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Sample records for distal diabetic neuropathy

  1. Symptom scoring systems to diagnose distal polyneuropathy in diabetes : the Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J.W.G.; Smit, A.J.; van Sonderen, E.; Groothoff, J.W.; Eisma, W.H.; Links, T.P.

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: To provide one of the diagnostic categories for distal diabetic polyneuro-pathy,several symptom scoring systems are available, which are often extensive andlack in validation. We validated a new four-item Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom (DNS) scorefor diagnosing distal diabetic polyneuropathy.

  2. Diabetic cachectic neuropathy: An uncommon neurological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetic cachectic neuropathy, also called diabetic neuropathic cachexia, is a very rare ... type 1 and type 2 diabetics and occurs irrespective of the duration of diabetes. .... distal symmetrical peripheral neuropathy in pregnancy. However,.

  3. Evaluation and Prevention of Diabetic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajouhi M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic neuropathy is an incapacitating disease that afflicts almost 50 percent of patients with diabetes. A late finding in type 1 diabetes, diabetic neuropathy can be an early finding in non insulin-dependent diabetes. Diabetic neuropathies are divided primarily into two groups, sensorimotor and autonomic. Patients may acquire only one type of diabetic neuropathy or may present with combinations of neuropathies, such as autonomic neuropathy or distal symmetric polyneuropathy, the latter of which the most common form. Motor deficits, orthostatic hypotension, silent cardiac ischemia, hyperhidrosis, vasomotor instability, gastroparesis, bladder dysfunction, and sexual dysfunction can also result from diabetic neuropathy. Strict control of blood sugar, combined with proper daily foot care, is essential to avoid the complications of this disorder. With the potential to afflict any part of the nervous system, diabetic neuropathy should be suspected in all patients with type 2 diabetes as well as patients who have had type 1 diabetes for over five years. Although some patients with diabetic neuropathy notice few symptoms, upon physical examination mild to moderately severe sensory loss may be noted by the physician. Idiopathic neuropathy has been known to precede the onset of type 2 diabetes.

  4. The role of aberrant mitochondrial bioenergetics in diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Subir K Roy; Smith, Darrell R; Fernyhough, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a neurological complication of diabetes that causes significant morbidity and, because of the obesity-driven rise in incidence of type 2 diabetes, is becoming a major international health problem. Mitochondrial phenotype is abnormal in sensory neurons in diabetes and may contribute to the etiology of diabetic neuropathy where a distal dying-back neurodegenerative process is a key component contributing to fiber loss. This review summarizes the major features of mitochondrial dysfunction in neurons and Schwann cells in human diabetic patients and in experimental animal models (primarily exhibiting type 1 diabetes). This article attempts to relate these findings to the development of critical neuropathological hallmarks of the disease. Recent work reveals that hyperglycemia in diabetes triggers nutrient excess in neurons that, in turn, mediates a phenotypic change in mitochondrial biology through alteration of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) signaling axis. This vital energy sensing metabolic pathway modulates mitochondrial function, biogenesis and regeneration. The bioenergetic phenotype of mitochondria in diabetic neurons is aberrant due to deleterious alterations in expression and activity of respiratory chain components as a direct consequence of abnormal AMPK/PGC-1α signaling. Utilization of innovative respirometry equipment to analyze mitochondrial function of cultured adult sensory neurons from diabetic rodents shows that the outcome for cellular bioenergetics is a reduced adaptability to fluctuations in ATP demand. The diabetes-induced maladaptive process is hypothesized to result in exhaustion of the ATP supply in the distal nerve compartment and induction of nerve fiber dissolution. The role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the etiology of diabetic neuropathy is compared with other types of neuropathy with a distal dying-back pathology such as Friedreich

  5. Medial arterial calcification in diabetes and its relationship to neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeffcoate, W J; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt; Hofbauer, L C

    2009-01-01

    Calcification of the media of arterial walls is common in diabetes and is particularly associated with distal symmetrical neuropathy. Arterial calcification also complicates chronic kidney disease and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The term calcification......, such as calcitonin gene-related peptide, which are inherently protective. The association between distal symmetrical neuropathy and calcification of the arterial wall highlights the fact that neuropathy may be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality.......Calcification of the media of arterial walls is common in diabetes and is particularly associated with distal symmetrical neuropathy. Arterial calcification also complicates chronic kidney disease and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The term calcification...

  6. Muscular atrophy in diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Gadeberg, P C; Brock, B

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic patients with polyneuropathy develop motor dysfunction. To establish whether motor dysfunction is associated with muscular atrophy the ankle dorsal and plantar flexors of the non-dominant leg were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging in 8 patients with symptomatic neuropathy, in 8 non...... confirmed that the atrophy predominated distally. We conclude that muscular atrophy underlies motor weakness at the ankle in diabetic patients with polyneuropathy and that the atrophy is most pronounced in distal muscles of the lower leg indicating that a length dependent neuropathic process explains...

  7. Glucose control and diabetic neuropathy: lessons from recent large clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Lynn; Jaiswal, Mamta; Martin, Catherine; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral and autonomic neuropathies are common complications of diabetes with broad spectrums of clinical manifestations and high morbidity. Studies using various agents to target the pathways implicated in the development and progression of diabetic neuropathy were promising in animal models. In humans, however, randomized controlled studies have failed to show efficacy on objective measures of neuropathy. The complex anatomy of the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems, the multitude of pathogenic mechanisms involved, and the lack of uniformity of neuropathy measures have likely contributed to these failures. To date, tight glycemic control is the only strategy convincingly shown to prevent or delay the development of neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes and to slow the progression of neuropathy in some patients with type 2 diabetes. Lessons learned about the role of glycemic control on distal symmetrical polyneuropathy and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy are discussed in this review.

  8. Heterogeneity in diabetic distal neuropathy and differential approach to its treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Evgen'evna Khutornaya

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To determine the prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN, to evaluate the composition and efficacy of pharmacotherapy and to develop a differential algorithm for symptomatic treatment of PDN. Materials and Methods. 4494 outpatient subjects participated in this study. Severity of pain syndrome was assessed with DN4 question- naire (supplemented with NTSS-9 scale and visual analogue scale (VAS. After initial examination, a pharmacological evaluation of treatment was performed. Results. Based on our data, prevalence of diabetic neuropathy was estimated at 54%, with painful form reaching 6.4%. Median age was 57.2?12.1, duration of diabetes mellitus ? 16.5?10.6 years. Type 1 / type 2 ratio equaled 32.4% : 67.6%, male/female ? 29.7%: 70.3%. Median HbA1c level was 8.4?1.6%. Ratio of chronic/acute forms of neuropathy was 267 : 20. Pain severity (as measured by VAS distribution was as following: 15.6% ? severe, 40.6% ? moderate, 12.3% ? mild, and 31.3% ? no pain symptoms. We did not find PDN to be associated with any parameters but sensory deficit (NTSS-9 and NDS: r=0.4; p

  9. Effects of Semelil (ANGIPARSTM on diabetic peripheral neuropathy: A randomized, double-blind Placebo-controlled clinical trial

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    S Bakhshayeshi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available "n Background and the purpose of the study: Diabetic neuropathy is the most common diabetic complication that often is accompanied by significant morbidity, mortality and economic burden. The purpose of this study was evaluation of effect of Semelil (ANGIPARSTM, a new herbal drug for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers or diabetic peripheral neuropathy. "nMethods: In this double blind clinical trial, 49 type 2 diabetes patients with different degrees of neuropathy were evaluated in two groups (ANGIPARSTM and placebo groups. All patients were assessed at the start and 12 weeks after treatment, with laboratory tests, United Kingdom screening test, Michigan neuropathy screening score, Michigan diabetic neuropathy score, vibration perception thresholds, nerve conduction study, monofilament test and visual analog scale. "nResults: Michigan diabetic neuropathy score was decreased notably in ANGIPARSTM group. In the nerve conduction study, appropriate meaningful changes were observed in the distal latency and amplitude in the motor Ulnar nerve in ANGIPARSTM group. Conclusion: The results showed limited evidence of efficacy of ANGIPARSTM in diabetic neuropathy treatment and more studies with a larger sample size and longer duration are required.

  10. Clinical diagnosis of diabetic polyneuropathy with the diabetic neuropathy symptom and diabetic neuropathy examination scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J.W.; Lefrandt, J.D.; Links, T.P.; Smit, J.A.; Stewart, R.E.; van der Hoeven, J.H.; Hoogenberg, K.

    OBJECTIVE - To evaluate the discriminative power of the Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom (DNS) and Diabetic Neuropathy Examination (DNE) scores for diagnosing diabetic polyneuropathy (PNP), as well as their relation with cardiovascular autonomic function testing (cAFT) and electro-diagnostic studies

  11. One-stop microvascular screening service: an effective model for the early detection of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and the high-risk foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binns-Hall, O; Selvarajah, D; Sanger, D; Walker, J; Scott, A; Tesfaye, S

    2018-04-02

    To evaluate the feasibility of a one-stop microvascular screening service for the early diagnosis of diabetic distal symmetrical polyneuropathy, painful distal symmetrical polyneuropathy and the at-risk diabetic foot. People with diabetes attending retinal screening in hospital and community settings had their feet examined by a podiatrist. Assessment included: Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score evaluation; a 10-g monofilament test; and two validated, objective and quick measures of neuropathy obtained using the point-of-care devices 'DPN-Check', a hand-held device that measures sural nerve conduction velocity and amplitude, and 'Sudoscan', a device that measures sudomotor function. The diagnostic utility of these devices was assessed against the Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score as the 'gold standard'. A total of 236 consecutive people attending the retinal screening service, 18.9% of whom had never previously had their feet examined, were evaluated. The prevalence of distal symmetrical polyneuropathy, assessed using the Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score, was 30.9%, and was underestimated by 10-g monofilament test (14.4%). The prevalence of distal symmetrical polyneuropathy using DPN-check was 51.5% (84.3% sensitivity, 68.3% specificity), 38.2% using Sudoscan foot electrochemical skin conductance (77.4% sensitivity, 68.3% specificity), and 61.9% using abnormality in either of the results (93.2% sensitivity, 52.8% specificity). The results of both devices correlated with Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score (Peye, foot and renal screening is feasible, has a high uptake, reduces clinic visits, and identifies painful distal symmetrical polyneuropathy and the at-risk foot. Combined large- and small-nerve-fibre assessment using non-invasive, quantitative and quick point-of-care devices may be an effective model for the early diagnosis of distal symmetrical polyneuropathy. © 2018 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  12. Catecholamines and diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1995-01-01

    In diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy plasma noradrenaline concentration, used as an index of sympathetic nervous activity, is low. This decrease is, however, only found in patients with a long duration of diabetes with clinically severe autonomic neuropathy. This apparent insensitivity...... of plasma catecholamine measurements is not due to changes in the clearance of catecholamines in diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The physiological responses to infused adrenaline and to noradrenaline are enhanced, for noradrenaline mainly cardiovascular responses. Adrenoceptors (alpha and beta adrenoceptors......) are not altered in circulating blood cells in diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Thus, a generalized up-regulation of adrenoceptors does not occur in diabetic autonomic neuropathy....

  13. Is distal motor and/or sensory demyelination a distinctive feature of anti-MAG neuropathy?

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    Lozeron, Pierre; Ribrag, Vincent; Adams, David; Brisset, Marion; Vignon, Marguerite; Baron, Marine; Malphettes, Marion; Theaudin, Marie; Arnulf, Bertrand; Kubis, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    To report the frequency of the different patterns of sensory and motor electrophysiological demyelination distribution in patients with anti-MAG neuropathy in comparison with patients with IgM neuropathy without MAG reactivity (IgM-NP). Thirty-five anti-MAG patients at early disease stage (20.1 months) were compared to 23 patients with IgM-NP; 21 CIDP patients and 13 patients with CMT1a neuropathy were used as gold standard neuropathies with multifocal and homogeneous demyelination, respectively. In all groups, standard motor and sensory electrophysiological parameters, terminal latency index and modified F ratio were investigated. Motor electrophysiological demyelination was divided in four profiles: distal, homogeneous, proximal, and proximo-distal. Distal sensory and sensorimotor demyelination were evaluated. Anti-MAG neuropathy is a demyelinating neuropathy in 91 % of cases. In the upper limbs, reduced TLI is more frequent in anti-MAG neuropathy, compared to IgM-NP. But, predominant distal demyelination of the median nerve is encountered in only 43 % of anti-MAG neuropathy and is also common in IgM-NP (35 %). Homogeneous demyelination was the second most frequent pattern (31 %). Concordance of electrophysiological profiles across motor nerves trunks is low and median nerve is the main site of distal motor conduction slowing. Reduced sensory conduction velocities occurs in 14 % of patients without evidence of predominant distal slowing. Simultaneous sensory and motor distal slowing was more common in the median nerve of anti-MAG neuropathy than IgM-NP. Electrophysiological distal motor demyelination and sensory demyelination are not a distinctive feature of anti-MAG reactivity. In anti-MAG neuropathy it is mainly found in the median nerve suggesting a frequent nerve compression at wrist.

  14. Heterogeneity in diabetic distal neuropathy and differential approach to its treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O E Khutornaya

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To determine the prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN, to evaluate the composition and efficacy of pharmacotherapy and to develop a differential algorithm for symptomatic treatment of PDN.Materials and Methods. 4494 outpatient subjects participated in this study. Severity of pain syndrome was assessed with DN4 question- naire (supplemented with NTSS-9 scale and visual analogue scale (VAS. After initial examination, a pharmacological evaluation of treatment was performed.Results. Based on our data, prevalence of diabetic neuropathy was estimated at 54%, with painful form reaching 6.4%. Median age was 57.2±12.1, duration of diabetes mellitus – 16.5±10.6 years. Type 1 / type 2 ratio equaled 32.4% : 67.6%, male/female – 29.7%: 70.3%. Median HbA1c level was 8.4±1.6%. Ratio of chronic/acute forms of neuropathy was 267 : 20. Pain severity (as measured by VAS distribution was as following: 15.6% – severe, 40.6% – moderate, 12.3% – mild, and 31.3% – no pain symptoms. We did not find PDN to be associated with any parameters but sensory deficit (NTSS-9 and NDS: r=0.4; p <0.001. 21% of patients with chronic painful neuropathy (CPN demonstrated allodynia and hyperalgesia besides typical symptoms. 97.9% of patients were previ- ously treated with “pathogenetic” agents, 2.1% received anticonvulsants; overall efficiency was estimated at 22%. Patients with CPN and allodynia did not respond to treatment with alpha-lipoic acid (ALA, but pregabalin was efficient. After the examination treatment composition was adjusted as follows: treatment was ceased in 23% of patients, 11.9% received ALA, 53.6% – anticonvulsants, and11.5% – antidepressants; overall efficiency was estimated at 75%.Conclusion. Prevalence of PDN is relatively low. 15.6% of patients suffer from severe pain. Neuropathic pain intensity correlates only with sensory deficit and is not dependent on any other parameters. CPN consists of two forms with higher and lower

  15. Treatment options in painful diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, T P

    1999-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is common in patients with diabetes mellitus, and 7.5% of diabetics experience pain from diabetic neuropathy. Complications of diabetes mellitus are more common where control of the disease is not optimal. By improving the control of the disease, both the neuropathy and the pain it can produce may be improved. The pain of diabetic neuropathy can frequently be controlled using analgesics, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, topical capsaicin, and neuromodulation, either alone or in any combination.

  16. Phenotyping animal models of diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biessels, G J; Bril, V; Calcutt, N A

    2014-01-01

    NIDDK, JDRF, and the Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of EASD sponsored a meeting to explore the current status of animal models of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The goal of the workshop was to develop a set of consensus criteria for the phenotyping of rodent models of diabetic neuropathy...... with a discussion on the merits and limitations of a unified approach to phenotyping rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and a consensus formed on the definition of the minimum criteria required for establishing the presence of the disease. A neuropathy phenotype in rodents was defined as the presence...

  17. Expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in footpad skin lesions with diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Up Noh, Sun; Lee, Won-Young; Kim, Won-Serk; Lee, Yong-Taek; Jae Yoon, Kyung

    2018-01-01

    Background Diabetic neuropathy originating in distal lower extremities is associated with pain early in the disease course, overwhelming in the feet. However, the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy remains unclear. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor has been implicated in the onset of neuropathic pain and the development of diabetes. Objective of this study was to observe pain syndromes elicited in the footpad of diabetic neuropathy rat model and to assess the contributory role of migration inhibitory factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. Methods Diabetic neuropathy was made in Sprague Dawley rats by streptozotocin. Pain threshold was evaluated using von Frey monofilaments for 24 weeks. On comparable experiment time after streptozotocin injection, all footpads were prepared for following procedures; glutathione assay, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated UTP nick end labeling staining, immunohistochemistry staining, real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot. Additionally, human HaCaT skin keratinocytes were treated with methylglyoxal, transfected with migration inhibitory factor/control small interfering RNA, and prepared for real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Results As compared to sham group, pain threshold was significantly reduced in diabetic neuropathy group, and glutathione was decreased in footpad skin, simultaneously, cell death was increased. Over-expression of migration inhibitory factor, accompanied by low expression of glyoxalase-I and intraepidermal nerve fibers, was shown on the footpad skin lesions of diabetic neuropathy. But, there was no significance in expression of neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators such as transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, mas-related G protein coupled receptor D, nuclear factor kappa B, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-6 between diabetic neuropathy group and sham group. Intriguingly

  18. Easier operation and similar power of 10 g monofilament test for screening diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Yi, Na; Liu, Siying; Zheng, Hangping; Qiao, Xiaona; Xiong, Qian; Liu, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Shuo; Wen, Jie; Ye, Hongying; Zhou, Linuo; Li, Yiming; Hu, Renming; Lu, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Objective The 10 g Semmes-Weinstein monofilament evaluation (SWME) of 4 sites on each foot is recommended for distal symmetric polyneuropathy screening and diagnosis. A similar method has been proposed to diagnose 'high-risk' (for ulceration) feet, using 3 sites per foot. This study compared the effectiveness of SWME for testing 3, 4 and 10 sites per foot to identify patients with diabetic neuropathy. Methods We included 3497 subjects in a SWME of 10 sites; records from the 10-site SWME were used for a SWME of 3 and 4 sites. Neuropathy symptom scores and neuropathy deficit scores were evaluated to identify patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Results The sensitivities of the 10 g SWME for 3, 4 and 10 sites were 17.8%, 19.0% and 22.4%, respectively. The Kappa coefficients for the SWME tests of 3, 4 and 10 sites were high (range: 0.78-0.93). Conclusions There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of 3-, 4- and 10-site SWME testing for diabetic peripheral neuropathy screening. SWME testing of 3 sites on each foot may be sufficient to screen for diabetic neuropathy.

  19. Cutaneous manifestations of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogiparthi, S N; Muralidhar, K; Seshadri, K G; Rangarajan, S

    2017-01-01

    There is a rise in number of people diagnosed with Diabetes Mellitus. The incidence is rising in modern Indian society because of Industrial development and drastically changing lifestyles. Diabetic neuropathies are microvascular disorders that are usually associated with the duration of Diabetes. Among the various forms, the most common is Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy. The disease if neglected leads to chronic ulcer formation leading to amputations frequently. Hence the aim of this study is to document the early cutaneous changes and create an early awareness in the importance of controlling Diabetes. The study consisted of 205 patients with Type 2 DM. Participant's neuropathy status was determined based on Neuropathy Disability Score and Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom Score. Among the Skin changes documented, the common changes seen were: Peripheral hair loss in 185 (90.2%), Xerosis in 168 (82%), Anhydrosis in 162 (79%), Plantar Fissures in 136 (66.3%), Plantar Ulcer in 80 (39%), common nail changes documented were Onychomycosis in 165 (80.5%) and Onychauxis in 53 (25.8%) patients in relation to the occupation and duration of Diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, it is important to control glycemic levels in the all stages of Diabetes and institute foot care measures to prevent the complications of neuropathy.

  20. ANTIOXIDANT STATUS IN DIABETIC NEUROPATHY

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    Giriraja Vrushabaiah Kanakapura

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic neuropathy, retinopathy and nephropathy are the chronic complications of diabetes mellitus. Neuropathy, retinopathy and nephropathy are microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus. Antioxidant status is reduced in DM-induced retinopathy and nephropathy. Present study is undertaken to evaluate the degree of oxidative stress in diabetic neuropathy patients. The aim of the study is to study on oxidative stress as measured by lipid peroxidation marker, malondialdehyde and antienzyme status in type II DM patients with neuropathy and compared them with a controlled nondiabetic group. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study included 100 subjects from Sapthagiri Medical College, Bangalore, from January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2015, of age group 50 to 70 yrs. out of which 50 patients were non-insulin-dependent DM with neuropathy and rest 50 age and sex matched apparently healthy individuals (control group. Antioxidant status was assessed by measuring superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione reductase (GR, Catalase and Reduced Glutathione (GSH. RESULTS It showed a significant increase p<0.001 in FBS, PPBS, TC, TG, LDL, VLDL, CAT, MDA, while HDL, GSH, GPX, GR and SOD were found to be decreased significantly (p 0.001. CONCLUSION MDA was significantly elevated in diabetic group, whereas antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and reduced glutathione were significantly decreased, which might be helpful in risk assessment of various complications of DM. The data suggests that alteration in antioxidant status and MDA may help to predict the risk of diabetic neuropathy.

  1. Treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

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    Rosenberg, Casandra J; Watson, James C

    2015-02-01

    Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy impairs quality of life and can be difficult to treat. To discuss current treatment recommendations for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Literature review. Systematic review of the literature discussing treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Existing treatment guidelines were studied and compared. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy occurs in about one in six people with diabetes. This condition impairs quality of life and increases healthcare costs. Treatment recommendations exist, but individual patient therapy can require a trial-and-error approach. Many treatment options have adjuvant benefits or side effects which should be considered prior to initiating therapy. Often, a combination of treatment modalities with various mechanisms of action is required for adequate pain control. Adequate medication titration and a reasonable trial period should be allowed. The treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy can be challenging, but effective management can improve patient's quality of life. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy impairs quality of life and can be difficult to treat. Many treatment options have adjuvant benefits or side effects which should be considered prior to initiating therapy. Often, a combination of treatment modalities with various mechanisms of action is required for adequate pain control. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  2. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy, is it an autoimmune disease?

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    Janahi, Noor M; Santos, Derek; Blyth, Christine; Bakhiet, Moiz; Ellis, Mairghread

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmunity has been identified in a significant number of neuropathies, such as, proximal neuropathies, and autonomic neuropathies associated with diabetes mellitus. However, possible correlations between diabetic peripheral neuropathy and autoimmunity have not yet been fully investigated. This study was conducted to investigate whether autoimmunity is associated with the pathogenesis of human diabetic peripheral neuropathy. A case-control analysis included three groups: 30 patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, 30 diabetic control patients without neuropathy, and 30 healthy controls. Blood analysis was conducted to compare the percentages of positive antinuclear antibodies (ANA) between the three groups. Secondary analysis investigated the correlations between the presence of autoimmune antibodies and sample demographics and neurological manifestations. This research was considered as a pilot study encouraging further investigations to take place in the near future. Antinuclear antibodies were significantly present in the blood serum of patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy in comparison to the control groups (pneuropathy group were 50 times higher when compared to control groups. Secondary analysis showed a significant correlation between the presence of ANA and the neurological manifestation of neuropathy (Neuropathy symptom score, Neuropathy disability score and Vibration Perception Threshold). The study demonstrated for the first time that human peripheral diabetic neuropathy may have an autoimmune aetiology. The new pathogenic factors may lead to the consideration of new management plans involving new therapeutic approaches and disease markers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Verrotti, Alberto; Prezioso, Giovanni; Scattoni, Raffaella; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent ...

  4. Corneal markers of diabetic neuropathy.

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    Pritchard, Nicola; Edwards, Katie; Shahidi, Ayda M; Sampson, Geoff P; Russell, Anthony W; Malik, Rayaz A; Efron, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a significant clinical problem that currently has no effective therapy, and in advanced cases, leads to foot ulceration and lower limb amputation. The accurate detection, characterization and quantification of this condition are important in order to define at-risk patients, anticipate deterioration, monitor progression, and assess new therapies. This review evaluates novel corneal methods of assessing diabetic neuropathy. Two new noninvasive corneal markers have emerged, and in cross-sectional studies have demonstrated their ability to stratify the severity of this disease. Corneal confocal microscopy allows quantification of corneal nerve parameters and noncontact corneal esthesiometry, the functional correlate of corneal structure, assesses the sensitivity of the cornea. Both these techniques are quick to perform, produce little or no discomfort for the patient, and are suitable for clinical settings. Each has advantages and disadvantages over traditional techniques for assessing diabetic neuropathy. Application of these new corneal markers for longitudinal evaluation of diabetic neuropathy has the potential to reduce dependence on more invasive, costly, and time-consuming assessments, such as skin biopsy.

  5. Effects of diabetic peripheral neuropathy on gait in vascular trans-tibial amputees.

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    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Sumiko; Katsuhira, Junji

    2018-07-01

    Patients with diabetes often develop diabetic peripheral neuropathy, which is a distal symmetric polyneuropathy, so foot function on the non-amputated side is expected to affect gait in vascular trans-tibial amputees. However, there is little information on the kinematics and kinetics of gait or the effects of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in vascular trans-tibial amputees. This study aimed to clarify these effects, including the biomechanics of the ankle on the non-amputated side. Participants were 10 vascular trans-tibial amputees with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (group V) and 8 traumatic trans-tibial amputees (group T). Each subject's gait was analyzed at a self-selected speed using a three-dimensional motion analyzer and force plates. Ankle plantarflexion angle, heel elevation angle, and peak and impulse of anterior ground reaction force were smaller on the non-amputated side during pre-swing in group V than in group T. Center of gravity during pre-swing on the non-amputated side was lower in group V than in group T. Hip extension torque during loading response on the prosthetic side was greater in group V than in group T. These findings suggest that the biomechanical function of the ankle on the non-amputated side during pre-swing is poorer in vascular trans-tibial amputees with DPN than in traumatic trans-tibial amputees; the height of the center of gravity could not be maintained during this phase in vascular trans-tibial amputees with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The hip joint on the prosthetic side compensated for this diminished function at the ankle during loading response. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spallone, Vincenza; Ziegler, Dan; Freeman, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy (CAN) Subcommittee of Toronto Consensus Panel on Diabetic Neuropathy worked to update CAN guidelines, with regard to epidemiology, clinical impact, diagnosis, usefulness of CAN testing, and management. CAN is the impairment of cardiovascular autonomic control...... in type 2 diabetes. CAN is a risk marker of mortality and cardiovascular morbidity, and possibly a progression promoter of diabetic nephropathy. Criteria for CAN diagnosis and staging are: 1. one abnormal cardio-vagal test identifies possible or early CAN; 2. at least two abnormal cardio-vagal tests....... diagnosis of CAN clinical forms, 2. detection and tailored treatment of CAN clinical correlates (e.g. tachycardia, OH, nondipping, QT interval prolongation), 3. risk stratification for diabetic complications and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and 4. modulation of targets of diabetes therapy...

  7. [Diabetic neuropathy: therapeutic nihilism is no longer acceptable].

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    Haslbeck, Manfred

    2007-05-21

    The repeatedly expressed doubts about the value of an effective therapy for diabetic neuropathies are no longer acceptable. Today a number of excellent longitudinal and cross-sectional studies, i.e. DCCT, Steno 2, DCCT/EDIC, European Diabetes Prospective Complications Study, are available. The attending physician should make every effort to diagnose diabetic neuropathies as soon as possible with all their multivarious manifestations. Treatment must be promptly, aggressively and multifactorially as described in evidence-based guidelines. In principle, the same risk factors apply to neuropathy in type 1 and type 2 diabetes as for macro-angiopathy and microangiopathy. Therapy focuses on establishing near-normal diabetes and blood pressure control, lipid management, intensive patient education, avoidance of exogenous noxae such as alcohol and nicotine and if necessary, an effective therapy of neuropathic pain. The objective of all diagnostic and preventive efforts must be always to avoid the development of the diabetic neuropathic foot syndrome, which is the most important end stage of somatic and autonomic diabetic neuropathy.

  8. The role of serum methylglyoxal on diabetic peripheral and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C.S.; Jensen, T.M.; Jensen, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and diabetic peripheral neuropathy are common diabetic complications and independent predictors of cardiovascular disease. The glucose metabolite methylglyoxal has been suggested to play a causal role in the pathogeneses of diabetic peripheral neuropathy...... and possibly diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the cross-sectional association between serum methylglyoxal and diabetic peripheral neuropathy and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in a subset of patients in the ADDITION-Denmark study with short-term screen......-detected Type 2 diabetes (duration ~ 5.8 years). METHODS: The patients were well controlled with regard to HbA(1c), lipids and blood pressure. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was assessed by measures of resting heart rate variability and cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy...

  9. Mechanisms and Management of Diabetic Painful Distal Symmetrical Polyneuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Solomon; Boulton, Andrew J.M.; Dickenson, Anthony H.

    2013-01-01

    Although a number of the diabetic neuropathies may result in painful symptomatology, this review focuses on the most common: chronic sensorimotor distal symmetrical polyneuropathy (DSPN). It is estimated that 15–20% of diabetic patients may have painful DSPN, but not all of these will require therapy. In practice, the diagnosis of DSPN is a clinical one, whereas for longitudinal studies and clinical trials, quantitative sensory testing and electrophysiological assessment are usually necessary. A number of simple numeric rating scales are available to assess the frequency and severity of neuropathic pain. Although the exact pathophysiological processes that result in diabetic neuropathic pain remain enigmatic, both peripheral and central mechanisms have been implicated, and extend from altered channel function in peripheral nerve through enhanced spinal processing and changes in many higher centers. A number of pharmacological agents have proven efficacy in painful DSPN, but all are prone to side effects, and none impact the underlying pathophysiological abnormalities because they are only symptomatic therapy. The two first-line therapies approved by regulatory authorities for painful neuropathy are duloxetine and pregabalin. α-Lipoic acid, an antioxidant and pathogenic therapy, has evidence of efficacy but is not licensed in the U.S. and several European countries. All patients with DSPN are at increased risk of foot ulceration and require foot care, education, and if possible, regular podiatry assessment. PMID:23970715

  10. Potential risk factors for diabetic neuropathy: a case control study

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    Nooraei Mahdi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus type II afflicts at least 2 million people in Iran. Neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes and lowers the patient's quality of life. Since neuropathy often leads to ulceration and amputation, we have tried to elucidate the factors that can affect its progression. Methods In this case-control study, 110 diabetic patients were selected from the Shariati Hospital diabetes clinic. Michigan Neuropathic Diabetic Scoring (MNDS was used to differentiate cases from controls. The diagnosis of neuropathy was confirmed by nerve conduction studies (nerve conduction velocity and electromyography. The multiple factors compared between the two groups included consumption of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI, blood pressure, serum lipid level, sex, smoking, method of diabetes control and its quality. Results Statistically significant relationships were found between neuropathy and age, gender, quality of diabetes control and duration of disease (P values in the order: 0.04, 0.04, Conclusion In this study, hyperglycemia was the only modifiable risk factor for diabetic neuropathy. Glycemic control reduces the incidence of neuropathy, slows its progression and improves the diabetic patient's quality of life. More attention must be paid to elderly male diabetic patients with poor diabetes control with regard to regular foot examinations and more practical education.

  11. The assessment of clinical distal symmetric polyneuropathy in type 1 diabetes: A comparison of methodologies from the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Pambianco, G.; Costacou, T.; Strotmeyer, Elsa; Orchard, T.J.

    2011-01-01

    Distal symmetrical polyneuropathy (DSP) is the most common type of diabetic neuropathy, but often difficult to diagnose reliably. We evaluated the cross-sectional association between three point-of-care devices, Vibratron II, NC-stat®, and Neurometer®, and two clinical protocols, MNSI and monofilament, in identifying those with DSP, and/or amputation/ulcer/neuropathic pain (AUP), the two outcomes of major concern. This report presents data from 195 type 1 diabetic participants of the Epidemio...

  12. Correlation of Michigan neuropathy screening instrument, United Kingdom screening test and electrodiagnosis for early detection of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fateh, Hamid R; Madani, Seyed Pezhman; Heshmat, Ramin; Larijani, Bagher

    2015-01-01

    Almost half of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathies (DPNs) are symptom-free. Methods including questionnaires and electrodiagnosis (EDx) can be fruitful for easy reach to early diagnosis, correct treatments of diabetic neuropathy, and so decline of complications for instance diabetic foot ulcer and prevention of high costs. The goal of our study was to compare effectiveness of the Michigan neuropathy screening instrument (MNSI), United Kingdom screening test (UKST) and electrophysiological evaluation in confirming diabetic peripheral neuropathy. One hundred twenty five known diabetes mellitus male and female subjects older than 18 with or without symptoms of neuropathy comprised in this research. All of them were interviewed in terms of demographic data, lipid profile, HbA1C, duration of disease, and history of retinopathy, so examined by Michigan neuropathy screening instrument (MNSI), United Kingdom screening test (UKST), and nerve conduction studies (NCS). The collected data were analyzed by SPSS software 18. One hundred twenty five diabetic patients (70 female, 55 male) were recruited in this study with a mean age of 58.7 ± 10.2, and mean duration of diabetes was 10.17 ± 6.9 years. The mean neuropathy score of MNSI and UKST were 2.3 (1.7) and 4.16 (2.9), respectively. Each instrument detected the peripheral neuropathy in 78 (69 %) and 91 (73 %) of patients, respectively. There was a significant relationship between number of neuropathies and mean of diabetes duration and development of retinopathy in both questionnaire evaluations and NCS. By nerve conduction study, neuropathy was detected in 121 (97 %) diabetic patients were reported in order 15 (12 %) mononeuropathy (as 33 % sensory and 67 % motor neuropathy) and 106 (85 %) polyneuropathy (as 31 % motor and 69 % sensorimotor neuropathy). As regards NCS is an objective, simple, and non-invasive tool and also can determine level of damage and regeneration in peripheral nerves, this study

  13. Diabetic neuropathies: update on definitions, diagnostic criteria, estimation of severity, and treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tesfaye, Solomon; Boulton, Andrew J M; Dyck, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Preceding the joint meeting of the 19th annual Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (NEURODIAB) and the 8th International Symposium on Diabetic Neuropathy in Toronto, Canada, 13-18 October 2009, expert panels were convened to provide updates on cla...... on classification, definitions, diagnostic criteria, and treatments of diabetic peripheral neuropathies (DPNs), autonomic neuropathy, painful DPNs, and structural alterations in DPNs.......Preceding the joint meeting of the 19th annual Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (NEURODIAB) and the 8th International Symposium on Diabetic Neuropathy in Toronto, Canada, 13-18 October 2009, expert panels were convened to provide updates...

  14. High resolution ultrasonography of the tibial nerve in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kunwarpal; Gupta, Kamlesh; Kaur, Sukhdeep

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography of the tibial nerve is a fast and non invasive tool for diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Our study was aimed at finding out the correlation of the cross sectional area and maximum thickness of nerve fascicles of the tibial nerve with the presence and severity of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. 75 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus clinically diagnosed with diabetic peripheral neuropathy were analysed, and the severity of neuropathy was determined using the Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score. 58 diabetic patients with no clinical suspicion of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and 75 healthy non-diabetic subjects were taken as controls. The cross sectional area and maximum thickness of nerve fascicles of the tibial nerves were calculated 3 cm cranial to the medial malleolus in both lower limbs. The mean cross sectional area (22.63 +/- 2.66 mm 2 ) and maximum thickness of nerve fascicles (0.70 mm) of the tibial nerves in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy compared with both control groups was significantly larger, and statistically significant correlation was found with the Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score ( p peripheral neuropathy had a larger mean cross sectional area (14.40 +/- 1.72 mm 2 ) and maximum thickness of nerve fascicles of the tibial nerve (0.40 mm) than healthy non-diabetic subjects (12.42 +/- 1.01 mm 2 and 0.30 mm respectively). The cross sectional area and maximum thickness of nerve fascicles of the tibial nerve is larger in diabetic patients with or without peripheral neuropathy than in healthy control subjects, and ultrasonography can be used as a good screening tool in these patients.

  15. Investigation of depression in Greek patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekleiti, Maria; Sarafis, Pavlos; Saridi, Maria; Toska, Aikaterini; Melos, Chrysovaladis; Souliotis, Kyriakos; Tsironi, Maria

    2013-06-16

    Considerable studies directly connect the complications in diabetic patients, and especially peripheral neuropathy, with the emergence of depression. Neuropathetic pain may deteriorate the general health status of the diabetic patient and glycaemic regulation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the appearance and degree of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and its correlation with depression, with other parameters of the disease and also duration. 57 diabetic patients participated with diagnosed diabetic peripheral neuropathy (male n=27, female n= 30, mean of age 72.7±6.35 years). The first part of Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument and the Zung Depression Rating Scale were used as tools for our study. Data was analysed with the SPSS 18.0 statistic program. 57.9% of the patients were overweight, 35.1% were obese and only 7% were within normal weight range. The BMI findings between the two genders indicate that male participants are more often obese than females. Women surpassed men in the category of overweight patients (p depression, it derives that a high degree of diabetic neuropathy is related with high score of depression [F(3.160)=9.821, p=0.001]. Moderate and severe neuropathy was found with almost the same levels of depression. The correlation between diabetic neuropathy and depression is confirmed, while a very high depression rate was found in patients with severe neuropathy. The issue needs further study by using common instruments to obtain comparative results from the scientific community.

  16. Does Peripheral Neuropathy Associate with Cranial Nerves Neuropathy in Type 2 diabetes Patients?

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    Walaa Fadhil Jalal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN is the most common complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cranial neuropathies is usually presenting as mononeuropathies coexist with DPN either presented clinically or in subclinical form. The aim of this study is to detect cranial neuropathy in diabetic patients. Eighty three patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM with an age range of 30-69 years were included in the study. The study also involved normal healthy persons whose age and gender are harmonized with that of our patients that were deliberated as control group (60 persons. Diabetic patients with DPN had significant difference in age, highly significant difference in the duration of the disease and highly significance difference in BMI had poor glycemic control reflected by high FBS and HbA1c, while lipid profile picture showed insignificant difference when compared with diabetic patients without DPN. Nerve conduction study (sensory and motor showed a significant difference regarding latency, amplitude, and conduction velocity between diabetic patients with DPN and those without DPN. The results of blink reflex showed highly significant difference between diabetic patients and controls.

  17. Vitamin B supplementation for diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayabalan, Bhavani; Low, Lian Leng

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency has been associated with significant neurological pathology, especially peripheral neuropathy. This review aims to examine the existing evidence on the effectiveness of vitamin B12 supplementation for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. A search of PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for all relevant randomised controlled trials was conducted in December 2014. Any type of therapy using vitamin B12 or its coenzyme forms was assessed for efficacy and safety in diabetics with peripheral neuropathy. Changes in vibration perception thresholds, neuropathic symptoms and nerve conduction velocities, as well as the adverse effects of vitamin B12 therapy, were assessed. Four studies comprising 363 patients met the inclusion criteria. This review found no evidence that the use of oral vitamin B12 supplements is associated with improvement in the clinical symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. Furthermore, the majority of studies reported no improvement in the electrophysiological markers of nerve conduction. Copyright © Singapore Medical Association.

  18. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

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    Heung Yong Jin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN. Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed.

  19. Prevalence and characteristics of painful diabetic neuropathy in a large community-based diabetic population in the U.K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Caroline A; Malik, Rayaz A; van Ross, Ernest R E; Kulkarni, Jai; Boulton, Andrew J M

    2011-10-01

    To assess, in the general diabetic population, 1) the prevalence of painful neuropathic symptoms; 2) the relationship between symptoms and clinical severity of neuropathy; and 3) the role of diabetes type, sex, and ethnicity in painful neuropathy. Observational study of a large cohort of diabetic patients receiving community-based health care in northwest England (n = 15,692). Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) was assessed using neuropathy symptom score (NSS) and neuropathy disability score (NDS). Prevalence of painful symptoms (NSS ≥5) and PDN (NSS ≥5 and NDS ≥3) was 34 and 21%, respectively. Painful symptoms occurred in 26% of patients without neuropathy (NDS ≤2) and 60% of patients with severe neuropathy (NDS >8). Adjusted risk of painful neuropathic symptoms in type 2 diabetes was double that of type 1 diabetes (odds ratio [OR] = 2.1 [95% CI 1.7-2.4], P diabetic patients have painful neuropathy symptoms, regardless of their neuropathic deficit. PDN was more prevalent in patients with type 2 diabetes, women, and people of South Asian origin. This highlights a significant morbidity due to painful neuropathy and identifies key groups who warrant screening for PDN.

  20. Mobile phone generated vibrations used to detect diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jonathan David; Morris, Matthew William John

    2017-12-01

    In the current United Kingdom population the incidence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is increasing. The presence of diabetic neuropathy affects decision making and treatment options. This study seeks to evaluate if the vibrations generated from a mobile phone can be used to screen patients for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This study comprised of 61 patients; a control group of 21 patients; a lower limb injury group of 19 patients; a diabetic peripheral neuropathy group of 21 patients. The control and injury group were recruited randomly from fracture clinics. The diabetic peripheral neuropathy group were randomly recruited from the diabetic foot clinic. The 61 patients were examined using a 10g Semmes-Weinstein monofilament, a 128Hz tuning fork and a vibrating mobile phone. The points tested were, index finger, patella, lateral malleoli, medial malleoli, heel, first and fifth metatarsal heads. The most accurate location of all the clinical tests was the head of the 1st metatarsal at 0.86. The overall accuracy of the tuning fork was 0.77, the ten gram monofilament 0.79 and the mobile phone accuracy was 0.88. The control group felt 420 of 441 tests (95%). The injury group felt 349 of 399 tests (87%). The neuropathic group felt 216 of 441 tests (48%). There is a significant difference in the number of tests felt between the control and both the injury and neuropathic groups. pperipheral neuropathy. The most accurate location to test for diabetic peripheral neuropathy is the head of the 1st metatarsal. Screening for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in the index finger and patella were inaccurate. An injury to the lower limb affects the patient's vibration sensation, we would therefore recommend screening the contralateral limb to the injury. This study represents level II evidence of a new diagnostic investigation. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Diagnostic capability of retinal thickness measures in diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeetha Srinivasan

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: The GCC FLV can differentiate individuals with diabetic neuropathy from healthy controls, while the inferior RNFL thickness is able to differentiate those with greater degrees of neuropathy from those with mild or no neuropathy, both with an acceptable level of accuracy. Optical coherence tomography represents a non-invasive technology that aids in detection of retinal structural changes in patients with established diabetic neuropathy. Further refinement of the technique and the analytical approaches may be required to identify patients with minimal neuropathy.

  2. Frequency of sensory motor neuropathy in type 2 diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ather, N.A.; Sattar, R.A.; Ara, J.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of sensory motor neuropathy in type 2 diabetics at the time of presentation to the hospital. The study was conducted at Medical Unit-1, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Center, Karachi, from November 2005 to April 2006. Patients of different ages and either gender with history of confirmed diabetes for ten years and above, on regular follow up were included. Those with non-diabetic causes of hyperglycemia or neuropathy were excluded. Relevant features like age, gender, treatment, symptoms , signs, nerve conduction study (NCS) results, duration of Diabetes mellitus (DM), fasting blood sugar (FBS) and serum values of glycosylated hemoglobin (HB1Ac) were recorded. Out of a total of 300 patients, there were 111 female and 189 male patients. Mean age was 58 +- 11.23 years. Mean duration of diabetes was 13.6+-5.48 years. One hundred and twenty three patients had symptoms of neuropathy. Clinical examination revealed mixed sensory and motor signs in 135 (45%) patients. Nerve conduction studies revealed abnormalities in 159 (53%) patients. Among patients having an abnormal NCS, the fasting blood glucose (FBS) was 120mg/dl in 147 (91%) patients. The glycosylated hemoglobin ranged from 4-15% with mean of 8.1% and standard deviation of 2.5%. This showed significant association (p <0.001) of peripheral neuropathy with abnormal FBS, HB1Ac and duration of diabetes. NCS diagnosed the neuropathy in more than half of the total number of patients, including both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Majority of the patients revealed symmetrical and a mixed type (motor and sensory) polyneuropathy. This shows that nerve conduction may not be concordant with the clinical signs and symptoms. NCS detects neuropathy much earlier, before it becomes evident clinically. The neuropathy is associated with abonromal fasting blood sugar, HBIAC and duration of diabetes. (author)

  3. Diabetes and obesity are the main metabolic drivers of peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Brian C; Gao, LeiLi; Li, Yufeng; Zhou, Xianghai; Reynolds, Evan; Banerjee, Mousumi; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Feldman, Eva L; Ji, Linong

    2018-04-01

    To determine the associations between individual metabolic syndrome (MetS) components and peripheral neuropathy in a large population-based cohort from Pinggu, China. A cross-sectional, randomly selected, population-based survey of participants from Pinggu, China was performed. Metabolic phenotyping and neuropathy outcomes were performed by trained personnel. Glycemic status was defined according to the American Diabetes Association criteria, and the MetS using modified consensus criteria (body mass index instead of waist circumference). The primary peripheral neuropathy outcome was the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI) examination. Secondary outcomes were the MNSI questionnaire and monofilament testing. Multivariable models were used to assess for associations between individual MetS components and peripheral neuropathy. Tree-based methods were used to construct a classifier for peripheral neuropathy using demographics and MetS components. The mean (SD) age of the 4002 participants was 51.6 (11.8) and 51.0% were male; 37.2% of the population had normoglycemia, 44.0% prediabetes, and 18.9% diabetes. The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy increased with worsening glycemic status (3.25% in normoglycemia, 6.29% in prediabetes, and 15.12% in diabetes, P peripheral neuropathy. Age, diabetes, and weight were the primary splitters in the classification tree for peripheral neuropathy. Similar to previous studies, diabetes and obesity are the main metabolic drivers of peripheral neuropathy. The consistency of these results reinforces the urgent need for effective interventions that target these metabolic factors to prevent and/or treat peripheral neuropathy.

  4. Comparison of Efficiencies of Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument, Neurothesiometer, and Electromyography for Diagnosis of Diabetic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turkan Mete

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This study compares the effectiveness of Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI, neurothesiometer, and electromyography (EMG in detecting diabetic peripheral neuropathy in patients with diabetes type 2. Materials and Methods. 106 patients with diabetes type 2 treated at the outpatient clinic of Ankara Numune Education and Research Hospital Department of Endocrinology between September 2008 and May 2009 were included in this study. Patients were evaluated by glycemic regulation tests, MNSI (questionnaire and physical examination, EMG (for detecting sensorial and motor defects in right median, ulnar, posterior tibial, and bilateral sural nerves, and neurothesiometer (for detecting alterations in cold and warm sensations as well as vibratory sensations. Results. According to the MNSI score, there was diabetic peripheral neuropathy in 34 (32.1% patients (score ≥2.5. However, when the patients were evaluated by EMG and neurothesiometer, neurological impairments were detected in 49 (46.2% and 79 (74.5% patients, respectively. Conclusion. According to our findings, questionnaires and physical examination often present lower diabetic peripheral neuropathy prevalence. Hence, we recommend that in the evaluation of diabetic patients neurological tests should be used for more accurate results and thus early treatment options to prevent neuropathic complications.

  5. Dyslipidemia as a contributory factor in etiopathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhir S Al-Ani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The pathogenesis of neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus is multifactorial.Dyslipidemia may contribute to the development of diabetic neuropathy. This study aimed to assess the atherogenic lipid indices in type 2 diabetic patients with neuropathy.Material and Methods: Fifty-one patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 31 healthy subjects were studied in the Unit of Neurophysiology at the University Hospital of Medical College, Al-Nahrin University in Baghdad, Iraq, from January 2002 to January 2003. Neuropathy total symptom score (NTSS, neuropathy impairment score in the lower leg (NIS-LL, and electrophysiological study of sensory (ulnar and sural and motor (ulnar and common peroneal nerves were used to assess nerve function. Fasting venous blood was obtained from each participant for determination of lipid profile and atherogenic lipid ratios. Results: The frequency of high blood pressure was significantly higher in neuropathic patients. The electrophysiology study revealed significant decrease in conduction velocity of ulnar (sensory and motor components, sural, and common peroneal nerves. The minimum F-wave latency of motor nerve was significantly prolonged. Among the lipid fractions, only high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was significantly reduced by 14% of healthy participant′s value. Atherogenic lipid ratios were significantly higher in diabetic patients than corresponding healthy ratios. Conclusion: Metabolic lipid disturbances in terms of atherogenicity co-existwith neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus, irrespective of duration of disease.

  6. Mechanisms of Distal Axonal Degeneration in Peripheral Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Christopher R.; Höke, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of a variety of diseases and treatments, including diabetes, cancer chemotherapy, and infectious causes (HIV, hepatitis C, and Campylobacter jejuni). Despite the fundamental difference between these insults, peripheral neuropathy develops as a combination of just six primary mechanisms: altered metabolism, covalent modification, altered organelle function and reactive oxygen species formation, altered intracellular and inflammatory signaling, slowed axonal transport, and altered ion channel dynamics and expression. All of these pathways converge to lead to axon dysfunction and symptoms of neuropathy. The detailed mechanisms of axon degeneration itself have begun to be elucidated with studies of animal models with altered degeneration kinetics, including the slowed Wallerian degeneration (Wlds) and Sarmknockout animal models. These studies have shown axonal degeneration to occur througha programmed pathway of injury signaling and cytoskeletal degradation. Insights into the common disease insults that converge on the axonal degeneration pathway promise to facilitate the development of therapeutics that may be effective against other mechanisms of neurodegeneration. PMID:25617478

  7. Prevalence and biochemical risk factors of diabetic peripheral neuropathy with or without neuropathic pain in Taiwanese adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Yen-Wei; Lin, Ching-Heng; Lee, I-Te; Chang, Ming-Hong

    To investigate the prevalence and risk factors for diabetic peripheral neuropathy with or without neuropathic pain in Taiwanese. A cross-sectional, hospital-based observational study was conducted. We enrolled 2837 adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy with or without pain were diagnosed using 2 validated screening tools, namely the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument and Douleur Neuropathique 4 questionnaire. In our sample, 2233 participants had no neuropathy, 476 had diabetic peripheral neuropathy without pain, and 128 had diabetic peripheral neuropathy with neuropathic pain, representing an overall diabetic peripheral neuropathy prevalence of 21.3%, and the prevalence of neuropathic pain in diabetic peripheral neuropathy was 21.2%. Multivariate analysis revealed that older age (Pperipheral neuropathy, whereas older age (Pperipheral neuropathy with neuropathic pain. During clinical visits involving biochemical studies, the risk for diabetic peripheral neuropathy with neuropathic pain should be considered for people with older age, elevated glycated haemoglobin, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and overt proteinuria, with particular attention given to increased levels of albuminuria while concerning neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiographic Abnormalities in the Feet of Diabetic Patients with Neuropathy and Foot Ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vijay; Kumpatla, Satyavani; Rao, V Narayan

    2014-11-01

    People with diabetic neuropathy are frequently prone to several bone and joint abnormalities. Simple radiographic findings have been proven to be quite useful in the detection of such abnormalities, which might be helpful not only for early diagnosis but also in following the course of diabetes through stages of reconstruction of the ulcerated foot.The present study was designed to identify the common foot abnormalities in south Indian diabetic subjects with and without neuropathy using radiographic imaging. About 150 (M:F 94:56) subjects with type 2 diabetes were categorised into three groups: Group I (50 diabetic patients), Group II (50 patients with neuropathy), and Group III (50 diabetic patients with both neuropathy and foot ulceration). Demographic details, duration of diabetes and HbA1c values were recorded. Vibration perception threshold was measured for assessment of neuropathy. Bone and joint abnormalities in the feet and legs of the study subjects were identified using standardised dorsi-plantar and lateral weight-bearing radiographs. Radiographic findings of the study subjects revealed that those with both neuropathy and foot ulceration and a longer duration of diabetes had more number of bone and joint abnormalities. Subjects with neuropathy alone also showed presence of several abnormalities, including periosteal reaction, osteopenia, and Charcot changes. The present findings highlight the impact of neuropathy and duration of diabetes on the development of foot abnormalities in subjects with diabetes. Using radiographic imaging can help in early identification of abnormalities and better management of the diabetic foot.

  9. Sympathetic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus patients does not elicit Charcot osteoarthropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tomas M; Simonsen, Lene; Holstein, Per E

    2011-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study was to determine the degree of neuropathy (autonomic and somatic) in patients with diabetes mellitus with or without Charcot osteoarthropathy (CA). METHODS: Forty-nine patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 or 2 were investigated. The patient population of interest...... with first toe amputation (n=5), a high-risk group for development of CA, and two control groups consisting of diabetes patients with (n=9) or without somatic neuropathy (n=11) were investigated. Regional blood flow in the feet was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography. Quantitation of somatic...... neuropathy was done by the Neuropathy Disability Score and modified Neuropathy Symptom Score. Quantitation of autonomic neuropathy was done by measurements of local venoarteriolar sympathetic axon reflex in the feet and of heart rate variability during deep breathing and orthostatic challenge. RESULTS...

  10. Autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eVerrotti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent definition, different diagnostic method, different patient cohorts studied. The pathogenesis is still unclear and probably multifactorial. Once DAN becomes clinically evident, no form of therapy has been identified which can effectively stop or reverse it. Prevention strategies are based on strict glycemic control with intensive insulin treatment, multifactorial intervention and lifestyle modification including control of hypertension, dyslipidemia, stop smoking, weight loss and adequate physical exercise. The present review summarizes the latest knowledge regarding clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathogenesis and management of DAN, with some mention to childhood and adolescent population.

  11. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

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    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7 identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra

  12. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2008-03-18

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances) are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7) identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra neuropathy, or decaying skin

  13. Diagnostic Accuracy of Clinical Methods for Detection of Diabetic Sensory Neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arshad, A. R.; Alvi, K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the accuracy of clinical methods for detection of sensory neuropathy as compared to biothesiometry. Study Design: Cross-sectional analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: 1 Mountain Medical Battalion, Azad Kashmir, from October 2013 to September 2014. Methodology: Patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled by convenience sampling. Exclusion criteria included other identifiable causes of neuropathy, extensive ulceration of feet, amputated feet, those on treatment for neuropathy and unwilling patients. Average of 3 vibration perception threshold values measured with a biothesiometer on distal hallux was calculated. Ten gm monofilament was used to examine touch sensation over dorsal surfaces of great toes. Vibration sensation was checked over the tips of great toes using 128Hz tuning fork. Ankle jerks were checked bilaterally. Result: Neuropathy (vibration perception threshold > 25 volts) was present in 34 (21.12 percentage) out of 161 patients and 93 (57.76 percentage) were symptomatic. Measures of diagnostic accuracy for monofilament, tuning fork and ankle jerks were: sensitivity 41.18 percentage, 55.88 percentage and 64.71 percentage; specificity 92.91 percentage, 93.70 percentage and 80.31 percentage; positive predictive value (PPV) 60.87 percentage, 70.37 percentage and 46.81 percentage; negative predictive value (NPV) 85.51 percentage, 88.81 percentage and 89.47 percentage; and, diagnostic accuracy 81.99 percentage, 85.71 percentage and 77.02 percentage, respectively. Values for any 1 positive sign, any 2 positive signs or all 3 positive signs were: sensitivity 35.29 percentage, 14.71 percentage and 32.35 percentage; specificity 81.89 percentage, 93.70 percentage and 99.21 percentage; PPV 34.29 percentage, 38.46 percentage and 91.67 percentage; NPV 82.54 percentage, 80.41 percentage and 84.56 percentage; and, diagnostic accuracy 72.05 percentage, 77.02 percentage and 85.09 percentage, respectively. Conclusion: Clinical methods are

  14. Protection of Trigonelline on Experimental Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yin Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms leading to diabetic peripheral neuropathy are complex and there is no effective drug to treat it. As an active component of several traditional Chinese medicines, trigonelline has beneficial effects on diabetes with hyperlipidemia. The protective effects and the mechanism of trigonelline on diabetic peripheral neuropathy were evaluated in streptozotocin- and high-carbohydrate/high-fat diet-induced diabetic rats. Rats were divided into four groups at the end of week 2: control, diabetes, diabetes + trigonelline (40 mg/kg, and diabetes + sitagliptin (4 mg/kg. After 48-week treatment, technologies of nerve conduction, cold and hot immersion test, transmission electron microscopy, real-time PCR, and Western blotting were applied. Serum glucose, serum insulin, insulin sensitivity index, lipid parameters, body weight, sciatic nerve conduction velocity, nociception, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor mRNA and protein, total and phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases protein expression, malonaldehyde content, and superoxide dismutase activity were altered in diabetic rats, and were near control levels treated with trigonelline. Slight micropathological changes existed in sciatic nerve of trigonelline-treated diabetic rats. These findings suggest that trigonelline has beneficial effects for diabetic peripheral neuropathy through glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling pathway, nerve conduction velocity, antioxidant enzyme activity, improving micropathological changes of sciatic nerve and decreasing lipid peroxidation.

  15. Ambulatory screening of diabetic neuropathy and predictors of its severity in outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, M S; Iqbal, M; Zahoor, S; Ali, J; Javed, M U

    2017-04-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is one of the most common causes of chronic neuropathic symptomatology and the most disabling and difficult-to-treat diabetic microangiopathic complication. The neuropathies associated with diabetes are typically classified into generalized, focal and multifocal varieties. There exists a scarcity of literature studying the correlation of different patient- and disease-related variables with severity of neuropathy. This study aims to delineate the prevalence of diabetic neuropathy in type 2 diabetes, describe its characteristics and find out predictors of its severity. Eight hundred consecutive diabetic patients presenting to outpatient department (OPD) of Khan Research Labs (KRL) General Hospital and Centre for Diabetes and Liver diseases, Islamabad, during March-June, 2015 were made to complete a self-administered questionnaire (Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument-MNSI) and underwent a thorough physical examination according to MNSI protocols. A score of >2 was considered to be diagnostic for DPN. Patient and disease variables were noted. MNSI score was used as an index of severity of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Correlation of several patient- and disease-related variables with the severity of DPN was determined using multivariate regression. Out of a total 800 patients screened, 90 (11.25%) were found to have diabetic neuropathy. Of these 90, 45.5% were males, the median age was 54.47 ± 10.87 years and the median duration of diabetes was 11.12 ± 9.8 years. The most common symptom was found to be numbness (63.6%) followed by generalized body weakness (61.5%). The common findings on physical examination were dry skin/callus (38.7%) and deformities (14.7%). Duration of diabetes was found to be the strongest predictor for development and severity of diabetic neuropathy followed by glycemic controls (HbA1c values) and age. Duration of diabetes rather than diabetic controls predicts better the development and severity of

  16. Serum Uric Acid Levels and Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetes: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuai; Chen, Ying; Hou, Xu; Xu, Donghua; Che, Kui; Li, Changgui; Yan, Shengli; Wang, Yangang; Wang, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies suggested a possible association between serum uric acid levels and peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes, but no definite evidence was available. A systematic review and meta-analysis of relevant studies were performed to comprehensively estimate the association. Pubmed, Web of Science, Embase, and China Biology Medicine (CBM) databases were searched for eligible studies. Study-specific data were combined using random-effect or fixed-effect models of meta-analysis according to between-study heterogeneity. Twelve studies were finally included into the meta-analysis, which involved a total of 1388 type 2 diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy and 4746 patients without peripheral neuropathy. Meta-analysis showed that there were obvious increased serum uric acid levels in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy (weighted mean difference [WMD] = 50.03 μmol/L, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 22.14-77.93, P = 0.0004). Hyperuricemia was also significantly associated with increased risk of peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes (risk ratio [RR] = 2.83, 95%CI 2.13-3.76, P peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetic patients (RR = 1.95, 95%CI 1.23-3.11, P = 0.005). Type 2 diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy have obvious increased serum uric acid levels, and hyperuricemia is associated with increased risk of peripheral neuropathy. Further prospective cohort studies are needed to validate the impact of serum uric acid levels on peripheral neuropathy risk.

  17. The Prevalence of diabetic optic neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Taqi Al-Saffar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: As diabetes mellitus a common health problem, it is well known that it can lead to optic neuropathy that affects the optic nerve functions. It is important to monitor the effect of this metabolic disease on the optic nerve that can lead ultimately to decrease visual acuity that can be irreversible. This study aimed to find out the prevalence of diabetic optic nerve diseases and to evaluate the patient characteristics and fundus findings. Methods: Screening examination was done for 2213 patients with type 2 diabetic patients presented to the diabetic center from October 2007 to September 2009. The examination includes visual acuity test using conventional E chart, slit lamp exam, followed by installing short acting Mydriatics (tropicamide 1% eye drops for fundoscopy examination using +76.D or +90 D. Results: Eighty eight patients (approximately 4% had optic nerve problems; 50 females and 38 males. The mean age was 59 years. A total of 58 (116 eyes patients were bilaterally affected, 42 patients with optic papillopathy, 8 patients with anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and profound loss of vision, 8 with glaucomatous cupping and pallor and 30 patients with end stage optic atrophy. A total of 63 (71.5% patients had poor metabolic control. Conclusions: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have 4% prevalence of diabetic optic neuropathy.

  18. Gallbladder ejection fraction using 99mTc-DISIDA scan in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Jang; Kim, In Ju; Kim, Yong Ki; An, Jun Hyup; Yoo, Seok Dong

    2000-01-01

    We performed this study to evaluate the changes of gallbladder ejection fraction (GBEF) in diabetic patients with or without autonomic neuropathy. This study included 37 diabetic patients (25 women, 12 men, mean age 51 years) and 24 normal controls (10 women, 14 men, mean age 38 years). After intravenous injection of 185 MBq of 99m T c -DISIDA, serial anterior abdominal images were acquired before and after fatty meal. Regions of interest were applied on gallbladder and right hepatic lobe on 60 and 90 minute images to calculate GBEF. GBEF was significantly reduced in diabetes with autonomic neuropathy (43±12.3%) and without autonomic neuropathy (57.5±13.2%) compared with normal controls (68±11.6%, p 0.05). When 50.2% of GBEF was used as the criteria for diabetic autonomic neuropathy, the sensitivity and specificity were 80%, 76.5%, respectively. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.846. GBEF of diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy was significantly reduced than that of diabetic patients without autonomic neuropathy.=20

  19. The prevalence, patterns and predictors of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in a developing country

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    Katulanda Prasad

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM has reached epidemic proportions in Sri Lanka. Presently there are studies on the community prevalence of distal peripheral neuropathy (DPN in Sri Lanka. We describe prevalence, patterns and predictors of DPN in patients with DM in Sri Lanka. Data were collected as part of a national study on DM. In new cases DPN was assessed using the Diabetic-Neuropathy-Symptom (DNS score, while in those with established diabetes both DNS and Toronto-Clinical-Scoring-System (TCSS were used. A binary logistic-regression analysis was performed with ‘presence of DPN’ as the dichomatous dependent variable and other independent co-variants. The study included 528 diabetic patients (191-new cases, with a mean age of 55.0 ± 12.4 years and 37.3% were males, while 18% were from urban areas. Prevalence of DPN according to DNS score among all patients, patients with already established diabetes and newly diagnosed patients were 48.1%, 59.1% and 28.8% respectively. Prevalence of DPN in those with established DM as assessed by TCSS was 24% and the majority had mild DPN (16.6%. The remainder of the abstract is based on subjects with established DM. The prevalence of DPN in males and female was 20.0% and 26.4% respectively. The mean age of those with and without DPN was 62.1 ± 10.8 and 55.1 ± 10.8 years respectively (p 

  20. Frequency of autonomic neuropathy in patients with erectile dysfunction in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafoor, A.; Zaidi, S.M.H.; Moazzam, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Among diabetic patients autonomic neuropathy (AN) is one of the most frequent complications. This affects peripheral nervous system and thus results into erectile dysfunction (ED). The main objectives of the study were to determine the frequency of autonomic neuropathy (AN) in diabetic patients with ED and to find out the associated risk factors. Method: In this descriptive case series, a total 200 consecutive patients of Diabetes Mellitus with erectile dysfunction attended the Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism (DEM), Services Hospital Lahore during three months (from June to August 2013), were included. For assessing erectile dysfunction (ED) and autonomic neuropathy (AN) International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and Composite Autonomic Scoring System (CASS) were used respectively. Other factors impacting the autonomic functions in diabetes like duration of diabetes, age of patient, body mass index (BMI), and glycaemic control (HbAlc), hypertension and smoking status were recorded. Results: Average age of the patients was 57.58±9.53 years (95 percentage C.I. 55.54-59.63). Frequency of autonomic neuropathy (AN) in ED patients was 86 (43 percentage). Duration of diabetes Mellitus and BMI were statistically significantly different among patients with severe, moderate and mild autonomic neuropathy. Conclusions: Autonomic neuropathy was very frequent in diabetic patients with erectile dysfunction. The associated risk factors are duration of disease and body mass index. (author)

  1. The sympathetic skin response in diabetic neuropathy and its relationship to autonomic symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Moallem, Mansour A.; Zaidan, Radwan M.; Alkali, Nura H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to examine the utility of the sympathetic skin response (SSR) as a measure of impaired autonomic function among diabetic patients in Saudi Arabia. In this case-control study, baseline SSR was obtained from 18 healthy subjects, followed by nerve conduction studies and SSR testing on a consecutive cohort of 50 diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. The SSR in diabetic patients was compared between those with autonomic neuropathy and those without autonomic neuropathy. This study was conducted at the King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from June 2006 to June 2007. The SSR was present in all healthy subjects and in 32 diabetic patients. Among 16 patients with autonomic neuropathy, the SSR was absent in 14 and present in 2, while 4 of 34 patients lacking evidence of autonomic neuropathy had absent SSR. Using Fisher's exact test, we found a strong association between absent SSR and autonomic neuropathy (p<0.001), however, not with age or duration of diabetes mellitus. As a diagnostic test of autonomic neuropathy, the SSR had a sensitivity of 87.5%, a specificity of 88.2%, a positive predictive value of 77.8%, and a negative predictive value of 93.7%. Absence of the SSR is a reliable indicator of autonomic neuropathy among patients with diabetes mellitus in Saudi Arabia. (author)

  2. Cold immersion recovery responses in the diabetic foot with neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharara, Manish; Viswanathan, Vijay; Cobb, Jonathan E

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this article was to investigate the effectiveness of testing cold immersion recovery responses in the diabetic foot with neuropathy using a contact thermography system based on thermochromic liquid crystals. A total of 81 subjects with no history of diabetic foot ulceration were assigned to neuropathy, non neuropathy and healthy groups. Each group received prior verbal and written description of the test objectives and subsequently underwent a comprehensive foot care examination. The room temperature and humidity were consistently maintained at 24 degrees C and less than 50%, respectively, with air conditioning. The right foot for each subject was located on the measurement platform after cold immersion in water at 18-20 degrees C. Whole-field thermal images of the plantar foot were recorded for 10 minutes. Patients with diabetes with neuropathy show the highest 'delta temperature', that is difference between the temperature after 10-minute recovery period and baseline temperature measured independently at all the three sites tested, that is first metatarsal head (MTH), second MTH and heel. This clinical study showed for the first time the evidence of poor recovery times for the diabetic foot with neuropathy when assessing the foot under load. A temperature deficit (because of poor recovery to baseline temperature) suggests degeneration of thermoreceptors, leading to diminished hypothalamus-mediated activity in the diabetic neuropathic group.

