to improve reactor maintenance accessibility or to replace failed coil segments if necessary. A design example is presented of a DEALS magnet system for a UWMAK II size reactor. The overall magnet system is described, followed by a detailed analysis of the major heat loads in order to assess the refrigeration requirements for the concept. Despite the increased heat loads caused by high current power leads (200,000 amps) and the coil warm reinforcement support system, the analysis shows that at most, only about one percent (approximately 20 Mw) of the plant electrical output (approximately 2,000 Mw) is needed to operate the magnet cryogenic system. The advantages and the drawbacks of the DEALS magnet system are also discussed. The advantages include: capability to replace failed coils, increased accessibility to the blanket shield assembly, reduced reliability requirements for the magnet, much lower stress in conductor, easier application of improved high field brittle superconductors like Nb 3 Sn, improved magnet safety features, etc. The drawbacks are the increased refrigeration requirements and the necessity of a movable coil support system. A comparison with a conventional magnet system is made. It is concluded that the benefits of the DEALS approach far outweigh its penalties, and that the DEALS concept is the most practical, economical way to construct TF magnet systems for Tokamak reactors

  7. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak experimental power reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buncher, B.R.; Chi, J.W.H.; Fernandez, R.

    1976-01-01

    This report documents the principal results of a Conceptual Design Study for the Superconducting Toroidal Field System for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor. Two concepts are described for peak operating fields at the windings of 8 tesla, and 12 tesla, respectively. The design and manufacturing considerations are treated in sufficient detail that cost and schedule estimates could be developed. Major uncertainties in the design are identified and their potential impact discussed, along with recommendations for the necessary research and development programs to minimize these uncertainties. The minimum dimensions of a sub-size test coil for experimental qualification of the full size design are developed and a test program is recommended

  8. Application of the integrated blanket-coil concept (IBC) to fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrechts, M.J.; Steiner, D.; Mohanti, R.; Duggan, W.

    1987-01-01

    A novel concept is proposed for combining the blanket and coil functions of a fusion reactor into a single component and several unique applications to fusion reactor embodiments are identified. The proposed concept takes advantage of the fact that lithium is a good electrical conductor in addition to being a unique tritium-breeding material capable of energy recovery and transport at high temperatures. This concept, designated the ''integrated-blanket-coil (IBC) concept'' has the potential for: allowing fusion reactor embodiments which are easier to maintain; making fusion reactors more compact with an intrinsic ultra-high mass power density (net kW/sub E//metric tonne); and enhancing the tritium breeding potential for special coil applications such as ohmic heating and bean identation. By assuming a sandwich construction for the IBC walls (i.e., a layered combination of a thin wall of structural material, insulator and structural materials) the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-induced pressure drops and associated pressure stresses are modest and well below design limits. Possible unique applications of the IBC concept have been investigated and include the IBC concept applied to the poloidal field (PF) coils, toroidal field (TF) coils, divertor coils, ohmic heating (OH) coils, and identation coils for bean shaping

  9. Quench evolution and hot spot temperature in the ATLAS B0 model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; Boxman, H; Broggi, F; Dolgetta, N; Juster, F P; Tetteroo, M; ten Kate, H H J

    2004-01-01

    The 9-m long superconducting model coil B0 was built to verify design parameters and exercise the construction of the Barrel Toroid magnet of ATLAS Detector. The model coil has been successfully tested at CERN. An intensive test program to study quench propagation through the coil windings as well as the temperature distribution has been carried out. The coil is well equipped with pickup coils, voltage taps, superconducting quench detectors and temperature sensors. The current is applied up to 24 kA and about forty quenches have been induced by firing internal heaters. Characteristic numbers at full current of 24 kA are a normal zone propagation of 15 m/s in the conductor leading to a turn-to-turn propagation of 0.1 m/s, the entire coil in normal state within 5.5 s and a safe peak temperature in the windings of 85 K. The paper summarizes the quench performance of the B0 coil. Based on this experience the full-size coils are now under construction and first test results are awaited by early 2004. 7 Refs.

  10. NET model coil test possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erb, J.; Gruenhagen, A.; Herz, W.; Jentzsch, K.; Komarek, P.; Lotz, E.; Malang, S.; Maurer, W.; Noether, G.; Ulbricht, A.; Vogt, A.; Zahn, G.; Horvath, I.; Kwasnitza, K.; Marinucci, C.; Pasztor, G.; Sborchia, C.; Weymuth, P.; Peters, A.; Roeterdink, A.

    1987-11-01

    A single full size coil for NET/INTOR represents an investment of the order of 40 MUC (Million Unit Costs). Before such an amount of money or even more for the 16 TF coils is invested as much risks as possible must be eliminated by a comprehensive development programme. In the course of such a programme a coil technology verification test should finally prove the feasibility of NET/INTOR TF coils. This study report is almost exclusively dealing with such a verification test by model coil testing. These coils will be built out of two Nb 3 Sn-conductors based on two concepts already under development and investigation. Two possible coil arrangements are discussed: A cluster facility, where two model coils out of the two Nb 3 TF-conductors are used, and the already tested LCT-coils producing a background field. A solenoid arrangement, where in addition to the two TF model coils another model coil out of a PF-conductor for the central PF-coils of NET/INTOR is used instead of LCT background coils. Technical advantages and disadvantages are worked out in order to compare and judge both facilities. Costs estimates and the time schedules broaden the base for a decision about the realisation of such a facility. (orig.) [de

  11. Implementation of vertically asymmetric toroidal-field ripple for beam heating of tokamak reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Sheffield, G.V.; Towner, H.H.; Weissenburger, D.W.

    1976-10-01

    The neutral-beam energy required for adequate penetration of tokamak plasmas of high opacity can be reduced by a large factor if the beam is injected vertically into a region of large TF (toroidal-field) ripple. Energetic ions are trapped in local magnetic wells and drift vertically toward the midplane (z = 0). If the ripple is made very small on the opposite side of the midplane, drifting ions are detrapped and thermalized in the central plasma region. This paper discusses design considerations for establishing the required vertically asymmetric ripple. Examples are given of special TF-coil configurations, and of the use of auxiliary coil windings to create the prescribed ripple profiles

  12. Trim coil power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisler, R.; Peeler, H.; Zajicek, W.

    1985-01-01

    The 18 trim coil power supplies have been constructed and are now in place in the K500 pit and pit mezzanine. Final wiring of the primary power and control power is proceeding along with installation of cooling water supplies. The supplies are expected to be ready for final testing into resistive loads at the beginning of June, 1985

  13. Structural analysis of superconducting coils for fusion reactors taking into account the slip between conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gori, R.E.; Schrefler, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    A finite element formulation of friction effects for multilayered superconductors based on partially bonded beam systems is shown. The stiffness matrix of superconductor elements is derived, which takes into account the effects of friction between conductors. Examples relating to superconductors proposed for the NET toroidal and poloidal field coils show that the effects of slip are not negligible and should be taken into account in a structural analysis of the coil system. Also parametric studies with varying widths and heights of the insulation layer are shown

  14. Distorted Fingerprint Verification System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya KARTHIKAESHWARAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fingerprint verification is one of the most reliable personal identification methods. Fingerprint matching is affected by non-linear distortion introduced in fingerprint impression during the image acquisition process. This non-linear deformation changes both the position and orientation of minutiae. The proposed system operates in three stages: alignment based fingerprint matching, fuzzy clustering and classifier framework. First, an enhanced input fingerprint image has been aligned with the template fingerprint image and matching score is computed. To improve the performance of the system, a fuzzy clustering based on distance and density has been used to cluster the feature set obtained from the fingerprint matcher. Finally a classifier framework has been developed and found that cost sensitive classifier produces better results. The system has been evaluated on fingerprint database and the experimental result shows that system produces a verification rate of 96%. This system plays an important role in forensic and civilian applications.

  15. Toroidal cores of Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/PAA nanocomposites with potential applications in antennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcalá, Olgi [Laboratorio de Física de la Materia Condensada, Centro de Física, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), Apartado 20632, Caracas, 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Briceño, Sarah [Laboratorio de Materiales, Centro de Ingenieria de Materiales y Nanotecnología, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), Apartado 20632, Caracas, 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Brämer-Escamilla, Werner [Laboratorio de Física de la Materia Condensada, Centro de Física, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), Apartado 20632, Caracas, 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Silva, Pedro, E-mail: pejosi@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Física de la Materia Condensada, Centro de Física, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), Apartado 20632, Caracas, 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we study the electrical response of toroidal coils with cores of mixed ferrites magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) embedded in a polyacrylamide matrix (Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/PAA, 0 ≤ x ≤ 1). The MNPs were synthesized by thermal decomposition of molecular precursors and Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/PAA toroidal cores were constructed by using the method of copolymerization of MNPs with acrylamide and bis-acrylamide. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns of MNPs correspond to the cubic spinel phase. The MNPs average size obtained by using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) ranges from 6 to 12 nm. In order to compare our results we measure the characteristics of a commercial toroidal coil and we found that the impedance curves show a resonance peak for each configuration (commercial and Laboratory-made coils) around 75 MHz; the signal intensity of the Laboratory-made coil increases by one order of magnitude with respect to the commercial coil. We found that both, magnetic and electrical measurements, are related to the manganese concentration. The advantage of the designed Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/PAA toroidal coils system lies in the fact that versatile combinations of Mn{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+} components can bring facile tuning of the electrical and magnetic properties to optimize the impedance of the coils. - Highlights: • We prepare Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (MNPs) using a thermal decomposition method. • Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/PAA nanocomposite were prepared embedding the MNPs in a Polyacrylamide matrix. • Toroidal coils with cores of the Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/PAA nanocomposite were prepared. • We Compare Impedance measurements in our cores with that of a commercial core T50. • The intensity peak around 75 MHz was one order of magnitude greater in our cores.

  16. Limited distortion in LSB steganography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younhee; Duric, Zoran; Richards, Dana

    2006-02-01

    It is well known that all information hiding methods that modify the least significant bits introduce distortions into the cover objects. Those distortions have been utilized by steganalysis algorithms to detect that the objects had been modified. It has been proposed that only coefficients whose modification does not introduce large distortions should be used for embedding. In this paper we propose an effcient algorithm for information hiding in the LSBs of JPEG coefficients. Our algorithm uses parity coding to choose the coefficients whose modifications introduce minimal additional distortion. We derive the expected value of the additional distortion as a function of the message length and the probability distribution of the JPEG quantization errors of cover images. Our experiments show close agreement between the theoretical prediction and the actual additional distortion.

  17. Long-wavelength microinstabilities in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.W.; Rewoldt, G.

    1993-01-01

    Realistic kinetic toroidal eigenmode calculations have been carried out to support a proper assessment of the influence of long-wavelength microturbulence on transport in tokamak plasmas. In order to efficiently evaluate large-scale kinetic behavior extending over many rational surfaces, significant improvements have been made to a toroidal finite element code used to analyze the fully two-dimensional (r,θ) mode structures of trapped-ion and toroidal ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities. It is found that even at very long wavelengths, these eigenmodes exhibit a strong ballooning character with the associated radial structure relatively insensitive to ion Landau damping at the rational surfaces. In contrast to the long-accepted picture that the radial extent of trapped-ion instabilities is characterized by the ion-gyroradius-scale associated with strong localization between adjacent rational surfaces, present results demonstrate that under realistic conditions, the actual scale is governed by the large-scale variations in the equilibrium gradients. Applications to recent measurements of fluctuation properties in TFTR L-mode plasmas indicate that the theoretical trends appear consistent with spectral characteristics as well as rough heuristic estimates of the transport level. Benchmarking calculations in support of the development of a three-dimensional toroidal gyrokinetic code indicate reasonable agreement with respect to both the properties of the eigenfunctions and the magnitude of the eigenvalues during the linear phase of the simulations of toroidal ITG instabilities

  18. Cryogenic structures of superconducting coils for fusion experimental reactor 'ITER'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Hideo; Iguchi, Masahide; Hamada, Kazuya; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Shimamoto, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes both structural materials and structural design of the Toroidal Field (TF) coil and Central Solenoid (CS) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). All the structural materials used in the superconducting coil system of the ITER are austenitic stainless steels. Although 316LN is used in the most parts of the superconducting coil system, the cryogenic stainless steels, JJ1 and JK2LB, which were newly developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and Japanese steel companies, are used in the highest stress area of the TF coil case and the whole CS conductor jackets, respectively. These two materials became commercially available based on demonstration of productivity and weldability of materials, and evaluations of 4 K mechanical properties of trial products including welded parts. Structural materials are classified into five grades depending on stress distribution in the TF coil case. JAEA made an industrial specification for mass production based on the ITER requirements. In order to simplify quality control in mass production, JAEA has used materials specified in the material section of 'Codes for Fusion Facilities - Rules on Superconducting Magnet Structure (2008)' issued by the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME) in October 2008, which was established using an extrapolation method of 4 K material strengths from room temperature strength and chemical compositions developed by JAEA. It enables steel suppliers to easily control the quality of products at room temperature. JAEA has already started actual production with several manufacturing companies. The first JJ1 product to be used in the TF coil case and the first JK2LB jackets for CS were completed in October and September 2013, respectively. (author)

  19. Eccentric Coil Test Facility (ECTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, P.B.; Walstrom, P.L.; Anderson, W.C.; Marguerat, E.F.

