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Sample records for dissolving delta-phase plutonium

  1. Microstructural analysis of the {delta} to {alpha}' phase transformation in plutonium alloys using X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platteau, C; Ravat, B; Texier, G; Oudot, B; Delaunay, F, E-mail: brice.ravat@cea.fr [CEA Valduc 21120 Is sur Tille (France)

    2010-03-15

    The partial martensitic {delta}{yields}{alpha}' transformation in plutonium alloys is sensitive to chemical composition, sample thermal history, as well as crystalline defects. The present work investigates the {delta}-Pu phase microstructure before and after the martensitic transformation {delta}{yields}{delta}+{alpha}'. More precisely, microstructural modifications of the host {delta}-phase, resulting from the stress induced by a cell volume difference of 19% between the {delta} and {alpha}'-phases, were analysed. Microstructural information about crystallite size and microstrain of a highly homogenized Pu-Ga alloy was extracted from x-ray diffraction patterns using a three dimension crystallite size and microstrain model. This is available in Rietveld refinement software and consists in anisotropic broadening analysis of diffraction peaks. Crystallite size doesn't significantly change with the phase transformation contrary to microstrain that is multiplied, on average, by five. Furthermore, internal normal and shear microstress are multiplied, respectively, by 2 and 13 when {alpha}'-phase appears. Last, dislocation densities, calculated from crystallite size and microstrain, are compared to TEM results available in the literature.

  2. Electronic structure, phase transitions and diffusive properties of elemental plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setty, Arun; Cooper, B. R.

    2003-03-01

    We present a SIC-LDA-LMTO based study of the electronic structure of the delta, alpha and gamma phases of plutonium, and also of the alpha and gamma phases of elemental cerium. We find excellent agreement with the experimental densities and magnetic properties [1]. Furthermore, detailed studies of the computational densities of states for delta plutonium, and comparison with the experimental photoemission spectrum [2], provide evidence for the existence of an unusual fluctuating valence state. Results regarding the vacancy formation and self-diffusion in delta plutonium will be presented. Furthermore, a study of interface diffusion between plutonium and steel (technologically relevant in the storage of spent fuel) or other technologically relevant alloys will be included. Preliminary results regarding gallium stabilization of delta plutonium, and of plutonium alloys will be presented. [1] M. Dormeval et al., private communication (2001). [2] A. J. Arko, J. J. Joyce, L. Morales, J. Wills, and J. Lashley et. al., Phys. Rev. B, 62, 1773 (2000). [3] B. R. Cooper et al, Phil. Mag. B 79, 683 (1999); B.R. Cooper, Los Alamos Science 26, 106 (2000)); B.R. Cooper, A.K. Setty and D.L.Price, to be published.

  3. X-ray diffraction study of delta-stabilized plutonium alloys under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, Ph, E-mail: philippe.faure@cea.f [CEA, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Genestier, C. [CEA, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2010-02-15

    Previous extensive studies of the delta -> alpha'-phase transformation induced by temperature and/or by pressure in delta-stabilized plutonium alloys indicate strong dependence on parameters such as solute type, solute distribution, chemical impurities, kinetics, thermodynamic path.... The present paper reports results obtained on two Pu-2.3at.%Ga binary alloys differing by solute homogenization treatment and studied under pressure by in situ by X-ray diffraction in diamond anvil cells. The gamma'-phase appears as an intermediate phase during the delta -> alpha'-phase transformation. In cored samples, unexpanded alpha'-phase is formed at the beginning of the transformation, from domains with low solute content, and expanded alpha'-phase subsequently forms (from domains with higher solute content) as the transformation progresses with the pressure increase.

  4. Criticality safety analysis for plutonium dissolver using silver mediated electrolytic oxidation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, Miki; Sugikawa, Susumu; Nakamura, Kazuhito; Egashira, Tetsurou

    1998-08-01

    Design and construction of a plutonium dissolver using silver mediated electrolytic oxidation method are promoted in NUCEF. Criticality safety analysis for the plutonium dissolver is described in this report. The electrolytic plutonium dissolver consists of connection pipes and three pots for MOX powder supply, circulation and electrolysis. The criticality control for the dissolver is made by geometrically safe shape with mass limitation. Monte Carlo code KENO-IV using MGCL-137 library based on ENDF/B-IV was used for the criticality safety analysis for the plutonium dissolver. Considering the required size for construction and criticality safety, diameter of pot and distance between two pots were determined. On this condition, the criticality safety analysis for the plutonium dissolver with connection pipes was carried out. As the result of the criticality safety analysis, an effective neutron multiplication factor keff of 0.91 was obtained and the criticality safety of the plutonium dissolver was confirmed on the basis of criteria of ≤0.95. (author)

  5. Delta phase plutonium and its alloys with III B elements: a microscopic study; Etude du plutonium en phase {delta} et de ses alliages avec les elements de la colonne IIIB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchet, J

    2001-07-01

    The plutonium belongs to the actinides where it occupies a crucial place. In the actinide series the competition between the itinerant and local character of the f-electrons is responsible of its unique properties. The series can be divided into two sub-series: the light ({sub 90}Th-{sub 94}Pu) and the heavy ({sub 95}Am and beyond) actinides with very different characteristics. The volume behavior of the light actinides is very similar to the one found for the transitions metals with a parabolic decrease of the volume as a function of atomic number. This trend can be explained by the itinerant character of the 5 f electrons which participate to the chemical bonding, and thus the light actinides are considered to form a 5 f transition series. The density functional theory in the local-density approximation (LDA) gives a good description of the ground state of the light actinides in agreement with experiment and a simple Friedel model can explain the parabolic decrease of the volumes. As for heavy actinides, the pattern is reversed: 5 f electrons are localized. This picture places plutonium as the link between the two series, at the transition from delocalized to localized states. The density functional theory within the local density approximation is a very crude approximation for these systems where the on-site interaction between f electrons is strong enough to overcome the kinetic energy. Equilibrium properties for the {delta}-phase of Pu have been calculated. Taking into account strong electron correlations in the 5 f shell, we show how the equilibrium volume and the bulk modulus are improved in comparison to previous results using the local density approximation (LDA) or the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). In addition, an augmentation of the orbital moment is observed due to the respect of Hund's rules, reducing the total magnetic moment. The stability of the {delta}-phase is explored and for the first time a positive value for the tetragonal shear

  6. Delta phase plutonium and its alloys with III B elements: a microscopic study; Etude du plutonium en phase {delta} et de ses alliages avec les elements de la colonne IIIB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchet, J

    2001-07-01

    The plutonium belongs to the actinides where it occupies a crucial place. In the actinide series the competition between the itinerant and local character of the f-electrons is responsible of its unique properties. The series can be divided into two sub-series: the light ({sub 90}Th-{sub 94}Pu) and the heavy ({sub 95}Am and beyond) actinides with very different characteristics. The volume behavior of the light actinides is very similar to the one found for the transitions metals with a parabolic decrease of the volume as a function of atomic number. This trend can be explained by the itinerant character of the 5 f electrons which participate to the chemical bonding, and thus the light actinides are considered to form a 5 f transition series. The density functional theory in the local-density approximation (LDA) gives a good description of the ground state of the light actinides in agreement with experiment and a simple Friedel model can explain the parabolic decrease of the volumes. As for heavy actinides, the pattern is reversed: 5 f electrons are localized. This picture places plutonium as the link between the two series, at the transition from delocalized to localized states. The density functional theory within the local density approximation is a very crude approximation for these systems where the on-site interaction between f electrons is strong enough to overcome the kinetic energy. Equilibrium properties for the {delta}-phase of Pu have been calculated. Taking into account strong electron correlations in the 5 f shell, we show how the equilibrium volume and the bulk modulus are improved in comparison to previous results using the local density approximation (LDA) or the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). In addition, an augmentation of the orbital moment is observed due to the respect of Hund's rules, reducing the total magnetic moment. The stability of the {delta}-phase is explored and for the first time a positive value for the tetragonal

  7. Impurity diffusion of cobalt in plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charissoux, Christian; Calais, Daniel.

    1975-01-01

    The sectioning method for investigation of the impurity diffusion of 60 Co in the fcc and bcc phases of plutonium gives the following results: 344-426 deg C: D=1.2x10 -2 exp(-12700/RT)cm 2 /s in delta Pu(fcc); 484-621 deg C: D=1.4x10 -3 exp(-9900/RT)cm 2 /s in epsilon Pu(bcc). Cobalt is a fast diffuser in plutonium; the diffusion coefficient being unaffected by phase changes delta'→delta; delta'→epsilon, the diffusion mechanism is probably dissociative in both phases, the solute becoming interstitial by: solute (substitution) reversible solute (interstitial) + vacancy [fr

  8. Electronic structure of Pu-Ce(-Ga) and Pu-Am(-Ga) alloys, stabilized in the {delta} phase; Structure electronique d'alliages Pu-Ce(-Ga) et Pu-Am(-Ga) stabilises en phase {delta}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormeval, M

    2001-09-01

    The behaviour of {delta}-plutonium, stable between 319 and 451 deg C, exhibits numerous singularities which are still a mystery for both physicists and metallurgists. This is due to its complex electronic structure, and in particular to the 5f electrons, which are at the edge between localization and delocalization. The stability domain of the {delta} phase can be extended down to room temperature by alloying with so called 'deltagen atoms' such as gallium (Ga), aluminum (A1), cerium (Ce) or americium (Am). The present work deals, one the one hand, with the influence of cerium and americium solutes regarding the localization of the 5f electrons of {delta}-plutonium, in binary Pu-Ce and Pu-Am alloys. On the other hand, the effect of two different deltagen solutes, simultaneously present, on the stability of the {delta} phase has been studied in ternary Pu-Am-Ga and Pu-Ce-Ga alloys. The electronic structure being strongly related to the crystalline organization, characterization methods such as X-Ray diffraction and EXAFS measurements were used together with electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility experiments. These showed that the roles of cerium and americium, supposed to be similar at the beginning of this investigation, are actually very different. Moreover, the additive effect of cerium and gallium, and, americium and gallium, has been demonstrated. Studying plutonium alloys, which are radioactive, also means following their evolution in time. The characteristics of the alloys have then been followed which allowed to detect, in Pu-Ce(-Ga) alloys, a destabilization of the {delta} phase and, to observe, in Pu-Am(-Ga) alloys, the influence of self-irradiation defects on the magnetic response. (author)

  9. Electronic structure of Pu-Ce(-Ga) and Pu-Am(-Ga) alloys, stabilized in the {delta} phase; Structure electronique d'alliages Pu-Ce(-Ga) et Pu-Am(-Ga) stabilises en phase {delta}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormeval, M

    2001-09-01

    The behaviour of {delta}-plutonium, stable between 319 and 451 deg C, exhibits numerous singularities which are still a mystery for both physicists and metallurgists. This is due to its complex electronic structure, and in particular to the 5f electrons, which are at the edge between localization and delocalization. The stability domain of the {delta} phase can be extended down to room temperature by alloying with so called 'deltagen atoms' such as gallium (Ga), aluminum (A1), cerium (Ce) or americium (Am). The present work deals, one the one hand, with the influence of cerium and americium solutes regarding the localization of the 5f electrons of {delta}-plutonium, in binary Pu-Ce and Pu-Am alloys. On the other hand, the effect of two different deltagen solutes, simultaneously present, on the stability of the {delta} phase has been studied in ternary Pu-Am-Ga and Pu-Ce-Ga alloys. The electronic structure being strongly related to the crystalline organization, characterization methods such as X-Ray diffraction and EXAFS measurements were used together with electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility experiments. These showed that the roles of cerium and americium, supposed to be similar at the beginning of this investigation, are actually very different. Moreover, the additive effect of cerium and gallium, and, americium and gallium, has been demonstrated. Studying plutonium alloys, which are radioactive, also means following their evolution in time. The characteristics of the alloys have then been followed which allowed to detect, in Pu-Ce(-Ga) alloys, a destabilization of the {delta} phase and, to observe, in Pu-Am(-Ga) alloys, the influence of self-irradiation defects on the magnetic response. (author)

  10. An intercomparison experiment on isotope dilution thermal ionisation mass spectrometry using plutonium-239 spike for the determination of plutonium concentration in dissolver solution of irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.; Shah, P.M.; Saxena, M.K.; Jain, H.C.; Gurba, P.B.; Babbar, R.K.; Udagatti, S.V.; Moorthy, A.D.; Singh, R.K.; Bajpai, D.D.

    1996-01-01

    Determination of plutonium concentration in the dissolver solution of irradiated fuel is one of the key measurements in the nuclear fuel cycle. This report presents the results of an intercomparison experiment performed between Fuel Chemistry Division (FCD) at BARC and PREFRE, Tarapur for determining plutonium concentration in dissolver solution of irradiated fuel using 239 Pu spike in isotope dilution thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS). The 239 Pu spike method was previously established at FCD as viable alternative to the imported enriched 242 Pu or 244 Pu; the spike used internationally for plutonium concentration determination by IDMS in dissolver solution of irradiated fuel. Precision and accuracy achievable for determining plutonium concentration are compared under the laboratory and the plant conditions using 239 Pu spike in IDMS. For this purpose, two different dissolver solutions with 240 Pu/ 239 Pu atom ratios of about 0.3 and 0.07 corresponding, respectively, to high and low burn-up fuels, were used. The results of the intercomparison experiment demonstrate that there is no difference in the precision values obtained under the laboratory and the plant conditions; with mean precision values of better than 0.2%. Further, the plutonium concentration values determined by the two laboratories agreed within 0.3%. This exercise, therefore, demonstrates that ID-TIMS method using 239 Pu spike can be used for determining plutonium concentration in dissolver solution of irradiated fuel, under the plant conditions. 7 refs., 8 tabs

  11. Influence of dissolved organic carbon on the sorption of plutonium to natural sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.M.; Karttunen, J.O.; Orlandini, K.A.; Larsen, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    One prominent aspect of the environmental behavior of plutonium is a tendency for strong, though not complete, association with soil and sediments. The nature of this association is not well understood, and the water quality parameters which may affect it have not been identified. It is assumed that adsorption is dependent upon the chemical species present (oxidation state and complex ion associations) and that the uncomplexed form of Pu(IV) is the one that is most highly sorbed. In certain oligotrophic waters the dissolved plutonium is primarily in the oxidized form (presumably as Pu(V)), a form that is weakly sorbed. This could account for its solubility. In all water, however, some of the dissolved plutonium is present in the reduced form (presumably as Pu(IV)). The apparent solubility of this reduced form, as measured by a sediment concentration factor, varies markedly among the lakes. The concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) have now been measured in the waters from a number of lakes and a general dependence of the sediment concentration factor (K/sub D/) for Pu(IV) upon DOC has become evident. In order to study the nature of this plutonium-organic complex in more detail several experiments were conducted in which the sediment concentration factor was measured as a function of DOC concentration

  12. Simultaneous determination of uranium and plutonium in dissolver solution of irradiated fuel, using ID-TIMS. IRP-11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Raju; Sasi Bhushan, K.; Govindan, R.; Alamelu, D.; Khodade, P.S.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2007-01-01

    A simple sample preparation and simultaneous analysis method to determine uranium and plutonium from dissolver solution, employing the technique of Isotope Dilution Mass spectrometry has been demonstrated. The method used, co-elusion of Uranium and Plutonium from anion exchanger column after initial elution of major part of uranium in 1:5 HNO 3 in order to reduce the initial U/Pu ratio from 1000 to about 100-200 in the co-eluted fraction. Due to the availability of variable multi-collector system, different Faraday cups were adjusted to collect the different ion intensities corresponding to the different masses, during the simultaneous analysis of Uranium and Plutonium, loaded on Re double filament assembly. 233 U and PR grade Plutonium were used as spikes to determine Uranium and Plutonium from dissolver solution of irradiated fuel from research reactor. The possibility of getting the isotopic composition of uranium from the simultaneous analysis of co-eluted purified fraction of U and Pu from spiked aliquots is also explained. (author)

  13. Observation of allotropic transformations of plutonium with a hot stage microscope; Etude des transformations allotropiques du plutonium au microscopic a platine chauffante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mars, J; Spftiet, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    A hot stage microscope designed for the examination of plutonium and its alloys is described. This apparatus was used to study the {alpha} {r_reversible} {beta} and {delta} {r_reversible} {epsilon} allotropic transformations of pure or {beta} and {delta} stabilised plutonium. The {alpha} {yields} {beta} transformation is typically a nucleation and growth process. Some particularities caused by the internal stresses due to the volume change during this transformation are examined. The kinetics has been studied as a function of these stresses and a temperature dependent activation energy for nucleation has been deduced. The {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation presents a memory effect which implies an orientation relationship between the two phases. This fact is probably caused by the stresses created during the {beta} {yields} {alpha} transition. The {beta} {r_reversible} {gamma} and {delta} {r_reversible} {epsilon} transformations are also diffusion governed processes. (authors) [French] On decrit un microscope a platine chauffante permettant l'examen du plutonium et de ses alliages. Cet appareil a servi a l'etude des transformations {alpha} {r_reversible} {gamma} et {delta} {r_reversible} {epsilon} du plutonium pur ou stabilise en phase {beta} et {delta}. La transformation {alpha} {yields} {beta} est une transformation typique par germination et croissance; elle presente des caracteristiques bien particulieres qui sont dues aux contraintes internes qui prennent naissance au changement de volume a la transformation; la cinetique a ete etudiee en fonction de ces contraintes, et on en a deduit une energie d'activation pour la germination variable avec la temperature. La transformation {beta} {yields} {alpha} presente un effet de memoire qui suppose une relation d'orientation entre les deux phases; ce phenomene semble lie comme auparavant aux contraintes creees par le passage {beta} {yields} {alpha}. Les transformations {beta} {r_reversible} {gamma} et {delta} {r

  14. Critical and subcritical parameters of the system simulating plutonium metal dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilev, Yury Yu.; Ryazanov, Boris G.; Sviridov, Victor I.; Mozhayeva, Lubov I.

    2003-01-01

    Dissolution of plutonium metal was simulated using the Monte Carlo computer code to calculate criticality safety limits for the process. Calculations were made for the constant masses of plutonium charged to the dissolving vessel considering distribution of plutonium in metal and solution phases. Critical parameters and limits were calculated as a function of dissolving vessel volume and plutonium metal mass. 240 Pu content was assumed to be from 0% to 10% (mass). Critical parameters were evaluated for the system with a water reflector. Results of this paper may be used in the designing process equipment for plutonium metal dissolution. (author)

  15. Phonon dispersion curves determination in (delta)-phase Pu-Ga alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, J; Clatterbuck, D; Occelli, F; Farber, D; Schwartz, A; Wall, M; Boro, C; Krisch, M; Beraud, A; Chiang, T; Xu, R; Hong, H; Zschack, P; Tamura, N

    2006-02-07

    We have designed and successfully employed a novel microbeam on large grain sample concept to conduct high resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (HRIXS) experiments to map the full phonon dispersion curves of an fcc {delta}-phase Pu-Ga alloy. This approach obviates experimental difficulties with conventional inelastic neutron scattering due to the high absorption cross section of the common {sup 239}Pu isotope and the non-availability of large (mm size) single crystal materials for Pu and its alloys. A classical Born von-Karman force constant model was used to model the experimental results, and no less than 4th nearest neighbor interactions had to be included to account for the observation. Several unusual features including, a large elastic anisotropy, a small shear elastic modulus, (C{sub 11}-C{sub 12})/2, a Kohn-like anomaly in the T{sub 1}[011] branch, and a pronounced softening of the T[111] branch towards the L point in the Brillouin are found. These features may be related to the phase transitions of plutonium and to strong coupling between the crystal structure and the 5f valence instabilities. Our results represent the first full phonon dispersions ever obtained for any Pu-bearing material, thus ending a 40-year quest for this fundamental data. The phonon data also provide a critical test for theoretical treatments of highly correlated 5f electron systems as exemplified by recent dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) calculations for {delta}-plutonium. We also conducted thermal diffuse scattering experiments to study the T(111) dispersion at low temperatures with an attempt to gain insight into bending of the T(111) branch in relationship to the {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} transformation.

  16. Phase transformation in delta-Pu alloys at low temperature: An in situ microstructural characterization using X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravat, B., E-mail: brice.ravat@cea.f [CEA, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Platteau, C.; Texier, G.; Oudot, B.; Delaunay, F. [CEA, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2009-09-15

    In order to investigate the martensitic transformation, an isothermal hold at -130 deg. C for 48 h was performed on a highly homogenized PuGa alloy. The modifications of the microstructure were characterized in situ thanks to a specific tool. This device was developed at the CEA-Valduc to analyze the crystalline structure of plutonium alloys as a function of temperature and more especially at low temperature using X-ray diffraction. The analysis of the recorded diffraction patterns highlighted that the martensitic transformation for this alloy is the result of a direct delta -> alpha' + delta phase transformation. Moreover, a significant Bragg's peaks broadening corresponding to the delta-phase was observed. A microstructural analysis was made to characterize anisotropic microstrain resulting from the stress induced by the unit cell volume difference between the delta and alpha' phases. The amount of alpha'-phase evolved was analyzed within the framework of the Avrami theory in order to characterize the nucleation process. The results suggested that the growth mechanism corresponded to a general mechanism where the nucleation sites were in the delta-grain edges and the alpha'-phase had a plate-like morphology.

  17. Deformation characteristics of {delta} phase in the delta-processed Inconel 718 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H.Y., E-mail: haiyanzhang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, S.H., E-mail: shzhang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Cheng, M. [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Z.X. [Beijing Institute of Aeronautica1 Materials, Beijing 100095 (China)

    2010-01-15

    The hot working characteristics of {delta} phase in the delta-processed Inconel 718 alloy during isothermal compression deformation at temperature of 950 deg. C and strain rate of 0.005 s{sup -1}, were studied by using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and quantitative X-ray diffraction technique. The results showed that the dissolution of plate-like {delta} phase and the precipitation of spherical {delta} phase particles coexisted during the deformation, and the content of {delta} phase decreased from 7.05 wt.% to 5.14 wt.%. As a result of deformation breakage and dissolution breakage, the plate-like {delta} phase was spheroidized and transferred to spherical {delta} phase particles. In the center with largest strain, the plate-like {delta} phase disappeared and spherical {delta} phase appeared in the interior of grains and grain boundaries.

  18. Delta phase plutonium and its alloys with III B elements: a microscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchet, J.

    2001-01-01

    The plutonium belongs to the actinides where it occupies a crucial place. In the actinide series the competition between the itinerant and local character of the f-electrons is responsible of its unique properties. The series can be divided into two sub-series: the light ( 90 Th- 94 Pu) and the heavy ( 95 Am and beyond) actinides with very different characteristics. The volume behavior of the light actinides is very similar to the one found for the transitions metals with a parabolic decrease of the volume as a function of atomic number. This trend can be explained by the itinerant character of the 5 f electrons which participate to the chemical bonding, and thus the light actinides are considered to form a 5 f transition series. The density functional theory in the local-density approximation (LDA) gives a good description of the ground state of the light actinides in agreement with experiment and a simple Friedel model can explain the parabolic decrease of the volumes. As for heavy actinides, the pattern is reversed: 5 f electrons are localized. This picture places plutonium as the link between the two series, at the transition from delocalized to localized states. The density functional theory within the local density approximation is a very crude approximation for these systems where the on-site interaction between f electrons is strong enough to overcome the kinetic energy. Equilibrium properties for the δ-phase of Pu have been calculated. Taking into account strong electron correlations in the 5 f shell, we show how the equilibrium volume and the bulk modulus are improved in comparison to previous results using the local density approximation (LDA) or the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). In addition, an augmentation of the orbital moment is observed due to the respect of Hund's rules, reducing the total magnetic moment. The stability of the δ-phase is explored and for the first time a positive value for the tetragonal shear constant is found. The

  19. Plutonium disposition study phase 1b final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report provides the results of the Westinghouse activities performed as part of the Plutonium Disposition Study Phase 1b. These activities, which took place from May 16, 1993 to September 15, 1993, build upon the work completed in Phase 1a, which concluded on May 15, 1993. In Phase 1a, three Plutonium Disposal Reactor (PDR) options were developed for the disposal of excess weapons grade plutonium from returned and dismantled nuclear weapons. This report documents the results of several tasks that were performed to further knowledge in specific areas leading up to Phase 2 of the PDR Study. The Westinghouse activities for Phase 1b are summarized as follows: (1) resolved technical issues concerning reactor physics including equilibrium cycle calculations, use of gadolinium, moderator temperature coefficient, and others as documented in Section 2.0; (2) analyzed large Westinghouse commercial plants for plutonium disposal; (3) reactor safety issues including the steam line break were resolved, and are included in Section 2.0; (4) several tasks related to the PDR Fuel Cycle were examined; (5) cost and deployment options were examined to determine optimal configuration for both plutonium disposal and tritium production; (6) response to questions from DOE and National Academy of Scientists (NAS) reviewers concerning the PDR Phase 1a report are included in Appendix A

  20. Plutonium estimation in the process solutions and oxide dissolved audit samplers by potentiometry using memo titrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumaraguru, K.; Shukla, Y.D.; Vijayan, K.; Ramamoorthy, N.; Jambunathan, U.; Kapoor, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    Potentiometric method is employed by using memotitrator coupled with combined electrode for the estimation of plutonium. The estimations are carried out on the process samples and the acid dissolved samples for auditing, in the concentration range of 5 g/l to 20 g/l. The chemical procedure is: i)oxidising plutonium to higher oxidation state by silver oxide, ii)reducing the same by adding excess ferrous, and iii)titrating potassium dichromate against the unreacted ferrous. The plutonium content is computed from ferrous consumed in the reaction. The average percentage error of the method is +/-0.27. The values obtained are in close agreement with those obtained by coulometry. (author)

  1. Diffusion in the uranium - plutonium system and self-diffusion of plutonium in epsilon phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuy, M.

