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Sample records for distinct protease pathways

  1. Distinct protease pathways control cell shape and apoptosis in v-src-transformed quail neuroretina cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, Benjamin D.; Aouacheria, Abdel; Nouvion, Anne-Laure; Ronot, Xavier; Gillet, Germain

    2005-01-01

    Intracellular proteases play key roles in cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. In nerve cells, little is known about their relative contribution to the pathways which control cell physiology, including cell death. Neoplastic transformation of avian neuroretina cells by p60 v-src tyrosine kinase results in dramatic morphological changes and deregulation of apoptosis. To identify the proteases involved in the cellular response to p60 v-src , we evaluated the effect of specific inhibitors of caspases, calpains and the proteasome on cell shape changes and apoptosis induced by p60 v-src inactivation in quail neuroretina cells transformed by tsNY68, a thermosensitive strain of Rous sarcoma virus. We found that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is recruited early after p60 v-src inactivation and is critical for morphological changes, whereas caspases are essential for cell death. This study provides evidence that distinct intracellular proteases are involved in the control of the morphology and fate of v-src-transformed cells

  2. Neuropeptidomics Mass Spectrometry Reveals Signaling Networks Generated by Distinct Protease Pathways in Human Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Vivian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptides regulate intercellular signaling as neurotransmitters of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and as peptide hormones in the endocrine system. Diverse neuropeptides of distinct primary sequences of various lengths, often with post-translational modifications, coordinate and integrate regulation of physiological functions. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of the diverse neuropeptide structures in neuropeptidomics research is necessary to define the full complement of neuropeptide signaling molecules. Human neuropeptidomics has notable importance in defining normal and dysfunctional neuropeptide signaling in human health and disease. Neuropeptidomics has great potential for expansion in translational research opportunities for defining neuropeptide mechanisms of human diseases, providing novel neuropeptide drug targets for drug discovery, and monitoring neuropeptides as biomarkers of drug responses. In consideration of the high impact of human neuropeptidomics for health, an observed gap in this discipline is the few published articles in human neuropeptidomics compared with, for example, human proteomics and related mass spectrometry disciplines. Focus on human neuropeptidomics will advance new knowledge of the complex neuropeptide signaling networks participating in the fine control of neuroendocrine systems. This commentary review article discusses several human neuropeptidomics accomplishments that illustrate the rapidly expanding diversity of neuropeptides generated by protease processing of pro-neuropeptide precursors occurring within the secretory vesicle proteome. Of particular interest is the finding that human-specific cathepsin V participates in producing enkephalin and likely other neuropeptides, indicating unique proteolytic mechanisms for generating human neuropeptides. The field of human neuropeptidomics has great promise to solve new mechanisms in disease conditions, leading to new drug targets and therapeutic agents for human

  3. Distinct pathways of mannan-binding lectin (MBL)- and C1-complex autoactivation revealed by reconstitution of MBL with recombinant MBL-associated serine protease-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorup-Jensen, T; Petersen, Steen Vang; Hansen, A G

    2000-01-01

    proteolytic activation of both C1r and C1s, reconstitution with MASP-2 alone is sufficient for complement activation by MBL. The results suggest that the catalytic activities of MASP-2 split between the two proteases of the C1 complex during the course of vertebrate complement evolution. Udgivelsesdato: 2000...

  4. Pathogen-secreted proteases activate a novel plant immune pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhenyu; Li, Jian-Feng; Niu, Yajie; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Woody, Owen Z; Xiong, Yan; Djonović, Slavica; Millet, Yves; Bush, Jenifer; McConkey, Brendan J; Sheen, Jen; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2015-05-14

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play central roles in innate immune signalling networks in plants and animals. In plants, however, the molecular mechanisms of how signal perception is transduced to MAPK activation remain elusive. Here we report that pathogen-secreted proteases activate a previously unknown signalling pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana involving the Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits of heterotrimeric G-protein complexes, which function upstream of an MAPK cascade. In this pathway, receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) functions as a novel scaffold that binds to the Gβ subunit as well as to all three tiers of the MAPK cascade, thereby linking upstream G-protein signalling to downstream activation of an MAPK cascade. The protease-G-protein-RACK1-MAPK cascade modules identified in these studies are distinct from previously described plant immune signalling pathways such as that elicited by bacterial flagellin, in which G proteins function downstream of or in parallel to an MAPK cascade without the involvement of the RACK1 scaffolding protein. The discovery of the new protease-mediated immune signalling pathway described here was facilitated by the use of the broad host range, opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The ability of P. aeruginosa to infect both plants and animals makes it an excellent model to identify novel immunoregulatory strategies that account for its niche adaptation to diverse host tissues and immune systems.

  5. Escherichia coli contains a soluble ATP-dependent protease (Ti) distinct from protease La

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, B.J.; Park, W.J.; Chung, C.H.; Goldberg, A.L.

    1987-01-01

    The energy requirement for protein breakdown in Escherichia coli has generally been attributed to the ATP-dependence of protease La, the lon gene product. The authors have partially purified another ATP-dependent protease from lon - cells that lack protease La (as shown by immunoblotting). This enzyme hydrolyzes [ 3 H]methyl-casein to acid-soluble products in the presence of ATP and Mg 2+ . ATP hydrolysis appears necessary for proteolytic activity. Since this enzyme is inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, it appears to be a serine protease, but it also contains essential thiol residues. They propose to name this enzyme protease Ti. It differs from protease La in nucleotide specificity, inhibitor sensitivity, and subunit composition. On gel filtration, protease Ti has an apparent molecular weight of 370,000. It can be fractionated by phosphocellulose chromatography or by DEAE chromatography into two components with apparent molecular weights of 260,000 and 140,000. When separated, they do not show preteolytic activity. One of these components, by itself, has ATPase activity and is labile in the absence of ATP. The other contains the diisopropyl fluorophosphate-sensitive proteolytic site. These results and the similar findings of Katayama-Fujimura et al. indicate that E. coli contains two ATP-hydrolyzing proteases, which differ in many biochemical features and probably in their physiological roles

  6. Bacterial protease uses distinct thermodynamic signatures for substrate recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Ohara-Nemoto, Yuko; Cornaciu, Irina; Fedosyuk, Sofiya; Hoffmann, Guillaume; Round, Adam; Márquez, José A; Nemoto, Takayuki K; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2017-06-06

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Porphyromonas endodontalis are important bacteria related to periodontitis, the most common chronic inflammatory disease in humans worldwide. Its comorbidity with systemic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, oral cancers and cardiovascular diseases, continues to generate considerable interest. Surprisingly, these two microorganisms do not ferment carbohydrates; rather they use proteinaceous substrates as carbon and energy sources. However, the underlying biochemical mechanisms of their energy metabolism remain unknown. Here, we show that dipeptidyl peptidase 11 (DPP11), a central metabolic enzyme in these bacteria, undergoes a conformational change upon peptide binding to distinguish substrates from end products. It binds substrates through an entropy-driven process and end products in an enthalpy-driven fashion. We show that increase in protein conformational entropy is the main-driving force for substrate binding via the unfolding of specific regions of the enzyme ("entropy reservoirs"). The relationship between our structural and thermodynamics data yields a distinct model for protein-protein interactions where protein conformational entropy modulates the binding free-energy. Further, our findings provide a framework for the structure-based design of specific DPP11 inhibitors.

  7. Manipulating the autolytic pathway of a Bacillus protease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VandenBurg, B; Eijsink, VGH; Vriend, G; Veltman, OR; Venema, G; HopsuHavu, VK; Jarvinen, M; Kirschke, H

    1997-01-01

    Autolytic degradation of Bacillus subtilis thermolysin-like proteinase (TLP-sub) is responsible for the irreversible inactivation of the enzyme at elevated temperatures. Previously, we reported five autolysis sites in B. subtilis neutral protease (Van den Burg et al., 1990, Biochem. J. 272:93-97).

  8. Photostability and photodegradation pathways of distinctive pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Attila; Virág, Diána

    2009-01-01

    Transformation of pesticides in the environment is a highly complex process affected by different factors. Biological and physical-chemical factors may play a role in the degradation to variable extent. Photodecomposition might be regarded as one of the most crucial factors affecting the fate of pesticides. Therefore, our study focused on revealing specific details of the photolytic degradation of pesticides. The toxicity of the examined pesticides is well known; however, little information is available regarding their natural degradation processes. More detailed examinations are required to reveal the exact mechanism of the pesticide decomposition and the biological impacts of the degradates. Significance of this study is enhanced by the fact that decomposition of pesticides may result in the formation of toxic degradation products. The photolytic degradation of frequently applied pesticides (e.g., acetochlor, simazine, chlorpyrifos, and carbendazim) with different chemical structures was investigated. An immersible ultraviolet light source was applied to induce photodegradation. The degradation processes were followed by thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry techniques. Electron ionization mass spectrometry was used to identify the degradation species. Detailed mechanisms of photolytic transformation were established by identification of each degradate. The photolytic degradation of pesticides of distinctive chemical character exhibited markedly different photodecomposition mechanisms. At least four degradation species were detected and identified in each case. Loss of alkyl, chloro, and hydroxyl groups as well as cleavage of alkyloxy, amide, amino-alkyl, and ester bonds might be regarded as typical decomposition patterns. Deamination and ring opening might be observed at the last stages of decomposition.

  9. AAA+ proteases and their role in distinct stages along the Vibrio cholerae lifecycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressler, Katharina; Vorkapic, Dina; Lichtenegger, Sabine; Malli, Gerald; Barilich, Benjamin P; Cakar, Fatih; Zingl, Franz G; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    The facultative human pathogen Vibrio cholerae has to adapt to different environmental conditions along its lifecycle by means of transcriptional, translational and post-translational regulation. This study provides a first comprehensive analysis regarding the contribution of the cytoplasmic AAA+ proteases Lon, ClpP and HslV to distinct features of V. cholerae behaviour, including biofilm formation, motility, cholera toxin expression and colonization fitness in the mouse model. While absence of HslV did not yield to any altered phenotype compared to wildtype, absence of Lon or ClpP resulted in significantly reduced colonization in vivo. In addition, a Δlon deletion mutant showed altered biofilm formation and increased motility, which could be correlated with higher expression of V. cholerae flagella gene class IV. Concordantly, we could show by immunoblot analysis, that Lon is the main protease responsible for proteolytic control of FliA, which is required for class IV flagella gene transcription, but also downregulates virulence gene expression. FliA becomes highly sensitive to proteolytic degradation in absence of its anti-sigma factor FlgM, a scenario reported to occur during mucosal penetration due to FlgM secretion through the broken flagellum. Our results confirm that the high stability of FliA in the absence of Lon results in less cholera toxin and toxin corgulated pilus production under virulence gene inducing conditions and in the presence of a damaged flagellum. Thus, the data presented herein provide a molecular explanation on how V. cholerae can achieve full expression of virulence genes during early stages of colonization, despite FliA getting liberated from the anti-sigma factor FlgM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of Inactivated Extracellular Proteases on the Modified Flagellin Type III Secretion Pathway of Bacillus halodurans▿

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Eldie; du Plessis, Erika; Gerber, Isak; Crampton, Michael; Nxumalo, Nolwandle; Louw, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    The flagellin type III secretion pathway of Bacillus halodurans BhFC01 (Δhag) was modified by the inactivation of fliD. An in-frame flagellin gene fusion polypeptide construct was expressed, and the heterologous peptides were secreted as flagellin fusion monomers. The stability of the secreted monomers was significantly enhanced through gene-targeted inactivation of extracellular proteases.

  11. Scabies mite inactive serine proteases are potent inhibitors of the human complement lectin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone L Reynolds

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Scabies is an infectious skin disease caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei and has been classified as one of the six most prevalent epidermal parasitic skin diseases infecting populations living in poverty by the World Health Organisation. The role of the complement system, a pivotal component of human innate immunity, as an important defence against invading pathogens has been well documented and many parasites have an arsenal of anti-complement defences. We previously reported on a family of scabies mite proteolytically inactive serine protease paralogues (SMIPP-Ss thought to be implicated in host defence evasion. We have since shown that two family members, SMIPP-S D1 and I1 have the ability to bind the human complement components C1q, mannose binding lectin (MBL and properdin and are capable of inhibiting all three human complement pathways. This investigation focused on inhibition of the lectin pathway of complement activation as it is likely to be the primary pathway affecting scabies mites. Activation of the lectin pathway relies on the activation of MBL, and as SMIPP-S D1 and I1 have previously been shown to bind MBL, the nature of this interaction was examined using binding and mutagenesis studies. SMIPP-S D1 bound MBL in complex with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs and released the MASP-2 enzyme from the complex. SMIPP-S I1 was also able to bind MBL in complex with MASPs, but MASP-1 and MASP-2 remained in the complex. Despite these differences in mechanism, both molecules inhibited activation of complement components downstream of MBL. Mutagenesis studies revealed that both SMIPP-Ss used an alternative site of the molecule from the residual active site region to inhibit the lectin pathway. We propose that SMIPP-Ss are potent lectin pathway inhibitors and that this mechanism represents an important tool in the immune evasion repertoire of the parasitic mite and a potential target for therapeutics.

  12. Microtubule depolymerization induces traction force increase through two distinct pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rape, Andrew; Guo, Wei-hui; Wang, Yu-li

    2011-01-01

    Traction forces increase after microtubule depolymerization; however, the signaling mechanisms underlying this, in particular the dependence upon myosin II, remain unclear. We investigated the mechanism of traction force increase after nocodazole-induced microtubule depolymerization by applying traction force microscopy to cells cultured on micropatterned polyacrylamide hydrogels to obtain samples of homogeneous shape and size. Control cells and cells treated with a focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor showed similar increases in traction forces, indicating that the response is independent of FAK. Surprisingly, pharmacological inhibition of myosin II did not prevent the increase of residual traction forces upon nocodazole treatment. This increase was abolished upon pharmacological inhibition of FAK. These results suggest two distinct pathways for the regulation of traction forces. First, microtubule depolymerization activates a myosin-II-dependent mechanism through a FAK-independent pathway. Second, microtubule depolymerization also enhances traction forces through a myosin-II-independent, FAK-regulated pathway. Traction forces are therefore regulated by a complex network of complementary signals and force-generating mechanisms. PMID:22193960

  13. A distinct binding model of a hydroxyethylamine isostere inhibitor of HIV-1 protease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnálek, Jan; Hašek, Jindřich; Dušková, Jarmila; Petroková, Hana; Hradilek, Martin; Souček, Milan; Konvalinka, Jan; Brynda, Jiří; Sedláček, Juraj; Fábry, Milan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 3 (2001), s. 472-476 ISSN 0907-4449 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050811; GA ČR GA203/97/P031; GA ČR GV203/98/K023; GA AV ČR KSK2050602 Grant - others:GA TU(XC) 30497487 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : HIV-1 protease * inhibitors Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.124, year: 2001

  14. Distinct metal-exchange pathways of doped Ag25 nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa

    2016-09-09

    Atomically precise metal nanoclusters (NCs) containing more than one type of metal atom (i.e., doped or alloyed), due to synergistic effects, open new avenues for engineering the catalytic and optical properties of NCs in a manner that homometal NCs cannot. Unfortunately, it is still a major challenge to controllably introduce multimetallic dopants in NCs, understanding the dopants\\' positions, mechanism, and synergistic effects. To overcome these challenges, we designed a metal-exchange approach involving NCs as molecular templates and metal ions as the source of the incoming dopant. In particular, two structurally similar monodoped silver-rich NCs, [MAg24(SR)(18)](2-) (M = Pd/Pt and SR: thiolate), were synthesized as templates to study their mechanistic transformation in response to the introduction of gold atoms. The controllable incorporation of Au atoms into the MAg24 framework facilitated the elucidation of distinct doping pathways through high-resolution mass spectrometry, optical spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Interestingly, gold replaced the central Pd atom of [PdAg24(SR)(18)](2-) clusters to produce predominantly bimetallic [AuAg24(SR)(18)](-) clusters along with a minor product of an [Au2Ag23(SR)(18)](-) cluster. In contrast, the central Pt atom remained intact in [PtAg24(SR)(18)](2-) clusters, and gold replaced the noncentral Ag atoms to form trimetallic [AuxPtAg24-x(SR)(18)](2-) NCs, where x = 1-2, with a portion of the starting [PtAg24(SR)(18)](2-) NCs remaining. This study reveals some of the unusual metal-exchange pathways of doped NCs and the important role played by the initial metal dopant in directing the position of a second dopant in the final product.

  15. The lectin complement pathway serine proteases (MASPs) represent a possible crossroad between the coagulation and complement systems in thromboinflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozarcanin, H; Lood, C; Fog, Lea Munthe

    2016-01-01

    both in vitro and in vivo. These findings may represent a crossroad between the complement and the coagulation systems. SUMMARY: BACKGROUND: The activated forms of the complement lectin pathway (LP) proteases MASP-1 and MASP-2 are able to cleave the coagulation factors prothrombin, fibrinogen, factor...

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease blocks complement activation via the classical and lectin pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laarman, Alexander J; Bardoel, Bart W; Ruyken, Maartje; Fernie, Job; Milder, Fin J; van Strijp, Jos A G; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M

    2012-01-01

    The complement system rapidly detects and kills Gram-negative bacteria and supports bacterial killing by phagocytes. However, bacterial pathogens exploit several strategies to evade detection by the complement system. The alkaline protease (AprA) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been associated with bacterial virulence and is known to interfere with complement-mediated lysis of erythrocytes, but its exact role in bacterial complement escape is unknown. In this study, we analyzed how AprA interferes with complement activation and whether it could block complement-dependent neutrophil functions. We found that AprA potently blocked phagocytosis and killing of Pseudomonas by human neutrophils. Furthermore, AprA inhibited opsonization of bacteria with C3b and the formation of the chemotactic agent C5a. AprA specifically blocked C3b deposition via the classical and lectin pathways, whereas the alternative pathway was not affected. Serum degradation assays revealed that AprA degrades both human C1s and C2. However, repletion assays demonstrated that the mechanism of action for complement inhibition is cleavage of C2. In summary, we showed that P. aeruginosa AprA interferes with classical and lectin pathway-mediated complement activation via cleavage of C2.

  17. Alcohol consumption and distinct molecular pathways to colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaerts, B.W.C.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Vogel, S. de; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goldbohm, R.A.; Weijenberg, M.P.

    2007-01-01

    High alcohol consumption is related to colorectal cancer (CRC). Our objective was to study associations between alcohol consumption and risk of CRC according to characteristics of aetiological pathways: the chromosomal instability (CIN) and the microsatellite instability (MIN) pathway. We classified

  18. An aspartyl protease defines a novel pathway for export of Toxoplasma proteins into the host cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Michael J; Sleebs, Brad E; Uboldi, Alessandro D; Garnham, Alexandra; Franco, Magdalena; Marino, Nicole D; Panas, Michael W; Ferguson, David Jp; Enciso, Marta; O'Neill, Matthew T; Lopaticki, Sash; Stewart, Rebecca J; Dewson, Grant; Smyth, Gordon K; Smith, Brian J; Masters, Seth L; Boothroyd, John C; Boddey, Justin A; Tonkin, Christopher J

    2015-11-18

    Infection by Toxoplasma gondii leads to massive changes to the host cell. Here, we identify a novel host cell effector export pathway that requires the Golgi-resident aspartyl protease 5 (ASP5). We demonstrate that ASP5 cleaves a highly constrained amino acid motif that has similarity to the PEXEL-motif of Plasmodium parasites. We show that ASP5 matures substrates at both the N- and C-terminal ends of proteins and also controls trafficking of effectors without this motif. Furthermore, ASP5 controls establishment of the nanotubular network and is required for the efficient recruitment of host mitochondria to the vacuole. Assessment of host gene expression reveals that the ASP5-dependent pathway influences thousands of the transcriptional changes that Toxoplasma imparts on its host cell. All these changes result in attenuation of virulence of Δasp5 tachyzoites in vivo. This work characterizes the first identified machinery required for export of Toxoplasma effectors into the infected host cell.

  19. Small protease sensitive oligomers of PrPSc in distinct human prions determine conversion rate of PrP(C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae Kim

    Full Text Available The mammalian prions replicate by converting cellular prion protein (PrP(C into pathogenic conformational isoform (PrP(Sc. Variations in prions, which cause different disease phenotypes, are referred to as strains. The mechanism of high-fidelity replication of prion strains in the absence of nucleic acid remains unsolved. We investigated the impact of different conformational characteristics of PrP(Sc on conversion of PrP(C in vitro using PrP(Sc seeds from the most frequent human prion disease worldwide, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD. The conversion potency of a broad spectrum of distinct sCJD prions was governed by the level, conformation, and stability of small oligomers of the protease-sensitive (s PrP(Sc. The smallest most potent prions present in sCJD brains were composed only of∼20 monomers of PrP(Sc. The tight correlation between conversion potency of small oligomers of human sPrP(Sc observed in vitro and duration of the disease suggests that sPrP(Sc conformers are an important determinant of prion strain characteristics that control the progression rate of the disease.

  20. Small protease sensitive oligomers of PrPSc in distinct human prions determine conversion rate of PrP(C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae; Haldiman, Tracy; Surewicz, Krystyna; Cohen, Yvonne; Chen, Wei; Blevins, Janis; Sy, Man-Sun; Cohen, Mark; Kong, Qingzhong; Telling, Glenn C; Surewicz, Witold K; Safar, Jiri G

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian prions replicate by converting cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into pathogenic conformational isoform (PrP(Sc)). Variations in prions, which cause different disease phenotypes, are referred to as strains. The mechanism of high-fidelity replication of prion strains in the absence of nucleic acid remains unsolved. We investigated the impact of different conformational characteristics of PrP(Sc) on conversion of PrP(C) in vitro using PrP(Sc) seeds from the most frequent human prion disease worldwide, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). The conversion potency of a broad spectrum of distinct sCJD prions was governed by the level, conformation, and stability of small oligomers of the protease-sensitive (s) PrP(Sc). The smallest most potent prions present in sCJD brains were composed only of∼20 monomers of PrP(Sc). The tight correlation between conversion potency of small oligomers of human sPrP(Sc) observed in vitro and duration of the disease suggests that sPrP(Sc) conformers are an important determinant of prion strain characteristics that control the progression rate of the disease.

  1. Small Protease Sensitive Oligomers of PrPSc in Distinct Human Prions Determine Conversion Rate of PrPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae; Haldiman, Tracy; Surewicz, Krystyna; Cohen, Yvonne; Chen, Wei; Blevins, Janis; Sy, Man-Sun; Cohen, Mark; Kong, Qingzhong; Telling, Glenn C.; Surewicz, Witold K.; Safar, Jiri G.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian prions replicate by converting cellular prion protein (PrPC) into pathogenic conformational isoform (PrPSc). Variations in prions, which cause different disease phenotypes, are referred to as strains. The mechanism of high-fidelity replication of prion strains in the absence of nucleic acid remains unsolved. We investigated the impact of different conformational characteristics of PrPSc on conversion of PrPC in vitro using PrPSc seeds from the most frequent human prion disease worldwide, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). The conversion potency of a broad spectrum of distinct sCJD prions was governed by the level, conformation, and stability of small oligomers of the protease-sensitive (s) PrPSc. The smallest most potent prions present in sCJD brains were composed only of∼20 monomers of PrPSc. The tight correlation between conversion potency of small oligomers of human sPrPSc observed in vitro and duration of the disease suggests that sPrPSc conformers are an important determinant of prion strain characteristics that control the progression rate of the disease. PMID:22876179

  2. Factor VII activating protease (FSAP) promotes the proteolysis and inhibition of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanse, Sandip M.; Declerck, Paul J.; Ruf, Wolfram; Broze, George; Etscheid, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Factor VII activating protease (FSAP) activates FVII as well as pro-urokinase and inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-BB, thus regulating haemostasis- and remodeling-associated processes in the vasculature. A genetic variant of FSAP (Marburg I polymorphism) results in low enzymatic activity and is associated with an enhanced risk for carotid stenosis and stroke. We postulate that there are additional substrates for FSAP that will help to explain its role in vascular biology and have searched for such a substrate. Results and Methods Using screening procedures to determine the influence of FSAP on various haemostasis-related processes on endothelial cells we discovered that FSAP inhibited tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), a major anti-coagulant secreted by these cells. Proteolytic degradation of TFPI by FSAP could also be demonstrated by Western blotting and the exact cleavage sites were determined by N-terminal sequencing. The Marburg I variant of FSAP had a diminished ability to inhibit TFPI. A monoclonal antibody to FSAP, that specifically inhibited FSAP binding to TFPI, reversed the inhibitory effect of FSAP on TFPI. Conclusions The identification of TFPI as a sensitive substrate for FSAP increases our understanding of its role in regulating haemostasis and proliferative remodeling events in the vasculature. PMID:22116096

  3. Life and death of proteins after protease cleavage: protein degradation by the N-end rule pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissmeyer, Nico; Rivas, Susana; Graciet, Emmanuelle

    2018-05-01

    Contents Summary 929 I. conservation and diversity of N-end rule pathways 929 II. Defensive functions of the N-end rule pathway in plants 930 III. Proteases and degradation by the N-end rule pathway 930 IV. New proteomics approaches for the identification of N-end rule substrates 932 V. Concluding remarks 932 Acknowledgements 934 References 934 SUMMARY: The N-end rule relates the stability of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal residue and some of its modifications. Since its discovery in the 1980s, the repertoire of N-terminal degradation signals has expanded, leading to a diversity of N-end rule pathways. Although some of these newly discovered N-end rule pathways remain largely unexplored in plants, recent discoveries have highlighted roles of N-end rule-mediated protein degradation in plant defense against pathogens and in cell proliferation during organ growth. Despite this progress, a bottleneck remains the proteome-wide identification of N-end rule substrates due to the prerequisite for endoproteolytic cleavage and technical limitations. Here, we discuss the recent diversification of N-end rule pathways and their newly discovered functions in plant defenses, stressing the role of proteases. We expect that novel proteomics techniques (N-terminomics) will be essential for substrate identification. We review these methods, their limitations and future developments. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Alcohol consumption and distinct molecular pathways to colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongaerts, Brenda W C; de Goeij, Anton F P M; de Vogel, Stefan; van den Brandt, Piet A; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; Weijenberg, Matty P

    2007-03-01

    High alcohol consumption is related to colorectal cancer (CRC). Our objective was to study associations between alcohol consumption and risk of CRC according to characteristics of aetiological pathways: the chromosomal instability (CIN) and the microsatellite instability (MIN) pathway. We classified CIN+ tumours (tumours with either a truncating APC mutation, an activating K-ras mutation or overexpression of p53), MIN+ tumours (tumours lacking hMLH1 expression) and CIN- /MIN- tumours (tumours without these defects). In the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, 120852 men and women, aged 55-69 years, completed a questionnaire on risk factors for cancer at baseline (1986). Case-cohort analyses were conducted using 573 CRC cases with complete data after 7 x 3 years of follow-up, excluding the first 2 x 3 years. Adjusted incidence rate ratios (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Compared with abstaining, alcohol consumption of >or=30 g/d was positively associated with the risk of CRC irrespective of genetic or molecular aberrations present, although statistical significance was not reached (RR 1 x 35 (95 % CI 0 x 9-2 x 0) for the CIN+ tumours, RR 1 x 59 (95 % CI 0 x 4-5 x 8) for the MIN+ tumours and RR 1.15 (95 % CI 0 x 5-2 x 7) for the CIN- /MIN- tumours). Beer, wine and liquor consumption were, independent of their alcoholic content, not consistently associated with the risk of CRC within the defined subgroups. In conclusion, our results indicate that a daily alcohol consumption of >or=30 g is associated with an increase in risk of CRC, independent of the presence or absence of the studied characteristics of different aetiological pathways.

  5. Distinct pathways of neural coupling for different basic emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tettamanti, Marco; Rognoni, Elena; Cafiero, Riccardo; Costa, Tommaso; Galati, Dario; Perani, Daniela

    2012-01-16

    Emotions are complex events recruiting distributed cortical and subcortical cerebral structures, where the functional integration dynamics within the involved neural circuits in relation to the nature of the different emotions are still unknown. Using fMRI, we measured the neural responses elicited by films representing basic emotions (fear, disgust, sadness, happiness). The amygdala and the associative cortex were conjointly activated by all basic emotions. Furthermore, distinct arrays of cortical and subcortical brain regions were additionally activated by each emotion, with the exception of sadness. Such findings informed the definition of three effective connectivity models, testing for the functional integration of visual cortex and amygdala, as regions processing all emotions, with domain-specific regions, namely: i) for fear, the frontoparietal system involved in preparing adaptive motor responses; ii) for disgust, the somatosensory system, reflecting protective responses against contaminating stimuli; iii) for happiness: medial prefrontal and temporoparietal cortices involved in understanding joyful interactions. Consistently with these domain-specific models, the results of the effective connectivity analysis indicate that the amygdala is involved in distinct functional integration effects with cortical networks processing sensorimotor, somatosensory, or cognitive aspects of basic emotions. The resulting effective connectivity networks may serve to regulate motor and cognitive behavior based on the quality of the induced emotional experience. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Human papillomaviruses: shared and distinct pathways for pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Denise A; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2015-10-01

    Over 200 types of human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been identified that infect epithelial cells at different anatomic locations. HPVs are grouped into five genera with the alpha and beta viruses being the most commonly studied. Members of the alpha HPV genus infect genital epithelia and are the causative agents of many anogenital cancers. Beta HPVs infect cutaneous epithelia and have been suggested as co-factors in the development of non-melanoma skin cancers. Recent studies have shown that activation of DNA damage pathways is important for the productive life cycle of the alpha HPVs while the beta viruses suppress their activation. These differences likely contribute to the varying types of lesions and malignancies that are associated with these viruses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Uniform and Complementary Social Interaction: Distinct Pathways to Solidarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudenburg, Namkje; Postmes, Tom; Gordijn, Ernestine H; van Mourik Broekman, Aafke

    2015-01-01

    We examine how different forms of co-action give rise to feelings of solidarity. We propose that (a) coordinated action elicits a sense of solidarity, and (b) the process through which such solidarity emerges differs for different forms of co-action. We suggest that whether solidarity within groups emerges from uniform action (e.g. synchronizing, as when people speak in unison) or from more complementary forms of action (e.g. alternating, when speaking in turns) has important consequences for the emergent position of individuals within the group. Uniform action relies on commonality, leaving little scope for individuality. In complementary action each individual makes a distinctive contribution to the group, thereby increasing a sense of personal value to the group, which should contribute to the emergence of solidarity. The predictions receive support from five studies, in which we study groups in laboratory and field settings. Results show that both complementary and uniform co-action increase a sense of solidarity compared to control conditions. However, in the complementary action condition, but not in the uniform action (or synchrony) condition, the effect on feelings of solidarity is mediated by a sense of personal value to the group.

  8. Enzyme Substrate Specificity Conferred by Distinct Conformational Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, Florencia; Saltzberg, Daniel; Allen, Karen N; Tolan, Dean R

    2015-11-04

    Substrate recognition is one of the hallmarks of enzyme catalysis. Enzyme conformational changes have been linked to selectivity between substrates with little direct evidence. Aldolase, a glycolytic enzyme, must distinguish between two physiologically important substrates, fructose 1-phosphate and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, and provides an excellent model system for the study of this question. Previous work has shown that isozyme specific residues (ISRs) distant from the active site are responsible for kinetic distinction between these substrates. Notably, most of the ISRs reside in a cluster of five surface α-helices, and the carboxyl-terminal region (CTR), and cooperative interactions among these helices have been demonstrated. To test the hypothesis that conformational changes are at the root of these changes, single surface-cysteine variants were created with the cysteine located on helices of the cluster and CTR. This allowed for site-specific labeling with an environmentally sensitive fluorophore, and subsequent monitoring of conformational changes by fluorescence emission spectrophotometry. These labeled variants revealed different spectra in the presence of saturating amounts of each substrate, which suggested the occurrence of different conformations. Emission spectra collected at various substrate concentrations showed a concentration dependence of the fluorescence spectra, consistent with binding events. Lastly, stopped-flow fluorescence spectrophotometry showed that the rate of these fluorescence changes was on the same time-scale as catalysis, thus suggesting a link between the different fluorescence changes and events during catalysis. On the basis of these results, we propose that different conformational changes may be a common mechanism for dictating substrate specificity in other enzymes with multiple substrates.

  9. N-terminomics reveals control of Arabidopsis seed storage proteins and proteases by the Arg/N-end rule pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongtao; Gannon, Lucy; Hassall, Kirsty L; Deery, Michael J; Gibbs, Daniel J; Holdsworth, Michael J; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Lilley, Kathryn S; Theodoulou, Frederica L

    2018-05-01

    The N-end rule pathway of targeted protein degradation is an important regulator of diverse processes in plants but detailed knowledge regarding its influence on the proteome is lacking. To investigate the impact of the Arg/N-end rule pathway on the proteome of etiolated seedlings, we used terminal amine isotopic labelling of substrates with tandem mass tags (TMT-TAILS) for relative quantification of N-terminal peptides in prt6, an Arabidopsis thaliana N-end rule mutant lacking the E3 ligase PROTEOLYSIS6 (PRT6). TMT-TAILS identified over 4000 unique N-terminal peptides representing c. 2000 protein groups. Forty-five protein groups exhibited significantly increased N-terminal peptide abundance in prt6 seedlings, including cruciferins, major seed storage proteins, which were regulated by Group VII Ethylene Response Factor (ERFVII) transcription factors, known substrates of PRT6. Mobilisation of endosperm α-cruciferin was delayed in prt6 seedlings. N-termini of several proteases were downregulated in prt6, including RD21A. RD21A transcript, protein and activity levels were downregulated in a largely ERFVII-dependent manner. By contrast, cathepsin B3 protein and activity were upregulated by ERFVIIs independent of transcript. We propose that the PRT6 branch of the pathway regulates protease activities in a complex manner and optimises storage reserve mobilisation in the transition from seed to seedling via control of ERFVII action. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal Protein Cry6Aa Triggers Caenorhabditis elegans Necrosis Pathway Mediated by Aspartic Protease (ASP-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjuan Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell death plays an important role in host-pathogen interactions. Crystal proteins (toxins are essential components of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt biological pesticides because of their specific toxicity against insects and nematodes. However, the mode of action by which crystal toxins to induce cell death is not completely understood. Here we show that crystal toxin triggers cell death by necrosis signaling pathway using crystal toxin Cry6Aa-Caenorhabditis elegans toxin-host interaction system, which involves an increase in concentrations of cytoplasmic calcium, lysosomal lyses, uptake of propidium iodide, and burst of death fluorescence. We find that a deficiency in the necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Cry6Aa toxin. Intriguingly, the necrosis pathway is specifically triggered by Cry6Aa, not by Cry5Ba, whose amino acid sequence is different from that of Cry6Aa. Furthermore, Cry6Aa-induced necrosis pathway requires aspartic protease (ASP-1. In addition, ASP-1 protects Cry6Aa from over-degradation in C. elegans. This is the first demonstration that deficiency in necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Bt crystal protein, and that Cry6A triggers necrosis represents a newly added necrosis paradigm in the C. elegans. Understanding this model could lead to new strategies for nematode control.

  11. Task-dependent activation of distinct fast and slow(er) motor pathways during motor imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Martin; Taube, Wolfgang; Lauber, Benedikt

    2018-02-22

    Motor imagery and actual movements share overlapping activation of brain areas but little is known about task-specific activation of distinct motor pathways during mental simulation of movements. For real contractions, it was demonstrated that the slow(er) motor pathways are activated differently in ballistic compared to tonic contractions but it is unknown if this also holds true for imagined contractions. The aim of the present study was to assess the activity of fast and slow(er) motor pathways during mentally simulated movements of ballistic and tonic contractions. H-reflexes were conditioned with transcranial magnetic stimulation at different interstimulus intervals to assess the excitability of fast and slow(er) motor pathways during a) the execution of tonic and ballistic contractions, b) motor imagery of these contraction types, and c) at rest. In contrast to the fast motor pathways, the slow(er) pathways displayed a task-specific activation: for imagined ballistic as well as real ballistic contractions, the activation was reduced compared to rest whereas enhanced activation was found for imagined tonic and real tonic contractions. This study provides evidence that the excitability of fast and slow(er) motor pathways during motor imagery resembles the activation pattern observed during real contractions. The findings indicate that motor imagery results in task- and pathway-specific subliminal activation of distinct subsets of neurons in the primary motor cortex. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Distinct 3D Architecture and Dynamics of the Human HtrA2(Omi Protease and Its Mutated Variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Gieldon

    Full Text Available HtrA2(Omi protease controls protein quality in mitochondria and plays a major role in apoptosis. Its HtrA2S306A mutant (with the catalytic serine routinely disabled for an X-ray study to avoid self-degradation is a homotrimer whose subunits contain the serine protease domain (PD and the regulatory PDZ domain. In the inactive state, a tight interdomain interface limits penetration of both PDZ-activating ligands and PD substrates into their respective target sites. We successfully crystalized HtrA2V226K/S306A, whose active counterpart HtrA2V226K has had higher proteolytic activity, suggesting higher propensity to opening the PD-PDZ interface than that of the wild type HtrA2. Yet, the crystal structure revealed the HtrA2V226K/S306A architecture typical of the inactive protein. To get a consistent interpretation of crystallographic data in the light of kinetic results, we employed molecular dynamics (MD. V325D inactivating mutant was used as a reference. Our simulations demonstrated that upon binding of a specific peptide ligand NH2-GWTMFWV-COOH, the PDZ domains open more dynamically in the wild type protease compared to the V226K mutant, whereas the movement is not observed in the V325D mutant. The movement relies on a PDZ vs. PD rotation which opens the PD-PDZ interface in a lid-like (budding flower-like in trimer fashion. The noncovalent hinges A and B are provided by two clusters of interfacing residues, harboring V325D and V226K in the C- and N-terminal PD barrels, respectively. The opening of the subunit interfaces progresses in a sequential manner during the 50 ns MD simulation. In the systems without the ligand only minor PDZ shifts relative to PD are observed, but the interface does not open. Further activation-associated events, e.g. PDZ-L3 positional swap seen in any active HtrA protein (vs. HtrA2, were not observed. In summary, this study provides hints on the mechanism of activation of wtHtrA2, the dynamics of the inactive HtrA2V325D

  13. Chemically different non-thermal plasmas target distinct cell death pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, O.; Zablotskyy, V.; Chrupina, O.; Lunova, M.; Jirsa, M.; Dejneka, A.; Kubinová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, apr (2017), s. 600 ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : chemically different * non-thermal plasmas * target distinct cell death pathways Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  14. The Levels of the Lectin Pathway Serine Protease MASP-1 and Its Complex Formation with C1 Inhibitor Are Linked to the Severity of Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Cecilie Bo; Csuka, Dorottya; Munthe-Fog, Lea

    2015-01-01

    C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) is known to form complexes with the lectin complement pathway serine proteases MASP-1 and MASP-2. Deficiency of C1-INH is associated with hereditary angioedema (HAE), an autosomal inherited disease characterized by swelling attacks caused by elevated levels of bradykinin. MASP...

  15. Mycobacteria exploit three genetically distinct DNA double-strand break repair pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Barkan, Daniel; Redelman-Sidi, Gil; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on their DNA repair pathways to resist genomic damage inflicted by the host. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are especially threatening to bacterial viability. DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR) requires nucleases that resect DSB ends and a strand exchange protein that facilitates homology search. RecBCD and RecA perform these functions in Escherichia coli and constitute the major pathway of error-free DSB repair. Mycobacteria, including the human pathogen M. tuberculosis, elaborate an additional error-prone pathway of DSB repair via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) catalysed by Ku and DNA ligase D (LigD). Little is known about the relative contributions of HR and NHEJ to mycobacterial chromosome repair, the factors that dictate pathway choice, or the existence of additional DSB repair pathways. Here we demonstrate that Mycobacterium smegmatis has three DSB repair pathway options: HR, NHEJ and a novel mechanism of single-strand annealing (SSA). Inactivation of NHEJ or SSA is compensated by elevated HR. We find that mycobacterial RecBCD does not participate in HR or confer resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), but is required for the RecA-independent SSA pathway. In contrast, the mycobacterial helicase-nuclease AdnAB participates in the RecA-dependent HR pathway, and is a major determinant of resistance to IR and oxidative DNA damage. These findings reveal distinctive features of mycobacterial DSB repair, most notably the dedication of the RecBCD and AdnAB helicase-nuclease machines to distinct repair pathways. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Chemically different non-thermal plasmas target distinct cell death pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Lunova, M.; Jirsa, M.; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-17, č. článku 600. ISSN 2045-2322 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : chemically different * non-thermal plasmas * target distinct cell death pathways Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  17. Formation of distinct inclusion bodies by inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Junho; Yang, Kyu-Hwan; Joe, Cheol O.; Kang, Seok-Seong

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Distinct inclusion bodies are developed by inhibition of UPP and ALP. → The inclusion bodies differ in morphology, localization and formation process. → The inclusion bodies are distinguishable by the localization of TSC2. → Inhibition of both UPP and ALP simultaneously induces those inclusion bodies. -- Abstract: Accumulation of misfolded proteins is caused by the impairment of protein quality control systems, such as ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) and autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP). In this study, the formation of inclusion bodies was examined after the blockade of UPP and/or ALP in A549 cells. UPP inhibition induced a single and large inclusion body localized in microtubule-organizing center. Interestingly, however, ALP inhibition generated dispersed small inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm. Tuberous sclerosis complex 2 was selectively accumulated in the inclusion bodies of UPP-inhibited cells, but not those of ALP-inhibited cells. Blockade of transcription and translation entirely inhibited the formation of inclusion body induced by UPP inhibition, but partially by ALP inhibition. Moreover, the simultaneous inhibition of two protein catabolic pathways independently developed two distinct inclusion bodies within a single cell. These findings clearly demonstrated that dysfunction of each catabolic pathway induced formation and accumulation of unique inclusion bodies on the basis of morphology, localization and formation process in A549 cells.

  18. Syndecans promote integrin-mediated adhesion of mesenchymal cells in two distinct pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whiteford, James; Behrends, Volker; Kirby, Hishani

    2007-01-01

    and signaling through the cytoplasmic domain of syndecan-4. Here an alternate pathway mediated by the extracellular domains of syndecans-2 and -4 is characterized that is independent of both heparan sulphate and syndecan signaling. This pathway is restricted to mesenchymal cells and was not seen in any...... epithelial cell line tested, apart from vascular endothelia. The syndecan ectodomains coated as substrates promoted integrin-dependent attachment, spreading and focal adhesion formation. Syndecan-4 null cells were competent, as were fibroblasts compromised in heparan sulphate synthesis that were unable...... to form focal adhesions in response to fibronectin. Consistent with actin cytoskeleton organization, the process required Rho-GTP and Rho kinase. While syndecan-2 and -4 ectodomains could both promote integrin-mediated adhesion, their pathways were distinct, as shown by competition assays. Evidence...

  19. Functionally distinct PI 3-kinase pathways regulate myelination in the peripheral nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Bradley A.; Ghidinelli, Monica; Voelkl, Jakob; Einheber, Steven; Smith, Ryan; Grund, Ethan; Morahan, Grant; Chandler, David; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Giancotti, Filippo; King, Rosalind H.; Fejes-Toth, Aniko Naray; Fejes-Toth, Gerard; Feltri, Maria Laura; Lang, Florian

    2014-01-01

    The PI 3-kinase (PI 3-K) signaling pathway is essential for Schwann cell myelination. Here we have characterized PI 3-K effectors activated during myelination by probing myelinating cultures and developing nerves with an antibody that recognizes phosphorylated substrates for this pathway. We identified a discrete number of phospho-proteins including the S6 ribosomal protein (S6rp), which is down-regulated at the onset of myelination, and N-myc downstream-regulated gene-1 (NDRG1), which is up-regulated strikingly with myelination. We show that type III Neuregulin1 on the axon is the primary activator of S6rp, an effector of mTORC1. In contrast, laminin-2 in the extracellular matrix (ECM), signaling through the α6β4 integrin and Sgk1 (serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase 1), drives phosphorylation of NDRG1 in the Cajal bands of the abaxonal compartment. Unexpectedly, mice deficient in α6β4 integrin signaling or Sgk1 exhibit hypermyelination during development. These results identify functionally and spatially distinct PI 3-K pathways: an early, pro-myelinating pathway driven by axonal Neuregulin1 and a later-acting, laminin–integrin-dependent pathway that negatively regulates myelination. PMID:24687281

  20. Induction of postmitotic neuroretina cell proliferation by distinct Ras downstream signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyssonnaux, C; Provot, S; Felder-Schmittbuhl, M P; Calothy, G; Eychène, A

    2000-10-01

    Ras-induced cell transformation is mediated through distinct downstream signaling pathways, including Raf, Ral-GEFs-, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)-dependent pathways. In some cell types, strong activation of the Ras-Raf-MEK-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade leads to cell cycle arrest rather than cell division. We previously reported that constitutive activation of this pathway induces sustained proliferation of primary cultures of postmitotic chicken neuroretina (NR) cells. We used this model system to investigate the respective contributions of Ras downstream signaling pathways in Ras-induced cell proliferation. Three RasV12 mutants (S35, G37, and C40) which differ by their ability to bind to Ras effectors (Raf, Ral-GEFs, and the p110 subunit of PI 3-kinase, respectively) were able to induce sustained NR cell proliferation, although none of these mutants was reported to transform NIH 3T3 cells. Furthermore, they all repressed the promoter of QR1, a neuroretina growth arrest-specific gene. Overexpression of B-Raf or activated versions of Ras effectors Rlf-CAAX and p110-CAAX also induced NR cell division. The mitogenic effect of the RasC40-PI 3-kinase pathway appears to involve Rac and RhoA GTPases but not the antiapoptotic Akt (protein kinase B) signaling. Division induced by RasG37-Rlf appears to be independent of Ral GTPase activation and presumably requires an unidentified mechanism. Activation of either Ras downstream pathway resulted in ERK activation, and coexpression of a dominant negative MEK mutant or mKsr-1 kinase domain strongly inhibited proliferation induced by the three Ras mutants or by their effectors. Similar effects were observed with dominant negative mutants of Rac and Rho. Thus, both the Raf-MEK-ERK and Rac-Rho pathways are absolutely required for Ras-induced NR cell division. Activation of these two pathways by the three distinct Ras downstream effectors possibly relies on an autocrine or paracrine loop

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies Follow Distinct Aggregation Pathways During Production-Relevant Acidic Incubation and Neutralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Skamris; Tian, Xinsheng; Thorolfsson, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Aggregation aspects of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are of common concern to the pharmaceutical industry. Low pH treatment is applied during affinity purification and to inactivate endogenous retroviruses, directing interest to the mechanisms of acid-induced antibody aggregat......PURPOSE: Aggregation aspects of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are of common concern to the pharmaceutical industry. Low pH treatment is applied during affinity purification and to inactivate endogenous retroviruses, directing interest to the mechanisms of acid-induced antibody...... identified, which may lead to two distinct pathways of reversible and irreversible aggregation, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that subtle variations in mAb sequence greatly affect responses towards low-pH incubation and subsequent neutralization, and demonstrate how orthogonal biophysical methods...... distinguish between reversible and irreversible mAb aggregation pathways at early stages of acidic treatment....

  2. Formation of distinct inclusion bodies by inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junho; Yang, Kyu-Hwan; Joe, Cheol O; Kang, Seok-Seong

    2011-01-14

    Accumulation of misfolded proteins is caused by the impairment of protein quality control systems, such as ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) and autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP). In this study, the formation of inclusion bodies was examined after the blockade of UPP and/or ALP in A549 cells. UPP inhibition induced a single and large inclusion body localized in microtubule-organizing center. Interestingly, however, ALP inhibition generated dispersed small inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm. Tuberous sclerosis complex 2 was selectively accumulated in the inclusion bodies of UPP-inhibited cells, but not those of ALP-inhibited cells. Blockade of transcription and translation entirely inhibited the formation of inclusion body induced by UPP inhibition, but partially by ALP inhibition. Moreover, the simultaneous inhibition of two protein catabolic pathways independently developed two distinct inclusion bodies within a single cell. These findings clearly demonstrated that dysfunction of each catabolic pathway induced formation and accumulation of unique inclusion bodies on the basis of morphology, localization and formation process in A549 cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Cognition-Emotion Interactions and Psychopathic Personality: Distinct Pathways to Antisocial and Violent Behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verona, Edelyn

    Researchers have long acknowledged heterogeneity among persons who exhibit antisocial and violent behaviours. The study of psychopathic personality or psychopathy can help elucidate this heterogeneity through examination of the different facets that constitute this disorder. In particular, the distinct correlates of the interpersonal-affective traits (Factor 1) and the impulsive-antisocial traits (Factor 2) of psychopathy suggest at least two possible pathways to antisocial behaviours. Building on basic studies in cognitive and affective neuroscience, we provide a focused, non-comprehensive review of work identifying the biopsychological mechanisms involved in these two pathways, with special attention to studies using event-related potential (ERP) methods. In specific, a series of studies are discussed which examined affective and cognitive processes that may distinguish offenders high on psychopathic traits from other offenders, with emphasis on alterations in emotion-cognition interactions related to each factor of psychopathy. The set of findings reviewed highlight a central conclusion: Factor 1 represents a pathway involving reduced emotional responding, exacerbated by attentional abnormalities, that make for a more deliberate and emotionally insensitive offender profile. In contrast, Factor 2 characterizes a pathway marked by emotional and behavioural dysregulation and cognitive control dysfunctions, particularly in emotional contexts. Implications for identifying etiological processes and the further understanding of antisocial and violent behaviours are discussed.

  4. Azospirillum brasilense Chemotaxis Depends on Two Signaling Pathways Regulating Distinct Motility Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Kumar, Dhivya; Burriss, Nathan; Xie, Zhihong; Alexandre, Gladys

    2016-06-15

    The genomes of most motile bacteria encode two or more chemotaxis (Che) systems, but their functions have been characterized in only a few model systems. Azospirillum brasilense is a motile soil alphaproteobacterium able to colonize the rhizosphere of cereals. In response to an attractant, motile A. brasilense cells transiently increase swimming speed and suppress reversals. The Che1 chemotaxis pathway was previously shown to regulate changes in the swimming speed, but it has a minor role in chemotaxis and root surface colonization. Here, we show that a second chemotaxis system, named Che4, regulates the probability of swimming reversals and is the major signaling pathway for chemotaxis and wheat root surface colonization. Experimental evidence indicates that Che1 and Che4 are functionally linked to coordinate changes in the swimming motility pattern in response to attractants. The effect of Che1 on swimming speed is shown to enhance the aerotactic response of A. brasilense in gradients, likely providing the cells with a competitive advantage in the rhizosphere. Together, the results illustrate a novel mechanism by which motile bacteria utilize two chemotaxis pathways regulating distinct motility parameters to alter movement in gradients and enhance the chemotactic advantage. Chemotaxis provides motile bacteria with a competitive advantage in the colonization of diverse niches and is a function enriched in rhizosphere bacterial communities, with most species possessing at least two chemotaxis systems. Here, we identify the mechanism by which cells may derive a significant chemotactic advantage using two chemotaxis pathways that ultimately regulate distinct motility parameters. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Magnetic resonance image features identify glioblastoma phenotypic subtypes with distinct molecular pathway activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Haruka; Achrol, Achal S; Mitchell, Lex A; Loya, Joshua J; Liu, Tiffany; Westbroek, Erick M; Feroze, Abdullah H; Rodriguez, Scott; Echegaray, Sebastian; Azad, Tej D; Yeom, Kristen W; Napel, Sandy; Rubin, Daniel L; Chang, Steven D; Harsh, Griffith R; Gevaert, Olivier

    2015-09-02

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and highly lethal primary malignant brain tumor in adults. There is a dire need for easily accessible, noninvasive biomarkers that can delineate underlying molecular activities and predict response to therapy. To this end, we sought to identify subtypes of GBM, differentiated solely by quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features, that could be used for better management of GBM patients. Quantitative image features capturing the shape, texture, and edge sharpness of each lesion were extracted from MR images of 121 single-institution patients with de novo, solitary, unilateral GBM. Three distinct phenotypic "clusters" emerged in the development cohort using consensus clustering with 10,000 iterations on these image features. These three clusters--pre-multifocal, spherical, and rim-enhancing, names reflecting their image features--were validated in an independent cohort consisting of 144 multi-institution patients with similar tumor characteristics from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Each cluster mapped to a unique set of molecular signaling pathways using pathway activity estimates derived from the analysis of TCGA tumor copy number and gene expression data with the PARADIGM (Pathway Recognition Algorithm Using Data Integration on Genomic Models) algorithm. Distinct pathways, such as c-Kit and FOXA, were enriched in each cluster, indicating differential molecular activities as determined by the image features. Each cluster also demonstrated differential probabilities of survival, indicating prognostic importance. Our imaging method offers a noninvasive approach to stratify GBM patients and also provides unique sets of molecular signatures to inform targeted therapy and personalized treatment of GBM. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Monosodium Urate Crystals Generate Nuclease-Resistant Neutrophil Extracellular Traps via a Distinct Molecular Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, Simon M; Grebe, Kathrin; Whitehead, Lachlan W; Rogers, Kelly L; Nebl, Thomas; Murphy, James M; Wicks, Ian P

    2018-03-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and the cell death associated with it (NETosis) have been implicated in numerous diseases. Mechanistic studies of NETosis have typically relied on nonphysiological stimuli, such as PMA. The human disease of gout is caused by monosodium urate (MSU) crystals. We observed that DNA consistent with NETs is present in fluid from acutely inflamed joints of gout patients. NETs also coat the crystals found in uninflamed tophi of chronic gout patients. We developed a quantitative, live cell imaging assay, which measures the key features of NETosis, namely, cell death and chromatin decondensation. We show that MSU and other physiologically relevant crystals induce NETosis through a molecular pathway that is distinct from PMA and Candida hyphae. Crystals interact with lysosomes to induce NADPH oxidase-independent cell death, with postmortem chromatin decondensation mediated by neutrophil elastase. The resulting MSU-induced NETs are enriched for actin and are resistant to serum and DNase degradation. These findings demonstrate a distinct physiological NETosis pathway in response to MSU crystals, which coats MSU crystals in DNA that persists in tissues as gouty tophi. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Distinct Spatiotemporal Expression of Serine Proteases Prss23 and Prss35 in Periimplantation Mouse Uterus and Dispensable Function of Prss35 in Fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Honglu; Xiao, Shuo; Li, Rong; Zhao, Fei; Ye, Xiaoqin

    2013-01-01

    PRSS23 and PRSS35 are homologous proteases originally identified in mouse ovaries. In the periimplantation mouse uterus, Prss23 was highly expressed in the preimplantation gestation day 3.5 (D3.5) uterine luminal epithelium (LE). It disappeared from the postimplantation LE and reappeared in the stromal compartment next to the myometrium on D6.5. It was undetectable in the embryo from D4.5 to D6.5 but highly expressed in the embryo on D7.5. Prss35 became detectable in the uterine stromal compartment surrounding the embryo on D4.5 and shifted towards the mesometrial side of the stromal compartment next to the embryo from D5.5 to D7.5. In the ovariectomized uterus, Prss23 was moderately and Prss35 was dramatically downregulated by progesterone and 17β-estradiol. Based on the expression of Prss35 in granulosa cells and corpus luteum of the ovary and the early pregnant uterus, we hypothesized that PRSS35 might play a role in female reproduction, especially in oocyte development, ovulation, implantation, and decidualization. This hypothesis was tested in Prss35(−/−) mice, which proved otherwise. Between wild type (WT) and Prss35(−/−) mice, superovulation of immature females produced comparable numbers of cumulus-oocyte complexes; there were comparable numbers of implantation sites detected on D4.5 and D7.5; there were no obvious differences in the expression of implantation and decidualization marker genes in D4.5 or D7.5 uteri. Comparable mRNA expression levels of a few known protease-related genes in the WT and Prss35(−/−) D4.5 uteri indicated no compensatory upregulation. Comparable litter sizes from WT × WT and Prss35 (−/−)× Prss35 (−/−) crosses suggested that Prss35 gene was unessential for fertility and embryo development. Prss35 gene has been linked to cleft lip/palate in humans. However, no obvious such defects were observed in Prss35(−/−) mice. This study demonstrates the distinct expression of Prss23 and Prss35 in the periimplantation

  8. Distinct spatiotemporal expression of serine proteases Prss23 and Prss35 in periimplantation mouse uterus and dispensable function of Prss35 in fertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglu Diao

    Full Text Available PRSS23 and PRSS35 are homologous proteases originally identified in mouse ovaries. In the periimplantation mouse uterus, Prss23 was highly expressed in the preimplantation gestation day 3.5 (D3.5 uterine luminal epithelium (LE. It disappeared from the postimplantation LE and reappeared in the stromal compartment next to the myometrium on D6.5. It was undetectable in the embryo from D4.5 to D6.5 but highly expressed in the embryo on D7.5. Prss35 became detectable in the uterine stromal compartment surrounding the embryo on D4.5 and shifted towards the mesometrial side of the stromal compartment next to the embryo from D5.5 to D7.5. In the ovariectomized uterus, Prss23 was moderately and Prss35 was dramatically downregulated by progesterone and 17β-estradiol. Based on the expression of Prss35 in granulosa cells and corpus luteum of the ovary and the early pregnant uterus, we hypothesized that PRSS35 might play a role in female reproduction, especially in oocyte development, ovulation, implantation, and decidualization. This hypothesis was tested in Prss35((-/- mice, which proved otherwise. Between wild type (WT and Prss35((-/- mice, superovulation of immature females produced comparable numbers of cumulus-oocyte complexes; there were comparable numbers of implantation sites detected on D4.5 and D7.5; there were no obvious differences in the expression of implantation and decidualization marker genes in D4.5 or D7.5 uteri. Comparable mRNA expression levels of a few known protease-related genes in the WT and Prss35((-/- D4.5 uteri indicated no compensatory upregulation. Comparable litter sizes from WT × WT and Prss35((-/-× Prss35((-/- crosses suggested that Prss35 gene was unessential for fertility and embryo development. Prss35 gene has been linked to cleft lip/palate in humans. However, no obvious such defects were observed in Prss35((-/- mice. This study demonstrates the distinct expression of Prss23 and Prss35 in the periimplantation uterus

  9. Genetic approach identifies distinct asthma pathways in overweight vs normal weight children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butsch Kovacic, M; Martin, L J; Biagini Myers, J M; He, H; Lindsey, M; Mersha, T B; Khurana Hershey, G K

    2015-08-01

    The pathogenesis of asthma in the context of excess body weight may be distinct from asthma that develops in normal weight children. The study's objective was to explore the biology of asthma in the context of obesity and normal weight status using genetic methodologies. Associations between asthma and SNPs in 49 genes were assessed, as well as, interactions between SNPs and overweight status in child participants of the Greater Cincinnati Pediatric Clinic Repository. Asthma was significantly associated with weight (OR = 1.38; P = 0.037). The number of genes and the magnitude of their associations with asthma were notably greater when considering overweight children alone vs normal weight and overweight children together. When considering weight, distinct sets of asthma-associated genes were observed, many times with opposing effects. We demonstrated that the underlying heterogeneity of asthma is likely due in part to distinct pathogenetic pathways that depend on preceding/comorbid overweight and/or allergy. It is therefore important to consider both obesity and asthma when conducting studies of asthma. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Two distinct pathways for metabolism of theophylline and caffeine are coexpressed in Pseudomonas putida CBB5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chi Li; Louie, Tai Man; Summers, Ryan; Kale, Yogesh; Gopishetty, Sridhar; Subramanian, Mani

    2009-07-01

    Pseudomonas putida CBB5 was isolated from soil by enrichment on caffeine. This strain used not only caffeine, theobromine, paraxanthine, and 7-methylxanthine as sole carbon and nitrogen sources but also theophylline and 3-methylxanthine. Analyses of metabolites in spent media and resting cell suspensions confirmed that CBB5 initially N demethylated theophylline via a hitherto unreported pathway to 1- and 3-methylxanthines. NAD(P)H-dependent conversion of theophylline to 1- and 3-methylxanthines was also detected in the crude cell extracts of theophylline-grown CBB5. 1-Methylxanthine and 3-methylxanthine were subsequently N demethylated to xanthine. CBB5 also oxidized theophylline and 1- and 3-methylxanthines to 1,3-dimethyluric acid and 1- and 3-methyluric acids, respectively. However, these methyluric acids were not metabolized further. A broad-substrate-range xanthine-oxidizing enzyme was responsible for the formation of these methyluric acids. In contrast, CBB5 metabolized caffeine to theobromine (major metabolite) and paraxanthine (minor metabolite). These dimethylxanthines were further N demethylated to xanthine via 7-methylxanthine. Theobromine-, paraxanthine-, and 7-methylxanthine-grown cells also metabolized all of the methylxanthines mentioned above via the same pathway. Thus, the theophylline and caffeine N-demethylation pathways converged at xanthine via different methylxanthine intermediates. Xanthine was eventually oxidized to uric acid. Enzymes involved in theophylline and caffeine degradation were coexpressed when CBB5 was grown on theophylline or on caffeine or its metabolites. However, 3-methylxanthine-grown CBB5 cells did not metabolize caffeine, whereas theophylline was metabolized at much reduced levels to only methyluric acids. To our knowledge, this is the first report of theophylline N demethylation and coexpression of distinct pathways for caffeine and theophylline degradation in bacteria.

  11. Distinct pathways mediate the sorting of tail-anchored proteins to the plastid outer envelope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetinder K Dhanoa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tail-anchored (TA proteins are a distinct class of membrane proteins that are sorted post-translationally to various organelles and function in a number of important cellular processes, including redox reactions, vesicular trafficking and protein translocation. While the molecular targeting signals and pathways responsible for sorting TA proteins to their correct intracellular destinations in yeasts and mammals have begun to be characterized, relatively little is known about TA protein biogenesis in plant cells, especially for those sorted to the plastid outer envelope. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated the biogenesis of three plastid TA proteins, including the 33-kDa and 34-kDa GTPases of the translocon at the outer envelope of chloroplasts (Toc33 and Toc34 and a novel 9-kDa protein of unknown function that we define here as an outer envelope TA protein (OEP9. Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays we show that OEP9 utilizes a different sorting pathway than that used by Toc33 and Toc34. For instance, while all three TA proteins interact with the cytosolic OEP chaperone/receptor, AKR2A, the plastid targeting information within OEP9 is distinct from that within Toc33 and Toc34. Toc33 and Toc34 also appear to differ from OEP9 in that their insertion is dependent on themselves and the unique lipid composition of the plastid outer envelope. By contrast, the insertion of OEP9 into the plastid outer envelope occurs in a proteinaceous-dependent, but Toc33/34-independent manner and membrane lipids appear to serve primarily to facilitate normal thermodynamic integration of this TA protein. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, the results provide evidence in support of at least two sorting pathways for plastid TA outer envelope proteins and shed light on not only the complex diversity of pathways involved in the targeting and insertion of proteins into plastids, but also the molecular mechanisms that underlie

  12. Antiangiogenic ruthenium(ii) benzimidazole complexes, structure-based activation of distinct signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Haoqiang; Zhao, Zhennan; Li, Linlin; Zheng, Wenjie; Chen, Tianfeng

    2015-03-01

    Antiangiogenic therapy is considered to be a promising strategy for the treatment of cancers. VEGF and its receptors are important angiogenic factors involved in tumor growth. In the present study, the new ruthenium(ii) complexes containing 2,6-bis(benzimidazolyl)pyridine have been identified as potent antiangiogenic agents in vitro and in vivo, through activation of distinct antiangiogenic signaling pathways. Specifically, [Ru(bbp)(p-mpip)Cl]ClO4 (complex , bbp = 2,6-bis(benzimidazolyl)pyridine; p-mpip = 2-(4-methylphenyl)imidazo[4,5-f]-1,10-phenanthroline) exhibited the highest antiangiogenic activity, as evidenced by significant suppression of neovessel formation in chick chorioallantoic membranes and blockage of the angiogenesis in a matrigel plugs assay, which are significantly higher than those of the most accepted anti-metastasis ruthenium-based drug NAMI-A. Generally, these kinds of complexes induced the G0/G1cell cycle by inhibiting the formation of a Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex and CDK2 activation, through up regulation of the expression levels of p15(INK4B), p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1). Moreover, the complexes also triggered intracellular DNA damage, and thus activated the phosphorylation of ATM, ATR, CHK1, Histone and p53. The suppression of Akt and ERK1/2 pathways reinforced the cell cycle perturbation effects of the complexes. Interestingly, complex displayed strong inhibition on the activation of VEGF and VEGFR-2 phosphorylation, which blocked the transmission of the mitogenic signal through Akt and ERK1/2 pathways, and thus enhanced cell cycle arrest. In contrast, we found that the most accepted anti-metastasis ruthenium based drug NAMI-A exerted lower antiangiogenic activity via activation of the DNA damage-mediated pathway, but showed no effects on VEGF and VEGFR-2 phosphorylation. Taken together, this study clearly demonstrates the distinct antiangiogenic mechanisms of metal complexes, and these kinds of complexes can be further developed as anti

  13. Spermidine and resveratrol induce autophagy by distinct pathways converging on the acetylproteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morselli, Eugenia; Mariño, Guillermo; Bennetzen, Martin V

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy protects organelles, cells, and organisms against several stress conditions. Induction of autophagy by resveratrol requires the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). In this paper, we show that the acetylase inhibitor spermidine stimulates autophagy...... independent of SIRT1 in human and yeast cells as well as in nematodes. Although resveratrol and spermidine ignite autophagy through distinct mechanisms, these compounds stimulate convergent pathways that culminate in concordant modifications of the acetylproteome. Both agents favor convergent deacetylation...... and acetylation reactions in the cytosol and in the nucleus, respectively. Both resveratrol and spermidine were able to induce autophagy in cytoplasts (enucleated cells). Moreover, a cytoplasm-restricted mutant of SIRT1 could stimulate autophagy, suggesting that cytoplasmic deacetylation reactions dictate...

  14. Distinct neural pathways mediate alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-dependent activation of the forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Hansen, Henrik H

    2010-01-01

    alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists are candidates for the treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Selective alpha(7) nAChR agonists, such as SSR180711, activate neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens shell (ACCshell) in rats, regions......, as measured by c-Fos immunoreactivity, a marker of neuronal activation. Selective depletion of these cholinergic neurons abolishes the SSR180711-induced activation of the mPFC but not the ACCshell, demonstrating their critical importance for alpha(7) nAChR-dependent activation of the mPFC. Contrarily......, selective depletion of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area abolishes the SSR180711-induced activation of the ACCshell but not the mPFC or HDB. These results demonstrate 2 distinct neural pathways activated by SSR180711. The BF and mPFC are important for attentional function and may subserve...