    1975-01-01

    The conceptual design of a facility for testing superconducting coils under some conditions peculiar to tokamak systems is given. A primary element of the proposed facility is a large 25 MJ background solenoid. Discussions of the mechanical structure, the stress distribution and the thermal stability for this coil are included. The systems for controlling the facility and diagnosing test coil behavior are also described

  20. The ITER magnets: Preparation for full size construction based on the results of the model coil programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet, M.

    2003-01-01

    The ITER magnets are long-lead time items and the preparation of their construction is the subject of a major and coordinated effort of the ITER International Team and Participant Teams. The results of the ITER model coil programme constitute the basis and the main source of data for the preparation of the technical specifications for the procurement of the ITER magnets. A review of the salient results of the ITER model coil programme is given and the significance of these results for the preparation of full size industrial production is explained. The model coil programme has confirmed the validity of the design and the manufacturer's ability to produce the coils with the required quality level. The programme has also allowed the optimisation of the conductor design and the identification of further development which would lead to cost reductions of the toroidal field coil case. (author)

  1. Optimization of Coil Element Configurations for a Matrix Gradient Coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroboth, Stefan; Layton, Kelvin J; Jia, Feng; Littin, Sebastian; Yu, Huijun; Hennig, Jurgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2018-01-01

    Recently, matrix gradient coils (also termed multi-coils or multi-coil arrays) were introduced for imaging and B 0 shimming with 24, 48, and even 84 coil elements. However, in imaging applications, providing one amplifier per coil element is not always feasible due to high cost and technical complexity. In this simulation study, we show that an 84-channel matrix gradient coil (head insert for brain imaging) is able to create a wide variety of field shapes even if the number of amplifiers is reduced. An optimization algorithm was implemented that obtains groups of coil elements, such that a desired target field can be created by driving each group with an amplifier. This limits the number of amplifiers to the number of coil element groups. Simulated annealing is used due to the NP-hard combinatorial nature of the given problem. A spherical harmonic basis set up to the full third order within a sphere of 20-cm diameter in the center of the coil was investigated as target fields. We show that the median normalized least squares error for all target fields is below approximately 5% for 12 or more amplifiers. At the same time, the dissipated power stays within reasonable limits. With a relatively small set of amplifiers, switches can be used to sequentially generate spherical harmonics up to third order. The costs associated with a matrix gradient coil can be lowered, which increases the practical utility of matrix gradient coils.

  2. Effects of toroidicity on resistive tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzo, R.; Monticello, D.A.; Manickam, J.; Strauss, H.R.; Grimm, R.; McGuire, K.

    1983-03-01

    A reduced set of resistive MHD equations is solved numerically in three dimensions to study the stability of tokamak plasmas. Toroidal effects are included self-consistently to leading and next order in inverse aspect ratio, epsilon. The equations satisfy an energy integral. In addition, the momentum equation yields the Grad-Shafranov equation correct to all orders in epsilon. Low beta plasma are studied using several different q-profiles. In all cases, the linear growth rates are reduced by finite toroidicity. Excellent agreement with resistive PEST is obtianed. In some cases, toroidal effects lead to complete stabilization of the mode. Nonlinear results show smaller saturated island widths for finite aspect ratio compared to the cylindrical limit. If the current channel is wide enough so as to produce steep gradients towards the outside of the plasma, both the finite aspect ratio cases and cylindrical cases disrupt

  3. Toroidal mode-conversion in the ICRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaun, A.; Hellsten, T.; Chiu, S.C.

    1997-08-01

    Mode-conversion is studied in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) taking into account the toroidal geometry relevant for tokamaks. The global wavefields obtained using the gyrokinetic toroidal PENN code illustrate how the fast wave propagates to the neighborhood of the ion-ion hybrid resonance, where it is converted to a slow wave which deposits the wave energy through resonant interactions with the particles. The power deposition profiles obtained are dramatically different from the toroidal resonance absorption, showing that Budden's model is not a good approximation in the torus. Radially and poloidally localized wavefield structures characteristic of slow wave eigenmodes are predicted and could in experiments be driven to large amplitudes so as to interact efficiently with fast particles. (author) 5 figs., 1 tab., 48 refs

  4. Models for large superconducting toroidal magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arendt, F.; Brechna, H.; Erb, J.; Komarek, P.; Krauth, H.; Maurer, W.

    1976-01-01

    Prior to the design of large GJ toroidal magnet systems it is appropriate to procure small scale models, which can simulate their pertinent properties and allow to investigate their relevant phenomena. The important feature of the model is to show under which circumstances the system performance can be extrapolated to large magnets. Based on parameters such as the maximum magnetic field and the current density, the maximum tolerable magneto-mechanical stresses, a simple method of designing model magnets is presented. It is shown how pertinent design parameters are changed when the toroidal dimensions are altered. In addition some conductor cost estimations are given based on reactor power output and wall loading

  5. Guiding Center Equations in Toroidal Equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Roscoe; Zakharov, Leonid

    2002-01-01

    Guiding center equations for particle motion in a general toroidal magnetic equilibrium configuration are derived using magnetic coordinates. Previous derivations made use of Boozer coordinates, in which the poloidal and toroidal angle variables are chosen so that the Jacobian is inversely proportional to the square of the magnetic field. It is shown that the equations for guiding center motion in any equilibrium possessing nested flux surfaces have exactly the same simple form as those derived in this special case. This allows the use of more spatially uniform coordinates instead of the Boozer coordinates, greatly increasing the accuracy of calculations in large beta and strongly shaped equilibria

  6. Current control necessary for toroidal plasma equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, S.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that a significant amount of dipole current is necessary for the plasma equilibrium of toroidal configurations in general. Through the vector product with the poloidal field, this dipole current force has to balance with the hoop force of plasma pressure itself of the annular shape. The measurement of such a current of dipole type may be interesting for the confirmation of the plasma equilibrium in the toroidal system. Moreover it is certained that there is a new mode of a tokamak operation with such a dipole current component and with smaller vertical field than that based on the classical tokamak theory. (author) [pt

  7. Toroidal Precession as a Geometric Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.W. Burby and H. Qin

    2012-09-26

    Toroidal precession is commonly understood as the orbit-averaged toroidal drift of guiding centers in axisymmetric and quasisymmetric configurations. We give a new, more natural description of precession as a geometric phase effect. In particular, we show that the precession angle arises as the holonomy of a guiding center's poloidal trajectory relative to a principal connection. The fact that this description is physically appropriate is borne out with new, manifestly coordinate-independent expressions for the precession angle that apply to all types of orbits in tokamaks and quasisymmetric stellarators alike. We then describe how these expressions may be fruitfully employed in numerical calculations of precession.

  8. A model for the neoclassical toroidal viscosity effect on Edge plasma toroidal rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miron, I.G. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Euratom-MEdC Association, Bucharest (Romania)

    2013-11-15

    A semianalytic expression for the edge plasma angular toroidal rotation frequency that includes the neoclassical toroidal viscosity braking influence is obtained. Based on the model presented in a previous paper [I.G. Miron, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 53, 214 (2013)], the less destabilizing error field spectrum is found in order to minimize the nonlinear effect of the NTV on the toroidal rotation of the edge of the plasma. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. The effect of sheared toroidal rotation on pressure driven magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegna, C. C. [Departments of Engineering Physics and Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The impact of sheared toroidal rotation on the evolution of pressure driven magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas is investigated using a resistive magnetohydrodynamics model augmented by a neoclassical Ohm's law. Particular attention is paid to the asymptotic matching data as the Mercier indices are altered in the presence of sheared flow. Analysis of the nonlinear island Grad-Shafranov equation shows that sheared flows tend to amplify the stabilizing pressure/curvature contribution to pressure driven islands in toroidal tokamaks relative to the island bootstrap current contribution. As such, sheared toroidal rotation tends to reduce saturated magnetic island widths.

  10. Compact toroids generated by a magnetized coaxial source in the CTX experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, A.R.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Jarboe, T.R.; McKenna, K.F.; Linford, R.K.; Marshall, J.; Platts, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    Compact toroids containing both toroidal and poloidal magnetic field (Spheromak-type) have been generated in CTX using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. These CTs tear loose from the gun by magnetic field line reconnection, and they are trapped in flux conservers having various geometries. In a straight cylindrical flux conserver the CTs are observed to be unstable to a gross tilting mode. Stability to the tilting mode has been demonstrated in flux conservers having an oblate trapping region; however, the geometry of the entrance region leading to the trapping volume can also have important effects. Lifetimes of about 150 μs for the CTs are typically observed. Interferometric measurements give a value of about 2 x 10 14 cm -3 for the initial plasma density. The plasma temperature measured at a single spot near the minor magnetic axis decreases to around 10 eV by the time the magnetic reconnection is complete. Spectrographic measurements and pressure probe results are in agreement with this temperature. A snipper coil has been installed to induce the CT to tear loose from the gun sooner. The use of this coil is observed to speed up the magnetic field reconnection process by about a factor of 2

  11. Compact toroids generated by a magnetized coaxial source in the CTX experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwood, A.R.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Jarboe, T.R.; McKenna, K.F.; Linford, R.K.; Marshall, J.; Platts, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    Compact toroids containing both toroidal and poloidal magnetic field (Spheromak-type) have been generated in CTX using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. These CTs tear loose from the gun by magnetic field line reconnection, and they are trapped in flux conservers having various geometries. In a straight cylindrical flux conserver the CTs are observed to be unstable to a gross tilting mode. Stability to the tilting mode has been demonstrated in flux conservers having an oblate trapping region; however, the geometry of the entrance region leading to the trapping volume can also have important effects. Lifetimes of about 150 ..mu..s for the CTs are typically observed. Interferometric measurements give a value of about 2 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ for the initial plasma density. The plasma temperature measured at a single spot near the minor magnetic axis decreases to around 10 eV by the time the magnetic reconnection is complete. Spectrographic measurements and pressure probe results are in agreement with this temperature. A snipper coil has been installed to induce the CT to tear loose from the gun sooner. The use of this coil is observed to speed up the magnetic field reconnection process by about a factor of 2.

  12. Effect of halo current and its toroidal asymmetry during disruptions in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neyatani, Y.; Yoshino, R.; Ando, T.