  3. Reversal of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and new wound incidence: the role of MIRE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Mark W; Carnegie, Dale E; Burke, Thomas J

    2004-01-01

    To determine if improved foot sensitivity to the Semmes-Weinstein 10-g (5.07) monofilament, originally impaired because of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, might be associated with a reduced incidence of new diabetic foot wounds. Retrospective cohort study using a health status questionnaire. Sixty-eight individuals over age 64 with diabetes, diabetic peripheral neuropathy, and loss of protective sensation who had clinically demonstrable increases in foot sensation to the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament after treatment with monochromatic near infrared photo energy. After reversal of diabetic peripheral neuropathy following treatment with monochromatic near infrared photo energy, only 1 of 68 patients developed a new diabetic foot wound, for an incidence of 1.5%. Comparatively, the incidence previously reported in the Medicare-aged population with diabetes was 7.3%. Improved foot sensitivity to the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament in patients previously suffering from loss of protective sensation due to diabetic neuropathy appears to be associated with a lower incidence of new diabetic foot ulcers when compared with the expected incidence in the Medicare-aged population with diabetes. Therapeutic interventions that effectively improve foot sensitivity that has been previously diminished due to diabetic peripheral neuropathy may substantially reduce the incidence of new foot wounds in the Medicare-aged population with diabetes.

  4. Herbal Remedies: A Boon for Diabetic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Reshu; Siddiqui, Mohd Haris; Mahmood, Tarique; Bagga, Paramdeep; Ahsan, Farogh; Shamim, Arshiya

    2018-03-26

    Diabetic neuropathy is a chronic complication of diabetes mellitus affecting about 50% of patients. Its symptoms include decreased motility and severe pain in peripheral parts. The pathogenesis involved is an abnormality in blood vessels that supply the peripheral nerves, metabolic disorders such as myo-inositol depletion, and increased nonenzymatic glycation. Moreover, oxidative stress in neurons results in activation of multiple biochemical pathways, which results in the generation of free radicals. Apart from available marketed formulations, extensive research is being carried out on herbal-based natural products to control hyperglycemia and its associated complications. This review is focused to provide a summary on diabetic neuropathy covering its etiology, types, and existing work on herbal-based therapies, which include pure compounds isolated from plant materials, plant extracts, and Ayurvedic preparations.

  5. Comparison of peripheral nerve blockade characteristics between non-diabetic patients and patients suffering from diabetic neuropathy: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeriswyl, M; Taffé, P; Kirkham, K R; Bathory, I; Rancati, V; Crevoisier, X; Cherix, S; Albrecht, E

    2018-06-02

    Animal data have demonstrated increased block duration after local anaesthetic injections in diabetic rat models. Whether the same is true in humans is currently undefined. We, therefore, undertook this prospective cohort study to test the hypothesis that type-2 diabetic patients suffering from diabetic peripheral neuropathy would have increased block duration after ultrasound-guided popliteal sciatic nerve block when compared with patients without neuropathy. Thirty-three type-2 diabetic patients with neuropathy and 23 non-diabetic control patients, scheduled for fore-foot surgery, were included prospectively. All patients received an ultrasound-guided popliteal sciatic nerve block with a 30 ml 1:1 mixture of lidocaine 1% and bupivacaine 0.5%. The primary outcome was time to first opioid request after block procedure. Secondary outcomes included the time to onset of sensory blockade, and pain score at rest on postoperative day 1 (numeric rating scale 0-10). These outcomes were analysed using an accelerated failure time regression model. Patients in the diabetic peripheral neuropathy group had significantly prolonged median (IQR [range]) time to first opioid request (diabetic peripheral neuropathy group 1440 (IQR 1140-1440 [180-1440]) min vs. control group 710 (IQR 420-1200 [150-1440] min, p = 0.0004). Diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients had a time ratio of 1.57 (95%CI 1.10-2.23, p peripheral neuropathy group 0 (IQR 0-1 [0-5]) vs. control group 3 (IQR 0-5 [0-9]), p = 0.001). In conclusion, after an ultrasound-guided popliteal sciatic nerve block, patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy demonstrated reduced time to onset of sensory blockade, with increased time to first opioid request when compared with patients without neuropathy. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists.

  6. Electrophysiological measurements of diabetic peripheral neuropathy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabeeb, Dheyauldeen; Najafi, Masoud; Hasanzadeh, Gholamreza; Hadian, Mohammed Reza; Musa, Ahmed Eleojio; Shirazi, Alireza

    2018-03-28

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the main complications of diabetes mellitus. One of the features of diabetic nerve damage is abnormality of sensory and motor nerve conduction study. An electrophysiological examination can be reproduced and is also a non-invasive approach in the assessment of peripheral nerve function. Population-based and clinical studies have been conducted to validate the sensitivity of these methods. When the diagnosis was based on clinical electrophysiological examination, abnormalities were observed in all patients. In this research, using a review design, we reviewed the issue of clinical electrophysiological examination of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in articles from 2008 to 2017. For this purpose, PubMed, Scopus and Embase databases of journals were used for searching articles. The researchers indicated that diabetes (both types) is a very disturbing health issue in the modern world and should be given serious attention. Based on conducted studies, it was demonstrated that there are different procedures for prevention and treatment of diabetes-related health problems such as diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). The first objective quantitative indication of the peripheral neuropathy is abnormality of sensory and motor nerve conduction tests. Electrophysiology is accurate, reliable and sensitive. It can be reproduced and also is a noninvasive approach in the assessment of peripheral nerve function. The methodological review has found that the best method for quantitative indication of the peripheral neuropathy compared with all other methods is clinical electrophysiological examination. For best results, standard protocols such as temperature control and equipment calibration are recommended. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Clinical Significance of the Presence of Autonomic and Vestibular Dysfunction in Diabetic Patients with Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Kyoung Kim

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe investigated the prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN and vestibular dysfunction (VD in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy.MethodsThirty-five diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy were enrolled from August 2008 to July 2009. All subjects underwent autonomic function tests. Nineteen of the patients (54.3% underwent videonystagmography.ResultsDiabetic autonomic neuropathy was observed in 28 patients (80%. A mild degree of autonomic failure was observed in 18 patients (64.3%, and a moderate degree of autonomic failure was observed in ten patients (35.7%. Factors related to DAN included diabetic nephropathy (P=0.032, degree of chronic kidney disease (P=0.003, and duration of diabetes (P=0.044. Vestibular dysfunction was observed in 11 of 19 patients (57.9%. There was no significant association between DAN and VD.ConclusionDiabetic autonomic neuropathy was observed in 28 diabetic patients (80% with peripheral neuropathy. Vestibular dysfunction was observed in nearly 60% of diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy who complained of dizziness but showed no significant association with DAN. Diabetic patients who complained of dizziness need to examine both autonomic function and vestibular function.

  8. Diabetic Driving Studies-Part 1: Brake Response Time in Diabetic Drivers With Lower Extremity Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyr, Andrew J; Spiess, Kerianne E

    Although the effect of lower extremity pathology and surgical intervention on automobile driving function has been a topic of contemporary interest, we are unaware of any analysis of the effect of lower extremity diabetic sensorimotor neuropathy on driving performance. The objective of the present case-control investigation was to assess the mean brake response time in diabetic drivers with lower extremity neuropathy compared with that of a control group and a brake response safety threshold. The driving performances of participants were evaluated using a computerized driving simulator with specific measurement of the mean brake response time and frequency of abnormally delayed brake responses. We analyzed a control group of 25 active drivers with neither diabetes nor lower extremity neuropathy and an experimental group of 25 active drivers with type 2 diabetes and lower extremity neuropathy. The experimental group demonstrated a 37.89% slower mean brake response time (0.757 ± 0.180 versus 0.549 ± 0.076 second; p time in the experimental group was slower than the reported safety brake response threshold of 0.70 second. The results of the present investigation provide original data with respect to abnormally delayed brake responses in diabetic patients with lower extremity neuropathy and might raise the potential for impaired driving function in this population. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Treatment of diabetic neuropathy in the lower limb

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is defined as 'the presence of symptoms and/or ... painful, paralytic and ataxic), type of fibres affected (motor, sensory, ... alcohol abuse and smoking. In fact, ... prevents or slows the progression of diabetic ...

  10. IMPACT OF GLYCEMIC CONTROL ON OXIDATIVE STRESS AND ANTIOXIDANT STATUS IN DIABETIC NEUROPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpashree

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Oxidative stress due to enhanced free - radical generation and/or a decrease in antioxidant defense mechanisms has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. This study was conducted to study the impact of glycemic control on oxidative stress and antioxidant balance in diab etic neuropathy. METHOD S : fifty patients with diabetic neuropathy and fifty age matched healthy controls were included in the study. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c was estimated to assess the severity of diabetes and the glycemic control. Serum malondiaal dehyde (MDA levels were assessed as a marker of lipid peroxidation and hence oxidative stress. Superoxide Dismutase (SOD levels were assessed for antioxidant status. RESULTS: Significant positive correlation was found between serum MDA levels and hba1c ( r = 0.276, p < 0.0001 in patients with diabetic neuropathy. There was statistically significant reduction in the Glutathione peroxidase levels. Further, SOD levels were inversely correlated with HbA1c (r= - 0.603, p<0.0001 levels. CONCLUSION AND SUMMARY: oxidative stress is greatly increased in patients suffering from diabetic neuropathy and is inversely related to glycemic control. This may be due to depressed antioxidant enzyme levels and may also be responsible for further depletion of antioxidant enzym e GPx. This worsens the oxidative stress and creates a vicious cycle of imbalance of free radical generation and deficit of antioxidant status in these patients which may lead to nervous system damage causing diabetic neuropathy. A good glycemic control is essential for prevention of diabetic neuropathy.

  11. Sympathetic Blocks Provided Sustained Pain Relief in a Patient with Refractory Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic nervous system has been implicated in pain associated with painful diabetic neuropathy. However, therapeutic intervention targeted at the sympathetic nervous system has not been established. We thus tested the hypothesis that sympathetic nerve blocks significantly reduce pain in a patient with painful diabetic neuropathy who has failed multiple pharmacological treatments. The diagnosis of small fiber sensory neuropathy was based on clinical presentations and confirmed by skin biopsies. A series of 9 lumbar sympathetic blocks over a 26-month period provided sustained pain relief in his legs. Additional thoracic paravertebral blocks further provided control of the pain in the trunk which can occasionally be seen in severe diabetic neuropathy cases, consequent to extensive involvement of the intercostal nerves. These blocks provided sustained and significant pain relief and improvement of quality of life over a period of more than two years. We thus provided the first clinical evidence supporting the notion that sympathetic nervous system plays a critical role in painful diabetic neuropathy and sympathetic blocks can be an effective management modality of painful diabetic neuropathy. We concluded that the sympathetic nervous system is a valuable therapeutic target of pharmacological and interventional modalities of treatments in painful diabetic neuropathy patients.

  12. Plasma osteoprotegerin concentrations in peripheral sensory neuropathy in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, M; Poulsen, M K; Grauslund, J

    2010-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) has been linked to different diabetes complications, including cardiovascular disease, and new findings have indicated a specific role in diabetic peripheral neuropathy, but the exact mechanism is unknown. To investigate a possible association between OPG and diabetic...... peripheral sensory neuropathy, we therefore analysed plasma OPG in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic patients with and without peripheral neuropathy....

  13. Comorbidity of psychiatric disorders and symmetric distal polyneuropathy among type II diabetic outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, R O; Papelbaum, M; Fontenelle, L F; Appolinario, J C; Ellinger, V C M; Coutinho, W F; Zagury, L

    2007-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to establish the frequency of psychiatric comorbidity in a sample of diabetic patients with symmetric distal polyneuropathy (SDPN). Sixty-five patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were selected consecutively to participate in the study at Instituto Estadual de Diabetes e Endocrinologia. All patients were submitted to a complete clinical and psychiatric evaluation, including the Portuguese version of the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Neuropathy Symptom Score, and Neuropathy Disability Score. SDPN was identified in 22 subjects (33.8%). Patients with and without SDPN did not differ significantly regarding sociodemographic characteristics. However, a trend toward a worse glycemic control was found in patients with SDPN in comparison to patients without SDPN (HbA1c = 8.43 +/- 1.97 vs 7.48 +/- 1.95; P = 0.08). Patients with SDPN exhibited axis I psychiatric disorders significantly more often than those without SDPN (especially anxiety disorders, in general (81.8 vs 60.0%; P = 0.01), and major depression--current episode, in particular (18.2 vs 7.7%; P = 0.04)). The severity of the depressive symptoms correlated positively with the severity of SDPN symptoms (r = 0.38; P = 0.006), but not with the severity of SDPN signs (r = 0.07; P = 0.56). In conclusion, the presence of SDPN seems to be associated with a trend toward glycemic control. The diagnosis of SDPN in diabetic subjects seems also to be associated with relevant psychiatric comorbidity, including anxiety and current mood disorders.

  14. Effects of fenofibrate in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated by diabetic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Nikolaevna Tkacheva

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is a severe complication of diabetes mellitus (DM that considerably worsens the patients quality of life and reduces life expectancy.The FIELD study for the first time demonstrated the ability of fenofibrate to prevent macro- and microvacular complications in patientswith DM2 regardless of glycated hemoglobin level and dyslipidemia at the early stage of the disease. Neuropathy being a manifestation of microangiopathy,it suggests the possibility to treat this disorder with fenofibrate.Aim. To study effects of fenofibrate in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated by diabetic neuropathy. Materials and methods. The present study included 73 patients with DM2 randomized into 2 groups to receive standard therapy (antihypertensiveand glucose control, statins or fenofibrate (Tricor 145 mg, Solvay Pharma in addition to the standard treatment. Results. Positive effect of fenofibrate on autonomous and peripheral neuropathy was apparent within 6 months after the onset of therapy when thesought parameters of AP, glycemia, and lipid spectrum were achieved. Fenofibrate improved cardiovascular function, reduced cardiac rhythm variability;QT length and dispersion, pain and paresthesia thereby enhancing quality of life and preventing cardiovascular catastrophes including death. Conclusion. It is concluded that supplementation of standard therapy of DM with fenofibrate is both safe and pathogenetically sound.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Neurography Visualizes Abnormalities in Sciatic and Tibial Nerves in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes and Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaeggemose, Michael; Pham, Mirko; Ringgaard, Steffen; Tankisi, Hatice; Ejskjaer, Niels; Heiland, Sabine; Poulsen, Per L; Andersen, Henning

    2017-07-01

    This study evaluates whether diffusion tensor imaging magnetic resonance neurography (DTI-MRN), T2 relaxation time, and proton spin density can detect and grade neuropathic abnormalities in patients with type 1 diabetes. Patients with type 1 diabetes ( n = 49) were included-11 with severe polyneuropathy (sDPN), 13 with mild polyneuropathy (mDPN), and 25 without polyneuropathy (nDPN)-along with 30 healthy control subjects (HCs). Clinical examinations, nerve conduction studies, and vibratory perception thresholds determined the presence and severity of DPN. DTI-MRN covered proximal (sciatic nerve) and distal (tibial nerve) nerve segments of the lower extremity. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were calculated, as were T2 relaxation time and proton spin density obtained from DTI-MRN. All magnetic resonance findings were related to the presence and severity of neuropathy. FA of the sciatic and tibial nerves was lowest in the sDPN group. Corresponding with this, proximal and distal ADCs were highest in patients with sDPN compared with patients with mDPN and nDPN, as well as the HCs. DTI-MRN correlated closely with the severity of neuropathy, demonstrating strong associations with sciatic and tibial nerve findings. Quantitative group differences in proton spin density were also significant, but less pronounced than those for DTI-MRN. In conclusion, DTI-MRN enables detection in peripheral nerves of abnormalities related to DPN, more so than proton spin density or T2 relaxation time. These abnormalities are likely to reflect pathology in sciatic and tibial nerve fibers. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  16. Metabolic and cardiovascular responses to epinephrine in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Richter, E; Madsbad, S

    1987-01-01

    with autonomic neuropathy (P less than 0.01) but was unchanged in the other groups. Since cardiac output increased to a similar extent in the three groups, the decrease in blood pressure was due to a significantly larger decrease (P less than 0.01) in total peripheral vascular resistance in the patients......Norepinephrine-induced vasoconstriction, which is mediated by alpha-adrenergic receptors, is accentuated in patients with autonomic neuropathy. In contrast, responses mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors, including vasodilatation and metabolic changes, have not been evaluated in these patients....... To study these responses, we administered epinephrine in a graded intravenous infusion (0.5 to 5 micrograms per minute) to seven diabetic patients without neuropathy, seven diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy, and seven normal subjects. Mean arterial pressure decreased significantly in the patients...

  17. Role of autogenic relaxation in management of diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in type II diabetes mellitus patients

    OpenAIRE

    Manish K. Verma; D. A. Biswas; Shambhavi Tripathi; N. S. Verma

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a very common complication of Type II diabetes mellitus patients. Early detection and treatment of CAN is necessary for reduction of mortality and morbidity in type II diabetes patients. Methods: The study included 120 diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus with autonomic neuropathy both male and female, with more than 5 years duration of disease. Age group of the study subjects was between 30 and ndash; 70 years. All the 120 diabet...

  18. The sensitivity of clinical diagnostic methods in the diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onde, M E; Ozge, A; Senol, M G; Togrol, E; Ozdag, F; Saracoglu, M; Misirli, H

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the sensitivity of various methods for the clinical diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. A total of 147 randomly selected patients with diabetes mellitus and 65 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were evaluated by various clinical (the neuropathy symptom score [NSS], the neuropathy disability score [NDS], vibration perception thresholds [VPTs], Tinel's sign and Phalen's sign), laboratory (fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated haemoglobin levels) and electro-physiological (nerve conduction studies, H-reflex and F-wave measurements) methods. In the patient group, 8.2% had an abnormal NSS, 28.5% had a positive Phalen's sign, 32.6% had a positive Tinel's sign, 42.8% had an abnormal VPT and 57.1% had an abnormal NDS. Significant correlations were found between electro-physiologically confirmed neuropathy and the two provocation tests and abnormal VPTs. In conclusion, assessment with a complete neurological examination and standard electrophysiological tests is very important for the diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and the prevention of morbidity in patients with or without symptoms.

  19. Uncovering sensory axonal dysfunction in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Ying Sung

    Full Text Available This study investigated sensory and motor nerve excitability properties to elucidate the development of diabetic neuropathy. A total of 109 type 2 diabetes patients were recruited, and 106 were analyzed. According to neuropathy severity, patients were categorized into G0, G1, and G2+3 groups using the total neuropathy score-reduced (TNSr. Patients in the G0 group were asymptomatic and had a TNSr score of 0. Sensory and motor nerve excitability data from diabetic patients were compared with data from 33 healthy controls. Clinical assessment, nerve conduction studies, and sensory and motor nerve excitability testing data were analyzed to determine axonal dysfunction in diabetic neuropathy. In the G0 group, sensory excitability testing revealed increased stimulus for the 50% sensory nerve action potential (P<0.05, shortened strength-duration time constant (P<0.01, increased superexcitability (P<0.01, decreased subexcitability (P<0.05, decreased accommodation to depolarizing current (P<0.01, and a trend of decreased accommodation to hyperpolarizing current in threshold electrotonus. All the changes progressed into G1 (TNSr 1-8 and G2+3 (TNSr 9-24 groups. In contrast, motor excitability only had significantly increased stimulus for the 50% compound motor nerve action potential (P<0.01 in the G0 group. This study revealed that the development of axonal dysfunction in sensory axons occurred prior to and in a different fashion from motor axons. Additionally, sensory nerve excitability tests can detect axonal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. These insights further our understanding of diabetic neuropathy and enable the early detection of sensory axonal abnormalities, which may provide a basis for neuroprotective therapeutic approaches.

  20. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is associated with macrovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleischer, Jesper; Yderstræde, Knud Bonnet; Gulichsen, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    peripheral neuropathy (P = .041). Among type 2 diabetes patients CAN was independently associated with high pulse pressure (P ...The objective was to identify the presence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in a cohort of individuals with diabetes in outpatient clinics from 4 different parts of Denmark and to explore the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes in relation to CAN. The DAN-Study is a Danish...... multicenter study focusing on diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Over a period of 12 months, 382 type 1 and 271 type 2 individuals with diabetes were tested for CAN. Patients were randomly recruited and tested during normal visits to outpatient clinics at 4 Danish hospitals. The presence of CAN was quantified...

  1. Pregnancy Associated Plasma Protein-A in Type 2 Diabetic Patient with Peripheral Neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosseir, N.M.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic changes induced by hyperglycemia lead to dysregulation of cytokines control, subclinical inflammation together with oxidative stress associated with diabetes. The aim of this study is to correlate the role of type 2 diabetic neuropathy on serum pregnancy associated plasma protein-A,interleukin-6 and c-reactive protein .The results denoted that both pregnancy associated plasma protein-A and interleukin-6 were significantly increased in those patients with diabetic neuropathy compared with those without neuropathy but while c-reactive proteins showed significant differences between the three groups, the results lead to the conclusion that PAPP-A,IL-6 are useful tests in monitoring the neuropathic complications associated with type 2 diabetes

  2. Blood pressure regulation in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1985-01-01

    Defective blood pressure responses to standing, exercise and epinephrine infusions have been demonstrated in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. The circulatory mechanisms underlying blood pressure responses to exercise and standing up in these patients are well characterized: In both...... which may contribute to exercise hypotension in these patients. During hypoglycemia, blood pressure regulation seems intact in patients with autonomic neuropathy. This is probably due to release of substantial amounts of catecholamines during these experiments. During epinephrine infusions a substantial...... blood pressure fall ensues in patients with autonomic neuropathy, probably due to excessive muscular vasodilation. It is unresolved why blood pressure regulation is intact during hypoglycemia and severely impaired--at similar catecholamine concentrations--during epinephrine infusions....

  3. Nephropathy and Neuropathy in Diabetic Patients with Chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Several reports described an association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Chronic HCV infection is prevalent in Egypt. The present work aimed to evaluate the prevalence of proteinuria and neuropathy among diabetic patients with and without chronic HCV ...

  4. Epalrestat, an aldose reductase inhibitor, in diabetic neuropathy: An Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of diabetic patients with diabetic neuropathy, in India, were treated with epalrestat, an aldose reductase inhibitor. In this study, more than 2000 patients with diabetic neuropathy, who were treated with epalrestat for 3-12 months, were analyzed to assess the efficacy and the adverse reactions of the drug. Method: We analyzed the subjective symptoms (spontaneous pain, numbness, coldness and hypoesthesia and the nerve function tests (motor nerve conduction velocity, sensory nerve conduction velocity and vibration threshold. Result: The improvement rate of the subjective symptoms was 75% (slightly improved or better and that of the nerve function tests 36%. Adverse drug reactions were encountered in 52 (2.5% of the 2190 patients, none of which was severe. Conclusion: Although data are limited, it is strongly suggested that epalrestat is a highly effective and safe agent for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

  5. High Prevalence and Incidence of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Children and Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Results From a Five-Year Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter-Höliner, Isabella; Barbarini, Daniela Seick; Lütschg, Jürg; Blassnig-Ezeh, Anya; Zanier, Ulrike; Saely, Christoph H; Simma, Burkhard

    2018-03-01

    In this prospective cohort study, we investigated the prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy at baseline and after five years of follow-up in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus using both measurements of nerve conduction velocity and clinical neurological examination. A total of 38 patients who underwent insulin pump or intensive insulin therapy were included. The subjects averaged 12.6 ± 2.4 years of age and their diabetes duration averaged 5.6 ± 3.2 years. All patients underwent a detailed physical, neurological, and electrophysiological examination, as well as laboratory testing at their annual checkup. At baseline, the prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy diagnosed using neurological examination was 13.2%, whereas nerve conduction velocity testing revealed diabetic peripheral neuropathy in 31.6%, highlighting a high prevalence of subclinical diabetic peripheral neuropathy. During follow-up, there was a strong increase in the prevalence of clinically diagnosed diabetic peripheral neuropathy, which reached 34.2% (P = 0.039) after five years; the proportion of patients with subclinical diabetic peripheral neuropathy even reached 63.2% (P = 0.002). The most significant changes in electrophysiological parameters were observed in the tibial sensory nerve (P = 0.001). The prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus was high, and there was a rapid increase in the prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy during a five-year follow-up interval. Importantly, our data show that a mere clinical evaluation is not sensitive enough to diagnose diabetic peripheral neuropathy in these patients. Nerve conduction velocity measurement, which is regarded as the gold standard for the assessment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, should be applied more broadly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy assessment through texture based analysis of corneal nerve images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Susana F.; Gouveia, Sofia; Gomes, Leonor; Negrão, Luís; João Quadrado, Maria; Domingues, José Paulo; Morgado, António Miguel

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one common complication of diabetes. Early diagnosis of DPN often fails due to the non-availability of a simple, reliable, non-invasive method. Several published studies show that corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) can identify small nerve fibre damage and quantify the severity of DPN, using nerve morphometric parameters. Here, we used image texture features, extracted from corneal sub-basal nerve plexus images, obtained in vivo by CCM, to identify DPN patients, using classification techniques. A SVM classifier using image texture features was used to identify (DPN vs. No DPN) DPN patients. The accuracies were 80.6%, when excluding diabetic patients without neuropathy, and 73.5%, when including diabetic patients without diabetic neuropathy jointly with healthy controls. The results suggest that texture analysis might be used as a complementing technique for DPN diagnosis, without requiring nerve segmentation in CCM images. The results also suggest that this technique has enough sensitivity to detect early disorders in the corneal nerves of diabetic patients.

  7. Distal technologies and type 1 diabetes management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Danny C; Barry, Samantha; Wagner, David V; Speight, Jane; Choudhary, Pratik; Harris, Michael A

    2018-02-01

    Type 1 diabetes requires intensive self-management to avoid acute and long-term health complications. In the past two decades, substantial advances in technology have enabled more effective and convenient self-management of type 1 diabetes. Although proximal technologies (eg, insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitors, closed-loop and artificial pancreas systems) have been the subject of frequent systematic and narrative reviews, distal technologies have received scant attention. Distal technologies refer to electronic systems designed to provide a service remotely and include heterogeneous systems such as telehealth, mobile health applications, game-based support, social platforms, and patient portals. In this Review, we summarise the empirical literature to provide current information about the effectiveness of available distal technologies to improve type 1 diabetes management. We also discuss privacy, ethics, and regulatory considerations, issues of global adoption, knowledge gaps in distal technology, and recommendations for future directions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Treatment of Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy in Older Adults with Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinberg, Nataliya; Salbu, Rebecca L; Goswami, Gayotri; Cohen, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    To review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, screening and diagnosis, and optimal treatment of diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) and its implications in older adults. A search of PubMed using the Mesh terms "diabetes," "type 1," "insulin-dependent," "T1DM," and "diabetic autonomic neuropathy" was performed to find relevant primary literature. Additional search terms "epidemiology," "geriatric," and "risk" were employed. All English-language articles from 2005 to 2015 appearing in these searches were reviewed for relevance. Related articles suggested in the PubMed search and clinical guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists were reviewed. These uncovered further resources for risk stratification, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of DAN. DAN is highly prevalent in the diabetes population and increases the risk of morbidity and mortality in older adults, yet, often goes undiagnosed and untreated. Treatment of DAN is complex in the older adult because of poor tolerability of many pharmacologic treatment options; therefore, great care must be taken when selecting therapy as to avoid unwanted adverse effects. With increasing life-expectancy of patients with diabetes mellitus, awareness of DAN and its implications to older adults is needed in primary care. Consistent screening and appropriate treatment of DAN in older adults with diabetes mellitus is essential in helping to maintain functional status and avoid adverse events.

  9. Altered joint moment strategy during stair walking in diabetes patients with and without peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven J; Handsaker, Joseph C; Maganaris, Constantinos N; Bowling, Frank L; Boulton, Andrew J M; Reeves, Neil D

    2016-05-01

    To investigate lower limb biomechanical strategy during stair walking in patients with diabetes and patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, a population known to exhibit lower limb muscular weakness. The peak lower limb joint moments of twenty-two patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy and thirty-nine patients with diabetes and no neuropathy were compared during ascent and descent of a staircase to thirty-two healthy controls. Fifty-nine of the ninety-four participants also performed assessment of their maximum isokinetic ankle and knee joint moment (muscle strength) to assess the level of peak joint moments during the stair task relative to their maximal joint moment-generating capabilities (operating strengths). Both patient groups ascended and descended stairs slower than controls (pperipheral neuropathy were lower (pperipheral neuropathy compared to controls, and lower at knee only in patients without neuropathy. Operating strengths were higher (pneuropathy during stair descent compared to the controls, but not during stair ascent. Patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy walk slower to alter gait strategy during stair walking and account for lower-limb muscular weakness, but still exhibit heightened operating strengths during stair descent, which may impact upon fatigue and the ability to recover a safe stance following postural instability. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Peripheral neuropathy in children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louraki, M; Karayianni, C; Kanaka-Gantenbein, C; Katsalouli, M; Karavanaki, K

    2012-10-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a major complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) with significant morbidity and mortality in adulthood. Clinical neuropathy is rarely seen in paediatric populations, whereas subclinical neuropathy is commonly seen, especially in adolescents. Peripheral DN involves impairment of the large and/or small nerve fibres, and can be diagnosed by various methods. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) are the gold-standard method for the detection of subclinical DN; however, it is invasive, difficult to perform and selectively detects large-fibre abnormalities. Vibration sensation thresholds (VSTs) and thermal discrimination thresholds (TDTs) are quicker and easier and, therefore, more suitable as screening tools. Poor glycaemic control is the most important risk factor for the development of DN. Maintaining near-normoglycaemia is the only way to prevent or reverse neural impairment, as the currently available treatments can only relieve the symptoms of DN. Early detection of children and adolescents with nervous system abnormalities is crucial to allow all appropriate measures to be taken to prevent the development of DN. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Neuropathy-specific alterations in a Mexican population of diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajal-Ramírez, Angélica; García-Macedo, Rebeca; Díaz-García, Carlos Manlio; Sanchez-Soto, Carmen; Padrón, Araceli Méndez; de la Peña, Jorge Escobedo; Cruz, Miguel; Hiriart, Marcia

    2017-08-25

    Neuropathy is one of the major complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Our first aim was to determine the clinical characteristics of a population of diabetic patients with different types of neuropathy. Our next goal was to characterize the cytokine profile (IL-6 and IL-10), nerve growth factor (NGF) and circulating cell-adhesion molecules in these patients. Finally, we aimed to compare the renal function among the groups of neuropathic patients. In a cross-sectional study, we included 217 diabetic patients classified in three groups: sensory polyneuropathy with hypoesthesia (DS h P) or hyperesthesia (DS H P), and motor neuropathy (DMN). Two control groups were included: one of 26 diabetic non-neuropathic patients (DNN), and the other of 375 non-diabetic (ND) healthy subjects. The participants were attending to the Mexican Institute of Social Security. The circulating levels of NGF were significantly lower in diabetic patients, compared to healthy subjects. The range of IL-6 and IL-10 levels in neuropathic patients was higher than the control groups; however, several samples yielded null measurements. Neuropathic patients also showed increased circulating levels of the adhesion molecules ICAM, VCAM, and E-Selectin, compared to the ND group. Moreover, neuropathic patients showed reduced glomerular filtration rates compared to healthy subjects (82-103 ml/min per 1.73 m 2 , data as range from 25th-75th percentiles), especially in the group with DMN (45-76 ml/min per 1.73 m 2 ). Some particular alterations in neuropathic patients included -but were not limited to- changes in circulating NGF, cell adhesion molecules, inflammation, and the worsening of the renal function. This study supports the need for further clinical surveillance and interventions considering a neuropathy-related basis.

  12. H-reflex amplitude depression as a marker of presynaptic inhibition in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy (PDN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Asmedi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Painful Diabetic Neuropathy (PDN is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM. Disruption in presynaptic inhibition in dorsal horn of the spinal cord has been proposed as one of the pathomechanism of PDN. Previous research showed that presynaptic inhibition can be detected by H-reflex examination. The aim of this study was to know whether the reduction of presynaptic inhibition in spinal dorsal horn of PDN patients really exist, and detectable by H-reflex examination. It was cohort prospective involving 141 (58 men, 83 women patients with DM and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT between the ages of 40 and 61 years from several health facilities in Yogyakarta. All patients underwent clinical, laboratory and electrodiagnostic examination. Demographic, clinical and electrodiagnostic data were collected and analyzed. By survival analysis there were 25 new cases of PDN (12.12% cumulative incidence. Using survival Kaplan Meier analysis, the significant hazard ratio for PDN were 12.81 for median motor nerve amplitude, 5.74 for median nerve distal latency, 3.71 for median sensory nerve amplitude, 6.33 for median sensory latency, 3.4 for tibial nerve amplitude, 3.48 for tibial nerve distal latency, 2.29 for sural nerve amplitude, 4.47 for sural nerve latency, 3.99 for H-reflex latency, 5.88 for H-reflex amplitude, and 17.83 for Diabetic Neuropathy (DN status. Using hazard proportional cox analysis, only H amplitude and DN status (DNS score were significantly correlated with PDN (p= 0.026; hazard ratio = 15.450; CI 95%= 1.39 – 171.62 for H amplitude and p= 0.030; hazard ratio = 10.766; CI 95%=1.26 – 92.09 for DN status. This study showed that depression of H-reflex amplitude was correlated with the occurrence of PDN. This result proves that there was presynaptic inhibition process in PDN that manifests as low H-reflex amplitude.

  13. Chinese herbal medicine for diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Yin; Li, Xinxue; Yang, Guoyan; Liu, Jian Ping

    2013-10-06

    Chinese herbal medicine is frequently used for treating diabetic peripheral neuropathy in China. Many controlled trials have been undertaken to investigate its efficacy.This is an update of a Cochrane review that was first published in the year 2011. To assess the beneficial effects and harms of Chinese herbal medicine for people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. On 14 May 2012, we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register CENTRAL (2012, Issue 4 in The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (January 1966 to May 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to May 2012), AMED (January 1985 to May 2012) and in October 2012, the Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM) (1979 to October 2012), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database (CNKI) (1979 to October 2012), and VIP Chinese Science and Technique Journals Database (1989 to October 2012). We searched for unpublished literature in the Chinese Conference Papers Database, and Chinese Dissertation Database (from inception to October 2012). There were no language or publication restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials of Chinese herbal medicine (with a minimum of four weeks treatment duration) for people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy compared with placebo, no intervention, or conventional interventions. Trials of herbal medicine plus a conventional drug versus the drug alone were also included. Two authors independently extracted data and evaluated trial quality. We contacted study authors for additional information. Forty-nine randomised trials involving 3639 participants were included. All trials were conducted and published in China. Thirty-eight different herbal medicines were tested in these trials, including four single herbs (extracts from a single herb), eight traditional Chinese patent medicines, and 26 self concocted Chinese herbal compound prescriptions. The trials reported on global symptom improvement (including improvement in numbness or pain) and changes in nerve conduction

  14. The effects of capillary dysfunction on oxygen and glucose extraction in diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Leif; Finnerup, Nanna B.; Terkelsen, Astrid J.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is associated with disturbances in endoneurial metabolism and microvascular morphology, but the roles of these factors in the aetiopathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy remain unclear. Changes in endoneurial capillary morphology and vascular reactivity apparently predate the dev...... inflammation and glucose clearance from blood. We discuss the implications of these predictions in relation to the prevention and management of diabetic complications in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and suggest ways of testing these hypotheses in experimental and clinical settings....

  15. Efficiencies of Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) and Gabapentin in the Management of Peripheral Neuropathy: Diabetic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Wahhab, Khaled G; Daoud, Eitedal M; El Gendy, Aliaa; Mourad, Hagar H; Mannaa, Fathia A; Saber, Maha M

    2018-03-12

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is the highly occurred complication of diabetes mellitus; it has been defined as an event of peripheral nerve dysfunction characterized by pain, allodynia, hyperalgesia, and paraesthesia. The current study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the management of neuropathy in diabetic rats. The used animals were divided into the following groups: negative control, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, and diabetic rats with peripheral neuropathy (DNP) and DNP treated with gabapentin or with LLLT. Behavioral tests were carried out through hotplate test for the determination of pain sensations and the Morris water maze test for spatial reference memory evaluation. Blood samples were collected at the end of treatment for biochemical determinations. In the current study, the latency of hind-paw lick decreased significantly when DNP are treated with gabapentin or LLLT. The Morris water maze test showed that LLLT treatment improved memory that deteriorated in DNP more than gabapentin do. The results of the biochemical study revealed that LLLT could not affect the level of beta-endorphin that decreased in DNP but significantly decreased S100B that rose in DNP. PGE2 and cytokines IL-1β, IL-10, and TNF-α showed significant increase in DNP compared with control group. The gabapentin administration or LLLT application significantly reversed the levels of the mentioned markers towards the normal values of the controls. Levels of serum MDA and nitric oxide increased significantly in the DNP but rGSH showed significant decrease. These markers were improved significantly when the DNP were treated with gabapentin or LLLT. The treatment with gabapentin or LLLT significantly decreased the raised level in total cholesterol in DNP but could not decrease the elevated level of triglycerides, while LDL cholesterol decreased significantly in DNP treated with gabapentin but not affected by LLLT. Values of serum alanine

  16. Alanyl-tRNA synthetase mutation in a family with dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z.; Hashiguchi, A.; Sakiyama, Y.; Okamoto, Y.; Tokunaga, S.; Zhu, L.; Shen, H.; Takashima, H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify a new genetic cause of distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN), which is also known as a variant of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), in a Chinese family. Methods: We investigated a Chinese family with dHMN clinically, electrophysiologically, and genetically. We screened for the mutations of 28 CMT or related pathogenic genes using an originally designed microarray resequencing DNA chip. Results: Investigation of the family history revealed an autosomal dominant transmission pattern. The clinical features of the family included mild weakness and wasting of the distal muscles of the lower limb and foot deformity, without clinical sensory involvement. Electrophysiologic studies revealed motor neuropathy. MRI of the lower limbs showed accentuated fatty infiltration of the gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis muscles. All 4 affected family members had a heterozygous missense mutation c.2677G>A (p.D893N) of alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS), which was not found in the 4 unaffected members and control subjects. Conclusion: An AARS mutation caused dHMN in a Chinese family. AARS mutations result in not only a CMT phenotype but also a dHMN phenotype. PMID:22573628

  17. Type 2 diabetes and cardiac autonomic neuropathy screening using dynamic pupillometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Alana G.; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio; Ticse, Ray; Hernandez, Arturo; Huaylinos, Yvonne; Pinto, Miguel E.; Málaga, Germán; Checkley, William; Gilman, Robert H.; Miranda, J. Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine if changes in pupillary response are useful as a screening tool for diabetes and to assess whether pupillometry is associated with cardiac autonomic neuropathy. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study with participants drawn from two settings: a hospital and a community site. At the community site, individuals with newly diagnosed diabetes as well as a random sample of control individuals without diabetes, confirmed by oral glucose tolerance test, were selected. Participants underwent an LED light stimulus test and eight pupillometry variables were measured. Outcomes were diabetes, defined by oral glucose tolerance test, and cardiac autonomic dysfunction, determined by a positive readout on two of four diagnostic tests: heart rate response to the Valsalva manoeuvre; orthostatic hypotension; 30:15 ratio; and expiration-to-inspiration ratio. The area under the curve, best threshold, sensitivity and specificity of each pupillometry variable was calculated. Results Data from 384 people, 213 with diabetes, were analysed. The mean (±SD) age of the people with diabetes was 58.6 (±8.2) years and in the control subjects it was 56.1 (±8.6) years. When comparing individuals with and without diabetes, the amplitude of the pupil reaction had the highest area under the curve [0.69 (sensitivity: 78%; specificity: 55%)]. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy was present in 51 of the 138 people evaluated (37.0%; 95% CI 28.8–45.1). To diagnose cardiac autonomic neuropathy, two pupillometry variables had the highest area under the curve: baseline pupil radius [area under the curve: 0.71 (sensitivity: 51%; specificity: 84%)], and amplitude of the pupil reaction [area under the curve: 070 (sensitivity: 82%; specificity: 55%)]. Conclusions Pupillometry is an inexpensive technique to screen for diabetes and cardiac autonomic neuropathy, but it does not have sufficient accuracy for clinical use as a screening tool. PMID:25761508

  18. Noradrenaline and isoproterenol kinetics in diabetic patients with and without autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Anders; Hilsted, J; Christensen, N J

    1986-01-01

    Noradrenaline and isoproterenol kinetics using intravenous infusion of L-3H-NA and of 3H-isoproterenol were investigated in eight Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients without neuropathy and in eight Type 1 diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy matched for age, sex and duration...... with autonomic failure (p less than 0.01). The disappearance of L-3H-noradrenaline from plasma after the infusion of L-3H-noradrenaline had been stopped was not different in patients with and without neuropathy. The metabolic clearance of isoproterenol was not influenced by the presence of autonomic failure...

  19. Diabetic neuropathy: structural analysis of nerve hydration by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffey, R.H.; Eaton, P.; Sibbitt, R.R.; Sibbitt, W.L. Jr.; Bicknell, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The water content of the sural nerve of diabetic patients was quantitatively defined by magnetic resonance proton imaging as a putative reflection of activity of the aldose-reductase pathway. Thirty-nine patients were evaluated, comparing group A, symptomatic diabetic men with sensory neuropathy; group B, similarly symptomatic diabetic men treated aldose-reductase inhibition; group C, neurologically asymptomatic diabetic men; and group D, control nondiabetic men. Marked increase in hydration of the sural nerve was seen in more than half of the symptomatic diabetic patients. Two of 11 neurologically asymptomatic diabetics had increased nerve hydration, suggesting a presymptomatic alteration of the nerve. Symptomatic diabetics treated with aldose-reductase inhibitors had normal nerve water levels. Increased level of peripheral nerve water represents a new finding in diabetes mellitus. It seems to be related to aldose-reductase activity, involved in the development of neuropathy, and similar to events that occur in other target tissue in human diabetes

  20. Corneal Confocal Microscopy – A Novel, Noninvasive Method to Assess Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inceu Georgeta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. This article aims to compare corneal confocal microscopy (CCM with acknowledged tests of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN, to assess corneal nerve morphology using CCM in diabetic patients, and to underline possible correlations between clinical and biological parameters, diabetes duration and DPN severity. Material and methods. A total of 90 patients with type 2 diabetes were included in the study for whom we measured anthropometric parameters and we performed laboratory measurements (tests. The patients were assessed for diabetic peripheral neuropathy using Semmes-Weinstein Monofilament Testing (SWMT, Rapid-Current Perception Threshold (R-CPT measurements using the Neurometer®, and CCM. We stratified the patients according to DPN severity, based on four parameters extracted after image analysis. Results. A higher percentage of patients were diagnosed with DPN using CCM (88.8%, compared with SWMT and R-CPT measurement (17.8% and 40% respectively. The incidence of DPN detected with CCM was considerable in patients with normal protective sensation and with normal R-CPT values. Conclusions. Our study showed that corneal confocal microscopy is a useful noninvasive method for diabetic neuropathy assessement in early stages. It was proven to directly quantify small fiber pathology, and to stratify neuropathic severity, and therefore can be used as a new, reliable tool in the diagnosis, clinical evaluation, and follow-up of peripheral diabetic neuropathy.

  1. Effect of atorvastatin on hyperglycemia-induced brain oxidative stress and neuropathy induced by diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaran Faghihi

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: The findings of the present study reveal that atorvastatin is able to prevent hyperglycemia-induced diabetic neuropathy and inhibit brain oxidative stress during diabetes. It is probable that reduction of urea is one of the reasons for atorvastatin prevention of hyperglycemia-induced neuropathy.

  2. Treatment of diabetic neuropathy in the lower limb: Signs and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is defined as 'the presence of symptoms and/or signs of peripheral nerve dysfunction in people with diabetes after exclusion of other causes: the diagnosis cannot be made without a clinical examination'. In fact, many of these symptoms and signs may precede the onset of diabetes.

  3. Biofeedback for foot offloading in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataky, Z; de León Rodriguez, D; Allet, L; Golay, A; Assal, M; Assal, J-P; Hauert, C-A

    2010-01-01

    The reduction of high plantar pressure in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy is mandatory for prevention of foot ulcers and amputations. We used a new biofeedback-based method to reduce the plantar pressure at an at-risk area of foot in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. Thirteen diabetic patients (age 60.8 +/- 12.3 years, body mass index 29.0 +/- 5.0 kg/m(2)) with peripheral neuropathy of the lower limbs were studied. Patients with memory impairment were excluded. The portable in-shoe foot pressure measurement system (PEDAR) was used for foot offloading training by biofeedback. The learning procedure consisted in sequences of walking (10 steps), each followed by a subjective estimation of performance and objective feedback. The goal was to achieve three consecutive walking cycles of 10 steps, with a minimum of seven steps inside the range of 40-80% of the baseline peak plantar pressure. The peak plantar pressure was assessed during the learning period and at retention tests. A significant difference in peak plantar pressure was recorded between the beginning and the end of the learning period (when the target for plantar pressure was achieved) (262 +/- 70 vs. 191 +/- 53 kPa; P = 0.002). The statistically significant difference between the beginning of learning and all retention tests persisted, even at the 10-day follow-up. Terminal augmented feedback training may positively affect motor learning in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy and could possibly lead to suitable foot offloading. Additional research is needed to confirm the maintenance of offloading in the long term.

  4. Protective effects of methanolic extract of Juglans regia L. leaf on streptozotocin-induced diabetic peripheral neuropathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiry, Davood; Khalatbary, Ali Reza; Ahmadvand, Hassan; Talebpour Amiri, Fereshteh; Akbari, Esmaeil

    2017-10-02

    Oxidative stress has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis and development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), the most common and debilitating complications of diabetes mellitus. There is accumulating evidence that Juglans regia L. (GRL) leaf extract, a rich source of phenolic components, has hypoglycemic and antioxidative properties. This study aimed to determine the protective effects of Juglans regia L. leaf extract against streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathy in rat. The DPN rat model was generated by intraperitoneal injection of a single 55 mg/kg dose of streptozotocin (STZ). A subset of the STZ-induced diabetic rats intragastically administered with GRL leaf extract (200 mg/kg/day) before or after the onset of neuropathy, whereas other diabetic rats received only isotonic saline as the same volume of GRL leaf extract. To evaluate the effects of GRL leaf extract on the diabetic neuropathy various parameters, including histopathology and immunohistochemistry of apoptotic and inflammatory factors were assessed along with nociceptive and biochemical assessments. Degeneration of the sciatic nerves which was detected in the STZ-diabetic rats attenuated after GRL leaf extract administration. Greater caspase-3, COX-2, and iNOS expression could be detected in the STZ-diabetic rats, which were significantly attenuated after GRL leaf extract administration. Also, attenuation of lipid peroxidation and nociceptive response along with improved antioxidant status in the sciatic nerve of diabetic rats were detected after GRL leaf extract administration. In other word, GRL leaf extract ameliorated the behavioral and structural indices of diabetic neuropathy even after the onset of neuropathy, in addition to blood sugar reduction. Our results suggest that GRL leaf extract exert preventive and curative effects against STZ-induced diabetic neuropathy in rats which might be due to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic properties. Protection against

  5. Inspection methods progression of diabetic optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Sun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing incidence of diabetes, diet restructuring with excessive intake of high-calorie foods closely related with this. Currently diabetes prevalence rate increased from 7% in 2003 to 14% in 2010. Diabetes can cause a variety of eye diseases, such as corneal ulcers, glaucoma, vitreous hemorrhage and so on. Diabetic retinopathy and cataract are the most common and greater impact on patients. At present, study for diabetic retinopathy(DRis wider than diabetes optic neuropathy(DON. Clinical manifestations of DON are not specific, but DON occurred extensively, also contributed to an important cause of blindness.In this paper, we collected a variety of inspection and early diagnosis methods, try to achieve early detection, interventional therapy and good treatment for this disease. Here to make a presentation on the various types of inspection methods.

  6. Peripheral Neuropathy and Tear Film Dysfunction in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuti L. Misra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare tear film metrics in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM and healthy controls and investigate the association between peripheral neuropathy and ocular surface quality. Methods. Dry eye symptoms were quantified in 53 patients with type 1 DM and 40 age-matched controls. Ocular examination included tear film lipid layer thickness grading, tear film stability and quantity measurement, and retinal photography. DM individuals additionally underwent a detailed neuropathy assessment. Results. Neither mean age nor dry eye symptom scores differed significantly between the DM and control groups (P=0.12 and P=0.33, resp.. Tear lipid thickness (P=0.02, stability (P<0.0001, and quantity (P=0.01 were significantly lower in the DM group. Corneal sensitivity was also reduced in the DM group (P<0.001 and tear film stability was inversely associated with total neuropathy score (r=-0.29, P=0.03. Conclusion. The DM group exhibited significantly reduced tear film stability, secretion, and lipid layer quality relative to the age-matched control group. The negative correlation between tear film parameters and total neuropathy score suggests that ocular surface abnormalities occur in parallel with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  7. Diabetic Driving Studies-Part 2: A Comparison of Brake Response Time Between Drivers With Diabetes With and Without Lower Extremity Sensorimotor Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiess, Kerianne E; Sansosti, Laura E; Meyr, Andrew J

    We have previously demonstrated an abnormally delayed mean brake response time and an increased frequency of abnormally delayed brake responses in a group of neuropathic drivers with diabetes compared with a control group of drivers with neither diabetes nor lower extremity neuropathy. The objective of the present case-control study was to compare the mean brake response time between 2 groups of drivers with diabetes with and without lower extremity sensorimotor neuropathy. The braking performances of the participants were evaluated using a computerized driving simulator with specific measurement of the mean brake response time and the frequency of the abnormally delayed brake responses. We compared a control group of 25 active drivers with type 2 diabetes without lower extremity neuropathy and an experimental group of 25 active drivers with type 2 diabetes and lower extremity neuropathy from an urban U.S. podiatric medical clinic. The experimental group demonstrated an 11.49% slower mean brake response time (0.757 ± 0.180 versus 0.679 ± 0.120 second; p time slower than a suggested safety threshold of 0.70 second, and diabetic drivers without neuropathy demonstrated a mean brake response time faster than this threshold. The results of the present investigation provide evidence that the specific onset of lower extremity sensorimotor neuropathy associated with diabetes appears to impart a negative effect on automobile brake responses. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Serum levels of TGF-β1 in patients of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and its correlation with nerve conduction velocity in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Gauhar; Rizvi, S Aijaz Abbas; Singhal, Sangeeta; Zubair, Mohammad; Ahmad, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    To correlate serum levels of TGF-β1 with motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities in patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus The study was conducted in diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients which were divided in patients with clinically detectable peripheral neuropathy of shorter duration (n=37) and longer duration (n=27). They were compared with patients without clinical neuropathy (n=22). Clinical diagnosis was based on neuropathy symptom score (NSS) and Neuropathy disability score (NDS) for signs. Blood samples were collected for baseline investigations and estimation of serum TGF-β1. Nerve conduction velocity was measured in both upper and lower limbs. Median, Ulnar, Common Peroneal and Posterior Tibial nerves were selected for motor nerve conduction study and Median and Sural nerves were selected for sensory nerve conduction study In patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus with clinically detectable and serum TGF-β1 showed positive correlation with nerve conduction velocities High level of TGF-β1 in serum of T2DM patients with neuropathy show possible contribution in development of neuropathy. Due to its independent association this cytokine might be used as biomarker for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Copyright © 2015 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dongye; Zhang, Xiang; Lu, Liejing; Li, Haojiang; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Yueyao; Shen, Jun [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2014-09-10

    To determine the role of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and quantitative T2 value measurements in the assessment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Sequential MR imaging, T2 measurement, and quantitative sensory testing of sciatic nerves were performed in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (n = 6) and normal control rats (n = 6) over a 7-week follow-up period. Histological assessment was obtained from 48 diabetic rats and 48 control rats once weekly for 7 weeks (n = 6 for each group at each time point). Nerve signal abnormalities were observed, and the T2 values, mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT), and histological changes were measured and compared between diabetic and control animals. Sciatic nerves in the diabetic rats showed a gradual increase in T2 values beginning at 2 weeks after the induction (P = 0.014), while a decrease in MWT started at 3 weeks after the induction (P = 0.001). Nerve T2 values had a similar time course to sensory functional deficit in diabetic rats. Histologically, sciatic nerves of diabetic rats demonstrated obvious endoneural oedema from 2 to 3 weeks after the induction, followed by progressive axonal degeneration, Schwann cell proliferation, and coexistent disarranged nerve regeneration. Nerve T2 measurement is potentially useful in detecting and monitoring diabetic neuropathy. (orig.)

  10. Assessment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dongye; Zhang, Xiang; Lu, Liejing; Li, Haojiang; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Yueyao; Shen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    To determine the role of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and quantitative T2 value measurements in the assessment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Sequential MR imaging, T2 measurement, and quantitative sensory testing of sciatic nerves were performed in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (n = 6) and normal control rats (n = 6) over a 7-week follow-up period. Histological assessment was obtained from 48 diabetic rats and 48 control rats once weekly for 7 weeks (n = 6 for each group at each time point). Nerve signal abnormalities were observed, and the T2 values, mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT), and histological changes were measured and compared between diabetic and control animals. Sciatic nerves in the diabetic rats showed a gradual increase in T2 values beginning at 2 weeks after the induction (P = 0.014), while a decrease in MWT started at 3 weeks after the induction (P = 0.001). Nerve T2 values had a similar time course to sensory functional deficit in diabetic rats. Histologically, sciatic nerves of diabetic rats demonstrated obvious endoneural oedema from 2 to 3 weeks after the induction, followed by progressive axonal degeneration, Schwann cell proliferation, and coexistent disarranged nerve regeneration. Nerve T2 measurement is potentially useful in detecting and monitoring diabetic neuropathy. (orig.)

  11. Sildenafil ameliorates long term peripheral neuropathy in type II diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    Full Text Available Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of long-standing diabetes mellitus. To mimic clinical trials in which patients with diabetes enrolled have advanced peripheral neuropathy, we investigated the effect of sildenafil, a specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase type 5 enzyme, on long term peripheral neuropathy in middle aged male mice with type II diabetes. Treatment of diabetic mice (BKS.Cg-m+/+Leprdb/J, db/db at age 36 weeks with sildenafil significantly increased functional blood vessels and regional blood flow in the sciatic nerve, concurrently with augmentation of intra-epidermal nerve fiber density in the skin and myelinated axons in the sciatic nerve. Functional analysis showed that the sildenafil treatment considerably improved motor and sensory conduction velocities in the sciatic nerve and peripheral thermal stimulus sensitivity compared with the saline treatment. In vitro studies showed that mouse dermal endothelial cells (MDE cultured under high glucose levels exhibited significant down regulation of angiopoietin 1 (Ang1 expression and reduction of capillary-like tube formation, which were completely reversed by sildenafil. In addition, incubation of dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons with conditioned medium harvested from MDE under high glucose levels suppressed neurite outgrowth, where as conditional medium harvested from MDE treated with sildenafil under high glucose levels did not inhibit neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons. Moreover, blockage of the Ang1 receptor, Tie2, with a neutralized antibody against Tie2 abolished the beneficial effect of sildenafil on tube formation and neurite outgrowth. Collectively, our data indicate that sildenafil has a therapeutic effect on long term peripheral neuropathy of middle aged diabetic mice and that improvement of neurovascular dysfunction by sildenafil likely contributes to the amelioration of nerve function. The Ang1/Tie2 signaling pathway may play an important role in these

  12. Vasculitic Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, Elie; Dyck, P James Bonham

    2015-10-01

    From pathological standpoint, we divide vasculitic neuropathies in two categories: nerve large arteriole vasculitides and nerve microvasculitis. It is also important to determine whether a large arteriole vasculitis has an infectious etiology as it entails different treatment approach. Treatment of non-infectious large arteriole vasculitides consists initially of induction therapy with corticosteroids. Adding an immunosuppressant, mainly cyclophosphamide, is often needed. Treatment of infectious large arteriole vasculitides needs a multidisciplinary approach to target both the underlying infection and the vasculitis. Corticosteroids are the first-line therapy for classic non-systemic vasculitic neuropathy. Stable or improving patients without biopsy evidence of active vasculitis can be either observed or treated. Currently, adding an immunosuppressant is only indicated for patients who continue to progress on corticosteroids alone or patients with a rapidly progressive course. The treatment of the radiculoplexus neuropathies such as diabetic lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy, lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy (in non-diabetic patients), and diabetic cervical radiculoplexus neuropathy, as well as painless diabetic motor neuropathy, is not well established yet. We treat patients, if they present early on in the disease course or if they have severe disabling symptoms, with IV methylprednisolone 1 g once a week for 12 weeks.

  13. Computer aided diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekh, Viktor; Soliz, Peter; McGrew, Elizabeth; Barriga, Simon; Burge, Mark; Luan, Shuang

    2014-03-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) refers to the nerve damage that can occur in diabetes patients. It most often affects the extremities, such as the feet, and can lead to peripheral vascular disease, deformity, infection, ulceration, and even amputation. The key to managing diabetic foot is prevention and early detection. Unfortunately, current existing diagnostic techniques are mostly based on patient sensations and exhibit significant inter- and intra-observer differences. We have developed a computer aided diagnostic (CAD) system for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The thermal response of the feet of diabetic patients following cold stimulus is captured using an infrared camera. The plantar foot in the images from a thermal video are segmented and registered for tracking points or specific regions. The temperature recovery of each point on the plantar foot is extracted using our bio-thermal model and analyzed. The regions that exhibit abnormal ability to recover are automatically identified to aid the physicians to recognize problematic areas. The key to our CAD system is the segmentation of infrared video. The main challenges for segmenting infrared video compared to normal digital video are (1) as the foot warms up, it also warms up the surrounding, creating an ever changing contrast; and (2) there may be significant motion during imaging. To overcome this, a hybrid segmentation algorithm was developed based on a number of techniques such as continuous max-flow, model based segmentation, shape preservation, convex hull, and temperature normalization. Verifications of the automatic segmentation and registration using manual segmentation and markers show good agreement.

  14. Protective effect of oryzanol isolated from crude rice bran oil in experimental model of diabetic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsuvra B. Ghatak

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have implicated the involvement of poor glycemic control and oxidative/nitrosative stress in the development of diabetic neuropathic pain, an important microvascular complication affecting more than 50% of diabetic patients. However, lack of understanding of the underlying etiology, development of tolerance, inadequate relief and possible toxicity associated with classical analgesics warrant the investigation of the novel agents. Therefore, the present study was carried out to investigate the effect of oryzanol (OZ, a commercially-important potent antioxidant component isolated from from crude rice bran oil (cRBO, in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic neuropathy in rats. After eight weeks, diabetic rats developed neuropathy which was evident from decreased tail-flick latency (thermal hyperalgesia and increased nociceptive behavior during the formalin test. This was accompanied by decreased motor coordination based on the evaluation of neuromuscular strength. Na+ K+ ATPase, a biochemical marker associated with the development of diabetic neuropathy, was significantly inhibited in the sciatic nerve of diabetic animals. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation levels were significantly elevated in diabetic rats, indicating the involvement of oxidative stress in diabetic neuropathy. Chronic treatment with oryzanol (OZ (50 and 100 mg/kg per oral (p.o. and standard drug glibenclamide (Gl (10 mg/kg, p.o. significantly attenuated the behavioral as well as biochemical changes associated with diabetic neuropathy. The findings provide experimental evidence to the protective effects of OZ on hyperglycemia-induced thermal hyperalgesia and oxidative stress which might be responsible for diabetes induced nerve damage.

  15. Duloxetine for the treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy in Venezuela: economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, Fernando; Espejel, Luis; Novick, Diego; López, Rubén; Flores, Daniel

    2015-09-25

    Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy affects 40-50% of patients with diabetic neuropathy, leading to impaired quality of life and substantial costs. Duloxetine and pregabalin have evidence-based support, and are formally approved for controlling painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. We used a 12-week decision model for examining painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy first-line therapy with daily doses of duloxetine 60mg or pregabalin 300mg, under the perspective of the Instituto Venezolano de los Seguros Sociales. We gathered model parameters from published literature and expert´s opinion, focusing on the magnitude of pain relief, the presence of adverse events, the possibility of withdrawal owing to intolerable adverse events or due to lack of efficacy, and the quality-adjusted life years expected in each strategy. We analyzed direct medical costs (which are expressed in Bolívares Fuertes, BsF) comprising drug acquisition besides additional care devoted to treatment of adverse events and poor pain relief. We conducted both deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Total expected costs per 1000 patients were BsF 1 046 146 (26%) lower with duloxetine than with pregabalin. Most of these savings (91%) corresponds to the difference in the acquisition’s cost of each medication. duloxetine also provided 23 more patients achieving good pain relief and a gain of about two quality-adjusted life years per 1000 treated. Model was robust to plausible changes in main parameters. Duloxetine remained the preferred option in 93.9% of the second-order Monte Carlo simulations. This study suggests duloxetine dominates (i.e., is more effective and lead to gains in quality-adjusted life years), remaining less costly than pregabalin for treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  16. The Diabetes Telephone Study: Design and challenges of a pragmatic cluster randomized trial to improve diabetic peripheral neuropathy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Alyce S; Bayliss, Elizabeth A; Schmittdiel, Julie A; Altschuler, Andrea; Dyer, Wendy; Neugebauer, Romain; Jaffe, Marc; Young, Joseph D; Kim, Eileen; Grant, Richard W

    2016-06-01

    Challenges to effective pharmacologic management of symptomatic diabetic peripheral neuropathy include the limited effectiveness of available medicines, frequent side effects, and the need for ongoing symptom assessment and treatment titration for maximal effectiveness. We present here the rationale and implementation challenges of the Diabetes Telephone Study, a randomized trial designed to improve medication treatment, titration, and quality of life among patients with symptomatic diabetic peripheral neuropathy. We implemented a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of an automated interactive voice response tool designed to provide physicians with real-time patient-reported data about responses to newly prescribed diabetic peripheral neuropathy medicines. A total of 1834 primary care physicians treating patients in the diabetes registry at Kaiser Permanente Northern California were randomized into the intervention or control arm. In September 2014, we began identification and recruitment of patients assigned to physicians in the intervention group who receive three brief interactive calls every 2 months after a medication is prescribed to alleviate diabetic peripheral neuropathy symptoms. These calls provide patients with the opportunity to report on symptoms, side effects, self-titration of medication dose and overall satisfaction with treatment. We plan to compare changes in self-reported quality of life between the intervention group and patients in the control group who receive three non-interactive automated educational phone calls. Successful implementation of this clinical trial required robust stakeholder engagement to help tailor the intervention and to address pragmatic concerns such as provider time constraints. As of 27 October 2015, we had screened 2078 patients, 1447 of whom were eligible for participation. We consented and enrolled 1206 or 83% of those eligible. Among those enrolled, 53% are women and the mean age

  17. Screening for diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy using a new handheld device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulichsen, Elisabeth; Fleischer, Jesper; Ejskjaer, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a serious complication of longstanding diabetes and is associated with an increased morbidity and reduced quality of life in patients with diabetes. The present study evaluated the prevalence of CAN diagnosed by reduced heart rate variability (HRV) using a ne...

  18. In Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rats, Subclinical Diabetic Neuropathy Increases In Vivo Lidocaine Block Duration But Not In Vitro Neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lirk, Philipp; Flatz, Magdalena; Haller, Ingrid; Hausott, Barbara; Blumenthal, Stephan; Stevens, Markus F.; Suzuki, Suzuko; Klimaschewski, Lars; Gerner, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Application of local anesthetics may lead to nerve damage. Increasing evidence suggests that risk of neurotoxicity is higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. In addition, block duration may be prolonged in neuropathy. We sought to investigate neurotoxicity

  19. The ECG vertigo in diabetes and cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgari, Christina; Tentolouris, Nicholas; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2011-01-01

    The importance of diabetes in the epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases cannot be overemphasized. About one third of acute myocardial infarction patients have diabetes, and its prevalence is steadily increasing. The decrease in cardiac mortality in people with diabetes is lagging behind that of the general population. Cardiovascular disease is a broad term which includes any condition causing pathological changes in blood vessels, cardiac muscle or valves, and cardiac rhythm. The ECG offers a quick, noninvasive clinical and research screen for the early detection of cardiovascular disease in diabetes. In this paper, the clinical and research value of the ECG is readdressed in diabetes and in the presence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

  20. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with uraemia is not related to pre-diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eming, Marie Bayer; Hornum, Mads; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo Friis

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: It has been proposed that pre-diabetes may cause neuropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in uraemic patients was related to the presence of pre-diabetes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included 66 non-diabetic uraemic patients...... enrolled. Beat-to-beat variability was determined from the echocardiographic (ECG) recording during deep inspiration and expiration. CAN was defined as a beat-to-beat value below 10 beats/min. Pre-diabetes was defined as presence of impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance measured...... by oral glucose tolerance test (WHO/American Diabetes Association criteria 2007). RESULTS: The prevalence of CAN was 38% in uraemic patients compared with 8% in the controls (p prediabetic, while the remaining 39 had a normal glucose...