    1967-07-01

    A survey of uranium-plutonium phase diagram leads to confirm anglo-saxon results about the plutonium solubility in α uranium (15 per cent at 565 C) and the uranium one in ζ phase (74 per cent at 565 C). Interdiffusion coefficients, for concentration lower than 15 per cent had been determined in a temperature range from 410 C to 640 C. They vary between 0.2 and 6 10 12 cm 2 s -1 , and the activation energy between 13 and 20 kcal/mole. Grain boundary, diffusion of plutonium in a uranium had been pointed out by micrography, X-ray microanalysis and α autoradiography. Self-diffusion of plutonium in ε phase (bcc) obeys Arrhenius law: D = 2. 10 -2 exp -(18500)/RT. But this activation energy does not follow empirical laws generally accepted for other metals. It has analogies with 'anomalous' bcc metals (βZr, βTi, βHf, U γ ). (author) [fr

  2. Resin bead-thermal ionization mass spectrometry for determination of plutonium concentration in irradiated fuel dissolver solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Sumana; Shah, R.V.; Aggarwal, S.K.; Pandey, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Determination of isotopic composition (IC) and concentration of plutonium (Pu) is necessary at various stages of nuclear fuel cycle which involves analysis of complex matrices like dissolver solution of irradiated fuel, nuclear waste stream etc. Mass spectrometry, e.g. thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are commonly used for determination of IC and concentration of plutonium. However, to circumvent matrix interferences, efficient separation as well as preconcentration of Pu is required prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Purification steps employing ion-exchange resins are widely used for the separation of Pu from dissolver solution or from mixture of other actinides e.g. U, Am. However, an alternative way is to selectively preconcentrate Pu on a resin bead, followed by direct loading of the bead on the filament of thermal ionization mass spectrometer

  3. Some of the properties of plutonium and the aluminium-plutonium alloy; Quelques proprietes du plutonium et de l'alliage aluminium-plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramson, R; Boucher, R; Fabre, R; Monti, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    1- Study of the physical properties of plutonium. 1) Study of the allotropy of plutonium. a) Thermal analysis: the apparatus used and the measurement technique are briefly described. The transition point temperatures and the corresponding heats of transformation have been determined. Finally, the results of the particular study of certain transition points are given. b) Dilatometry. The dilatometric analysis of the phase changes of plutonium has been carried out by means of the Chevenard dilatometer with photographic recording. The testing conditions (heating and cooling speeds, isotherm plateaux) have been varied in order to determine accurately the characteristics of each transition, particularly the {delta} {yields} {gamma} transition on cooling. 2) Micrography of plutonium. For the accurate preparation of metallographic samples the electrolytic polishing must be rapid, which implies a mechanical polishing of excellent quality. Information is given on new attacking reagents which show the structure of the metal very clearly. 2- Study of aluminium-plutonium alloys. Comparative study of Al-Pu and Al-U alloys rich in aluminium. a) Thermal analysis. The liquids and fusion temperatures of the eutectic Al-XAl{sub 4}, have been accurately determined. From the measurement of the heats of fusion the exact composition of the eutectic alloy has been determined. b) Thermal treatments. The eutectic coalescence kinetics have been studied by a micrographic method and by following the evolution of hardness. The results obtained show that the phenomenon is more rapid in Al-Pu alloys than in Al-U alloys. c) Micrographic study of the transition XAl{sub 3} {yields} XAl{sub 4}. The peritectic reaction XAl{sub 3} + liq. {yields} XAl{sub 4} has been suppressed by quenching. The transformation of the XAl{sub 3} phase to the solid phase has been studied as well as the effect of small additions of silicon on the kinetics of this reaction. (author) [French] 1- Etude des proprietes

  4. Diffusion in the uranium - plutonium system and self-diffusion of plutonium in epsilon phase; Diffusion dans le systeme uranium-plutonium et autodiffusion du plutonium epsilon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    A survey of uranium-plutonium phase diagram leads to confirm anglo-saxon results about the plutonium solubility in {alpha} uranium (15 per cent at 565 C) and the uranium one in {zeta} phase (74 per cent at 565 C). Interdiffusion coefficients, for concentration lower than 15 per cent had been determined in a temperature range from 410 C to 640 C. They vary between 0.2 and 6 10{sup 12} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}, and the activation energy between 13 and 20 kcal/mole. Grain boundary, diffusion of plutonium in a uranium had been pointed out by micrography, X-ray microanalysis and {alpha} autoradiography. Self-diffusion of plutonium in {epsilon} phase (bcc) obeys Arrhenius law: D = 2. 10{sup -2} exp -(18500)/RT. But this activation energy does not follow empirical laws generally accepted for other metals. It has analogies with 'anomalous' bcc metals ({beta}Zr, {beta}Ti, {beta}Hf, U{sub {gamma}}). (author) [French] Une etude du diagramme d'equilibre uranium-plutonium conduit a confirmer les resultats anglo-saxons relatifs a la solubilite du plutonium dans l'uranium {alpha} (15 pour cent a 565 C) et de l'uranium dans la phase {zeta} (74 pour cent a 565 C). Les coefficients de diffusion chimique, pour des concentrations inferieures a 15 pour cent ont ete determines a des temperatures comprises entre 410 et 640 C. Ils se situent entre 0.2 et 6. 10{sup 12} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. L'energie d'activation varie entre 13 et 20 kcal/mole. La diffusion intergranulaire du plutonium dans l'uranium a a ete mise en evidence par micrographie, microanalyse X et autoradiographie {alpha}. L' autodiffusion du plutonium {beta} cubique centree obeit a la loi d'Arrhenius D = 2. 10{sup -2} exp - (18500)/RT. Son energie d'activation n'obeit pas aux lois empiriques generalement admises pour les autres metaux. Elle possede des analogies avec les cubiques centres ''anormaux'' (Zr{beta}, Ti{beta}, Hf{beta}, U{gamma}). (auteur)

  5. Study of plutonium and its alloys with III B elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, Gregory

    2003-12-01

    The objective of this research thesis is to understand phenomena which intervene in the delta phase stabilisation of plutonium alloys, and to build phase diagrams for PuAl, PuGa, and PuIn. After a presentation of some properties of plutonium and of its compounds, the author presents the adopted approach: the 'ab initio' approach to the fundamental state based on the density functional theory (DFT). Then, a numerical method used within the framework of the DFT is developed, and results obtained by using the developed code are presented for the different studied materials (Al, Ga, In, Pu). A gradient correction is applied to the alloys by using the Generalised Gradient Approximation (GGA) with spin polarisation. It allows the determination of the formation energy of compounds. Hybridisation effects between plutonium and delta-generating elements (Al, Ga, In) are assessed. A statistic approach (cluster variation method, CVM) is used to assess the influence of the chemical order at short distance on the stability of the fcc solid solution, and to obtain theoretical binary alloy diagrams

  6. Dissolved and colloidal trace elements in the Mississippi River delta outflow after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Moo-Joon; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Shiller, Alan M.

    2012-07-01

    The Mississippi River delta outflow region is periodically disturbed by tropical weather systems including major hurricanes, which can terminate seasonal bottom water hypoxia and cause the resuspension of shelf bottom sediments which could result in the injection of trace elements into the water column. In the summer of 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita passed over the Louisiana Shelf within a month of each other. Three weeks after Rita, we collected water samples in the Mississippi River delta outflow, examining the distributions of trace elements to study the effect of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. We observed limited stratification on the shelf and bottom waters that were no longer hypoxic. This resulted, for instance, in bottom water dissolved Mn being lower than is typically observed during hypoxia, but with concentrations still compatible with Mn-O2 trends previously reported. Interestingly, for no element were we able to identify an obvious effect of sediment resuspension on its distribution. In general, elemental distributions were compatible with previous observations in the Mississippi outflow system. Co and Re, which have not been reported for this system previously, showed behavior consistent with other systems: input for Co likely from desorption and conservative mixing for Re. For Cs, an element for which there is little information regarding its estuarine behavior, conservative mixing was also observed. Our filtration method, which allowed us to distinguish the dissolved (<0.02 μm) from colloidal (0.02-0.45 μm) phase, revealed significant colloidal fractions for Fe and Zn, only. For Fe, the colloidal phase was the dominant fraction and was rapidly removed at low salinity. Dissolved Fe, in contrast, persisted out to mid-salinities, being removed in a similar fashion to nitrate. This ability to distinguish the smaller Fe (likely dominantly organically complexed) from larger colloidal suspensates may be useful in better interpreting the bioavailablity

  7. Crystallographic study and self irradiation damage on plutonium at low temperature; Etude cristallographique et effets de l'auto-irradiation sur le plutonium a basse temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solente, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-05-01

    We have studied the variation of the parameters of {alpha} plutonium and aluminium stabilised {delta} alloys at low temperature, in order to verify the existence of an antiferromagnetic transition at low temperature. The effects of {alpha} particles on the length of a polycrystal of {alpha} plutonium at 4,2 deg. K are also presented at 18 deg. K a plutonium shows no crystallographic change from its structure at room temperature. The thermal expansion coefficients along the 3 axis seem to be positive at this temperature. Therefore a magnetic contribution on thermal expansion coefficients must be small. A dilatation anomaly of {delta}Pu has been observed at 100 deg. K, together with an anomaly of the diffraction lines intensity. No sur-structure line has been observed at 20 deg. K. The length of {alpha} plutonium Increases with time at a rate of about 5 x 10{sup -6} per hour when held in liquid helium. This effect is attributed to the creation of Frenkel pairs. (author) [French] On presente une etude cristallographique a basse temperature du plutonium {alpha} et stabilise {delta} par des additions d'aluminium en vue de verifier l'existence d'une transformation antiferromagnetique a basse temperature. L'effet des particules {alpha} a 4,2 deg. K sur la longueur d'un polycristal de plutonium {alpha} a egalement ete etudie. Il a ete determine que le plutonium {alpha} ne mange pas de phase allotropique Jusqu'a 18 deg. K, les coefficients de dilatation des trois axes de la maille semblent rester positifs. Une eventuelle contribution magnetique sur les coefficients de dilatation devrait donc etre faible. Une legere anomalie de dilatation de Pu {delta} a ete observee a 100 deg. K ainsi qu'une anomalie d'intensite des raies de diffraction. Aucune raie de surstructure n'a ete observee. Le plutonium {alpha} s'allonge lorsqu'il est plonge dans l'helium liquide d'un taux de l'ordre de 5 x 10{sup -6}/heure. Cet effet a ete attribuee a la creation de paires de Frenkel. (auteur)

  8. PRODUCTION OF PLUTONIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, W.L.; Moore, R.H.

    1961-01-17

    A process is given for producing plutonium metal by the reduction of plutonium chloride, dissolved in alkali metal chloride plus or minus aluminum chloride, with magnesium or a magnesium-aluminum alloy at between 700 and 800 deg C and separating the plutonium or plutonium-aluminum alloy formed from the salt.

  9. Phase transformation in {delta} Pu alloys at low temperature: In situ dilatometric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Texier, G; Oudot, B; Platteau, C; Ravat, B; Delaunay, F, E-mail: gwenael.texier@cea.fr, E-mail: benoit.oudot@cea.fr [CEA, DAM, Valduc, Is sur Tille 21120 (France)

    2010-03-15

    The purpose of this work is to precisely study the martensitic transformation in a plutonium-gallium alloy. Thus, the thermodynamics and kinetics of the {delta}{yields}{alpha}'+{delta} phase transformation in a Pu-Ga alloy were studied under isochronal and isothermal conditions. The activation energy of the {delta}{yields}{alpha}'+{delta} phase transformation at a constant cooling rate (0.5 K.min{sup -1}) was determined by using Kissinger and Ozawa models. The average value of the activation energy was found to be at -56 kJ.mol{sup -1}. Dilatometry measurement was also used to trace 'in situ' the entire transformation for several temperatures. The kinetics of the {delta}{yields}{alpha}'+{delta} transformation were modelled under isothermal conditions in the theoretical frame of the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) theory. It is proposed that the transformation consists of three stages. The {alpha}' transformation begins with a nucleation of pre-existing embryos. Then, both nucleation and rapid growth of {alpha}' occurs simultaneously and finally, the plates width expend. Apparent activation energies for nucleation and growth transformation were determined from the temperature dependence of the constant K at respectively -34 kJ.mol{sup -1} and -60 kJ.mol{sup -1}. Adler et al. [1] investigated also the thermodynamics and the kinetics of the martensitic transformation in Pu alloys. These nucleation energies were found by modelling of heterogeneous martensitic nucleation via strain interaction with observed superdislocation-like nucleation sites in PuGa alloys. The values obtain by this model was very close to those we find. Investigations in steels alloys indicate that these energies are of the same order for nucleation near dislocation. Then, it could be indicating a strong relationship between these dislocations and martensitic nucleation sites.

  10. Pu-239+240 and Pu-238 distribution among dissolved, colloidal and particulate phases in the Rhone River (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyrolle, F.; Goutelard, F.; Calmet, D.

    1999-01-01

    The determination of plutonium distribution among dissolved, colloidal and particulate phases was investigated in the Rhone River at Arles, 50 km upstream the river mouth, in May 1997. The flow rate of the river reached its average annual value (i.e., 1800 m 3 s -1 ). 1100 l of fresh water were collected, a part (900 l) was prefiltered on 1200 and 450 nm, then ultrafiltered by sequential ultrafiltration

  11. Plutonium immobilization program - Cold pour Phase 1 test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, L.

    2000-01-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project will disposition excess weapons grade plutonium. It uses the can-in-canister approach that involves placing plutonium-ceramic pucks in sealed cans that are then placed into Defense Waste Processing Facility canisters. These canisters are subsequently filled with high-level radioactive waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it unattractive for reuse. A cold (non-radioactive) glass pour program was performed to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. This paper describes the Phase 1 scoping test results

  12. Plutonium Immobilization Program - Cold pour Phase 1 test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, L.

    2000-01-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project will disposition excess weapons grade plutonium. It uses the can-in-canister approach that involves placing plutonium-ceramic pucks in sealed cans that are then placed into Defense Waste Processing Facility canisters. These canisters are subsequently filled with high-level radioactive waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it unattractive for reuse. A cold (non-radioactive) glass pour program was performed to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. This paper describes the Phase 1 scoping test results

  13. Oxidation-state distribution of plutonium in surface and subsurface waters at Thule, northwest Greenland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, C.A.; Leon Vintro, L.; Mitchell, P.I.; Dahlgaard, H.

    2000-01-01

    The speciation of plutonium in Arctic waters sampled on the northwest Greenland shelf in August 1997 is discussed in this paper. Specifically, we report the results of analyses carried out on seawater sampled (a) close to the Thule air base where, in 1968, a US military aircraft carrying four nuclear weapons crashed on sea ice, releasing kilogram quantities of plutonium to the snow pack and underlying seabed sediments, and (b) at a reference station (Upernavik) located ∼400 km to the south. The data show that most of the plutonium in the dissolved phase at Thule is in the form of Pu(V, VI) (mean: 68±6%; n=6), with little if any distinction apparent between surface and bottom waters. Further, the oxidation state distribution at stations close to the accident site is similar to that measured at Upernavik, remote from this site. It is also similar to the distribution observed in shelf waters at mid-latitudes, suggesting that the underlying processes controlling plutonium speciation are insensitive to temperature over the range 0-25 deg. C. Measurements using tangential-flow ultrafiltration indicate that virtually all of the plutonium (including the fraction in a reduced chemical form) is present as fully dissolved species. Most of this plutonium would seem to be of weapons fallout origin, as the mean 238 Pu/ 239,240 Pu activity ratio in the water column (dissolved phase) at Thule (0.06±0.02; n=10) is similar to the global fallout ratio at this latitude (∼0.04). Thus, there is little evidence of weapons-grade plutonium in the water column at Thule at the present time

  14. Acoustic emission during low temperature phase transformations in plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khejpl, K.; Karpenter, S.

    1988-01-01

    To study the nature of phase transformations in plutonium and plutonium-gallium alloys (0.3 and 0.57% Ga) the measurement of acoustic emission is conducted. The presence of acoustic emission testifies to martensitic character of transformation, related to sharp local changes in the volume, which cause elastic waves. It is detected that during α reversible β transformations in non-alloyed plutonium acoustic emission is absent, and that testifies to nonmartensitic nature of the transformations. σ reversible α transformation in plutonium-gallium alloys is accompanied by the appearance of acoustic emission, i.e. it is of martensitic origin

  15. Controls of {delta}{sup 34}S and {delta}{sup 18}O in dissolved sulphate: Learning from a detailed survey in the Llobregat River (Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otero, Neus [Departament Cristal . lografia, Mineralogia i Diposits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, s/n, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Grup d' Hidrogeoquimica, Departament de Geologia Ambiental, Institut de Ciencies de la Terra ' Jaume Almera' , CSIC, Lluis Sole i Sabaris, s/n, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: notero@ub.edu; Soler, Albert; Canals, Angels [Departament Cristal . lografia, Mineralogia i Diposits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, s/n, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-05-15

    The S and O isotopic composition of dissolved SO{sub 4}, used as a tracer for SO{sub 4} sources, was applied to the water of the Llobregat River system (NE Spain). The survey was carried out at 30 sites where surface water was sampled on a monthly basis over a period of 2a. The concentration of dissolved SO{sub 4} varied from 20 to 1575 mg L{sup -1}. Sulphur isotopic compositions clustered in two populations: one - 93% of the samples - had positive values with a mode of +9 per mille ; the other had negative values and a mode of -5 per mille . Data for {delta}{sup 18}O{sub SO{sub 4}} showed a mean value of +11 per mille , with no bi-modal distribution, though lower values of {delta}{sup 18}O corresponded to samples with negative {delta}{sup 34}S. These values can not be explained solely by the contribution of bedrock SO{sub 4} sources: that is, sulphide oxidation and the weathering of outcrops of sulphates, though numerous chemical sediments exist in the basin. Even in a river with a high concentration of natural sources of dissolved SO{sub 4}, such as the Llobregat River, the {delta}{sup 34}S values suggest that dissolved SO{sub 4} is controlled by a complex mix of both natural and anthropogenic sources. The main anthropogenic sources in this basin are fertilizers, sewage, potash mine effluent and power plant emissions. Detailed river water sampling, together with the chemical and isotopic characterisation of the main anthropogenic inputs, allowed determination of the influence of redox processes, as well as identification of the contribution of natural and anthropogenic SO{sub 4} sources and detection of spatial variations and seasonal changes among these sources. For instance, in the Llobregat River the input of fertilisers is well marked seasonally. Minimum values of {delta}{sup 34}S are reported during fertilization periods - from January to March - indicating a higher contribution of this source. The dual isotope approach, {delta}{sup 34}S and {delta}{sup 18}O

  16. Solubility of plutonium dioxide aerosols, in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, G.J.; Kanapilly, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Solubility of plutonium aerosols is an important parameter in establishing risk estimates for industrial workers who might accidentally inhale these materials and in evaluating environmental health impacts associated with Pu. In vitro solubility of industrial plutonium aerosols in a simulated lung fluid is compared to similar studies with ultrafine aerosols from laser ignition of delta phase plutonium metal and laboratory-produced spherical particles of 238 PuO 2 and 239 PuO 2 . Although relatively insoluble, industrial plutonium-mixed oxide aerosols were much more soluble than laboratory-produced plutonium dioxide particles. Chain agglomerate aerosols from laser ignition of metallic Pu indicated in vitro dissolution half-times of 10 and 50 days for activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 0.7 and 2.3 μm, respectively. Plutonium-containing mixed oxide aerosols indicated dissolution half-times of 40 to 500 days for particles formed by industrial powder comminution and blending. Centerless grinding of fuel pellets yielded plutonium-containing aerosols with dissolution half-times of 1200 to 8000 days. All mixed oxide particles were in the size range 1.0 μm to 2.5 μm AMAD

  17. Development of isotope dilution gamma-ray spectrometry for plutonium analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, T.K.; Parker, J.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Kuno, Y.; Sato, S.; Kurosawa, A.; Akiyama, T. (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    We are studying the feasibility of determining the plutonium concentration and isotopic distribution of highly radioactive, spent-fuel dissolver solutions by employing high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The study involves gamma-ray plutonium isotopic analysis for both dissolver and spiked dissolver solution samples, after plutonium is eluted through an ion-exchange column and absorbed in a small resin bead bag. The spike is well characterized, dry plutonium containing {approximately}98% of {sup 239}Pu. By using measured isotopic information, the concentration of elemental plutonium in the dissolver solution can be determined. Both the plutonium concentration and the isotopic composition of the dissolver solution obtained from this study agree well with values obtained by traditional isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). Because it is rapid, easy to operate and maintain, and costs less, this new technique could be an alternative method to IDMS for input accountability and verification measurements in reprocessing plants. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Probing phonons in plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Joe; Krisch, M.; Farber, D.; Occelli, F.; Schwartz, A.; Chiang, T.C.; Wall, M.; Boro, C.; Xu, Ruqing

    2010-01-01

    Plutonium (Pu) is well known to have complex and unique physico-chemical properties. Notably, the pure metal exhibits six solid-state phase transformations with large volume expansions and contractions along the way to the liquid state: α → β → γ → (delta) → (delta)(prime) → (var e psilon) → liquid. Unalloyed Pu melts at a relatively low temperature ∼640 C to yield a higher density liquid than that of the solid from which it melts, (Figure 1). Detailed understanding of the properties of plutonium and plutonium-based alloys is critical for the safe handling, utilization, and long-term storage of these important, but highly toxic materials. However, both technical and and safety issues have made experimental observations extremely difficult. Phonon dispersion curves (PDCs) are key experimenta l data to the understanding of the basic properties of Pu materials such as: force constants, sound velocities, elastic constants, thermodynamics, phase stability, electron-phonon coupling, structural relaxation, etc. However, phonon dispersion curves (PDCs) in plutonium (Pu) and its alloys have defied measurement for the past few decades since the discovery of this element in 1941. This is due to a combination of the high thermal-neutron absorption cross section of plutonium and the inability to grow the large single crystals (with dimensions of a few millimeters) necessary for inelastic neutron scattering. Theoretical simulations of the Pu PDC continue to be hampered by the lack of suitable inter -atomic potentials. Thus, until recently the PDCs for Pu and its alloys have remained unknown experimentally and theoretically. The experimental limitations have recently been overcome by using a tightly focused undulator x-ray micro-beam scattered from single -grain domains in polycrystalline specimens. This experimental approach has been applied successfully to map the complete PDCs of an fcc d-Pu-Ga alloy using the high resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (HRIXS

  19. Dissolved and colloidal trace elements in the Mississippi River Delta outflow after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Moo-Joon; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Shiller, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    The Mississippi River delta outflow region is periodically disturbed by tropical weather systems including major hurricanes, which can terminate seasonal bottom water hypoxia and cause the resuspension of shelf bottom sediments which could result in the injection of trace elements into the water column. In the summer of 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita passed over the Louisiana Shelf within a month of each other. Three weeks after Rita, we collected water samples in the Mississippi River delta outflow, examining the distributions of trace elements to study the effect of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. We observed limited stratification on the shelf and bottom waters that were no longer hypoxic. This resulted, for instance, in bottom water dissolved Mn being lower than is typically observed during hypoxia, but with concentrations still compatible with Mn–O2 trends previously reported. Interestingly, for no element were we able to identify an obvious effect of sediment resuspension on its distribution. In general, elemental distributions were compatible with previous observations in the Mississippi outflow system. Co and Re, which have not been reported for this system previously, showed behavior consistent with other systems: input for Co likely from desorption and conservative mixing for Re. For Cs, an element for which there is little information regarding its estuarine behavior, conservative mixing was also observed. Our filtration method, which allowed us to distinguish the dissolved (<0.02 μm) from colloidal (0.02–0.45 μm) phase, revealed significant colloidal fractions for Fe and Zn, only. For Fe, the colloidal phase was the dominant fraction and was rapidly removed at low salinity. Dissolved Fe, in contrast, persisted out to mid-salinities, being removed in a similar fashion to nitrate. This ability to distinguish the smaller Fe (likely dominantly organically complexed) from larger colloidal suspensates may be useful in better interpreting the

  20. Uranium/plutonium and uranium/neptunium separation by the Purex process using hydroxyurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhaowu; He Jianyu; Zhang Zefu; Zhang Yu; Zhu Jianmin; Zhen Weifang

    2004-01-01

    Hydroxyurea dissolved in nitric acid can strip plutonium and neptunium from tri-butyl phosphate efficiently and has little influence on the uranium distribution between the two phases. Simulating the 1B contactor of the Purex process by hydroxyurea with nitric acid solution as a stripping agent, the separation factors of uranium/plutonium and uranium/neptunium can reach values as high as 4.7 x 10 4 and 260, respectively. This indicates that hydroxyurea is a promising salt free agent for uranium/plutonium and uranium/neptunium separations. (author)

  1. A rapid method of dosing plutonium in radioactive effluents; Methode de dosage rapide du plutonium dans les effluents radioactifs (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheidhauer, J; Messainguiral, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Production de Plutonium, Marcoule (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The plutonium is first separated by a lanthanum fluoride precipitation. The precipitated fluorides are dissolved in normal nitric acid solution in the presence of aluminium nitrate. The plutonium transformed to the tetravalent state is then extracted with thenoyltrifluoroacetone and returned to the aqueous phase with 10 N nitric acid. After evaporation on a watch glass the residue is calcined on a Meker burner and counted using a counting system fitted with a zinc sulphide scintillator. When necessary, the calcium is eliminated at the beginning of the dosage by a fluoride precipitation, the plutonium being oxidised to the valency IV. (authors) [French] Le plutonium est d'abord separe par entrainement au fluorure de lanthane. Le precipite des fluorures est remis en solution en milieu acide nitrique normal, en presence de nitrate d'aluminium. Le plutonium amene a la valence IV est alors extrait par la thenoyltrifluoroacetone et remis en phase aqueuse dans l'acide nitrique 10 N. Apres evaporation sur verre de montre, le residu est calcine sur bec Meker et compte sur un ensemble de comptage equipe d'un scintillateur au sulfure de zinc. Lorsque cela est necessaire, le calcium est elimine, au debut du dosage, par precipitation du fluorure, le plutonium etant oxyde a la valence VI. (auteurs)

  2. Modified titrimetric determination of plutonium using photometric end-point detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baughman, W.J.; Dahlby, J.W.

    1980-04-01

    A method used at LASL for the accurate and precise assay of plutonium metal was modified for the measurement of plutonium in plutonium oxides, nitrate solutions, and in other samples containing large quantities of plutonium in oxidized states higher than +3. In this modified method, the plutonium oxide or other sample is dissolved using the sealed-reflux dissolution method or other appropriate methods. Weighed aliquots, containing approximately 100 mg of plutonium, of the dissolved sample or plutonium nitrate solution are fumed to dryness with an HC1O 4 -H 2 SO 4 mixture. The dried residue is dissolved in dilute H 2 SO 4 , and the plutonium is reduced to plutonium (III) with zinc metal. The excess zinc metal is dissolved with HCl, and the solution is passed through a lead reductor column to ensure complete reduction of the plutonium to plutonium (III). The solution, with added ferroin indicator, is then titrated immediately with standardized ceric solution to a photometric end point. For the analysis of plutonium metal solutions, plutonium oxides, and nitrate solutions, the relative standard deviation are 0.06, 0.08, and 0.14%, respectively. Of the elements most likely to be found with the plutonium, only iron, neptunium, and uranium interfere. Small amounts of uranium and iron, which titrate quantitatively in the method, are determined by separate analytical methods, and suitable corrections are applied to the plutonium value. 4 tables, 4 figures

  3. Modeling of Diffusion of Plutonium in Other Metals and of Gaseous Species in Plutonium-Based Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, Bernard R.; Gayanath W. Fernando; Beiden, S.; Setty, A.; Sevilla, E.H.

    2004-01-01

    Establish standards for temperature conditions under which plutonium, uranium, or neptunium from nuclear wastes permeates steel, with which it is in contact, by diffusion processes. The primary focus is on plutonium because of the greater difficulties created by the peculiarities of face-centered-cubic-stabilized (delta) plutonium (the form used in the technology generating the waste)

  4. Study of allotropic transformations in plutonium; Etude des transformations allotropiques du plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spriet, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-06-01

    The allotropic transformations in plutonium have been studied by different methods: metallography, dilatometry, thermal analysis, resistivity measurements, examination with a hot stage microscope. In order to study the importance of the purity, purification process such as zone-melting or electro-diffusion have been developed. The characteristics of the {alpha} {r_reversible} {beta} transformation can be explained in terms of the influence of internal stresses on the transition temperature and on the transformation kinetics. Some particular characteristics of {delta} {yields} {gamma}, {gamma} {yields} {alpha}, {delta} {r_reversible} {epsilon}, {beta} {r_reversible} {gamma} and {delta} {yields} {alpha} transformations are also given. (author) [French] Les transformations, allotropiques du plutonium ont ete etudiees a l'aide de differentes methodes: metallographie, dilatometrie, analyse thermique, mesure de resistivite, examen au microscope a platine chauffante. Pour preciser l'influence de la purete, des procedes de purification comme la fusion de zone ou l'electrodiffusion ont ete mis au point. Les caracteres de la transformation {alpha} {r_reversible} {beta} s'expliquent par le role des contraintes internes sur la temperature de transition et la cinetique de transformation. Quelques particularites des transformations {delta} {yields} {gamma}, {gamma} {yields} {alpha}, {delta} {r_reversible} {epsilon}, {beta} {r_reversible} {gamma} et {delta} {yields} {alpha} sont egalement presentees. (auteur)

  5. High temperature elastic constant measurements: application to plutonium; Mesure des constantes elastiques a haute temperature application au plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchet, J M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-03-01

    We present an apparatus with which we have measured the Young's modulus and the Poisson's ratio of several compounds from the resonance frequency of cylinders in the temperature range 0 deg. C-700 deg. C. We especially studied the elastic constants of plutonium and measured for the first time to our knowledge the Young's modulus of Pu{sub {delta}} and Pu{sub {epsilon}}. E{sub {delta}} 360 deg. C = 1.6 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}; E{sub {epsilon}} 490 deg. C = 1.1 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}, {sigma}{sub {epsilon}} = 0.25 {+-} 0.03 Using our results, we have calculated the compressibility, the Debye temperature, the Grueneisen constant and the electronic specific heat of Pu{sub {epsilon}}. (author) [French] Nous decrivons un appareil qui permet de mesurer les constantes elastiques (module de Young et module de Poisson) jusqu'a 700 deg. C a partir des frequences de resonance de barreaux cylindriques. Nous avons plus specialement etudie le plutonium et determine pour la premiere fois a notre connaissance le module de Young des phases {delta} et {epsilon}: E{sub {delta}} 360 deg. C = 1.6 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}; E{sub {epsilon}} 490 deg. C = 1.1 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}, {sigma}{sub {epsilon}} = 0.25 {+-} 0.03 Nos mesures nous ont permis de calculer la compressibilite, la temperature de Debye, la constante de Gruneisen et la chaleur specifique electronique de Pu{sub {epsilon}}. (auteur)

  6. Phase transformation in delta Pu alloys at low temperature: in situ dilatometric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Texier, G.; Oudot, B.; Platteau, C.; Ravat, B.; Delaunay, F. [CEA Valduc, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to precisely study the martensitic transformation in a plutonium-gallium alloy. Thus, the thermodynamics and kinetics of the {delta} {yields} {alpha}' + {delta} transformation in a Pu-Ga alloy were studied under isochronal and isothermal conditions. The activation energy of the {delta} {yields} {alpha}' + {delta} phase transformation at a constant cooling rate (0.5 K. min{sup -1}) was determined by using Kissinger and Ozawa models. The average value of the activation energy was found to be at -56 kJ.mol{sup -1}. Dilatometry measurement was also used to trace 'in situ' the entire transformation for several temperatures. The kinetics of the {delta} {yields} {alpha}' + {delta} transformation were modelled under isothermal conditions in the theoretical frame of the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) theory. It is proposed that the transformation consists of three stages. The {alpha}' transformation begins with a nucleation of pre-existing embryos. Then, both nucleation and rapid growth of {alpha}' occurs simultaneously and finally, the plates width expend. Apparent activation energies for nucleation and growth transformation were determined from the temperature dependence of the constant K at respectively -34 kJ.mol{sup -1} and -60 kJ.mol{sup -1}. Dler et al. [1] investigated also the thermodynamics and the kinetics of the martensitic transformation in Pu alloys. These nucleation energies were found by modelling of heterogeneous martensitic nucleation via strain interaction with observed superdislocation-like nucleation sites in PuGa alloys. The values obtain by this model was very close to those we find. Investigations in steels alloys indicate that these energies are of the same order for nucleation near dislocation. Then, it could be indicating a strong relationship between these dislocations and martensitic nucleation sites. (authors)

  7. The determination of plutonium isotopes in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siripirom, Lopchai.

    1983-01-01

    The concentration of plutonium in environmental samples such as soil, water, and surface air in the middle part of Thailand were studied. The surface air were collected only at the fifth floor of the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP). Plutonium-242 was used as a tracer. Soil and air samples were dissolved by pyrosulphate fusion, and plutonium was co-precipitated with barium sulfate. Then dissolved the precipitate in perchloric acid. Plutonium was extracted out by using solvent bis-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP). Plutonium in water samples were coprecipitated with iron (III) hydroxide and were dissolved in 8 M. nitric acid. Then the plutonium was separated out by using anion exchange resin, Dowex 1x4. After the solvent extraction or the anion exchange, plutonium was coprecipitated with cerous hydroxide. The activities of plutonium were measured by a surface barrier detector for about 24 hours. Lower limit of detection for 1,440 minutes is 0.012 pCi. These studies showed that only plutonium-239, 240 was observed. The range of activities of plutonium-239, 240 in soil were 0.002-0.157 pCi/g (dry), in water were 0.1-81 f Ci/l, and in air were 7-330 a Ci/m 3 . However, the plutonium concentrations in these studies are far below the maximum permissible concentration (MPC) recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for general population which is equal to 3x10 8 f Ci/l of water and 5x10 6 a Ci/m 3 of air

  8. Influence of colloidal dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the sorption of plutonium on natural sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.M.; Karttunen, J.O.; Mehlhoff, P.