    1995-01-01

    A poloidal halo current due to a vertical displacement event (VDE) is observed in experimentally simulated VDE discharges and density limit disruptions in the JT-60U tokamak. In the case of a clockwise I p and B T discharge, the halo current flows into the vacuum vessel from the inside separatrix and goes back to the plasma from the outside separatrix. A maximum halo current is produced by a change in the poloidal flux generated by plasma current decay. A toroidal asymmetry factor of 2.5 is estimated from the requirements of the fracture of the carbon-fiber composite tiles. The toroidal asymmetry is caused by the poloidal field (PF) that is produced by the toroidal field (TF) ripple, the deformation of the vacuum vessel, the setting error between the vacuum vessel and the TF and PF coils, the low-n mode during current quench, etc. To consider this asymmetry, in JT-60U, one must estimate the total halo current as nearly 26% of the plasma current just before a current quench. 25 refs., 10 figs

  13. A versatile ray-tracing code for studying rf wave propagation in toroidal magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peysson, Y; Decker, J; Morini, L

    2012-01-01

    A new ray-tracing code named C3PO has been developed to study the propagation of arbitrary electromagnetic radio-frequency (rf) waves in magnetized toroidal plasmas. Its structure is designed for maximum flexibility regarding the choice of coordinate system and dielectric model. The versatility of this code makes it particularly suitable for integrated modeling systems. Using a coordinate system that reflects the nested structure of magnetic flux surfaces in tokamaks, fast and accurate calculations inside the plasma separatrix can be performed using analytical derivatives of a spline-Fourier interpolation of the axisymmetric toroidal MHD equilibrium. Applications to reverse field pinch magnetic configuration are also included. The effects of 3D perturbations of the axisymmetric toroidal MHD equilibrium, due to the discreteness of the magnetic coil system or plasma fluctuations in an original quasi-optical approach, are also studied. Using a Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg method for solving the set of ordinary differential equations, the ray-tracing code is extensively benchmarked against analytical models and other codes for lower hybrid and electron cyclotron waves. (paper)

  14. Comparative investigation of ELM control based on toroidal modelling of plasma response to RMP fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueqiang

    2016-10-01

    The type-I edge localized mode (ELM), bursting at low frequency and with large amplitude, can channel a substantial amount of the plasma thermal energy into the surrounding plasma-facing components in tokamak devices operating at the high-confinement mode, potentially causing severe material damages. Learning effective ways of controlling this instability is thus an urgent issue in fusion research, in particular in view of the next generation large devices such as ITER and DEMO. Among other means, externally applied, three-dimensional resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields have been experimentally demonstrated to be successful in mitigating or suppressing the type-I ELM, in multiple existing devices. In this work, we shall report results of a comparative study of ELM control using RMPs. Comparison is made between the modelled plasma response to the 3D external fields and the observed change of the ELM behaviour on multiple devices, including MAST, ASDEX Upgrade, EAST, DIII-D, JET, and KSTAR. We show that toroidal modelling of the plasma response, based on linear and quasi-linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models, provides essential insights that are useful in interpreting and guiding the ELM control experiments. In particular, linear toroidal modelling results, using the MARS-F code, reveal the crucial role of the edge localized peeling-tearing mode response during ELM mitigation/suppression on all these devices. Such response often leads to strong peaking of the plasma surface displacement near the region of weak equilibrium poloidal field (e.g. the X-point), and this provides an alternative practical criterion for ELM control, as opposed to the vacuum field based Chirikov criteria. Quasi-linear modelling using MARS-Q provides quantitative interpretation of the side effects due to the ELM control coils, on the plasma toroidal momentum and particle confinements. The particular role of the momentum and particle fluxes, associated with the neoclassical toroidal

  15. Development of Compact Toroid Injector for C-2 FRCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Sekiguchi, Junichi; Asai, Tomohiko; Gota, Hiroshi; Garate, Eusebio; Allfrey, Ian; Valentine, Travis; Smith, Brett; Morehouse, Mark; TAE Team

    2014-10-01

    Collaborative research project with Tri Alpha Energy has been started and we have developed a new compact toroid (CT) injector for the C-2 device, mainly for fueling field-reversed configurations (FRCs). The CT is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma-gun (MCPG), which consists of coaxial cylinder electrodes; a spheromak-like plasma is generated by discharge and pushed out from the gun by Lorentz force. The inner diameter of outer electrode is 83.1 mm and the outer diameter of inner electrode is 54.0 mm. The surface of the inner electrode is coated with tungsten in order to reduce impurities coming out from the electrode. The bias coil is mounted inside of the inner electrode. We have recently conducted test experiments and achieved a supersonic CT translation speed of up to ~100 km/s. Other typical plasma parameters are as follows: electron density ~ 5 × 1021 m-3, electron temperature ~ 40 eV, and the number of particles ~0.5-1.0 × 1019. The CT injector is now planned to be installed on C-2 and the first CT injection experiment will be conducted in the near future. The detailed MCPG design as well as the test experimental results will be presented.

  16. Control of Compact-Toroid Characteristics by External Copper Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T.; Sekiguchi, J.; Asai, T.; Gota, H.; Roche, T.; Allfrey, I.; Cordero, M.; Garate, E.; Kinley, J.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    A collaborative research project by Tri Alpha Energy and Nihon University has been conducted for several years, which led to the development of a new compact toroid (CT) injector for efficient FRC particle refueling in the C-2U experiment. The CT is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), consisting of coaxial cylindrical electrodes. In CT formation via MCPG, the magnetic helicity content of the generated CT is one of the critical parameters. A bias coil is inserted into the inner electrode to generate a poloidal flux. The resultant bias magnetic field is spread out of MCPG with time due to its low-frequency bias current. To obtain a more effectively distributed bias magnetic field as well as to improve the voltage breakdown between electrodes, the MCPG incorporates a novel ~ 1 mm thick copper shell mounted outside of the outer electrode. This allows for reliable and controlled operation and more robust CT generation. A detailed discussion of the copper shell and experimental test results will be presented.

  17. Distortions in Judged Spatial Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Albert

    1978-01-01

    Distortions in judgments of relative geographical relations were observed, particularly when the locations were in different geographical or political units. Subjects distorted the judged relation to conform with the relation of the superordinate political unit. A model for the hierachical storage of spatial information is presented. (Author/RD)

  18. Cryogenics - Its influence on the selection of the ASTROMAG superconducting magnet coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    ASTROMAG, a particle astrophysics experimental facility proposed for running alongside a Space Station, has a large superconducting magnet to analyze particles coming from deep space. Several types of magnets were investigated for use in the ASTROMAG central facility. The factors which influence the selection of the magnet coil design include: (1) the upper limit of particle momentum resolved (proportional to the integrated field) as a function of solid angle; (2)cryogenic design and its effect on cryogen lifetime for a given central facility mass; and (3) the overall cost of the magnet coils and cryostat. Four magnet types are analyzed in this paper. These include a simple two-coil solenoid (the baseline design),two disk coils at the ends of the helium tank, a two-coil toroid and a thin solenoid plus bucking coil. A balance must be struck between cryostat lifetime, total mass and the integrated field through the detectors. This balance tends to favor coils which are in the same vacuum vessel as the cryogen.

  19. Modular coil design developments for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, D.; Brooks, A.; Brown, T.; Chrzanowski, J.; Cole, M.; Fan, H.-M.; Freudenberg, K.; Fogarty, P.; Hargrove, T.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Lovett, G.; Miller, P.; Myatt, R.; Nelson, B.; Reiersen, W.; Strickler, D.

    2005-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is a quasi-axisymmetric facility that combines the high beta and good confinement features of an advanced tokamak with the low current, disruption-free characteristics of a stellarator. The experiment is based on a three field-period plasma configuration with an average major radius of 1.4 m, a minor radius of 0.3 m, and a toroidal magnetic field on axis of up to 2 T. The modular coils are one set in a complex assembly of four coil systems that surround the highly shaped plasma. There are six, each of three coil types in the assembly for a total of 18 modular coils. The coils are constructed by winding copper cable onto a cast stainless steel winding form that has been machined to high accuracy, so that the current center of the winding pack is within ±1.5 mm of its theoretical position. The modular coils operate at a temperature of 80 K and are subjected to rapid heating and stress during a pulse. At this time, the project has completed construction of several prototype components which validate the fabrication and inspection processes that are planned for the production coils. In addition, some advanced techniques for error-field compensation and assembly simulation using computer-aided design (CAD) have been developed

  20. New material equations for electromagnetism with toroid polarizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubovik, V.M.; Martsenyuk, M.A.; Saha, B.

    1999-09-01

    With regard to the toroid contributions, a modified system of equations of electrodynamics moving continuous media has been obtained. Alternative formalisms to introduce the toroid moment contributions in the equations of electromagnetism has been worked out. The two four-potential formalism has been developed. Lorentz transformation laws for the toroid polarizations has been given. Covariant form of equations of electrodynamics of continuous media with toroid polarizations has been written. (author)

  1. Research on Harmonic Characteristic of Electronic Current Transformer Based on the Rogowski Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Diqiu; Hu, Bei; Wang, Xufeng; Zhu, Mingdong; Wang, Liang; Lu, Wenxing

    2017-05-01

    The nonlinear load present in the power system will cause the distortion of AC sine wave and generate the harmonic, which havea severe impact on the accuracy of energy metering and reliability of relay protection. Tosatisfy the requirements of energy metering and relay protection for the new generation of intelligent substation, based on the working principle of Rogowski coil current transformer, mathematical model and transfer characteristics of Rogowski coil sensors were studied in this paper, and frequency response characteristics of Rogowski coil current transformer system were analysed. Finally, the frequency response characteristics of the Rogowski coil current transformer at 2 to 13 harmonics was simulated and experimented. Simulation and experiments show that Rogowski coil current transformer couldmeet 0.2 accuracy requirements of harmonic power measurement of power system, and measure the harmonic components of the grid reliably.

  2. System for calibration of SPEAR transport line toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, T.V.; Smith, H.; Crook, K.

    1977-01-01

    A one nanosecond pulse generator was developed for calibration of the intensity monitors (toroids) in the SPEAR transport lines. The generator, located at the toroid, is simple, low cost and resistant to radiation. The generator and its connection to the standard SLAC toroid calibration system are described

  3. Toroidal groups line bundles, cohomology and quasi-Abelian varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Kopfermann, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    Toroidal groups are the connecting link between torus groups and any complex Lie groups. Many properties of complex Lie groups such as the pseudoconvexity and cohomology are determined by their maximal toroidal subgroups. Quasi-Abelian varieties are meromorphically separable toroidal groups. They are the natural generalisation of the Abelian varieties. Nevertheless, their behavior can be completely different as the wild groups show.

  4. On the stabilization of toroidal pinches by finite larmor radius effects and toroidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.; Weiland, J.

    1989-01-01

    The radial eigenvalue problem for internal modes in a large aspect ratio toriodal pinch has been solved. A particularly stable regime for a weak but nonzero toroidal magnetic field has been found. (31 refs.)

  5. Anisotropic diffusion in a toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Paul F

    2005-01-01

    As part of the Department of Energy's applications oriented SciDAC project, three model problems have been proposed by the Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamics Modeling to test the potential of numerical algorithms for challenging magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) problems that are required for future fusion development. The first of these, anisotropic diffusion in a toroidal geometry, is considered in this note

  6. A steady-state axisymmetric toroidal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, K.

    1984-01-01

    Conditions for achieving a steady state in an axisymmetric toroidal system are studied with emphasis on a very-high-beta field-reversed configuration. The analysis is carried out for the electromotive force produced by the Ohkawa current that is induced by neutral-beam injection. It turns out that, since the perpendicular component of the current j-vectorsub(perpendicular) to the magnetic field can be generated automatically by the diamagnetic effect, only the parallel component j-vectorsub(parallel) must be driven by the electromotive force. The drive of j-vectorsub(parallel) generates shear in the field line so that the pure toroidal field on the magnetic axis is rotated towards the plasma boundary and matched to the external field lines. This matching condition determines the necessary amount of injection beam current and power. It is demonstrated that a very-high-beta field-reversed configuration requires only a small amount of current-driving beam power because almost all the toroidal current except that close to the magnetic axis is carried by the diamagnetic current due to high beta. A low-beta tokamak, on the other hand, needs very high current-driving power since most of the toroidal current is composed of j-vectorsub(parallel) which must be driven by the beam. (author)

  7. Trapped ion mode in toroidally rotating plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artun, M.; Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1995-04-01

    The influence of radially sheared toroidal flows on the Trapped Ion Mode (TIM) is investigated using a two-dimensional eigenmode code. These radially extended toroidal microinstabilities could significantly influence the interpretation of confinement scaling trends and associated fluctuation properties observed in recent tokamak experiments. In the present analysis, the electrostatic drift kinetic equation is obtained from the general nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in rotating plasmas. In the long perpendicular wavelength limit k τ ρ bi much-lt 1, where ρ bi is the average trapped-ion banana width, the resulting eigenmode equation becomes a coupled system of second order differential equations nmo for the poloidal harmonics. These equations are solved using finite element methods. Numerical results from the analysis of low and medium toroidal mode number instabilities are presented using representative TFTR L-mode input parameters. To illustrate the effects of mode coupling, a case is presented where the poloidal mode coupling is suppressed. The influence of toroidal rotation on a TFTR L-mode shot is also analyzed by including a beam species with considerable larger temperature. A discussion of the numerical results is presented

  8. Design of the TPX outboard toroidal limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaubel, K.M.; Anderson, P.M.; Baxi, C.B.