  15. Distinct Signaling Mechanisms in Multiple Developmental Pathways by the SCRAMBLED Receptor of Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Su-Hwan; Woo, Sooah; Lee, Myeong Min; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-01-01

    SCRAMBLED (SCM), a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), is required for positional signaling in the root epidermis and for tissue/organ development in the shoot. To further understand SCM action, we generated a series of kinase domain variants and analyzed their ability to complement scm mutant defects. We found that the SCM kinase domain, but not kinase activity, is required for its role in root epidermal patterning, supporting the view that SCM is an atypical receptor kinase. We also describe a previously uncharacterized role for SCM in fruit dehiscence, because mature siliques from scm mutants fail to open properly. Interestingly, the kinase domain of SCM appears to be dispensable for this developmental process. Furthermore, we found that most of the SCM kinase domain mutations dramatically inhibit inflorescence development. Because this process is not affected in scm null mutants, it is likely that SCM acts redundantly to regulate inflorescence size. The importance of distinct kinase residues for these three developmental processes provides an explanation for the maintenance of the conserved kinase domain in the SCM protein, and it may generally explain its conservation in other atypical kinases. Furthermore, these results indicate that individual leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases may participate in multiple pathways using distinct signaling mechanisms to mediate diverse cellular communication events. PMID:25136062

  16. Distinct signaling mechanisms in multiple developmental pathways by the SCRAMBLED receptor of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Su-Hwan; Woo, Sooah; Lee, Myeong Min; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-10-01

    SCRAMBLED (SCM), a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), is required for positional signaling in the root epidermis and for tissue/organ development in the shoot. To further understand SCM action, we generated a series of kinase domain variants and analyzed their ability to complement scm mutant defects. We found that the SCM kinase domain, but not kinase activity, is required for its role in root epidermal patterning, supporting the view that SCM is an atypical receptor kinase. We also describe a previously uncharacterized role for SCM in fruit dehiscence, because mature siliques from scm mutants fail to open properly. Interestingly, the kinase domain of SCM appears to be dispensable for this developmental process. Furthermore, we found that most of the SCM kinase domain mutations dramatically inhibit inflorescence development. Because this process is not affected in scm null mutants, it is likely that SCM acts redundantly to regulate inflorescence size. The importance of distinct kinase residues for these three developmental processes provides an explanation for the maintenance of the conserved kinase domain in the SCM protein, and it may generally explain its conservation in other atypical kinases. Furthermore, these results indicate that individual leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases may participate in multiple pathways using distinct signaling mechanisms to mediate diverse cellular communication events. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Two distinct and competitive pathways confer the cellcidal actions of artemisinins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The biological actions of artemisinin (ART, an antimalarial drug derived from Artemisia annua, remain poorly understood and controversial. Besides potent antimalarial activity, some of artemisinin derivatives (together with artemisinin, hereafter referred to as ARTs, in particular dihydroartemisinin (DHA, are also associated with anticancer and other antiparasitic activities. In this study, we used baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as cellular and genetic model to investigate the molecular and cellular properties of ARTs. Two clearly separable pathways exist. While all ARTs exhibit potent anti-mitochondrial actions as shown before, DHA exerts an additional strong heme-dependent, likely mitochondria-independent inhibitory action. More importantly, heme antagonizes the mitochondria-dependent cellcidal action. Indeed, when heme synthesis was inhibited, the mitochondria-dependent cellcidal action of ARTs could be dramatically strengthened, and significant yeast growth inhibition at as low as 100 nM ART, an increase of about 25 folds in sensitivity, was observed. We conclude that ARTs are endowed with two major and distinct types of properties: a potent and specific mitochondria-dependent reaction and a more general and less specific heme-mediated reaction. The competitive nature of these two actions could be explained by their shared source of the consumable ARTs, so that inhibition of the heme-mediated degradation pathway would enable more ARTs to be available for the mitochondrial action. These properties of ARTs can be used to interpret the divergent antimalarial and anticancer actions of ARTs.

  18. Distinct configurations of protein complexes and biochemical pathways revealed by epistatic interaction network motifs

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casey, Fergal

    2011-08-22

    Abstract Background Gene and protein interactions are commonly represented as networks, with the genes or proteins comprising the nodes and the relationship between them as edges. Motifs, or small local configurations of edges and nodes that arise repeatedly, can be used to simplify the interpretation of networks. Results We examined triplet motifs in a network of quantitative epistatic genetic relationships, and found a non-random distribution of particular motif classes. Individual motif classes were found to be associated with different functional properties, suggestive of an underlying biological significance. These associations were apparent not only for motif classes, but for individual positions within the motifs. As expected, NNN (all negative) motifs were strongly associated with previously reported genetic (i.e. synthetic lethal) interactions, while PPP (all positive) motifs were associated with protein complexes. The two other motif classes (NNP: a positive interaction spanned by two negative interactions, and NPP: a negative spanned by two positives) showed very distinct functional associations, with physical interactions dominating for the former but alternative enrichments, typical of biochemical pathways, dominating for the latter. Conclusion We present a model showing how NNP motifs can be used to recognize supportive relationships between protein complexes, while NPP motifs often identify opposing or regulatory behaviour between a gene and an associated pathway. The ability to use motifs to point toward underlying biological organizational themes is likely to be increasingly important as more extensive epistasis mapping projects in higher organisms begin.

  19. Phyllodes tumors with and without fibroadenoma-like areas display distinct genomic features and may evolve through distinct pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Fresia; Geyer, Felipe C; Kumar, Rahul; Selenica, Pier; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Burke, Kathleen A; Edelweiss, Marcia; Murray, Melissa P; Brogi, Edi; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2017-01-01

    Breast fibroepithelial lesions (fibroadenomas and phyllodes tumors) are underpinned by recurrent MED12 exon 2 mutations, which are more common in fibroadenomas and benign phyllodes tumors. TERT promoter hotspot mutations have been documented in phyllodes tumors, and found to be more frequent in borderline and malignant lesions. Several lines of evidence suggest that a subset of phyllodes tumors might arise from fibroadenomas. Here we sought to investigate the genetic differences between phyllodes tumors with fibroadenoma-like areas vs. those without. We retrieved data for 16 borderline/ malignant phyllodes tumors, including seven phyllodes tumors with fibroadenoma-like areas and nine phyllodes tumors without fibroadenoma-like areas, which had been previously subjected to targeted capture massively parallel sequencing. Whilst MED12 exon 2 mutations were significantly more frequent in tumors with fibroadenoma-like areas (71 vs. 11%), an enrichment in genetic alterations targeting bona fide cancer genes was found in those without fibroadenoma-like areas, in particular in EGFR mutations and amplifications (78 vs. 14%). No significant difference in the frequency of TERT genetic alterations was observed (71% in cases with fibroadenoma-like areas vs 56% in those without fibroadenoma-like areas). Our data suggest that the development of phyllodes tumors might follow two different evolutionary pathways: a MED12 -mutant pathway that involves the progression from a fibroadenoma to a malignant phyllodes tumor; and a MED12 -wild-type pathway, where malignant phyllodes tumors arise de novo through the acquisition of genetic alterations targeting cancer genes. Additional studies are warranted to confirm our observations and define whether the outcome differs between both pathways.

  20. Protease-sensitive conformers in broad spectrum of distinct PrPSc structures in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are indicator of progression rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae Kim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The origin, range, and structure of prions causing the most common human prion disease, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD, are largely unknown. To investigate the molecular mechanism responsible for the broad phenotypic variability of sCJD, we analyzed the conformational characteristics of protease-sensitive and protease-resistant fractions of the pathogenic prion protein (PrP(Sc using novel conformational methods derived from a conformation-dependent immunoassay (CDI. In 46 brains of patients homozygous for polymorphisms in the PRNP gene and exhibiting either Type 1 or Type 2 western blot pattern of the PrP(Sc, we identified an extensive array of PrP(Sc structures that differ in protease sensitivity, display of critical domains, and conformational stability. Surprisingly, in sCJD cases homozygous for methionine or valine at codon 129 of the PRNP gene, the concentration and stability of protease-sensitive conformers of PrP(Sc correlated with progression rate of the disease. These data indicate that sCJD brains exhibit a wide spectrum of PrP(Sc structural states, and accordingly argue for a broad spectrum of prion strains coding for different phenotypes. The link between disease duration, levels, and stability of protease-sensitive conformers of PrP(Sc suggests that these conformers play an important role in the pathogenesis of sCJD.

  1. Protease-sensitive conformers in broad spectrum of distinct PrPSc structures in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are indicator of progression rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae; Haldiman, Tracy; Cohen, Yvonne; Chen, Wei; Blevins, Janis; Sy, Man-Sun; Cohen, Mark; Safar, Jiri G

    2011-09-01

    The origin, range, and structure of prions causing the most common human prion disease, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), are largely unknown. To investigate the molecular mechanism responsible for the broad phenotypic variability of sCJD, we analyzed the conformational characteristics of protease-sensitive and protease-resistant fractions of the pathogenic prion protein (PrP(Sc)) using novel conformational methods derived from a conformation-dependent immunoassay (CDI). In 46 brains of patients homozygous for polymorphisms in the PRNP gene and exhibiting either Type 1 or Type 2 western blot pattern of the PrP(Sc), we identified an extensive array of PrP(Sc) structures that differ in protease sensitivity, display of critical domains, and conformational stability. Surprisingly, in sCJD cases homozygous for methionine or valine at codon 129 of the PRNP gene, the concentration and stability of protease-sensitive conformers of PrP(Sc) correlated with progression rate of the disease. These data indicate that sCJD brains exhibit a wide spectrum of PrP(Sc) structural states, and accordingly argue for a broad spectrum of prion strains coding for different phenotypes. The link between disease duration, levels, and stability of protease-sensitive conformers of PrP(Sc) suggests that these conformers play an important role in the pathogenesis of sCJD.

  2. Diverse developmental disorders from The One Ring: distinct molecular pathways underlie the cohesinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eHorsfield

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The multi-subunit protein complex, cohesin, is responsible for sister chromatid cohesion during cell division. The interaction of cohesin with DNA is controlled by a number of additional regulatory proteins. Mutations in cohesin, or its regulators, cause a spectrum of human developmental syndromes known as the ‘cohesinopathies’. Cohesinopathy disorders include Cornelia de Lange Syndrome and Roberts Syndrome. The discovery of novel roles for chromatid cohesion proteins in regulating gene expression led to the idea that cohesinopathies are caused by dysregulation of multiple genes downstream of mutations in cohesion proteins. Consistent with this idea, Drosophila, mouse and zebrafish cohesinopathy models all show altered expression of developmental genes. However, there appears to be incomplete overlap among dysregulated genes downstream of mutations in different components of the cohesion apparatus. This is surprising because mutations in all cohesion proteins would be predicted to affect cohesin’s roles in cell division and gene expression in similar ways. Here we review the differences and similarities between genetic pathways downstream of components of the cohesion apparatus, and discuss how such differences might arise, and contribute to the spectrum of cohesinopathy disorders. We propose that mutations in different elements of the cohesion apparatus have distinct developmental outcomes that can be explained by sometimes subtly different molecular effects.

  3. Dendritic cells and hepatocytes use distinct pathways to process protective antigen from plasmodium in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian A Cockburn

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Malaria-protective CD8+ T cells specific for the circumsporozoite (CS protein are primed by dendritic cells (DCs after sporozoite injection by infected mosquitoes. The primed cells then eliminate parasite liver stages after recognizing the CS epitopes presented by hepatocytes. To define the in vivo processing of CS by DCs and hepatocytes, we generated parasites carrying a mutant CS protein containing the H-2K(b epitope SIINFEKL, and evaluated the T cell response using transgenic and mutant mice. We determined that in both DCs and hepatocytes CS epitopes must reach the cytosol and use the TAP transporters to access the ER. Furthermore, we used endosomal mutant (3d and cytochrome c treated mice to address the role of cross-presentation in the priming and effector phases of the T cell response. We determined that in DCs, CS is cross-presented via endosomes while, conversely, in hepatocytes protein must be secreted directly into the cytosol. This suggests that the main targets of protective CD8+ T cells are parasite proteins exported to the hepatocyte cytosol. Surprisingly, however, secretion of the CS protein into hepatocytes was not dependent upon parasite-export (Pexel/VTS motifs in this protein. Together, these results indicate that the presentation of epitopes to CD8+ T cells follows distinct pathways in DCs when the immune response is induced and in hepatocytes during the effector phase.

  4. Distinct Internalization Pathways of Human Amylin Monomers and Its Cytotoxic Oligomers in Pancreatic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trikha, Saurabh; Jeremic, Aleksandar M.

    2013-01-01

    Toxic human amylin oligomers and aggregates are implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (TTDM). Although recent studies have shown that pancreatic cells can recycle amylin monomers and toxic oligomers, the exact uptake mechanism and trafficking routes of these molecular forms and their significance for amylin toxicity are yet to be determined. Using pancreatic rat insulinoma (RIN-m5F) beta (β)-cells and human islets as model systems we show that monomers and oligomers cross the plasma membrane (PM) through both endocytotic and non-endocytotic (translocation) mechanisms, the predominance of which is dependent on amylin concentrations and incubation times. At low (≤100 nM) concentrations, internalization of amylin monomers in pancreatic cells is completely blocked by the selective amylin-receptor (AM-R) antagonist, AC-187, indicating an AM-R dependent mechanism. In contrast at cytotoxic (µM) concentrations monomers initially (1 hour) enter pancreatic cells by two distinct mechanisms: translocation and macropinocytosis. However, during the late stage (24 hours) monomers internalize by a clathrin-dependent but AM-R and macropinocytotic independent pathway. Like monomers a small fraction of the oligomers initially enter cells by a non-endocytotic mechanism. In contrast a majority of the oligomers at both early (1 hour) and late times (24 hours) traffic with a fluid-phase marker, dextran, to the same endocytotic compartments, the uptake of which is blocked by potent macropinocytotic inhibitors. This led to a significant increase in extra-cellular PM accumulation, in turn potentiating amylin toxicity in pancreatic cells. Our studies suggest that macropinocytosis is a major but not the only clearance mechanism for both amylin’s molecular forms, thereby serving a cyto-protective role in these cells. PMID:24019897

  5. Differential involvement of E2A-corepressor interactions in distinct leukemogenic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Chien-Hung; Guo, Chun; Wang, David; Hu, Qiande; Zhang, Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    E2A is a member of the E-protein family of transcription factors. Previous studies have reported context-dependent regulation of E2A-dependent transcription. For example, whereas the E2A portion of the E2A-Pbx1 leukemia fusion protein mediates robust transcriptional activation in t(1;19) acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the transcriptional activity of wild-type E2A is silenced by high levels of corepressors, such as the AML1-ETO fusion protein in t(8;21) acute myeloid leukemia and ETO-2 in hematopoietic cells. Here, we show that, unlike the HEB E-protein, the activation domain 1 (AD1) of E2A has specifically reduced corepressor interaction due to E2A-specific amino acid changes in the p300/CBP and ETO target motif. Replacing E2A-AD1 with HEB-AD1 abolished the ability of E2A-Pbx1 to activate target genes and to induce cell transformation. On the other hand, the weak E2A-AD1-corepressor interaction imposes a critical importance on another ETO-interacting domain, downstream ETO-interacting sequence (DES), for corepressor-mediated repression. Deletion of DES abrogates silencing of E2A activity by AML1-ETO in t(8;21) leukemia cells or by ETO-2 in normal hematopoietic cells. Our results reveal an E2A-specific mechanism important for its context-dependent activation and repression function, and provide the first evidence for the differential involvement of E2A-corepressor interactions in distinct leukemogenic pathways.

  6. CXCL12-induced macropinocytosis modulates two distinct pathways to activate mTORC1 in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacitto, Regina; Gaeta, Isabella; Swanson, Joel A; Yoshida, Sei

    2017-03-01

    Although growth factors and chemokines elicit different overall effects on cells-growth and chemotaxis, respectively-and activate distinct classes of cell-surface receptors, nonetheless, they trigger similar cellular activities and signaling pathways. The growth factor M-CSF and the chemokine CXCL12 both stimulate the endocytic process of macropinocytosis, and both activate the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), a protein complex that regulates cell metabolism. Recent studies of signaling by M-CSF in macrophages identified a role for macropinocytosis in the activation of mTORC1, in which delivery of extracellular amino acids into lysosomes via macropinocytosis was required for activation of mTORC1. Here, we analyzed the regulation of macropinosome (MP) formation in response to CXCL12 and identified 2 roles for macropinocytosis in the activation of mTORC1. Within 5 min of adding CXCL12, murine macrophages increased ruffling, macropinocytosis and amino acid-dependent activation of mTORC1. Inhibitors of macropinocytosis blocked activation of mTORC1, and various isoform-specific inhibitors of type 1 PI3K and protein kinase C (PKC) showed similar patterns of inhibition of macropinocytosis and mTORC1 activity. However, unlike the response to M-CSF, Akt phosphorylation (pAkt) in response to CXCL12 required the actin cytoskeleton and the formation of macropinocytic cups. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy showed that phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP 3 ), a product of PI3K and an upstream activator of Akt, localized to macropinocytic cups and that pAkt occurred primarily in cups. These results indicate that CXCL12 activates mTORC1 via 2 mechanisms: 1) that the macropinocytic cup localizes Akt signaling and 2) that MPs convey extracellular nutrients to lysosomes. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  7. Distinct internalization pathways of human amylin monomers and its cytotoxic oligomers in pancreatic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Trikha

    Full Text Available Toxic human amylin oligomers and aggregates are implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (TTDM. Although recent studies have shown that pancreatic cells can recycle amylin monomers and toxic oligomers, the exact uptake mechanism and trafficking routes of these molecular forms and their significance for amylin toxicity are yet to be determined. Using pancreatic rat insulinoma (RIN-m5F beta (β-cells and human islets as model systems we show that monomers and oligomers cross the plasma membrane (PM through both endocytotic and non-endocytotic (translocation mechanisms, the predominance of which is dependent on amylin concentrations and incubation times. At low (≤ 100 nM concentrations, internalization of amylin monomers in pancreatic cells is completely blocked by the selective amylin-receptor (AM-R antagonist, AC-187, indicating an AM-R dependent mechanism. In contrast at cytotoxic (µM concentrations monomers initially (1 hour enter pancreatic cells by two distinct mechanisms: translocation and macropinocytosis. However, during the late stage (24 hours monomers internalize by a clathrin-dependent but AM-R and macropinocytotic independent pathway. Like monomers a small fraction of the oligomers initially enter cells by a non-endocytotic mechanism. In contrast a majority of the oligomers at both early (1 hour and late times (24 hours traffic with a fluid-phase marker, dextran, to the same endocytotic compartments, the uptake of which is blocked by potent macropinocytotic inhibitors. This led to a significant increase in extra-cellular PM accumulation, in turn potentiating amylin toxicity in pancreatic cells. Our studies suggest that macropinocytosis is a major but not the only clearance mechanism for both amylin's molecular forms, thereby serving a cyto-protective role in these cells.

  8. Pulmonary Proteases in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung Induce Interleukin 8 Expression from Bronchial Epithelial Cells via a Heme/Meprin/Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/Toll-like Receptor Pathway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cosgrove, Sonya

    2011-03-04

    A high intrapulmonary protease burden is characteristic of cystic fibrosis (CF), and the resulting dysregulation of the protease\\/anti-protease balance has serious implications for inflammation in the CF lung. Because of this inflammation, micro-bleeds can occur releasing hemoglobin into the lung. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the protease-rich environment of the CF lung on human hemoglobin and to assess the proinflammatory effect of heme on CF bronchial epithelium. Here, we show that the Pseudomonas proteases (Pseudomonas elastase and alkaline protease) and the neutrophil proteases (neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase-3) are capable of almost complete degradation of hemoglobin in vitro but that NE is the predominant protease that cleaves hemoglobin in vivo in CF bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. One of the effects of this is the release of heme, and in this study we show that heme stimulates IL-8 and IL-10 protein production from ΔF508 CFBE41o(-) bronchial epithelial cells. In addition, heme-induced IL-8 expression utilizes a novel pathway involving meprin, EGF receptor, and MyD88. Meprin levels are elevated in CF cell lines and bronchial brushings, thus adding to the proinflammatory milieu. Interestingly, α(1)-antitrypsin, in addition to its ability to neutralize NE and protease-3, can also bind heme and neutralize heme-induced IL-8 from CFBE41o(-) cells. This study illustrates the proinflammatory effects of micro-bleeds in the CF lung, the process by which this occurs, and a potential therapeutic intervention.

  9. Pulmonary proteases in the cystic fibrosis lung induce interleukin 8 expression from bronchial epithelial cells via a heme/meprin/epidermal growth factor receptor/Toll-like receptor pathway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cosgrove, Sonya

    2012-02-01

    A high intrapulmonary protease burden is characteristic of cystic fibrosis (CF), and the resulting dysregulation of the protease\\/anti-protease balance has serious implications for inflammation in the CF lung. Because of this inflammation, micro-bleeds can occur releasing hemoglobin into the lung. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the protease-rich environment of the CF lung on human hemoglobin and to assess the proinflammatory effect of heme on CF bronchial epithelium. Here, we show that the Pseudomonas proteases (Pseudomonas elastase and alkaline protease) and the neutrophil proteases (neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase-3) are capable of almost complete degradation of hemoglobin in vitro but that NE is the predominant protease that cleaves hemoglobin in vivo in CF bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. One of the effects of this is the release of heme, and in this study we show that heme stimulates IL-8 and IL-10 protein production from DeltaF508 CFBE41o(-) bronchial epithelial cells. In addition, heme-induced IL-8 expression utilizes a novel pathway involving meprin, EGF receptor, and MyD88. Meprin levels are elevated in CF cell lines and bronchial brushings, thus adding to the proinflammatory milieu. Interestingly, alpha(1)-antitrypsin, in addition to its ability to neutralize NE and protease-3, can also bind heme and neutralize heme-induced IL-8 from CFBE41o(-) cells. This study illustrates the proinflammatory effects of micro-bleeds in the CF lung, the process by which this occurs, and a potential therapeutic intervention.

  10. MALT1 Protease Activity Is Required for Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong W Yu

    Full Text Available CARMA-BCL10-MALT1 signalosomes play important roles in antigen receptor signaling and other pathways. Previous studies have suggested that as part of this complex, MALT1 functions as both a scaffolding protein to activate NF-κB through recruitment of ubiquitin ligases, and as a protease to cleave and inactivate downstream inhibitory signaling proteins. However, our understanding of the relative importance of these two distinct MALT1 activities has been hampered by a lack of selective MALT1 protease inhibitors with suitable pharmacologic properties. To fully investigate the role of MALT1 protease activity, we generated mice homozygous for a protease-dead mutation in MALT1. We found that some, but not all, MALT1 functions in immune cells were dependent upon its protease activity. Protease-dead mice had defects in the generation of splenic marginal zone and peritoneal B1 B cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells displayed decreased T cell receptor-stimulated proliferation and IL-2 production while B cell receptor-stimulated proliferation was partially dependent on protease activity. In dendritic cells, stimulation of cytokine production through the Dectin-1, Dectin-2, and Mincle C-type lectin receptors was also found to be partially dependent upon protease activity. In vivo, protease-dead mice had reduced basal immunoglobulin levels, and showed defective responses to immunization with T-dependent and T-independent antigens. Surprisingly, despite these decreased responses, MALT1 protease-dead mice, but not MALT1 null mice, developed mixed inflammatory cell infiltrates in multiple organs, suggesting MALT1 protease activity plays a role in immune homeostasis. These findings highlight the importance of MALT1 protease activity in multiple immune cell types, and in integrating immune responses in vivo.

  11. Specific Hsp100 Chaperones Determine the Fate of the First Enzyme of the Plastidial Isoprenoid Pathway for Either Refolding or Degradation by the Stromal Clp Protease in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Pablo; Llamas, Ernesto; Llorente, Briardo; Ventura, Salvador; Wright, Louwrance P; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The lifespan and activity of proteins depend on protein quality control systems formed by chaperones and proteases that ensure correct protein folding and prevent the formation of toxic aggregates. We previously found that the Arabidopsis thaliana J-protein J20 delivers inactive (misfolded) forms of the plastidial enzyme deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) to the Hsp70 chaperone for either proper folding or degradation. Here we show that the fate of Hsp70-bound DXS depends on pathways involving specific Hsp100 chaperones. Analysis of individual mutants for the four Hsp100 chaperones present in Arabidopsis chloroplasts showed increased levels of DXS proteins (but not transcripts) only in those defective in ClpC1 or ClpB3. However, the accumulated enzyme was active in the clpc1 mutant but inactive in clpb3 plants. Genetic evidence indicated that ClpC chaperones might be required for the unfolding of J20-delivered DXS protein coupled to degradation by the Clp protease. By contrast, biochemical and genetic approaches confirmed that Hsp70 and ClpB3 chaperones interact to collaborate in the refolding and activation of DXS. We conclude that specific J-proteins and Hsp100 chaperones act together with Hsp70 to recognize and deliver DXS to either reactivation (via ClpB3) or removal (via ClpC1) depending on the physiological status of the plastid.

  12. Lectin pathway effector enzyme mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 can activate native complement C3 in absence of C4 and/or C2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yaseen, Sadam; Demopulos, Gregory; Dudler, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    All 3 activation pathways of complement-the classic pathway (CP), the alternative pathway, and the lectin pathway (LP)- converge into a common central event: the cleavage and activation of the abundant third complement component, C3,viaformation of C3-activating enzymes (C3 convertases). The four......., Sacks, S., Garred, P., Andrew, P., Sim, R. B., Lachmann, P. J., Wallis, R., Lynch, N., Schwaeble, W. J. Lectin pathway effector enzyme mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 can activate native complement C3 in absence of C4 and/or C2....

  13. The PAF complex and Prf1/Rtf1 delineate distinct Cdk9-dependent pathways regulating transcription elongation in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbogning, Jean; Nagy, Stephen; Pagé, Viviane; Schwer, Beate; Shuman, Stewart; Fisher, Robert P; Tanny, Jason C

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (Cdk9) promotes elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII), mRNA processing, and co-transcriptional histone modification. Cdk9 phosphorylates multiple targets, including the conserved RNAPII elongation factor Spt5 and RNAPII itself, but how these different modifications mediate Cdk9 functions is not known. Here we describe two Cdk9-dependent pathways in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe that involve distinct targets and elicit distinct biological outcomes. Phosphorylation of Spt5 by Cdk9 creates a direct binding site for Prf1/Rtf1, a transcription regulator with functional and physical links to the Polymerase Associated Factor (PAF) complex. PAF association with chromatin is also dependent on Cdk9 but involves alternate phosphoacceptor targets. Prf1 and PAF are biochemically separate in cell extracts, and genetic analyses show that Prf1 and PAF are functionally distinct and exert opposing effects on the RNAPII elongation complex. We propose that this opposition constitutes a Cdk9 auto-regulatory mechanism, such that a positive effect on elongation, driven by the PAF pathway, is kept in check by a negative effect of Prf1/Rtf1 and downstream mono-ubiquitylation of histone H2B. Thus, optimal RNAPII elongation may require balanced action of functionally distinct Cdk9 pathways.

  14. The PAF complex and Prf1/Rtf1 delineate distinct Cdk9-dependent pathways regulating transcription elongation in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Mbogning

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (Cdk9 promotes elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII, mRNA processing, and co-transcriptional histone modification. Cdk9 phosphorylates multiple targets, including the conserved RNAPII elongation factor Spt5 and RNAPII itself, but how these different modifications mediate Cdk9 functions is not known. Here we describe two Cdk9-dependent pathways in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe that involve distinct targets and elicit distinct biological outcomes. Phosphorylation of Spt5 by Cdk9 creates a direct binding site for Prf1/Rtf1, a transcription regulator with functional and physical links to the Polymerase Associated Factor (PAF complex. PAF association with chromatin is also dependent on Cdk9 but involves alternate phosphoacceptor targets. Prf1 and PAF are biochemically separate in cell extracts, and genetic analyses show that Prf1 and PAF are functionally distinct and exert opposing effects on the RNAPII elongation complex. We propose that this opposition constitutes a Cdk9 auto-regulatory mechanism, such that a positive effect on elongation, driven by the PAF pathway, is kept in check by a negative effect of Prf1/Rtf1 and downstream mono-ubiquitylation of histone H2B. Thus, optimal RNAPII elongation may require balanced action of functionally distinct Cdk9 pathways.

  15. Distinct Litter Stabilization Dynamics Pathways for Decomposition of Pine Needle and Fine Root Within Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mambelli, S.; Filley, T. R.; Bird, J.; Dawson, T.; Torn, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    content than SFA. This indicates that molecular fragments of plant biopolymers can readily associate with both labile and stabilized SOM fractions. At the same time, these results suggest that distinct decomposition and stabilization pathways exist for litters, such as needles vs. roots, of different chemical quality.

  16. Loss of MYC confers resistance to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis by preventing the activation of multiple serine protease- and caspase-mediated pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grassilli, Emanuela; Ballabeni, Andrea; Maellaro, Emilia

    2004-01-01

    c-Myc plays an essential role in proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Because of its relevance to cancer, most studies have focused on the cellular consequences of c-Myc overexpression. Here, we address the role of physiological levels of c-Myc in drug-induced apoptosis. By using c-MYC...... null cells we confirm and extend recent reports showing a c-Myc requirement for the induction of apoptosis by a number of anticancer agents. In particular, we show that c-Myc is required for the induction of apoptosis by doxorubicin and etoposide, whereas it is not required for camptothecin......-3 activation. Finally, a complete rescue from doxorubicin-induced apoptosis is obtained only when serine proteases, caspase-3, and mitochondrial activation are inhibited simultaneously. Interestingly, doxorubicin requires c-Myc for the activation of all of these pathways. Our findings therefore...

  17. Cartography of Pathway Signal Perturbations Identifies Distinct Molecular Pathomechanisms in Malignant and Chronic Lung Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakelyan, Arsen; Nersisyan, Lilit; Petrek, Martin; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Lung diseases are described by a wide variety of developmental mechanisms and clinical manifestations. Accurate classification and diagnosis of lung diseases are the bases for development of effective treatments. While extensive studies are conducted toward characterization of various lung diseases at molecular level, no systematic approach has been developed so far. Here we have applied a methodology for pathway-centered mining of high throughput gene expression data to describe a wide range of lung diseases in the light of shared and specific pathway activity profiles. We have applied an algorithm combining a Pathway Signal Flow (PSF) algorithm for estimation of pathway activity deregulation states in lung diseases and malignancies, and a Self Organizing Maps algorithm for classification and clustering of the pathway activity profiles. The analysis results allowed clearly distinguish between cancer and non-cancer lung diseases. Lung cancers were characterized by pathways implicated in cell proliferation, metabolism, while non-malignant lung diseases were characterized by deregulations in pathways involved in immune/inflammatory response and fibrotic tissue remodeling. In contrast to lung malignancies, chronic lung diseases had relatively heterogeneous pathway deregulation profiles. We identified three groups of interstitial lung diseases and showed that the development of characteristic pathological processes, such as fibrosis, can be initiated by deregulations in different signaling pathways. In conclusion, this paper describes the pathobiology of lung diseases from systems viewpoint using pathway centered high-dimensional data mining approach. Our results contribute largely to current understanding of pathological events in lung cancers and non-malignant lung diseases. Moreover, this paper provides new insight into molecular mechanisms of a number of interstitial lung diseases that have been studied to a lesser extent.

  18. Three distinct developmental pathways for adaptive and two IFN-γ-producing γδ T subsets in adult thymus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Terkild Brink; Ødum, Niels; Geisler, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    -producing γδ T cells (γδNKT). Developmental progression towards both IFN-γ-producing subsets can be induced by TCR signalling, and each pathway results in thymic emigration at a different stage. Finally, we show that γδT1 cells are the predominating IFN-γ-producing subset developing in the adult thymus. Thus......, this study maps out three distinct development pathways that result in the programming of γδTn, γδT1 and γδNKT cells.......Murine γδ T cells include subsets that are programmed for distinct effector functions during their development in the thymus. Under pathological conditions, different γδ T cell subsets can be protective or can exacerbate a disease. Here we show that CD117, CD200 and CD371, together with other...

  19. Two Distinct Pathways to Development of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Y.; Enomoto, T.; Kimura, T.; Yoshino, K.; Fujita, M.; Kimura, T.

    2011-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) accounts for approximately 95% of the malignant tumors of the vaginal vulva and is mostly found in elderly women. The future numbers of patients with vulva r SCC is expected to rise, mainly because of the proportional increase in the average age of the general population. Two different pathways for vulva r SCC have been put forth. The first pathway is triggered by infection with a high-risk-type Human Papillomavirus (HPV). Integration of the HPV DNA into the host genome leads to the development of a typical vulva r intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), accompanied with overexpression ofP14 A RF and P16 I NK4A . This lesion subsequently forms a warty- or basaloid-type SCC. The HPV vaccine is a promising new tool for prevention of this HPV related SCC of the vulva. The second pathway is HPV-independent. Keratinizing SCC develops within a background of lichen sclerosus (LS) through a differentiated VIN. It has a different set of genetic alterations than those in the first pathway, including p53 mutations, allelic imbalances (AI), and microsatellite instability (MSI). Further clinical and basic research is still required to understand and prevent vulvar SCC. Capsule. Two pathway for pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma of the value are reviewed.

  20. Two Distinct Pathways to Development of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Vulva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Ueda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC accounts for approximately 95% of the malignant tumors of the vaginal vulva and is mostly found in elderly women. The future numbers of patients with vulvar SCC is expected to rise, mainly because of the proportional increase in the average age of the general population. Two different pathways for vulvar SCC have been put forth. The first pathway is triggered by infection with a high-risk-type Human Papillomavirus (HPV. Integration of the HPV DNA into the host genome leads to the development of a typical vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN, accompanied with overexpression of p14ARF and p16INK4A. This lesion subsequently forms a warty- or basaloid-type SCC. The HPV vaccine is a promising new tool for prevention of this HPV related SCC of the vulva. The second pathway is HPV-independent. Keratinizing SCC develops within a background of lichen sclerosus (LS through a differentiated VIN. It has a different set of genetic alterations than those in the first pathway, including p53 mutations, allelic imbalances (AI, and microsatellite instability (MSI. Further clinical and basic research is still required to understand and prevent vulvar SCC. Capsule. Two pathway for pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma of the value are reviewed.

  1. Earthworm Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Pan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The alimentary tract of earthworm secretes a group of proteases with a relative wide substrate specificity. In 1983, six isozymes were isolated from earthworm with fibrinolytic activities and called fibriniolytic enzymes. So far, more isozymes have been found from different earthworm species such as Lumbricus rubellus and Eisenia fetida. For convenience, the proteases are named on the basis of the earthworm species and the protein function, for instance, Eisenia fetida protease (EfP. The proteases have the abilities not only to hydrolyze fibrin and other protein, but also activate proenzymes such as plasminogen and prothrombin. In the light of recent studies, eight of the EfPs contain oligosaccharides chains which are thought to support the enzyme structure. Interestingly, EfP-II has a broader substrate specificity presenting alkaline trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase activities, but EfP-III-1 has a stricter specificity. The protein crystal structures show the characteristics in their specificities. Earthworm proteases have been applied in several areas such as clinical treatment of clotting diseases, anti-tumor study, environmental protection and nutritional production. The current clinical utilizations and some potential new applications of the earthworm protease will be discussed in this paper.

  2. Earthworm Protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, R.; Zhang, Z.; He, R.

    2010-01-01

    The alimentary tract of earthworm secretes a group of proteases with a relative wide substrate specificity. In 1983, six isozymes were isolated from earthworm with fibrinolytic activities and called fibrinolytic enzymes. So far, more isozymes have been found from different earthworm species such as Lumbricus rubellus and Eisenia fetida. For convenience, the proteases are named on the basis of the earthworm species and the protein function, for instance, Eisenia fetida protease (EfP). The proteases have the abilities not only to hydrolyze fibrin and other protein, but also activate pro enzymes such as plasminogen and prothrombin. In the light of recent studies, eight of the EfPs contain oligosaccharides chains which are thought to support the enzyme structure. Interestingly, EfP-II has a broader substrate specificity presenting alkaline trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase activities, but EfP-III-1 has a stricter specificity. The protein crystal structures show the characteristics in their specificities. Earthworm proteases have been applied in several areas such as clinical treatment of clotting diseases, anti-tumor study, environmental protection and nutritional production. The current clinical utilizations and some potential new applications of the earthworm protease will be discussed in this paper.

  3. Coagulation factor VIIa-mediated protease-activated receptor 2 activation leads to β-catenin accumulation via the AKT/GSK3β pathway and contributes to breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Abhishek; Ansari, Shabbir A; Das, Kaushik; Prasad, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Anindita; Mallik, Suman; Mukherjee, Ashis; Sen, Prosenjit

    2017-08-18

    Cell migration and invasion are very characteristic features of cancer cells that promote metastasis, which is one of the most common causes of mortality among cancer patients. Emerging evidence has shown that coagulation factors can directly mediate cancer-associated complications either by enhancing thrombus formation or by initiating various signaling events leading to metastatic cancer progression. It is well established that, apart from its distinct role in blood coagulation, coagulation factor FVIIa enhances aggressive behaviors of breast cancer cells, but the underlying signaling mechanisms still remain elusive. To this end, we investigated FVIIa's role in the migration and invasiveness of the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Consistent with previous observations, we observed that FVIIa increased the migratory and invasive potential of these cells. We also provide molecular evidence that protease-activated receptor 2 activation followed by PI3K-AKT activation and GSK3β inactivation is involved in these processes and that β-catenin, a well known tumor-regulatory protein, contributes to this signaling pathway. The pivotal role of β-catenin was further indicated by the up-regulation of its downstream targets cyclin D1, c-Myc, COX-2, MMP-7, MMP-14, and Claudin-1. β-Catenin knockdown almost completely attenuated the FVIIa-induced enhancement of breast cancer migration and invasion. These findings provide a new perspective to counteract the invasive behavior of breast cancer, indicating that blocking PI3K-AKT pathway-dependent β-catenin accumulation may represent a potential therapeutic approach to control breast cancer. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Antagonize Distinct Pathways to Suppress Tumorigenesis of Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terra Vleeshouwer-Neumann

    Full Text Available Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS is the most common soft tissue cancer in children. The prognosis of patients with relapsed or metastatic disease remains poor. ERMS genomes show few recurrent mutations, suggesting that other molecular mechanisms such as epigenetic regulation might play a major role in driving ERMS tumor biology. In this study, we have demonstrated the diverse roles of histone deacetylases (HDACs in the pathogenesis of ERMS by characterizing effects of HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; also known as vorinostat in vitro and in vivo. TSA and SAHA suppress ERMS tumor growth and progression by inducing myogenic differentiation as well as reducing the self-renewal and migratory capacity of ERMS cells. Differential expression profiling and pathway analysis revealed downregulation of key oncogenic pathways upon HDAC inhibitor treatment. By gain-of-function, loss-of-function, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP studies, we show that Notch1- and EphrinB1-mediated pathways are regulated by HDACs to inhibit differentiation and enhance migratory capacity of ERMS cells, respectively. Our study demonstrates that aberrant HDAC activity plays a major role in ERMS pathogenesis. Druggable targets in the molecular pathways affected by HDAC inhibitors represent novel therapeutic options for ERMS patients.

  5. Gene expression profiling in whole blood identifies distinct biological pathways associated with obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorman Shelby A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions and represents a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. Methods To explore the relationship between increased body mass and gene expression in blood, we conducted whole-genome expression profiling of whole blood from seventeen obese and seventeen well matched lean subjects. Gene expression data was analyzed at the individual gene and pathway level and a preliminary assessment of the predictive value of blood gene expression profiles in obesity was carried out. Results Principal components analysis of whole-blood gene expression data from obese and lean subjects led to efficient separation of the two cohorts. Pathway analysis by gene-set enrichment demonstrated increased transcript levels for genes belonging to the "ribosome", "apoptosis" and "oxidative phosphorylation" pathways in the obese cohort, consistent with an altered metabolic state including increased protein synthesis, enhanced cell death from proinflammatory or lipotoxic stimuli, and increased energy demands. A subset of pathway-specific genes acted as efficient predictors of obese or lean class membership when used in Naive Bayes or logistic regression based classifiers. Conclusion This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the whole blood transcriptome in obesity and demonstrates that the investigation of gene expression profiles from whole blood can inform and illustrate the biological processes related to regulation of body mass. Additionally, the ability of pathway-related gene expression to predict class membership suggests the feasibility of a similar approach for identifying clinically useful blood-based predictors of weight loss success following dietary or surgical interventions.

  6. Parallel pathways from whisker and visual sensory cortices to distinct frontal regions of mouse neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, Varun; Kyriakatos, Alexandros; Mateo, Celine; Jaeger, Dieter; Petersen, Carl C H

    2017-07-01

    The spatial organization of mouse frontal cortex is poorly understood. Here, we used voltage-sensitive dye to image electrical activity in the dorsal cortex of awake head-restrained mice. Whisker-deflection evoked the earliest sensory response in a localized region of primary somatosensory cortex and visual stimulation evoked the earliest responses in a localized region of primary visual cortex. Over the next milliseconds, the initial sensory response spread within the respective primary sensory cortex and into the surrounding higher order sensory cortices. In addition, secondary hotspots in the frontal cortex were evoked by whisker and visual stimulation, with the frontal hotspot for whisker deflection being more anterior and lateral compared to the frontal hotspot evoked by visual stimulation. Investigating axonal projections, we found that the somatosensory whisker cortex and the visual cortex directly innervated frontal cortex, with visual cortex axons innervating a region medial and posterior to the innervation from somatosensory cortex, consistent with the location of sensory responses in frontal cortex. In turn, the axonal outputs of these two frontal cortical areas innervate distinct regions of striatum, superior colliculus, and brainstem. Sensory input, therefore, appears to map onto modality-specific regions of frontal cortex, perhaps participating in distinct sensorimotor transformations, and directing distinct motor outputs.

  7. Activation of Type I Interferon Pathway in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Association with Distinct Clinical Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorgas, Theophanis P.; Tseronis, Dimitrios D.; Mavragani, Clio P.

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence over the last few years suggests a central role of type I IFN pathway in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune disorders. Data from clinical and genetic studies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus-prone mouse models, indicates that the type I interferon system may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of several lupus and associated clinical features, such as nephritis, neuropsychiatric and cutaneous lupus, premature atherosclerosis as well as lupus-specific autoantibodies particularly against ribonucleoproteins. In the current paper, our aim is to summarize the latest findings supporting the association of type I IFN pathway with specific clinical manifestations in the setting of SLE providing insights on the potential use of type I IFN as a therapeutic target. PMID:22162633

  8. Distinct endothelial pathways underlie sexual dimorphism in vascular auto-regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Melissa V; Bubb, Kristen J; Noyce, Alastair; Villar, Inmaculada C; Duchene, Johan; Hobbs, Adrian J; Scotland, Ramona S; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Pre-menopausal females have a lower incidence of cardiovascular disease compared with age-matched males, implying differences in the mechanisms and pathways regulating vasoactivity. In small arteries, myogenic tone (constriction in response to raised intraluminal pressure) is a major determinant of vascular resistance. Endothelium-derived dilators, particularly NO, tonically moderate myogenic tone and, because the endothelium is an important target for female sex hormones, we investigated whether NO-mediated moderation of myogenic tone differed between the sexes. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Pressure–diameter or relaxation concentration–response curves to the NO donor spermine-NO or soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) stimulation (BAY41-2272) were constructed before and following drug intervention in murine mesenteric resistance arteries. Hypotensive responses to activators of the NO-sGC pathway were determined. Quantitative PCR and Western blotting were used for expression analysis. KEY RESULTS NO synthase inhibition enhanced myogenic tone of arteries of both sexes while block of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) enhanced responses in arteries of females only. Spermine-NO concentration-dependently relaxed mesenteric arteries isolated from either sex. However, while inhibition of sGC activity attenuated responses of arteries from male mice only, endothelial denudation attenuated responses of arteries from females only. BAY41-2272 and spermine-NO-induced vasodilatation and hypotension were greater in males than in females. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS NO moderated myogenic tone in arteries of male mice by a sGC-dependent pathway while EDHF was the predominant endothelial regulator in arteries of females. This is a potentially important sexual dimorphism in NO-mediated reactivity and further implicates EDHF as the predominant endothelial vasodilator in female resistance arteries. PMID:22540539

  9. Synergism of Selective Tumor Vascular Thrombosis and Protease Activated Prodrug

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Cheng

    2008-01-01

    ... by administration of protease-activated prodrug. The activation of coagulation cascade and tumor vascular thrombosis as well as the following activation of the thrombolytic pathways led to explosive amplification of serine protease cascades...

  10. Distinct DNA repair pathways involving RecA and nonhomologous end joining in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korycka-Machala, Malgorzata; Brzostek, Anna; Rozalska, Sylwia; Rumijowska-Galewicz, Anna; Dziedzic, Renata; Bowater, Richard; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2006-05-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis was used to study the relationship between DNA repair processes involving RecA and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). The effect of gene deletions in recA and/or in two genes involved in NHEJ (ku and ligD) was tested on the ability of bacteria to join breaks in plasmids transformed into them and in their response to chemicals that damage DNA. The results provide in vivo evidence that only NHEJ is required for the repair of noncompatible DNA ends. By contrast, the response of mycobacteria to mitomycin C preferentially involved a RecA-dependent pathway.

  11. Extracellular Monomeric and Aggregated Tau Efficiently Enter Human Neurons through Overlapping but Distinct Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis D. Evans

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: In Alzheimer’s disease, neurofibrillary tangle pathology appears to spread along neuronal connections, proposed to be mediated by the release and uptake of abnormal, disease-specific forms of microtubule-binding protein tau MAPT. It is currently unclear whether transfer of tau between neurons is a toxic gain-of-function process in dementia or reflects a constitutive biological process. We report two entry mechanisms for monomeric tau to human neurons: a rapid dynamin-dependent phase typical of endocytosis and a second, slower actin-dependent phase of macropinocytosis. Aggregated tau entry is independent of actin polymerization and largely dynamin dependent, consistent with endocytosis and distinct from macropinocytosis, the major route for aggregated tau entry reported for non-neuronal cells. Anti-tau antibodies abrogate monomeric tau entry into neurons, but less efficiently in the case of aggregated tau, where internalized tau carries antibody with it into neurons. These data suggest that tau entry to human neurons is a physiological process and not a disease-specific phenomenon. : In contrast with predictions that transfer of the microtubule-associated protein tau between neurons is a toxic gain-of-function process in dementia, Evans et al. show that healthy human neurons efficiently take up both normal and aggregated tau, by distinct but overlapping uptake mechanisms. Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, Tau, MAPT, iPSC, endocytosis, human neurons, intracellular transport

  12. Two distinct pathways lead Bacillus thuringiensis to commit to sporulation in biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplaetse, Emilie; Slamti, Leyla; Gohar, Michel; Lereclus, Didier

    2017-05-01

    The spore-forming bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis is an efficient biofilm producer, responsible for persistent contamination of industrial food processing systems. B. thuringiensis biofilms are highly heterogeneous bacterial structures in which three distinct cell types controlled by quorum sensing regulators were identified: PlcR-controlled virulent cells, NprR-dependent necrotrophic cells and cells committed to sporulation, a differentiation process controlled by Rap phosphatases and Spo0A-P. Interestingly, a cell lineage study revealed that, in LB medium or in insect larvae, only necrotrophic cells became spores. Here we analyzed cellular differentiation undertaken by cells growing in biofilm in a medium optimized for sporulation. No virulent cells were identified; surprisingly, two distinct routes could lead to differentiation as a spore in this growth condition: the NprR-dependent route, followed by the majority of cells, and the newly identified NprR-independent route, which is followed by 20% of sporulating cells. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Distinct Effects of p19 RNA Silencing Suppressor on Small RNA Mediated Pathways in Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levente Kontra

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available RNA silencing is one of the main defense mechanisms employed by plants to fight viruses. In change, viruses have evolved silencing suppressor proteins to neutralize antiviral silencing. Since the endogenous and antiviral functions of RNA silencing pathway rely on common components, it was suggested that viral suppressors interfere with endogenous silencing pathway contributing to viral symptom development. In this work, we aimed to understand the effects of the tombusviral p19 suppressor on endogenous and antiviral silencing during genuine virus infection. We showed that ectopically expressed p19 sequesters endogenous small RNAs (sRNAs in the absence, but not in the presence of virus infection. Our presented data question the generalized model in which the sequestration of endogenous sRNAs by the viral suppressor contributes to the viral symptom development. We further showed that p19 preferentially binds the perfectly paired ds-viral small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs but does not select based on their sequence or the type of the 5' nucleotide. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation of sRNAs with AGO1 or AGO2 from virus-infected plants revealed that p19 specifically impairs vsiRNA loading into AGO1 but not AGO2. Our findings, coupled with the fact that p19-expressing wild type Cymbidium ringspot virus (CymRSV overcomes the Nicotiana benthamiana silencing based defense killing the host, suggest that AGO1 is the main effector of antiviral silencing in this host-virus combination.

  14. IAPs Regulate Distinct Innate Immune Pathways to Co-ordinate the Response to Bacterial Peptidoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Che A; Lawlor, Kate E; Heim, Valentin J; Bankovacki, Aleksandra; Bernardini, Jonathan P; Silke, John; Nachbur, Ueli

    2018-02-06

    Inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) proteins are critical regulators of innate immune signaling pathways and therefore have potential as drug targets. X-linked IAP (XIAP) and cellular IAP1 and IAP2 (cIAP1 and cIAP2) are E3 ligases that have been shown to be required for signaling downstream of NOD2, an intracellular receptor for bacterial peptidoglycan. We used genetic and biochemical approaches to compare the responses of IAP-deficient mice and cells to NOD2 stimulation. In all cell types tested, XIAP is the only IAP required for signaling immediately downstream of NOD2, while cIAP1 and cIAP2 are dispensable for NOD2-induced nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. However, mice lacking cIAP1 or TNFR1 have a blunted cytokine response to NOD2 stimulation. We conclude that cIAPs regulate NOD2-dependent autocrine TNF signaling in vivo and highlight the importance of physiological context in the interplay of innate immune signaling pathways. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hemagglutinin protease secreted by V. cholerae induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells by ROS mediated intrinsic pathway and regresses tumor growth in mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Tanusree; Chakrabarti, Monoj Kumar; Pal, Amit

    2016-02-01

    Conventional anticancer therapies are effective but have side effects, so alternative targets are being developed. Bacterial toxins that can kill cells or alter the cellular processes like proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation have been reported for cancer treatment. In this study we have shown antitumor activity of hemagglutinin protease (HAP) secreted by Vibrio cholerae. One µg of HAP showed potent antitumor activity when injected into Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) tumors in Swiss albino mice. Weekly administration of this dose is able to significantly diminish a large tumor volume within 3 weeks and increases the survival rates of cancerous mice. HAP showed apoptotic activity on EAC and other malignant cells. Increased level of pro-apoptotic p53 with increased ratio of pro-apoptotic Bax to anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 signify that HAP induced apoptogenic signals lead to death of the tumor cells. In vivo and ex vivo studies suggest that mitochondrial dependent intrinsic pathway is responsible for this apoptosis. The level of ROS in malignant cells is reported to be higher than the normal healthy cells. HAP induces oxidative stress and increases the level of ROS in malignant cells which is significantly higher than the normal healthy cells. As a result the malignant cells cross the threshold level of ROS for cell survival faster than normal healthy cells. This mechanism causes HAP mediated apoptosis in malignant cells, but normal cells remain unaltered in the same environment. Our study suggests that HAP may be used as a new candidate drug for cancer therapy.

  16. Genome-Wide Survey of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 Reveals a Role for the Glyoxylate Pathway and Extracellular Proteases in the Utilization of Mucin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Jeffrey M.; Phan, Chi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic airway infections by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are a major cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Although this bacterium has been extensively studied for its virulence determinants, biofilm growth, and immune evasion mechanisms, comparatively little is known about the nutrient sources that sustain its growth in vivo. Respiratory mucins represent a potentially abundant bioavailable nutrient source, although we have recently shown that canonical pathogens inefficiently use these host glycoproteins as a growth substrate. However, given that P. aeruginosa, particularly in its biofilm mode of growth, is thought to grow slowly in vivo, the inefficient use of mucin glycoproteins may be relevant to its persistence within the CF airways. To this end, we used whole-genome fitness analysis, combining transposon mutagenesis with high-throughput sequencing, to identify genetic determinants required for P. aeruginosa growth using intact purified mucins as a sole carbon source. Our analysis reveals a biphasic growth phenotype, during which the glyoxylate pathway and amino acid biosynthetic machinery are required for mucin utilization. Secondary analyses confirmed the simultaneous liberation and consumption of acetate during mucin degradation and revealed a central role for the extracellular proteases LasB and AprA. Together, these studies describe a molecular basis for mucin-based nutrient acquisition by P. aeruginosa and reveal a host-pathogen dynamic that may contribute to its persistence within the CF airways. PMID:28507068

  17. Modeling the distinct pathways of influence of coping strategies on youth suicidal ideation: a national longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Atika; Romer, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    National surveys indicate high rates of suicidal ideation in youth, especially among females. Coping skill training programs hold promise as a potential intervention that can help young people better manage stress and not consider suicide as a solution to life's problems. To assess the promise of this strategy, the present research examined which coping strategies (if any) predicted reduction in youth suicidal ideation over a 1-year follow-up, and explored the potential pathways through which their influence was channeled. Two waves of panel data from a nationally representative sample of youth, assessed 1 year apart (N = 710; Mean age = 18 years) were analyzed separately by gender using multiple group path analytic procedures. Four coping strategies, namely problem solving, emotional regulation, support seeking and acceptance were found to predict reduction in suicidal ideation among both males and females. However, the influence of these strategies (at baseline) was channeled through distinct pathways. The effect of emotional regulation (and acceptance) was channeled through its use at follow-up and was mediated by reductions in perceived stress and depressive symptoms, leading to reduction in suicidal ideation. The influence of support seeking was also channeled through its more recent use at follow-up, but directly predicted reduction in suicidal ideation, with no effect on perceived stress or depressive symptoms. The effect of problem solving on suicidal ideation was mediated by reduction in depressive symptoms, but was not channeled through its use at follow-up, suggesting a longer time course for the protective influence of this strategy. Finally, acceptance had a direct risk-enhancing effect on suicidal ideation. Coping strategies commonly used by youth can be effective in reducing suicidal ideation and therefore universal training in the effective use of these strategies should be considered. An understanding of the distinct pathways through which

  18. Two distinct phases of apoptosis in mammary gland involution: proteinase-independent and -dependent pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, Leif R; Romer, John; Thomasset, Nicole; Solberg, Helene; Pyke, Charles; Bissell, Mina J; Dano, Keld; Werb, Zena

    1996-01-01

    Postlactational involution of the mammary gland is characterized by two distinct physiological events: apoptosis of the secretory, epithelial cells undergoing programmed cell death, and proteolytic degradation of the mammary gland basement membrane. We examined the spatial and temporal patterns of apoptotic cells in relation to those of proteinases during involution of the BALB/c mouse mammary gland. Apoptosis was almost absent during lactation but became evident at day 2 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was still high. Apoptotic cells were then seen at least up to day 8 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was being extinguished. Expression of sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2), interleukin-1{beta} converting enzyme (ICE) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 was upregulated at day 2, when apoptotic cells were seen initially. Expression of the matrix metalloproteinases gelatinase A and stromelysin-1 and the serine proteinase urokinase-type plasminogen activator, which was low during lactation, was strongly upregulated in parallel starting at day 4 after weaning, coinciding with start of the collapse of the lobulo-alveolar structures and the intensive tissue remodeling in involution. The major sites of mRNA synthesis for these proteinases were fibroblast-like cells in the periductal stroma and stromal cells surrounding the collapsed alveoli, suggesting that the degradative phase of involution is due to a specialized mesenchymal-epithelial interaction. To elucidate the functional role of these proteinases during involution, at the onset of weaning we treated mice systemically with the glucocorticoid hydrocortisone, which is known to inhibit mammary gland involution. Although the initial wave of apoptotic cells appeared in the lumina of the gland, the dramatic regression and tissue remodeling usually evident by day 5 was substantially inhibited by systemic treatment with hydrocortisone. mRNA and protein for gelatinase A, stromelysin

  19. LIM domain only-2 (LMO2 induces T-cell leukemia by two distinct pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Smith

    Full Text Available The LMO2 oncogene is deregulated in the majority of human T-cell leukemia cases and in most gene therapy-induced T-cell leukemias. We made transgenic mice with enforced expression of Lmo2 in T-cells by the CD2 promoter/enhancer. These transgenic mice developed highly penetrant T-ALL by two distinct patterns of gene expression: one in which there was concordant activation of Lyl1, Hhex, and Mycn or alternatively, with Notch1 target gene activation. Most strikingly, this gene expression clustering was conserved in human Early T-cell Precursor ALL (ETP-ALL, where LMO2, HHEX, LYL1, and MYCN were most highly expressed. We discovered that HHEX is a direct transcriptional target of LMO2 consistent with its concordant gene expression. Furthermore, conditional inactivation of Hhex in CD2-Lmo2 transgenic mice markedly attenuated T-ALL development, demonstrating that Hhex is a crucial mediator of Lmo2's oncogenic function. The CD2-Lmo2 transgenic mice offer mechanistic insight into concordant oncogene expression and provide a model for the highly treatment-resistant ETP-ALL subtype.

  20. Tumor necrosis factor-α regulates distinct molecular pathways and gene networks in cultured skeletal muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shephali Bhatnagar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle wasting is a debilitating consequence of large number of disease states and conditions. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α is one of the most important muscle-wasting cytokine, elevated levels of which cause significant muscular abnormalities. However, the underpinning molecular mechanisms by which TNF-α causes skeletal muscle wasting are less well-understood.We have used microarray, quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR, Western blot, and bioinformatics tools to study the effects of TNF-α on various molecular pathways and gene networks in C2C12 cells (a mouse myoblastic cell line. Microarray analyses of C2C12 myotubes treated with TNF-α (10 ng/ml for 18h showed differential expression of a number of genes involved in distinct molecular pathways. The genes involved in nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB signaling, 26s proteasome pathway, Notch1 signaling, and chemokine networks are the most important ones affected by TNF-α. The expression of some of the genes in microarray dataset showed good correlation in independent QRT-PCR and Western blot assays. Analysis of TNF-treated myotubes showed that TNF-α augments the activity of both canonical and alternative NF-κB signaling pathways in myotubes. Bioinformatics analyses of microarray dataset revealed that TNF-α affects the activity of several important pathways including those involved in oxidative stress, hepatic fibrosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, cholesterol biosynthesis, and TGF-β signaling. Furthermore, TNF-α was found to affect the gene networks related to drug metabolism, cell cycle, cancer, neurological disease, organismal injury, and abnormalities in myotubes.TNF-α regulates the expression of multiple genes involved in various toxic pathways which may be responsible for TNF-induced muscle loss in catabolic conditions. Our study suggests that TNF-α activates both canonical and alternative NF-κB signaling pathways in a time-dependent manner in skeletal muscle cells

  1. Substrate-Trapped Interactors of PHD3 and FIH Cluster in Distinct Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Rodriguez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid hydroxylation is a post-translational modification that regulates intra- and inter-molecular protein-protein interactions. The modifications are regulated by a family of 2-oxoglutarate- (2OG dependent enzymes and, although the biochemistry is well understood, until now only a few substrates have been described for these enzymes. Using quantitative interaction proteomics, we screened for substrates of the proline hydroxylase PHD3 and the asparagine hydroxylase FIH, which regulate the HIF-mediated hypoxic response. We were able to identify hundreds of potential substrates. Enrichment analysis revealed that the potential substrates of both hydroxylases cluster in the same pathways but frequently modify different nodes of signaling networks. We confirm that two proteins identified in our screen, MAPK6 (Erk3 and RIPK4, are indeed hydroxylated in a FIH- or PHD3-dependent mechanism. We further determined that FIH-dependent hydroxylation regulates RIPK4-dependent Wnt signaling, and that PHD3-dependent hydroxylation of MAPK6 protects the protein from proteasomal degradation.

  2. Distinct surveillance pathway for immunopathology during acute infection via autophagy and SR-BI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiler, Susanne; Khandagale, Avinash B.; Magenau, Astrid; Nichols, Maryana; Heijnen, Harry F. G.; Rinninger, Franz; Ziegler, Tilman; Seveau, Stephanie; Schubert, Sören; Zahler, Stefan; Verschoor, Admar; Latz, Eicke; Massberg, Steffen; Gaus, Katharina; Engelmann, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms protecting from immunopathology during acute bacterial infections are incompletely known. We found that in response to apoptotic immune cells and live or dead Listeria monocytogenes scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), an anti-atherogenic lipid exchange mediator, activated internalization mechanisms with characteristics of macropinocytosis and, assisted by Golgi fragmentation, initiated autophagic responses. This was supported by scavenger receptor-induced local increases in membrane cholesterol concentrations which generated lipid domains particularly in cell extensions and the Golgi. SR-BI was a key driver of beclin-1-dependent autophagy during acute bacterial infection of the liver and spleen. Autophagy regulated tissue infiltration of neutrophils, suppressed accumulation of Ly6C+ (inflammatory) macrophages, and prevented hepatocyte necrosis in the core of infectious foci. Perifocal levels of Ly6C+ macrophages and Ly6C− macrophages were unaffected, indicating predominant regulation of the focus core. SR-BI-triggered autophagy promoted co-elimination of apoptotic immune cells and dead bacteria but barely influenced bacterial sequestration and survival or inflammasome activation, thus exclusively counteracting damage inflicted by immune responses. Hence, SR-BI- and autophagy promote a surveillance pathway that partially responds to products of antimicrobial defenses and selectively prevents immunity-induced damage during acute infection. Our findings suggest that control of infection-associated immunopathology can be based on a unified defense operation. PMID:27694929

  3. Drosophila JAK/STAT pathway reveals distinct initiation and reinforcement steps in early transcription of Sxl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Frank W; Erickson, James W

    2007-04-03

    X-linked signal elements (XSEs) communicate the dose of X chromosomes to the regulatory-switch gene Sex-lethal (Sxl) during Drosophila sex determination. Unequal XSE expression in precellular XX and XY nuclei ensures that only XX embryos will activate the establishment promoter, SxlPe, to produce a pulse of the RNA-binding protein, SXL [1]. Once XSE protein concentrations have been assessed, SxlPe is inactivated and the maintenance promoter, SxlPm, is turned on in both sexes; however, only in females is SXL present to direct the SxlPm-derived transcripts to be spliced into functional mRNA [2, 3]. Thereafter, Sxl is maintained in the on state by positive autoregulatory RNA splicing [2]. Once set in the stable on (female) or off (male) state, Sxl controls somatic sexual development through control of downstream effectors of sexual differentiation and dosage compensation [1, 4]. Most XSEs encode transcription factors that bind SxlPe, but the XSE unpaired (upd) encodes a secreted ligand for the JAK/STAT pathway [5-7]. We show that although STAT directly regulates SxlPe, it is dispensable for promoter activation. Instead, JAK/STAT is needed to maintain high-level SxlPe expression in order to ensure Sxl autoregulation in XX embryos. Thus, upd is a unique XSE that augments, rather than defines, the initial sex-determination signal.

  4. Distinct pathways for repairing mutagenic lesions induced by methylating and ethylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Kentaro; Kaneto, Satomi; Nakano, Kota; Watanabe, Shinji; Takahashi, Eizo; Arimoto, Sakae; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Schaaper, Roel M; Negishi, Kazuo; Negishi, Tomoe

    2013-05-01

    DNA alkylation damage can be repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair (BER) or by direct removal of alkyl groups from modified bases by O(6)-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT; E.C. 2.1.1.63). DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is also likely involved in this repair. We have investigated alkylation-induced mutagenesis in a series of NER- or AGT-deficient Escherichia coli strains, alone or in combination with defects in the MutS, MutL or MutH components of MMR. All strains used contained the F'prolac from strain CC102 (F'CC102) episome capable of detecting specifically lac GC to AT reverse mutations resulting from O(6)-alkylguanine. The results showed the repair of O(6)-methylguanine to be performed by AGT ≫ MMR > NER in order of importance, whereas the repair of O(6)-ethylguanine followed the order NER > AGT > MMR. Studies with double mutants showed that in the absence of AGT or NER repair pathways, the lack of MutS protein generally increased mutant frequencies for both methylating and ethylating agents, suggesting a repair or mutation avoidance role for this protein. However, lack of MutL or MutH protein did not increase alkylation-induced mutagenesis under these conditions and, in fact, reduced mutagenesis by the N-alkyl-N-nitrosoureas MNU and ENU. The combined results suggest that little or no alkylation damage is actually corrected by the mutHLS MMR system; instead, an as yet unspecified interaction of MutS protein with alkylated DNA may promote the involvement of a repair system other than MMR to avoid a mutagenic outcome. Furthermore, both mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of MMR were detected, revealing a dual function of the MMR system in alkylation-exposed cells.