    1982-01-01

    It now appears possible to formulate a practical model to describe the absorption of Pu(IV) by suspended solids. In such a model the constants describing the association of plutonium with both soluble organics and solid adsorbers must be known, as well as any variation in these constants due to solution properties such as pH and ionic strength. If the complexing ability of dissolved organic carbon is sufficiently constant, such a model could describe plutonium behavior in a wide variety of surface and ground waters. Observations to date indicate that the variation in K/sub D/ (K/sub D/ = concentration of Pu(IV) in suspended solids divided by the concentration of Pu(IV) in the water) among water bodies is due primarily to differences in water chemistry and that differences in the character of the absorbing solid are less important. The mathematical relationship and parameter values presented in this report adequately describe the adsorption of Pu(IV) on one-specific sediment

  9. Reclamation of plutonium from pyrochemical processing residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Gray, J.H.; Holcomb, H.P.; Chostner, D.F.

    1987-04-01

    Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), Savannah River Plant (SRP), and Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) have jointly developed a process to recover plutonium from molten salt extraction residues. These NaCl, KCL, and MgCl 2 residues, which are generated in the pyrochemical extraction of 241 Am from aged plutonium metal, contain up to 25 wt % dissolved plutonium and up to 2 wt % americium. The overall objective was to develop a process to convert these residues to a pure plutonium metal product and discardable waste. To meet this objective a combination of pyrochemical and aqueous unit operations was used. The first step was to scrub the salt residue with a molten metal (aluminum and magnesium) to form a heterogeneous ''scrub alloy'' containing nominally 25 wt % plutonium. This unit operation, performed at RFP, effectively separated the actinides from the bulk of the chloride salts. After packaging in aluminum cans, the ''scrub alloy'' was then dissolved in a nitric acid - hydrofluoric acid - mercuric nitrate solution at SRP. Residual chloride was separated from the dissolver solution by precipitation with Hg 2 (NO 3 ) 2 followed by centrifuging. Plutonium was then separated from the aluminum, americium and magnesium using the Purex solvent extraction system. The 241 Am was diverted to the waste tank farm, but could be recovered if desired

  10. Plutonium and americium separation from salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, P.G.; Miner, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    Salts or materials containing plutonium and americium are dissolved in hydrochloric acid, heated, and contacted with an alkali metal carbonate solution to precipitate plutonium and americium carbonates which are thereafter readily separable from the solution

  11. Determination of the positions and residues of the. delta. /sup + +/ and. delta. /sup 0/ poles. [Phase shifts,coulomb corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasan, S S [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA). Dept. of Physics

    1976-04-19

    The poles and the associated residues in the ..pi..N P/sub 33/ amplitude corresponding to the resonances ..delta../sup + +/ and ..delta../sup 0/ are determined by fitting the ..pi../sup +/p and ..pi../sup -/p hadronic phase shifts from the Carter 73 analysis. The ..delta../sup + +/ and ..delta../sup 0/ pole positions are determined also from the nuclear phase shifts, these being the phase shifts made up of the hadronic phase shifts plus the Coulomb corrections. The pole positions obtained from the two sets of phase shifts are different, the differences being larger in the case of the ..delta../sup + +/.

  12. Oxidation-state distribution of plutonium in surface and subsurface waters at Thule, northwest Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMahon, C.A.; Vintró, L.L.; Mitchell, P.I.

    2000-01-01

    (V, VI) (mean, 68 +/- 6%; n = 6), with little if any distinction apparent between surface and bottom waters. Further, the oxidation state distribution at stations close to the accident site is similar to that measured at Upernavik, remote from this site. It is also similar to the distribution observed...... in shelf waters at midlatitudes, suggesting that the underlying processes controlling plutonium speciation are insensitive to temperature over the range 0-25 degrees C. Measurements using tangential-flow ultrafiltration indicate that virtually all of the plutonium (including the fraction in a reduced...... chemical form) is present as fully dissolved species. Most of this plutonium would seem to be of weapons fallout origin, as the mean Pu-238/Pu-239,Pu-240 activity ratio in the water column (dissolved phase) at Thule (0.06 +/- 0.02; n = 10) is similar to the global fallout ratio at this latitude...

  13. Plutonium oxide dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    Several processing options for dissolving plutonium oxide (PuO 2 ) from high-fired materials have been studied. The scoping studies performed on these options were focused on PuO 2 typically generated by burning plutonium metal and PuO 2 produced during incineration of alpha contaminated waste. At least two processing options remain applicable for dissolving high-fired PuO 2 in canyon dissolvers. The options involve solid solution formation of PuO 2 With uranium oxide (UO 2 ) and alloying incinerator ash with aluminum. An oxidative dissolution process involving nitric acid solutions containing a strong oxidizing agent, such as cerium (IV), was neither proven nor rejected. This uncertainty was due to difficulty in regenerating cerium (IV) ions during dissolution. However, recent work on silver-catalyzed dissolution of PuO 2 with persulfate has demonstrated that persulfate ions regenerate silver (II). Use of persulfate to regenerate cerium (IV) or bismuth (V) ions during dissolution of PuO 2 materials may warrant further study

  14. Phonon anharmonicity and Gruneisen parameters of alpha-plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filanovich, A.N.; Povzner, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    A self-consistent thermodynamic model of alpha-phase of plutonium is constructed. The calculations of thermal and elastic properties of α-Pu, carried out within this model, demonstrate that anomalously strong temperature dependence of the bulk modulus and unusually high value of the coefficient of thermal expansion of α-Pu are caused by its strong lattice anharmonicity. The isothermal and isobaric Gruneisen parameters of α-Pu and δ-Pu Pu_0_._9_6Ga_0_._0_4 are calculated. It is shown that wide spread of the values of Gruneisen parameter of α-Pu, obtained previously from different experimental data, is explained by the dependence of Gruneisen parameter of α-Pu on temperature. - Highlights: • A self-consistent thermodynamic model of alpha-plutonium is developed. • Thermal and elastic properties of alpha-plutonium are calculated. • The reason of spread in the values of Gruneisen parameter of alpha-Pu is established. • Different types of phonon anharmonicity in alpha-Pu and delta-Pu are revealed.

  15. ``Distribution and behaviour of plutonium in the waters of the channel and of the seine estuary``; ``Distribution et comportement du plutonium dans les eaux de la manche et de l`estuaire de la seine``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, K

    1998-12-31

    Excess dissolved plutonium has been measured in the coastal waters of the Channel, from Granville to Boulogne, probably due to sorption-desorption processus. In the Seine estuary, in situ measurements and experimental studies showed that the plutonium desorbs himself from particles in low salinity waters. The desorbed plutonium originates in marine and/or fluvial dissolved Pu. Marine dissolved Pu(V), originating from La Hague plant discharges and from atlantic waters, is reduced and sorbed when the salinity decreases onto estuarial particles: Isotopic Activity Ration {sup 238}Pu/{sup 239}, Pu(IR) of marine dissolved Pu(V) is about 0.7. Fluvial dissolved plutonium originates from atmospheric fallout and from an internal river source: fallout plutonium (IR=0.05) is unreactive with salinity while 45% of river plutonium (IR>1.7) flocculates at 0.5 g l{sup -1}. Desorbed plutonium may have various origins, depending on the Seine liquid discharges and on the tidal coefficient. When the marine waters do not migrate upstream, the low salinity waters encounters particles marked essentially with marine plutonium and the IR of desorbed Pu is about 0.7. The activities of desorbed plutonium are too low to have any influence on the distribution of plutonium in the coastal waters on the Seine Bay. When the marine waters migrate upstream, the low salinity waters meet particles marked essentially with river plutonium (IR>1.7) and desorbed plutonium has a very high IR. These estuarine conditions are encountered five to seven month a year and implicate an increase of the IR of 0.1 of the plutonium present in the coastal waters of the Seine bay (1.2.-1.3.). (author).

  16. Plutonium in the Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, M.R.; Salter, P.F.

    The geochemistry of fallout plutonium in the sediments of the Gulf of Mexico was studied. A series of sediment cores was collected in a traverse from the deep Gulf of Mexico to the Mississippi Delta. The cores were sliced into 1 cm intervals and analyzed for plutonium. Explanations for the variations in concentration are presented

  17. First-principles elastic constants and phonons of delta-Pu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderlind, P.; Landa, A.; Sadigh, B.

    2004-01-01

    Elastic constants and zone-boundary phonons of delta-plutonium have been calculated within the density-functional theory. The paramagnetic state of delta-Pu is modeled by disordered magnetism utilizing either the disordered local moment or the special quasirandom structure techniques. The anomalo......Elastic constants and zone-boundary phonons of delta-plutonium have been calculated within the density-functional theory. The paramagnetic state of delta-Pu is modeled by disordered magnetism utilizing either the disordered local moment or the special quasirandom structure techniques....... The anomalously soft C-' as well as a large anisotropy ratio (C-44/C-') of delta-Pu is reproduced by this theoretical model. Also the recently measured phonons for delta-Pu compare relatively well with their theoretical counterpart at the zone boundaries....

  18. ''Distribution and behaviour of plutonium in the waters of the channel and of the seine estuary''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, K.

    1997-01-01

    Excess dissolved plutonium has been measured in the coastal waters of the Channel, from Granville to Boulogne, probably due to sorption-desorption processus. In the Seine estuary, in situ measurements and experimental studies showed that the plutonium desorbs himself from particles in low salinity waters. The desorbed plutonium originates in marine and/or fluvial dissolved Pu. Marine dissolved Pu(V), originating from La Hague plant discharges and from atlantic waters, is reduced and sorbed when the salinity decreases onto estuarial particles: Isotopic Activity Ration 238 Pu/ 239 , Pu(IR) of marine dissolved Pu(V) is about 0.7. Fluvial dissolved plutonium originates from atmospheric fallout and from an internal river source: fallout plutonium (IR=0.05) is unreactive with salinity while 45% of river plutonium (IR>1.7) flocculates at 0.5 g l -1 . Desorbed plutonium may have various origins, depending on the Seine liquid discharges and on the tidal coefficient. When the marine waters do not migrate upstream, the low salinity waters encounters particles marked essentially with marine plutonium and the IR of desorbed Pu is about 0.7. The activities of desorbed plutonium are too low to have any influence on the distribution of plutonium in the coastal waters on the Seine Bay. When the marine waters migrate upstream, the low salinity waters meet particles marked essentially with river plutonium (IR>1.7) and desorbed plutonium has a very high IR. These estuarine conditions are encountered five to seven month a year and implicate an increase of the IR of 0.1 of the plutonium present in the coastal waters of the Seine bay (1.2.-1.3.). (author)

  19. Standard test method for plutonium assay by plutonium (III) diode array spectrophotometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the determination of total plutonium as plutonium(III) in nitrate and chloride solutions. The technique is applicable to solutions of plutonium dioxide powders and pellets (Test Methods C 697), nuclear grade mixed oxides (Test Methods C 698), plutonium metal (Test Methods C 758), and plutonium nitrate solutions (Test Methods C 759). Solid samples are dissolved using the appropriate dissolution techniques described in Practice C 1168. The use of this technique for other plutonium-bearing materials has been reported (1-5), but final determination of applicability must be made by the user. The applicable concentration range for plutonium sample solutions is 10–200 g Pu/L. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropria...

  20. The Dissolution of Uranium Oxides in HB-Line Phase 1 Dissolvers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    A series of characterization and dissolution studies has been performed to define flowsheet conditions for the dissolution of uranium oxide materials in dissolvers. The samples selected for analysis were uranium oxide materials. The selection of these uranium oxide materials for characterization and dissolution studies was based on high enriched uranium content and trace levels of plutonium. Test results from the characterization study identified ferric oxide (Fe2O3) and iron/chromium/nickel (Fe/Cr/Ni) particles as impurities along with the tri-uranium oxide (U3O8) and uranium trioxide (UO3). The weight percent uranium in this material was found to vary depending on the impurity content. The trace impurity plutonium appears to be associated with the Fe/Cr/Ni particles. A small amount of absorbed moisture and waters of hydration is present. Most of the uranium oxides easily dissolved in low-molar nitric acid solutions without fluoride within one to two hours at solution temperature s between 60-80 degrees C. A small amount of residue remained following this dissolution step. To assure complete dissolution of uranium from these oxide materials, an additional dissolution step at 90 degrees C to boiling for at least one to two hours has been suggested. Only trace amounts of iron associated with Fe2O3 and Fe/Cr/Ni particles will dissolve during the dissolution steps. Neither hydrogen nor heat will be generated during the dissolution of these uranium oxide materials in nitric acid solutions. Some brown nitrogen dioxide (NO2) fumes will be generated during the dissolution of U3O8

  1. Characterization of Urban Runoff Pollution between Dissolved and Particulate Phases

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Zhang; Simin, Li; Fengbing, Tang

    2013-01-01

    To develop urban stormwater management effectively, characterization of urban runoff pollution between dissolved and particulate phases was studied by 12 rainfall events monitored for five typical urban catchments. The average event mean concentration (AEMC) of runoff pollutants in different phases was evaluated. The AEMC values of runoff pollutants in different phases from urban roads were higher than the ones from urban roofs. The proportions of total dissolved solids, total dissolved nitr...

  2. Removal of sulfamic acid from plutonium sulfamate--sulfamic acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.

    1978-10-01

    Plutonium metal can be readily dissolved in aqueous solutions of sulfamic acid. When the plutonium sulfamate--sulfamic acid solutions are added to normal purex process streams, the sulfamate ion is oxidized by addition of sodium nitrite. This generates sodium sulfate which must be stored as radioactive waste. When recovery of ingrown 241 Am or storage of the dissolved plutonium must be considered, the sulfamate ion poses major and undesirable precipitation problems in the process streams. The present studies show that 40 to 80% of the sulfamate present in the dissolver solutions can be removed by precipitation as sulfamic acid by the addition of concentrated nitric acid. Addition of 64% nitric acid allows precipitation of 40 to 50% of the sulfamate; addition of 72% nitric acid allows precipitation of 50 to 60% of the sulfamate. If the solutions are chilled, additional sulfamic acid will precipitate. If the solutions are chilled to -10 0 C, about 70 to 80% of the orginal sulfamic acid in the dissolver will precipitate. A single, low-volume wash of the sulfamic acid crystals with concentrated nitric acid will decontaminate the crystals to a plutonium content of 5 dis/(min-gram)

  3. Study of a spectrophotometric method of plutonium determination in the organic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brutus, Andre

    1971-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to study a method of determining plutonium in the 'Purex' process organic phase, the minimum concentrations to be measured being about 10 -5 M. Spectrophotometry, at 665 nm, of the plutonium arsenazo III complex was carried out directly in the organic phase. Several complexes can be formed between arsenazo III and plutonium; the conditions under which a single complex is obtained, and also those for which this latter follows Beer's law, were determined. The nature and stability of the complex formed were studied, after which it was possible to calculate the equilibrium constant and the standard free enthalpy variation. The field application of the method was established from calculation of the regression line, the confidence limits, the detection limit and the sensitivity. Finally the principle of the elimination of certain troublesome cations in the medium involved was considered. (author) [fr

  4. Uranium-plutonium fuel for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antipov, S.A.; Astafiev, V.A.; Clouchenkov, A.E.; Gustchin, K.I.; Menshikova, T.S.

    1996-01-01

    Technology was established for fabrication of MOX fuel pellets from co-precipitated and mechanically blended mixed oxides. Both processes ensure the homogeneous structure of pellets readily dissolvable in nitric acid upon reprocessing. In order to increase the plutonium charge in a reactor-burner a process was tested for producing MOX fuel with higher content of plutonium and an inert diluent. It was shown that it is feasible to produce fuel having homogeneous structure and the content of plutonium up to 45% mass

  5. Precipitation of plutonium from acidic solutions using magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    Magnesium oxide will be used as a neutralizing agent for acidic plutonium-containing solutions. It is expected that as the magnesium oxide dissolves, the pH of the solution will rise, and plutonium will precipitate. The resulting solid will be tested for suitability to storage. The liquid is expected to contain plutonium levels that meet disposal limit requirements

  6. Phase equilibrium study on system uranium-plutonium-tungsten-carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugajin, Mitsuhiro

    1976-11-01

    Metallurgical properties of the U-Pu-W-C system have been studied with emphasis on phases and reactions. Free energy of compound formation, carbon activity and U/Pu segregation in the W-doped carbide fuel are estimated using phase diagram data. The results indicate that tungsten metal is useful as a thermochemical stabilizer of the carbide fuel. Tungsten has high temperature stability in contact with uranium carbide and mixed uranium-plutonium carbide. (auth.)

  7. Characterization of Urban Runoff Pollution between Dissolved and Particulate Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhang; Simin, Li; Fengbing, Tang

    2013-01-01

    To develop urban stormwater management effectively, characterization of urban runoff pollution between dissolved and particulate phases was studied by 12 rainfall events monitored for five typical urban catchments. The average event mean concentration (AEMC) of runoff pollutants in different phases was evaluated. The AEMC values of runoff pollutants in different phases from urban roads were higher than the ones from urban roofs. The proportions of total dissolved solids, total dissolved nitrogen, and total dissolved phosphorus in total ones for all the catchments were 26.19%–30.91%, 83.29%–90.51%, and 61.54–68.09%, respectively. During rainfall events, the pollutant concentration at the initial stage of rainfall was high and then sharply decreased to a low value. Affected by catchments characterization and rainfall distribution, the highest concentration of road pollutants might appear in the later period of rainfall. Strong correlations were also found among runoffs pollutants in different phases. Total suspended solid could be considered as a surrogate for particulate matters in both road and roof runoff, while dissolved chemical oxygen demand could be regarded as a surrogate for dissolved matters in roof runoff. PMID:23935444

  8. Characterization of urban runoff pollution between dissolved and particulate phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhang; Simin, Li; Fengbing, Tang

    2013-01-01

    To develop urban stormwater management effectively, characterization of urban runoff pollution between dissolved and particulate phases was studied by 12 rainfall events monitored for five typical urban catchments. The average event mean concentration (AEMC) of runoff pollutants in different phases was evaluated. The AEMC values of runoff pollutants in different phases from urban roads were higher than the ones from urban roofs. The proportions of total dissolved solids, total dissolved nitrogen, and total dissolved phosphorus in total ones for all the catchments were 26.19%-30.91%, 83.29%-90.51%, and 61.54-68.09%, respectively. During rainfall events, the pollutant concentration at the initial stage of rainfall was high and then sharply decreased to a low value. Affected by catchments characterization and rainfall distribution, the highest concentration of road pollutants might appear in the later period of rainfall. Strong correlations were also found among runoffs pollutants in different phases. Total suspended solid could be considered as a surrogate for particulate matters in both road and roof runoff, while dissolved chemical oxygen demand could be regarded as a surrogate for dissolved matters in roof runoff.

  9. Dissolved Concentration Limits of Radioactive Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Chen; E.R. Thomas; F.J. Pearson; P.L. Cloke; T.L. Steinborn; P.V. Brady

    2003-06-20

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of radioactive elements under possible repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, and measurements made in laboratory experiments and field work. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 radioactive elements (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium), which are important to calculated dose. Model outputs are mainly in the form of look-up tables plus one or more uncertainty terms. The rest are either in the form of distributions or single values. The results of this analysis are fundamental inputs for total system performance assessment to constrain the release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Solubilities of plutonium, neptunium, uranium, americium, actinium, thorium, protactinium, lead, and radium have been re-evaluated using the newly updated thermodynamic database (Data0.ymp.R2). For all of the actinides, identical modeling approaches and consistent environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models in this revision. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, activity coefficients, and selection of solubility controlling phase have been quantified or otherwise addressed. Moreover, a new blended plutonium solubility model has been developed in this revision, which gives a mean solubility that is three orders of magnitude lower than the plutonium solubility model used for the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation. Two alternative neptunium solubility models have also been

  10. Dissolved Concentration Limits of Radioactive Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Chen; E.R. Thomas; F.J. Pearson; P.L. Cloke; T.L. Steinborn; P.V. Brady

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of radioactive elements under possible repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, and measurements made in laboratory experiments and field work. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 radioactive elements (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium), which are important to calculated dose. Model outputs are mainly in the form of look-up tables plus one or more uncertainty terms. The rest are either in the form of distributions or single values. The results of this analysis are fundamental inputs for total system performance assessment to constrain the release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Solubilities of plutonium, neptunium, uranium, americium, actinium, thorium, protactinium, lead, and radium have been re-evaluated using the newly updated thermodynamic database (Data0.ymp.R2). For all of the actinides, identical modeling approaches and consistent environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models in this revision. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, activity coefficients, and selection of solubility controlling phase have been quantified or otherwise addressed. Moreover, a new blended plutonium solubility model has been developed in this revision, which gives a mean solubility that is three orders of magnitude lower than the plutonium solubility model used for the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation. Two alternative neptunium solubility models have also been

  11. Chloride removal from plutonium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, H.P.

    1983-01-01

    SRP is evaluating a program to recover plutonium from a metallic alloy that will contain chloride salt impurities. Removal of chloride to sufficiently low levels to prevent damaging corrosion to canyon equipment is feasible as a head-end step following dissolution. Silver nitrate and mercurous nitrate were each successfully used in laboratory tests to remove chloride from simulated alloy dissolver solution containing plutonium. Levels less than 10 ppM chloride were achieved in the supernates over the precipitated and centrifuged insoluble salts. Also, less than 0.05% loss of plutonium in the +3, +4, or +6 oxidation states was incurred via precipitate carrying. These results provide impetus for further study and development of a plant-scale process to recover plutonium from metal alloy at SRP

  12. Accountability methods for plutonium and uranium: the NRC manuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutmacher, R.G.; Stephens, F.B.

    1977-09-28

    Four manuals containing methods for the accountability of plutonium nitrate solutions, plutonium dioxide, uranium dioxide and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide have been prepared by us and issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A similar manual on methods for the accountability of uranium and plutonium in reprocessing plant dissolver solutions is now in preparation. In the present paper, we discuss the contents of the previously issued manuals and give a preview of the manual now being prepared.

  13. Accountability methods for plutonium and uranium: the NRC manuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutmacher, R.G.; Stephens, F.B.

    1977-01-01

    Four manuals containing methods for the accountability of plutonium nitrate solutions, plutonium dioxide, uranium dioxide and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide have been prepared by us and issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A similar manual on methods for the accountability of uranium and plutonium in reprocessing plant dissolver solutions is now in preparation. In the present paper, we discuss the contents of the previously issued manuals and give a preview of the manual now being prepared

  14. Process for recovery of plutonium from fabrication residues of mixed fuels consisting of uranium oxide and plutonium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heremanns, R.H.; Vandersteene, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The invention concerns a process for recovery of plutonium from fabrication residues of mixed fuels consisting of uranium oxide and plutonium oxide in the form of PuO 2 . Mixed fuels consisting of uranium oxide and plutonium oxide are being used more and more. The plants which prepare these mixed fuels have around 5% of the total mass of fuels as fabrication residue, either as waste or scrap. In view of the high cost of plutonium, it has been attempted to recover this plutonium from the fabrication residues by a process having a purchase price lower than the price of plutonium. The problem is essentially to separate the plutonium, the uranium and the impurities. The residues are fluorinated, the UF 6 and PuF 6 obtained are separated by selective absorption of the PuF 6 on NaF at a temperature of at least 400 0 C, the complex obtained by this absorption is dissolved in nitric acid solution, the plutonium is precipitated in the form of plutonium oxalate by adding oxalic acid, and the precipitated plutonium oxalate is calcined

  15. Isotope dilution alpha spectrometry for the determination of plutonium concentration in irradiated fuel dissolver solution : IDAS and R-IDAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramaniah, M.V.; Jain, H.C.; Aggarwal, S.K.; Chitambar, S.A.; Kavimandan, V.D.; Almaula, A.I.; Shah, P.M.; Parab, A.R.; Sant, V.L.

    1980-01-01

    The report presents a new technique, Isotope Dilution Alpha Spectrometry (IDAS) and Reverse Isotope Dilution Alpha Spectrometry (R-IDAS) for determining the concentration of plutonium in the irradiated fuel dissolver solution. The method exploits sup(238)Pu in IDAS and sup(239)Pu in R-IDAS as a spike and provides an alternative method to Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) which requires enriched sup(242)Pu as a spike. Depending upon the burn-up of the fuel, sup(238)Pu or sup(239)Pu is used as a spike to change the sup(238)Pu/(sup(239)Pu+sup(240)Pu)α activity ratio in the sample by a factor of 10. This change is determined by α-spectrometry on electrodeposited sources using a solid state silicon surface barrier detector coupled to a multichannel analyser. The validity of a simple method based on the geometric progression (G.P.) decrease for the far tail of the spectrum to correct for the tail contribution of sup(238)Pu peak (5.50 MeV) to the low energy sup(239)Pu + sup(240)Pu peak (5.17 MeV) is established. Results for the plutonium concentration on different irradiated fuel dissolver solutions with burn-uo ranging from J,000 to 100,000 MWD/TU are presented and compared with those obtained by IDMS. The values obtained by IDAS or R-IDAS and IDMS agree within 0.5%. (auth.)

  16. Conversion of metal plutonium to plutonium dioxide by pyrochemical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panov, A.V.; Subbotin, V.G. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, ALL-Russian Science and Research Institute of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation); Mashirev, V.P. [ALL-Russian Science and Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    Report contains experimental results on metal plutonium of weapon origin samples conversion to plutonium dioxide by pyrochemical method. Circuits of processes are described. Their advantages and shortcomings are shown. Parameters of plutonium dioxide powders (phase and fraction compositions, poured density) manufactured by pyrochemical method in RFNC-VNIITF are shown as well. (authors)

  17. Evolution Of Chemical Conditions And Estimated Plutonium Solubility In The Residual Waste Layer During Post-Closure Aging Of Tank 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, M.

    2012-01-01

    evolution. In Denham (2007, Rev. 1), the solubilities in the oxidized regions were estimated at Eh values in equilibrium with dissolved oxygen. Here, these are considered to be maximum possible solubilities because Eh values are unlikely to be in equilibrium with dissolved oxygen. More realistic Eh values are estimated here and plutonium solubilities calculated at these are considered more realistic. Apparent solubilities of plutonium that coprecipitated with iron phases are estimated from Pu:Fe ratios in Tank 18 residual waste and the solubilities of the host iron phases. The estimated plutonium solubilities are shown. Uncertainties in the grout simulations and plutonium solubility estimates are discussed. The primary uncertainty in the grout simulations is that little is known about the physical state of the grout as it ages. The simulations done here are pertinent to a porous medium, which may or may not be applicable to fractured grout, depending on the degree and nature of the fractures. Other uncertainties that are considered are the assumptions about the reducing capacity imparted by blast furnace slag, the effects of varying dissolved carbon dioxide and oxygen concentrations, and the treatment of silica in the simulations. The primary uncertainty in the estimates of plutonium solubility is that little is known about the exact form of plutonium in the residual waste. Other uncertainties include those inherent in the thermodynamic data, pH variations from those estimated in the grout simulations, the effects of the treatment of silica in the grout simulations, and the effect of varying total dissolved carbonate concentrations. The objective of this document is to update the model for solubility controls on release of plutonium from residual waste in closed F-Area waste tanks. The update is based on new information including a new proposed grout formulation, chemical analysis of Tank 18 samples and more current thermodynamic data for plutonium and grout minerals. In

  18. Rapid dissolution of plutonium metal in sulfamic acid followed by conversion to a nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.