    1995-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment outboard limiter system incorporates the passive stabilizer plates, the ripple armor, the toroidal break and the support structures. These components are designed to withstand substantial steady state heat loads and high mechanical forces caused by plasma disruptions. The design of these components has been developed to deal with the challenging thermal, structural and remote handling requirements

  9. Escape of magnetic toroids from the Sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieber, John W.; Rust, David M.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of heliospheric magnetic fields at 1 AU shows that 10 24 Mx of net toroidal flux escapes from the Sun per solar cycle. This rate is compared with the apparent rate of flux emergence at the solar surface, and it is concluded that escaping toroids will remove at least 20% of the emerging flux, and may remove as much as 100% of emerging flux if multiple eruptions occur on the toroids. The data imply that flux escapes the Sun with an efficiency far exceeding Parker's upper limit estimate of 3%. Toroidal flux escape is almost certainly the source of the observed overwinding of the interplanetary magnetic field spiral. Two mechanisms to facilitate net flux escape are discussed: helicity charging to push open the fields and flux transport with reconnection to close them off. We estimate the Sun will shed ∼2x10 45 Mx 2 of magnetic helicity per solar cycle, leading to a mean helicity density of 100 Mx 2 cm -3 at 1 AU, which agrees well with observations

  10. Toroidal 12 cavity klystron : a novel approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarika, A.B.R.

    2013-01-01

    A toroidal 12 cavity klystron is designed to provide with high energy power with the high frequency microwave RF- plasma generated from it. The cavities are positioned in clock hour positions. The theoretical modeling and designing is done to study the novel approach. (author)

  11. Celebration for the ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Representatives from Funding Agencies and Barrel Toroid Magnet Laboratories during the ceremony. From left to right: Jean Zinn-Justin (Head of DAPNIA/CEA/Saclay), CERN Director-General Robert Aymar, and Roberto Petronzio (President INFN).Allan Clark (DPNC University Geneva) and Enrique Fernandez (IFAE Barcelona) were among the guests visiting the ATLAS cavern. The barrel toroid is visible in the background. A celebration took place at Point 1 on 13 December to toast the recent powering-up of the ATLAS barrel toroid magnet to full field (Bulletin No. 47-48/06). About 70 guests were invited to attend, mainly composed of representatives from funding partners and key members of the laboratory management teams of the barrel toroid magnet, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. An introductory speech by ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni the scene for evening. This was followed by the ATLAS magnet system project leader Herman Ten Kate's account of the...

  12. Curvature driven instabilities in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, P.

    1986-11-01

    The electromagnetic ballooning mode, the curvature driven trapped electron mode and the toroidally induced ion temperature gradient mode have been studies. Eigenvalue equations have been derived and solved both numerically and analytically. For electromagnetic ballooning modes the effects of convective damping, finite Larmor radius, higher order curvature terms, and temperature gradients have been investigated. A fully toroidal fluid ion model has been developed. It is shown that a necessary and sufficient condition for an instability below the MHD limit is the presence of an ion temperature gradient. Analytical dispersion relations giving results in good agreement with numerical solutions are also presented. The curvature driven trapped electron modes are found to be unstable for virtually all parameters with growth rates of the order of the diamagnetic drift frequency. Studies have been made, using both a gyrokinetic ion description and the fully toroidal ion model. Both analytical and numerical results are presented and are found to be in good agreement. The toroidally induced ion temperature gradients modes are found to have a behavior similar to that of the curvature driven trapped electron modes and can in the electrostatic limit be described by a simple quadratic dispersion equation. (author)

  13. Toroidal vortices in resistive magnetohydrodynamic equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, D.; Bates, J.W.; Li, S.

    1997-01-01

    When a time-independent electric current flows toroidally in a uniform ring of electrically conducting fluid, a Lorentz force results, jxB, where j is the local electric current density, and B is the magnetic field it generates. Because of purely geometric effects, the curl of jxB is nonvanishing, and so jxB cannot be balanced by the gradient of any scalar pressure. Taking the curl of the fluid close-quote s equation of motion shows that the net effect of the jxB force is to generate toroidal vorticity. Allowed steady states necessarily contain toroidal vortices, with flows in the poloidal directions. The flow pattern is a characteristic open-quotes double smoke ringclose quotes configuration. The effect seems quite general, although it is analytically simple only in special limits. One limit described here is that of high viscosity (low Reynolds number), with stress-free wall boundary conditions on the velocity field, although it is apparent that similar mechanical motions will result for no-slip boundaries and higher Reynolds numbers. A rather ubiquitous connection between current-carrying toroids and vortex rings seems to be implied, one that disappears in the open-quotes straight cylinderclose quotes limit. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  14. Neoclassical poloidal and toroidal rotation in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.B.; Diamond, P.H.; Groebner, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Explicit expressions for the neoclassical poloidal and toroidal rotation speeds of primary ion and impurity species are derived via the Hirshman and Sigmar moment approach. The rotation speeds of the primary ion can be significantly different from those of impurities in various interesting cases. The rapid increase of impurity poloidal rotation in the edge region of H-mode discharges in tokamaks can be explained by a rapid steepening of the primary ion pressure gradient. Depending on ion collisionality, the poloidal rotation speed of the primary ions at the edge can be quite small and the flow direction may be opposite to that of the impurities. This may cast considerable doubts on current L to H bifurcation models based on primary ion poloidal rotation only. Also, the difference between the toroidal rotation velocities of primary ions and impurities is not negligible in various cases. In Ohmic plasmas, the parallel electric field induces a large impurity toroidal rotation close to the magnetic axis, which seems to agree with experimental observations. In the ion banana and plateau regime, there can be non-negligible disparities between primary ion and impurity toroidal rotation velocities due to the ion density and temperature gradients. Detailed analytic expressions for the primary ion and impurity rotation speeds are presented, and the methodology for generalization to the case of several impurity species is also presented for future numerical evaluation

  15. Welding distortion control in double walled KSTAR vacuum vessel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, D. W.; Lee, G. T.; Kim, H. K.; Yang, H. L.; Bak, J. S.

    2004-01-01

    The KSTAR(Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) vacuum vessel is designed to be a double walled structure made of 12mm thick 316LN stainless steel with a D shaped cross-section about 4 m height. Vacuum vessel was pre-fabricated in two parts, 180 degree and 157.5 degree sectors in toroidal direction to meet the transportation purpose. These two parts have to be welded on site with ±2mm allowable fabrication tolerances. 1/3 scaled mock-up model was used to estimate the welding distortion and to ensure the weld quality of vacuum vessel. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding(GTAW), which has been approved by procedure qualification test, was used during mock-up test and vacuum vessel site fabrication. Welding distortion could be managed by allowing for distortion in opposite direction, by applying high restraint using lots of strong backs, by controlling the welding heat input with symmetrical welding sequence. The integrity of the site welding joint was assured by radiographic test, ultrasonic test and leak test with helium detecting method

  16. Long-wavelength microinstabilities in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1993-01-01

    Realistic kinetic toroidal eigenmode calculations have been carried out to support a proper assessment of the influence of long-wavelength microturbulence on transport in tokamak plasmas. In order to efficiently evaluate large-scale kinetic behavior extending over many rational surfaces, significant improvements have been made to a toroidal finite element code used to analyze the fully two-dimensional (r,θ) mode structures of trapped-ion and toroidal ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities. It is found that even at very long wavelengths, these eigenmodes exhibit a strong ballooning character with the associated radial structure relatively insensitive to ion Landau damping at the rational surfaces. In contrast to the long-accepted picture that the radial extent of trapped-ion instabilities is characterized by the ion-gyroradius-scale associated with strong localization between adjacent rational surfaces, present results demonstrate that under realistic conditions, the actual scale is governed by the large-scale variations in the equilibrium gradients. Applications to recent measurements of fluctuation properties in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Plasma Phys. Controlled Nucl. Fusion Res. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1985), Vol. 1, p. 29] L-mode plasmas indicate that the theoretical trends appear consistent with spectral characteristics as well as rough heuristic estimates of the transport level. Benchmarking calculations in support of the development of a three-dimensional toroidal gyrokinetic code indicate reasonable agreement with respect to both the properties of the eigenfunctions and the magnitude of the eigenvalues during the linear phase of the simulations of toroidal ITG instabilities

  17. Harmonic Distortion of Rectifier Topologies for Adjustable Speed Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffan

    This thesis deals with the harmonic distortion of the diode rectifier and a number of alternative rectifier topologies for adjustable speed drives. The main intention of this thesis is to provide models and tools that allow easy prediction of the harmonic distortion of ASD’s in a given system...... rectifier are presented. The first level is an ideal model where the diode rectifier basically is treated as an independent (harmonic) current source. The second level is an empirical model, where simulated (or measured) values of the harmonic currents of the diode rectifier for different parameters......-angle of the individual harmonic currents of different diode rectifier types is analyzed. Four selected rectifier topologies with a high input power factor are presented. It is shown that using ac- or dc-coils is a very simple and efficient method to reduce the harmonic currents compared to the basic diode rectifier...

  18. RF current drive in a toroidal plasna in the banana regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belikov, V.S.; Kolesnichenko, Ya.I.; Plotnik, I.S.

    1982-01-01

    The use of travelling waves for the steady-state current drive in an axisymmetric toroidal plasma in the banana regime is studied. The treatment is based on a quasi-linear equation for the electron distribution function averaged over the period of the particle motion along the small azimuth of the torus. It is show that the trapped electrons do not absorb the energy of the monochromatic (over frequency) RF field and thus only the circulating electrons contribute to the driving current and to the absorbed RF power. The current and the absorbed power are calculated by using the electron distribution function obtained for the case of narrow wave packet, both the toroidal magnetic field and the distortion of the electron distribution over transverse velocities being taken into consideration. The significant role of the barely carculating electrons is revealed. It is pointed out that the toroidal satellite resonances can affect the RF current drive by spreading and splitting the region of the wave-marticle interaction

  19. Volterra Series Based Distortion Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2010-01-01

    A large part of the characteristic sound of the electric guitar comes from nonlinearities in the signal path. Such nonlinearities may come from the input- or output-stage of the amplier, which is often equipped with vacuum tubes or a dedicated distortion pedal. In this paper the Volterra series...... expansion for non linear systems is investigated with respect to generating good distortion. The Volterra series allows for unlimited adjustment of the level and frequency dependency of each distortion component. Subjectively relevant ways of linking the dierent orders are discussed....

  20. Development of compact toroids injector for direct plasma controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azuma, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Takasago (Japan); Oda, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Takasago (Japan); Onozuka, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Takasago (Japan); Uyama, T. [Himeji Inst. of Tech. (Japan); Nagata, M. [Himeji Inst. of Tech. (Japan); Fukumoto, N. [Himeji Inst. of Tech. (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    The application of the compact toroids injector for direct plasma controls has been investigated. The compact toroids injection can fuel particles directly into the core of the plasma and modify the plasma profiles at the desired locations. The acceleration tests of the compact toroids have been conducted at Himeji Institute of Technology. The tests showed that the hydrogen compact toroid was accelerated up to 80km/s and the plasma density of the compact toroid was compressed to 1.2 x 10{sup 21}m{sup -3}. (orig.).

  1. Development of compact toroids injector for direct plasma controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, K.; Oda, Y.; Onozuka, M.; Uyama, T.; Nagata, M.; Fukumoto, N.

    1995-01-01

    The application of the compact toroids injector for direct plasma controls has been investigated. The compact toroids injection can fuel particles directly into the core of the plasma and modify the plasma profiles at the desired locations. The acceleration tests of the compact toroids have been conducted at Himeji Institute of Technology. The tests showed that the hydrogen compact toroid was accelerated up to 80km/s and the plasma density of the compact toroid was compressed to 1.2 x 10 21 m -3 . (orig.)

  2. Compact toroid challenge experiment with the increasing in the energy input into plasma and the level of trapped magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romadanov, I.V.; Ryzhkov, S.V., E-mail: ryzhkov@power.bmstu.ru

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Compact torus formation method with high level of magnetic flux is proposed. • A compact torus is produced in a theta-pinch-coil with pulse mode of operation. • Key feature is a pulse of current in an axial direction. • We report a level of linked magnetic flux is higher than theta-pinch results. - Abstract: The present work reports on compact toroid hydrogen plasma creation by means of a specially designed discharge system and results of magnetic fields introduction. Experiments in the compact toroid challenge (CTC) device at P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (FIAN) have been conducted since 2005. The CTC device differs from the conventional theta-pinch formation in the use of an axial current for enhanced efficiency. We have used a novel technique to maximize the flux linked to the plasma. The purpose of this method is to increase the energy input into the plasma and the level of trapped magnetic flux using an additional toroidal magnetic field. A study of compact torus formation with axial and toroidal currents was done and a new method is proposed and implemented.

  3. Coil Optimization for HTS Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    An optimization approach of HTS coils in HTS synchronous machines (SM) is presented. The optimization is aimed at high power SM suitable for direct driven wind turbines applications. The optimization process was applied to a general radial flux machine with a peak air gap flux density of ~3T...... is suitable for which coil segment is presented. Thus, the performed study gives valuable input for the coil design of HTS machines ensuring optimal usage of HTS tapes....

  4. Program for development of toroidal superconducting magnets for fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, H.M.; Lubell, M.S.