  5. Two Distinct Pathways for Metabolism of Theophylline and Caffeine Are Coexpressed in Pseudomonas putida CBB5▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chi Li; Louie, Tai Man; Summers, Ryan; Kale, Yogesh; Gopishetty, Sridhar; Subramanian, Mani

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida CBB5 was isolated from soil by enrichment on caffeine. This strain used not only caffeine, theobromine, paraxanthine, and 7-methylxanthine as sole carbon and nitrogen sources but also theophylline and 3-methylxanthine. Analyses of metabolites in spent media and resting cell suspensions confirmed that CBB5 initially N demethylated theophylline via a hitherto unreported pathway to 1- and 3-methylxanthines. NAD(P)H-dependent conversion of theophylline to 1- and 3-methylxanthines was also detected in the crude cell extracts of theophylline-grown CBB5. 1-Methylxanthine and 3-methylxanthine were subsequently N demethylated to xanthine. CBB5 also oxidized theophylline and 1- and 3-methylxanthines to 1,3-dimethyluric acid and 1- and 3-methyluric acids, respectively. However, these methyluric acids were not metabolized further. A broad-substrate-range xanthine-oxidizing enzyme was responsible for the formation of these methyluric acids. In contrast, CBB5 metabolized caffeine to theobromine (major metabolite) and paraxanthine (minor metabolite). These dimethylxanthines were further N demethylated to xanthine via 7-methylxanthine. Theobromine-, paraxanthine-, and 7-methylxanthine-grown cells also metabolized all of the methylxanthines mentioned above via the same pathway. Thus, the theophylline and caffeine N-demethylation pathways converged at xanthine via different methylxanthine intermediates. Xanthine was eventually oxidized to uric acid. Enzymes involved in theophylline and caffeine degradation were coexpressed when CBB5 was grown on theophylline or on caffeine or its metabolites. However, 3-methylxanthine-grown CBB5 cells did not metabolize caffeine, whereas theophylline was metabolized at much reduced levels to only methyluric acids. To our knowledge, this is the first report of theophylline N demethylation and coexpression of distinct pathways for caffeine and theophylline degradation in bacteria. PMID:19447909

  6. Protease-activated receptor-2 promotes kidney tubular epithelial inflammation by inhibiting autophagy via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chunyang; Zhang, Tao; Xiao, Xia; Shi, Yonghong; Duan, Huijun; Ren, Yunzhuo

    2017-08-02

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2), which belongs to a specific class of the G-protein-coupled receptors, is central to several inflammation processes. However, the precise molecular mechanism involved remains undefined. Autophagy has been previously shown to affect inflammation. In the present study, we examine the effect of PAR2 on kidney tubular epithelial autophagy and on autophagy-related inflammation and reveal the underlying mechanism involved. Autophagic activity and levels of autophagic marker LC3 were examined in human kidney tubular epithelial cells with PAR2 knockdown or overexpression. We administered the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor (rapamycin) or activator (MHY1485) to investigate the function of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mTOR pathway. We also used transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced HK-2 cell inflammation models to investigate the role of PAR2-associated autophagy in kidney tubular epithelial inflammation. PAR2 antagonist and rapamycin were administered to mice after unilateral ureteral obstruction to detect the correlations between PAR2, autophagy, and inflammation. Our results show that PAR2 overexpression in HK-2 cells led to a greater reduction in autophagy via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway activation and induces autophagy-related inflammation. Meanwhile, a knockdown of PAR2 via PAR2 RNAi transfection greatly increased autophagy and alleviated autophagy-associated inflammation. In unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) kidneys, PAR2 antagonist treatment greatly attenuated renal inflammation and interstitial injury by enhancing autophagy. Moreover, inhibition of mTOR, rapa, markedly increased autophagy and inhibited the UUO-induced inflammation. We conclude that PAR2 induces kidney tubular epithelial inflammation by inhibiting autophagy via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling pathway. Our results are suggestive that PAR2 inhibition may play a role in the treatment of diseases with increased inflammatory

  7. Puma and Trail/Dr5 Pathways Control Radiation-Induced Apoptosis in Distinct Populations of Testicular Progenitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coureuil, M.; Tavernier, M.; Barroca, V.; Fouchet, P.; Allemand, I.; Ugolin, N.; Chevillard, S.

    2010-01-01

    Spermatogonia- stem cells and progenitors of adult spermatogenesis- are killed through a p53-regulated apoptotic process after γ-irradiation but the death effectors are still poorly characterized. Our data demonstrate that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways are involved, and especially that spermatogonia can be split into two main populations, according to apoptotic effectors. Following irradiation both Dr5 and Puma genes are up-regulated in the α 6 -integrin-positive Side Population (SP) fraction, which is highly enriched in spermatogonia. Flow cytometric analysis confirms an increased number of Dr5-expressing SP cells, and Puma-β isoform accumulates in α 6 -integrin positive cellular extracts, enriched in spermatogonia. Trail -/- or Puma -/- spermatogonia display a reduced sensitivity to radiation-induced apoptosis. The TUNEL kinetics strongly suggest that the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways, via Trail/Dr5 and Puma respectively, could be engaged in distinct subpopulations of spermatogonia. Indeed flow cytometric studies show that Dr5 receptor is constitutively present on more than half of the undifferentiated progenitors (Kit - α 6 + SP) and half of the differentiated ones (Kit + α 6 + SP). In addition after irradiation, Puma is not detected in the Dr5-positive cellular fraction isolated by immuno-magnetic purification, while Puma is present in the Dr5-negative cell extracts. In conclusion, adult testicular progenitors are divided into distinct sub-populations by apoptotic effectors, independently of progenitor types (immature Kit-negative versus mature Kit-positive), underscoring differential radiosensitivities characterizing the stem cell/progenitors compartment. (authors)

  8. The ARG1-LIKE2 gene of Arabidopsis functions in a gravity signal transduction pathway that is genetically distinct from the PGM pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Changhui; Rosen, Elizabeth S.; Boonsirichai, Kanokporn; Poff, Kenneth L.; Masson, Patrick H.

    2003-01-01

    The arl2 mutants of Arabidopsis display altered root and hypocotyl gravitropism, whereas their inflorescence stems are fully gravitropic. Interestingly, mutant roots respond like the wild type to phytohormones and an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. Also, their cap columella cells accumulate starch similarly to wild-type cells, and mutant hypocotyls display strong phototropic responses to lateral light stimulation. The ARL2 gene encodes a DnaJ-like protein similar to ARG1, another protein previously implicated in gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis seedlings. ARL2 is expressed at low levels in all organs of seedlings and plants. arl2-1 arg1-2 double mutant roots display kinetics of gravitropism similar to those of single mutants. However, double mutants carrying both arl2-1 and pgm-1 (a mutation in the starch-biosynthetic gene PHOSPHOGLUCOMUTASE) at the homozygous state display a more pronounced root gravitropic defect than the single mutants. On the other hand, seedlings with a null mutation in ARL1, a paralog of ARG1 and ARL2, behave similarly to the wild type in gravitropism and other related assays. Taken together, the results suggest that ARG1 and ARL2 function in the same gravity signal transduction pathway in the hypocotyl and root of Arabidopsis seedlings, distinct from the pathway involving PGM.

  9. A Pathway Switch Directs BAFF Signaling to Distinct NFκB Transcription Factors in Maturing and Proliferating B Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan V. Almaden

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BAFF, an activator of the noncanonical NFκB pathway, provides critical survival signals during B cell maturation and contributes to B cell proliferation. We found that the NFκB family member RelB is required ex vivo for B cell maturation, but cRel is required for proliferation. Combined molecular network modeling and experimentation revealed Nfkb2 p100 as a pathway switch; at moderate p100 synthesis rates in maturing B cells, BAFF fully utilizes p100 to generate the RelB:p52 dimer, whereas at high synthesis rates, p100 assembles into multimeric IκBsome complexes, which BAFF neutralizes in order to potentiate cRel activity and B cell expansion. Indeed, moderation of p100 expression or disruption of IκBsome assembly circumvented the BAFF requirement for full B cell expansion. Our studies emphasize the importance of p100 in determining distinct NFκB network states during B cell biology, which causes BAFF to have context-dependent functional consequences.

  10. A pathway switch directs BAFF signaling to distinct NFκB transcription factors in maturing and proliferating B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaden, Jonathan V; Tsui, Rachel; Liu, Yi C; Birnbaum, Harry; Shokhirev, Maxim N; Ngo, Kim A; Davis-Turak, Jeremy C; Otero, Dennis; Basak, Soumen; Rickert, Robert C; Hoffmann, Alexander

    2014-12-24

    BAFF, an activator of the noncanonical NFκB pathway, provides critical survival signals during B cell maturation and contributes to B cell proliferation. We found that the NFκB family member RelB is required ex vivo for B cell maturation, but cRel is required for proliferation. Combined molecular network modeling and experimentation revealed Nfkb2 p100 as a pathway switch; at moderate p100 synthesis rates in maturing B cells, BAFF fully utilizes p100 to generate the RelB:p52 dimer, whereas at high synthesis rates, p100 assembles into multimeric IκBsome complexes, which BAFF neutralizes in order to potentiate cRel activity and B cell expansion. Indeed, moderation of p100 expression or disruption of IκBsome assembly circumvented the BAFF requirement for full B cell expansion. Our studies emphasize the importance of p100 in determining distinct NFκB network states during B cell biology, which causes BAFF to have context-dependent functional consequences. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional overlap among distinct G1/S inhibitory pathways allows robust G1 arrest by yeast mating pheromones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Patricia A; Pryciak, Peter M

    2013-12-01

    In budding yeast, mating pheromones arrest the cell cycle in G1 phase via a pheromone-activated Cdk-inhibitor (CKI) protein, Far1. Alternate pathways must also exist, however, because deleting the cyclin CLN2 restores pheromone arrest to far1 cells. Here we probe whether these alternate pathways require the G1/S transcriptional repressors Whi5 and Stb1 or the CKI protein Sic1, whose metazoan analogues (Rb or p27) antagonize cell cycle entry. Removing Whi5 and Stb1 allows partial escape from G1 arrest in far1 cln2 cells, along with partial derepression of G1/S genes, which implies a repressor-independent route for inhibiting G1/S transcription. This route likely involves pheromone-induced degradation of Tec1, a transcriptional activator of the cyclin CLN1, because Tec1 stabilization also causes partial G1 escape in far1 cln2 cells, and this is additive with Whi5/Stb1 removal. Deleting SIC1 alone strongly disrupts Far1-independent G1 arrest, revealing that inhibition of B-type cyclin-Cdk activity can empower weak arrest pathways. Of interest, although far1 cln2 sic1 cells escaped G1 arrest, they lost viability during pheromone exposure, indicating that G1 exit is deleterious if the arrest signal remains active. Overall our findings illustrate how multiple distinct G1/S-braking mechanisms help to prevent premature cell cycle commitment and ensure a robust signal-induced G1 arrest.

  12. Distinct Splice Variants and Pathway Enrichment in the Cell Line Models of Aggressive Human Breast Cancer Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Rajasree; Im, Hogune; Zhang, Emma (Yue); Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Chen, Rui; Snyder, Michael; Hancock, William S.; Omenn, Gilbert S.

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted as a part of the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) of the Human Proteome Organization. The United States team of C-HPP is focused on characterizing the protein-coding genes in chromosome 17. Despite its small size, chromosome 17 is rich in protein-coding genes, it contains many cancer-associated genes, including BRCA1, ERBB2 (Her2/neu), and TP53. The goal of this study was to examine the splice variants expressed in three ERBB2 expressed breast cancer cell line models of hormone receptor negative breast cancers by integrating RNA-Seq and proteomic mass spectrometry data. The cell-lines represent distinct phenotypic variations subtype: SKBR3 (ERBB2+ (over-expression)/ ER−/PR−; adenocarcinoma), SUM190 (ERBB2+ (over-expression)/ER−/PR−; inflammatory breast cancer) and SUM149 (ERBB2 (low expression) ER−/PR −; inflammatory breast cancer). We identified more than one splice variant for 1167 genes expressed in at least one of the three cancer cell lines. We found multiple variants of genes that are in the signaling pathways downstream of ERBB2 along with variants specific to one cancer cell line compared to the other two cancer cell lines and to normal mammary cells. The overall transcript profiles based on read counts indicated more similarities between SKBR3 and SUM190. The top-ranking Gene Ontology and BioCarta pathways for the cell-line specific variants pointed to distinct key mechanisms including: amino sugar metabolism, caspase activity, and endocytosis in SKBR3; different aspects of metabolism, especially of lipids in SUM190; cell- to-cell adhesion, integrin and ERK1/ERK2 signaling, and translational control in SUM149. The analyses indicated an enrichment in the electron transport chain processes in the ERBB2 over-expressed cell line models; and an association of nucleotide binding, RNA splicing and translation processes with the IBC models, SUM190 and SUM149. Detailed experimental studies on the distinct

  13. Cross-talk between non-genomic and genomic signalling pathways - Distinct effect profiles of environmental estrogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Elisabete; Kabil, Alena; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) transcriptional cross-talk after activation by 17β-estradiol (E2) has been studied in considerable detail, but comparatively little is known about the ways in which synthetic estrogen-like chemicals, so-called xenoestrogens, interfere with these signalling pathways. E2 can stimulate rapid, non-genomic signalling events, such as activation of the Src/Ras/Erk signalling pathway. We investigated how activation of this pathway by E2, the estrogenic environmental contaminants o,p'-DDT, β-HCH and p,p'-DDE, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) influences the expression of ER target genes, such as TFF1, ER, PR, BRCA1 and CCND1, and the proliferation of breast cancer cells. Despite commonalities in their estrogenicity as judged by cell proliferation assays, the environmental contaminants exhibited striking differences in their non-genomic and genomic signalling. The gene expression profiles of o,p'-DDT and β-HCH resembled the effects observed with E2. In the case of β-HCH this is surprising, considering its reported lack of affinity to the 'classical' ER. The expression profiles seen with p,p'-DDE showed some similarities with E2, but overall, p,p'-DDE was a fairly weak transcriptional inducer of TFF1, ER, PR, BRCA1 and CCND1. We observed distinct differences in the non-genomic signalling of the tested compounds. p,p'-DDE was unable to stimulate Src and Erk1/Erk2 activations. The effects of E2 on Src and Erk1/Erk2 phosphorylation were transient and weak when compared to EGF, but β-HCH induced strong and sustained activation of all tested kinases. Transcription of TFF1, ER, PR and BRCA1 by E2, o,p'-DDT and β-HCH could be suppressed partially by inhibiting the Src/Ras/Erk pathway with PD 98059. However, this was not seen with p,p'-DDE. Our investigations show that the cellular activities of estrogens and xenoestrogens are the result of a combination of extranuclear (non-genomic) and nuclear (genomic) events and highlight the need to take non

  14. Regulator of G protein signaling 2 (RGS2 and RGS4 form distinct G protein-dependent complexes with protease activated-receptor 1 (PAR1 in live cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungho Ghil

    Full Text Available Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1 is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR that is activated by natural proteases to regulate many physiological actions. We previously reported that PAR1 couples to Gi, Gq and G12 to activate linked signaling pathways. Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS proteins serve as GTPase activating proteins to inhibit GPCR/G protein signaling. Some RGS proteins interact directly with certain GPCRs to modulate their signals, though cellular mechanisms dictating selective RGS/GPCR coupling are poorly understood. Here, using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET, we tested whether RGS2 and RGS4 bind to PAR1 in live COS-7 cells to regulate PAR1/Gα-mediated signaling. We report that PAR1 selectively interacts with either RGS2 or RGS4 in a G protein-dependent manner. Very little BRET activity is observed between PAR1-Venus (PAR1-Ven and either RGS2-Luciferase (RGS2-Luc or RGS4-Luc in the absence of Gα. However, in the presence of specific Gα subunits, BRET activity was markedly enhanced between PAR1-RGS2 by Gαq/11, and PAR1-RGS4 by Gαo, but not by other Gα subunits. Gαq/11-YFP/RGS2-Luc BRET activity is promoted by PAR1 and is markedly enhanced by agonist (TFLLR stimulation. However, PAR1-Ven/RGS-Luc BRET activity was blocked by a PAR1 mutant (R205A that eliminates PAR1-Gq/11 coupling. The purified intracellular third loop of PAR1 binds directly to purified His-RGS2 or His-RGS4. In cells, RGS2 and RGS4 inhibited PAR1/Gα-mediated calcium and MAPK/ERK signaling, respectively, but not RhoA signaling. Our findings indicate that RGS2 and RGS4 interact directly with PAR1 in Gα-dependent manner to modulate PAR1/Gα-mediated signaling, and highlight a cellular mechanism for selective GPCR/G protein/RGS coupling.

  15. Distinct Signaling Pathways After Higher or Lower Doses of Radiation in Three Closely Related Human Lymphoblast Cell Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, T.-P.; Lai, L.-C.; Lin, B.-I.; Chen, L.-H.; Hsiao, T.-H.; Liber, Howard L.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B.; Tsai, M.-H.; Chuang, Eric Y.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The tumor suppressor p53 plays an essential role in cellular responses to DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation; therefore, this study aims to further explore the role that p53 plays at different doses of radiation. Materials and Methods: The global cellular responses to higher-dose (10 Gy) and lower dose (iso-survival dose, i.e., the respective D0 levels) radiation were analyzed using microarrays in three human lymphoblast cell lines with different p53 status: TK6 (wild-type p53), NH32 (p53-null), and WTK1 (mutant p53). Total RNAs were extracted from cells harvested at 0, 1, 3, 6, 9, and 24 h after higher and lower dose radiation exposures. Template-based clustering, hierarchical clustering, and principle component analysis were applied to examine the transcriptional profiles. Results: Differential expression profiles between 10 Gy and iso-survival radiation in cells with different p53 status were observed. Moreover, distinct gene expression patterns were exhibited among these three cells after 10 Gy radiation treatment, but similar transcriptional responses were observed in TK6 and NH32 cells treated with iso-survival radiation. Conclusions: After 10 Gy radiation exposure, the p53 signaling pathway played an important role in TK6, whereas the NFkB signaling pathway appeared to replace the role of p53 in WTK1. In contrast, after iso-survival radiation treatment, E2F4 seemed to play a dominant role independent of p53 status. This study dissected the impacts of p53, NFkB and E2F4 in response to higher or lower doses of γ-irradiation.

  16. Stress-induced alternative splice forms of MDM2 and MDMX modulate the p53-pathway in distinct ways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aishwarya G Jacob

    Full Text Available MDM2 and MDMX are the chief negative regulators of the tumor-suppressor protein p53 and are essential for maintaining homeostasis within the cell. In response to genotoxic stress and also in several cancer types, MDM2 and MDMX are alternatively spliced. The splice variants MDM2-ALT1 and MDMX-ALT2 lack the p53-binding domain and are incapable of negatively regulating p53. However, they retain the RING domain that facilitates dimerization of the full-length MDM proteins. Concordantly, MDM2-ALT1 has been shown to lead to the stabilization of p53 through its interaction with and inactivation of full-length MDM2. The impact of MDM2-ALT1 expression on the p53 pathway and the nature of its interaction with MDMX remain unclear. Also, the role of the architecturally similar MDMX-ALT2 and its influence of the MDM2-MDMX-p53 axis are yet to be elucidated. We show here that MDM2-ALT1 is capable of binding full-length MDMX as well as full-length MDM2. Additionally, we demonstrate that MDMX-ALT2 is able to dimerize with both full-length MDMX and MDM2 and that the expression of MDM2-ALT1 and MDMX-ALT2 leads to the upregulation of p53 protein, and also of its downstream target p21. Moreover, MDM2-ALT1 expression causes cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase in a p53 and p21 dependent manner, which is consistent with the increased levels of p21. Finally we present evidence that MDM2-ALT1 and MDMX-ALT2 expression can activate subtly distinct subsets of p53-transcriptional targets implying that these splice variants can modulate the p53 tumor suppressor pathway in unique ways. In summary, our study shows that the stress-inducible alternative splice forms MDM2-ALT1 and MDMX-ALT2 are important modifiers of the p53 pathway and present a potential mechanism to tailor the p53-mediated cellular stress response.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide and platelet-activating factor stimulate expression of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase via distinct signaling pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-al, Mohammed; Ditmyer, Marcia; Patel, Nipa

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to investigate and characterize the ability of platelet-activating factor (PAF) to induce the expression of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH). Methods Ribonuclease protection assays and quantitative real-time PCR were used to investigate the ability of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and PAF to regulate PAF-AH mRNA expression in human monocyte–macrophage 6 (MM6) cells. Pharmacological inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) and PAF receptor antagonists were used to investigate the mechanism of regulation of PAF-AH. Results PAF-AH mRNA levels were increased upon exposure to LPS or PAF in a dose-dependent manner. LPS elicited a more potent and rapid increase in PAF-AH expression than the PAF-stimulated response. However, when administered concomitantly, PAF augmented the LPS-stimulated response. LPS-stimulated PAF-AH expression was susceptible to partial inhibition by a p38 MAPK inhibitor and PAF receptor antagonists. PAF-induced up-regulation of PAF-AH levels was solely mediated via the PAF receptor and was p38 MAPK-independent. Conclusion The proinflammatory mediators, LPS and PAF, increased levels of PAF-AH mRNA via distinct signaling pathways. PMID:21432021

  18. Distinct pathways of insulin-regulated versus diabetes-regulated gene expression: an in vivo analysis in MIRKO mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yechoor, Vijay K; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Ueki, Kohjiro; Laustsen, Palle G; Saccone, Robert; Rauniyar, Ravi; Kahn, C Ronald

    2004-11-23

    Diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disorder accompanied by alterations in cellular physiology, metabolism, and gene expression. These alterations can be primary (due to loss of direct insulin action) or secondary (due to the metabolic perturbations associated with the disease). To dissect and quantitate these two separate effects, we compared the skeletal muscle gene-expression profiles of muscle insulin receptor knockout (MIRKO) mice and their Lox controls in the basal, streptozotocin-induced diabetic, and insulin-treated diabetic states. Pure deficiency of insulin action as present in the MIRKO mouse results in regulation of 130 genes, with down-regulation of NSF (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein) and VAMP-2 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 2), stearoyl CoA desaturase 1, and cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase 4B, as well as up-regulation of some signaling-related genes, such as Akt2, and the fatty-acid transporter CD36. In diabetes, additional transcriptional mechanisms are activated, resulting in alterations in expression of approximately 500 genes, including a highly coordinated down-regulation of genes of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain and one of the mammalian homologues of the histone deacetylase Sir2, which has been implicated in the link between nutrition and longevity. These distinct pathways of direct and indirect regulation of gene expression provide insights into the complex mechanisms of transcriptional control in diabetes and areas of potential therapeutic targeting.

  19. Genomic and phenotypic characterization of myxoma virus from Great Britain reveals multiple evolutionary pathways distinct from those in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Kerr

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The co-evolution of myxoma virus (MYXV and the European rabbit occurred independently in Australia and Europe from different progenitor viruses. Although this is the canonical study of the evolution of virulence, whether the genomic and phenotypic outcomes of MYXV evolution in Europe mirror those observed in Australia is unknown. We addressed this question using viruses isolated in the United Kingdom early in the MYXV epizootic (1954-1955 and between 2008-2013. The later UK viruses fell into three distinct lineages indicative of a long period of separation and independent evolution. Although rates of evolutionary change were almost identical to those previously described for MYXV in Australia and strongly clock-like, genome evolution in the UK and Australia showed little convergence. The phenotypes of eight UK viruses from three lineages were characterized in laboratory rabbits and compared to the progenitor (release Lausanne strain. Inferred virulence ranged from highly virulent (grade 1 to highly attenuated (grade 5. Two broad disease types were seen: cutaneous nodular myxomatosis characterized by multiple raised secondary cutaneous lesions, or an amyxomatous phenotype with few or no secondary lesions. A novel clinical outcome was acute death with pulmonary oedema and haemorrhage, often associated with bacteria in many tissues but an absence of inflammatory cells. Notably, reading frame disruptions in genes defined as essential for virulence in the progenitor Lausanne strain were compatible with the acquisition of high virulence. Combined, these data support a model of ongoing host-pathogen co-evolution in which multiple genetic pathways can produce successful outcomes in the field that involve both different virulence grades and disease phenotypes, with alterations in tissue tropism and disease mechanisms.

  20. Targeting of apoptotic pathways by SMAC or BH3 mimetics distinctly sensitizes paclitaxel-resistant triple negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayotopoulou, Effrosini G; Müller, Anna-Katharina; Börries, Melanie; Busch, Hauke; Hu, Guohong; Lev, Sima

    2017-07-11

    Standard chemotherapy is the only systemic treatment for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), and despite the good initial response, resistance remains a major therapeutic obstacle. Here, we employed a High-Throughput Screen to identify targeted therapies that overcome chemoresistance in TNBC. We applied short-term paclitaxel treatment and screened 320 small-molecule inhibitors of known targets to identify drugs that preferentially and efficiently target paclitaxel-treated TNBC cells. Among these compounds the SMAC mimetics (BV6, Birinapant) and BH3-mimetics (ABT-737/263) were recognized as potent targeted therapy for multiple paclitaxel-residual TNBC cell lines. However, acquired paclitaxel resistance through repeated paclitaxel pulses result in desensitization to BV6, but not to ABT-263, suggesting that short- and long-term paclitaxel resistance are mediated by distinct mechanisms. Gene expression profiling of paclitaxel-residual, -resistant and naïve MDA-MB-231 cells demonstrated that paclitaxel-residual, as opposed to -resistant cells, were characterized by an apoptotic signature, with downregulation of anti-apoptotic genes (BCL2, BIRC5), induction of apoptosis inducers (IL24, PDCD4), and enrichment of TNFα/NF-κB pathway, including upregulation of TNFSF15, coupled with cell-cycle arrest. BIRC5 and FOXM1 downregulation and IL24 induction was also evident in breast cancer patient datasets following taxane treatment. Exposure of naïve or paclitaxel-resistant cells to supernatants of paclitaxel-residual cells sensitized them to BV6, and treatment with TNFα enhanced BV6 potency, suggesting that sensitization to BV6 is mediated, at least partially, by secreted factor(s). Our results suggest that administration of SMAC or BH3 mimetics following short-term paclitaxel treatment could be an effective therapeutic strategy for TNBC, while only BH3-mimetics could effectively overcome long-term paclitaxel resistance.

  1. High nitrogen fertilization and stem leaning have overlapping effects on wood formation in poplar but invoke largely distinct molecular pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitre, Frederic E; Lafarguette, Florian; Boyle, Brian; Pavy, Nathalie; Caron, Sébastien; Dallaire, Nancy; Poulin, Pier-Luc; Ouellet, Mario; Morency, Marie-Josée; Wiebe, Nicholas; Ly Lim, Emilia; Urbain, Aurélie; Mouille, Gregory; Cooke, Janice E K; Mackay, John J

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies indicated that high nitrogen fertilization may impact secondary xylem development and alter fibre anatomy and composition. The resulting wood shares some resemblance with tension wood, which has much thicker cell walls than normal wood due to the deposition of an additional layer known as the G-layer. This report compares the short-term effects of high nitrogen fertilization and tree leaning to induce tension wood, either alone or in combination, upon wood formation in young trees of Populus trichocarpa (Torr. & Gray) × P. deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh. Fibre anatomy, chemical composition and transcript profiles were examined in newly formed secondary xylem. Each of the treatments resulted in thicker cell walls relative to the controls. High nitrogen and tree leaning had overlapping effects on chemical composition based on Fourier transform infrared analysis, specifically indicating that secondary cell wall composition was shifted in favour of cellulose and hemicelluloses relative to lignin content. In contrast, the high-nitrogen trees had shorter fibres, whilst the leaning trees had longer fibres that the controls. Microarray transcript profiling carried out after 28 days of treatment identified 180 transcripts that accumulated differentially in one or more treatments. Only 10% of differentially expressed transcripts were affected in all treatments relative to the controls. Several of the affected transcripts were related to carbohydrate metabolism, secondary cell wall formation, nitrogen metabolism and osmotic stress. RT-qPCR analyses at 1, 7 and 28 days showed that several transcripts followed very different accumulation profiles in terms of rate and level of accumulation, depending on the treatment. Our findings suggest that high nitrogen fertilization and tension wood induction elicit largely distinct and molecular pathways with partial overlap. When combined, the two types of environmental cue yielded additive effects.

  2. Activation of ADAM 12 protease by copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loechel, F; Wewer, Ulla M.

    2001-01-01

    Conversion of latent proteases to the active form occurs by various mechanisms characteristic for different protease families. Here we report that the disintegrin metalloprotease ADAM 12-S is activated by Cu(II). Copper activation is distinct from the cysteine switch component of latency: elimina......Conversion of latent proteases to the active form occurs by various mechanisms characteristic for different protease families. Here we report that the disintegrin metalloprotease ADAM 12-S is activated by Cu(II). Copper activation is distinct from the cysteine switch component of latency......: elimination of the ADAM 12 cysteine switch by a point mutation in the propeptide had no effect on copper activation, whereas mutation of an unpaired cysteine residue in the catalytic domain resulted in a mutant form of ADAM 12-S that was insensitive to copper. This suggests a multi-step activation mechanism...... for ADAM 12 involving both furin cleavage and copper binding....

  3. LPA, HGF, and EGF utilize distinct combinations of signaling pathways to promote migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, Susan MW; Knifley, Teresa; Chen, Min; O’Connor, Kathleen L

    2013-01-01

    Various pathways impinge on the actin-myosin pathway to facilitate cell migration and invasion including members of the Rho family of small GTPases and MAPK. However, the signaling components that are considered important for these processes vary substantially within the literature with certain pathways being favored. These distinctions in signaling pathways utilized are often attributed to differences in cell type or physiological conditions; however, these attributes have not been systematically assessed. To address this question, we analyzed the migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cell line in response to various stimuli including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) and determined the involvement of select signaling pathways that impact myosin light chain phosphorylation. LPA, a potent stimulator of the Rho-ROCK pathway, surprisingly did not require the Rho-ROCK pathway to stimulate migration but instead utilized Rac and MAPK. In contrast, LPA-stimulated invasion required Rho, Rac, and MAPK. Of these three major pathways, EGF-stimulated MDA-MB-231 migration and invasion required Rho; however, Rac was essential only for invasion and MAPK was dispensable for migration. HGF signaling, interestingly, utilized the same pathways for migration and invasion, requiring Rho but not Rac signaling. Notably, the dependency of HGF-stimulated migration and invasion as well as EGF-stimulated invasion on MAPK was subject to the inhibitors used. As expected, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), a convergence point for MAPK and Rho family GTPase signaling, was required for all six conditions. These observations suggest that, while multiple signaling pathways contribute to cancer cell motility, not all pathways operate under all conditions. Thus, our study highlights the plasticity of cancer cells to adapt to multiple migratory cues

  4. The Role of Proteases in Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity: Putting Together Small Pieces of a Complex Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Ivan L; Caldeira, Margarida V; Curcio, Michele; Duarte, Carlos B

    2016-02-01

    Long-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus is thought to underlie the formation of certain forms of memory, including spatial memory. The early phase of long-term synaptic potentiation and synaptic depression depends on post-translational modifications of synaptic proteins, while protein synthesis is also required for the late-phase of both forms of synaptic plasticity (L-LTP and L-LTD). Numerous pieces of evidence show a role for different types of proteases in synaptic plasticity, further increasing the diversity of mechanisms involved in the regulation of the intracellular and extracellular protein content. The cleavage of extracellular proteins is coupled to changes in postsynaptic intracellular mechanisms, and additional alterations in this compartment result from the protease-mediated targeting of intracellular proteins. Both mechanisms contribute to initiate signaling cascades that drive downstream pathways coupled to synaptic plasticity. In this review we summarize the evidence pointing to a role for extracellular and intracellular proteases, with distinct specificities, in synaptic plasticity. Where in the cells the proteases are located, and how they are regulated is also discussed. The combined actions of proteases and translation mechanisms contribute to a tight control of the synaptic proteome relevant for long-term synaptic potentiation and synaptic depression in the hippocampus. Additional studies are required to elucidate the mechanisms whereby these changes in the synaptic proteome are related with plasticity phenomena.

  5. Proteases and protease inhibitors in cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noorden, C. J.

    1998-01-01

    The second conference on 'Proteases and protease inhibitors in cancer' was organized by the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and Acta Pathologica Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS). To understand the role of proteinases and to develop relevant synthetic inhibitors to

  6. HIV protease inhibitor resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, Annemarie M.J.; Fun, Axel; Nijhuis, Monique

    2017-01-01

    HIV protease is pivotal in the viral replication cycle and directs the formation of mature infectious virus particles. The development of highly specific HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), based on thorough understanding of the structure of HIV protease and its substrate, serves as a prime example of

  7. Emerging principles in protease-based drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drag, Marcin; Salvesen, Guy S

    2010-09-01

    Proteases have an important role in many signalling pathways, and represent potential drug targets for diseases ranging from cardiovascular disorders to cancer, as well as for combating many parasites and viruses. Although inhibitors of well-established protease targets such as angiotensin-converting enzyme and HIV protease have shown substantial therapeutic success, developing drugs for new protease targets has proved challenging in recent years. This in part could be due to issues such as the difficulty of achieving selectivity when targeting protease active sites. This Perspective discusses the general principles in protease-based drug discovery, highlighting the lessons learned and the emerging strategies, such as targeting allosteric sites, which could help harness the therapeutic potential of new protease targets.

  8. A Multifunctional Protease Inhibitor To Regulate Endolysosomal Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Proteases constitute a major class of drug targets. Endosomal compartments harbor several protease families whose attenuation may be beneficial to a number of biological processes, including inflammation, cancer metastasis, antigen presentation, and parasite clearance. As a step toward the goal of generalized but targeted protease inhibition in the endocytic pathway, we describe here the synthesis, characterization, and cellular application of a novel multifunctional protease inhibitor. We show that pepstatin A, a potent but virtually insoluble inhibitor of cathepsins D and E, can be conjugated to a single site on cystatin C, a potent inhibitor of the papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCP) and of asparagine endopeptidease (AEP), to create a highly soluble compound capable of suppressing the activity of all 3 principal protease families found in endosomes and lysosomes. We demonstrate that this cystatin–pepstatin inhibitor (CPI) can be taken up by cells to modulate protease activity and affect biological responses. PMID:21910425

  9. Experimentally-derived fibroblast gene signatures identify molecular pathways associated with distinct subsets of systemic sclerosis patients in three independent cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Johnson

    Full Text Available Genome-wide expression profiling in systemic sclerosis (SSc has identified four 'intrinsic' subsets of disease (fibroproliferative, inflammatory, limited, and normal-like, each of which shows deregulation of distinct signaling pathways; however, the full set of pathways contributing to this differential gene expression has not been fully elucidated. Here we examine experimentally derived gene expression signatures in dermal fibroblasts for thirteen different signaling pathways implicated in SSc pathogenesis. These data show distinct and overlapping sets of genes induced by each pathway, allowing for a better understanding of the molecular relationship between profibrotic and immune signaling networks. Pathway-specific gene signatures were analyzed across a compendium of microarray datasets consisting of skin biopsies from three independent cohorts representing 80 SSc patients, 4 morphea, and 26 controls. IFNα signaling showed a strong association with early disease, while TGFβ signaling spanned the fibroproliferative and inflammatory subsets, was associated with worse MRSS, and was higher in lesional than non-lesional skin. The fibroproliferative subset was most strongly associated with PDGF signaling, while the inflammatory subset demonstrated strong activation of innate immune pathways including TLR signaling upstream of NF-κB. The limited and normal-like subsets did not show associations with fibrotic and inflammatory mediators such as TGFβ and TNFα. The normal-like subset showed high expression of genes associated with lipid signaling, which was absent in the inflammatory and limited subsets. Together, these data suggest a model by which IFNα is involved in early disease pathology, and disease severity is associated with active TGFβ signaling.

  10. A Pathway Switch Directs BAFF Signaling to Distinct NFκB Transcription Factors in Maturing and Proliferating B Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan V. Almaden; Rachel Tsui; Yi C. Liu; Harry Birnbaum; Maxim N. Shokhirev; Kim A. Ngo; Jeremy C. Davis-Turak; Dennis Otero; Soumen Basak; Robert C. Rickert; Alexander Hoffmann

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY BAFF, an activator of the noncanonical NF?B pathway, provides critical survival signals during B cell maturation and contributes to B cell proliferation. We found that the NF?B family member RelB is required ex vivo for B cell maturation, but cRel is required for proliferation. Combined molecular network modeling and experimentation revealed Nfkb2 p100 as a pathway switch; at moderate p100 synthesis rates in maturing B cells, BAFF fully utilizes p100 to generate the RelB:p52 dimer, wh...

  11. The Striatal Balancing Act in Drug Addiction: Distinct Roles of Direct and Indirect Pathway Medium Spiny Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Kay eLobo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The striatum plays a key role in mediating the acute and chronic effects of addictive drugs, with drugs of abuse causing long-lasting molecular and cellular alterations in both dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens (ventral striatum. Despite the wealth of research on the biological actions of abused drugs in striatum, until recently, the distinct roles of the striatum’s two major subtypes of medium spiny neuron (MSN in drug addiction remained elusive. Recent advances in cell-type specific technologies, including fluorescent reporter mice, transgenic or knockout mice, and viral-mediated gene transfer, have advanced the field toward a more comprehensive understanding of the two MSN subtypes in the long-term actions of drugs of abuse. Here we review progress in defining the distinct molecular and functional contributions of the two MSN subtypes in mediating addiction.

  12. Localisation of a multicatalytic protease complex in Trypanosoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recently, a multicatalytic protease complex, the proteasome, has also become of interest because of its potential involvement in cell-cycle development. The proteasome is the central protease of the non lysosomal ubiquitin dependent pathway of protein degradation. Here we report the subcellular localization of 20S ...

  13. Gene expression profile of adult human olfactory bulb and embryonic neural stem cell suggests distinct signaling pathways and epigenetic control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany E S Marei

    Full Text Available Global gene expression profiling was performed using RNA from human embryonic neural stem cells (hENSC, and adult human olfactory bulb-derived neural stem cells (OBNSCs, to define a gene expression pattern and signaling pathways that are specific for each cell lineage. We have demonstrated large differences in the gene expression profile of human embryonic NSC, and adult human OBNSCs, but less variability between parallel cultures. Transcripts of genes involved in neural tube development and patterning (ALDH1A2, FOXA2, progenitor marker genes (LMX1a, ALDH1A1, SOX10, proliferation of neural progenitors (WNT1 and WNT3a, neuroplastin (NPTN, POU3F1 (OCT6, neuroligin (NLGN4X, MEIS2, and NPAS1 were up-regulated in both cell populations. By Gene Ontology, 325 out of 3875 investigated gene sets were scientifically different. 41 out of the 307 investigated Cellular Component (CC categories, 45 out of the 620 investigated Molecular Function (MF categories, and 239 out of the 2948 investigated Biological Process (BP categories were significant. KEGG Pathway Class Comparison had revealed that 75 out of 171 investigated gene sets passed the 0.005 significance threshold. Levels of gene expression were explored in three signaling pathways, Notch, Wnt, and mTOR that are known to be involved in NS cell fates determination. The transcriptional signature also deciphers the role of genes involved in epigenetic modifications. SWI/SNF DNA chromatin remodeling complex family, including SMARCC1 and SMARCE1, were found specifically up-regulated in our OBNSC but not in hENSC. Differences in gene expression profile of transcripts controlling epigenetic modifications, and signaling pathways might indicate differences in the therapeutic potential of our examined two cell populations in relation to in cell survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation following engraftments in different CNS insults.

  14. p53 and ATF4 mediate distinct and additive pathways to skeletal muscle atrophy during limb immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Daniel K.; Ebert, Scott M.; Bongers, Kale S.; Dyle, Michael C.; Bullard, Steven A.; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Kunkel, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization causes skeletal muscle atrophy via complex signaling pathways that are not well understood. To better understand these pathways, we investigated the roles of p53 and ATF4, two transcription factors that mediate adaptations to a variety of cellular stresses. Using mouse models, we demonstrate that 3 days of muscle immobilization induces muscle atrophy and increases expression of p53 and ATF4. Furthermore, muscle fibers lacking p53 or ATF4 are partially resistant to immobilization-induced muscle atrophy, and forced expression of p53 or ATF4 induces muscle fiber atrophy in the absence of immobilization. Importantly, however, p53 and ATF4 do not require each other to promote atrophy, and coexpression of p53 and ATF4 induces more atrophy than either transcription factor alone. Moreover, muscle fibers lacking both p53 and ATF4 are more resistant to immobilization-induced atrophy than fibers lacking only p53 or ATF4. Interestingly, the independent and additive nature of the p53 and ATF4 pathways allows for combinatorial control of at least one downstream effector, p21. Using genome-wide mRNA expression arrays, we identified p21 mRNA as a skeletal muscle transcript that is highly induced in immobilized muscle via the combined actions of p53 and ATF4. Additionally, in mouse muscle, p21 induces atrophy in a manner that does not require immobilization, p53 or ATF4, and p21 is required for atrophy induced by immobilization, p53, and ATF4. Collectively, these results identify p53 and ATF4 as essential and complementary mediators of immobilization-induced muscle atrophy and discover p21 as a critical downstream effector of the p53 and ATF4 pathways. PMID:24895282

  15. Distinct development of peripheral trigeminal pathways in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Hardman, Craig D; Giere, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The extant monotremes (platypus and echidnas) are believed to all be capable of electroreception in the trigeminal pathways, although they differ significantly in the number and distribution of electroreceptors. It has been argued by some authors that electroreception was first developed in an aquatic environment and that echidnas are descended from a platypus-like ancestor that invaded an available terrestrial habitat. If this were the case, one would expect the developmental trajectories of the trigeminal pathways to be similar in the early stages of platypus and short-beaked echidna development, with structural divergence occurring later. We examined the development of the peripheral trigeminal pathway from snout skin to trigeminal ganglion in sectioned material in the Hill and Hubrecht collections to test for similarities and differences between the two during the development from egg to adulthood. Each monotreme showed a characteristic and different pattern of distribution of developing epidermal sensory gland specializations (electroreceptor primordia) from the time of hatching. The cross-sectional areas of the trigeminal divisions and the volume of the trigeminal ganglion itself were also very different between the two species at embryonic ages, and remained consistently different throughout post-hatching development. Our findings indicate that the trigeminal pathways in the short-beaked echidna and the platypus follow very different developmental trajectories from the earliest ages. These findings are more consistent with the notion that the platypus and echidna have both diverged from an ancestor with rudimentary electroreception and/or trigeminal specialization, rather than the contention that the echidna is derived from a platypus-like ancestor. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Distinct polymer architecture mediates switching of complement activation pathways at the nanosphere-serum interface: implications for stealth nanoparticle engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Islam; Al-Hanbali, Othman; Hunter, A Christy; Rutt, Kenneth J; Andresen, Thomas L; Moghimi, S Moein

    2010-11-23

    Nanoparticles with surface projected polyethyleneoxide (PEO) chains in "mushroom-brush" and "brush" configurations display stealth properties in systemic circulation and have numerous applications in site-specific targeting for controlled drug delivery and release as well as diagnostic imaging. We report on the "structure-activity" relationship pertaining to surface-immobilized PEO of various configurations on model nanoparticles, and the initiation of complement cascade, which is the most ancient component of innate human immunity, and its activation may induce clinically significant adverse reactions in some individuals. Conformational states of surface-projected PEO chains, arising from the block copolymer poloxamine 908 adsorption, on polystyrene nanoparticles trigger complement activation differently. Alteration of copolymer architecture on nanospheres from mushroom to brush configuration not only switches complement activation from C1q-dependent classical to lectin pathway but also reduces the level of generated complement activation products C4d, Bb, C5a, and SC5b-9. Also, changes in adsorbed polymer configuration trigger alternative pathway activation differently and through different initiators. Notably, the role for properdin-mediated activation of alternative pathway was only restricted to particles displaying PEO chains in a transition mushroom-brush configuration. Since nanoparticle-mediated complement activation is of clinical concern, our findings provide a rational basis for improved surface engineering and design of immunologically safer stealth and targetable nanosystems with polymers for use in clinical medicine.

  17. Activated factor X signaling via protease-activated receptor 2 suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokine production from LPS-stimulated myeloid cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, Eimear M

    2013-07-19

    Vitamin K-dependent proteases generated in response to vascular injury and infection enable fibrin clot formation, but also trigger distinct immuno-regulatory signaling pathways on myeloid cells. Factor Xa, a protease crucial for blood coagulation, also induces protease-activated receptor-dependent cell signaling. Factor Xa can bind both monocytes and macrophages, but whether factor Xa-dependent signaling stimulates or suppresses myeloid cell cytokine production in response to Toll-like receptor activation is not known. In this study, exposure to factor Xa significantly impaired pro-inflammatory cytokine production from lipopolysaccharide-treated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, THP-1 monocytic cells and murine macrophages. Furthermore, factor Xa inhibited nuclear factor-kappa B activation in THP-1 reporter cells, requiring phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase activity for its anti-inflammatory effect. Active-site blockade, γ-carboxyglutamic acid domain truncation and a peptide mimic of the factor Xa inter-epidermal growth factor-like region prevented factor Xa inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced tumour necrosis factor-α release. In addition, factor Xa anti-inflammatory activity was markedly attenuated by the presence of an antagonist of protease-activated receptor 2, but not protease-activated receptor 1. The key role of protease-activated receptor 2 in eliciting factor Xa-dependent anti-inflammatory signaling on macrophages was further underscored by the inability of factor Xa to mediate inhibition of tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 release from murine bone marrow-derived protease-activated receptor 2-deficient macrophages. We also show for the first time that, in addition to protease-activated receptor 2, factor Xa requires a receptor-associated protein-sensitive low-density lipoprotein receptor to inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine production. Collectively, this study supports a novel function for factor Xa as an endogenous, receptor

  18. The melanomas: a synthesis of epidemiological, clinical, histopathological, genetic, and biological aspects, supporting distinct subtypes, causal pathways, and cells of origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, David C.; Pavan, William J; Bastian, Boris C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Converging lines of evidence from varied scientific disciplines suggest that cutaneous melanomas comprise biologically distinct subtypes that arise through multiple causal pathways. Understanding the respective relationships of each subtype with etiologic factors such as UV radiation and constitutional factors is the first necessary step toward developing refined prevention strategies for the specific forms of melanoma. Furthermore, classifying this disease precisely into biologically distinct subtypes is the key to developing mechanism- based treatments, as highlighted by recent discoveries. In this review, we outline the historical developments that underpin our understanding of melanoma heterogeneity, and we do this from the perspectives of clinical presentation, histopathology, epidemiology, molecular genetics, and developmental biology. We integrate the evidence from these separate trajectories to catalog the emerging major categories of melanomas and conclude with important unanswered questions relating to the development of melanoma and its cells of origin. PMID:21707960

  19. Distinct energetics and closing pathways for DNA polymerase β with 8-oxoG template and different incoming nucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yanli

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG is a common oxidative lesion frequently encountered by DNA polymerases such as the repair enzyme DNA polymerase β (pol β. To interpret in atomic and energetic detail how pol β processes 8-oxoG, we apply transition path sampling to delineate closing pathways of pol β 8-oxoG complexes with dCTP and dATP incoming nucleotides and compare the results to those of the nonlesioned G:dCTP and G:dATPanalogues. Results Our analyses show that the closing pathways of the 8-oxoG complexes are different from one another and from the nonlesioned analogues in terms of the individual transition states along each pathway, associated energies, and the stability of each pathway's closed state relative to the corresponding open state. In particular, the closed-to-open state stability difference in each system establishes a hierarchy of stability (from high to low as G:C > 8-oxoG:C > 8-oxoG:A > G:A, corresponding to -3, -2, 2, 9 kBT, respectively. This hierarchy of closed state stability parallels the experimentally observed processing efficiencies for the four pairs. Network models based on the calculated rate constants in each pathway indicate that the closed species are more populated than the open species for 8-oxoG:dCTP, whereas the opposite is true for 8-oxoG:dATP. Conclusion These results suggest that the lower insertion efficiency (larger Km for dATP compared to dCTP opposite 8-oxoG is caused by a less stable closed-form of pol β, destabilized by unfavorable interactions between Tyr271 and the mispair. This stability of the closed vs. open form can also explain the higher insertion efficiency for 8-oxoG:dATP compared to the nonlesioned G:dATP pair, which also has a higher overall conformational barrier. Our study offers atomic details of the complexes at different states, in addition to helping interpret the different insertion efficiencies of dATP and dCTP opposite 8-oxoG and G.

  20. Distinct and atypical intrinsic and extrinsic cell death pathways between photoreceptor cell types upon specific ablation of Ranbp2 in cone photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-In Cho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-autonomous cell-death is a cardinal feature of the disintegration of neural networks in neurodegenerative diseases, but the molecular bases of this process are poorly understood. The neural retina comprises a mosaic of rod and cone photoreceptors. Cone and rod photoreceptors degenerate upon rod-specific expression of heterogeneous mutations in functionally distinct genes, whereas cone-specific mutations are thought to cause only cone demise. Here we show that conditional ablation in cone photoreceptors of Ran-binding protein-2 (Ranbp2, a cell context-dependent pleiotropic protein linked to neuroprotection, familial necrotic encephalopathies, acute transverse myelitis and tumor-suppression, promotes early electrophysiological deficits, subcellular erosive destruction and non-apoptotic death of cones, whereas rod photoreceptors undergo cone-dependent non-autonomous apoptosis. Cone-specific Ranbp2 ablation causes the temporal activation of a cone-intrinsic molecular cascade highlighted by the early activation of metalloproteinase 11/stromelysin-3 and up-regulation of Crx and CoREST, followed by the down-modulation of cone-specific phototransduction genes, transient up-regulation of regulatory/survival genes and activation of caspase-7 without apoptosis. Conversely, PARP1+ -apoptotic rods develop upon sequential activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 and loss of membrane permeability. Rod photoreceptor demise ceases upon cone degeneration. These findings reveal novel roles of Ranbp2 in the modulation of intrinsic and extrinsic cell death mechanisms and pathways. They also unveil a novel spatiotemporal paradigm of progression of neurodegeneration upon cell-specific genetic damage whereby a cone to rod non-autonomous death pathway with intrinsically distinct cell-type death manifestations is triggered by cell-specific loss of Ranbp2. Finally, this study casts new light onto cell-death mechanisms that may be shared by human dystrophies with distinct

  1. Distinct UV-B and UV-A/blue light signal transduction pathways induce chalcone synthase gene expression in Arabidopsis cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, J.M.; Jenkins, G.I.

    1996-01-01

    UV and blue light control the expression of flavonoid biosynthesis genes in a range of higher plants. To investigate the signal transduction processes involved in the induction of chalcone synthase (CHS) gene expression by UV-B and UV-A/blue light, we examined the, effects of specific agonists and inhibitors of known signaling components in mammalian systems in a photomixotrophic Arabidopsis cell suspension culture. CHS expression is induced specifically by these wavelengths in the cell culture, in a manner similar to that in mature Arabidopsis leaf tissue. Both the UV-B and UV-A/blue phototransduction processes involve calcium, although the elevation of cytosolic calcium is insufficient on its own to stimulate CHS expression. The UV-A/blue light induction of CHS expression does not appear to involve calmodulin, whereas the UV-B response does; this difference indicates that the signal transduction pathways are, at least in part, distinct. We provide evidence that both pathways involve reversible protein phosphorylation and require protein synthesis. The UV-B and UV-A/blue light signaling pathways are therefore different from the phytochrome signal transduction pathway regulating CHS expression in other species

  2. Distinctive effects of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids in regulating neural stem cell fate are mediated via endocannabinoid signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyall, S C; Mandhair, H K; Fincham, R E A; Kerr, D M; Roche, M; Molina-Holgado, F

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests a complex interplay between the endocannabinoid system, omega-3 fatty acids and the immune system in the promotion of brain self-repair. However, it is unknown if all omega-3 fatty acids elicit similar effects on adult neurogenesis and if such effects are mediated or regulated by interactions with the endocannabinoid system. This study investigated the effects of DHA and EPA on neural stem cell (NSC) fate and the role of the endocannabinoid signalling pathways in these effects. EPA, but not DHA, significantly increased proliferation of NSCs compared to controls, an effect associated with enhanced levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) and p-p38 MAPK, effects attenuated by pre-treatment with CB1 (AM251) or CB2 (AM630) receptor antagonists. Furthermore, in NSCs derived from IL-1β deficient mice, EPA significantly decreased proliferation and p-p38 MAPK levels compared to controls, suggesting a key role for IL-1β signalling in the effects observed. Although DHA similarly increased 2-AG levels in wild-type NSCs, there was no concomitant increase in proliferation or p-p38 MAPK activity. In addition, in NSCs from IL-1β deficient mice, DHA significantly increased proliferation without effects on p-P38 MAPK, suggesting effects of DHA are mediated via alternative signalling pathways. These results provide crucial new insights into the divergent effects of EPA and DHA in regulating NSC proliferation and the pathways involved, and highlight the therapeutic potential of their interplay with endocannabinoid signalling in brain repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. In vitro resistance selection with doravirine (MK-1439), a novel nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor with distinct mutation development pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Meizhen; Wang, Deping; Grobler, Jay A; Hazuda, Daria J; Miller, Michael D; Lai, Ming-Tain

    2015-01-01

    Doravirine (DOR, formerly known as MK-1439) is a human immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1) nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) that is currently in phase 2b clinical trials. In vitro resistance selection of subtype B virus (MT4-green fluorescent protein [GFP] cells), as well as subtype A and C viruses (MT4-GFP/CCR5 cells) was conducted with DOR, rilpivirine (RPV), and efavirine (EFV) under low-multiplicity-of-infection conditions in a 96-well format. Resistance selection was performed with escalating concentrations of the NNRTIs ranging from the 95% effective concentration (1 × EC(95)) to 1,000 × EC(95) in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum. In the resistance selection of subtype B virus with DOR, a V106A mutant virus led to two mutation pathways, followed by the emergence separately of either F227L or L234I. In the resistance selection of subtype A and C viruses, similar mutation development pathways were detected, in which a V106A or V106M mutant was also the starting virus in the pathways. Mutations that are commonly associated with RPV and EFV in clinical settings were also identified in subtype B viruses such as the E138K and K103N mutants, respectively, in this in vitro resistance selection study. The susceptibility of subtype B mutant viruses selected by DOR, RPV, and EFV to NNRTIs was evaluated. Results suggest that mutant viruses selected by DOR are susceptible to RPV and EFV and mutants selected by RPV and EFV are susceptible to DOR. When the replication capacity of the V106A mutant was compared with that of the wild-type (WT) virus, the mutant virus was 4-fold less fit than the WT virus. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Transgenic Mouse Lines Subdivide External Segment of the Globus Pallidus (GPe) Neurons and Reveal Distinct GPe Output Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastro, Kevin J.; Bouchard, Rachel S.; Holt, Hiromi A. K.

    2014-01-01

    Cell-type diversity in the brain enables the assembly of complex neural circuits, whose organization and patterns of activity give rise to brain function. However, the identification of distinct neuronal populations within a given brain region is often complicated by a lack of objective criteria to distinguish one neuronal population from another. In the external segment of the globus pallidus (GPe), neuronal populations have been defined using molecular, anatomical, and electrophysiological criteria, but these classification schemes are often not generalizable across preparations and lack consistency even within the same preparation. Here, we present a novel use of existing transgenic mouse lines, Lim homeobox 6 (Lhx6)–Cre and parvalbumin (PV)–Cre, to define genetically distinct cell populations in the GPe that differ molecularly, anatomically, and electrophysiologically. Lhx6–GPe neurons, which do not express PV, are concentrated in the medial portion of the GPe. They have lower spontaneous firing rates, narrower dynamic ranges, and make stronger projections to the striatum and substantia nigra pars compacta compared with PV–GPe neurons. In contrast, PV–GPe neurons are more concentrated in the lateral portions of the GPe. They have narrower action potentials, deeper afterhyperpolarizations, and make stronger projections to the subthalamic nucleus and parafascicular nucleus of the thalamus. These electrophysiological and anatomical differences suggest that Lhx6–GPe and PV–GPe neurons participate in different circuits with the potential to contribute to different aspects of motor function and dysfunction in disease. PMID:24501350

  5. Intracellular alkaline proteases produced by thermoacidophiles: detection of protease heterogeneity by gelatin zymography and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocab, S.; Erdem, B. [Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    2002-08-01

    In this study 24 thermoacidophilic archeal and bacterial strains isolated from hot-springs and hot-soils were screened for their ability to produce intracellular alkaline proteases. The protease activities of the strains, based on azocasein hydrolysis, showed a variation from 0.6 to 5.1 U. The cell extracts of three most potent producers were further examined and it was found that their proteases exhibited maximum activity at 60-70{sup o}C and showed a pH optimum over a range of pH 7.0-8.5. Gelatin zymography revealed that two of the selected archeal strains produced multiple active SDS-resistant proteases. On the other hand, PCR amplification of alkaline serine protease gene sequences of total DNA from all isolates yielded four distinct amplification fragments of 650, 450, 400 and 300 bp, which might have been derived from different serine protease genes. (author)

  6. Redox environment is an intracellular factor to operate distinct pathways for aggregation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki eFurukawa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dominant mutations in Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1 cause a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS. Misfolding and aggregation of mutant SOD1 proteins are a pathological hallmark of SOD1-related fALS cases; however, the molecular mechanism of SOD1 aggregation remains controversial. Here, I have used E. coli as a model organism and shown multiple distinct pathways of SOD1 aggregation that are dependent upon its thiol-disulfide status. Overexpression of fALS-mutant SOD1s in the cytoplasm of E. coli BL21 and SHuffleTM, where redox environment is reducing and oxidizing, respectively, resulted in the formation of insoluble aggregates with notable differences; a disulfide bond of SOD1 was completely reduced in BL21 or abnormally formed between SOD1 molecules in SHuffleTM. Depending upon intracellular redox environment, therefore, mutant SOD1 is considered to misfold/aggregate through distinct pathways, which would be relevant in description of the pathological heterogeneity of SOD1-related fALS cases.

  7. Erythropoietin activates two distinct signaling pathways required for the initiation and the elongation of c-myc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.; Sytkowski, A. J.

    2001-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) stimulation of erythroid cells results in the activation of several kinases and a rapid induction of c-myc expression. Protein kinase C is necessary for Epo up-regulation of c-myc by promoting elongation at the 3'-end of exon 1. PKCepsilon mediates this signal. We now show that Epo triggers two signaling pathways to c-myc. Epo rapidly up-regulated Myc protein in BaF3-EpoR cells. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 blocked Myc up-regulation in a concentration-dependent manner but had no effect on the Epo-induced phosphorylation of ERK1 and ERK2. LY294002 also had no effect on Epo up-regulation of c-fos. MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 blocked both the c-myc and the c-fos responses to Epo. PD98059 and the PKC inhibitor H7 also blocked the phosphorylation of ERK1 and ERK2. PD98059 but not LY294002 inhibited Epo induction of ERK1 and ERK2 phosphorylation in normal erythroid cells. LY294002 blocked transcription of c-myc at exon 1. PD98059 had no effect on transcription from exon 1 but, rather, blocked Epo-induced c-myc elongation at the 3'-end of exon 1. These results identify two Epo signaling pathways to c-myc, one of which is PI3K-dependent operating on transcriptional initiation, whereas the other is mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent operating on elongation.

  8. Cysteine Protease Zymography: Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkesman, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine proteases play multiple roles in basically all aspects of physiology and development. In plants, they are involved in growth and development and in accumulation and mobilization of storage proteins. Furthermore, they are engaged in signalling pathways and in the response to biotic and abiotic stresses. In animals and also in humans, they are responsible for senescence and apoptosis, prohormone processing, and ECM remodelling. When analyzed by zymography, the enzyme must be renaturated after SDS-PAGE. SDS must be washed out and substituted by Triton X-100. Gels are then further incubated under ideal conditions for activity detection. Cysteine proteases require an acidic pH (5.0-6.0) and a reducing agent, usually DTT. When screening biological samples, there is generally no previous clue on what peptidase class will be present, neither optimal proteolysis conditions are known. Hence, it is necessary to assess several parameters, such as incubation time, pH, temperature, influence of ions or reducing agents, and finally evaluate the inhibition profile. For detection of cysteine peptidase activity, the use of specific inhibitors, such as E-64, can be used to prevent the development of cysteine peptidase activity bands and positively confirm its presence. Here four different protocols to assess cysteine protease activity from different sources are presented.

  9. Mutant Allele-Specific Uncoupling of PENETRATION3 Functions Reveals Engagement of the ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter in Distinct Tryptophan Metabolic Pathways1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xunli; Dittgen, Jan; Piślewska-Bednarek, Mariola; Molina, Antonio; Schneider, Bernd; Doubský, Jan; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PENETRATION (PEN) genes quantitatively contribute to the execution of different forms of plant immunity upon challenge with diverse leaf pathogens. PEN3 encodes a plasma membrane-resident pleiotropic drug resistance-type ATP-binding cassette transporter and is thought to act in a pathogen-inducible and PEN2 myrosinase-dependent metabolic pathway in extracellular defense. This metabolic pathway directs the intracellular biosynthesis and activation of tryptophan-derived indole glucosinolates for subsequent PEN3-mediated efflux across the plasma membrane at pathogen contact sites. However, PEN3 also functions in abiotic stress responses to cadmium and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA)-mediated auxin homeostasis in roots, raising the possibility that PEN3 exports multiple functionally unrelated substrates. Here, we describe the isolation of a pen3 allele, designated pen3-5, that encodes a dysfunctional protein that accumulates in planta like wild-type PEN3. The specific mutation in pen3-5 uncouples PEN3 functions in IBA-stimulated root growth modulation, callose deposition induced with a conserved peptide epitope of bacterial flagellin (flg22), and pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation from PEN3 activity in extracellular defense, indicating the engagement of multiple PEN3 substrates in different PEN3-dependent biological processes. We identified 4-O-β-d-glucosyl-indol-3-yl formamide (4OGlcI3F) as a pathogen-inducible, tryptophan-derived compound that overaccumulates in pen3 leaf tissue and has biosynthesis that is dependent on an intact PEN2 metabolic pathway. We propose that a precursor of 4OGlcI3F is the PEN3 substrate in extracellular pathogen defense. These precursors, the shared indole core present in IBA and 4OGlcI3F, and allele-specific uncoupling of a subset of PEN3 functions suggest that PEN3 transports distinct indole-type metabolites in distinct biological processes. PMID:26023163

  10. Two distinct mTORC2-dependent pathways converge on Rac1 to drive breast cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison Joly, Meghan; Williams, Michelle M; Hicks, Donna J; Jones, Bayley; Sanchez, Violeta; Young, Christian D; Sarbassov, Dos D; Muller, William J; Brantley-Sieders, Dana; Cook, Rebecca S

    2017-06-30

    The importance of the mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) signaling complex in tumor progression is becoming increasingly recognized. HER2-amplified breast cancers use Rictor/mTORC2 signaling to drive tumor formation, tumor cell survival and resistance to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted therapy. Cell motility, a key step in the metastatic process, can be activated by mTORC2 in luminal and triple negative breast cancer cell lines, but its role in promoting metastases from HER2-amplified breast cancers is not yet clear. Because Rictor is an obligate cofactor of mTORC2, we genetically engineered Rictor ablation or overexpression in mouse and human HER2-amplified breast cancer models for modulation of mTORC2 activity. Signaling through mTORC2-dependent pathways was also manipulated using pharmacological inhibitors of mTOR, Akt, and Rac. Signaling was assessed by western analysis and biochemical pull-down assays specific for Rac-GTP and for active Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Metastases were assessed from spontaneous tumors and from intravenously delivered tumor cells. Motility and invasion of cells was assessed using Matrigel-coated transwell assays. We found that Rictor ablation potently impaired, while Rictor overexpression increased, metastasis in spontaneous and intravenously seeded models of HER2-overexpressing breast cancers. Additionally, migration and invasion of HER2-amplified human breast cancer cells was diminished in the absence of Rictor, or upon pharmacological mTOR kinase inhibition. Active Rac1 was required for Rictor-dependent invasion and motility, which rescued invasion/motility in Rictor depleted cells. Rictor/mTORC2-dependent dampening of the endogenous Rac1 inhibitor RhoGDI2, a factor that correlated directly with increased overall survival in HER2-amplified breast cancer patients, promoted Rac1 activity and tumor cell invasion/migration. The mTORC2 substrate Akt did not affect RhoGDI2 dampening, but partially

  11. Calcium and SOL Protease Mediate Temperature Resetting of Circadian Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataroglu, Ozgur; Zhao, Xiaohu; Busza, Ania; Ling, Jinli; O’Neill, John S.; Emery, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Summary Circadian clocks integrate light and temperature input to remain synchronized with the day/night cycle. Although light input to the clock is well studied, the molecular mechanisms by which circadian clocks respond to temperature remain poorly understood. We found that temperature phase shifts Drosophila circadian clocks through degradation of the pacemaker protein TIM. This degradation is mechanistically distinct from photic CRY-dependent TIM degradation. Thermal TIM degradation is triggered by cytosolic calcium increase and CALMODULIN binding to TIM and is mediated by the atypical calpain protease SOL. This thermal input pathway and CRY-dependent light input thus converge on TIM, providing a molecular mechanism for the integration of circadian light and temperature inputs. Mammals use body temperature cycles to keep peripheral clocks synchronized with their brain pacemaker. Interestingly, downregulating the mammalian SOL homolog SOLH blocks thermal mPER2 degradation and phase shifts. Thus, we propose that circadian thermosensation in insects and mammals share common principles. PMID:26590423

  12. SYK Inhibition Modulates Distinct PI3K/AKT-dependent Survival Pathways and Cholesterol Biosynthesis in Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linfeng; Monti, Stefano; Juszczynski, Przemyslaw; Ouyang, Jing; Chapuy, Bjoern; Neuberg, Donna; Doench, John G.; Bogusz, Agata M.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Dogan, Ahmet; Witzig, Thomas E.; Kutok, Jeffery L.; Rodig, Scott J.; Golub, Todd; Shipp, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway components represent promising treatment targets in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and additional B-cell tumors. BCR signaling activates spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) and downstream pathways including PI3K/AKT and NF-κB. In previous studies, chemical SYK blockade selectively decreased BCR signaling and induced apoptosis of BCR-dependent DLBCLs. Herein, we characterize distinct SYK/PI3K-dependent survival pathways in DLBCLs with high or low baseline NF-κB activity including selective repression of the pro-apoptotic HRK protein in NF-κB-low tumors. We also define SYK/PI3K-dependent cholesterol biosynthesis as a feed-forward mechanism of maintaining the integrity of BCRs in lipid rafts in DLBCLs with low or high NF-κB. In addition, SYK amplification and PTEN deletion are identified as selective genetic alterations in primary “BCR”-type DLBCLs. PMID:23764004

  13. SYK inhibition modulates distinct PI3K/AKT- dependent survival pathways and cholesterol biosynthesis in diffuse large B cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linfeng; Monti, Stefano; Juszczynski, Przemyslaw; Ouyang, Jing; Chapuy, Bjoern; Neuberg, Donna; Doench, John G; Bogusz, Agata M; Habermann, Thomas M; Dogan, Ahmet; Witzig, Thomas E; Kutok, Jeffery L; Rodig, Scott J; Golub, Todd; Shipp, Margaret A

    2013-06-10

    B cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway components represent promising treatment targets in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and additional B cell tumors. BCR signaling activates spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) and downstream pathways including PI3K/AKT and NF-κB. In previous studies, chemical SYK blockade selectively decreased BCR signaling and induced apoptosis of BCR-dependent DLBCLs. Herein, we characterize distinct SYK/PI3K-dependent survival pathways in DLBCLs with high or low baseline NF-κB activity including selective repression of the pro-apoptotic HRK protein in NF-κB-low tumors. We also define SYK/PI3K-dependent cholesterol biosynthesis as a feed-forward mechanism of maintaining the integrity of BCRs in lipid rafts in DLBCLs with low or high NF-κB. In addition, SYK amplification and PTEN deletion are identified as selective genetic alterations in primary "BCR"-type DLBCLs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Joint ancestry and association test indicate two distinct pathogenic pathways involved in classical dengue fever and dengue shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marisa; Lert-itthiporn, Worachart; Cavadas, Bruno; Fernandes, Verónica; Chuansumrit, Ampaiwan; Anunciação, Orlando; Casademont, Isabelle; Koeth, Fanny; Penova, Marina; Tangnararatchakit, Kanchana; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Paul, Richard; Malasit, Prida; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Simon-Lorière, Etienne; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj

    2018-01-01

    Ethnic diversity has been long considered as one of the factors explaining why the severe forms of dengue are more prevalent in Southeast Asia than anywhere else. Here we take advantage of the admixed profile of Southeast Asians to perform coupled association-admixture analyses in Thai cohorts. For dengue shock syndrome (DSS), the significant haplotypes are located in genes coding for phospholipase C members (PLCB4 added to previously reported PLCE1), related to inflammation of blood vessels. For dengue fever (DF), we found evidence of significant association with CHST10, AHRR, PPP2R5E and GRIP1 genes, which participate in the xenobiotic metabolism signaling pathway. We conducted functional analyses for PPP2R5E, revealing by immunofluorescence imaging that the coded protein co-localizes with both DENV1 and DENV2 NS5 proteins. Interestingly, only DENV2-NS5 migrated to the nucleus, and a deletion of the predicted top-linking motif in NS5 abolished the nuclear transfer. These observations support the existence of differences between serotypes in their cellular dynamics, which may contribute to differential infection outcome risk. The contribution of the identified genes to the genetic risk render Southeast and Northeast Asian populations more susceptible to both phenotypes, while African populations are best protected against DSS and intermediately protected against DF, and Europeans the best protected against DF but the most susceptible against DSS. PMID:29447178

  15. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    with the proteases either encoded within the same polypeptide or on separate subunits. In contrast, substrate recognition by extracellular proteases is less selective and therefore these enzymes are generally expressed as zymogens to prevent premature proteolytic activity that would be detrimental to the cell......Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing...... signalling to short-circuit host cell processes. Common to both intra- and extracellular proteases is the tight control of their proteolytic activities. In general, substrate recognition by the intracellular proteases is highly selective which is, in part, attributed to the chaperone activity associated...