    1981-01-01

    Plutonium metal that does not meet product purity specifications and aged plutonium metal into which /sup 241/Am has grown must be recycled through a recovery and purification process. At the Savannah River Plant (SRP), the initial recycle step is dissolution of the metal. Since about 1962, sulfamic acid has been the accepted dissolvent in the SRP process. This paper dicusses the dissolving of plutonium metal in sulfamic aid. 4 refs

  19. Study of the reaction of uranium and plutonium with bone char

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.; Koenst, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    A study of the reaction of plutonium with a commercial bone char indicates that this bone char has a high capacity for removing plutonium from aqueous wastes. The adsorption of plutonium by bone char is pH dependent, and for plutonium(IV) polymer appears to be maximized near pH 7.3 for plutonium concentrations typical of some waste streams. Adsorption is affected by dissolved salts, especially calcium and phosphate salts. Freundlich isotherms representing the adsorption of uranium and plutonium have been prepared. The low potential imposed upon aqueous solutions by commercial bone char is adequate for reduction of hexavalent plutonium to a lower plutonium oxidation state

  20. Pyrochemical recovery of plutonium fluoride reduction slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, D.C.; Rayburn, J.A.

    1983-07-01

    A process was developed for the pyrochemical recovery of plutonium from residues resulting from the PuF 4 reduction process. The process involves crushing the CaF 2 slag and dissolving it at 800 0 C in a CaCl 2 solvent. The plutonium, which exists either as finely divided metal or as incompletely reduced fluoride salt, is reduced to metal and/or allowed to coalesce as a massive button in the bottom of the reaction crucible. The recovery of plutonium in a 1-day cycle averaged 96%; all of the resulting residues were discardable

  1. Determination of uranium and plutonium by sequential potentiometric titration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yoshiharu; Takahashi, Masao

    1976-01-01

    The determination of uranium and plutonium in mixed oxide fuels has been developed by sequential potentiometric titration. A weighed sample of uranium and plutonium oxides is dissolved in a mixture of nitric and hydrofluoric acids and the solution is fumed with sulfuric acid. After the reduction of uranium and plutonium to uranium(IV) and plutonium(III) by chromium(II) sulfate, 5 ml of buffer solution (KCl-HCl, pH 1.0) is added to the solution. Then the solution is diluted to 30 ml with water and the pH of the solution is adjusted to 1.0 -- 1.5 with 1 M sodium hydroxide. The solution is stirred until the oxidation of the excess of chromium(II) by air is completed. After the removal of dissolved oxygen by bubbling nitrogen through the solution for 10 minutes, uranium (IV) is titrated with 0.1 N cerium(IV) sulfate. Then, plutonium is titrated by 0.02 N cerium(IV) sulfate. When a mixture of uranium and plutonium is titrated with 0.1 N potassium dichromate potentiometrically, the potential change at the end point of plutonium is very small and the end point of uranium is also unclear when 0.1 N potassium permanganate is used as a titrant. In the present method, nitrate, fluoride and copper(II) interfere with the determination of plutonium and uranium. Iron interferes quantitatively with the determination of plutonium but not of uranium. Results obtained in applying the proposed method to 50 mg of mixtures of plutonium and uranium ((7.5 -- 50))% Pu were accurate to within 0.15 mg of each element. (auth.)

  2. Recovery of plutonium from electrorefining anode heels at Savannah River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.H.; Gray, L.W.; Karraker, D.G.

    1987-03-01

    In a joint effort, the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), Savannah River Plant (SRP), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) have developed two processes to recover plutonium from electrorefining anode heel residues. Aqueous dissolution of anode heel metal was demonstrated at SRL on a laboratory scale and on a larger pilot scale using either sulfamic acid or nitric acid-hydrazine-fluoride solutions. This direct anode heel metal dissolution requires the use of a geometrically favorable dissolver. The second process developed involves first diluting the plutonium in the anode heel residues by alloying with aluminum. The alloyed anode heel plutonium can then be dissolved using a nitric acid-fluoride-mercury(II) solution in large non-geometrically favorable equipment where nuclear safety is ensured by concentration control

  3. Solid-phase extraction of plutonium in various oxidation states from simulated groundwater using N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perevalov, S.A.; Malofeeva, G.I.; Kuzovkina, E.V.; Spivakov, B.Ya.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction of plutonium in different individual and mixed oxidation states from simulated groundwater (pH 8.5) was studied. The extraction of plutonium species was carried out in a dynamic mode using DIAPAK C16 cartridges modified by N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine (BPHA). It was shown that the extent of recovery depends on the oxidation state of plutonium. The extraction of Pu(IV) was at the level of 98-99% regardless of the volume and flow-rate of the sample solution. Pu(V) was extracted by 90-95% and 75-80% from 10- and 100-mL aliquots of the samples, respectively, whereas the extraction of Pu(VI) did not exceed 45-50%. An equimolar mixture of Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI) was extracted by 74%. The distribution coefficients (K d ) and kinetic exchange capacities (S) of plutonium in various oxidation states were measured. It was found that during the sorption process, Pu(V) was reduced to Pu(IV) by 80-90% after an hour-long contact with the solid phase. Pu(VI) is reduced to Pu(V) by 34% and to Pu(IV) by 55%. In the case of mixed-valent solution of plutonium, only Pu(V) and Pu(IV) were found in the effluents. (author)

  4. Plutonium recovery from incinerator ash and centrifuge sludge by peroxide fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, J.A.; Wheelwright, E.J.

    1975-05-01

    A technique was demonstrated for solubilizing the plutonium contained in incinerator ash and in other waste solids (such as solids accumulated by centrifugation after solvent extraction contacts in the plutonium reclamation facility at Hanford). A sodium hydroxide--sodium peroxide fusion is performed on the Pu-containing solids. The cooled melt is then dissolved in dilute nitric acid. Mild steel cans were used as ''single use'' crucibles for the fusions. Both the can and the cooled melt are dissolved in nitric acid. Fusion tests were conducted on three different cans of incinerator ash and on one can of centrifuge sludge. The series of tests demonstrated that a caustic-peroxide fusion treatment can yield 95 percent or greater recovery of plutonium from these waste solids. In most cases, quantitative recovery of the plutonium can probably be achieved by recycling the residual solids obtained in aqueous dissolution of the cooled fusion mixture. Tests with some of the incinerator ash and with the centrifuge sludge resulted in gelatinous precipitates which were difficult to separate from the nitric acid dissolver solutions. These gelatinous precipitates present what is probably the major problem to be overcome in the use of this Pu recovery method. Techniques need to be examined for making these residual solids less difficult to separate from the dissolver solution. (U.S.)

  5. Studies of the conversion-chemistry of plutonium and uranium in the nitrate- and carbonate-systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, G.; Steinhauser, M.; Boehm, M.

    1988-01-01

    A novel type construction of an autoclave for dissolving of plutonium dioxide in concentrated nitric acid (without any admixtures) has been developed. This process allows the dissolving of batches with high oxide/acid ratio and yields plutonium-solutions of high concentration. The tests for separation of plutonium- and, respectively, uranium-process-solutions from Am-241 and other interfering impurities are described. The time-factor for the oxidation-reaction of plutonium in nitric acid with ozone has been optimized. Important data on the solubility-behavior of plutonyl(VI)- and of pure Pu(IV)-nitrates have been gained. The majority of the precipitates, occuring in theses reactions, were characterized. (orig.) [de

  6. Simultaneous determinations of uranium, thorium, and plutonium in soft tissues by solvent extraction and alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.P.; Zimmerman, C.J.; Lewis, L.L.; Wrenn, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    A radiochemical procedure for the simultaneous determination of uranium, thorium, and plutonium, in soft tissues has been developed. The weighed amounts of tissues, spiked with 232 U, 242 Pu, and 229 th tracers, are wet ashed. Uranium, thorium, and plutonium are coprecipitated with iron as hydroxides, dissolved in concentrated HCl and the acidity adjusted to 10 M. Uranium and plutonium are extracted into 20% TLA solution in xylene, leaving thorium in the aqueous phase. Plutonium is back-extracted by reducing to the trivalent state with 0.05 M NH 4 I solution in 8 M HCl, and uranium is back-extracted with 0.1 M HCl. Thorium is extracted into 20% TLA solution from 4 M HNO 3 and back-extracted with 10 M HCl. Uranium, thorium and plutonium are electrodeposited separately onto platinum discs and counted alpha-spectrometrically using surface barrier silicon diodes and a multichannel analyzer. The method was developed using bovine liver and applied to dog and human tissues. The mean radiochemical recoveries of these actinides in different organs were better than 70%. 6 references, 2 tables

  7. Geochemical behaviour of plutonium isotopes in natural media (lakes, rivers, estuaries)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeandel, C.P.

    1981-10-01

    Artificial radionuclide activities ( 238 Pu, 239+240 Pu) were measured in natural environments. Their distribution and geochemical behaviour are evaluated and compared them to these of the 137 Cs. In a volcanic crater lake, influenced only by atmospheric fallout (Lac Pavin, France), sediments are enriched in 239+240 Pu, whereas 137 Cs stays in the dissolved phase. Diffusion processes and migration of radionuclides is shown to occur in sediments. Remobilization of 239+240 Pu is probable at the sediment/water interface. In the Garonne-Dordogne, Seine and Loire rivers, the 239+240 Pu activity levels in suspended matter are little influenced by the waste discharges of nuclear power plants. The element is essentially transported in the particulate fraction, more than is 137 Cs. In all the esturies studied (Gironde, Seine, Loire) 239+240 Pu concentrations in suspended matter increase between the river and the estuary. Simultaneously a removal of plutonium from the dissolved phase is observed. High plutonium concentrations are measured in the Seine estuary; they are attributed to a ''marine'' contamination: the French nuclear reprocessing plant of La Hague discharges low level radioactive liquid wastes, a part may reach the Seine estuary. There are no decrease in particulate 137 Cs concentrations between the river and the estuary of the Gironde, such as it occurs in the Loire. In this last case, the phenomenon is explained by the presence of ''young caesium'' originating in the power plant effluents and which is more exchangeable than 137 Cs of atmospheric origin. In the Seine estuary, the influence of marine contamination causes an increase of particulate and dissolved 137 Cs concentrations [fr

  8. In search of plutonium: A nonproliferation journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Siegfried

    2010-02-01

    In February 1992, I landed in the formerly secret city of Sarov, the Russian Los Alamos, followed a few days later by a visit to Snezhinsk, their Livermore. The briefings we received of the Russian nuclear weapons program and tours of their plutonium, reactor, explosives, and laser facilities were mind boggling considering the Soviet Union was dissolved only two months earlier. This visit began a 17-year, 41 journey relationship with the Russian nuclear complex dedicated to working with them in partnership to protect and safeguard their weapons and fissile materials, while addressing the plight of their scientists and engineers. In the process, we solved a forty-year disagreement about the plutonium-gallium phase diagram and began a series of fundamental plutonium science workshops that are now in their tenth year. At the Yonbyon reprocessing facility in January 2004, my North Korean hosts had hoped to convince me that they have a nuclear deterrent. When I expressed skepticism, they asked if I wanted to see their ``product.'' I asked if they meant the plutonium; they replied, ``Well, yes.'' Thus, I wound up holding 200 grams of North Korean plutonium (in a sealed glass jar) to make sure it was heavy and warm. So began the first of my six journeys to North Korea to provide technical input to the continuing North Korean nuclear puzzle. In Trombay and Kalpakkam a few years later I visited the Indian nuclear research centers to try to understand how India's ambitious plans for nuclear power expansion can be accomplished safely and securely. I will describe these and other attempts to deal with the nonproliferation legacy of the cold war and the new challenges ahead. )

  9. Plutonium behavior during the early diagenesis of marine sediments: applications to two marine environments labelled by radionuclides released from reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouzy, A.

    2004-12-01

    The plutonium released into the English Channel and the Irish Sea by nuclear fuel reprocessing plants is mainly associated to sediments. Nevertheless, this association is partially reversible. This work combines a field study, carried out on the Cumbrian mud patch and the Esk estuary (Eastern Irish Sea), and laboratory experiments performed on carbonaceous coarse-grained sediments collected in the Central Channel. It presents new data on the plutonium solid partition in sediments and suggests realistic scenarios for describing its release from sediments to the water column. The role of reactive sulphides acting as temporary sink phases is shown in anoxic sediments; those sulphides are liable to release dissolved plutonium upon their oxidation. The plutonium is also bound to carbonates within the carbonaceous matrix and as carbonate surface complexes. Conceptual schemes of the behaviour of the plutonium in marine sediments are proposed; they highlight the strong remobilization potential of plutonium from marine sediments to the interstitial water. Its plutonium content can be injected into the overlying water column. (author)

  10. Standard practice for preparation and dissolution of plutonium materials for analysis

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This practice is a compilation of dissolution techniques for plutonium materials that are applicable to the test methods used for characterizing these materials. Dissolution treatments for the major plutonium materials assayed for plutonium or analyzed for other components are listed. Aliquants of the dissolved samples are dispensed on a weight basis when one of the analyses must be highly reliable, such as plutonium assay; otherwise they are dispensed on a volume basis. 1.2 The treatments, in order of presentation, are as follows: Procedure Title Section Dissolution of Plutonium Metal with Hydrochloric Acid 9.1 Dissolution of Plutonium Metal with Sulfuric Acid 9.2 Dissolution of Plutonium Oxide and Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxide by the Sealed-Reflux Technique 9.3 Dissolution of Plutonium Oxide and Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxides by Sodium Bisulfate Fusion 9.4 Dissolution of Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxides and Low-Fired Plutonium Oxide in Beakers 9.5 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be re...

  11. Improvement of sample preparation for input plutonium accountability measurement by isotope dilution gammy-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, K.; Kuno, Y.; Sato, S.; Masui, J.; Li, T.K.; Parker, J.L.; Hakkila, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    The sample preparation method for the isotope dilution gamma-ray spectrometry (IDGS) technique has been further improved for simultaneously determining the plutonium concentration and isotopic composition of highly irradiated spent-fuel dissolver solutions. The improvement includes using ion-exchange filter papers (instead of resin beads, as in two previous experiments) for better separation and recovery of plutonium from fission products. The results of IDGS measurements for five dissolver solutions are in good agreement with those by mass spectrometry with ∼0.4% for plutonium concentration and ∼0.1% for 239 Pu isotopic composition. The precision of the plutonium concentration is ∼1% with a 1-h count time. The technique could be implemented as an alternative method for input accountability and verification measurements in reprocessing plants

  12. Method of stripping plutonium from tributyl phosphate solution which contains dibutyl phosphate-plutonium stable complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochsenfeld, W.; Schmieder, H.

    1976-01-01

    Fast breeder fuel elements which have been highly burnt-up are reprocessed by extracting uranium and plutonium into an organic solution containing tributyl phosphate. The tributyl phosphate degenerates at least partially into dibutyl phosphate and monobutyl phosphate, which form stable complexes with tetravalent plutonium in the organic solution. This tetravalent plutonium is released from its complexed state and stripped into aqueous phase by contacting the organic solution with an aqueous phase containing tetravalent uranium. 6 claims, 1 drawing figure

  13. Separation of trace uranium from plutonium for subsequent analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.

    1980-08-01

    Trace uranium quantities are separated from plutonium metal and plutonium oxide for subsequent analysis. Samples are dissolved in hydrobromic acid or a hydrobromic acid-hydrofluoric acid mixture. The U(VI)-halide complex is separated from nonsorbed Pu(III) on an anion exchange column using sequential washes of 9M HBr, a 0.1M HI-12M HCl mixture and 0.1M HCl

  14. Dissolution of aerosol particles collected from nuclear facility plutonium production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Xu; Martinez, Alex; Schappert, Michael; Montoya, D.P.; Martinez, Patrick; Tandon, Lav

    2016-01-01

    A simple, robust analytical chemistry method has been developed to dissolve plutonium containing particles in a complex matrix. The aerosol particles collected on Marple cascade impactor substrates were shown to be dissolved completely with an acid mixture of 12 M HNO 3 and 0.1 M HF. A pressurized closed vessel acid digestion technique was utilized to heat the samples at 130 deg C for 16 h to facilitate the digestion. The dissolution efficiency for plutonium particles was 99 %. The resulting particle digestate solution was suitable for trace elemental analysis and isotope composition determination, as well as radiochemistry measurements. (author)

  15. Properties of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Jin Su; Yoon, Hwan Ki; Min, Kyung Sik; Kim, Hyun Tae; Ahn, Jong Sung; Kwag, Eon Ho; Ryu, Keon Joong

    1996-03-01

    Plutonium has unique chemical and physical properties. Its uniqueness in use has led to rare publications, in Korea. This report covers physical aspects of phase change of metal plutonium, mechanical properties, thermal conductivity, etc, chemical aspects of corrosion, oxidation, how to produce plutonium from spent fuels by describing various chemical treatment methods, which are currently used and were used in the past. It also contains characteristics of the purex reprocessing process which is the most widely used nowadays. And show processes to purify and metalize from recovered plutonium solution. Detection and analysis methods are introduced with key pints for handling, critical safety, toxicity, and effects on peoples. This report gives not only a general idea on what plutonium is, rather than deep technical description, but also basic knowledge on plutonium production and safeguards diversion from the view point of nonproliferation. 18 refs. (Author) .new

  16. Properties of plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Jin Su; Yoon, Hwan Ki; Min, Kyung Sik; Kim, Hyun Tae; Ahn, Jong Sung; Kwag, Eon Ho; Ryu, Keon Joong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daeduk (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-01

    Plutonium has unique chemical and physical properties. Its uniqueness in use has led to rare publications, in Korea. This report covers physical aspects of phase change of metal plutonium, mechanical properties, thermal conductivity, etc, chemical aspects of corrosion, oxidation, how to produce plutonium from spent fuels by describing various chemical treatment methods, which are currently used and were used in the past. It also contains characteristics of the purex reprocessing process which is the most widely used nowadays. And show processes to purify and metalize from recovered plutonium solution. Detection and analysis methods are introduced with key pints for handling, critical safety, toxicity, and effects on peoples. This report gives not only a general idea on what plutonium is, rather than deep technical description, but also basic knowledge on plutonium production and safeguards diversion from the view point of nonproliferation. 18 refs. (Author) .new.

  17. Deposition of plutonium isotopes and Cs-137 in sediments of the Ob delta from the beginning of the nuclear age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panteleyev, G.P.; Livingston, H.D.; Sayles, F.L.; Medkova, O.N.

    1995-01-01

    As an approach to an assessment of the transport of artificial radionuclides through the Ob river system towards the arctic Ocean, results are presented from the analyses of a series of sediment cores collected in the Ob delta and estuary in 1994. These cores, collected in areas of sediment accumulation, contain the depositional history at the Ob mouth of substances associated with sediment particles from the whole river system watershed. Several approaches to dating these sediments permitted the development of a chronology for the deposition of plutonium isotopes and Cs-137, following their first introduction to the environment a half century ago. Some preliminary results for I-129 are also presented. 6 figs

  18. Plutonium behavior during the early diagenesis of marine sediments: applications to two marine environments labelled by radionuclides released from reprocessing plants; Etude du comportement du plutonium au cours de la diagenese precoce des sediments marins: applications a deux environnements marins marques par les rejets issus d'usines de retraitement de combustibles uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouzy, A

    2004-12-15

    The plutonium released into the English Channel and the Irish Sea by nuclear fuel reprocessing plants is mainly associated to sediments. Nevertheless, this association is partially reversible. This work combines a field study, carried out on the Cumbrian mud patch and the Esk estuary (Eastern Irish Sea), and laboratory experiments performed on carbonaceous coarse-grained sediments collected in the Central Channel. It presents new data on the plutonium solid partition in sediments and suggests realistic scenarios for describing its release from sediments to the water column. The role of reactive sulphides acting as temporary sink phases is shown in anoxic sediments; those sulphides are liable to release dissolved plutonium upon their oxidation. The plutonium is also bound to carbonates within the carbonaceous matrix and as carbonate surface complexes. Conceptual schemes of the behaviour of the plutonium in marine sediments are proposed; they highlight the strong remobilization potential of plutonium from marine sediments to the interstitial water. Its plutonium content can be injected into the overlying water column. (author)

  19. Plutonium behavior during the early diagenesis of marine sediments: applications to two marine environments labelled by radionuclides released from reprocessing plants; Etude du comportement du plutonium au cours de la diagenese precoce des sediments marins: applications a deux environnements marins marques par les rejets issus d'usines de retraitement de combustibles uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouzy, A

    2004-12-15

    The plutonium released into the English Channel and the Irish Sea by nuclear fuel reprocessing plants is mainly associated to sediments. Nevertheless, this association is partially reversible. This work combines a field study, carried out on the Cumbrian mud patch and the Esk estuary (Eastern Irish Sea), and laboratory experiments performed on carbonaceous coarse-grained sediments collected in the Central Channel. It presents new data on the plutonium solid partition in sediments and suggests realistic scenarios for describing its release from sediments to the water column. The role of reactive sulphides acting as temporary sink phases is shown in anoxic sediments; those sulphides are liable to release dissolved plutonium upon their oxidation. The plutonium is also bound to carbonates within the carbonaceous matrix and as carbonate surface complexes. Conceptual schemes of the behaviour of the plutonium in marine sediments are proposed; they highlight the strong remobilization potential of plutonium from marine sediments to the interstitial water. Its plutonium content can be injected into the overlying water column. (author)

  20. The growth and evolution of thin oxide films on delta-plutonium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Flores, Harry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pugmire, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The common oxides of plutonium are the dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) and the sesquioxide (Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The structure of an oxide on plutonium metal under air at room temperature is typically described as a thick PuO{sub 2} film at the gas-oxide interface with a thinner PuO{sub 2} film near the oxide-metal substrate interface. In a reducing environment, such as ultra high vacuum, the dioxide (Pu{sup 4+}; O/Pu = 2.0) readily converts to the sesquioxide (Pu{sup 3+}; O/Pu = 1.5) with time. In this work, the growth and evolution of thin plutonium oxide films is studied with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) under varying conditions. The results indicate that, like the dioxide, the sesquioxide is not stable on a very clean metal substrate under reducing conditions, resulting in substoichiometric films (Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3-y}). The Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3-y} films prepared exhibit a variety of stoichiometries (y = 0.2-1) as a function of preparation conditions, highlighting the fact that caution must be exercised when studying plutonium oxide surfaces under these conditions and interpreting resulting data.

  1. Reduction of uranium and plutonium oxides by aluminum. Application to the recycling of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallay, J.

    1968-01-01

    A process for treating plutonium oxide calcined at high temperatures (1000 to 2000 deg. C) with a view to recovering the metal consists in the reduction of this oxide dissolved in a mixture of aluminium, sodium and calcium fluorides by aluminium at about 1180 deg. C. The first part of the report presents the results of reduction tests carried out on the uranium oxides UO 2 and U 3 O 8 ; these are in agreement with the thermodynamic calculations of the exchange reaction at equilibrium. The second part describes the application of this method to plutonium oxides. The Pu-Al alloy obtained (60 per cent Pu) is then recycled in an aqueous medium. (author) [fr

  2. Solubility of Plutonium (IV) Oxalate During Americium/Curium Pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    Approximately 15,000 L of solution containing isotopes of americium and curium (Am/Cm) will undergo stabilization by vitrification at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Prior to vitrification, an in-tank pretreatment will be used to remove metal impurities from the solution using an oxalate precipitation process. Material balance calculations for this process, based on solubility data in pure nitric acid, predict approximately 80 percent of the plutonium in the solution will be lost to waste. Due to the uncertainty associated with the plutonium losses during processing, solubility experiments were performed to measure the recovery of plutonium during pretreatment and a subsequent precipitation process to prepare a slurry feed for a batch melter. A good estimate of the plutonium content of the glass is required for planning the shipment of the vitrified Am/Cm product to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).The plutonium solubility in the oxalate precipitation supernate during pretreatment was 10 mg/mL at 35 degrees C. In two subsequent washes with a 0.25M oxalic acid/0.5M nitric acid solution, the solubility dropped to less than 5 mg/mL. During the precipitation and washing steps, lanthanide fission products in the solution were mostly insoluble. Uranium, and alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal impurities were soluble as expected. An elemental material balance for plutonium showed that greater than 94 percent of the plutonium was recovered in the dissolved precipitate. The recovery of the lanthanide elements was generally 94 percent or higher except for the more soluble lanthanum. The recovery of soluble metal impurities from the precipitate slurry ranged from 15 to 22 percent. Theoretically, 16 percent of the soluble oxalates should have been present in the dissolved slurry based on the dilution effects and volumes of supernate and wash solutions removed. A trace level material balance showed greater than 97 percent recovery of americium-241 (from the beta dec

  3. GLASS FABRICATION AND PRODUCT CONSISTENCY TESTING OF LANTHANIDE BOROSHILICATE FRIT X COMPOSITION FOR PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J

    2006-11-21

    were analyzed to determine the dissolved concentrations of key elements. Acid stripping of leach vessels was performed to determine the concentration of the glass constituents that may have sorbed on the vessels during leach testing. Additionally, the leachate solutions were ultrafiltered to quantify colloid formation. Characterization of the quenched Pu Frit X glass prior to testing revealed that some crystalline plutonium oxide was present in the glass. The crystalline particles had a disklike morphology and likely formed via coarsening of particles in areas compositionally enriched in plutonium. Similar results had also been observed in previous Pu Frit B studies. Isothermal 1250 C heat-treated Pu Frit X glasses showed two different crystalline phases (PuO{sub 2} and Nd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}), as well as a peak shift in the XRD spectra that is likely due to a solid solution phase PuO{sub 2}-HfO{sub 2} formation. Micrographs of this glass showed a clustering of some of the crystalline phases. Pu Frit X glass subjected to the can-in-canister heating profile also displayed the two PuO{sub 2} and Nd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} phases from XRD analysis. Additional micrographs indicate crystalline phases in this glass were of varying forms (a spherical PuO{sub 2} phase that appeared to range in size from submicron to {approx}5 micron, a dendritic-type phase that was comprised of mixed lanthanides and plutonium, and a minor phase that contained Pu and Hf), and clustering of the phases was also observed.

  4. A host phase for the disposal of weapons plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, Werner; Helean, K.B.; Gong, W.L.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    1999-01-01

    Research was conducted into the possible use of zircon (ZrSiO 4 ) as a host phase for storage or disposal of excess weapons plutonium. Zircon is one of the most chemically durable minerals. Its structure can accommodate a variety of elements, including plutonium and uranium. Natural zircon contains uranium and thorium together in different quantities, usually in the range of less than one weight percent up to several weight percent. Zircon occurs in nature as a crystalline or a partially to fully metamict mineral, depending on age and actinide element concentration, i.e., on radiation damage. These zircon samples have been studied extensively and the results are documented in the literature in terms of radiation damage to the crystal structure and related property changes, e.g., density, hardness, loss of uranium and lead, etc. Thus, a unique suite of natural analogues are available to describe the effect of decay of 239 Pu on zircon's structure and how zircon's physical and chemical properties will be affected over very long periods of time. Actually, the oldest zircon samples known are over 3 billion years old. This period covers the time for decay of 239 Pu (half-life 24,300 yr.) and most of its daughter 235 U (half-life 700 million yr.). Because of its chemical durability, even under extreme geological conditions, zircon is the most widely used mineral for geochronological dating (7,000 publications). It is the oldest dated mineral on earth and in the universe. Zircon has already been doped with about 10 weight percent of plutonium. Pure PuSiO 4 has also been synthesized and has the same crystal structure as zircon. However, use of zircon as a storage medium or waste form for plutonium requires further materials characterization. Experiments can either be conducted in laboratories where plutonium can be handled or plutonium can be simulated by other elements, and experiments can be done under less restricted conditions. The authors conducted work with zircon

  5. Characterization and Fate of Dissolved Organic Matter in the Lena Delta Region, Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves-Araujo, R.; Stedmon, C. A.; Heim, B.; Dubinenkov, I.; Kraberg, A.; Moiseev, D.; Bracher, A.

    2016-02-01

    Connectivity between the terrestrial and marine environment in the Artic is changing as a result of climate change, influencing both freshwater budgets and the supply of carbon to the sea. This study characterizes the optical properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) within the Lena Delta region and evaluates the behavior of DOM across the fresh water-marine gradient. Six fluorescent components (four humic-like; one marine humic-like; one protein-like) were identified by Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC) with a clear dominance of allochthonous humic-like signals. Colored DOM (CDOM) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were highly correlated and had their distribution coupled with hydrographical conditions. Higher DOM concentration and degree of humification were associated with the low salinity waters of the Lena River. Values decreased towards the higher salinity Laptev Sea shelf waters. Results demonstrate different responses of DOM mixing in relation to the vertical structure of the water column, as reflecting the hydrographical dynamics in the region. Two mixing curves for DOM were apparent. In surface waters above the pycnocline there was a sharper decrease in DOM concentration in relation to salinity indicating removal. In the bottom water layer the DOM decrease within salinity was less. We propose there is a removal of DOM occurring primarily at the surface layer, which is likely driven by photodegradation and flocculation.