  1. Neutrophils Infiltrate the Spinal Cord Parenchyma of Rats with Experimental Diabetic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L. Newton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal glial cell activation and cytokine secretion have been implicated in the etiology of neuropathic pain in a number of experimental models, including diabetic neuropathy. In this study, streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic rats were either untreated or treated with gabapentin (50 mg/kg/day by gavage for 2 weeks, from 6 weeks after STZ. At 8 weeks after STZ, hypersensitivity was confirmed in the untreated diabetic rats as a reduced response threshold to touch, whilst mechanical thresholds in gabapentin-treated diabetic rats were no different from controls. Diabetes-associated thermal hypersensitivity was also ameliorated by gabapentin. We performed a cytokine profiling array in lumbar spinal cord samples from control and diabetic rats. This revealed an increase in L-selectin, an adhesion molecule important for neutrophil transmigration, in the spinal cord of diabetic rats but not diabetic rats treated with gabapentin. Furthermore, we found an increase in the number of neutrophils present in the parenchyma of the spinal cord, which was again ameliorated in gabapentin-treated diabetic rats. Therefore, we suggest that dysregulated spinal L-selectin and neutrophil infiltration into the spinal cord could contribute to the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy.

  2. [Does autonomic diabetic neuropathy influence microcirculation reactivity in adolescents with diabetes type 1?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Mirosława; Peczyńska, Jadwiga; Kowalewski, Marek; Głowińska-Olszewska, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Microcirculation is known to be disturbed in many organs of diabetic patients. Retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy might be considered as the cause of the functional and morphological changes at the level of microcirculation. The aim of the study was to assess by means of dynamic capillaroscopy the influence of autonomic diabetic nephropathy (CAN) in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus on capillary blood flow (CBV) in skin microcirculation. The study group consisted of 18 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (mean age 15+/-2 years). In 9 of them the diagnosis of CAN was made on the basis of Ewing tests. The control group consisted of 10 healthy persons aged 15+/-1.5 years. CBV was measured in capillars of the nailfold of the fourth finger during rest and after 2 minutes of arterial occlusion (the occlusion pressure - above 20 mmHg systolic blood pressure - was obtained by the occlusion of brachial artery using sphygnomanometer cuff). The resting CBV did not differ between patients with CAN, without CAN and healthy controls (0.39+/-0.06, 0.41+0.05 i 0.42+/-0.07). The values of the peak CBV significantly differ between the examined groups (CAN: 0.75+0.1; without CAN: 0.86+/-0.11; control group: 0.98+/-0.09, p<0.01). The obtained results indicate that the presence of the autonomic diabetic neuropathy significantly influences the regulatory function of microcirculation, which may predispose to occurrence of different late diabetic complications.

  3. Verrucous lesions arising in lymphedema and diabetic neuropathy: Elephantiasis nostras verrucosa or verrucous skin lesions on the feet of patients with diabetic neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Eri; Asai, Jun; Okuzawa, Yasutaro; Hanada, Keiji; Nomiyama, Tomoko; Takenaka, Hideya; Katoh, Norito

    2016-03-01

    Verrucous skin lesions on the feet in diabetic neuropathy (VSLDN) develop in areas with sensory loss in diabetic patients. Although various types of chronic stimulation, such as pressure or friction, are considered an important factor in the development of such lesions, the precise pathogenesis of VSLDN remains obscure, and there is currently no established treatment for this disease. Here, we present a case of VSLDN on the dorsum of the right foot. However, because lymphedema was also observed at the same site, this lesion could also be diagnosed as elephantiasis nostras verrucosa arising in diabetic neuropathy. The lesion was successfully treated with a combination of elastic stocking and mixed killed bacterial suspension and hydrocortisone ointment, which suggested that VSLDN might have been exacerbated by the pre-existing lymphedema. Because various types of chronic stimulation can trigger VSLDN, treatment plans should be devised on a case-by-case basis. Therefore, it is important to investigate the presence of factors that can induce or exacerbate chronic inflammatory stimulation, such as lymphedema in our case, in each patient with VSLDN. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  4. Medial arterial calcification, calcific aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification in a diabetic patient with severe autonomic neuropathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Medial arterial calcification (Monckeberg\\'s arteriosclerosis) is well described in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. There is also a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus among subjects with calcific aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification. We describe a diabetic patient with autonomic neuropathy and extensive medial arterial calcification who also had calcification of the aortic valve and of the mitral valve annulus. We propose that autonomic neuropathy may play a role in calcification of these structures at the base of the heart.

  5. NRP-1 Receptor Expression Mismatch in Skin of Subjects with Experimental and Diabetic Small Fiber Neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Van Acker

    Full Text Available The in vivo cutaneous nerve regeneration model using capsaicin is applied extensively to study the regenerative mechanisms and therapeutic efficacy of disease modifying molecules for small fiber neuropathy (SFN. Since mismatches between functional and morphological nerve fiber recovery are described for this model, we aimed at determining the capability of the capsaicin model to truly mimic the morphological manifestations of SFN in diabetes. As nerve and blood vessel growth and regenerative capacities are defective in diabetes, we focused on studying the key regulator of these processes, the neuropilin-1 (NRP-1/semaphorin pathway. This led us to the evaluation of NRP-1 receptor expression in epidermis and dermis of subjects presenting experimentally induced small fiber neuropathy, diabetic polyneuropathy and of diabetic subjects without clinical signs of small fiber neuropathy. The NRP-1 receptor was co-stained with CD31 vessel-marker using immunofluorescence and analyzed with Definiens® technology. This study indicates that capsaicin application results in significant loss of epidermal NRP-1 receptor expression, whereas diabetic subjects presenting small fiber neuropathy show full epidermal NRP-1 expression in contrast to the basal expression pattern seen in healthy controls. Capsaicin induced a decrease in dermal non-vascular NRP-1 receptor expression which did not appear in diabetic polyneuropathy. We can conclude that the capsaicin model does not mimic diabetic neuropathy related changes for cutaneous NRP-1 receptor expression. In addition, our data suggest that NRP-1 might play an important role in epidermal nerve fiber loss and/or defective regeneration and that NRP-1 receptor could change the epidermal environment to a nerve fiber repellant bed possibly through Sem3A in diabetes.

  6. Peripheral Glial Cells in the Development of Diabetic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Nádia Pereira; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard; Pallesen, Lone Tjener

    2018-01-01

    The global prevalence of diabetes is rapidly increasing, affecting more than half a billion individuals within the next few years. As diabetes negatively affects several physiological systems, this dramatic increase represents not only impaired quality of life on the individual level but also a huge socioeconomic challenge. One of the physiological consequences affecting up to half of diabetic patients is the progressive deterioration of the peripheral nervous system, resulting in spontaneous pain and eventually loss of sensory function, motor weakness, and organ dysfunctions. Despite intense research on the consequences of hyperglycemia on nerve functions, the biological mechanisms underlying diabetic neuropathy are still largely unknown, and treatment options lacking. Research has mainly focused directly on the neuronal component, presumably from the perspective that this is the functional signal-transmitting unit of the nerve. However, it is noteworthy that each single peripheral sensory neuron is intimately associated with numerous glial cells; the neuronal soma is completely enclosed by satellite glial cells and the length of the longest axons covered by at least 1,000 Schwann cells. The glial cells are vital for the neuron, but very little is still known about these cells in general and especially how they respond to diabetes in terms of altered neuronal support. We will discuss current knowledge of peripheral glial cells and argue that increased research in these cells is imperative for a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying diabetic neuropathy. PMID:29770116

  7. Single Sensor Gait Analysis to Detect Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Proof of Principle Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Patrick; Collett, Johnny; Maynard, Kevin; Steins, Dax; Hillier, Angela; Buckingham, Jodie; Tan, Garry D; King, Laurie; Dawes, Helen

    2018-02-01

    This study explored the potential utility of gait analysis using a single sensor unit (inertial measurement unit [IMU]) as a simple tool to detect peripheral neuropathy in people with diabetes. Seventeen people (14 men) aged 63±9 years (mean±SD) with diabetic peripheral neuropathy performed a 10-m walk test instrumented with an IMU on the lower back. Compared to a reference healthy control data set (matched by gender, age, and body mass index) both spatiotemporal and gait control variables were different between groups, with walking speed, step time, and SDa (gait control parameter) demonstrating good discriminatory power (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve >0.8). These results provide a proof of principle of this relatively simple approach which, when applied in clinical practice, can detect a signal from those with known diabetes peripheral neuropathy. The technology has the potential to be used both routinely in the clinic and for tele-health applications. Further research should focus on investigating its efficacy as an early indicator of or effectiveness of the management of peripheral neuropathy. This could support the development of interventions to prevent complications such as foot ulceration or Charcot's foot. Copyright © 2018 Korean Diabetes Association.

  8. Foot Kinetics and Kinematics Profile in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Peripheral Neuropathy: A Hospital Based Study from South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Animesh; Maiya, Arun G; N, Shivashankara K

    2018-02-01

    A kinetic change in thefoot like altered plantar pressure is the most common etiological risk factor for causing foot ulcers among people with diabetes mellitus. Kinematic alterations in joint angle and spatiotemporal parameters of the gait have also been frequently observed in participants with diabetes peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes peripheral neuropathy is the most common long-term standing complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It leads to various micro and macrovascular related complication of the foot. There is a gap in theliteraturefor biomechanical evaluation and assessment in type 2 diabetes mellitus with peripheral neuropathy in Indian population. The aim of the study was to assess and determine the biomechanical changes including kinetics and kinematics of foot among diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The cross-sectional study was conducted at Diabetic Foot Clinic, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka, India. A total of 120 participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathywere recruited under the purposive sampling method. Participants with any active ulceration or amputation were excluded from the study. The mean age, height, weight, body mass index, duration of diabetes was 57±14 year, 164±11cm, 61±18kg, 24± 3, 12±7 year respectively. There were significant changes in overall biomechanical profile along with clinical manifestations of diabetes peripheral neuropathy.The regression analysis showed statistical significance for dynamic maximum plantar pressure at forefoot with age, weight, height, duration of diabetes, body mass index, knee & ankle joint angle at toe-off phase of gait cycle,pinprick sensation and ankle reflex (R=.71,R =.55, F (12, 108)=521.9 kPa, p=.002) Conclusions: From the present study, we conclude that people with type 2 diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy have significant changes in their foot kinetics and kinematicsparameters. Therefore, they could be at higher risk of foot

  9. Electrochemical skin conductance to detect sudomotor dysfunction, peripheral neuropathy and the risk of foot ulceration among Saudi patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshah, Eman; Madanat, Amal; Al-Greesheh, Fahad; Al-Qaisi, Dalal; Al-Harbi, Mohammad; Aman, Reem; Al-Ghamdi, Abdul Aziz; Al-Madani, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Sudomotor dysfunction is manifested clinically as abnormal sweating leading to dryness of feet skin and increased risk of foot ulceration. The aim of this study was to test the performance of foot electrochemical skin conductance (ESC) to detect diabetic peripheral neuropathy and the risk of foot ulceration against traditional methods in Saudi patients with diabetes mellitus. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 296 Saudi patients with diabetes mellitus. Painful neuropathic symptoms were evaluated using the neuropathy symptom score (NSS). The risk of foot ulceration and diabetic peripheral neuropathy were determined using the neuropathy disability score (NDS). Vibration perception threshold (VPT) was assessed using neurothesiometer. Neurophysiological assessment of the right and left sural, peroneal and tibial nerves was performed in 222 participants. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy was defined according to the definition of the American Academy of Neurology. ESC was measured with Sudoscan. Feet-ESC decreased as the scores of sensory and motor function tests increased. Feet-ESC decreased as the NSS, NDS and severity of diabetic peripheral neuropathy increased. Sensitivity of feet-ESC peripheral neuropathy assessed by VPT ≥ 25 V, NDS ≥ 3, NDS ≥ 6 was 90.1, 61 and 63.8 % respectively and specificity 77, 85 and 81.9 % respectively. Sensitivity of feet-ESC peripheral neuropathy assessed by VPT ≥ 25 V, NDS ≥ 3, NDS ≥ 6 was 100, 80.6 and 80.9 % respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of feet-ESC peripheral neuropathy were 67.5 and 58.9 % respectively. Sudoscan a simple and objective tool can be used to detect diabetic peripheral neuropathy and the risk of foot ulceration among patients with diabetes mellitus. Prospective studies to confirm our results are warranted.

  10. Symptomatic reversal of peripheral neuropathy in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochman, Alan B; Carnegie, Dale H; Burke, Thomas J

    2002-03-01

    Forty-nine consecutive subjects with established diabetic peripheral neuropathy were treated with monochromatic near-infrared photo energy (MIRE) to determine if there was an improvement of sensation. Loss of protective sensation characterized by Semmes-Weinstein monofilament values of 4.56 and above was present in 100% of subjects (range, 4.56 to 6.45), and 42 subjects (86%) had Semmes-Weinstein values of 5.07 or higher. The ability to discriminate between hot and cold sensation was absent (54%) or impaired (46%) in both groups prior to the initiation of MIRE treatment. On the basis of Semmes-Weinstein monofilament values, 48 subjects (98%) exhibited improved sensation after 6 treatments, and all subjects had improved sensation after 12 treatments. Therefore, MIRE may be a safe, drug-free, noninvasive treatment for the consistent and predictable improvement of sensation in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy of the feet.

  11. Clinical diagnosis of distal diabetic polyneuropathy using neurological examination scores: correlation with nerve conduction studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen R Kamel

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion Neurological examination scores can detect and grade neuropathy in the majority of cases. However, NCS was accurate for detection of diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy, especially for the subclinical neuropathies.

  12. The ECG Vertigo in Diabetes and Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Voulgari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of diabetes in the epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases cannot be overemphasized. About one third of acute myocardial infarction patients have diabetes, and its prevalence is steadily increasing. The decrease in cardiac mortality in people with diabetes is lagging behind that of the general population. Cardiovascular disease is a broad term which includes any condition causing pathological changes in blood vessels, cardiac muscle or valves, and cardiac rhythm. The ECG offers a quick, noninvasive clinical and research screen for the early detection of cardiovascular disease in diabetes. In this paper, the clinical and research value of the ECG is readdressed in diabetes and in the presence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

  13. Effects of early and late diabetic neuropathy on sciatic nerve block duration and neurotoxicity in Zucker diabetic fatty rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lirk, P.; Verhamme, C.; Boeckh, R.; Stevens, M. F.; ten Hoope, W.; Gerner, P.; Blumenthal, S.; de Girolami, U.; van Schaik, I. N.; Hollmann, M. W.; Picardi, S.

    2015-01-01

    The neuropathy of type II diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing in prevalence worldwide. We aimed to test the hypothesis that in a rodent model of type II DM, neuropathy would lead to increased neurotoxicity and block duration after lidocaine-induced sciatic nerve block when compared with control

  14. [Response of pancreatic polypeptide to a protein rich meal in insulin non dependent diabetes melitus and autonomic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostić, N; Zamaklar, M; Novaković, R; Stajić, S

    1994-01-01

    Parasympathetic function and plasma hPP response to a protein rich meal were evaluated in 105 insulin non-dependent diabetic patients: 20 with autonomic neuropathy (group A), diagnosed by Clonidin test; 35 patients with neurophysiological evidence of polyneuropath (group B); 30 patients with autonomic neuropathy and polineuropathy (group C), and 20 patients without any sign of neuropathy (group D). Plasma hPP levels were determined by RIA using an anti-hPP antiserum, kindly provided by Prof. S. R. Bloom (Hammersmith Hospital, London). Blood was taken at 0. 45 and 60 minutes after the beginning of the meal. In groups A and C, the meal induced hPP increase was significantly lower than in group D (p 0.001). All group B patients had a marked increase in the peptide, similar to that in diabetics without neuropathy. These result ssuggest that diabetic autonomic neuropathy is associated with dysfunction of hPP secretion, and that the evaluation of hPP response to test meal may be a sensitive and simple method for the assessment of paraympathetic impairment in diabetes.

  15. Single Sensor Gait Analysis to Detect Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Proof of Principle Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Esser

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the potential utility of gait analysis using a single sensor unit (inertial measurement unit [IMU] as a simple tool to detect peripheral neuropathy in people with diabetes. Seventeen people (14 men aged 63±9 years (mean±SD with diabetic peripheral neuropathy performed a 10-m walk test instrumented with an IMU on the lower back. Compared to a reference healthy control data set (matched by gender, age, and body mass index both spatiotemporal and gait control variables were different between groups, with walking speed, step time, and SDa (gait control parameter demonstrating good discriminatory power (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve >0.8. These results provide a proof of principle of this relatively simple approach which, when applied in clinical practice, can detect a signal from those with known diabetes peripheral neuropathy. The technology has the potential to be used both routinely in the clinic and for tele-health applications. Further research should focus on investigating its efficacy as an early indicator of or effectiveness of the management of peripheral neuropathy. This could support the development of interventions to prevent complications such as foot ulceration or Charcot's foot.

  16. Comparison of topical capsaicin and topical turpentine oil for treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musharraf, M.U.; Ahmed, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diabetes Mellitus is a pandemic of the modern era owing to our rapidly deteriorating lifestyle. Painful diabetic neuropathy is one of the costliest and disabling complications of diabetes mellitus. No single treatment exists to prevent or reverse neuropathic changes or to provide total pain relief. Topical Capsaicin and Turpentine Oil are found to be effective in treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. Methods: Patients of either gender with ages between 18 and 70 years having painful diabetic neuropathy already taking one oral drug for painful neuropathy and treatment for diabetes mellitus and an HbA1C less than 8.5% were included while Pregnant or lactating mothers, patients with chronic liver disease and patients with renal insufficiency (creatinine >3.0 mg/dl) and peripheral arterial disease were excluded from study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups (A and B) using computer generated random number table. Group A was given topical application of capsaicin while Group B was given topical application of commercially available turpentine oil over painful site on feet. Results: 300 patients were equally divided in two groups. The patients in group A had a Visual Analog Pain Score of 7.91±5.10 at baseline and 5.10±1.343 after 3 months of treatment (p-value 0.0001). The patients in group B had a Visual Analog Pain Score of 7.83±1.012 at baseline and 5.20±1.187 after 3 months of treatment (p-value 0.0001). Chi Square test was applied to compare efficacy of both groups. It was noted that 71 (53%) had efficacy in group A and 63 (47%) had efficacy in the group B but the difference was not statistically significant. (p-value=0.399). Conclusion: It has been concluded that turpentine oil is effective in managing diabetic neuropathic pain similar to capsaicin cream.

  17. Comparison of shoe-length fit between people with and without diabetic peripheral neuropathy: a case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McInnes Alistair D

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amongst the many identified mechanisms leading to diabetic foot ulceration, ill-fitting footwear is one. There is anecdotal evidence that people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy wear shoes that are too small in order to increase the sensation of fit. The aim of this study was to determine whether people with diabetic sensory neuropathy wear appropriate length footwear. Methods A case–control design was used to compare internal shoe length and foot length differences between a group of people with diabetes and peripheral sensory neuropathy and a group of people without diabetes and no peripheral sensory neuropathy. Shoe and foot length measurements were taken using a calibrated Internal Shoe Size Gauge® and a Brannock Device®, respectively. Results Data was collected from 85 participants with diabetes and 118 participants without diabetes. The mean difference between shoe and foot length was not significantly different between the two groups. However, a significant number of participants within both groups had a shoe to foot length difference that lay outside a previously suggested 10 to 15 mm range. From the diabetic and non-diabetic groups 82% (70/85 and 66% (78/118, respectively had a foot to shoe length difference outside this same range. Conclusions This study shows that although there is no significant difference in shoe-length fit between participants with and without neuropathy, a significant proportion of these populations wear shoes that are either too long or too short for their foot length according to the 10 to 15 mm value used for comparison. The study has highlighted the need for standardised approaches when considering the allowance required between foot and internal shoe length and for the measurement and comparison of foot and shoe dimensions.

  18. The assessment of clinical distal symmetric polyneuropathy in type 1 diabetes: a comparison of methodologies from the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pambianco, G; Costacou, T; Strotmeyer, Elsa; Orchard, T J

    2011-05-01

    Distal symmetrical polyneuropathy (DSP) is the most common type of diabetic neuropathy, but often difficult to diagnose reliably. We evaluated the cross-sectional association between three point-of-care devices, Vibratron II, NC-stat(®), and Neurometer(®), and two clinical protocols, MNSI and monofilament, in identifying those with DSP, and/or amputation/ulcer/neuropathic pain (AUP), the two outcomes of major concern. This report presents data from 195 type 1 diabetic participants of the Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications (EDC) Study attending the 18-year examination (2004-2006). Participants with physician-diagnosed DSP, AUP or who were abnormal on the NC-stat, and the Vibratron II, MNSI, and monofilament were older (pAUP, or any testing modality, with the exception of NCstat (motor). The Vibratron II and MNSI showed the highest sensitivity for DSP (>87%) and AUP (>80%), whereas the monofilament had the highest specificity (98% DSP, 94% AUP) and positive predictive value (89% DSP, 47% AUP), but lowest sensitivity (20% DSP, 30% AUP). The MNSI also had the highest negative predictive value (83%) and Youden's Index (37%) and currently presents the single best combination of sensitivity and specificity of DSP in type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Polyol pathway, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in erythrocytes and diabetic neuropathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, J; Koh, N; Sakakibara, F; Hamada, Y; Wakao, T; Hara, T; Mori, K; Nakashima, E; Naruse, K; Hotta, N

    1995-12-27

    The relationship between the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentration in red blood cells as a biological indicator of tissue hypoxia and diabetic neuropathy, and the effect of a potent aldose reductase inhibitor, (2S,4S)-6-fluoro-2'5'-dioxospiro [chroman-4,4'-imidazolidine]-2-carboxamide (SNK-860), on both were investigated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diabetic rats demonstrated significantly delayed motor nerve conduction velocity and reduced sciatic nerve blood flow. Altered biochemical features in the sciatic nerves, including a marked accumulation of sorbitol and fructose, myo-inositol depletion and decreased Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity were also detected in diabetic rats. These defects were accompanied by a decrease in the red blood cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentration. Treatment with SNK-860 partially or completely ameliorated these abnormalities. These observations suggest that a decrease in the red blood cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentration is one of the factors contributing to tissue hypoxia, which results in diabetic neuropathy, and that this decrease is mediated through an aldose reductase inhibitor-sensitive pathway.

  20. Association of aldose reductase gene polymorphism (C-106T) in susceptibility of diabetic peripheral neuropathy among north Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Balram; Singh, S K

    2017-07-01

    Polymorphism in aldose reductase (ALR) gene at nucleotide C(-106)T (rs759853) in the promoter region is associated with susceptibility to development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The aim of this study was to detect the association of the C (-106)T polymorphism of ALR gene and its frequency among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with and without peripheral neuropathy. The study subjects were divided into three groups. Group I included 356 patients with diabetes having peripheral neuropathy. Group II included 294 patients with diabetes without peripheral neuropathy and group III included 181 healthy subjects. Genotyping of ALR C(-106)T SNPs was performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and direct sequencing methods. The genetic risk among the groups was compared and tested by calculating odds ratio with 95% class interval. ALR 106TT genotype was significantly higher in group I compared to group II with an odds ratio of 2.12 (95% CI: 1.22-3.67; pneuropathy with relative risk of 1.97 (95% CI: 1.16-3.35; pperipheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of blink reflex in diagnosis of subclinical cranial neuropathy in diabetic mellitus type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazem, Shakouri S; Behzad, Davoudi

    2006-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is one of the late complications of diabetes mellitus. Cranial nerves III, VII, and V are among the most commonly affected in diabetic patients. Traditional electrodiagnosis (Edx) studies are a useful method for diagnosis of PN and symptomatic cranial neuropathy, and may not be useful for detecting subclinical involvement of cranial nerves. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the role of blink reflex (BR) for early diagnosis of cranial neuropathy in diabetic patients with PN. A prospective study was performed on NIDDM patients with PN. One hundred eighty-eight subjects were included in our study in which 142 acted as healthy subjects and 46 as diabetic patients. Patients were excluded with prior history of cranial nerve lesions, stroke, or any other disease with polyneuropathy or drug-induced neuropathy. Routine nerve conduction studies were performed, and only patients with PN were included in this study. Abnormalities were found in 54.4% of patients. R1, IR2, and CR2 were prolonged relative to the healthy group. Statistically there was no significant difference in R/D ratio of patients (P=0.201). Also, there was a positive correlation between R1, IR2, and CR2 latencies with duration of diabetes and severity of polyneuropathy, but not for R/D. The greatest correlation was shown in R1 latency (69.9% abnormality). BR is a noninvasive and very useful method for the evaluation and diagnosis of subclinical cranial nerve involvement in diabetic patients.

  2. Sympathetic mediated vasomotion and skin capillary permeability in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefrandt, JD; Hoeven, JH; Roon, AM; Smit, AJ; Hoogenberg, K

    Aims/hypothesis. A loss of sympathetic function could lead to changes in capillary fluid filtration in diabetic patients. We investigated whether a decreased sympathetically mediated vasomotion in the skin in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy is associated with an abnormal capillary

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of Fall Risk Assessment Tools in People With Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Patricia S.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Kluding, Patricia M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetic peripheral neuropathy affects nearly half of individuals with diabetes and leads to increased fall risk. Evidence addressing fall risk assessment for these individuals is lacking. Objective The purpose of this study was to identify which of 4 functional mobility fall risk assessment tools best discriminates, in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, between recurrent “fallers” and those who are not recurrent fallers. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted. Setting The study was conducted in a medical research university setting. Participants The participants were a convenience sample of 36 individuals between 40 and 65 years of age with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Measurements Fall history was assessed retrospectively and was the criterion standard. Fall risk was assessed using the Functional Reach Test, the Timed “Up & Go” Test, the Berg Balance Scale, and the Dynamic Gait Index. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios, and overall diagnostic accuracy were calculated for each fall risk assessment tool. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to estimate modified cutoff scores for each fall risk assessment tool; indexes then were recalculated. Results Ten of the 36 participants were classified as recurrent fallers. When traditional cutoff scores were used, the Dynamic Gait Index and Functional Reach Test demonstrated the highest sensitivity at only 30%; the Dynamic Gait Index also demonstrated the highest overall diagnostic accuracy. When modified cutoff scores were used, all tools demonstrated improved sensitivity (80% or 90%). Overall diagnostic accuracy improved for all tests except the Functional Reach Test; the Timed “Up & Go” Test demonstrated the highest diagnostic accuracy at 88.9%. Limitations The small sample size and retrospective fall history assessment were limitations of the study. Conclusions Modified cutoff scores improved diagnostic accuracy for 3 of 4 fall risk

  4. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, O.; Arildsen, H.; Damsgaard, E.M.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in Type 1 diabetes mellitus in the general population and to assess the relationship between CAN and risk of future coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS: The Type 1 diabetes mellitus......-R interval in expiration divided by the shortest in inspiration during deep breathing at 6 breaths min(-1) and taken to express the degree of CAN. A maximal symptom-limited exercise test was carried out and the VA Prognostic Score, indicating risk of cardiovascular death or non-fatal myocardial infarction...

  5. Characterization of Diabetic Neuropathy in the Zucker Diabetic Sprague-Dawley Rat: A New Animal Model for Type 2 Diabetes

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    Eric P. Davidson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently a new rat model for type 2 diabetes the Zucker diabetic Sprague-Dawley (ZDSD/Pco was created. In this study we sought to characterize the development of diabetic neuropathy in ZDSD rats using age-matched Sprague-Dawley rats as a control. Rats were examined at 34 weeks of age 12 weeks after the onset of hyperglycemia in ZDSD rats. At this time ZDSD rats were severely insulin resistant with slowing of both motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities. ZDSD rats also had fatty livers, elevated serum free fatty acids, triglycerides, and cholesterol, and elevated sciatic nerve nitrotyrosine levels. The corneas of ZDSD rats exhibited a decrease in subbasal epithelial corneal nerves and sensitivity. ZDSD rats were hypoalgesic but intraepidermal nerve fibers in the skin of the hindpaw were normal compared to Sprague-Dawley rats. However, the number of Langerhans cells was decreased. Vascular reactivity of epineurial arterioles, blood vessels that provide circulation to the sciatic nerve, to acetylcholine and calcitonin gene-related peptide was impaired in ZDSD rats. These data indicate that ZDSD rats develop many of the neural complications associated with type 2 diabetes and are a good animal model for preclinical investigations of drug development for diabetic neuropathy.

  6. Evaluation of diabetic autonomic neuropathy by 123I-metaiodobenzyl-guanidine (MIBG) cardiac imaging. Initial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osonoi, Takeshi; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Saitou, Miyoko; Kuroda, Yasuhisa; Uchimi, Nobuo; Ishioka, Kuniharu; Onuma, Tomio; Suga, Shigeki; Takebe, Kazuo.

    1994-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography was performed in 52 diabetics and 10 healthy volunteers using MIBG. The diabetics had no particular findings of electrocardiography, echocardiography, or exercise thallium imaging and no cardiovascular episodes. The healthy volunteers had no abnormal findings on exercise thallium imaging or glucose tolerance test. The average relative regional uptake (RRU) was decreased in the inferoposterior wall compared with the anterior or lateral wall in both the diabetics and volunteers. According to the RRU and visual images, we divided the diabetics into the following four groups: 14 who were normal (group N), 30 with segmental defects (group S), 4 with diffuse defects (group D) and 4 without accumulation (group DH). Diabetic complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy) and hypertension were more frequent in group S than group N. However, there were no significant differences in the physiological evidence of autonomic neuropathy (C.V. of the R-R interval on the ECG and blood pressure response to standing or deep breathing) between groups S and N. Vibration sense was significantly more impaired in group S than in group N. These results suggest that cardiac imaging with MIBG might be a useful examination for the early diagnosis of diabetic autonomic neuropathy. (author)

  7. Spinal cord stimulation in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy: a multicentre randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vos, Cecile C; Meier, Kaare; Zaalberg, Paul Brocades

    2014-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a peripheral neuropathic pain condition that is often difficult to relieve. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a proven effective therapy for various types of mixed neuropathic conditions, yet effectiveness of SCS treatment for PDN is not well established. To our......D questionnaires also showed that patients in the SCS group, unlike those in the control group, experienced reduced pain and improved health and quality of life after 6 months of treatment. In patients with refractory painful diabetic neuropathy, spinal cord stimulation therapy significantly reduced...

  8. [Pathomechanism of diabetic neuropathy: background of the pathogenesis-oriented therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Gábor; Kempler, Péter

    2010-06-13

    The pathomechanism of diabetic neuropathy remains still poorly understood, however, a broad spectrum of novel findings associated with therapeutic consequences emerged during the last decades. Both disturbed function of primary hemostasis and increased activity of coagulation system contribute to the reduced endoneurial blood flow. Increased superoxide anion production induced by hyperglycemia leads to decreased activity of glycerinaldehid-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and to consequential increased activity of alternative pathways, including the polyol-, hexosamine-, diacilglycerol protein kinase-C- and advanced glycation pathways. Advanced glycation endproducts increase the activity of the nuclear-factor kappa-B, as well as the production of vasoactive factors and cytokines (interleukin-1, -6, tumor necrosis factor alpha). The aim of pathogenetic oriented treatment is to slow down, stop or reverse the progression of neuropathy. Components of pathogenetic oriented treatment are glycaemic control, management of risk factors, benfotiamine and alpha-lipoic acid. On one hand, transketolase-activator benfotiamine inhibits alternative pathways induced by hyperglycemia (the polyol-, hexosamine-, diacilglycerol protein kinase-C-, and advanced glycation pathways), while, on the other hand, it increases the activity of the pentose-phosphate-shunt. The clinical effectiveness of benfotiamine has been shown in many international and Hungarian trials. Alpha-lipoic acid as a powerful antioxidant decreases oxidative stress and this way increases the activity of glycerinaldehid-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Alpha-lipoic acid administered in infusion or oral treatment decreases both symptoms of neuropathy and neuropathic deficit. In conclusion, the case of diabetic neuropathy illustrates well, how widening of our knowledge on pathogenesis might contribute to successful therapy.

  9. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in diabetes mellitus: a complication of diabetic neuropathy or a different type of diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, Philip D; Ewald, Nils

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is a frequently observed phenomenon in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Alterations of exocrine pancreatic morphology can also be found frequently in diabetic patients. Several hypotheses try to explain these findings, including lack of insulin as a trophic factor for exocrine tissue, changes in secretion and/or action of other islet hormones, and autoimmunity against common endocrine and exocrine antigens. Another explanation might be that diabetes mellitus could also be a consequence of underlying pancreatic diseases (e.g., chronic pancreatitis). Another pathophysiological concept proposes the functional and morphological alterations as a consequence of diabetic neuropathy. This paper discusses the currently available studies on this subject and tries to provide an overview of the current concepts of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in diabetes mellitus.

  10. Cognitive representations of peripheral neuropathy and self-reported foot-care behaviour of people at high risk of diabetes-related foot complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrin, B. M.; Swerissen, H.; Payne, C. B.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the cognitive representations of peripheral neuropathy and self-reported foot-care behaviour in an Australian sample of people with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy. Methods: This cross-sectional study was undertaken with 121 participants with diabetes...... and peripheral neuropathy. Cognitive representations of peripheral neuropathy were measured by the Patients' Interpretation of Neuropathy questionnaire and two aspects of self-foot-care behaviour were measured using a self-report questionnaire. Hierarchical cluster analysis using the average linkage method...... was used to identify distinct illness schemata related to peripheral neuropathy. Results: Three clusters of participants were identified who exhibited distinct illness schemata related to peripheral neuropathy. One cluster had more misperceptions about the nature of peripheral neuropathy, one cluster...

  11. An observational study of vitamin b12 levels and peripheral neuropathy profile in patients of diabetes mellitus on metformin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kamesh; Jain, Anand; Rohatgi, Anurag

    A descriptive, observational study was completed in a tertiary care hospital between November 2014 and March 2016. Fifty consecutive patients of Type 2-Diabetes Mellitus who had been on metformin therapy for at least three months were included in our study. Several Parameters were compared with vitamin B12 levels and severity of peripheral neuropathy (using Toronto Clinical Scoring System (TCSS) and Nerve Conduction Velocity). These included the duration of diabetes, duration of metformin usage, dietary history, and HbA1c levels. Definite B12 deficiency was defined as B12peripheral neuropathy (r=0.40). The mean TCSS score was 6.8. The percentage of patients with mild neuropathy was 28%, with moderate neuropathy was 20% and severe neuropathy in 12% of the patients. The average duration of metformin use in patients without peripheral neuropathy was 5.5yrs whereas the average length of metformin use in patients with peripheral neuropathy was 10.4 yrs. Patients on long-term metformin therapy are at a high risk for Vitamin B12 deficiency and peripheral neuropathy. Interval Screening for peripheral neuropathy is recommended for patients on metformin even if Vitamin B12 levels appear to be normal. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Icariside II on Corpus Cavernosum and Major Pelvic Ganglion Neuropathy in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Yi Bai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic erectile dysfunction is associated with penile dorsal nerve bundle neuropathy in the corpus cavernosum and the mechanism is not well understood. We investigated the neuropathy changes in the corpus cavernosum of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes and the effects of Icariside II (ICA II on improving neuropathy. Thirty-six 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly distributed into normal control group, diabetic group and ICA-II treated group. Diabetes was induced by a one-time intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg. Three days later, the diabetic rats were randomly divided into 2 groups including a saline treated placebo group and an ICA II-treated group (5 mg/kg/day, by intragastric administration daily. Twelve weeks later, erectile function was measured by cavernous nerve electrostimulation with real time intracorporal pressure assessment. The penis was harvested for the histological examination (immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical staining and transmission electron microscopy detecting. Diabetic animals exhibited a decreased density of dorsal nerve bundle in penis. The neurofilament of the dorsal nerve bundle was fragmented in the diabetic rats. There was a decreased expression of nNOS and NGF in the diabetic group. The ICA II group had higher density of dorsal nerve bundle, higher expression of NGF and nNOS in the penis. The pathological change of major pelvic nerve ganglion (including the microstructure by transmission electron microscope and the neurite outgrowth length of major pelvic nerve ganglion tissue cultured in vitro was greatly attenuated in the ICA II-treated group (p < 0.01. ICA II treatment attenuates the diabetes-related impairment of corpus cavernosum and major pelvic ganglion neuropathy in rats with Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes.

  13. EFFECT OF PROPRIOCEPTIVE NEUROMUSCULAR FACILITATION (PNF IN IMPROVING SENSORIMOTOR FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETIC NEUROPATHY AFFECTING LOWER LIMBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaljeet Singh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic Mellitus is a group of metabolic disease characterized by hyperglycaemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action or both. Distal Sensorimotor Polyneuropathy is the most common complication of diabetes which mainly affects the lower limbs. Most of the studies aimed at individually increasing muscle strength or sensation but not on overall performance enhancements of the diabetic lower limbs. The evidence supporting the effectiveness of PNF in diabetic neuropathic patients is scarce. Methods: 30 patients, with age between 50 to 70 years, diagnosed with Diabetic Sensorimotor Polyneuropathy (DSP were selected from the department of Medicine and department of Neurosurgery Guru Gobind Singh Medical College and Hospital. Patients were evaluated at the beginning and at the end of the intervention using Diabetic Neuropathy Examination scores. Patients received 3 sets of exercises one hour/day with 3 days/week for 3 months. Each set of exercises consists of 5 repetitions of PNF patterns (alternate day and techniques. Results: D1 & D2 patterns of PNF are effective in improving both motor and sensory functions of diabetic patients with neuropathic symptoms. Improvement in muscle strength, reflex and sensations occurred to a greater extent after the treatment of three months in these subjects. This study shows that PNF patterns were effective at enhancing sensorimotor problems of lower limbs. Conclusion: This study concluded that PNF is found to be effective in improving sensorimotor functions of diabetic neuropathic patients affecting lower limbs.

  14. Peripheral neuropathy in prediabetes and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stino, Amro M; Smith, Albert G

    2017-09-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a major cause of disability worldwide. Diabetes is the most common cause of neuropathy, accounting for 50% of cases. Over half of people with diabetes develop neuropathy, and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a major cause of reduced quality of life due to pain, sensory loss, gait instability, fall-related injury, and foot ulceration and amputation. Most patients with non-diabetic neuropathy have cryptogenic sensory peripheral neuropathy (CSPN). A growing body of literature links prediabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome to the risk of both DPN and CSPN. This association might be particularly strong in type 2 diabetes patients. There are no effective medical treatments for CSPN or DPN, and aggressive glycemic control is an effective approach to neuropathy risk reduction only in type 1 diabetes. Several studies suggest lifestyle-based treatments that integrate dietary counseling with exercise might be a promising therapeutic approach to early DPN in type 2 diabetes and CSPN associated with prediabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Prevalence and risk factors for peripheral neuropathy among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients at a tertiary care hospital in coastal Karnataka

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    Sonalika Gogia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context and Objective: In view of the growing burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM globally and associated microvascular and macrovascular complications, the study was done to assess the prevalence and risk factors for diabetic neuropathy among T2DM patients attending a tertiary care hospital. Subjects and Methods: T2DM patients' ≥30 years of both gender, presenting to the Medicine Department at a tertiary care hospital were included in the study. Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom (DNS questionnaire to assess symptoms and Diabetic Neuropathy Examination (DNE scoring to assess clinical signs were used. Results: A total of 273 patients were included. The mean age was 57.8 ± 11.5 years. The male to female distribution was 75% (202 and 25% (71, respectively. According to DNS instrument, 41.4% patients scored positive for the presence of neuropathy while only 24.5% had neuropathy according to DNE score. The proportion of males affected by neuropathy was more than females. 43.1% males had a positive DNS score while only 27.2% of them had a positive DNE score. Duration of the disease was positively correlated with neuropathy. Neuropathy was more prevalent among people who had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure as per DNS and DNE instruments. Conclusions: The present study identified a higher proportion of males to be affected by neuropathy. Hence, more detailed evaluation must be accorded to elderly male diabetic patients with longer duration of the disease. Lifestyle modifications and watchful screening need to be incorporated as part of routine patient health education during follow-up clinic visits.

  16. Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency in Diabetes Mellitus: A Complication of Diabetic Neuropathy or a Different Type of Diabetes?

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    Philip D. Hardt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is a frequently observed phenomenon in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Alterations of exocrine pancreatic morphology can also be found frequently in diabetic patients. Several hypotheses try to explain these findings, including lack of insulin as a trophic factor for exocrine tissue, changes in secretion and/or action of other islet hormones, and autoimmunity against common endocrine and exocrine antigens. Another explanation might be that diabetes mellitus could also be a consequence of underlying pancreatic diseases (e.g., chronic pancreatitis. Another pathophysiological concept proposes the functional and morphological alterations as a consequence of diabetic neuropathy. This paper discusses the currently available studies on this subject and tries to provide an overview of the current concepts of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in diabetes mellitus.

  17. Treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulos, Ioannis N.; Alam, Uazman; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2015-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a debilitating consequence of diabetes that may be present in as many as one in five patients with diabetes. The objective assessment of PDN is difficult, making it challenging to diagnose and assess in both clinical practice and clinical trials. No single treatment exists to prevent or reverse neuropathic changes or to provide total pain relief. Treatment of PDN is based on three major approaches: intensive glycaemic control and risk factor management, treatments based on pathogenetic mechanisms, and symptomatic pain management. Clinical guidelines recommend pain relief in PDN through the use of antidepressants such as amitriptyline and duloxetine, the γ-aminobutyric acid analogues gabapentin and pregabalin, opioids and topical agents such as capsaicin. Of these medications, duloxetine and pregabalin were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2004 and tapentadol extended release was approved in 2012 for the treatment of PDN. Proposed pathogenetic treatments include α-lipoic acid (stems reactive oxygen species formation), benfotiamine (prevents vascular damage in diabetes) and aldose-reductase inhibitors (reduces flux through the polyol pathway). There is a growing need for studies to evaluate the most potent drugs or combinations for the management of PDN to maximize pain relief and improve quality of life. A number of agents are potential candidates for future use in PDN therapy, including Nav 1.7 antagonists, N-type calcium channel blockers, NGF antibodies and angiotensin II type 2 receptor antagonists. PMID:25553239

  18. Dioscorea Extract (DA-9801) Modulates Markers of Peripheral Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetic db/db Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Eunjung; Lee, Sung Ok; Kang, Tong Ho; Kim, Hye Ju; Choi, Sang Zin; Son, Mi-Won; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of DA-9801, an optimized extract of Dioscorea species, on diabetic peripheral neuropathy in a type 2 diabetic animal model. In this study, db/db mice were treated with DA-9801 (30 and 100 mg/kg, daily, p.o.) for 12 weeks. DA-9801 reduced the blood glucose levels and increased the withdrawal latencies in hot plate tests. Moreover, it prevented nerve damage based on increased nerve conduction velocity and ultrastructural changes. Decrease of nerve growth factor (NGF) may have a detrimental effect on diabetic neuropathy. We previously reported NGF regulatory properties of the Dioscorea genus. In this study, DA-9801 induced NGF production in rat primary astrocytes. In addition, it increased NGF levels in the sciatic nerve and the plasma of type 2 diabetic animals. DA-9801 also increased neurite outgrowth and mRNA expression of Tieg1/Klf10, an NGF target gene, in PC12 cells. These results demonstrated the attenuation of diabetic peripheral neuropathy by oral treatment with DA-9801 via NGF regulation. DA-9801 is currently being evaluated in a phase II clinical study.

  19. Effect of Urtica dioica on memory dysfunction and hypoalgesia in an experimental model of diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sita Sharan; Udayabanu, M

    2013-09-27

    Diabetic neuropathy is considered as a disease of the peripheral nervous system, but recent evidences suggest the involvement of central nervous system as well. In this study we evaluated the effect of Urtica dioica (UD) extract against memory dysfunction and hypoalgesia on a mouse model of streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic neuropathy. STZ (50 mg/kg, i.p. consecutively for 5 days) was used to induce diabetes, followed by treatment with the UD extract (50 mg/kg, oral) and rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg, oral) for 8 weeks. Cognitive functions were evaluated using Morris water maze and passive avoidance step through task. Pain thresholds were measured using thermal, mechanical and chemical induced hyperalgesia. We observed that chronic diabetes resulted in a decline in circulating insulin level, elevated blood glucose, reduced body weight, increased water intake, cognitive impairment and hypoalgesia. UD significantly reduced the blood glucose and polydypsia, as well as improved the body weight, insulin level, cognition and insensate neuropathy. In conclusion, UD showed results comparable to rosiglitazone in reversing the long standing diabetes induced complications such as central and peripheral neuronal dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Association of peripheral neuropathy with circulating advanced glycation end products, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products and other risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, C E; Michel, P-L; Gillery, P; Jaisson, S; Fonfrede, M; Morel, F; Hartemann, A; Bourron, O

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy remains uncertain and nonenzymatic glycoxidation is one of the contributing mechanisms. The aim of this study was to assess the respective relationship of diabetic peripheral neuropathy with glycoxidation, compared with other identified risk factors, in patients with type 2 diabetes. We included 198 patients with type 2 diabetes and high risk for vascular complications. Circulating concentrations of three advanced glycation end products (carboxymethyllysine, methyl-glyoxal-hydroimidazolone-1, pentosidine) and of their soluble receptor (sRAGE) were measured. Peripheral neuropathy was assessed by the neuropathy disability score and by the monofilament test and defined as either an abnormal monofilament test and/or a neuropathy disability score ≥6. Multivariate regression analyses were performed adjusting for potential confounding factors for neuropathy: age, gender, diabetes duration, current smoking, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, height, peripheral arterial occlusive disease, glycated haemoglobin, estimated glomerular filtration rate and lipid profile. Prevalence of peripheral neuropathy was 20.7%. sRAGE and carboxymethyllysine were independently and positively associated with the presence of peripheral neuropathy. No significant association was found between peripheral neuropathy and methyl-glyoxal-hydroimidazolone-1 or pentosidine. Waist circumference, height and peripheral arterial occlusive disease were independently associated with peripheral neuropathy. Carboxymethyllysine and sRAGE were independently associated with peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Although the conclusions are limited by the absence of a healthy control population, this study confirms the relationship between advanced glycoxidation and diabetic peripheral neuropathy, independently of other risk factors. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in diabetes: clinical impact, assessment, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallone, Vincenza; Ziegler, Dan; Freeman, Roy; Bernardi, Luciano; Frontoni, Simona; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Stevens, Martin; Kempler, Peter; Hilsted, Jannik; Tesfaye, Solomon; Low, Phillip; Valensi, Paul

    2011-10-01

    The Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy (CAN) Subcommittee of the Toronto Consensus Panel on Diabetic Neuropathy worked to update CAN guidelines, with regard to epidemiology, clinical impact, diagnosis, usefulness of CAN testing, and management. CAN is the impairment of cardiovascular autonomic control in the setting of diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The prevalence of confirmed CAN is around 20%, and increases up to 65% with age and diabetes duration. Established risk factors for CAN are glycaemic control in type 1 and a combination of hypertension, dyslipidaemia, obesity, and glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes. CAN is a risk marker of mortality and cardiovascular morbidity, and possibly a progression promoter of diabetic nephropathy. Criteria for CAN diagnosis and staging are: (1) one abnormal cardiovagal test result identifies possible or early CAN; (2) at least two abnormal cardiovagal test results are required for definite or confirmed CAN; and (3) the presence of orthostatic hypotension in addition to abnormal heart rate test results identifies severe or advanced CAN. Progressive stages of CAN are associated with increasingly worse prognosis. CAN assessment is relevant in clinical practice for (1) diagnosis of CAN clinical forms, (2) detection and tailored treatment of CAN clinical correlates (e.g. tachycardia, orthostatic hypotension, non-dipping, QT interval prolongation), (3) risk stratification for diabetic complications and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and (4) modulation of targets of diabetes therapy. Evidence on the cost-effectiveness of CAN testing is lacking. Apart from the preventive role of intensive glycaemic control in type 1 diabetes, recommendations cannot be made for most therapeutic approaches to CAN. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy in ambulatory patients with type 2 diabetes in a general hospital in a middle income country: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo, María de Los Angeles; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio; Pinto, Miguel E; Ticse, Ray; Malaga, German; Sacksteder, Katherine; Miranda, J Jaime; Gilman, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the morbidity rate and associated factors for diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in a low-middle income country setting. Cross-sectional study, data was gathered at Peru's Ministry of Health national specialized hospital for endocrinological conditions through standardized interviews, anthropometric measurements and blood tests for glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). DPN was evaluated using two techniques: the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test and the diabetic neuropathy symptom score. Overall prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. Potential factors related to DPN explored included body mass index, years with disease (diabetes in a national specialized facility from Peru. Associated factors to DPN included being a diabetic patient for over ten years, and receiving insulin plus metformin.

  3. Educational strategies for diabetic people at risk for foot neuropathy: synthesis of good evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Catunda Gomes de Menezes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to identify the best evidence concerning health education strategies used in teaching-learning for people with diabetes mellitus who are at risk for foot neuropathy. An integrative review was conducted in the databases PubMed, LILACS, CINAHL and SCOPUS in January 2015; a total of 14 papers was analyzed in detail. The results are shown in a summary table and categories are discussed, covering various health education strategies for prevention and management with patients at risk of foot neuropathy (group; individual in face-to-face visits or via telephone; and using interactive technologies, and a synthesis of the best evidence for the effectiveness of these interventions in reducing diabetic foot complications. It was concluded that all the educational strategies are effective in promoting diabetic foot self-care. However, the group strategies showed greater effectiveness, enabling significant improvements in the knowledge, attitude, and practices of care for feet and general health of diabetic patients.

  4. Mexiletine for treatment of chronic painful diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgard, A; Kastrup, J; Petersen, P

    1988-01-01

    Sixteen of nineteen patients completed a randomised double-blind crossover trial to assess the effect of oral mexiletine (10 mg/kg bodyweight daily) on the symptoms and signs of chronic painful diabetic neuropathy. The median age of the sixteen patients was 50 years (range 30-64). Assessment...... threshold levels, beat-to-beat variation in heart rate during deep breathing, and postural blood pressure response. Mild side-effects were seen in three of the sixteen patients during mexiletine treatment....

  5. An integrated perspective on diabetic, alcoholic, and drug-induced neuropathy, etiology, and treatment in the US

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    Zeng L

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lily Zeng,1 Doungkamol Alongkronrusmee,2 Richard M van Rijn2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA Abstract: Neuropathic pain (NeuP is a syndrome that results from damaged nerves and/or aberrant regeneration. Common etiologies of neuropathy include chronic illnesses and medication use. Chronic disorders, such as diabetes and alcoholism, can cause neuronal injury and consequently NeuP. Certain medications with antineoplastic effects also carry an exquisitely high risk for neuropathy. These culprits are a few of many that are fueling the NeuP epidemic, which currently affects 7%–10% of the population. It has been estimated that approximately 10% and 7% of US adults carry a diagnosis of diabetes and alcohol disorder, respectively. Despite its pervasiveness, many physicians are unfamiliar with adequate treatment of NeuP, partly due to the few reviews that are available that have integrated basic science and clinical practice. In light of the recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines that advise against the routine use of μ-opioid receptor-selective opioids for chronic pain management, such a review is timely. Here, we provide a succinct overview of the etiology and treatment options of diabetic and alcohol- and drug-induced neuropathy, three different and prevalent neuropathies fusing the combined clinical and preclinical pharmacological expertise in NeuP of the authors. We discuss the anatomy of pain and pain transmission, with special attention to key ion channels, receptors, and neurotransmitters. An understanding of pain neurophysiology will lead to a better understanding of the rationale for the effectiveness of current treatment options, and may lead to better diagnostic tools to help distinguish types of neuropathy. We close with a discussion of ongoing research

  6. The association between pulse wave velocity and peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tentolouris, Anastasios; Eleftheriadou, Ioanna; Grigoropoulou, Pinelopi; Kokkinos, Alexander; Siasos, Gerasimos; Ntanasis-Stathopoulos, Ioannis; Tentolouris, Nikolaos

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is the most common diabetic complication, affecting up to half of the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Increased aortic stiffness, measured with the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), has been associated with incidence of cardiovascular disease independently of traditional risk factors. Previous data showed associations between risk factors for macroangiopathy and DPN in diabetes. However, the association between PWV and DPN is not well known. In this study we examined the association between PWV and presence as well as severity of DPN in subjects with T2DM. A total of 381 patients with T2DM were recruited. Participants were classified as having DPN and not having DPN. PWV was measured at the carotid-femoral segment with a non-invasive method using applanation tonometry. DPN was assessed by determination of the Neuropathy Symptom Score (NSS) and the Neuropathy Disability Score (NDS). A hundred and seven participants (28.1%) had DPN. Patients with DPN were significantly more often male and older, had longer diabetes duration, higher height, larger waist circumference, higher systolic arterial blood pressure (SBP) and higher PWV (all Pperipheral arterial disease. Multivariate logistic regression analysis, after adjustment for age, gender, waist circumference, SBP, nephropathy and use of b-blockers, demonstrated that the odds [OR (95% confidence intervals)] of peripheral neuropathy were associated significantly and independently only with diabetes duration [1.044 (1.009-1.081), P=0.013], height [1.075 (1.041-1.110), Pperipheral arterial disease [4.658 (2.264-9.584), Pperipheral arterial disease (beta=0.374, P<0.001). Increased PWV is associated strongly and independently not only with the presence but also with the severity of DPN in patients with T2DM, irrespective of known risk factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of electrochemical skin conductance and vibration perception threshold measurement in the detection of early diabetic neuropathy.

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    Amit Goel

    Full Text Available The early diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN is challenging. Sudomotor dysfunction is one of the earliest detectable abnormalities in DPN. The present study aimed to determine the diagnostic performance of the electrochemical skin conductance (ESC test in detecting early DPN, compared with the vibration perception threshold (VPT test and diabetic neuropathy symptom (DNS score, using the modified neuropathy disability score (NDS as the reference standard. Five hundred and twenty-three patients with type 2 diabetes underwent an NDS-based clinical assessment for neuropathy. Participants were classified into the DPN and non-DPN groups based on the NDS (≥ 6. Both groups were evaluated further using the DNS, and VPT and ESC testing. A receiver-operator characteristic (ROC curve analysis was performed to compare the efficacy of ESC measurements with those of DNS and VPT testing in detecting DPN. The DPN group (n = 110, 21% had significantly higher HbA1c levels and longer diabetes durations compared with the non-DPN group (n = 413. The sensitivity of feet ESC 15 V, and DNS ≥ 1, were 16.4, 10.9 and 1.8, respectively. ESC measurement is an objective and sensitive technique for the early detection of DPN. Feet ESC measurement was superior to VPT testing for identifying patients with early DPN.

  8. Role of neuropathy and high foot pressures in diabetic foot ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frykberg, R G; Lavery, L A; Pham, H; Harvey, C; Harkless, L; Veves, A

    1998-10-01

    High plantar foot pressures in association with peripheral neuropathy have been ascertained to be important risk factors for ulceration in the diabetic foot. Most studies investigating these parameters have been limited by their size and the homogeneity of study subjects. The objective of this study was therefore to ascertain the risk of ulceration associated with high foot pressures and peripheral neuropathy in a large and diverse diabetic population. We studied a cross-sectional group of 251 diabetic patients of Caucasian (group C) (n=121), black (group B) (n=36), and Hispanic (group H) (n=94) racial origins with an overall age of 58.5+/-12.5 years (range 20-83). There was an equal distribution of men and women across the entire study population. All patients underwent a complete medical history and lower extremity evaluation for neuropathy and foot pressures. Neuropathic parameters were dichotomized (0/1) into two high-risk variables: patients with a vibration perception threshold (VPT) > or =25 V were categorized as HiVPT (n=132) and those with Semmes-Weinstein monofilament tests > or =5.07 were classified as HiSWF (n=190). The mean dynamic foot pressures of three footsteps were measured using the F-scan mat system with patients walking without shoes. Maximum plantar pressures were dichotomized into a high-pressure variable (Pmax6) indicating those subjects with pressures > or =6 kg/cm2 (n=96). A total of 99 patients had a current or prior history of ulceration at baseline. Joint mobility was significantly greater in the Hispanic cohort compared with the other groups at the first metatarsal-phalangeal joint (C 67+/-23 degrees, B 69+/-23 degrees, H 82+/-23 degrees, P=0.000), while the subtalar joint mobility was reduced in the Caucasian group (C 21+/-8 degrees, B 26+/-7 degrees, H 27+/-11 degrees, P=0.000). Maximum plantar foot pressures were significantly higher in the Caucasian group (C 6.7+/-2.9 kg/cm2, B 5.7+/-2.8 kg/cm2, H 4.4+/-1.9 kg/cm2, P=0

  9. Peripheral neuropathy in HIV: an analysis of evidence-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Patrice K; Corless, Inge B; Evans, Linda A

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common and vexing symptom for people living with HIV infection (PLWH). Neuropathy occurs in several different syndromes and is identified in the literature as distal sensory polyneuropathy or distal sensory peripheral neuropathy. More recently, the HIV literature has focused on the syndrome as painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathy, addressing the symptom rather than the underlying pathophysiology. Assessment of neuropathy in PLWH is critical and must be incorporated into nursing practice for each visit. Neuropathy has been attributed to the direct effects of HIV, exposure to antiretroviral medications (particularly the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors), advanced immune suppression, and comorbid tuberculosis infection and exposure to antituberculosis medications. Evidence supports the importance of addressing neuropathy in PLWH with pharmacologic treatment regimens and complementary/alternative approaches. This paper examines the pathophysiology, evidence, and approaches to managing peripheral neuropathy. A case study has been included to illustrate a patient's experience with neuropathy symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Plantar pressure in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients with active foot ulceration, previous ulceration and no history of ulceration: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Malindu Eranga; Crowther, Robert George; Pappas, Elise; Lazzarini, Peter Anthony; Cunningham, Margaret; Sangla, Kunwarjit Singh; Buttner, Petra; Golledge, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Elevated dynamic plantar pressures are a consistent finding in diabetes patients with peripheral neuropathy with implications for plantar foot ulceration. This meta-analysis aimed to compare the plantar pressures of diabetes patients that had peripheral neuropathy and those with neuropathy with active or previous foot ulcers. Published articles were identified from Medline via OVID, CINAHL, SCOPUS, INFORMIT, Cochrane Central EMBASE via OVID and Web of Science via ISI Web of Knowledge bibliographic databases. Observational studies reporting barefoot dynamic plantar pressure in adults with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, where at least one group had a history of plantar foot ulcers were included. Interventional studies, shod plantar pressure studies and studies not published in English were excluded. Overall mean peak plantar pressure (MPP) and pressure time integral (PTI) were primary outcomes. The six secondary outcomes were MPP and PTI at the rear foot, mid foot and fore foot. The protocol of the meta-analysis was published with PROPSERO, (registration number CRD42013004310). Eight observational studies were included. Overall MPP and PTI were greater in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients with foot ulceration compared to those without ulceration (standardised mean difference 0.551, 95% CI 0.290-0.811, pdiabetic peripheral neuropathy with a history of foot ulceration compared to those with diabetic neuropathy without a history of ulceration. More homogenous data is needed to confirm these findings.

  11. Nerve Regeneration Should Be Highly Valued in the Treatment of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xiao-chun

    2008-01-01

    @@ Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is the most common chronic complication of the long-term complications of diabetes, affecting up to 90% of patients during the progress of the disease. Many parts of the nerve system, including the sensory nerves, motor nerves and autonomic nerves, can be affected, leading to various clinical features. DPN leads not only to a great degree of mutilation and death but also to the occurrence and development of other long-term complications in diabetics.

  12. Antinociceptive interaction of gabapentin with minocycline in murine diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, H F; Sierralta, F; Jorquera, V; Poblete, P; Prieto, J C; Noriega, V

    2017-02-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is the most common complication of diabetes and pain is one of the main symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, however, currently available drugs are often ineffective and complicated by adverse events. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the antinociceptive interaction between gabapentin and minocycline in a mice experimental model of DN by streptozocin (STZ). The interaction of gabapentin with minocycline was evaluated by the writhing and hot plate tests at 3 and 7 days after STZ injection or vehicle in male CF1 mice. STZ (150 mg/kg, i.p.) produced a marked increase in plasma glucose levels on day 7 (397.46 ± 29.65 mg/dL) than on day 3 (341.12 ± 35.50 mg/dL) and also developed neuropathic pain measured by algesiometric assays. Gabapentin produced similar antinociceptive activity in both writhing and hot plate tests in mice pretreated with STZ. However, minocycline was more potent in the writhing than in the hot plate test in the same type of mice. The combination of gabapentin with minocycline produced synergistic interaction in both test. The combination of gabapentin with minocycline in a 1:1 proportion fulfills all the criteria of multimodal analgesia and this finding suggests that the combination provide a therapeutic alternative that could be used for human neuropathic pain management.

  13. Niceritrol prevents the decrease in red blood cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, N; Nakamura, J; Kakuta, H; Fukasawa, H; Koh, N; Sakakibara, F; Mori, K; Sakamoto, N

    1995-01-01

    Nerve ischemia/hypoxia has been linked to the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Red blood cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate is an important regulator of peripheral tissue oxygenation; however, the relationship between 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentration and diabetic complications has not been studied in detail. This investigation focused on the relationship between red blood cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and diabetic neuropathy, by measuring motor nerve conduction velocity and sciatic nerve blood flow in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The effect of treatment with niceritrol, a nicotinic acid derivative that acts as a vasodilator and reduces serum lipid concentrations, on 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentration and diabetic neuropathy was also examined. Untreated diabetic rats had significantly lower concentrations of red blood cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, higher concentrations of serum total cholesterol and triglyceride, as well as reduced motor nerve conduction velocity and sciatic nerve blood flow, compared to untreated normal rats. Niceritrol prevented these abnormalities without correcting hyperglycemia in diabetic rats, but had no effect on these parameters in normal rats. Red blood cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentration and motor nerve conduction velocity showed a positive correlation with sciatic nerve blood flow and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, respectively. These observations suggest that ischemia/hypoxia plays an important role in the development of diabetic neuropathy, and that niceritrol has a therapeutic effect on this condition by improving endoneurial ischemia/hypoxia.

  14. Improvement in Neuropathy Specific Quality of Life in Patients with Diabetes after Vitamin D Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uazman Alam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the effect of vitamin D supplementation on neuropathy specific quality of life (NeuroQoL in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy. Methods. This prospective, open label study was conducted between June 2012 and April 2013. Patients with symptomatic diabetic neuropathy were given a single dose of 600,000 IU intramuscular vitamin D, and NeuroQol was assessed at baseline and at five follow-up visits every 4 weeks. Results. Of 143 participants, 41.3% were vitamin D deficient (vitamin D < 20 ng/ml. Treatment with vitamin D resulted in a significant increase in 25(OHD (P<0.0001 and a significant improvement in the NeuroQoL subscale score for emotional distress (P=0.04, with no significant change in the other NeuroQoL domains of painful symptoms and paresthesia, loss of temperature and touch sensation, unsteadiness, limitation in daily activities, and interpersonal problems. There was a significant reduction in patient perception about foot problems on QoL of “quite a lot” (P<0.05 and “very much” (P<0.0001 with a significant reduction in the baseline response of having a “poor” QoL from 5.2% to 0.7% (P<0.0001 and an increase in the response of an “excellent QoL” from 1.5% to 7.4% (P<0.0001. Conclusion. Vitamin D is effective in improving quality of life in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy.

  15. Impaired peripheral nerve regeneration in type-2 diabetic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Vuong M; Tu, Nguyen Huu; Katano, Tayo; Matsumura, Shinji; Saito, Akira; Yamada, Akihiro; Furue, Hidemasa; Ito, Seiji

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common and serious complications of type-2 diabetes. Diabetic neuropathy is characterized by a distal symmetrical sensorimotor polyneuropathy, and its incidence increases in patients 40 years of age or older. In spite of extensive research over decades, there are few effective treatments for diabetic neuropathy besides glucose control and improved lifestyle. The earliest changes in diabetic neuropathy occur in sensory nerve fibers, with initial degeneration and regeneration resulting in pain. To seek its effective treatment, here we prepared a type-2 diabetic mouse model by giving mice 2 injections of streptozotocin and nicotinamide and examining the ability for nerve regeneration by using a sciatic nerve transection-regeneration model previously established by us. Seventeen weeks after the last injection, the mice exhibited symptoms of type-2 diabetes, that is, impaired glucose tolerance, decreased insulin level, mechanical hyperalgesia, and impaired sensory nerve fibers in the plantar skin. These mice showed delayed functional recovery and nerve regeneration by 2 weeks compared with young healthy mice and by 1 week compared with age-matched non-diabetic mice after axotomy. Furthermore, type-2 diabetic mice displayed increased expression of PTEN in their DRG neurons. Administration of a PTEN inhibitor at the cutting site of the nerve for 4 weeks promoted the axonal transport and functional recovery remarkably. This study demonstrates that peripheral nerve regeneration was impaired in type-2 diabetic model and that its combination with sciatic nerve transection is suitable for the study of the pathogenesis and treatment of early diabetic neuropathy. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Thioredoxin plays a key role in retinal neuropathy prior to endothelial damage in diabetic mice

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    Ren, Xiang; Li, Chen; Liu, Junli; Zhang, Chenghong; Fu, Yuzhen; Wang, Nina; Ma, Haiying; Lu, Heyuan; Kong, Hui; Kong, Li

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic metabolic syndrome that results in changes in carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. With diabetes for a long time, it increases the risk of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and long-term morbidity and mortality. Moreover, emerging evidence suggests that neuron damage occurs earlier than microvascular complications in DR patients, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. We investigated diabetes-induced retinal neuropathy and elucidated key molecular events to identify new...