    1976-04-01

    Research progress on the following subprograms is described/: (1) system design, (2) coil design, (3) conductor selection and test, (4) radiation effects on superconducting coils, (5) coil protection, eddy current shielding, and power supply, (6) structural analysis and materials investigation, (7) cryogenics and refrigeration, (8) subsize coil fabrication, (9) large coil project, (10) coil testing and evaluation, (11) administrative plan, and (12) quality assurance and reliability

  5. Parametric system studies of candidate TF coil system options for the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiersen, W.T.; Flanagan, C.A.; Miller, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    System studies were performed to determine the sensitivity of hybrid and superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil system options to maximum field at the TF coil and to field enhancement due to resistive insert coils. The studies were performed using Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) design assumptions, guidelines, and criteria and involved iterative execution of the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) systems code, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium code, and EFFI (a code to evaluate magnetic field strength). The results indicate that for TFCX with no minimum wall loading specified, a design point chosen solely on the basis of cost would likely be in the low-field region of design space where the cost advantage of hybrids is least apparent. However, as the desired neutron wall loading increases, the hybrid option suggests an increasing cost advantage over the all-superconducting option; this cost advantage is countered by increased complexity in design -- particularly in assembly and maintenance

  6. Special remote tooling developed and utilized to tighten TFTR TF coil casing bolts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, T.W.; Walton, G.R.; Meighan, T.G.; Paul, B.L.

    1993-01-01

    Special tooling has been developed and used to tighten toroidal field (TF) coil casing bolts that have loosened from years of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) operation. Due to their location, many of the TF casing bolts cannot be directly accessed or viewed; their condition was first discovered during unrelated inspections in 1988. Engineering solutions were, sought until 1992, when a remotely operated wrench concept was successfully demonstrated on a TF coil mockup. The concept was developed into several working tools that have successfully been applied to tighten several thousand TF casing bolts during recent scheduled outages. This effort has improved the integrity and reliability of the TF coil system in preparing for the final experimental phase of the TFTR. This paper discusses the design and application of this tooling

  7. Mechanical strength of an ITER coil insulation system under static and dynamic load after reactor irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner-Rohrhofer, K.; Humer, K.; Weber, H.W.; Hamada, K.; Sugimoto, M.; Okuno, K.

    2002-01-01

    The insulation system proposed by the Japanese Home Team for the ITER Toroidal Field coil (TF coil) is a T-glass-fiber/Kapton reinforced epoxy prepreg system. In order to assess the material performance under the actual operating conditions of the coils, the insulation system was irradiated in the TRIGA reactor (Vienna) to a fast neutron fluence of 2x10 22 m -2 (E>0.1 MeV). After measurements of swelling, all mechanical tests were carried out at 77 K. Tensile and short-beam-shear (SBS) tests were performed under static loading conditions. In addition, tension-tension fatigue experiments up to about 10 6 cycles were made. The laminate swells in the through-thickness direction by 0.86% at the highest dose level. The fatigue tests as well as the static tests do not show significant influences of the irradiation on the mechanical behavior of this composite

  8. Mechanical strength of an ITER coil insulation system under static and dynamic load after reactor irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner-Rohrhofer, K.; Humer, K.; Weber, H. W.; Hamada, K.; Sugimoto, M.; Okuno, K.

    2002-12-01

    The insulation system proposed by the Japanese Home Team for the ITER Toroidal Field coil (TF coil) is a T-glass-fiber/Kapton reinforced epoxy prepreg system. In order to assess the material performance under the actual operating conditions of the coils, the insulation system was irradiated in the TRIGA reactor (Vienna) to a fast neutron fluence of 2×10 22 m -2 ( E>0.1 MeV). After measurements of swelling, all mechanical tests were carried out at 77 K. Tensile and short-beam-shear (SBS) tests were performed under static loading conditions. In addition, tension-tension fatigue experiments up to about 10 6 cycles were made. The laminate swells in the through-thickness direction by 0.86% at the highest dose level. The fatigue tests as well as the static tests do not show significant influences of the irradiation on the mechanical behavior of this composite.

  9. Parametric system studies of candidate TF coil system options for the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiersen, W.T.; Flanagan, C.A.; Miller, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    System studies were performed to determine the sensitivity of hybrid and superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil system options to maximum field at the TF coil and to field enhancement due to resistive insert coils. The studies were performed using Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) design assumptions, guidelines, and criteria and involved iterative execution of the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) systems code, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium code, and EFFI (a code to evaluate magnetic field strength). The results indicate that for TFCX with no minimum wall loading specified, a design point chosen solely on the basis of cost would likely be in the low-field region of design space where the cost advantage of hybrids is least apparent. However, as the desired neutron wall loading increases, the hybrid option suggests an increasing cost advantage over the all-superconducting option; this cost advantage is countered by increased complexity in design - particularly in assembly and maintenance

  10. Room Temperature Magnetic Determination of the Current Center Line for the ITER TF Coils

    CERN Document Server

    Lerch, Philippe; Buzio, Marco; Negrazus, Marco; Baynham, Elwyn; Sanfilippo, Stephane; Foussat, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    The ITER tokamak includes 18 superconducting D-shaped toroidal field (IT) coils. Unavoidable shape deformations as well as assembly errors will lead to field errors, which can be modeled with the knowledge of the current center line (CCL). Accurate survey during the entire manufacturing and assembly process, including transfer of survey points, is complex. In order to increase the level of confidence, a room temperature magnetic measurement of the CCL on assembled and closed winding packs is foreseen, prior to insertion into their cold case. In this contribution, we discuss the principle of the CCL determination and present a low frequency ac measurement system under development at PSI, within an ITER framework contract. The largest current allowed to flow in the TF coil at room temperature and the precision requirements for the determination of the CCL loci of the coil are hard boundaries. Eddy currents in the radial plates, the winding pack enclosures, and possibly from iron in the reinforced concrete floor...

  11. Study of the Tokamak-15 Superconducting Toroidal Field Coil (STFC) heating under the quench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anashkin, I.O.; Kabanovsky, S.V.; Chudnovsky, A.N.; Khvostenko, P.P.; Vertiporokh, A.N.; Ivanov, D.P.; Posadsky, I.A.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments in Tokamak-15 were performed to study the STFC heating under the quench. The quench was specially caused by current introduction into STFC at the unchanged input helium temperature. The experimental results and simulation data on temperature heating and amount of heat realized in the pancakes under the quench are given. In the experiments was shown that quench occurs in the internal turns of pancakes and estimations of maximal temperature heating corresponds to calculated ones

  12. Tore Supra: a tokamak with superconducting coils for the toroidal field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck, B.

    1984-01-01

    It is under construction on the site of CEN/Cadarache for the EURATOM-CEA Association. The design has been lead by a group including teams of the DRFC of Fontenay-aux-Roses and Grenoble and the DPh/PE-STI of CEN/Saclay [fr

  13. Triple Halo Coil: Development and Comparison with Other TMS Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Priyam; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive stimulation technique that can be used for the treatment of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's Disease, PTSD, TBI and anxiety by regulating synaptic activity. TMS is FDA approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder. There is a critical need to develop deep TMS coils that can stimulate deeper regions of the brain without excessively stimulating the cortex in order to provide an alternative to surgical methods. We have developed a novel multi-coil configuration called ``Triple Halo Coil'' (THC) that can stimulate deep brain regions. Investigation of induced electric and magnetic field in these regions have been achieved by computer modelling. Comparison of the results due to THC configuration have been conducted with other TMS coils such as ``Halo Coil'', circular coil and ``Figure of Eight'' coil. There was an improvement of more than 15 times in the strength of magnetic field, induced by THC configuration at 10 cm below the vertex of the head when compared with the ``Figure of Eight'' coil alone. Carver Charitable Trust.

  14. The coiled coil motif in polymer drug delivery systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pechar, Michal; Pola, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 1 (2013), s. 90-96 ISSN 0734-9750 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0543; GA MŠk 1M0505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : coiled coil * hydrophilic polymer * recombinant protein Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 8.905, year: 2013

  15. Variation of the poloidal field during a disruption and consequences on the vacuum chamber, the poloidal system and the toroidal magnet (Tore II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatineau, F.; Leloup, C.; Pariente, M.

    1977-12-01

    The currents induced into the vacuum vessel and into the poloidal field coils and the overvoltages on the generators during a plasma current disruption are calculated. The subsequent applied mechanical forces and the poloidal field variations at the toroidal field conductor are deduced. The current decrease rate considered, during a disruption, ranges from d Ip/dt=0.810 9 A/s to 0.410 11 A/s [fr

  16. Contributions to the design and to the fabrication of the magnet of the toroidal field of Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck, B.

    1992-03-01

    This report is a collection of published papers in French and in English about the design and the qualification of the magnet of the toroidal field of Tore Supra. The development test programme, the controls during conductor manufacturing and the acceptance tests have shown to be the bases for achieving a very low level of rejection for the whole production. A systematic study of the performances correlated to the fabrication conditions has provided valuable informations for the optimization of the manufacturing processes of superconductors. The tests of single coils have enabled the commissioning of a monitoring and protection system specially adapted for this magnet of 18 coils cooled in a superfluid helium bath. After the accident caused by an arcing in one coil of the Torus, and the replacement of the faulty coil, the monitoring and safety discharge system have been adapted. The current in the magnet has been increased up to 1 455 A for 9.3 T on the conductors (nominal values 1 400 A and 9 T). During the last three years (1989-1991) only one transition to normal state has been observed in one coil strongly irradiated after a severe plasma disruption. In these conditions the protection system acted very well and as expected

  17. LCT-coil design: Mechanical interaction between composite winding and steel casing under various test conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolensky, B.; Messemer, G.; Zehlein, H.; Erb, J.

    1981-01-01

    Finite element computations for the structural design of the large superconducting toroidal field coil contributed by EURATOM to the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) at ORNL, USA were performed at KfK, using the ASKA code. The layout of the coil must consider different types of requirements: firstly, an optimal D-shaped contour minimizing circumferential stress gradients under normal operation in the toroidal arrangement must be defined. Secondly, the three-dimensional real design effects due to the actual support conditions, manufacturing tolerances etc. must be mastered for different basic operational and failure load cases. And, thirdly, the design must stand a single coil qualification test in the TOSKA-facility at KfK, Karlsruhe, FRG, before it is plugged into the LCTF. The emphasis of the paper is three-pronged according to these requirements: i) the 3D magnetic body forces as well as the underlying magnetic fields as computed by the HEDO-code are described. ii) The mechanical interaction between casing and winding as given elsewhere in terms of high stress regions, gaps, slide movements and contact forces for various load cases representing the LCTF test conditions is illustrated here by a juxtaposition of the operational deformations and stresses within the LCTF and the TOSKA. iii) Particular effects like the restraint imposed by a corset-type reinforcement of the coil in the TOSKA test facility to limit the breathing deformation are parametrically studied. Moreover, the possibilities to derive scaling laws which make essential results transferable to larger coils by extracting a 1D mechanical response from the 3D finite element model is also demonstrated. (orig./GG)

  18. A high-performance OH coil for the Los Alamos CPRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weggel, C.F.; Bogart, S.L.; Dalessandro, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    A high-performance Ohmic Heating (OH) magnet has been designed for the Confinement Physics Research Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The magnet has an outside radius at its throat of 1.00 meters. At maximum current, the maximum current density is 40 amperes per square millimetre, at which point it generates 38.32 webers, single swing (or 76.6 webers, double swing), and generates a central field of 17.37 teslas. The maximum von Miess stress is 408.6 MPa (59.26 ksi). The magnet stores 637 megajoules, with a time constant of 8.30 seconds. The magnet consists of two zones: a central hour-glass-shaped coil, and an outer coil gallery of trimming coils. The central stack is built of bandsawed spirals, the construction technique which was pioneered at MIT for the OH coils for Alcater A and C. the coil uses 42 spirals, each of which is sawed from a 5-cm-thick plate of either MZC, Elbrodur, SSC-155, or OFE copper, depending on the maximum ambient stress. The inner radius of every plate is 0.60 m, and the outside radius is tangent to a toroid whose major radius is 2.00 m and whose minor radius is 1.00 m. The pitch of each spiral is adjusted to minimize the field error. The outer trimming coils are built of high-conductivity aluminum (Alloy 1350). For ease of fabrication, all but the outermost pair of trimming coils lie in a single ''coil-gallery'' plane and carry the same current density, so that all can be wound from a single continuous strip. The trimming coils are positioned within this gallery to yield a field error of less than 7 gauss throughout a toroidal volume centered at R/sub T/ = 2.00 meters, and whose minor radius is r/sub p/ = 0.80 meters. The current density in the trimming coils is so low that vertical diagnostic access can be provided by boring 15-cm holes through the windings themselves

  19. Generation of toroidal pre-heat plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Nagayasu; Tamaru, Ken; Nagata, Akiyoshi.