  6. Recovery of plutonium from incinerator ash at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.C.

    1976-01-01

    Incineration of combustible materials highly contaminated with plutonium produces a residue of incinerator ash. Recovery of plutonium from incinerator ash residues at Rocky Flats is accomplished by a continuous leaching operation with nitric acid containing fluoride ion. Special equipment used in the leaching operation consists of a screw feeder, air-lift dissolvers, filters, solids dryer, and vapor collection system. Each equipment item is described in detail. The average dissolution efficiency of plutonium experienced with the process was 68% on the first pass, 74% on the second pass, and 64% on each subsequent pass. Total-solids dissolution efficiencies averaged 47% on the first pass and about 25% on each subsequent pass

  7. Dissolved organic carbon enhances the mass transfer of hydrophobic organic compounds from Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLs) into the aqueous phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, K.E.C.; Thullner, M.; Wick, L.Y.; Harms, H.

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis that dissolved organic carbon (DOC) enhances the mass transfer of hydrophobic organic compounds from nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) into the aqueous phase above that attributable to dissolved molecular diffusion alone was tested. In controlled experiments, mass transfer rates of

  8. System for imaging plutonium through heavy shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuckertz, T.H.; Cannon, T.M.; Fenimore, E.E.; Moss, C.E.; Nixon, K.V.

    1984-04-01

    A single pinhole can be used to image strong self-luminescent gamma-ray sources such as plutonium on gamma scintillation (Anger) cameras. However, if the source is weak or heavily shielded, a poor signal to noise ratio can prevent acquisition of the image. An imaging system designed and built at Los Alamos National Laboratory uses a coded aperture to image heavily shielded sources. The paper summarizes the mathematical techniques, based on the Fast Delta Hadamard transform, used to decode raw images. Practical design considerations such as the phase of the uniformly redundant aperture and the encoded image sampling are discussed. The imaging system consists of a custom designed m-sequence coded aperture, a Picker International Corporation gamma scintillation camera, a LeCroy 3500 data acquisition system, and custom imaging software. The paper considers two sources - 1.5 mCi 57 Co unshielded at a distance of 27 m and 220 g of bulk plutonium (11.8% 240 Pu) with 0.3 cm lead, 2.5 cm steel, and 10 cm of dense plastic material at a distance of 77.5 cm. Results show that the location and geometry of a source hidden in a large sealed package can be determined without having to open the package. 6 references, 4 figures

  9. The spectrographic analysis of plutonium oxide or mixed plutonium oxide/uranium oxide fuel pellets by the dried residue technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarbo, G.J.; Faught, P.; Hildebrandt, B.

    1980-05-01

    An emission spectrographic method for the quantitative determination of metallic impurities in plutonium oxide and mixed plutonium oxide/uranium oxide is described. The fuel is dissolved in nitric acid and the plutonium and/or uranium extracted with tributyl phosphate. A small aliquot of the aqueous residue is dried on a 'mini' pyrolitic graphite plate and excited by high voltage AC spark in an oxygen atmosphere. Spectra are recorded in a region which has been specially selected to record simultaneously lines of boron and cadmium in the 2nd order and all the other elements of interest in the 1st order. Indium is used as an internal standard. The excitation of very small quantities of the uraniumm/plutonium free residue by high voltage spark, together with three separate levels of containment reduce the hazards to personnel and the environment to a minimum with limited effect on sensitivity and accuracy of the results. (auth)

  10. Changes in concentration and (delta) 13C value of dissolved CH4, CO2 and organic carbon in rice paddies under ambient and elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiguo Cheng; Yagi, Kazuyuki; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Hua Xu; Kobayashi, Kazuhiko

    2005-01-01

    Changes in concentration and (delta) 13 C value of dissolved CH 4 , CO 2 and organic carbon (DOC) in floodwater and soil solution from a Japanese rice paddy were studied under ambient and elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO 2 in controlled environment chambers. The concentrations of dissolved CH 4 in floodwater increased with rice growth (with some fluctuation), while the concentrations of CO 2 remained between 2.9 to 4.4 and 4.2 to 5.8 μg C mL -1 under conditions of ambient and elevated CO 2 concentration, respectively. The amount of CH 4 dissolved in soil solution under elevated CO 2 levels was significantly lower than under ambient CO 2 in the tillering stage, implying that the elevated CO 2 treatment accelerated CH 4 oxidation during the early stage of growth. However, during later stages of growth, production of CH 4 increased and the amount of CH 4 dissolved in soil solution under elevated CO 2 levels was, on average, greater than that under ambient CO 2 conditions. Significant correlation existed among the (delta) 13 C values of dissolved CH 4 , CO 2 , and DOC in floodwater (except for the samples taken immediately after pulse feeding with 13 C enriched CO 2 ), indicating that the origins and cycling of CH 4 , CO 2 and DOC were related. There were also significant correlations among the (delta) 13 C values of CH 4 , CO 2 and DOC in the soil solution. The turnover rate of CO 2 in soil solution was most rapid in the panicle formation stage of rice growth and that of CH 4 fastest in the grain filling stage. (Author)

  11. Chemical species of plutonium in Hanford radioactive tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    Large quantities of radioactive wastes have been generated at the Hanford Site over its operating life. The wastes with the highest activities are stored underground in 177 large (mostly one million gallon volume) concrete tanks with steel liners. The wastes contain processing chemicals, cladding chemicals, fission products, and actinides that were neutralized to a basic pH before addition to the tanks to prevent corrosion of the steel liners. Because the mission of the Hanford Site was to provide plutonium for defense purposes, the amount of plutonium lost to the wastes was relatively small. The best estimate of the amount of plutonium lost to all the waste tanks is about 500 kg. Given uncertainties in the measurements, some estimates are as high as 1,000 kg (Roetman et al. 1994). The wastes generally consist of (1) a sludge layer generated by precipitation of dissolved metals from aqueous wastes solutions during neutralization with sodium hydroxide, (2) a salt cake layer formed by crystallization of salts after evaporation of the supernate solution, and (3) an aqueous supernate solution that exists as a separate layer or as liquid contained in cavities between sludge or salt cake particles. The identity of chemical species of plutonium in these wastes will allow a better understanding of the behavior of the plutonium during storage in tanks, retrieval of the wastes, and processing of the wastes. Plutonium chemistry in the wastes is important to criticality and environmental concerns, and in processing the wastes for final disposal. Plutonium has been found to exist mainly in the sludge layers of the tanks along with other precipitated metal hydrous oxides. This is expected due to its low solubility in basic aqueous solutions. Tank supernate solutions do not contain high concentrations of plutonium even though some tanks contain high concentrations of complexing agents. The solutions also contain significant concentrations of hydroxide which competes with other

  12. The first metallurgical tests on plutonium; Premiers essais metallurgiques sur le plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grison, E; Abramson, R; Anselin, F; Monti, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Metallic plutonium was first prepared in France in January 1956, as soon as we had access to quantities of the order of several grams of plutonium, which had been extracted from the rods of the pile EL2 at Saclay. Since up to the present this reactor, of thermal power 2 000 kW, has been our only source of plutonium, we have so far only worked on experimental quantities sufficient for the basic tests but not for tests on a scale of possible applications. It is this work, carried out during this phase of preliminary research, which is described below. With the starting up of the plutonium extraction plant at Marcoule, where the reactor G1 has been operating at power for more than a year, we shall go on next to a another order of magnitude which will allow the manufacture and experimentation of prototype fuel elements. (author) [French] La premiere elaboration de plutonium metallique en France fut faite en janvier 1956, des que nous pumes disposer de quantites de plutonium de l'ordre de quelques grammes, qui avaient ete retires des barreaux de la pile EL2 de Saclay. Ce reacteur, d'une puissance thermique de 2 000 kW, ayant ete jusqu'a present notre seule source de plutonium, nous n'avons encore travaille que sur des quantites experimentales suffisantes pour les essais de base, mais non pour des essais a l'echelle d'applications possibles. Ce sont les travaux effectues pendant cette phase de recherches preliminaires qui seront evoques ci-dessous. Avec la mise eu route de l'usine d'extraction de plutonium de Marcoule, ou le reacteur G1 fonctionne en puissance depuis plus d'un an, nous allons passer prochainement a un autre ordre de grandeur, qui nous permettra la fabrication et l'experimentation d'elements combustibles prototypes. (auteur)

  13. Equilibrium state of delta-phase with tellurium in the Sb-Bi-Te system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajgukova, V.S.; Dudkin, L.D.; Erofeev, R.S.; Musaelyan, V.V.; Nadzhip, A.Eh.; Sokolov, O.B.

    1978-01-01

    A research has been carried out with a view to establish the equilibrium state of delta-phase of the composition (Sbsub(1-x)Bisub(x)) 2 Te 3 with tellurium, depending on x and temperature. The Hall effect, the thermoelectromotive force, and the electric conductivity of the samples of Sb-Bi-Te alloys have been measured, the samples being annealed at various temperatures (550 to 250 deg C). The measurement results have shown that as the Bi 2 Te 3 content in the solid solutions increases and temperature decreases, the delta-phase-Te boundary monotonously approaches the stoichiometric composition. Using the research carrid out as the basis, the general character of the equilibrium delta-phase with tellurium boundary has been rendered more precise in Sb-Bi-Te system, depending on the temperature and Bi content (up to 25 at.%)

  14. Landscape scale controls on the vascular plant component of dissolved organic carbon across a freshwater delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckard, Robert S.; Hernes, Peter J.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Kendall, Carol

    2007-01-01

    Lignin phenol concentrations and compositions were determined on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) extracts (XAD resins) within the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (the Delta), the tidal freshwater portion of the San Francisco Bay Estuary, located in central California, USA. Fourteen stations were sampled, including the following habitats and land-use types: wetland, riverine, channelized waterway, open water, and island drains. Stations were sampled approximately seasonally from December, 1999 through May, 2001. DOC concentrations ranged from 1.3 mg L-1 within the Sacramento River to 39.9 mg L-1 at the outfall from an island drain (median 3.0 mg L-1), while lignin concentrations ranged from 3.0 μL-1 within the Sacramento River to 111 μL-1 at the outfall from an island drain (median 11.6 μL-1). Both DOC and lignin concentrations varied significantly among habitat/land-use types and among sampling stations. Carbon-normalized lignin yields ranged from 0.07 mg (100 mg OC)-1 at an island drain to 0.84 mg (100 mg OC)-1 for a wetland (median 0.36 mg (100 mg OC)-1), and also varied significantly among habitat/land-use types. A simple mass balance model indicated that the Delta acted as a source of lignin during late autumn through spring (10-83% increase) and a sink for lignin during summer and autumn (13-39% decrease). Endmember mixing models using S:V and C:V signatures of landscape scale features indicated strong temporal variation in sources of DOC export from the Delta, with riverine source signatures responsible for 50% of DOC in summer and winter, wetland signatures responsible for 40% of DOC in summer, winter, and late autumn, and island drains responsible for 40% of exported DOC in late autumn. A significant negative correlation was observed between carbon-normalized lignin yields and DOC bioavailability in two of the 14 sampling stations. This study is, to our knowledge, the first to describe organic vascular plant DOC sources at the level of localized

  15. Dissolution of uranium and plutonium particles: simulations using the Mercer equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, C.E.; Jenne, E.A.

    1983-10-01

    There is a need to be able to predict the amount of plutonium that will be in solution at a given time from dissolution of particles in order to better predict the environmental behavior and possible adverse effects of plutonium spills. The equation developed by Mercer (1967) to simulate the dissolution of particles in lungs was parameterized and used to simulate the dissolution of a population of plutonium or uranium particles in the soil. Parameter values for the size distribution of particles in soil, and the density of the particles were found; however, values for the shape factors, and the dissolution rate were virtually non-existent. The calculated mass dissolved was most sensitive to the median diameter of the population of particles and least sensitive to the geometric standard deviation. A given percent change in the shape parameter and the dissolution rate resulted in approximately an equal percent change in the mass dissolved. Provided that the population of particles follows a log-normal distribution, the particles are homogeneous in composition and the dissolution can be represented by first-order kinetics, this equation can probably be applied with slight modification to estimate the mass dissolved at a given time. 66 references, 7 figures, 4 tables

  16. Plutonium recovery from spent reactor fuel by uranium displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, J.P.

    1992-03-17

    A process is described for separating uranium values and transuranic values from fission products containing rare earth values when the values are contained together in a molten chloride salt electrolyte. A molten chloride salt electrolyte with a first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is contacted with both a solid cathode and an anode having values of uranium and fission products including plutonium. A voltage is applied across the anode and cathode electrolytically to transfer uranium and plutonium from the anode to the electrolyte while uranium values in the electrolyte electrolytically deposit as uranium metal on the solid cathode in an amount equal to the uranium and plutonium transferred from the anode causing the electrolyte to have a second ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride. Then the solid cathode with the uranium metal deposited thereon is removed and molten cadmium having uranium dissolved therein is brought into contact with the electrolyte resulting in chemical transfer of plutonium values from the electrolyte to the molten cadmium and transfer of uranium values from the molten cadmium to the electrolyte until the first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is reestablished.

  17. Plutonium recovery from spent reactor fuel by uranium displacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    A process is described for separating uranium values and transuranic values from fission products containing rare earth values when the values are contained together in a molten chloride salt electrolyte. A molten chloride salt electrolyte with a first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is contacted with both a solid cathode and an anode having values of uranium and fission products including plutonium. A voltage is applied across the anode and cathode electrolytically to transfer uranium and plutonium from the anode to the electrolyte while uranium values in the electrolyte electrolytically deposit as uranium metal on the solid cathode in an amount equal to the uranium and plutonium transferred from the anode causing the electrolyte to have a second ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride. Then the solid cathode with the uranium metal deposited thereon is removed and molten cadmium having uranium dissolved therein is brought into contact with the electrolyte resulting in chemical transfer of plutonium values from the electrolyte to the molten cadmium and transfer of uranium values from the molten cadmium to the electrolyte until the first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is reestablished

  18. Chemical Disposition of Plutonium in Hanford Site Tank Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jones, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-05-07

    This report examines the chemical disposition of plutonium (Pu) in Hanford Site tank wastes, by itself and in its observed and potential interactions with the neutron absorbers aluminum (Al), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), and sodium (Na). Consideration also is given to the interactions of plutonium with uranium (U). No consideration of the disposition of uranium itself as an element with fissile isotopes is considered except tangentially with respect to its interaction as an absorber for plutonium. The report begins with a brief review of Hanford Site plutonium processes, examining the various means used to recover plutonium from irradiated fuel and from scrap, and also examines the intermediate processing of plutonium to prepare useful chemical forms. The paper provides an overview of Hanford tank defined-waste–type compositions and some calculations of the ratios of plutonium to absorber elements in these waste types and in individual waste analyses. These assessments are based on Hanford tank waste inventory data derived from separately published, expert assessments of tank disposal records, process flowsheets, and chemical/radiochemical analyses. This work also investigates the distribution and expected speciation of plutonium in tank waste solution and solid phases. For the solid phases, both pure plutonium compounds and plutonium interactions with absorber elements are considered. These assessments of plutonium chemistry are based largely on analyses of idealized or simulated tank waste or strongly alkaline systems. The very limited information available on plutonium behavior, disposition, and speciation in genuine tank waste also is discussed. The assessments show that plutonium coprecipitates strongly with chromium, iron, manganese and uranium absorbers. Plutonium’s chemical interactions with aluminum, nickel, and sodium are minimal to non-existent. Credit for neutronic interaction of plutonium with these absorbers

  19. Studies of plutonium-iron and uranium-plutonium-iron alloys; Etudes d'alliages plutonium-fer et d'alliages uranium-plutonium-fer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avivi, Ehud [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-01-15

    We study the plutonium-iron system, by means of dilatometry, X rays and metallography, especially in the domain between PuFe{sub 2} and Fe. We determine the solubilities of Fe in PuFe{sub 2} and of Pu in Fe. We show the presence of an hexagonal PuFe{sub 2} phase and we propose a modification in the Pu-Fe phase diagram. Some low iron concentration U-Pu-Fe alloys have also been investigated. We characterise the different phases. We confirm that adding some iron lowers the quantity of the zeta U-Pu phase. We emphasize some characteristics of the alloys having the global concentration (U, Pu){sub 6} Fe. (authors) [French] On etudie par dilatometrie, rayons X et micrographie le systeme plutonium-fer, principalement dans la region comprise entre PuFe{sub 2} et Fe, On determine les solubilites du fer dans PuFe{sub 2}, et de Pu dans Fe. On met en evidence une phase PuFe{sub 2} hexagonale et on propose une modification du diagramme d'equilibre Pu-Fe. Certains alliages U-Pu-Fe a faibles concentrations en fer sont egalement etudies. On caracterise les phases en presence. On confirme que l'addition de fer diminue rapidement la quantite de phase U-Pu zeta. Enfin on revele certaines caracteristiques des alliages de composition globale (U, Pu){sub 6} Fe. (auteurs)

  20. Strategies for the plutonium utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zouain, D.M.; Lima, J.O.V.; Sakamoto, L.H.

    1981-11-01

    A review of the activities involving plutonium (its recycle, utilization and technological status and perspectives) is done. These informations are useful for an economic viability study for the plutonium utilization in thermal reactors (recycling) and in fast breeders reactor (FBR), trying to collect the major number of informations about these subjects. The initial phase describes the present status and projections of plutonium accumulation and requirements. Then, the technological process are described and some strategies are analyzed. (E.G.) [pt

  1. Particulate, colloidal, and solution phase associations of plutonium, americium, and uranium in surface and groundwater at the Rocky Flats Plant, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnish, R.A.; McKnight, D.M.; Ranville, J.F.; Stephens, V.C.; Honeyman, B.D.

    1993-01-01

    With the cessation of plutonium processing at the D.O.E.-administered Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, CO, the focus of activities at the facility has switched to contaminant assessment and potential remediation strategies. In this context the authors began a study in 1991 to determine the potential for colloid-facilitated transport of the actinides Pu, Am, and in surface- and groundwater at this site. Using the technique of tangential flow ultrafiltration, the authors isolated particles from four size fractions at one groundwater well and two surface water seeps to determine the distribution of Pu, Am, and U among particulate, colloidal, and dissolved aqueous phases. Analysis of particle isolates and filtrate fractions showed significant associations of Am and Pu with colloidal and particulate size particles; uranium isotopes were associated mainly with low molecular weight organic species. The results indicate a potential for colloidal-facilitated transport of the actinides Pu and Am and a significant contribution by low molecular weight natural organic matter to uranium transport

  2. Plutonium Chemistry in the UREX Separation Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulenova, Alena; Vandegrift, George F. III; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the project is to examine the chemical speciation of plutonium in UREX+ (uranium/tributylphosphate) extraction processes for advanced fuel technology. Researchers will analyze the change in speciation using existing thermodynamics and kinetic computer codes to examine the speciation of plutonium in aqueous and organic phases. They will examine the different oxidation states of plutonium to find the relative distribution between the aqueous and organic phases under various conditions such as different concentrations of nitric acid, total nitrates, or actinide ions. They will also utilize techniques such as X-ray absorbance spectroscopy and small-angle neutron scattering for determining plutonium and uranium speciation in all separation stages. The project started in April 2005 and is scheduled for completion in March 2008.

  3. Formation, characterization, and stability of plutonium (IV) colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobart, D.E.; Morris, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Newton, T.W.

    1989-01-01

    Plutonium is expected to be a major component of the waste element package in any high-level nuclear waste repository. Plutonium(IV) is known to form colloids under chemical conditions similar to those found in typical groundwaters. In the event of a breach of a repository, these colloids represent a source of radionuclide transport to the far-field environment, in parallel with the transport of dissolved waste element species. In addition, the colloids may decompose or disaggregate into soluble ionic species. Thus, colloids represent an additional term in determining waste element solubility limits. A thorough characterization of the physical and chemical properties of these colloids under relevant conditions is essential to assess the concentration limits and transport mechanisms for the waste elements at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository site. This report is concerned primarily with recent results obtained by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Solubility Determination Task pertaining to the characterization of the structural and chemical properties of Pu(IV) colloid. Important results will be presented which provides further evidence that colloidal plutonium(IV) is structurally similar to plutonium dioxide and that colloidal plutonium(IV) is electrochemically reactive. 13 refs., 7 figs

  4. Recovery of americium-241 from aged plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Burney, G.A.; Reilly, T.A.; Wilson, T.W.; McKibben, J.M.

    1980-12-01

    About 5 kg of ingrown 241 Am was recovered from 850 kg of aged plutonium using a process developed specifically for Savannah River Plant application. The aged plutonium metal was first dissolved in sulfamic acid. Sodium nitrite was added to oxidize the plutonium to Pu(IV) and the residual sulfamate ion was oxidized to nitrogen gas and sulfate. The plutonium and americium were separated by one cycle of solvent extraction. The recovered products were subsequently purified by cation exchange chromatography, precipitated as oxalates, and calcined to the oxides. Plutonium processng was routine. Before cation exchange purification, the aqueous americium solution from solvent extraction was concentrated and stripped of nitric acid. More than 98% of the 241 Am was then recovered from the cation exchange column where it was effectively decontaminated from all major impurities except nickel and chromium. This partially purified product solution was concentrated further by evaporation and then denitrated by reaction with formic acid. Individual batches of americium oxalate were then precipitated, filtered, washed, and calcined. About 98.5% of the americium was recovered. The final product purity averaged 98% 241 AmO 2 ; residual impurities were primarily lead and nickel

  5. Reduction of uranium and plutonium oxides by aluminum. Application to the recycling of plutonium; Reduction des oxydes d'uranium et de plutonium par l'aluminium application au recyclage du plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallay, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Valduc (France). Centre d' Etudes

    1968-07-01

    A process for treating plutonium oxide calcined at high temperatures (1000 to 2000 deg. C) with a view to recovering the metal consists in the reduction of this oxide dissolved in a mixture of aluminium, sodium and calcium fluorides by aluminium at about 1180 deg. C. The first part of the report presents the results of reduction tests carried out on the uranium oxides UO{sub 2} and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}; these are in agreement with the thermodynamic calculations of the exchange reaction at equilibrium. The second part describes the application of this method to plutonium oxides. The Pu-Al alloy obtained (60 per cent Pu) is then recycled in an aqueous medium. (author) [French] Un procede de traitement de l'oxyde de plutonium calcine a haute temperature (1000 deg. C a 2000 deg. C), en vue de la recuperation du metal, consiste a reduire cet oxyde dissous dans un melange de fluorures d'aluminium, de sodium et de calcium, par l'aluminium vers 1180 deg. C. Une premiere partie du rapport presente les resultats des essais de reduction des oxydes d'uranium UO{sub 2} et U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, en accord avec les resultats du calcul thermodynamique de la reaction d'echange a l'equilibre. Une seconde partie rend compte de l'application de cette methode a l'oxyde de plutonium. L'alliage Pu-Al obtenu (60 pour cent Pu) est ensuite recycle par voie aqueuse. (auteur)

  6. The Plutonium Temperature Effect Experimental Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeck, Wim; Leclaire, Nicolas; Letang, Eric [IRSN, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Girault, Emmanuel; Fouillaud, Patrick [CEA, VALDUC (France)

    2008-07-01

    Various theoretical studies have shown that highly diluted plutonium solutions could have a positive temperature effect but (up to now) no experimental program has confirmed this effect. The main goal of the French Plutonium Temperature Effect Experimental Program (or PU+ in short) is to effectively show that such a positive temperature effect exists for diluted plutonium solutions. The experiments were conducted in the 'Apparatus B' facility at the CEA Valduc research centre in France and involved several sub-critical approach type of experiments using plutonium nitrate solutions with concentrations of 14.3, 15 and 20 g/l at temperatures ranging from 20 to 40 deg. C. A total number of 14 phase I experiments (consisting of independent subcritical approaches) have been performed (5 at 20 g/l, 4 at 15 g/l and 5 at 14.3 g/l) between 2006 and 2007. The impact of the uncertainties on the solution acidity and the plutonium concentration makes it difficult to clearly demonstrate the positive temperature effect, requiring an additional phase II experiment (in which the use of the same plutonium solution was ensured) from 22 to 28 deg. C performed in July 2007. This experiment has shown the existence of a positive temperature effect approx +2 pcm/deg. C (from 22 to 28 deg. C for a plutonium concentration of 14.3 g/l). (authors)

  7. Plutonium Chemistry in the UREX+ Separation Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALena Paulenova; George F. Vandegrift, III; Kenneth R. Czerwinski

    2009-10-01

    The project "Plutonium Chemistry in the UREX+ Separation Processes” is led by Dr. Alena Paulenova of Oregon State University under collaboration with Dr. George Vandegrift of ANL and Dr. Ken Czerwinski of the University of Nevada at Las Vegas. The objective of the project is to examine the chemical speciation of plutonium in UREX+ (uranium/tributylphosphate) extraction processes for advanced fuel technology. Researchers will analyze the change in speciation using existing thermodynamics and kinetic computer codes to examine the speciation of plutonium in aqueous and organic phases. They will examine the different oxidation states of plutonium to find the relative distribution between the aqueous and organic phases under various conditions such as different concentrations of nitric acid, total nitrates, or actinide ions. They will also utilize techniques such as X-ray absorbance spectroscopy and small-angle neutron scattering for determining plutonium and uranium speciation in all separation stages. The project started in April 2005 and is scheduled for completion in March 2008.

  8. The veining phenomenon in unalloyed plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation has been made of the veining phenomenon in unalloyed plutonium. The surface markings, or veins, which are sometimes seen on α-phase plutonium samples, arise as a result of the β→α transformation. As far as is known, this veining is unrivalled in its scale and form as compared with the solid state surface transformation effects shown by any other metal. The phenomenon has been explained by the application of the Le Chatelier principle to the phase change. In this instance, the large (10%) volume contraction associated with the β→α reaction and the anisotropy of the nonoclinic α-phase structure, account for the fact that the veins are so prominent in plutonium. On the basis of the proposed model, the veins can only form at temperatures where the transformation mechanism is non-martensitic. (Auth.)

  9. Plutonium fires; Incendies de plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestre, E.

    1959-06-23

    The author reports an information survey on accidents which occurred when handling plutonium. He first addresses accidents reported in documents. He indicates the circumstances and consequences of these accidents (explosion in glove boxes, fires of plutonium chips, plutonium fire followed by filter destruction, explosion during plutonium chip dissolution followed by chip fire). He describes hazards associated with plutonium fires: atmosphere and surface contamination, criticality. The author gives some advices to avoid plutonium fires. These advices concern electric installations, the use of flammable solvents, general cautions associated with plutonium handling, venting and filtration. He finally describes how to fight plutonium fires, and measures to be taken after the fire (staff contamination control, atmosphere control)

  10. Preparation of plutonium waste forms with ICPP calcined high-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staples, B.A.; Knecht, D.A. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); O`Holleran, T.P. [Argonne National Lab.-West, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    Glass and glass-ceramic forms developed for the immobilization of calcined high-level wastes generated by Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) fuel reprocessing activities have been investigated for ability to immobilize plutonium and to simultaneously incorporate calcined waste as an anti-proliferation barrier. Within the forms investigated, crystallization of host phases result in an increased loading of plutonium as well as its incorporation into potentially more durable phases than the glass. The host phases were initially formed and characterized with cerium (Ce{sup +4}) as a surrogate for plutonium (Pu{sup +4}) and samarium as a neutron absorber for criticality control. Verification of the surrogate testing results were then performed replacing cerium with plutonium. All testing was performed with surrogate calcined high-level waste. The results of these tests indicated that a potentially useful host phase, based on zirconia, can be formed either by devitrification or solid state reaction in the glass studied. This phase incorporates plutonium as well as samarium and the calcined waste becomes part of the matrix. Its ease of formation makes it potentially useful in excess plutonium dispositioning. Other durable host phases for plutonium and samarium, including zirconolite and zircon have been formed from zirconia or alumina calcine through cold press-sintering techniques and hot isostatic pressing. Host phase formation experiments conducted through vitrification or by cold press-sintering techniques are described and the results discussed. Recommendations are given for future work that extends the results of this study.

  11. Preparation of plutonium waste forms with ICPP calcined high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, B.A.; Knecht, D.A.; O'Holleran, T.P.