  17. Reversal of diabetic peripheral neuropathy with phototherapy (MIRE) decreases falls and the fear of falling and improves activities of daily living in seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Mark W; Carnegie, Dale H; Burke, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    to determine whether restoration of sensation, impaired due to diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), would reduce the number of falls and the fear of falling and improve activities of daily living (ADL) in a Medicare-aged population. retrospective cohort study of patients with documented, monochromatic near-infrared phototherapy (MIRE)-mediated, symptomatic reversal of DPN. responses to a health status questionnaire following symptomatic reversal of DPN. 252 patients (mean age 76 years) provided health information following symptomatic reversal of diabetic neuropathy (mean duration 8.6 months). incidence of falls and fear of falling decreased within 1 month after reversal of peripheral neuropathy and remained low after 1 year. Likewise, improved ADL were evident soon after reversal of peripheral neuropathy and showed further improvement after 1 year. Overall, reversal of peripheral neuropathy in a clinician's office and subsequent use of MIRE at home was associated with a 78% reduction in falls, a 79% decrease in balance-related fear of falling and a 72% increase in ADL (P < 0.0002 for all results). reversal of peripheral neuropathy is associated with an immediate reduction in the absolute number of falls, a reduced fear of falling and improved ADL. These results suggest that symptomatic reversal of diabetic neuropathy will have a substantial favourable, long-term socioeconomic impact on patients with DPN and the Medicare system, and improve the quality of life for elderly patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy.

  18. Variable phenotypic expression and onset in MYH14 distal hereditary motor neuropathy phenotype in a large, multigenerational North American family.

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    Iyadurai, Stanley; Arnold, W David; Kissel, John T; Ruhno, Corey; Mcgovern, Vicki L; Snyder, Pamela J; Prior, Thomas W; Roggenbuck, Jennifer; Burghes, Arthur H; Kolb, Stephen J

    2017-08-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) causes distal-predominant weakness without prominent sensory loss. Myosin heavy chain disorders most commonly result in distal myopathy and cardiomyopathy with or without hearing loss, but a complex phenotype with dHMN, myopathy, hoarseness, and hearing loss was reported in a Korean family with a c.2822G>T mutation in MYH14. In this study we report phenotypic features in a North American family with the c.2822G>T in MYH14. Clinical and molecular characterization was performed in a large, 6-generation, Caucasian family with MYH14 dHMN. A total of 11 affected and 7 unaffected individuals were evaluated and showed varying age of onset and severity of weakness. Genotypic concordance was confirmed with molecular analysis. Electrophysiological studies demonstrated distal motor axonal degeneration without myopathy in all affected subjects tested. Mutation of MYH14 can result in a range of neuromuscular phenotypes that includes a dHMN and hearing loss phenotype with variable age of onset. Muscle Nerve 56: 341-345, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Evaluation of PMI-5011, an ethanolic extract of Artemisia dracunculus L., on peripheral neuropathy in streptozotocin-diabetic mice.

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    Watcho, Pierre; Stavniichuk, Roman; Tane, Pierre; Shevalye, Hanna; Maksimchyk, Yury; Pacher, Pal; Obrosova, Irina G

    2011-03-01

    We previously reported that PMI-5011, an ethanolic extract of Artemisia dracunculus L., alleviates peripheral neuropathy in high fat diet-fed mice, a model of prediabetes and obesity developing oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory changes in the peripheral nervous system. This study evaluated PMI-5011 on established functional, structural, and biochemical changes associated with Type I diabetic peripheral neuropathy. C57Bl6/J mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes of a 12-week duration, developed motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity deficits, thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia, tactile allodynia, and intra-epidermal nerve fiber loss. PMI-5011 (500 mg/kg/day for 7 weeks) alleviated diabetes-induced nerve conduction slowing, small sensory nerve fiber dysfunction, and increased intra-epidermal nerve fiber density. PMI-5011 blunted sciatic nerve and spinal cord 12/15-lipoxygenase activation and oxidative-nitrosative stress, without ameliorating hyperglycemia or reducing sciatic nerve sorbitol pathway intermediate accumulation. In conclusion, PMI-5011, a safe and non-toxic botanical extract, may find use in the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  20. Effect of painless diabetic neuropathy on pressure pain hypersensitivity (hyperalgesia after acute foot trauma

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    Tobias Wienemann

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Acute injury transiently lowers local mechanical pain thresholds at a limb. To elucidate the impact of painless (diabetic neuropathy on this post-traumatic hyperalgesia, pressure pain perception thresholds after a skeletal foot trauma were studied in consecutive persons without and with neuropathy (i.e. history of foot ulcer or Charcot arthropathy. Design and methods: A case–control study was done on 25 unselected clinical routine patients with acute unilateral foot trauma (cases: elective bone surgery; controls: sprain, toe fracture. Cases were 12 patients (11 diabetic subjects with severe painless neuropathy and chronic foot pathology. Controls were 13 non-neuropathic persons. Over 1 week after the trauma, cutaneous pressure pain perception threshold (CPPPT and deep pressure pain perception threshold (DPPPT were measured repeatedly, adjacent to the injury and at the opposite foot (pinprick stimulators, Algometer II®. Results: In the control group, post-traumatic DPPPT (but not CPPPT at the injured foot was reduced by about 15–25%. In the case group, pre- and post-operative CPPPT and DPPPT were supranormal. Although DPPPT fell post-operatively by about 15–20%, it remained always higher than the post-traumatic DPPPT in the control group: over musculus abductor hallucis 615 kPa (kilopascal versus 422 kPa, and over metatarsophalangeal joint 518 kPa versus 375 kPa (medians; case vs. control group; CPPPT did not decrease post-operatively. Conclusion: Physiological nociception and post-traumatic hyperalgesia to pressure are diminished at the foot with severe painless (diabetic neuropathy. A degree of post-traumatic hypersensitivity required to ‘pull away’ from any one, even innocuous, mechanical impact in order to avoid additional damage is, therefore, lacking.

  1. Effect of painless diabetic neuropathy on pressure pain hypersensitivity (hyperalgesia) after acute foot trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienemann, Tobias; Chantelau, Ernst A.; Koller, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and objective Acute injury transiently lowers local mechanical pain thresholds at a limb. To elucidate the impact of painless (diabetic) neuropathy on this post-traumatic hyperalgesia, pressure pain perception thresholds after a skeletal foot trauma were studied in consecutive persons without and with neuropathy (i.e. history of foot ulcer or Charcot arthropathy). Design and methods A case–control study was done on 25 unselected clinical routine patients with acute unilateral foot trauma (cases: elective bone surgery; controls: sprain, toe fracture). Cases were 12 patients (11 diabetic subjects) with severe painless neuropathy and chronic foot pathology. Controls were 13 non-neuropathic persons. Over 1 week after the trauma, cutaneous pressure pain perception threshold (CPPPT) and deep pressure pain perception threshold (DPPPT) were measured repeatedly, adjacent to the injury and at the opposite foot (pinprick stimulators, Algometer II®). Results In the control group, post-traumatic DPPPT (but not CPPPT) at the injured foot was reduced by about 15–25%. In the case group, pre- and post-operative CPPPT and DPPPT were supranormal. Although DPPPT fell post-operatively by about 15–20%, it remained always higher than the post-traumatic DPPPT in the control group: over musculus abductor hallucis 615 kPa (kilopascal) versus 422 kPa, and over metatarsophalangeal joint 518 kPa versus 375 kPa (medians; case vs. control group); CPPPT did not decrease post-operatively. Conclusion Physiological nociception and post-traumatic hyperalgesia to pressure are diminished at the foot with severe painless (diabetic) neuropathy. A degree of post-traumatic hypersensitivity required to ‘pull away’ from any one, even innocuous, mechanical impact in order to avoid additional damage is, therefore, lacking. PMID:25397867

  2. Effect of painless diabetic neuropathy on pressure pain hypersensitivity (hyperalgesia) after acute foot trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienemann, Tobias; Chantelau, Ernst A; Koller, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Acute injury transiently lowers local mechanical pain thresholds at a limb. To elucidate the impact of painless (diabetic) neuropathy on this post-traumatic hyperalgesia, pressure pain perception thresholds after a skeletal foot trauma were studied in consecutive persons without and with neuropathy (i.e. history of foot ulcer or Charcot arthropathy). A case-control study was done on 25 unselected clinical routine patients with acute unilateral foot trauma (cases: elective bone surgery; controls: sprain, toe fracture). Cases were 12 patients (11 diabetic subjects) with severe painless neuropathy and chronic foot pathology. Controls were 13 non-neuropathic persons. Over 1 week after the trauma, cutaneous pressure pain perception threshold (CPPPT) and deep pressure pain perception threshold (DPPPT) were measured repeatedly, adjacent to the injury and at the opposite foot (pinprick stimulators, Algometer II(®)). In the control group, post-traumatic DPPPT (but not CPPPT) at the injured foot was reduced by about 15-25%. In the case group, pre- and post-operative CPPPT and DPPPT were supranormal. Although DPPPT fell post-operatively by about 15-20%, it remained always higher than the post-traumatic DPPPT in the control group: over musculus abductor hallucis 615 kPa (kilopascal) versus 422 kPa, and over metatarsophalangeal joint 518 kPa versus 375 kPa (medians; case vs. control group); CPPPT did not decrease post-operatively. Physiological nociception and post-traumatic hyperalgesia to pressure are diminished at the foot with severe painless (diabetic) neuropathy. A degree of post-traumatic hypersensitivity required to 'pull away' from any one, even innocuous, mechanical impact in order to avoid additional damage is, therefore, lacking.

  3. Evaluation of diabetic polyneuropathy in Type 2 diabetes mellitus by nerve conduction study and association of severity of neuropathy with serum sFasL level

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    Avijit Mondal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus (DM, a growing health problem globally, has reached epidemic proportions in India. Recently, Fas-mediated apoptosis has been proposed as a causative factor responsible for neuronal degeneration in diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN, but there are very few studies to show association of serum soluble Fas ligand (sFasL level with severity of neuropathy. Aim and Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether serum sFasL, a transmembrane glycoprotein involved in apoptosis, has any association with severity of peripheral neuropathy in Type 2 DM. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in Department of Physiology in collaboration with Department of Endocrinology, IPGME&R. sFasL levels in serum were assessed using ELISA method in healthy individuals (n = 16, newly diagnosed diabetic controls (n = 16 without any complications, and in DPN cases (n = 33 with predominant neuropathy only. All subjects underwent both electrodiagnostic procedures and vibration perception threshold (VPT for quantitative assessment of the severity of neuropathy. Using nerve conduction studies, amplitudes, velocities, and latencies of both sensory and motor nerves were recorded. Results: In DPN patients, concentration of sFasL levels (87.53 ± 3.49 was significantly decreased (P < 0.0001 not only when compared with normal controls (225.30 ± 2.97 but also when compared with diabetic patients without any complication (161 ± 3.63. Moreover, the concentration of sFasL is significantly (P < 0.0001 associated with the severity of neuropathy both by VPT and nerve conduction velocity (NCV. Conclusion: Fas-mediated apoptosis is involved in Type 2 DM and might be associated with the severity of polyneuropathy.

  4. Impaired Hedgehog signalling-induced endothelial dysfunction is sufficient to induce neuropathy: implication in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapouly, Candice; Yao, Qinyu; Vandierdonck, Soizic; Larrieu-Lahargue, Frederic; Mariani, John N; Gadeau, Alain-Pierre; Renault, Marie-Ange

    2016-02-01

    Microangiopathy, i.e. endothelial dysfunction, has long been suggested to contribute to the development of diabetic neuropathy, although this has never been fully verified. In the present paper, we have identified the role of Hedgehog (Hh) signalling in endoneurial microvessel integrity and evaluated the impact of impaired Hh signalling in endothelial cells (ECs) on nerve function. By using Desert Hedgehog (Dhh)-deficient mice, we have revealed, that in the absence of Dhh, endoneurial capillaries are abnormally dense and permeable. Furthermore, Smoothened (Smo) conditional KO mice clarified that this increased vessel permeability is specifically due to impaired Hh signalling in ECs and is associated with a down-regulation of Claudin5 (Cldn5). Moreover, impairment of Hh signalling in ECs was sufficient to induce hypoalgesia and neuropathic pain. Finally in Lepr(db/db) type 2 diabetic mice, the loss of Dhh expression observed in the nerve was shown to be associated with increased endoneurial capillary permeability and decreased Cldn5 expression. Conversely, systemic administration of the Smo agonist SAG increased Cldn5 expression, decreased endoneurial capillary permeability, and restored thermal algesia to diabetic mice, demonstrating that loss of Dhh expression is crucial in the development of diabetic neuropathy. The present work demonstrates the critical role of Dhh in maintaining blood nerve barrier integrity and demonstrates for the first time that endothelial dysfunction is sufficient to induce neuropathy. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Sensory neuropathy in two Border collie puppies.

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    Vermeersch, K; Van Ham, L; Braund, K G; Bhatti, S; Tshamala, M; Chiers, K; Schrauwen, E

    2005-06-01

    A peripheral sensory neuropathy was diagnosed in two Border collie puppies. Neurological, electrophysiological and histopathological examinations suggested a purely sensory neuropathy with mainly distal involvement. Urinary incontinence was observed in one of the puppies and histological examination of the vagus nerve revealed degenerative changes. An inherited disorder was suspected.

  6. Coexistent Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A and type 2 diabetes mellitus neuropathies in a Chinese family

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    A-ping Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A is caused by duplication of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22 gene on chromosome 17. It is the most common inherited demyelinating neuropathy. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder that frequently causes predominantly sensory neuropathy. In this study, we report the occurrence of CMT1A in a Chinese family affected by type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this family, seven individuals had duplication of the PMP22 gene, although only four had clinical features of polyneuropathy. All CMT1A patients with a clinical phenotype also presented with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The other three individuals had no signs of CMT1A or type 2 diabetes mellitus. We believe that there may be a genetic link between these two diseases.

  7. The effects of intradermal botulinum toxin type a injections on pain symptoms of patients with diabetic neuropathy

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    Majid Ghasemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the dramatic increasing rate of diabetes and consequently its related complications, most importantly diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN, challenges regarding proper treatment of DPN and its effect on the quality-of-life and care of diabetic patients, the aim of this current study is to evaluate the effect of intradermal botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A injections on pain symptoms of patients with diabetic neuropathic pain. Materials and Methods: In this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial study, diabetic patients aged <70 years with neuropathic pain in both feet were enrolled. Diabetic neuropathy (DN in selected patients was diagnosed using DN4 questionnaire and nerve conduction velocity examinations. They randomized in two intervention (BTX-A injection/100 unit, N = 20 and placebo groups (normal saline injection, N = 20. The outcome of injection on diabetic neuropathic pain was assessed using neuropathy pain scale (NPS and visual analog scale (VAS score and compared in two studied groups. Results: There was no significant difference in DN4, NPS and VAS scales of studied population after intervention in the placebo group. Intradermal injection of BTX-A reduced NPS scores for all items except cold sensation (P = 0.05. It reduced DN4 scores for electric shocks, burning, pins and needles and brushing (P < 0.05. According to VAS scale 30% and 0% of patients in intervention and placebo groups have no pain after intervention (P = 0.01. Conclusion: Intradermal injection of BTX-A is a well-tolerated agent that has a significant effect on DPN pain.

  8. Reduction of voltage gated sodium channel protein in DRG by vector mediated miRNA reduces pain in rats with painful diabetic neuropathy.

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    Chattopadhyay, Munmun; Zhou, Zhigang; Hao, Shuanglin; Mata, Marina; Fink, David J

    2012-03-22

    Painful neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes. Previous studies have identified significant increases in the amount of voltage gated sodium channel isoforms Na(V)1.7 and Na(V)1.3 protein in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. We found that gene transfer-mediated release of the inhibitory neurotransmitters enkephalin or gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) from DRG neurons in diabetic animals reduced pain-related behaviors coincident with a reduction in Na(V)1.7 protein levels in DRG in vivo. To further evaluate the role of Na(V)α subunit levels in DRG in the pathogenesis of pain in diabetic neuropathy, we constructed a non-replicating herpes simplex virus (HSV)-based vector expressing a microRNA (miRNA) against Na(V)α subunits. Subcutaneous inoculation of the miRNA-expressing HSV vector into the feet of diabetic rats to transduce DRG resulted in a reduction in Na(V)α subunit levels in DRG neurons, coincident with a reduction in cold allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical hyperalgesia. These data support the role of increased Na(V)α protein in DRG in the pathogenesis of pain in diabetic neuropathy, and provide a proof-of-principle demonstration for the development of a novel therapy that could be used to treat intractable pain in patients with diabetic neuropathy.

  9. Postural Control and Gait Performance in the Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Systematic Review.

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    Mustapa, Amirah; Justine, Maria; Mohd Mustafah, Nadia; Jamil, Nursuriati; Manaf, Haidzir

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this paper is to review the published studies on the characteristics of impairments in the postural control and gait performance in diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Methods. A review was performed by obtaining publication of all papers reporting on the postural control and gait performance in DPN from Google Scholar, Ovid, SAGE, Springerlink, Science Direct (SD), EBSCO Discovery Service, and Web of Science databases. The keywords used for searching were "postural control," "balance," "gait performance," "diabetes mellitus," and "diabetic peripheral neuropathy." Results. Total of 4,337 studies were hit in the search. 1,524 studies were screened on their titles and citations. Then, 79 studies were screened on their abstract. Only 38 studies were eligible to be selected: 17 studies on postural control and 21 studies on the gait performance. Most previous researches were found to have strong evidence of postural control impairments and noticeable gait deficits in DPN. Deterioration of somatosensory, visual, and vestibular systems with the pathologic condition of diabetes on cognitive impairment causes further instability of postural and gait performance in DPN. Conclusions. Postural instability and gait imbalance in DPN may contribute to high risk of fall incidence, especially in the geriatric population. Thus, further works are crucial to highlight this fact in the hospital based and community adults.

  10. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy in ambulatory patients with type 2 diabetes in a general hospital in a middle income country: a cross-sectional study.

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    María de Los Angeles Lazo

    Full Text Available We aimed to estimate the morbidity rate and associated factors for diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN in a low-middle income country setting.Cross-sectional study, data was gathered at Peru's Ministry of Health national specialized hospital for endocrinological conditions through standardized interviews, anthropometric measurements and blood tests for glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c. DPN was evaluated using two techniques: the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test and the diabetic neuropathy symptom score. Overall prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI were calculated. Potential factors related to DPN explored included body mass index, years with disease (<10 vs. ≥10 years, glycaemic control (HbA1c <7% vs. ≥7%, microalbuminuria, retinopathy, and current pharmacological treatment. Multivariable analysis was performed using Poisson analysis to calculate prevalence ratios.DPN was observed in 73/129 (56.6% patients. In multivariable analysis adjusted by age and sex, the prevalence ratio of neuropathy was 1.4 times higher (95% CI 1.07-1.88 in patients who took insulin plus metformin compared to patients who used one treatment alone, and 1.4 higher (95% CI 1.02-1.93 in patients with ≥10 years of disease compared to those with a shorter duration of disease. Also we found some characteristics in foot evaluation associated to neuropathy such as deformities (p<0.001, onychomycosis (p = 0.012, abnormal Achilles reflex (p<0.001, pain perception (p<0.001 and vibration perception (p<0.001.DPN is highly frequent among patients with diabetes in a national specialized facility from Peru. Associated factors to DPN included being a diabetic patient for over ten years, and receiving insulin plus metformin.

  11. Range of Motion and Plantar Pressure Evaluation for the Effects of Self-Care Foot Exercises on Diabetic Patients with and Without Neuropathy.

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    Cerrahoglu, Lale; Koşan, Umut; Sirin, Tuba Cerrahoglu; Ulusoy, Aslihan

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to investigate whether a home exercise for self-care program that consists of range of motion (ROM), stretching, and strengthening exercises could improve ROM for foot joints and plantar pressure distribution during walking in diabetic patients to prevent diabetic foot complications. Seventy-six diabetic patients were recruited (38 with neuropathy and 38 without neuropathy). Neuropathy and nonneuropathy groups were randomly divided into a home exercise group (n = 19) and a control group (n = 19). Exercise groups performed their own respective training programs for 4 weeks, whereas no training was done in the control group. Total contact area and plantar pressure under six foot areas before and after the exercise program were measured. Ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joint ROM were measured before and after the exercise program. In the exercise group, there were significant improvements in ROM for the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joints (P .05). A home exercise program could be an effective preventive method for improving ROM for foot joints and plantar pressure distribution in diabetic patients independent of the presence of neuropathy.

  12. Plantar fascia enthesopathy is highly prevalent in diabetic patients without peripheral neuropathy and correlates with retinopathy and impaired kidney function.

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    Ursini, Francesco; Arturi, Franco; Nicolosi, Kassandra; Ammendolia, Antonio; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Russo, Emilio; Naty, Saverio; Bruno, Caterina; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Olivieri, Ignazio; Grembiale, Rosa Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of plantar fascia (PF) enthesopathy in Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients without distal peripheral neuropathy (DPN). We recruited 50 T2DM patients without DPN and 50 healthy controls. DPN was excluded using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI). All patients underwent a bilateral sonographicevaluation of the enthesealportion of the PF. PF thickness was significantly higher in T2DM patients (p<0.0001). T2DM patients presented a higher prevalence of entheseal thickening (p = 0.002), enthesophyte (p = 0.02) and cortical irregularity (p = 0.02). The overall sum of abnormalities was higher in T2DM patients (p<0.0001), as was the percentage of bilateral involvement (p = 0.005). In a logistic regression analysis, retinopathy predicted entheseal thickening (OR 3.5, p = 0.05) and enthesophytes (OR 5.13, p = 0.001); reduced eGFR predicted enthesophytes (OR 2.93, p = 0.04); body mass index (BMI) predicted cortical irregularity (OR 0.87, p = 0.05); mean glucose predicted enthesophyte (OR 1.01, p = 0.03); LDL cholesterol predicted cortical irregularity (OR 0.98, p = 0.02). Our data suggest that T2DM is associated with PF enthesopathyindependently of DPN.

  13. Plantar fascia enthesopathy is highly prevalent in diabetic patients without peripheral neuropathy and correlates with retinopathy and impaired kidney function.

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    Francesco Ursini

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of plantar fascia (PF enthesopathy in Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients without distal peripheral neuropathy (DPN.We recruited 50 T2DM patients without DPN and 50 healthy controls. DPN was excluded using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI. All patients underwent a bilateral sonographicevaluation of the enthesealportion of the PF.PF thickness was significantly higher in T2DM patients (p<0.0001. T2DM patients presented a higher prevalence of entheseal thickening (p = 0.002, enthesophyte (p = 0.02 and cortical irregularity (p = 0.02. The overall sum of abnormalities was higher in T2DM patients (p<0.0001, as was the percentage of bilateral involvement (p = 0.005. In a logistic regression analysis, retinopathy predicted entheseal thickening (OR 3.5, p = 0.05 and enthesophytes (OR 5.13, p = 0.001; reduced eGFR predicted enthesophytes (OR 2.93, p = 0.04; body mass index (BMI predicted cortical irregularity (OR 0.87, p = 0.05; mean glucose predicted enthesophyte (OR 1.01, p = 0.03; LDL cholesterol predicted cortical irregularity (OR 0.98, p = 0.02.Our data suggest that T2DM is associated with PF enthesopathyindependently of DPN.

  14. Evaluation of the Effects of Novel Nafimidone Derivatives on Thermal Hypoalgesia in Mice with Diabetic Neuropathy

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    Suat Kamışlı

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diabetic neuropathy (DN is a common complication in Diabetes Mellitus. The streptozotocin-induced diabetic rodent is the most commonly used animal model of diabetes and increased sodium channel expression and activity were revealed in this model. At this study, we evaluated the effect of three different nafimidone derivatives which have possible anticonvulsant activity on disorders of thermal pain sensation in diabetic mice. Study Design: Randomized animal experiment. Material and Methods: Mice were divided randomly into five groups (5 mice per group: Control, Diabetes, Dibetes+C1, Diabetes+C2, Diabetes+C3. We used hot and cold plate, and tail-immersion tests for assessment of thermal nociceptive responses. Results: Compared with the control group, the hot-plate response time and the number of paw liftings on cold plate as important indicators of loss of sensation increased, but no significant difference (p>0.05 was found in tail-immersion response time test in diabetes group. C3 compound moved it back to control group levels in the all of three tests. C1 and C2 compounds were effective only in cold-plate test. Conclusion: Nafimidone derivatives may be effective in the cases where epilepsy and diabetes occur together since it has shown efficacy against “loss of sensation” which evolves in diabetic neuropathy over time as well as its antiepileptic effect.

  15. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy-russe: new autosomal recessive neuropathy in Balkan Gypsies.

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    Thomas, P K; Kalaydjieva, L; Youl, B; Rogers, T; Angelicheva, D; King, R H; Guergueltcheva, V; Colomer, J; Lupu, C; Corches, A; Popa, G; Merlini, L; Shmarov, A; Muddle, J R; Nourallah, M; Tournev, I

    2001-10-01

    A novel peripheral neuropathy of autosomal recessive inheritance has been identified in Balkan Gypsies and termed hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy-Russe (HMSN-R). We investigated 21 affected individuals from 10 families. Distal lower limb weakness began between the ages of 8 and 16 years, upper limb involvement beginning between 10 and 43 years, with an average of 22 years. This progressive disorder led to severe weakness of the lower limbs, generalized in the oldest subject (aged 57 years), and marked distal upper limb weakness. Prominent distal sensory loss involved all modalities, resulting in neuropathic joint degeneration in two instances. All patients showed foot deformity, and most showed hand deformity. Motor nerve conduction velocity was moderately reduced in the upper limbs but unobtainable in the legs. Sensory nerve action potentials were absent. There was loss of larger myelinated nerve fibers and profuse regenerative activity in the sural nerve. HMSN-R is a new form of autosomal recessive inherited HMSN caused by a single founder mutation in a 1 Mb interval on chromosome 10q.

  16. Extracellular Matrix Remodeling and Modulation of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress by Sulforaphane in Experimental Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Passant E; Abdelkader, Noha F; El Awdan, Sally A; El-Shabrawy, Osama A; Zaki, Hala F

    2018-04-27

    The peripheral nervous system is one of many organ systems that can be profoundly impacted in diabetes mellitus. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy has a significant negative effect on patients' quality of life as it begins with loss of limbs' sensation and may result in lower limb amputation. This investigation aimed at exploring the effect of sulforaphane on peripheral neuropathy in diabetic rats. Experimental diabetes was induced through single intraperitoneal injections of nicotinamide (50 mg/kg) and streptozotocin (52.5 mg/kg). Rats were divided into five groups. Two groups were treated with saline or sulforaphane (1 mg/kg, p.o.). Three diabetic groups were either untreated or given sulforaphane (1 mg/kg, p.o.) or pregabalin (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Two weeks after drugs' administration, biochemical, behavioral, histopathological, and immunohistochemical investigations were carried out. Treatment with sulforaphane restored animals' body weight, reduced blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and increased insulin levels. In parallel, it normalized motor coordination and the latency withdrawal time of tail flick test, increased the latency withdrawal time of cold allodynia test, and ameliorated histopathological changes. Treatment of sulforaphane, likewise, decreased sciatic nerve malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, interleukin-6, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 contents. Similarly, it reduced sciatic nerve DNA fragmentation and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and nuclear factor kappa-B p65. Meanwhile, it increased sciatic nerve superoxide dismutase and interleukin-10 contents. These results reveal the neuroprotective effect of sulforaphane against peripheral neuropathy in diabetic rats possibly through modulating oxidative stress, inflammation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Graphical Abstract Diagram that illustrates the effects of sulforaphane in treating experimental diabetic peripheral neuropathy. In NA-STZ model of diabetes mellitus, sulforaphane, restored

  17. Relationships between Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Peripheral Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetes

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    Byung Kil Ha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBrachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV is known to be a good surrogate marker of clinical atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is a major predictor for developing neuropathy. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship between baPWV and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN in patients with type 2 diabetes.MethodsA retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted involving 692 patients with type 2 diabetes. The correlation between increased baPWV and DPN, neurological symptoms, and neurological assessment was analyzed. DPN was examined using the total symptom score (TSS, ankle reflexes, the vibration test, and the 10-g monofilament test. DPN was defined as TSS ≥2 and an abnormal neurological assessment. Data were expressed as means±standard deviation for normally distributed data and as median (interquartile range for non-normally distributed data. Independent t-tests or chi-square tests were used to make comparisons between groups, and a multiple logistic regression test was used to evaluate independent predictors of DPN. The Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test was used to adjust for age.ResultsPatients with DPN had higher baPWV and systolic blood pressure, and were more likely to be older and female, when compared to the control group. According to univariate analysis of risk factors for DPN, the odds ratio of the baPWV ≥1,600 cm/sec was 1.611 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.072 to 2.422; P=0.021 and the odds ratio in female was 1.816 (95% CI, 1.195 to 2.760; P=0.005.ConclusionIncreased baPWV was significantly correlated with peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  18. THE INFLUENCE OF PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY AND PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASE IN THE OUTCOME OF DIABETIC FOOT MANAGEMENT – A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

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    Sundar Prakash S, Krishnakumar, Chandra Prabha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Peripheral neuropathy and Peripheral Vascular Disease are the risk factors for the development of diabetic foot. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences and predictors of outcome parameters in patients with diabetic foot by stratifying these subjects according to the severity of these risk factors. Materials and methods: This is a prospective study conducted in 70 patients in the age group of 30-90 years diagnosed as Type II Diabetes with foot ulcers. After detailed clinical examination the following tests were conducted in all the patients: Complete blood count (CBC, Haemoglobin (Hb, Random Blood Sugar (RBS, Erythrocyte Sedimentation rate (ESR, Chest X-ray(CXR, Electrocardiography (ECG, foot X-ray, pus culture, Neuropathy testing by Semmes Weinstein Monofilament Test and Vibration Perception Threshold and Peripheral vascularity assessment by Duplex Doppler. Then grading of the ulcers was done using Wagner’s Grade. The outcome of the patients was assessed by recording the healing time, mode of surgery and amputation rates of the patients. Results: A total of 70 patients with diabetic foot were consecutively included into the study (65.7% male, age (31% in 51-60 years, mean diabetes duration (5.2 years, Ulcer Grade (37% in Grade IV, Foot lesions (45.7% in toe, Blood sugar levels (64% in 300-400 mg/dl, Neuropathy (84%, Peripheral vascular disease (67%, major amputation (7% and mortality (1.4%. Conclusion: All diabetic patients should undergo testing for neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease apart from doing other tests.

  19. Diagnosis and therapeutic options for peripheral vasculitic neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Vasculitis can affect the peripheral nervous system alone (nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy) or can be a part of primary or secondary systemic vasculitis. In cases of pre-existing systemic vasculitis, the diagnosis can easily be made, whereas suspected vasculitic neuropathy as initial or only manifestation of vasculitis requires careful clinical, neurophysiological, laboratory and histopathological workout. The typical clinical syndrome is mononeuropathia multiplex or asymmetric neuropathy, but distal-symmetric neuropathy can frequently be seen. Standard treatments include steroids, azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide. More recently the B-cell antibody rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins have shown to be effective in some vasculitic neuropathy types. PMID:25829955

  20. The role of foot morphology on foot function in diabetic subjects with or without neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiotto, Annamaria; Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Cristoferi, Giuseppe; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of foot morphology, related with respect to diabetes and peripheral neuropathy in altering foot kinematics and plantar pressure during gait. Healthy and diabetic subjects with or without neuropathy with different foot types were analyzed. Three dimensional multisegment foot kinematics and plantar pressures were assessed on 120 feet: 40 feet (24 cavus, 20 with valgus heel and 11 with hallux valgus) in the control group, 80 feet in the diabetic (25 cavus 13 with valgus heel and 13 with hallux valgus) and the neuropathic groups (28 cavus, 24 with valgus heel and 18 with hallux valgus). Subjects were classified according to their foot morphology allowing further comparisons among the subgroups with the same foot morphology. When comparing neuropathic subjects with cavus foot, valgus heel with controls with the same foot morphology, important differences were noticed: increased dorsiflexion and peak plantar pressure on the forefoot (Pfoot morphology in altering both kinematics and plantar pressure in diabetic subjects, diabetes appeared to further contribute in altering foot biomechanics. Surprisingly, all the diabetic subjects with normal foot arch or with valgus hallux were no more likely to display significant differences in biomechanics parameters than controls. This data could be considered a valuable support for future research on diabetic foot function, and in planning preventive interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamics of electrophysiological parameters of distal symmetric polyneuropathy in the course of pregnancy of women with type 1 diabetes mellitus

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    A. I. Poroshnichenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the study: assessment of clinical and electroneuromyographic (ENMG parameters of distal symmetric polyneuropathy during pregnancy.Materials and methods. 32 pregnant women with type I diabetes mellitus were examined. Signs of diabetic polyneuropathy (DPNP were revealed in 87.5 percent (n = 28 of patients. Duration of diabetes in patients with DPNP varied from 1 to 30 years (in average, 11.0 ± 6.4 years. Subjective (NSS scale and objective assessment (NDS scale of neuropathy symptoms, as well as the nerve conduction studies of the peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves were performed twice, on the 15–16 and 32–33 weeks of pregnancy.Results. Increase in subjective and objective symptoms of polyneuropathy along the pregnancy according to NSS and NDS scales (р < 0.05, as well as significant decrease of CMAP and SNAP amplitudes (р < 0.05 in the second half of pregnancy, indicating the progression of the DPNP. The most frequent pathological changes were observed in the peroneal and sural nerves.Conclusions. Pregnancy has an adverse effect on the course of the DPNP contributing to the axonal damage of peripheral nerves, progression of neurological impairment and aggravation of subjective neuropathic symptoms.

  2. Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy Affects Symptom Generation and Brain-Gut Axis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, Christina; Søfteland, Eirik; Gunterberg, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    electrostimulations, and brain activity was modeled by brain electrical source analysis. Self-reported gastrointestinal symptoms (per the Patient Assessment of Upper Gastrointestinal Disorder Severity Symptom Index) and quality of life (per short-form health survey with 36 questions) were collected...... symptoms.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSFifteen healthy volunteers and 15 diabetic patients (12 with type 1 diabetes) with severe gastrointestinal symptoms and clinical suspicion of autonomic neuropathy were included. Psychophysics and evoked brain potentials were assessed after painful rectosigmoid...... component in evoked potentials (P = 0.01). There was a caudoanterior shift of the insular brain source (P = 0.01) and an anterior shift of the cingulate generator (P = 0.01). Insular source location was associated with HRV assessments (all P

  3. Determination of Efficacy of Reflexology in Managing Patients with Diabetic Neuropathy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

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    Krishna Dalal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The restricted usage of existing pharmacological methods which do not seem to provide the treatment of diabetic neuropathy may lead to exploring the efficacy of a complementary therapy. In this context, this paper was devoted to evaluate the efficacy of foot reflexology. This health science works on the hypothesis that the dysfunctional states of body parts could be identified by observing certain skin features and be rectified by stimulating certain specific areas mapped on feet. Method. Subjects (N=58 with diagnosed diabetic neuropathy were randomly distributed into reflexology and control groups in which both group patients were treated with ongoing pharmacological drugs. Reflexology group patients were additionally treated holistically with the hypothesis that this therapy would bring homeostasis among body organ functions. This was a caregiver-based study with a follow-up period of 6 months. The outcome measures were pain reduction, glycemic control, nerve conductivity, and thermal and vibration sensitivities. The skin features leading to the detection of the abnormal functional states of body parts were also recorded and analyzed. Results. Reflexology group showed more improvements in all outcome measures than those of control subjects with statistical significance. Conclusion. This study exhibited the efficient utility of reflexology therapy integrated with conventional medicines in managing diabetic neuropathy.

  4. Determination of Efficacy of Reflexology in Managing Patients with Diabetic Neuropathy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Krishna; Maran, V. Bharathi; Pandey, Ravindra M.; Tripathi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Background. The restricted usage of existing pharmacological methods which do not seem to provide the treatment of diabetic neuropathy may lead to exploring the efficacy of a complementary therapy. In this context, this paper was devoted to evaluate the efficacy of foot reflexology. This health science works on the hypothesis that the dysfunctional states of body parts could be identified by observing certain skin features and be rectified by stimulating certain specific areas mapped on feet. Method. Subjects (N = 58) with diagnosed diabetic neuropathy were randomly distributed into reflexology and control groups in which both group patients were treated with ongoing pharmacological drugs. Reflexology group patients were additionally treated holistically with the hypothesis that this therapy would bring homeostasis among body organ functions. This was a caregiver-based study with a follow-up period of 6 months. The outcome measures were pain reduction, glycemic control, nerve conductivity, and thermal and vibration sensitivities. The skin features leading to the detection of the abnormal functional states of body parts were also recorded and analyzed. Results. Reflexology group showed more improvements in all outcome measures than those of control subjects with statistical significance. Conclusion. This study exhibited the efficient utility of reflexology therapy integrated with conventional medicines in managing diabetic neuropathy. PMID:24527055

  5. Deletion of Sarm1 gene is neuroprotective in two models of peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkiew, Elliot; Falconer, Debbie; Reed, Nicole; Höke, Ahmet

    2017-09-01

    Distal axon degeneration seen in many peripheral neuropathies is likely to share common molecular mechanisms with Wallerian degeneration. Although several studies in mouse models of peripheral neuropathy showed prevention of axon degeneration in the slow Wallerian degeneration (Wlds) mouse, the role of a recently identified player in Wallerian degeneration, Sarm1, has not been explored extensively. In this study, we show that mice lacking the Sarm1 gene are resistant to distal axonal degeneration in a model of chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy caused by paclitaxel and a model of high fat diet induced putative metabolic neuropathy. This study extends the role of Sarm1 to axon degeneration seen in peripheral neuropathies and identifies it as a likely target for therapeutic development. © 2017 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  6. Postural Control and Gait Performance in the Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Systematic Review

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    Amirah Mustapa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this paper is to review the published studies on the characteristics of impairments in the postural control and gait performance in diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN. Methods. A review was performed by obtaining publication of all papers reporting on the postural control and gait performance in DPN from Google Scholar, Ovid, SAGE, Springerlink, Science Direct (SD, EBSCO Discovery Service, and Web of Science databases. The keywords used for searching were “postural control,” “balance,” “gait performance,” “diabetes mellitus,” and “diabetic peripheral neuropathy.” Results. Total of 4,337 studies were hit in the search. 1,524 studies were screened on their titles and citations. Then, 79 studies were screened on their abstract. Only 38 studies were eligible to be selected: 17 studies on postural control and 21 studies on the gait performance. Most previous researches were found to have strong evidence of postural control impairments and noticeable gait deficits in DPN. Deterioration of somatosensory, visual, and vestibular systems with the pathologic condition of diabetes on cognitive impairment causes further instability of postural and gait performance in DPN. Conclusions. Postural instability and gait imbalance in DPN may contribute to high risk of fall incidence, especially in the geriatric population. Thus, further works are crucial to highlight this fact in the hospital based and community adults.

  7. Unsteady walking as a symptom in type 2 diabetes mellitus: independent association with depression and sedentary lifestyle and no association with diabetic neuropathy

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    L.S. Dias

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to look at the determinants of the unsteady walking (UW symptom in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM by defining if UW and/or the Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms Score (DNSS are associated with positive scores in Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI and with a positive Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument score (MNSI. We evaluated 203 T2DM patients without visible gait disturbances. They were divided into UW (+ and UW (− or DNSS (+ and DNSS (− according to symptoms. We found a prevalence of 48.3% for UW (+ and of 63% for DNSS (+ in our sample. In univariate analysis, the presence of UW was significantly associated with waist circumference (P=0.024, number of comorbidities (P=0.012, not practicing physical exercise (P=0.011, positive BDI score (P=0.003, presence of neuropathic symptoms by the MNSI questionnaire (P<0.001, and positive diabetic neuropathy screening by MNSI (P=0.021. In multivariate analysis, UW (used as a dependent variable was independently associated with a positive BDI score (P<0.001; 95%CI=1.01-1.03, T2DM duration (P=0.023; 95%CI=1.00–1.03, number of co-morbidities (P=0.032; 95%CI=1.01–1.37, and a sedentary lifestyle (P=0.025; 95%CI=1.06–2.5. The UW symptom and a positive DNSS are more closely related to a positive score for depression than to presence of neuropathy in T2DM.

  8. Benfotiamine and Alpha-Lipoic Acid in the Treatment of Diabetic Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy (Review of Literature and Own Researches

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    V.O. Sergiyenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of current views on the mechanisms of fat-soluble form of vitamin B1 (benfotiamine and α-lipoic acid action, in particular features of their impact on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, endothelial function, hemodynamics, vessel stiffness in cardiovascular diseases, cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus, was perfomed. The results of experimental, randomized and own studies confirmed the value of the combined administration of benfotiamine and α-lipoic acid for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, in particular cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  9. Targeting apoptosis signalling kinase-1 (ASK-1 does not prevent the development of neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

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    Victoria L Newton

    Full Text Available Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase-1 (ASK1 is a mitogen-activated protein 3 kinase (MAPKKK/MAP3K which lies upstream of the stress-activated MAPKs, JNK and p38. ASK1 may be activated by a variety of extracellular and intracellular stimuli. MAP kinase activation in the sensory nervous system as a result of diabetes has been shown in numerous preclinical and clinical studies. As a common upstream activator of both p38 and JNK, we hypothesised that activation of ASK1 contributes to nerve dysfunction in diabetic neuropathy. We therefore wanted to characterize the expression of ASK1 in sensory neurons, and determine whether the absence of functional ASK1 would protect against the development of neuropathy in a mouse model of experimental diabetes. ASK1 mRNA and protein is constitutively expressed by multiple populations of sensory neurons of the adult mouse lumbar DRG. Diabetes was induced in male C57BL/6 and transgenic ASK1 kinase-inactive (ASK1n mice using streptozotocin. Levels of ASK1 do not change in the DRG, spinal cord, or sciatic nerve following induction of diabetes. However, levels of ASK2 mRNA increase in the spinal cord at 4 weeks of diabetes, which could represent a future target for this field. Neither motor nerve conduction velocity deficits, nor thermal or mechanical hypoalgesia were prevented or ameliorated in diabetic ASK1n mice. These results suggest that activation of ASK1 is not responsible for the nerve deficits observed in this mouse model of diabetic neuropathy.

  10. Balance rehabilitation: promoting the role of virtual reality in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Gurtej S; Sayeed, Rashad; Schwenk, Michael; Bharara, Manish; Menzies, Robert; Talal, Talal K; Armstrong, David G; Najafi, Bijan

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with diabetic peripheral neuropathy frequently experience concomitant impaired proprioception and postural instability. Conventional exercise training has been demonstrated to be effective in improving balance but does not incorporate visual feedback targeting joint perception, which is an integral mechanism that helps compensate for impaired proprioception in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This prospective cohort study recruited 29 participants (mean ± SD: age, 57 ± 10 years; body mass index [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared], 26.9 ± 3.1). Participants satisfying the inclusion criteria performed predefined ankle exercises through reaching tasks, with visual feedback from the ankle joint projected on a screen. Ankle motion in the mediolateral and anteroposterior directions was captured using wearable sensors attached to the participant's shank. Improvements in postural stability were quantified by measuring center of mass sway area and the reciprocal compensatory index before and after training using validated body-worn sensor technology. Findings revealed a significant reduction in center of mass sway after training (mean, 22%; P = .02). A higher postural stability deficit (high body sway) at baseline was associated with higher training gains in postural balance (reduction in center of mass sway) (r = -0.52, P virtual reality technology. The method included wearable sensors and an interactive user interface for real-time visual feedback based on ankle joint motion, similar to a video gaming environment, for compensating impaired joint proprioception. These findings support that visual feedback generated from the ankle joint coupled with motor learning may be effective in improving postural stability in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  11. Association between a MIR499A polymorphism and diabetic neuropathy in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccacci, Cinzia; Latini, Andrea; Greco, Carla; Politi, Cristina; D'Amato, Cinzia; Lauro, Davide; Novelli, Giuseppe; Borgiani, Paola; Spallone, Vincenza

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) affect a large percentage of diabetic people and impact severely on quality of life. As it seems that miRNAs and their variations might play a role in these complications, we investigated whether the rs3746444 SNP in the MIR499A gene could be associated with susceptibility to DPN and/or CAN. We analyzed 150 participants with type 2 diabetes. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples and genotyping was performed by TaqMan genotyping assay. Cardiovascular tests, MNSI-Q and MDNS for neuropathic symptoms and signs, VPT, and thermal thresholds were used for CAN and DPN assessment. We performed a genotype-phenotype correlation analysis. We observed that the GG genotype was associated with a higher risk of developing CAN (P=0.002 and OR=16.08, P=0.0005 and OR=35.02, for early and confirmed CAN, respectively) and DPN (P=0.037 and OR=6.56), after correction for BMI, sex, age, HbA1c and disease duration. Moreover, the GG genotype was associated with worse values of MDNS (P=0.017), VPT (P=0.01), thermal thresholds (P=0.01), and CAN score (P<0.001). A logistic multivariate analysis confirmed that MIR499A GG genotype, disease duration and HbA1c contributed to early CAN (R 2 =0.26), while the same variables and age contributed to DPN (R 2 =0.21). With a multiple linear regression, we observed that GG genotype (P=0.001) and disease duration (P=0.035) were the main variables contributing to the CAN score (R 2 =0.35). We described for the first time that the MIR499A genetic variation could be involved in diabetic neuropathies susceptibility. In particular, patients carrying the rs3746444 GG genotype had a higher risk of CAN development, together with a more severe form of CAN. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Foot care knowledge and practices and the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy among people with diabetes attending a secondary care rural hospital in southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Hanu; Rakesh, Ps; Krishna, Manjunath; Alex, Reginald; Abraham, Vinod Joseph; George, Kuryan; Prasad, Jasmin H

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multifaceted disease and foot ulceration is one of its most common complications. Poor foot care knowledge and practices are important risk factors for foot problems among people with diabetes. To assess the knowledge and practices regarding foot care and to estimate the proportion of people with peripheral neuropathy among people with diabetes. The cross-sectional study was conducted in 212 consecutive diabetes patients attending the out-patient department of a rural secondary care hospital. A questionnaire which included demographic details, knowledge questionnaire, and Nottingham assessment of functional foot care was administered. The Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument was used to identify peripheral neuropathy. Descriptive analysis with frequency distribution for knowledge and practice scores, univariate analysis, and multiple logistic regressions to find significant variables associated with good knowledge and practice scores. About 75% had good knowledge score and 67% had good foot care practice score. Male gender (OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.16-4.79), poor education status (OR 2.40, 95% CI 1.19-4.28), and lesser duration of diabetes (OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.15-4.41) were significantly associated with poor knowledge on foot care. Poor knowledge was associated with poor foot care practices (OR 3.43, 95% CI 1.75-6.72). The prevalence of neuropathy was 47% (95% CI 40.14-53.85) and it was associated with longer duration of the disease (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.18-4.04). There exist deficiencies in knowledge and practices regarding foot care. Male gender, low education, and lesser duration of diabetes are associated with poor knowledge scores. The prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is high.

  13. Spinal cord stimulation in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy: A multicentre randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Cecilia Cecilia Clementine; Meier, Kaare; Brocades Zaalberg, Paul; Nijhuis, Harold J.A.; Duyvendak, Wim; Vesper, Jan; Enggaard, Thomas P.; Lenders, Mathieu W.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a peripheral neuropathic pain condition that is often difficult to relieve. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a proven effective therapy for various types of mixed neuropathic conditions, yet effectiveness of SCS treatment for PDN is not well established. To our

  14. Unsteady walking as a symptom in type 2 diabetes mellitus: independent association with depression and sedentary lifestyle and no association with diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, L S; Nienov, O H; Goelzer Neto, C F; Schmid, H

    2018-03-26

    The purpose of this study was to look at the determinants of the unsteady walking (UW) symptom in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by defining if UW and/or the Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms Score (DNSS) are associated with positive scores in Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) and with a positive Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument score (MNSI). We evaluated 203 T2DM patients without visible gait disturbances. They were divided into UW (+) and UW (-) or DNSS (+) and DNSS (-) according to symptoms. We found a prevalence of 48.3% for UW (+) and of 63% for DNSS (+) in our sample. In univariate analysis, the presence of UW was significantly associated with waist circumference (P=0.024), number of comorbidities (P=0.012), not practicing physical exercise (P=0.011), positive BDI score (P=0.003), presence of neuropathic symptoms by the MNSI questionnaire (Psedentary lifestyle (P=0.025; 95%CI=1.06-2.5). The UW symptom and a positive DNSS are more closely related to a positive score for depression than to presence of neuropathy in T2DM.

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of skin blood flow response to mechanical and thermal stresses in the plantar foot of diabetics with peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Fuyuan; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) are a major complication in diabetics. Impaired microvascular reactivity is a major contributor to the development of DFU and has been traditionally quantified by time-domain or frequency-domain measures of skin blood flow (SBF). These measures, however, are unable to characterize the changes of nonlinear dynamics of SBF associated with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy. The objective of this study was to investigate altered nonlinear dynamics of skin blood flow in the plantar foot of diabetics with peripheral neuropathy. 18 type 2 diabetics with peripheral neuropathy and 8 healthy controls were recruited. SBF at the first metatarsal head in response to a loading pressure of 300 mmHg and a local heating was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. A sample entropy approach was used to quantify the degree of regularity of SBF. Our results showed that the regularity degree of SBF in the diabetic foot underwent only small changes during post-occlusive reactive hyperemia and thermally induced biphasic response compared to non-diabetics. SBF of the diabetic foot has higher degree of irregularity during reactive hyperemia because of attenuated myogenic activity, and demonstrated higher regularity during the biphasic response largely due to significantly enhanced cardiac activities. This study suggests that the regularity degree of SBF at the first metatarsal head could be used to assess impaired microvascular reactivity and thus may be used to assess the risk for DFU in diabetics with peripheralneuropathy.

  16. Use of Natural Compounds in the Management of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

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    Maria Galuppo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nephropathy, retinopathy cardiomyopathy and peripheral neuropathy are all recognized as important complications in about 50% of diabetes mellitus (DM patients, mostly related to a poor glycemic control or to an improper management of this pathology. In any case, amongst others, diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN seems the leading and most painful complication usually affecting many DM patients. For this reason, this work was conceived to review the large variety of strategies adopted for management of DPN, starting from the most conventional therapies to arrive at alternative approaches. From this perspective, both the most popular pharmacological treatments used to respond to the poorly effect of common analgesics—non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS and opioids—understood as gabapentin vs. pregabalin clinical use, and the guidelines provided by Oriental Medicine as well as by a long list of natural compounds that many authors identify as possible therapeutic or alternative agents to replace or to combine with the existing therapies will be included. Moreover, in the effort to provide the widest panel of remedies, the most antique techniques of acupuncture and electrostimulation will be considered as alternative, which are useful approaches to take into account in any non-pharmacological strategy for DPN management.

  17. Concurrent targeting of nitrosative stress-PARP pathway corrects functional, behavioral and biochemical deficits in experimental diabetic neuropathy

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    Negi, Geeta; Kumar, Ashutosh [Molecular Neuropharmacology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER), Sector-67, S.A.S. Nagar, Punjab 160062 (India); Sharma, Shyam S., E-mail: sssharma@niper.ac.in [Molecular Neuropharmacology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER), Sector-67, S.A.S. Nagar, Punjab 160062 (India)

    2010-01-01

    Peroxynitrite mediated nitrosative stress, an indisputable initiator of DNA damage and overactivation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), a nuclear enzyme activated after sensing DNA damage, are two crucial pathogenetic mechanisms in diabetic neuropathy. The intent of the present study was to investigate the effect of combination of a peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst (PDC), FeTMPyP and a PARP inhibitor, 4-ANI against diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The end points of evaluation of the study included motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) and nerve blood flow (NBF) for evaluating nerve functions; thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia for assessing nociceptive alterations, malondialdehyde and peroxynitrite levels to detect oxidative stress-nitrosative stress; NAD concentration in sciatic nerve to assess overactivation of PARP. Additionally immunohistochemical studies for nitrotyrosine and Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) was also performed. Treatment with the combination of FeTMPyP and 4-ANI led to significant improvement in nerve functions and pain parameters and also attenuated the oxidative-nitrosative stress markers. Further, the combination also reduced the overactivation of PARP as evident from increased NAD levels and decreased PAR immunopositivity in sciatic nerve microsections. Thus, it can be concluded that treatment with the combination of a PDC and PARP inhibitor attenuates alteration in peripheral nerves in diabetic neuropathy (DN).

  18. [Joint diagnostic value of four temperature sensation tests in elderly patients with type 2 diabetic peripheral neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Li, Yun-Ming; Ai, Zhi-Hua; You, Zhi-Qing; Wan, Yong; Cheng, Ying; Lang, Hong-Mei

    2013-07-01

    To explore the joint diagnostic value of four temperature sensation tests in elderly patients with type 2 diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Thermal sensory analyzer-II were applied to measure cool sensation (CS), warm sensation (WS), cold pain sensation (CP)and heat pain sensation (HP) of 308 elderly patients with type 2 diabetes. Logistic regression model was adopted to create the new variable Temp4 from four temperature sensation tests to diagnose type 2 diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The ROC curve analysis was used to determine the best cut-off points of the four temperature sensation and Temp4, and the diagnostic value of it was evaluated. The means of temperature sensation tests of the diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) group were significantly different from those of the non-DPN group (P sensation tests to diagnose the DPN, the sensitivity of WS test was the highest, and the value was 0.710; but the specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, Youden index, diagnostic accuracy and Kappa value of cold sensation test were the highest, and the values were 0.842, 0.746, 0.799, 0.528, 77.92% and 0.535, respectively; the Kappa values of the other three temperature sensation tests were all greater than 0.4 (P sensation tests (P sensation quantitative tests were in good agreementand could be applied to diagnose DPN; the new variable Temp4 could be used for diagnosis of DPN with a higher diagnostic accuracy.

  19. Testing for autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1984-01-01

    Autonomic neuropathy is a common complication in long-term diabetes, about 30% of the patients showing measurable signs of autonomic dysfunction after 10 years duration of disease. The diagnosis is often difficult to establish because clinical symptoms generally occur late in the course of the di......Autonomic neuropathy is a common complication in long-term diabetes, about 30% of the patients showing measurable signs of autonomic dysfunction after 10 years duration of disease. The diagnosis is often difficult to establish because clinical symptoms generally occur late in the course...

  20. Correction and transformation of normative neurophysiological data: is there added value in the diagnosis of distal symmetrical peripheral neuropathy?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mchugh, John C

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Despite theoretical advantages, the practical impact of mathematical correction of normative electrodiagnostic data is poorly quantified. METHODS: One hundred five healthy volunteers had clinical and neurophysiological assessment. The effects of age, height, gender, weight, and body mass index were explored using stepwise regression modeling. Reference values were derived from raw and adjusted data, which were transformed to allow appropriate use of parametric statistics. The diagnostic accuracy of derived limits was tested in patients at risk of distal symmetric peripheral neuropathy (DSPN) from chemotherapy. RESULTS: The variability of our normative data was reduced by up to 69% through the use of regression modeling, but the overall benefits of mathematical correction were marginal. The most accurate reference limits were established using the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles of the raw data. CONCLUSIONS: Stepwise statistical regression and mathematical transformation improve the distribution of normative data, but their practical impact for diagnosis of distal symmetrical polyneuropathy is small.

  1. Peripheral neuropathy as a complication of diabetic ketoacidosis in a child with newly diagnosed diabetes type 1 - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baszyńska-Wilk, Marta; Wysocka-Mincewicz, Marta; Świercz, Anna; Świderska, Jolanta; Marszał, Magdalena; Szalecki, Mieczysław

    2017-12-08

    Neurological complications of diabetic ketoacidosis are considered to be very serious clinical problem. The most common complication is cerebral edema. However this group includes also less common syndromes such as ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis or very rare peripheral neuropathy. We present a case of 9-year old girl with new onset type 1 diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis, cerebral edema, multifocal vasogenic brain lesions and lower limbs peripheral paresis. The patient developed polydipsia and polyuria one week before admission to the hospital. In laboratory tests initial blood glucose level 1136 mg/dl and acidosis (pH 7.1; BE-25.9) were noted. She was admitted to the hospital in a critical condition and required treatment in intensive care unit. Computed tomography scan showed brain edema and hipodense lesion in the left temporal region. Brain MRI revealed more advanced multifocal brain lesions Nerve conduction studies demonstrated damage of the motor neuron in both lower extremities with dysfunction in both peroneal nerves and the right tibial nerve. As a result of diabetological, neurological treatment and physiotherapy patient's health state gradually improved. Acute neuropathy after ketoacidosis is rare complication and its pathomechanism is not clear. Patients with DKA require careful monitoring of neurological functions even after normalization of glycemic parameters.

  2. Ethnic differences in the +405 and -460 vascular endothelial growth factor polymorphisms and peripheral neuropathy in patients with diabetes residing in a North London, community in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitouni, Karima; Tinworth, Lorna; Earle, Kenneth Anthony

    2017-06-29

    There are marked ethnic differences in the susceptibility to the long-term diabetic vascular complications including sensory neuropathy. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) +405 (C/G) and -460 (T/C) polymorphisms are associated with retinopathy and possibly with nephropathy, however no information is available on their relationship with peripheral neuropathy. Therefore, we examined the prevalence of these VEGF genotypes in a multi-ethnic cohort of patients with diabetes and their relationship with evident peripheral diabetic neuropathy. In the current investigation, we studied 313 patients with diabetes mellitus of African-Caribbean, Indo-Asian and Caucasian ethnic origin residing in an inner-city community in London, United Kingdom attending a single secondary care centre. Genotyping was performed for the VEGF +405 and VEGF -460 polymorphisms using a pyrosequencing technique. Forty-nine patients (15.6%) had clinical evidence of peripheral neuropathy. Compared to Caucasian patients, African-Caribbean and Indo-Asian patients had lower incidence of neuropathy (24.6%, 14.28%, 6.7%, respectively; P = 0.04). The frequency of the VEGF +405 GG genotype was more common in Indo-Asian patients compared to African-Caribbean and Caucasian patients (67.5%, 45.3%, 38.4%, respectively; p ≤ 0.02). The G allele was more common in patients with type 2 diabetes of Indo-Asian origin compared to African-Caribbean and Caucasian origin (p ≤ 0.02). There was no difference between the ethnic groups in VEGF -460 genotypes. The distributions of the VEGF +405 and VEGF -460 genotypes were similar between the diabetic patients with and without neuropathy. In this cohort of patients, VEGF +405 and VEGF -460 polymorphisms were not associated with evident diabetic peripheral neuropathy, however an association was found between VEGF +405 genotypes and Indo-Asian which might have relevance to their lower rates of ulceration and amputation. This finding highlights the need for

  3. MDCT assessment of CAD in type-2 diabetic subjects with diabetic neuropathy: the role of Charcot neuro-arthropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marano, Riccardo; Savino, Giancarlo; Merlino, Biagio; Pirro, Federica; Rutigliano, Claudia; Santangelo, Carolina; Minoiu, Aurelian Costin; Natale, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Pitocco, Dario; Di Stasio, Enrico; Trani, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    To compare the CACS and CAD severity assessed by MDCT in neuropathic type-2 diabetic patients with and without Charcot-neuroarthropathy (CN). Thirty-four CN asymptomatic-patients and 36 asymptomatic-patients with diabetic-neuropathy (DN) without CN underwent MDCT to assess CACS and severity of CAD. Patients were classified as positive for significant CAD in presence of at least one stenosis >50 % on MDCT-coronary-angiography (MDCT-CA). Groups were matched for age, sex and traditional CAD risk-factors. The coronary-angiography (CA) was performed in all patients with at least a significant stenosis detected by MDCT-CA, both as reference and eventually as treatment. CN patients showed higher rates of significant CAD in comparison with DN subjects [p < 0.001], while non-significant differences were observed in CACS (p = 0.980). No significant differences were also observed in CACS distribution in all subjects for stenosis ≥/<50 % (p = 0.814), as well as in both groups (p = 0.661 and 0.559, respectively). The MDCT-CA showed an overall diagnostic-accuracy for significant CAD of 87 %. These preliminary data suggest that CN-patients have a higher prevalence of severe CAD in comparison with DN-patients, while coronary plaques do not exhibit an increased amount of calcium. MDCT may be helpful to assess the CV risk in such asymptomatic type-2-diabetic patients with autonomic-neuropathy. (orig.)

  4. MDCT assessment of CAD in type-2 diabetic subjects with diabetic neuropathy: the role of Charcot neuro-arthropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marano, Riccardo; Savino, Giancarlo; Merlino, Biagio; Pirro, Federica; Rutigliano, Claudia; Santangelo, Carolina; Minoiu, Aurelian Costin; Natale, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Catholic University of Rome, ' ' A. Gemelli' ' University Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences - Institute of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Pitocco, Dario [Catholic University of Rome, ' ' A. Gemelli' ' University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Rome (Italy); Di Stasio, Enrico [Catholic University of Rome, ' ' A. Gemelli' ' University Hospital, Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Rome (Italy); Trani, Carlo [Catholic University of Rome, ' ' A. Gemelli' ' University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine - Institute of Cardiology, Rome (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    To compare the CACS and CAD severity assessed by MDCT in neuropathic type-2 diabetic patients with and without Charcot-neuroarthropathy (CN). Thirty-four CN asymptomatic-patients and 36 asymptomatic-patients with diabetic-neuropathy (DN) without CN underwent MDCT to assess CACS and severity of CAD. Patients were classified as positive for significant CAD in presence of at least one stenosis >50 % on MDCT-coronary-angiography (MDCT-CA). Groups were matched for age, sex and traditional CAD risk-factors. The coronary-angiography (CA) was performed in all patients with at least a significant stenosis detected by MDCT-CA, both as reference and eventually as treatment. CN patients showed higher rates of significant CAD in comparison with DN subjects [p < 0.001], while non-significant differences were observed in CACS (p = 0.980). No significant differences were also observed in CACS distribution in all subjects for stenosis ≥/<50 % (p = 0.814), as well as in both groups (p = 0.661 and 0.559, respectively). The MDCT-CA showed an overall diagnostic-accuracy for significant CAD of 87 %. These preliminary data suggest that CN-patients have a higher prevalence of severe CAD in comparison with DN-patients, while coronary plaques do not exhibit an increased amount of calcium. MDCT may be helpful to assess the CV risk in such asymptomatic type-2-diabetic patients with autonomic-neuropathy. (orig.)

  5. Foot care knowledge and practices and the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy among people with diabetes attending a secondary care rural hospital in southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanu George

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is a multifaceted disease and foot ulceration is one of its most common complications. Poor foot care knowledge and practices are important risk factors for foot problems among people with diabetes. Aims: To assess the knowledge and practices regarding foot care and to estimate the proportion of people with peripheral neuropathy among people with diabetes. Settings and Design: The cross-sectional study was conducted in 212 consecutive diabetes patients attending the out-patient department of a rural secondary care hospital Materials and Methods: A questionnaire which included demographic details, knowledge questionnaire, and Nottingham assessment of functional foot care was administered. The Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument was used to identify peripheral neuropathy. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive analysis with frequency distribution for knowledge and practice scores, univariate analysis, and multiple logistic regressions to find significant variables associated with good knowledge and practice scores. Results: About 75% had good knowledge score and 67% had good foot care practice score. Male gender (OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.16-4.79, poor education status (OR 2.40, 95% CI 1.19-4.28, and lesser duration of diabetes (OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.15-4.41 were significantly associated with poor knowledge on foot care. Poor knowledge was associated with poor foot care practices (OR 3.43, 95% CI 1.75-6.72. The prevalence of neuropathy was 47% (95% CI 40.14-53.85 and it was associated with longer duration of the disease (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.18-4.04. Conclusion: There exist deficiencies in knowledge and practices regarding foot care. Male gender, low education, and lesser duration of diabetes are associated with poor knowledge scores. The prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is high.

  6. Plasma adrenaline kinetics in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with and without autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, A; Hilsted, J; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1989-01-01

    Plasma adrenaline kinetics (clearance, extraction across the forearm, initial plasma disappearance rate, mean sojourn time, volume of distribution) were studied in sixteen Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients during constant i.v. infusion of tritium labelled adrenaline. In patients with (n...... = 8) and without (n = 8) neuropathy forearm venous plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline concentrations as well as plasma clearance of adrenaline based on arterial sampling (1.7 vs 2.1 l/min) were not significantly different. The initial disappearance time (T 1/2) after the infusion of the tritium...... labelled adrenaline had been stopped was significantly prolonged in Type 1 diabetic patients with neuropathy compared to those without (after 20 min infusion 2.7 vs 2.2 min, p less than 0.02, after 75 min infusion 3.7 vs 2.9 min, p less than 0.05). The corresponding values for the mean sojourn time...

  7. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  8. Activity-Dependent Excitability Changes Suggest Na[superscript +]/K[superscript +] Pump Dysfunction in Diabetic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Arun V.; Lin, Cindy S.-Y.; Kiernan, Matthew C.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the role of Na[superscript +]/K[superscript +] pump dysfunction in the development of diabetic neuropathy (DN). Nerve excitability techniques, which provide information about membrane potential and axonal ion channel function, were undertaken in 15 patients with established DN and in 10 patients with…

  9. Peripheral Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... wasting. Various dietary strategies can improve gastrointestinal symptoms. Timely treatment of injuries can help prevent permanent damage. ... diabetic neuropathy is more limited. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-invasive intervention used for ...