  16. Co-ordinate regulation of distinct host cell signalling pathways by multifunctional enteropathogenic Escherichia coli effector molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Brendan; Ellis, Sarah; Leard, Alan D; Warawa, Jonathan; Mellor, Harry; Jepson, Mark A

    2002-05-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of paediatric diarrhoea and a model for the family of attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens. A/E pathogens encode a type III secretion system to transfer effector proteins into host cells. The EPEC Tir effector protein acts as a receptor for the bacterial surface protein intimin and is involved in the formation of Cdc42-independent, actin-rich pedestal structures beneath the adhered bacteria. In this paper, we demonstrate that EPEC binding to HeLa cells also induces Tir-independent, cytoskeletal rearrangement evidenced by the early, transient formation of filopodia-like structures at sites of infection. Filopodia formation is dependent on expression of the EPEC Map effector molecule - a protein that targets mitochondria and induces their dysfunction. We show that Map-induced filopodia formation is independent of mitochondrial targeting and is abolished by cellular expression of the Cdc42 inhibitory WASP-CRIB domain, demonstrating that Map has at least two distinct functions in host cells. The transient nature of the filopodia is related to an ability of EPEC to downregulate Map-induced cell signalling that, like pedestal formation, was dependent on both Tir and intimin proteins. The ability of Tir to downregulate filopodia was impaired by disrupting a putative GTPase-activating protein (GAP) motif, suggesting that Tir may possess such a function, with its interaction with intimin triggering this activity. Furthermore, we also found that Map-induced cell signalling inhibits pedestal formation, revealing that the cellular effects of Tir and Map must be co-ordinately regulated during infection. Possible implications of the multifunctional nature of EPEC effector molecules in pathogenesis are discussed.

  17. Adaptive immunity alters distinct host feeding pathways during nematode induced inflammation, a novel mechanism in parasite expulsion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Worthington

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal infection is often associated with hypophagia and weight loss; however, the precise mechanisms governing these responses remain poorly defined. Furthermore, the possibility that alterations in feeding during infection may be beneficial to the host requires further study. We used the nematode Trichinella spiralis, which transiently inhabits the small intestine before migrating to skeletal muscle, as a biphasic model of infection to determine the cellular and molecular pathways controlling feeding during enteric and peripheral inflammation. Through the infection of genetically modified mice lacking cholecystokinin, Tumor necrosis factor α receptors and T and B-cells, we observed a biphasic hypophagic response to infection resulting from two separate immune-driven mechanisms. The enteroendocrine I-cell derived hormone cholecystokinin is an essential mediator of initial hypophagia and is induced by CD4+ T-cells during enteritis. In contrast, the second hypophagic response is extra-intestinal and due to the anorectic effects of TNFα during peripheral infection of the muscle. Moreover, via maintaining naive levels of the adipose secreted hormone leptin throughout infection we demonstrate a novel feedback loop in the immunoendocrine axis. Immune driven I-cell hyperplasia and resultant weight loss leads to a reduction in the inflammatory adipokine leptin, which in turn heightens protective immunity during infection. These results characterize specific immune mediated mechanisms which reduce feeding during intestinal or peripheral inflammation. Importantly, the molecular mediators of each phase are entirely separate. The data also introduce the first evidence that I-cell hyperplasia is an adaptively driven immune response that directly impinges on the outcome to infection.

  18. Distinct signalling pathways of murine histamine H1- and H4-receptors expressed at comparable levels in HEK293 cells.

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    Silke Beermann

    Full Text Available Histamine (HA is recognized by its target cells via four G-protein-coupled receptors, referred to as histamine H1-receptor (H1R, H2R, H3R, and H4R. Both H1R and H4R exert pro-inflammatory functions. However, their signal transduction pathways have never been analyzed in a directly comparable manner side by side. Moreover, the analysis of pharmacological properties of the murine orthologs, representing the main targets of pre-clinical research, is very important. Therefore, we engineered recombinant HEK293 cells expressing either mouse (mH1R or mH4R at similar levels and analyzed HA-induced signalling in these cells. HA induced intracellular calcium mobilization via both mH1R and mH4R, with the mH1R being much more effective. Whereas cAMP accumulation was potentiated via the mH1R, it was reduced via the mH4R. The regulation of both second messengers via the H4R, but not the H1R, was sensitive to pertussis toxin (PTX. The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs ERK 1/2 were massively activated downstream of both receptors and demonstrated a functional involvement in HA-induced EGR-1 gene expression. The p38 MAPK was moderately activated via both receptors as well, but was functionally involved in HA-induced EGR-1 gene expression only in H4R-expressing cells. Surprisingly, in this system p38 MAPK activity reduced the HA-induced gene expression. In summary, using this system which allows a direct comparison of mH1R- and mH4R-induced signalling, qualitative and quantitative differences on the levels of second messenger generation and also in terms of p38 MAPK function became evident.

  19. Mechanistically Distinct Pathways of Divergent Regulatory DNA Creation Contribute to Evolution of Human-Specific Genomic Regulatory Networks Driving Phenotypic Divergence of Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2016-09-19

    Thousands of candidate human-specific regulatory sequences (HSRS) have been identified, supporting the hypothesis that unique to human phenotypes result from human-specific alterations of genomic regulatory networks. Collectively, a compendium of multiple diverse families of HSRS that are functionally and structurally divergent from Great Apes could be defined as the backbone of human-specific genomic regulatory networks. Here, the conservation patterns analysis of 18,364 candidate HSRS was carried out requiring that 100% of bases must remap during the alignments of human, chimpanzee, and bonobo sequences. A total of 5,535 candidate HSRS were identified that are: (i) highly conserved in Great Apes; (ii) evolved by the exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA; (iii) defined by either the acceleration of mutation rates on the human lineage or the functional divergence from non-human primates. The exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA pathway seems mechanistically distinct from the evolution of regulatory DNA segments driven by the species-specific expansion of transposable elements. Genome-wide proximity placement analysis of HSRS revealed that a small fraction of topologically associating domains (TADs) contain more than half of HSRS from four distinct families. TADs that are enriched for HSRS and termed rapidly evolving in humans TADs (revTADs) comprise 0.8-10.3% of 3,127 TADs in the hESC genome. RevTADs manifest distinct correlation patterns between placements of human accelerated regions, human-specific transcription factor-binding sites, and recombination rates. There is a significant enrichment within revTAD boundaries of hESC-enhancers, primate-specific CTCF-binding sites, human-specific RNAPII-binding sites, hCONDELs, and H3K4me3 peaks with human-specific enrichment at TSS in prefrontal cortex neurons (P Homo sapiens is driven by the evolution of human-specific genomic regulatory networks via at least two mechanistically distinct pathways of

  20. Different gene-expression profiles for the poorly differentiated carcinoma and the highly differentiated papillary adenocarcinoma in mammary glands support distinct metabolic pathways

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    Barash Itamar

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deregulation of Stat5 in the mammary gland of transgenic mice causes tumorigenesis. Poorly differentiated carcinoma and highly differentiated papillary adenocarcinoma tumors evolve. To distinguish the genes and elucidate the cellular processes and metabolic pathways utilized to preserve these phenotypes, gene-expression profiles were analyzed. Methods Mammary tumors were excised from transgenic mice carrying a constitutively active variant of Stat5, or a Stat5 variant lacking s transactivation domain. These tumors displayed either the carcinoma or the papillary adenocarcinoma phenotypes. cRNAs, prepared from each tumor were hybridized to an Affymetrix GeneChip® Mouse Genome 430A 2.0 array. Gene-ontology analysis, hierarchical clustering and biological-pathway analysis were performed to distinct the two types of tumors. Histopathology and immunofluorescence staining complemented the comparison between the tumor phenotypes. Results The nucleus-cytoskeleton-plasma membrane axis is a major target for differential gene expression between phenotypes. In the carcinoma, stronger expression of genes coding for specific integrins, cytoskeletal proteins and calcium-binding proteins highlight cell-adhesion and motility features of the tumor cells. This is supported by the higher expression of genes involved in O-glycan synthesis, TGF-β, activin, their receptors and Smad3, as well as the Notch ligands and members of the γ-secretase complex that enable Notch nuclear localization. The Wnt pathway was also a target for differential gene expression. Higher expression of genes encoding the degradation complex of the canonical pathway and limited TCF expression in the papillary adenocarcinoma result in membranal accumulation of β-catenin, in contrast to its nuclear translocation in the carcinoma. Genes involved in cell-cycle arrest at G1 and response to DNA damage were more highly expressed in the papillary adenocarcinomas, as opposed to

  1. Different gene-expression profiles for the poorly differentiated carcinoma and the highly differentiated papillary adenocarcinoma in mammary glands support distinct metabolic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eilon, Tali; Barash, Itamar

    2008-01-01

    Deregulation of Stat5 in the mammary gland of transgenic mice causes tumorigenesis. Poorly differentiated carcinoma and highly differentiated papillary adenocarcinoma tumors evolve. To distinguish the genes and elucidate the cellular processes and metabolic pathways utilized to preserve these phenotypes, gene-expression profiles were analyzed. Mammary tumors were excised from transgenic mice carrying a constitutively active variant of Stat5, or a Stat5 variant lacking s transactivation domain. These tumors displayed either the carcinoma or the papillary adenocarcinoma phenotypes. cRNAs, prepared from each tumor were hybridized to an Affymetrix GeneChip ® Mouse Genome 430A 2.0 array. Gene-ontology analysis, hierarchical clustering and biological-pathway analysis were performed to distinct the two types of tumors. Histopathology and immunofluorescence staining complemented the comparison between the tumor phenotypes. The nucleus-cytoskeleton-plasma membrane axis is a major target for differential gene expression between phenotypes. In the carcinoma, stronger expression of genes coding for specific integrins, cytoskeletal proteins and calcium-binding proteins highlight cell-adhesion and motility features of the tumor cells. This is supported by the higher expression of genes involved in O-glycan synthesis, TGF-β, activin, their receptors and Smad3, as well as the Notch ligands and members of the γ-secretase complex that enable Notch nuclear localization. The Wnt pathway was also a target for differential gene expression. Higher expression of genes encoding the degradation complex of the canonical pathway and limited TCF expression in the papillary adenocarcinoma result in membranal accumulation of β-catenin, in contrast to its nuclear translocation in the carcinoma. Genes involved in cell-cycle arrest at G1 and response to DNA damage were more highly expressed in the papillary adenocarcinomas, as opposed to favored G2/M regulation in the carcinoma tumors. At least

  2. The Drosophila TRPP cation channel, PKD2 and Dmel/Ced-12 act in genetically distinct pathways during apoptotic cell clearance.

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    Emeline Van Goethem

    Full Text Available Apoptosis, a genetically programmed cell death, allows for homeostasis and tissue remodelling during development of all multi-cellular organisms. Phagocytes swiftly recognize, engulf and digest apoptotic cells. Yet, to date the molecular mechanisms underlying this phagocytic process are still poorly understood. To delineate the molecular mechanisms of apoptotic cell clearance in Drosophila, we have carried out a deficiency screen and have identified three overlapping phagocytosis-defective mutants, which all delete the fly homologue of the ced-12 gene, known as Dmel\\ced12. As anticipated, we have found that Dmel\\ced-12 is required for apoptotic cell clearance, as for its C. elegans and mammalian homologues, ced-12 and elmo, respectively. However, the loss of Dmel\\ced-12 did not solely account for the phenotypes of all three deficiencies, as zygotic mutations and germ line clones of Dmel\\ced-12 exhibited weaker phenotypes. Using a nearby genetically interacting deficiency, we have found that the polycystic kidney disease 2 gene, pkd2, which encodes a member of the TRPP channel family, is also required for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, thereby demonstrating a novel role for PKD2 in this process. We have also observed genetic interactions between pkd2, simu, drpr, rya-r44F, and retinophilin (rtp, also known as undertaker (uta, a gene encoding a MORN-repeat containing molecule, which we have recently found to be implicated in calcium homeostasis during phagocytosis. However, we have not found any genetic interaction between Dmel\\ced-12 and simu. Based on these genetic interactions and recent reports demonstrating a role for the mammalian pkd-2 gene product in ER calcium release during store-operated calcium entry, we propose that PKD2 functions in the DRPR/RTP pathway to regulate calcium homeostasis during this process. Similarly to its C. elegans homologue, Dmel\\Ced-12 appears to function in a genetically distinct pathway.

  3. The erbB3- and IGF-1 receptor-initiated signaling pathways exhibit distinct effects on lapatinib sensitivity against trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Hui; Yang, Xiao He; Edgerton, Susan M; Thor, Ann D; Wu, Xiaoying; He, Zhimin; Liu, Bolin

    2016-01-19

    Both erbB3 and IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) have been shown to play an important role in trastuzumab resistance. However, it remains unclear whether erbB3- and IGF-1R-initiated signaling pathways possess distinct effects on the sensitivity of lapatinib, a dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor against both EGFR and erbB2, in trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer. Here, we show that the trastuzumab-resistant SKBR3-pool2 and BT474-HR20 breast cancer sublines, as compared the parental SKBR3 and BT474 cells, respectively, exhibit refractoriness to lapatinib. Knockdown of erbB3 inhibited Akt in SKBR3-pool2 and BT474-HR20 cells, significantly increased lapatinib efficacy, and dramatically re-sensitized the cells to lapatinib-induced apoptosis. In contrast, specific knockdown of IGF-1R did not alter the cells' responsiveness to lapatinib. While the levels of phosphorylated Src (P-Src) were reduced upon IGF-1R downregulation, the P-Akt levels remained unchanged. Furthermore, a specific inhibitor of Akt, but not Src, significantly enhanced lapatinib-mediated anti-proliferative/anti-survival effects on SKBR3-pool2 and BT474-HR20 cells. These data indicate that erbB3 signaling is critical for both trastuzumab and lapatinib resistances mainly through the PI-3K/Akt pathway, whereas IGF-1R-initiated Src activation results in trastuzumab resistance without affecting lapatinib sensitivity. Our findings may facilitate the development of precision therapeutic regimens for erbB2-positive breast cancer patients who become resistant to erbB2-targeted therapy.

  4. Transcriptomic Analysis of Lung Tissue from Cigarette Smoke-Induced Emphysema Murine Models and Human Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Show Shared and Distinct Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jeong H; Morrow, Jarrett; Owen, Caroline A; Qiu, Weiliang; Glass, Kimberly; Lao, Taotao; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Perrella, Mark A; Silverman, Edwin K; Zhou, Xiaobo; Hersh, Craig P

    2017-07-01

    Although cigarette smoke (CS) is the primary risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the underlying molecular mechanisms for the significant variability in developing COPD in response to CS are incompletely understood. We performed lung gene expression profiling of two different wild-type murine strains (C57BL/6 and NZW/LacJ) and two genetic models with mutations in COPD genome-wide association study genes (HHIP and FAM13A) after 6 months of chronic CS exposure and compared the results to human COPD lung tissues. We identified gene expression patterns that correlate with severity of emphysema in murine and human lungs. Xenobiotic metabolism and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2-mediated oxidative stress response were commonly regulated molecular response patterns in C57BL/6, Hhip +/- , and Fam13a -/- murine strains exposed chronically to CS. The CS-resistant Fam13a -/- mouse and NZW/LacJ strain revealed gene expression response pattern differences. The Fam13a -/- strain diverged in gene expression compared with C57BL/6 control only after CS exposure. However, the NZW/LacJ strain had a unique baseline expression pattern, enriched for nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2-mediated oxidative stress response and xenobiotic metabolism, and converged to a gene expression pattern similar to the more susceptible wild-type C57BL/6 after CS exposure. These results suggest that distinct molecular pathways may account for resistance to emphysema. Surprisingly, there were few genes commonly modulated in mice and humans. Our study suggests that gene expression responses to CS may be largely species and model dependent, yet shared pathways could provide biologically significant insights underlying individual susceptibility to CS.

  5. Mass balance, bedload extraction, surface morphology, and Holocene stratigraphic architecture along distinct sediment transport pathways of the Brahmaputra River in Bengal Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sincavage, R.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Wilson, C.; Pickering, J.; Paola, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Brahmaputra River has followed three preferred pathways within the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta during the Holocene: the principal course along the modern Jamuna braidbelt and two subsidiary routes through the tectonically deforming Sylhet Basin. The Jamuna braidbelt follows a relatively straight and tectonically stable (subsidence rates generally Basin traverse an actively subsiding basin (typically 3-4 mm/yr, with rates as high as 7 mm/year near the adjacent Dauki foredeep). In spite of differential subsidence, the Brahmaputra has only episodically occupied Sylhet Basin for brief periods during most of the Holocene. We compare downstream rates of mass extraction via selective deposition along multiple sediment delivery pathways using quantitative grain size data from a network of over 400 closely-spaced (3-5 km) boreholes (up to 90 m deep). An exponential function to describe downstream fining was fitted to the data, with the exponent alpha taken to be the rate of downstream fining. Our data indicate 1.) the upper and lower reaches (~100 km) of all pathways exhibit limited to no fining, 2.) once fining begins it proceeds rapidly in a downstream direction until the coarse fraction has been extracted, and 3.) the fining rate in Sylhet Basin (α = 0.005) is considerably higher than that for the modern braidbelt (α = 0.001), likely due to a steeper slope down the fan delta. When converted to a scale-independent chi space, preserved stratigraphy along both courses show declining sand:mud ratios and sand body thickness at a chi distance of about 0.7, consistent with previous studies in other depositional settings. This downstream distance also generally coincides with a decrease in slope from the fan delta to the lower fluvial-tidal delta, as well as the cessation of downstream fining. Furthermore, this transition corresponds with the backwater length as calculated by a number of different methods. These initial results suggest that complete extraction of the

  6. The MyD88 protein 88 pathway is differently involved in immune responses induced by distinct substrains of Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revaz-Breton, Mélanie; Ronet, Catherine; Ives, Annette; Torre, Yazmin Hauyon-La; Masina, Slavica; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; Launois, Pascal

    2010-06-01

    Host resistance to Leishmania major is highly dependent on the development of a Th1 immune response. The TLR adaptator myeloid differentiation protein 88 (MyD88) has been implicated in the Th1 immune response associated with the resistant phenotype observed in C57BL/6 mice after infection with L. major. To investigate whether the MyD88 pathway is differentially used by distinct substrains of parasites, MyD88(-/-) C57BL/6 mice were infected with two substrains of L. major, namely L. major LV39 and L. major IR75. MyD88(-/-) mice were susceptible to both substrains of L. major, although with different kinetics of infection. The mechanisms involved during the immune response associated with susceptibility of MyD88(-/-) mice to L. major is however, parasite substrain-dependent. Susceptibility of MyD88(-/-) mice infected with L. major IR75 is a consequence of Th2 immune-deviation, whereas susceptibility of MyD88(-/-) mice to infection with L. major LV39 resulted from an impaired Th1 response. Depletion of regulatory T cells (Treg) partially restored IFN-gamma secretion and the Th1 immune response in MyD88(-/-) mice infected with L. major LV39, demonstrating a role of Treg activity in the development of an impaired Th1 response in these mice.

  7. Two Sets of Piwi Proteins Are Involved in Distinct sRNA Pathways Leading to Elimination of Germline-Specific DNA

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    Dominique I. Furrer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Piwi proteins and piRNAs protect eukaryotic germlines against the spread of transposons. During development in the ciliate Paramecium, two Piwi-dependent sRNA classes are involved in the elimination of transposons and transposon-derived DNA: scan RNAs (scnRNAs, associated with Ptiwi01 and Ptiwi09, and iesRNAs, whose binding partners we now identify as Ptiwi10 and Ptiwi11. scnRNAs derive from the maternal genome and initiate DNA elimination during development, whereas iesRNAs continue DNA targeting until the removal process is complete. Here, we show that scnRNAs and iesRNAs are processed by distinct Dicer-like proteins and bind Piwi proteins in a mutually exclusive manner, suggesting separate biogenesis pathways. We also demonstrate that the PTIWI10 gene is transcribed from the developing nucleus and that its transcription depends on prior DNA excision, suggesting a mechanism of gene expression control triggered by the removal of short DNA segments interrupting the gene.

  8. TNF is required for TLR ligand–mediated but not protease-mediated allergic airway inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Gregory S.; Thomas, Seddon Y.; Shalaby, Karim H.; Nakano, Keiko; Moran, Timothy P.; Ward, James M.; Flake, Gordon P.; Cook, Donald N.

    2017-01-01

    Asthma is associated with exposure to a wide variety of allergens and adjuvants. The extent to which overlap exists between the cellular and molecular mechanisms triggered by these various agents is poorly understood, but it might explain the differential responsiveness of patients to specific therapies. In particular, it is unclear why some, but not all, patients benefit from blockade of TNF. Here, we characterized signaling pathways triggered by distinct types of adjuvants during allergic sensitization. Mice sensitized to an innocuous protein using TLR ligands or house dust extracts as adjuvants developed mixed eosinophilic and neutrophilic airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) following allergen challenge, whereas mice sensitized using proteases as adjuvants developed predominantly eosinophilic inflammation and AHR. TLR ligands, but not proteases, induced TNF during allergic sensitization. TNF signaled through airway epithelial cells to reprogram them and promote Th2, but not Th17, development in lymph nodes. TNF was also required during the allergen challenge phase for neutrophilic and eosinophilic inflammation. In contrast, TNF was dispensable for allergic airway disease in a protease-mediated model of asthma. These findings might help to explain why TNF blockade improves lung function in only some patients with asthma. PMID:28758900

  9. Secreted proteases from pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monod, Michel; Capoccia, Sabrina; Léchenne, Barbara; Zaugg, Christophe; Holdom, Mary; Jousson, Olivier

    2002-10-01

    Many species of human pathogenic fungi secrete proteases in vitro or during the infection process. Secreted endoproteases belong to the aspartic proteases of the pepsin family, serine proteases of the subtilisin family, and metalloproteases of two different families. To these proteases has to be added the non-pepsin-type aspartic protease from Aspergillus niger and a unique chymotrypsin-like protease from Coccidioides immitis. Pathogenic fungi also secrete aminopeptidases, carboxypeptidases and dipeptidyl-peptidases. The function of fungal secreted proteases and their importance in infections vary. It is evident that secreted proteases are important for the virulence of dermatophytes since these fungi grow exclusively in the stratum corneum, nails or hair, which constitutes their sole nitrogen and carbon sources. The aspartic proteases secreted by Candida albicans are involved in the adherence process and penetration of tissues, and in interactions with the immune system of the infected host. For Aspergillus fumigatus, the role of proteolytic activity has not yet been proved. Although the secreted proteases have been intensively investigated as potential virulence factors, knowledge on protease substrate specificities is rather poor and few studies have focused on the research of inhibitors. Knowledge of substrate specificities will increase our understanding about the action of each protease secreted by pathogenic fungi and will help to determine their contribution to virulence.

  10. Cross genome comparisons of serine proteases in Arabidopsis and rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowdhamini R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serine proteases are one of the largest groups of proteolytic enzymes found across all kingdoms of life and are associated with several essential physiological pathways. The availability of Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa genome sequences has permitted the identification and comparison of the repertoire of serine protease-like proteins in the two plant species. Results Despite the differences in genome sizes between Arabidopsis and rice, we identified a very similar number of serine protease-like proteins in the two plant species (206 and 222, respectively. Nearly 40% of the above sequences were identified as potential orthologues. Atypical members could be identified in the plant genomes for Deg, Clp, Lon, rhomboid proteases and species-specific members were observed for the highly populated subtilisin and serine carboxypeptidase families suggesting multiple lateral gene transfers. DegP proteases, prolyl oligopeptidases, Clp proteases and rhomboids share a significantly higher percentage orthology between the two genomes indicating substantial evolutionary divergence was set prior to speciation. Single domain architectures and paralogues for several putative subtilisins, serine carboxypeptidases and rhomboids suggest they may have been recruited for additional roles in secondary metabolism with spatial and temporal regulation. The analysis reveals some domain architectures unique to either or both of the plant species and some inactive proteases, like in rhomboids and Clp proteases, which could be involved in chaperone function. Conclusion The systematic analysis of the serine protease-like proteins in the two plant species has provided some insight into the possible functional associations of previously uncharacterised serine protease-like proteins. Further investigation of these aspects may prove beneficial in our understanding of similar processes in commercially significant crop plant species.

  11. The CXC Chemokine-degrading Protease SpyCep of Streptococcus pyogenes Promotes Its Uptake into Endothelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simran Jeet; Nerlich, Andreas; Bergmann, Simone; Rohde, Manfred; Fulde, Marcus; Zähner, Dorothea; Hanski, Emanuel; Zinkernagel, Annelies; Nizet, Victor; Chhatwal, Gursharan S.; Talay, Susanne R.

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes expresses the LPXTG motif-containing cell envelope serine protease SpyCep (also called ScpC, PrtS) that degrades and inactivates the major chemoattractant interleukin 8 (IL-8), thereby impairing host neutrophil recruitment. In this study, we identified a novel function of SpyCep: the ability to mediate uptake into primary human endothelial cells. SpyCep triggered its uptake into endothelial cells but not into human epithelial cells originating from pharynx or lung, indicating an endothelial cell-specific uptake mechanism. SpyCep mediated cellular invasion by an endosomal/lysosomal pathway distinct from the caveolae-mediated invasion pathway of S. pyogenes. Recombinant expression and purification of proteolytically active SpyCep and a series of subfragments allowed functional dissection of the domains responsible for endothelial cell invasion and IL-8 degradation. The N-terminal PR domain was sufficient to mediate endothelial cell invasion, whereas for IL-8-degrading activity, the protease domain and the flanking A domain were required. A polyclonal rabbit serum raised against the recombinant protease efficiently blocked the invasion-mediating activity of SpyCep but not its proteolytic function, further indicating that SpyCep-mediated internalization is independent from its enzymatic activity. SpyCep may thus specifically mediate its own uptake as secreted protein into human endothelial cells. PMID:20562101

  12. The CXC chemokine-degrading protease SpyCep of Streptococcus pyogenes promotes its uptake into endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simran Jeet; Nerlich, Andreas; Bergmann, Simone; Rohde, Manfred; Fulde, Marcus; Zähner, Dorothea; Hanski, Emanuel; Zinkernagel, Annelies; Nizet, Victor; Chhatwal, Gursharan S; Talay, Susanne R

    2010-09-03

    Streptococcus pyogenes expresses the LPXTG motif-containing cell envelope serine protease SpyCep (also called ScpC, PrtS) that degrades and inactivates the major chemoattractant interleukin 8 (IL-8), thereby impairing host neutrophil recruitment. In this study, we identified a novel function of SpyCep: the ability to mediate uptake into primary human endothelial cells. SpyCep triggered its uptake into endothelial cells but not into human epithelial cells originating from pharynx or lung, indicating an endothelial cell-specific uptake mechanism. SpyCep mediated cellular invasion by an endosomal/lysosomal pathway distinct from the caveolae-mediated invasion pathway of S. pyogenes. Recombinant expression and purification of proteolytically active SpyCep and a series of subfragments allowed functional dissection of the domains responsible for endothelial cell invasion and IL-8 degradation. The N-terminal PR domain was sufficient to mediate endothelial cell invasion, whereas for IL-8-degrading activity, the protease domain and the flanking A domain were required. A polyclonal rabbit serum raised against the recombinant protease efficiently blocked the invasion-mediating activity of SpyCep but not its proteolytic function, further indicating that SpyCep-mediated internalization is independent from its enzymatic activity. SpyCep may thus specifically mediate its own uptake as secreted protein into human endothelial cells.

  13. Death proteases come alive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Cell death in plants exhibits morphological features comparable to caspase-mediated apoptosis in animals, suggesting that plant cell death is executed by (caspase-like) proteases. However, to date, no caspase homologues have been identified in plants and therefore the existence and nature of these

  14. Promotion of Human Trophoblasts Invasion by Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) I and GnRH II via Distinct Signaling Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jing; MacCalman, Colin D.; Wang, Yan-ling; Leung, Peter C. K.

    2009-01-01

    The potential roles of GnRH I and GnRH II have been assigned in promoting the invasive capacity of human trophoblasts by regulating matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9, type I tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase, and urokinase plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor protease systems during human placentation, and GnRH II has been shown to be more potent than GnRH I. However, the mechanisms for the differential effects of these two hormones remain unclear. In this study, ...

  15. Different clinical importance of FLT3 internal tandem duplications in AML according to FAB classification: possible existence of distinct leukemogenesis involving monocyte differentiation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Youngil; Park, Juwon; Ahn, Kwang-Sung; Kim, Inho; Bang, Soo-Mee; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Soon Lee, Dong; Yiul Lee, Young; Park, Seonyang; Kim, Byung-Kook

    2009-11-01

    morphologic profile. FLT3-ITD is a predictive and prognostic marker only in monocyte lineage patients. This result suggests an existence of distinct subset of monocyte lineage AML with leukemogenesis involving FLT3 activating pathway.

  16. Distinct domains within the NITROGEN LIMITATION ADAPTATION protein mediate its subcellular localization and function in the nitrate-dependent phosphate homeostasis pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NITROGEN LIMITATION ADAPTATION (NLA) protein is a RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase that plays an essential role in the regulation of nitrogen and phosphate homeostasis. NLA is localized to two distinct subcellular sites, the plasma membrane and nucleus, and contains four distinct domains: i) a RING...

  17. Serine protease inhibitors suppress pancreatic endogenous proteases and modulate bacterial neutral proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nduaguibe, Chikodili C; Bentsi-Barnes, Kwamina; Mullen, Yoko; Kandeel, Fouad; Al-Abdullah, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Pefabloc, Trasylol and Urinary Trypsin Inhibitor (UTI) have been reported to be effective serine protease inhibitors that impair pancreatic endogenous proteases resulting in improved islet yield. Here we evaluated the effect of these inhibitors on endogenous proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase), bacterial neutral proteases (thermolysin and neutral protease) and islet isolation digestion samples. Protease activity was measured using a fluorimetric assay and islet function was assessed by dynamic perifusion. Trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase were significantly inhibited by Pefabloc and UTI. Trasylol showed strong inhibitory effects on trypsin and chymotrypsin but also decreased thermolysin activity. UTI was found to inhibit the activity of endogenous proteases and increase the activity of bacterial neutral proteases. Human islets exposed to Pefabloc had reduced insulin response, unlike Trasylol or UTI, which had no detrimental effect on insulin secretion. Although Trasylol was an effective inhibitor of endogenous proteases, FDA regulatory issues preclude its use in clinical application and thus in the isolation process. UTI has the greatest potential because it impairs endogenous pancreatic proteases and enhances digestion enzymes.

  18. Clp chaperone-proteases: structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Wolfgang; Maglica, Zeljka; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2009-11-01

    Clp proteases are the most widespread energy-dependent proteases in bacteria. Their two-component architecture of protease core and ATPase rings results in an inventory of several Clp protease complexes that often coexist. Here, we present insights into Clp protease function, from their assembly to substrate recruitment and processing, and how this is coupled to the expense of energy.

  19. Identification of Physiological Substrates and Binding Partners of the Plant Mitochondrial Protease FTSH4 by the Trapping Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Opalińska

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of functional mitochondria is vital for optimal cell performance and survival. This is accomplished by distinct mechanisms, of which preservation of mitochondrial protein homeostasis fulfills a pivotal role. In plants, inner membrane-embedded i-AAA protease, FTSH4, contributes to the mitochondrial proteome surveillance. Owing to the limited knowledge of FTSH4’s in vivo substrates, very little is known about the pathways and mechanisms directly controlled by this protease. Here, we applied substrate trapping coupled with mass spectrometry-based peptide identification in order to extend the list of FTSH4’s physiological substrates and interaction partners. Our analyses revealed, among several putative targets of FTSH4, novel (mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 4 (MPC4 and Pam18-2 and known (Tim17-2 substrates of this protease. Furthermore, we demonstrate that FTSH4 degrades oxidatively damaged proteins in mitochondria. Our report provides new insights into the function of FTSH4 in the maintenance of plant mitochondrial proteome.

  20. Perturbation of myelination by activation of distinct signaling pathways : An in vitro study in a myelinating culture derived from fetal rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baron, W; de Jonge, JC; Vries, de Hans; Hoekstra, D

    2000-01-01

    An in vitro myelinating mouse-derived model system has been adapted and optimized for fetal rat brain. In these mixed brain cell (MBC) cultures, myelinogenesis was studied by examining the effect of signaling pathways that are involved in the timing of oligodendrocyte differentiation. When PMA, a

  1. Kinetic intermediates en route to the final serpin-protease complex: studies of complexes of α1-protease inhibitor with trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddur, Ashoka A; Swanson, Richard; Izaguirre, Gonzalo; Gettins, Peter G W; Olson, Steven T

    2013-11-01

    Serpin protein protease inhibitors inactivate their target proteases through a unique mechanism in which a major serpin conformational change, resulting in a 70-Å translocation of the protease from its initial reactive center loop docking site to the opposite pole of the serpin, kinetically traps the acyl-intermediate complex. Although the initial Michaelis and final trapped acyl-intermediate complexes have been well characterized structurally, the intermediate stages involved in this remarkable transformation are not well understood. To better characterize such intermediate steps, we undertook rapid kinetic studies of the FRET and fluorescence perturbation changes of site-specific fluorophore-labeled derivatives of the serpin, α1-protease inhibitor (α1PI), which report the serpin and protease conformational changes involved in transforming the Michaelis complex to the trapped acyl-intermediate complex in reactions with trypsin. Two kinetically resolvable conformational changes were observed in the reactions, ascribable to (i) serpin reactive center loop insertion into sheet A with full protease translocation but incomplete protease distortion followed by, (ii) full conformational distortion and movement of the protease and coupled serpin conformational changes involving the F helix-sheet A interface. Kinetic studies of calcium effects on the labeled α1PI-trypsin reactions demonstrated both inactive and low activity states of the distorted protease in the final complex that were distinct from the intermediate distorted state. These studies provide new insights into the nature of the serpin and protease conformational changes involved in trapping the acyl-intermediate complex in serpin-protease reactions and support a previously proposed role for helix F in the trapping mechanism.

  2. Disruption of TLR3 signaling due to cleavage of TRIF by the hepatitis A virus protease-polymerase processing intermediate, 3CD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Qu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 and cytosolic RIG-I-like helicases (RIG-I and MDA5 sense viral RNAs and activate innate immune signaling pathways that induce expression of interferon (IFN through specific adaptor proteins, TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon-β (TRIF, and mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS, respectively. Previously, we demonstrated that hepatitis A virus (HAV, a unique hepatotropic human picornavirus, disrupts RIG-I/MDA5 signaling by targeting MAVS for cleavage by 3ABC, a precursor of the sole HAV protease, 3C(pro, that is derived by auto-processing of the P3 (3ABCD segment of the viral polyprotein. Here, we show that HAV also disrupts TLR3 signaling, inhibiting poly(I:C-stimulated dimerization of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3, IRF-3 translocation to the nucleus, and IFN-β promoter activation, by targeting TRIF for degradation by a distinct 3ABCD processing intermediate, the 3CD protease-polymerase precursor. TRIF is proteolytically cleaved by 3CD, but not by the mature 3C(pro protease or the 3ABC precursor that degrades MAVS. 3CD-mediated degradation of TRIF depends on both the cysteine protease activity of 3C(pro and downstream 3D(pol sequence, but not 3D(pol polymerase activity. Cleavage occurs at two non-canonical 3C(pro recognition sequences in TRIF, and involves a hierarchical process in which primary cleavage at Gln-554 is a prerequisite for scission at Gln-190. The results of mutational studies indicate that 3D(pol sequence modulates the substrate specificity of the upstream 3C(pro protease when fused to it in cis in 3CD, allowing 3CD to target cleavage sites not normally recognized by 3C(pro. HAV thus disrupts both RIG-I/MDA5 and TLR3 signaling pathways through cleavage of essential adaptor proteins by two distinct protease precursors derived from the common 3ABCD polyprotein processing intermediate.

  3. Linear and non-linear dependencies between copy number aberrations and mRNA expression reveal distinct molecular pathways in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frigessi Arnoldo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elucidating the exact relationship between gene copy number and expression would enable identification of regulatory mechanisms of abnormal gene expression and biological pathways of regulation. Most current approaches either depend on linear correlation or on nonparametric tests of association that are insensitive to the exact shape of the relationship. Based on knowledge of enzyme kinetics and gene regulation, we would expect the functional shape of the relationship to be gene dependent and to be related to the gene regulatory mechanisms involved. Here, we propose a statistical approach to investigate and distinguish between linear and nonlinear dependences between DNA copy number alteration and mRNA expression. Results We applied the proposed method to DNA copy numbers derived from Illumina 109 K SNP-CGH arrays (using the log R values and expression data from Agilent 44 K mRNA arrays, focusing on commonly aberrated genomic loci in a collection of 102 breast tumors. Regression analysis was used to identify the type of relationship (linear or nonlinear, and subsequent pathway analysis revealed that genes displaying a linear relationship were overall associated with substantially different biological processes than genes displaying a nonlinear relationship. In the group of genes with a linear relationship, we found significant association to canonical pathways, including purine and pyrimidine metabolism (for both deletions and amplifications as well as estrogen metabolism (linear amplification and BRCA-related response to damage (linear deletion. In the group of genes displaying a nonlinear relationship, the top canonical pathways were specific pathways like PTEN and PI13K/AKT (nonlinear amplification and Wnt(B and IL-2 signalling (nonlinear deletion. Both amplifications and deletions pointed to the same affected pathways and identified cancer as the top significant disease and cell cycle, cell signaling and cellular

  4. Evolution under Drug Pressure Remodels the Folding Free-Energy Landscape of Mature HIV-1 Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, John M; Roche, Julien

    2016-07-03

    Using high-pressure NMR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, we investigate the folding landscape of the mature HIV-1 protease homodimer. The cooperativity of unfolding was measured in the absence or presence of a symmetric active site inhibitor for the optimized wild type protease (PR), its inactive variant PRD25N, and an extremely multidrug-resistant mutant, PR20. The individual fit of the pressure denaturation profiles gives rise to first order, ∆GNMR, and second order, ∆VNMR (the derivative of ∆GNMR with pressure); apparent thermodynamic parameters for each amide proton considered. Heterogeneity in the apparent ∆VNMR values reflects departure from an ideal cooperative unfolding transition. The narrow to broad distribution of ∆VNMR spanning the extremes from inhibitor-free PR20D25N to PR-DMP323 complex, and distinctively for PRD25N-DMP323 complex, indicated large variations in folding cooperativity. Consistent with this data, the shape of thermal unfolding transitions varies from asymmetric for PR to nearly symmetric for PR20, as dimer-inhibitor ternary complexes. Lack of structural cooperativity was observed between regions located close to the active site, including the hinge and tip of the glycine-rich flaps, and the rest of the protein. These results strongly suggest that inhibitor binding drastically decreases the cooperativity of unfolding by trapping the closed flap conformation in a deep energy minimum. To evade this conformational trap, PR20 evolves exhibiting a smoother folding landscape with nearly an ideal two-state (cooperative) unfolding transition. This study highlights the malleability of retroviral protease folding pathways by illustrating how the selection of mutations under drug pressure remodels the free-energy landscape as a primary mechanism. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. A New Pepstatin-Insensitive Thermopsin-Like Protease Overproduced in Peptide-Rich Cultures of Sulfolobus solfataricus

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    Marta Gogliettino

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we gain insight into the extracellular proteolytic system of Sulfolobus solfataricus grown on proteinaceous substrates, providing further evidence that acidic proteases were specifically produced in response to peptide-rich media. The main proteolytic component was the previously isolated SsMTP (Sulfolobus solfataricus multi-domain thermopsin-like protease, while the less abundant (named SsMTP-1 one was purified, characterized and identified as the sso1175 gene-product. The protein revealed a multi-domain organization shared with the cognate SsMTP with a catalytic domain followed by several tandemly-repeated motifs. Moreover, both enzymes were found spread across the Crenarchaeota phylum and belonging to the thermopsin family, although segregated into diverse phylogenetic clusters. SsMTP-1 showed a 75-kDa molecular mass and was stable in the temperature range 50–90 °C, with optimal activity at 70 °C and pH 2.0. Serine, metallo and aspartic protease inhibitors did not affect the enzyme activity, designating SsMTP-1 as a new member of the pepstatin-insensitive aspartic protease family. The peptide-bond-specificity of SsMTP-1 in the cleavage of the oxidized insulin B chain was uncommon amongst thermopsins, suggesting that it could play a distinct, but cooperative role in the protein degradation machinery. Interestingly, predictions of the transmembrane protein topology of SsMTP and SsMTP-1 strongly suggest a possible contribution in signal-transduction pathways.

  6. A distinct profile of tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway downstream of Toll-like receptor activation in irritable bowel syndrome

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    Gerard eClarke

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, a disorder of the brain-gut axis, is characterised by the absence of reliable biological markers. Tryptophan is an essential amino acid that serves as a precursor to serotonin but which can alternatively be metabolised along the kynurenine pathway leading to the production of other neuroactive agents. We previously reported an increased degradation of tryptophan along this immunoresponsive pathway in IBS. Recently, altered cytokine production following activation of specific members of the toll-like receptor (TLR family (TLR1-9 has also been demonstrated in IBS. However, the relationship between TLR activation and kynurenine pathway activity in IBS is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether activation of specific TLRs elicits exaggerated kynurenine production in IBS patients compared to controls. Whole blood from IBS patients and healthy controls was cultured with a panel of nine different TLR agonists for 24 hours. Cell culture supernatants were then analysed for both tryptophan and kynurenine concentrations, as were plasma samples from both cohorts. IBS subjects had an elevated plasma kynurenine:tryptophan ratio compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, we demonstrated a differential downstream profile of kynurenine production subsequent to TLR activation in IBS patients compared to healthy controls. This profile included alterations at TLR1/2, TLR2, TLR3, TLR5, TLR7 and TLR8. Our data expands on our previous understanding of altered tryptophan metabolism in IBS and suggests that measurement of tryptophan metabolites downstream of TLR activation may ultimately find utility as components of a biomarker panel to aid gastroenterologists in the diagnosis of IBS. Furthermore, these studies implicate the modulation of TLRs as means through which aberrant tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway can be controlled, a novel potential therapeutic strategy in this and other disorders.

  7. Protease-Sensitive Synthetic Prions

    OpenAIRE

    Colby, David W.; Wain, Rachel; Baskakov, Ilia V.; Legname, Giuseppe; Palmer, Christina G.; Nguyen, Hoang-Oanh B.; Lemus, Azucena; Cohen, Fred E.; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2010-01-01

    Prions arise when the cellular prion protein (PrPC) undergoes a self-propagating conformational change; the resulting infectious conformer is designated PrPSc. Frequently, PrPSc is protease-resistant but protease-sensitive (s) prions have been isolated in humans and other animals. We report here that protease-sensitive, synthetic prions were generated in vitro during polymerization of recombinant (rec) PrP into amyloid fibers. In 22 independent experiments, recPrP amyloid preparations, but no...

  8. Co-evolution of insect proteases and plant protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongsma, Maarten A; Beekwilder, Jules

    2011-08-01

    Plants are at the basis of the food chain, but there is no such thing as a "free lunch" for herbivores. To promote reproductive success, plants evolved multi-layered defensive tactics to avoid or discourage herbivory. To the detriment of plants, herbivores, in turn, evolved intricate strategies to find, eat, and successfully digest essential plant parts to raise their own offspring. In this battle the digestive tract is the arena determining final victory or defeat as measured by growth or starvation of the herbivore. Earlier, specific molecular opponents were identified as proteases and inhibitors: digestive proteases of herbivores evolved structural motifs to occlude plant protease inhibitors, or alternatively, the insects evolved proteases capable of specifically degrading the host plant inhibitors. In response plant inhibitors evolved hyper-variable and novel protein folds to remain active against potential herbivores. At the level of protease regulation in herbivorous insects, it was shown that inhibition-insensitive digestive proteases are up-regulated when sensitive proteases are inhibited. The way this regulation operates in mammals is known as negative feedback by gut-luminal factors, so-called 'monitor peptides' that are sensitive to the concentration of active enzymes. We propose that regulation of gut enzymes by endogenous luminal factors has been an open invitation to plants to "hijack" this regulation by evolving receptor antagonists, although yet these plant factors have not been identified. In future research the question of the co-evolution of insect proteases and plant inhibitors should, therefore, be better approached from a systems level keeping in mind that evolution is fundamentally opportunistic and that the plant's fitness is primarily improved by lowering the availability of essential amino acids to an herbivore by any available mechanism.

  9. Microarray and pathway analysis reveal distinct mechanisms underlying cannabinoid-mediated modulation of LPS-induced activation of BV-2 microglial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Juknat

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids are known to exert immunosuppressive activities. However, the mechanisms which contribute to these effects are unknown. Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS to activate BV-2 microglial cells, we examined how Δ(9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the major psychoactive component of marijuana, and cannabidiol (CBD the non-psychoactive component, modulate the inflammatory response. Microarray analysis of genome-wide mRNA levels was performed using Illumina platform and the resulting expression patterns analyzed using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to identify functional subsets of genes, and the Ingenuity System Database to denote the gene networks regulated by CBD and THC. From the 5338 transcripts that were differentially expressed across treatments, 400 transcripts were found to be upregulated by LPS, 502 by CBD+LPS and 424 by THC+LPS, while 145 were downregulated by LPS, 297 by CBD+LPS and 149 by THC+LPS, by 2-fold or more (p≤0.005. Results clearly link the effects of CBD and THC to inflammatory signaling pathways and identify new cannabinoid targets in the MAPK pathway (Dusp1, Dusp8, Dusp2, cell cycle related (Cdkn2b, Gadd45a as well as JAK/STAT regulatory molecules (Socs3, Cish, Stat1. The impact of CBD on LPS-stimulated gene expression was greater than that of THC. We attribute this difference to the fact that CBD highly upregulated several genes encoding negative regulators of both NFκB and AP-1 transcriptional activities, such as Trib3 and Dusp1 known to be modulated through Nrf2 activation. The CBD-specific expression profile reflected changes associated with oxidative stress and glutathione depletion via Trib3 and expression of ATF4 target genes. Furthermore, the CBD affected genes were shown to be controlled by nuclear factors usually involved in regulation of stress response and inflammation, mainly via Nrf2/Hmox1 axis and the Nrf2/ATF4-Trib3 pathway. These observations indicate that CBD, and less so THC, induce a cellular stress

  10. Evidence of distinct pathways for bacterial degradation of the steroid compound cholate suggests the potential for metabolic interactions by interspecies cross-feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holert, Johannes; Yücel, Onur; Suvekbala, Vemparthan; Kulić, Zarko; Möller, Heiko; Philipp, Bodo

    2014-05-01

    The distribution and the metabolic pathways of bacteria degrading steroid compounds released by eukaryotic organisms were investigated using the bile salt cholate as model substrate. Cholate-degrading bacteria could be readily isolated from freshwater environments. All isolated strains transiently released steroid degradation intermediates into culture supernatants before their further degradation. Cholate degradation could be initiated via two different reaction sequences. Most strains degraded cholate via a reaction sequence known from the model organism Pseudomonas sp. strain Chol1 releasing intermediates with a 3-keto-Δ(1,4) -diene structure of the steroid skeleton. The actinobacterium Dietzia sp. strain Chol2 degraded cholate via a different and yet unexplored reaction sequence releasing intermediates with a 3-keto-Δ(4,6) -diene-7-deoxy structure of the steroid skeleton such as 3,12-dioxo-4,6-choldienoic acid (DOCDA). Using DOCDA as substrate, two Alphaproteobacteria, strains Chol10-11, were isolated that produced the same cholate degradation intermediates as strain Chol2. With DOCDA as substrate for Pseudomonas sp. strain Chol1 only the side chain was degraded while the ring system was transformed into novel steroid compounds accumulating as dead-end metabolites. These metabolites could be degraded by the DOCDA-producing strains Chol10-11. These results indicate that bacteria with potentially different pathways for cholate degradation coexist in natural habitats and may interact via interspecies cross-feeding. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Community structure analysis of transcriptional networks reveals distinct molecular pathways for early- and late-onset temporal lobe epilepsy with childhood febrile seizures.

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    Carlos Alberto Moreira-Filho

    Full Text Available Age at epilepsy onset has a broad impact on brain plasticity and epilepsy pathomechanisms. Prolonged febrile seizures in early childhood (FS constitute an initial precipitating insult (IPI commonly associated with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE. FS-MTLE patients may have early disease onset, i.e. just after the IPI, in early childhood, or late-onset, ranging from mid-adolescence to early adult life. The mechanisms governing early (E or late (L disease onset are largely unknown. In order to unveil the molecular pathways underlying E and L subtypes of FS-MTLE we investigated global gene expression in hippocampal CA3 explants of FS-MTLE patients submitted to hippocampectomy. Gene coexpression networks (GCNs were obtained for the E and L patient groups. A network-based approach for GCN analysis was employed allowing: i the visualization and analysis of differentially expressed (DE and complete (CO - all valid GO annotated transcripts - GCNs for the E and L groups; ii the study of interactions between all the system's constituents based on community detection and coarse-grained community structure methods. We found that the E-DE communities with strongest connection weights harbor highly connected genes mainly related to neural excitability and febrile seizures, whereas in L-DE communities these genes are not only involved in network excitability but also playing roles in other epilepsy-related processes. Inversely, in E-CO the strongly connected communities are related to compensatory pathways (seizure inhibition, neuronal survival and responses to stress conditions while in L-CO these communities harbor several genes related to pro-epileptic effects, seizure-related mechanisms and vulnerability to epilepsy. These results fit the concept, based on fMRI and behavioral studies, that early onset epilepsies, although impacting more severely the hippocampus, are associated to compensatory mechanisms, while in late MTLE development the brain is less

  12. Gold compounds as cysteine protease inhibitors: perspectives for pharmaceutical application as antiparasitic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massai, Lara; Messori, Luigi; Micale, Nicola; Schirmeister, Tanja; Maes, Louis; Fregona, Dolores; Cinellu, Maria Agostina; Gabbiani, Chiara

    2017-04-01

    Gold compounds form a new class of promising metal-based drugs with a number of potential therapeutic applications, particularly in the fields of anticancer and antimicrobial treatments. Previous research revealed that a group of structurally diverse gold compounds cause conspicuous inhibition of the protease activities of the human proteasome. Given the pharmacological importance of protease inhibition, the present study further explored whether these gold compounds might inhibit a few other proteases that are accepted druggable targets for disease treatment. In particular, four distinct cysteine proteases were considered here: cathepsin B and L that play a primary role in tumor-cell invasion and metastasis; rhodesain, the major cathepsin L-like cysteine protease of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and CPB2.8ΔCTE, a Leishmania mexicana mature cysteine protease. Based on the encouraging results obtained for some of the tested gold compounds on the two parasitic cysteine proteases, especially against CPB2.8ΔCTE, with IC 50s in the micromolar range, we next evaluated whether those gold compounds might contrast effectively the growth of the respective protozoa and indeed important antiprotozoal properties were disclosed; on the other hand a certain lack of selectivity was highlighted. Also, no direct or clear correlation could be established between the in vitro antiprotozoal properties and the level of protease inhibition. The implications of these results are discussed in relation to possible pharmaceutical applications.

  13. Distinct pathways of redox changes from settling to burial in contrasting marine environments of the Gulf of California: Alfonso, La Paz and Pescadero basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choumiline, K.; Lyons, T. W.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.

    2016-02-01

    The oxygenation fluctuations of marine basins are controlled by complex interplay between circulation, climate, productivity and sea level variability, also enhanced by anthropogenic influence. These variations can cause OMZ expansions and increase coastal hypoxia, thus leading to unforeseen consequences of ecosystem alteration, marine life mortality and release of potentially-toxic trace elements previously sequestered within marine sediments. Despite many findings by the scientific community, accurate past reconstructions and future change predictions are far from perfect. This is mainly due to gaps in the understanding of redox processes occurring during settling and burial especially in coastal, yet iron-limited areas of the oceans. Hereby, we tackle this problem by following the transformation pathways of various paleoproductivity and paleoredox indicators (Mo, Ni, V, U, detailed Fe speciation, C and S concentrations and isotope ratios) from their sources to settling and burial. We emphasize sediment trap, core and pore water geochemistry of contrasting oxic, suboxic and anoxic marine settings of the southern Gulf of California: semi-closed Alfonso Basin, OMZ-influenced La Paz Basin and upper-OMZ Pescadero Basin with cyclic dust and fluvial inputs. Our data show evident physicochemical and microbiological transformations during settling with several event-related U enrichments in the marine snow aggregates, probably related to redox microniche processes. The sediment core solid fraction geochemistry, on the other hand, reveals a diagenetic downcore decrease of most highly reactive Fe phases (including the labile ascorbate-extracted Fe), correlating with trace element trends and dissolved Fe in pore waters. The comparison among basins exhibits an expected FeHR/FeT ratio trend for oxic (less than 0.1) and suboxic/anoxic (0.2 and higher) sediments. Although, Mn, S, Mo, U trends varied from core to core suggesting chemical zone and metabolic pathway differences

  14. The MAPKERK-1,2 pathway integrates distinct and antagonistic signals from TGF alpha and FGF7 in morphogenesis of mouse mammary epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fata, Jimmie E; Mori, Hidetoshi; Ewald, Andrew J; Zhang, Hui; Yao, Evelyn; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    2006-10-03

    Transforming growth factor-{alpha} (TGF{alpha}) and fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF7) exhibit distinct expression patterns in the mammary gland. Both factors signal through mitogen-activated kinase/extracellular regulated kinase-1,2 (MAPK{sup ERK1,2}); however, their unique and/or combined contributions to mammary morphogenesis have not been examined. In ex vivo mammary explants, we show that a sustained activation of MAPK{sup ERK1,2} for 1 h, induced by TGF{alpha}, was necessary and sufficient to initiate branching morphogenesis, whereas a transient activation (15 min) of MAPK{sup ERK1,2}, induced by FGF7, led to growth without branching. Unlike TGF{alpha}, FGF7 promoted sustained proliferation as well as ectopic localization of, and increase in, keratin-6 expressing cells. The response of the explants to FGF10 was similar to that to FGF7. Simultaneous stimulation by FGF7 and TGF{alpha} indicated that the FGF7-induced MAPK{sup ERK1,2} signaling and associated phenotypes were dominant: FGF7 may prevent branching by suppression of two necessary TGF{alpha}-induced morphogenetic effectors, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3/stromelysin-1), and fibronectin. Our findings indicate that expression of morphogenetic effectors, proliferation, and cell-type decisions during mammary organoid morphogenesis are intimately dependent on the duration of activation of MAPK{sup ERK1,2} activation.

  15. Nutritional Omega-3 Deficiency Alters Glucocorticoid Receptor-Signaling Pathway and Neuronal Morphology in Regionally Distinct Brain Structures Associated with Emotional Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Larrieu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive evidence suggests that long term dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs deficiency results in altered emotional behaviour. We have recently demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs deficiency induces emotional alterations through abnormal corticosterone secretion which leads to altered dendritic arborisation in the prefrontal cortex (PFC. Here we show that hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis feedback inhibition was not compromised in n-3 deficient mice. Rather, glucocorticoid receptor (GR signaling pathway was inactivated in the PFC but not in the hippocampus of n-3 deficient mice. Consequently, only dendritic arborisation in PFC was affected by dietary n-3 PUFAs deficiency. In addition, occlusion experiment with GR blockade altered GR signaling in the PFC of control mice, with no further alterations in n-3 deficient mice. In conclusion, n-3 PUFAs deficiency compromised PFC, leading to dendritic atrophy, but did not change hippocampal GR function and dendritic arborisation. We argue that this GR sensitivity contributes to n-3 PUFAs deficiency-related emotional behaviour deficits.

  16. Engineering Environmentally-Stable Proteases to Specifically Neutralize Protein Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    synthesized as a fusion protein on the surface of M13 phage . The random library of subtilisin phage is mixed with the GA- PLFRAL-S-GB substrate...factor (LF), representing four functionally distinct families of toxins. The centerpiece of our design effort is a phage -display selection method for...hour assay. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Enterotoxin, protease, directed evolution, subtilisin, protein engineering, phage -display, enzymology 16. SECURITY

  17. Solar-simulated radiation and heat treatment induced metalloproteinase-1 expression in cultured dermal fibroblasts via distinct pathways: implications on reduction of sun-associated aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Cheng-Che E; Wu, Ching-Shang; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2013-12-01

    Sun exposure is an important environmental factor affecting human beings. Most knowledge regarding solar aging focused on light radiation (photoaging), and little emphasis has been placed on heat, a factor that is also closely associated with sun exposure. This study was launched to evaluate the effects of simulated solar radiation (SSR) and environmental heat on skin fibroblasts in terms of dermal aging. Cultured human dermal fibroblasts were treated with moderate amount of SSR (200J/cm(2)) and heat (+2°C). The metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) expression was used as a surrogate marker for dermal aging and the involved regulatory mechanisms were explored. Both treatment conditions did not affect viability but significantly increased the expressions of MMP-1. In parallel, both treatments increased the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the increase induced by SSR is much greater than heat. In contrast, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV-1), the sensor of environmental heat, was upregulated by heat but not SSR treatment. Pretreating fibroblasts with antioxidant abrogated the SSR-induced MMP-1 but has limited effect on heat-induced MMP-1. On the other hand, TRPV-1 antagonist pretreatment reduced heat-induced MMP-1 in fibroblasts but not their SSR-treated counterparts. Both SSR and heat induced MMP-1 expression in dermal fibroblasts but through different pathways. As current strategies for reducing sun-related aging focused on filtering of light and use of antioxidants, future strategies design to reduce solar aging should also incorporate heat-induced aging into consideration. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cytochrome P450s from Cynara cardunculus L. CYP71AV9 and CYP71BL5, catalyze distinct hydroxylations in the sesquiterpene lactone biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eljounaidi, Kaouthar; Cankar, Katarina; Comino, Cinzia; Moglia, Andrea; Hehn, Alain; Bourgaud, Frédéric; Bouwmeester, Harro; Menin, Barbara; Lanteri, Sergio; Beekwilder, Jules

    2014-06-01

    Cynara cardunculus (Asteraceae) is a cross pollinated perennial crop which includes the two cultivated taxa globe artichoke and cultivated cardoon. The leaves of these plants contain high concentrations of sesquiterpene lactones (STLs) among which cynaropicrin is the most represented, and has recently attracted attention because of its therapeutic potential as anti-tumor and anti-photoaging agent. Costunolide is considered the common precursor of the STLs and three enzymes are involved in its biosynthetic pathway: i.e. the germacrene A synthase (GAS), the germacrene A oxidase (GAO) and the costunolide synthase (COS). Here we report on the isolation of two P450 genes, (i.e. CYP71AV9 and CYP71BL5), in a set of ∼19,000 C. cardunculus unigenes, and their functional characterization in yeast and in planta. The metabolite analyses revealed that the co-expression of CYP71AV9 together with GAS resulted in the biosynthesis of germacra-1(10),4,11(13)-trien-12-oic acid in yeast. The co-expression of CYP71BL5 and CYP71AV9 with GAS led to biosynthesis of the free costunolide in yeast and costunolide conjugates in Nicotiana benthamiana, demonstrating their involvement in STL biosynthesis as GAO and COS enzymes. The substrate specificity of CYP71AV9 was investigated by testing its ability to convert amorpha-4,11-diene, (+)-germacrene D and cascarilladiene to their oxidized products when co-expressed in yeast with the corresponding terpene synthases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cytomegalovirus protease targeted prodrug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabit, Hairat; Dahan, Arik; Sun, Jing; Provoda, Chester J; Lee, Kyung-Dall; Hilfinger, John H; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a prevalent virus that infects up to 90% of the population. The goal of this research is to determine if small molecular prodrug substrates can be developed for a specific HCMV encoded protease and thus achieve site-specific activation. HCMV encodes a 256 amino acid serine protease that is responsible for capsid assembly, an essential process for herpes virus production. The esterase activity of the more stable HCMV A143T/A144T protease mutant was evaluated with model p-nitrophenol (ONp) esters, Boc-Xaa-ONp (Ala, Leu, Ile, Val, Gln, Phe at the Xaa position). We demonstrate that the A143T/A144T mutant has esterase activity toward specific small ester compounds, e.g., Boc-L-Ala-ONp. Mono amino acid and dipeptide prodrugs of ganciclovir (GCV) were also synthesized and evaluated for hydrolysis by the A143T/A144T protease mutant in solution. Hydrolysis of these prodrugs was also evaluated in Caco-2 cell homogenates, human liver microsomes (HLMs), and rat and human plasma. For the selectivity potential of the prodrugs, the hydrolysis ratio was evaluated as a percentage of prodrug hydrolyzed by the HCMV protease over the percentages of prodrug hydrolyses by Caco-2 cell homogenates, HLMs, and human/rat plasma. A dipeptide prodrug of ganciclovir, Ac-l-Gln-l-Ala-GCV, emerged as a potential selective prodrug candidate. The results of this research demonstrate that targeting prodrugs for activation by a specific protease encoded by the infectious HCMV pathogen may be achievable.

  20. Contemporary protease inhibitors and cardiovascular risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens; Mocroft, Amanda; Ryom, Lene

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the evidence linking use of HIV protease inhibitors with excess risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in HIV+ populations. RECENT FINDINGS: For the two contemporary most frequently used protease inhibitors, darunavir and atazanavir [both pharmacologically boosted...

  1. Phytase and protease supplementation for laying hens in peak egg production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Serpa Vieira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the combination of enzymes in commercial laying hens need to be more explored in literature. To determine if the type of protease affects performance, egg quality, nutrient intake, and morphometry of intestinal mucosa of laying hens in peak egg production and fed with phytase, 780 25-weeks Hy-Line W36 hens were assigned to a completely randomized design composed of five treatments/diets (one positive control, two negative controls, and negative controls plus protease A or B, with 12 replicates of 13 birds each. There was no effect of treatments (P > 0.05 on egg production, egg mass and feed conversion, even though the nutritional restriction imposed by the negative controls reduced egg weight (P = 0.02, albumen height (P < 0.01, and Haugh unit (P < 0.01. Although inclusion of proteases in negative controls did not cause the calculated intake of protein and amino acids to return to the same amount consumed by positive-control hens, egg quality parameters returned to positive control standards with protease A. Intestinal mucosa responded to treatment only at jejunum, where birds fed with protease B showed greater (P < 0.01 villus height and crypt depth than those treated with protease A. These findings suggest that different proteases and phytases interact distinctly and, in consequence, induce different responses on the birds. Moreover, the behavior of egg quality parameters after protease A inclusion in the diet indicates that the nutritional contribution of the combination of this protease with phytase is greater than the contribution of protease alone.

  2. Recombinant expression and functional analysis of proteases from Streptococcus pneumoniae, Bacillus anthracis, and Yersinia pestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieper Rembert

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncharacterized proteases naturally expressed by bacterial pathogens represents important topic in infectious disease research, because these enzymes may have critical roles in pathogenicity and cell physiology. It has been observed that cloning, expression and purification of proteases often fail due to their catalytic functions which, in turn, cause toxicity in the E. coli heterologous host. Results In order to address this problem systematically, a modified pipeline of our high-throughput protein expression and purification platform was developed. This included the use of a specific E. coli strain, BL21(DE3 pLysS to tightly control the expression of recombinant proteins and various expression vectors encoding fusion proteins to enhance recombinant protein solubility. Proteases fused to large fusion protein domains, maltosebinding protein (MBP, SP-MBP which contains signal peptide at the N-terminus of MBP, disulfide oxidoreductase (DsbA and Glutathione S-transferase (GST improved expression and solubility of proteases. Overall, 86.1% of selected protease genes including hypothetical proteins were expressed and purified using a combination of five different expression vectors. To detect novel proteolytic activities, zymography and fluorescence-based assays were performed and the protease activities of more than 46% of purified proteases and 40% of hypothetical proteins that were predicted to be proteases were confirmed. Conclusions Multiple expression vectors, employing distinct fusion tags in a high throughput pipeline increased overall success rates in expression, solubility and purification of proteases. The combinatorial functional analysis of the purified proteases using fluorescence assays and zymography confirmed their function.

  3. tolerant alkaline protease from Bacillus coagulans PSB

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oyaide

    2013-05-22

    May 22, 2013 ... suggest the suitability of the enzyme for applications in peptide synthesis, detergent formulation and ... The cell free supernatant was recovered as crude enzyme preparation and used for further studies. Assay of protease activity. Protease activity was ... Effect of pH on growth and protease production.