    1997-05-01

    Glass and glass-ceramic forms developed for the immobilization of calcined high-level wastes generated by Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) fuel reprocessing activities have been investigated for ability to immobilize plutonium and to simultaneously incorporate calcined waste as an anti-proliferation barrier. Within the forms investigated, crystallization of host phases result in an increased loading of plutonium as well as its incorporation into potentially more durable phases than the glass. The host phases were initially formed and characterized with cerium (Ce +4 ) as a surrogate for plutonium (Pu +4 ) and samarium as a neutron absorber for criticality control. Verification of the surrogate testing results were then performed replacing cerium with plutonium. All testing was performed with surrogate calcined high-level waste. The results of these tests indicated that a potentially useful host phase, based on zirconia, can be formed either by devitrification or solid state reaction in the glass studied. This phase incorporates plutonium as well as samarium and the calcined waste becomes part of the matrix. Its ease of formation makes it potentially useful in excess plutonium dispositioning. Other durable host phases for plutonium and samarium, including zirconolite and zircon have been formed from zirconia or alumina calcine through cold press-sintering techniques and hot isostatic pressing. Host phase formation experiments conducted through vitrification or by cold press-sintering techniques are described and the results discussed. Recommendations are given for future work that extends the results of this study

  12. Method for dissolving ceramic beryllia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sands, A.E.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for dissolving a nuclear fuel composition consisting of a sintered mass containing beryllia, a nuclear fuel selected from uranium and plutonium and a stabilizing agent, sintered at a temperature of at least 1500 0 C to a density of about 2.7 gs/cc. The process comprises contacting said sintered mass with a stoichiometric excess of lithium oxide dissolved or dispersed in a carrier selected from lithium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide or sodium nitrate at a temperature in the range 750--850 0 C to convert the beryllia to lithium beryllate and thereafter recovering the nuclear fuel content of said mass. (U.S.)

  13. Stop plutonium; Stop plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-02-01

    This press document aims to inform the public on the hazards bound to the plutonium exploitation in France and especially the plutonium transport. The first part is a technical presentation of the plutonium and the MOX (Mixed Oxide Fuel). The second part presents the installation of the plutonium industry in France. The third part is devoted to the plutonium convoys safety. The highlight is done on the problem of the leak of ''secret'' of such transports. (A.L.B.)

  14. Solvent anode for plutonium purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowersox, D.F.; Fife, K.W.; Christensen, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a technique to allow complete oxidation of plutonium from the anode during plutonium electrorefining. This will eliminate the generation of a ''spent'' anode heel which requires further treatment for recovery. Our approach is to employ a solvent metal in the anode to provide a liquid anode pool throughout electrorefining. We use molten salts and metals in ceramic crucibles at 700 0 C. Our goal is to produce plutonium metal at 99.9% purity with oxidation and transfer of more than 98% of the impure plutonium feed metal from the anode into the salt and product phases. We have met these criteria in experiments on the 100 to 1000 g scale. We plan to scale our operations to 4 kg of feed plutonium and to optimize the process parameters

  15. Effect of the expansion associated with the plutonium α-β-γ phase transitions on storage can integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearing, Dane R.; Veirs, D. Kirk; Prenger, F. Coyne

    2001-11-01

    The effects of the volume expansion of plutonium metal through the α-β and β-γ phase transitions on a stainless steel storage container were examined. A cylindrical plutonium ingot was placed in the axial center of an annealed stainless steel cylinder and thermally cycled until a steady state in the strain response of the cylinder was reached. The average plastic hoop strain was 1.47% and 1.55% after six and four cycles through the α-β and α-β-γ phase transitions, respectively. Elastic strain was ˜0.2%, indicating a 8.96 MPa back pressure on the Pu ingot. This is an order of magnitude less than the compressive yield strength of α- and β-Pu at the transition temperature. Metallographic analyses indicate that anisotropic expansion of the Pu ingot is due to preferentially oriented grain growth of the β-Pu along the axial direction due to stress applied by the steel cylinder during the α-β phase transition.

  16. The plutonium-oxygen and uranium-plutonium-oxygen systems: A thermochemical assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The report of a panel of experts convened by the IAEA in Vienna in March 1964. It reviews the structural and thermodynamic data for the Pu-O and U-Pu-O systems and presents the conclusions of the panel. The report gives information on preparation, phase diagrams, thermodynamic and vaporization behaviour of plutonium oxides, uranium-plutonium oxides and PuO 2 -MeO x (Me=Be, Mg, Al, Si, W, Th, Eu, Zr, Ce) systems. 167 refs, 27 figs, 17 tabs

  17. PLUTONIUM PURIFICATION PROCESS EMPLOYING THORIUM PYROPHOSPHATE CARRIER

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E.L.

    1959-04-28

    The separation and purification of plutonium from the radioactive elements of lower atomic weight is described. The process of this invention comprises forming a 0.5 to 2 M aqueous acidffc solution containing plutonium fons in the tetravalent state and elements with which it is normally contaminated in neutron irradiated uranium, treating the solution with a double thorium compound and a soluble pyrophosphate compound (Na/sub 4/P/sub 2/O/sub 7/) whereby a carrier precipitate of thorium A method is presented of reducing neptunium and - trite is advantageous since it destroys any hydrazine f so that they can be removed from solutions in which they are contained is described. In the carrier precipitation process for the separation of plutonium from uranium and fission products including zirconium and columbium, the precipitated blsmuth phosphate carries some zirconium, columbium, and uranium impurities. According to the invention such impurities can be complexed and removed by dissolving the contaminated carrier precipitate in 10M nitric acid, followed by addition of fluosilicic acid to about 1M, diluting the solution to about 1M in nitric acid, and then adding phosphoric acid to re-precipitate bismuth phosphate carrying plutonium.

  18. The kinetics of the β→α transformation in unalloyed plutonium after partial formation of the β phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.C.; Stacey, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the isothermal β→α transformation after complete and only partial formation of the β phase in unalloyed plutonium containing about 900 ppm of impurity are reported and compared with previously published and conventionally accepted β→α transformation kinetics after complete formation of the β phase in this material. In these experiments the heating was provided by constant temperature oil baths and the transformations were monitored by electrical resistance measurements on 0.63 mm diameter wire samples at temperatures ranging from -65 0 C to +75 0 C. After complete formation of the β phase in the plutonium used in these experiments the kinetics of the β→α transformation were in general agreement with previously published data, although the present transformations were slower than reported by previous workers. After only partial formation of the β phase the subsequent β→α transformations were found to be very fast and to be characterised by zero or very short incubation periods, rapid rates of transformation and a final equilibrium consisting of more than 90% β phase. (Auth.)

  19. Probability of production of mobile plutonium in environments of soil and sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahara, Y.; Kudo, A.

    1998-01-01

    Mobile plutonium was found in the bottom sediment in the Nishiyama reservoir in Nagasaki after more than 40 years from deposition of local fallout released in the explosion of the A-bomb in 1945. Less than 10% of total deposited plutonium had turned into a mobile form in the bottom environment of the reservoir. The environmental conditions at bottom sediment is expected to be rich organic materials and high bacterial population under anaerobic conditions. Anaerobic bacteria have a high ability to uptake plutonium into cell during their growth. The K d of plutonium to living bacteria is 20 times greater than the dead bacteria under anaerobic conditions. The results of field observations combined with empirical laboratory tests indicate that mobile plutonium in soil and sediment may be affected not only by binding with dissolved natural organic materials but also by the number of living anaerobic bacteria. (orig.)

  20. Proserpine - plutonium 239 - Proserpine - uranium 235 - comparison of experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunet, J.P.; Caizergues, R.; Clouet D'Orval, Ch.; Kremser, J.; Moret-Bailly, J.; Verriere, Ph.

    1964-01-01

    The Proserpine homogeneous reactor is constituted by a tank, 25 cm dia, 30 cm high, surrounded by a composite reflector made of beryllium oxide and graphite. In this tank can be made critical plutonium or 90 per cent enriched uranium solutions, the fissile substances being in the form of a dissolved salt. In varying the concentration of the solution, critical masses were studied as a function of the level of the liquid in the tank. The minimum critical mass is 256 ± 2 grs for plutonium and 409 ± 3 grs for uranium 235. In the range of the critical concentrations which were studied, the neutronic properties of fissionable solutions of plutonium and enriched uranium were compared for identical geometries. (authors) [fr

  1. Modeling the thermodynamic properties of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stan, Marius

    2000-01-01

    The golden dream of any modeling enterprise is to predict the properties of the studied system in a new and often 'hostile' environment. The basis of this kind of work is the careful, accurate assessment of the system properties in normal conditions. What 'normal conditions' means for plutonium is an interesting question itself. This work is dedicated to modeling only a fraction of the remarkable characteristics of this 'mysterious' material, that is the thermodynamic properties of its six allotropic phases (seven under pressure), the liquid phase, and the vapor phase. The goal is to provide valuable information for the calculation of alloyed plutonium phase diagrams

  2. Plutonium in Southern Hemisphere Ocean Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, K. [Sophia University, Tokyo (Japan); Aoyama, M. [Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan); Gastaud, J.; Levy, I. [Marine Environment Laboratories, International Atomic Energy Agency (Monaco); Fukasawa, M. [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology Yokosuka (Japan); Kim, C. -S. [Environment Laboratories, International Atomic Energy Agency, Seibersdorf (Austria); Povinec, P. P. [Comenius University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Roos, P. [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde (Denmark); Sanchez-Cabeza, J. A. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Yim, S. A. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    Plutonium in seawater collected by the BEAGLE2003 cruise was determined using ICP-SF-MS and alpha spectrometry after Fe co-precipitation and radiochemical purification. Levels and distributions of dissolved plutonium activity concentrations in Southern Hemisphere ocean waters are summarized here, including historical data. Pu-239 concentrations in surface water of the central South Pacific (32.5{sup o}S) in 2003 were around 1 mBq/m{sup 3}. The {sup 239}Pu concentrations in the Indian Ocean surface waters (20{sup o}S) were similar to that in the South Pacific, whereas the {sup 239}Pu concentrations in the South Atlantic surface waters (30{sup o}S) were markedly lower than those in the South Pacific and Indian Oceans. The {sup 239}Pu vertical profile pattern was similar to that in the North Pacific subtropical gyre, although {sup 239}Pu concentrations in the deep South Pacific were significantly lower than those in the North Pacific. One of the dominant factors controlling plutonium distributions in the Southern Hemisphere oceans is biogeochemical processes including particle scavenging. (author)

  3. Determination of isotope fractionation effect using a double spike (242Pu+240Pu) during the mass spectrometric analysis of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitambar, S.A.; Parab, A.R.; Khodade, P.S.; Jain, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    Isotope fractionation effect during the mass spectrometric analysis of plutonium has been investigated using a double spike ( 242 Pu+ 240 Pu) and the determination of concentration of plutonium in dissolver solution of irradiated fuel is reported. (author). 6 refs., 2 tables

  4. The structure of the blue luminescent delta-phase of tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminium(III) (Alq3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cölle, Michael; Dinnebier, Robert E; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2002-12-07

    The existence of the facial isomer in the delta-phase of Alq3 is proven by X-ray structural analysis, revealing that both the different molecular structure and the weaker overlap of the pi-orbitals of hydroxyquinoline ligands belonging to neighboring Alq3 molecules as compared to other phases (alpha, beta) are likely to be the origin of the significantly different optical properties of delta-Alq3.

  5. Real And Reactive Power Saving In Three Phase Induction Machine Using Star-Delta Switching Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Daravath

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Induction machines are the most commonly used industrial drives for variety of applications. It has been estimated that induction motors consumes approximately 50 of all the electric energy generated. Further in the area of renewable energy sources such as wind or bio-mass energy induction machines have been found suitable for functioning as generators. In this context it may be mentioned that a star-delta switching is common for the starting of three-phase induction motor. Now it is proposed to use this star-delta switching for energy conservation of induction machines i.e. at times of reduced loads the machine switched back to star connection. Using a three-phase 400 V 50 Hz 4-pole induction machine it has been demonstrated that the star-delta switching of stator winding of three-phase induction machine motor generator operations reconnected in star at suitable reduced loads with a switching arrangement can result in improved efficiency and power factor as compared to a fixed delta or star connection. The predetermined values along with the experimental results have also been presented in this report. A simulation program has been developed for the predetermination of performance of the three-phase induction machine using exact equivalent circuit. A case study on a 250 kW 400 V 4-pole three-phase induction machine operated with different load cycles reveals the significant real and reactive power savings that could be obtained in the present proposal.

  6. Towards a single host phase ceramic formulation for UK plutonium disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stennett, M. C.; Hyatt, N. C.; Gilbert, M.; Livens, F. R.; Maddrell, E. R.

    2008-01-01

    The UK has a considerable stockpile of separated plutonium; a legacy of over 50 years of civilian nuclear programmes. This material has been considered both as an asset for future energy generation and a liability due to the proliferation threat. A proportion of the PuO 2 stocks may be consumed by nuclear fission, in mixed oxide (MOx) or inert matrix (IMF) fuels but a quantity of waste PuO 2 will remain which is unsuitable for fuel manufacture and will require immobilisation. A research program is currently underway to investigate the potential of various single phase ceramic formulations for the immobilisation of this waste PuO 2 fraction. In this work a number of synthetic mineral systems have been considered including titanate, zirconate, phosphate and silicate based matrices. Although a wealth of information on plutonium disposition in some of the systems exists in the literature, the data is not always directly comparable which hinders comparison between different ceramic hosts. The crux of this research has been to compile a database of information on the proposed hosts to allow impartial comparison of the relative merits and shortcomings in each system. (authors)

  7. Analysis of historical delta values for IAEA/LANL NDA training courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, William; Santi, Peter; Swinhoe, Martyn; Bonner, Elisa

    2009-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) supports the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) by providing training for IAEA inspectors in neutron and gamma-ray Nondestructive Assay (NDA) of nuclear material. Since 1980, all new IAEA inspectors attend this two week course at LANL gaining hands-on experience in the application of NDA techniques, procedures and analysis to measure plutonium and uranium nuclear material standards with well known pedigrees. As part of the course the inspectors conduct an inventory verification exercise. This exercise provides inspectors the opportunity to test their abilities in performing verification measurements using the various NDA techniques. For an inspector, the verification of an item is nominally based on whether the measured assay value agrees with the declared value to within three times the historical delta value. The historical delta value represents the average difference between measured and declared values from previous measurements taken on similar material with the same measurement technology. If the measurement falls outside a limit of three times the historical delta value, the declaration is not verified. This paper uses measurement data from five years of IAEA courses to calculate a historical delta for five non-destructive assay methods: Gamma-ray Enrichment, Gamma-ray Plutonium Isotopics, Passive Neutron Coincidence Counting, Active Neutron Coincidence Counting and the Neutron Coincidence Collar. These historical deltas provide information as to the precision and accuracy of these measurement techniques under realistic conditions.

  8. Plutonium - its behavior in natural-water systems and assimilation by man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.P.; Nelson, D.M.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Oldham, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    There are a number of factors which must be considered in establishing whether or not the inadvertent intrusion of a sizable amount of plutonium-bearing material into a natural-water system may have a significant impact on the health of those individuals who use that system as a drinking-water resource. These factors include the chemical form(s) and solubility of plutonium in natural waters, its behavior in relation to natural processes (geochemical and biological), its fate in water-treatment systems, and its uptake by man from drinking water. From the results obtained of the behavior in natural-water systems, it appears that (1) the chemical forms of plutonium dissolved in natural waters are Pu(IV) and Pu(V), (2) the soluble plutonium in many waters is bound to the organic constituents which probably enhance plutonium solubility, (3) the natural process responsible for the removal of plutonium from water is adsorption onto sediments, and (4) in water-treatment systems, soluble plutonium is oxidized to the VI state and this form is not removed. From investigations of gastrointestinal absorption, it appears that the value for f 1 , the fraction transferred from the gut to blood, is greater than 1 x 10 - 3 and may be as high as 2 x 10 - 1

  9. Technical report for generic site add-on facility for plutonium polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide environmental data and reference process information associated with incorporating plutonium polishing steps (dissolution, impurity removal, and conversion to oxide powder) into the genetic-site Mixed-Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MOXFF). The incorporation of the plutonium polishing steps will enable the removal of undesirable impurities, such as gallium and americium, known to be associated with the plutonium. Moreover, unanticipated impurities can be removed, including those that may be contained in (1) poorly characterized feed materials, (2) corrosion products added from processing equipment, and (3) miscellaneous materials contained in scrap recycle streams. These impurities will be removed to the extent necessary to meet plutonium product purity specifications for MOX fuels. Incorporation of the plutonium polishing steps will mean that the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) will need to produce a plutonium product that can be dissolved at the MOXFF in nitric acid at a suitable rate (sufficient to meet overall production requirements) with the minimal usage of hydrofluoric acid, and its complexing agent, aluminum nitrate. This function will require that if the PDCF product is plutonium oxide powder, that powder must be produced, stored, and shipped without exceeding a temperature of 600 C

  10. COUPLED FREE AND DISSOLVED PHASE TRANSPORT: NEW SIMULATION CAPABILITIES AND PARAMETER INVERSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The vadose zone free-phase simulation capabilities of the US EPA Hydrocarbon Spill Screening Model (HSSM) (Weaver et al., 1994) have been linked with the 3-D multi-species dissolved-phase contaminant transport simulator MT3DMS (Zheng and Wang, 1999; Zheng, 2005). The linkage pro...

  11. Technique of preparation of plutonium screens for soft x ray spectrography (1963); Technique de preparation d'ecrans de plutonium pour la spectrographie de rayons x mous (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bersuder, L de [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The present work concerns the preparation of thin layers of pure plutonium (thickness 100 to 10000 A) by thermal vacuum evaporation. The protection of the plutonium against oxidation is obtained by vacuum deposition of aluminium layers under. and above the plutonium layer. The purity of the layers is checked by electron and X ray diffraction which has shown that very thin films of plutonium condense in {beta} form instead of {alpha}. (author) [French] Le present travail concerne la preparation de couches minces (epaisseurs de 100 a 10000 A) de plutonium pur par evaporation thermique sous vide. La protection du plutonium contre l'oxydation par l'air est obtenu grace a des couches d'aluminium deposees sous vide sous et sur la couche de plutonium. La purete des couches est verifiee par diffraction d'electrons et de rayons X ce qui a permis d'observer que les couches tres minces de plutonium se condensent en phase {beta} au lieu de la phase {alpha}. (auteur)

  12. Long-term behavior of refractory thorium-plutonium dioxide solid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claparede, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.claparede@umontpellier.fr [ICSM, UMR 5257 CNRS/CEA/Univ. Montpellier/ENSCM, Site de Marcoule, Bât. 426, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols/Cèze (France); Guigue, Mireille [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, RadioChemistry & Processes Department, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols/Cèze (France); Jouan, Gauthier [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, DTEC Department, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols/Cèze (France); Nadah, Nassima [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, RadioChemistry & Processes Department, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols/Cèze (France); Dacheux, Nicolas [ICSM, UMR 5257 CNRS/CEA/Univ. Montpellier/ENSCM, Site de Marcoule, Bât. 426, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols/Cèze (France); Moisy, Philippe [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, RadioChemistry & Processes Department, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols/Cèze (France)

    2017-01-15

    The long-term behavior of Th{sub 0.87}Pu{sub 0.13}O{sub 2} was examined in nitric acid concentrations. The normalized dissolution rates after 3380 days, range from (1.4 ± 0.2) × 10{sup −6} g m{sup −2} d{sup −1} in 5 M HNO{sub 3} down to (3.2 ± 0.4) × 10{sup −8} g m{sup −2} d{sup −1} in 10{sup −3} M HNO{sub 3}, which confirms the high chemical durability of this solid solution. The amounts of plutonium measured in solution lead to 0.9% and 2.1% of dissolved solid in 1 M and 5 M HNO{sub 3}, respectively. In such conditions, the time required to reach the full dissolution of the material varies from 430 years (5 M HNO{sub 3}) to 18,000 years (10{sup −3} M HNO{sub 3}). Moreover, the partial order related to the proton activity (n = 0.45 ± 0.03) suggests that the dissolution is mainly driven by surface reactions occurring at the solid/liquid interface. The characterization of the leached samples by SEM shows small microstructural modifications (i.e. detachment of crystallites) and the absence of neoformed phase while from PXRD, the unit cell parameter and crystallite size are not significantly affected. - Highlights: • Leaching tests of Th{sub 0.87}Pu{sub 0.13}O{sub 2} were performed for 9 years in several nitric acid solutions. • The high chemical durability of thorium-plutonium oxide solid solutions was confirmed. • The solubility of plutonium(IV) was not controlled by the precipitation of plutonium tetrahydroxide in these experiments.

  13. The use of curium neutrons to verify plutonium in spent fuel and reprocessing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, N.

    1994-05-01

    For safeguards verification of spent fuel, leached hulls, and reprocessing wastes, it is necessary to determine the plutonium content in these items. We have evaluated the use of passive neutron multiplicity counting to determine the plutonium content directly and also to measure the 240 Pu/ 244 Cm ratio for the indirect verification of the plutonium. Neutron multiplicity counting of the singles, doubles, and triples neutrons has been evaluated for measuring 240 Pu, 244 Cm, and 252 Cf. We have proposed a method to establish the plutonium to curium ratio using the hybrid k-edge densitometer x-ray fluorescence instrument plus a neutron coincidence counter for the reprocessing dissolver solution. This report presents the concepts, experimental results, and error estimates for typical spent fuel applications

  14. Chemical characterization of local and stratospheric plutonium in Ohio soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, R.N.

    1978-01-01

    The chemical nature of plutonium derived from stratospheric fallout and industrial sources was studied in three agricultural soils. The majority of the soil plutonium was associated with a reductant-soluble, hydrous oxide phase that, under most conditions of terrestrial ecosystems, remains essentially immobile. The proportion of plutonium associated with organic matter (0.1N NaOH-extractable) varied among soils, and increased with decreasing particle size in the same soil. In a soil containing 238 Pu from a local fabrication facility and 239 , 240 Pu from stratospheric fallout, isotopic ratios between the NaOH-extractable and residual phases were essentially constant, indicating that, in these soils, plutonium from both sources behaves similarly. The distribution of soil plutonium with particle size appears to be most directly related to the mass of the soil particle

  15. Proserpine - plutonium 239 - Proserpine - uranium 235 - comparison of experimental results; Proserpine - plutonium 239 - proserpine - uranium 235 - comparaison de resultats experimentaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunet, J P; Caizergues, R; Clouet D' Orval, Ch; Kremser, J; Moret-Bailly, J; Verriere, Ph [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The Proserpine homogeneous reactor is constituted by a tank, 25 cm dia, 30 cm high, surrounded by a composite reflector made of beryllium oxide and graphite. In this tank can be made critical plutonium or 90 per cent enriched uranium solutions, the fissile substances being in the form of a dissolved salt. In varying the concentration of the solution, critical masses were studied as a function of the level of the liquid in the tank. The minimum critical mass is 256 {+-} 2 grs for plutonium and 409 {+-} 3 grs for uranium 235. In the range of the critical concentrations which were studied, the neutronic properties of fissionable solutions of plutonium and enriched uranium were compared for identical geometries. (authors) [French] Proserpine est un reacteur homogene comportant une cuve de diametre 25 cm, de hauteur 30 cm, entouree d'un reflecteur composite d'oxyde de beryllium et de graphite. On y a rendu critiques des solutions de plutonium ou d'uranium enrichi a 90 pour cent, le produit fissile se trouvant sous la forme d'un sel dissous. En faisant varier la concentration de la solution, on a etudie les masses critiques en fonction de la hauteur du liquide dans la cuve. La masse- critique minimum est, pour le plutonium de 256 {+-} 2 g, pour l'uranium 235 de 409 {+-} 3 g. Dans la gamme des concentrations critiques etudiees, on a compare, dans des conditions de geometrie identique, les proprietes neutroniques des solutions fissiles de plutonium et d'uranium enrichi. (auteurs)

  16. First inventory of optical lake types in the permafrost landscapes of the central Lena River Delta and central Yamal - case studies of Coloured Dissolved Organic Matter (cDOM) and turbidity regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Birgit; Bartsch, Annett; Dvornikov, Yuri; Leibman, Marina; Eulenburg, Antje; Morgenstern, Anne; Boike, Julia; Widhalm, Barbara; Fedorova, Irina; Chetverova, Antonina

    2015-04-01

    We provide a first satellite-based inventory of optical lake types in the permafrost landscapes of the central Lena River Delta and central Yamal using multi-sensor satellite data. Within our thematic network between our groups we seek to investigate how we may link: • multi-sensor remote sensing analysis (optical and radar) • tachymmetrical and satellite-based stereographical analysis • geochemical and hydrodynamical ground investigations in the thermokarst- and thermoerosional-influenced landscape types in the central Lena Delta and the Yamal region in Siberia. We are investigating the turbidity regimes of the lakes and the catchment characteristics (vegetation, geomorphology, topography) using satellite-derived information from optical and radar sensors. For some of the lakes in Yamal and the central Lena River Delta we were able to sample for Dissolved Organic Carbon, DOC, and coloured dissolved organic matter, cDOM (the absorbing fraction of the DOC pool). The sediment sources for turbidity spatial patterns are provided by the large subaquatic sedimentary banks and lake cliffs. The cDOM regimes influence the transparency of the different lake types. However, turbidity seems to play the dominant role in providing the water colour of thermokarst lake types.

  17. CONVERSION OF PLUTONIUM TRIFLUORIDE TO PLUTONIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, S.; Davidson, N.R.

    1957-09-10

    A large proportion of the trifluoride of plutonium can be converted, in the absence of hydrogen fluoride, to the tetrafiuoride of plutonium. This is done by heating plutonium trifluoride with oxygen at temperatures between 250 and 900 deg C. The trifiuoride of plutonium reacts with oxygen to form plutonium tetrafluoride and plutonium oxide, in a ratio of about 3 to 1. In the presence of moisture, plutonium tetrafluoride tends to hydrolyze at elevated temperatures and therefore it is desirable to have the process take place under anhydrous conditions.

  18. Product Evaluation Task Force Phase Two report for BWR/PWR dissolver wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    It has been proposed that all Intermediate Level Wastes arising at Sellafield should be encapsulated prior to ultimate disposal. The Product Evaluation Task Force (PETF) was set up to investigate possible encapsulants and to produce an adequate data base to justify the preferred matrices. This report details the work carried out, under Phase 2 of the Product Evaluation Task Force programme, on BWR/PWR Dissolver Wastes. Three possible types of encapsulants for BWR/PWR Dissolver Wastes:- Inorganic cements, Polymer cements and Polymers are evaluated using the Kepner Tregoe decision analysis technique. This technique provides a methodology for scoring and ranking alternative options and evaluating any risks associated with an option. The analysis shows that for all four stages of waste management operations ie Storage, Transport, handling and emplacement, Disposal and Process, cement matrices are considerably superior to other potential matrices. A matrix, consisting of three parts Blast Furnace Slag (BFS) to one part Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), is recommended for Phase 3 studies on BWR/PWR Dissolver Wastes. (author)

  19. Simulation study for purification, recovery of plutonium and uranium from plant streams of Fast Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukumar, S.; Siva Kumar, P.; Radhika, R.; Subbuthai, S.; Mohan, S.V.; Subha Rao, R.V.

    2005-01-01

    A method for removal of plutonium from the lean organic streams obtained after co-stripping of uranium -plutonium was developed. Plutonium from lean organic phase was stripped using U 4+ /hydrazine as the stripping agent. The effect of concentrations of stripping agent U 4+ and feed Pu concentration in the lean organic phase was studied. Lean organic phases having higher plutonium concentration require three stages of stripping to bring plutonium concentration 4+ stabilized by hydrazine reduces Pu (IV) to Pu (III) thereby stripping plutonium from the organic phase. The non-extractability of Pu (III) by TBP was utilized for development of flow sheet for obtaining a uranium product lean of plutonium for ease of handling. (author)

  20. Fallout plutonium in two oxic-anoxic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, A.L.; Murray, J.W.; Schell, W.R.; Miller, L.G.

    1986-01-01

    The profiles of soluble fallout plutonium in two partially anoxic waters revealed minimum concentrations at the O 2 -H 2 S interface, indicating Pu removal onto particulate phases of Fe and other oxidized species that form during the redox cycle. In Saanich Inlet, an intermittently anoxic fjord in Vancouver Island, Canada, the concentration of soluble Pu in the anoxic zone was slightly less than in the oxygenated surface layer. In Soap Lake, a saline meromictic lake in eastern Washington State, Pu concentrations i the permanently anoxic zone were at least an order of magnitude higher than at the surface. Differences in the chemical characteristics of these two waters suggest important chemical species that influenced the observed Pu distribution. In the permanently anoxic zone of Soap Lake, high values of total alkalinity ranging from 940 to 1500 meq liter -1 , sulfide species from 38 to 128 μM, dissolved organic carbon from 163 to 237 mg liter -1 , and total dissolved solids from 80 to 140 ppt, all correlated with the observed high concentration of Pu. In Saanich Inlet, where total alkalinity ranged from 2.1 to 2.4 meq liter -1 and salinity from 25 to 32 per thousand and H 2 S concentration in May 1981 showed a maximum of 8μM, the observed Pu concentrations were significantly lower than for the Soap Lake monimolimnion

  1. The distribution of plutonium-241 in rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priest, N.D.

    1977-01-01

    Plutonium-241 citrate solution at pH 6.5 was injected intravenously or intraperitoneally into hamsters and rats at a dose of 50 MBq kg -1 (1.35 mCi kg -1 ). The animals were killed 1 day or 1 week later, and tissues were removed for autoradiography and radiochemical analysis. Plutonium-241 was distributed in rats in the same way as plutonium-239, and is a suitable isotope for high-resolution tissue-section autoradiography. Plutonium deposits in cells consisted of a nuclear and a cytoplasmic component. In the hamster kidney cells, the amount associated with the nucleus was about 55 per cent of the total cellular plutonium at 24 hours after injection. Six days later, it was only about 30 per cent. Plutonium deposits were also characterized in hepatocytes, in the interstitial cells of the testes, in the cells of ovarian follicles, in chondrocytes and in bone cells, including osteoblasts and osteocytes. In bone there appeared to be both an extracellular and intracellular deposit. No evidence was found of substantial incorporation of plutonium into the mineral phase of bone. (author)

  2. Plutonium in Southern Hemisphere ocean Waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirose, K.; Aoyama, M.; Gastaud, J.