  10. Evaluation of the effect of duration of diabetes mellitus on peripheral neuropathy using the United Kingdom screening test scoring system, bio-thesiometry and aesthesiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguejiofor, O C; Odenigbo, C U; Oguejiofor, C B N

    2010-09-01

    Risk factors predisposing to foot ulceration in diabetic subjects are multiple. Long duration of diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor, likewise peripheral neuropathy (PN), which globally, is recognized as the commonest risk factor for foot disease in diabetic subjects. To evaluate the effect of duration of diabetes mellitus on peripheral neuropathy using the United Kingdom Screening Test (UKST) Scoring System, Bio-thesiometry and Aesthesiometry, in Nigerian diabetic subjects without current or previous foot ulceration. One hundred and twenty (120) diabetes mellitus (DM) subjects with and without symptoms of peripheral neuropathy receiving care at the medical outpatient department (MOPD) and the diabetic clinic of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, Nigeria, were recruited consecutively as they presented. Data collected included subjects age (years), gender, age at first diagnosis of DM, duration of DM (years) and baseline fasting venous plasma glucose. The United Kingdom Screening Test (UKST) symptom score was used to separate the participants into two groups those with symptoms of PN and those without and the subjects further assessed by three methods the UKST Signs score, Bio-thesiometry and Aesthesiometry to determine the presence . of PN. Among the 120 diabetic participants, 83(69.2%) had neuropathic symptoms (the symptomatic participants) while 37 (30.8%) were asymptomatic (the asymptomatic participants). The different methods of diagnosing PN increasingly detected PN with increasing duration of diabetes. For the symptomatic group, the UKST method detected PN least in those with duration of DM 15 years while for the asymptomatic group, it detected PN in 25.0% of those with duration of DM 15 years. For the symptomatic group, Aesthesiometry detected PN in 65.2% of those with duration of DM 15 years. For the asymptomatic group, it detected PN in 29.2% of those with duration of DM 15 years. Likewise, for the symptomatic group, Bio

  11. A prospective study of prevalence and association of peripheral neuropathy in Indian patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H K Gill

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN predisposes to foot ulceration and gangrene. It has been reported that DPN is lower in Indians relative to Caucasians. Studies among recent onset patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM are very few. We studied the prevalence and risk factors of DPN in patients with newly diagnosed T2DM. Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 195 consecutive patients over age 30 with a duration of diabetes ≤6 months. All underwent a clinical and biochemical evaluation and were screened for DPN using Neuropathy Symptom Score (NSS and Neuropathy Disability Score (NDS as well as the vibration perception threshold using a biothesiometer. We compared the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy (PN in 75 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Results: The cases had a mean age of 47.6 ± 10.2 years (59% males and duration of symptoms of 5.9 ± 8.2 months prior to presentation. The overall prevalence of DPN was 29.2% [95% CI 22.8-35.7]. PN among matched control was 10.7% (95% CI 3.5-17.8. The prevalence of DPN showed an increasing trend with age (trend chi-square 11.8, P = 0.001. Abnormal vibration perception threshold was present in 43.3% (95% CI 36.3-50.3 of cases and had a significant correlation with NDS (P = 0.000. Abnormal monofilament testing was present in 6.1% of cases (95% CI 2.7- 9.5. A logistic regression analysis showed that DPN was independently associated with age (P = 0.002 and duration of diabetes prior to presentation (P = 0.02 but not with body mass index, plasma glucose, or HbA1c. Conclusions: Our study showed high prevalence of PN in recently diagnosed patients with T2DM, which was independently associated with age and duration of symptoms of diabetes prior to the diagnosis. Screening for DPN at diagnosis of diabetes is warranted, especially among older subjects.

  12. Effect of flat insoles with different shore A values on posture stability in diabetic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Geffen, J.A.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Hof, A.L.; Halbertsma, J.P.K.; Postema, K.

    The objective of the study was to determine whether insoles with a low Shore A value (15 degrees) as prescribed for patients with a diabetic neuropathy have a negative effect on posture stability because these insoles may reduce somatosensory input under the feet. It was conducted in the Center for

  13. Topiramate induced peripheral neuropathy: A case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Sherifa Ahmed

    2017-12-16

    Drug-induced peripheral neuropathy had been rarely reported as an adverse effect of some antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) at high cumulative doses or even within the therapeutic drug doses or levels. We describe clinical and diagnostic features of a patient with peripheral neuropathy as an adverse effect of chronic topiramate (TPM) therapy. A 37-year-old woman was presented for the control of active epilepsy (2010). She was resistant to some AEDs as mono- or combined therapies (carbamazepine, sodium valproate, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine and lamotrigine). She has the diagnosis of frontal lobe epilepsy with secondary generalization and has a brother, sister and son with active epilepsies. She became seizure free on TPM (2013-2017) but is complaining of persistent distal lower extremities paresthesia in a stocking distribution. Neurological examination revealed presence of diminished Achilles tendon reflexes, stocking hypesthesia and delayed distal latencies, reduced conduction velocities and amplitudes of action potentials of posterior tibial and sural nerves, indicating demyelinating and axonal peripheral neuropathy of the lower extremities. After exclusion of the possible causes of peripheral neuropathy, chronic TPM therapy is suggested as the most probable cause of patient's neuropathy. This is the first case report of topiramate induced peripheral neuropathy in the literature.

  14. Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy May Play a Role in Pathogenesis of Atherosclerosis in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malá, Š.; Potočková, V.; Hoskovcová, L.; Pithová, P.; Brabec, Marek; Kulhánková, J.; Keil, R.; Riedlbauchová, L.; Brož, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 134, December (2017), s. 139-144 ISSN 0168-8227 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : autonomic neuropathy * diabetes mellitus * intima media thickness * atherosclerosis * heart rate variability Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research OBOR OECD: Statistics and probability Impact factor: 3.639, year: 2016

  15. Altered protein phosphorylation in sciatic nerve from rats with streptozocin-induced diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrama, L.H.; Berti-Mattera, L.N.; Eichberg, J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of experimental diabetes on the phosphorylation of proteins in the rat sciatic nerve was studied. Nerves from animals made diabetic with streptozocin were incubated in vitro with [ 32 P]orthophosphate and divided into segments from the proximal to the distal end, and proteins from each segment were then separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The principal labeled species were the major myelin proteins, P0, and the basic proteins. After 6 wk of diabetes, the incorporation of isotope into these proteins rose as a function of distance along the nerve in a proximal to distal direction and was significantly higher at the distal end compared with incorporation into nerves from age-matched controls. The overall level of isotope uptake was similar in nerves from diabetic animals and weight-matched controls. The distribution of 32 P among proteins also differed in diabetic nerve compared with both control groups in that P0 and the small basic protein accounted for a greater proportion of total label incorporated along the entire length of nerve. In contrast to intact nerve, there was no significant difference in protein phosphorylation when homogenates from normal and diabetic nerve were incubated with [ 32 P]-gamma-ATP. The results suggest that abnormal protein phosphorylation, particularly of myelin proteins, is a feature of experimental diabetic neuropathy and that the changes are most pronounced in the distal portion of the nerve

  16. Another cause of occupational entrapment neuropathy: la main du cuisinier (the chef's hand).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Arun V; Fulham, Michael J; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2009-04-01

    Recent studies have raised the possibility of a predisposition to mononeuropathies in a number of professions including musicians, cleaners, and industrial workers. There are, however, no previous reports of increased rates of mononeuropathies in the culinary arts. The authors report three cases of mononeuropathies occurring in professional chefs that presented over a 3-month period in the same outpatient clinic, with a case each of distal ulnar neuropathy, distal median motor neuropathy (thenar motor syndrome) and posterior interosseous neuropathy. There was no history of direct hand trauma in any of the patients. In all three patients, the injuries occurred exclusively in the dominant hand, further strengthening the argument for an occupational link.

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction in an animal model of diabetic neuropathy is associated with a reduction of neurosteroid synthesis. [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R. Humble

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent work in a model of diabetic neuropathy revealed that layer 2/3 cortical pyramidal neurones of the pain pathway exhibited reduced endogenous neurosteroid modulation of the GABAAR and exogenously applied neurosteroids had an exaggerated impact. It is postulated that this is related to reduced precursor synthesis, due to mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic neuropathy. Benzodiazepines are also known to activate neurosteroidogenesis by binding to mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO. This study explored the differential effect of diazepam on GABAAR modulation via neurosteroidogenesis in diabetic and wild type (WT mice. Methods: Whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used on slices of neural tissue. Electrophysiological recordings were obtained from layer 2/3 cortical pyramidal neurons of the pain pathway from mice with type-II diabetic neuropathy (ob/ob and WT controls aged 60-80 days. Results: There was a key difference in the response of the WT and ob/ob cortical neurons to simultaneous incubation with diazepam and flumazenil. In contrast, diazepam and the 5a-reductase inhibitor finasteride, individually or in combination, produced the same response in both strains. Conclusions: The exaggerated effect of diazepam on GABAergic inhibitory tone in the ob/ob, despite the presence of the GABAAR benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil is likely observed due to physiological upregulation of key neurosteroidogenic enzymes in response to the reduced pregnenolone synthesis by the mitochondria. By increasing pregnenolone via TSPO activation, it is possible to promote enhanced neurosteroidogenesis and increase GABAergic inhibitory tone via an alternate route. In diabetic neuropathy, mitochondrial dysfunction may play an important role. Enhancing the GABAergic neurosteroid tone could be of potential therapeutic benefit.

  18. Effects of thai foot massage on balance performance in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy: a randomized parallel-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatchawan, Uraiwan; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Plandee, Piyawan; Yamauchi, Junichiro

    2015-04-20

    BACKGROUND Peripheral neuropathy is the most common complications of diabetic patients and leads to loss of plantar cutaneous sensation, movement perception, and body balance. Thai foot massage is an alternative therapy to improve balance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Thai foot massage on balance performance in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty patients with type-2 diabetes were recruited and randomly assigned into either the Thai foot massage or control groups. The Thai foot massage group received a modified Thai traditional foot massage for 30 min, 3 days per week for 2 weeks. We measured timed up and go (TUG), one leg stance: OLS), the range of motion (ROM) of the foot, and foot sensation (SWMT) before treatment, after the first single session, and after the 2-week treatment. RESULTS After the single treatment session, only the Thai foot massage group showed a significant improvement in TUG. After the 2-week treatment, both Thai foot massage and control groups showed a significant improvement of TUG and OLS (Pfoot massage group showed better improvement in TUG than the control group (pfoot massage group also showed significant improvements in ROM and SWMT after the 2-week treatment. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study suggest that Thai foot massage is a viable alternative treatment for balance performance, ROM of the foot, and the foot sensation in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy.

  19. Effectiveness of different benfotiamine dosage regimens in the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, G; Pál, B; Nagybéganyi, E; Ory, I; Porochnavec, M; Kempler, P

    1999-03-01

    The therapeutic effectiveness of a benfotiamine (CAS 22457-89-2)-vitamin B combination (Milgamma-N), administered in high (4 x 2 capsules/day, = 320 mg benfotiamine/day) and medium doses (3 x 1 capsules/day), was compared to a monotherapy with benfotiamine (Benfogamma) (3 x 1 tablets/day, = 150 mg benfotiamine/day) in diabetic patients suffering from painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy (DNP). In a 6-week open clinical trial, 36 patients (aged 40 to 70 yrs) having acceptable metabolic control (HbA1c benfotiamine (p benfotiamine is most effective in large doses, although even in smaller daily dosages, either in combination or in monotherapy, it is effective.

  20. Metabolic Correction in the Management of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Improving Clinical Results Beyond Symptom Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Massari, Jorge R.; Gonzalez, Michael J.; Jimenez, Francisco J.; Allende-Vigo, Myriam Z.; Duconge, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Current Clinical Management Guidelines of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (DPN) are based on adequate glucose control and symptomatic pain relief. However, meticulous glycemic control could delay the onset or slow the progression of diabetic neuropathy in patients with DM type 2, but it does not completely prevent the progression of the disease. Complications of DPN as it continues its natural course, produce increasing pain and discomfort, loss of sensation, ulcers, infections, amputations and even death. In addition to the increased suffering, disability and loss of productivity, there is a very significant economic impact related to the treatment of DPN and its complications. In USA alone, it has been estimated that there are more than 5,000,000 patients suffering from DPN and the total annual cost of treating the disease and its complications is over $10,000 million dollars. In order to be able to reduce complications of DPN, it is crucial to improve or correct the metabolic conditions that lead to the pathology present in this condition. Pathophysiologic mechanisms implicated in diabetic neuropathy include: increased polyol pathway with accumulation of sorbitol and reduced Na+/K+-ATPase activity, microvascular damage and hypoxia due to nitric oxide deficit and increased oxygen free radical activity. Moreover, there is a decrease in glutathione and increase in homocysteine. Clinical trials in the last two decades have demonstrated that the use of specific nutrients can correct some of these metabolic derangements, improving symptom control and providing further benefits such as improved sensorium, blood flow and nerve regeneration. We will discuss the evidence on lipoic acid, acetyi-L-carnitine, benfotiamine and the combination of active B vitamins L-methylfolate, methylcobalamin and piridoxal-6-phosphate. In addition, we discuss the role of metforrnin, an important drug in the management of diabetes, and the presence of specific polymorphic genes, in the risk

  1. Effect and safety of spinal cord stimulation for treatment of chronic pain caused by diabetic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, C.; de Vos, Cecile C.; Rajan, Vinayakrishnan; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van der Aa, Hans E.; Buschman, H.P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been shown effective as a therapy for different chronic painful conditions, but the effectiveness of this treatment for pain as a result of peripheral diabetic neuropathy is not well established. The primary objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect

  2. Neuronal involvement in cisplatin neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Helweg-Larsen, Susanne Elisabeth; Schmalbruch, H

    2007-01-01

    of large dorsal root ganglion cells. Motor conduction studies, autonomic function and warm and cold temperature sensation remained unchanged at all doses of cisplatin treatment. The results of these studies are consistent with degeneration of large sensory neurons whereas there was no evidence of distal......Although it is well known that cisplatin causes a sensory neuropathy, the primary site of involvement is not established. The clinical symptoms localized in a stocking-glove distribution may be explained by a length dependent neuronopathy or by a distal axonopathy. To study whether the whole neuron...

  3. Favorable impact of a vegan diet with exercise on hemorheology: implications for control of diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F

    2002-06-01

    A little-noticed clinical report indicates that a low-fat, whole-food vegan diet, coupled with daily walking exercise, leads to rapid remission of neuropathic pain in the majority of type 2 diabetics expressing this complication. Concurrent marked improvements in glycemic control presumably contribute to this benefit, but are unlikely to be solely responsible. Consideration should be given to the possibility that improved blood rheology - decreased blood viscosity and increased blood filterability - plays a prominent role in mediating this effect. There is considerable evidence that neural hypoxia, secondary to impaired endoneurial microcirculatory perfusion, is a crucial etiologic factor in diabetic neuropathy; the unfavorable impact of diabetes on hemorheology would be expected to exacerbate endoneurial ischemia. Conversely, measures which improve blood fluidity would likely have a beneficial impact on diabetic neuropathy. There is indeed evidence that vegan diets, as well as exercise training, tend to decrease the viscosity of both whole blood and plasma; reductions in hematocrit and in fibrinogen may contribute to this effect. The fact that vegan diets decrease the white cell count is suggestive of an improvement in blood filterability as well; filterability improves with exercise training owing to an increase in erythrocyte deformability. Whether these measures influence the activation of leukocytes in diabetics - an important determinant of blood filterability - remains to be determined. There are various reasons for suspecting that a vegan diet can reduce risk for other major complications of diabetes - retinopathy, nephropathy, and macrovascular disease - independent of its tendency to improve glycemic control in type 2 patients. The vegan diet/exercise strategy represents a safe, 'low-tech' approach to managing diabetes that deserves far greater attention from medical researchers and practitioners.

  4. An update on electrophysiological studies in neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The review concentrates on the use of clinical neurophysiology in peripheral nerve disorders covered in the present issue. It is pertinent to distinguish different types of involvement of fibers in diabetic neuropathy, including the involvement of small and large fibers, to outline the diagnostic...... criteria of inflammatory neuropathies, and to describe the spectrum of peripheral nerve pathophysiology in inherited neuropathies. Painful neuropathies represent a particular challenge to clinical neurophysiology since it is mainly small fibers, which are difficult to study, that are affected....

  5. [Discussion of acupuncture for diabetic peripheral neuropathy based on blood stasis theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Huan; Guo, Anlin; Wang, Houlian; She, Chang; Liu, Mi; Liu, Mailan; Zhang, Wei; Chang, Xiaorong

    2017-02-12

    Based on the understanding of TCM and western medicine on diabetes mellitus (DM) and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), the relationship between DPN pathogenesis and blood stasis of TCM is discussed from the perspective of modern medicine. It is indicated blood stasis is the key pathogenesis to DPN, and a two-step acupuncture treatment of DPN from the theory of blood stasis is proposed. The first step is to analyze the pathogenesis of blood stasis, which could block the progress of the disease and diminish the symptoms. The second step is to apply acupuncture for pathological result of blood stasis by following the principle of eliminating exogenous pathogen , as a result, the purpose of treating both symptoms and root cause is achieved.

  6. Duloxetine in the treatment of chronic pain due to fibromyalgia and diabetic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Wright

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Alan Wright, Kyle E Luedtke, Chad VanDenBergCenter for Clinical Research, Mercer University, Atlanta, Georgia, USAAbstract: Duloxetine is a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia and painful diabetic neuropathy at doses of 60 mg daily. Duloxetine has been shown to significantly improve the symptoms of chronic pain associated with these disorders, as measured by the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Brief Pain Inventory scores, the Clinical Global Impressions Scale, and other various outcome measures in several placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, multicenter studies. Symptom improvement generally began within the first few weeks, and continued for the duration of the study. In addition, the efficacy of duloxetine was found to be due to direct effects on pain symptoms rather than secondary to improvements in depression or anxiety. Adverse events including nausea, constipation, dry mouth, and insomnia, were mild and transient and occurred at relatively low rates. In conclusion, duloxetine, a selective inhibitor for the serotonin and norepinephrine transporters, is efficacious in the treatment of chronic pain associated with fibromyalgia or diabetic neuropathy, and has a predictable tolerability profile, with adverse events generally being mild to moderate.Keywords: duloxetine, chronic pain, neuropathic pain, fibromyalgia, efficacy, safety

  7. Advances in the management of diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Várkonyi, Tamás; Körei, Anna; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Martos, Tímea; Keresztes, Katalin; Lengyel, Csaba; Nyiraty, Szabolcs; Stirban, Alin; Jermendy, György; Kempler, Péter

    2017-10-01

    The authors review current advances in the therapy of diabetic neuropathy. The role of glycemic control and management of cardiovascular risk factors in the prevention and treatment of neuropathic complications are discussed. As further options of pathogenetically oriented treatment, recent knowledge on benfotiamine and alpha-lipoic acid is comprehensively reviewed. Alpha-lipoic acid is a powerful antioxidant and clinical trials have proven its efficacy in ameliorating neuropathic signs and symptoms. Benfotiamine acts via the activation of transketolase and thereby inhibits alternative pathways triggered by uncontrolled glucose influx in the cells comprising polyol, hexosamine, protein-kinase-C pathways and formation of advanced glycation end products. Beyond additional forms of causal treatment, choices of symptomatic treatment will be summarized. The latter is mostly represented by the anticonvulsive agents pregabalin and gabapentin as well as duloxetine widely acknowledged as antidepressant. Finally, non-pharmacological therapeutic alternatives are summarized. The authors conclude that combination therapy should be more often suggested to our patients; especially the combination of pathogenetic and symptomatic agents.

  8. Duloxetine in the treatment of chronic pain due to fibromyalgia and diabetic neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Alan; Luedtke, Kyle E; VanDenBerg, Chad

    2010-01-01

    Alan Wright, Kyle E Luedtke, Chad VanDenBergCenter for Clinical Research, Mercer University, Atlanta, Georgia, USAAbstract: Duloxetine is a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia and painful diabetic neuropathy at doses of 60 mg daily. Duloxetine has been shown to significantly improve the symptoms of chronic pain associated with these disorders, as measured by the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Brief P...

  9. Neuropathy of nitroimidazole radiosensitizers: clinical and pathological description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, T.H.; Nelson, J.S.; VonGerichten, D.

    1984-01-01

    The dose limiting toxicity of the nitroimidazole radiosensitizers is peripherial neuropathy. Improved pharmacology of newer drugs has eliminated the encephalopathy. Peripheral neuropathies are predominently mild to moderate paresthesias of both hands and feet. Subjective changes occur with or without minimal objective changes on neurologic exam. All of the neuropathies occurred within 30 days of the last drug dose and are of varible duration. Sural nerve biopsies from patients indicate progressive axonal degeneration affecting both large and small caliber myelinated fibers. Axonal damage appears to be more severe in the distal portion of the nerves. More data are needed for correlation of clinical and pathological changes

  10. Treatment of neuropathic pain in a patient with diabetic neuropathy using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied to the skin of the lumbar region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, D L; Somers, M F

    1999-08-01

    Diabetic neuropathy can produce severe pain. The purpose of this case report is to describe the alteration of pain in a patient with severe, painful diabetic neuropathy following application of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to the low back. The patient was a 73-year-old woman with pain in the left lower extremity over the lateral aspect of the hip and the entire leg below the knee. The pain prevented sound sleep. The intensity of pain was assessed with a visual analog scale. The TENS (80 Hz) was delivered 1 to 2 hours a day and during the entire night through electrodes placed on the lumbar area of the back. Following 20 minutes of TENS on the first day of treatment, the patient reported a 38% reduction in intensity of pain. After 17 days, the patient reported no pain following 20 minutes of TENS and that she could sleep through the night. Application of TENS to the skin of the lumbar area may be an effective treatment for the pain of diabetic neuropathy.

  11. The development and validation of a neuropathy- and foot ulcer-specific quality of life instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vileikyte, Loretta; Peyrot, Mark; Bundy, Christine; Rubin, Richard R; Leventhal, Howard; Mora, Pablo; Shaw, Jonathan E; Baker, Paul; Boulton, Andrew J M

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a questionnaire that measures patients' perceptions of the impact of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and foot ulcers on their quality of life and to assess the psychometric properties of this instrument in a sample of patients with varying severity and symptomatology of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The neuropathy- and foot ulcer-specific quality of life instrument (NeuroQoL), generated from interviews with patients with (n = 47) and without (n = 15) diabetic peripheral neuropathy, was administered to 418 consecutive patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (35% with foot ulcer history) attending either U.K. (n = 290) or U.S. (n = 128) diabetes centers. Psychometric tests of NeuroQoL included factor analyses and internal consistency of scales; a series of multivariate analyses were performed to establish its criterion, construct, and incremental validity. Results were compared with those obtained using the Short Form (SF)-12 measure of health-related functioning. Factor analyses of NeuroQoL revealed three physical symptom measures and two psychosocial functioning measures with good reliability (alpha = 0.86-0.95). NeuroQoL was more strongly associated with measures of neuropathic severity than SF-12, more fully mediated the relationship of diabetic peripheral neuropathy with overall quality of life, and significantly increased explained variance in overall quality of life over SF-12. NeuroQoL reliably captures the key dimensions of the patients' experience of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and is a valid tool for studying the impact of neuropathy and foot ulceration on quality of life.

  12. Median and ulnar neuropathies in university guitarists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Rachel H; Hutcherson, Kimberly J; Kain, Jennifer B; Phillips, Alicia L; Halle, John S; Greathouse, David G

    2006-02-01

    Descriptive study. To determine the presence of median and ulnar neuropathies in both upper extremities of university guitarists. Peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes of the upper extremities are well documented in musicians. Guitarists and plucked-string musicians are at risk for entrapment neuropathies in the upper extremities and are prone to mild neurologic deficits. Twenty-four volunteer male and female guitarists (age range, 18-26 years) were recruited from the Belmont University School of Music and the Vanderbilt University Blair School of Music. Individuals were excluded if they were pregnant or had a history of recent upper extremity or neck injury. Subjects completed a history form, were interviewed, and underwent a physical examination. Nerve conduction status of the median and ulnar nerves of both upper extremities was obtained by performing motor, sensory, and F-wave (central) nerve conduction studies. Descriptive statistics of the nerve conduction study variables were computed using Microsoft Excel. Six subjects had positive findings on provocative testing of the median and ulnar nerves. Otherwise, these guitarists had normal upper extremity neural and musculoskeletal function based on the history and physical examinations. When comparing the subjects' nerve conduction study values with a chart of normal nerve conduction studies values, 2 subjects had prolonged distal motor latencies (DMLs) of the left median nerve of 4.3 and 4.7 milliseconds (normal, DMLs are compatible with median neuropathy at or distal to the wrist. Otherwise, all electrophysiological variables were within normal limits for motor, sensory, and F-wave (central) values. However, comparison studies of median and ulnar motor latencies in the same hand demonstrated prolonged differences of greater than 1.0 milliseconds that affected the median nerve in 2 additional subjects, and identified contralateral limb involvement in a subject with a prolonged distal latency. The other 20

  13. Incidence of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy: increased risk among diabetic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael S; Grossman, Daniel; Arnold, Anthony C.; Sloan, Frank A

    2011-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have identified a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) among patient cohorts with non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). We sought to determine the development of incident NAION among a group of newly diagnosed patients with DM and to estimate the incidence of NAION among the elderly. Design Medicare 5% database study. Participants 25,515 patients with DM and an equal number of age- and gender-matched non-diabetics. Methods Query of Medicare 5% claims files identified patients with new diagnosis of DM in 1994. A randomly selected control group was created using one-to-one propensity score matching. Patients with a diagnosis of giant cell arteritis, pre-existing DM, and age 95 years were excluded. Patients with DM and controls were followed for the development of NAION over the following 4,745 days. Main Outcome Measures Incidence of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) among patients with and without DM. Results Each group was 85% White, 11% Black, and 4% other race, aged 76.4 years, and 40% male with a mean followup time of 7.6 years. In the diabetes group, 188 individuals developed AION (0.7%) compared to 131 individuals (0.5%; p<0.01) in the control group. In unadjusted Cox regression analysis, having diabetes mellitus was associated with a 43% increased risk (Hazard ratio [HR]: 1.431; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.145,1.789) of developing AION. After adjusting for other covariates, the risk of developing AION among individuals with DM was reduced to 40% (HR: 1.397; 95% CI: 1.115,1.750). Male gender increased an individual's risk of developing AION by 32% (HR: 1.319; 95% CI: 1.052,1.654). No other covariate was statistically significantly associated with developing AION. The annual incidence of NAION was 82 per 100,000. Conclusions DM significantly increased the risk of the diagnosis NAION. The incidence of NAION among patients older than 67 years may be higher than previously reported. PMID:21439645

  14. Peripheral neuropathy in a diabetic child treated with linezolid for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Aravind; du Cros, Philipp; Seddon, James A; Mirgayosieva, Shamsiya; Asladdin, Rajabov; Dusmatova, Zulfiya

    2017-06-12

    Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug resistant (MDR)-TB with additional resistance to injectable agents or fluoroquinolones are challenging to treat due to lack of available, effective drugs. Linezolid is one of the few drugs that has shown promise in treating these conditions. Long-term linezolid use is associated with toxicities such as peripheral and optic neuropathies. Diabetes mellitus (DM), especially when uncontrolled, can also result in peripheral neuropathy. The global burden of DM is increasing, and DM has been associated with a three-fold increased risk of developing TB disease. TB and DM can be a challenging combination to treat. DM can inhibit the host immune response to tuberculosis infection; and TB and some anti-TB drugs can worsen glycaemic control. A child experiencing neuropathy that is a possible complication of both DM and linezolid used to treat TB has not been reported previously. We report peripheral neuropathy in a 15-year-old boy with type 1 DM, diagnosed with MDR-TB and additional resistance to injectable TB medications. The boy was treated with a linezolid-based regimen, but after 8 months developed peripheral neuropathy. It was unclear whether the neuropathy was caused by the DM or the linezolid therapy. He had clinical improvement following cessation of linezolid and was declared cured following 21 months of treatment. Following completion of treatment, nerve conduction studies demonstrated significant improvement in neuropathy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of peripheral neuropathy reported in a diabetic child on long-term linezolid therapy for tuberculosis. This case study underlines the importance of stringent follow-up for side effects of linezolid, especially when associated with co-morbidity such as DM that increases the chances of adverse effects. The presence of both DM and TB should alert a physician to strive for optimal glycaemic control to minimize the risk of

  15. The Impact of Diabetic Neuropathy on Balance and on the Risk of Falls in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Timar, Bogdan; Timar, Romulus; Gai??, Laura; Oancea, Cristian; Levai, Codrina; Lungeanu, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a prevalent complication of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) with a major impact on the health of the affected patient. We hypothesized that mediated by the dysfunctionalities associated with DN?s three major components: sensitive (lack of motion associated sensory), motor (impairments in movement coordination) and autonomic (the presence of postural hypotension), the presence of DN may impair the balance in the affected patients. Our study?s main aim i...

  16. A 70-year-old male with peripheral neuropathy, ataxia and antigliadin antibodies shows improvement in neuropathy, but not ataxia, after intravenous immunoglobulin and gluten-free diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharshan Anandacoomaraswamy

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Dharshan Anandacoomaraswamy1, Jagdeesh Ullal2, Aaron I Vinik21Department of Internal Medicine, Coney Island Hospital, Brooklyn, NY, USA; 2Strelitz Diabetes Center, Department of Internal Medicine, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USAAbstract: This is a case of a 70-year-old man with severe peripheral neuropathy, type 2 diabetes and progressively worsening cerebellar ataxia. He was found to have circulating antigliadin and antireticulin antibodies compatible with celiac disease in the absence of intestinal pathology. The peripheral neuropathy improved with a gluten-free diet, antioxidants and intravenous immunoglobulin, whereas the ataxia did not. This case illustrates the need to test for celiac disease in patients with idiopathic ataxia and peripheral neuropathy and the need for alternative therapies for ataxia. Keywords: celiac disease, peripheral neuropathy, autoimmune disease, cerebellar ataxia, type 2 diabetes

  17. INTERPLAY OF SORBITOL PATHWAY OF GLUCOSE METABOLISM, 12/15-LIPOXYGENASE, AND MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF DIABETIC PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavniichuk, Roman; Shevalye, Hanna; Hirooka, Hiroko; Nadler, Jerry L.; Obrosova, Irina G.

    2012-01-01

    The interactions among multiple pathogenetic mechanisms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy largely remain unexplored. Increased activity of aldose reductase, the first enzyme of the sorbitol pathway, leads to accumulation of cytosolic Ca++, essentially required for 12/15-lipoxygenase activation. The latter, in turn, causes oxidative-nitrosative stress, an important trigger of MAPK phosphorylation. This study therefore evaluated the interplay of aldose reductase, 12/15-lipoxygenase, and MAPKs in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. In experiment 1, male control and streptozotocin-diabetic mice were maintained with or without the aldose reductase inhibitor fidarestat, 16 mg kg−1 d−1, for 12 weeks. In experiment 2, male control and streptozotocin-diabetic wild-type (C57Bl6/J) and 12/15-lipoxygenase-deficient mice were used. Fidarestat treatment did not affect diabetes-induced increase in glucose concentrations, but normalized sorbitol and fructose concentrations (enzymatic spectrofluorometric assays) as well as 12(S) hydroxyeicosatetraenoic concentration (ELISA), a measure of 12/15-lipoxygenase activity, in the sciatic nerve and spinal cord. 12/15-lipoxygenase expression in these two tissues (Western blot analysis) as well as dorsal root ganglia (immunohistochemistry) was similarly elevated in untreated and fidarestat-treated diabetic mice. 12/15-lipoxygenase gene deficiency prevented diabetesassociated p38 MAPK and ERK, but not SAPK/JNK, activation in the sciatic nerve (Western blot analysis) and all three MAPK activation in the dorsal root ganglia (immunohistochemistry). In contrast, spinal cord p38 MAPK, ERK, and SAPK/JNK were similarly activated in diabetic wild-type and 12/15-lipoxygenase−/− mice. These findings identify the nature and tissue specificity of interactions among three major mechanisms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, and suggest that combination treatments, rather than monotherapies, can sometimes be an optimal choice for its management. PMID

  18. Public control of environmental health hazards (clinical and experimental studies of distal axonopathy--a frequent form of brain and nerve damage produced by environmental chemical hazards)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaumburg, H.H.; Spencer, P.S.

    1979-01-01

    Clinical and pathological studies of the peripheral and central nervous system degeneration (distal dying-back axonopathy) in humans and experimental animals produced by acrylamide monomer and certain hydrocarbon compounds are summarized. The human distal axonopathies include: many of the naturally occurring, genetically determined system disorders/ certain nutritional disorders/ uremic neuropathy/ the neuropathies associated with some malignancies/ and the toxic neuropathies induced by industrial chemicals. The irreversible, subclinical, and clinical effects of distal axonopathies on the human central nervous system are examined. A morphological rationale for previously enigmatic clinical phenomena in the human toxic neuropathies is presented. Neuropathology is potentially useful in the screening of chemicals for neurotoxicity. (7 photos, 24 references)

  19. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get ... you change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. ...

  20. The impact of bodyweight and body condition on behavioral testing for painful diabetic neuropathy in the streptozotocin rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoybergs, Yves M J J; Biermans, Ria L V; Meert, Theo F

    2008-05-02

    The streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes model is widely used for the induction of neuropathy in the rat. In this model, diabetic animals often display chronic illness, which raises objections not only on ethical but also on scientific grounds. In this study, the investigators set out to determine the impact of bodyweight and body condition (BC) on behavioral testing in the rat. Animals were allocated to four different groups as a function of their bodyweight, in particular one control group and three experimental groups with different starting weights (low bodyweight [LBW], medium bodyweight [MBW] and high bodyweight [HBW]), the groups having been rendered diabetic with an intraperitoneal injection of STZ (65mg/kg). Bodyweight, blood glucose, body condition and thresholds for mechanical hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia were measured or evaluated over a 68-day period. Animals with a LBW at the start of the experiment showed a gradual increase in BW with a decrease in mechanical nociceptive thresholds, while MBW and HBW animals presented a decrease in both thresholds and BW. The body condition score (BCS) decreased in all STZ-treated groups over time. Since correlations between mechanical thresholds and BW were similar between the control group and the HBW and MBW groups, the loss in BW clearly contributed to the decrease in thresholds. In the LBW group, thresholds and BW correlated negatively, so that the decrease in thresholds was mainly caused by the development of a painful neuropathy. From an ethical and a scientific point of view, in the STZ-induced diabetic neuropathy model, animals should be chosen on the basis of bodyweight and it must also be ensured that STZ is correctly dosed.

  1. A Clinical and Electrophysiological Study of Peripheral Neuropathies in Predialysis Chronic Kidney Disease Patients and Relation of Severity of Peripheral Neuropathy with Degree of Renal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasti, Dushyanth Babu; Mallipeddi, Sarat; Apparao, A; Vengamma, B; Sivakumar, V; Kolli, Satyarao

    2017-01-01

    To study the prevalence, clinical features, electrophysiological features, and severity of peripheral neuropathy in predialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with respect to severity of renal failure and presence of diabetes mellitus. Between May 2015 and December 2016, 200 predialysis CKD patients were assessed prospectively. The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in predialysis CKD patients in the present study was 45% based on clinical symptoms and 90% electrophysiologically. Mean age of 200 predialysis CKD patients who participated in the study was 53.2 ± 13.2 years. One hundred and thirty-six (68%) patients were male and 64 (32%) patients were female. Mean duration of disease was 2.2 ± 1.6 years. Nearly 45% patients of patients had asymptomatic peripheral neuropathy in the present study, which was more common in mild-to-moderate renal failure group. One hundred twenty-six patients (63%) had definite damage and 54 patients (27%) had early damage. In mild-to-moderate renal failure ( n = 100) and severe renal failure patients ( n = 100), 88% and 92% had significant peripheral neuropathy, respectively. Most common nerves involved were sural nerve, median sensory nerve, and ulnar sensory nerve. Diabetic patients (97%) showed more severe and high prevalence of peripheral neuropathy when compared to nondiabetic patients (83%). Most common patterns were pure axonal sensorimotor neuropathy and mixed sensorimotor neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is common in predialysis patients, prevalence and severity of which increases as renal failure worsens. Predialysis patients with diabetes show higher prevalence and severity of peripheral neuropathy when compared with nondiabetics.

  2. A Clinical and Electrophysiological Study of Peripheral Neuropathies in Predialysis Chronic Kidney Disease Patients and Relation of Severity of Peripheral Neuropathy with Degree of Renal Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasti, Dushyanth Babu; Mallipeddi, Sarat; Apparao, A.; Vengamma, B.; Sivakumar, V.; Kolli, Satyarao

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the prevalence, clinical features, electrophysiological features, and severity of peripheral neuropathy in predialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with respect to severity of renal failure and presence of diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: Between May 2015 and December 2016, 200 predialysis CKD patients were assessed prospectively. Results: The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in predialysis CKD patients in the present study was 45% based on clinical symptoms and 90% electrophysiologically. Mean age of 200 predialysis CKD patients who participated in the study was 53.2 ± 13.2 years. One hundred and thirty-six (68%) patients were male and 64 (32%) patients were female. Mean duration of disease was 2.2 ± 1.6 years. Nearly 45% patients of patients had asymptomatic peripheral neuropathy in the present study, which was more common in mild-to-moderate renal failure group. One hundred twenty-six patients (63%) had definite damage and 54 patients (27%) had early damage. In mild-to-moderate renal failure (n = 100) and severe renal failure patients (n = 100), 88% and 92% had significant peripheral neuropathy, respectively. Most common nerves involved were sural nerve, median sensory nerve, and ulnar sensory nerve. Diabetic patients (97%) showed more severe and high prevalence of peripheral neuropathy when compared to nondiabetic patients (83%). Most common patterns were pure axonal sensorimotor neuropathy and mixed sensorimotor neuropathy. Conclusion: Peripheral neuropathy is common in predialysis patients, prevalence and severity of which increases as renal failure worsens. Predialysis patients with diabetes show higher prevalence and severity of peripheral neuropathy when compared with nondiabetics. PMID:29204008

  3. Relationship among esophageal dysfunction, diabetic gastro-enteropathy, and autonomic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, S.H.; Liu, R.S.; Wu, L.C.; Lin, H.D.; Wang, S.J.; Lin, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    This study assessed the relationship of esophageal radionuclide transit (RT) to diabetic gastroenteropethy (CEP) and autonomic neuropathy (AN). Data were acquired in list mode after an oral dose of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid in 10 ml of water in the supine position. A modified computer routine was used to calculate: (A) total mean transit time (TMTT) in sec, (B) residual fraction after the first swallow (RF), and )C) retrograde index (RI). Twenty-one patients (pts) with diabetes and 25 normal subjects (N) were studied. Eleven pts belonged to Group 1 with symptomatic GEP and AN; 5, Group 2 with no GEP but with AN; and 5, Group 3 with neither. Abnormal RT mainly occurred in Group 1. RI was the best parameter with respective sensitivity and specificity of 0.91 (10/110 and 0.96 (24/25. RI was abnormal in 10/11 pts with GEP (Group 1), but normal in all 10 pts without GEP (Groups 2 and 3). All 5 pts only with AN (group 2) had normal RI. The authors conclude that esophageal dysfunction is present in nearly all pts with diabetic GEP. However, the presence of AN alone will not explain esophageal transit abnormality

  4. Peripheral neuropathy in HIV: prevalence and risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Scott R.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Chen, Huichao; Yeh, Tzu-min; Lee, Anthony J.; Schifitto, Giovanni; Wu, Kunling; Bosch, Ronald J.; McArthur, Justin C.; Simpson, David M.; Clifford, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To estimate neuropathic sign/symptom rates with initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in HIV-infected ART-naive patients, and to investigate risk factors for: peripheral neuropathy and symptomatic peripheral neuropathy (SPN), recovery from peripheral neuropathy/SPN after neurotoxic ART (nART) discontinuation, and the absence of peripheral neuropathy/SPN while on nART. Design AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) Longitudinal Linked Randomized Trial participants who initiated cART in randomized trials for ART-naive patients were annually screened for symptoms/signs of peripheral neuropathy. ART use and disease characteristics were collected longitudinally. Methods Peripheral neuropathy was defined as at least mild loss of vibration sensation in both great toes or absent/hypoactive ankle reflexes bilaterally. SPN was defined as peripheral neuropathy and bilateral symptoms. Generalized estimating equation logistic regression was used to estimate associations. Results Two thousand, one hundred and forty-one participants were followed from January 2000 to June 2007. Rates of peripheral neuropathy/SPN at 3 years were 32.1/8.6% despite 87.1% with HIV-1RNA 400 copies/ml or less and 70.3% with CD4 greater than 350 cells/µl. Associations with higher odds of peripheral neuropathy included older patient age and current nART use. Associations with higher odds of SPN included older patient age, nART use, and history of diabetes mellitus. Associations with lower odds of recovery after nART discontinuation included older patient age. Associations with higher odds of peripheral neuropathy while on nART included older patient age and current protease inhibitor use. Associations with higher odds of SPN while on nART included older patient age, history of diabetes, taller height, and protease inhibitor use. Conclusion Signs of peripheral neuropathy remain despite virologic/immunologic control but frequently occurs without symptoms. Aging is a risk factor for

  5. Automated identification of diabetic type 2 subjects with and without neuropathy using wavelet transform on pedobarograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Rajendra; Tan, Peck Ha; Subramaniam, Tavintharan; Tamura, Toshiyo; Chua, Kuang Chua; Goh, Seach Chyr Ernest; Lim, Choo Min; Goh, Shu Yi Diana; Chung, Kang Rui Conrad; Law, Chelsea

    2008-02-01

    Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism-the way our bodies use digested food for growth and energy. The most common form of diabetes is Type 2 diabetes. Abnormal plantar pressures are considered to play a major role in the pathologies of neuropathic ulcers in the diabetic foot. The purpose of this study was to examine the plantar pressure distribution in normal, diabetic Type 2 with and without neuropathy subjects. Foot scans were obtained using the F-scan (Tekscan USA) pressure measurement system. Various discrete wavelet coefficients were evaluated from the foot images. These extracted parameters were extracted using the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and presented to the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) and a four-layer feed forward neural network for classification. We demonstrated a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of more than 85% for the classifiers.

  6. Key role for spinal dorsal horn microglial kinin B1 receptor in early diabetic pain neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couture Réjean

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pro-nociceptive kinin B1 receptor (B1R is upregulated on sensory C-fibres, astrocytes and microglia in the spinal cord of streptozotocin (STZ-diabetic rat. This study aims at defining the role of microglial kinin B1R in diabetic pain neuropathy. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were made diabetic with STZ (65 mg/kg, i.p., and 4 days later, two specific inhibitors of microglial cells (fluorocitrate, 1 nmol, i.t.; minocycline, 10 mg/kg, i.p. were administered to assess the impact on thermal hyperalgesia, allodynia and mRNA expression (qRT-PCR of B1R and pro-inflammatory markers. Spinal B1R binding sites ((125I-HPP-desArg10-Hoe 140 were also measured by quantitative autoradiography. Inhibition of microglia was confirmed by confocal microscopy with the specific marker Iba-1. Effects of intrathecal and/or systemic administration of B1R agonist (des-Arg9-BK and antagonists (SSR240612 and R-715 were measured on neuropathic pain manifestations. Results STZ-diabetic rats displayed significant tactile and cold allodynia compared with control rats. Intrathecal or peripheral blockade of B1R or inhibition of microglia reversed time-dependently tactile and cold allodynia in diabetic rats without affecting basal values in control rats. Microglia inhibition also abolished thermal hyperalgesia and the enhanced allodynia induced by intrathecal des-Arg9-BK without affecting hyperglycemia in STZ rats. The enhanced mRNA expression (B1R, IL-1β, TNF-α, TRPV1 and Iba-1 immunoreactivity in the STZ spinal cord were normalized by fluorocitrate or minocycline, yet B1R binding sites were reduced by 38%. Conclusion The upregulation of kinin B1R in spinal dorsal horn microglia by pro-inflammatory cytokines is proposed as a crucial mechanism in early pain neuropathy in STZ-diabetic rats.

  7. A knock-in/knock-out mouse model of HSPB8-associated distal hereditary motor neuropathy and myopathy reveals toxic gain-of-function of mutant Hspb8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhy, Delphine; Juneja, Manisha; Katona, Istvan; Holmgren, Anne; Asselbergh, Bob; De Winter, Vicky; Hochepied, Tino; Goossens, Steven; Haigh, Jody J; Libert, Claude; Ceuterick-de Groote, Chantal; Irobi, Joy; Weis, Joachim; Timmerman, Vincent

    2018-01-01

    Mutations in the small heat shock protein B8 gene (HSPB8/HSP22) have been associated with distal hereditary motor neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and recently distal myopathy. It is so far not clear how mutant HSPB8 induces the neuronal and muscular phenotypes and if a common pathogenesis lies behind these diseases. Growing evidence points towards a role of HSPB8 in chaperone-associated autophagy, which has been shown to be a determinant for the clearance of poly-glutamine aggregates in neurodegenerative diseases but also for the maintenance of skeletal muscle myofibrils. To test this hypothesis and better dissect the pathomechanism of mutant HSPB8, we generated a new transgenic mouse model leading to the expression of the mutant protein (knock-in lines) or the loss-of-function (functional knock-out lines) of the endogenous protein Hspb8. While the homozygous knock-in mice developed motor deficits associated with degeneration of peripheral nerves and severe muscle atrophy corroborating patient data, homozygous knock-out mice had locomotor performances equivalent to those of wild-type animals. The distal skeletal muscles of the post-symptomatic homozygous knock-in displayed Z-disk disorganisation, granulofilamentous material accumulation along with Hspb8, αB-crystallin (HSPB5/CRYAB), and desmin aggregates. The presence of the aggregates correlated with reduced markers of effective autophagy. The sciatic nerve of the homozygous knock-in mice was characterized by low autophagy potential in pre-symptomatic and Hspb8 aggregates in post-symptomatic animals. On the other hand, the sciatic nerve of the homozygous knock-out mice presented a normal morphology and their distal muscle displayed accumulation of abnormal mitochondria but intact myofiber and Z-line organisation. Our data, therefore, suggest that toxic gain-of-function of mutant Hspb8 aggregates is a major contributor to the peripheral neuropathy and the myopathy. In addition, mutant Hspb8 induces

  8. Postural control and functional balance in individuals with diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia de Souza Fortaleza

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (DPN brings on reduced somatosensation, which can lead to changes in postural control. The objective of this study was to evaluate postural control in a standing position and in different conditions, as well as functional balance in individuals with DPN, make the correlation between the results obtained from the postural control assessment with the values from the functional balance test and compare the results obtained in the neuropathy group with those of the control group, checking for possible differences between the evaluation conditions of both groups. The study included 13 women with DPN (NG and 17 non-diabetic women (CG. Postural control assessment was performed by kinemetry in the following conditions: eyes opened (EO, eyes closed (EC, and semi-tandem (ST. The data was processed in MATLAB and the following variables were generated: mean amplitude of oscillation (MAO in the anterior-posterior (AP and medial-lateral (ML direction; and average speed of oscillation (ASO in AP and ML direction. Functional balance was assessed by the Timed Up and Go Test. There was significant difference between the groups (p≤0.005 in MAO-AP EO and EC, MAO-ML EC and ST, and ASO-ML ST. There were differences between the conditions EO and ST (p≤0.005 and EC and ST (p≤0.005 for the variables MAO-ML and ASO-ML with greater damage to the NG, which also had a lower functional balance (p=0.001. ML instability was positively correlated with functional imbalance. The results show a change in the postural control system in the DPN, which could lead these individuals to a higher risk for falls and functional impairment.

  9. Identification, prevalence, and treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy in patients from a rural area in South Carolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruitt III J

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Jimmy Pruitt III,1 Carolina Moracho-Vilrriales,1,2 Tiffaney Threatt,3 Sarah Wagner,3 Jun Wu,1 E Alfonso Romero-Sandoval1 1Department of Pharmaceutical and Administrative Sciences, Presbyterian College School of Pharmacy, Clinton, SC, USA; 2Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, University of Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain; 3Department of Pharmacy Practice, Presbyterian College School of Pharmacy, Clinton, SC, USA Abstract: Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN represents significant burdens to many patients and the public health-care system. Patients with diabetes in rural areas have higher risk of developing complications and having less access to proper treatment. We studied a rural population of patients with diabetes who attended a pharmacist-led free clinic for a diabetic education program. Our objectives were to 1 determine the prevalence of DPN and painful diabetic neuropathy (p-DN in patients with type 2 diabetes; 2 assess the proportion of patients with DPN and p-DN left undocumented upon physician referral to a pharmacist-led free clinic; and 3 determine the appropriateness of pain medication regimen. We performed a retrospective analysis of clinical records of patients from the Presbyterian College School of Pharmacy (PCSP Wellness Center located in Clinton, SC. Diagnoses of DPN and/or p-DN were obtained from referral notes in the clinical records and compared with results from foot examinations performed in the free clinic and clinical features. Medication regimens were also obtained and compared using American Academy of Neurology (AAN treatment guidelines. Within our study population (n=111, the prevalence of DPN was 62.2% (national average of 28%–45% and that of p-DN was 23.4% (national average of 11%–24%. In p-DN patients (n=26, 53.8% (n=14 had a documented diagnosis of p-DN by the referring physician, and 46.2% (n=12 were identified by the pharmacists. A total of 95% (19 of 20 of the patients treated for p

  10. Assessment of muscle mass, risk of falls and fear of falling in elderly people with diabetic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudson Azevedo Pinheiro

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective : To assess muscle mass, risk of falls and fear of falling in elderly adults with diabetic neuropathy (DNP. Methods : 50 elderly patients with diabetes mellitus (DM and diabetic neuropathy (NPD participated in this study. Risk of falling was assessed using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS. Fear of falling was assessed by means of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I. Muscle mass was assessed by tetrapolar bioimpedance analysis (BIA and Janssen's equation. Subjects were divided into two groups: one with a history of falls in the six months before study enrollment (G1 and the other without history of falls (G2. Results : There were statistically significant differences between G1 and G2 regarding lean body mass (p < 0.05, risk of falls as measured by the BBS (p < 0.01, and fear of falling as measured by the FES-I (p < 0.01. In addition, there was a significant correlation between the BBS and BIA (r = 0.45 and p < 0.01, showing that the greater the lean body mass, the lower the risk of falling. Conclusions : We found an association between lean mass, risk of falls and fear of falling in elderly adults with DNP and a history of falls from own height.

  11. MR imaging of trigeminal neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Si Yeon; Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Chung, Jin Il; Lee, Seung Ik; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves and has both sensory and motor functions. It can be divided into proximal (brainstem, preganglionic, gasserian ganglion, and cavernous sinus) and distal (extracranial opthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular) segments. Patients with trigeminal neuropathy present with a wide variety of symptoms, and lesions producing those symptoms may occur anywhere along the protracted course of the trigeminal nerve, from its distal facial branches to its nuclear columns in the brainstem. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the normal anatomy of the trigeminal nerve and associated various pathologic conditions. These are arranged anatomically according to their site of interaction with it.

  12. Vitamin B12 deficiency is associated with cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian S; Jensen, Jan S; Ridderstråle, Martin

    2017-01-01

    .01; 0.43, p=0.038), and a decrease in 5min RHR of 0.25 beats per minute (95% CI -0.47; -0.03, p=0.025). CONCLUSION: Vitamin B12 may be inversely associated with CAN in patients with type 2 diabetes. Confirmatory studies investigating a causal role of vitamin B12 for the development of diabetic CAN......AIMS: Vitamin B12 deficiency could be associated with cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in diabetes patients. We aim to investigate the association between serum levels of vitamin B12 and CAN in type 2 diabetes patients. METHODS: 469 ambulatory type 2 diabetes patients (mean diabetes...... duration 10.0years (IQR 5.0;17.0), mean age 59.0years (SD 11.6), 63% men, mean B12 289.0pmol/l (IQR 217;390)) were screened for CAN using three cardiovascular reflex tests, five minute resting heart rate (5min RHR) and heart rate variability indices. RESULTS: Serum levels of vitamin B12 were significantly...

  13. Histopathological and behavioral evaluations of the effects of crocin, safranal and insulin on diabetic peripheral neuropathy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Farshid

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Crocin and safranal, the major constituents of saffron, exert neuroprotective effects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of crocin and safranal  (alone or in combination with insulin on peripheral neuropathy in diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of 60 mg/kg of streptozotocin (STZ and confirmed by blood glucose level higher than 250 mg/dl. After confirmation of diabetes, crocin (30 mg/kg, i.p., safranal (1 mg/kg, i.p. (alone or in combination with insulin and insulin (5 IU/kg, s.c. were administered for eight weeks. Neuropathic pain was evaluated using acetone drop test. Histopathological changes of sciatic nerve were evaluated using light microscope. Blood glucose levels and sciatic nerve malondialdehyde (MDA contents were also measured. Results: STZ caused cold allodynia, edema and degenerative changes of sciatic nerve, hyperglycemia and an elevation of sciatic nerve MDA levels. Crocin, safranal and insulin improved STZ-induced behavioral, histopathological and biochemical changes. Combined treatments produced more documented improving effects. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed neuroprotective effects of crocin, safranal and insulin in a rat model of diabetic neuropathy. In addition, crocin and safranal enhanced the neuroprotective effect of insulin. The neuroprotective effects of theses chemical compounds could be associated with their anti-hyperglycemic and antioxidant properties.

  14. Quantifying dynamic changes in plantar pressure gradient in diabetics with peripheral neuropathy

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    Chi-Wen Lung

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot ulcers remain one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Peak plantar pressure (PPP and peak pressure gradient (PPG during walking have been shown to be associated with the development of diabetic foot ulcers. To gain further insight into the mechanical etiology of diabetic foot ulcers, examination of the pressure gradient angle (PGA has been recently proposed. The PGA quantifies directional variation or orientation of the pressure gradient during walking, and provides a measure of whether pressure gradient patterns are concentrated or dispersed along the plantar surface. We hypothesized that diabetics at risk of foot ulceration would have smaller PGA in key plantar regions, suggesting less movement of the pressure gradient over time. A total of 27 participants were studied, including 19 diabetics with peripheral neuropathy and 8 non-diabetic control subjects. A foot pressure measurement system was used to measure plantar pressures during walking. PPP, PPG and PGA were calculated for four foot regions - 1st toe (T1, 1st metatarsal head (M1, 2nd metatarsal head (M2, and heel (HL. Consistent with prior studies, PPP and PPG were significantly larger in the diabetic group compared to non-diabetic controls in the T1 and M1 regions, but not M2 or HL. For example, PPP was 165% (P=0.02 and PPG was 214% (P<0.001 larger in T1. PGA was found to be significantly smaller in the diabetic group in T1 (46%, P=0.04, suggesting a more concentrated pressure gradient pattern under the toe. The proposed PGA may improve our understanding of the role of pressure gradient on the risk of diabetic foot ulcers.

  15. Effects of Xueshuantong combined with antioxidant drugs on nerve conduction function and oxidative stress in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Zhen Chu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of Xueshuantong combined with antioxidant drugs on nerve conduction function and oxidative stress in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Methods: 138 cases of patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy who were treated in endocrinology department of our hospital between June 2014 and October 2016 were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups. The combination group received Xueshuantong combined with antioxidant drug therapy, and the control group received antioxidant drug therapy. Before and after treatment, the nerve conduction velocity as well as serum content of oxidative stress indexes and nerve cytokines was measured. Results: 4 weeks and 8 weeks after treatment, common peroneal nerve and median nerve MNCV and SNCV as well as serum SOD, GSH-Px, HO-1, CAT, CNTF, BDNF and SDF-1α levels of both groups were significantly higher than those before treatment while serum MDA, AOPP and 8-OHdG levels were significantly lower than those before treatment, and common peroneal nerve and median nerve MNCV and SNCV as well as serum SOD, GSH-Px, HO-1, CAT, CNTF, BDNF and SDF-1α levels of combination group were significantly higher than those of control group while serum MDA, AOPP and 8-OHdG levels were significantly lower than those of control group. Conclusion: Xueshuantong combined with antioxidant drugs can improve the nerve conduction function, inhibit oxidative stress response and improve neurotrophy status in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  16. Prostaglandin E1 in conjunction with high doses of vitamin B12 improves nerve conduction velocity of patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jilai Li; Zhirong Wan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostaglandin E1 improves diabetic peripheral neuropathy in symptoms and sensory threshold. Vitamin B1 and methyl-vitamin B12 improve microcirculation to peripheral nerve tissue and promote neurotrophy.OBJECTIVE: To observe motor nerve and sensory nerve conduction velocity in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, prior to and after treatment with prostaglandin E1, vitamin B1 and different doses of vitamin B12.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomized, controlled experiment, performed at the Department of Neurology. Beijing Hantian Central Hospital, between February 2002 and September 2007.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 122 patients with type 2 diabetic peripheral neuropathy; 73 males and 49 females were included. All patients met the diagnostic criteria of diabetes mellitus, as determined by the World Health Organization in 1999 and 2006, and also the diagnostic criteria of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. For each subject, conduction disorders in the median nerve and in the common peroneal nerve were observed using electromyogram. Also, after diet and drug treatment, the blood glucose level of subjects was observed to be at a satisfactory level for more than two weeks, and the symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy were not alleviated.METHODS: All patients were randomly divided into the following three groups. A control group (n=40), in which, 100mg vitamin B1 and 500μg vitamin B12 were intramuscularly injected. A vitamin B12 low-dose treated group (n=42), in which 10μg prostaglandin E1 in 250mL physiological saline was intravenously injected once a day and 100mg vitamin B1 and 500μg vitamin B12 was intramuscularly injected once a day. Lastly, a vitamin B12 high-dose treated group (n=40), in which administration was the same as in the vitamin B12 low-dose treated group, except that 500μg vitamin B12 was replaced by 1mg vitamin B12. Administration was performed for four weeks for each group.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The motor nerve and sensory nerve

  17. Neurophysiological role of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) on seminal parameters in diabetic males with and without neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed Tabrez; Rakkah, Nabeeh I

    2007-01-01

    Sildenafil citrate is a specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE) type-5 and represents a powerful therapy for male erectile and fertility dysfunctions of different etiologies. Present study demonstrates whether sildenafil administration modifies seminal parameters in diabetic neuropathic patients. In this investigation 50 insulin dependent (IDDM) and 50 non insulin dependent (NIDDM) diabetic male patients with and without an objective evidence of neuropathy and 50 age matched non diabetic male controls were selected. Every male had age between 20 to 65 years with duration of diabetes distributed over 1 to 20 years. Treatment with 100 mg of oral sildenafil citrate on seminal parameters was evaluated by semen analysis in these patients. In both IDDM and NIDDM diabetic neuropathic patients, chronic sildenafil treatment exhibited a significant decrease in total sperm output and sperm concentration (p<0.001). On the other hand, sperm motility and semen volume were found to be increased by about 40% and 48% respectively in these patients, where as sperm morphology and quality of sperm motility remained unaffected. However both types of non neuropathic diabetics showed a non significant difference in all the above mentioned parameters when compared with the untreated groups and their respective control subjects. A comparison between IDDM and NIDDM neuropathic and non neuropathic diabetic groups further indicated a non significant difference in all the parameters of semen analysis. These findings suggest a chronic neuro physiological effect of sildenafil treatment on male fertility profile exclusively in diabetic neuropathic condition with an improvement in testicular function which was probably arrested due to some kind of testicular hyperplasia resulted by testicular necrosis and promoted spermatogenesis. Sildenafil seems to be associated with an improvement in the entire smooth musculature of reproductive tract and testicular morphology which was altered due to

  18. Inherited focal, episodic neuropathies: hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies and hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Phillip F

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP; also called tomaculous neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant disorder that produces a painless episodic, recurrent, focal demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP generally develops during adolescence, and may cause attacks of numbness, muscular weakness, and atrophy. Peroneal palsies, carpal tunnel syndrome, and other entrapment neuropathies may be frequent manifestations of HNPP. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities may be reduced in clinically affected patients, as well as in asymptomatic gene carriers. The histopathological changes observed in peripheral nerves of HNPP patients include segmental demyelination and tomaculous or "sausage-like" formations. Mild overlap of clinical features with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 1 (CMT1) may lead patients with HNPP to be misdiagnosed as having CMT1. HNPP and CMT1 are both demyelinating neuropathies, however, their clinical, pathological, and electrophysiological features are quite distinct. HNPP is most frequently associated with a 1.4-Mb pair deletion on chromosome 17p12. A duplication of the identical region leads to CMT1A. Both HNPP and CMT1A result from a dosage effect of the PMP22 gene, which is contained within the deleted/duplicated region. This is reflected in reduced mRNA and protein levels in sural nerve biopsy samples from HNPP patients. Treatment for HNPP consists of preventative and symptom-easing measures. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA; also called familial brachial plexus neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant disorder causing episodes of paralysis and muscle weakness initiated by severe pain. Individuals with HNA may suffer repeated episodes of intense pain, paralysis, and sensory disturbances in an affected limb. The onset of HNA is at birth or later in childhood with prognosis for recovery usually favorable; however, persons with HNA may have permanent residual neurological dysfunction following attack(s). Episodes are often

  19. Postural control and functional balance in individuals with diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia de Souza Fortaleza

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2013v15n3p305 Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (DPN brings on reduced somatosensation, which can lead to changes in postural control. The objective of this study was to evaluate postural control in a standing position and in different conditions, as well as functional balance in individuals with DPN, make the correlation between the results obtained from the postural control assessment with the values from the functional balance test and compare the results obtained in the neuropathy group with those of the control group, checking for possible differences between the evaluation conditions of both groups. The study included 13 women with DPN (NG and 17 non-diabetic women (CG. Postural control assessment was performed by kinemetry in the following conditions: eyes opened (EO, eyes closed (EC, and semi-tandem (ST. The data was processed in MATLAB and the following variables were generated: mean amplitude of oscillation (MAO in the anterior-posterior (AP and medial-lateral (ML direction; and average speed of oscillation (ASO in AP and ML direction. Functional balance was assessed by the Timed Up and Go Test. There was significant difference between the groups (p≤0.005 in MAO-AP EO and EC, MAO-ML EC and ST, and ASO-ML ST. There were differences between the conditions EO and ST (p≤0.005 and EC and ST (p≤0.005 for the variables MAO-ML and ASO-ML with greater damage to the NG, which also had a lower functional balance (p=0.001. ML instability was positively correlated with functional imbalance. The results show a change in the postural control system in the DPN, which could lead these individuals to a higher risk for falls and functional impairment.

  20. Severe sensory neuropathy in patients with adult-onset multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoxia; Hong, Daojun; Zhang, Wei; Li, Wurong; Shi, Xin; Zhao, Danhua; Yang, Xu; Lv, He; Yuan, Yun

    2016-02-01

    Multiple Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of fatty acid oxidation. Most patients with late-onset MADD are clinically characterized by lipid storage myopathy with dramatic responsiveness to riboflavin treatment. Abnormalities of peripheral neuropathy have rarely been reported in patients with late-onset MADD. We describe six patients who presented with proximal limb weakness and loss of sensation in the distal limbs. Muscle biopsy revealed typical myopathological patterns of lipid storage myopathy and blood acylcarnitine profiles showed a combined elevation of multiple acylcarnitines supporting the diagnosis of MADD. However, nerve conduction investigations and sural nerve biopsies in these patients indicated severe axonal sensory neuropathy. Causative ETFDH gene mutations were found in all six cases. No other causative gene mutations were identified in mitochondrial DNA and genes associated with hereditary neuropathies through next-generation-sequencing panel. Late-onset patients with ETFDH mutations can present with proximal muscle weakness and distal sensory neuropathy, which might be a new phenotypic variation, but the precise underlying pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Pseudohypertrophy of the calf muscles in a patient with diabetic neuropathy: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Jin; Lee, Young Hwan; Jung, Kyung Jae; Park, Young Chan; Kim, Ho Kyun; Kim, Ok Dong

    2007-01-01

    Partial or complete loss of innervation of skeletal muscle leads to muscle weakness and atrophic changes, resulting in decreased muscle volume with fatty replacement. Rarely, enlargement of the affected muscle may occur, related to two processes: true hypertrophy and pseudohypertrophy. We report CT and MR findings of the pseudohypertrophy of calf muscles, especially the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, in a patient with diabetic neuropathy that showed increased muscle volume with diffuse fatty replacement and the presence of scanty muscle fibers

  2. Pseudohypertrophy of the calf muscles in a patient with diabetic neuropathy: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Jin; Lee, Young Hwan; Jung, Kyung Jae; Park, Young Chan; Kim, Ho Kyun; Kim, Ok Dong [School of Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    Partial or complete loss of innervation of skeletal muscle leads to muscle weakness and atrophic changes, resulting in decreased muscle volume with fatty replacement. Rarely, enlargement of the affected muscle may occur, related to two processes: true hypertrophy and pseudohypertrophy. We report CT and MR findings of the pseudohypertrophy of calf muscles, especially the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, in a patient with diabetic neuropathy that showed increased muscle volume with diffuse fatty replacement and the presence of scanty muscle fibers.

  3. Nocturnal antihypertensive treatment in patients with type 1 diabetes with autonomic neuropathy and non-dipping of blood pressure during night time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkær, Henrik; Jensen, Tonny; Kofoed, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) and elevated nocturnal blood pressure are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Previously, associations between CAN, non-dipping of nocturnal blood pressure and coronary artery calcification have been...

  4. Foot care knowledge and practices and the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy among people with diabetes attending a secondary care rural hospital in southern India

    OpenAIRE

    Hanu George; P S Rakesh; Manjunath Krishna; Reginald Alex; Vinod Joseph Abraham; Kuryan George; Jasmin H Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is a multifaceted disease and foot ulceration is one of its most common complications. Poor foot care knowledge and practices are important risk factors for foot problems among people with diabetes. Aims: To assess the knowledge and practices regarding foot care and to estimate the proportion of people with peripheral neuropathy among people with diabetes. Settings and Design: The cross-sectional study was conducted in 212 consecutive diabetes patients attending ...