  4. A genomic survey of proteases in Aspergilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budak, Sebnem Ozturkoglu; Zhou, M.; Brouwer, Carlo; Wiebenga, A.; Benoit, Isabelle; Di Falco, Marcos; Tsang, Adrian; de Vries, Ronald P; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proteases can hydrolyze peptides in aqueous environments. This property has made proteases the most important industrial enzymes by taking up about 60% of the total enzyme market. Microorganisms are the main sources for industrial protease production due to their high yield and a wide

  5. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  6. Carbohydrase and protease supplementation increased ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2014-09-15

    Sep 15, 2014 ... Department of Animal and Wildlife Sciences, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Science ... control birds was 12% higher than that of the positive control, while diets supplemented with single enzyme ... The inclusion of exogenous proteases in maize-soya-based diets increases protein digestion by.

  7. Carbohydrase and protease supplementation increased ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A trial was conducted to evaluate whether the addition of commercial enzyme preparations containing carbohydrases and a protease would increase the available metabolizable energy (ME) of maize-soya-based broiler diets. Seven thousand five hundred and sixty (7560) day-old Ross 788 chicks were randomly allocated ...

  8. Biotechnology of Cold-Active Proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulasi Satyanarayana

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The bulk of Earth’s biosphere is cold (<5 °C and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth’s surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review.

  9. The Drosophila melanogaster seminal fluid protease "seminase" regulates proteolytic and post-mating reproductive processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke A LaFlamme

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteases and protease inhibitors have been identified in the ejaculates of animal taxa ranging from invertebrates to mammals and form a major protein class among Drosophila melanogaster seminal fluid proteins (SFPs. Other than a single protease cascade in mammals that regulates seminal clot liquefaction, no proteolytic cascades (i.e. pathways with at least two proteases acting in sequence have been identified in seminal fluids. In Drosophila, SFPs are transferred to females during mating and, together with sperm, are necessary for the many post-mating responses elicited in females. Though several SFPs are proteolytically cleaved either during or after mating, virtually nothing is known about the proteases involved in these cleavage events or the physiological consequences of proteolytic activity in the seminal fluid on the female. Here, we present evidence that a protease cascade acts in the seminal fluid of Drosophila during and after mating. Using RNAi to knock down expression of the SFP CG10586, a predicted serine protease, we show that it acts upstream of the SFP CG11864, a predicted astacin protease, to process SFPs involved in ovulation and sperm entry into storage. We also show that knockdown of CG10586 leads to lower levels of egg laying, higher rates of sexual receptivity to subsequent males, and abnormal sperm usage patterns, processes that are independent of CG11864. The long-term phenotypes of females mated to CG10586 knockdown males are similar to those of females that fail to store sex peptide, an important elicitor of long-term post-mating responses, and indicate a role for CG10586 in regulating sex peptide. These results point to an important role for proteolysis among insect SFPs and suggest that protease cascades may be a mechanism for precise temporal regulation of multiple post-mating responses in females.

  10. Protease-sensitive synthetic prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Colby

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prions arise when the cellular prion protein (PrP(C undergoes a self-propagating conformational change; the resulting infectious conformer is designated PrP(Sc. Frequently, PrP(Sc is protease-resistant but protease-sensitive (s prions have been isolated in humans and other animals. We report here that protease-sensitive, synthetic prions were generated in vitro during polymerization of recombinant (rec PrP into amyloid fibers. In 22 independent experiments, recPrP amyloid preparations, but not recPrP monomers or oligomers, transmitted disease to transgenic mice (n = 164, denoted Tg9949 mice, that overexpress N-terminally truncated PrP. Tg9949 control mice (n = 174 did not spontaneously generate prions although they were prone to late-onset spontaneous neurological dysfunction. When synthetic prion isolates from infected Tg9949 mice were serially transmitted in the same line of mice, they exhibited sPrP(Sc and caused neurodegeneration. Interestingly, these protease-sensitive prions did not shorten the life span of Tg9949 mice despite causing extensive neurodegeneration. We inoculated three synthetic prion isolates into Tg4053 mice that overexpress full-length PrP; Tg4053 mice are not prone to developing spontaneous neurological dysfunction. The synthetic prion isolates caused disease in 600-750 days in Tg4053 mice, which exhibited sPrP(Sc. These novel synthetic prions demonstrate that conformational changes in wild-type PrP can produce mouse prions composed exclusively of sPrP(Sc.

  11. Molecular Imaging of Proteases in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunan Yang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteases play important roles during tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Various molecular imaging techniques have been employed for protease imaging: optical (both fluorescence and bioluminescence, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, and positron emission tomography (PET. In this review, we will summarize the current status of imaging proteases in cancer with these techniques. Optical imaging of proteases, in particular with fluorescence, is the most intensively validated and many of the imaging probes are already commercially available. It is generally agreed that the use of activatable probes is the most accurate and appropriate means for measuring protease activity. Molecular imaging of proteases with other techniques (i.e. MRI, SPECT, and PET has not been well-documented in the literature which certainly deserves much future effort. Optical imaging and molecular MRI of protease activity has very limited potential for clinical investigation. PET/SPECT imaging is suitable for clinical investigation; however the optimal probes for PET/SPECT imaging of proteases in cancer have yet to be developed. Successful development of protease imaging probes with optimal in vivo stability, tumor targeting efficacy, and desirable pharmacokinetics for clinical translation will eventually improve cancer patient management. Not limited to cancer, these protease-targeted imaging probes will also have broad applications in other diseases such as arthritis, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction.

  12. A Lys49 phospholipase A2, isolated from Bothrops asper snake venom, induces lipid droplet formation in macrophages which depends on distinct signaling pathways and the C-terminal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, Karina Cristina; Leiguez, Elbio; Moreira, Vanessa; Nascimento, Neide Galvão; Lomonte, Bruno; Gutiérrez, José Maria; Lopes de Melo, Robson; Teixeira, Catarina

    2013-01-01

    MT-II, a Lys49PLA2 homologue devoid of catalytic activity from B. asper venom, stimulates inflammatory events in macrophages. We investigated the ability of MT-II to induce formation of lipid droplets (LDs), key elements of inflammatory responses, in isolated macrophages and participation of protein kinases and intracellular PLA2s in this effect. Influence of MT-II on PLIN2 recruitment and expression was assessed, and the effects of some synthetic peptides on LD formation were further evaluated. At noncytotoxic concentrations, MT-II directly activated macrophages to form LDs. This effect was reproduced by a synthetic peptide corresponding to the C-terminal sequence 115-129 of MT-II, evidencing the critical role of C-terminus for MT-II-induced effect. Moreover, MT-II induced expression and recruitment of PLIN2. Pharmacological interventions with specific inhibitors showed that PKC, PI3K, ERK1/2, and iPLA2, but not P38(MAPK) or cPLA2, signaling pathways are involved in LD formation induced by MT-II. This sPLA2 homologue also induced synthesis of PGE2 that colocalized to LDs. In conclusion, MT-II is able to induce formation of LDs committed to PGE2 formation in a process dependent on C-terminal loop engagement and regulated by distinct protein kinases and iPLA2. LDs may constitute an important inflammatory mechanism triggered by MT-II in macrophages.

  13. A Lys49 Phospholipase A2, Isolated from Bothrops asper Snake Venom, Induces Lipid Droplet Formation in Macrophages Which Depends on Distinct Signaling Pathways and the C-Terminal Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Cristina Giannotti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MT-II, a Lys49PLA2 homologue devoid of catalytic activity from B. asper venom, stimulates inflammatory events in macrophages. We investigated the ability of MT-II to induce formation of lipid droplets (LDs, key elements of inflammatory responses, in isolated macrophages and participation of protein kinases and intracellular PLA2s in this effect. Influence of MT-II on PLIN2 recruitment and expression was assessed, and the effects of some synthetic peptides on LD formation were further evaluated. At noncytotoxic concentrations, MT-II directly activated macrophages to form LDs. This effect was reproduced by a synthetic peptide corresponding to the C-terminal sequence 115–129 of MT-II, evidencing the critical role of C-terminus for MT-II-induced effect. Moreover, MT-II induced expression and recruitment of PLIN2. Pharmacological interventions with specific inhibitors showed that PKC, PI3K, ERK1/2, and iPLA2, but not P38MAPK or cPLA2, signaling pathways are involved in LD formation induced by MT-II. This sPLA2 homologue also induced synthesis of PGE2 that colocalized to LDs. In conclusion, MT-II is able to induce formation of LDs committed to PGE2 formation in a process dependent on C-terminal loop engagement and regulated by distinct protein kinases and iPLA2. LDs may constitute an important inflammatory mechanism triggered by MT-II in macrophages.

  14. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojcic, Ljubica; Pitzler, Christian; Körfer, Georgette; Jakob, Felix; Ronny Martinez; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2015-12-25

    Proteases are essential ingredients in modern laundry detergents. Over the past 30 years, subtilisin proteases employed in the laundry detergent industry have been engineered by directed evolution and rational design to tailor their properties towards industrial demands. This comprehensive review discusses recent success stories in subtilisin protease engineering. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents comprise simultaneous improvement of thermal resistance and activity at low temperatures, a rational strategy to modulate pH profiles, and a general hypothesis for how to increase promiscuous activity towards the production of peroxycarboxylic acids as mild bleaching agents. The three protease engineering campaigns presented provide in-depth analysis of protease properties and have identified principles that can be applied to improve or generate enzyme variants for industrial applications beyond laundry detergents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mass spectrometry-assisted protease substrate screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlüter, Hartmut; Rykl, Jana; Thiemann, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Since sequencing of the human genome was completed, more than 500 genes have been annotated as proteases. Exploring the physiological role of each protease requires the identification of their natural substrates. However, the endogenous substrates of many of the human proteases are as yet unknown....... Here we describe a new assay that addresses this problem. The assay, which easily can be automated, is based on the incubation of immobilized protein fractions, which may contain the natural substrate, with a defined protease. After concentrating the proteolytically released peptides by reversed...

  16. Proteolytic crosstalk in multi-protease networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Curtis T.; Mather, William H.

    2016-04-01

    Processive proteases, such as ClpXP in E. coli, are conserved enzyme assemblies that can recognize and rapidly degrade proteins. These proteases are used for a number of purposes, including degrading mistranslated proteins and controlling cellular stress response. However, proteolytic machinery within the cell is limited in capacity and can lead to a bottleneck in protein degradation, whereby many proteins compete (‘queue’) for proteolytic resources. Previous work has demonstrated that such queueing can lead to pronounced statistical relationships between different protein counts when proteins compete for a single common protease. However, real cells contain many different proteases, e.g. ClpXP, ClpAP, and Lon in E. coli, and it is not clear how competition between proteins for multiple classes of protease would influence the dynamics of cellular networks. In the present work, we theoretically demonstrate that a multi-protease proteolytic bottleneck can substantially couple the dynamics for both simple and complex (oscillatory) networks, even between substrates with substantially different affinities for protease. For these networks, queueing often leads to strong positive correlations between protein counts, and these correlations are strongest near the queueing theoretic point of balance. Furthermore, we find that the qualitative behavior of these networks depends on the relative size of the absolute affinity of substrate to protease compared to the cross affinity of substrate to protease, leading in certain regimes to priority queue statistics.

  17. Serine protease EspP from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli is sufficient to induce shiga toxin macropinocytosis in intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Julie; Lukyanenko, Valeriy; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; Hubbard, Ann L; Delannoy, Michael; Hansen, Anne-Marie; Kaper, James B; Boisen, Nadia; Nataro, James P; Zhu, Chengru; Boedeker, Edgar C; Girón, Jorge A; Kovbasnjuk, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Life-threatening intestinal and systemic effects of the Shiga toxins produced by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) require toxin uptake and transcytosis across intestinal epithelial cells. We have recently demonstrated that EHEC infection of intestinal epithelial cells stimulates toxin macropinocytosis, an actin-dependent endocytic pathway. Host actin rearrangement necessary for EHEC attachment to enterocytes is mediated by the type 3 secretion system which functions as a molecular syringe to translocate bacterial effector proteins directly into host cells. Actin-dependent EHEC attachment also requires the outer membrane protein intimin, a major EHEC adhesin. Here, we investigate the role of type 3 secretion in actin turnover occurring during toxin macropinocytosis. Toxin macropinocytosis is independent of EHEC type 3 secretion and intimin attachment. EHEC soluble factors are sufficient to stimulate macropinocytosis and deliver toxin into enterocytes in vitro and in vivo; intact bacteria are not required. Intimin-negative enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) O104:H4 robustly stimulate Shiga toxin macropinocytosis into intestinal epithelial cells. The apical macropinosomes formed in intestinal epithelial cells move through the cells and release their cargo at these cells' basolateral sides. Further analysis of EHEC secreted proteins shows that a serine protease EspP alone is able to stimulate host actin remodeling and toxin macropinocytosis. The observation that soluble factors, possibly serine proteases including EspP, from each of two genetically distinct toxin-producing strains, can stimulate Shiga toxin macropinocytosis and transcellular transcytosis alters current ideas concerning mechanisms whereby Shiga toxin interacts with human enterocytes. Mechanisms important for this macropinocytic pathway could suggest new potential therapeutic targets for Shiga toxin-induced disease.

  18. Serine protease EspP from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli is sufficient to induce shiga toxin macropinocytosis in intestinal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie In

    Full Text Available Life-threatening intestinal and systemic effects of the Shiga toxins produced by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC require toxin uptake and transcytosis across intestinal epithelial cells. We have recently demonstrated that EHEC infection of intestinal epithelial cells stimulates toxin macropinocytosis, an actin-dependent endocytic pathway. Host actin rearrangement necessary for EHEC attachment to enterocytes is mediated by the type 3 secretion system which functions as a molecular syringe to translocate bacterial effector proteins directly into host cells. Actin-dependent EHEC attachment also requires the outer membrane protein intimin, a major EHEC adhesin. Here, we investigate the role of type 3 secretion in actin turnover occurring during toxin macropinocytosis. Toxin macropinocytosis is independent of EHEC type 3 secretion and intimin attachment. EHEC soluble factors are sufficient to stimulate macropinocytosis and deliver toxin into enterocytes in vitro and in vivo; intact bacteria are not required. Intimin-negative enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC O104:H4 robustly stimulate Shiga toxin macropinocytosis into intestinal epithelial cells. The apical macropinosomes formed in intestinal epithelial cells move through the cells and release their cargo at these cells' basolateral sides. Further analysis of EHEC secreted proteins shows that a serine protease EspP alone is able to stimulate host actin remodeling and toxin macropinocytosis. The observation that soluble factors, possibly serine proteases including EspP, from each of two genetically distinct toxin-producing strains, can stimulate Shiga toxin macropinocytosis and transcellular transcytosis alters current ideas concerning mechanisms whereby Shiga toxin interacts with human enterocytes. Mechanisms important for this macropinocytic pathway could suggest new potential therapeutic targets for Shiga toxin-induced disease.

  19. Structural Evidence for Regulation and Specificity of Flaviviral Proteases and Evolution of the Flaviviridae Fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleshin,A.; Shiryaev, S.; Strongin, A.; Liddington, R.

    2007-01-01

    Pathogenic members of the flavivirus family, including West Nile Virus (WNV) and Dengue Virus (DV), are growing global threats for which there are no specific treatments. The two-component flaviviral enzyme NS2B-NS3 cleaves the viral polyprotein precursor within the host cell, a process that is required for viral replication. Here, we report the crystal structure of WNV NS2B-NS3pro both in a substrate-free form and in complex with the trypsin inhibitor aprotinin/BPTI. We show that aprotinin binds in a substrate-mimetic fashion in which the productive conformation of the protease is fully formed, providing evidence for an 'induced fit' mechanism of catalysis and allowing us to rationalize the distinct substrate specificities of WNV and DV proteases. We also show that the NS2B cofactor of WNV can adopt two very distinct conformations and that this is likely to be a general feature of flaviviral proteases, providing further opportunities for regulation. Finally, by comparing the flaviviral proteases with the more distantly related Hepatitis C virus, we provide insights into the evolution of the Flaviviridae fold. Our work should expedite the design of protease inhibitors to treat a range of flaviviral infections.

  20. Functional Diversity of AAA+ Protease Complexes in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsholz, Alexander K. W.; Birk, Marlene S.; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Turgay, Kürşad

    2017-01-01

    Here, we review the diverse roles and functions of AAA+ protease complexes in protein homeostasis, control of stress response and cellular development pathways by regulatory and general proteolysis in the Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis. We discuss in detail the intricate involvement of AAA+ protein complexes in controlling sporulation, the heat shock response and the role of adaptor proteins in these processes. The investigation of these protein complexes and their adaptor proteins has revealed their relevance for Gram-positive pathogens and their potential as targets for new antibiotics. PMID:28748186

  1. Current and Novel Inhibitors of HIV Protease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorná, Jana; Machala, L.; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Konvalinka, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 3 (2009), s. 1209-1239 ISSN 1999-4915 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) IAAX00320901 Program:IA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : HIV protease * protease inhibitor * HAART Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  2. Tissue dissociation enzyme neutral protease assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breite, A G; Dwulet, F E; McCarthy, R C

    2010-01-01

    Neutral proteases, essential components of purified tissue dissociation enzymes required for successful human islet isolation, show variable activities and effects of substrate on their activities. Initially we used a spectrophotometric endpoint assay with azocasein substrate to measure neutral protease activity. After critical review of the results, we observed these data to be inconsistent and not correlating expected differences in specific activities between thermolysin and Bacillus polymyxa proteases. This observation led to the development of a fluorescent microplate assay using fluorescein isothyocyanate-conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) as the substrate. This simpler, more flexible method offered a homogeneous, kinetic enzyme assay allowing determination of steady state reaction rates of sample replicates at various dilutions. The assay had a linear range of 4- to 8-fold and interassay coefficients of variation for B polymyxa protease and thermolysin of inhibitors, as illustrated by addition of sulfhydryl protease inhibitors, which, consistent with earlier reports, strongly indicated that the main contaminant in purified collagenase preparations was clostripain. Determination of the specific activities for several purified neutral proteases showed that the B polymyxa and Clostridium histolyticum proteases had approximately 40% and 15% specific activities, respectively, of those obtained with purified thermolysin, indicating the different characteristics of neutral protease enzymes for cell isolation procedures. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Production of extracellular aspartic protease in submerged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production of extracellular aspartic protease in submerged fermentation with Mucor mucedo DSM 809. ... The preferred method was the inoculation of the culture media with spores at a total load of 6x105 spores per flask. Key words: Milk clotting enzyme, Aspartic protease, Mucor mucedo, Sub-merged fermentation.

  4. Purification and characterization of protease enzyme from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-03-20

    Mar 20, 2013 ... be absorbed and utilized by living cells. Due to their wide .... The effect of pH on protease stability was determined by pre-incubating the enzyme without substrate at different pH values (5 to 11) using different buffers. The residual ..... detergent formulations: effects of thermodynamic stabilizers and protease ...

  5. Immobilization to prevent enzyme incompatibility with proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenberg, P.; Beeftink, H.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Tramper, J.

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme incompatibility is a problem in multi-enzyme processes that involve a non-specific protease, such as Alcalase. An example is the one-pot enzymatic synthesis of peptides catalyzed by a lipase and a protease. The incompatibility between lipase B from Candida antarctica (CalB) and Alcalase was

  6. Partial Purification and Characterization of Extracellular Protease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    ABSTRACT: Microbial proteases have wide industrial applications and proteases of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have received special attention ... Purification of the enzyme by gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G75 following ammonium .... Gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. The dialysate was ...

  7. Optimization of alkaline protease production from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A protease producing bacteria was isolated from meat waste contaminated soil and identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens. Optimization of the fermentation medium for maximum protease production was carried out. The culture conditions like inoculum concentration, incubation time, pH, temperature, carbon sources, ...

  8. Optimization of medium composition for thermostable protease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... Optimization of the fermentation medium for maximization of thermostable neutral protease production by Bacillus sp. ... at 3.6 g/l and yeast extract at 3.9 g/l gived maximum protease activity of 6804 U/ml. Key words: Medium ... face method, which is used to study the effects of several factors influencing the ...

  9. Optimization of alkaline protease production from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... the metal ions tested. Key words: Alkaline protease, casein agar, meat waste contaminated soil, Pseudomonas fluorescens. INTRODUCTION. Proteases are the most important industrial enzymes that execute a wide variety of functions and have various important biotechnological applications (Mohen et al.,.

  10. Both Hsp70 chaperone and Clp protease plastidial systems are required for protection against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Pablo; Llamas, Ernesto; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2017-03-04

    Environmental stress conditions such as high light, extreme temperatures, salinity or drought trigger oxidative stress and eventually protein misfolding in plants. In chloroplasts, chaperone systems refold proteins after stress, while proteases degrade misfolded and aggregated proteins that cannot be refolded. We observed that reduced activity of chloroplast Hsp70 chaperone or Clp protease systems both prevented growth of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings after treatment with the oxidative agent methyl viologen. Besides showing a role for these particular protein quality control components on the protection against oxidative stress, we provide evidence supporting the existence of a yet undiscovered pathway for Clp-mediated degradation of the damaged proteins.

  11. Factor VII-activating protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanathan, Ramshanker; Gram, Jørgen B; Sand, Niels Peter R

    2017-01-01

    : Factor VII-activating protease (FSAP) may regulate development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We evaluated sex differences in FSAP measures and examined the association between FSAP and coronary artery calcification (CAC) in a middle-aged population. Participants were randomly selected citizens...... aged 50 or 60 without CVD, diabetes mellitus, Marburg I polymorphism, or hormone replacement therapy (HRT). FSAP protein concentration (total FSAP), FSAP urokinase-activating capacity (FSAP GP), and FSAP GP/total FSAP (specific FSAP activity) were measured. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) determined...... the Agatston score, dividing the study population in three groups: (1) Agatston score = 0 U, (2) Agatston score = 1-99 U, or (3) Agatston score more than 99 U. A total of 134 women and 116 men were included. Total FSAP, FSAP GP, and specific FSAP activity were independently higher in women (97.4%, 81.1%, 0...

  12. Generation and characterization of a collection of knock-down lines for the chloroplast Clp protease complex in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Juan C; Tiller, Nadine; Diez, Mercedes; Karcher, Daniel; Tillich, Michael; Schöttler, Mark A; Bock, Ralph

    2017-04-01

    Protein degradation in chloroplasts is carried out by a set of proteases that eliminate misfolded, damaged, or superfluous proteins. The ATP-dependent caseinolytic protease (Clp) is the most complex protease in plastids and has been implicated mainly in stromal protein degradation. In contrast, FtsH, a thylakoid membrane-associated metalloprotease, is believed to participate mainly in the degradation of thylakoidal proteins. To determine the role of specific Clp and FtsH subunits in plant growth and development, RNAi lines targeting at least one subunit of each Clp ring and FtsH were generated in tobacco. In addition, mutation of the translation initiation codon was employed to down-regulate expression of the plastid-encoded ClpP1 subunit. These protease lines cover a broad range of reductions at the transcript and protein levels of the targeted genes. A wide spectrum of phenotypes was obtained, including pigment deficiency, alterations in leaf development, leaf variegations, and impaired photosynthesis. When knock-down lines for the different protease subunits were compared, both common and specific phenotypes were observed, suggesting distinct functions of at least some subunits. Our work provides a well-characterized collection of knock-down lines for plastid proteases in tobacco and reveals the importance of the Clp protease in physiology and plant development. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  13. Gut proteases target Yersinia invasin in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freund Sandra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia enterocolitica is a common cause of food borne gastrointestinal disease. After oral uptake, yersiniae invade Peyer's patches of the distal ileum. This is accomplished by the binding of the Yersinia invasin to β1 integrins on the apical surface of M cells which overlie follicle associated lymphoid tissue. The gut represents a barrier that severely limits yersiniae from reaching deeper tissues such as Peyer's patches. We wondered if gut protease attack on invasion factors could contribute to the low number of yersiniae invading Peyer's patches. Findings Here we show that invasin is rapidly degraded in vivo by gut proteases in the mouse infection model. In vivo proteolytic degradation is due to proteolysis by several gut proteases such as trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, pancreatic elastase, and pepsin. Protease treated yersiniae are shown to be less invasive in a cell culture model. YadA, another surface adhesin is cleaved by similar concentrations of gut proteases but Myf was not cleaved, showing that not all surface proteins are equally susceptible to degradation by gut proteases. Conclusions We demonstrate that gut proteases target important Yersinia virulence factors such as invasin and YadA in vivo. Since invasin is completely degraded within 2-3 h after reaching the small intestine of mice, it is no longer available to mediate invasion of Peyer's patches.

  14. Natural inhibitors of tumor-associated proteases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magdolen, U.; Krol, J.; Sato, S.; Schmitt, M.; Magdolen, V.; Krueger, A.; Mueller, M.M.; Sperl, S.

    2002-01-01

    The turnover and remodelling of extracellular matrix (ECM) is an essential part of many normal biological processes including development, morphogenesis, and wound healing. ECM turnover also occurs in severe pathological situations like artherosclerosis, fibrosis, tumor invasion and metastasis. The major proteases involved in this turnover are serine proteases (especially the urokinase-type plasminogen activator/plasmin system), matrix metalloproteases (a family of about 20 zinc-dependent endopeptidases including collagenases, gelatinases, stromelysins, and membrane-type metalloproteases), and cysteine proteases. In vivo, the activity of these proteases is tightly regulated in the extracellular space by zymogen activation and/or controlled inhibition. In the present review, we give an overview on the structure and biochemical properties of important tumor-associated protease inhibitors such as plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and type 2 (PAI-1, PAI-2), tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1, -2, -3, and -4), and the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C. Interestingly, some of these inhibitors of tumor-associated proteases display multiple functions which rather promote than inhibit tumor progression, when the presence of inhibitors in the tumor tissue is not balanced. (author)

  15. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Monteiro de Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications.

  16. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications. PMID:26273247

  17. Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Virus Replication Upregulates Serine Protease Inhibitor Kazal, Resulting in Cellular Resistance to Serine Protease-Dependent Apoptosis▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Lamontagne, Jason; Pinkerton, Mark; Block, Timothy M.; Lu, Xuanyong

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV, respectively) are different and distinct viruses, but there are striking similarities in their disease potential. Infection by either virus can cause chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and ultimately, liver cancer, despite the fact that no pathogenetic mechanisms are known which are shared by the two viruses. Our recent studies have suggested that replication of either of these viruses upregulates a cellular protein called serine protease inhibitor Kaz...

  18. Novel peptide-based protease inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roodbeen, Renée

    This thesis describes the design and synthesis of peptide-based serine protease inhibitors. The targeted protease, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activates plasminogen, which plays a major role in cancer metastasis. The peptide upain-2 (S 1 ,S 12-cyclo-AcCSWRGLENHAAC-NH2) is a highly...... of novel peptide-based protease inhibitors, efforts were made towards improved methods for peptide synthesis. The coupling of Fmoc-amino acids onto N-methylated peptidyl resins was investigated. These couplings can be low yielding and the effect of the use of microwave heating combined with the coupling...

  19. Structure and function of a novel type of ATP-dependent Clp protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Fredrik I; Tryggvesson, Anders; Sharon, Michal; Diemand, Alexander V; Classen, Mirjam; Best, Christoph; Schmidt, Ronny; Schelin, Jenny; Stanne, Tara M; Bukau, Bernd; Robinson, Carol V; Witt, Susanne; Mogk, Axel; Clarke, Adrian K

    2009-05-15

    The Clp protease is conserved among eubacteria and most eukaryotes, and uses ATP to drive protein substrate unfolding and translocation into a chamber of sequestered proteolytic active sites. The main constitutive Clp protease in photosynthetic organisms has evolved into a functionally essential and structurally intricate enzyme. The model Clp protease from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus consists of the HSP100 molecular chaperone ClpC and a mixed proteolytic core comprised of two distinct subunits, ClpP3 and ClpR. We have purified the ClpP3/R complex, the first for a Clp proteolytic core comprised of heterologous subunits. The ClpP3/R complex has unique functional and structural features, consisting of twin heptameric rings each with an identical ClpP3(3)ClpR(4) configuration. As predicted by its lack of an obvious catalytic triad, the ClpR subunit is shown to be proteolytically inactive. Interestingly, extensive modification to ClpR to restore proteolytic activity to this subunit showed that its presence in the core complex is not rate-limiting for the overall proteolytic activity of the ClpCP3/R protease. Altogether, the ClpP3/R complex shows remarkable similarities to the 20 S core of the proteasome, revealing a far greater degree of convergent evolution than previously thought between the development of the Clp protease in photosynthetic organisms and that of the eukaryotic 26 S proteasome.

  20. Ovarian Tumor (OTU)-domain Containing Viral Proteases Evade Ubiquitin- and ISG15-dependent Innate Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias-Staheli, Natalia; Giannakopoulos, Nadia V.; Kikkert, Marjolein; Taylor, Shannon L.; Bridgen, Anne; Paragas, Jason J.; Richt, Juergen A.; Rowland, Raymond R.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.; Lenschow, Deborah J.; Snijder, Eric J.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Virgin, Herbert Whiting

    2007-01-01

    Summary Ubiquitin (Ub) and interferon stimulated gene product 15 (ISG15) reversibly conjugate to proteins via a conserved LRLRGG C-terminal motif, mediating important innate antiviral responses. The ovarian tumor (OTU) domain represents a superfamily of predicted proteases found in eukaryotic, bacterial and viral proteins, some of which have Ub-deconjugating activity. We show that the OTU domain-containing proteases of nairoviruses and arteriviruses hydrolyze Ub and ISG15 from cellular target proteins. This broad activity contrasts with the target specificity of known mammalian OTU domain-containing proteins. The biological significance of this activity of viral OTU domain-containing proteases was evidenced by their capacity to inhibit NF-κB dependent signaling and to antagonize the antiviral effects of ISG15 during Sindbis virus infection in vivo. The deconjugating activity of viral OTU proteases represents a novel viral immune evasion mechanism that inhibits Ub-and ISG15-dependent antiviral pathways. PMID:18078692

  1. Aspartic Protease Zymography Case Study: Detection of Fungal Acid Proteases by Zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernaghan, Gavin; Mayerhofer, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes a method for the production and characterization of fungal acid proteases. Protease production is induced by growth on BSA media over a pH gradient and protein levels are monitored over time with the Bradford assay. Once protein is depleted, the media is purified and proteases are characterized by gelatin zymography using acrylamide and buffers at near-neutral pH. Maintaining pH levels below those found in traditional zymographic systems avoids the potential loss of activity that may occur in aspartic proteases under alkaline conditions.

  2. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Tissue Dissociation Enzyme Neutral Protease Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Breite, A.G.; Dwulet, F.E.; McCarthy, R.C.

    2010-01-01

    Neutral proteases, essential components of purified tissue dissociation enzymes required for successful human islet isolation, show variable activities and effects of substrate on their activities. Initially we used a spectrophotometric endpoint assay with azocasein substrate to measure neutral protease activity. After critical review of the results, we observed these data to be inconsistent and not correlating expected differences in specific activities between thermolysin and Bacillus polym...

  4. Purification and characterization of protease enzyme from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The enzyme was active in pH range 5 to11 and temperature of 30 to 80°C. The optimum pH and the temperature for protease activity were recorded to be pH 8 and 50°C, respectively. The enzyme was stable up to 40°C and pH 9. The protease activity was inhibited by Zn2+, Ni2+ and Sn2+ and increased by Ca2+, Mg2+ ...

  5. A novel Ca2+-activated protease from germinating Vigna radiata seeds and its role in storage protein mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sadaf; Verma, Giti; Sharma, Samir

    2010-07-15

    Calcium (Ca(2+))-dependent/activated proteases make decisive cleavages in proteins, affecting their further degradation/activation. Few such Ca(2+)-dependent proteases have been reported from plants, and none during germination-related events. Seeds are woken up from their quiescent state upon imbibition of water. The subsequent process of germination is strongly influenced by hormones (mainly gibberellins) and light, with both resulting in change in intracellular Ca(2+). We have investigated the effect of Ca(2+) on protease activity in extracts prepared from dry Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczec seeds and cotyledons 4, 24, 48 and 72h post-imbibition. Ca(2+)-activated protease activity is present at a very low level in dry seeds, rises with imbibition and peaks 24h post-imbibition. Subsequently, the activity rapidly declines, even as total protease activity continues to rise. Calcium activation of proteolysis was reversed by ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), ethylene glycol-bis (2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), 1,10, phenanthroline, chlorpromazine and by beta-mercaptoethanol in a concentration-dependent manner. Protease activity was also inhibited by para chloro mercuribenzoate (pCMB) and l-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido(4-guanidino) butane (E 64), while phenyl methyl sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and pepstatin did not effect Ca(2+) activation. The protease could be separated from the calmodulin fraction by size-exclusion chromatography, while retaining its ability for Ca(2+) activation, excluding the possibility of activation through calmodulin-based pathways. The presence of a Ca(2+)-activated protease in the cotyledons suggests its role in a predetermined program of germination involving elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels during germination. This protease could be an important enzyme interfacing cytoplasmic signaling events and initiation of storage protein mobilization during seed germination. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights

  6. Acid protease production in fungal root endophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerhofer, Michael S; Fraser, Erica; Kernaghan, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Fungal endophytes are ubiquitous in healthy root tissue, but little is known about their ecosystem functions, including their ability to utilize organic nutrient sources such as proteins. Root-associated fungi may secrete proteases to access the carbon and mineral nutrients within proteins in the soil or in the cells of their plant host. We compared the protein utilization patterns of multiple isolates of the root endophytes Phialocephala fortinii s.l., Meliniomyces variabilis and Umbelopsis isabellina with those of two ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, Hebeloma incarnatulum and Laccaria bicolor, and the wood-decay fungus Irpex lacteus at pH values of 2-9 on liquid BSA media. We also assessed protease activity using a fluorescently labeled casein assay and gelatin zymography and characterized proteases using specific protease inhibitors. I. lacteus and U. isabellina utilized protein efficiently, while the ECM fungi exhibited poor protein utilization. ECM fungi secreted metallo-proteases and had pH optima above 4, while other fungi produced aspartic proteases with lower pH optima. The ascomycetous root endophytes M. variabilis and P. fortinii exhibited intermediate levels of protein utilization and M. variabilis exhibited a very low pH optimum. Comparing proteolytic profiles between fungal root endophytes and fungi with well defined ecological roles provides insight into the ecology of these cryptic root associates. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  7. Carbohydrate protease conjugates: Stabilized proteases for peptide synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wartchow, C.A.; Wang, Peng; Bednarski, M.D.; Callstrom, M.R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The synthesis of oligopeptides using stable carbohydrate protease conjugates (CPCs) was examined in acetonitrile solvent systems. CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin] was used for the preparation of peptides containing histidine, phenylalanine, tryptophan in the P{sub 1} position in 60-93% yield. The CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin]-catalyzed synthesis of octamer Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-OEt from Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-OMe was achieved in 71% yield demonstrating that synthesis peptides containing both hydrophylic and hydrophobic amino acids. The P{sub 2} specificity of papain for aromatic residues was utilized for the 2 + 3 coupling of Z-Tyr-Gly-OMe to H{sub 2}N-Gly-Phe-Leu-OH to generate the leucine enkephalin derivative in 79% yield. Although papain is nonspecific for the hydrolysis of N-benzyloxycarbonyl amino acid methyl esters in aqueous solution, the rates of synthesis for these derivitives with nucleophile leucine tert-butyl ester differed by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. CPC[thermolysin] was used to prepare the aspartame precursor Z-Asp-Phe-OMe in 90% yield. The increased stability of CPCs prepared from periodate-modified poly(2-methacryl- amido-2-deoxy-D-glucose), poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose), and poly(5-methacryl-amido-5-deoxy-D-ribose), carbohydrate materials designed to increase the aldehyde concentration in aqueous solution, suggests that the stability of CPCs is directly related to the aldehyde concentration of the carbohydrate material. Periodate oxidation of poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose) followed by covalent attachment to {alpha}-chymotrypsin gave a CPC with catalytic activity in potassium phosphate buffer at 90{degrees}C for 2 h. 1 fig., 1 tab., 40 refs.

  8. Evaluation of proteases and protease inhibitors in Heterodera glycines cysts obtained from laboratory and field populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteases and proteases inhibitors were evaluated in a number of preparations of Heterodera glycines cysts obtained from glasshouse cultures (GH) and field (LR) populations. Using a FRET-peptide library comprising 512 peptide substrate pools that detect 4 endoprotease types (aspartic, cysteine, meta...

  9. Purification and characterisation of a protease (tamarillin) from tamarillo fruit

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhao

    2018-02-16

    A protease from tamarillo fruit (Cyphomandra betacea Cav.) was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation and diethylaminoethyl-Sepharose chromatography. Protease activity was determined on selected peak fractions using a casein substrate. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis showed that the peak with the highest protease activity consisted of one protein of molecular mass ca. 70 kDa. The protease showed optimal activity at pH 11 and 60°C. It was sensitive to phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride while ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and p-chloromercuribenzoic acid had little effect on its activity, indicating that this enzyme was a serine protease. Hg2+ strongly inhibited enzyme activity, possibly due to formation of mercaptide bonds with the thiol groups of the protease, suggesting that some cysteine residues may be located close to the active site. De novo sequencing strongly indicated that the protease was a subtilisin-like alkaline serine protease. The protease from tamarillo has been named \\'tamarillin\\'.

  10. Temporal Proteomics of Inducible RNAi Lines of Clp Protease Subunits Identifies Putative Protease Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Juan C; Martínez-Jaime, Silvia; Schwartzmann, Joram; Karcher, Daniel; Tillich, Michael; Graf, Alexander; Bock, Ralph

    2018-02-01

    The Clp protease in the chloroplasts of plant cells is a large complex composed of at least 13 nucleus-encoded subunits and one plastid-encoded subunit, which are arranged in several ring-like structures. The proteolytic P-ring and the structurally similar R-ring form the core complex that contains the proteolytic chamber. Chaperones of the HSP100 family help with substrate unfolding, and additional accessory proteins are believed to assist with Clp complex assembly and/or to promote complex stability. Although the structure and function of the Clp protease have been studied in great detail in both bacteria and chloroplasts, the identification of bona fide protease substrates has been very challenging. Knockout mutants of genes for protease subunits are of limited value, due to their often pleiotropic phenotypes and the difficulties with distinguishing primary effects (i.e. overaccumulation of proteins that represent genuine protease substrates) from secondary effects (proteins overaccumulating for other reasons). Here, we have developed a new strategy for the identification of candidate substrates of plant proteases. By combining ethanol-inducible knockdown of protease subunits with time-resolved analysis of changes in the proteome, proteins that respond immediately to reduced protease activity can be identified. In this way, secondary effects are minimized and putative protease substrates can be identified. We have applied this strategy to the Clp protease complex of tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum ) and identified a set of chloroplast proteins that are likely degraded by Clp. These include several metabolic enzymes but also a small number of proteins involved in photosynthesis. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Temporal Proteomics of Inducible RNAi Lines of Clp Protease Subunits Identifies Putative Protease Substrates1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Jaime, Silvia; Karcher, Daniel; Tillich, Michael

    2018-01-01

    The Clp protease in the chloroplasts of plant cells is a large complex composed of at least 13 nucleus-encoded subunits and one plastid-encoded subunit, which are arranged in several ring-like structures. The proteolytic P-ring and the structurally similar R-ring form the core complex that contains the proteolytic chamber. Chaperones of the HSP100 family help with substrate unfolding, and additional accessory proteins are believed to assist with Clp complex assembly and/or to promote complex stability. Although the structure and function of the Clp protease have been studied in great detail in both bacteria and chloroplasts, the identification of bona fide protease substrates has been very challenging. Knockout mutants of genes for protease subunits are of limited value, due to their often pleiotropic phenotypes and the difficulties with distinguishing primary effects (i.e. overaccumulation of proteins that represent genuine protease substrates) from secondary effects (proteins overaccumulating for other reasons). Here, we have developed a new strategy for the identification of candidate substrates of plant proteases. By combining ethanol-inducible knockdown of protease subunits with time-resolved analysis of changes in the proteome, proteins that respond immediately to reduced protease activity can be identified. In this way, secondary effects are minimized and putative protease substrates can be identified. We have applied this strategy to the Clp protease complex of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and identified a set of chloroplast proteins that are likely degraded by Clp. These include several metabolic enzymes but also a small number of proteins involved in photosynthesis. PMID:29229697

  12. Localization to Chromosomes of Structural Genes for the Major Protease Inhibitors of Barley Grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejgaard, Jørn; Bjørn, S.E.; Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1984-01-01

    Wheat-barley chromosome addition lines were compared by isoelectric focusing of protein extracts to identify chromosomes carrying loci for the major immunochemically distinct protease inhibitors of barley grains. Structural genes for the following inhibitors were localized: an inhibitor of both...... endogenous α-amylase 2 and subtilisin (ASI) on chromosome 2, two chymotrypsin/subtilisin inhibitors (CI-1 and CI-2) on chromosome 5 (long arm) and the major trypsin inhibitor (TI-1) on chromosome 3....

  13. Bacterial proteases, untapped antimicrobial drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, Elizabeth; Wright, Gerard D

    2017-04-01

    Bacterial proteases are an extensive collection of enzymes that have vital roles in cell viability, stress response and pathogenicity. Although their perturbation clearly offers the potential for antimicrobial drug development, both as traditional antibiotics and anti-virulence drugs, they are not yet the target of any clinically used therapeutics. Here we describe the potential for and recent progress in the development of compounds targeting bacterial proteases with a focus on AAA+ family proteolytic complexes and signal peptidases (SPs). Caseinolytic protease (ClpP) belongs to the AAA+ family of proteases, a group of multimeric barrel-shaped complexes whose activity is tightly regulated by associated AAA+ ATPases. The opportunity for chemical perturbation of these complexes is demonstrated by compounds targeting ClpP for inhibition, activation or perturbation of its associated ATPase. Meanwhile, SPs are also a proven antibiotic target. Responsible for the cleavage of targeting peptides during protein secretion, both type I and type II SPs have been successfully targeted by chemical inhibitors. As the threat of pan-antibiotic resistance continues to grow, these and other bacterial proteases offer an arsenal of novel antibiotic targets ripe for development.

  14. Two Distinct Interferon-γ in the Orange-Spotted Grouper (Epinephelus coioides: Molecular Cloning, Functional Characterization, and Regulation in Toll-Like Receptor Pathway by Induction of miR-146a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Peng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Interferon gamma (IFNγ is a Th1 cytokine that is critical for innate and adaptive immunity. Toll-like receptors (TLRs signaling pathways are critical in early host defense against invading pathogens. miR-146a has been reported to participate in the regulation of host immunity. The known mechanisms of integrations between the IFNγ and TLR signaling pathways are incompletely understood, especially in teleosts. In this study, orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides IFNγ1 and IFNγ2, their biological activities, especially their involvements in TLR pathway, were explored. We identified and cloned two IFNγ genes of E. coioides, namely EcIFNγ1 and EcIFNγ2. The produced recombinant E. coioides IFNγ1 (rEcIFNγ1 and IFNγ2 (rEcIFNγ2 proteins showed functions, which are similar to those of other bony fishes, such as enhancing nitric oxide responses and respiratory burst response. rEcIFNγ2 could regulate TLR pathway by enhancing the promoter activity of miR-146a upstream sequence and thus increasing the expression level of miR-146a, which possibly targets TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6, a key adapter molecule in TLR signaling pathway. Taken together, these findings unravel a novel regulatory mechanism of anti-inflammatory response by IFNγ2, which could mediate TLR pathway through IFNγ2–miR-146a–TRAF6 negative regulation loop. It is suggested that IFNγ2 may provide a promising therapeutic, which may help to fine tune the immune response.

  15. Development of potent inhibitors of the coxsackievirus 3C protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eui Seung; Lee, Won Gil; Yun, Soo-Hyeon; Rho, Seong Hwan; Im, Isak; Yang, Sung Tae; Sellamuthu, Saravanan; Lee, Yong Jae; Kwon, Sun Jae; Park, Ohkmae K.; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Park, Woo Jin; Kim, Yong-Chul

    2007-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) 3C protease (3CP) plays essential roles in the viral replication cycle, and therefore, provides an attractive therapeutic target for treatment of human diseases caused by CVB3 infection. CVB3 3CP and human rhinovirus (HRV) 3CP have a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity. Comparative modeling of these two 3CPs revealed one prominent distinction; an Asn residue delineating the S2' pocket in HRV 3CP is replaced by a Tyr residue in CVB3 3CP. AG7088, a potent inhibitor of HRV 3CP, was modified by substitution of the ethyl group at the P2' position with various hydrophobic aromatic rings that are predicted to interact preferentially with the Tyr residue in the S2' pocket of CVB3 3CP. The resulting derivatives showed dramatically increased inhibitory activities against CVB3 3CP. In addition, one of the derivatives effectively inhibited the CVB3 proliferation in vitro

  16. Cleavage entropy as quantitative measure of protease specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian E Fuchs

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A purely information theory-guided approach to quantitatively characterize protease specificity is established. We calculate an entropy value for each protease subpocket based on sequences of cleaved substrates extracted from the MEROPS database. We compare our results with known subpocket specificity profiles for individual proteases and protease groups (e.g. serine proteases, metallo proteases and reflect them quantitatively. Summation of subpocket-wise cleavage entropy contributions yields a measure for overall protease substrate specificity. This total cleavage entropy allows ranking of different proteases with respect to their specificity, separating unspecific digestive enzymes showing high total cleavage entropy from specific proteases involved in signaling cascades. The development of a quantitative cleavage entropy score allows an unbiased comparison of subpocket-wise and overall protease specificity. Thus, it enables assessment of relative importance of physicochemical and structural descriptors in protease recognition. We present an exemplary application of cleavage entropy in tracing substrate specificity in protease evolution. This highlights the wide range of substrate promiscuity within homologue proteases and hence the heavy impact of a limited number of mutations on individual substrate specificity.

  17. Protease activated receptor-2 (PAR2): possible target of phytochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakarala, Kavita Kumari; Jamil, Kaiser

    2015-09-01

    The use of phytochemicals either singly or in combination with other anticancer drugs comes with an advantage of less toxicity and minimal side effects. Signaling pathways play central role in cell cycle, cell growth, metabolism, etc. Thus, the identification of phytochemicals with promising antagonistic effect on the receptor/s playing key role in single transduction may have better therapeutic application. With this background, phytochemicals were screened against protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). PAR2 belongs to the superfamily of GPCRs and is an important target for breast cancer. Using in silico methods, this study was able to identify the phytochemicals with promising binding affinity suggesting their therapeutic potential in the treatment of breast cancer. The findings from this study acquires importance as the information on the possible agonists and antagonists of PAR2 is limited due its unique mechanism of activation.

  18. Ox40L-Ox40 pathway plays distinct roles in regulating Th2 responses but does not determine outcome of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania mexicana and Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuladhar, Rashmi; Oghumu, Steve; Dong, Ran; Peterson, Allison; Sharpe, Arlene H; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2015-01-01

    Ox40 ligand (Ox40L)-Ox40 pathway has been shown to enhance Th2 responses and play a role in pathogenesis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) caused by Leishmania major. Using Ox40l(-/-) BALB/c mice we analyzed the role of this pathway in determining the outcome to CL caused by L. mexicana and compared to L. major. Contrary to our expectations, Ox40l(-/-) mice were highly susceptible to both L. major (LV39) and L. mexicana (M379) and developed large non-healing lesions containing parasites comparable to Ox40l(+/+) BALB/c mice. Interestingly, upon in vitro stimulation with Leishmania antigen (LmAg), the lymph node cells from L. major infected Ox40l(-/-) mice produced significantly less IL-4 and IL-10 compared to Ox40l(+/+) mice. L. mexicana infected Ox40l(-/-) and Ox40l(+/+) mice did not show any difference in the production of IL-4 and IL-10. No difference was noted in the amount of Th1 cytokines IFN-ү and IL-12 produced by Ox40l(-/-) and Ox40l(+/+) mice infected with either parasite. These results indicate that the Ox40L-Ox40 pathway promotes Th2 bias only in L. major infection but not L. mexicana infection and this pathway is not critical for susceptibility to CL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protease inhibits complement activation by cleaving complement component 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiichi Mawatari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is mediated in part by viral proteins that abrogate the host immune response, including the complement system, but the precise mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated whether HCV proteins are involved in the fragmentation of complement component 4 (C4, composed of subunits C4α, C4β, and C4γ, and the role of HCV proteins in complement activation. METHODS: Human C4 was incubated with HCV nonstructural (NS 3/4A protease, core, or NS5. Samples were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then subjected to peptide sequencing. The activity of the classical complement pathway was examined using an erythrocyte hemolysis assay. The cleavage pattern of C4 in NS3/4A-expressing and HCV-infected cells, respectively, was also examined. RESULTS: HCV NS3/4A protease cleaved C4γ in a concentration-dependent manner, but viral core and NS5 did not. A specific inhibitor of NS3/4A protease reduced C4γ cleavage. NS3/4A protease-mediated cleavage of C4 inhibited classical pathway activation, which was abrogated by a NS3/4A protease inhibitor. In addition, co-transfection of cells with C4 and wild-type NS3/4A, but not a catalytic-site mutant of NS3/4A, produced cleaved C4γ fragments. Such C4 processing, with a concomitant reduction in levels of full-length C4γ, was also observed in HCV-infected cells expressing C4. CONCLUSIONS: C4 is a novel cellular substrate of the HCV NS3/4A protease. Understanding disturbances in the complement system mediated by NS3/4A protease may provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying persistent HCV infection.

  20. The Clp protease system; a central component of the chloroplast protease network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinares, Paul Dominic B; Kim, Jitae; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2011-08-01

    Intra-plastid proteases play crucial and diverse roles in the development and maintenance of non-photosynthetic plastids and chloroplasts. Formation and maintenance of a functional thylakoid electron transport chain requires various protease activities, operating in parallel, as well as in series. This review first provides a short, referenced overview of all experimentally identified plastid proteases in Arabidopsis thaliana. We then focus on the Clp protease system which constitutes the most abundant and complex soluble protease system in the plastid, consisting of 15 nuclear-encoded members and one plastid-encoded member in Arabidopsis. Comparisons to the simpler Clp system in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic bacteria will be made and the role of Clp proteases in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii will be briefly reviewed. Extensive molecular genetics has shown that the Clp system plays an essential role in Arabidopsis chloroplast development in the embryo as well as in leaves. Molecular characterization of the various Clp mutants has elucidated many of the consequences of loss of Clp activities. We summarize and discuss the structural and functional aspects of the Clp machinery, including progress on substrate identification and recognition. Finally, the Clp system will be evaluated in the context of the chloroplast protease network. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Regulation of Electron Transport in Chloroplasts. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Protease activated receptor signaling is required for African trypanosome traversal of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Grab

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs as an in vitro model for how African trypanosomes cross the human blood-brain barrier (BBB we recently reported that the parasites cross the BBB by generating calcium activation signals in HBMECs through the activity of parasite cysteine proteases, particularly cathepsin L (brucipain. In the current study, we examined the possible role of a class of protease stimulated HBMEC G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs known as protease activated receptors (PARs that might be implicated in calcium signaling by African trypanosomes.Using RNA interference (RNAi we found that in vitro PAR-2 gene (F2RL1 expression in HBMEC monolayers could be reduced by over 95%. We also found that the ability of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense to cross F2RL1-silenced HBMEC monolayers was reduced (39%-49% and that HBMECs silenced for F2RL1 maintained control levels of barrier function in the presence of the parasite. Consistent with the role of PAR-2, we found that HBMEC barrier function was also maintained after blockade of Galpha(q with Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT. PAR-2 signaling has been shown in other systems to have neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective roles and our data implicate a role for proteases (i.e. brucipain and PAR-2 in African trypanosome/HBMEC interactions. Using gene-profiling methods to interrogate candidate HBMEC pathways specifically triggered by brucipain, several pathways that potentially link some pathophysiologic processes associated with CNS HAT were identified.Together, the data support a role, in part, for GPCRs as molecular targets for parasite proteases that lead to the activation of Galpha(q-mediated calcium signaling. The consequence of these events is predicted to be increased permeability of the BBB to parasite transmigration and the initiation of neuroinflammation, events precursory to CNS disease.

  2. Arabidopsis SUMO protease ASP1 positively regulates flowering time partially through regulating FLC stability 

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, Xiangxiong

    2016-12-07

    The initiation of flowering is tightly regulated by the endogenous and environment signals, which is crucial for the reproductive success of flowering plants. It is well known that autonomous and vernalization pathways repress transcription of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), a focal floral repressor, but how its protein stability is regulated remains largely unknown. Here, we found that mutations in a novel Arabidopsis SUMO protease 1 (ASP1) resulted in a strong late-flowering phenotype under long-days, but to a lesser extent under short-days. ASP1 localizes in the nucleus and exhibited a SUMO protease activity in vitro and in vivo. The conserved Cys-577 in ASP1 is critical for its enzymatic activity, as well as its physiological function in the regulation of flowering time. Genetic and gene expression analyses demonstrated that ASP1 promotes transcription of positive regulators of flowering, such as FT, SOC1 and FD, and may function in both CO-dependent photoperiod pathway and FLC-dependent pathways. Although the transcription level of FLC was not affected in the loss-of-function asp1 mutant, the protein stability of FLC was increased in the asp1 mutant. Taken together, this study identified a novel bona fide SUMO protease, ASP1, which positively regulates transition to flowering at least partly by repressing FLC protein stability.

  3. Effect of protease inhibitors on exflagellation in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Ingrid; Bosse, Rebecca; Schirmeister, Tanja; Pradel, Gabriele

    2008-04-01

    Enzymes involved in sexual differentiation and fertilization of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum represent potential targets for transmission blocking strategies. Parasite proteases are putatively involved in several steps during fertilization, but the types of proteases, their targets and modes of action remain hitherto unknown. We investigated the involvement of proteases in gametogenesis via exflagellation and immunofluorescence assays, using a variety of commercially available as well as newly designed protease inhibitors. The assays revealed a blockade of microgamete formation by the cysteine/serine protease inhibitors TLCK and TPCK. The serine protease inhibitor PMSF, the falcipain-targeting inhibitor RV112D, and the aspartic protease inhibitor EPNP also significantly decreased formation of microgametes. The metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline, on the other hand, inhibited exflagellation by interfering with microgamete motility. Furthermore, EPNP reduced the activation of male and female gametocytes. Our data point to a major involvement of serine proteases and a non-thermolysin-like zinc metalloprotease in microgametocyte exflagellation.

  4. Cysteine proteases as potential antigens in antiparasitic DNA vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Buchmann, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner.......En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner....

  5. Selection of Protease Inhibitors to Prevent or Attenuate Inflammatory Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    temperature. elevated body temperature, pH, oxygen tension): * number of chemical factors (fatty acids. lactid acid, pepsin, lysozyme, antimicrobial ...inhibit toxic serine proteases produced by the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae. The known spectrum of protease inhibitors from invertebrates includes also

  6. Ten Prominent Host Proteases in Plant-Pathogen Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L. Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Proteases are enzymes integral to the plant immune system. Multiple aspects of defence are regulated by proteases, including the hypersensitive response, pathogen recognition, priming and peptide hormone release. These processes are regulated by unrelated proteases residing at different subcellular locations. In this review, we discuss 10 prominent plant proteases contributing to the plant immune system, highlighting the diversity of roles they perform in plant defence.

  7. Crystal structure of a novel cysteinless plant Kunitz-type protease inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Daiane; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Verissimo, Paula; Yoo Im, Sonia; Sampaio, Misako Uemura; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela

    2007-01-01

    Bauhinia bauhinioides Cruzipain Inhibitor (BbCI) is a cysteine protease inhibitor highly homologous to plant Kunitz-type inhibitors. However, in contrast to classical Kunitz family inhibitors it lacks cysteine residues and therefore disulfide bridges. BbCI is also distinct in the ability to inactivate enzymes belonging to two different classes, cysteine and serine proteases. Besides inhibiting the cysteine protease cruzipain, BbCI also inhibits cathepsin L and the serine proteases HNE (human neutrophil elastase) and PPE (porcine pancreatic elastase). Monoclinic crystals of the recombinant inhibitor that diffract to 1.7 A resolution were obtained using hanging drop method by vapor diffusion at 18 o C. The refined structure shows the conservative β-trefoil fold features of the Kunitz inhibitors. In BbCI, one of the two characteristic S-S bonds is replaced by the water-mediated interaction between Tyr125 and Gly132. In this work we explore the structural differences between Kunitz-type inhibitors and analyze the essential interactions that maintain the protein structural stability preserving its biological function

  8. Thermostable alkaline halophilic-protease production by Natronolimnobius innermongolicus WN18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Samy; Hagagy, Nashwa; Abdel Aziz, Mohamed; El-Meleigy, El Syaed; Pessione, Enrica

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the production and biochemical characterisation of a thermostable alkaline halophilic protease from Natronolimnobius innermongolicus WN18 (HQ658997), isolated from soda Lake of Wadi An-Natrun, Egypt. The enzyme was concentrated by spinning through a centriplus, centrifugal ultrafiltration Millipore membrane with a total yield of 25%. The relative molecular mass of this protease determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis ranged from 67 to 43 kDa. The extracellular protease of N. innermongolicus WN18 was dependent on high salt concentrations for activity and stability, and it had an optimum temperature of 60°C in the presence of 2.5 M NaCl. This enzyme was stable in a broad pH range (6-12) with an optimum pH of 9-10 for azocasein hydrolysis. This extracellular protease, therefore, could be defined as thermostable and haloalkaliphilic with distinct properties that make the enzyme applicable for different industrial purposes.

  9. Degradation of PsbO by the Deg protease HhoA Is thioredoxin dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma N Roberts

    Full Text Available The widely distributed members of the Deg/HtrA protease family play an important role in the proteolysis of misfolded and damaged proteins. Here we show that the Deg protease rHhoA is able to degrade PsbO, the extrinsic protein of the Photosystem II (PSII oxygen-evolving complex in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and in spinach. PsbO is known to be stable in its oxidized form, but after reduction by thioredoxin it became a substrate for recombinant HhoA (rHhoA. rHhoA cleaved reduced eukaryotic (specifically, spinach PsbO at defined sites and created distinct PsbO fragments that were not further degraded. As for the corresponding prokaryotic substrate (reduced PsbO of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, no PsbO fragments were observed. Assembly to PSII protected PsbO from degradation. For Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, our results show that HhoA, HhoB, and HtrA are localized in the periplasma and/or at the thylakoid membrane. In agreement with the idea that PsbO could be a physiological substrate for Deg proteases, part of the cellular fraction of the three Deg proteases of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (HhoA, HhoB, and HtrA was detected in the PSII-enriched membrane fraction.

  10. Production of alkaline proteases by alkalophilic Bacillus subtilis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-11-23

    Nov 23, 2016 ... detergent industries (Moon and Parulekar, 1991). Proteases of commercial importance are produced from microbial, animal and plant sources (Patel, 1985). Almost all living organisms can produce alkaline protease at 32 to 45°C and pH 8 to 9 (Akcan and Uyar, 2011). Microbial proteases are produced ...

  11. Optimization of alkaline protease production from Bacillus subtilis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimization of the strain revealed that the most suitable nitrogen source to enhance protease production was beef extract. Among various carbon sources tested, maximum production of protease was registered in medium with added glucose. The effect of metals ions indicated that maximum protease production was ...

  12. Production dynamics of extracellular protease from Bacillus species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... showed that Bacillus species under study are good producers of extracellular protease at high temperature. This might be an indication that proteases produced would be thermostable. Keywords Protease; proteolytic bacteria; Bacillus macerans; Bacillus licheniformis; Bacillus subtilis. African Journal of Biotechnology Vol.

  13. Purification and characterization of a protease from Thermophilic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2006-10-19

    Oct 19, 2006 ... strain HS08, originally isolated from a soil sample collected from the Tulufan Crater of China, is .... Effect of temperature and pH on protease activity ... pH. To test the thermostability of the protease, the purified protease was incubated at various temperatures ranging from 40 to 80°C for. 10 to 60 min, then ...

  14. Structure of granzyme C reveals an unusual mechanism of protease autoinhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiserman, Dion; Buckle, Ashley M.; Van Damme, Petra; Irving, James A.; Law, Ruby H.P.; Matthews, Antony Y.; Bashtannyk-Puhalovich, Tanya; Langendorf, Chris; Thompson, Philip; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Gevaert, Kris; Whisstock, James C.; Bird, Phillip I.; (Monash); (Flanders)

    2009-05-21

    Proteases act in important homeostatic pathways and are tightly regulated. Here, we report an unusual structural mechanism of regulation observed by the 2.5-{angstrom} X-ray crystal structure of the serine protease, granzyme C. Although the active-site triad residues adopt canonical conformations, the oxyanion hole is improperly formed, and access to the primary specificity (S1) pocket is blocked through a reversible rearrangement involving Phe-191. Specifically, a register shift in the 190-strand preceding the active-site serine leads to Phe-191 filling the S1 pocket. Mutation of a unique Glu-Glu motif at positions 192-193 unlocks the enzyme, which displays chymase activity, and proteomic analysis confirms that activity of the wild-type protease can be released through interactions with an appropriate substrate. The 2.5-{angstrom} structure of the unlocked enzyme reveals unprecedented flexibility in the 190-strand preceding the active-site serine that results in Phe-191 vacating the S1 pocket. Overall, these observations describe a broadly applicable mechanism of protease regulation that cannot be predicted by template-based modeling or bioinformatic approaches alone.

  15. Emerging Role of Proteases in the Pathogenesis of Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP is a heterogeneous upper airway disease with multiple etiologies. Clinically, CRSwNP can be classified into either eosinophilic or non-eosinophilic subtypes. The eosinophilic phenotype of CRSwNP is widely thought to be highly associated with recurrence of nasal polyps or surgical failure. Epithelial cells have a crucial role in the development of Th2-biased airway diseases. Recent studies have shown that a wide range of external stimuli such as allergens and microorganisms can elicit the release of epithelial-derived Th2-driving cytokines and chemokines. Protease activity is a feature common to these multiple environmental insults and there is growing evidence for the concept that an imbalance of proteases and protease inhibitors in the epithelial barrier leads to both the initiation and maintenance of chronic eosinophilic airway inflammation. In this review, we analyze recent work on the role of proteases in the development of the sinonasal mucosal type 2 immune response with an emphasis on the molecular pathways promoting adaptive Th2 cell immunity.

  16. The Clp Chaperones and Proteases of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakkouri, Majida El; Pow, Andre; Mulichak, Anne; Cheung, Kevin L.Y.; Artz, Jennifer D.; Amani, Mehrnaz; Fell, Stuart; de Koning-Ward, Tania F.; Goodman, C. Dean; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Ortega, Joaquin; Hui, Raymond; Houry, Walid A. (McMaster U.); (Melbourne); (Toronto); (Deakin); (HWMRI)

    2015-02-09

    The Clp chaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clp chaperones and proteases in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clp chaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum.

  17. The Clp Chaperones and Proteases of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M El Bakkouri; A Pow; A Mulichak; K Cheung; J Artz; M Amani; S Fell; T de Koning-Ward; C Goodman; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The Clpchaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clpchaperones and proteases in the humanmalariaparasitePlasmodiumfalciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clpchaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum.

  18. Developing HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors through Stereospecific Reactions in Protein Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olajuyigbe, Folasade M; Demitri, Nicola; De Zorzi, Rita; Geremia, Silvano

    2016-10-31

    Protease inhibitors are key components in the chemotherapy of HIV infection. However, the appearance of viral mutants routinely compromises their clinical efficacy, creating a constant need for new and more potent inhibitors. Recently, a new class of epoxide-based inhibitors of HIV-1 protease was investigated and the configuration of the epoxide carbons was demonstrated to play a crucial role in determining the binding affinity. Here we report the comparison between three crystal structures at near-atomic resolution of HIV-1 protease in complex with the epoxide-based inhibitor, revealing an in-situ epoxide ring opening triggered by a pH change in the mother solution of the crystal. Increased pH in the crystal allows a stereospecific nucleophile attack of an ammonia molecule onto an epoxide carbon, with formation of a new inhibitor containing amino-alcohol functions. The described experiments open a pathway for the development of new stereospecific protease inhibitors from a reactive lead compound.

  19. Developing HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors through Stereospecific Reactions in Protein Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folasade M. Olajuyigbe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Protease inhibitors are key components in the chemotherapy of HIV infection. However, the appearance of viral mutants routinely compromises their clinical efficacy, creating a constant need for new and more potent inhibitors. Recently, a new class of epoxide-based inhibitors of HIV-1 protease was investigated and the configuration of the epoxide carbons was demonstrated to play a crucial role in determining the binding affinity. Here we report the comparison between three crystal structures at near-atomic resolution of HIV-1 protease in complex with the epoxide-based inhibitor, revealing an in-situ epoxide ring opening triggered by a pH change in the mother solution of the crystal. Increased pH in the crystal allows a stereospecific nucleophile attack of an ammonia molecule onto an epoxide carbon, with formation of a new inhibitor containing amino-alcohol functions. The described experiments open a pathway for the development of new stereospecific protease inhibitors from a reactive lead compound.

  20. Nepenthesin protease activity indicates digestive fluid dynamics in carnivorous nepenthes plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Buch

    Full Text Available Carnivorous plants use different morphological features to attract, trap and digest prey, mainly insects. Plants from the genus Nepenthes possess specialized leaves called pitchers that function as pitfall-traps. These pitchers are filled with a digestive fluid that is generated by the plants themselves. In order to digest caught prey in their pitchers, Nepenthes plants produce various hydrolytic enzymes including aspartic proteases, nepenthesins (Nep. Knowledge about the generation and induction of these proteases is limited. Here, by employing a FRET (fluorescent resonance energy transfer-based technique that uses a synthetic fluorescent substrate an easy and rapid detection of protease activities in the digestive fluids of various Nepenthes species was feasible. Biochemical studies and the heterologously expressed Nep II from Nepenthes mirabilis proved that the proteolytic activity relied on aspartic proteases, however an acid-mediated auto-activation mechanism was necessary. Employing the FRET-based approach, the induction and dynamics of nepenthesin in the digestive pitcher fluid of various Nepenthes plants could be studied directly with insect (Drosophila melanogaster prey or plant material. Moreover, we observed that proteolytic activity was induced by the phytohormone jasmonic acid but not by salicylic acid suggesting that jasmonate-dependent signaling pathways are involved in plant carnivory.