    2013-01-01

    Plutonium in seawater collected by the BEAGLE2003 cruise was determined using ICP- SF-MS and alpha spectrometry after Fe co-precipitation and radiochemical purification. Levels and distributions of dissolved plutonium activity concentrations in Southern Hemisphere ocean waters are summarized here......, including historical data. Pu-239 concentrations in surface water----of the central South Pacific (32.5 °S) in 2003 were around 1 mBq/m3. The 239Pu concentrations in the Indian Ocean surface waters (20°S) were similar to that in the South Pacific, whereas the 239Pu concentrations in the South Atlantic...... surface waters (30°S) were markedly lower than those in the South Pacific and Indian Oceans. The 239Pu vertical profile pattern was similar to that in the North Pacific subtropical gyre, although 239Pu concentrations in the deep South Pacific were significantly lower than those in the North Pacific. One...

  3. Reactivity of dissolved- vs. supercritical-CO2 phase toward muscovite basal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Kim, Y.; Wang, S.; Altoe, M. V. P.; Ashby, P. D.; DePaolo, D.

    2015-12-01

    The current understanding of geochemical reactions in reservoirs for geological carbon sequestration (GCS) is largely based on aqueous chemistry (CO2 dissolves in reservoir brine and brine reacts with rocks). However, only a portion of the injected supercritical (sc) CO2 dissolves before the buoyant plume contacts caprock, where it is expected to reside for a long time. Although numerous studies have addressed scCO2-mineral reactions occurring within adsorbed aqueous films, possible reactions resulting from direct CO2-rock contact remain less understood. Does CO2 as a supercritical phase react with reservoir rocks? Do mineral react differently with scCO2 than with dissolved CO2? We selected muscovite, one of the more stable and common rock-forming silicate minerals, to react with scCO2 phase (both water-saturated and water-free) and compared with CO2-saturated-brine. The reacted basal surfaces were analyzed using atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for examining the changes in surface morphology and chemistry. The results show that scCO2 (regardless of its water content) altered muscovite considerably more than CO2-saturated brine; suggest CO2 diffusion into mica interlayers and localized mica dissolution into scCO2 phase. The mechanisms underlying these observations and their implications for GCS need further exploration.

  4. Precipitation of {gamma}' phase in {delta}-precipitated Alloy 718 during deformation at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalawade, S.A. [Structural Metallurgy Section, Mechanical Metallurgy Section, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sundararaman, M., E-mail: msraman@barc.gov.in [Structural Metallurgy Section, Mechanical Metallurgy Section, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Singh, J.B.; Verma, A.; Kishore, R. [Structural Metallurgy Section, Mechanical Metallurgy Section, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2010-05-15

    Alloy 718 samples aged to precipitate only {delta} particles (with maximum volume fraction) when tensile deformed to fracture at elevated temperatures revealed precipitation of {gamma}' and {gamma}'' phases. The {gamma}' precipitation was found to precede the {gamma}'' phase precipitation unlike in the case of specimens subjected to standard ageing treatment where both the {gamma}' and the {gamma}'' phases precipitate simultaneously. This sequence is explained on the basis of the relative concentration of Al, Ti and Nb in the matrix of {delta} precipitated Alloy 718 microstructure. The precipitation sequence was consistent with the Cozar and Pineau's model that predicts such sequences on the basis of (Al + Ti) to Nb atom ratios.

  5. Comparative behavior of americium and plutonium in wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsvetaeva, N.E.; Filin, V.M.; Ragimov, T.K.; Rudaya, L.Y.; Shapiro, K.Y.; Shcherbakov, B.Y.

    1986-01-01

    This paper studies the behavior of trace americium and plutoniumin wastewater fed into purification systems. Activities of the elements were determined on a semiconductive alpha-ray spectrometer. the distributio nonuniformity, or heterogeneity, of americium and plutonium per unit volume of wastewater was determined quantitatively before and after passage through filter papers. The two elements were found to be in a colloidal or pseudocolloidal state in the original wastewater sample at pH 6. On acidifying the wastewater from pH 4 to 1 M nitric acid the americium passed quantitatively into the water phase but the most plutonium remained in the colloidal or pseudocolloidal state. the plutonium also passed quantitatively into the water phase in wastewater at a 1 M nitric acid acidity but only after a prolonged (12-day) hold. A knowledge of the heterogeneity of plutonium and americium in wastewaters made it possible to quickly distinguish their state, i.e., colloidal, pseudocolloidal, or in true solution

  6. Weapons grade plutonium disposition in PWR, CANDU and FR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deplech, M.; Tommasi, J.; Zaetta, A.

    2000-01-01

    In the frame work of the AIDA/MOX phase I/I/ program (1994-1997) between France and Russia, the disposition of plutonium in reactors was studied. The LWR (Light Water Reactor), FR (Fast reactors), CANDU (Heavy Water Reactors), HTR (High Temperature Reactors) options for using excess dismantled weapons plutonium for peaceful commercial nuclear power generating purposes offer some advantages over the remaining options (storage). The AIDA/MOX phase 1 program covers different topics, among which are the neutronic aspects of loading reactors with weapons-grade plutonium. The conclusions are that the weapon plutonium consumption is similar in the different type of reactors. However, the use of inert matrices allows to increase the mass balance for a same denaturing level. The use of Thorium as a matrix or special isotopes to increase the proliferation resistance prove to be insufficient. (author)

  7. The Macdonald and Savage titrimetric procedure scaled down to 4 mg sized plutonium samples. P. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuvik, V.; Lecouteux, C.; Doubek, N.; Ronesch, K.; Jammet, G.; Bagliano, G.; Deron, S.

    1992-01-01

    The original Macdonald and Savage amperometric method scaled down to milligram-sized plutonium samples was further modified. The electro-chemical process of each redox step and the end-point of the final titration were monitored potentiometrically. The method is designed to determine 4 mg of plutonium dissolved in nitric acid solution. It is suitable for the direct determination of plutonium in non-irradiated fuel with a uranium-to-plutonium ratio of up to 30. The precision and accuracy are ca. 0.05-0.1% (relative standard deviation). Although the procedure is very selective, the following species interfere: vanadyl(IV) and vanadate (almost quantitatively), neptunium (one electron exchange per mole), nitrites, fluorosilicates (milligram amounts yield a slight bias) and iodates. (author). 15 refs.; 8 figs.; 7 tabs

  8. Zirconolite glass-ceramics for plutonium immobilization: The effects of processing redox conditions on charge compensation and durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yingjie, E-mail: yzx@ansto.gov.au; Gregg, Daniel J.; Kong, Linggen; Jovanovich, Miodrag; Triani, Gerry

    2017-07-15

    Zirconolite glass-ceramic samples doped with plutonium have been prepared via hot isostatic pressing. The effects of processing redox and plutonium loadings on plutonium valences, the presence of cation vacancies, zirconolite phase compositions, microstructures and durability have been investigated. Either tetravalent or trivalent plutonium ions may be incorporated on the Ca-site of CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7} zirconolite with the Ca-site cation vacancies and the incorporation of Al{sup 3+} ions on the Ti-site for charge compensation. Plutonium and gadolinium (as a neutron absorber) are predominantly partitioned in zirconolite phases leading to the formation of chemically durable glass-ceramics suitable for the immobilization of impure plutonium wastes arising from the nuclear fuel cycle. - Highlights: •Plutonium validations of zirconolite glass-ceramics. •Effects of processing redox and plutonium loading. •Zirconolite phase compositions and plutonium valences. •Cation vacancies and chemical durability.

  9. /sup 210/Po in the western Indian Ocean: Distributions, disequilibria and partitioning between the dissolved and particulate phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Y.; Finkel, R.

    1988-05-01

    Seven GEOSECS stations in the western Indian Ocean were measured for dissolved /sup 210/Po, and five of these were also measured for particulate /sup 210/Po. Dissolved phase /sup 210/Po is lower than /sup 210/Pb in the deep water north of Madagascar, with values in the Arabian Sea being lower by about 4 dpm/100 kg (approx. = 30%) for almost the entire water column. South of Madagascar, /sup 210/Po is essentially in equilibrium with /sup 210/Pb in the deep water, but with /sup 210/Po excess in subsurface water south of the Crozet basin. In the benthic boundary layer, /sup 210/Po is consistently lower than /sup 210/Pb for all the stations. In the particulate phase /sup 210/Po shows a general increase with depth and is highest in the benthic boundary layer. In general, /sup 210/Po is lower than /sup 210/Pb in the particulate phase, but at the one Somali basin station where data are available, deep water /sup 210/Po is systematically higher than /sup 210/Pb. A mid-depth maximum of particulate /sup 210/Pb is generally associated with that of dissolved /sup 210/Pb. The partition of /sup 210/Po between the particulate and dissolved phases is not significantly different from that of /sup 210/Pb. The activities of the two nuclides in the particulate phase are generally less than 10% of those in the dissolved phase. The range is from 1% to 60%. High particulate and low dissolved activities are observed in the deep water, especially in the benthic boundary layer.

  10. Plutonium immobilization in glass and ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, D.A. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Idaho Falls (United States); Murphy, W.M. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Materials Research Society Nineteenth Annual Symposium on the Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management was held in Boston on November 27 to December 1, 1995. Over 150 papers were presented at the Symposium dealing with all aspects of nuclear waste management and disposal. Fourteen oral sessions and on poster session included a Plenary session on surplus plutonium dispositioning and waste forms. The proceedings, to be published in April, 1996, will provide a highly respected, referred compilation of the state of scientific development in the field of nuclear waste management. This paper provides a brief overview of the selected Symposium papers that are applicable to plutonium immobilization and plutonium waste form performance. Waste forms that were described at the Symposium cover most of the candidate Pu immobilization options under consideration, including borosilicate glass with a melting temperature of 1150 {degrees}C, a higher temperature (1450 {degrees}C) lanthanide glass, single phase ceramics, multi-phase ceramics, and multi-phase crystal-glass composites (glass-ceramics or slags). These Symposium papers selected for this overview provide the current status of the technology in these areas and give references to the relevant literature.

  11. Plutonium immobilization in glass and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knecht, D.A.; Murphy, W.M.

    1996-01-01

    The Materials Research Society Nineteenth Annual Symposium on the Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management was held in Boston on November 27 to December 1, 1995. Over 150 papers were presented at the Symposium dealing with all aspects of nuclear waste management and disposal. Fourteen oral sessions and on poster session included a Plenary session on surplus plutonium dispositioning and waste forms. The proceedings, to be published in April, 1996, will provide a highly respected, referred compilation of the state of scientific development in the field of nuclear waste management. This paper provides a brief overview of the selected Symposium papers that are applicable to plutonium immobilization and plutonium waste form performance. Waste forms that were described at the Symposium cover most of the candidate Pu immobilization options under consideration, including borosilicate glass with a melting temperature of 1150 degrees C, a higher temperature (1450 degrees C) lanthanide glass, single phase ceramics, multi-phase ceramics, and multi-phase crystal-glass composites (glass-ceramics or slags). These Symposium papers selected for this overview provide the current status of the technology in these areas and give references to the relevant literature

  12. Nuclear safety of the ten-well insert for the SRP fuel element dissolver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, W.C.; Forstner, J.L.

    1977-06-01

    Mass limits are developed and presented for safe dissolution of fissile materials in the Ten-Well Insert, an improved device for limiting the configuration of fuel in SRP dissolvers. This insert permits high-capacity dissolution of SRP fuels, offsite fuels, and scrap fissile materials with adequate margins of nuclear safety. Limits were developed by calculating the safe (subcritical) mass per well as a function of the concentration of fissile material in the dissolver solution. Safe mass values were then selected for use as well-loading limits so as to ensure subcriticality throughout the dissolution. Well-loading limits are presented for uranium metal, uranium-aluminum alloy, U 3 O 8 -aluminum cermet, plutonium-aluminum alloy, and uranium-plutonium-aluminum alloy. With these limits, the maximum k/sub eff/ is 0.95. Nuclear safety is maintained in process operations by conforming to well-loading limits calculated from the safe mass values, conforming to dissolver-loading limits, and maintaining the concentration of fissile material in solution below 4.0 g/l. 9 figures, 14 tables

  13. Plutonium in nature; Le plutonium dans la nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madic, C.

    1994-12-31

    Plutonium in nature comes from natural sources and anthropogenic ones. Plutonium at the earth surface comes principally from anthropogenic sources. It is easily detectable in environment. The plutonium behaviour in environment is complex. It seems necessary for the future to reduce releases in environment, to improve predictive models of plutonium behaviour in geosphere, to precise biological impact of anthropogenic plutonium releases.

  14. Treatment of plutonium contamined solid wastes by electrogenerated Ag(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saulze, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    A process for the treatment of plutonium contaminated solid wastes is designed. Two types of wastes have been studied; incineration ashes (COGEMA UP1) and sludges produced in the cryotreatment facility in Cadarache Center (France). The principle of the process is based on the rapid dissolution of PuO 2 (contained in the wastes) under the action of aggressive Ag(II) species, regenerated electrochemically. In the case of the treatment of incinerator ashes an electrochemical pretreatment is necessary if the chloride ion content of the ashes is high. The feasibility of the decontamination process has been proved for the two types of plutonium contaminated solid wastes at a pilot level; for example 1 Kg of ashes (or 0.75 Kg of sludges) has been treated in one experiment, and 97% (or 95%) of the total plutonium was dissolved at the end of the experiment. Industrial applications of this new process are underway [fr

  15. The first metallurgical tests on plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grison, E.; Abramson, R.; Anselin, F.; Monti, H.

    1958-01-01

    Metallic plutonium was first prepared in France in January 1956, as soon as we had access to quantities of the order of several grams of plutonium, which had been extracted from the rods of the pile EL2 at Saclay. Since up to the present this reactor, of thermal power 2 000 kW, has been our only source of plutonium, we have so far only worked on experimental quantities sufficient for the basic tests but not for tests on a scale of possible applications. It is this work, carried out during this phase of preliminary research, which is described below. With the starting up of the plutonium extraction plant at Marcoule, where the reactor G1 has been operating at power for more than a year, we shall go on next to a another order of magnitude which will allow the manufacture and experimentation of prototype fuel elements. (author) [fr

  16. Characterization of plutonium-bearing wastes by chemical analysis and analytical electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, R.G.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Van Deventer, E.; Chaiko, D.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of characterization studies of plutonium-bearing wastes produced at the US Department of Energy weapons production facilities. Several different solid wastes were characterized, including incinerator ash and ash heels from Rocky Flats Plant and Los Alamos National Laboratory; sand, stag, and crucible waste from Hanford; and LECO crucibles from the Savannah River Site. These materials were characterized by chemical analysis and analytical electron microscopy. The results showed the presence of discrete PuO 2 PuO 2-x , and Pu 4 O 7 phases, of about 1μm or less in size, in all of the samples examined. In addition, a number of amorphous phases were present that contained plutonium. In all the ash and ash heel samples examined, plutonium phases were found that were completely surrounded by silicate matrices. Consequently, to achieve optimum plutonium recovery in any chemical extraction process, extraction would have to be coupled with ultrafine grinding to average particle sizes of less than 1 μm to liberate the plutonium from the surrounding inert matrix

  17. Pyrochemical recovery of plutonium from calcium fluoride reduction slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, D.C.

    A pyrochemical method of recovering finely dispersed plutonium metal from calcium fluoride reduction slag is claimed. The plutonium-bearing slag is crushed and melted in the presence of at least an equimolar amount of calcium chloride and a few percent metallic calcium. The calcium chloride reduces the melting point and thereby decreases the viscosity of the molten mixture. The calcium reduces any oxidized plutonium in the mixture and also causes the dispersed plutonium metal to coalesce and settle out as a separate metallic phase at the bottom of the reaction vessel. Upon cooling the mixture to room temperature, the solid plutonium can be cleanly separated from the overlying solid slag, with an average recovery yield on the order of 96 percent.

  18. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2004-11-22

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  19. The influence of plutonium concentration and solution flow rate on the effective capacity of macroporous anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Gallegos, T.D.

    1987-07-01

    The principal aqueous process used to recover and purify plutonium at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility is anion exchange in nitric acid. Previous studies with gel-type anion exchange resin have shown an inverse relationship between plutonium concentration in the feed solution and the optimum flow rate for this process. Because gel-type resin has been replaced with macroporous resin at Los Alamos, the relationship between plutonium concentration and solution flow rate was reexamined with the selected Lewatit MP-500-FK resin using solutions of plutonium in nitric acid and in nitric acid with high levels of added nitrate salts. Our results with this resin differ significantly from previous data obtained with gel-type resin. Flow-rate variation from 10 to 80 liters per hour had essentially no effect on the measured quantities of plutonium sorbed by the macroporous resin. However, the effect of plutonium concentration in the feed solutions was pronounced, as feed solutions that contained the highest concentrations of plutonium also produced the highest resin loadings. The most notable effect of high concentrations of dissolved nitrate salts in these solutions was an increased resin capacity for plutonium at low flow rates. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Kinetics of tetravalent plutonium oxidation by cerium (4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitina, G P; Shumakov, V G; Egorova, V P

    1975-01-01

    Stoichiometry and kinetics of the Pu(4) + Ce(4) reaction is studied by spectrophotometric method at 5-30 deg C in nitric acid solutions (..mu..=(HNO/sub 3/)+(NaNO/sub 3/) = 1.0 - 5.7; (Ce(4)) = 5.10/sup -5/ - 1.2.10/sup -3/ g-ion/1, (Pu(4)) =1.10/sup -5/ - 8.5.10/sup -4/ g-ion/1. Oxidation of one Pu(4) ion to a hexavalent state requires two Ce(4) ions. The plutonium oxidation is not complicated by by-processes. Reverse Ce(3) + PuO/sub 2//sup +/ reaction does not contribute essentially to the process at (Ce(3)) 2.6.10/sup -2/ g-ion/1. The reaction rate obeys the kinetic equation - d(Pu(4))/dt = ksub(eff)(Pu(4))(Ce(4))/a sub(+-HNO/sub 3/). The thermodynamical activation parameters are found for solutions at the varied nitric acid concentrations:..delta..Gsup(not equal) = 17.0+-0.2 and ..delta..Hsup(not equal) = 21.8+-2 kcal/mole(..mu..=1.0); ..delta..Gsup(not equal) = 19.1+-0.1 and ..delta..Hsup(not equal) = 23.1+-1 kcal/mole(..mu..=4.9). The reaction mechanism is discussed in terms of the theory of absolute reaction rates and the model of long-range charge transfer.

  1. Aqueous recovery of plutonium from pyrochemical processing residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Gray, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Pyrochemical processes provide rapid methods to reclaim plutonium from scrap residues. Frequently, however, these processes yield an impure plutonium product and waste residues that are contaminated with actinides and are therefore nondiscardable. The Savannah River Laboratory and Plant and the Rocky Flats Plant are jointly developing new processes using both pyrochemistry and aqueous chemistry to generate pure product and discardable waste. An example of residue being treated is that from the molten salt extraction (MSE), a mixture of NaCl, KCl, MgCl 2 , PuCl 3 , AmCl 3 , PuO 2 , and Pu 0 . This mixture is scrubbed with molten aluminum containing a small amount of magnesium to produce a nonhomogeneous Al-Pu-Am-Mg alloy. This process, which rejects most of the NaCl-KCl-MgCl 2 salts, results in a product easily dissolved in 6M HNO 3 -0.1M HF. Any residual chloride in the product is removed by precipitation with Hg(I) followed by centrifuging. Plutonium and americium are then separated by the standard Purex process. The americium, initially diverted to the solvent extraction waste stream, can either be recovered or sent to waste

  2. Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Discovery of the neutron made it easy to create elements which do not exist in nature. One of these is plutonium, and its isotope with mass number 239 has nuclear properties which make it both a good fuel for nuclear power reactors and a good explosive for nuclear weapons. Since it was discovered during a war the latter characteristic was put to use, but it is now evident that use of plutonium in a particular kind of nuclear reactor, the fast breeder reactor, will allow the world's resources of uranium to last for millennia as a major source of energy. Plutonium is very radiotoxic, resembling radium in this respect. Therefore the widespread introduction of fast breeder reactors to meet energy demands can be contemplated only after assurances on two points; that adequate control of the radiological hazard resulting from the handling of very large amounts of plutonium can be guaranteed, and that diversion of plutonium to illicit use can be prevented. The problems exist to a lesser degree already, since all types of nuclear reactor produce some plutonium. Some plutonium has already been dispersed in the environment, the bulk of it from atmospheric tests of nuclear weapons. (author)

  3. Dopamine Modulates Delta-Gamma Phase-Amplitude Coupling in the Prefrontal Cortex of Behaving Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andino-Pavlovsky, Victoria; Souza, Annie C.; Scheffer-Teixeira, Robson; Tort, Adriano B. L.; Etchenique, Roberto; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine release and phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling (CFC) have independently been implicated in prefrontal cortex (PFC) functioning. To causally investigate whether dopamine release affects phase-amplitude comodulation between different frequencies in local field potentials (LFP) recorded from the medial PFC (mPFC) of behaving rats, we used RuBiDopa, a light-sensitive caged compound that releases the neurotransmitter dopamine when irradiated with visible light. LFP power did not change in any frequency band after the application of light-uncaged dopamine, but significantly strengthened phase-amplitude comodulation between delta and gamma oscillations. Saline did not exert significant changes, while injections of dopamine and RuBiDopa produced a slow increase in comodulation for several minutes after the injection. The results show that dopamine release in the medial PFC shifts phase-amplitude comodulation from theta-gamma to delta-gamma. Although being preliminary results due to the limitation of the low number of animals present in this study, our findings suggest that dopamine-mediated modification of the frequencies involved in comodulation could be a mechanism by which this neurotransmitter regulates functioning in mPFC. PMID:28536507

  4. Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, G.J.; Gallucci, R.H.; Garrett, S.M.K.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Goheen, R.S.; Molton, P.M.; Templeton, K.J.; Villegas, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Nass, R. [Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage.

  5. Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevigny, G.J.; Gallucci, R.H.; Garrett, S.M.K.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Goheen, R.S.; Molton, P.M.; Templeton, K.J.; Villegas, A.J.; Nass, R.

    1995-08-01

    This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage

  6. Plutonium Elastic Moduli, Electron Localization, and Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migliori, Albert; Mihut-Stroe, Izabella; Betts, Jon B.

    2008-01-01

    In almost all materials, compression is accompanied naturally by stiffening. Even in materials with zero or negative thermal expansion, where warming is accompanied by volume contraction it is the volume change that primarily controls elastic stiffness. Not so in the metal plutonium. In plutonium, alloying with gallium can change the sign of thermal expansion, but for the positive thermal- expansion monoclinic phase as well as the face-centered-cubic phase with either sign of thermal expansion, and the orthorhombic phase, recent measurements of elastic moduli show soften on warming by an order of magnitude more than expected, the shear and compressional moduli track, and volume seems irrelevant. These effects point toward a novel mechanism for electron localization, and have important implication for the pressure dependence of the bulk compressibility. (authors)

  7. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yung-Jin; Schwaiger, Luna Kestrel; Booth, Corwin H.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Cristiano, Elena; Kaplan, Daniel; Nitsche, Heino

    2010-03-09

    Plutonium(VI) sorption on the surface of well-characterized synthetic manganese-substituted goethite minerals (Fe1-xMnxOOH) was studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We chose to study the influence of manganese as a minor component in goethite, because goethite rarely exists as a pure phase in nature. Manganese X-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements indicated that essentially all the Mn in the goethite existed as Mn(III), even though Mn was added during mineral synthesis as Mn(II). Importantly, energy dispersive X-ray analysis demonstrated that Mn did not exist as discrete phases and that it was homogeneously mixed into the goethite to within the limit of detection of the method. Furthermore, Mössbauer spectra demonstrated that all Fe existed as Fe(III), with no Fe(II) present. Plutonium(VI) sorption experiments were conducted open to air and no attempt was made to exclude carbonate. The use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy allows us to directly and unambiguously measure the oxidation state of plutonium in situ at the mineral surface. Plutonium X-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements carried out on these samples showed that Pu(VI) was reduced to Pu(IV) upon contact with the mineral. This reduction appears to be strongly correlated with mineral solution pH, coinciding with pH transitions across the point of zero charge of the mineral. Furthermore, extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements show evidence of direct plutonium binding to the metal surface as an inner-sphere complex. This combination of extensive mineral characterization and advanced spectroscopy suggests that sorption of the plutonium onto the surface of the mineral was followed by reduction of the plutonium at the surface of the mineral to form an inner-sphere complex. Because manganese is often found in the environment as a minor component associated with major mineral components, such as goethite, understanding the molecular-level interactions of plutonium with

  8. Generalized Rate Theory for Void and Bubble Swelling and its Application to Delta-Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, P. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wall, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wolfer, W. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-04

    A rate theory for void and bubble swelling is derived that allows both vacancies and self-interstitial atoms to be generated by thermal activation at all sinks. In addition, they can also be produced by displacement damage from external and internal radiation. This generalized rate theory (GRT) is applied to swelling of gallium-stabilized δ-plutonium in which α-decay causes the displacement damage. Since the helium atoms produced also become trapped in vacancies, a distinction is made between empty and occupied vacancies. The growth of helium bubbles observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in weapons-grade and in material enriched with Pu238 is analyzed, using different values for the formation energy of self-interstitial atoms (SIA) and two different sets of relaxation volumes for the vacancy and for the SIA. One set allows preferential capture of SIA at dislocations, while the other set gives equal preference to both vacancy and SIA. It is found that the helium bubble diameters observed are in better agreement with GRT predictions if no preferential capture occurs at dislocations. Therefore, helium bubbles in δ-plutonium will not evolve into voids. The helium density within the bubbles remains sufficiently high to cause thermal emission of SIA. Based on a helium density between two to three helium atoms per vacant site, the sum of formation and migration energies must be around 2.0 eV for SIA in δ-plutonium.

  9. Stop plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    This press document aims to inform the public on the hazards bound to the plutonium exploitation in France and especially the plutonium transport. The first part is a technical presentation of the plutonium and the MOX (Mixed Oxide Fuel). The second part presents the installation of the plutonium industry in France. The third part is devoted to the plutonium convoys safety. The highlight is done on the problem of the leak of ''secret'' of such transports. (A.L.B.)

  10. Speciation of the plutonium at trace levels by capillary electrophoresis-ICP-MS coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambard, Ch.