  5. Genetic heterogeneity of motor neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansagi, Boglarka; Griffin, Helen; Whittaker, Roger G; Antoniadi, Thalia; Evangelista, Teresinha; Miller, James; Greenslade, Mark; Forester, Natalie; Duff, Jennifer; Bradshaw, Anna; Kleinle, Stephanie; Boczonadi, Veronika; Steele, Hannah; Ramesh, Venkateswaran; Franko, Edit; Pyle, Angela; Lochmüller, Hanns; Chinnery, Patrick F; Horvath, Rita

    2017-03-28

    To study the prevalence, molecular cause, and clinical presentation of hereditary motor neuropathies in a large cohort of patients from the North of England. Detailed neurologic and electrophysiologic assessments and next-generation panel testing or whole exome sequencing were performed in 105 patients with clinical symptoms of distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN, 64 patients), axonal motor neuropathy (motor Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease [CMT2], 16 patients), or complex neurologic disease predominantly affecting the motor nerves (hereditary motor neuropathy plus, 25 patients). The prevalence of dHMN is 2.14 affected individuals per 100,000 inhabitants (95% confidence interval 1.62-2.66) in the North of England. Causative mutations were identified in 26 out of 73 index patients (35.6%). The diagnostic rate in the dHMN subgroup was 32.5%, which is higher than previously reported (20%). We detected a significant defect of neuromuscular transmission in 7 cases and identified potentially causative mutations in 4 patients with multifocal demyelinating motor neuropathy. Many of the genes were shared between dHMN and motor CMT2, indicating identical disease mechanisms; therefore, we suggest changing the classification and including dHMN also as a subcategory of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Abnormal neuromuscular transmission in some genetic forms provides a treatable target to develop therapies. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy: cause, effect, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Shauna; Lin, Weijie V; Sadaka, Ama; Lee, Andrew G

    2017-01-01

    Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is the most common form of ischemic optic neuropathy and the second most common optic neuropathy. Patients are generally over the age of 50 years with vasculopathic risk factors (eg, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and obstructive sleep apnea). The exact mechanism of NAION is not fully understood. In addition, several treatment options have been proposed. This article summarizes the current literature on the diagnosis, treatment, and management of NAION.

  7. Striated muscle fiber size, composition and capillary density in diabetes in relation to neuropathy and muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Christer Swan; Jensen, Jacob Malte; Jakobsen, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    study was to evaluate histologic properties and capillarization of diabetic skeletal muscle in relation to DPN and muscle strength. METHODS: Twenty type 1 and 20 type 2 diabetic (T1D and T2D, respectively) patients underwent biopsy of the gastrocnemic muscle, isokinetic dynamometry at the ankle...... between muscle fiber diameter, muscle fiber type distribution, or capillary density and degree of neuropathy or muscle strength for either patient group. Muscle fiber diameter and the proportion of Type II fibers were greater for T1D patients than both T2D patients and controls. The T2D patients had fewer...

  8. No effect of Pindolol on postural hypotension in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. A randomised double-blind controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgård, A; Hilsted, J

    1988-01-01

    of this therapy we performed a double-blind placebo controlled cross-over study with Pindolol (15 mg/day). Eight Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy and signs and symptoms of orthostatic hypotension (systolic blood pressure decrease greater than 30 mm Hg when standing......) participated in the study. Patients were treated for 10 weeks. Clinical examinations were performed every fortnight and patients registered postural symptoms twice daily on a visual analog scale. No significant changes were seen in blood pressure recordings, heart-rate or visual analog scale registration...... during treatment with Pindolol compared to placebo. Our study does not support the suggestion that Pindolol is a valuable drug for treatment of diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy and postural giddiness....

  9. Diabetic foot syndrome: Immune-inflammatory features as possible cardiovascular markers in diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Maida, Carlo; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcerations have been extensively reported as vascular complications of diabetes mellitus associated with a high degree of morbidity and mortality. Diabetic foot syndrome (DFS), as defined by the World Health Organization, is an “ulceration of the foot (distally from the ankle and including the ankle) associated with neuropathy and different grades of ischemia and infection”. Pathogenic events able to cause diabetic foot ulcers are multifactorial. Among the commonest causes of this pathogenic pathway it’s possible to consider peripheral neuropathy, foot deformity, abnormal foot pressures, abnormal joint mobility, trauma, peripheral artery disease. Several studies reported how diabetic patients show a higher mortality rate compared to patients without diabetes and in particular these studies under filled how cardiovascular mortality and morbidity is 2-4 times higher among patients affected by type 2 diabetes mellitus. This higher degree of cardiovascular morbidity has been explained as due to the observed higher prevalence of major cardiovascular risk factor, of asymptomatic findings of cardiovascular diseases, and of prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events in diabetic patients with foot complications. In diabetes a fundamental pathogenic pathway of most of vascular complications has been reported as linked to a complex interplay of inflammatory, metabolic and procoagulant variables. These pathogenetic aspects have a direct interplay with an insulin resistance, subsequent obesity, diabetes, hypertension, prothrombotic state and blood lipid disorder. Involvement of inflammatory markers such as IL-6 plasma levels and resistin in diabetic subjects as reported by Tuttolomondo et al confirmed the pathogenetic issue of the a “adipo-vascular” axis that may contribute to cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. This “adipo-vascular axis” in patients with type 2 diabetes has been reported as characterized

  10. Autosomal recessive type II hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with acrodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P K; Claus, D; King, R H

    1999-02-01

    A family is described with presumed autosomal recessive inheritance in which three siblings developed a progressive neuropathy that combined limb weakness and severe distal sensory loss leading to prominent mutilating changes. Electrophysiological and nerve biopsy findings indicated an axonopathy. The disorder is therefore classifiable as type II hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN II). The clinical features differ from those reported in previously described cases of autosomal recessive HMSN II. This disorder may therefore represent a new variant.

  11. Text Messaging to Improve Disease Management in Patients With Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Victoria; Goodman, Nancy; Lapin, Brittany; Cooley, Camille; Wang, Ed; Craig, Terri L; Glosner, Scott E; Juhn, Mark S; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Sadosky, Alesia B; Masi, Christopher

    2018-06-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of educational text messages on diabetes self-management activities and outcomes in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (pDPN). Methods Patients with pDPN identified from a large integrated health system who agreed to participate were randomized to 6 months of usual care (UC) or UC plus twice-daily diabetes self-management text messages (UC+TxtM). Outcomes included the Pain Numerical Rating Scale, Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA), questions on diabetes health beliefs, and glycated hemoglobin (A1C). Changes from baseline were evaluated at 6 months and compared between groups. Results Demographic characteristics were balanced between groups (N = 62; 53% female, mean age = 63 years, 94% type 2 diabetes), as were baseline measures. After 6 months, pain decreased with UC+TxtM from 6.3 to 5.5 and with UC from 6.5 to 6.0, with no difference between groups. UC+TxtM but not UC was associated with significant improvements from baseline on all SDSCA subscales. On diabetes health beliefs, UC+TxtM patients reported significantly increased benefits and reduced barriers and susceptibility relative to UC at 6 months. A1C declined in both groups, but neither change was significant relative to baseline. Conclusions Patients with pDPN who receive twice-daily text messages regarding diabetes management reported reduced pain relative to baseline, although this change was not significant compared with usual care. In addition, text messaging was associated with increased self-management activities and improved diabetes health beliefs and total self-care. These results warrant further investigation.

  12. A family with autosomal dominant mutilating neuropathy not linked to either Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2B (CMT2B) or hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellone, Emilia; Rodolico, Carmelo; Toscano, Antonio; Di Maria, Emilio; Cassandrini, Denise; Pizzuti, Antonio; Pigullo, Simona; Mazzeo, Anna; Macaione, Vincenzo; Girlanda, Paolo; Vita, Giuseppe; Ajmar, Franco; Mandich, Paola

    2002-03-01

    Sensory loss and ulcero-mutilating features have been observed in hereditary sensory neuropathy type I and in hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type IIB, also referred as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2B. To date two loci associated with ulcero-mutilating neuropathy have been described: CMT2B at 3q13-q22 and HSN I at 9q22.1-q22.3. We performed linkage analysis with chromosomal markers representing the hereditary sensory neuropathy type I and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2B loci on an Italian family with a severe distal sensory loss leading to an ulcero-mutilating peripheral neuropathy. Negative likelihood-of-odds scores excluded any evidence of linkage to both chromosome 3q13 and chromosome 9q22 markers, confirming the genetic heterogeneity of this clinical entity and the presence of a third locus responsible for ulcero-mutilating neuropathies.

  13. Nocturnal antihypertensive treatment in patients with type 1 diabetes with autonomic neuropathy and non-dipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Henrik Øder; Jensen, Tonny; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2016-01-01

    to test if bedtime dosing (BD) versus morning dosing (MD) of the ACE inhibitor enalapril would affect the 24-hour BP profile in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), CAN and non-dipping. SETTING: Secondary healthcare unit in Copenhagen, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 24 normoalbuminuric patients with T1D with CAN...... and non-dipping were included, consisting of mixed gender and Caucasian origin. Mean±SD age, glycosylated haemoglobin and diabetes duration were 60±7 years, 7.9±0.7% (62±7 mmol/mol) and 36±11 years. INTERVENTIONS: In this randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind cross-over study, the patients were......OBJECTIVES: Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) and abnormal circadian blood pressure (BP) rhythm are independent cardiovascular risk factors in patients with diabetes and associations between CAN, non-dipping of nocturnal BP and coronary artery disease have been demonstrated. We aimed...

  14. Association of glycaemic variability evaluated by continuous glucose monitoring with diabetic peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu-Ming; Zhao, Li-Hua; Zhang, Xiu-Lin; Cai, Hong-Li; Huang, Hai-Yan; Xu, Feng; Chen, Tong; Wang, Xue-Qin; Guo, Ai-Song; Li, Jian-An; Su, Jian-Bin

    2018-05-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), a common microvascular complication of diabetes, is linked to glycaemic derangements. Glycaemic variability, as a pattern of glycaemic derangements, is a key risk factor for diabetic complications. We investigated the association of glycaemic variability with DPN in a large-scale sample of type 2 diabetic patients. In this cross-sectional study, we enrolled 982 type 2 diabetic patients who were screened for DPN and monitored by a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system between February 2011 and January 2017. Multiple glycaemic variability parameters, including the mean amplitude of glycaemic excursions (MAGE), mean of daily differences (MODD), standard deviation of glucose (SD), and 24-h mean glucose (24-h MG), were calculated from glucose profiles obtained from CGM. Other possible risks for DPN were also examined. Of the recruited type 2 diabetic patients, 20.1% (n = 197) presented with DPN, and these patients also had a higher MAGE, MODD, SD, and 24-h MG than patients without DPN (p diabetic duration, HOMA-IR, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were found to be independent contributors to DPN, and the corresponding odds ratios (95% confidence interval) were 4.57 (3.48-6.01), 1.10 (1.03-1.17), 1.24 (1.09-1.41), and 1.33 (1.15-1.53), respectively. Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated that the optimal MAGE cutoff value for predicting DPN was 4.60 mmol/L; the corresponding sensitivity was 64.47%, and the specificity was 75.54%. In addition to conventional risks including diabetic duration, HOMA-IR and HbA1c, increased glycaemic variability assessed by MAGE is a significant independent contributor to DPN in type 2 diabetic patients.

  15. Clinical spectrum of Castleman disease-associated neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, Elie; Dispenzieri, Angela; Mandrekar, Jay; Mauermann, Michelle L

    2016-12-06

    To define the peripheral neuropathy phenotypes associated with Castleman disease. We conducted a retrospective chart review for patients with biopsy-proven Castleman disease evaluated between January 2003 and December 2014. Patients with associated peripheral neuropathy were identified and divided into 2 groups: those with Castleman disease without POEMS syndrome (CD-PN) and those with Castleman disease with POEMS syndrome (CD-POEMS). We used a cohort of patients with POEMS as controls. Clinical, electrodiagnostic, and laboratory characteristics were collected and compared among patient subgroups. There were 7 patients with CD-PN, 20 with CD-POEMS, and 122 with POEMS. Patients with CD-PN had the mildest neuropathy characterized by predominant sensory symptoms with no pain and mild distal sensory deficits (median Neuropathy Impairment Score of 7 points). Although both patients with CD-POEMS and patients with POEMS had a severe sensory and motor neuropathy, patients with CD-POEMS were less affected (median Neuropathy Impairment Score of 33 and 66 points, respectively). The degree of severity was also reflected on electrodiagnostic testing in which patients with CD-PN demonstrated a mild degree of axonal loss, followed by patients with CD-POEMS and then those with POEMS. Demyelinating features, defined by European Federation of Neurologic Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society criteria, were present in 43% of the CD-PN, 78% of the CD-POEMS, and 86% of the POEMS group. There is a spectrum of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies associated with Castleman disease. CD-PN is sensory predominant and is the mildest phenotype, whereas CD-POEMS is a more severe sensory and motor neuropathy. Compared to the POEMS cohort, those with CD-POEMS neuropathy have a similar but less severe phenotype. Whether these patients respond differently to treatment deserves further study. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Clinical spectrum of Castleman disease–associated neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, Elie; Dispenzieri, Angela; Mandrekar, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To define the peripheral neuropathy phenotypes associated with Castleman disease. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review for patients with biopsy-proven Castleman disease evaluated between January 2003 and December 2014. Patients with associated peripheral neuropathy were identified and divided into 2 groups: those with Castleman disease without POEMS syndrome (CD-PN) and those with Castleman disease with POEMS syndrome (CD-POEMS). We used a cohort of patients with POEMS as controls. Clinical, electrodiagnostic, and laboratory characteristics were collected and compared among patient subgroups. Results: There were 7 patients with CD-PN, 20 with CD-POEMS, and 122 with POEMS. Patients with CD-PN had the mildest neuropathy characterized by predominant sensory symptoms with no pain and mild distal sensory deficits (median Neuropathy Impairment Score of 7 points). Although both patients with CD-POEMS and patients with POEMS had a severe sensory and motor neuropathy, patients with CD-POEMS were less affected (median Neuropathy Impairment Score of 33 and 66 points, respectively). The degree of severity was also reflected on electrodiagnostic testing in which patients with CD-PN demonstrated a mild degree of axonal loss, followed by patients with CD-POEMS and then those with POEMS. Demyelinating features, defined by European Federation of Neurologic Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society criteria, were present in 43% of the CD-PN, 78% of the CD-POEMS, and 86% of the POEMS group. Conclusion: There is a spectrum of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies associated with Castleman disease. CD-PN is sensory predominant and is the mildest phenotype, whereas CD-POEMS is a more severe sensory and motor neuropathy. Compared to the POEMS cohort, those with CD-POEMS neuropathy have a similar but less severe phenotype. Whether these patients respond differently to treatment deserves further study. PMID:27807187

  17. A case report of congenital sensory neuropathy with anhidrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Hyong; Chang, Hae Soon; Han, Man Chung; Lee, Suck Hyun; Lee, Duk Yong

    1974-01-01

    Congenital sensory neuropathy with anhidrosis is rare disease and may be confused with other cause of pain insensitivity or indifference. Other cause of pain insensitivity include congenital indifference to pain, congenital sensory neuropathy, hereditary sensory radicular neuropathy, nonprogressive sensory radicular neuropathy, syringomyelia, and hysterical analgesia. It is hereditary disease which is transmitted with autosomal recessive trait. The patient is 8 years old Korean male with complaint of swelling and local heat on right knee joint. Generalized analgesia is noted on physical examination. The skin is dry and coarse with no evidence of sweating. Delayed motor development was noted on early children. Mental development is retarded. On past history, patient showed unpredictable rises of temperature, though the general condition remained good. Multiple painless fracture on right humerus and right metatasal bone was occurred. Rt.knee radiograms show marked swelling of soft tissue and periosteal calcification on distal femru,which are resemble with neurotrophic joint

  18. A case report of congenital sensory neuropathy with anhidrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Hyong; Chang, Hae Soon; Han, Man Chung; Lee, Suck Hyun; Lee, Duk Yong [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-10-15

    Congenital sensory neuropathy with anhidrosis is rare disease and may be confused with other cause of pain insensitivity or indifference. Other cause of pain insensitivity include congenital indifference to pain, congenital sensory neuropathy, hereditary sensory radicular neuropathy, nonprogressive sensory radicular neuropathy, syringomyelia, and hysterical analgesia. It is hereditary disease which is transmitted with autosomal recessive trait. The patient is 8 years old Korean male with complaint of swelling and local heat on right knee joint. Generalized analgesia is noted on physical examination. The skin is dry and coarse with no evidence of sweating. Delayed motor development was noted on early children. Mental development is retarded. On past history, patient showed unpredictable rises of temperature, though the general condition remained good. Multiple painless fracture on right humerus and right metatasal bone was occurred. Rt.knee radiograms show marked swelling of soft tissue and periosteal calcification on distal femru,which are resemble with neurotrophic joint.

  19. Development of Postoperative Diabetes Mellitus in Patients Undergoing Distal Pancreatectomy versus Whipple Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Adrienne; Demirjian, Aram; Yamamoto, Maki; Hollenbach, Kathryn; Imagawa, David K

    2017-10-01

    Because the islets of Langerhans are more prevalent in the body and tail of the pancreas, distal pancreatectomy (DP) is believed to increase the likelihood of developing new onset diabetes mellitus (NODM). To determine whether the development of postoperative diabetes was more prevalent in patients undergoing DP or Whipple procedure, 472 patients undergoing either a DP (n = 122) or Whipple (n = 350), regardless of underlying pathology, were analyzed at one month postoperatively. Insulin or oral hypoglycemic requirements were assessed and patients were stratified into preoperative diabetic status: NODM or preexisting diabetes. A retrospective chart review of the 472 patients between 1996 and 2014 showed that the total rate of NODM after Whipple procedure was 43 per cent, which was not different from patients undergoing DP (45%). The incidence of preoperative diabetes was 12 per cent in patients undergoing the Whipple procedure and 17 per cent in the DP cohort. Thus, the overall incidence of diabetes after Whipple procedure was 54 and 49 per cent in the DP group. The development of diabetes was unrelated to the type of resection performed. Age more than 65 and Caucasian ethnicity were associated with postoperative diabetes regardless of the type of resection performed.

  20. Potential Association of Triglyceride Glucose Index with Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Md; Bhandari, Uma; Habib, Anwar; Ahmad, Razi

    2017-07-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a common and most neglected complication of diabetes, estimated to be roughly 8% in recently diagnosed patients and greater than 50% in patients with chronic disease history. The insulin resistance (IR) itself is bidirectionally associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and CAN is a predisposing factor. The primary objective of the present study was aimed to find a correlation of triglyceride glucose index (TyG index) in CAN patients along with the prevalence of CAN in T2DM patients as a secondary objective. This prevalence study was conducted on 202 patients visiting the diabetic clinic of Hamdard Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Jamia Hamdard (HIMSR) teaching hospital in New Delhi, India who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The Ewings autonomic function test was used for diagnosis of CAN. TyG index was calculated for patients based on fasting levels of glucose and triglyceride. The CAN was diagnosed in 62 participants out of 202 T2DM patients (overall prevalence 30.7%). The mean ± standard deviation (SD) for TyG index was 10.3 ± 0.2 and 9.5 ± 0.2 in CAN positive, T2DM patients, respectively. The difference of TyG index, in CAN positive and T2DM patients, was highly significant (P index, duration, and age with patient groups. TyG index showed a positive correlation with heart rate during deep breathing (HRD), heart rate variation during standing (HRS), blood pressure (BP) response to handgrip and BP response to standing. Our finding highlights the TyG index, low-cost IR index, might be useful as an alternative tool for the early screening of patients at a high risk of diabetic neuropathy. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  1. Pes cavus and hereditary neuropathies: when a relationship should be suspected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, S; Ricci, G; Caldarazzo Ienco, E; Carlesi, C; Volpi, L; Siciliano, G; Mancuso, M

    2010-12-01

    The hereditary peripheral neuropathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases of the peripheral nervous system. Foot deformities, including the common pes cavus, but also hammer toes and twisting of the ankle, are frequently present in patients with hereditary peripheral neuropathy, and often represent one of the first signs of the disease. Pes cavus in hereditary peripheral neuropathies is caused by imbalance between the intrinsic muscles of the foot and the muscles of the leg. Accurate clinical evaluation in patients with pes cavus is necessary to exclude or confirm the presence of peripheral neuropathy. Hereditary peripheral neuropathies should be suspected in those cases with bilateral foot deformities, in the presence of family history for pes cavus and/or gait impairment, and in the presence of neurological symptoms or signs, such as distal muscle hypotrophy of limbs. Herein, we review the hereditary peripheral neuropathies in which pes cavus plays a key role as a "spy sign," discussing the clinical and molecular features of these disorders to highlight the importance of pes cavus as a helpful clinical sign in these rare diseases.

  2. The influence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy on local postural muscle and central sensory feedback balance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toosizadeh, Nima; Mohler, Jane; Armstrong, David G; Talal, Talal K; Najafi, Bijan

    2015-01-01

    Poor balance control and increased fall risk have been reported in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Traditional body sway measures are unable to describe underlying postural control mechanism. In the current study, we used stabilogram diffusion analysis to examine the mechanism under which balance is altered in DPN patients under local-control (postural muscle control) and central-control (postural control using sensory cueing). DPN patients and healthy age-matched adults over 55 years performed two 15-second Romberg balance trials. Center of gravity sway was measured using a motion tracker system based on wearable inertial sensors, and used to derive body sway and local/central control balance parameters. Eighteen DPN patients (age = 65.4±7.6 years; BMI = 29.3±5.3 kg/m2) and 18 age-matched healthy controls (age = 69.8±2.9; BMI = 27.0±4.1 kg/m2) with no major mobility disorder were recruited. The rate of sway within local-control was significantly higher in the DPN group by 49% (healthy local-controlslope = 1.23±1.06×10-2 cm2/sec, Pcontrol balance behavior in DPN patients. Unlike local-control, the rate of sway within central-control was 60% smaller in the DPN group (healthy central-controlslope-Log = 0.39±0.23, Pcontrol rate of sway with neuropathy severity (rPearson = 0.65-085, Pcontrols. However, as soon as they perceived the magnitude of sway using sensory feedback, they chose a high rigid postural control strategy, probably due to high concerns for fall, which may increase the energy cost during extended period of standing; the adaptation mechanism using sensory feedback depends on the level of neuropathy and the history of diabetes.

  3. Reactive Eccrine Syringofibroadenoma Associated with Neuropathy, Venous Stasis, and Diabetic Foot Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirawut Sirikham

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Eccrine syringofibroadenoma (ESFA is an uncommon benign adnexal neoplasm which derives from cells of the acrosyringium of eccrine sweat glands. The clinical appearance is nonspecific but the histological features are typical. Five clinical subtypes of ESFA exist: (1 solitary ESFA; (2 multiple ESFA associated with ectodermal dysplasia; (3 multiple ESFA without cutaneous features; (4 unilateral linear ESFA (nevoid, and (5 reactive ESFA associated with inflammatory or neoplastic dermatoses. We report the case of a 42-year-old man with long-standing diabetes and neuropathy, presenting with a 4-year history of asymptomatic erythematous plaques on a background of brown hyperpigmentation on the left foot. The clinical presentation and histopathological findings are compatible with reactive ESFA.

  4. Peripheral neuropathy: an often-overlooked cause of falls in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J K; Ashton-Miller, J A

    1996-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is common in the elderly and results in impairments in distal proprioception and strength that hinder balance and predispose them to falls. The loss of heel reflexes, decreased vibratory sense that improves proximally, impaired position sense at the great toe, and inability to maintain unipedal stance for 10 seconds in three attempts all suggest functionally significant peripheral neuropathy. Physicians can help their patients with peripheral neuropathy to prevent falls by teaching them and their families about peripheral nerve dysfunction and its effects on balance and by advising patients to substitute vision for the lost somatosensory function, correctly use a cane, wear proper shoes and orthotics, and perform balance and upper extremity strengthening exercises.

  5. Diabetic Neuropathy and Oxidative Stress: Therapeutic Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asieh Hosseini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy (DN is a widespread disabling disorder comprising peripheral nerves' damage. DN develops on a background of hyperglycemia and an entangled metabolic imbalance, mainly oxidative stress. The majority of related pathways like polyol, advanced glycation end products, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, hexosamine, and protein kinase c all originated from initial oxidative stress. To date, no absolute cure for DN has been defined; although some drugs are conventionally used, much more can be found if all pathophysiological links with oxidative stress would be taken into account. In this paper, although current therapies for DN have been reviewed, we have mainly focused on the links between DN and oxidative stress and therapies on the horizon, such as inhibitors of protein kinase C, aldose reductase, and advanced glycation. With reference to oxidative stress and the related pathways, the following new drugs are under study such as taurine, acetyl-L-carnitine, alpha lipoic acid, protein kinase C inhibitor (ruboxistaurin, aldose reductase inhibitors (fidarestat, epalrestat, ranirestat, advanced glycation end product inhibitors (benfotiamine, aspirin, aminoguanidine, the hexosamine pathway inhibitor (benfotiamine, inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (nicotinamide, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (trandolapril. The development of modern drugs to treat DN is a real challenge and needs intensive long-term comparative trials.

  6. Diabetic Neuropathy and Oxidative Stress: Therapeutic Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Asieh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a widespread disabling disorder comprising peripheral nerves' damage. DN develops on a background of hyperglycemia and an entangled metabolic imbalance, mainly oxidative stress. The majority of related pathways like polyol, advanced glycation end products, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, hexosamine, and protein kinase c all originated from initial oxidative stress. To date, no absolute cure for DN has been defined; although some drugs are conventionally used, much more can be found if all pathophysiological links with oxidative stress would be taken into account. In this paper, although current therapies for DN have been reviewed, we have mainly focused on the links between DN and oxidative stress and therapies on the horizon, such as inhibitors of protein kinase C, aldose reductase, and advanced glycation. With reference to oxidative stress and the related pathways, the following new drugs are under study such as taurine, acetyl-L-carnitine, alpha lipoic acid, protein kinase C inhibitor (ruboxistaurin), aldose reductase inhibitors (fidarestat, epalrestat, ranirestat), advanced glycation end product inhibitors (benfotiamine, aspirin, aminoguanidine), the hexosamine pathway inhibitor (benfotiamine), inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (nicotinamide), and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (trandolapril). The development of modern drugs to treat DN is a real challenge and needs intensive long-term comparative trials. PMID:23738033

  7. Incidence of re-amputation following partial first ray amputation associated with diabetes mellitus and peripheral sensory neuropathy: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L. Borkosky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus with peripheral sensory neuropathy frequently results in forefoot ulceration. Ulceration at the first ray level tends to be recalcitrant to local wound care modalities and off-loading techniques. If healing does occur, ulcer recurrence is common. When infection develops, partial first ray amputation in an effort to preserve maximum foot length is often performed. However, the survivorship of partial first ray amputations in this patient population and associated re-amputation rate remain unknown. Therefore, in an effort to determine the actual re-amputation rate following any form of partial first ray amputation in patients with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy, the authors conducted a systematic review. Only studies involving any form of partial first ray amputation associated with diabetes mellitus and peripheral sensory neuropathy but without critical limb ischemia were included. Our search yielded a total of 24 references with 5 (20.8% meeting our inclusion criteria involving 435 partial first ray amputations. The weighted mean age of patients was 59 years and the weighted mean follow-up was 26 months. The initial amputation level included the proximal phalanx base 167 (38.4% times; first metatarsal head resection 96 (22.1% times; first metatarsal-phalangeal joint disarticulation 53 (12.2% times; first metatarsal mid-shaft 39 (9% times; hallux fillet flap 32 (7.4% times; first metatarsal base 29 (6.7% times; and partial hallux 19 (4.4% times. The incidence of re-amputation was 19.8% (86/435. The end stage, most proximal level, following re-amputation was an additional digit 32 (37.2% times; transmetatarsal 28 (32.6% times; below-knee 25 (29.1% times; and LisFranc 1 (1.2% time. The results of our systematic review reveal that one out of every five patients undergoing any version of a partial first ray amputation will eventually require more proximal re-amputation. These results reveal that partial first ray

  8. Image analysis software for following progression of peripheral neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epplin-Zapf, Thomas; Miller, Clayton; Larkin, Sean; Hermesmeyer, Eduardo; Macy, Jenny; Pellegrini, Marco; Luccarelli, Saverio; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Holmes, Timothy

    2009-02-01

    A relationship has been reported by several research groups [1 - 4] between the density and shapes of nerve fibers in the cornea and the existence and severity of peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is a complication of several prevalent diseases or conditions, which include diabetes, HIV, prolonged alcohol overconsumption and aging. A common clinical technique for confirming the condition is intramuscular electromyography (EMG), which is invasive, so a noninvasive technique like the one proposed here carries important potential advantages for the physician and patient. A software program that automatically detects the nerve fibers, counts them and measures their shapes is being developed and tested. Tests were carried out with a database of subjects with levels of severity of diabetic neuropathy as determined by EMG testing. Results from this testing, that include a linear regression analysis are shown.

  9. Association of peripheral neuropathy with sleep-related breathing disorders in myotonic dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banach M

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Marta Banach,1,* Jakub Antczak,1,* Rafał Rola21Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, 2First Department of Neurology, Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Warsaw, Poland *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Myotonic dystrophy (DM type 1 and type 2 are inherited diseases characterized by myotonia and myopathy. Additional symptoms include, among others, peripheral neuropathy and sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBDs. There is growing evidence for a complex association between DM1 and DM2, which was described in patients with diabetes mellitus and in the general population. In this study, we investigated whether there is an association between peripheral neuropathy and SRBDs also in the population of patients with DM.Methods: The study included 16 patients with DM1 (mean age, 37.9±14.1 years; 20–69 years and eight patients with DM2 (mean age, 47.6±14.1 years; 20–65 years, who underwent a sensory and motor nerve conduction study (NCS and diagnostic screening for SRBDs. In both groups, the NCS parameters were correlated with respiratory parameters.Results: In both groups, the amplitude of the ulnar sensory nerve action potential (SNAP correlated with the mean arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2. In addition, in the DM2 group, the median SNAP correlated with the mean SaO2. In the DM1 group, the median SNAP and the distal motor latency (DML of the ulnar nerve correlated with the apnea–hypopnea index, while the oxygen desaturation index correlated with the DML of the tibial nerve and with conduction velocity in the sural nerve.Conclusion: Our results indicate a complex association between neuropathy and SRBDs in DM1 and DM2. Axonal degeneration may contribute to nocturnal hypoxemia and vice versa. Neuropathy may contribute to muscle weakness, which in turn may cause respiratory events.Keywords: myotonic dystrophy, SRBD and neuropathy with AHI, SNAP, CMAP

  10. The influence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy on local postural muscle and central sensory feedback balance control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Toosizadeh

    Full Text Available Poor balance control and increased fall risk have been reported in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN. Traditional body sway measures are unable to describe underlying postural control mechanism. In the current study, we used stabilogram diffusion analysis to examine the mechanism under which balance is altered in DPN patients under local-control (postural muscle control and central-control (postural control using sensory cueing. DPN patients and healthy age-matched adults over 55 years performed two 15-second Romberg balance trials. Center of gravity sway was measured using a motion tracker system based on wearable inertial sensors, and used to derive body sway and local/central control balance parameters. Eighteen DPN patients (age = 65.4±7.6 years; BMI = 29.3±5.3 kg/m2 and 18 age-matched healthy controls (age = 69.8±2.9; BMI = 27.0±4.1 kg/m2 with no major mobility disorder were recruited. The rate of sway within local-control was significantly higher in the DPN group by 49% (healthy local-controlslope = 1.23±1.06×10-2 cm2/sec, P<0.01, which suggests a compromised local-control balance behavior in DPN patients. Unlike local-control, the rate of sway within central-control was 60% smaller in the DPN group (healthy central-controlslope-Log = 0.39±0.23, P<0.02, which suggests an adaptation mechanism to reduce the overall body sway in DPN patients. Interestingly, significant negative correlations were observed between central-control rate of sway with neuropathy severity (rPearson = 0.65-085, P<0.05 and the history of diabetes (rPearson = 0.58-071, P<0.05. Results suggest that in the lack of sensory feedback cueing, DPN participants were highly unstable compared to controls. However, as soon as they perceived the magnitude of sway using sensory feedback, they chose a high rigid postural control strategy, probably due to high concerns for fall, which may increase the energy cost during extended period of standing; the adaptation

  11. Interactions of Notch1 and TLR4 signaling pathways in DRG neurons of in vivo and in vitro models of diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianhua; Li, Hao; Yin, Yiting; Zhang, Yuanpin; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Huaxiang

    2017-11-02

    Understanding the interactions between Notch1 and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathways in the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy may lead to interpretation of the mechanisms and novel approaches for preventing diabetic neuropathic pain. In the present study, the interactions between Notch1 and TLR4 signaling pathways were investigated by using dorsal root ganglion (DRG) from diabetic neuropathic pain rats and cultured DRG neurons under high glucose challenge. The results showed that high glucose induced not only Notch1 mRNA, HES1 mRNA, and TLR4 mRNA expression, but also Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD1) and TLR4 protein expression in DRG neurons. The proportion of NICD1-immunoreactive (IR) and TLR4-IR neurons in DRG cultures was also increased after high glucose challenge. The above alterations could be partially reversed by inhibition of either Notch1 or TLR4 signaling pathway. Inhibition of either Notch1 or TLR4 signaling pathway could improve mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia thresholds. Inhibition of Notch1 or TLR4 signaling also decreased tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in DRG from diabetic neuropathic rats. These data imply that the interaction between Notch1 and TLR4 signaling pathways is one of the important mechanisms in the development or progression of diabetic neuropathy.

  12. Distribution of elements and water in peripheral nerve of streptozocin-induced diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowery, J.M.; Eichberg, J.; Saubermann, A.J.; LoPachin, R.M. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that alterations in Na, Ca, K, and other biologically relevant elements play a role in the mechanism of cell injury. The pathogenesis of experimental diabetic neuropathy is unknown but might include changes in the distribution of these elements in morphological compartments. In this study, this possibility was examined via electron-probe X-ray microanalysis to measure both concentrations of elements (millimoles of element per kilogram dry or wet weight) and cell water content (percent water) in frozen, unfixed, unstained sections of peripheral nerve from control and streptozocin-induced diabetic rats. Our results indicate that after 20 wk of experimental diabetes, mitochondria and axoplasm from myelinated axons of proximal sciatic nerve displayed diminished K and Cl content, whereas in tibial nerve, the intraaxonal levels of these elements increased. In distal sciatic nerve, mitochondrial and axoplasmic levels of Ca were increased, whereas other elemental alterations were not observed. These regional changes resulted in a reversal of the decreasing proximodistal concentration gradients for K and Cl, which exist in nondiabetic rat sciatic nerve. Our results cannot be explained on the basis of altered water. Highly distinctive changes in elemental distribution observed might be a critical component of the neurotoxic mechanism underlying diabetic neuropathy

  13. Determination of Efficacy of Reflexology in Managing Patients with Diabetic Neuropathy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Dalal, Krishna; Maran, V. Bharathi; Pandey, Ravindra M.; Tripathi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Background. The restricted usage of existing pharmacological methods which do not seem to provide the treatment of diabetic neuropathy may lead to exploring the efficacy of a complementary therapy. In this context, this paper was devoted to evaluate the efficacy of foot reflexology. This health science works on the hypothesis that the dysfunctional states of body parts could be identified by observing certain skin features and be rectified by stimulating certain specific areas mapped on feet....

  14. Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Consensus Recommendations on Diagnosis, Assessment and Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tesfaye, S; Vileikyte, L; Rayman, G

    2011-01-01

    use of opiates such as the synthetic opioid tramadol, morphine and oxycodone controlled release. There is a limited literature with regard to combination treatment. In extreme cases of painful DPN unresponsive to pharmacotherapy, occasional use of electrical spinal cord stimulation might be indicated......Painful Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (painful DPN) is common, is associated with significant reduction in quality of life and poses major treatment challenges to the practising physician. Although poor glucose control and cardiovascular risk factors are proven to contribute to the aetiology...... of DPN, risk factors specific for painful DPN remain unknown. A number of instruments have been proven to assess the character, intensity and impact of painful DPN on quality of life, activities of daily living and mood. Management of the patient with DPN must be tailored to individual requirements...

  15. Exercise improves gait, reaction time and postural stability in older adults with type 2 diabetes and neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Steven; Colberg, Sheri R; Parson, Henri K; Vinik, Aaron I

    2014-01-01

    For older adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), declines in balance and walking ability are risk factors for falls, and peripheral neuropathy magnifies this risk. Exercise training may improve balance, gait and reduce the risk of falling. This study investigated the effects of 12weeks of aerobic exercise training on walking, balance, reaction time and falls risk metrics in older T2DM individuals with/without peripheral neuropathy. Adults with T2DM, 21 without (DM; age 58.7±1.7years) and 16 with neuropathy (DM-PN; age 58.9±1.9years), engaged in either moderate or intense supervised exercise training thrice-weekly for 12weeks. Pre/post-training assessments included falls risk (using the physiological profile assessment), standing balance, walking ability and hand/foot simple reaction time. Pre-training, the DM-PN group had higher falls risk, slower (hand) reaction times (232 vs. 219ms), walked at a slower speed (108 vs. 113cm/s) with shorter strides compared to the DM group. Following training, improvements in hand/foot reaction times and faster walking speed were seen for both groups. While falls risk was not significantly reduced, the observed changes in gait, reaction time and balance metrics suggest that aerobic exercise of varying intensities is beneficial for improving dynamic postural control in older T2DM adults with/without neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Continuous glucose monitoring adds information beyond HbA1c in well-controlled diabetes patients with early cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleischer, Jesper; Laugesen, Esben; Cichosz, Simon Lebech

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Hyperglycemia as evaluated by HbA1c is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) may add information beyond HbA1c in patients with type 2 diabetes and CAN. METHO...

  17. Footboards: Indigenous and novel method of screening for diabetes peripheral neuropathy – A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Hussain Bijli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To validate the effectiveness of indigenously designed “footboard (FB” in early diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (PNP by comparing it with Semmes–Weinstein monofilament (SWM and vibration perception (VP. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and forty-four patients with diabetes were examined for PNP using SWM and 128 Hz tuning fork. The findings were compared with indigenously designed FBs with 1, 2, and 3 mm elevations. Results: Out of 108 patients who did not have protective sensation as per SWM, only 10 (9.2% felt 1 mm board bearings, and out of 72 patients who did not feel vibration, only 8 (11.1% felt 1 mm board bearings. Out of 136 patients who had protective sensation, 128 (94.11% felt 2 mm elevated board bearings, and out of 172 patients who had VP, only 152 patients (88.3% felt 2 mm board bearings. With SWM as standard, the sensitivities and specificities, respectively, were 63% and 90% (1 mm board, and 94% and 60% (2 mm board. With VP, the sensitivities and specificities, respectively, were 59% and 90% (1 mm board, and 88% and 61% (2 mm board. Conclusions: FB, which simultaneously tests touch and pressure sensation, shows a high level of performance in detecting at-risk feet. FB may be simple, time-efficient, and inexpensive test for detection of neuropathy and needs further validation in a larger study.

  18. Analysis of Postural Control During Quiet Standing in a Population with Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Undergoing Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise Training: A Single Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Snehil; Maiya, Arun; Shastry, Barkur A; Guddattu, Vasudev

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 8 wks of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise on postural control during quiet standing in type 2 diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Individuals were included in the study if they had type 2 diabetes with clinical neuropathy, defined by a minimum score of 7 on the Michigan Diabetic Neuropathy Score, following which the patients were randomly assigned to an 8-wk program by computer-generated random number tables to study or control group. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used for data analysis (P < 0.05 was considered significant). After final randomization, there were 36 patients in the study group and 45 in the control group. On comparison of results for control and study groups using repeated-measures analysis of variance only in the eyes closed on foam condition was there was a significant difference between the two groups for sway velocity along the x-axis (df1, df2 = 1, 18, F = 3.86, P = 0.04) and mediolateral displacement (df1, df2 = 1, 18, F = 4.04, P = 0.03). Aerobic exercise training could exert a therapeutic effect on center of pressure movement only along the x-axis in the eyes closed condition on foam surface during quiet standing.

  19. CARDIAC AUTONOMIC NEUROPATHY AND MICROALBUMINURIA IN TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS- A CROSS-SECTIONAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Padmini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Autonomous neuropathy is one of the least focused complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus in clinical practice. CAN is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality associated with a high risk of cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death. Higher urinary albumin excretion has been suggested as a predicting diabetic nephropathy. This cross-sectional study sought to determine relationship of CAN with early renal decline in type 2 diabetes mellitus. MATERIALS AND METHODS Over a period of two years, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus after careful exclusion of other risk factors for proteinuria, 199 patients were included in this cross-sectional survey. CAN was measured by portable ANSiscope and 24-hour urine microalbumin level was estimated. Correlation was sought between the two variable. RESULTS Out of the 199 patients chosen for the study, 127 were male. The mean age of diabetes was 6.4±3.9 years. 57.8% had late or advanced CAN and there was a significant linear correlation with 24-hour urine microalbumin levels. CONCLUSION Measurement of CAN is an effective way to assess the level of cardiac sympathetic dysfunction due to disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus of more than 5 years duration. Urine microalbumin levels correlate with the degree of CAN. There is a strong need to conduct more studies about CAN to fully understand its pathology and develop treatment strategies to reduce cardiac mortality.

  20. The clinical identification of peripheral neuropathy among older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, James K

    2002-11-01

    To identify simple clinical rules for the detection of a diffuse peripheral neuropathy among older outpatients. Observational, blinded, controlled study. A tertiary-care electrodiagnostic laboratory and biomechanics laboratory. One hundred research subjects, 68 with electrodiagnostic evidence of peripheral neuropathy, between the ages of 50 and 80 years. Not applicable. One examiner, unaware of the results of electrodiagnostic testing, evaluated Achilles' and patellar reflexes, Romberg testing, semiquantified vibration, and position sense at the toe and ankle in all subjects, and unipedal stance time and the Michigan Diabetes Neuropathy Score in a subset of subjects. Significant group differences were present in all clinical measures tested. Three signs, Achilles' reflex (absent despite facilitation), vibration (128Hz tuning fork perceived for <10s), and position sense (<8/10 1-cm trials) at the toe, were the best predictors of peripheral neuropathy on both univariate and logistic regression (pseudo R(2)=.744) analyses. The presence of 2 or 3 signs versus 0 or 1 sign identified peripheral neuropathy with sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 94.1%, 84.4%, 92.8%, and 87.1%, respectively. Values were similar among subgroups of subjects with and without diabetes mellitus. When other clinicians applied the technique to 12 more subjects, excellent interrater reliability regarding the presence of peripheral neuropathy (kappa=.833) and good to excellent interrater reliability for each sign (kappa range,.667-1.00) were shown. Among older persons, the presence of 2 or 3 of the 3 clinical signs strongly suggested electrodiagnostic evidence of a peripheral neuropathy, regardless of etiology. Age-related decline in peripheral nerve function need not be a barrier to the clinical recognition of a diffuse peripheral neuropathy among older persons. Copyright 2002 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of

  1. Statin use before diabetes diagnosis and risk of microvascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of statins in the development of microvascular disease in patients with diabetes is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that statin use increases the risk of diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic nephropathy, and gangrene of the foot in individuals with diabetes...... the cumulative incidence of diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic nephropathy, or gangrene of the foot in statin users versus non-statin users. We analysed data with Cox regression models, adjusted for covariates including sex, age at diabetes diagnosis, and method of diabetes diagnosis. To address...... diabetic neuropathy, 1248 developed diabetic nephropathy, and 2392 developed gangrene of the foot. Compared with non-statin users, statin users had a lower cumulative incidence of diabetic retinopathy (hazard ratio 0·60, 95% CI 0·54-0·66; pdiabetic neuropathy (0·66, 0·57-0·75; p

  2. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease complicating type 2 diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Win, Htet Htet Ne

    2012-02-01

    Although both conditions are relatively common, there are very few descriptions of type 2 diabetes mellitus coexisting with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). This case report and literature review describes a 53-year-old Irish man who presented with type 2 diabetes and significant neuropathy, and who was subsequently diagnosed with CMT type 1A. This case report will also discuss how to differentiate diabetic neuropathy from a progressive hereditary neuropathy and how coexistence aggravates the progression of neuropathy thus necessitating early diagnosis.

  3. Charcot-marie-tooth disease complicating type 2 diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Win, Htet Htet Ne

    2011-07-01

    Although both conditions are relatively common, there are very few descriptions of type 2 diabetes mellitus coexisting with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). This case report and literature review describes a 53-year-old Irish man who presented with type 2 diabetes and significant neuropathy, and who was subsequently diagnosed with CMT type 1A. This case report will also discuss how to differentiate diabetic neuropathy from a progressive hereditary neuropathy and how coexistence aggravates the progression of neuropathy thus necessitating early diagnosis.

  4. The effect of bioresorbable vascular scaffold implantation on distal coronary endothelial function in dyslipidemic swine with and without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Mieke; Sorop, Oana; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S; de Vries, René; van Duin, Richard W B; Peters, Ilona; van Loon, Janine E; de Maat, Moniek P; van Beusekom, Heleen M; van der Giessen, Wim J; Jan Danser, A H; Duncker, Dirk J

    2018-02-01

    We studied the effect of bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) implantation on distal coronary endothelial function, in swine on a high fat diet without (HFD) or with diabetes (DM+HFD). Five DM+HFD and five HFD swine underwent BVS implantation on top of coronary plaques, and were studied six months later. Conduit artery segments >5mm proximal and distal to the scaffold and corresponding segments of non-scaffolded coronary arteries, and segments of small arteries within the flow-territory of scaffolded and non-scaffolded arteries were harvested for in vitro vasoreactivity studies. Conduit segments proximal and distal of the BVS edges showed reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation as compared to control vessels (p≤0.01), with distal segments being most prominently affected(p≤0.01). Endothelial dysfunction was only observed in DM±HFD swine and was principally due to a loss of NO. Endothelium-independent vasodilation and vasoconstriction were unaffected. Surprisingly, segments from the microcirculation distal to the BVS showed enhanced endothelium-dependent vasodilation (pswine, and did not appear to be either NO- or EDHF-mediated. Six months of BVS implantation in DM+HFD swine causes NO-mediated endothelial dysfunction in nearby coronary segments, which is accompanied by a, possibly compensatory, increase in endothelial function of the distal microcirculation. Endothelial dysfunction extending into coronary conduit segments beyond the implantation-site, is in agreement with recent reports expressing concern for late scaffold thrombosis and of early BVS failure in diabetic patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. [Case of distal renal tubular acidosis complicated with renal diabetes insipidus, showing aggravation of symptoms with occurrence of diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hexing; Tomoda, Fumihiro; Koike, Tsutomu; Ohara, Maiko; Nakagawa, Taizo; Kagitani, Satoshi; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    We report herein a 27-year-old male case of inherited distal renal tubular acidosis complicated with renal diabetes insipidus, the symptoms of which were aggravated by the occurrence of diabetes mellitus. At 2 months after birth, he was diagnosed as having inherited distal renal tubular acidosis and thereafter supplementation of both potassium and alkali was started to treat his hypokalemia and metabolic acidosis. At the age of 4 years, calcification of the bilateral renal medulla was detected by computed tomography. Subsequently his urinary volume gradually increased and polyuria of approximately 4 L/day persisted. At the age of 27 years, he became fond of sugar-sweetened drinks and also often forgot to take the medicine. He was admitted to our hospital due to polyuria of more than 10 L day, muscle weakness and gait disturbance. Laboratory tests disclosed worsening of both hypokalemia and metabolic acidosis in addition to severe hyperglycemia. It seemed likely that occurrence of diabetes mellitus and cessation of medications can induce osmotic diuresis and aggravate hypokalemia and metabolic acidosis. Consequently, severe dehydration, hypokalemia-induced damage of his urinary concentration ability and enhancement of the renin angiotensin system occurred and thereby possibly worsened his hypokalemia and metabolic acidosis. As normalization of hyperglycemia and metabolic acidosis might have exacerbated hypokalemia further, dehydration and hypokalemia were treated first. Following intensive treatment, these abnormalities were improved, but polyuria persisted. Elevated plasma antidiuretic hormone (12.0 pg/mL) and deficit of renal responses to antidiuretic hormone suggested that the polyuria was attributable to the preexisting renal diabetes insipidus possibly caused by bilateral renal medulla calcification. Thiazide diuretic or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were not effective for the treatment of diabetes insipidus in the present case.

  6. Evaluation of atrophy of foot muscles in diabetic neuropathy -- a comparative study of nerve conduction studies and ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Kaare; Andersen, Henning

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relation between the findings at nerve conduction studies and the size of small foot muscles determined by ultrasonography. METHODS: In 26 diabetic patients the size of the extensor digitorum brevis muscle (EDB) and of the muscles between the first and second metatarsal...... related to the size of the small foot muscles as determined by ultrasonography. SIGNIFICANCE: In diabetic patients motor nerve conduction studies can reliably determine the size of small foot muscles. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Oct....... RESULTS: Seventeen patients fulfilled the criteria for diabetic neuropathy. The cross-sectional area of the EDB muscle and the thickness of the MIL muscle were 116 +/- 65 mm2 and 29.6 +/- 8.2 mm, respectively. Close relations were established between muscle size and the amplitude of the CMAP...

  7. Physical Training and Activity in People With Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Paradigm Shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluding, Patricia M; Bareiss, Sonja K; Hastings, Mary; Marcus, Robin L; Sinacore, David R; Mueller, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) occurs in more than 50% of people with diabetes and is an important risk factor for skin breakdown, amputation, and reduced physical mobility (ie, walking and stair climbing). Although many beneficial effects of exercise for people with diabetes have been well established, few studies have examined whether exercise provides comparable benefits to people with DPN. Until recently, DPN was considered to be a contraindication for walking or any weight-bearing exercise because of concerns about injuring a person's insensitive feet. These guidelines were recently adjusted, however, after research demonstrated that weight-bearing activities do not increase the risk of foot ulcers in people who have DPN but do not have severe foot deformity. Emerging research has revealed positive adaptations in response to overload stress in these people, including evidence for peripheral neuroplasticity in animal models and early clinical trials. This perspective article reviews the evidence for peripheral neuroplasticity in animal models and early clinical trials, as well as adaptations of the integumentary system and the musculoskeletal system in response to overload stress. These positive adaptations are proposed to promote improved function in people with DPN and to foster the paradigm shift to including weight-bearing exercise for people with DPN. This perspective article also provides specific assessment and treatment recommendations for this important, high-risk group. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association.

  8. HIV Distal Neuropathic Pain Is Associated with Smaller Ventral Posterior Cingulate Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keltner, John R; Connolly, Colm G; Vaida, Florin; Jenkinson, Mark; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Archibald, Sarah; Akkari, Cherine; Schlein, Alexandra; Lee, Jisu; Wang, Dongzhe; Kim, Sung; Li, Han; Rennels, Austin; Miller, David J; Kesidis, George; Franklin, Donald R; Sanders, Chelsea; Corkran, Stephanie; Grant, Igor; Brown, Gregory G; Atkinson, J Hampton; Ellis, Ronald J

    2017-03-01

    . Despite modern antiretroviral therapy, HIV-associated neuropathy is one of the most prevalent, disabling and treatment-resistant complications of HIV disease. The presence and intensity of distal neuropathic pain is not fully explained by the degree of peripheral nerve damage. A better understanding of brain structure in HIV distal neuropathic pain may help explain why some patients with HIV neuropathy report pain while the majority does not. Previously, we reported that more intense distal neuropathic pain was associated with smaller total cerebral cortical gray matter volumes. The objective of this study was to determine which parts of the cortex are smaller. . HIV positive individuals with and without distal neuropathic pain enrolled in the multisite (N = 233) CNS HIV Antiretroviral Treatment Effects (CHARTER) study underwent structural brain magnetic resonance imaging. Voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate regional brain volumes in these structural brain images. . Left ventral posterior cingulate cortex was smaller for HIV positive individuals with versus without distal neuropathic pain (peak P  = 0.017; peak t = 5.15; MNI coordinates x = -6, y = -54, z = 20). Regional brain volumes within cortical gray matter structures typically associated with pain processing were also smaller for HIV positive individuals having higher intensity ratings of distal neuropathic pain. . The posterior cingulate is thought to be involved in inhibiting the perception of painful stimuli. Mechanistically a smaller posterior cingulate cortex structure may be related to reduced anti-nociception contributing to increased distal neuropathic pain. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  9. Predictors of Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy Onset and Progression in a Cohort of Type 1 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Matta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The prevalence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN in diabetes mellitus is well documented. However, the rate and predictors of both the development and progression of CAN have been less studied. Hereby, we assessed the rate and the major risk factors for CAN initiation and progression in a cohort of type 1 diabetic patients followed over a three-year period. Methods. 175 type 1 diabetic patients (mean age: 50 ± 11 years; female/male: 76/99 with positive bedside screening for CAN were included and underwent 2 standardized autonomic testings using 4 standardized tests (deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, 30/15 ratio, and changes in blood pressure during standing, separated by 3 ± 1 years. CAN staging was achieved according to the Toronto Consensus Panel on Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy into 4 categories: absent, possible, confirmed, or severe CAN. Results. Out of the 175 patients included, 31.4% were free of CAN, 34.2% had possible CAN, 24.6% had confirmed CAN, and 9.7% exhibited severe CAN at the first assessment. Among the 103 patients with nonsevere CAN at inclusion, forty-one (39.8% had an increase of at least one category when reassessed and 62 (60.2% remained stable. A bivariate analysis indicated that only BMI and exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs were significantly different in both groups. A multivariate analysis indicated that lower BMI (OR: 0.15, CI 95%: 0.05–0.48, p=0.003 and SSRI exposure (OR: 4.18, CI 95%: 1.03–16.97, p=0.04 were the sole predictors of CAN deterioration. In the 55 patients negative for CAN at the first laboratory assessment, 12 became positive at the second assessment. Conclusion. No clear predictive factor for CAN onset was identified. However, once present, CAN progression was related to low BMI and SSRI exposure.

  10. Study of the association between left ventricular diastolic impairment and cardiac autonomic neuropathy in diabetic patients using [123I] metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Rokuro; Tanaka, Shiro; Tojo, Osamu; Ishii, Tomofusa; Sato, Toshihiko; Fujii, Satoru; Tumura, Kei.

    1994-01-01

    The association between left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction and myocardial MIBG accumulation was investigated. The subjects were 14 Type II diabetic patients who had no evidence of ischemic heat disease, LV hypertrophy or dilated cardiomyopathy as determined by exercise Tl-201 myocardial scintigraphy and echocardiography. In 14 diabetic patients, isovolumic relaxation time (IRT) was measured by M-mode echocardiography, and the subjects were subdivided into two groups: Group1, 8 patients with impaired left ventricular diastolic function (IRT≥80 msec), and Group 2, 6 patients with normal left ventricular diastolic function (IRT 123 I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy was performed, and the myocardial accumulation of 123 I-MIBG was investigated. The ratio of myocardial to mediastinal MIBG uptake was significantly (p<0.01) lower in Group 1 than in Group 2. And scintigraphic defects were significantly (p<0.05) more numerous in Group 1 than in Group 2. Patients in Group 1 had a greater frequency of cardiac autonomic neuropathy evaluated by QTc interval and coefficient of variation of R-R interval, when compared with Group 2. These data suggest that, in diabetic patients with no evidence of ischemic heart disease, LV hypertrophy or dilated cardiomyopathy, impairment of left ventricular diastolic function is associated with cardiac autonomic neuropathy. (author)

  11. Insights into the management of diabetic neuropathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    dynamic interaction between insulin secretion and tissue sensitivity to ... impairment in the way glucose, lipids, protein metabolism, and ... neuropathy have not yet been fully elucidated, ... Brownlee M. Biochemistry and molecular cell biology of ...

  12. A comparative profile of methanol extracts of Allium cepa and Allium sativum in diabetic neuropathy in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanot, Abhishek; Shri, Richa

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetic Neuropathy (DN) is a major microvascular complication of uncontrolled diabetes. This may result from increased oxidative stress that accompanies diabetes. Hence plants with antioxidant action play an important role in management of diabetes and its complications. Materials and Methods: This study was designed to evaluate preventive as well as curative effect of methanol extracts of outer scales and edible portions of two plants with established antioxidant action - Allium cepa and Allium sativum, in induced DN in albino mice. Mice were divided into control, diabetic and test extracts treated groups. Test extracts were administered daily at a dose of 200 mg/kg p.o. for 21 days, in the preventive group prior to onset of DN, and in the curative group after the onset of DN. Hyperalgesia and oxidative stress markers were assessed. STZ-diabetic mice showed a significant thermal hyperalgesia (as assessed by the tail-flick test), indicating development of DN. Results: Treatment with test extracts prevented loss in body weight, decreased plasma glucose level, and significantly ameliorated the hyperalgesia, TBARS, serum nitrite and GSH levels in diabetic mice. Conclusion: Methanol extract of outer scales of onion has shown most significant improvement; may be due to higher content of phenolic compounds in outer scales of A. cepa. PMID:21713142

  13. Early-Onset Physical Frailty in Adults with Diabesity and Peripheral Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Lori J; Bittel, Daniel C; Bittel, Adam J; Sinacore, David R

    2017-12-07

    Diabesity (obesity and diabetes mellitus) has been identified as a potential contributor to early-onset frailty. Impairments contributing to early onset of physical frailty in this population are not well understood, and there is little evidence of the impact of peripheral neuropathy on frailty. The purpose of this study was to determine impairments that contribute to early-onset physical frailty in individuals with diabesity and peripheral neuropathy. We studied 105 participants, 82 with diabesity and peripheral neuropathy (57 years of age, body mass index [BMI] 31 kg/m 2 ); 13 with diabesity only (53 years of age, BMI 34 kg/m 2 ) and 10 obese controls (67 years of age, BMI 32 kg/m 2 ). Peripheral neuropathy was determined using Semmes Weinstein monofilaments; physical frailty was classified using the 9-item, modified Physical Performance Test; and knee extension and ankle plantarflexion peak torques were measured using isokinetic dynamometry. Participants with diabesity and peripheral neuropathy were 7.4 times more likely to be classified as physically frail. Impairments in lower-extremity function were associated with classification of frailty. Individuals with diabesity and peripheral neuropathy are particularly likely to be classified as frail. Earlier identification and interventions aimed at improving lower-extremity function may be important to mitigate the early-onset functional decline. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A prospective multi-centric open clinical trial of homeopathy in diabetic distal symmetric polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Chaturbhuja; Oberai, Praveen; Varanasi, Roja; Baig, Hafeezullah; Ch, Raveender; Reddy, G R C; Devi, Pratima; S, Bhubaneshwari; Singh, Vikram; Singh, V P; Singh, Hari; Shitanshu, Shashi Shekhar

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate homeopathic treatment in the management of diabetic distal symmetric polyneuropathy. A prospective multi-centric clinical observational study was carried out from October 2005 to September 2009 by Central Council for Research in Homeopathy (CCRH) (India) at its five institutes/units. Patients suffering from diabetes mellitus (DM) and presenting with symptoms of diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) were screened, investigated and were enrolled in the study after fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Patients were evaluated by the diabetic distal symmetric polyneuropathy symptom score (DDSPSS) developed by the Council. A total of 15 homeopathic medicines were identified after repertorizing the nosological symptoms and signs of the disease. The appropriate constitutional medicine was selected and prescribed in 30, 200 and 1 M potency on an individualized basis. Patients were followed up regularly for 12 months. Out of 336 patients (167 males and 169 females) enrolled in the study, 247 patients (123 males and 124 females) were analyzed. All patients who attended at least three follow-up appointments and baseline curve conduction studies were included in the analysis.). A statistically significant improvement in DDSPSS total score (p = 0.0001) was found at 12 months from baseline. Most objective measures did not show significant improvement. Lycopodium clavatum (n = 132), Phosphorus (n = 27) and Sulphur (n = 26) were the medicines most frequently prescribed. Adverse event of hypoglycaemia was observed in one patient only. This study suggests homeopathic medicines may be effective in managing the symptoms of DPN patients. Further studies should be controlled and include the quality of life (QOL) assessment. Copyright © 2013 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Benefit of magnesium-25 carrying porphyrin-fullerene nanoparticles in experimental diabetic neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Asieh; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Hassani, Shokoufeh; Baeeri, Maryam; Shetab-Bushehri, Vahid; Kuznetsov, Dmitry A; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a debilitating disorder occurring in most diabetic patients without a viable treatment yet. The present work examined the protective effect of 25Mg-PMC16 nanoparticle (porphyrin adducts of cyclohexil fullerene-C60) in a rat model of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced DN. 25Mg-PMC16 (0.5 lethal dose50 [LD50]) was administered intravenously in two consecutive days before intraperitoneal injection of STZ (45 mg/kg). 24Mg-PMC16 and MgCl2 were used as controls. Blood 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), oxidative stress biomarkers, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) level in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were determined as biomarkers of DN. Results indicated that 2,3-DPG and ATP decreased whereas oxidative stress increased by induction of DN which all were improved in 25Mg-PMC16-treated animals. No significant changes were observed by administration of 24Mg-PMC16 or MgCl2 in DN rats. It is concluded that in DN, oxidative stress initiates injuries to DRG neurons that finally results in death of neurons whereas administration of 25Mg-PMC16 by release of Mg and increasing ATP acts protectively. PMID:20957114

  16. Peripheral Neuropathy: A Practical Approach to Diagnosis and Symptom Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, James C; Dyck, P James B

    2015-07-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most prevalent neurologic conditions encountered by physicians of all specialties. Physicians are faced with 3 distinct challenges in caring for patients with peripheral neuropathy: (1) how to efficiently and effectively screen (in less than 2 minutes) an asymptomatic patient for peripheral neuropathy when they have a disorder in which peripheral neuropathy is highly prevalent (eg, diabetes mellitus), (2) how to clinically stratify patients presenting with symptoms of neuropathy to determine who would benefit from specialty consultation and what testing is appropriate for those who do not need consultation, and (3) how to treat the symptoms of painful peripheral neuropathy. In this concise review, we address these 3 common clinical scenarios. Easily defined clinical patterns of involvement are used to identify patients in need of neurologic consultation, the yield of laboratory and other diagnostic testing is reviewed for the evaluation of length-dependent, sensorimotor peripheral neuropathies (the most common form of neuropathy), and an algorithmic approach with dosing recommendations is provided for the treatment of neuropathic pain associated with peripheral neuropathy. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Immune-mediated neuropathy with Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Takaaki; Arai, Ayako; Yokota, Takanori; Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Tomimitsu, Hiroyuki; Miura, Osamu; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old man with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T/NK- cell lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-T/NK-LPD) developed acute-onset weakness. A nerve conduction study showed a conduction block in both the proximal and most distal segments. Although the patient's neuropathy transiently responded to intravenous immunoglobulin, it was progressive for at least 25 days until the start of prednisolone (PSL) administration, after which it remarkably improved. The neuropathy further improved after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The present patient's clinical course is not consistent with that of typical Guillain-Barré syndrome. This case suggests that EBV-T/NK-LPD can cause progressive immune-mediated neuropathy as a result of chronic EBV antigen presentation and can be treated with PSL and BMT.

  18. Does footwear affect balance?: the views and experiences of people with diabetes and neuropathy who have fallen.

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    Paton, Joanne S; Roberts, Anne; Bruce, Graham K; Marsden, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Despite falls being a major concern for people living with somatosensory deficit, little is known about the perceived impact of footwear and footwear features on balance. Clinical relevance is increased given that therapeutic footwear is often provided to people with diabetes to reduce foot ulcer risk. This qualitative study aims to explore the experiences and views of people with diabetes and neuropathy who have recently fallen to understand whether footwear type is perceived to affect balance or contribute to falling. Sixteen individuals (13 men and three women aged 44-83 years) were purposively sampled from a larger population of potential participants. Audio-recorded, in-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted in participant homes or at a place preferable to them. Once transcribed verbatim, the data were themed, charted, and interpreted using a framework approach. Although most participants did not believe that the footwear in which they fell contributed to their fall, most revealed how footwear choice influenced their balance confidence to undertake daily tasks. Most found their therapeutic footwear "difficult" to walk in, "heavy, or "slippery bottomed." Design recommendations for enhanced balance included a close fit with tight fastening, lightweight, substantial tread, and a firm, molded sole/insole. Complying with these recommendations, the hiking sandal was believed to be the most stable and safe shoe and was frequently worn as a walking aid to reduce fear of falling and boost confidence. People with diabetic neuropathy have disease-specific needs and concerns relating to how footwear affects balance. Engaging with patients to address those needs and concerns is likely to improve the feasibility and acceptability of therapeutic footwear to reduce foot ulcer risk and boost balance confidence.

  19. Neuronal involvement in cisplatin neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Helweg-Larsen, Susanne Elisabeth; Schmalbruch, H

    2007-01-01

    Although it is well known that cisplatin causes a sensory neuropathy, the primary site of involvement is not established. The clinical symptoms localized in a stocking-glove distribution may be explained by a length dependent neuronopathy or by a distal axonopathy. To study whether the whole neuron...... of the foot evoked by a tactile probe showed similar changes to those observed in SNAPs evoked by electrical stimulation. At these doses, somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) from the tibial nerve had increased latencies of peripheral, spinal and central responses suggesting loss of central processes...

  20. Amelioration of Diabetes and Painful Diabetic Neuropathy by Punica granatum L. Extract and Its Spray Dried Biopolymeric Dispersions

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    K. Raafat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To evaluate the effect of Punica granatum (Pg rind extract and its spray dried biopolymeric dispersions with casein (F1 or chitosan (F2 against Diabetes mellitus (DM and diabetic neuropathy (DN. Methods. We measured the acute (6 h and subacute (8 days effect of various doses of Pg, F1, and F2 and the active compounds on alloxan-induced DM mouse model. We evaluated DN utilizing latency tests for longer period of time (8 weeks. In addition, the in vivo antioxidant activity was assessed utilizing serum catalase level. Results. The results proved that the highest dose levels of Pg extract, F1, F2 exerted remarkable hypoglycemic activity with 48, 52, and 40% drop in the mice glucose levels after 6 hours, respectively. The tested compounds also improved peripheral nerve function as observed from the latency tests. Bioguided fractionation suggested that gallic acid (GA was Pg main active ingredient responsible for its actions. Conclusion. Pg extract, F1, F2, and GA could be considered as a new therapeutic potential for the amelioration of diabetic neuropathic pain and the observed in vivo antioxidant potential may be involved in its antinociceptive effect. It is highly significant to pay attention to Pg and GA for amelioration and control of DM and its complications.

  1. Amelioration of Diabetes and Painful Diabetic Neuropathy by Punica granatum L. Extract and Its Spray Dried Biopolymeric Dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raafat, K.; Samy, W.