  1. Nepenthesin protease activity indicates digestive fluid dynamics in carnivorous nepenthes plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Franziska; Kaman, Wendy E; Bikker, Floris J; Yilamujiang, Ayufu; Mithöfer, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Carnivorous plants use different morphological features to attract, trap and digest prey, mainly insects. Plants from the genus Nepenthes possess specialized leaves called pitchers that function as pitfall-traps. These pitchers are filled with a digestive fluid that is generated by the plants themselves. In order to digest caught prey in their pitchers, Nepenthes plants produce various hydrolytic enzymes including aspartic proteases, nepenthesins (Nep). Knowledge about the generation and induction of these proteases is limited. Here, by employing a FRET (fluorescent resonance energy transfer)-based technique that uses a synthetic fluorescent substrate an easy and rapid detection of protease activities in the digestive fluids of various Nepenthes species was feasible. Biochemical studies and the heterologously expressed Nep II from Nepenthes mirabilis proved that the proteolytic activity relied on aspartic proteases, however an acid-mediated auto-activation mechanism was necessary. Employing the FRET-based approach, the induction and dynamics of nepenthesin in the digestive pitcher fluid of various Nepenthes plants could be studied directly with insect (Drosophila melanogaster) prey or plant material. Moreover, we observed that proteolytic activity was induced by the phytohormone jasmonic acid but not by salicylic acid suggesting that jasmonate-dependent signaling pathways are involved in plant carnivory.

  2. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor in paediatric patients with nephrotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is an endogenous protease inhibitor that regulates the initiation of the extrinsic coagulation pathway by producing factor ... plasma TFPI level and total protein and serum albumin, and a positive correlation between the plasma TFPI level and the urinary protein/creatinine ratio (p<0.05).

  3. tolerant alkaline protease from Bacillus coagulans PSB

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oyaide

    2013-05-22

    May 22, 2013 ... optimum activity at 60°C and pH 8.0 with casein as substrate. The enzyme was .... appropriate buffers. 50 mM of buffer solutions (sodium citrate, pH .... Table 2. Hydrolysis of protein substrates by protease from Bacillus coagulans PSB-07. Substrate. Relative activity (%). Casein. 100. Gelatin. 18. BSA. 72.

  4. HIV-1 protease-induced apoptosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rumlová, Michaela; Křížová, Ivana; Keprová, Alena; Hadravová, Romana; Doležal, Michal; Strohalmová, Karolína; Pichová, Iva; Hájek, Miroslav; Ruml, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, May 20 (2014), 37/1-37/15 ISSN 1742-4690 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1388 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : HIV protease * BCA3 * AKIP-1 * apoptosis * mitochondria Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.185, year: 2014 http://www.retrovirology.com/content/11/1/37

  5. Protease inhibitor mediated resistance to insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Outchkourov, N.S.

    2003-01-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) are among the defensive molecules that plants produce in order to defend themselves against herbivores. A major aim of this thesis is to develop novel insect resistance traits usingheterologous, non-plant PIs. Prerequisite for the success of the

  6. Protease inhibitor (Pi) locus, fertility and twinning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, D.I.; Frants, R.R.; Bank, R.A.; Martin, N.G.

    1992-01-01

    In a sample of 160 Dutch twin pairs and their parents, we found that mothers of dizygotic twins had frequencies of the S and Z alleles at the protease inhibitor (Pi) locus that were 3 times higher than a control sample. Mothers of identical twins also had a higher frequency of S than controls. The S

  7. Inhibition of HIV protease by monoclonal antibodies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáčová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jiří; Fábry, Milan; Hořejší, Magdalena; Štouračová, Renata; Lescar, J.; Riottot, M. M.; Sedláček, Juraj; Bentley, G. A.

    15(5), č. 15 (2002), s. 272-276 ISSN 0952-3499 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5052502; GA ČR GV203/98/K023 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : monoclonal antibodies * HIV protease * crystal structure Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.838, year: 2002

  8. Dataset of cocoa aspartic protease cleavage sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Janek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data provide information in support of the research article, “The cleavage specificity of the aspartic protease of cocoa beans involved in the generation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors” (Janek et al., 2016 [1]. Three different protein substrates were partially digested with the aspartic protease isolated from cocoa beans and commercial pepsin, respectively. The obtained peptide fragments were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS and identified using the MASCOT server. The N- and C-terminal ends of the peptide fragments were used to identify the corresponding in-vitro cleavage sites by comparison with the amino acid sequences of the substrate proteins. The same procedure was applied to identify the cleavage sites used by the cocoa aspartic protease during cocoa fermentation starting from the published amino acid sequences of oligopeptides isolated from fermented cocoa beans. Keywords: Aspartic protease, Cleavage sites, Cocoa, In-vitro proteolysis, Mass spectrometry, Peptides

  9. A novel protease activity assay using a protease-responsive chaperone protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sao, Kentaro [Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Murata, Masaharu, E-mail: m-murata@dem.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Fujisaki, Yuri; Umezaki, Kaori [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Mori, Takeshi; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki [Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Center for Future Chemistry, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Hashizume, Makoto [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2009-06-05

    Protease activity assays are important for elucidating protease function and for developing new therapeutic agents. In this study, a novel turbidimetric method for determining the protease activity using a protease-responsive chaperone protein is described. For this purpose, a recombinant small heat-shock protein (sHSP) with an introduced Factor Xa protease recognition site was synthesized in bacteria. This recombinant mutant, FXa-HSP, exhibited chaperone-like activity at high temperatures in cell lysates. However, the chaperone-like activity of FXa-HSP decreased dramatically following treatment with Factor Xa. Protein precipitation was subsequently observed in the cell lysates. The reaction was Factor Xa concentration-dependent and was quantitatively suppressed by a specific inhibitor for Factor Xa. Protein aggregation was detected by a simple method based on turbidimetry. The results clearly demonstrate that this assay is an effective, easy-to-use method for determining protease activities without the requirement of labeling procedures and the use of radioisotopes.

  10. Computational visual distinctness metric

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez-Baena, J.; Toet, A.; Fdez-Vidal, X.R.; Garrido, A.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, R.

    1998-01-01

    A new computational visual distinctness metric based on principles of the early human visual system is presented. The metric is applied to quantify (1) the visual distinctness of targets in complex natural scenes and (2) the perceptual differences between compressed and uncompressed images. The new

  11. Pathophysiological significance and therapeutic applications of snake venom protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Rupamoni; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2017-06-01

    Protease inhibitors are important constituents of snake venom and play important roles in the pathophysiology of snakebite. Recently, research on snake venom protease inhibitors has provided valuable information to decipher the molecular details of various biological processes and offer insight for the development of some therapeutically important molecules from snake venom. The process of blood coagulation and fibrinolysis, in addition to affecting platelet function, are well known as the major targets of several snake venom protease inhibitors. This review summarizes the structure-functional aspects of snake venom protease inhibitors that have been described to date. Because diverse biological functions have been demonstrated by protease inhibitors, a comparative overview of their pharmacological and pathophysiological properties is also highlighted. In addition, since most snake venom protease inhibitors are non-toxic on their own, this review evaluates the different roles of individual protease inhibitors that could lead to the identification of drug candidates and diagnostic molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Microbial alkaline proteases: Optimization of production parameters and their properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanupriya Miglani Sharma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteases are hydrolytic enzymes capable of degrading proteins into small peptides and amino acids. They account for nearly 60% of the total industrial enzyme market. Proteases are extensively exploited commercially, in food, pharmaceutical, leather and detergent industry. Given their potential use, there has been renewed interest in the discovery of proteases with novel properties and a constant thrust to optimize the enzyme production. This review summarizes a fraction of the enormous reports available on various aspects of alkaline proteases. Diverse sources for isolation of alkaline protease producing microorganisms are reported. The various nutritional and environmental parameters affecting the production of alkaline proteases in submerged and solid state fermentation are described. The enzymatic and physicochemical properties of alkaline proteases from several microorganisms are discussed which can help to identify enzymes with high activity and stability over extreme pH and temperature, so that they can be developed for industrial applications.

  13. Preliminary characterisation of extracellular serine proteases of Dermatophilus congolensis isolates from cattle, sheep and horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, N C; Mijinyawa, M S; Hermoso de Mendoza, J

    1998-08-15

    Dermatophilus congolensis is a filamentous branching actinomycete that causes dermatophilosis, an exudative dermatitis in ruminants. The pathogenesis of this disease is poorly understood and virulence factors of D. congolensis have not been characterised. Culture filtrate (CF) of 14 D. congolensis isolates from cattle, 15 from sheep and four from horses were examined for proteolytic activity using azocasein as a non-specific substrate. The isolates were from a variety of geographical locations. All the isolates examined produced extracellular proteolytic activity. CF from 24 and 48 h cultures and from first and third passages contained proteases. Proteolytic activity was greatest in neutral to alkaline pH (pH 7-10). CF of bovine isolates contained more proteolytic activity than that of ovine isolates. Furthermore, in substrate SDS-PAGE gels containing azocasein the number of proteolytic bands and their molecular weights in CF of bovine, ovine and equine isolates were different, giving distinctive band patterns for isolates from each host species. Three out of four bovine isolates from Antigua gave a fourth band pattern. Bands of equivalent molecular weights to the proteases could not be identified in silver stained SDS-PAGE gels of CF. Serine protease inhibitors had a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on proteolytic activity in CF and inhibited activity of all proteolytic bands in substrate gels. With the exception of EDTA which had a variable-enhancing effect on activity, inhibitors of other classes of protease had no effect on activity. We conclude that D. congolensis produces a number of extracellular alkaline serine proteases, our results suggest the presence of host-specific variation between isolates and to a lesser extent between isolates from the same host species.

  14. In vivo assessment of protease dynamics in cutaneous wound healing by degradomics analysis of porcine wound exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, Fabio; Hermes, Olivia; Egli, Fabian E; Kockmann, Tobias; Schlage, Pascal; Croizat, Pierre; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Smola, Hans; auf dem Keller, Ulrich

    2015-02-01

    Proteases control complex tissue responses by modulating inflammation, cell proliferation and migration, and matrix remodeling. All these processes are orchestrated in cutaneous wound healing to restore the skin's barrier function upon injury. Altered protease activity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of healing impairments, and proteases are important targets in diagnosis and therapy of this pathology. Global assessment of proteolysis at critical turning points after injury will define crucial events in acute healing that might be disturbed in healing disorders. As optimal biospecimens, wound exudates contain an ideal proteome to detect extracellular proteolytic events, are noninvasively accessible, and can be collected at multiple time points along the healing process from the same wound in the clinics. In this study, we applied multiplexed Terminal Amine Isotopic Labeling of Substrates (TAILS) to globally assess proteolysis in early phases of cutaneous wound healing. By quantitative analysis of proteins and protein N termini in wound fluids from a clinically relevant pig wound model, we identified more than 650 proteins and discerned major healing phases through distinctive abundance clustering of markers of inflammation, granulation tissue formation, and re-epithelialization. TAILS revealed a high degree of proteolysis at all time points after injury by detecting almost 1300 N-terminal peptides in ∼450 proteins. Quantitative positional proteomics mapped pivotal interdependent processing events in the blood coagulation and complement cascades, temporally discerned clotting and fibrinolysis during the healing process, and detected processing of complement C3 at distinct time points after wounding and by different proteases. Exploiting data on primary cleavage specificities, we related candidate proteases to cleavage events and revealed processing of the integrin adapter protein kindlin-3 by caspase-3, generating new hypotheses for protease

  15. Non-secreted clusterin isoforms are translated in rare amounts from distinct human mRNA variants and do not affect Bax-mediated apoptosis or the NF-κB signaling pathway.

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    Hans Prochnow

    Full Text Available Clusterin, also known as apolipoprotein J, is expressed from a variety of tissues and implicated in pathological disorders such as neurodegenerative diseases, ischemia and cancer. In contrast to secretory clusterin (sCLU, which acts as an extracellular chaperone, the synthesis, subcellular localization and function(s of intracellular CLU isoforms is currently a matter of intense discussion. By investigating human CLU mRNAs we here unravel mechanisms leading to the synthesis of distinct CLU protein isoforms and analyze their subcellular localization and their impact on apoptosis and on NF-κB-activity. Quantitative PCR-analyses revealed the expression of four different stress-inducible CLU mRNA variants in non-cancer and cancer cell lines. In all cell lines variant 1 represents the most abundant mRNA, whereas all other variants collectively account for no more than 0.34% of total CLU mRNA, even under stressed conditions. Overexpression of CLU cDNAs combined with in vitro mutagenesis revealed distinct translational start sites including a so far uncharacterized non-canonical CUG start codon. We show that all exon 2-containing mRNAs encode sCLU and at least three non-glycosylated intracellular isoforms, CLU1‑449, CLU21‑449 and CLU34‑449, which all reside in the cytosol of unstressed and stressed HEK‑293 cells. The latter is the only form expressed from an alternatively spliced mRNA variant lacking exon 2. Functional analysis revealed that none of these cytosolic CLU forms modulate caspase-mediated intrinsic apoptosis or significantly affects TNF-α-induced NF-κB-activity. Therefore our data challenge some of the current ideas regarding the physiological functions of CLU isoforms in pathologies.

  16. RC1339/APRc from Rickettsia conorii is a novel aspartic protease with properties of retropepsin-like enzymes.

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    Rui Cruz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Members of the species Rickettsia are obligate intracellular, gram-negative, arthropod-borne pathogens of humans and other mammals. The life-threatening character of diseases caused by many Rickettsia species and the lack of reliable protective vaccine against rickettsioses strengthens the importance of identifying new protein factors for the potential development of innovative therapeutic tools. Herein, we report the identification and characterization of a novel membrane-embedded retropepsin-like homologue, highly conserved in 55 Rickettsia genomes. Using R. conorii gene homologue RC1339 as our working model, we demonstrate that, despite the low overall sequence similarity to retropepsins, the gene product of rc1339 APRc (for Aspartic Protease from Rickettsia conorii is an active enzyme with features highly reminiscent of this family of aspartic proteases, such as autolytic activity impaired by mutation of the catalytic aspartate, accumulation in the dimeric form, optimal activity at pH 6, and inhibition by specific HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Moreover, specificity preferences determined by a high-throughput profiling approach confirmed common preferences between this novel rickettsial enzyme and other aspartic proteases, both retropepsins and pepsin-like. This is the first report on a retropepsin-like protease in gram-negative intracellular bacteria such as Rickettsia, contributing to the analysis of the evolutionary relationships between the two types of aspartic proteases. Additionally, we have also shown that APRc is transcribed and translated in R. conorii and R. rickettsii and is integrated into the outer membrane of both species. Finally, we demonstrated that APRc is sufficient to catalyze the in vitro processing of two conserved high molecular weight autotransporter adhesin/invasion proteins, Sca5/OmpB and Sca0/OmpA, thereby suggesting the participation of this enzyme in a relevant proteolytic pathway in rickettsial life-cycle. As a

  17. Structural Insights of the Cysteine Protease Heynein from Induction and Characterization of Non-native Intermediate States

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    Basant K. Patel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases are vital to cell physiology and many plants secrete these proteases for defense purposes. Many recent studies have reported unusually high stabilities for several plant cysteine proteases which possibly enable these proteases to function under adverse environmental conditions. Here, we have examined the conformational features of a new plant cysteine protease heynein using spectroscopic tools to understand the basis for its robust functional stability. The studies revealed structural integrity over a wide range of pH (2.5-12.0, temperature (65 oC and urea (8M. However, at pH 2.0, the protein gets acid-unfolded (UA -state with exposed hydrophobic patches, which upon addition of more protons (pH 0.5 or anions (0.5 M KCl and 0.2 M Na2 SO4 yields conformationally distinct refolded intermediates respectively termed: A-, I 1 - and I 2 -states. Strikingly, a high methanol level drives the UA -state into a predominantly -sheet rich conformation (O-state. We observed three-state unfolding kinetics of the I 2 -state by urea, possibly suggesting presence of two domains in the heynein molecule.

  18. Conformational control of the bacterial Clp protease by natural product antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, I T; Brötz-Oesterhelt, H

    2017-07-06

    Covering: up to 2017The bacterial Clp protease is a highly conserved and structurally versatile machine. It has gained a lot of recognition during the last decade as a novel antibacterial drug target with an unprecedented mechanism of action. Due to its complexity, there are distinct means of interfering with its natural functions and several compounds targeting this machine have been identified. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge about natural products deregulating Clp proteolysis, a crucial and delicate process within the cell. Among those, acyldepsipeptide antibiotics of the ADEP class (ADEPs) are characterized best. The molecular mechanism of ADEP-mediated deregulation sheds light on the inner workings of the Clp protease.

  19. Protease-resistant prions selectively decrease Shadoo protein.

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    Joel C Watts

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The central event in prion diseases is the conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C into PrP(Sc, a partially protease-resistant and infectious conformer. However, the mechanism by which PrP(Sc causes neuronal dysfunction remains poorly understood. Levels of Shadoo (Sho, a protein that resembles the flexibly disordered N-terminal domain of PrP(C, were found to be reduced in the brains of mice infected with the RML strain of prions [1], implying that Sho levels may reflect the presence of PrP(Sc in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we examined levels of Sho during prion infection using a variety of experimental systems. Sho protein levels were decreased in the brains of mice, hamsters, voles, and sheep infected with different natural and experimental prion strains. Furthermore, Sho levels were decreased in the brains of prion-infected, transgenic mice overexpressing Sho and in infected neuroblastoma cells. Time-course experiments revealed that Sho levels were inversely proportional to levels of protease-resistant PrP(Sc. Membrane anchoring and the N-terminal domain of PrP both influenced the inverse relationship between Sho and PrP(Sc. Although increased Sho levels had no discernible effect on prion replication in mice, we conclude that Sho is the first non-PrP marker specific for prion disease. Additional studies using this paradigm may provide insight into the cellular pathways and systems subverted by PrP(Sc during prion disease.

  20. Inhibition of sulfur mustard-increased protease activity by niacinamide, N-acetyl-L-cysteine or dexamethasone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, F.M.; Broomfield, C.A.; Smith, W.J.

    1991-03-11

    The pathologic mechanism of sulfur mustard-induced skin vesication is as yet undefined. Papirmeister et al. have postulated a biochemical mechanism for sulfur mustard-induced cutaneous injury involving sequelae of DNA alkylation, metabolic disruption resulting in NAD+ depletion and activation of protease. The authors have utilized a chromogenic peptide substrate assay to establish that human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed 24 hr previously to sulfur mustard exhibited an increase in proteolytic activity. Doses of compounds known to alter the biochemical events associated with sulfur mustard exposure or reduce protease activity were tested in this system for their ability to block the sulfur mustard-induced protease activity. Treatment with niacinamide 1 hr after or with N-acetyl-L-cysteine or dexamethasone 24 hr prior to sulfur mustard exposure resulted in a decrease of 39%, 33% and 42% respectively of sulfur mustard-increased protease activity. These data suggest that therapeutic intervention into the biochemical pathways that culminate in protease activation might serve as an approach to treatment of sulfur mustard-induced pathology.

  1. Clp Protease and OR Directly Control the Proteostasis of Phytoene Synthase, the Crucial Enzyme for Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Ralf; Zhou, Xiangjun; Yuan, Hui; Álvarez, Daniel; Sun, Tianhu; Schlossarek, Dennis; Yang, Yong; Shen, Guoxin; Zhang, Hong; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Li, Li

    2018-01-08

    Phytoene synthase (PSY) is the crucial plastidial enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. However, its post-translational regulation remains elusive. Likewise, Clp protease constitutes a central part of the plastid protease network, but its substrates for degradation are not well known. In this study, we report that PSY is a substrate of the Clp protease. PSY was uncovered to physically interact with various Clp protease subunits (i.e., ClpS1, ClpC1, and ClpD). High levels of PSY and several other carotenogenic enzyme proteins overaccumulate in the clpc1, clpp4, and clpr1-2 mutants. The overaccumulated PSY was found to be partially enzymatically active. Impairment of Clp activity in clpc1 results in a reduced rate of PSY protein turnover, further supporting the role of Clp protease in degrading PSY protein. On the other hand, the ORANGE (OR) protein, a major post-translational regulator of PSY with holdase chaperone activity, enhances PSY protein stability and increases the enzymatically active proportion of PSY in clpc1, counterbalancing Clp-mediated proteolysis in maintaining PSY protein homeostasis. Collectively, these findings provide novel insights into the quality control of plastid-localized proteins and establish a hitherto unidentified post-translational regulatory mechanism of carotenogenic enzymes in modulating carotenoid biosynthesis in plants. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel peptide-based protease inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roodbeen, Renée

    This thesis describes the design and synthesis of peptide-based serine protease inhibitors. The targeted protease, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activates plasminogen, which plays a major role in cancer metastasis. The peptide upain-2 (S 1 ,S 12-cyclo-AcCSWRGLENHAAC-NH2) is a highly...... specific inhibitor of uPA. With the aim of creating better inhibitors based on the upain-2 scaffold, the following three strategies were explored: First, it was attempted to predefine the structure of upain-2 in solution by incorporating turn-inducing sequences and peptidomimetics. Additionally...... bond across the ring. The second bridge was made by a disulfide bridge, amide bond formation or via ring-closing metathesis. A, with upain-2 equipotent, bicyclic inhibitor was obtained and its binding to uPA was studied by ITC, NMR and X-ray. The knowledge of how selective inhibitors bind uPA has been...

  3. LGN/mInsc and LGN/NuMA complex structures suggest distinct functions in asymmetric cell division for the Par3/mInsc/LGN and Gαi/LGN/NuMA pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinwei; Wen, Wenyu; Zheng, Zhen; Shang, Yuan; Wei, Zhiyi; Xiao, Zhuoni; Pan, Zhu; Du, Quansheng; Wang, Wenning; Zhang, Mingjie

    2011-08-05

    Asymmetric cell division requires the establishment of cortical cell polarity and the orientation of the mitotic spindle along the axis of cell polarity. Evidence from invertebrates demonstrates that the Par3/Par6/aPKC and NuMA/LGN/Gαi complexes, which are thought to be physically linked by the adaptor protein mInscuteable (mInsc), play indispensable roles in this process. However, the molecular basis for the binding of LGN to NuMA and mInsc is poorly understood. The high-resolution structures of the LGN/NuMA and LGN/mInsc complexes presented here provide mechanistic insights into the distinct and highly specific interactions of the LGN TPRs with mInsc and NuMA. Structural comparisons, together with biochemical and cell biology studies, demonstrate that the interactions of NuMA and mInsc with LGN are mutually exclusive, with mInsc binding preferentially. Our results suggest that the Par3/mInsc/LGN and NuMA/LGN/Gαi complexes play sequential and partially overlapping roles in asymmetric cell division. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dysregulation of protease and protease inhibitors in a mouse model of human pelvic organ prolapse.

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    Madhusudhan Budatha

    Full Text Available Mice deficient for the fibulin-5 gene (Fbln5(-/- develop pelvic organ prolapse (POP due to compromised elastic fibers and upregulation of matrix metalloprotease (MMP-9. Here, we used casein zymography, inhibitor profiling, affinity pull-down, and mass spectrometry to discover additional protease upregulated in the vaginal wall of Fbln5(-/- mice, herein named V1 (25 kDa. V1 was a serine protease with trypsin-like activity similar to protease, serine (PRSS 3, a major extrapancreatic trypsinogen, was optimum at pH 8.0, and predominantly detected in estrogenized vaginal epithelium of Fbln5(-/- mice. PRSS3 was (a localized in epithelial secretions, (b detected in media of vaginal organ culture from both Fbln5(-/- and wild type mice, and (c cleaved fibulin-5 in vitro. Expression of two serine protease inhibitors [Serpina1a (α1-antitrypsin and Elafin] was dysregulated in Fbln5(-/- epithelium. Finally, we confirmed that PRSS3 was expressed in human vaginal epithelium and that SERPINA1 and Elafin were downregulated in vaginal tissues from women with POP. These data collectively suggest that the balance between proteases and their inhibitors contributes to support of the pelvic organs in humans and mice.

  5. Acanthamoeba protease activity promotes allergic airway inflammation via protease-activated receptor 2.

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    Mi Kyung Park

    Full Text Available Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba commonly present in the environment and often found in human airway cavities. Acanthamoeba possesses strong proteases that can elicit allergic airway inflammation. To our knowledge, the aeroallergenicity of Acanthamoeba has not been reported. We repeatedly inoculated mice with Acanthamoeba trophozoites or excretory-secretory (ES proteins intra-nasally and evaluated symptoms and airway immune responses. Acanthamoeba trophozoites or ES proteins elicited immune responses in mice that resembled allergic airway inflammation. ES proteins had strong protease activity and activated the expression of several chemokine genes (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, TSLP, and IL-25 in mouse lung epithelial cells. The serine protease inhibitor phenyl-methane-sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF inhibited ES protein activity. ES proteins also stimulated dendritic cells and enhanced the differentiation of naive T cells into IL-4-secreting T cells. After repeated inoculation of the protease-activated receptor 2 knockout mouse with ES proteins, airway inflammation and Th2 immune responses were markedly reduced, but not to basal levels. Furthermore, asthma patients had higher Acanthamoeba-specific IgE titers than healthy controls and we found Acanthamoeba specific antigen from house dust in typical living room. Our findings suggest that Acanthamoeba elicits allergic airway symptoms in mice via a protease allergen. In addition, it is possible that Acanthamoeba may be one of the triggers human airway allergic disease.

  6. Acanthamoeba Protease Activity Promotes Allergic Airway Inflammation via Protease-Activated Receptor 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi Kyung; Cho, Min Kyoung; Kang, Shin Ae; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba commonly present in the environment and often found in human airway cavities. Acanthamoeba possesses strong proteases that can elicit allergic airway inflammation. To our knowledge, the aeroallergenicity of Acanthamoeba has not been reported. We repeatedly inoculated mice with Acanthamoeba trophozoites or excretory-secretory (ES) proteins intra-nasally and evaluated symptoms and airway immune responses. Acanthamoeba trophozoites or ES proteins elicited immune responses in mice that resembled allergic airway inflammation. ES proteins had strong protease activity and activated the expression of several chemokine genes (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, TSLP, and IL-25) in mouse lung epithelial cells. The serine protease inhibitor phenyl-methane-sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) inhibited ES protein activity. ES proteins also stimulated dendritic cells and enhanced the differentiation of naive T cells into IL-4-secreting T cells. After repeated inoculation of the protease-activated receptor 2 knockout mouse with ES proteins, airway inflammation and Th2 immune responses were markedly reduced, but not to basal levels. Furthermore, asthma patients had higher Acanthamoeba-specific IgE titers than healthy controls and we found Acanthamoeba specific antigen from house dust in typical living room. Our findings suggest that Acanthamoeba elicits allergic airway symptoms in mice via a protease allergen. In addition, it is possible that Acanthamoeba may be one of the triggers human airway allergic disease. PMID:24658532

  7. Role of Proteases in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

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    Kailash C. Pandey

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is generally associated with progressive destruction of airways and lung parenchyma. Various factors play an important role in the development and progression of COPD, like imbalance of proteases, environmental and genetic factors and oxidative stress. This review is specifically focused on the role of proteases and their imbalance in COPD. There are three classes (serine, mettalo, and cysteine of proteases involved in COPD. In serine proteases, neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase-3 are involved in destruction of alveolar tissue. Matrix-mettaloproteinase-9, 12, 13, plays an influential role in severity of COPD. Among cysteine proteases, caspase-3, caspases-8 and caspase-9 play an important role in controlling apoptosis. These proteases activities can be regulated by inhibitors like α-1-antitrypsin, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, and leukocyte protease inhibitor. Studies suggest that neutrophil elastase may be a therapeutic target for COPD, and specific inhibitor against this enzyme has potential role to control the disease. Current study suggests that Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV is a potential marker for COPD. Since the expression of proteases and its inhibitors play an important role in COPD pathogenesis, therefore, it is worth investigating the role of proteases and their regulation. Understanding the biochemical basis of COPD pathogenesis using advanced tools in protease biochemistry and aiming toward translational research from bench-to-bedside will have great impact to deal with this health problem.

  8. PARTIAL PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ALKALOPHILIC PROTEASE FROM PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA

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    R. Satheeskumar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Partial purification and characterization of alkalophilic protease production from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the gut of marine and coastal waters shrimp Penaeus monodon. The protease production was assayed in submerged fermentation to produce maximum protease activity (423 ± 0.09 U/ml. The enzyme was precipitated with ammonium sulphate and partially purified by ion exchange chromatography through DEAE Sephadex A-50 column. In 10th fraction showed maximum protease activity (734 ± 0.18 U/ml with increase in purification fold. The molecular weight of protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was recorded as 60 kDa. The stability of protease was tested at various pH and temperature; it showed maximum protease activity at pH-9 and temperature 50ºC. Among the various surfactants tested for enzyme stability, maximum activity was retained in poly ethylene glycol. The compatibility of protease enzyme with various commercial detergents; the enzyme retained maximum protease activity in tide. The results are indicated that all these properties make the bacterial proteases are most suitable for wide industrial applications.

  9. Corruption of innate immunity by bacterial proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potempa, Jan; Pike, Robert N

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune system of the human body has developed numerous mechanisms to control endogenous and exogenous bacteria and thus prevent infections by these microorganisms. These mechanisms range from physical barriers such as the skin or mucosal epithelium to a sophisticated array of molecules and cells that function to suppress or prevent bacterial infection. Many bacteria express a variety of proteases, ranging from non-specific and powerful enzymes that degrade many proteins involved in innate immunity to proteases that are extremely precise and specific in their mode of action. Here we have assembled a comprehensive picture of how bacterial proteases affect the host's innate immune system to gain advantage and cause infection. This picture is far from being complete since the numbers of mechanisms utilized are as astonishing as they are diverse, ranging from degradation of molecules vital to innate immune mechanisms to subversion of the mechanisms to allow the bacterium to hide from the system or take advantage of it. It is vital that such mechanisms are elucidated to allow strategies to be developed to aid the innate immune system in controlling bacterial infections.

  10. Corruption of Innate Immunity by Bacterial Proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potempa, Jan; Pike, Robert N.

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune system of the human body has developed numerous mechanisms to control endogenous and exogenous bacteria and thus prevent infections by these microorganisms. These mechanisms range from physical barriers such as the skin or mucosal epithelium to a sophisticated array of molecules and cells that function to suppress or prevent bacterial infection. Many bacteria express a variety of proteases, ranging from non-specific and powerful enzymes that degrade many proteins involved in innate immunity to proteases that are extremely precise and specific in their mode of action. Here we have assembled a comprehensive picture of how bacterial proteases affect the host’s innate immune system to gain advantage and cause infection. This picture is far from being complete since the numbers of mechanisms utilized are as astonishing as they are diverse, ranging from degradation of molecules vital to innate immune mechanisms to subversion of the mechanisms to allow the bacterium to hide from the system or take advantage of it. It is vital that such mechanisms are elucidated to allow strategies to be developed to aid the innate immune system in controlling bacterial infections. PMID:19756242

  11. Metabolic inhibitors as tools to delineate participation of distinct intracellular pathways in enhancement of lactose-induced dissociation of neutrophil and thymocyte aggregates formed by mediation of a plant lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoshenko, A V; Gorudko, I V; Kaltner, H; Cherenkevich, S N; Gabius, H J

    1997-10-01

    Signaling processes in the course of the formation of the lectin-mediated aggregates may partake in conveying enhanced stability to the cell clusters. To prove the validity of this reasoning in a model, we have studied the impact of addition of three metabolic inhibitors (N-ethylmaleimide, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, and trifluoperazine) on lactose-dependent dissociation of cell aggregates, formed in the presence of the galactoside-binding mistletoe lectin. Using both human neutrophils and rat thymocytes to avoid measurement of responses restricted to a single cell type, an enhanced dissociation of lectin-formed cell aggregates was observed, when lactose and an inhibitor were present. Among the tested inhibitors, nordihydroguaiaretic acid and N-ethylmaleimide were more potent enhancers of cell dissociation than trifluoperazine. These results suggest that biosignalling pathways connected with lipoxygenase activity as well as the level of intracellular sulfhydryl groups confer further stability to lectin-dependent cell aggregates. The systematic evaluation of inhibitors for defined activities is thus suggested as a tool to disclose the nature and the contribution of individual signaling mechanisms to post-binding effects following lectin-initiated cell contact formation.

  12. Cell death patterns in Arabidopsis cells subjected to four physiological stressors indicate multiple signalling pathways and cell cycle phase specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathirana, Ranjith; West, Phillip; Hedderley, Duncan; Eason, Jocelyn

    2017-03-01

    Corpse morphology, nuclear DNA fragmentation, expression of senescence-associated genes (SAG) and cysteine protease profiles were investigated to understand cell death patterns in a cell cycle-synchronised Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture treated with four physiological stressors in the late G2 phase. Within 4 h of treatment, polyethylene glycol (PEG, 20 %), mannose (100 mM) and hydrogen peroxide (2 mM) caused DNA fragmentation coinciding with cell permeability to Evans Blue (EB) and produced corpse morphology corresponding to apoptosis-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD) with cytoplasmic retraction from the cell wall. Ethylene (8 mL per 250-mL flask) caused permeability of cells to EB without concomitant nuclear DNA fragmentation and cytoplasmic retraction, suggesting necrotic cell death. Mannose inducing glycolysis block and PEG causing dehydration resulted in relatively similar patterns of upregulation of SAG suggesting similar cell death signalling pathways for these two stress factors, whereas hydrogen peroxide caused unique patterns indicating an alternate pathway for cell death induced by oxidative stress. Ethylene did not cause appreciable changes in SAG expression, confirming necrotic cell death. Expression of AtDAD, BoMT1 and AtSAG2 genes, previously shown to be associated with plant senescence, also changed rapidly during AL-PCD in cultured cells. The profiles of nine distinct cysteine protease-active bands ranging in size from ca. 21.5 to 38.5 kDa found in the control cultures were also altered after treatment with the four stressors, with mannose and PEG again producing similar patterns. Results also suggest that cysteine proteases may have a role in necrotic cell death.

  13. A look inside HIV resistance through retroviral protease interaction maps.

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    Aleksejs Kontijevskis

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses affect a large number of species, from fish and birds to mammals and humans, with global socioeconomic negative impacts. Here the authors report and experimentally validate a novel approach for the analysis of the molecular networks that are involved in the recognition of substrates by retroviral proteases. Using multivariate analysis of the sequence-based physiochemical descriptions of 61 retroviral proteases comprising wild-type proteases, natural mutants, and drug-resistant forms of proteases from nine different viral species in relation to their ability to cleave 299 substrates, the authors mapped the physicochemical properties and cross-dependencies of the amino acids of the proteases and their substrates, which revealed a complex molecular interaction network of substrate recognition and cleavage. The approach allowed a detailed analysis of the molecular-chemical mechanisms involved in substrate cleavage by retroviral proteases.

  14. Magnesium Enhanced Fibrinolytic Activity of Protease from Schizophyllum commune

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    Chung-Lun Lu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Prevention and therapy of thrombotic diseases have attracted much attention in developed countries during recent years. Investigators have been looking for cheaper and safer thrombolytic agents for therapy of thrombotic diseases. Recently, we have discovered a fibrinolytic protease from Schizophyllum commune. In this study, the protease was proven to degrade blood clot effectively. Seven divalent metal ions were used to test the selectiveness on enhancing protease activity. The treated rat blood was traced by thromboelastography to assess the viscoelastic properties of whole blood. As the result, fibrinolytic activity of the protease was enhanced remarkably by Mg2+ in reducing the strength of blood clot and showed the innovative anti-thrombotic effects. This is the first study of anti-thrombotic effects from fungal-derived fibrinolytic protease using thromboelastography and delineates the efficacy of magnesium supplementation in enhancement of thrombolytic activity from S. commune fibrinolytic protease.

  15. Direct Visualization of Ebola Virus Fusion Triggering in the Endocytic Pathway

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    Jennifer S. Spence

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV makes extensive and intricate use of host factors in the cellular endosomal/lysosomal pathway to release its genome into the cytoplasm and initiate infection. Following viral internalization into endosomes, host cysteine proteases cleave the EBOV fusion glycoprotein (GP to unmask the binding site for its intracellular receptor, the cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1. GP-NPC1 interaction is required for viral entry. Despite these and other recent discoveries, late events in EBOV entry following GP-NPC1 binding and culminating in GP-catalyzed fusion between viral and cellular lipid bilayers remain enigmatic. A mechanistic understanding of EBOV membrane fusion has been hampered by the failure of previous efforts to reconstitute fusion in vitro or at the cell surface. This report describes an assay to monitor initial steps directly in EBOV membrane fusion—triggering of GP and virus-cell lipid mixing—by single virions in live cells. Fusogenic triggering of GP occurs predominantly in Rab7-positive (Rab7+ endosomes, absolutely requires interaction between proteolytically primed GP and NPC1, and is blocked by key GP-specific neutralizing antibodies with therapeutic potential. Unexpectedly, cysteine protease inhibitors do not inhibit lipid mixing by virions bearing precleaved GP, even though they completely block cytoplasmic entry by these viruses, as shown previously. These results point to distinct cellular requirements for different steps in EBOV membrane fusion and suggest a model in which host cysteine proteases are dispensable for GP fusion triggering after NPC1 binding but are required for the formation of fusion pores that permit genome delivery.

  16. Erwinia carotovora extracellular proteases : characterization and role in soft rot

    OpenAIRE

    Kyöstiö, Sirkka R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc) strain EC14, a Gram-negative bacterium, causes soft rot on several crops, including potato. Maceration of potato tuber tissue is caused by secreted pectolytic enzymes. Other cell-degrading enzymes may also have roles in pathogenesis, including cellulases, phospholipases, and protease(s). The objectives of this research were to (1) characterize Ecc extracellular protease (Prt) and (2) elucidate its role in potato soft rot. A gene enc...

  17. Microbial alkaline proteases: Optimization of production parameters and their properties

    OpenAIRE

    Kanupriya Miglani Sharma; Rajesh Kumar; Surbhi Panwar; Ashwani Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Proteases are hydrolytic enzymes capable of degrading proteins into small peptides and amino acids. They account for nearly 60% of the total industrial enzyme market. Proteases are extensively exploited commercially, in food, pharmaceutical, leather and detergent industry. Given their potential use, there has been renewed interest in the discovery of proteases with novel properties and a constant thrust to optimize the enzyme production. This review summarizes a fraction of the enormous repor...

  18. Extracellular protease from the antarctic yeast Candida humicola.

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, M K; Devi, K U; Kumar, G S; Shivaji, S

    1992-01-01

    The psychrotrophic, dimorphic yeast Candida humicola, isolated from Antarctic soil, secretes an acidic protease into the medium. The secretion of this protease by C. humicola was found to be dependent on the composition of the medium. In YPD or yeast nitrogen base medium containing either amino acids or ammonium sulfate as the nitrogen source, the activity of the protease in the medium was low (basal level). However, when yeast nitrogen base medium was depleted of amino acids or ammonium sulf...

  19. Fibrin(ogen)olytic activity of bumblebee venom serine protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Yuling; Choo, Young Moo; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Jia Jingming; Cui Zheng; Wang Dong; Kim, Doh Hoon; Sohn, Hung Dae; Jin, Byung Rae

    2011-01-01

    Bee venom is a rich source of pharmacologically active components; it has been used as an immunotherapy to treat bee venom hypersensitivity, and venom therapy has been applied as an alternative medicine. Here, we present evidence that the serine protease found in bumblebee venom exhibits fibrin(ogen)olytic activity. Compared to honeybee venom, bumblebee venom contains a higher content of serine protease, which is one of its major components. Venom serine proteases from bumblebees did not cross-react with antibodies against the honeybee venom serine protease. We provide functional evidence indicating that bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) acts as a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. Bt-VSP activates prothrombin and directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. However, Bt-VSP is not a plasminogen activator, and its fibrinolytic activity is less than that of plasmin. Taken together, our results define roles for Bt-VSP as a prothrombin activator, a thrombin-like protease, and a plasmin-like protease. These findings offer significant insight into the allergic reaction sequence that is initiated by bee venom serine protease and its potential usefulness as a clinical agent in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: → Bumblebee venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) is a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. → Bt-VSP activates prothrombin. → Bt-VSP directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. → Bt-VSP is a hemostatically active protein that is a potent clinical agent.

  20. Characterization of Fibrinolytic Proteases from Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Ho Choi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : This study was undertaken to identify fibrinolytic proteases from Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus venom and to characterize a major fibrinolytic protease purified from the venom. Methods: The venom was subjected to chromatography using columns of Q-Sepharose and Sephadex G-75. The molecular weights of fibrinolytic proteases showing fibrinolytic zone in fibrin plate assay were determined in SDS-PAGE (Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis The effects of inhibitors and metal ions on fibrinolytic protease and the proteolysis patterns of fibrinogen, gelatin, and bovine serum albumin were investigated. Results : 1 The fibrinolytic fractions of the three peaks isolated from Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus venom contained two polypeptides of 46 and 59 kDa and three polypeptides of 32, 18, and 15 kDa and a major polypeptide of 54 kDa, respectively. 2 The fibrinolytic activity of the purified protease of 54 kDA was inhibited by metal chelators, such as EDTA, EGTA, and 1,10-phenanthroline, and disulfhydryl-reducing compounds, such as dithiothreitol and cysteine. 3 Calcium chloride promoted the fibrinolytic activity of the protease, but mercuric chloride and cobalt(II chloride inhibited it. 4 The fibrinolytic protease cleaved preferentially A-chain and slowly B-chain of fibrinogen. It also hydrolyzed gelatin but not bovine serum albumin. Conclusions: The Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus venom contained more than three fibrinolytic proteases. The major fibrinolytic protease was a metalloprotease which hydrolyzed both fibrinogen and gelatin, but not bovine serum albumin.

  1. Molecular cloning and tissue-specific expression analysis of mouse spinesin, a type II transmembrane serine protease 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yoshihisa; Okui, Akira; Mitsui, Shinichi; Kawarabuki, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Tatsuyuki; Uemura, Hidetoshi; Yamaguchi, Nozomi

    2004-01-01

    We have previously reported novel serine proteases isolated from cDNA libraries of the human and mouse central nervous system (CNS) by PCR using degenerate oligodeoxyribonucleotide primers designed on the basis of the serine protease motifs, AAHC and DSGGP. Here we report a newly isolated serine protease from the mouse CNS. This protease is homologous (77.9% identical) to human spinesin type II transmembrane serine protease 5. Mouse spinesin (m-spinesin) is also composed of (from the N-terminus) a short cytoplasmic domain, a transmembrane domain, a stem region containing a scavenger-receptor-like domain, and a serine protease domain, as is h-spinesin. We also isolated type 1, type 2, and type 3 variant cDNAs of m-spinesin. Full-length spinesin (type 4) and type 3 contain all the domains, whereas type 1 and type 2 variants lack the cytoplasmic, transmembrane, and scavenger-receptor-like domains. Subcellular localization of the variant forms was analyzed using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion proteins. EGFP-type 4 fusion protein was predominantly localized to the ER, Golgi apparatus, and plasma membrane, whereas EGFP-type 1 was localized to the cytoplasm, reflecting differential classification of m-spinesin variants into transmembrane and cytoplasmic types. We analyzed the distribution of m-spinesin variants in mouse tissues, using RT-PCR with variant-specific primer sets. Interestingly, transmembrane-type spinesin, types 3 and 4, was specifically expressed in the spinal cord, whereas cytoplasmic type, type 1, was expressed in multiple tissues, including the cerebrum and cerebellum. Therefore, m-spinesin variants may have distinct biological functions arising from organ-specific variant expression

  2. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Roszak, Aleksander W. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.walker@glasgow.ac.uk [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  3. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group

  4. PAR-1 mediated apoptosis of breast cancer cells by V. cholerae hemagglutinin protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Tanusree; Pal, Amit

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial toxins have emerged as promising agents in cancer treatment strategy. Hemagglutinin (HAP) protease secreted by Vibrio cholerae induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells and regresses tumor growth in mice model. The success of novel cancer therapies depends on their selectivity for cancer cells with limited toxicity for normal tissues. Increased expression of Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR-1) has been reported in different malignant cells. In this study we report that HAP induced activation and over expression of PAR-1 in breast cancer cells (EAC). Immunoprecipitation studies have shown that HAP specifically binds with PAR-1. HAP mediated activation of PAR-1 caused nuclear translocation of p50-p65 and the phosphorylation of p38 which triggered the activation of NFκB and MAP kinase signaling pathways. These signaling pathways enhanced the cellular ROS level in malignant cells that induced the intrinsic pathway of cell apoptosis. PAR-1 mediated apoptosis by HAP of malignant breast cells without effecting normal healthy cells in the same environment makes it a good therapeutic agent for treatment of cancer.

  5. Multiple routes and milestones in the folding of HIV-1 protease monomer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Bonomi

    Full Text Available Proteins fold on a time scale incompatible with a mechanism of random search in conformational space thus indicating that somehow they are guided to the native state through a funneled energetic landscape. At the same time the heterogeneous kinetics suggests the existence of several different folding routes. Here we propose a scenario for the folding mechanism of the monomer of HIV-1 protease in which multiple pathways and milestone events coexist. A variety of computational approaches supports this picture. These include very long all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent, an analysis of the network of clusters found in multiple high-temperature unfolding simulations and a complete characterization of free-energy surfaces carried out using a structure-based potential at atomistic resolution and a combination of metadynamics and parallel tempering. Our results confirm that the monomer in solution is stable toward unfolding and show that at least two unfolding pathways exist. In our scenario, the formation of a hydrophobic core is a milestone in the folding process which must occur along all the routes that lead this protein towards its native state. Furthermore, the ensemble of folding pathways proposed here substantiates a rational drug design strategy based on inhibiting the folding of HIV-1 protease.

  6. msaABCR operon positively regulates biofilm development by repressing proteases and autolysis in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahukhal, Gyan S; Batte, Justin L; Elasri, Mohamed O

    2015-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen that causes nosocomial and community-acquired infections. One of the most important aspects of staphylococcal infections is biofilm development within the host, which renders the bacterium resistant to the host's immune response and antimicrobial agents. Biofilm development is very complex and involves several regulators that ensure cell survival on surfaces within the extracellular polymeric matrix. Previously, we identified the msaABCR operon as an additional positive regulator of biofilm formation. In this study, we define the regulatory pathway by which msaABCR controls biofilm formation. We demonstrate that the msaABCR operon is a negative regulator of proteases. The control of protease production mediates the processing of the major autolysin, Atl, and thus regulates the rate of autolysis. In the absence of the msaABCR operon, Atl is processed by proteases at a high rate, leading to increased cell death and a defect in biofilm maturation. We conclude that the msaABCR operon plays a key role in maintaining the balance between autolysis and growth within the staphylococcal biofilm. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Construction of dengue virus protease expression plasmid and in vitro protease assay for screening antiviral inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Huiguo; Teramoto, Tadahisa; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus serotypes 1-4 (DENV1-4) are mosquito-borne human pathogens of global significance causing ~390 million cases annually worldwide. The virus infections cause in general a self-limiting disease, known as dengue fever, but occasionally also more severe forms, especially during secondary infections, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome causing ~25,000 deaths annually. The DENV genome contains a single-strand positive sense RNA, approximately 11 kb in length. The 5'-end has a type I cap structure. The 3'-end has no poly(A) tail. The viral RNA has a single long open reading frame that is translated by the host translational machinery to yield a polyprotein precursor. Processing of the polyprotein precursor occurs co-translationally by cellular proteases and posttranslationally by the viral serine protease in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to yield three structural proteins (capsid (C), precursor membrane (prM), and envelope (E) and seven nonstructural (NS) proteins (NS1, NS2A, NS2B, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, and NS5). The active viral protease consists of both NS2B, an integral membrane protein in the ER, and the N-terminal part of NS3 (180 amino acid residues) that contains the trypsin-like serine protease domain having a catalytic triad of H51, D75, and S135. The C-terminal part of NS3, ~170-618 amino acid residues, encodes an NTPase/RNA helicase and 5'-RNA triphosphatase activities; the latter enzyme is required for the first step in 5'-capping. The cleavage sites of the polyprotein by the viral protease consist of two basic amino acid residues such as KR, RR, or QR, followed by short chain amino acid residues, G, S, or T. Since the cleavage of the polyprotein by the viral protease is absolutely required for assembly of the viral replicase, blockage of NS2B/NS3pro activity provides an effective means for designing dengue virus (DENV) small-molecule therapeutics. Here we describe the screening of small-molecule inhibitors against DENV2 protease.

  8. Complexity of cancer protease biology: Cathepsin K expression and function in cancer progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbovšek, Urška; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; Lah, Tamara T.

    2015-01-01

    Proteases, including lysosomal cathepsins, are functionally involved in many processes in cancer progression from its initiation to invasion and metastatic spread. Only recently, cathepsin K (CatK), the cysteine protease originally reported as a collagenolytic protease produced by osteoclasts,

  9. The role of protease-activated receptor type 2 in nociceptive signaling and pain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrózková, Petra; Paleček, Jiří; Špicarová, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 3 (2016), s. 357-367 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH12058; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11138S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH15279; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : protease-activated receptor (PAR2) * signaling pathways * nociception * pain * spinal cord Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  10. Evidence that two ATP-dependent (Lon proteases in Borrelia burgdorferi serve different functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Coleman

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The canonical ATP-dependent protease Lon participates in an assortment of biological processes in bacteria, including the catalysis of damaged or senescent proteins and short-lived regulatory proteins. Borrelia spirochetes are unusual in that they code for two putative ATP-dependent Lon homologs, Lon-1 and Lon-2. Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, is transmitted through the blood feeding of Ixodes ticks. Previous work in our laboratory reported that B. burgdorferi lon-1 is upregulated transcriptionally by exposure to blood in vitro, while lon-2 is not. Because blood induction of Lon-1 may be of importance in the regulation of virulence factors critical for spirochete transmission, the clarification of functional roles for these two proteases in B. burgdorferi was the object of this study. On the chromosome, lon-2 is immediately downstream of ATP-dependent proteases clpP and clpX, an arrangement identical to that of lon of Escherichia coli. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Lon-1 and Lon-2 cluster separately due to differences in the NH(2-terminal substrate binding domains that may reflect differences in substrate specificity. Recombinant Lon-1 manifested properties of an ATP-dependent chaperone-protease in vitro but did not complement an E. coli Lon mutant, while Lon-2 corrected two characteristic Lon-mutant phenotypes. We conclude that B. burgdorferi Lons -1 and -2 have distinct functional roles. Lon-2 functions in a manner consistent with canonical Lon, engaged in cellular homeostasis. Lon-1, by virtue of its blood induction, and as a unique feature of the Borreliae, may be important in host adaptation from the arthropod to a warm-blooded host.

  11. Serotype-Specific Structural Differences in the Protease-Cofactor Complexes of the Dengue Virus Family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandramouli, Sumana; Joseph, Jeremiah S.; Daudenarde, Sophie; Gatchalian, Jovylyn; Cornillez-Ty, Cromwell; Kuhn, Peter (Scripps)

    2010-03-04

    With an estimated 40% of the world population at risk, dengue poses a significant threat to human health, especially in tropical and subtropical regions. Preventative and curative efforts, such as vaccine development and drug discovery, face additional challenges due to the occurrence of four antigenically distinct serotypes of the causative dengue virus (DEN1 to -4). Complex immune responses resulting from repeat assaults by the different serotypes necessitate simultaneous targeting of all forms of the virus. One of the promising targets for drug development is the highly conserved two-component viral protease NS2B-NS3, which plays an essential role in viral replication by processing the viral precursor polyprotein into functional proteins. In this paper, we report the 2.1-{angstrom} crystal structure of the DEN1 NS2B hydrophilic core (residues 49 to 95) in complex with the NS3 protease domain (residues 1 to 186) carrying an internal deletion in the N terminus (residues 11 to 20). While the overall folds within the protease core are similar to those of DEN2 and DEN4 proteases, the conformation of the cofactor NS2B is dramatically different from those of other flaviviral apoprotease structures. The differences are especially apparent within its C-terminal region, implicated in substrate binding. The structure reveals for the first time serotype-specific structural elements in the dengue virus family, with the reported alternate conformation resulting from a unique metal-binding site within the DEN1 sequence. We also report the identification of a 10-residue stretch within NS3pro that separates the substrate-binding function from the catalytic turnover rate of the enzyme. Implications for broad-spectrum drug discovery are discussed.

  12. Semi-continuous in situ magnetic separation for enhanced extracellular protease productionmodeling and experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerff, M.; Scholz, A.; Käppler, T.

    2013-01-01

    ) constitutes an excellent adsorptive method for efficient extracellular protease removal during cultivation. In this work, the impact of semi‐continuous ISMS on the overall protease yield has been investigated. Results reveal significant removal of the protease from Bacillus licheniformis cultivations......In modern biotechnology proteases play a major role as detergent ingredients. Especially the production of extracellular protease by Bacillus species facilitates downstream processing because the protease can be directly harvested from the biosuspension. In situ magnetic separation (ISMS...

  13. Apoptosis of CTLL-2 cells induced by an immunosuppressant, ISP-I, is caspase-3-like protease-independent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaji, T; Nakamura, S; Takematsu, H; Kawasaki, T; Kozutsumi, Y

    2001-04-01

    In our previous study, the sphingosine-like immunosuppressant ISP-1 was shown to induce apoptosis in the mouse cytotoxic T cell line CTLL-2. In this study, we characterized the ISP-1-induced apoptotic pathway. Although caspase-3-like protease activity increases concomitantly with ISP-1-induced apoptosis in CTLL-2 cells, the apoptosis is not inhibited by caspase-3-like protease inhibitors, i.e. DEVD-cho and z-DEVD-fmk. In contrast, sphingosine-induced apoptosis in CTLL-2 cells is caspase-3-like protease-dependent. A caspase inhibitor with broad specificity, z-VAD-fmk, protects cells from apoptosis induced by ISP-1, indicating that ISP-1-induced apoptosis is dependent on caspase(s) other than caspase-3. Overexpression of Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL suppresses the apoptosis induced by ISP-1, although sphingosine-induced apoptosis is not efficiently inhibited by Bcl-2. Finally, ISP-1-induced mitochondrial depolarization, which is thought to be a checkpoint dividing the apoptotic pathway into upstream and downstream stages, is not inhibited by DEVD-cho, but is inhibited by z-VAD-fmk. These data suggest that a pathway dependent on caspase(s) other than caspase-3 is involved upstream of mitochondrial depolarization in ISP-1-induced apoptosis.

  14. The Clp chaperones and proteases of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bakkouri, Majida; Pow, Andre; Mulichak, Anne; Cheung, Kevin L Y; Artz, Jennifer D; Amani, Mehrnaz; Fell, Stuart; de Koning-Ward, Tania F; Goodman, C Dean; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Ortega, Joaquin; Hui, Raymond; Houry, Walid A

    2010-12-03

    The Clp chaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clp chaperones and proteases in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clp chaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Generation of infectious feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) encoding FIV/human immunodeficiency virus chimeric protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Chuan; Torbett, Bruce E; Elder, John H

    2010-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proteases (PRs) share only 23% amino acid identity and exhibit distinct specificities yet have very similar 3-dimensional structures. Chimeric PRs in which HIV residues were substituted in structurally equivalent positions in FIV PR were prepared in order to study the molecular basis of PR specificity. Previous in vitro analyses showed that such substitutions dramatically altered the inhibitor specificity of mutant PRs but changed the rate and specificity of Gag cleavage so that chimeric FIVs were not infectious. Chimeric PRs encoding combinations of the I37V, N55M, M56I, V59I, L97T, I98P, Q99V, and P100N mutations were cloned into FIV Gag-Pol, and those constructs that best approximated the temporal cleavage pattern generated by wild-type FIV PR, while maintaining HIV-like inhibitor specificity, were selected. Two mutations, M56I and L97T, were intolerant to change and caused inefficient cleavage at NC-p2. However, a mutant PR with six substitutions (I37V, N55M, V59I, I98P, Q99V, and P100N) was selected and placed in the context of full-length FIV-34TF10. This virus, termed YCL6, had low-level infectivity ex vivo, and after passage, progeny that exhibited a higher growth rate emerged. The residue at the position of one of the six mutations, I98P, further mutated on passage to either P98H or P98S. Both PRs were sensitive to the HIV-1 PR inhibitors lopinavir (LPV) and darunavir (DRV), as well as to the broad-based inhibitor TL-3, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) of 30 to 40 nM, consistent with ex vivo results obtained using mutant FIVs. The chimeras offer an infectivity system with which to screen compounds for potential as broad-based PR inhibitors, define structural parameters that dictate specificity, and investigate pathways for drug resistance development.

  16. Karakterisasi protease Bacillus sp. UGM5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titik Purwati Widowati

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment is to indentify the characters of proetease produced by Bacillus sp.UGM5.the protease secreted by Bacillus sp.UGM5 was first isolated,purified and then charactirezed.The crude enzyme has spesific actifity of 1.14 U/mg,however,the spesific activity of purified enzyme was increased by 23.8 times fold and recovery was 33.69%.The Page of nondenatured crude enzymes showes two type of proreases,however ,the SDS-Page of denatured purified enzyme showed four protein-bends with molecular weights of 55.5 kDa,18kDa respecetively.The optimum pH and temperature for the enzyme acrivity are 8.5 and 420C and belongs to serin protease type,with Km 3 X 10-3mM and Vmax 0.0890mM/30 minutes.The activity is not inhibited by Ca+2,Fe+2 and EDTA.

  17. Lopinavir-Ritonavir: a new protease inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangum, E M; Graham, K K

    2001-11-01

    Lopinavir is a new protease inhibitor that is structurally related to ritonavir. It recently was approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a coformulation with ritonavir under the brand name Kaletra. Ritonavir substantially increases lopinavir drug exposure by inhibiting cytochrome P450 isoenzyme 3A4. Based on limited data, lopinavir-ritonavir demonstrates safety and efficacy in both antiretroviral-naive and protease inhibitor-experienced patients. It has the ability to durably suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA for up to 2 years in antiretroviral-naïve patients. Compared with nelfinavir, it had superior virologic control at 48 weeks in antiretroviral-naïve patients. Its side effects include diarrhea, abnormal stools, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and asthenia. A number of patients experienced grade 3-4 laboratory abnormalities in liver function tests, cholesterol, and triglycerides while receiving this drug combination. The exact resistance patterns of lopinavir-ritonavir are unknown, but the Department of Health and Human Services strongly recommends it for the initial treatment of HIV-infected adults and adolescents.

  18. Peptide synthesis in neat organic solvents with novel thermostable proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toplak, Ana; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J L M; Wu, Bian; Janssen, Dick B

    Biocatalytic peptide synthesis will benefit from enzymes that are active at low water levels in organic solvent compositions that allow good substrate and product solubility. To explore the use of proteases from thermophiles for peptide synthesis under such conditions, putative protease genes of the

  19. Expression and characterization of Coprothermobacter proteolyticus alkaline serine protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    TECHNICAL ABSTRACT A putative protease gene (aprE) from the thermophilic bacterium Coprothermobacter proteolyticus was cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme was determined to be a serine protease based on inhibition by PMSF. Biochemical characterization demonstrated the enzyme had...

  20. Focal Cerebral Ischemia Induces Active Proteases That Degrade Microvascular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Shunichi; Fini, Catherine A.; Mabuchi, Takuma; Koziol, James A.; Eggleston, Leonard L.; del Zoppo, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Focal cerebral ischemia causes microvessel matrix degradation and generates proteases known to degrade this matrix. However, proof that the proteases generated do indeed degrade vascular matrix is lacking. Here we demonstrate that active proteases derived from ischemic tissue after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and transferred to normal tissue can degrade vascular matrix. Methods In an ex vivo bioassay, the effects of supernatants from ischemic and normal basal ganglia of nonhuman primates, proteases, and control buffer on the immunoreactivity of vascular matrix constituents in normal brain tissue sections were quantified. Protease families were identified with specific inhibitors. Results Plasmin, active matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and active MMP-9 significantly reduced microvessel-associated collagen, laminin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG). The vascular HSPG perlecan was more sensitive than collagen or laminin in the bioassay and in the ischemic core 2 hours after MCAO. Two-hour and 7-day ischemic tissue samples significantly degraded matrix perlecan and collagen. Inhibitor studies confirmed that while active MMPs were generated, active cysteine proteases significantly degraded microvessel perlecan. The cysteine proteases cathepsins B and L were generated in the microvasculature and adjacent neurons or glial cells 2 hours after MCAO and decreased perlecan in the bioassay. Conclusions This is the first direct evidence that active proteases are generated in ischemic cerebral tissues that are acutely responsible for vascular matrix degradation. Degradation of vascular perlecan, the most sensitive matrix component thus far identified, may be due to cathepsins B and L, generated very rapidly after MCAO. PMID:15001799

  1. Acidic extracellular proteases from microrganisms of fairly acidic niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, Alessandra; Bonizzato, Luca; Zapparoli, Giacomo

    2006-01-01

    The protein population secreted from three wine-contaminant microorganisms was studied by two-dimensional electrophoresis and screened for proteases. Proteolytic enzymes were electrophoretically purified and their activity, optimum pH and temperature determined. The protease of Acetobacter aceti maintained its activity over the range of pHs 3.0-5.0, thus being of potential biotechnological interest.

  2. Partial purification and characterization of alkaline proteases from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alkaline proteases from the digestive tract of anchovy were partially purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation, dialysis and Sephadex G-75 gel filtration. The purification fold and yield were 6.23 and 4.49%, respectively. The optimum activities of partially purified alkaline proteases were observed at 60°C and at pH 11.0.

  3. Cold denaturation of the HIV-1 protease monomer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösner, Heike Ilona; Caldarini, Martina; Prestel, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The HIV-1-protease is a complex protein which in its active form adopts a homodimer dominated by -sheet structures. We have discovered a cold-denatured state of the monomeric subunit of HIV-1-protease which is populated above 0ºC and therefore directly accessible to various spectroscopic...

  4. Extracellular protease produced by Bacillus subtilis isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a study to evaluate the microbiological safety of some paracetamol oral solutions sold in some Nigerian drug stores, 40.0% of the samples examined was contaminated with protease-producing Bacillus subtilis. The production of extracellular protease was induced by casein in the minimal medium and was found to be the ...

  5. Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease heterologous expressed in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach

    During germination of barley seeds, the mobilization of protein is essential and Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins [1]. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme until activated through reduction of the...

  6. A Protease Isolated from the Latex of Plumeria rubra Linn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To isolate, purify and characterize protease from the latex of the plant. Methods: Protease was isolated from the latex of Plumeria rubra Linn using acetone precipitation method and purified by a sequence of DEAE cellulose column chromatography, followed by two successive column purification in Sephadex G-50 ...

  7. Protease-induced solubilisation of carbohydrates from brewers' spent grain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faulds, C.B.; Collins, S.; Robertson, J.A.; Treimo, J.; Eijsink, V.G.H.; Hinz, S.W.A.; Schols, H.A.; Buchert, J.; Waldron, K.W.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of microbial proteases on the release of carbohydrates from BSG was studied. The proteases were able to release the non-cellulosic glucose, a portion of feruloylated arabinoxylan and over 50% of the protein from brewers' spent grain (BSG) after 24 h hydrolysis. The non-cellulosic glucose

  8. Cloning and characterization of a novel cysteine protease gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Latex has been reported to contain a number of proteins such as protease-like enzymes (Arima et al 2000;. Arribere et al 1998), chitinase (Haque and Bradbury 1999;. Cloning and characterization of a novel cysteine protease gene (HbCP1) from Hevea brasiliensis. SHI-QING PENG. 1,#,*, JIA-HONG ZHU. 1,#, HUI-LIANG LI.

  9. Reaction mechanism of O-acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    such as, cardiovascular, oncology, osteoporosis, and arthritis. Till now, twenty one families of cysteine proteases have been discovered5, almost half of them are found in viruses and others are found in bacteria, fungi, pro- tozoa and plants. In mammals, two main groups of cysteine proteases are present: cytosolic calpains.

  10. Improvement of acid protease production by a mixed culture of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The synthesis of acid protease by Aspergillus oryzae AS3042 was enhanced significantly with the mixed culture of Aspergillus niger SL-09 using solid-state fermentation technique. The influence of carbon sources, nitrogen sources and the addition of phytic acid on acid protease production were investigated. The enzyme ...

  11. Comparison of protease production from newly isolated bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fermentation medium (by using sub-merged fermentation technique) was incubated for 48 h at 37°C temperature and agitation speed of 200 rpm. The protease was partially purified with 70% ammonium sulphate. Four different supports were used for the immobilization of the bacterial protease by physical adsorption ...

  12. Purification of an Intracellular Fibrinolytic Protease from Ganoderma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Method: The intracellular fibrinolytic protease produced by Ganoderma lucidum VK12 was isolated from the mycelia grown in MCDBF broth ... The inhibitory effect of different metal ions and commercial protease inhibitors on enzyme activity was studied. ... sodium hydroxide and 2.9 %w/v sodium carbonate in glass-distilled ...

  13. Some physicochemical properties of acid protease produced during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acid protease synthesis by Aspergillus niger increased in direct proportion to growth up to the early hours of the death phase. Maximum enzyme synthesis was obtained at the 96th hour of fermentation, which was 12 hours into the death phase. The acid protease synthesized had optimum pH of 4.0, while the enzyme was ...

  14. High-level expression of alkaline protease using recombinant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-02-16

    Feb 16, 2012 ... compared with that of wild-type B. licheniformis CICIM B5102. Key word: Alkaline protease, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus licheniformis. INTRODUCTION. Proteases are one of the most important industrial enzyme groups, accounting for approximately 60% of the total enzyme sales (Beg et al., 2003).

  15. Heterologous expression of Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben B

    Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins during germination. Several Cysteine proteases have been identified in barley. One of the key enzymes, Hordeum vulgare endoprotease B2 (HvEPB2) was cloned...

  16. Isolation of protease producing novel Bacillus cereus and detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-14

    Feb 14, 2011 ... The highest protease activity was determined at 30°C temperature and 6.4 pH conditions and after the 18th hour, it decreased evidently. Key words: Protease, production, optimization, Bacillus sp. INTRODUCTION. Enzymes have been produced in large industrial scale for several decades (Falch, 1991).

  17. Production of alkaline proteases by alkalophilic Bacillus subtilis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among various nitrogen sources, yeast extract was found to be the best inducer of alkaline protease. Among metal salts, KNO3 and NH4Cl were found to increase protease production. The maximum enzyme production (3600 U/ml) was observed with pomegranate peels of fermentation medium in the presence of yeast ...