    1979-01-01

    The characteristics of toroidal plasma in the initial stage of electric discharge were investigated. A small toroidal-pinch system was used for the present work. A magnetic probe was used to measure the magnetic field. The time of beginning of discharge was determined by observing the variation of the magnetic field. The initial gas pressure dependence of the induced electric field regions, in which electric discharge can be caused, was studied. It is necessary to increase the initial induced electric field for starting discharge. The delay time of large current discharge was measured, and it was about 2 microsecond. Dependences of the electric fields at the beginning of discharge on the charging voltage of capacitors, on the initial gas pressure, and on the discharge frequency were studied. The formation mechanism of plasma column was analyzed. (Kato, T.)

  20. Toroidal charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Minyou, E-mail: yemy@ustc.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Li, Yingying [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Yu, Yi [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Shi, Yuejiang [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); WCI for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Lyu, Bo; Fu, Jia [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Du, Xuewei; Yin, Xianghui; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Qiuping [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Wan, Baonian [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-10-15

    A toroidal charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic, on the basis of a heating neutral beam injector (NBI), is constructed on EAST tokamak. Simulation of Spectra (SOS) code is used to design and evaluate the diagnostic performance. 30 spatial channels work simultaneously in recent experiment, which covers a radial region from 1.55 m to 2.30 m in the cross section. The CXRS has a radial resolution of 1–3.5 cm from core to edge. The acquisition time is typically 10 ms, limited by the poor photon statistics. The diagnostic can observe not only the normal C{sup 5+} emission line at 529.1 nm but also any interested wavelength in the range of 400–700 nm. In this work, a brief overview on the R&D and the instrument performance for the toroidal CXRS diagnostic is described, together with first results.

  1. Reynolds stress of localized toroidal modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.Z.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1995-02-01

    An investigation of the 2D toroidal eigenmode problem reveals the possibility of a new consistent 2D structure, the dissipative BM-II mode. In contrast to the conventional ballooning mode, the new mode is poloidally localized at π/2 (or -π/2), and possesses significant radial asymmetry. The radial asymmetry, in turn, allows the dissipative BM-II to generate considerably larger Reynolds stress as compared to the standard slab drift type modes. It is also shown that a wide class of localized dissipative toroidal modes are likely to be of the dissipative BM-II nature, suggesting that at the tokamak edge, the fluctuation generated Reynolds stress (a possible source of poloidal flow) can be significant

  2. Ballooning instabilities in toroidally linked mirror systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastie, R.J.; Watson, C.J.H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper examines the stability against ballooning modes of plasma equilibria in toroidally linked mirror configurations consisting of a number of quadrupole minimum-B mirrors linked toroidally. On the basis of the Kruskal-Oberman energy principle, a class of displacements is identified which are potentially unstable, and a necessary criterion for stability is derived. The criterion is obtained from the eigenvalues of an ordinary differential equation, which determines the variation of the displacement along a field line. The coefficients in the equation are determined by the configuration, and by inserting various model configurations, estimates are obtained of the maximum value of β consistent with stability. In cases of interest, quite high β-values are obtained. (author)

  3. Reynolds stress of localized toroidal modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.Z.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of the 2D toroidal eigenmode problem reveals the possibility of a new consistent 2D structure, the dissipative BM-II mode. In contrast to the conventional ballooning mode, the new mode is poloidally localized at π/2 (or -π/2), and possesses significant radial asymmetry. The radial asymmetry, in turn, allows the dissipative BM-II to generate considerably larger Reynolds stress as compared to the standard slab drift type modes. It is also shown that a wide class of localized dissipative toroidal modes are likely to be of the dissipative BM-II nature, suggesting that at the tokamak edge, the fluctuation generated Reynolds stress (a possible source of poloidal flow) can be significant. (author). 15 refs

  4. METHODS TO DEVELOP A TOROIDAL SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANAILA Ligia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper work presents two practical methods to draw the development of a surface unable to be developed applying classical methods of Descriptive Geometry, the toroidal surface, frequently met in technical practice. The described methods are approximate ones; the development is obtained with the help of points. The accuracy of the methods is given by the number of points used when drawing. As for any other approximate method, when practically manufactured the development may need to be adjusted on site.

  5. Unstable universal drift eigenmodes in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chen, L.

    1980-01-01

    The eigenmode equation describing ballooning collisionless drift instabilities is analyzed both analytically and numerically. A new branch of eigenmodes, which corresponds to quasi-bound states due to toroidal coupling effects such as ion delB drifts, is shown to be destabilized by electron Landau damping for typical tokamak parameters. This branch cannot be understood by the strong coupling approximation. However, the slab-like (Pearlstein--Berk-type) branch is found to remain stable and experience enhanced shear damping

  6. Stellarator approach to toroidal plasma confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.L.

    1981-12-01

    An overview is presented of the development and current status of the stellarator approach to controlled thermonuclear confinement. Recent experimental, theoretical, and systems developments have made this concept a viable option for the evolution of the toroidal confinement program. Some experimental study of specific problems associated with departure from two-dimensional symmetry must be undertaken before the full advantages and opportunities of steady-state, net-current-free operation can be realized

  7. Status of European manufacture of Toroidal Field conductor and strand for JT-60SA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zani, Louis, E-mail: louis.zani@jt60sa.org [Fusion for Energy, D-85748 Garching (Germany); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Barabaschi, Pietro; Di Pietro, Enrico [Fusion for Energy, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    In the framework of the JT-60SA project, part of the Broader Approach (BA) agreement, EURATOM provides to Japan, the Toroidal Field (TF) magnet system, consisting of 18 superconducting coils. The procurement of the conductor for the TF coils is managed by Fusion for Energy, acting as EU representative in the BA agreement. The TF conductor procurement is split into two contracts, one dedicated to the production of Niobium Titanium (NbTi) and Cu strand and the other to TF conductor production through strand cabling and cable jacketing operations. The TF conductor is a rectangular-shaped cable-in-conduit conductor formed by 486 (0.81 mm diameter) strands (2/3 NbTi–1/3 Cu) wrapped in a stainless steel foil and embedded into a stainless steel jacket. The 18 TF coils require (including spares) 115 ‘Unit Lengths’ (UL) of such conductor, each 240 m long for a total of about 28 km. Correspondingly about 10,000 km for NbTi and 5000 km for Cu strand are produced. The Japanese company Furukawa Electric Co. (FEC) is in charge of TF strand manufacture while the Italian company Italian Consortium for Applied Superconductivity (ICAS) is in charge of cabling and jacketing of TF conductor ULs. In the paper, we provide information on the production stages presently achieved in TF strand and conductor contracts.

  8. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak (fusion) experimental power reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This report presents the results of ''Conceptual Studies of Toroidal Field Magnets for the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor'' performed for the Energy Research and Development Administration, Oak Ridge Operations. Two conceptual coil designs are developed. One design approach to produce a specified 8 Tesla maximum field uses a novel NbTi superconductor design cooled by pool-boiling liquid helium. For a highest practicable field design, a unique NbSn 3 conductor is used with forced-flow, single-phase liquid helium cooling to achieve a 12 Tesla peak field. Fabrication requirements are also developed for these approximately 7 meter horizontal bore by 11 meter vertical bore coils. Cryostat design approaches are analyzed and a hybrid cryostat approach selected. Structural analyses are performed for approaches to support in-plane and out-of-plane loads and a structural approach selected. In addition to the conceptual design studies, cost estimates and schedules are prepared for each of the design approaches, major uncertainties and recommendations for research and development identified, and test coil size for demonstration recommended

  9. Finite toroidal flow generated by unstable tearing mode in a toroidal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, G. Z., E-mail: haogz@swip.ac.cn; Wang, A. K.; Xu, Y. H.; He, H. D.; Xu, M.; Qu, H. P.; Peng, X. D.; Xu, J. Q.; Qiu, X. M. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sun, Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academic of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Cui, S. Y. [School of Mathematics and Statistics Science, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China)

    2014-12-15

    The neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity torque and electromagnetic torque, generated by tearing mode (TM) in a toroidal plasma, are numerically investigated using the MARS-Q code [Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 042503 (2013)]. It is found that an initially unstable tearing mode can intrinsically drive a toroidal plasma flow resulting in a steady state solution, in the absence of the external momentum input and external magnetic field perturbation. The saturated flow is in the order of 0.5%ω{sub A} at the q=2 rational surface in the considered case, with q and ω{sub A} being the safety factor and the Alfven frequency at the magnetic axis, respectively. The generation of the toroidal flow is robust, being insensitive to the given amplitude of the perturbation at initial state. On the other hand, the flow amplitude increases with increasing the plasma resistivity. Furthermore, the initially unstable tearing mode is fully stabilized by non-linear interaction with the self-generated toroidal flow.

  10. Mirror theory applied to toroidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Central features of a mirror plasma are strong departures from Maxwellian distribution functions, ambipolar potentials and densities which vary along a field line, and losses, and the mirror field itself. To examine these features, mirror theorists have developed analytical and numerical techniques to solve the Fokker-Planck equation, evaluate the potentials consistent with the resulting distribution functions, and assess the microstability of these distributions. Various combinations of mirror-plasma fetures are present and important in toroidal plasmas as well, particularly in the edge region and in plasmas with strong r.f. heating. In this paper we survey problems in toroidal plasmas where mirror theory and computational techniques are applicable, and discuss in more detail three specific examples: calculation of the toroidal generalization of the Spitzer-Haerm distribution function (from which trapped-particle effects on current drive can be calculated), evaluation of the nonuniform potential and density set up by pulsed electron-cyclotron heating, and calculation of steady-state distribution functions in the presence of strong r.f. heating and collisions. 37 refs., 3 figs

  11. Mirror theory applied to toroidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Central features of a mirror plasma are strong departures from Maxwellian distribution functions, ambipolar potentials and densities which vary along a field line, end losses, and the mirror field itself. To examine these features, mirror theorists have developed analytical and numerical techniques to solve the Fokker-Planck equation, evaluate the potentials consistent with the resulting distribution functions, and assess the microstability of these distributions. Various combinations of mirror-plasma features are present and important in toroidal plasmas as well, particularly in the edge region and in plasmas with strong rf heating. In this paper we survey problems in toroidal plasmas where mirror theory and computational techniques are applicable, and discuss in more detail three specific examples: calculation of the toroidal generalization of the Spitzer-Haerm distribution function (from which trapped-particle effects on current drive can be calculated), evaluation of the nonuniform potential and density set up by pulsed electron-cyclotron heating, and calculation of steady-state distribution functions in the presence of strong rf heating and collisions. 37 refs

  12. The feasibility of low-mass conductors for toroidal superconducting magnets for SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luton, J.N.

    1990-01-01

    An earlier study by Luton and Bonanos concluded that the design and fabrication of superconducting toroidal bending magnets would require a major effort but would be feasible. This study is an extension to examine the feasibility of low-mass conductors for such use. It included a literature search, consultations, with conductor manufacturers, and design calculations, but no experimental work. An unoptimized sample design that used a residual resistivity ratio for aluminum of 1360 and a current density of 3.5 kA/cm 2 over the uninsulated conductor for a 4.5-T toroid with 1 GJ of stored energy obtained a hot-spot temperature of 120 K with a maximum dump voltage of 3.6 kV and 24% of the initial current inductively transferred into the shorted aluminum structure. The stability margin was 200 mJ/cm 3 of cable space. Limiting the quench pressure to 360 atm to give conservative stresses in the sheath and assuming that the whole flow path quenched immediately resulted in helium taps that could be a kilometer apart if the flow friction factor were the same as that experienced in the Westinghouse (W) Large Coil Task (LCT) coil. This indicates that the 520-m conductor length of each of the 72 individual coil segments of a toroid would be a single flow path. If some practical uncertainties can be favorably resolved by producing and testing sample conductors, the use of a conductor with clad-aluminum stabilizer and extruded aluminum-alloy sheath should be feasible and economical. 9 refs., 3 figs

  13. Superconducting cyclotron magnet coil short

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallory, M.L.; Blosser, H.G.; Clark, D.J.; Launer, H.; Lawton, D.; Miller, P.; Resmini, F.