    2014-01-01

    Aims. To evaluate the effect of Punica granatum (Pg) rind extract and its spray dried biopolymeric dispersions with casein (F1) or chitosan (F2) against Diabetes mellitus (DM) and diabetic neuropathy (DN). Methods. We measured the acute (6 h) and subacute (8 days) effect of various doses of Pg, F1, and F2 and the active compounds on alloxan-induced DM mouse model. We evaluated DN utilizing latency tests for longer period of time (8 weeks). In addition, the in vivo antioxidant activity was assessed utilizing serum catalase level. Results. The results proved that the highest dose levels of Pg extract, F1, F2 exerted remarkable hypoglycemic activity with 48, 52, and 40% drop in the mice glucose levels after 6 hours, respectively. The tested compounds also improved peripheral nerve function as observed from the latency tests. Bioguided fractionation suggested that gallic acid (GA) was Pg main active ingredient responsible for its actions. Conclusion. Pg extract, F1, F2, and GA could be considered as a new therapeutic potential for the amelioration of diabetic neuropathic pain and the observed in vivo antioxidant potential may be involved in its antinociceptive effect. It is highly significant to pay attention to Pg and GA for amelioration and control of DM and its complications. PMID:24982685

  2. Presence of neuropathic pain may explain poor performances on olfactory testing in diabetes mellitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Shauna; Lalli, Paul; Midha, Nisha; Chan, Ayechen; Garven, Alexandra; Chan, Cynthia; Toth, Cory

    2013-07-01

    Olfactory dysfunction in neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's syndrome and Alzheimer's disease can hallmark disease onset. We hypothesized that patients with diabetes mellitus, a condition featuring peripheral and central neurodegeneration, would have decreased olfaction abilities. We examined participants with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, participants with diabetes without diabetic peripheral neuropathy, and control participants in blinded fashion using standardized Sniffin' Sticks. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy severity was quantified using the Utah Early Neuropathy Scale. Further subcategorization of diabetic peripheral neuropathy based on presence of neuropathic pain was performed with Douleur Neuropathique 4 Questionnaires. Participants with diabetes had decreased olfactory sensitivity, impaired olfactory discrimination abilities, and reduced odor identification skills when compared with controls. However, loss of olfaction ability was, at least partially, attributed to presence of neuropathic pain on subcategory assessment, although pain severity was not associated with dysfunction. Those participants with diabetes without diabetic peripheral neuropathy and those with diabetic peripheral neuropathy without neuropathic pain had similar olfactory function as controls in general. The presence of neuropathic pain, associated with limited attention and concentration, may explain at least a portion of the olfactory dysfunction witnessed in the diabetic patient population.

  3. Role of Fyn-mediated NMDA receptor function in prediabetic neuropathy in mice

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    Suo, Meng; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes. This study evaluated the role of Fyn kinase and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) in the spinal cord in diabetic neuropathy using an animal model of high-fat diet-induced prediabetes. We found that prediabetic wild-type mice exhibited tactile allodynia and thermal hypoalgesia after a 16-wk high-fat diet, relative to normal diet-fed wild-type mice. Furthermore, prediabetic wild-type mice exhibited increased tactile allodynia and thermal hypoalgesia at 24 wk relative to 16 wk. Such phenomena were correlated with increased expression and activation of NR2B subunit of NMDARs, as well as Fyn-NR2B interaction in the spinal cord. Fyn−/− mice developed prediabetes after 16-wk high-fat diet treatment and exhibited thermal hypoalgesia, without showing tactile allodynia or altered expression and activation of NR2B subunit, relative to normal diet-fed Fyn−/− mice. Finally, intrathecal administrations of Ro 25-6981 (selective NR2B subunit-containing NMDAR antagonist) dose-dependently alleviated tactile allodynia, but not thermal hypoalgesia, at 16 and 24 wk in prediabetic wild-type mice. Our results suggested that Fyn-mediated NR2B signaling plays a critical role in regulation of prediabetic neuropathy and that the increased expression/function of NR2B subunit-containing NMDARs may contribute to the progression of neuropathy in type 2 diabetes. PMID:27146985

  4. Effect of a polyherbal formulation cream on diabetic neuropathic pain among patients with type 2 diabetes – A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vijay; Rajsekar, Seena; Selvaraj, Bamila; Kumpatla, Satyavani

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes and can severely limit patients’ daily functions. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the safety and effect of using a polyherbal formulation in reducing the symptoms of diabetic neuropathic pain in comparison with placebo among patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A total of 50 (M:F = 33:17) consecutive type 2 diabetes patients with painful diabetic neuropathy were enrolled in this study. All these patients had either two or more symptoms of diabetic neuropathy such as pain, burning and pricking sensations and numbness in their feet. They were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 (n = 26) patients were treated with polyherbal formulation cream and group 2 (n = 24) patients were administered placebo. The patients were followed up for six months. Changes in the symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy of each patient were recorded at baseline, third and sixth month using the Diabetic Neuropathic Score. Results: The mean age of the patients, duration of diabetes and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were similar in both groups at baseline. During follow up visits, there was a decrease in the HbA1c levels in the study and control groups. The symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy were also similar in both groups at baseline. A significant decrease in symptoms of neuropathic pain was observed among the group of patients treated with polyherbal formulation cream (76.9 per cent) compared to the placebo-treated group (12.5 per cent) (P<0.001), at the end of the final follow up. Interpretation & conclusions: In this pilot study polyherbal formulation cream was found to be effective as well as safe to treat painful diabetic neuropathy. However, its long term use needs to be evaluated for any further effectiveness and side effects. PMID:27934800

  5. Conditioned pain modulation predicts duloxetine efficacy in painful diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnitsky, David; Granot, Michal; Nahman-Averbuch, Hadas; Khamaisi, Mogher; Granovsky, Yelena

    2012-06-01

    This study aims to individualize the selection of drugs for neuropathic pain by examining the potential coupling of a given drug's mechanism of action with the patient's pain modulation pattern. The latter is assessed by the conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and temporal summation (TS) protocols. We hypothesized that patients with a malfunctioning pain modulation pattern, such as less efficient CPM, would benefit more from drugs augmenting descending inhibitory pain control than would patients with a normal modulation pattern of efficient CPM. Thirty patients with painful diabetic neuropathy received 1 week of placebo, 1 week of 30 mg/d duloxetine, and 4 weeks of 60 mg/d duloxetine. Pain modulation was assessed psychophysically, both before and at the end of treatment. Patient assessment of drug efficacy, assessed weekly, was the study's primary outcome. Baseline CPM was found to be correlated with duloxetine efficacy (r=0.628, P<.001, efficient CPM is marked negative), such that less efficient CPM predicted efficacious use of duloxetine. Regression analysis (R(2)=0.673; P=.012) showed that drug efficacy was predicted only by CPM (P=.001) and not by pretreatment pain levels, neuropathy severity, depression level, or patient assessment of improvement by placebo. Furthermore, beyond its predictive value, the treatment-induced improvement in CPM was correlated with drug efficacy (r=-0.411, P=.033). However, this improvement occurred only in patients with less efficient CPM (16.8±16.0 to -1.1±15.5, P<.050). No predictive role was found for TS. In conclusion, the coupling of CPM and duloxetine efficacy highlights the importance of pain pathophysiology in the clinical decision-making process. This evaluative approach promotes personalized pain therapy. Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Differential expression of the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 and related novel receptors TRPV3, TRPV4 and TRPM8 in normal human tissues and changes in traumatic and diabetic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bountra Chas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transient receptor potential (TRP receptors expressed by primary sensory neurons mediate thermosensitivity, and may play a role in sensory pathophysiology. We previously reported that human dorsal root ganglion (DRG sensory neurons co-expressed TRPV1 and TRPV3, and that these were increased in injured human DRG. Related receptors TRPV4, activated by warmth and eicosanoids, and TRPM8, activated by cool and menthol, have been characterised in pre-clinical models. However, the role of TRPs in common clinical sensory neuropathies needs to be established. Methods We have studied TRPV1, TRPV3, TRPV4, and TRPM8 in nerves (n = 14 and skin from patients with nerve injury, avulsed dorsal root ganglia (DRG (n = 11, injured spinal nerve roots (n = 9, diabetic neuropathy skin (n = 8, non-diabetic neuropathic nerve biopsies (n = 6, their respective control tissues, and human post mortem spinal cord, using immunohistological methods. Results TRPV1 and TRPV3 were significantly increased in injured brachial plexus nerves, and TRPV1 in hypersensitive skin after nerve repair, whilst TRPV4 was unchanged. TRPM8 was detected in a few medium diameter DRG neurons, and was unchanged in DRG after avulsion injury, but was reduced in axons and myelin in injured nerves. In diabetic neuropathy skin, TRPV1 expressing sub- and intra-epidermal fibres were decreased, as was expression in surviving fibres. TRPV1 was also decreased in non-diabetic neuropathic nerves. Immunoreactivity for TRPV3 was detected in basal keratinocytes, with a significant decrease of TRPV3 in diabetic skin. TRPV1-immunoreactive nerves were present in injured dorsal spinal roots and dorsal horn of control spinal cord, but not in ventral roots, while TRPV3 and TRPV4 were detected in spinal cord motor neurons. Conclusion The accumulation of TRPV1 and TRPV3 in peripheral nerves after injury, in spared axons, matches our previously reported changes in avulsed DRG. Reduction of TRPV1 levels

  7. Immune-mediated neuropathies our experience over 3 years

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    Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Immune-mediated peripheral neuropathy is the term applied to a spectrum of peripheral nerve disorders where immune dysregulation plays a role. Therefore, they are treatable. We analyzed the cases seen in the past 3 years by us and evaluated the clinical, laboratory, and outcome parameters in these patients. Patients and Methods: Consecutive patients seen by the authors and diagnosed as immune-mediated neuropathy were analyzed for etiology, pathology, and outcome assessed. Results: A total of sixty patients, 31 acute and 29 chronic neuropathies, were identified. Their subtypes treatment and outcome assessed. Males were significantly more in both acute and chronic cases. Miller Fisher 4, AMAN 1, paraplegic type 1, motor dominant type 19, Sensory-motor 1, MADSAM 3, Bifacial 2. Nonsystemic vasculitis was seen in 16 out of 29 chronic neuropathy and HIV, POEMS, and diabetes mellitus one each. Discussion: There is a spectrum of immune-mediated neuropathy which varies in clinical course, response to treatment, etc., Small percentage of uncommon cases are seen. In this group, mortality was nil and morbidity was minimal. Conclusion: Immune-mediated neuropathies are treatable and hence should be diagnosed early for good quality outcome.

  8. Analysis of youtube as a source of information for peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Harsh V; Lee, Ricky W; Raina, Sunil K; Behrle, Brian L; Hinduja, Archana; Mittal, Manoj K

    2016-01-01

    YouTube is an important resource for patients. No study has evaluated the information on peripheral neuropathy disseminated by YouTube videos. In this study, our aim was to perform a systematic review of information on YouTube regarding peripheral neuropathy. The Web site (www.youtube.com) was searched between September 19 and 21, 2014, for the terms "neuropathy," "peripheral neuropathy," "diabetic neuropathy," "neuropathy causes," and "neuropathy treatment." Two hundred videos met the inclusion criteria. Healthcare professionals accounted for almost half of the treatment videos (41 of 92; 44.6%), and most came from chiropractors (18 of 41; 43.9%). Alternative medicine was cited most frequently among the treatment discussions (54 of 145, 37.2%), followed by devices (38 of 145, 26.2%), and pharmacological treatments (23 of 145, 15.9%). Approximately half of the treatment options discussed in the videos were not evidence-based. Caution should be exercised when YouTube videos are used as a patient resource. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy: cause, effect, and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berry S

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Shauna Berry,1 Weijie V Lin,2 Ama Sadaka,1 Andrew G Lee1–7 1Department of Ophthalmology, Blanton Eye Institute, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 3Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB, Galveston, TX, USA; 4Department of Ophthalmology, 5Department of Neurology, 6Department of Neurosurgery, Weill Cornell Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 7Department of Ophthalmology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION is the most common form of ischemic optic neuropathy and the second most common optic neuropathy. Patients are generally over the age of 50 years with vasculopathic risk factors (eg, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and obstructive sleep apnea. The exact mechanism of NAION is not fully understood. In addition, several treatment options have been proposed. This article summarizes the current literature on the diagnosis, treatment, and management of NAION. Keywords: anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, ischemic optic neuropathy

  10. Doppler sonography of diabetic feet: Quantitative analysis of blood flow volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Young Lan; Kim, Ho Chul; Choi, Chul Soon; Yoon, Dae Young; Han, Dae Hee; Moon, Jeung Hee; Bae, Sang Hoon

    2002-01-01

    To analyze Doppler sonographic findings of diabetic feet by estimating the quantitative blood flow volume and by analyzing waveform on Doppler. Doppler sonography was performed in thirty four patients (10 diabetic patients with foot ulceration, 14 diabetic patients without ulceration and 10 normal patients as the normal control group) to measure the flow volume of the arteries of the lower extremities (posterior and anterior tibial arteries, and distal femoral artery. Analysis of doppler waveforms was also done to evaluate the nature of the changed blood flow volume of diabetic patients, and the waveforms were classified into triphasic, biphasic-1, biphasic-2 and monophasic patterns. Flow volume of arteries in diabetic patients with foot ulceration was increased witha statistical significance when compared to that of diabetes patients without foot ulceration of that of normal control group (P<0.05). Analysis of Doppler waveform revealed that the frequency of biphasic-2 pattern was significantly higher in diabetic patients than in normal control group(p<0.05). Doppler sonography in diabetic feet showed increased flow volume and biphasic Doppler waveform, and these findings suggest neuropathy rather than ischemic changes in diabetic feet.

  11. Doppler sonography of diabetic feet: Quantitative analysis of blood flow volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Young Lan; Kim, Ho Chul; Choi, Chul Soon; Yoon, Dae Young; Han, Dae Hee; Moon, Jeung Hee; Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-15

    To analyze Doppler sonographic findings of diabetic feet by estimating the quantitative blood flow volume and by analyzing waveform on Doppler. Doppler sonography was performed in thirty four patients (10 diabetic patients with foot ulceration, 14 diabetic patients without ulceration and 10 normal patients as the normal control group) to measure the flow volume of the arteries of the lower extremities (posterior and anterior tibial arteries, and distal femoral artery. Analysis of doppler waveforms was also done to evaluate the nature of the changed blood flow volume of diabetic patients, and the waveforms were classified into triphasic, biphasic-1, biphasic-2 and monophasic patterns. Flow volume of arteries in diabetic patients with foot ulceration was increased witha statistical significance when compared to that of diabetes patients without foot ulceration of that of normal control group (P<0.05). Analysis of Doppler waveform revealed that the frequency of biphasic-2 pattern was significantly higher in diabetic patients than in normal control group(p<0.05). Doppler sonography in diabetic feet showed increased flow volume and biphasic Doppler waveform, and these findings suggest neuropathy rather than ischemic changes in diabetic feet.

  12. Association between diabetic nephrology and other diabetic microvascularand macrovascular complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandy, A.; John, M.; Pawar, B.; Isaac, R.

    2008-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is found to be significantly associated withdiabetic retinopathy and coronary artery disease. Few studies have also shownan association between diabetic nephropathy and neuropathy and peripheralvascular disease. A cross sectional study was done among consecutive type 2diabetics presenting to Christian Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana fromJune 2004 to may 2005. Patients were subjected to the clinical and laboratoryinvestigations 174 patients were studied over a period of one year. Diabeticnephropathy was found to be associated with proliferative diabeticretinopathy, neuropathy and cardiovascular disease by univariate analysis. Inmultivariate analysis, diabetic nephropathy was again sufficiently associatedwith proliferative diabetic retinopathy and coronary artery disease. Weconclude that close association between diabetic nephropathy and other microand macrovascular complications exists in our Indian patients also. (author)

  13. Application of Multiscale Entropy in Assessing Plantar Skin Blood Flow Dynamics in Diabetics with Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuyuan Liao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, while tissue ischemia caused by impaired vasodilatory response to plantar pressure is thought to be a major factor of the development of DFUs, which has been assessed using various measures of skin blood flow (SBF in the time or frequency domain. These measures, however, are incapable of characterizing nonlinear dynamics of SBF, which is an indicator of pathologic alterations of microcirculation in the diabetic foot. This study recruited 18 type 2 diabetics with peripheral neuropathy and eight healthy controls. SBF at the first metatarsal head in response to locally applied pressure and heating was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. A multiscale entropy algorithm was utilized to quantify the regularity degree of the SBF responses. The results showed that during reactive hyperemia and thermally induced biphasic response, the regularity degree of SBF in diabetics underwent only small changes compared to baseline and significantly differed from that in controls at multiple scales (p < 0.05. On the other hand, the transition of regularity degree of SBF in diabetics distinctively differed from that in controls (p < 0.05. These findings indicated that multiscale entropy could provide a more comprehensive assessment of impaired microvascular reactivity in the diabetic foot compared to other entropy measures based on only a single scale, which strengthens the use of plantar SBF dynamics to assess the risk for DFU.

  14. Coefficient of Friction at the Fingertips in Type II Diabetics Compared to Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thames, Beatriz H; Gorniak, Stacey L

    2017-07-01

    Clinical observations suggest that type II diabetes patients are more susceptible to skin changes, which may be associated with reduced coefficient of friction at the fingertips. Reduced coefficient of friction may explain recent reports of fine motor dysfunction in diabetic patients. Coefficient of friction was evaluated using slip force evaluation in a cross-sectional cohort of diabetic patients and age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Covariates of tactile sensation, disease duration, glycated hemoglobin, and clinical diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy were also assessed. A significant decrease in fingertip coefficient of friction in the diabetic group was found as compared to controls. Health state covariates did not alter the strength of between-group differences in statistical analyses. This finding of between-group differences for fingertip frictional properties suggests that causative factors of reported manual motor dysfunction lie in both the distal and proximal portions of the nervous system.

  15. Arterial Stiffness Is Associated with Peripheral Sensory Neuropathy in Diabetes Patients in Ghana

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    Kwame Yeboah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Peripheral sensory neuropathy (PSN is among microvascular complications of diabetes that make patients prone to ulceration and amputation. Arterial stiffness is a predictor of cardiovascular diseases and microvascular complications associated with diabetes. We investigated the association between PSN and arterial stiffness, measured as aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVao and cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI. Method. In a case-control design, arterial stiffness was measured in 240 diabetes patients and 110 nondiabetic control. Large-fibre nerve function was assessed by vibration perception threshold (VPT using a neurothesiometer. PSN was defined as the VPT > 97.5th percentile from age- and gender-adjusted models in nondiabetic controls. Results. The overall prevalence of PSN was 16.6% in the entire study participants. Compared to non-PSN participants, PSN patients had higher levels of PWVao (9.5 ± 1.7 versus 8.7 ± 1.2 m/s, p=0.016 and CAVI (8.4 ± 1.3 versus 7.6 ± 1.1, p=0.001. In multiple regression models, VPT was associated with PWVao (β=0.14, p=0.025 and CAVI (β=0.12, p=0.04. PSN patients had increased odds of CAVI (OR = 1.51 (1.02–2.4, p=0.043, but not PWVao (OR = 1.25 (0.91–1.71, p=0.173. Conclusion. PWVao and CAVI were associated with VPT and PSN in diabetes patients in Ghana. Patients having PSN have increased odds of CAVI, independent of other conventional risk factors.

  16. A Comparison of Screening Tools for the Early Detection of Peripheral Neuropathy in Adults with and without Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J. Brown

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Examine the effectiveness of the 128 Hz tuning fork, two monofilaments, and Norfolk Quality of Life Diabetic Neuropathy (QOL-DN questionnaire as tools for the early detection of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN in overweight, obese, and inactive (OOI adults or those who have prediabetes (PD or type 2 diabetes (T2D. Research Design and Methods. Thirty-four adults (mean age 58.4 years ± 12.1 were divided by glycemia (10 OOI normoglycemic, 13 PD, and 11 T2D. Sural nerves were tested bilaterally with the NC-stat DPNCheck to determine sural nerve amplitude potential (SNAP and sural nerve conduction velocity (SNCV. All other testing results were compared to SNAP and SNCV. Results. Total 1 g monofilament scores significantly correlated with SNAP values and yielded the highest sensitivity and specificity combinations of tested measures. Total QOL-DN scores negatively correlated with SNAP values, as did QOL-DN symptoms. QOL-DN activities of daily living correlated with the right SNAP, and the QOL-DN small fiber subscore correlated with SNCV. Conclusions. The 1 g monofilament and total QOL-DN are effective, low-cost tools for the early detection of DPN in OOI, PD, and T2D adults. The 128 Hz tuning fork and 10 g monofilament may assist DPN screening as a tandem, but not primary, early DPN detection screening tools.

  17. Prevalence of Neuropathy and Peripheral Arterial Disease and the Impact of Treatment in People With Screen-Detected Type 2 Diabetes: The ADDITION-Denmark study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charles, Morten; Ejskjær, Niels; Witte, Daniel R

    2011-01-01

    in primary care on the prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) 6 years later in a pragmatic, cluster-randomized parallel group trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-A stepwise screening program in 1.90 general practices in Denmark was used to identify 1...

  18. The Impact of Diabetic Neuropathy on Balance and on the Risk of Falls in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timar, Bogdan; Timar, Romulus; Gaiță, Laura; Oancea, Cristian; Levai, Codrina; Lungeanu, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a prevalent complication of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) with a major impact on the health of the affected patient. We hypothesized that mediated by the dysfunctionalities associated with DN's three major components: sensitive (lack of motion associated sensory), motor (impairments in movement coordination) and autonomic (the presence of postural hypotension), the presence of DN may impair the balance in the affected patients. Our study's main aim is to evaluate the possible association between the presence and severity of DN and both the balance impairment and the risk of falls in patients with T2DM. In this cross-sectional study we enrolled, according to a consecutive-case population-based setting 198 patients with T2DM. The presence and severity of DN was evaluated using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument, a tool which allows both diagnosing and severity staging of DN. The balance impairment and the risk of falls were evaluated using four validated and standardized tools: Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed-up and Go test (TUG), Single Leg Stand test (SLS) and Fall Efficacy Scale (FES-I). The presence of DN was associated with significant decreases in the BBS score (40.5 vs. 43.7 points; prisk of falls in patients with T2DM. The presence of DN in patients with DM is associated with impaired balance and with a consecutively increase in the risk of falls.

  19. 123I-MIBG lung uptake in patients with diabetes mellitus. Correlation with cardiac autonomic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamachi, Shigeki; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Flores, L.G. II; Ohnishi, Takashi; Tamura, Shozo; Watanabe, Katsushi; Kurose, Takeshi; Matsukura, Sigeru

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between 123 I-MIBG lung uptake and autonomic neuropathy (AN) in patients with diabetes mellitus. For the quantitative analysis, lung to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (L/M) and heart to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (H/M) were obtained from chest planar image. In addition, both lung washout ratio (%WR-L) and heart washout ratio (%WR-H) were calculated from early and delayed images. Similarly, exercised myocardial scintigraphy using 201 Tl-chloride was done to rule out ischemia and lung to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (L/M-Tl) and heart to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (H/M-Tl) were obtained from chest planar image. Each indexes were compared in both diabetic group and control group. Both mean value of H/M and %WR-H in AN (+) group were significantly higher than those of control group. Mean value of L/M in each diabetic group was significantly higher than that of control group. Particularly, L/M of AN (+) group is higher than that of AN (-) group on early study. Mean value of %WR-L in AN (+) group was also significantly higher than that of control group. Regarding the 201 Tl-uptake index, there was no statistical significance among in each group. The current study showed that abnormal pulmonary 123 I-MIBG uptake in the lung existed in patients with diabetes mellitus. The phenomenon might be related with sympathetic dysfunction or severity of diabetes mellitus. (author)

  20. Biofeedback can reduce foot pressure to a safe level and without causing new at-risk zones in patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De León Rodriguez, D; Allet, L; Golay, A; Philippe, J; Assal, J-Ph; Hauert, C-A; Pataky, Z

    2013-02-01

    Plantar pressure reduction is mandatory for diabetic foot ulcer healing. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of a new walking strategy learned by biofeedback on plantar pressure distribution under both feet in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Terminally augmented biofeedback has been used for foot off-loading training in 21 patients with diabetic peripheral sensory neuropathy. The biofeedback technique was based on a subjective estimation of performance and objective visual feedback following walking sequences. The patient was considered to have learned a new walking strategy as soon as the peak plantar pressure (PPP) under the previously defined at-risk zone was within a range of 40-80% of baseline PPP in 70% of the totality of steps and during three consecutive walking sequences. The PPP was measured by a portable in-shoe foot pressure measurement system (PEDAR(®)) at baseline (T0), directly after learning (T1) and at 10-day retention test (T2). The PPP under at-risk zones decreased significantly at T1 (165 ± 9 kPa, p biofeedback leads to a safe and regular plantar pressure distribution without inducing any new 'at-risk' area under both feet. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Regulation of the neuropathy-associated Pmp22 gene by a distal super-enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantera, Harrison; Moran, John J; Hung, Holly A; Pak, Evgenia; Dutra, Amalia; Svaren, John

    2018-05-16

    Peripheral nerve myelination is adversely affected in the most common form of the hereditary peripheral neuropathy called Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease. This form, classified as CMT1A, is caused by a 1.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 17, which includes the abundantly expressed Schwann cell myelin gene, Peripheral Myelin Protein 22 (PMP22). This is one of the most common copy number variants causing neurological disease. Overexpression of Pmp22 in rodent models recapitulates several aspects of neuropathy, and reduction of Pmp22 in such models results in amelioration of the neuropathy phenotype. Recently we identified a potential super-enhancer approximately 90-130 kb upstream of the Pmp22 transcription start sites. This super-enhancer encompasses a cluster of individual enhancers that have the acetylated histone H3K27 active enhancer mark, and coincides with smaller duplications identified in patients with milder CMT1A-like symptoms, where the PMP22 coding region itself was not part of the duplication. In this study, we have utilized genome editing to create a deletion of this super-enhancer to determine its role in Pmp22 regulation. Our data show a significant decrease in Pmp22 transcript expression using allele-specific internal controls. Moreover, the P2 promoter of the Pmp22 gene, which is used in other cell types, is affected, but we find that the Schwann cell-specific P1 promoter is disproportionately more sensitive to loss of the super-enhancer. These data show for the first time the requirement of these upstream enhancers for full Pmp22 expression.

  2. [Acrodystrophic neuropathy in an alcoholic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Y; Hironaka, M; Shimoyama, M; Toyota, Y; Kurokawa, M; Kohriyama, T; Nakamura, S

    1993-01-01

    The patient was a 48-year-old alcoholic man with no contributory family history. At age 36 he had developed sensory dominant polyneuropathy with highly impaired temperature sensation and deep sensation in the lower extremities, recurrent ulcers of the toes, and sexual impotence. A sural nerve biopsy at this time revealed marked loss of myelinated fibers with relative preservation of the population of unmyelinated fibers. Subsequently, he developed muscle atrophy of the lower thighs, urinary incontinence, and Wernicke's encephalopathy, and became non-ambulatory at age 44. The peripheral nerve conduction findings suggested predominantly axonal degeneration. The entire course was characterized by alternative progression and partial recovery influenced by his alcohol intake and nutritional state. Alcoholic neuropathy is a major cause of solitary acrodystrophic neuropathy (ADN). Manifestations of autonomic and motor neuropathy are more marked in alcoholic ADN than in HSAN-I, and central nervous system involvement is the hallmark of alcoholic ADN. In the treatment of patients with alcoholic ADN, attention should be paid to diabetes mellitus, malnutritional state, and vitamin deficiency, which frequently complicate alcoholism.

  3. Complications of Diabetes and Their Implications for Service Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchillia, S. V.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents information on the complications of both Type I and Type II diabetes and the implications for the rehabilitation of persons with diabetes and visual impairment. Topics covered include retinopathy, cataracts, glaucoma, peripheral neuropathy, carpal tunnel syndrome, diabetic hand syndrome, neuropathy of the autonomic nervous…

  4. Three-question set from Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument adds independent prognostic information on cardiovascular outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seferovic, Jelena P; Pfeffer, Marc A; Claggett, Brian

    2018-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The self-administered Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI) is used to diagnose diabetic peripheral neuropathy. We examined whether the MNSI might also provide information on risk of death and cardiovascular outcomes. METHODS: In this post hoc analysis of the Aliskiren...

  5. Nociception at the diabetic foot, an uncharted territory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantelau, Ernst A

    2015-01-01

    The diabetic foot is characterised by painless foot ulceration and/or arthropathy; it is a typical complication of painless diabetic neuropathy. Neuropathy depletes the foot skin of intraepidermal nerve fibre endings of the afferent A-delta and C-fibres, which are mostly nociceptors and excitable by noxious stimuli only. However, some of them are cold or warm receptors whose functions in diabetic neuropathy have frequently been reported. Hence, it is well established by quantitative sensory testing that thermal detection thresholds at the foot skin increase during the course of painless diabetic neuropathy. Pain perception (nociception), by contrast, has rarely been studied. Recent pilot studies of pinprick pain at plantar digital skinfolds showed that the perception threshold was always above the upper limit of measurement of 512 mN (equivalent to 51.2 g) at the diabetic foot. However, deep pressure pain perception threshold at musculus abductor hallucis was beyond 1400 kPa (equivalent to 14 kg; limit of measurement) only in every fifth case. These discrepancies of pain perception between forefoot and hindfoot, and between skin and muscle, demand further study. Measuring nociception at the feet in diabetes opens promising clinical perspectives. A critical nociception threshold may be quantified (probably corresponding to a critical number of intraepidermal nerve fibre endings), beyond which the individual risk of a diabetic foot rises appreciably. Staging of diabetic neuropathy according to nociception thresholds at the feet is highly desirable as guidance to an individualised injury prevention strategy. PMID:25897350

  6. A retrospective study on the impact of comorbid depression or anxiety on healthcare resource use and costs among diabetic neuropathy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Yanjun

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic neuropathy (DN is a common complication of diabetes that has significant economic burden, especially for patients with comorbid depression or anxiety. This study examines and quantifies factors associated with healthcare costs among patients diagnosed with diabetic neuropathy (DN with or without a comorbid diagnosis of depression or anxiety (DA using retrospective administrative claims data. No study has examined the differences in economic outcomes depending on the presence of comorbid DA disorders. Methods Over-age-18 individuals with 1+ diagnosis of DN in 2005 were selected. The first observed DN claim was considered the "index date." All individuals had a 12-month pre-index and follow-up period. For both under-age-65 commercially insured and over-age-65 individuals with employer-sponsored Medicare supplemental insurance, we constructed 2 subgroups for individuals with DA (DN-DA or without (DN-only. Patients' clinical characteristics over pre-index period were compared. Multivariate regressions were performed to assess whether DN-DA patients had higher utilization of healthcare resources and costs than DN-only patients, controlling for demographic and clinical characteristics. Results We identified 16,831 DN-only and 1,699 DN-DA patients in the Medicare supplemental cohort, as well as 17,205 and 3,105 in the commercially insured. DN-DA patients had higher prevalence of diabetes-related comorbidities for cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular/peripheral vascular disease, nephropathy, obesity, and hypoglycemic events than DN-only patients (all p Conclusion These findings indicate that the healthcare costs were significantly higher for DN patients with depression or anxiety relative to those without such comorbid disorders.

  7. Profile and analysis of diabetes chronic complications in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta

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    Tri J.E. Tarigan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic complications of diabetes mellitus have a significant role in increasing morbidity, mortality, disability, and health cost. In the outpatient setting, the availability of data regarding to the chronic complications of type 2 diabetes is useful for evaluation of prevention, education, and patient’s treatment. This study aimed to describe the characteristic of type 2 diabetes chronic complications in outpatient diabetes clinic.Methods: A cross-sectional study was done using 155 patients in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (RSCM, Jakarta in 2010. Secondary data were used from medical record based on history taking, physical examination, diabetic foot assessment, laboratory, neurologic, cardiology, opthalmology, ankle brachial index, and electrography of the patients. Characteristic profiles of the subjects, prevalence of the chronic complications, and its association with diabetes risk factors, such as glycemic control using HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, duration of diabetes, and LDL cholesterol were analyzed using chi square test.Results: Among 155 subjects participated in the study, most of them were women (59% and elderly (46%. The prevalence of diabetes chronic complications was 69% from all subjects. These chronic complications included microangiopathy, macroangiopathy and mixed complications, with prevalence of 56%, 7% and 27% respectively. Microangiopathy included nephropathy (2%, retinopathy (7%, neuropathy (38% and mixed complications (53%. Macroangiopathy included coronary heart disease (46%, peripheral arterial disease (19%, stroke (18%, and mixed complication (17%. From the analysis, we found significant association between duration of diabetes and diabetic neuropathy (p = 0.003.Conclusion: Prevalence of diabetes chronic complications in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, mainly dominated by microvascular-related complications including nephropathy, retinopathy

  8. Relationship between cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and coronary artery calcification in patients with type 2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Seong-Su; Choi, Yeon-Kyung; Seo, Hyun-Ae

    2010-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor of coronary artery calcification (CAC), in this cross-sectional study, 118 patients (60 males, 58 females) with type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomly selected from the diabetes clinic of Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, Korea, between January, 2008 and September, 2008. The subjects, whose mean age was 56.9±1.1 years, were tested for CAN by Ewing's method which employs five non-invasive tests of autonomic function. The coronary calcium score (CCS) was determined by Multi Detector-row Computed Tomography (MDCT). Statistical analysis was performed by using SPSS 13.0 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, Illinois). CAN was found in 31/118 (26.3%) patients. Compared to the patients without CAN, the patients with CAN were significantly older and had significantly higher triglyceride levels, blood pressure, pulse pressure, fasting c-peptide levels, CAN scores, and log-transformed coronary calcium scores [ln(CCS+1)]. The CAN scores correlated positively with ln(CCS+1) values (r=0.214; P=0.028). Multiple regression analysis using ln(CCS+1) as a dependent variable showed that CAN score (β coefficient 0.623, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.059-1.188, P=0.031) associated independently with ln(CCS+1). In conclusion, CAN was associated independently with CAC, which suggests that CAN is a risk factor of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes. This may help to explain the excess cardiovascular mortality seen in diabetic patients with CAN. (author)

  9. Diabetes mellitus and upper gut motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mandolfino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to detect the presence of esophageal motor disorders in type I and II diabetic patients, and to establish whether there is any difference between patients with and without neuropathy. 118 diabetics patients (34 type I and 84 type II were investigated by water-perfused stationary esophageal manometry. Data were correlated with the presence of peripheral neurophaty. As a result 71% of patients affected by peripheral neuropathy showed manometric abnormalities against the 37% of the patients without neuropathy. Our experience has shown that patients with diabetes mellitus frequently present esophageal symptoms and manometric abnormalities. Manometric study of the esophagus has to be considered a useful investigative tool to manage and monitorize the gastrointestinal abnormalities in patients affected by diabetes mellitus.

  10. New allelic variant of autosomal recessive hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type 2S resulted from mutations in gene IGHMBP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Dadali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN, Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders with more than 80 genes linked to different phenotypes, including IGHMBP2 gene responsible for HMSN type 2S (OMIM 616155. Until recently, mutations in IGHMBP2 were exclusively associated with neonatal distal spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress (SMARD1, OMIM 604320. A case report presents a boy with infant onset decreased distal muscle tone and weakness, distal wasting and deformation in legs and hands, areflexia and decreased sensation without respiratory involvement; at age seven he had severe fixed kypho-scoliosis. EMG revealed signs distal axonal neuropathy. The exsome sequencing confirmed the allelic variant of two compound heterozygous mutations in gene IGHMBP2: known missens mutation с.1616С>Т (р.Ser539Leu in exone 11 and a novel deletion с.2601_2602delGA in exone 13. The diagnosis of infant HMSN type 2S was confirmed. The phenotype of HMSN type 2S and its diagnostics differences between SMARD1 are discussed.

  11. Genotype/phenotype correlations in AARS-related neuropathy in a cohort of patients from the United Kingdom and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansagi, Boglarka; Antoniadi, Thalia; Burton-Jones, Sarah; Murphy, Sinead M; McHugh, John; Alexander, Michael; Wells, Richard; Davies, Joanna; Hilton-Jones, David; Lochmüller, Hanns; Chinnery, Patrick; Horvath, Rita

    2015-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited neuropathy with heterogeneous clinical presentation and genetic background. The axonal form (CMT2) is characterised by decreased action potentials indicating primary axonal damage. The underlying pathology involves axonal degeneration which is supposed to be related to axonal protein dysfunction caused by various gene mutations. The overlapping clinical manifestation of CMT2 with distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) and intermediate CMT causes further diagnostic difficulties. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases have been implicated in the pathomechanism of CMT2. They have an essential role in protein translation by attaching amino acids to their cognate tRNAs. To date six families have been reported worldwide with dominant missense alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS) mutations leading to clinically heterogeneous axonal neuropathies. The pathomechanism of some variants could be explained by impaired amino acylation activity while other variants implicating an editing defect need to be further investigated. Here, we report a cohort of six additional families originating from the United Kingdom and Ireland with dominant AARS-related neuropathies. The phenotypic manifestation was distal lower limb predominant sensorimotor neuropathy but upper limb impairment with split hand deformity occasionally associated. Nerve conduction studies revealed significant demyelination accompanying the axonal lesion in motor and sensory nerves. Five families have the c.986G>A, p.(Arg329His) variant, further supporting that this is a recurrent loss of function variant. The sixth family, of Irish origin, had a novel missense variant, c.2063A>G, p.(Glu688Gly). We discuss our findings and the associated phenotypic heterogeneity in these families, which expands the clinical spectrum of AARS-related neuropathies.

  12. Autonomic neuropathy in nondiabetic offspring of type 2 diabetic subjects is associated with urinary albumin excretion rate and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure: the Fredericia Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Anne-Catherine; Vestbo, Else; Frøland, Anders

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of parental type 2 diabetes on the autonomic nervous system and to determine whether autonomic neuropathy is present and associated with changes in 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (AMBP) and urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER) in nondiabetic subjects......, Redmond, WA), and UAER was determined through three overnight urine samples. The subjects with parental type 2 diabetes had significantly lower heart rate variation in all three bedside tests (P

  13. Efficacy of spinal cord stimulators in treating peripheral neuropathy: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elsayed, Alaa; Schiavoni, Nick; Sachdeva, Harsh

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common cause of pain, and it is increasing in prevalence. Peripheral neuropathic pain is very hard to treat and can be resistant to multiple pain management modalities. Our series aimed at testing the efficacy of spinal cord stimulators (SCSs) in treating resistant painful peripheral neuropathy. Case 1: A 79-year-old man presented to our clinic with long-standing history of painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy resistant to conservative management. After failure of all possible modalities, we offered the patient an SCS trial that was very successful, and we proceeded with the permanent implant that continued to help with his pain and allowed the patient to wean down his medications. Case 2: A 60-year-old man presented with chronic peripheral neuropathy secondary to HIV, patient failed all conservative and procedural management. Patient then had an SCS trial that relieved his pain significantly. Unfortunately, we did not proceed with the implant due to deterioration of the patient general health. Case 3: A 39-year-old woman presented with painful peripheral neuropathy secondary to chemotherapy for breast cancer. After failure of medication management and procedures, patient had a SCS trial that improved her pain and we then proceeded with performing the permanent implant that controlled her pain. We presented 3 cases with chronic painful peripheral neuropathy secondary to HIV, diabetes mellitus, and chemotherapy that was resistant to conservative pain management and procedures that was successfully treated with neurostimulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Gait pattern alteration by functional sensory substitution in healthy subjects and in diabetic subjects with peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S C; Helm, P A; Lavery, L A

    1997-08-01

    To evaluate the ability of diabetic and nondiabetic individuals to learn to use a lower extremity sensory substitution device to cue gait pattern changes. Case-control study. Gait laboratory. Thirty diabetic persons and 20 age- and education-matched nondiabetic controls responded to advertisements for study participation. Participants walked on a treadmill at three speeds (1, 2, and 2.5mph) with auditory sensory feedback to cue ground contact greater than 80% duration of baseline. The variables measured included gait cycle (steps per minute) and number of times per minute that any step during a trial exceeded 80% duration of ground contacted compared with a measured baseline step length for each speed. Persons in both groups were able to rapidly and significantly alter their gait patterns in response to signals from the sensory substitution device, by changing their gait cycles (nondiabetic group, F(17,124) = 5.27, p gait cycle modification and error reduction among both groups. The nondiabetic group learned to use the device significantly more quickly than the diabetic group during the slow (1mph, t = 3.57, p gait trainer malfunction occurred during the study. Diabetic persons with neuropathy effectively used lower extremity sensory substitution, and the technology is now available to manufacture a durable, effective lower extremity sensory substitution system.

  15. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy Lom type in a Serbian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacković, J; Keckarević-Marković, M; Komazec, Z; Rakocević-Stojanović, V; Lavrnić, D; Stević, Z; Ribarić, K; Romac, S; Apostolski, S

    2008-10-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy Lom type (HMSNL), also called CMT 4D, a hereditary autosomal recessive neuropathy, caused by mutation in N-Myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1 gene), was first described in a Bulgarian Gypsy population near Lom and later has been found in Gypsy communities in Italy, Spain, Slovenia and Hungary. We present two siblings with HMSNL, female and male, aged 30 and 26, respectively in a Serbian non-consanguineous family of Gypsy ethnic origin. They had normal developmental milestones. Both had symptoms of lower limb muscle weakness and walking difficulties with frequent falls, which began at the age of seven. At the age of 12, they developed hearing problems and at the age of 15 hand muscle weakness. Neurological examination revealed sensorineural hearing loss, dysarthria, severe distal and mild proximal muscle wasting and weakness, areflexia and impairment of all sensory modalities of distal distribution. Electrophysiological study revealed denervation with severe and early axonal loss. Sensorineural hearing loss was confirmed on electrocochleography and brainstem evoked potentials. Molecular genetic testing confirmed homozygote C564t (R148X) mutation in NDRG1 gene.

  16. Proximal Neuropathy and Associated Skeletal Muscle Changes Resembling Denervation Atrophy in Hindlimbs of Chronic Hypoglycaemic Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vivi F.H.; Molck, Anne Marie; Soeborg, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetic hyperglycaemia. Insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (IIH) might potentially exacerbate or contribute to neuropathy as hypoglycaemia also causes peripheral neuropathy. In rats, IIH induces neuropathy associated with skeletal muscle......, and severity of the myofibre atrophy correlated with severity of axonal degeneration in sciatic nerve. Both neuropathy and myopathy were still present after four weeks of recovery, although the neuropathy was less severe. In conclusion, the results suggest that peripheral neuropathy induced by IIH progresses...... changes. Aims of this study were to investigate the progression and sequence of histopathologic changes caused by chronic IIH in rat peripheral nerves and skeletal muscle, and whether such changes were reversible. Chronic IIH was induced by infusion of human insulin, followed by an infusion-free recovery...

  17. Proximal Neuropathy and Associated Skeletal Muscle Changes Resembling Denervation Atrophy in Hindlimbs of Chronic Hypoglycaemic Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vivi F.H.; Molck, Anne Marie; Soeborg, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetic hyperglycaemia. Insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (IIH) might potentially exacerbate or contribute to neuropathy as hypoglycaemia also causes peripheral neuropathy. In rats, IIH induces neuropathy associated with skeletal muscle......, and severity of the myofibre atrophy correlated with severity of axonal degeneration in sciatic nerve. Both neuropathy and myopathy were still present after four weeks of recovery, although the neuropathy was less severe. In conclusion, the results suggest that peripheral neuropathy induced by IIH progresses...... changes. Aims of this study were to investigate the progression and sequence of histopathologic changes caused by chronic IIH in rat peripheral nerves and skeletal muscle, and whether such changes were reversible. Chronic IIH was induced by infusion of human insulin, followed by an infusion-free recovery...

  18. The management of ankle fractures in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wukich, Dane K; Kline, Alex J

    2008-07-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus have higher complication rates following both open and closed management of ankle fractures. Diabetic patients with neuropathy or vasculopathy have higher complication rates than both diabetic patients without these comorbidities and nondiabetic patients. Unstable ankle fractures in diabetic patients without neuropathy or vasculopathy are best treated with open reduction and internal fixation with use of standard techniques. Patients with neuropathy or vasculopathy are at increased risk for both soft-tissue and osseous complications, including delayed union and nonunion. Careful soft-tissue management as well as stable, rigid internal fixation are crucial to obtaining a good outcome. Prolonged non-weight-bearing and subsequently protected weight-bearing are recommended following both operative and nonoperative management of ankle fractures in patients with diabetes.

  19. Antibodies against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in patients with diabetes mellitus is associated with lower body weight and autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntorp, Kerstin; Frid, Anders; Alm, Ragnar; Fredrikson, Gunilla Nordin; Sjöberg, Klas; Ohlsson, Bodil

    2013-08-17

    Esophageal dysmotility and gastroparesis are common secondary complications in patients with diabetes mellitus. Patients with dysmotility express antibodies against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in serum. The aim of the present study was to scrutinize patients with diabetes mellitus with regard to the presence of GnRH antibodies, and to examine associations between antibodies and clinical findings. Thirty-nine consecutive patients with diabetes mellitus were included in the study after clinical examination and examination by esophageal manometry and gastric emptying scintigraphy. Serum was analyzed for the presence of antibodies against GnRH using an ELISA, and values are expressed as relative units (RU). Two age- and gender-matched healthy subjects per each patient served as controls. The prevalence of IgM GnRH antibodies in patients was 33% compared to 14% in controls (p = 0.027), with a higher antibody titer; 1.2 (0.6-5.0) and 0.2 (0.1-0.3) RU, respectively (p = 0.000). The expression of IgG antibodies was 15% in patients and none in controls (p = 0.000). Lower body mass index was associated with the presence of IgM antibodies (OR = 0.835, 95% CI = 0.699-0.998), and autonomic neuropathy with the presence IgG antibodies (OR = 9.000, 95% CI = 1.327-61.025). Esophageal dysmotility (69%) or gastroparesis (18%) were not associated with the presence of IgM antibodies (OR = 0.589, 95% CI = 0.143-2.424 and OR = 3.407, 95% CI = 0.633-18.350, respectively). Neither was esophageal dysmotility associated with IgG antibodies (OR = 2.500, 95% CI = 0.259-24.096). Antibodies against GnRH are more common in patients with diabetes mellitus compared with healthy controls. IgM antibodies are associated with lower body mass index and IgG antibodies are associated with autonomic neuropathy.

  20. Diabetes - taking care of your feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes - foot care - self-care; Diabetic foot ulcer - foot care; Diabetic neuropathy - foot care ... Diabetes can damage the nerves and blood vessels in your feet. This damage can cause numbness and ...

  1. Susceptibility of various areas of the nervous system of hens to TOCP-induced delayed neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classen, W; Gretener, P; Rauch, M; Weber, E; Krinke, G J

    1996-01-01

    Sensitivity of in-life parameters, biochemical endpoints, and susceptibility of various areas of the chicken nervous system to delayed neuropathy induced by tri-orthocresyl phosphate (TOCP) was assessed. Groups of hens were exposed to a single oral dose of TOCP of 0, 50, 200 or 500 mg/kg and the animals observed for 21 days. Perfusion fixed, paraffin embedded tissue sections were stained with Bodian's silver and Luxol blue and semi-thin epoxy sections with toluidine blue. Sciatic and tibial nerves, lumbosacral, midthoracic, and upper cervical spinal cord, medulla oblongata and cerebellum were examined using a semiquantitative scoring system. In pair-dosed hens inhibition of brain and spinal cord neurotoxic esterase (NTE) and cholinesterase and of plasma and erythrocyte cholinesterases was determined 24 hr and 48 hr after administration. At all dose levels NTE in brain and spinal cord and plasma cholinesterase was inhibited markedly. Quantitative inhibition of NTE was seen also in absence of neuropathy. Ataxia and body weight loss occurred in high-dose animals only, while dose-related neuropathy was seen in the distal tibial nerve, medulla oblongata and cerebellum. Ataxia was correlated best with neuropathy in peripheral nerves while degeneration of nerve fibers in the cerebellum, seen best in mid-longitudinal sections, was the most sensitive histological indicator of TOCP-induced delayed neuropathy. The particular susceptibility of spinocerebellar neurons was recognized long ago, but often has been neglected in delayed neurotoxicity studies and respective guidelines. Optimal sensitivity of toxicity tests is a prerequisite for risk assessment, can be cost efficient, and nowadays should be a main interest of animal welfare in order to reduce animals' suffering. Based on these data, determination of NTE inhibition together with histopathological examination of longitudinal sections of distal tibial nerves, mid-longitudinal sections of rostral cerebellum and cross

  2. PMP22 related neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Paassen, Barbara W; van der Kooi, Anneke J; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Verhamme, Camiel; Baas, Frank; de Visser, Marianne

    2014-03-19

    PMP22 related neuropathies comprise (1) PMP22 duplications leading to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), (2) PMP22 deletions, leading to Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP), and (3) PMP22 point mutations, causing both phenotypes. Overall prevalence of CMT is usually reported as 1:2,500, epidemiological studies show that 20-64% of CMT patients carry the PMP22 duplication. The prevalence of HNPP is not well known. CMT1A usually presents in the first two decades with difficulty walking or running. Distal symmetrical muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is present, legs more frequently and more severely affected than arms. HNPP typically leads to episodic, painless, recurrent, focal motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy, preceded by minor compression on the affected nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation is needed to determine whether the polyneuropathy is demyelinating. Sonography of the nerves can be useful. Diagnosis is confirmed by finding respectively a PMP22 duplication, deletion or point mutation. Differential diagnosis includes other inherited neuropathies, and acquired polyneuropathies. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant and de novo mutations occur. Offspring of patients have a chance of 50% to inherit the mutation from their affected parent. Prenatal testing is possible; requests for prenatal testing are not common. Treatment is currently symptomatic and may include management by a rehabilitation physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and orthopaedic surgeon. Adult CMT1A patients show slow clinical progression of disease, which seems to reflect a process of normal ageing. Life expectancy is normal.

  3. Aldosterone signaling regulates the over-expression of claudin-4 and -8 at the distal nephron from type 1 diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Molina-Jijón

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia in diabetes alters tight junction (TJ proteins in the kidney. We evaluated the participation of aldosterone (ALD, and the effect of spironolactone (SPL, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, on the expressions of claudin-2, -4, -5 and -8, and occludin in glomeruli, proximal and distal tubules isolated from diabetic rats. Type 1 diabetes was induced in female Wistar rats by a single tail vein injection of streptozotocin (STZ, and SPL was administrated daily by gavage, from days 3-21. Twenty-one days after STZ injection the rats were sacrificed. In diabetic rats, the serum ALD levels were increased, and SPL-treatment did not have effect on these levels or in hyperglycemia, however, proteinuria decreased in SPL-treated diabetic rats. Glomerular damage, evaluated by nephrin and Wilm's tumor 1 (WT1 protein expressions, and proximal tubular damage, evaluated by kidney injury molecule 1 (Kim-1 and heat shock protein 72 kDa (Hsp72 expressions, were ameliorated by SPL. Also, SPL prevented decrement in claudin-5 in glomeruli, and claudin-2 and occludin in proximal tubules by decreasing oxidative stress, evaluated by superoxide anion (O2●- production, and oxidative stress markers. In distal tubules, SPL ameliorated increase in mRNA, protein expression, and phosphorylation in threonine residues of claudin-4 and -8, through a serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase 1 (SGK1, and with-no-lysine kinase 4 (WNK4 signaling pathway. In conclusion, this is the first study that demonstrates that ALD modulates the expression of renal TJ proteins in diabetes, and that the blockade of its actions with SPL, may be a promising therapeutic strategy to prevent alterations of TJ proteins in diabetic nephropathy.

  4. Functional anatomy of the distal radioulnar joint in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, V C

    2013-04-01

    The distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) is critical to the function of the forearm as a mechanical unit. This paper is concerned with the concepts and observations that have changed understanding of the function of the DRUJ, notably with respect to the biomechanics of this joint. The DRUJ has been shown to be important in acting to distribute load and removal of the ulna head leads to the biomechanical equivalent of a one-bone forearm. The soft tissues with topographical relations to the distal forearm and DRUJ have also been investigated in our experimental series with findings including the description of a clinical disorder termed subluxation-related ulna neuropathy syndrome.

  5. Associations of Diabetic Retinopathy with Retinal Neurodegeneration on the Background of Diabetes Mellitus. Overview of Recent Medical Studies with an Assessment of the Impact on Healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muc, Rafał; Saracen, Agnieszka; Grabska-Liberek, Iwona

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is one of the biggest healthcare and financial problems worldwide. The disease is strongly associated with microvascular and macrovascular complications, causing co-existing diseases like Diabetic Retinopathy, Diabetic Neuropathy and Diabetic Nephropathy. Annual healthcare expenditures for diabetes treatment and complications prevention cost 727 billion USD in year 2017. Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetic Retinopathy and Diabetic Retinal Neuropathy are closely related diseases - originating from incorrectly controlled glycemia, blood pressure and lipid levels in the course of increasing resistance of the body tissues to insulin. Irrespectively of thorough programs for Diabetes Mellitus prevention and treatment, Diabetic Retinopathy management requires targeted treatment strategies for both microvasculopathy and retinal neurodegeneration, to delay disease severity course and risk of blindness. The study and conclusions in this article are based on web-available data and officially published articles related to the diabetes mellitus and associated diseases - Diabetic Retinopathy and Diabetic Retinal Neuropathy. The articles have been reviewed and analyzed to assess mutual relations between the discussed diseases.

  6. Gene Expression Profiling Identifies Downregulation of the Neurotrophin-MAPK Signaling Pathway in Female Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lin; Zhou, Wen-Hua; Cai, Jiang-Jia; Feng, Mei; Zhou, Mi; Hu, Su-Pei; Xu, Jin; Ji, Lin-Dan

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM). It is not diagnosed or managed properly in the majority of patients because its pathogenesis remains controversial. In this study, human whole genome microarrays identified 2898 and 4493 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in DM and DPN patients, respectively. A further KEGG pathway analysis indicated that DPN and DM share four pathways, including apoptosis, B cell receptor signaling pathway, endocytosis, and Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. The DEGs identified through comparison of DPN and DM were significantly enriched in MAPK signaling pathway, NOD-like receptor signaling pathway, and neurotrophin signaling pathway, while the "neurotrophin-MAPK signaling pathway" was notably downregulated. Seven DEGs from the neurotrophin-MAPK signaling pathway were validated in additional 78 samples, and the results confirmed the initial microarray findings. These findings demonstrated that downregulation of the neurotrophin-MAPK signaling pathway may be the major mechanism of DPN pathogenesis, thus providing a potential approach for DPN treatment.

  7. The Importance of Rare Subtypes in Diagnosis and Treatment of Peripheral Neuropathy: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Brian C; Price, Raymond S; Chen, Kevin S; Feldman, Eva L

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a prevalent condition that usually warrants a thorough history and examination but has limited diagnostic evaluation. However, rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy often require more extensive diagnostic testing and different treatments. To describe rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy, including the appropriate diagnostic evaluation and available treatments. References were identified from PubMed searches conducted on May 29, 2015, with an emphasis on systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials. Articles were also identified through the use of the authors' own files. Search terms included common rare neuropathy localizations and their causes, as well as epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Diffuse, nonlength-dependent neuropathies, multiple mononeuropathies, polyradiculopathies, plexopathies, and radiculoplexus neuropathies are rare peripheral neuropathy localizations that often require extensive diagnostic testing. Atypical neuropathy features, such as acute/subacute onset, asymmetry, and/or motor predominant signs, are frequently present. The most common diffuse, nonlength-dependent neuropathies are Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Effective disease-modifying therapies exist for many diffuse, nonlength-dependent neuropathies including Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and some paraprotein-associated demyelinating neuropathies. Vasculitic neuropathy (multiple mononeuropathy) also has efficacious treatment options, but definitive evidence of a treatment effect for IgM anti-MAG neuropathy and diabetic amyotrophy (radiculoplexus neuropathy) is lacking. Recognition of rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy is essential given the implications for diagnostic testing and treatment. Electrodiagnostic studies are an important

  8. Associations between diabetes self-management and microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes

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    Fatemeh Mehravar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Diabetes is a major public health problem that is approaching epidemic proportions globally. Diabetes self-management can reduce complications and mortality in type 2 diabetic patients. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between diabetes self-management and microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 562 Iranian patients older than 30 years of age with type 2 diabetes who received treatment at the Diabetes Research Center of the Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences were identified. The participants were enrolled and completed questionnaires between January and April 2014. Patients’ diabetes self-management was assessed as an independent variable by using the Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire translated into Persian. The outcomes were the microvascular complications of diabetes (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy, identified from the clinical records of each patient. A multiple logistic regression model was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs between diabetes self-management and the microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes, adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: After adjusting for potential confounders, a significant association was found between the diabetes self-management sum scale and neuropathy (adjusted OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.45 to 0.92, p=0.01. Additionally, weak evidence was found of an association between the sum scale score of diabetes self-management and nephropathy (adjusted OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.47 to 1.05, p=0.09. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with type 2 diabetes, a lower diabetes self-management score was associated with higher rates of nephropathy and neuropathy.

  9. Relation between diabetes mellitus and male fertility

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    Andy Petroianu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the present study was to verify if there is any relation between diabetes mellitus and male infertility. Methods: the spermograms of 43 non-diabetic subjects and 12 diabetic patients (type 1 and 2 aged 20-60 years were compared. Spermiological findings in diabetic patients were compared with those of normal individuals of the same age. Serum testosterone, prolactin, follicle-stimulant hormone, luteinizing hormone, glucose and glycosilated hemoglobin were assayed in diabetic patients. Rresults: Six diabetic patients (four type 1 and two type 2 presented chronic complications attributed to neuropathy and vascular insufficiency. No difference was observed in the semen characteristics (odor, color, viscosity and pH between the control group and the diabetic patients. There were no differences between seminal concentrations and percentage of motile spermatozoa during the first hour of observation in the two groups (p < 0.05. Impotence was reported by four diabetic patients (33.3%. Erectile failure was associated with diabetic microangiopathy and neuropathy. There were no controls with impotence. No significant hormonal changes were found in the diabetic patients. Cconclusions: The present results suggest that neuropathy and vascular insufficiency  may be  implicated in sexual dysfunction in type 1 and 2 diabetic patients, without significantly affecting the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  10. [Diabetic foot risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus in a family medicine unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Godínez, S A; Zonana-Nacach, A; Anzaldo-Campos, M C; Muñoz-Martínez, J A

    2014-01-01

    To determine the risk of diabetic foot in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM) seen in a Family Medicine Unit. The study included type II DM patients with a disease duration ≥ 5 years seen in a Family Medicine Unit, Tijuana, Mexico, during September-December 2011. Neuropathy was assessed with the Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom questionnaire, and pressure sensation using a 10-g Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. A patient had a high risk of diabetic foot if there was sensitivity loss, foot deformities, and non-palpable pedal pulses. We studied 205 patients with an average (± SD) age and DM duration of 59 ± 10 years and 10.7 ± 6.7 years, respectively. Ninety one patients (44%) had a high risk of developing diabetic foot, and it was associated with; an education of less than 6 years (OR 2.3; 95%CI: 1-1-4.1), DM disease duration ≥ 10 years (OR 5.1; 95%CI: 2.8-9.4), female gender (OR 2.0; 95%CI: 1.1-3.6), monthly familiar income diabetic neuropathy, since they have a high risk of diabetic foot. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Management of diabetic foot infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamil, M.; Amin, Z.; Chaudhary, T. H.; Shaheen, J.; Alvi, Z. R.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To determine the infecting agent in diabetic food infection with the susceptibility pattern, and to evaluate the effect of wound infection, was culopathy, neuropathy and control of diabetes mellitus on the outcome of the patients. Design: A descriptive and observational study. Place and duration of study: Patients with diabetic foot, admitted in surgical unit 1, B.V. Hospital Bahawalpur, from April 1999 to April 2000, were included in this study. Subject and methods: A total of 60 known diabetic patients were studied, out of these 47 were males and 13 females. They were assessed for angiopathy, neuropathy and extend of foot involvement. Necessary investigations, including x-ray foot, ECG, serum urea and creatinine, pus culture and sensitivity were carried out. Diabetes was controlled on insulin of the basis of serum sugar and urine sugar chart and treated accordingly. Results: The most common age of foot involvement was between 40-70 years. Right side was involved more often than the left (67%: 37%). Most of the infections were due to staphylococcus (50%), pseudomonas (25%) and streptococci (8%). Antibiotic was started based on sensitivity report. Fluoro quinolone plus clindamycin was used in 50%, fluoro quinolone plus metronidazole in 20% and amoxicillin/clavulanate in 23%. Most of the patients (61.7%) were in grade iii or iv of Meggit wagner classification of diabetic foot. Three patients (5%) were treated by below knee amputations while 1.7% patient by above knee amputation. In twenty-four (40%) patients some form of to amputation/ray amputation had to be done,while 32(53.3%) patients had complete healing of would without any amputation. Mortality was 3.33% all the 4 patients (6.7%) who presented late, having uncontrolled diabetes, with angiopathy (absent foot pulses), neuropathy, infection of the foot (grade iii or above) resulted in major amputation sooner or latter. The 32 patients (53.3%) having controlled diabetes mellitus with no angiopathy or

  12. Presence of diabetic microvascular complications does not incrementally increase risk of ischemic stroke in diabetic patients with atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Annie Y.; Liu, Chia-Jen; Chao, Tze-Fan; Wang, Kang-Ling; Tuan, Ta-Chuan; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Conventional stroke risk prediction tools used in atrial fibrillation (AF) incorporate the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM) as a risk factor. However, it is unknown whether this risk is homogenous or dependent on the presence of diabetic microvascular complications, such as diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. The present study examined the risk of ischemic stroke in diabetic patients with and without microvascular complications. The present study used the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan with detailed healthcare data on all-comers to the Taiwanese medical system from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2011. AF and DM were identified when listed as discharge diagnoses or confirmed more than twice in the outpatient department. Patients on antithrombotic agents were excluded. The clinical endpoint was ischemic stroke. Among the 50,180 AF patients with DM, the majority had no microvascular complications (72.7%), while 2.6% had diabetic retinopathy, 8.4% had diabetic nephropathy, and 16.1% had diabetic neuropathy. Ischemic stroke occurred in 6003 patients, with a 4.74% annual risk of ischemic stroke. When compared with DM patients without microvascular complications, those with diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, or neuropathy had higher incidences of ischemic stroke (4.65 vs 5.07, 4.77, or 5.20 per 100 person-years, respectively). However, after adjusting for confounding factors, the differences were no longer significant. In a large nationwide AF cohort with DM, risk of ischemic stroke was similar between patients with and without microvascular complications, suggesting that risk stratification of these patients does not require inclusion of diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. PMID:27399075

  13. Efficacy and safety of aldose reductase inhibitor for the treatment of diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs can block the metabolism of the polyol pathway, and have been used to slow or reverse the progression of diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (DCAN. The purpose of this study was to review the effectiveness and safety of ARIs in the treatment of DCAN as determined by five cardiac autonomic neuropathy function tests. METHODS: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus databases (inception to May 2012 were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs and non-randomized controlled trials (non-RCTs investigating ARIs for the treatment of DCAN with an English-language restriction. The data were analyzed using RevMan 5.0, and the heterogeneity between the trials was evaluated using the Cochrane's Q-test as well as the I² test. The type of model (random or fixed used for analysis was based on heterogeneity. Weighted mean differences (WMD with 95% confidence intervals (CI were computed for the five cardiac automatic neuropathy function tests to evaluate the effects. RESULTS: Ten articles met the prerequisites for this review. Analysis of the results showed that ARIs significantly improved function in at least three of the five automatic neuropathy tests, including the resting heart rate variation coefficients (WMD = 0.25, 95%CI 0.02 to 0.48, P = 0.040; the 30∶15 ratio (WMD = 0.06, 95%CI 0.01 to 0.10, P = 0.010 and the postural systolic blood pressure change (WMD = -5.94, 95%CI -7.31 to -4.57, P = 0.001. The expiration/inspiration ratio showed a marginally significant benefit (WMD = 0.05, 95%CI 0.00 to 0.09, P = 0.040. Glycaemic control was not significantly affected by ARIs. Adverse effects of ARIs except for Tolerestat were minimal. CONCLUSIONS: Based on these results, we conclude that ARIs could ameliorate cardiac automatic neuropathy especially mild or asymptomatic DCAN but need further investigation.

  14. Assessment of ulceration risk in diabetic individuals

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    Luz Marina Alfonso Dutra

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To identify the risk factors for foot ulceration through the tracing of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and peripheral arterial disease in individuals with type I and II diabetes, who were assisted in reference centers of the Federal District, Brazil. Method: a cross-sectional and analytical study, with the assessment of 117 individuals in outpatient clinics of the Federal District. Continuous variables were compared through Mann-Whitney test, and categorized variables, through Chi-square test for univariate analysis and Logistics regression test for multivariate analysis. Results: painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy was present in 37 (75.5% of the individuals with neuropathy. Deformities and loss of protective plant sensibility were related to neuropathy (p=0.014 and p=0.001, respectively. Of the 40 (34.2% individuals in the sample who presented peripheral arterial disease, 26 (65% presented calcification risk. Conclusion: signs of painful peripheral polyneuropathy, peripheral arterial disease, deformities, loss of protective plantar sensibility, and dry skin were identified as risk factors for ulceration.