  18. Alkaline protease production by a strain of marine yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Wang; Zhenming, Chi; Chunling, Ma

    2006-07-01

    Yeast strain 10 with high yield of protease was isolated from sediments of saltern near Qingdao, China. The protease had the highest activity at pH 9.0 and 45°C. The optimal medium for the maximum alkaline protease production of strain 10 was 2.5g soluble starch and 2.0g NaNO3 in 100mL seawater with initial pH 6.0. The optimal cultivation conditions for the maximum protease production were temperature 24.5°C, aeration rate 8.0L min-1 and agitation speed 150r min-1 Under the optimal conditions, 623.1 U mg-1 protein of alkaline protease was reached in the culture within 30h of fermentation.

  19. Sulforaphane prevents human platelet aggregation through inhibiting the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Wen-Ying; Kung, Po-Hsiung; Kuo, Chih-Yun; Wu, Chin-Chung

    2013-06-01

    Sulforaphane, a dietary isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, has been shown to exert beneficial effects in animal models of cardiovascular diseases. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, which is a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, is still unclear. In the present study, we show that sulforaphane inhibited human platelet aggregation caused by different receptor agonists, including collagen, U46619 (a thromboxane A2 mimic), protease-activated receptor 1 agonist peptide (PAR1-AP), and an ADP P2Y12 receptor agonist. Moreover, sulforaphane significantly reduced thrombus formation on a collagen-coated surface under whole blood flow conditions. In exploring the underlying mechanism, we found that sulforaphane specifically prevented phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signalling, without markedly affecting other signlaling pathways involved in platelet aggregation, such as protein kinase C activation, calcium mobilisation, and protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Although sulforaphane did not directly inhibit the catalytic activity of PI3K, it caused ubiquitination of the regulatory p85 subunit of PI3K, and prevented PI3K translocation to membranes. In addition, sulforaphane caused ubiquitination and degradation of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1), which is required for Akt activation. Therefore, sulforaphane is able to inhibit the PI3K/Akt pathway at two distinct sites. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that sulforaphane prevented platelet aggregation and reduced thrombus formation in flow conditions; our data also support that the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway by sulforaphane contributes it antiplatelet effects.

  20. Plasmodium falciparum metacaspase PfMCA-1 triggers a z-VAD-fmk inhibitable protease to promote cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Meslin

    Full Text Available Activation of proteolytic cell death pathways may circumvent drug resistance in deadly protozoan parasites such as Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania. To this end, it is important to define the cell death pathway(s in parasites and thus characterize proteases such as metacaspases (MCA, which have been reported to induce cell death in plants and Leishmania parasites. We, therefore, investigated whether the cell death function of MCA is conserved in different protozoan parasite species such as Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania major, focusing on the substrate specificity and functional role in cell survival as compared to Saccharomyces cerevisae. Our results show that, similarly to Leishmania, Plasmodium MCA exhibits a calcium-dependent, arginine-specific protease activity and its expression in yeast induced growth inhibition as well as an 82% increase in cell death under oxidative stress, a situation encountered by parasites during the host or when exposed to drugs such as artemisins. Furthermore, we show that MCA cell death pathways in both Plasmodium and Leishmania, involve a z-VAD-fmk inhibitable protease. Our data provide evidence that MCA from both Leishmania and Plasmodium falciparum is able to induce cell death in stress conditions, where it specifically activates a downstream enzyme as part of a cell death pathway. This enzymatic activity is also induced by the antimalarial drug chloroquine in erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Interestingly, we found that blocking parasite cell death influences their drug sensitivity, a result which could be used to create therapeutic strategies that by-pass drug resistance mechanisms by acting directly on the innate pathways of protozoan cell death.

  1. Positive selection of digestive Cys proteases in herbivorous Coleoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorster, Juan; Rasoolizadeh, Asieh; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Cloutier, Conrad; Sainsbury, Frank; Michaud, Dominique

    2015-10-01

    Positive selection is thought to contribute to the functional diversification of insect-inducible protease inhibitors in plants in response to selective pressures exerted by the digestive proteases of their herbivorous enemies. Here we assessed whether a reciprocal evolutionary process takes place on the insect side, and whether ingestion of a positively selected plant inhibitor may translate into a measurable rebalancing of midgut proteases in vivo. Midgut Cys proteases of herbivorous Coleoptera, including the major pest Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), were first compared using a codon-based evolutionary model to look for the occurrence of hypervariable, positively selected amino acid sites among the tested sequences. Hypervariable sites were found, distributed within -or close to- amino acid regions interacting with Cys-type inhibitors of the plant cystatin protein family. A close examination of L. decemlineata sequences indicated a link between their assignment to protease functional families and amino acid identity at positively selected sites. A function-diversifying role for positive selection was further suggested empirically by in vitro protease assays and a shotgun proteomic analysis of L. decemlineata Cys proteases showing a differential rebalancing of protease functional family complements in larvae fed single variants of a model cystatin mutated at positively selected amino acid sites. These data confirm overall the occurrence of hypervariable, positively selected amino acid sites in herbivorous Coleoptera digestive Cys proteases. They also support the idea of an adaptive role for positive selection, useful to generate functionally diverse proteases in insect herbivores ingesting functionally diverse, rapidly evolving dietary cystatins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel tetra-peptide insertion in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding motif in HIV-1 subtype C associated with protease inhibitor failure in Indian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Ujjwal; Rao, Shwetha D; Bontell, Irene; Verheyen, Jens; Rao, Vasudev R; Gore, Sagar C; Soni, Neelesh; Shet, Anita; Schülter, Eugen; Ekstrand, Maria L; Wondwossen, Amogne; Kaiser, Rolf; Madhusudhan, Mallur S; Prasad, Vinayaka R; Sonnerborg, Anders

    2014-09-24

    A novel tetra-peptide insertion was identified in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding region, which appeared in protease inhibitor failure Indian HIV-1C sequences (odds ratio=17.1, P < 0.001) but was naturally present in half of untreated Ethiopian HIV-1C sequences. The insertion is predicted to restore ALIX-mediated virus release pathway, which is lacking in HIV-1C. The clinical importance of the insertion needs to be evaluated in HIV-1C dominating regions wherein the use of protease inhibitor drugs are being scaled up.

  3. Multi-step inhibition explains HIV-1 protease inhibitor pharmacodynamics and resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabi, S. Alireza; Laird, Gregory M.; Durand, Christine M.; Laskey, Sarah; Shan, Liang; Bailey, Justin R.; Chioma, Stanley; Moore, Richard D.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) are among the most effective antiretroviral drugs. They are characterized by highly cooperative dose-response curves that are not explained by current pharmacodynamic theory. An unresolved problem affecting the clinical use of PIs is that patients who fail PI-containing regimens often have virus that lacks protease mutations, in apparent violation of fundamental evolutionary theory. Here, we show that these unresolved issues can be explained through analysis of the effects of PIs on distinct steps in the viral life cycle. We found that PIs do not affect virion release from infected cells but block entry, reverse transcription, and post–reverse transcription steps. The overall dose-response curves could be reconstructed by combining the curves for each step using the Bliss independence principle, showing that independent inhibition of multiple distinct steps in the life cycle generates the highly cooperative dose-response curves that make these drugs uniquely effective. Approximately half of the inhibitory potential of PIs is manifest at the entry step, likely reflecting interactions between the uncleaved Gag and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Sequence changes in the CT alone, which are ignored in current clinical tests for PI resistance, conferred PI resistance, providing an explanation for PI failure without resistance. PMID:23979165

  4. From nonpeptide toward noncarbon protease inhibitors: Metallacarboranes as specific and potent inhibitors of HIV protease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cígler, Petr; Kožíšek, Milan; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jiří; Otwinowski, Z.; Pokorná, Jana; Plešek, Jaromír; Grüner, Bohumír; Marešová, Lucie; Máša, Martin; Sedláček, Juraj; Bodem, J.; Kräusslich, H. G.; Král, V.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 43 (2005), s. 15394-15399 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0508; GA MŠk(CZ) LC523 Grant - others:5th Framework(XE) QLK2-CT-2001-02360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : carboranes * HIV protease * X-ray structure Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 10.231, year: 2005

  5. Characterization of a secreted Chlamydia protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, A.C.; Vandahl, B.B.; Larsen, M.R.

    2002-01-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria that are important human pathogens. The Chlamydia genomes contain orthologues to secretion apparatus proteins from other intracellular bacteria, but only a few secreted proteins have been identified. Most likely, effector proteins are secreted in order...... to promote infection. Effector proteins cannot be identified by motif or similarity searches. As a new strategy for identification of secreted proteins we have compared 2D-PAGE profiles of [35S]-labelled Chlamydia proteins from whole lysates of infected cells to 2D-PAGE profiles of proteins from purified...... Chlamydia. Several secretion candidates from Chlamydia trachomatis D and Chlamydia pneumoniae were detected by this method. Two protein spots were identified among the candidates. These represent fragments of the 'chlamydial protease- or proteasome-like activity factor' (CPAF) and were clearly present in 2D...

  6. Protease-Mediated Maturation of HIV: Inhibitors of Protease and the Maturation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine S. Adamson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Protease-mediated maturation of HIV-1 virus particles is essential for virus infectivity. Maturation occurs concomitant with immature virus particle release and is mediated by the viral protease (PR, which sequentially cleaves the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins into mature protein domains. Maturation triggers a second assembly event that generates a condensed conical capsid core. The capsid core organizes the viral RNA genome and viral proteins to facilitate viral replication in the next round of infection. The fundamental role of proteolytic maturation in the generation of mature infectious particles has made it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Development of small molecules that target the PR active site has been highly successful and nine protease inhibitors (PIs have been approved for clinical use. This paper provides an overview of their development and clinical use together with a discussion of problems associated with drug resistance. The second-half of the paper discusses a novel class of antiretroviral drug termed maturation inhibitors, which target cleavage sites in Gag not PR itself. The paper focuses on bevirimat (BVM the first-in-class maturation inhibitor: its mechanism of action and the implications of naturally occurring polymorphisms that confer reduced susceptibility to BVM in phase II clinical trials.

  7. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh-Stenta X

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoying Koh-Stenta,1 Joma Joy,1 Si Fang Wang,1 Perlyn Zekui Kwek,1 John Liang Kuan Wee,1 Kah Fei Wan,2 Shovanlal Gayen,1 Angela Shuyi Chen,1 CongBao Kang,1 May Ann Lee,1 Anders Poulsen,1 Subhash G Vasudevan,3 Jeffrey Hill,1 Kassoum Nacro11Experimental Therapeutics Centre, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR, Singapore; 2Novartis Institute for Tropical Diseases, Singapore; 3Program in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, SingaporeAbstract: Dengue virus (DENV protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described.Keywords: flavivirus protease, small molecule optimization, covalent inhibitor, active site binding, pyrazole ester derivatives

  8. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SUBSP. plantarum PROBIOTIC STRAINS AS PROTEASE PRODUCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Маtseliukh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Proteases from probiotic strains of the genus Bacillus, just like the antibiotics, bacteriocins and other hydrolytic enzymes, are one of the main factors that determine their biological activity. The aim of this work was to study the synthesis and biochemical properties of proteases from two strains Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum UCM B-5139 and UCM B-5140 that included in the probiotic Endosporin. The cultivation of strains was carried out in flasks under rotating for two days. The influence of physico-chemical parameters of the reaction medium on proteolytic activity was studied on partially purified protease preparations. Lytic activity was determined by turbidimetric method. On the second day of cultivation B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum UCM В-5139 and UCM В-5140 synthesized the metal-dependent peptidase and serine protease, respectively. The optimum conditions of their action were the following: temperature 37–40 °C and pH 6.5–7.0. Isolated proteases are able to lyse the living cells of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Thus we demonstrated that B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum UCM B-5140 and UCM B-5139, included in the probiotic veterinary preparation Endosporin, produced proteolytic enzymes that hydrolyze the native insoluble proteins (elastin, fibrin and collagen. These enzymes belong to the group of neutral metal-dependent and serine proteases. They are active under physiological conditions against gram-positive bacteria and yeasts. The application of these proteases in biotechnology is considered.

  9. Structure of HIV-1 protease determined by neutron crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Motoyasu; Kuroki, Ryota

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 protease is an aspartic protease, and plays an essential role in replication of HIV. To develop HIV-1 protease inhibitors through structure-based drug design, it is necessary to understand the catalytic mechanism and inhibitor recognition of HIV-1 protease. We have determined the crystal structure of HIV-1 protease in complex with KNI-272 to 1.9 A resolution by neutron crystallography in combination with 1.4 A resolution X-ray diffraction data. The results show that the carbonyl group of hydroxymethylcarbonyl (HMC) in KNI-272 forms a hydrogen bonding interaction with protonated Asp 25 and the hydrogen atom from the hydroxyl group of HMC forms a hydrogen bonding interaction with the deprotonated Asp125. This is the first neutron report for HIV-1/inhibitor complex and shows directly the locations of key hydrogen atoms in catalysis and in the binding of a transition-state analog. The results confirm key aspect of the presumed catalytic mechanism of HIV-1 protease and will aid in the further development of protease inhibitors. (author)

  10. Influence of major surgery on the mannan-binding lectin pathway of innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, H; Christensen, I J; Basse, L

    2006-01-01

    The mannan-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of complement activation is important in host defence against pathogens and possibly against cancer. We investigated the effect of major surgery on two central components of the MBL pathway; MBL and the MBL-associated serine protease MASP-2, and for compari...

  11. The pestivirus N terminal protease N(pro redistributes to mitochondria and peroxisomes suggesting new sites for regulation of IRF3 by N(pro..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Jefferson

    Full Text Available The N-terminal protease of pestiviruses, N(pro is a unique viral protein, both because it is a distinct autoprotease that cleaves itself from the following polyprotein chain, and also because it binds and inactivates IRF3, a central regulator of interferon production. An important question remains the role of N(pro in the inhibition of apoptosis. In this study, apoptotic signals induced by staurosporine, interferon, double stranded RNA, sodium arsenate and hydrogen peroxide were inhibited by expression of wild type N(pro, but not by mutant protein N(pro C112R, which we show is less efficient at promoting degradation of IRF3, and led to the conclusion that N(pro inhibits the stress-induced intrinsic mitochondrial pathway through inhibition of IRF3-dependent Bax activation. Both expression of N(pro and infection with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV prevented Bax redistribution and mitochondrial fragmentation. Given the role played by signaling platforms during IRF3 activation, we have studied the subcellular distribution of N(pro and we show that, in common with many other viral proteins, N(pro targets mitochondria to inhibit apoptosis in response to cell stress. N(pro itself not only relocated to mitochondria but in addition, both N(pro and IRF3 associated with peroxisomes, with over 85% of N(pro puncta co-distributing with PMP70, a marker for peroxisomes. In addition, peroxisomes containing N(pro and IRF3 associated with ubiquitin. IRF3 was degraded, whereas N(pro accumulated in response to cell stress. These results implicate mitochondria and peroxisomes as new sites for IRF3 regulation by N(pro, and highlight the role of these organelles in the anti-viral pathway.

  12. The pestivirus N terminal protease N(pro) redistributes to mitochondria and peroxisomes suggesting new sites for regulation of IRF3 by N(pro.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Matthew; Whelband, Matthew; Mohorianu, Irina; Powell, Penny P

    2014-01-01

    The N-terminal protease of pestiviruses, N(pro) is a unique viral protein, both because it is a distinct autoprotease that cleaves itself from the following polyprotein chain, and also because it binds and inactivates IRF3, a central regulator of interferon production. An important question remains the role of N(pro) in the inhibition of apoptosis. In this study, apoptotic signals induced by staurosporine, interferon, double stranded RNA, sodium arsenate and hydrogen peroxide were inhibited by expression of wild type N(pro), but not by mutant protein N(pro) C112R, which we show is less efficient at promoting degradation of IRF3, and led to the conclusion that N(pro) inhibits the stress-induced intrinsic mitochondrial pathway through inhibition of IRF3-dependent Bax activation. Both expression of N(pro) and infection with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) prevented Bax redistribution and mitochondrial fragmentation. Given the role played by signaling platforms during IRF3 activation, we have studied the subcellular distribution of N(pro) and we show that, in common with many other viral proteins, N(pro) targets mitochondria to inhibit apoptosis in response to cell stress. N(pro) itself not only relocated to mitochondria but in addition, both N(pro) and IRF3 associated with peroxisomes, with over 85% of N(pro) puncta co-distributing with PMP70, a marker for peroxisomes. In addition, peroxisomes containing N(pro) and IRF3 associated with ubiquitin. IRF3 was degraded, whereas N(pro) accumulated in response to cell stress. These results implicate mitochondria and peroxisomes as new sites for IRF3 regulation by N(pro), and highlight the role of these organelles in the anti-viral pathway.

  13. Optimizing PHB and Protease Production by Box Behnken Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amro Abd al fattah Amara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mixed culture is more suitable to adapt more flexible fermentation process and produce different product simultaneously. In this study a mixed Bacillus culture was investigated for their ability to produce the bioplastic "Polyhydroxybutyrate" and both of the mesophilic and the thermophilic proteases in one flask. Box-Behnken experimental design was used. The produced amount of PHB has been increased significantly. Meanwhile there is a competition between PHB and proteases. The maximum produced amount of PHB using Box-Behnken design was 2.82 g/l/48 h with protease activity equal to 41.9 Units/ml/48 h for thermophilic proteases and 99.65 Units/ml/48 h for mesophilic proteases. Excel solver was used for extra-optimization for the optimum conditions obtained from Box-Behnken experiments and its model. The maximum PHB obtained after using Excel solver was 2.88 g/l/48 h. The maximum mesophilic and thermophilic activities obtained at the same PHB production conditions were 175.68 and 243.38 Units/ml respectively. The model accuracy as obtained from Excel solver was 118.8%, which prove the power of the experimental design in optimizing such complicated process. The strategies used in this study are recommended for the production of PHB and different proteases simultaneously using Bacillus mixed culture. ABSTRAK: Kultur campuran adalah lebih sesuai bagi proses penapaian yang fleksibel dan ia boleh menghasilkan produk yang berbeza secara serentak. Dalam kajian ini keupayaan  menghasilkan "Polyhydroxybutyrate" bioplastik serta mesofilik dan termofilik protease dalam satu flask oleh  kultur Bacillus campuran telah disiasat. Eksperimen rekabentuk Box-Behnken telah digunakan. Jumlah PHB yang dikeluarkan meningkat dengan ketara dan terdapat persaingan antara PHB dan protease. Jumlah keluaran PHB maksima menggunakan rekabentuk Box-Behnken adalah 2.82 g/l/48 jam dengan aktiviti protease sama dengan 41.9 Unit/ml/48 jam untuk protease termofilik dan 99.65 Unit

  14. Allergens with Protease Activity from House Dust Mites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Reithofer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Globally, house dust mites (HDM are one of the main sources of allergens causing Type I allergy, which has a high risk of progressing into a severe disabling disease manifestation such as allergic asthma. The strong protease activities of a number of these allergens are thought to be involved in several steps of the pathophysiology of this allergic disease. It has been a common notion that protease activity may be one of the properties that confers allergenicity to proteins. In this review we summarize and discuss the roles of the different HDM proteases in the development of Type I allergy.

  15. Two-Dimensional Zymography of Proteases from Steatotic Duck Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Padrón, María Fernanda; Kurz, Liliana; Rémignon, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    Protease activity present in liver cells with steatosis can be electrophoretically characterized. Zymographic techniques allow semi-quantitative results, successfully detecting cathepsin and metalloprotease activity using polyacrylamide gels copolymerized with gelatin and quantified by densitometry. By using specific inhibitors, the identity of the proteases can be confirmed. 2D zymography allows the determination of both M r. and pI of the metalloprotease and cathepsin activity present in the homogenates. The analysis of liver proteases activities in force fed ducks may elucidate the mechanisms behind steatosis development.

  16. Protease-associated cellular networks in malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilburn Timothy G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria continues to be one of the most severe global infectious diseases, responsible for 1-2 million deaths yearly. The rapid evolution and spread of drug resistance in parasites has led to an urgent need for the development of novel antimalarial targets. Proteases are a group of enzymes that play essential roles in parasite growth and invasion. The possibility of designing specific inhibitors for proteases makes them promising drug targets. Previously, combining a comparative genomics approach and a machine learning approach, we identified the complement of proteases (degradome in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and its sibling species 123, providing a catalog of targets for functional characterization and rational inhibitor design. Network analysis represents another route to revealing the role of proteins in the biology of parasites and we use this approach here to expand our understanding of the systems involving the proteases of P. falciparum. Results We investigated the roles of proteases in the parasite life cycle by constructing a network using protein-protein association data from the STRING database 4, and analyzing these data, in conjunction with the data from protein-protein interaction assays using the yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H system 5, blood stage microarray experiments 678, proteomics 9101112, literature text mining, and sequence homology analysis. Seventy-seven (77 out of 124 predicted proteases were associated with at least one other protein, constituting 2,431 protein-protein interactions (PPIs. These proteases appear to play diverse roles in metabolism, cell cycle regulation, invasion and infection. Their degrees of connectivity (i.e., connections to other proteins, range from one to 143. The largest protease-associated sub-network is the ubiquitin-proteasome system which is crucial for protein recycling and stress response. Proteases are also implicated in heat shock response, signal peptide

  17. A small molecule inhibitor of dengue virus type 2 protease inhibits the replication of all four dengue virus serotypes in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Rajendra; Beesetti, Hemalatha; Tyagi, Poornima; Khanna, Ira; Jain, Swatantra K; Jeankumar, Variam U; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam

    2015-02-08

    Dengue has emerged as the most significant of arboviral diseases in the 21st century. It is endemic to >100 tropical and sub-tropical countries around the world placing an estimated 3.6 billion people at risk. It is caused by four genetically similar but antigenically distinct, serotypes of dengue viruses. There is neither a vaccine to prevent nor a drug to treat dengue infections, at the present time. The major objective of this work was to explore the possibility of identifying a small molecule inhibitor of the dengue virus protease and assessing its ability to suppress viral replication in cultured cells. We cloned, expressed and purified recombinant dengue virus type 2 protease. Using an optimized and validated fluorogenic peptide substrate cleavage assay to monitor the activity of this cloned dengue protease we randomly screened ~1000 small molecules from an 'in-house' library to identify potential dengue protease inhibitors. A benzimidazole derivative, named MB21, was found to be the most potent in inhibiting the cloned protease (IC₅₀ = 5.95 μM). In silico docking analysis indicated that MB21 binds to the protease in the vicinity of the active site. Analysis of kinetic parameters of the enzyme reaction suggested that MB21 presumably functions as a mixed type inhibitor. Significantly, this molecule identified as an inhibitor of dengue type 2 protease was also effective in inhibiting each one of the four serotypes of dengue viruses in infected cells in culture, based on analysis of viral antigen synthesis and infectious virus production. Interestingly, MB21 did not manifest any discernible cytotoxicity. This work strengthens the notion that a single drug molecule can be effective against all four dengue virus serotypes. The molecule MB21 could be a potential candidate for 'hit-to-lead' optimization, and may pave the way towards developing a pan-dengue virus antiviral drug.

  18. In vivo expression of proteases and protease inhibitor, a serpin, by periodontal pathogens at teeth and implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Martin; Mizgalska, Danuta; Sculean, Anton; Potempa, Jan; Stavropoulos, Andreas; Eick, Sigrun

    2018-03-02

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia secrete proteases, gingipains and KLIKK-proteases. In addition, T. forsythia produces a serpin (miropin) with broad inhibitory spectrum. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the level of expression of miropin and individual proteases in vivo in periodontal and peri-implant health and disease conditions. Biofilm and gingival/peri-implant crevicular fluid (GCF or PISF respectively) samples from healthy tooth and implant sites (n=10), gingivitis and mucositis sites (n=12), and periodontitis and peri-implantitis sites (n=10). Concentration of interleukins (IL)-8, IL-1β and IL-10 in GCF was determined by ELISA. Loads of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia and the presence of proteases and miropin genes were assessed in biofilm by qPCR, while genes expression was estimated by qRT-PCR. Presence of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia, as well as the level of IL-8 and IL-1β, were associated with disease severity in the periodontal and peri-implant tissues. In biofilm samples harboring T. forsythia genes encoding proteases were found to be present at 72.4% for karilysin and 100% for other KLIKK-proteases genes and miropin. At the same time, detectable mRNA expression of individual genes was in the range from 20.7% to 58.6% samples (for forsylisin and miropsin-1, respectively). In comparison to the T. forsythia proteases, miropin and the gingipains were highly expressed. The level of expression of gingipains was associated with those of miropin and certain T. forsythia proteases around teeth but not implants. Cumulatively, KLIKK-proteases and especially miropin might play a role in pathogenesis of both periodontal and peri-implant diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Genome-wide identification and structure-function studies of proteases and protease inhibitors in Cicer arietinum (chickpea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ranu; Suresh, C G

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are a family of enzymes present in almost all living organisms. In plants they are involved in many biological processes requiring stress response in situations such as water deficiency, pathogen attack, maintaining protein content of the cell, programmed cell death, senescence, reproduction and many more. Similarly, protease inhibitors (PIs) are involved in various important functions like suppression of invasion by pathogenic nematodes, inhibition of spores-germination and mycelium growth of Alternaria alternata and response to wounding and fungal attack. As much as we know, no genome-wide study of proteases together with proteinaceous PIs is reported in any of the sequenced genomes till now. Phylogenetic studies and domain analysis of proteases were carried out to understand the molecular evolution as well as gene and protein features. Structural analysis was carried out to explore the binding mode and affinity of PIs for cognate proteases and prolyl oligopeptidase protease with inhibitor ligand. In the study reported here, a significant number of proteases and PIs were identified in chickpea genome. The gene expression profiles of proteases and PIs in five different plant tissues revealed a differential expression pattern in more than one plant tissue. Molecular dynamics studies revealed the formation of stable complex owing to increased number of protein-ligand and inter and intramolecular protein-protein hydrogen bonds. The genome-wide identification, characterization, evolutionary understanding, gene expression, and structural analysis of proteases and PIs provide a framework for future analysis when defining their roles in stress response and developing a more stress tolerant variety of chickpea. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. PathogenicLeptospiraSecreted Proteases Target the Membrane Attack Complex: A Potential Role for Thermolysin in Complement Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amamura, Thais A; Fraga, Tatiana R; Vasconcellos, Sílvio A; Barbosa, Angela S; Isaac, Lourdes

    2017-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira . This disease is common in tropical and subtropical areas, constituting a serious public health problem. Pathogenic Leptospira have the ability to escape the human Complement System, being able to survive when in contact with normal human serum. In a previous study, our group demonstrated that supernatants of pathogenic Leptospira (SPL) inhibit the three activation pathways of the Complement System. This inhibition can be directly correlated with the activity of secreted proteases, which cleave the Complement molecules C3, Factor B (Alternative Pathway), C4 and C2 (Classical and Lectin Pathways). In this work, we analyze the activity of the leptospiral proteases on the components of Terminal Pathway of Complement, called the membrane attack complex (MAC). We observed that proteases present in SPL from different Leptospira strains were able to cleave the purified proteins C5, C6, C7, C8, and C9, while culture supernatant from non-pathogenic Leptospira strains (SNPL) had no significant proteolytic activity on these substrates. The cleavages occurred in a time-dependent and specificity manner. No cleavage was observed when we used whole serum as a source of C5-C9 proteins, probably because of the abundant presence of plasma protease inhibitors such as α 2 -macroglobulin. Complement protein cleavage by SPL was inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline, indicating the involvement of metalloproteases. Furthermore, 1,10-phenanthroline- treated normal human serum diminished pathogenic leptospira survival. We also analyzed the proteolytic activity of thermolysin (LIC13322) a metalloprotease expressed exclusively by pathogenic Leptospira strains. Recombinant thermolysin was capable of cleaving the component C6, either purified or as part of the SC5b-9 complex. Furthermore, we found that the MAC proteins C6-C9 interact with thermolysin, indicating that this metalloprotease may have an additional inhibitory

  1. Pathogenic Leptospira Secreted Proteases Target the Membrane Attack Complex: A Potential Role for Thermolysin in Complement Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais A. Amamura

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. This disease is common in tropical and subtropical areas, constituting a serious public health problem. Pathogenic Leptospira have the ability to escape the human Complement System, being able to survive when in contact with normal human serum. In a previous study, our group demonstrated that supernatants of pathogenic Leptospira (SPL inhibit the three activation pathways of the Complement System. This inhibition can be directly correlated with the activity of secreted proteases, which cleave the Complement molecules C3, Factor B (Alternative Pathway, C4 and C2 (Classical and Lectin Pathways. In this work, we analyze the activity of the leptospiral proteases on the components of Terminal Pathway of Complement, called the membrane attack complex (MAC. We observed that proteases present in SPL from different Leptospira strains were able to cleave the purified proteins C5, C6, C7, C8, and C9, while culture supernatant from non-pathogenic Leptospira strains (SNPL had no significant proteolytic activity on these substrates. The cleavages occurred in a time-dependent and specificity manner. No cleavage was observed when we used whole serum as a source of C5–C9 proteins, probably because of the abundant presence of plasma protease inhibitors such as α2-macroglobulin. Complement protein cleavage by SPL was inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline, indicating the involvement of metalloproteases. Furthermore, 1,10-phenanthroline- treated normal human serum diminished pathogenic leptospira survival. We also analyzed the proteolytic activity of thermolysin (LIC13322 a metalloprotease expressed exclusively by pathogenic Leptospira strains. Recombinant thermolysin was capable of cleaving the component C6, either purified or as part of the SC5b-9 complex. Furthermore, we found that the MAC proteins C6–C9 interact with thermolysin, indicating that this metalloprotease may have an

  2. Pathogenic Leptospira Secreted Proteases Target the Membrane Attack Complex: A Potential Role for Thermolysin in Complement Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amamura, Thais A.; Fraga, Tatiana R.; Vasconcellos, Sílvio A.; Barbosa, Angela S.; Isaac, Lourdes

    2017-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. This disease is common in tropical and subtropical areas, constituting a serious public health problem. Pathogenic Leptospira have the ability to escape the human Complement System, being able to survive when in contact with normal human serum. In a previous study, our group demonstrated that supernatants of pathogenic Leptospira (SPL) inhibit the three activation pathways of the Complement System. This inhibition can be directly correlated with the activity of secreted proteases, which cleave the Complement molecules C3, Factor B (Alternative Pathway), C4 and C2 (Classical and Lectin Pathways). In this work, we analyze the activity of the leptospiral proteases on the components of Terminal Pathway of Complement, called the membrane attack complex (MAC). We observed that proteases present in SPL from different Leptospira strains were able to cleave the purified proteins C5, C6, C7, C8, and C9, while culture supernatant from non-pathogenic Leptospira strains (SNPL) had no significant proteolytic activity on these substrates. The cleavages occurred in a time-dependent and specificity manner. No cleavage was observed when we used whole serum as a source of C5–C9 proteins, probably because of the abundant presence of plasma protease inhibitors such as α2-macroglobulin. Complement protein cleavage by SPL was inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline, indicating the involvement of metalloproteases. Furthermore, 1,10-phenanthroline- treated normal human serum diminished pathogenic leptospira survival. We also analyzed the proteolytic activity of thermolysin (LIC13322) a metalloprotease expressed exclusively by pathogenic Leptospira strains. Recombinant thermolysin was capable of cleaving the component C6, either purified or as part of the SC5b-9 complex. Furthermore, we found that the MAC proteins C6–C9 interact with thermolysin, indicating that this metalloprotease may have an additional inhibitory

  3. Zebra chip disease decreases tuber (Solanum tuberosum L.) protein content by attenuating protease inhibitor levels and increasing protease activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, G N Mohan; Knowles, Lisa O; Knowles, N Richard

    2015-11-01

    Zebra chip disease of potato decreases protease inhibitor levels resulting in enhanced serine-type protease activity, decreased protein content and altered protein profiles of fully mature tubers. Zebra-chip (ZC), caused by Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLso), is a relatively new disease of potato that negatively affects growth, yield, propagation potential, and fresh and process qualities of tubers. Diseased plants produce tubers with characteristic brown discoloration of vascular tissue accompanied by elevated levels of free amino acids and reducing sugars. Here we demonstrate that ZC disease induces selective protein catabolism in tubers through modulating protease inhibitor levels. Soluble protein content of tubers from CLso-infected plants was 33% lower than from non-infected plants and electrophoretic analyses revealed substantial reductions in major tuber proteins. Patatin (~40 kDa) and ser-, asp- (22 kDa) and cys-type (85 kDa) protease inhibitors were either absent or greatly reduced in ZC-afflicted tubers. In contrast to healthy (non-infected) tubers, the proteolytic activity in CLso infected tubers was high and the ability of extracts from infected tubers to inhibit trypsin (ser-type) and papain (cys-type) proteases greatly attenuated. Moreover, extracts from CLso-infected tubers rapidly catabolized proteins purified from healthy tubers (40 kDa patatin, 22 kDa protease inhibitors, 85 kDa potato multicystatin) when subjected to proteolysis individually. In contrast, crude extracts from non-infected tubers effectively inhibited the proteolytic activity from ZC-afflicted tubers. These results suggest that the altered protein profile of ZC afflicted tubers is largely due to loss of ser- and cys-type protease inhibitors. Further analysis revealed a novel PMSF-sensitive (ser) protease (ca. 80-120 kDa) in CLso infected tubers. PMSF abolished the proteolytic activities responsible for degrading patatin, the 22 kDa protease inhibitor(s) and potato

  4. Isolation of protease producing novel Bacillus cereus and detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-14

    1991). Industrial enzymes-developments in production and application, Biotechnol. Adv. 9: 643-658. Ferrero MA, Castro GR, Abate CM, Baigori MD, Sineriz F (1996). Thermostable alkaline proteases of Bacillus licheniformis MIR ...

  5. Immune pressure analysis of protease and reverse transcriptase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    /dn) were analyzed for 33 HIV-1 subtype C protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) nucleotide sequences each from antiretroviral naïve South African chronically infected individuals. The ds/dn ratios were calculated using the ...

  6. Analysis and protease-catalysed synthesis of sucrose alkanoate regioisomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lie, Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    laurate in DMF using serine proteases and a metalloprotease. A broad range of elution strategies for the chromatographic analysis of sucrose alkanoate regioisomers was systematically investigated using design of experiments strategies and statistical and multivariate analysis and modelling. Efficiency...

  7. Effect of Gastrointestinal Protease Digestion on Bioactivity of Marine Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ida-Johanne; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk; Ossum, Carlo Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    executed without concerning subsequent digestion after intake and the aim of this work was hence to investigate how the in vitro antioxidative, antihypertensive and caspase activating activities of peptides are affected by digestion with gastrointestinal (GI) proteases. Five different fish protein...... hydrolysates were chosen to study the effect of in vitro digestion on bioactivity. The protein concentration decreased in all samples during digestion and the molecular weight distribution of the peptides shifted towards lower values. Thus, in vitro digestion with GI proteases resulted in a further degradation...... of the peptides obtained by hydrolysis. The antihypertensive effect increased in all samples after digestion with GI proteases whereas the antioxidative capacity decreased. The effect on the caspase activity depended on the proteases used in the preparation of hydrolysates. In conclusion, the caspase activity...

  8. The Place of protease inhibitors in antiretroviral treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B. Tenore

    Full Text Available With the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, a number of drugs have been developed. The best choice concerning which antiretroviral analogs to start is always under discussion, especially in the choice between non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors-based therapies and ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors. Both are proven to control viral replication and lead to immunological gain. The choice between a non-nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a protease inhibitor as a third antiretroviral drug in the therapy should consider factors related to the individual, as well as the inclusion of the best therapy in the patient's daily activities and potential adherence. The protease inhibitor-based therapies showed similar efficacy among the various inhibitors with characteristics concerning the adverse events from each medicine. For the treatment of protease-resistant patients, darunavir and tipranavir showed good efficacy with higher genetic barrier to resistance.

  9. Why cells need intramembrane proteases - a mechanistic perspective

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stříšovský, Kvido

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 283, č. 10 (2016), s. 1837-1845 ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11206; GA MŠk LO1302 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 304154 - Rhomboid substrates Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : enzyme mechanism * intramembrane protease * membrane protein * rhomboid protease * substrate specificity Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.902, year: 2016

  10. Sequential Detection of Thermophilic Lipase and Protease by Zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Liliana; Hernández, Zully; Contreras, Lellys M; Wilkesman, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    Lipase and protease present in cell-free fractions of thermophilic Bacillus sp. cultures were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel (PAG) electrophoresis. After run, the gel is electrotransferred to another PAG copolymerized with glycerol tributyrate, olive oil, and gelatin. This multi-substrate gel was incubated first for lipase detection, until bands appeared, and then stained with Coomassie for protease detection. Advantages of this sequential procedure are the detection of two different enzyme activities on a single PAG, beside time and resource saving.

  11. Functional protease profiling for diagnosis of malignant disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Peter; Neumaier, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Clinical proteomic profiling by mass spectrometry (MS) aims at uncovering specific alterations within mass profiles of clinical specimens that are of diagnostic value for the detection and classification of various diseases including cancer. However, despite substantial progress in the field, the clinical proteomic profiling approaches have not matured into routine diagnostic applications so far. Their limitations are mainly related to high-abundance proteins and their complex processing by a multitude of endogenous proteases thus making rigorous standardization difficult. MS is biased towards the detection of low-molecular-weight peptides. Specifically, in serum specimens, the particular fragments of proteolytically degraded proteins are amenable to MS analysis. Proteases are known to be involved in tumour progression and tumour-specific proteases are released into the blood stream presumably as a result of invasive progression and metastasis. Thus, the determination of protease activity in clinical specimens from patients with malignant disease can offer diagnostic and also therapeutic options. The identification of specific substrates for tumour proteases in complex biological samples is challenging, but proteomic screens for proteases/substrate interactions are currently experiencing impressive progress. Such proteomic screens include peptide-based libraries, differential isotope labelling in combination with MS, quantitative degradomic analysis of proteolytically generated neo-N-termini, monitoring the degradation of exogenous reporter peptides with MS, and activity-based protein profiling. In the present article, we summarize and discuss the current status of proteomic techniques to identify tumour-specific protease-substrate interactions for functional protease profiling. Thereby, we focus on the potential diagnostic use of the respective approaches. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Effects of two serine proteases from Bothrops pirajai snake venom on the complement system and the inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menaldo, Danilo L; Bernardes, Carolina P; Pereira, Juliana C; Silveira, Denise S C; Mamede, Carla C N; Stanziola, Leonilda; Oliveira, Fábio de; Pereira-Crott, Luciana S; Faccioli, Lúcia H; Sampaio, Suely V

    2013-04-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of two serine proteases from Bothrops pirajai snake venom, named BpirSP27 and BpirSP41, on the complement system and the inflammatory response. The effects of these enzymes on the human complement system were assessed by kinetic hemolytic assays, evaluating the hemolysis promoted by the classical/lectin (CP/LP) and alternative (AP) pathways after incubation of normal human serum with the serine proteases. The results suggested that these enzymes were able to induce modulation of CP/LP and AP at different levels: BpirSP41 showed higher inhibitory effects on the hemolytic activity of CP/LP than BpirSP27, with inhibition values close to 40% and 20%, respectively, for the highest concentration assayed. Regarding AP, both enzymes showed percentages of inhibition of the hemolytic activity around 20% for the highest concentrations tested, indicating similar effects on this complement pathway. The proinflammatory effects of B. pirajai serine proteases were evaluated regarding their ability to induce paw edema, variations in the pain threshold and leukocyte recruitment at the site of injection. Both showed mild effects on these inflammatory processes, leading to low levels of increase of paw volumes and decrease in pain thresholds in rats up to 6 h after injection, and inducing neutrophil recruitment without significant increases in the total number of leukocytes in the inflammatory exudates after 6 and 24 h of administration into mice peritoneal cavity. These results suggest that serine proteases must present a minor role in the inflammation caused by B. pirajai snake venom. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The crystal structure of GXGD membrane protease FlaK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian; Xue, Yi; Lee, Sangwon; Ha, Ya (Yale-MED)

    2011-09-20

    The GXGD proteases are polytopic membrane proteins with catalytic activities against membrane-spanning substrates that require a pair of aspartyl residues. Representative members of the family include preflagellin peptidase, type 4 prepilin peptidase, presenilin and signal peptide peptidase. Many GXGD proteases are important in medicine. For example, type 4 prepilin peptidase may contribute to bacterial pathogenesis, and mutations in presenilin are associated with Alzheimer's disease. As yet, there is no atomic-resolution structure in this protease family. Here we report the crystal structure of FlaK, a preflagellin peptidase from Methanococcus maripaludis, solved at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure contains six transmembrane helices. The GXGD motif and a short transmembrane helix, helix 4, are positioned at the centre, surrounded by other transmembrane helices. The crystal structure indicates that the protease must undergo conformational changes to bring the GXGD motif and a second essential aspartyl residue from transmembrane helix 1 into close proximity for catalysis. A comparison of the crystal structure with models of presenilin derived from biochemical analysis reveals three common transmembrane segments that are similarly arranged around the active site. This observation reinforces the idea that the prokaryotic and human proteases are evolutionarily related. The crystal structure presented here provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of the GXGD proteases, and may facilitate the rational design of inhibitors that target specific members of the family.

  14. The Crystal Structure of GXGD Membrane Protease FlaK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Hu; Y Xue; S Lee; Y Ha

    2011-12-31

    The GXGD proteases are polytopic membrane proteins with catalytic activities against membrane-spanning substrates that require a pair of aspartyl residues. Representative members of the family include preflagellin peptidase, type 4 prepilin peptidase, presenilin and signal peptide peptidase. Many GXGD proteases are important in medicine. For example, type 4 prepilin peptidase may contribute to bacterial pathogenesis, and mutations in presenilin are associated with Alzheimer's disease. As yet, there is no atomic-resolution structure in this protease family. Here we report the crystal structure of FlaK, a preflagellin peptidase from Methanococcus maripaludis, solved at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure contains six transmembrane helices. The GXGD motif and a short transmembrane helix, helix 4, are positioned at the centre, surrounded by other transmembrane helices. The crystal structure indicates that the protease must undergo conformational changes to bring the GXGD motif and a second essential aspartyl residue from transmembrane helix 1 into close proximity for catalysis. A comparison of the crystal structure with models of presenilin derived from biochemical analysis reveals three common transmembrane segments that are similarly arranged around the active site. This observation reinforces the idea that the prokaryotic and human proteases are evolutionarily related. The crystal structure presented here provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of the GXGD proteases, and may facilitate the rational design of inhibitors that target specific members of the family.

  15. Proteases induce secretion of collagenase and plasminogen activator by fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werb, Z.; Aggeler, J.

    1978-04-01

    We have observed that treatment of rabbit synovial fibroblasts with proteolytic enzymes can induce secretion of collagenase (EC 3.4.24.7) and plasminogen activator (EC 3.4.21.-). Cells treated for 2 to 24 hr with plasmin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, pancreatic elastase, papain, bromelain, thermolysin, or ..cap alpha..-protease but not with thrombin or neuraminidase secreted detectable amounts of collagenase within 16 to 48 hr. Treatment of fibroblasts with trypsin also induced secretion of plasminogen activator. Proteases initiated secretion of collagenase (up to 20 units per 10/sup 6/ cells per 24 hr) only when treatment produced decreased cell adhesion. Collagenase production did not depend on continued presence of proteolytic activity or on subsequent cell adhesion, spreading, or proliferation. Routine subculturing with crude trypsin also induced collagenase secretion by cells. Secretion of collagenase was prevented and normal spreading was obtained if the trypsinized cells were placed into medium containing fetal calf serum. Soybean trypsin inhibitor, ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin, bovine serum albumin, collagen, and fibronectin did not inhibit collagenase production. Although proteases that induced collagenase secretion also removed surface glycoprotein, the kinetics of induction of cell protease secretion were different from those for removal of fibronectin. Physiological inducers of secretion of collagenase and plasminogen activator by cells have not been identified. These results suggest that extracellular proteases in conjunction with plasma proteins may govern protease secretion by cells.

  16. Pnserpin: A Novel Serine Protease Inhibitor from Extremophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine protease inhibitors (serpins are native inhibitors of serine proteases, constituting a large protein family with members spread over eukaryotes and prokaryotes. However, only very few prokaryotic serpins, especially from extremophiles, have been characterized to date. In this study, Pnserpin, a putative serine protease inhibitor from the thermophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli for purification and characterization. It irreversibly inhibits chymotrypsin-, trypsin-, elastase-, and subtilisin-like proteases in a temperature range from 20 to 100 °C in a concentration-dependent manner. The stoichiometry of inhibition (SI of Pnserpin for proteases decreases as the temperature increases, indicating that the inhibitory activity of Pnserpin increases with the temperature. SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that Pnserpin inhibits proteases by forming a SDS-resistant covalent complex. Homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulations predicted that Pnserpin can form a stable common serpin fold. Results of the present work will help in understanding the structural and functional characteristics of thermophilic serpin and will broaden the current knowledge about serpins from extremophiles.

  17. Pnserpin: A Novel Serine Protease Inhibitor from Extremophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huan; Fei, Rui; Xue, Baigong; Yu, Shanshan; Zhang, Zuoming; Zhong, Sheng; Gao, Yuanqi; Zhou, Xiaoli

    2017-01-07

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are native inhibitors of serine proteases, constituting a large protein family with members spread over eukaryotes and prokaryotes. However, only very few prokaryotic serpins, especially from extremophiles, have been characterized to date. In this study, Pnserpin, a putative serine protease inhibitor from the thermophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum , was overexpressed in Escherichia coli for purification and characterization. It irreversibly inhibits chymotrypsin-, trypsin-, elastase-, and subtilisin-like proteases in a temperature range from 20 to 100 °C in a concentration-dependent manner. The stoichiometry of inhibition (SI) of Pnserpin for proteases decreases as the temperature increases, indicating that the inhibitory activity of Pnserpin increases with the temperature. SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) showed that Pnserpin inhibits proteases by forming a SDS-resistant covalent complex. Homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulations predicted that Pnserpin can form a stable common serpin fold. Results of the present work will help in understanding the structural and functional characteristics of thermophilic serpin and will broaden the current knowledge about serpins from extremophiles.

  18. Characterizing Protease Specificity: How Many Substrates Do We Need?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schauperl

    Full Text Available Calculation of cleavage entropies allows to quantify, map and compare protease substrate specificity by an information entropy based approach. The metric intrinsically depends on the number of experimentally determined substrates (data points. Thus a statistical analysis of its numerical stability is crucial to estimate the systematic error made by estimating specificity based on a limited number of substrates. In this contribution, we show the mathematical basis for estimating the uncertainty in cleavage entropies. Sets of cleavage entropies are calculated using experimental cleavage data and modeled extreme cases. By analyzing the underlying mathematics and applying statistical tools, a linear dependence of the metric in respect to 1/n was found. This allows us to extrapolate the values to an infinite number of samples and to estimate the errors. Analyzing the errors, a minimum number of 30 substrates was found to be necessary to characterize substrate specificity, in terms of amino acid variability, for a protease (S4-S4' with an uncertainty of 5 percent. Therefore, we encourage experimental researchers in the protease field to record specificity profiles of novel proteases aiming to identify at least 30 peptide substrates of maximum sequence diversity. We expect a full characterization of protease specificity helpful to rationalize biological functions of proteases and to assist rational drug design.

  19. Regulation of intestinal permeability: The role of proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Spaendonk, Hanne; Ceuleers, Hannah; Witters, Leonie; Patteet, Eveline; Joossens, Jurgen; Augustyns, Koen; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; De Meester, Ingrid; De Man, Joris G; De Winter, Benedicte Y

    2017-03-28

    The gastrointestinal barrier is - with approximately 400 m 2 - the human body's largest surface separating the external environment from the internal milieu. This barrier serves a dual function: permitting the absorption of nutrients, water and electrolytes on the one hand, while limiting host contact with noxious luminal antigens on the other hand. To maintain this selective barrier, junction protein complexes seal the intercellular space between adjacent epithelial cells and regulate the paracellular transport. Increased intestinal permeability is associated with and suggested as a player in the pathophysiology of various gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. The gastrointestinal tract is exposed to high levels of endogenous and exogenous proteases, both in the lumen and in the mucosa. There is increasing evidence to suggest that a dysregulation of the protease/antiprotease balance in the gut contributes to epithelial damage and increased permeability. Excessive proteolysis leads to direct cleavage of intercellular junction proteins, or to opening of the junction proteins via activation of protease activated receptors. In addition, proteases regulate the activity and availability of cytokines and growth factors, which are also known modulators of intestinal permeability. This review aims at outlining the mechanisms by which proteases alter the intestinal permeability. More knowledge on the role of proteases in mucosal homeostasis and gastrointestinal barrier function will definitely contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets for permeability-related diseases.

  20. Comparative Detection of Alkaline Protease Production in Exiguobacterium acetylicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, O.M.; EI Shafey, H.M.

    2009-01-01

    Alkaline protease is one of the most important enzymes in industry, medicine, and research. In the present work, a comparative detection for alkaline protease activity was established for instant detection of enzyme activity. Eight different alkalophilic bacterial isolates were compared based on the clear zone they produced on skim milk agar. One strain gave an absolute clear zone in 16 hours and was used for alkaline protease detection. The result of Phenotypic identification using Biology Microlog 3 identified the isolate as Exiguobacterium acetylicum. The isolate under study showed slightly different characteristics from a known Exiguobacterium acetylicum strain. The isolate tolerated alkaline conditions up to ph 11, while good growth was evident at ph 7, the maximum alkaline protease activity was observed at ph 9 which reached up to 109.01 U/ml. The alkaline activity assay using alkaline protease enzyme assay were coordinating with those obtained by conductivity; there was a relevant decrease in conductivity at the maximum increase in enzyme activity, which proved the cell membrane conductivity has a close relation to alkaline protease production. This isolate has tolerated gamma radiation, the increase in dose (up to 4 Gy) gave wider clear zones in terms of diameter and this was relevant to the conductivity measurements

  1. Insights into the Cyanobacterial Deg/HtrA Proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otilia eCheregi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Proteins are the main machinery for all living processes in a cell; they provide structural elements, regulate biochemical reactions as enzymes, and are the interface to the outside as receptors and transporters. Like any other machinery proteins have to be assembled correctly and need maintenance after damage, e.g. caused by changes in environmental conditions, genetic mutations, and limitations in the availability of cofactors. Proteases and chaperones help in repair, assembly, and folding of damaged and misfolded protein complexes cost-effective, with low energy investment compared with neo-synthesis. Despite their importance for viability, the specific biological role of most proteases in vivo is largely unknown. Deg/HtrA proteases, a family of serine-type ATP-independent proteases, have been shown in higher plants to be involved in the degradation of the Photosystem II reaction center protein D1. The objective of this review is to highlight the structure and function of their cyanobacterial orthologues. Homology modeling was used to find specific features of the Deg/HtrA proteases of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Based on the available data concerning their location and their physiological substrates we conclude that these Deg proteases not only have important housekeeping and chaperone functions within the cell, but also are needed for remodeling the cell exterior.

  2. Identification of Cysteine Proteases and Screening of Cysteine Protease Inhibitors in Biological Samples by a Two-Dimensional Gel System of Zymography and Reverse Zymography

    OpenAIRE

    Saitoh, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Shinya; Okamoto, Eishiro; Hayakawa, Yoshimi; Hoshino, Takashi; Sato, Ritsuko; Isemura, Satoko; Ohtsubo, Sadami; Taniguchi, Masayuki

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D-) gel system of zymography and reverse zymography for the detection and characterization of proteases and protease inhibitors. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) agarose gels with pH gradients were employed for separation in the fi rst-dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel copolymerized with gelatin used for the second dimension. Proteases and protease inhibitors separated by IEF gel were applied on the second gel without trichloroacetic...

  3. Antibody proteases: induction of catalytic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabibov, A G; Friboulet, A; Thomas, D; Demin, A V; Ponomarenko, N A; Vorobiev, I I; Pillet, D; Paon, M; Alexandrova, E S; Telegin, G B; Reshetnyak, A V; Grigorieva, O V; Gnuchev, N V; Malishkin, K A; Genkin, D D

    2002-10-01

    Most of the data accumulated throughout the years on investigation of catalytic antibodies indicate that their production increases on the background of autoimmune abnormalities. The different approaches to induction of catalytic response toward recombinant gp120 HIV-1 surface protein in mice with various autoimmune pathologies are described. The peptidylphosphonate conjugate containing structural part of gp120 molecule is used for reactive immunization of NZB/NZW F1, MRL, and SJL mice. The specific modification of heavy and light chains of mouse autoantibodies with Val-Ala-Glu-Glu-Glu-Val-PO(OPh)2 reactive peptide was demonstrated. Increased proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies in SJL mice encouraged us to investigate the production of antigen-specific catalytic antibodies on the background of induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The immunization of autoimmune-prone mice with the engineered fusions containing the fragments of gp120 and encephalitogenic epitope of myelin basic protein (MBP(89-104)) was made. The proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies isolated from the sera of autoimmune mice immunized by the described antigen was shown. Specific immune response of SJL mice to these antigens was characterized. Polyclonal antibodies purified from sera of the immunized animals revealed proteolytic activity. The antiidiotypic approach to raise the specific proteolytic antibody as an "internal image" of protease is described. The "second order" monoclonal antibodies toward subtilisin Carlsberg revealed pronounced proteolytic activity.

  4. Modelling of potentially promising SARS protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plewczynski, Dariusz [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, ICM, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Hoffmann, Marcin [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Grotthuss, Marcin von [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Knizewski, Lukasz [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, ICM, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Rychewski, Leszek [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Eitner, Krystian [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Ginalski, Krzysztof [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, ICM, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-07-18

    In many cases, at the beginning of a high throughput screening experiment some information about active molecules is already available. Active compounds (such as substrate analogues, natural products and inhibitors of related proteins) are often identified in low throughput validation studies on a biochemical target. Sometimes the additional structural information is also available from crystallographic studies on protein and ligand complexes. In addition, the structural or sequence similarity of various protein targets yields a novel possibility for drug discovery. Co-crystallized compounds from homologous proteins can be used to design leads for a new target without co-crystallized ligands. In this paper we evaluate how far such an approach can be used in a real drug campaign, with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus providing an example. Our method is able to construct small molecules as plausible inhibitors solely on the basis of the set of ligands from crystallized complexes of a protein target, and other proteins from its structurally homologous family. The accuracy and sensitivity of the method are estimated here by the subsequent use of an electronic high throughput screening flexible docking algorithm. The best performing ligands are then used for a very restrictive similarity search for potential inhibitors of the SARS protease within the million compounds from the Ligand.Info small molecule meta-database. The selected molecules can be passed on for further experimental validation.

  5. Protease Production by Different Thermophilic Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchione, Mariana M.; Merheb, Carolina W.; Gomes, Eleni; da Silva, Roberto

    A comparative study was carried out to evaluate protease production in solid-state fermentation (SSF) and submerged fermentation (SmF) by nine different thermophilic fungi — Thermoascus aurantiacus Miehe, Thermomyces lanuginosus, T. lanuginosus TO.03, Aspergillus flavus 1.2, Aspergillus sp. 13.33, Aspergillus sp. 13.34, Aspergillus sp. 13.35, Rhizomucor pusillus 13.36 and Rhizomucor sp. 13.37 — using substrates containing proteins to induce enzyme secretion. Soybean extract (soybean milk), soybean flour, milk powder, rice, and wheat bran were tested. The most satisfactory results were obtained when using wheat bran in SSF. The fungi that stood out in SSF were T. lanuginosus, T. lanuginosus TO.03, Aspergillus sp. 13.34, Aspergillus sp. 13.35, and Rhizomucor sp. 13.37, and those in SmF were T. aurantiacus, T. lanuginosus TO.03, and 13.37. In both fermentation systems, A. flavus 1.2 and R. pusillus 13.36 presented the lowest levels of proteolytic activity.

  6. New binding site conformations of the dengue virus NS3 protease accessed by molecular dynamics simulation.

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    Hugo de Almeida

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is caused by four distinct serotypes of the dengue virus (DENV1-4, and is estimated to affect over 500 million people every year. Presently, there are no vaccines or antiviral treatments for this disease. Among the possible targets to fight dengue fever is the viral NS3 protease (NS3PRO, which is in part responsible for viral processing and replication. It is now widely recognized that virtual screening campaigns should consider the flexibility of target protein by using multiple active conformational states. The flexibility of the DENV NS3PRO could explain the relatively low success of previous virtual screening studies. In this first work, we explore the DENV NS3PRO conformational states obtained from molecular dynamics (MD simulations to take into account protease flexibility during the virtual screening/docking process. To do so, we built a full NS3PRO model by multiple template homology modeling. The model comprised the NS2B cofactor (essential to the NS3PRO activation, a glycine flexible link and the proteolytic domain. MD simulations had the purpose to sample, as closely as possible, the ligand binding site conformational landscape prior to inhibitor binding. The obtained conformational MD sample was clustered into four families that, together with principal component analysis of the trajectory, demonstrated protein flexibility. These results allowed the description of multiple binding modes for the Bz-Nle-Lys-Arg-Arg-H inhibitor, as verified by binding plots and pair interaction analysis. This study allowed us to tackle protein flexibility in our virtual screening campaign against the dengue virus NS3 protease.

  7. Sequence conservation, phylogenetic relationships, and expression profiles of nondigestive serine proteases and serine protease homologs in Manduca sexta

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Xiaolong; He, Yan; Hu, Yingxia; Zhang, Xiufeng; Wang, Yang; Zou, Zhen; Chen, Yunru; Blissard, Gary W.; Kanost, Michael R.; Jiang, Haobo

    2014-01-01

    Serine protease (SP) and serine protease homolog (SPH) genes in insects encode a large family of proteins involved in digestion, development, immunity, and other processes. While 68 digestive SPs and their close homologs are reported in a companion paper (Kuwar et al., 2015), we have identified 125 other SPs/SPHs in Manduca sexta and studied their structure, evolution, and expression. Fifty-two of them contain cystine-stabilized structures for molecular recognition, including clip, LDLa, Sush...

  8. Toward a structure-based comprehension of the lectin pathway of complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Troels R; Thiel, Steffen; Andersen, Gregers R

    2013-01-01

    To initiate the lectin pathway of complement pattern recognition molecules bind to surface-linked carbohydrates or acetyl groups on pathogens or damaged self-tissue. This leads to activation of the serine proteases MASP-1 and MASP-2 resulting in deposition of C4 on the activator and assembly...... concerning the lectin pathway proteins and derive overall models for their glycan bound complexes. These models are used to discuss cis- versus trans-activation of MASP proteases and the geometry of C4 deposition occurring on glycans in the lectin pathway...... of the C3 convertase. In addition MASP-3 and the non-catalytic MAp19 and MAp44 presumably play regulatory functions, but the exact function of the MASP-3 protease remains to be established. Recent functional studies have significantly advanced our understanding of the molecular events occurring...

  9. Identification and characterization of human polyserase-3, a novel protein with tandem serine-protease domains in the same polypeptide chain

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    Garabaya Cecilia

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously described the identification and characterization of polyserase-1 and polyserase-2, two human serine proteases containing three different catalytic domains within the same polypeptide chain. Polyserase-1 shows a complex organization and it is synthesized as a membrane-bound protein which can generate three independent serine protease domains as a consequence of post-translational processing events. The two first domains are enzymatically active. By contrast, polyserase-2 is an extracellular glycosylated protein whose three protease domains remain embedded in the same chain, and only the first domain possesses catalytic activity. Results Following our interest in the study of the human degradome, we have cloned a human liver cDNA encoding polyserase-3, a new protease with tandem serine protease domains in the same polypeptide chain. Comparative analysis of polyserase-3 with the two human polyserases described to date, revealed that this novel polyprotein is more closely related to polyserase-2 than to polyserase-1. Thus, polyserase-3 is a secreted protein such as polyserase-2, but lacks additional domains like the type II transmembrane motif and the low-density lipoprotein receptor module present in the membrane-anchored polyserase-1. Moreover, analysis of post-translational mechanisms operating in polyserase-3 maturation showed that its two protease domains remain as integral parts of the same polypeptide chain. This situation is similar to that observed in polyserase-2, but distinct from polyserase-1 whose protease domains are proteolytically released from the original chain to generate independent units. Immunolocalization studies indicated that polyserase-3 is secreted as a non-glycosylated protein, thus being also distinct from polyserase-2, which is a heavily glycosylated protein. Enzymatic assays indicated that recombinant polyserase-3 degrades the α-chain of fibrinogen as well as pro

  10. Protease expression by microorganisms and its relevance to crucial physiological/pathological events

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, André Luis Souza

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of infections caused by fungi and trypanosomatids is difficult due to the eukaryotic nature of these microbial cells, which are similar in several biochemical and genetic aspects to host cells. Aggravating this scenario, very few antifungal and anti-trypanosomatidal agents are in clinical use and, therefore, therapy is limited by drug safety considerations and their narrow spectrum of activity, efficacy and resistance. The search for new bioactive agents against fungi and trypanosomatids has been expanded because progress in biochemistry and molecular biology has led to a better understanding of important and essential pathways in these microorganisms including nutrition, growth, proliferation, signaling, differentiation and death. In this context, proteolytic enzymes produced by these eukaryotic microorganisms are appointed and, in some cases, proven to be excellent targets for searching novel natural and/or synthetic pharmacological compounds, in order to cure or prevent invasive fungal/trypanosomatid diseases. With this task in mind, our research group and others have focused on aspartic-type proteases, since the activity of this class of hydrolytic enzymes is directly implicated in several facets of basic biological processes of both fungal and trypanosomatid cells as well as due to the participation in numerous events of interaction between these microorganisms and host structures. In the present paper, a concise revision of the beneficial effects of aspartic protease inhibitors, with emphasis on the aspartic protease inhibitors used in the anti-human immunodeficiency virus therapy, will be presented and discussed using our experience with the following microbial models: the yeast Candida albicans, the filamentous fungus Fonsecaea pedrosoi and the protozoan trypanosomatid Leishmania amazonensis. PMID:21537490

  11. A serine protease isolated from the bristles of the Amazonic caterpillar, Premolis semirufa, is a potent complement system activator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isadora Maria Villas Boas

    Full Text Available The caterpillar of the moth Premolis semirufa, commonly named pararama, is found in the Brazilian Amazon region. Accidental contact with the caterpillar bristles causes an intense itching sensation, followed by symptoms of an acute inflammation, which last for three to seven days after the first incident. After multiple accidents a chronic inflammatory reaction, called "Pararamose", characterized by articular synovial membrane thickening with joint deformities common to chronic synovitis, frequently occurs. Although complement mediated inflammation may aid the host defense, inappropriate or excessive activation of the complement system and generation of anaphylatoxins can lead to inflammatory disorder and pathologies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in vitro, whether the Premolis semirufa's bristles extract could interfere with the human complement system.The bristles extract was able to inhibit the haemolytic activity of the alternative pathway, as well as the activation of the lectin pathway, but had no effect on the classical pathway, and this inhibition seemed to be caused by activation and consumption of complement components. The extract induced the production of significant amounts of all three anaphylatoxins, C3a, C4a and C5a, promoted direct cleavage of C3, C4 and C5 and induced a significant generation of terminal complement complexes in normal human serum. By using molecular exclusion chromatography, a serine protease of 82 kDa, which activates complement, was isolated from P. semirufa bristles extract. The protease, named here as Ps82, reduced the haemolytic activity of the alternative and classical pathways and inhibited the lectin pathway. In addition, Ps82 induced the cleavage of C3, C4 and C5 and the generation of C3a and C4a in normal human serum and it was capable to cleave human purified C5 and generate C5a. The use of Phenanthroline, metalloprotease inhibitor, in the reactions did not significantly interfere

  12. Position-dependent impact of hexafluoroleucine and trifluoroisoleucine on protease digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Huhmann

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid digestion by proteases limits the application of peptides as therapeutics. One strategy to increase the proteolytic stability of peptides is the modification with fluorinated amino acids. This study presents a systematic investigation of the effects of fluorinated leucine and isoleucine derivatives on the proteolytic stability of a peptide that was designed to comprise substrate specificities of different proteases. Therefore, leucine, isoleucine, and their side-chain fluorinated variants were site-specifically incorporated at different positions of this peptide resulting in a library of 13 distinct peptides. The stability of these peptides towards proteolysis by α-chymotrypsin, pepsin, proteinase K, and elastase was studied, and this process was followed by an FL-RP-HPLC assay in combination with mass spectrometry. In a few cases, we observed an exceptional increase in proteolytic stability upon introduction of the fluorine substituents. The opposite phenomenon was observed in other cases, and this may be explained by specific interactions of fluorinated residues with the respective enzyme binding sites. Noteworthy is that 5,5,5-trifluoroisoleucine is able to significantly protect peptides from proteolysis by all enzymes included in this study when positioned N-terminal to the cleavage site. These results provide valuable information for the application of fluorinated amino acids in the design of proteolytically stable peptide-based pharmaceuticals.

  13. UBIQUITIN-SPECIFIC PROTEASES function in plant development and stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huapeng; Zhao, Jinfeng; Cai, Jingqing; Patil, Suyash B

    2017-08-01

    UBIQUITIN-SPECIFIC PROTEASES play important roles in plant development and stress responses. Protein ubiquitination and deubiquitination are reversible processes, which can modulate the stability, activity as well as subcellular localization of the substrate proteins. UBIQUITIN-SPECIFIC PROTEASE (UBP) protein family participates in protein deubiquitination. Members of UBP family are involved in a variety of physiological processes in plants, as evidenced by their functional characterization in model plant Arabidopsis and other plants. UBPs are conserved in plants and distinct UBPs function in different regulatory processes, although functional redundancies exist between some members. Here we briefly reviewed recent advances in understanding the biological functions of UBP protein family in Arabidopsis, particularly the molecular mechanisms by which UBPs regulate plant development and stress responses. We believe that elucidation of UBPs function and regulation in Arabidopsis will provide new insights about protein deubiquitination and might shed light on the understanding of the mechanistic roles of UBPs in general, which will definitely contribute to crop improvement in agriculture.

  14. Evaluation of Immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) Protease and IgA1 Protease-Inhibitory Activity in Human Female Genital Infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    OpenAIRE

    Hedges, Spencer R.; Mayo, Matthew S.; Kallman, Lisa; Mestecky, Jiri; Hook, Edward W.; Russell, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease, an enzyme that selectively cleaves human IgA1, may be a virulence factor for pathogenic organisms such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Host protection from the effects of IgA1 protease includes antibody-mediated inhibition of IgA1 protease activity, and it is believed that the relative balance between IgA1 protease and inhibitory antibodies contributes to the pathogenesis of disease caused by IgA1 protease-producing organisms. We have examined the levels of these ...