    1982-01-01

    In February 1981, a short circuit appeared in the superconducting coil of the K500 cyclotron. The short is resistive in character and therefore has no effect on steady state operation of the magnet. The resistance of the short varies, sometimes being below threshold of detection as a heat load on the cooling system and sometimes being significant. The resistance under certain conditions shows approximately cyclic phenomena with time constants in the range of seconds and other approximately cyclic phenomena which correlate with gross operating parameters of the magnet (shifting current from one coil to another at high field and lowering and raising the liquid helium level). A number of diagnostic studies of the short have been made, using 1) an array of flux sensing loops to sense the magnetic effect of the short, 2) voltage comparisons between upper and lower sections of the coil, 3) comparisons of forces in the nine member coil support system and 4) the effect of the short on the thermal charactersitics of the coil. Insulation failure or a metal chip shorting out turns have been explored in some detail but a convincing determination of the exact cause of the short may never be available, (even the extreme step of unwinding the coil having a significant probability that an imperfection with the observed characteristics would pass unnoticed). Analysis of the characteristics of the short indicated that the most serious consequence would be failure of the coils mechanical support system in the event that the magnet was quickly discharged, as in a dump or quench. To deal with this hazard, the support system has been modified by installing solid supports which prevent the coil from moving by an amount sufficient to damage the support system. We have also reexamined the data and calculations used in the original coil design and have made some additional measurements of the properties of the materials (yield strength, friction coefficient, Young's modulus) used in the

  14. Superconducting poloidal coils for STARFIRE commercial reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Evans, K. Jr.; Turner, L.R.; Huang, Y.C.; Prater, R.; Alcorn, J.

    1979-01-01

    STARFIRE is considered to be the tenth commercial tokamak power plant. A preliminary design study on its superconducting poloidal coil system is presented. Key features of the design studies are: the elimination of the ohmic heating coil; the trade-off studies of the equilibrium field coil locations; and the development of a conceptual design for the superconducting equilibrium field coils. Described are the 100 kA cryostable conductor design, the coil structure, and evaluation of the coil forces

  15. Stochastization of Magnetic Field Surfaces in Tokamaks by an Inner Coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez-Alarcon, Esteban; Herrera-Velazquez, J. Julio E.; Braun-Gitler, Eliezer

    2006-01-01

    A 3-D code has been developed in order to simulate the magnetic field lines in circular cross-section tokamaks. The toroidal magnetic field can be obtained from the individual fields of circular coils arranged around the torus, or alternatively, as a ripple-less field. The poloidal field is provided by a given toroidal current density profile. Proposing initial conditions for a magnetic filed line, it is integrated along the toroidal angle coordinate, and Poincare maps can be obtained at any desired cross section plane. Following this procedure, the code allows the mapping of magnetic field surfaces for the axisymmetric case. For this work, the density current profile is chosen to be bell-shaped, so that realistic safety factor profiles can be obtained. This code is used in order to study the braking up of external surfaces when the symmetry is broken by an inner coil with tilted circular loops, with the purpose of modelling the behaviour of ergodic divertors, such as those devised for TEXTOR

  16. Inductive Eigenmodes of a resistive toroidal surface in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo Surdo, C.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper it has been studied the Electro-Magnetic (EM) Eigenmodes, sufficiently slow as to legitimate the pre-Maxwell approximation of Maxwell's system (or inductive Eigenmodes), of a given smooth, toroidal-unknotted, electrically resistive surface Τ with given smooth (surface) resistivity 0 d egree 3 . Within the above limitations (to be made more precise), the geometry of Τ is arbitrary. With the eigenvalue associated with the generic Eigenmode being defined as the opposite of its logarithmic time-derivative, one expects that the resulting spectrum be discrete and strictly positive. It shall be interested into the degenerate case where Τ be cut (i.e. electrically broken) along one or more of its irreducible cycles. This case will be analyzed autonomously, rather than as a limit (for ρ d egree → ∞ along the cuts) of the regular case. Without cuts, the Eigenproblem under consideration is nothing but the two-dimensional (2-dim) generalization of the classical case of a smooth, unknotted, electrically conductive, simple coil in infinite vacuum. Its analysis hinges on the classical potential theory, and turns out to be a special application of the linear, integrodifferential (elliptic) equation theory on a compact, multiply connected, 2-dim manifold. The attention and approach will be confined to strong (or classical) solutions, both in Τ and C Τ = R 3 / Τ. This study is divided in two parts: a General Part (Sects 1 divided 4) is devoted to the case of generic Τ and ρ d egree (within the convenient smoothness requirements), whereas a Special Part (Sects 5 divided 7) deals with the (more or less formal) discussion of a couple of particular cases (Τ ≡ a canonical torus), both of which with uniform ρ d egree. Some propaedeutical/supplementary information is provided in a number of Appendices [it

  17. Study for Manufacturing of ITER TF Coil Radial Plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietz, W.H.; Muetzel, W.

    2006-01-01

    During the previous design phase of ITER the ITER Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC) has been built to verify the TF coil concept of ITER and to proof the feasibility of an industrial fabrication of such a coil. In April 2004, Forschungszentrum and BNG, started a Manufacturing Study for the full scale Radial Plates (RP) of the TF Coils in the frame of an EFDA task. The main part of the Study was to develop feasible concepts of the technology for the manufacturing of the Full Scale Radial Plates starting with the raw material until final testing. The Feasibility Study has covered all manufacturing steps that are necessary for production of the RP. It has included as well a basic layout for the manufacturing process. During the work several proposals for the single manufacturing work steps have been developed. After that an evaluation of the found proposals has taken place. The most feasible proposals have been combined to manufacturing concepts. Finally two main Concepts were elaborated and evaluated: Concept 1 includes the premachining of segments with grooves, the welding of the segments and the final machining of the RP. Concept 2 includes the welding of not machined small segments to the D-shape of the RP and the following machining of the surface and grooves. Both Concepts will be described in detail with a comparison of tooling and manufacturing details, achievement of technological requirements as well as with the requirements coming from the overall time schedule. Based on the results of the assessment of the different concepts and manufacturing techniques Concept 1 shows some advantages compared to Concept 2. These will be described in the paper. In addition a proposal about additional R(and)D in front of the later manufacturing will be made. (author)

  18. Development of manufacturing technology for ITER TF Coil Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Takeru, E-mail: sakurai.takeru@jaea.go.jp; Iguchi, Masahide; Nakahira, Masataka; Inagaki, Takashi; Matsui, Kunihiro; Koizumi, Norikiyo

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Heavy thick welding (Max. 287 mm) was performed by balance welding. • Figured out Attachment welding deformation including heavy thick welding. • The deformation of Segments welding was suppressed to 1/3 of previous method. • Based on this study, JAEA started actual ITER TF coil structure manufacturing. - Abstract: Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) performed a trial of A1 Segment manufacturing of Toroidal Field (TF) coil structure, which is a piece with a radius of curvature 3 m with square channel for coil. Even though both-side welding (balance welding) was preferred to one-side welding considering the welding deformation, it could not be applied to the previous trial due to the difficulty of overhead or horizontal welding by machine. Hence, one-side welding with strong restriction jig was applied in the previous trials. In the latest trial, JAEA adopted a manual balance welding with a development of manufacturing technology. As the result of A1 Segment Mainbody welding trial, welding deformation of the Outer Plate and the Side Plate could have been controlled closer to the target value. JAEA also tried Attachments welding, in which Pre-Compression Flange (PCF) and Extension are welded to A1 Segment Mainbody, and a Segments welding trial, which is a weld between A1 Segment and a part of A2 Segment. A2 Segment is a 3 m straight part with square channel for coil. The inclination of A1 Segment and A2 Segment due to the welding was 2.7 mm. By applying balance welding, the deformation by Segments welding was suppressed to about 1/3 of the one-side welding. The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the ITER Organization.

  19. An Improved Distortion Operator for Insurance Risks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jian-wei; QIU Wan-hua

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews the distortion function approach developed in the actuarial literature for insurance risks. The main aim of this paper is to derive an extensive distortion operator, and to propose a new premium principle based on this extensive distortion operator. Furthermore, the non-robustness of general distortion operator is also discussed. Examples are provided using Bernoulli, Pareto, Lognormal and Gamma distribution assumptions.

  20. Effect of capacitive feedback on the characteristics of direct current superconducting quantum interference device coupled to a multiturn input coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minotani, T.; Enpuku, K.; Kuroki, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Distortion of voltage versus flux (V endash Φ) relation of a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) coupled to a multiturn input coil is studied. First, resonant behavior of the coupled SQUID due to the so-called input coil resonance is clarified. It is shown that large rf noise flux is produced by the input coil resonance. This rf flux is added to the SQUID, and results in large rf voltage across the SQUID. In the case where parasitic capacitance exists between the input coil and the ground of the SQUID, this rf voltage produces the rf flux again, i.e., a feedback loop for the rf flux is formed. Taking into account this capacitive feedback, we study the V endash Φ relation of the coupled SQUID. Numerical simulation shows that the V endash Φ relation is distorted considerably by the feedback mechanism. The simulation result explains well the experimental V endash Φ relation of the coupled SQUID. The combination of the input coil resonance with the capacitive feedback is the most likely mechanism for the distorted V endash Φ curve of the coupled SQUID. The condition for occurrence of the distorted V endash Φ curve due to the capacitive feedback is also obtained, and methods to prevent degradation are discussed. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  1. Coil protection calculator for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsala, R.J.; Lawson, J.E.; Persing, R.G.; Senko, T.R.; Woolley, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    A new coil protection system (CPS) is being developed to replace the existing TFTR magnetic coil fault detector. The existing fault detector sacrifices TFTR operating capability for simplicity. The new CPS, when installed in October of 1988, will permit operation up to the actual coil stress limits parameters in real-time. The computation will be done in a microprocessor based Coil Protection Calculator (CPC) currently under construction at PPL. THe new CPC will allow TFTR to operate with higher plasma currents and will permit the optimization of pulse repetition rates. The CPC will provide real-time estimates of critical coil and bus temperatures and stresses based on real-time redundant measurements of coil currents, coil cooling water inlet temperature, and plasma current. The critical parameter calculations are compared to prespecified limits. If these limits are reached or exceeded, protection action will be initiated to a hard wired control system (HCS), which will shut down the power supplies. The CPC consists of a redundant VME based microprocessor system which will sample all input data and compute all stress quantities every ten milliseconds. Thermal calculations will be approximated every 10ms with an exact solution occurring every second. The CPC features continuous cross-checking of redundant input signal, automatic detection of internal failure modes, monitoring and recording of calculated results, and a quick, functional verification of performance via an internal test system. (author)

  2. Motion of a compact toroid inside a cylindrical flux conserver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Linford, R.K.; Marshall, J.; Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, A.R.

    1980-10-13

    Compact toroids have been generated in a cylindrical resistive flux conserver. They are observed to rotate so that their major axis is perpendicular to the axis of the flux conserver. Subsequently they remain stationary and their magnetic fields decay with a time constant of about 100 ..mu..s. This is the first observation of the predicted tipping mode and its saturation when no external fields are present. The compact toroids contain toroidal fields and are initially prolate in shape.

  3. Motion of a compact toroid inside a cylindrical flux conserver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Linford, R.K.; Marshall, J.; Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    Compact toroids have been generated in a cylindrical resistive flux conserver. They are observed to rotate so that their major axis is perpendicular to the axis of the flux conserver. Subsequently they remain stationary and their magnetic fields decay with a time constant of about 100 μs. This is the first observation of the predicted tipping mode and its saturation when no external fields are present. The compact toroids contain toroidal fields and are initially prolate in shape

  4. Application of plasma focus device to compression of toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari

    1980-01-01

    A new concept of compressing a toroidal plasma using a plasma focus device is considered. Maximum compression ratio of toroidal plasma is determined merely by the initial density ratio of the toroidal plasma to a sheet plasma in a focus device because of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. An initiation senario of plasma-linear is also proposed with a possible application of this concepts to the creation of a burning plasma in reversed field configurations, i.e., burning plasma vortex. (author)

  5. Structure of DNA toroids and electrostatic attraction of DNA duplexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherstvy, A G

    2005-01-01

    DNA-DNA electrostatic attraction is considered as the driving force for the formation of DNA toroids in the presence of DNA condensing cations. This attraction comes from the DNA helical charge distribution and favours hexagonal toroidal cross-sections. The latter is in agreement with recent cryo-electron microscopy studies on DNA condensed with cobalt hexammine. We treat the DNA-DNA interactions within the modern theory of electrostatic interaction between helical macromolecules. The size and thickness of the toroids is calculated within a simple model; other models of stability of DNA toroids are discussed and compared

  6. The SSC superconducting air core toroid design development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, T.; Carroll, A.; Chiang, I.H.; Frank, J.S.; Haggerty, J.; Littenberg, L.; Morse, W.; Strand, R.C.; Lau, K.; Weinstein, R.; McNeil, R.; Friedman, J.; Hafen, E.; Haridas, P.; Kendall, H.W.; Osborne, L.; Pless, I.; Rosenson, L.; Pope, B.; Jones, L.W.; Luton, J.N.; Bonanos, P.; Marx, M.; Pusateri, J.A.; Favale, A.; Gottesman, S.; Schneid, E.; Verdier, R.