  15. [Review of the recent literature on hereditary neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birouk, N

    2014-12-01

    The recent literature included interesting reports on the pathogenic mechanisms of hereditary neuropathies. The axonal traffic and its abnormalities in some forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease were particularly reviewed by Bucci et al. Many genes related to CMT disease code for proteins that are involved directly or not in intracellular traffic. KIF1B controls vesicle motility on microtubules. MTMR2, MTMR13 and FIG4 regulate the metabolism of phosphoinositide at the level of endosomes. The HSPs are involved in the proteasomal degradation. GDAP1 and MFN2 regulate the mitochondrial fission and fusion respectively and the mitochondial transport within the axon. Pareyson et al. reported a review on peripheral neuropathies in mitochondrial disorders. They used the term of "mitochondrial CMT" for the forms of CMT with abnormal mitochondrial dynamic or structure. Among the new entities, we can draw the attention to a proximal form of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with autosomal dominant inheritance, which is characterized by motor deficit with cramps and fasciculations predominating in proximal muscles. Distal sensory deficit can be present. The gene TFG on chromosome 3 has been recently identified to be responsible for this form. Another rare form of axonal autosomal recessive neuropathy due to HNT1 gene mutation is characterized by the presence of hands myotonia that appears later than neuropathy but constitute an interesting clinical hallmark to orientate the diagnosis of this form. In terms of differential diagnosis, CMT4J due to FIG4 mutation can present with a rapidly progressive and asymmetric weakness that resembles CIDP. Bouhy et al. made an interesting review on the therapeutic trials, animal models and the future therapeutic strategies to be developed in CMT disease. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Gait parameters in patients with diabetes mellitus

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    Cristina Elena Prado Teles Fregonesi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that results in sensorimotor alterations. These changes affect balance and walking and predispose affected patients to falls. The aim of this review was to identify studies in the recent literature that assess gait parameters and aspects involved in walking. The MEDLINE, SciELO, LILACS and PEDro databases were searched using the following combination of keywords: diabetic neuropathies x gait; diabetes mellitus x gait, and diabetic foot x gait. After the application of selection criteria, 15 articles were retrieved, summarized, discussed, and are included in this review. Diabetic neuropathy was found to lead to deficits in step amplitude, gait velocity and gait cadence on flat surfaces, without sudden changes in direction or stops, and to balance and coordination deficits on inclined and uneven terrain. Diabetic neuropathies also increase plantar pressure rates and lead to difficulties in the terminal stance phase and pre-swing phase due to changes in triceps surae activation. Thus, the next initial contact occurs in an inadequate manner, with the forefoot and without absorption of shocks.

  17. Guidelines in the management of diabetic nerve pain clinical utility of pregabalin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinik AI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aaron I Vinik, Carolina M Casellini Strelitz Diabetes Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USA Abstract: Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes. It presents as a variety of syndromes for which there is no universally accepted unique classification. Sensorimotor polyneuropathy is the most common type, affecting about 30% of diabetic patients in hospital care and 25% of those in the community. Pain is the reason for 40% of patient visits in a primary care setting, and about 20% of these have had pain for greater than 6 months. Chronic pain may be nociceptive, which occurs as a result of disease or damage to tissue with no abnormality in the nervous system. In contrast, neuropathic pain is defined as “pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system.” Persistent neuropathic pain interferes significantly with quality of life, impairing sleep and recreation; it also significantly impacts emotional well-being, and is associated with depression, anxiety, and noncompliance with treatment. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a difficult-to-manage clinical problem, and patients with this condition are more apt to seek medical attention than those with other types of diabetic neuropathy. Early recognition of psychological problems is critical to the management of pain, and physicians need to go beyond the management of pain per se if they are to achieve success. This evidence-based review of the assessment of the patient with pain in diabetes addresses the state-of-the-art management of pain, recognizing all the conditions that produce pain in diabetes and the evidence in support of a variety of treatments currently available. A search of the full Medline database for the last 10 years was conducted in August 2012 using the terms painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, painful diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy

  18. Effects of Long-Term Treatment with Ranirestat, a Potent Aldose Reductase Inhibitor, on Diabetic Cataract and Neuropathy in Spontaneously Diabetic Torii Rats

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    Ayumi Ota

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated ranirestat, an aldose reductase inhibitor, in diabetic cataract and neuropathy (DN in spontaneously diabetic Torii (SDT rats compared with epalrestat, the positive control. Animals were divided into groups and treated once daily with oral ranirestat (0.1, 1.0, 10 mg/kg or epalrestat (100 mg/kg for 40 weeks, normal Sprague-Dawley rats, and untreated SDT rats. Lens opacification was scored from 0 (normal to 3 (mature cataract. The combined scores (0–6 from both lenses represented the total for each animal. DN was assessed by measuring the motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV in the sciatic nerve. Sorbitol and fructose levels were measured in the lens and sciatic nerve 40 weeks after diabetes onset. Cataracts developed more in untreated rats than normal rats (P<0.01. Ranirestat significantly (P<0.01 inhibited rapid cataract development; epalrestat did not. Ranirestat significantly reversed the MNCV decrease (40.7 ± 0.6 m/s in SDT rats dose-dependently (P<0.01. Epalrestat also reversed the prevented MNCV decrease (P<0.05. Sorbitol levels in the sciatic nerve increased significantly in SDT rats (2.05 ± 0.10 nmol/g, which ranirestat significantly suppressed dose-dependently, (P<0.05, <0.01, and <0.01; epalrestat did not. Ranirestat prevents DN and cataract; epalrestat prevents DN only.

  19. Diabetic Driving Studies-Part 3: A Comparison of Mean Brake Response Time Between Neuropathic Diabetic Drivers With and Without Foot Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansosti, Laura E; Spiess, Kerianne E; Meyr, Andrew J

    We have previously demonstrated an abnormally delayed mean brake response time and an increased frequency of abnormally delayed brake responses in a group of neuropathic diabetic drivers compared with a control group of drivers with neither diabetes nor lower extremity neuropathy. The objective of the present case-control study was to compare the mean brake response time between neuropathic diabetic drivers with and without specific diabetic foot pathology. The braking performances of the participants were evaluated using a computerized driving simulator with specific measurement of the mean brake response time and the frequency of abnormally delayed brake responses. We analyzed a control group of 20 active drivers with type 2 diabetes, lower extremity neuropathy, and no history of diabetic foot pathology and an experimental group of 20 active drivers with type 2 diabetes, lower extremity neuropathy, and a history of diabetic foot pathology (ulceration, amputation, and/or Charcot neuroarthropathy) from an urban U.S. podiatric medical clinic. Neuropathic diabetic drivers without a history of specific foot pathology demonstrated an 11.11% slower mean brake response time (0.790 ± 0.223 versus 0.711 ± 0.135 second; p time slower than a suggested threshold of 0.70 second. The results of the present investigation provide evidence that diabetic patients across a spectrum of lower extremity sensorimotor neuropathy and foot pathology demonstrate abnormal automobile brake responses and might be at risk of impaired driving function. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Dioscoreae Rhizoma (SanYak on Peripheral Neuropathy and its Safety

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    Kim Min-jung

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the evidence available in the literature for the safety and efficacy of Dioscoreae Rhizoma (DR for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy. Methods: Literature searches were performed in MEDLINE and three Korean medical databases up to April 2013. All studies evaluating the effects on peripheral neuropathy or the safety of DR monopreparations were considered. Results: Three studies - DR extract per os (po on diabetic neuropathy in mice, DR extract injection on the peripheral sciatic nerve after crush injury in rats and DR extract injection to patients with peripheral facial paralysis proved that DR treatments were effective for the treatment of nerve injuries. Conclusions: In conclusion, we found the DR has a strong positive potential for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy, but studies addressing direct factors related to the nerve still remain insufficient.

  1. Improved sensitivity in patients with peripheral neuropathy: effects of monochromatic infrared photo energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLellis, Salvatore L; Carnegie, Dale H; Burke, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    The medical records of 1,047 patients (mean age, 73 years) with established peripheral neuropathy were examined to determine whether treatment with monochromatic infrared photo energy was associated with increased foot sensitivity to the 5.07 Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. The peripheral neuropathy in 790 of these patients (75%) was due to diabetes mellitus. Before treatment with monochromatic infrared photo energy, of the ten tested sites (five on each foot), a mean +/- SD of 7.9 +/- 2.4 sites were insensitive to the 5.07 Semmes-Weinstein monofilament, and 1,033 patients exhibited loss of protective sensation. After treatment, the mean +/- SD number of insensate sites on both feet was 2.3 +/- 2.4, an improvement of 71%. Only 453 of 1,033 patients (43.9%) continued to have loss of protective sensation after treatment. Therefore, monochromatic infrared photo energy treatment seems to be associated with significant clinical improvement in foot sensation in patients, primarily Medicare aged, with peripheral neuropathy. Because insensitivity to the 5.07 Semmes-Weinstein monofilament has been reported to be a major risk factor for diabetic foot wounds, the use of monochromatic infrared photo energy may be associated with a reduced incidence of diabetic foot wounds and amputations.

  2. Vulvodynia: An unrecognized diabetic neuropathic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharti Kalra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vulvar pain syndromes, including vulvodynia, are a common source of morbidity in women and cause much physical and psychological suffering. This brief communication postulates the hypothesis that unexplained vulvar pain may be hitherto undescribed manifestation of painful sensory diabetic neuropathy. It describes the clinical characteristics of vulvodynia and highlights the similarities between this condition and diabetic neuropathy. The hypothesis calls for women presenting with vulvar pain to be screened for diabetes, as well as women with diabetes to be questioned about vulvar symptomatology. The paper hopes to stimulate extensive research in this important, but so far neglected, field of women′s endocrine health.

  3. Trigeminal pain and quantitative sensory testing in painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arap, Astrid; Siqueira, Silvia R D T; Silva, Claudomiro B; Teixeira, Manoel J; Siqueira, José T T

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate patients with Diabetes Mellitus type 2 and painful peripheral neuropathy in order to investigate oral complaints and facial somatosensory findings. Case-control study; 29 patients (12 women, mean age 57.86 yo) with Diabetes Mellitus type 2 and 31 age-gender-matched controls were evaluated with a standardized protocol for general characteristics, orofacial pain, research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders, visual analogue scale and McGill Pain questionnaire, and a systematic protocol of quantitative sensory testing for bilateral facial sensitivity at the areas innervated by the trigeminal branches, which included the thermal detection by ThermoSensi 2, tactile evaluation with vonFrey filaments, and superficial pain thresholds with a superficial algometer (Micromar). Statistical analysis was performed with Wilcoxon, chi-square, confidence intervals and Spearman (ppain was reported by 55.2% of patients, and the most common descriptor was fatigue (50%); 17.2% had burning mouth. Myofascial temporomandibular disorders were diagnosed in 9 (31%) patients. The study group showed higher sensory thresholds of pain at the right maxillary branch (p=0.017) but sensorial differences were not associated with pain (p=0.608). Glycemia and HbA(1c) were positively correlated with the quantitative sensory testing results of pain (ppain thresholds were correlated with higher glycemia and glycated hemoglobin (p=0.027 and p=0.026). There was a high prevalence of orofacial pain and burning mouth was the most common complaint. The association of loss of pain sensation and higher glycemia and glycated hemoglobin can be of clinical use for the follow-up of DM complications. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cross-sectional analysis of adult diabetes type 1 and type 2 patients with diabetic microvascular complications from a German retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happich, M; Breitscheidel, L; Meisinger, C; Ulbig, M; Falkenstein, P; Benter, U; Watkins, J

    2007-06-01

    To obtain epidemiological data on the prevalence of predefined stages of diabetic microvascular complications from a representative cross-section of patients with existing microvascular complications of type 1 or type 2 diabetes in Germany. A cross-sectional, retrospective study of medical records of 705 type 1 and 1910 type 2 adult diabetic patients with a diagnosis of retinopathy and/or peripheral neuropathy and/or nephropathy before 2002 and treated in 2002 in Germany. Of 376 patients with type 1 diabetes having retinopathy, 59.3% had mild or moderate non-proliferative retinopathy without macular oedema, 27.1% had macular oedema, and 13.6% had severe retinopathy without macular oedema. In 862 patients with type 2 diabetes, the distribution of retinopathy/maculopathy classes was 56.8%, 35.5%, and 7.7%, respectively. Of 381 type 1 diabetes patients with observed peripheral neuropathy, 81.4% had sensorimotor neuropathy, 8.9% had diabetic foot conditions, and 9.7% had lower extremity amputations because of diabetes. In 1005 patients with type 2 diabetes, the distribution of neuropathy classes was 78.2%, 12.1%, and 9.7%, respectively. The proportions of patients with renal insufficiency in type 1 and type 2 diabetes groups were 15.3% versus 13.5%, respectively. The study suggests that there are considerable proportions of patients with progressive stages of microvascular complications related to type 1 and type 2 diabetes in Germany. This underlines the importance of improvement of optimal quality of care and frequent screening for preventing late diabetic microvascular complications and the necessity of effective intervention strategies to tackle this major public health problem.

  5. Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000326.htm Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care To use the ... or at other unusual times. Treating and Preventing Nerve Damage from Diabetes Treating diabetic neuropathy can make ...

  6. Assessment of the cardiovascular and gastrointestinal autonomic complications of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, Christina; Brock, Birgitte; Pedersen, Anne Grave

    2016-01-01

    The global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing; arguably as a consequence of changes in diet, lifestyle and the trend towards urbanization. Unsurprisingly, the incidence of both micro and macrovascular complications of diabetes mirrors this increasing prevalence. Amongst the complications...... with the highest symptom burden, yet frequently under-diagnosed and sub-optimally treated, is diabetic autonomic neuropathy, itself potentially resulting in cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and gastrointestinal (GI) tract dysmotility. The aims of this review are fourfold. Firstly to provide an overview...... of the pathophysiological processes that cause diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Secondly, to discuss both the established and emerging cardiometric methods for evaluating autonomic nervous system function in vivo. Thirdly, to examine the tools for assessing pan-GI and segmental motility and finally, we will provide...

  7. Truncating SLC5A7 mutations underlie a spectrum of dominant hereditary motor neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Claire G; Beijer, Danique; Hardy, Holly; Barwick, Katy E S; Bower, Matthew; Mademan, Ines; De Jonghe, Peter; Deconinck, Tine; Russell, Mark A; McEntagart, Meriel M; Chioza, Barry A; Blakely, Randy D; Chilton, John K; De Bleecker, Jan; Baets, Jonathan; Baple, Emma L; Walk, David; Crosby, Andrew H

    2018-04-01

    To identify the genetic cause of disease in 2 previously unreported families with forms of distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMNs). The first family comprises individuals affected by dHMN type V, which lacks the cardinal clinical feature of vocal cord paralysis characteristic of dHMN-VII observed in the second family. Next-generation sequencing was performed on the proband of each family. Variants were annotated and filtered, initially focusing on genes associated with neuropathy. Candidate variants were further investigated and confirmed by dideoxy sequence analysis and cosegregation studies. Thorough patient phenotyping was completed, comprising clinical history, examination, and neurologic investigation. dHMNs are a heterogeneous group of peripheral motor neuron disorders characterized by length-dependent neuropathy and progressive distal limb muscle weakness and wasting. We previously reported a dominant-negative frameshift mutation located in the concluding exon of the SLC5A7 gene encoding the choline transporter (CHT), leading to protein truncation, as the likely cause of dominantly-inherited dHMN-VII in an extended UK family. In this study, our genetic studies identified distinct heterozygous frameshift mutations located in the last coding exon of SLC5A7 , predicted to result in the truncation of the CHT C-terminus, as the likely cause of the condition in each family. This study corroborates C-terminal CHT truncation as a cause of autosomal dominant dHMN, confirming upper limb predominating over lower limb involvement, and broadening the clinical spectrum arising from CHT malfunction.

  8. Comparison of clinical effectiveness of laser acupuncture and amitriptyline in diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN): a sham controlled randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan Khan, Imran; Anwar, Shahzad; Hanif, Asif; Ayub, Muhammad; Jamil Raja, Arsalan

    2014-02-01

    Background: Painful neuropathy is a very common complication in diabetic patients. Various treatment strategies like manual therapies, conservative management, drug therapy and exercise have been opted for this problem. Studies have shown clinical effectiveness of laser acupuncture as well. On the other hand, Amitryptaline is also a commonly used treatment for this disease. We aim to compare the efficacy of both treatments. Objective: To assess the effect of laser acupuncture in patients suffering from painful diabetic neuropathy and its comparison with standard of care. Patients and Method: This study was conducted in Diabetic and Endocrine Management Center (DEMC) Lahore General Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan. A randomized control trial (RCT) was opted and a total of 164 patients were chosen using Non-probability purposive sampling technique. Pain was graded by using a patient friendly Visual Analogue Score (VAS), scoring from 0 to 10. Treatment was done involving organized fortnightly follow ups. Data of all patients was recorded on Performa and was entered and analyzed for descriptive statistics in PASW 18 (IBM®. SPSS). Results: A total of 164 subjects were included in the study who were subdivided into three groups labeled as A, B and C for laser therapy treatment, amitryptaline treatment and controls respectively. The mean age of subjects was 51.54+/-10.46 in Group A, 49.38+/-10.56 in Group B and 51.70+/-11.43 in Group C. The difference of mean ages in all study groups was statistically insignificant (p-value= 0.469). The average pain score in patients who received laser therapy was 5.95+/-0.91 before treatment, whereas after treatment it was 4.31+/-0.98. The mean pain score in subjects having Amitryptaline before starting the treatment was 6.87+/-0.71 and after treatment, it was 6.23+/-0.98. The mean score for daily life activities in subjects who received laser therapy was 9.562.37 before treatment, while after treatment it was 7.56+/-1.54. The average score

  9. Evaluating the Measurement Properties of the Self-Assessment of Treatment Version II, Follow-Up Version, in Patients with Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floortje van Nooten

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Self-Assessment of Treatment version II (SAT II measures treatment-related improvements in pain and impacts and impressions of treatment in neuropathic pain patients. The measure has baseline and follow-up versions. This study assesses the measurement properties of the SAT II. Methods. Data from 369 painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (PDPN patients from a phase III trial assessing capsaicin 8% patch (Qutenza® efficacy and safety were used in these analyses. Reliability, convergent validity, known-groups validity, and responsiveness (using the Brief Pain Inventory-Diabetic Neuropathy [BPI-DN] and Patient Global Impression of Change [PGIC] analyses were conducted, and minimally important differences (MID were estimated. Results. Exploratory factor analysis supported a one-factor solution for the six impact items. The SAT II has good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha: 0.96 and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients: 0.62–0.88. Assessment of convergent validity showed moderate to strong correlations with change in other study endpoints. Scores varied significantly by level of pain intensity and sleep interference (p<0.05 defined by the BPI-DN. Responsiveness was shown based on the PGIC. MID estimates ranged from 1.2 to 2.4 (pain improvement and 1.0 to 2.0 (impact scores. Conclusions. The SAT II is a reliable and valid measure for assessing treatment improvement in PDPN patients.

  10. Does a Rehabilitation Program of Aerobic and Progressive Resisted Exercises Influence HIV-Induced Distal Neuropathic Pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, Sonill S; Yakasai, Abdulsalam M

    2018-05-01

    Distal symmetrical polyneuropathy is a common neurological sequela after HIV, which leads to neuropathic pain and functional limitations. Rehabilitation programs with exercises are used to augment pharmacological therapy to relieve pain but appropriate and effective exercises are unknown. This study explored the safety and effect of moderate-intensity aerobic exercises and progressive resisted exercises for HIV-induced distal symmetrical polyneuropathy neuropathic pain. A randomized pretest, posttest of 12 wks of aerobic exercise or progressive resisted exercise compared with a control. Outcome measures were assessed using the subjective periphery neuropathy, brief peripheral neuropathy screening, and numeric pain rating scale. Pain was assessed at baseline, 6 and 12 wks. Data between groups were compared using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U test, and within-groups Friedman and Wilcoxon signed rank tests. There were 136 participants (mean [SD] age = 36.79 [8.23] yrs) and the exercise groups completed the protocols without any adverse effects. Pain scores within and between aerobic exercise and progressive resisted exercise groups showed significant improvement (P 0.05). This study supports a rehabilitation program of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise and progressive resisted exercise being safe and effective for reducing neuropathic pain and is beneficial with analgesics for HIV-induced distal symmetrical polyneuropathy.

  11. Guidelines in the management of diabetic nerve pain: clinical utility of pregabalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinik, Aaron I; Casellini, Carolina M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes. It presents as a variety of syndromes for which there is no universally accepted unique classification. Sensorimotor polyneuropathy is the most common type, affecting about 30% of diabetic patients in hospital care and 25% of those in the community. Pain is the reason for 40% of patient visits in a primary care setting, and about 20% of these have had pain for greater than 6 months. Chronic pain may be nociceptive, which occurs as a result of disease or damage to tissue with no abnormality in the nervous system. In contrast, neuropathic pain is defined as "pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system." Persistent neuropathic pain interferes significantly with quality of life, impairing sleep and recreation; it also significantly impacts emotional well-being, and is associated with depression, anxiety, and noncompliance with treatment. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a difficult-to-manage clinical problem, and patients with this condition are more apt to seek medical attention than those with other types of diabetic neuropathy. Early recognition of psychological problems is critical to the management of pain, and physicians need to go beyond the management of pain per se if they are to achieve success. This evidence-based review of the assessment of the patient with pain in diabetes addresses the state-of-the-art management of pain, recognizing all the conditions that produce pain in diabetes and the evidence in support of a variety of treatments currently available. A search of the full Medline database for the last 10 years was conducted in August 2012 using the terms painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, painful diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy, painful diabetic neuropathy and pain in diabetes. In addition, recent reviews addressing this issue were adopted as necessary. In particular, reports from the American Academy of Neurology

  12. Gastric Emptying in Patients with Diabetes: Gastric Emptying Time, Retention Rate and Effect of Cisapride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Byung Chun; Choi, Chung Il; Gwak, Dong Suck; Lee, Jae Tae; Lee, Kyu Bo; Kim, Bo Wan; Chung, Jun Mo

    1992-01-01

    Gastic emptying scan in diabetic patients is widely used to assess the degree of motility disturbance and the symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, bloating, abdominal pain and early gastric fullness which we can't find anatomic lesion by fiberoscopic or barium study. In order to determine the relationship among diabetic gastropathy, neropathy, retinopathy and disease duration, gastric emptying scan using 99m Tc-tin colloid labeled scramble egg in hamburger was performed in 10 healthy male controls and 50 diabetic patients which were subdivided to no neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy and autonomic neuropathy groups according to the degree of diabetic neuropathy and no retinopathy, background retinopathy and proliferative retinopathy groups according to the degree of diabetic retinopathy. After medication of cisapride for 2 weeks, we observed the presence of improvement of gastric motility in diabetics. The results were as following: 1) In controls, gastric emptying time (GET1/2) was 75 ± 13.6 min and 2 hour gastric retension rate(GRR2) was 32 ± 11.1%. 2) In diabetics, GET/2 was prolonged more than 2 hours and GRR2 was 58 ± 23.1%. According to degree of neuropathy, GET1/2 was prolonged more than 2 hours in all three groups and GRR2 was 54± 24.1% in no neuropathy group, 57 ± 24.3% in peripheral neuropathy group and 69 ± 24.6% in autonomic neuropathy group. According to degree of retinopathy, GET1/2 was 110 ± 23.4 min in no retinopathy group and prolonged more than 2 hours in other two groups and GRR2 was 45 ± 21.6% in no retinopathy group, 71 ± 19.7% in background retinopathy group and 73 ± 21.5% in proliferative retinopathy group. 3) After cisapride for 2 weeks, GET1/2 and GRR2 were improved as 90 ± 14.6 min and 40 ± 13.8% (initial GET1/2 and GRR2 were above 2 hours and 61 ± 15.4%). We can conclude from above findings that gastropathy in diabetic neuropathy suggesting main underlying factor in motility disorder. The degree of retinopathy and disease

  13. Gastric Emptying in Patients with Diabetes: Gastric Emptying Time, Retention Rate and Effect of Cisapride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Byung Chun; Choi, Chung Il; Gwak, Dong Suck; Lee, Jae Tae; Lee, Kyu Bo; Kim, Bo Wan; Chung, Jun Mo [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-07-15

    Gastic emptying scan in diabetic patients is widely used to assess the degree of motility disturbance and the symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, bloating, abdominal pain and early gastric fullness which we can't find anatomic lesion by fiberoscopic or barium study. In order to determine the relationship among diabetic gastropathy, neropathy, retinopathy and disease duration, gastric emptying scan using {sup 99m}Tc-tin colloid labeled scramble egg in hamburger was performed in 10 healthy male controls and 50 diabetic patients which were subdivided to no neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy and autonomic neuropathy groups according to the degree of diabetic neuropathy and no retinopathy, background retinopathy and proliferative retinopathy groups according to the degree of diabetic retinopathy. After medication of cisapride for 2 weeks, we observed the presence of improvement of gastric motility in diabetics. The results were as following: 1) In controls, gastric emptying time (GET1/2) was 75 +- 13.6 min and 2 hour gastric retension rate(GRR2) was 32 +- 11.1%. 2) In diabetics, GET/2 was prolonged more than 2 hours and GRR2 was 58 +- 23.1%. According to degree of neuropathy, GET1/2 was prolonged more than 2 hours in all three groups and GRR2 was 54+- 24.1% in no neuropathy group, 57 +- 24.3% in peripheral neuropathy group and 69 +- 24.6% in autonomic neuropathy group. According to degree of retinopathy, GET1/2 was 110 +- 23.4 min in no retinopathy group and prolonged more than 2 hours in other two groups and GRR2 was 45 +- 21.6% in no retinopathy group, 71 +- 19.7% in background retinopathy group and 73 +- 21.5% in proliferative retinopathy group. 3) After cisapride for 2 weeks, GET1/2 and GRR2 were improved as 90 +- 14.6 min and 40 +- 13.8% (initial GET1/2 and GRR2 were above 2 hours and 61 +- 15.4%). We can conclude from above findings that gastropathy in diabetic neuropathy suggesting main underlying factor in motility disorder. The degree of retinopathy and

  14. Median and ulnar neuropathies in U.S. Army Medical Command Band members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Scott W; Koreerat, Nicholas R; Gordon, Lindsay B; Santillo, Douglas R; Moore, Josef H; Greathouse, David G

    2013-12-01

    Musicians have been reported as having a high prevalence of upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders, including carpal tunnel syndrome. The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of median and ulnar neuropathies in U.S. Army Medical Command (MEDCOM) Band members at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Thirty-five MEDCOM Band members (30 males, 5 females) volunteered to participate. There were 33 right-handed musicians, and the mean length of time in the MEDCOM Band was 12.2 yrs (range, 1-30 yrs). Subjects completed a history form, were interviewed, and underwent a physical examination of the cervical spine and bilateral upper extremities. Nerve conduction studies of the bilateral median and ulnar nerves were performed. Electrophysiological variables served as the reference standard for median and ulnar neuropathy and included distal sensory latencies, distal motor latencies, amplitudes, conduction velocities, and comparison study latencies. Ten of the 35 subjects (29%) presented with abnormal electrophysiologic values suggestive of an upper extremity mononeuropathy. Nine of the subjects had abnormal median nerve electrophysiologic values at or distal to the wrist; 2 had bilateral abnormal values. One had an abnormal ulnar nerve electrophysiologic assessment at the elbow. Nine of these 10 subjects had clinical examination findings consistent with the electrophysiological findings. The prevalence of mononeuropathies in this sample of band members is similar to that found in previous research involving civilian musicians (20-36%) and far exceeds that reported in the general population. Prospective research investigating screening, examination items, and injury prevention measures in musicians appears to be warranted.

  15. [Hereditary motor and sensory Lom-neuropathy--first Hungarian case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Antal; Siska, Eva; Molnár, Mária Judit

    2007-01-20

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy-Lom is an autosomal recessive disorder of the peripheral nervous system, which occurs only in the european Roma population. The symptoms start in the first decade with slowly progressive gait disturbance, weakness and wasting of distal upper extremity muscles, joint deformities and hearing loss develop later in the second and third decades. This disorder is caused by a homozygous missense mutation of the NDRG1 gene, located in the 8q24 region. The Schwann cell dysfunction is most probably caused by altered lipid metabolism as a consequence of the NDRG1 mutation. Molecular genetic testing can be a first diagnostic step among roma individuals showing a Lom neuropathy phenotype, making evaluation of such patients and also genetic counselling faster and easier. Screening for hereditary neuromuscular disorders in this genetically isolated community may become an important public health issue in the near future.

  16. Muscle MRI STIR signal intensity and atrophy are correlated to focal lower limb neuropathy severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroide, N; Bousson, V; Mambre, L; Vicaut, E; Laredo, J D; Kubis, Nathalie

    2015-03-01

    The objective is to determine if muscle MRI is useful for assessing neuropathy severity. Clinical, MRI and electromyography (EMG) examinations were performed in 17 patients with focal lower limb neuropathies. MRI Short Tau Inversion Recovery (STIR) signal intensity, amyotrophy, and muscle fatty infiltration measured after T1-weighted image acquisition, EMG spontaneous activity (SA), and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) were graded using semiquantitative scores and quantitative scores for STIR signal intensity and were correlated to the Medical Research Council (MRC) score for testing muscle strength. Within this population, subgroups were selected according to severity (mild versus severe), duration (subacute versus chronic), and topography (distal versus proximal) of the neuropathy. EMG SA and MVC MRI amyotrophy and quantitative scoring of muscle STIR intensity were correlated with the MRC score. Moreover, MRI amyotrophy was significantly increased in severe, chronic, and proximal neuropathies along with fatty infiltration in chronic lesions. Muscle MRI atrophy and quantitative evaluation of signal intensity were correlated to MRC score in our study. Semiquantitative evaluation of muscle STIR signal was sensitive enough for detection of topography of the nerve lesion but was not suitable to assess severity. Muscle MRI could support EMG in chronic and proximal neuropathy, which showed poor sensitivity in these patients.

  17. Muscle MRI STIR signal intensity and atrophy are correlated to focal lower limb neuropathy severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deroide, N.; Mambre, L.; Kubis, Nathalie [Service de Physiologie Clinique-Explorations Fonctionnelles, AP-HP, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite France, Paris (France); Bousson, V.; Laredo, J.D. [Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite France, Paris (France); Radiologie Osteo-articulaire, AP-HP, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Vicaut, E. [Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite France, Paris (France); URC, AP-HP, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France)

    2014-09-26

    The objective is to determine if muscle MRI is useful for assessing neuropathy severity. Clinical, MRI and electromyography (EMG) examinations were performed in 17 patients with focal lower limb neuropathies. MRI Short Tau Inversion Recovery (STIR) signal intensity, amyotrophy, and muscle fatty infiltration measured after T1-weighted image acquisition, EMG spontaneous activity (SA), and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) were graded using semiquantitative scores and quantitative scores for STIR signal intensity and were correlated to the Medical Research Council (MRC) score for testing muscle strength. Within this population, subgroups were selected according to severity (mild versus severe), duration (subacute versus chronic), and topography (distal versus proximal) of the neuropathy. EMG SA and MVC MRI amyotrophy and quantitative scoring of muscle STIR intensity were correlated with the MRC score. Moreover, MRI amyotrophy was significantly increased in severe, chronic, and proximal neuropathies along with fatty infiltration in chronic lesions. Muscle MRI atrophy and quantitative evaluation of signal intensity were correlated to MRC score in our study. Semiquantitative evaluation of muscle STIR signal was sensitive enough for detection of topography of the nerve lesion but was not suitable to assess severity. Muscle MRI could support EMG in chronic and proximal neuropathy, which showed poor sensitivity in these patients. (orig.)

  18. Shear Stress-Normal Stress (Pressure) Ratio Decides Forming Callus in Patients with Diabetic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Takehara, Kimie; Ohashi, Yumiko; Suzuki, Ryo; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Callus is a risk factor, leading to severe diabetic foot ulcer; thus, prevention of callus formation is important. However, normal stress (pressure) and shear stress associated with callus have not been clarified. Additionally, as new valuables, a shear stress-normal stress (pressure) ratio (SPR) was examined. The purpose was to clarify the external force associated with callus formation in patients with diabetic neuropathy. Methods. The external force of the 1st, 2nd, and 5th metatarsal head (MTH) as callus predilection regions was measured. The SPR was calculated by dividing shear stress by normal stress (pressure), concretely, peak values (SPR-p) and time integral values (SPR-i). The optimal cut-off point was determined. Results. Callus formation region of the 1st and 2nd MTH had high SPR-i rather than noncallus formation region. The cut-off value of the 1st MTH was 0.60 and the 2nd MTH was 0.50. For the 5th MTH, variables pertaining to the external forces could not be determined to be indicators of callus formation because of low accuracy. Conclusions. The callus formation cut-off values of the 1st and 2nd MTH were clarified. In the future, it will be necessary to confirm the effect of using appropriate footwear and gait training on lowering SPR-i. PMID:28050567

  19. Shear Stress-Normal Stress (Pressure Ratio Decides Forming Callus in Patients with Diabetic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Amemiya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Callus is a risk factor, leading to severe diabetic foot ulcer; thus, prevention of callus formation is important. However, normal stress (pressure and shear stress associated with callus have not been clarified. Additionally, as new valuables, a shear stress-normal stress (pressure ratio (SPR was examined. The purpose was to clarify the external force associated with callus formation in patients with diabetic neuropathy. Methods. The external force of the 1st, 2nd, and 5th metatarsal head (MTH as callus predilection regions was measured. The SPR was calculated by dividing shear stress by normal stress (pressure, concretely, peak values (SPR-p and time integral values (SPR-i. The optimal cut-off point was determined. Results. Callus formation region of the 1st and 2nd MTH had high SPR-i rather than noncallus formation region. The cut-off value of the 1st MTH was 0.60 and the 2nd MTH was 0.50. For the 5th MTH, variables pertaining to the external forces could not be determined to be indicators of callus formation because of low accuracy. Conclusions. The callus formation cut-off values of the 1st and 2nd MTH were clarified. In the future, it will be necessary to confirm the effect of using appropriate footwear and gait training on lowering SPR-i.

  20. Paraneoplastic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Jean-Christophe; Camdessanché, Jean-Philippe

    2017-10-01

    To review recent advances in paraneoplastic neuropathies with emphasis on their definition, different forms and therapeutic development. A strict definition of definite paraneoplastic neuropathies is necessary to avoid confusion. With carcinoma, seronegative sensory neuronopathies and neuronopathies and anti-Hu and anti-CV2/Contactin Response Mediator Protein 5 antibodies are the most frequent. With lymphomas, most neuropathies occur with monoclonal gammopathy including AL amyloidosis, Polyneuropathy-Organomegaly-Endocrinopathy-M component-Skin changes (POEMS) syndrome, type I cryoglobulinemia and antimyelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) neuropathies and Waldenström's disease. Neuropathies improving with tumor treatment are occasional, occur with a variety of cancer and include motor neuron disease, chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy and nerve vasculitis. If antibodies toward intracellular antigens are well characterized, it is not the case for antibodies toward cell membrane proteins. Contactin-associated protein-2 antibodies occur with neuromyotonia and thymoma with the Morvan's syndrome in addition to Netrin 1 receptor antibodies but may not be responsible for peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. The treatment of AL amyloidosis, POEMS syndrome, anti-MAG neuropathy and cryoglobulinemia is now relatively well established. It is not the case with onconeural antibodies for which the rarity of the disorders and a short therapeutic window are limiting factors for the development of clinical trials. A strict definition of paraneoplastic neuropathies helps their identification and is necessary to allow an early diagnosis of the underlying tumor.

  1. Fibromyalgia and neuropathic pain - differences and similarities. A comparison of 3057 patients with diabetic painful neuropathy and fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with diabetic neuropathy (DPN) and fibromyalgia differ substantially in pathogenetic factors and the spatial distribution of the perceived pain. We questioned whether, despite these obvious differences, similar abnormal sensory complaints and pain qualities exist in both entities. We hypothesized that similar sensory symptoms might be associated with similar mechanisms of pain generation. The aims were (1) to compare epidemiological features and co-morbidities and (2) to identify similarities and differences of sensory symptoms in both entities. Methods The present multi-center study compares epidemiological data and sensory symptoms of a large cohort of 1434 fibromyalgia patients and 1623 patients with painful diabetic neuropathy. Data acquisition included standard demographic questions and self-report questionnaires (MOS sleep scale, PHQ-9, PainDETECT). To identify subgroups of patients with characteristic combinations of symptoms (sensory profiles) a cluster analysis was performed using all patients in both cohorts. Results Significant differences in co-morbidities (depression, sleep disturbance) were found between both disorders. Patients of both aetiologies chose very similar descriptors to characterize their sensory perceptions. Burning pain, prickling and touch-evoked allodynia were present in the same frequency. Five subgroups with distinct symptom profiles could be detected. Two of the subgroups were characteristic for fibromyalgia whereas one profile occurred predominantly in DPN patients. Two profiles were found frequently in patients of both entities (20-35%). Conclusions DPN and fibromyalgia patients experience very similar sensory phenomena. The combination of sensory symptoms - the sensory profile - is in most cases distinct and almost unique for each one of the two entities indicating aetiology-specific mechanisms of symptom generation. Beside the unique aetiology-specific sensory profiles an overlap of sensory profiles can be

  2. Plasma exchanges for severe acute neurological deterioration in patients with IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (anti-MAG) neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, M; Lozeron, P; Harel, S; Bengoufa, D; Vignon, M; Asli, B; Malphettes, M; Parquet, N; Brignier, A; Fermand, J P; Kubis, N; Arnulf, Bertrand

    2017-06-01

    Monoclonal IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) antibody-related peripheral neuropathy (anti-MAG neuropathy) is predominantly a demyelinating sensory neuropathy with ataxia and distal paresthesia. The clinical course of anti-MAG neuropathy is usually slowly progressive making difficult the identification of clear criteria to start a specific treatment. Although no consensus treatment is yet available, a rituximab-based regimen targeting the B-cell clone producing the monoclonal IgM may be proposed, alone or in combination with alkylating agents or purine analogs. However, in some rare cases, an acute and severe neurological deterioration can occur in few days leading to a rapid loss of autonomy. In these cases, a treatment rapidly removing the monoclonal IgM from the circulation might be useful before initiating a specific therapy. We report successful treatment with plasma exchanges (PE) in four patients presenting with acute neurological deterioration. PE allowed a dramatic and rapid neurological improvement in all patients. PE are safe and may be useful at the initial management of these cases of anti-MAG neuropathy.

  3. [Prevalence of urinary tract symptoms in women with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Rodríguez, Javier; Carbajal-Ramírez, Angélica; Meza-Vázquez, Héctor; Moreno-Palacios, Jorge; Serrano-Brambila, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the prevalence of urinary tract symptoms and the impact in the quality of life in women with diabetes, the association with DM and neuropathy evolution time and glycemic control. A cohort of women from the DiabetIMSS program was evaluated from January 2011 to 2013. The personal history, time of DM diagnosis, neuropathy, urinary symptoms, glycemic control and quality of life impact were noted. A total of 169 women were evaluated. The median age was 58 years (29-85) and DM main evolution time was 9 years (0.5-31). Urinary tract symptoms were present in 128 (75.7 %) patients. Stress and urge incontinence were predominantly present (45.3 and 40.6 % respectively), followed by obstructive and irritative symptoms (25 and 10.1 % respectively). The impact in the quality of life was mild-moderate in 91.1 % of the patients. At least one criteria for neuropathy was noted in 154 (91.1 %) patients. Neuropathy evolution time was longer in the symptomatic group (12 vs 4.8 months). Symptoms were mainly present in patients with more than one year of neuropathy; p urinary tract symptoms in diabetic women. The only associated risk factor was neuropathy. No significative association was found between the rest of the factors.

  4. Nerve conduction and antioxidant levels in experimentally diabetic rats: effects of streptozotocin dose and diabetes duration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Dam, P.S. van; Asbeck, B.S. van; Bravenboer, B.; Oirschot, J.F.L.M. van; Marx, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    Oxidative stress supposedly plays a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. We have studied whether a variation in the streptozotocin (STZ) dose or diabetes duration affects the outcome of measurements of oxidative damage in relation to nerve conduction. In experiment 1, we induced diabetes

  5. Sonographic and electrodiagnostic features of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginanneschi, Federica; Filippou, Georgios; Giannini, Fabio; Carluccio, Maria A; Adinolfi, Antonella; Frediani, Bruno; Dotti, Maria T; Rossi, Alessandro

    2012-12-01

    In hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), the increase in distal motor latencies (DMLs) is often out of proportion to the slowing of conduction velocities, but the pathophysiological mechanism is still unclear. We used a combined electrophysiological and ultrasonographic (US) approach to provide insight into this issue. Twelve HNPP subjects underwent extensive electrophysiological studies and US measurements of the cross-sectional area (CSA) of several peripheral nerves. US nerve enlargement was only observed in the carpal tunnel, Guyon's canal, the elbow and the fibular head. We did not observe US abnormalities at sites where nerve entrapment is uncommon. An increase in DMLs was observed regardless of US nerve enlargement. The increased nerve CSA only in common sites of entrapment likely reflected the well-documented nerve vulnerability to mechanical stress in HNPP. No morphometric changes were seen in the distal nerve segments where compression/entrapment is unlikely, despite the fact that the DMLs were increased. These data suggest that factors other than mechanical stress are responsible for the distal slowing of action potential propagation. We speculate that a mixture of mechanical insults and an axon-initiated process in the distal nerves underlies the distal slowing and/or conduction failure in HNPP. © 2012 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  6. The Impact of Diabetic Neuropathy on Balance and on the Risk of Falls in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Timar

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy (DN is a prevalent complication of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM with a major impact on the health of the affected patient. We hypothesized that mediated by the dysfunctionalities associated with DN's three major components: sensitive (lack of motion associated sensory, motor (impairments in movement coordination and autonomic (the presence of postural hypotension, the presence of DN may impair the balance in the affected patients. Our study's main aim is to evaluate the possible association between the presence and severity of DN and both the balance impairment and the risk of falls in patients with T2DM.In this cross-sectional study we enrolled, according to a consecutive-case population-based setting 198 patients with T2DM. The presence and severity of DN was evaluated using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument, a tool which allows both diagnosing and severity staging of DN. The balance impairment and the risk of falls were evaluated using four validated and standardized tools: Berg Balance Scale (BBS, Timed-up and Go test (TUG, Single Leg Stand test (SLS and Fall Efficacy Scale (FES-I.The presence of DN was associated with significant decreases in the BBS score (40.5 vs. 43.7 points; p<0.001 and SLS time (9.3 vs. 10.3 seconds; p = 0.003 respectively increases in TUG time (8.9 vs. 7.6 seconds; p = 0.002 and FES-I score (38 vs. 33 points; p = 0.034. The MNSI score was reverse and significantly correlated with both BBS score (Spearman's r = -0.479; p<0.001 and SLS time (Spearman's r = -0.169; p = 0.017. In the multivariate regression model, we observed that patient's age, DN severity and depression's symptoms acted as independent, significant predictors for the risk of falls in patients with T2DM.The presence of DN in patients with DM is associated with impaired balance and with a consecutively increase in the risk of falls.

  7. Limb Salvage After Failed Initial Operative Management of Bimalleolar Ankle Fractures in Diabetic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudreuil, Nicholas J; Fourman, Mitchell S; Wukich, Dane K

    2017-03-01

    Ankle fractures in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) can be difficult to manage, especially in the presence of peripheral neuropathy. In patients who fail initial operative management, attempts at limb salvage can be challenging, and no clear treatment algorithm exists. This study examined outcomes of different procedures performed for limb salvage in this population. This study retrospectively reviewed 17 patients with DM complicated by peripheral neuropathy who sustained a bimalleolar ankle fracture and failed initial operative management. Patients were treated with revision open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) (3/17), closed reduction external fixation (CREF) (8/17), or primary ankle joint fusion (3/17 tibiotalocalcaneal fusion with hindfoot nail [TTCN] and 3/17 with tibiotalar arthrodesis using plates and screws [TTA]). Median follow-up was 20 months. The overall rate of limb salvage was 82.3% (14/17). All patients who went on to amputation presented with infection and were treated initially with CREF (3/3). All patients who achieved successful limb salvage ended up with a clinically fused ankle joint (14/14); 9 underwent a primary or delayed formal fusion and 5 had a clinically fused ankle joint at study conclusion after undergoing revision ORIF or CREF with adjunctive procedures. This small study suggests that in this complicated group of patients it is difficult to achieve limb salvage with an end result of a functional ankle joint. CREF can be a viable option in cases where underlying infection or poor bone quality is present. Treatment with revision ORIF frequently requires supplementary external fixator or tibiotalar Steinman pin placement for additional stability. All patients who underwent revision ORIF ended up with clinically fused ankle joints at the end of the study period. Primary fusion procedures (TTA, TTCN) were associated with a high rate of limb salvage and a decreased number of operations. Level III, retrospective case series.

  8. Fisetin Imparts Neuroprotection in Experimental Diabetic Neuropathy by Modulating Nrf2 and NF-κB Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandireddy, Reddemma; Yerra, Veera Ganesh; Komirishetti, Prashanth; Areti, Aparna; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-08-01

    The current study is aimed to assess the therapeutic potential of fisetin, a phytoflavonoid in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced experimental diabetic neuropathy (DN) in rats. Fisetin was administered (5 and 10 mg/kg) for 2 weeks (7th and 8th week) post STZ administration. Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia were assessed by measuring tactile sensitivity to thermal and mechanical stimuli, respectively. Motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) was determined using power lab system and sciatic nerve blood flow (NBF) was determined using laser Doppler system. Nerve sections were processed for TUNEL assay and NF-κB, COX-2 immunohistochemical staining. Sciatic nerve homogenate was used for biochemical and Western blotting analysis. MNCV and sciatic NBF deficits associated with DN were ameliorated in fisetin administered rats. Fisetin treatment reduced the interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha in sciatic nerves of diabetic rats (p < 0.001). Protein expression studies have identified that the therapeutic benefit of fisetin might be through regulation of redox sensitive transcription factors such as nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). Our study provides an evidence for the therapeutic potential of fisetin in DN through simultaneous targeting of NF-κB and Nrf2.

  9. Hemodynamics in diabetic orthostatic hypotension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Parving, H H; Christensen, N J

    1981-01-01

    Hemodynamic variables (blood pressure, cardiac output, heart rate, plasma volume, splanchnic blood flow, and peripheral subcutaneous blood flow) and plasma concentrations of norepinephrine, epinephrine, and renin were measured in the supine position and after 30 min of quiet standing. This was done...... in normal subjects (n = 7) and in juvenile-onset diabetic patients without neuropathy (n = 8), with slight neuropathy (decreased beat-to-beat variation in heart rate during hyperventilation) (n = 8), and with severe neuropathy including orthostatic hypotension (n = 7). Blood pressure decreased precipitously...

  10. Sweat function in the diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markendeya Nirmala

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autonomic dysfunction, an early manifestation of diabetic neuropathy, presents with altered sweating patterns, leading to dryness and fissuring. We conducted a study to assess the sweat function in the diabetic foot and to determine the interrelation between the duration of diabetes, sensation, fissuring, and sweating. Methods: The sweat function was assessed in 30 diabetic patients, 28 of whom had fissuring of the feet, using Ninhydrin impregnated discs. Results: There was a significant association between fissuring and sensation, but not between the duration of diabetes and fissuring and between loss of sweating and fissuring. In 18 patients (60% there was impairment or absence of sweating in the presence of normal sensation. Conclusion: Although fissuring increases with long-standing diabetes and sweating is reduced in diabetic patients with fissures on the foot, the correlation between these entities was not statistically significant. Since 60% patients had altered sweating in the presence of normal sensations, the sweat test can be used as an early indicator of diabetic neuropathy.

  11. Hyperhomocysteinemia in bilateral anterior ischemic optic neuropathy after conventional coronary artery bypass graft: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niro, A; Sborgia, G; Sborgia, A; Alessio, G

    2018-01-17

    The incidence of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy after coronary artery bypass graft procedures ranges from 1.3 to 0.25%. The mechanisms of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy after cardiovascular procedures remain undefined but many systemic and related-to-surgery risk factors could underlie anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. In this case, we report a rare presentation of a bilateral anterior ischemic optic neuropathy after coronary artery bypass graft and speculate on the preoperative hyperhomocysteinemia as an independent risk factor for anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. A 56-year-old white man, a tobacco smoker with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease, underwent a conventional coronary artery bypass graft with extracorporeal circulation. In spite of ongoing anti-aggregation, antithrombotic, and vasodilator therapy, 10 days after the surgery he complained of severe bilateral visual loss. Funduscopy and fluorescein angiography revealed a bilateral anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. Analysis of preoperative laboratory tests revealed hyperhomocysteinemia. Hyperhomocysteinemia could increase the risk of ocular vascular damage and bilateral ocular involvement in patients who have undergone conventional coronary artery bypass graft.

  12. N-hexane neuropathy with vertigo and cold allodynia in a silk screen printer: A case study

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    Sunil Pradhan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available N-hexane neuropathy is an occupational disease caused by exposure to n-hexane, which is used as a solvent in silk screen printing. Here, we describe a 35-year-old man, a silk screen printer by profession, who presented with dizziness, distal swelling of both lower limbs for 10 months and tingling and burning sensation in both feet for 9.5 months along with cold allodynia. The patient had normal results of a motor and sensory system examination, apart from an impaired temperature sense. Nerve conduction tests showed a conduction block in bilateral common peroneal nerves and absence of conduction in bilateral sural nerves. These symptoms resolved when further exposure to n-hexane was ceased but cold allodynia remained. Thus, cold allodynia and impaired temperature sense can be a manifestation of n-hexane neuropathy. Hence, abnormalities on nerve conduction studies can be detected in n-hexane neuropathy patients, even before clinical examination detects any such abnormalities. In the case of the patients presenting with sensory motor neuropathy, history of occupational exposure to n-hexane becomes important, as the sooner the disease is detected, the better the chances of recovery.

  13. Alterations of Na,K-ATPase isoenzymes in the rat diabetic neuropathy: protective effect of dietary supplementation with n-3 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbi, A; Maixent, J M; Barbey, O; Jamme, I; Pierlovisi, M; Coste, T; Pieroni, G; Nouvelot, A; Vague, P; Raccah, D

    1998-08-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a degenerative complication of diabetes accompanied by an alteration of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and Na,K-ATPase activity. The present study in rats was designed first to measure diabetes-induced abnormalities in Na,K-ATPase activity, isoenzyme expression, fatty acid content in sciatic nerve membranes, and NCV and second to assess the preventive ability of a fish oil-rich diet (rich in n-3 fatty acids) on these abnormalities. Diabetes was induced by intravenous streptozotocin injection. Diabetic animals (D) and nondiabetic control animals (C) were fed the standard rat chow either without supplementation or supplemented with either fish oil (DM, CM) or olive oil (DO, CO) at a daily dose of 0.5 g/kg by gavage during 8 weeks. Analysis of the fatty acid composition of purified sciatic nerve membranes from diabetic animals showed a decreased incorporation of C16:1(n-7) fatty acids and arachidonic acids. Fish oil supplementation changed the fatty acid content of sciatic nerve membranes, decreasing C18:2(n-6) fatty acids and preventing the decreases of arachidonic acids and C18:1(n-9) fatty acids. Protein expression of Na,K-ATPase alpha subunits, Na,K-ATPase activity, and ouabain affinity were assayed in purified sciatic nerve membranes from CO, DO, and DM. Na,K-ATPase activity was significantly lower in sciatic nerve membranes of diabetic rats and significantly restored in diabetic animals that received fish oil supplementation. Diabetes induced a specific decrease of alpha1- and alpha3-isoform activity and protein expression in sciatic nerve membranes. Fish oil supplementation restored partial activity and expression to varying degrees depending on the isoenzyme. These effects were associated with a significant beneficial effect on NCV. This study indicates that fish oil has beneficial effects on diabetes-induced alterations in sciatic nerve Na,K-ATPase activity and function.

  14. Diabetic foot complications among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica: prevalence and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, T S; Tulloch-Reid, M K; Younger, N O M; Wright-Pascoe, R A; Boyne, M S; McFarlane, S R; Francis, D K; Wilks, R J

    2013-03-01

    To estimate the prevalence of diabetic foot complications among patients at a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica and identify factors associated with foot complications. A stratified random sample of 188 patients were interviewed and examined between 2009 and 2010. Trained nurses obtained demographic and clinical data, measured anthropometrics and performedfoot examinations including inspection for amputations, ulcers or infection and assessment of pain, vibration and pressure perception. Participants included 143 women and 45 men (mean age 56years; mean diabetes duration 16 years). The prevalence of amputations was 8.5% (95% CI 4.5, 12.5%) and was higher among men (22.2%) compared to women (4.2%, p foot infections was 4.3% and 3.7%, respectively. Overall, 12% ofpatients had at least one of these foot complications. Foot complications were more prevalent among men, patients with high blood pressure (BP > or = 130/80 mmHg) or peripheral neuropathy In multivariable logistic regression models, factors associated with foot complications were: neuropathy (OR 9.3 [95% CI 2.8, 30.3]), high BP (OR 7.9 [1.3, 49.7]) and diabetes duration (OR 1.32 [1.02, 1.72]). Approximately one of every eight patients in this specialist clinic had a major foot complication. Associated factors were neuropathy, high blood pressure and longer duration of diabetes.

  15. Dynamic cerebral autoregulatory capacity is affected early in Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Y.S.; Immink, R.V.; Stok, W.J.

    2008-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of endothelial dysfunction and microvascular complications with impaired autoregulation of tissue perfusion. Both microvascular disease and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy may affect cerebral autoregulation. In the present study, we tested...... the hypothesis that, in the absence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy, cerebral autoregulation is impaired in subjects with DM+ (Type 2 diabetes with microvascular complications) but intact in subjects with DM- (Type 2 diabetes without microvascular complications). Dynamic cerebral autoregulation...... and the steady-state cerebrovascular response to postural change were studied in subjects with DM+ and DM-, in the absence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy, and in CTRL (healthy control) subjects. The relationship between spontaneous changes in MCA V(mean) (middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity...

  16. Autonomic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk of autonomic neuropathy. Other diseases. Amyloidosis, porphyria, hypothyroidism and cancer (usually due to side effects from treatment) may also increase the risk of autonomic neuropathy. ...

  17. Effect of omega-3 supplementation on neuropathy in type 1 diabetes: A 12-month pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Evan J H; Perkins, Bruce A; Lovblom, Leif E; Bazinet, Richard P; Wolever, Thomas M S; Bril, Vera

    2017-06-13

    To test the hypothesis that 12 months of seal oil omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) supplementation will stop the known progression of diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSP) in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Individuals with T1DM and evidence of DSP as determined by a Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score ≥1 were recruited to participate in a single-arm, open-label trial of seal oil ω-3 PUFA supplementation (10 mL·d -1 ; 750 mg eicosapentaenoic acid, 560 mg docosapentaenoic acid, and 1,020 mg docosahexaenoic acid) for 1 year. The primary outcome was the 1-year change in corneal nerve fiber length (CNFL) measured by in vivo corneal confocal microscopy, with sensory and nerve conduction measures as secondary outcomes. Forty participants (53% female), aged 48 ± 14 years, body mass index 28.1 ± 5.8 with diabetes duration of 27 ± 18 years, were enrolled. At baseline, 23 participants had clinical DSP and 17 did not. Baseline CNFL was 8.3 ± 2.9 mm/mm 2 and increased 29% to 10.1 ± 3.7 mm/mm 2 ( p = 0.002) after 12 months of supplementation. There was no change in nerve conduction or sensory function. Twelve months of ω-3 supplementation was associated with increase in CNFL in T1DM. NCT02034266. This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with T1DM and evidence of DSP, 12 months of seal oil omega-3 supplementation increases CNFL. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. TREATMENT OF NEUROGENIC ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE I DIABETES

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    D. G. Kurbatov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The urogenital form of autonomic diabetic polyneuropathy is a specific lesion of the autonomic nervous system in diabetic patients. It is main pathogenetic cause of sexual disorders in this category of patients. The most common violation of sexual function in patients with diabetes is erectile dysfunction (ED.Objective. Diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy with ED caused by type I diabetes and assessment of the effectiveness phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (PDE5-I in its treatment.Materials and methods. The study included 40 patients with ED due to type 1 diabetes at the age of 25.7 ± 6.1. The duration of type 1 diabetes was 18 ± 9.7 years. All 40 patients, initially and after the course of therapy with the PDE5-Is, underwent a neuromyographic study with the determination of the excitation propagation rate for nervus peroneus and nervus pudendus, endothelial function evaluation on the EndoPat ™ device, and the questionnaire on the international index of erectile function (IIEF-5 scale.Results. In 30 (75.0% men, endothelial dysfunction was determined according to EndoPat ™. In the range of the gray zone of reactive hyperemia index (RHI was detected in 7 men (16.6%. Normal function of the endothelium was revealed in 3 cases (8.4%. In the control study, the following data were found: endothelial dysfunction was detected in 6 patients (16.6% according to Endo Pat ™, in 14 patients (33.4% in the range of gray zone of RHI, endothelial function was normalized in 20 patients (50.0%. According to the neuromyographic study, initially all patients had diabetic neuropathy in both the distal and urogenital forms. After therapy, significant positive dynamics were shown. Based on the results of the questionnaire on the scale of IIEF-5, initially all patients showed ED of varying severity. With the control questionnaire after therapy, there was an improvement in erectile function.Conclusions. Given the high incidence of endothelial

  19. Treatment strategies for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: potential role of exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Y. Wonders

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN is a common, dose-limiting effect of cancer therapy that often has negative implications on a patient’s quality of life. The pain associated with CIPN has long been recognized as one of the most difficult types of pain to treat. Historically, much effort has been made to explore pharmacological therapies aimed at reducing symptoms of CIPN. While many of these agents provide a modest relief in the symptoms of peripheral neuropathy, many have been shown to have additional negative side effects for cancer patients. Therefore, the authors suggest exercise rehabilitation as one lifestyle modification that may positively impact the lives of patients with CIPN. To our knowledge, there are currently no published clinical trials examining the role of exercise in preserving neurological function following chemotherapy. However, investigations using low-to-moderate intensity exercise as an intervention in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy and hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies have produced promising results. Given that cancer patients appear to tolerate exercise, it seems plausible that exercise rehabilitation could be used as an effective strategy to minimize CIPN-induced detriments to quality of life.

  20. Peripheral neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy; Chronic pain - peripheral neuropathy ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 107. Shy ME. Peripheral neuropathies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  1. HIV-related neuropathy: current perspectives

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    Schütz SG

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sonja G Schütz, Jessica Robinson-Papp Department of Neurology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is one of the most common neurologic complications of HIV, possibly affecting as many as 50% of all individuals infected with HIV. Two potentially neurotoxic mechanisms have been proposed to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HIV DSP: neurotoxicity resulting from the virus and its products; as well as adverse neurotoxic effects of medications used in the treatment of HIV. Clinically, HIV DSP is characterized by a combination of signs and symptoms that include decreased deep tendon reflexes at the ankles and decreased sensation in the distal extremities as well as paresthesias, dysesthesias, and pain in a symmetric stocking–glove distribution. These symptoms are generally static or slowly progressive over time, and depending on the severity, may interfere significantly with the patient's daily activities. In addition to the clinical picture, nerve conduction studies and skin biopsies are often pursued to support the diagnosis of HIV DSP. Anticonvulsants, antidepressants, topical agents, and nonspecific analgesics may help relieve neuropathic pain. Specifically, gabapentin, lamotrigine, pregabalin, amitriptyline, duloxetine, and high-dose topical capsaicin patches have been used in research and clinical practice. Further research is needed to elucidate the pathogenesis of HIV DSP, thus facilitating the development of novel treatment strategies. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical findings, diagnosis, and management of DSP in the setting of HIV. Keywords: neuropathy, human immunodeficiency virus, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, AIDS, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, DSP, pain

  2. Esophageal radionuclide in transit in patient with Diabetes Mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruzzo, R.; Sirandoni, G.; Olea, E.

    1985-01-01

    Nineteen unselected patients with Diabetes Mellitus (D.M.), were studied by Esophageal Radionuclide Transit (ERT), with positive or negative gastrointestinal symptoms, and/or peripheral neuropathy. Esophageal Manometry (EM) was performed to 10 of them. 6/10 symptomatic patients had abnormal ERT, 5 of which had dysphagia, 6/9 asymptomatic patients also had an altered ERT. 83% of those patients with peripheral neuropathy, had altered ERT. We found a 90% diagnostic correlation between ERT and EM. Our findings confirm that abnormal esophageal motor function, often subclinical, is present in most of the long term diabetic patients. This can be highly correlated with the presence of peripheral neuropathy and can be easily evaluated through a non-invasive method like TER. (Author)

  3. Gastrodin Inhibits Allodynia and Hyperalgesia in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy Rats by Decreasing Excitability of Nociceptive Primary Sensory Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xin; Han, Wen-Juan; Wang, Wen-Ting; Luo, Ceng; Hu, San-Jue

    2012-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus and adversely affects the patients’ quality of life. Evidence has accumulated that PDN is associated with hyperexcitability of peripheral nociceptive primary sensory neurons. However, the precise cellular mechanism underlying PDN remains elusive. This may result in the lacking of effective therapies for the treatment of PDN. The phenolic glucoside, gastrodin, which is a main constituent of the Chinese herbal medicine Gastrodia elata Blume, has been widely used as an anticonvulsant, sedative, and analgesic since ancient times. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying its analgesic actions are not well understood. By utilizing a combination of behavioral surveys and electrophysiological recordings, the present study investigated the role of gastrodin in an experimental rat model of STZ-induced PDN and to further explore the underlying cellular mechanisms. Intraperitoneal administration of gastrodin effectively attenuated both the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia induced by STZ injection. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were obtained from nociceptive, capsaicin-sensitive small diameter neurons of the intact dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Recordings from diabetic rats revealed that the abnormal hyperexcitability of neurons was greatly abolished by application of GAS. To determine which currents were involved in the antinociceptive action of gastrodin, we examined the effects of gastrodin on transient sodium currents (I NaT) and potassium currents in diabetic small DRG neurons. Diabetes caused a prominent enhancement of I NaT and a decrease of potassium currents, especially slowly inactivating potassium currents (I AS); these effects were completely reversed by GAS in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, changes in activation and inactivation kinetics of I NaT and total potassium current as well as I AS currents induced by STZ were normalized by GAS. This study provides a

  4. Acquired neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozeron, Pierre; Trocello, Jean-Marc; Kubis, Nathalie

    2013-09-01

    Acquired neuropathies represent most of the neuropathies encountered in clinical practice. Hundreds of causes have been identified even though up to 41% of patients are still classified as idiopathic (Rajabally and Shah in J Neurol 258:1431-1436, 1). Routine evaluation relies on comprehensive medical history taking, clinical examination, nerve conduction studies and laboratory tests. Other investigations such as nerve biopsy or nerve or muscle imaging are performed in specific settings. This review focuses on recent advances in acquired neuropathies.

  5. Determinants of incident distal sensorimotor polyneuropathy in a cohort with screen-detected type 2 diabetes followed for 13 years, the ADDITION Denmark study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Signe Toft; Witte, Daniel; Dalsgaard, Else-Marie

    .001 in a Students t-test). Conclusion This study demonstrates a fairly low cumulative incidence of DPN defined by the MNSI in people with screen-detected T2DM. Our study provides evidence that macrovascular disease, obesity and higher levels of methylglyoxal present at the time of diagnosis of T2DM are risk factors......Background and aims Distal sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DPN) is the most common complication of diabetes. Cross-sectional studies indicate that determinants beyond hyperglycemia, such as obesity, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease are important, particularly in type 2 diabetes (T2DM...

  6. Subcutaneous blood flow during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia: studies in juvenile diabetics with and without autonomic neuropathy and in normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S; Sestoft, L

    1982-08-01

    Subcutaneous blood flow was measured preceding insulin-induced hypoglycaemia, at the onset of hypoglycaemic symptoms and 2 h later in juvenile diabetics with and without autonomic neuropathy and in normal males. In all groups subcutaneous blood flow decreased at the onset of hypoglycaemic symptoms compared with pre-hypoglycaemic flow. Two hours after onset of hypoglycaemic symptoms, subcutaneous blood flow was still significantly decreased compared with pre-hypoglycaemic flow. In normal subjects local nerve blockade had no effect on blood flow changes during hypoglycaemia, whereas local alpha-receptor blockade abolished the vasoconstrictor response. We suggest that circulating catecholamines stimulating vascular alpha-receptors are probably responsible for flow reduction in the subcutaneous tissue during hypoglycaemia.

  7. The anti-diabetic drug metformin protects against chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Liang Mao-Ying

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN characterized by loss of sensory sensitivity and pain in hands and feet is the major dose-limiting toxicity of many chemotherapeutics. At present, there are no FDA-approved treatments for CIPN. The anti-diabetic drug metformin is the most widely used prescription drug in the world and improves glycemic control in diabetes patients. There is some evidence that metformin enhances the efficacy of cancer treatment. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that metformin protects against chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain and sensory deficits. Mice were treated with cisplatin together with metformin or saline. Cisplatin induced increased sensitivity to mechanical stimulation (mechanical allodynia as measured using the von Frey test. Co-administration of metformin almost completely prevented the cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Co-administration of metformin also prevented paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia. The capacity of the mice to detect an adhesive patch on their hind paw was used as a novel indicator of chemotherapy-induced sensory deficits. Co-administration of metformin prevented the cisplatin-induced increase in latency to detect the adhesive patch indicating that metformin prevents sensory deficits as well. Moreover, metformin prevented the reduction in density of intra-epidermal nerve fibers (IENFs in the paw that develops as a result of cisplatin treatment. We conclude that metformin protects against pain and loss of tactile function in a mouse model of CIPN. The finding that metformin reduces loss of peripheral nerve endings indicates that mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of metformin includes a neuroprotective activity. Because metformin is widely used for treatment of type II diabetes, has a broad safety profile, and is currently being tested as an adjuvant drug in cancer treatment, clinical translation of these findings could be rapidly achieved.

  8. Evaluation of Peripheral Neuropathy of Unknown Origin in an Outpatient Foot and Ankle Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sandra E; Chu, Jennifer; McCormick, Jeremy J; Johnson, Jeffrey E

    2015-09-01

    The foot and ankle surgeon can see peripheral neuropathy in the treatment of foot and ankle conditions. The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate the demographics and presenting complaints of patients diagnosed with idiopathic peripheral neuropathy during an examination by a foot and ankle surgeon and (2) to identify the type and frequency of subsequent diagnosis of medical causes of neuropathy. This was a retrospective study of patients diagnosed with idiopathic peripheral neuropathy in our practice between January 1997 and December 2008. Ninety-five patients were identified, and demographic data, presenting complaints, and medical comorbidities were extracted from the medical record. Examination findings of decreased sensation to Semmes Weinstein 5.07 monofilament testing were documented, and electromyogram and nerve conduction study results were reviewed when available. Laboratory values were noted, as were neurologic evaluations performed to diagnose medical conditions associated with peripheral neuropathy. The most common presentation was foot pain, in 36 patients (38%). Ninety-one patients had Semmes Weinstein 5.07 monofilament testing, with loss of protective sensation reported in 75 of the 91 tested (82%). Only 30 of the 95 patients had electromyogram and nerve conduction study resul