  15. Characterization of Toxoplasma DegP, a rhoptry serine protease crucial for lethal infection in mice.

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    Gaelle Lentini

    Full Text Available During the infection process, Apicomplexa discharge their secretory organelles called micronemes, rhoptries and dense granules to sustain host cell invasion, intracellular replication and to modulate host cell pathways and immune responses. Herein, we describe the Toxoplasma gondii Deg-like serine protein (TgDegP, a rhoptry protein homologous to High temperature requirement A (HtrA or Deg-like family of serine proteases. TgDegP undergoes processing in both types I and II strains as most of the rhoptries proteins. We show that genetic disruption of the degP gene does not impact the parasite lytic cycle in vitro but affects virulence in mice. While in a type I strain DegPI appears dispensable for the establishment of an infection, removal of DegPII in a type II strain dramatically impairs the virulence. Finally, we show that KO-DegPII parasites kill immunodeficient mice as efficiently as the wild-type strain indicating that the protease might be involved in the complex crosstalk that the parasite engaged with the host immune response. Thus, this study unravels a novel rhoptry protein in T. gondii important for the establishment of lethal infection.

  16. Newly generated cells are increased in hippocampus of adult mice lacking a serine protease inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sticker Melanie

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone occurs throughout the life of mammals and newly generated neurons can integrate functionally into established neuronal circuits. Neurogenesis levels in the dentate gyrus are modulated by changes in the environment (enrichment, exercise, hippocampal-dependent tasks, NMDA receptor (NMDAR activity, sonic hedgehog (SHH and/or other factors. Results previously, we showed that Protease Nexin-1 (PN-1, a potent serine protease inhibitor, regulates the NMDAR availability and activity as well as SHH signaling. Compared with wild-type (WT, we detected a significant increase in BrdU-labeled cells in the dentate gyrus of mice lacking PN-1 (PN-1 -/- both in controls and after running exercise. Patched homologue 1 (Ptc1 and Gli1 mRNA levels were higher and Gli3 down-regulated in mutant mice under standard conditions and to a lesser extent after running exercise. However, the number of surviving BrdU-positive cells did not differ between WT and PN-1 -/- animals. NMDAR availability was altered in the hippocampus of mutant animals after exercise. Conclusion All together our results indicate that PN-1 controls progenitors proliferation through an effect on the SHH pathway and suggest an influence of the serpin on the survival of newly generated neurons through modulation of NMDAR availability.

  17. The plasma contact system, a protease cascade at the nexus of inflammation, coagulation and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, Henri; Heikaus, Laura; Long, Andy T; Naudin, Clément; Schlüter, Hartmut; Renné, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The contact system is a potent procoagulant and proinflammatory plasma protease cascade that is initiated by binding ("contact")-induced, auto-activation of factor XII zymogen. Formed active serine protease FXIIa then cleaves plasma prekallikrein to kallikrein that in turn liberates the mediator bradykinin from its precursor high molecular weight kininogen. Bradykinin induces inflammation with implications for host defense and innate immunity. FXIIa also triggers the intrinsic pathway of coagulation that has been shown to critically contribute to thrombosis. Vice versa, FXII deficiency impairs thrombosis in animal models without inducing abnormal excessive bleeding. Recent work has established the FXIIa-driven contact system as promising target for anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory drugs. This review focuses on the biochemistry of the contact system, its regulation by endogenous and exogenous inhibitors, and roles in disease states. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteolysis as a Regulatory Event in Pathophysiology edited by Stefan Rose-John. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Desumoylation of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane VAP Family Protein Scs2 by Ulp1 and SUMO Regulation of the Inositol Synthesis Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felberbaum, Rachael; Wilson, Nicole R.; Cheng, Dongmei; Peng, Junmin

    2012-01-01

    Posttranslational protein modification by the ubiquitin-like SUMO protein is critical to eukaryotic cell regulation, but much remains unknown regarding its operation and substrates. Here we report that specific mutations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ulp1 SUMO protease, including its coiled-coil (CC) domain, lead to the accumulation of distinct sumoylated proteins in vivo. A prominent ∼50-kDa sumoylated protein accumulates in a Ulp1 CC mutant. The protein was identified as Scs2, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein that regulates phosphatidylinositol synthesis and lipid trafficking. Mutation of lysine 180 of Scs2 abolishes its sumoylation. Notably, impairment of either cellular sumoylation or cellular desumoylation mechanisms inhibits cell growth in the absence of inositol and exacerbates the inositol auxotrophy caused by deletion of SCS2. Mutants lacking the Ulp2 SUMO protease are the most severely affected, and this defect was traced to the mutants' impaired ability to induce transcription of INO1, which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme of inositol biosynthesis. Conversely, inositol starvation induces a striking change in the profiles of total cellular SUMO conjugates. These results provide the first evidence of cross-regulation between the SUMO and inositol pathways, including the sumoylation of an ER membrane protein central to phospholipid synthesis and phosphoinositide signaling. PMID:22025676

  19. Diversity of both the cultivable protease-producing bacteria and bacterial extracellular proteases in the coastal sediments of King George Island, Antarctica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yang Zhou

    Full Text Available Protease-producing bacteria play a vital role in degrading sedimentary organic nitrogen. However, the diversity of these bacteria and their extracellular proteases in most regions remain unknown. In this paper, the diversity of the cultivable protease-producing bacteria and of bacterial extracellular proteases in the sediments of Maxwell Bay, King George Island, Antarctica was investigated. The cultivable protease-producing bacteria reached 10(5 cells/g in all 8 sediment samples. The cultivated protease-producing bacteria were mainly affiliated with the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria, and the predominant genera were Bacillus (22.9%, Flavobacterium (21.0% and Lacinutrix (16.2%. Among these strains, Pseudoalteromonas and Flavobacteria showed relatively high protease production. Inhibitor analysis showed that nearly all the extracellular proteases from the bacteria were serine proteases or metalloproteases. These results begin to address the diversity of protease-producing bacteria and bacterial extracellular proteases in the sediments of the Antarctic Sea.

  20. Lessons learned from mice deficient in lectin complement pathway molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genster, Ninette; Takahashi, Minoru; Sekine, Hideharu

    2014-01-01

    The lectin pathway of the complement system is initiated when the pattern-recognition molecules, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins or collectin-11, bind to invading pathogens or damaged host cells. This leads to activation of MBL/ficolin/collectin-11 associated serine proteases (MASPs), which...... differences in the genetic arrangements of murine and human orthologues of lectin pathway molecules, the knockout mice have proven to be valuable models to explore the effect of deficiency states in humans. In addition, new insight and unexpected findings on the diverse roles of lectin pathway molecules...

  1. Cysteine Protease (Capparin from Capsules of Caper (Capparis spinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasar Demir

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteases are enzymes that perform very important functions in organisms and are used for a variety of objectives in vitro. In recent years, proteases have been used for clinical, pharmaceutical (alimentary digestion, anti-inflammatory, etc. and industrial applications (cheese production, meat tenderizing, leather tanning. In this research, a protease has been purified from capsules of caper (Capparis spinosa and characterized. Caper plants have been used for food and medicine since ancient times. The plant grows abundantly in certain regions of Turkey. Ammonium sulphate fractionation and a CM Sephadex column were used for purification of the enzyme. The purification enzyme has an optimum pH=5.0 and its optimum temperature was 60 °C. The vmax and Km values determined by Lineweaver-Burk graphics were 1.38 μg/(L·min and 0.88 μg/L, respectively. The purification degree and the molecular mass of the enzyme (46 kDa were determined by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration chromatography. It was investigated whether the purified and characterized protease could cause milk to congeal or digest chicken and cow meat. The results show that protease can be used for industrial production.

  2. Penaeus vannamei protease stabilizing process of ZnS nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaghi, Mozhgan; Homaei, Ahmad; Mosaddegh, Elaheh

    2018-01-31

    The protease enzyme purified from the Penaeus vannamei shrimp has unique properties, so improving the stability of this enzyme can improve their practical applications. In this study, ZnS nanoparticles, which have special properties for enzyme immobilization, were synthesized using a chemical precipitation method, and Penaeus vannamei protease was successfully immobilized on them. The size, structure, and morphology of the ZnS nanoparticles, and the immobilization of the protease were studied, using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) analysis. We show that the immobilized enzyme has improved functionality at high temperatures, extreme pH conditions (pH3 and 12), and during storage. Immobilization increased the optimum temperature range of the enzyme, but did not change the pH optimum, which remained at pH7. Immobilization of P. vannamei protease enzyme increased the K m and decreased k cat /K m . These results indicate that P. vannamei protease immobilized on ZnS nanoparticles, has improved properties due to its high stability and unique properties, can be used for biotechnology applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Extracellular protease from the antarctic yeast Candida humicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, M K; Devi, K U; Kumar, G S; Shivaji, S

    1992-06-01

    The psychrotrophic, dimorphic yeast Candida humicola, isolated from Antarctic soil, secretes an acidic protease into the medium. The secretion of this protease by C. humicola was found to be dependent on the composition of the medium. In YPD or yeast nitrogen base medium containing either amino acids or ammonium sulfate as the nitrogen source, the activity of the protease in the medium was low (basal level). However, when yeast nitrogen base medium was depleted of amino acids or ammonium sulfate and supplemented with proteins, the activity of the enzyme increased. The secretion of the enzyme was greater during exponential growth at low temperatures than during growth at higher temperatures. The purified protease had a molecular mass of 36,000 Da and was inhibited by pepstatin, iodoacetamide, and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Despite the prevalent cold temperatures in Antarctica, this extracellular protease of the psychrotrophic yeast C. humicola was active at temperatures ranging from 0 to 45 degrees C, with an optimum activity at 37 degrees C.

  4. Alkaline protease from Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 mitigates industrial pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Amit; Ansari, Mohammad W; Anwar, Mohmmad S; Agrawal, Ruchi; Agrawal, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    Proteases have found a wide application in the several industrial processes, such as laundry detergents, protein recovery or solubilization, prion degradation, meat tenderizations, and in bating of hides and skins in leather industries. But the main hurdle in industrial application of proteases is their economical production on a large scale. The present investigation aimed to exploit the locally available inexpensive agricultural and household wastes for alkaline protease production using Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 via solid-state fermentation (SSF) technique. The alkaline enzyme is potentially useful as an additive in commercial detergents to mitigate pollution load due to extensive use of caustic soda-based detergents. Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 showed good protease production under SSF conditions of 55 °C, pH 9, and 50 % moisture content with potato peels as solid substrate. The presented findings revealed that crude alkaline protease produced by Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 via SSF is of potential application in silver recovery from used X-ray films.

  5. Counselor Identity: Conformity or Distinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Jerry E.; Boettcher, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The authors explore 3 debates in other disciplines similar to counseling's identity debate in order to learn about common themes and outcomes. Conformity, distinction, and cohesion emerged as common themes. They conclude that counselors should retain their distinctive, humanistic approach rather than conforming to the dominant, medical approach.

  6. Common elements in interleukin 4 and insulin signaling pathways in factor-dependent hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L M; Keegan, A D; Li, W; Lienhard, G E; Pacini, S; Gutkind, J S; Myers, M G; Sun, X J; White, M F; Aaronson, S A

    1993-05-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4), insulin, and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) efficiently induced DNA synthesis in the IL-3-dependent murine myeloid cell lines FDC-P1 and FDC-P2. Although these factors could not individually sustain long-term growth of these lines, a combination of IL-4 with either insulin or IGF-I did support continuous growth. The principal tyrosine-phosphorylated substrate observed in FDC cells stimulated with IL-4, previously designated 4PS, was of the same size (170 kDa) as the major substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin or IGF-I. These substrates had phosphopeptides of the same size when analyzed by digestion with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, and each tightly associated with the 85-kDa component of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase after factor stimulation. IRS-1, the principal substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin or IGF-I stimulation in nonhematopoietic cells, is similar in size to 4PS. However, anti-IRS-1 antibodies failed to efficiently precipitate 4PS, and some phosphopeptides generated by V8 protease digestion of IRS-1 were distinct in size from the phosphopeptides of 4PS. Nevertheless, IL-4, insulin, and IGF-I were capable of stimulating tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 in FDC cells that expressed this substrate as a result of transfection. These findings indicate that (i) IL-4, insulin, and IGF-I use signal transduction pathways in FDC lines that have at least one major feature in common, the rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of 4PS, and (ii) insulin and IGF-I stimulation of hematopoietic cell lines leads to the phosphorylation of a substrate that may be related to but is not identical to IRS-1.

  7. SUMO proteases ULP1c and ULP1d are required for development and osmotic stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Pedro Humberto; Couto, Daniel; Freitas, Sara; Verde, Nuno; Macho, Alberto P; Huguet, Stéphanie; Botella, Miguel Angel; Ruiz-Albert, Javier; Tavares, Rui Manuel; Bejarano, Eduardo Rodríguez; Azevedo, Herlânder

    2016-09-01

    Sumoylation is an essential post-translational regulator of plant development and the response to environmental stimuli. SUMO conjugation occurs via an E1-E2-E3 cascade, and can be removed by SUMO proteases (ULPs). ULPs are numerous and likely to function as sources of specificity within the pathway, yet most ULPs remain functionally unresolved. In this report we used loss-of-function reverse genetics and transcriptomics to functionally characterize Arabidopsis thaliana ULP1c and ULP1d SUMO proteases. GUS reporter assays implicated ULP1c/d in various developmental stages, and subsequent defects in growth and germination were uncovered using loss-of-function mutants. Microarray analysis evidenced not only a deregulation of genes involved in development, but also in genes controlled by various drought-associated transcriptional regulators. We demonstrated that ulp1c ulp1d displayed diminished in vitro root growth under low water potential and higher stomatal aperture, yet leaf transpirational water loss and whole drought tolerance were not significantly altered. Generation of a triple siz1 ulp1c ulp1d mutant suggests that ULP1c/d and the SUMO E3 ligase SIZ1 may display separate functions in development yet operate epistatically in response to water deficit. We provide experimental evidence that Arabidopsis ULP1c and ULP1d proteases act redundantly as positive regulators of growth, and operate mainly as isopeptidases downstream of SIZ1 in the control of water deficit responses.

  8. Evaluation of a D-amino-acid-containing fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptide library for profiling prokaryotic proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaman, W.E.; Voskamp-Visser, I.; de Jongh, D.M.C.; Endtz, H.P.; van Belkum, A.; Hays, J.P.; Bikker, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial proteases play an important role in a broad spectrum of processes, including colonization, proliferation, and virulence. In this respect, bacterial proteases are potential biomarkers for bacterial diagnosis and targets for novel therapeutic protease inhibitors. To investigate these

  9. A Functional Interplay between Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease Residues 77 and 93 Involved in Differential Regulation of Precursor Autoprocessing and Mature Protease Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Counts

    Full Text Available HIV-1 protease (PR is a viral enzyme vital to the production of infectious virions. It is initially synthesized as part of the Gag-Pol polyprotein precursor in the infected cell. The free mature PR is liberated as a result of precursor autoprocessing upon virion release. We previously described a model system to examine autoprocessing in transfected mammalian cells. Here, we report that a covariance analysis of miniprecursor (p6*-PR sequences derived from drug naïve patients identified a series of amino acid pairs that vary together across independent viral isolates. These covariance pairs were used to build the first topology map of the miniprecursor that suggests high levels of interaction between the p6* peptide and the mature PR. Additionally, several PR-PR covariance pairs are located far from each other (>12 Å Cα to Cα relative to their positions in the mature PR structure. Biochemical characterization of one such covariance pair (77-93 revealed that each residue shows distinct preference for one of three alkyl amino acids (V, I, and L and that a polar or charged amino acid at either of these two positions abolishes precursor autoprocessing. The most commonly observed 77V is preferred by the most commonly observed 93I, but the 77I variant is preferred by other 93 variances (L, V, or M in supporting precursor autoprocessing. Furthermore, the 77I93V covariant enhanced precursor autoprocessing and Gag polyprotein processing but decreased the mature PR activity. Therefore, both covariance and biochemical analyses support a functional association between residues 77 and 93, which are spatially distant from each other in the mature PR structure. Our data also suggests that these covariance pairs differentially regulate precursor autoprocessing and the mature protease activity.

  10. The Cysteine Protease–Cysteine Protease Inhibitor System Explored in Soybean Nodule Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Dorcas Quain

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Almost all protease families have been associated with plant development, particularly senescence, which is the final developmental stage of every organ before cell death. Proteolysis remobilizes and recycles nitrogen from senescent organs that is required, for example, seed development. Senescence-associated expression of proteases has recently been characterized using large-scale gene expression analysis seeking to identify and characterize senescence-related genes. Increasing activities of proteolytic enzymes, particularly cysteine proteases, are observed during the senescence of legume nodules, in which a symbiotic relationship between the host plant and bacteria (Rhizobia facilitate the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. It is generally considered that cysteine proteases are compartmentalized to prevent uncontrolled proteolysis in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In addition, the activities of cysteine proteases are regulated by endogenous cysteine protease inhibitors called cystatins. These small proteins form reversible complexes with cysteine proteases, leading to inactivation. However, very little is currently known about how the cysteine protease-cysteine protease inhibitor (cystatin system is regulated during nodule development. Moreover, our current understanding of the expression and functions of proteases and protease inhibitors in nodules is fragmented. To address this issue, we have summarized the current knowledge and techniques used for studying proteases and their inhibitors including the application of “omics” tools, with a particular focus on changes in the cysteine protease-cystatin system during nodule development.

  11. Screening of Alkaline Protease-Producing Streptomyces diastaticus and Optimization of Enzyme Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Dawoodi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Alkaline proteases are used in pharmaceutical, film and photography, silk production and food, leather and detergent industries. Actinomycetes are gram positive bacteria that produce different enzymes such as proteases. The aims of this research were isolation of native alkaline protease-producing Actinomycete spp. from different soil samples as well as optimizing the conditions for enzyme production. Materials and Methods: The different soil samples were collected from different locations of the provinces of Khouzestan, Chahar Mahalo Bakhtiari and Isfahan, Iran. After determining of the best alkaline protease producing species using Lowry method, the optimization of alkaline protease was performed. Results: The alkaline protease producing Actinomycete spp. was isolated from soil. The most enzyme activity was measured in S.diastaticus. The best concentration of sucrose as the carbon source for the highest production of alkaline protease was 10 g/l. The optimum pH and temperature for the alkaline protease production by S. diastaticus were 10 and 30°C respectively. The maximum activity of alkaline protease was measured at 200 rpm as the best aeration speed. Conclusions: This is the first report of alkaline protease production by Streptomyces diastaticus in Iran. The accomplished examinations in this research confirmed the previous theories of alkaline protease production by Actinomycetes relatively. Regarding the immense applications of alkaline proteases in several industries and isolation of a native alkaline protease producing Actinomycete, The production potential of this enzyme in our country could be accessible in the near future.

  12. Diversity of cultivable protease-producing bacteria in sediments of Jiaozhou Bay, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Ying eZhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although protease-producing bacteria are key players in the degradation of organic nitrogen and essential for the nitrogen recycling in marine sediments, diversity of both these bacteria and their extracellular proteases is still largely unknown. This study investigated the diversity of the cultivable protease-producing bacteria and their extracellular proteases in the sediments of the eutrophied Jiaozhou Bay, China through phylogenetic analysis and protease inhibitor tests. The abundance of the cultivable protease-producing bacteria was up to 104 cells/g in all six sediment samples. The cultivated protease-producing bacteria mostly belonged to the phyla Proteobacteria and Firmicutes with the predominant genera being Photobacterium (39.4%, Bacillus (25.8% and Vibrio (19.7%. Protease inhibitor tests revealed that extracellular proteases secreted by the bacteria were mainly serine proteases and/or metalloproteases with relatively low proportions of cysteine proteases. This study represents the first comprehensive analysis on the diversity of protease-producing bacteria and their extracellular proteases in sediments of a eutrophic bay.

  13. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology. PMID:26861509

  14. The binding mechanism of a peptidic cyclic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Longguang; Svane, Anna Sigrid P.; Sørensen, Hans Peter

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases are classical objects for studies of catalytic and inhibitory mechanisms as well as interesting as therapeutic targets. Since small-molecule serine protease inhibitors generally suffer from specificity problems, peptidic inhibitors, isolated from phage-displayed peptide libraries......, have attracted considerable attention. Here, we have investigated the mechanism of binding of peptidic inhibitors to serine protease targets. Our model is upain-1 (CSWRGLENHRMC), a disulfide-bond-constrained competitive inhibitor of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator with a noncanonical...... inhibitory mechanism and an unusually high specificity. Using a number of modified variants of upain-1, we characterised the upain-1-urokinase-type plasminogen activator complex using X-ray crystal structure analysis, determined a model of the peptide in solution by NMR spectroscopy, and analysed binding...

  15. Cleaning protocols for crystallization robots: preventing protease contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naschberger, Andreas; Fürnrohr, Barbara G.; Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Bonagura, Christopher A.; Wright, David; Scheffzek, Klaus; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The protease in the commonly used commercial low-foam enzyme cleaner Zymit cannot be completely blocked by EDTA, a widely used inhibitor of metalloproteases, at concentrations of up to 5 mM. Severe protein degradation was observed in crystallization drops after EDTA-containing wash steps unless residual Zymit protease was removed with NaOH at a concentration of at least 0.1 M. Wash steps with 0.1% SDS were also ineffective in completely removing the remaining Zymit activity. Protocols including wash steps with at least 0.1 M NaOH, as for example specified in the original ZENM protocol, are recommended to completely deactivate Zymit protease activity. PMID:25615978

  16. Protease activity in the larval stage of the parasitoid wasp, Eulophus pennicornis (Nees) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae); effects of protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Down, R E; Ford, L; Mosson, H J; Fitches, E; Gatehouse, J A; Gatehouse, A M

    1999-08-01

    Hymenopteran, parasitoid wasps have good potential for use in integrated pest management (IPM); for example, the gregarious ectoparasitoid, Eulophus pennicornis, has been suggested as a biological control agent for larvae of the tomato moth (Lacanobia oleracea L.). However, the processes by which such parasitic larvae are able to utilize the nutritional resource provided by the host have been little studied. Protease activity was present in E. pennicornis larvae, and characterization of the enzymes responsible for proteolysis was performed using a range of synthetic substrates and specific inhibitors. Serine protease enzymes was both trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like activities were present. A range of plant-derived serine protease inhibitors was tested for activity against these enzymes. Certain inhibitors, notably soybean Kunitz inhibitor (SKTI), inhibited enzyme activity by > 80% at < 10(-5) M. When SKTI was fed to L. oleracea larvae in an artificial diet, the inhibitor was subsequently detected within the larval haemolymph, showing that protease inhibitors in the host diet can be delivered to a parasitoid via the host haemolymph. If transgenic plants expressing foreign protease inhibitors for protection against insect pests are to form a component of IPM systems, possible adverse effects, whether direct or indirect, of transgene expression on parasitoids like E. pennicornis should be considered.

  17. Purification and characterization of alkaline proteases from aspergillus terreus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.; Mannan, A.; Zubair, H.; Mirza, B.

    2010-01-01

    Proteases belong to an important class of enzymes known as hydrolases and catalyze hydrolysis of proteins. They act primarily to degrade proteins that are used for energy production and as biosynthetic precursors. In the following study, protease produced from Aspergillus terreus was found to be thermo stable and included in the category of alkaline serine and metallo protease. During partial purification, presence of enzyme in 60% (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ indicated small molecular weight polypeptide; later purification with Sephadex G-75 fractionation yielded a single proteolytic active molecule. At final purification step, the increase in specific activity of the enzyme was 7.5 fold with 23% yield. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that alkaline protease of Aspergillus terreus is a monomer with approximate molecular weight of 35 kDa. Optimum pH for protease activity was found in the range of 7.5-11.0 (maximum at pH 8.5), thus apparently classified as an alkaline protease. The enzyme was thermo stable towards high temperature (60 deg. C), however it denatured irreversibly at 70 deg. C showing 80% loss of activity. The maximum proteolytic activity was found at 40 deg. C. The enzyme was effectively inhibited by PMSF, EDTA and urea whereas iodoacetamide and thiourea did not result in any loss in activity while cysteine was found to be activator molecule. The study with metal ions Mg/sup +2/, Mn/sup +2/ and Fe/sup +3/ (1 mM each) showed minute stimulatory effects on enzyme activity. Co/sup +2/ and Ca/sup +2/ (1 mM) had neither excitatory nor inhibitory effect while Hg/sup +2/ and Cu/sup +2/ (1 mM) slightly reduced the enzyme activity. (author)

  18. Identification of new protein substrates for the chloroplast ATP-dependent Clp protease supports its constitutive role in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanne, Tara M; Sjögren, Lars L E; Koussevitzky, Shai; Clarke, Adrian K

    2009-01-01

    The ATP-dependent Clp protease in plant chloroplasts consists of a heterogeneous proteolytic core containing multiple ClpP and ClpR paralogues. In this study, we have examined in detail the only viable knockout mutant to date of one of these subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana, ClpR1. Loss of ClpR1 caused a slow-growth phenotype, with chlorotic leaves during early development that later partially recovered upon maturity. Analysis of the Clp proteolytic core in the clpR1 mutant (clpR1-1) revealed approx. 10% of the wild-type levels remaining, probably due to a relative increase in the closely related ClpR3 protein and its partial substitution of ClpR1 in the core complex. A proteomic approach using an in organello proteolytic assay revealed 19 new potential substrates for the chloroplast Clp protease. Many of these substrates were constitutive enzymes involved in different metabolic pathways, including photosynthetic carbon fixation, nitrogen metabolism and chlorophyll/haem biosynthesis, whereas others function in housekeeping roles such as RNA maturation, protein synthesis and maturation, and recycling processes. In contrast, degradation of the stress-related chloroplast proteins Hsp21 (heat-shock protein 21) and lipoxygenase 2 was unaffected in the clpR1-1 line and thus not facilitated by the Clp protease. Overall, we show that the chloroplast Clp protease is principally a constitutive enzyme that degrades numerous stromal proteins, a feature that almost certainly underlies its vital importance for chloroplast function and plant viability.

  19. Biological Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Biological Pathways Fact Sheet Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features ...

  20. Design of HIV protease inhibitors based on inorganic polyhedral metallacarboranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáčová, Pavlína; Pokorná, Jana; Brynda, Jiří; Kožíšek, Milan; Cígler, Petr; Lepšík, Martin; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Řezáč, Jan; Grantz Šašková, Klára; Sieglová, Irena; Plešek, Jaromír; Šícha, Václav; Grüner, Bohumír; Oberwinkler, H.; Sedláček, Juraj; Kräusslich, H. G.; Hobza, Pavel; Král, V.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 22 (2009), s. 7132-7141 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00320901; GA MŠk LC512; GA MŠk LC523 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 37693 - HIV PI RESISTANCE Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : HIV protease inhibitors * aspartic proteases * viral resistance * cobalt bis(dicarbollide) * crystal structure Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.802, year: 2009

  1. Chemistry and biology of natural product derived protease inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Stolze, Sara Christina

    2012-01-01

    Im Rahmen dieser Dissertation sollten Naturstoffe und davon abgeleitete Derivate synthetisiert und im Hinblick auf ihre biologische Aktivität als Protease-Inhibitoren untersucht werden. Für die Naturstoffklasse der 3-Amino-6-Hydroxy-2-piperidon(Ahp)-Cyclodepsipeptide, die als nicht-kovalente Serin-Protease-Inhibitoren bekannt sind, konnte eine Festphasensynthese basierend auf einem allgemeinen Ahp-Vorläufermolekül entwickelt werden. Für den Ahp-Vorläufer wurde eine Lösungssynthese entwicke...

  2. Dissecting Degradomes: Analysis of Protease-Coding Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Eguiluz, Ángel; Díaz-Navarro, Ander; Puente, Xose S

    2018-01-01

    Proteases constitute up to 3% of all protein-coding genes in a vertebrate genome and participate in numerous physiological and pathological processes. The characterization of the degradome of one organism, the set of all genes encoding proteolytic enzymes, and the comparison to the degradome of other species have proved useful to identify genetic differences that are helpful to elucidate the molecular basis of diverse biological processes, the different susceptibility to disease, and the evolution of the structure and function of proteases. Here we describe the main procedures involved in the characterization of the degradome of an organism for which its genome sequence is available.

  3. Prediction and analysis of structure, stability and unfolding of thermolysin-like proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Gert; Eijsink, Vincent

    1993-08-01

    Bacillus neutral proteases (NPs) form a group of well-characterized homologous enzymes, that exhibit large differences in thermostability. The three-dimensional (3D) structures of several of these enzymes have been modelled on the basis of the crystal structures of the NPs of B. thermoproteolyticus (thermolysin) and B. cercus. Several new techniques have been developed to improve the model-building procedures. Also a model-building by mutagenesis' strategy was used, in which mutants were designed just to shed light on parts of the structures that were particularly hard to model. The NP models have been used for the prediction of site-directed mutations aimed at improving the thermostability of the enzymes. Predictions were made using several novel computational techniques, such as position-specific rotamer searching, packing quality analysis and property-profile database searches. Many stabilizing mutations were predicted and produced: improvement of hydrogen bonding, exclusion of buried water molecules, capping helices, improvement of hydrophobic interactions and entropic stabilization have been applied successfully. At elevated temperatures NPs are irreversibly inactivated as a result of autolysis. It has been shown that this denaturation process is independent of the protease activity and concentration and that the inactivation follows first-order kinetics. From this it has been conjectured that local unfolding of (surface) loops, which renders the protein susceptible to autolysis, is the rate-limiting step. Despite the particular nature of the thermal denaturation process, normal rules for protein stability can be applied to NPs. However, rather than stabilizing the whole protein against global unfolding, only a small region has to be protected against local unfolding. In contrast to proteins in general, mutational effects in proteases are not additive and their magnitude is strongly dependent on the location of the mutation. Mutations that alter the stability

  4. Improving carbon fixation pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducat, DC; Silver, PA

    2012-08-01

    A recent resurgence in basic and applied research on photosynthesis has been driven in part by recognition that fulfilling future food and energy requirements will necessitate improvements in crop carbon-fixation efficiencies. Photosynthesis in traditional terrestrial crops is being reexamined in light of molecular strategies employed by photosynthetic microbes to enhance the activity of the Calvin cycle. Synthetic biology is well-situated to provide original approaches for compartmentalizing and enhancing photosynthetic reactions in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the elucidation of alternative carbon-fixation routes distinct from the Calvin cycle raises possibilities that novel pathways and organisms can be utilized to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide into useful materials.

  5. Distinction

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Pr Serge Haroche La Médaille d’or 2009 du CNRS est décernée au Pr Serge Haroche, titulaire de la chaire de Physique quantique depuis 2001. Serge Haroche est spécialiste de physique atomique et d’optique quantique. Il est l’un des fondateurs de l’électrodynamique quantique en cavité, domaine qui permet, par des expériences conceptuellement simples, d’éclairer les fondements de la théorie quantique et de réaliser des prototypes de systèmes de traitement quantique de l’information. Serge Haroche...

  6. Boosted protease inhibitors and the electrocardiographic measures of QT and PR durations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Elsayed Z; Lundgren, Jens D; Roediger, Mollie P

    2011-01-01

    There are contradictory reports regarding the effects of protease inhibitors on the ECG measures of QT and PR interval durations. The effect of interrupting use of protease inhibitors on QT and PR progression is also unknown.......There are contradictory reports regarding the effects of protease inhibitors on the ECG measures of QT and PR interval durations. The effect of interrupting use of protease inhibitors on QT and PR progression is also unknown....

  7. Evaluation of Immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) Protease and IgA1 Protease-Inhibitory Activity in Human Female Genital Infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, Spencer R.; Mayo, Matthew S.; Kallman, Lisa; Mestecky, Jiri; Hook, Edward W.; Russell, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease, an enzyme that selectively cleaves human IgA1, may be a virulence factor for pathogenic organisms such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Host protection from the effects of IgA1 protease includes antibody-mediated inhibition of IgA1 protease activity, and it is believed that the relative balance between IgA1 protease and inhibitory antibodies contributes to the pathogenesis of disease caused by IgA1 protease-producing organisms. We have examined the levels of these two opposing factors in genital tract secretions and sera from women with uncomplicated infection with N. gonorrhoeae. When IgA1 in cervical mucus was examined by Western blotting, no evidence of cleavage fragments characteristic of IgA1 protease activity was seen in gonococcus-infected or control patients. Cleavage fragments typical of IgA1 protease were detected, however, after the addition of exogenous IgA1 protease to cervical mucus. Degraded IgA1 was detected in some vaginal wash samples, but the fragment pattern was not typical of IgA1 protease activity. All N. gonorrhoeae isolates from the infected patients produced IgA1 protease in vitro. All but two serum samples and 16 of 65 cervical mucus samples displayed inhibitory activity against gonococcal IgA1 protease, but there was no significant difference in the level of inhibitory activity between gonococcus-infected and noninfected patients in either cervical mucus or serum. There was no difference in the levels of IgA1 protease-inhibitory activity in serum or cervical mucus collected from patients at recruitment and 2 weeks later. These results suggest that cleavage of IgA1 by gonococcal IgA1 protease within the lumen of the female lower genital tract is unlikely to be a significant factor in the pathogenesis of infections by N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:9826361

  8. Interference with plastome gene expression and Clp protease activity in Arabidopsis triggers a chloroplast unfolded protein response to restore protein homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas, Ernesto; Pulido, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2017-09-01

    Disruption of protein homeostasis in chloroplasts impairs the correct functioning of essential metabolic pathways, including the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway for the production of plastidial isoprenoids involved in photosynthesis and growth. We previously found that misfolded and aggregated forms of the first enzyme of the MEP pathway are degraded by the Clp protease with the involvement of Hsp70 and Hsp100/ClpC1 chaperones in Arabidopsis thaliana. By contrast, the combined unfolding and disaggregating actions of Hsp70 and Hsp100/ClpB3 chaperones allow solubilization and hence reactivation of the enzyme. The repair pathway is promoted when the levels of ClpB3 proteins increase upon reduction of Clp protease activity in mutants or wild-type plants treated with the chloroplast protein synthesis inhibitor lincomycin (LIN). Here we show that LIN treatment rapidly increases the levels of aggregated proteins in the chloroplast, unleashing a specific retrograde signaling pathway that up-regulates expression of ClpB3 and other nuclear genes encoding plastidial chaperones. As a consequence, folding capacity is increased to restore protein homeostasis. This sort of chloroplast unfolded protein response (cpUPR) mechanism appears to be mediated by the heat shock transcription factor HsfA2. Expression of HsfA2 and cpUPR-related target genes is independent of GUN1, a central integrator of retrograde signaling pathways. However, double mutants defective in both GUN1 and plastome gene expression (or Clp protease activity) are seedling lethal, confirming that the GUN1 protein is essential for protein homeostasis in chloroplasts.

  9. Higher Desolvation Energy Reduces Molecular Recognition in Multi-Drug Resistant HIV-1 Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislau C. Kovari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Designing HIV-1 protease inhibitors that overcome drug-resistance is still a challenging task. In this study, four clinical isolates of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases that exhibit resistance to all the US FDA-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitors and also reduce the substrate recognition ability were examined. A multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease isolate, MDR 769, was co-crystallized with the p2/NC substrate and the mutated CA/p2 substrate, CA/p2 P1’F. Both substrates display different levels of molecular recognition by the wild-type and multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease. From the crystal structures, only limited differences can be identified between the wild-type and multi-drug resistant protease. Therefore, a wild-type HIV-1 protease and four multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases in complex with the two peptides were modeled based on the crystal structures and examined during a 10 ns-molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation results reveal that the multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases require higher desolvation energy to form complexes with the peptides. This result suggests that the desolvation of the HIV-1 protease active site is an important step of protease-ligand complex formation as well as drug resistance. Therefore, desolvation energy could be considered as a parameter in the evaluation of future HIV-1 protease inhibitor candidates.

  10. A Kunitz-type cysteine protease inhibitor from cauliflower and Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halls, C.E.; Rogers, S. W.; Ouffattole, M.

    2006-01-01

    A Kunitz-type protease inhibitor co-purified from cauliflower florets with a granulin domain cysteine protease that cleaved barley proaleurain to yield a molecular form the same size as that for mature aleurain. The purified cauliflower protease required treatment with SDS detergent to become...

  11. Teaching Foundational Topics and Scientific Skills in Biochemistry within the Conceptual Framework of HIV Protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    HIV protease has served as a model protein for understanding protein structure, enzyme kinetics, structure-based drug design, and protein evolution. Inhibitors of HIV protease are also an essential part of effective HIV/AIDS treatment and have provided great societal benefits. The broad applications for HIV protease and its inhibitors make it a…

  12. A preliminary study of the protease activities in germinating brown rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cuijuan; Cao, Xiaohong; Gu, Zhenxin; Wen, Huanbin

    2011-03-30

    Proteases hydrolyse storage proteins to provide precursors for perpetuating species. The aim of this study was to investigate and characterise different proteases in germinating brown rice. The protease activity of brown rice increased sevenfold during 7 days of germination. It was highest on day 6 when determined at pH 3.5. With casein as substrate the proteases showed two catalytic groups: acidic proteases with an optimal pH of 3.5 and alkaline proteases with an optimal pH of 8.0. The acidic protease activity was inhibited by Ba(2+) and Pb(2+) but stimulated by Zn(2+) , while the alkaline protease activity was inhibited by Ca(2+) and Pb(2+) but stimulated by Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) . SDS-gelatin-PAGE assay showed two protease activity bands at pH 3.5, while two different bands with higher molecular weights were observed at pH 8.0. Inhibition assay revealed that pepstatin A and E-64 inhibited 67.63 and 38.26% respectively of the protease activity at pH 3.5, indicating the presence of aspartic and cysteine proteases. Metalloproteases played a major role under alkaline conditions (88.37% inhibition with EDTA). Germinated brown rice proteases fall into different classes with different properties. This study is helpful for their further purification. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. A New Subtilase-Like Protease Deriving from Fusarium equiseti with High Potential for Industrial Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntunen, Kari; Mäkinen, Susanna; Isoniemi, Sari; Valtakari, Leena; Pelzer, Alexander; Jänis, Janne; Paloheimo, Marja

    2015-09-01

    A gene encoding a novel extracellular subtilisin-like protease was cloned from the ascomycete Fusarium equiseti and expressed in Trichoderma reesei. The F. equiseti protease (Fe protease) showed excellent performance in stain removal and good compatibility with several commercial laundry detergent formulations, suggesting that it has high potential for use in various industrial applications. The recombinant enzyme was purified and characterized. The temperature optimum of the Fe protease was 60 °C and it showed high activity in the pH range of 6-10, with a sharp decline in activity at pH above 10. The amino acid specificity of the Fe protease was studied using casein, cytochrome c, and ubiquitin as substrates. The Fe protease had broad substrate specificity: almost all amino acid residues were accepted at position P1, even though it showed some preference for cleavage at the C-terminal side of asparagine and histidine residues. The S4 subsite of Fe protease favors aspartic acid and threonine. The other well-characterized proteases from filamentous fungi, Proteinase K from Engyodontium album, Thermomycolin from Malbranchea sulfurea, and alkaline subtilisins from Bacillus species prefer hydrophobic amino acids in both the S1 and S4 subsites. Due to its different specificity compared to the members of the S8 family of clan SB of proteases, we consider that the Fe protease is a new protease. It does not belong to any previously defined IUBMB groups of proteases.

  14. Proteomics and Deep Sequencing Comparison of Seasonally Active Venom Glands in the Platypus Reveals Novel Venom Peptides and Distinct Expression Profiles*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Emily S. W.; Morgenstern, David; Mofiz, Ehtesham; Gombert, Sara; Morris, Katrina M.; Temple-Smith, Peter; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Whittington, Camilla M.; King, Glenn F.; Warren, Wesley C.; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; Belov, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    The platypus is a venomous monotreme. Male platypuses possess a spur on their hind legs that is connected to glands in the pelvic region. They produce venom only during the breeding season, presumably to fight off conspecifics. We have taken advantage of this unique seasonal production of venom to compare the transcriptomes of in- and out-of-season venom glands, in conjunction with proteomic analysis, to identify previously undiscovered venom genes. Comparison of the venom glands revealed distinct gene expression profiles that are consistent with changes in venom gland morphology and venom volumes in and out of the breeding season. Venom proteins were identified through shot-gun sequenced venom proteomes of three animals using RNA-seq-derived transcripts for peptide-spectral matching. 5,157 genes were expressed in the venom glands, 1,821 genes were up-regulated in the in-season gland, and 10 proteins were identified in the venom. New classes of platypus-venom proteins identified included antimicrobials, amide oxidase, serpin protease inhibitor, proteins associated with the mammalian stress response pathway, cytokines, and other immune molecules. Five putative toxins have only been identified in platypus venom: growth differentiation factor 15, nucleobindin-2, CD55, a CXC-chemokine, and corticotropin-releasing factor-binding protein. These novel venom proteins have potential biomedical and therapeutic applications and provide insights into venom evolution. PMID:22899769

  15. Proteomics and deep sequencing comparison of seasonally active venom glands in the platypus reveals novel venom peptides and distinct expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Emily S W; Morgenstern, David; Mofiz, Ehtesham; Gombert, Sara; Morris, Katrina M; Temple-Smith, Peter; Renfree, Marilyn B; Whittington, Camilla M; King, Glenn F; Warren, Wesley C; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Belov, Katherine

    2012-11-01

    The platypus is a venomous monotreme. Male platypuses possess a spur on their hind legs that is connected to glands in the pelvic region. They produce venom only during the breeding season, presumably to fight off conspecifics. We have taken advantage of this unique seasonal production of venom to compare the transcriptomes of in- and out-of-season venom glands, in conjunction with proteomic analysis, to identify previously undiscovered venom genes. Comparison of the venom glands revealed distinct gene expression profiles that are consistent with changes in venom gland morphology and venom volumes in and out of the breeding season. Venom proteins were identified through shot-gun sequenced venom proteomes of three animals using RNA-seq-derived transcripts for peptide-spectral matching. 5,157 genes were expressed in the venom glands, 1,821 genes were up-regulated in the in-season gland, and 10 proteins were identified in the venom. New classes of platypus-venom proteins identified included antimicrobials, amide oxidase, serpin protease inhibitor, proteins associated with the mammalian stress response pathway, cytokines, and other immune molecules. Five putative toxins have only been identified in platypus venom: growth differentiation factor 15, nucleobindin-2, CD55, a CXC-chemokine, and corticotropin-releasing factor-binding protein. These novel venom proteins have potential biomedical and therapeutic applications and provide insights into venom evolution.

  16. Milk Clotting Activity of Protease, Extracted from Rhizome of Taffin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2017-03-07

    Mar 7, 2017 ... *1Murtala, Y., 1Babandi, A., 1Babagana, K., 1Rajah, M. R., 3Yakasai, H. M., 1Ibrahim, ... many traditional spices and food additives in ..... by fungi. J. Gen. Microbiol. 84, 327–331. Adulyatham, P. and Owusu-Apenten, R. (2005). Stabilization and partial purification of a protease from ginger rhizome (Zingiber.

  17. Purification and characterization of protease from Bacillus cereus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chitti

    2013-09-16

    Sep 16, 2013 ... Purification and characterization of protease from. Bacillus cereus SU12 isolated from oyster. Saccostrea cucullata. S. Umayaparvathi*, S. Meenakshi, M. Arumugam and T. Balasubramanian. Centre of Advanced Study in Marine Biology, Faculty of Marine Sciences, Annamalai University, Parangipettai - 608.

  18. Isolation of alkaline protease from Bacillus subtilis AKRS3

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ashok

    2012-08-28

    Aug 28, 2012 ... This research study was mainly focused on phenotypic, biochemical characterization, 16s rRNA sequence based species level identification of isolate and determination of the higher production of alkaline protease through optimization study (carbon, nitrogen, incubation period, temperature, pH and.

  19. Cleavage of desmin by cysteine proteases: Calpains and cathepsin B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline; Jacobsen, S.; Purslow, P.P.

    2004-01-01

    The intermediate filament protein, desmin, was purified from pork longissimus dorsi and incubated with either P-calpain, m-calpain or cathepsin B. Proteolysis of desmin was followed using SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. After incubation of desmin with the proteases, cleavage sites on the desmin...

  20. Retroviral proteases and their roles in virion maturation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konvalinka, Jan; Kräusslich, H. G.; Müller, B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 479, SI (2015), s. 403-417 ISSN 0042-6822 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016; GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : retrovirus * aspartic protease * maturation * human immunodeficiency virus * Gag Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.200, year: 2015

  1. Immunoglobulin A1 protease activity in Gemella haemolysans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, JA; Kilian, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the occurrence and nature of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease activity in members of the genus Gemella and related taxa. Among a total of 22 Gemella strains belonging to the four species Gemella haemolysans, Gemella morbillorum, Gemella sanguinis...

  2. Optimization of mycelial biomass and protease production by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-20

    Apr 20, 2009 ... 164: 81. De Azeredo LAI, De Lima MB, Coelho RRR, Freire DMG (2006). A low- cost fermentation medium for thermophilic protease production by. Streptomyces sp. 594 using feather meal and corn steep liquor. Curr. Microbiol. 53: 335-339. Dedman V (2000). “Native bread” Polyporus mylittae. Fungimap.

  3. Alkaline protease from senesced leaves of invasive weed Lantana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-17

    Dec 17, 2008 ... SDS-PAGE was performed on a slab gel containing 10% ( w/v) polyacrylamide by the method of Laemmli (Laemmli, 1971). Native. PAGE was performed on 7% (w/v) polyacrylamide gel. Compatibility with detergents. The compatibility of protease with local laundry detergents was studied in the presence of ...

  4. Alkaline protease production by alkaliphilic marine bacteria isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The molecular mass determined using SDS-PAGE, was nearly 31.0 39 kDa. Some fundamental properties like effects of different temperatures, pH, metal ions (Ca2+, Mg2+, Cu2+, Pb3+, Mn2+ and Cd2+) and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) on protease activity were also studied. Maximum activities were obtained ...

  5. Physical and chemical properties of the acid protease from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    samsung

    2016-03-02

    Mar 2, 2016 ... using casein as substrate. Activities were compared with the enzyme activity in absence of any inhibitor (100%). Determination of the molecular mass. The molecular mass of the purified protease was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-. PAGE) using 15% (w/v) ...

  6. Influence of radiation and photolysis on intracellular proteases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamadar, V.K.; Jamdar, S.N.; Harikumar, P.; Hari Mohan; Dandekar, S.P.

    2002-01-01

    In contrast to gamma radiation, photoinactivation of aminopeptidase was more profound in air than in N 2 , indicating that oxidative reactions are predominantly involved in photoinduced inactivation. The results are discussed in view of possible differences in the mechanisms underlying radiation and photoinduced inactivation of proteases

  7. Isolation and screening of alkaline protease producing bacteria and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil samples from different habitats including tanneries, soap industries, garden soil and soil compost were screened for the presence of alkalophilic Bacillus isolates capable of producing alkaline protease in large quantities. One hundred and eighteen (118) isolates were found having proteolytic activity on skim milk agar ...

  8. Isolation of alkaline protease from Bacillus subtilis AKRS3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research study was mainly focused on phenotypic, biochemical characterization, 16s rRNA sequence based species level identification of isolate and determination of the higher production of alkaline protease through optimization study (carbon, nitrogen, incubation period, temperature, pH and sodium chloride ...

  9. Production of Thermostable Alkaline Protease from Streptomyces sp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacterial extracellular alkaline proteases have been found to have broad spectrum industrial applications because of their stability characteristics among the bacteria. The Actinomyces are of enormous importance as they can be recovered easier than other bacteria after fermentation. Thus, the study was aimed at sourcing ...

  10. Alkaline protease production on date waste by an alkalophilic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research focused on isolation and characterization of a new strain of Bacillus sp. from alkaline soil, which was able to producing extracellular alkaline protease and amylase from date waste at pH ranging from 8 to 11 and temperatures of 20 to 50°C. Purification was conducted by fractionation, concentration, and cation ...

  11. Alkaline Protease from Bacillus firmus 7728 | Rao | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extracellular alkaline protease producing Bacillus firmus MTCC 7728 was isolated from the soil samples taken from the leather factories in Nacharam industrial area, Hyderabad. Maximum activity was found after 48 h of fermentation. Optimum pH and temperature for maximum enzyme activity were 9 and 40°C, respectively.

  12. Optimization of protease production by an actinomycete Strain, PS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Actinomycetes were isolated from the sediment samples of an estuarine shrimp pond located along the south east coast of India. During the investigation, a total of 28 strains of actinomycetes were isolated and examined for their protease activity. Among them, one strain PS-18A which was tentatively identified as ...

  13. Breakdown of the innate immune system by bacterial proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarman, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria have developed many strategies to circumvent our immune system to survive and colonize human tissues. One of these strategies is by secreting proteases that specifically target the innate immune system. Aureolysin is a metalloprotease from Staphylococcus aureus which target the main

  14. Determining and overcoming resistance to HIV protease inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prejdová, Jana; Souček, Milan; Konvalinka, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 4, - (2004), s. 137-152 ISSN 1568-0053 Grant - others:5th Framework(XE) QLK2-CT-2001-02360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : HIV protease inhibitors Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  15. Targeted degradomics in protein terminomics and protease substrate discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savickas, Simonas; auf dem Keller, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    extensive degradomics target lists that now can be tested with help of selected and parallel reaction monitoring (S/PRM) in complex biological systems, where proteases act in physiological environments. In this minireview, we describe the general principles of targeted degradomics, outline the generic...

  16. Delay of Iris flower senescence by protease inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pak, C.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2005-01-01

    asterisk inside a circle sign Visible senescence of the flag tepals in Iris x hollandica (cv. Blue Magic) was preceded by a large increase in endoprotease activity. Just before visible senescence about half of total endoprotease activity was apparently due to cysteine proteases, somewhat less than

  17. Ionic liquids and proteases: A clean alliance for semisynthesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wehofsky, N.; Wespe, Ch.; Čeřovský, Václav; Pech, A.; Hoess, E.; Rudolph, R.; Bordusa, F.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 9 (2008), s. 1493-1499 ISSN 1439-4227 Grant - others:DFG(DE) SPP1191; DFG(DE) SFB610 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : chemoenzymatic synthesis * ionic liquids * peptides * proteases * substrate mimetics Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.322, year: 2008

  18. Serine protease from midgut of Bombus terrestris males

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brabcová, Jana; Kindl, Jiří; Valterová, Irena; Pichová, Iva; Zarevúcka, Marie; Brabcová, J.; Jágr, Michal; Mikšík, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 3 (2013), s. 117-128 ISSN 0739-4462 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1446; GA TA ČR TA01020969 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : Bombus terrestris * midgut * serine protease * bumblebee Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry; CE - Biochemistry (FGU-C) Impact factor: 1.160, year: 2013

  19. Oxidant and solvent stable alkaline protease from Aspergillus flavus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The enzyme retained 80% of its original activity in the presence of non ionic and ionic surfactants and 100% with 10% H2O2 after 1 h of incubation at 30°C. In addition, the enzyme showed excellent compatibility with some commercial powder detergents. The compatibility of our protease with several detergents, oxidants ...

  20. ElaD, a Deubiquitinating protease expressed by E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Catic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubl are designed to modify polypeptides in eukaryotes. Covalent binding of ubiquitin or Ubls to substrate proteins can be reversed by specific hydrolases. One particular set of cysteine proteases, the CE clan, which targets ubiquitin and Ubls, has homologs in eukaryotes, prokaryotes, and viruses. FINDINGS: We have cloned and analyzed the E. coli protein elaD, which is distantly related to eukaryotic CE clan members of the ULP/SENP protease family that are specific for SUMO and Nedd8. Previously misannotated as a putative sulfatase/phosphatase, elaD is an efficient and specific deubiquitinating enzyme in vitro. Interestingly, elaD is present in all intestinal pathogenic E. coli strains, but conspicuously absent from extraintestinal pathogenic strains (ExPECs. Further homologs of this protease can be found in Acanthamoeba Polyphaga Mimivirus, and in Alpha-, Beta-and Gammaproteobacteria. CONCLUSION: The expression of ULP/SENP-related hydrolases in bacteria therefore extends to plant pathogens and medically relevant strains of Escherichia coli, Legionella pneumophila, Rickettsiae, Chlamydiae, and Salmonellae, in which the elaD ortholog sseL has recently been identified as a virulence factor with deubiquitinating activity. As a counterpoint, our phylogenetic and functional examination reveals that ancient eukaryotic ULP/SENP proteases also have the potential of ubiquitin-specific hydrolysis, suggesting an early common origin of this peptidase clan.

  1. Production of Microbial Protease from Selected Soil Fungal Isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production of Microbial Protease from Selected Soil Fungal Isolates. ... Nigerian Journal of Biotechnology ... and 500C. The optimal pH on the enzyme production was observed to be between pH 3.5 and 5.5 for the organisms. Keywords: Soil microorganism, fungal isolate, incubation period, microbial enzyme. Nig J. Biotech.

  2. Production of Microbial Protease from Selected Soil Fungal Isolates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oseni

    Nig J. Biotech. Vol. 23 (2011) 28 - 34. ISSN: 0189 17131. Available online at www.biotechsocietynigeria.org. Production of Microbial Protease from Selected Soil Fungal. Isolates. Oseni, O.A.. Department of Medical Biochemistry, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria. (Received 20.07.11, Accepted 09.11.11). Abstract.

  3. Accelerated ripening of Kashar cheese with encapsulated protease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, protease enzymes were encapsulated in Κ-carragenan, gellan and sodium alginate using emulsion and extrusion techniques and were then added in cheese milk together with rennet. The effects of the encapsulating material and ripening period on the chemical, textural and sensory characteristics of Kashar ...

  4. Purification and characterization of a protease from Thermophilic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purification and characterization of a thermophilic neutral protease from Thermophilic bacillus strain HS08, originally isolated from a soil sample collected from the Tulufan Crater of China, is presented in this paper. The purification steps included ammonium sulfate precipitation, with columns of DEAE-Sepharose anion ...

  5. High-level expression of alkaline protease using recombinant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The apr gene was cloned into plasmid pUB110, resulting in the recombinant plasmid pUB-apr, which was then transformed into Bacillus amyloliquefaciens CICIM B4803. The protease productivity was significantly improved in the transformants of B. amyloliquefaciens CICIM B4803. A transformant with high alkaline ...

  6. Staphylococcal Proteases Aid in Evasion of the Human Complement System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Kantyka, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    lines of defense against bacterial pathogens, and S. aureus expresses several specific complement inhibitors. The effect of extracellular proteases from this bacterium on complement, however, has been the subject of limited investigation, except for a recent report regarding cleavage of the C3 component...

  7. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Rhomboid Proteases in Liposomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wolf, E. V.; Seybold, M.; Hadravová, Romana; Stříšovský, Kvido; Verhelst, S. H. L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 11 (2015), s. 1616-1621 ISSN 1439-4227 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11206; GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : activity-based protein profiling * chemical probes * inhibitors * intramembrane proteases * liposomes Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.850, year: 2015

  8. An oxidant, detergent and salt stable alkaline protease from Bacillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A novel soil bacterium, Bacillus cereus SIU1 was earlier isolated from non-saline, slightly alkaline soil of Eastern Uttar Pradesh, India. The isolate B. cereus SIU1 was grown in modified glucose yeast extract (modified GYE) medium at pH 9.0 and 45°C. It produced maximum protease at 20 h incubation. The enzyme was ...

  9. Purification and characterization of a milk-clotting protease from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The protein homogeneity (a single electrophoretic band) of the monomeric protease was confirmed by both methods after precipitation with 80% saturated ammonium sulphate. Moreover, the fractional precipitation technique with this salt (40 and 80%) was useless in the experimental conditions employed and an important ...

  10. Molecular Basis for Drug Resistance in HIV-1 Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia A. Schiffer

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 protease is one of the major antiviral targets in the treatment of patients infected with HIV-1. The nine FDA approved HIV-1 protease inhibitors were developed with extensive use of structure-based drug design, thus the atomic details of how the inhibitors bind are well characterized. From this structural understanding the molecular basis for drug resistance in HIV-1 protease can be elucidated. Selected mutations in response to therapy and diversity between clades in HIV-1 protease have altered the shape of the active site, potentially altered the dynamics and even altered the sequence of the cleavage sites in the Gag polyprotein. All of these interdependent changes act in synergy to confer drug resistance while simultaneously maintaining the fitness of the virus. New strategies, such as incorporation of the substrate envelope constraint to design robust inhibitors that incorporate details of HIV-1 protease’s function and decrease the probability of drug resistance, are necessary to continue to effectively target this key protein in HIV-1 life cycle.

  11. A Protease Isolated from the Latex of Plumeria rubra Linn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    [3]. The extensive use of proteolytic enzymes in the treatment of inflammation and wound healing process is a well established fact. Bromelain from Ananas comosu has been shown to possess both anti-inflammatory and wound healing properties [4] while curcain, a protease from Jatropha curcas, was reported to have ...

  12. molecular biology approach to the search for novel hiv proteases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... which could be tested in the animal models of HIV infection before subjection to clinical trials. Optimistically, the magic HIV therapeutics may be hidden in such insects and may require the application of molecular biology techniques to unravel. KEY WORDS: Antiretroviral drugs, malaria, proteases, restriction enzymes, ...

  13. A Protease Isolated from the Latex of Plumeria rubra Linn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Spinacia oleracea and Petroselinum crispum leaves [5]. Proteases are important enzymes of plant metabolism and are instrumental in regulating senescence [6]. They are responsible for the degradation of proteins. Proteolytic enzymes are used extensively in industrial and medical applications [7]. Plumeria rubra Linn.

  14. Production of alkaline protease by Teredinobacter turnirae cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The conditions for immobilizing the new alkaline protease-producing bacteria strain Teredinobacter turnirae by entrapment in calcium alginate gel were investigated. The influence of alginate concentration (20, 25 and 30 g/l) and initial cell loading (ICL) on enzyme production were studied. The production of alkaline ...

  15. Biochemical Analysis Reveals the Multifactorial Mechanism of Histone H3 Clipping by Chicken Liver Histone H3 Protease

    KAUST Repository

    Chauhan, Sakshi

    2016-09-02

    Proteolytic clipping of histone H3 has been identified in many organisms. Despite several studies, the mechanism of clipping, the substrate specificity, and the significance of this poorly understood epigenetic mechanism are not clear. We have previously reported histone H3 specific proteolytic clipping and a protein inhibitor in chicken liver. However, the sites of clipping are still not known very well. In this study, we attempt to identify clipping sites in histone H3 and to determine the mechanism of inhibition by stefin B protein, a cysteine protease inhibitor. By employing site-directed mutagenesis and in vitro biochemical assays, we have identified three distinct clipping sites in recombinant human histone H3 and its variants (H3.1, H3.3, and H3t). However, post-translationally modified histones isolated from chicken liver and Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type cells showed different clipping patterns. Clipping of histone H3 N-terminal tail at three sites occurs in a sequential manner. We have further observed that clipping sites are regulated by the structure of the N-terminal tail as well as the globular domain of histone H3. We also have identified the QVVAG region of stefin B protein to be very crucial for inhibition of the protease activity. Altogether, our comprehensive biochemical studies have revealed three distinct clipping sites in histone H3 and their regulation by the structure of histone H3, histone modifications marks, and stefin B.

  16. The S8 serine, C1A cysteine and A1 aspartic protease families in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Eric P; Jones, Alan M; Dickerman, Allan W

    2004-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome has over 550 protease sequences representing all five catalytic types: serine, cysteine, aspartic acid, metallo and threonine (MEROPS peptidase database, http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), which probably reflect a wide variety of as yet unidentified functions performed by plant proteases. Recent indications that the 26S proteasome, a T1 family-threonine protease, is a regulator of light and hormone responsive signal transduction highlight the potential of proteases to participate in many aspects of plant growth and development. Recent discoveries that proteases are required for stomatal distribution, embryo development and disease resistance point to wider roles for four additional multigene families that include some of the most frequently studied (yet poorly understood) plant proteases: the subtilisin-like, serine proteases (family S8), the papain-like, cysteine proteases (family C1A), the pepsin-like, aspartic proteases (family A1) and the plant matrixin, metalloproteases (family M10A). In this report, 54 subtilisin-like, 30 papain-like and 59 pepsin-like proteases from Arabidopsis, are compared with S8, C1A and A1 proteases known from other plant species at the functional, phylogenetic and gene structure levels. Examples of structural conservation between S8, C1A and A1 genes from rice, barley, tomato and soybean and those from Arabidopsis are noted, indicating that some common, essential plant protease roles were established before the divergence of monocots and eudicots. Numerous examples of tandem duplications of protease genes and evidence for a variety of restricted expression patterns suggest that a high degree of specialization exists among proteases within each family. We propose that comprehensive analysis of the functions of these genes in Arabidopsis will firmly establish serine, cysteine and aspartic proteases as regulators and effectors of a wide range of plant processes.

  17. Molecular pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine Terra

    2014-01-01

    that 45% of deaths in the developed world are linked to fibrotic disease. Fibrosis and cancer are known to be inextricably linked; however, we are only just beginning to understand the common and overlapping molecular pathways between the two. Here, we discuss what is known about the intersection...... of fibrosis and cancer, with a focus on cancer metastasis, and highlight some of the exciting new potential clinical targets that are emerging from analysis of the molecular pathways associated with these two devastating diseases. Clin Cancer Res; 20(14); 3637-43. ©2014 AACR....

  18. Structural Mechanisms of Inactivation in Scabies Mite Serine Protease Paralogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Katja; Langendorf, Christopher G.; Irving, James A.; Reynolds, Simone; Willis, Charlene; Beckham, Simone; Law, Ruby H.P.; Yang, Sundy; Bashtannyk-Puhalovich, Tanya A.; McGowan, Sheena; Whisstock, James C.; Pike, Robert N.; Kemp, David J.; Buckle, Ashley M.; (Monash); (Queensland Inst. of Med. Rsrch.)

    2009-08-07

    The scabies mite (Sarcoptes scabiei) is a parasite responsible for major morbidity in disadvantaged communities and immuno-compromised patients worldwide. In addition to the physical discomfort caused by the disease, scabies infestations facilitate infection by Streptococcal species via skin lesions, resulting in a high prevalence of rheumatic fever/heart disease in affected communities. The scabies mite produces 33 proteins that are closely related to those in the dust mite group 3 allergen and belong to the S1-like protease family (chymotrypsin-like). However, all but one of these molecules contain mutations in the conserved active-site catalytic triad that are predicted to render them catalytically inactive. These molecules are thus termed scabies mite inactivated protease paralogues (SMIPPs). The precise function of SMIPPs is unclear; however, it has been suggested that these proteins might function by binding and protecting target substrates from cleavage by host immune proteases, thus preventing the host from mounting an effective immune challenge. In order to begin to understand the structural basis for SMIPP function, we solved the crystal structures of SMIPP-S-I1 and SMIPP-S-D1 at 1.85 {angstrom} and 2.0 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Both structures adopt the characteristic serine protease fold, albeit with large structural variations over much of the molecule. In both structures, mutations in the catalytic triad together with occlusion of the S1 subsite by a conserved Tyr200 residue is predicted to block substrate ingress. Accordingly, we show that both proteases lack catalytic function. Attempts to restore function (via site-directed mutagenesis of catalytic residues as well as Tyr200) were unsuccessful. Taken together, these data suggest that SMIPPs have lost the ability to bind substrates in a classical 'canonical' fashion, and instead have evolved alternative functions in the lifecycle of the scabies mite.

  19. Intramembrane protease RasP boosts protein production in Bacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neef, Jolanda; Bongiorni, Cristina; Goosens, Vivianne J; Schmidt, Brian; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2017-04-04

    The microbial cell factory Bacillus subtilis is a popular industrial platform for high-level production of secreted technical enzymes. Nonetheless, the effective secretion of particular heterologous enzymes remains challenging. Over the past decades various studies have tackled this problem, and major improvements were achieved by optimizing signal peptides or removing proteases involved in product degradation. On the other hand, serious bottlenecks in the protein export process per se remained enigmatic, especially for protein secretion at commercially significant levels by cells grown to high density. The aim of our present study was to assess the relevance of the intramembrane protease RasP for high-level protein production in B. subtilis. Deletion of the rasP gene resulted in reduced precursor processing and extracellular levels of the overproduced α-amylases AmyE from B. subtilis and AmyL from Bacillus licheniformis. Further, secretion of the overproduced serine protease BPN' from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens was severely impaired in the absence of RasP. Importantly, overexpression of rasP resulted in threefold increased production of a serine protease from Bacillus clausii, and 2.5- to 10-fold increased production of an AmyAc α-amylase from Paenibacillus curdlanolyticus, depending on the culture conditions. Of note, growth defects due to overproduction of the two latter enzymes were suppressed by rasP-overexpression. Here we show that an intramembrane protease, RasP, sets a limit to high-level production of two secreted heterologous enzymes that are difficult to produce in the B. subtilis cell factory. This finding was unexpected and suggests that proteolytic membrane sanitation is key to effective enzyme production in Bacillus.

  20. Effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on rabbit cathepsin D maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarel, A.M.; Ferguson, A.G.; Decker, R.S.; Lesch, M.

    1989-01-01

    To examine the effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on cathepsin D intracellular transport, proteolytic processing, and secretion, primary cultures of rabbit cardiac fibroblasts were grown to confluence and exposed to media containing leupeptin, E 64, or chloroquine. Cathepsin D maturation was then evaluated in pulse-chase biosynthetic labeling experiments. None of the three agents affected the charge modification of procathepsin D within the Golgi apparatus. However, all three agents interfered with the subsequent proteolytic processing of procathepsin D isoforms to active cathepsin D. Both leupeptin and E 64 caused the intracellular accumulation of large amounts of a Mr 51,000 processing intermediate. Trace amounts of this intermediate were also detected in chloroquine-treated cells. Combined activity assay and radioimmunoassay of cell lysates indicated that this partially processed form of cathepsin D possessed proteolytic activity. Whereas low medium concentrations of leupeptin (10-100 microM) but not E 64 appeared to stimulate procathepsin D secretion, neither agent appeared to have a major effect on the rate of proenzyme secretion at doses required to inhibit proteolytic maturation (1-10 mM). Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with 10 mM leupeptin appeared only to delay, but not prevent, the intracellular transport of cathepsin D to lysosomes. In contrast, chloroquine increased procathepsin D secretion in a dose-dependent manner, diverting the majority of newly synthesized procathepsin D from the intracellular protease(s) responsible for proteolytic processing. These results suggest that cysteine proteases participate in the proteolytic maturation of procathepsin D during the transport of newly synthesized enzyme to lysosomes, but cysteine protease-mediated proteolytic processing is not required for cathepsin D activation or lysosomal translocation