    1990-01-01

    Superconducting air core toroids show great promise for use in a muon spectrometer for the SSC. Early studies by SUNY at Stony Brook funded by SSC Laboratory, have established the feasibility of building magnets of the required size. The toroid spectrometer consists of a central toroid with two end cap toroids. The configuration under development provides for muon trajectory measurement outside the magnetic volume. System level studies on support structure, assembly, cryogenic material selection, and power are performed. Resulting selected optimal design and assembly is described. 4 refs., 6 figs

  7. Form factor of some types of toroidal solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koryavko, V.I.; Litvinenko, Yu.A.

    1979-01-01

    Obtained were the type of dependence between consumed power and formed field for toroidal helical-wound solenoids and the expression for the form factor analogous to the Fabry coefficient for cylindrical solenoids. Determined were optimum dimensions of the helical winding of ''forceless'' toroidal solenoids satisfying the condition of the formation of maximum field at minimum consumed power. Investigations also covered some types of conventional toroidal solenoids. Presented in the paper diagrams permitted to chose dimensions of the considered toroidal solenoids according to their consumed power and winding material volume

  8. Observation of distorted Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of epithermal ions in LHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Yoshinuma, M.; Akiyama, T.; Tokuzawa, T.; Tsuchiya, H.; Itoh, K.; LHD Experiment Group

    2017-12-01

    A distorted Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of epithermal ions is observed associated with the collapse of energetic ions triggered by the tongue shaped deformation. The tongue shaped deformation is characterized by the plasma displacement localized in the toroidal, poloidal, and radial directions at the non-rational magnetic flux surface in toroidal plasma. Moment analysis of the ion velocity distribution measured with charge exchange spectroscopy is studied in order to investigate the impact of tongue event on ion distribution. A clear non-zero skewness (3rd moment) and kurtosis (4th moment -3) of ion velocity distribution in the epithermal region (within three times of thermal velocity) is observed after the tongue event. This observation indicates the clear evidence of the distortion of ion velocity distribution from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. This distortion from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution is observed in one-third of plasma minor radius region near the plasma edge and disappears in the ion-ion collision time scale.

  9. Toroidal plasma enhanced CVD of diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvanya, John; Cullen, Christopher; Morris, Thomas; Krchnavek, Robert R.; Holber, William; Basnett, Andrew; Basnett, Robert; Hettinger, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    An inductively coupled toroidal plasma source is used as an alternative to microwave plasmas for chemical vapor deposition of diamond films. The source, operating at a frequency of 400 kHz, synthesizes diamond films from a mixture of argon, methane, and hydrogen. The toroidal design has been adapted to create a highly efficient environment for diamond film deposition: high gas temperature and a short distance from the sample to the plasma core. Using a toroidal plasma geometry operating in the medium frequency band allows for efficient (≈90%) coupling of AC line power to the plasma and a scalable path to high-power and large-area operation. In test runs, the source generates a high flux of atomic hydrogen over a large area, which is favorable for diamond film growth. Using a deposition temperature of 900–1050 °C and a source to sample distance of 0.1–2.0 cm, diamond films are deposited onto silicon substrates. The results showed that the deposition rate of the diamond films could be controlled using the sample temperature and source to sample spacing. The results also show the films exhibit good-quality polycrystalline diamond as verified by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction results show that the samples exhibit diamond (111) and diamond (022) crystallites. The Raman results show that the sp 3 peak has a narrow spectral width (FWHM 12 ± 0.5 cm −1 ) and that negligible amounts of the sp 2 band are present, indicating good-quality diamond films

  10. Liquid toroidal drop under uniform electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabarankin, Michael

    2017-06-01

    The problem of a stationary liquid toroidal drop freely suspended in another fluid and subjected to an electric field uniform at infinity is addressed analytically. Taylor's discriminating function implies that, when the phases have equal viscosities and are assumed to be slightly conducting (leaky dielectrics), a spherical drop is stationary when Q=(2R2+3R+2)/(7R2), where R and Q are ratios of the phases' electric conductivities and dielectric constants, respectively. This condition holds for any electric capillary number, CaE, that defines the ratio of electric stress to surface tension. Pairam and Fernández-Nieves showed experimentally that, in the absence of external forces (CaE=0), a toroidal drop shrinks towards its centre, and, consequently, the drop can be stationary only for some CaE>0. This work finds Q and CaE such that, under the presence of an electric field and with equal viscosities of the phases, a toroidal drop having major radius ρ and volume 4π/3 is qualitatively stationary-the normal velocity of the drop's interface is minute and the interface coincides visually with a streamline. The found Q and CaE depend on R and ρ, and for large ρ, e.g. ρ≥3, they have simple approximations: Q˜(R2+R+1)/(3R2) and CaE∼3 √{3 π ρ / 2 } (6 ln ⁡ρ +2 ln ⁡[96 π ]-9 )/ (12 ln ⁡ρ +4 ln ⁡[96 π ]-17 ) (R+1 ) 2/ (R-1 ) 2.

  11. Review of the Advanced Toroidal Facility program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Murakami, M.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the history and design goals of the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). The ATF is nearing completion at ORNL with device completion expected in May 1987 and first useful plasma operation in June/July 1987. ATF is a moderate-aspect-ratio torsatron, the world's largest stellarator facility with R = 2.1 m, α bar = 0.3 m and B = 2 T (5-s pulse) or 1 T (steady-state capability). It has been specifically designed to support the US tokamak program by studying important toroidal confinement issues in a similar magnetic geometry that allows external control of the magnetic configuration properties and their radial profiles: transform, shear, well depth, shaping, axis topology, etc. ATF will operate in a current-free model which allows separation of current-driven and pressure-driven plasma behavior. It also complements the world stellarator program in its magnetic configuration (between Heliotron-E and W VII-AS) and its capabilities (large size, good access, steady state capability, second stability access, etc.). For both roles ATF will require high-power long-pulse heating to carry out its physics goals since the high power NBI pulse is limited to 0.3 s. The ATF program focuses on demonstrating the principles of high-beta, steady-state operation in toroidal geometry through its study of: (1) scaling of beta limits with magnetic configuration properties and the plasma behavior in the second stability regime; (2) transport scaling at low collisionality and the role/control of electric field; (3) control of plasma density and impurities using divertors; (4) plasma heating with NBI, ECH, ICH, and plasma fueling with gas puffing and pellet injection; and (5) optimization of the magnetic configuration

  12. Possible distortion of autoradiographic results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, A.A.; Tumanushvili, G.D. (AN Gruzinskoj SSR, Tbilisi. Inst. Ehksperimental' noj Morfologii)

    1980-01-01

    The effect of radioactive labelling (H/sup 3/-thymidine) on the infusorian division is studied. The presented results show that introduction of labelled compounds results in accelerating infusorian cell division v. Thorough investigation of labelled compound effect with low activity on the parameters of cell division and the search of methods to eliminate distortions able to appear in autoradiographic experiments is expedient.

  13. Design and fabrication of the vacuum vessel for the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipley, K.K.; Frey, G.N.

    1985-01-01

    The vacuum vessel for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a heavily contoured and very complex formed vessel that is specifically designed to allow for maximum plasma volume in a pure stellarator arrangement. The design of the facility incorporates an internal vessel that is closely fitted to the two helical field coils following the winding law theta = 1/6phi. Metallic seals have been incorporated throughout the system to minimize impurities. The vessel has been fabricated utilizing a comprehensive set of tooling fixtures specifically designed for the task of forming 6-mm stainless steel plate to the complex shape. Computer programs were used to develop a series of ribs that essentially form an internal mold of the vessel. Plates were press-formed with multiple compound curves, fitted to the fixture, and joined with full-penetration welds. 7 refs., 8 figs

  14. Electromagnetic torque on the toroidal plasma and the error-field induced torque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2007-01-01

    The electromagnetic torque on the toroidal plasma is calculated assuming a linear plasma response to the applied perturbation, which may be the error field or the field created by the correction coils, or both. The result is compared with recently published expressions for the error field induced torque (Zheng et al 2006 Nucl. Fusion 46 L9, Zheng and Kotschenreuther 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 165001), and the conclusions of these papers are revised. We resolve the problem of the torque resonance raised there. It is shown that the strong increase in the torque due to the static error field must occur at the resistive wall mode stability limit and not at the no-wall stability limit

  15. Analysis of the TFTR toroidal field power supply and its interactions with other loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newell, W.E.

    1976-01-01

    The rectifiers which supply the four major pulsed loads of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) share two flywheel generators. Thus there is a possibility of significant interaction between these rectifiers by way of the notched voltage waveforms which they create at the generator terminals. This paper presents an analysis of the build up of current in the toroidal field (TF) coil, which is the largest load. From this analysis, the notched waveform caused by the TF rectifier is derived and its effect on the other rectifiers is investigated. It is concluded that with the present conceptual design parameters, the external effects of the interactions are likely to be small. However, the internal control circuits of the rectifiers must be carefully designed to minimize those effects

  16. Stable confinement of toroidal electron plasma in an internal conductor device Prototype-Ring Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, H.; Yoshida, Z.; Watanabe, S.

    2005-01-01

    A pure electron plasma has been produced in an internal conductor device Prototype-Ring Trap (Proto-RT). The temporal evolution of the electron plasma was investigated by the measurement of electrostatic fluctuations. Stable confinement was realized when the potential profile adjusted to match the magnetic surfaces. The confinement time varies as a function of the magnetic field strength and the neutral gas pressure, and is comparable to the diffusion time of electrons determined by the classical collisions with neutral gas. Although the addition of a toroidal magnetic field stabilized the electrostatic fluctuation of the plasma, the effects of the magnetic shear shortened the stable confinement time, possibly because of the obstacles of coil support structures

  17. Magnetic field profiles during turbulent heating in a toroidal hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalfsbeek, H.W.

    1978-12-01

    A description is given of the measurements of both poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components as functions of radius and time in a small turbulently heated tokamak. These measurements have been carried out with an array of miniature pick-up coils, enclosed in a quartz tube which is inserted into the plasma. The electric fields inside the plasma, as well as the parallel resistivity profiles are deduced from the measured magnetic fields. The ohmically dissipated energy is determined from the field distributions and compared with the total input energy. The experimental results are compared with the outcome of a numerical model. The consistency with information obtained from other diagnostic measurements is checked. (Auth.)

  18. Toroidal equilibrium of a non-neutral plasma with toroidal current, inertia and pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.N.; Avinash, K.

    1992-01-01

    Equilibrium of non-neutral clouds in a toroidal vessel with toroidal magnetic field is demonstrated in the presence of a toroidal current, finite mass and finite pressure. With a toroidal current, it is shown that in a large-aspect-ratio conducting torus the equilibrium is governed by competition between forces produced by image charges and image currents. When μ 0 ε 0 E r 2 >B θ 2 (whe re E r and B θ are the self electrostatic and self magnetic fields of the cloud), the confinement is electrostatic and plasma shifts inwards; when μ 0 ε 0 E r 2 θ 2 , the confinement is magnetic and plasma shifts outwards. For μ 0 ε 0 E r 2 = B θ 2 there is no equilibrium. With finite mass or finite pressure, it is shown, in a large-aspect-ratio approximation, that the fluid drift surfaces and equipotential surfaces are displaced with respect to each other. In both cases the fluid drift surfaces are shifted inwards from the equipotential surfaces. (author)

  19. 3D Printing the ATLAS' barrel toroid

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves, Tiago Barreiro

    2016-01-01

    The present report summarizes my work as part of the Summer Student Programme 2016 in the CERN IR-ECO-TSP department (International Relations – Education, Communication & Outreach – Teacher and Student Programmes). Particularly, I worked closely with the S’Cool LAB team on a science education project. This project included the 3D designing, 3D printing, and assembling of a model of the ATLAS’ barrel toroid. A detailed description of the project' development is presented and a short manual on how to use 3D printing software and hardware is attached.

  20. Linear mode conversion in a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellsten, T.

    1980-05-01

    Linear mode conversion at the perpendicular ion cyclotron resonance has been treated for an axially symmetric toroidal plasma. The mode conversion appears between a fast electromagnetic wave and a slow-quasi electrostatic wave, due to finite electron inertia. The problem reduces to the Orr-Sommerfeld equation where the coefficients determining the reflectron, transmission and conversion are functions of the arc length along a poloidal intersection of the resonance surface. These coefficients can be determined from eigenfunctions of an ordinary differential equation. (author)