    2007-01-01

    The CE-ICP-MS coupling allowed the development of new analytical methods for the study of plutonium speciation at trace levels including complexation studies of this element by organic and inorganic ligands. First, a method, called dual detection, based on the simultaneous use of the UV-Visible spectrophotometer integrated in the capillary electrophoresis and the ICPMS was developed and validated. It allows the unambiguous determination of electrophoretic mobilities for separated chemical species and gives a powerful tool for speciation studies. Then, the influence on plutonium redox speciation of the buffer from the background electrolyte was evaluated. This study showed the implications of the electrolyte constituents' choice on plutonium redox equilibrium in the sample. Furthermore, the CE-ICP-MS coupling was used for studying the plutonium complexation at trace levels by some organic (NTA and DTPA) and inorganic ligands (carbonates). The behaviour of plutonium valence +III, +IV and +VI was studied in the presence of buffer at near neutral pH. Different species of plutonium were observed depending on the initial oxidation state of the plutonium. This study showed the potential of poly-amino-carboxylic acids, such as NTA and DTPA, for dissolving plutonium precipitates, regardless its initial speciation. Finally, the carbonation of pentavalent neptunium, as an analogue of Pu(V), was achieved at very low concentration of Np (10 -8 mol.L -1 ). The formation constant of NpO 2 (CO 3 )- at 25 deg. C and 2,5 x 10 -2 mol.L -1 ionic strength was measured by CE-ICP-MS and found to be consistent with literature data. (author)

  11. Diffusion and Kirkendall effect in plutonium-zirconium system; Diffusion et effet Kirkendall dans le systeme plutonium-zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remy, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-10-01

    Results are reported for the chemical diffusion in {epsilon}{beta} phase (bcc) over the range 10 - 70 atomic per cent plutonium. Concentration-penetration curves, obtained by using electron microprobe, have been analysed by Hall and Matano methods. Chemical diffusion coefficients, measured from 650 to 900 deg. C., increase with plutonium concentration and follow the Arrhenius law. Activation energies range from 18000 up to 44000 cal/mole for plutonium concentrations from 60 to 20 atomic per cent plutonium. Kirkendall effect has been observed by the shift of inert markers located originally at the Zr-PuZr interface. Analysis of intrinsic diffusion coefficients variation, flux of the two species and lattice velocity has been carried out by the incremental couples technique by using Darken and Heumann equations. It was found that D{sub Pu} > D{sub Zr}; the ratio D{sub Pu}/D{sub Zr} increases from 1 to 6 over the range 15 - 60 atomic per cent Pu. Activation energies for intrinsic diffusion coefficients vary between 25 and 50 Kcal/mole. (author) [French] Nous donnons des resultats sur la diffusion chimique en phase {epsilon}{beta} (cc) de 10 a 70 pour cent atomique en plutonium. Les courbes concentration-penetration, obtenues par microanalyse X ont ete depouillees par les methodes de HALL et de MATANO. Les coefficients de diffusion chimique mesures de 650 deg. C a 900 deg. C., augmentent avec la concentration en plutonium et suivent la loi d'ARRHENIUS. Les energies d'activation passent de 18000 a 44000 calories par mole pour des concentrations de 60 a 20 pour cent atomique en plutonium. L'existence d'un effet KIRKENDALL a ete mis en evidence par le deplacement de fils inertes places initialement dans le plan de soudure. L'analyse de la variation des coefficients de diffusion intrinseques, des flux des deux especes et de la vitesse du reseau a ete faite par la technique des couples incrementaux en utilisant les equations de DARKEN et de HEUMANN. On trouve D{sub Pu} > D

  12. Crystalline matrices for the immobilization of plutonium and actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, E.B.; Burakov, E.E.; Galkin, Ya.B.; Starchenko, V.A.; Vasiliev, V.G. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1996-05-01

    The management of weapon plutonium, disengaged as a result of conversion, is considered together with the problem of the actinide fraction of long-lived high level radioactive wastes. It is proposed to use polymineral ceramics based on crystalline host-phases: zircon ZrSiO{sub 4} and zirconium dioxide ZrO{sub 2}, for various variants of the management of plutonium and actinides (including the purposes of long-term safe storage or final disposal from the human activity sphere). It is shown that plutonium and actinides are able to form with these phases on ZrSiO{sub 4} and ZrO{sub 2} was done on laboratory level by the hot pressing method, using the plasmochemical calcination technology. To incorporate simulators of plutonium into the structure of ZrSiO{sub 4} and ZrO{sub 2} in the course of synthesis, an original method developed by the authors as a result of studying the high-uranium zircon (Zr,U) SiO{sub 4} form Chernobyl {open_quotes}lavas{close_quotes} was used.

  13. Safe disposal of surplus plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, W. L.; Naz, S.; Lutze, W.; Busch, R.; Prinja, A.; Stoll, W.

    2001-06-01

    About 150 tons of weapons grade and weapons usable plutonium (metal, oxide, and in residues) have been declared surplus in the USA and Russia. Both countries plan to convert the metal and oxide into mixed oxide fuel for nuclear power reactors. Russia has not yet decided what to do with the residues. The US will convert residues into a ceramic, which will then be over-poured with highly radioactive borosilicate glass. The radioactive glass is meant to provide a deterrent to recovery of plutonium, as required by a US standard. Here we show a waste form for plutonium residues, zirconia/boron carbide (ZrO 2/B 4C), with an unprecedented combination of properties: a single, radiation-resistant, and chemically durable phase contains the residues; billion-year-old natural analogs are available; and criticality safety is given under all conceivable disposal conditions. ZrO 2/B 4C can be disposed of directly, without further processing, making it attractive to all countries facing the task of plutonium disposal. The US standard for protection against recovery can be met by disposal of the waste form together with used reactor fuel.

  14. From fresh to marine waters: characterization and fate of dissolved organic matter in the Lena River delta region, Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael eGonçalves-Araujo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Connectivity between the terrestrial and marine environment in the Artic is changing as a result of climate change, influencing both freshwater budgets and the supply of carbon to the sea. This study characterizes the optical properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM within the Lena Delta region and evaluates the behavior of DOM across the fresh water-marine gradient. Six fluorescent components (four humic-like; one marine humic-like; one protein-like were identified by Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC with a clear dominance of allochthonous humic-like signals. Colored DOM (CDOM and dissolved organic carbon (DOC were highly correlated and had their distribution coupled with hydrographical conditions. Higher DOM concentration and degree of humification were associated with the low salinity waters of the Lena River. Values decreased towards the higher salinity Laptev Sea shelf waters. Results demonstrate different responses of DOM mixing in relation to the vertical structure of the water column, as reflecting the hydrographical dynamics in the region. Two mixing curves for DOM were apparent. In surface waters above the pycnocline there was a sharper decrease in DOM concentration in relation to salinity indicating removal. In the bottom water layer the DOM decrease within salinity was less. We propose there is a removal of DOM occurring primarily at the surface layer, which is likely driven by photodegradation and flocculation.

  15. A robust and fast method of sampling and analysis of delta13C of dissolved inorganic carbon in ground waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spötl, Christoph

    2005-09-01

    The stable carbon isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (delta13C(DIC)) is traditionally determined using either direct precipitation or gas evolution methods in conjunction with offline gas preparation and measurement in a dual-inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometer. A gas evolution method based on continuous-flow technology is described here, which is easy to use and robust. Water samples (100-1500 microl depending on the carbonate alkalinity) are injected into He-filled autosampler vials in the field and analysed on an automated continuous-flow gas preparation system interfaced to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Sample analysis time including online preparation is 10 min and overall precision is 0.1 per thousand. This method is thus fast and can easily be automated for handling large sample batches.

  16. Investigation into the dissolution and direct assay of high-fired plutonium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    A fusion-melt and dissolution assay method has been developed and tested for the quantitative analysis of high-fired plutonium dioxide. The method employs fusion of the plutonium dioxide at temperatures greater than the melting point of an eutectic mixture of potassium pyrosulfate plus sodium peroxide. The resultant melt is then titrated directly by either controlled potential coulometry or a gravimetric titration, using standardized ceric sulfate as the titrant. It has been concluded from these investigations that by using the techniques described, high-fired plutonium dioxide (stochiometric) can be quantitatively dissolved and assayed to a degree heretofore beyond the state-of-the-art, while showing direct traceability to the Federal standards. After fusion, the dissolution and direct assay is applicable to existing routine analytical procedures. The method was designed so as to minimize physical handling, simplify the chemical operations, and maximize the personal safety of the analyst at an appreciable cost savings per analysis

  17. Determination of plutonium in pure plutonium nitrate solutions - Gravimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This International Standard specifies a precise and accurate gravimetric method for determining the concentration of plutonium in pure plutonium nitrate solutions and reference solutions, containing between 100 and 300 g of plutonium per litre, in a nitric acid medium. The weighed portion of the plutonium nitrate is treated with sulfuric acid and evaporated to dryness. The plutonium sulfate is decomposed and formed to oxide by heating in air. The oxide is ignited in air at 1200 to 1250 deg. C and weighed as stoichiometric plutonium dioxide, which is stable and non-hygroscopic

  18. Hot deformation behavior of delta-processed superalloy 718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y., E-mail: wangyanhit@yahoo.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Shao, W.Z.; Zhen, L.; Zhang, B.Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} The peak stress for hot deformation can be described by the Z parameter. {yields} The grain size of DRX was inversely proportional to the Z parameter. {yields} The dissolution of {delta} phases was greatly accelerated under hot deformation. {yields}The {delta} phase stimulated nucleation can serve as the main DRX mechanism. - Abstract: Flow stress behavior and microstructures during hot compression of delta-processed superalloy 718 at temperatures from 950 to 1100 deg. C with strain rates of 10{sup -3} to 1 s{sup -1} were investigated by optical microscopy (OM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The relationship between the peak stress and the deformation conditions can be expressed by a hyperbolic-sine type equation. The activation energy for the delta-processed superalloy 718 is determined to be 467 kJ/mol. The change of the dominant deformation mechanisms leads to the decrease of stress exponent and the increase of activation energy with increasing temperature. The dynamically recrystallized grain size is inversely proportional to the Zener-Hollomon (Z) parameter. It is found that the dissolution rate of {delta} phases under hot deformation conditions is much faster than that under static conditions. Dislocation, vacancy and curvature play important roles in the dissolution of {delta} phases. The main nucleation mechanisms of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) for the delta-processed superalloy 718 include the bulging of original grain boundaries and the {delta} phase stimulated DRX nucleation, which is closely related to the dissolution behavior of {delta} phases under certain deformation conditions.

  19. Mound-ACT*DE*CONSM feasibility study. Phase 2: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    A portion of the abandoned Miami-Erie Canal paralleling the Greater Miami River receives the runoff and storm-water discharge from Mound Laboratory. In 1969, a low-level plutonium leak contaminated sediment as far away as 1.5 mi from the Mound site along the old canal system. An estimated one million cubic feet of sediment requires remediation. The technology being evaluated for the remediation of the low-level plutonium-238 contamination of the sediment involves two processes: washing the sediments with ACT*DE*CON SM solution to dissolve the contaminant, followed by extraction of the solution and processing with the MAG*SEP SM process to concentrate the contaminant and allow reuse of the ACT*DE*CON SM solution. The processes are being optimized for pilot-scale and field demonstration. Phase 2 of the project primarily involved identification at the laboratory scale of the optimal ACT*DE*CON SM formulation, identification of the ion-exchanger and MAG*SEP SM particles, verification of the plutonium mobility in the treated soil, and evaluation of other process parameters according to a series of tasks

  20. Precipitation of plutonium (III) oxalate and calcination to plutonium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, A.; Orosco, E.H.; Cassaniti, P.; Greco, L.; Adelfang, P.

    1989-01-01

    The plutonium based fuel fabrication requires the conversion of the plutonium nitrate solution from nuclear fuel reprocessing into pure PuO2. The conversion method based on the precipitation of plutonium (III) oxalate and subsequent calcination has been studied in detail. In this procedure, plutonium (III) oxalate is precipitated, at room temperature, by the slow addition of 1M oxalic acid to the feed solution, containing from 5-100 g/l of plutonium in 1M nitric acid. Before precipitation, the plutonium is adjusted to trivalent state by addition of 1M ascorbic acid in the presence of an oxidation inhibitor such as hydrazine. Finally, the precipitate is calcinated at 700 deg C to obtain PuO2. A flowsheet is proposed in this paper including: a) A study about the conditions to adjust the plutonium valence. b) Solubility data of plutonium (III) oxalate and measurements of plutonium losses to the filtrate and wash solution. c) Characterization of the obtained products. Plutonium (III) oxalate has several potential advantages over similar conversion processes. These include: 1) Formation of small particle sizes powder with good pellets fabrication characteristics. 2) The process is rather insensitive to most process variables, except nitric acid concentration. 3) Ambient temperature operations. 4) The losses of plutonium to the filtrate are less than in other conversion processes. (Author) [es

  1. Evaluation of water quality by chlorophyll and dissolved oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latif, Z.; Tasneem, M.A.; Javed, T.; Butt, S.; Fazil, M.; Ali, M.; Sajjad, M.I.

    2002-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of Chlorophyll and dissolved Oxygen on water quality. Kalar Kahar and Rawal lakes were selected for this research. A Spectrophotometer was used for determination of Chlorophyll a, Chlorophyll b, Chlorophyll c and Pheophytin pigment. Dissolved Oxygen was measured in situ, using dissolved oxygen meter. The gamma O/sup 18/ of dissolved Oxygen, like concentration, is affected primarily by three processes: air water gas exchange, respiration and photosynthesis; gamma O/sup 18/ is analyzed on isotopic ratio mass spectrometer, after extraction of dissolved Oxygen from water samples, followed by purification and conversion into CO/sub 2/. Rawal lake receives most of the water from precipitation during monsoon period and supplemented by light rains in December and January. This water is used throughout the year for drinking purposes in Rawalpindi city. The water samples were collected from 5, 7.5, and 10 meters of depth for seasonal studies of physiochemical and isotopic parameters of water and dissolved Oxygen. Optimum experimental conditions for delta O/sup 18/ analysis of dissolved Oxygen from aqueous samples were determined. Stratification of dissolved Oxygen was observed in Rawal Lake before rainy season in summer. The water quality deteriorates with depth, because the respiration exceeds the photosynthesis and gas exchange. The concentration and delta O/sup 18/ of dissolved Oxygen show no variation with depth in 1998 winter sampling. Kalar Kahar lake gets water from springs, which are recharged by local rains on the nearby mountains. It is a big lake, with shallow and uniform depth of nearly 1.5 meters. A lot of vegetation can be seen on the periphery of the lake. Algae have grown on the floor of the lake Water samples were collected from the corner with large amount of vegetation and from the center of the lake for dissolved Oxygen and Chlorophyll measurements. Chlorophyll result shows that Kalar Kahar Lake falls in Eutrophic category

  2. Methylmercury speciation in the dissolved phase of a stratified lake using the diffusive gradient in thin film technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarisse, Olivier [Trent University, Department of Chemistry, 1600 West Bank Drive, Peterborough, Ontario K9J 7B8 (Canada)], E-mail: olivier.clarisse@umoncton.ca; Foucher, Delphine; Hintelmann, Holger [Trent University, Department of Chemistry, 1600 West Bank Drive, Peterborough, Ontario K9J 7B8 (Canada)

    2009-03-15

    The diffusive gradient in thin film (DGT) technique was successfully used to monitor methylmercury (MeHg) speciation in the dissolved phase of a stratified boreal lake, Lake 658 of the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Ontario, Canada. Water samples were conventionally analysed for MeHg, sulfides, and dissolved organic matter (DOM). MeHg accumulated by DGT devices was compared to MeHg concentration measured conventionally in water samples to establish MeHg speciation. In the epilimnion, MeHg was almost entirely bound to DOM. In the top of the hypolimnion an additional labile fraction was identified, and at the bottom of the lake a significant fraction of MeHg was potentially associated to colloidal material. As part of the METAALICUS project, isotope enriched inorganic mercury was applied to Lake 658 and its watershed for several years to establish the relationship between atmospheric Hg deposition and Hg in fish. Little or no difference in MeHg speciation in the dissolved phase was detected between ambient and spike MeHg. - Methylmercury speciation was determined in the dissolved phase of a stratified lake using the diffusive gradient in thin film technique.

  3. Methylmercury speciation in the dissolved phase of a stratified lake using the diffusive gradient in thin film technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarisse, Olivier; Foucher, Delphine; Hintelmann, Holger

    2009-01-01

    The diffusive gradient in thin film (DGT) technique was successfully used to monitor methylmercury (MeHg) speciation in the dissolved phase of a stratified boreal lake, Lake 658 of the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Ontario, Canada. Water samples were conventionally analysed for MeHg, sulfides, and dissolved organic matter (DOM). MeHg accumulated by DGT devices was compared to MeHg concentration measured conventionally in water samples to establish MeHg speciation. In the epilimnion, MeHg was almost entirely bound to DOM. In the top of the hypolimnion an additional labile fraction was identified, and at the bottom of the lake a significant fraction of MeHg was potentially associated to colloidal material. As part of the METAALICUS project, isotope enriched inorganic mercury was applied to Lake 658 and its watershed for several years to establish the relationship between atmospheric Hg deposition and Hg in fish. Little or no difference in MeHg speciation in the dissolved phase was detected between ambient and spike MeHg. - Methylmercury speciation was determined in the dissolved phase of a stratified lake using the diffusive gradient in thin film technique

  4. X-ray diffraction study of pure plutonium under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, Ph. [CEA, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)], E-mail: philippe.faure@cea.fr; Genestier, C. [CEA, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2009-03-15

    Atomic volume and bulk modulus represent basic cohesion properties of a material and are therefore linked to many other physical properties. However, large discrepancies are found in the literature regarding values for the bulk modulus of pure plutonium ({alpha}-phase). New X-ray diffraction measurements of plutonium in diamond anvil cell are presented and the isothermal bulk modulus is extracted.

  5. Isotope correlation verification of analytical measurements for dissolver materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satkowski, J.

    1988-01-01

    An independent verification of analytical results for accountability measurements of dissolver materials can be performed using the Iosotop Correlation Technique (ICT). ICT is based on the relationships that exist between the initial and final elemental concentration and isotopic abundances of the nuclear fuel. Linear correlation functions between isotopic ratios and plutonium/uranium ratios have been developed for specific reactor fuels. The application of these correlations to already existing analytical data provides a laboratory additional confidence in the reported results. Confirmation is done by a test of consistancy with historical data. ICT is being utilized with dissolver accountability measurements at the Savannah River Plant Laboratory. The application, implementation, and operating experience of this technique are presented

  6. Marine mollusks as bio concentrators of uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez R, E.; Almazan T, M. G.; Escalante G, D. C.

    2017-09-01

    The sudden presence of certain radionuclides in the marine environment has been of global concern and has raised concerns about the nature and abundance of these, in an attempt to establish dispersion patterns from their discharge points. In the particular case of our country, there are few data on the presence and concentration of alpha emitters, such as uranium and plutonium in the littorals and due to this fact there is a need to establish their reference levels in some specific points of the Mexican littoral. This work thus raises the study of part of the biota that grows and develops in sites near the sampling points. Is known that bivalve mollusks are natural bio-concentrators due to their capacity to absorb some metals dissolved in water, being able to find contaminating metals in their soft bodies, but they also accumulate large quantities when they generate their shells from dissolved carbonates that are complex with uranium and plutonium. The shells of the mollusks were studied to determine the physicochemical characteristics of their shells and the U and Pu were also separated by means of radiochemical techniques, being then electrodeposited in steel discs and evaluated by means of alpha spectroscopy. The results of the methodology prototype are presented to determine the U and Pu dispersed in the littoral by means of the analysis of some mollusks of the zone. (Author)

  7. Bibliographical study for the development of an electrochemical preparation of plutonium molten salts; Etude bibliographique en vue de la mise au point d'une preparation electrochimique en sels fondus du plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefevre, J.

    1957-01-15

    Based on an analogy with methods of electrochemical preparation of uranium molten salts, this bibliographical study reports data of physical properties of plutonium (melting point, density, ranges of existence of the different plutonium phases, resistivity, resistivity variation coefficient), discusses the search for an electrolytic bath (properties of plutonium bromides, chlorides and fluorides), and the required apparatus (an electrolysis cell)

  8. Plutonium-236 traces determination in plutonium-238 by α spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acena, M.L.; Pottier, R.; Berger, R.

    1969-01-01

    Two methods are described in this report for the determination of plutonium-236 traces in plutonium-238 by a spectrometry using semi-conductor detectors. The first method involves a direct comparison of the areas under the peaks of the α spectra of plutonium-236 and plutonium-238. The electrolytic preparation of the sources is carried out after preliminary purification of the plutonium. The second method makes it possible to determine the 236 Pu/ 238 Pu ratio by comparing the areas of the α peaks of uranium-232 and uranium-234, which are the decay products of the two plutonium isotopes respectively. The uranium in the source, also deposited by electrolysis, is separated from a 1 mg amount of plutonium either by a T.L.A. extraction, or by the use of ion-exchange resins. The report ends with a discussion of the results obtained with plutonium of two different origins. (authors) [fr

  9. Analisis Risiko Finansial Dengan Metode Simulasi Monte Carlo (Studi Kasus: Pt. Phase Delta Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atikah Aghdhi Pratiwi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Basically, the purpose of a company is make a profit and enrich the owners of the company. This is manifested by development and achievement of good performance, both in financial and operational perspective. But in reality, not all of companies can achieve good performance. One of them is because exposure of risk. This could threaten achievement of the objectives and existence of the company. Therefore, companies need to have an idea related to possible condition and financial projection in future periods that are affected by risk. One of the possible method is Monte Carlo Simulation. Research will be conducted at PT. Phase Delta Control with historical data related to production/sales volume, cost of production and selling price. Historical data will be used as Monte Carlo Simulation with random numbers that describe probability of each risk variables describing reality. The main result is estimated profitability of PT. Phase Delta Control in given period. Profit estimation will be uncertain variable due to some uncertainty

  10. Plutonium controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofman, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    If the world chooses to seek a solution to the energy dilemma through nuclear energy, the element plutonium will become an article of commerce to be handled in quantities of thousands of tonnes annually. Plutonium is a uniquely potent inhalation carcinogen, the potential induction of lung cancer dwarfing other possible toxic effects. For reasons to be presented here, it is the author's opinion that plutonium's carcinogenicity has been very seriously underestimated. If one couples the corrected carcinogenicity with the probable degree of industrial containment of the plutonium, it appears that the commercialization of a plutonium-based energy economy is not an acceptable option for society. Sagan's statement that ''the experience of 30 years supports the contention that plutonium can be used safely'' is manifestly indefensible. No meaningful epidemiological study of plutonium-exposed workers for that 30-year period has ever been done. Since thousands of those possibly exposed have left the industry and are not even available to follow-up, it is doubtful that any meaningful study of ''the experience of 30 years'' will ever be accomplished

  11. Preparation of hexavalent plutonium and its determination in the presence of tetravalent plutonium; Preparation de plutonium hexavalent et dosage en presence de plutonium tetravalent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corpel, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Corpel, J [Institut du Radium, 75 - Paris (France)

    1958-07-01

    In order to study the eventual reduction of plutonium from the VI-valent state to the IV-valent state, in sulphuric medium, under the influence of its own {alpha} radiation or of the {gamma}-rays from a cobalt-60 source, we have developed a method for preparing pure hexavalent plutonium and two methods for determining solutions containing tetravalent and hexavalent plutonium simultaneously. Hexavalent plutonium was prepared by anodic oxidation at a platinum electrode. Study of the oxidation yield as a function of various factors has made it possible to define experimental conditions giving complete oxidation. For concentrations in total plutonium greater than 1.5 x 10{sup -3} M, determination of the two valencies IV and VI was carried out by spectrophotometry at two wavelengths. For lower concentrations, the determination was done by counting, after separation of the tetravalent plutonium in the form of fluoride in the presence of a carrier. (author) [French] Afin d'etudier l'eventuelle reduction du plutonium de l'etat de valence VI a l'etat de valence IV, en milieu sulfurique sous l'influence de son propre rayonnement {alpha} ou des rayons {gamma} d'une source de cobalt-60, nous avons mis au point une methode de preparation de plutonium hexavalent pur et deux methodes de dosage des solutions contenant simultanement du plutonium tetravalent et du plutonium hexavalent. Nous avons prepare le plutonium hexavalent par oxydation anodique au contact d'une electrode de platine. L'etude de rendement de l'oxydation en fonction des divers facteurs nous a permis de definir des conditions experimentales donnant une oxydation complete. Pour des concentrations en plutonium total superieures a 1,5.10{sup -3} M, le dosage des deux valences IV et VI a ete realise par spectrophotometrie a deux longueurs d'onde. Pour des concentrations inferieures, le dosage a ete effectue par comptage apres separation du plutonium tetravalent sous la forme du fluorure en presence d'un entraineur

  12. Plutonium in nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.

    1994-01-01

    Plutonium in nature comes from natural sources and anthropogenic ones. Plutonium at the earth surface comes principally from anthropogenic sources. It is easily detectable in environment. The plutonium behaviour in environment is complex. It seems necessary for the future to reduce releases in environment, to improve predictive models of plutonium behaviour in geosphere, to precise biological impact of anthropogenic plutonium releases

  13. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddock, A.G.; Smith, F.

    1959-08-25

    A method is described for separating plutonium from uranium and fission products by treating a nitrate solution of fission products, uranium, and hexavalent plutonium with a relatively water-insoluble fluoride to adsorb fission products on the fluoride, treating the residual solution with a reducing agent for plutonium to reduce its valence to four and less, treating the reduced plutonium solution with a relatively insoluble fluoride to adsorb the plutonium on the fluoride, removing the solution, and subsequently treating the fluoride with its adsorbed plutonium with a concentrated aqueous solution of at least one of a group consisting of aluminum nitrate, ferric nitrate, and manganous nitrate to remove the plutonium from the fluoride.

  14. The origin and isotopic composition of dissolved sulfide in groundwater from carbonate aquifers in Florida and Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rye, R.O.; Back, W.; Hanshaw, B.B.; Rightmire, C.T.; Pearson, F.J. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The delta 34 S values of dissolved sulfide and the sulfur isotope fractionations between dissolved sulfide and sulfate species in Floridan ground water generally correlate with dissolved sulfate concentrations which are related to flow patterns and residence time within the aquifer. The dissolved sulfide derives from the slow in situ biogenic reduction of sulfate dissolved from sedimentary gypsum in the aquifer. In areas where the water is oldest, the dissolved sulfide has apparently attained isotopic equilibrium with the dissolved sulfate at the temperature of the system. This approach to equilibrium reflects an extremely slow reduction rate of the dissolved sulfate by bacteria; this slow rate probably results from very low concentrations of organic matter in the aquifer. In the reducing part of the Edwards aquifer, Texas, there is a general down-gradient increase in both dissolved sulfide and sulfate concentrations, but neither the delta 34 S values of sulfide nor the sulfide-sulfate isotope fractionation correlates with the ground-water flow pattern. The dissolved sulfide species appear to be derived primarily from biogenic reduction of sulfate ions whose source is gypsum dissolution although upgradient diffusion of H 2 S gas from deeper oil field brines may be important in places. (author)

  15. Process automation using combinations of process and machine control technologies with application to a continuous dissolver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.B.; Yarbro, O.O.

    1991-01-01

    Operation of a continuous rotary dissolver, designed to leach uranium-plutonium fuel from chopped sections of reactor fuel cladding using nitric acid, has been automated. The dissolver is a partly continuous, partly batch process that interfaces at both ends with batchwise processes, thereby requiring synchronization of certain operations. Liquid acid is fed and flows through the dissolver continuously, whereas chopped fuel elements are fed to the dissolver in small batches and move through the compartments of the dissolver stagewise. Sequential logic (or machine control) techniques are used to control discrete activities such as the sequencing of isolation valves. Feedback control is used to control acid flowrates and temperatures. Expert systems technology is used for on-line material balances and diagnostics of process operation. 1 ref., 3 figs

  16. Methodologies for extraction of dissolved inorganic carbon for stable carbon isotope studies : evaluation and alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Afifa Afifi

    1982-01-01

    The gas evolution and the strontium carbonate precipitation techniques to extract dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) for stable carbon isotope analysis were investigated. Theoretical considerations, involving thermodynamic calculations and computer simulation pointed out several possible sources of error in delta carbon-13 measurements of the DIC and demonstrated the need for experimental evaluation of the magnitude of the error. An alternative analytical technique, equilibration with out-gassed vapor phase, is proposed. The experimental studies revealed that delta carbon-13 of the DIC extracted from a 0.01 molar NaHC03 solution by both techniques agreed within 0.1 per mil with the delta carbon-13 of the DIC extracted by the precipitation technique, and an increase of only 0.27 per mil in that extracted by the gas evolution technique. The efficiency of extraction of DIC decreased with sulfate concentration in the precipitation technique but was independent of sulfate concentration in the gas evolution technique. Both the precipitation and gas evolution technique were found to be satisfactory for extraction of DIC from different kinds of natural water for stable carbon isotope analysis, provided appropriate precautions are observed in handling the samples. For example, it was found that diffusion of atmospheric carbon dioxide does alter the delta carbon-13 of the samples contained in polyethylene bottles; filtration and drying in the air change the delta carbon-13 of the samples contained in polyethylene bottles; filtration and drying in the air change the delta carbon-13 of the precipitation technique; hot manganese dioxide purification changes the delta carbon-13 of carbon dioxide. (USGS)

  17. Speculations about the upper Miocene change in abyssal Pacific dissolved bicarbonate delta13C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.L.; Keigwin, L.D. Jr

    1979-01-01

    New data from three Tasman Sea cores support Kleigwin's observation that the delta 13 C of Pacific benthic foraminifera (and by inference bottom-water TCO 2 ) decreased by 0.7 per thousand at about 6.5 Myr B.P. Simple box models are developed and used to test several hypotheses about the cause of the delta 13 C decrease. The authors favor the idea that the delta 13 C shift was due to a rapid change in TCO 2 cycling within the oceans (such as would result from either a decrease in upwelling rate, or an increase in the fraction of PO 4 3- reaching the deep oceans in particulate organic matter and a corresponding drop in the performed PO 4 3- concentration). The delta 13 C decrease across the shift might reflect either a global decrease in upwelling rate, or a different abyssal circulation pattern before the shift. (Auth.)

  18. Study of uranium-plutonium alloys containing from 0 to 20 peri cent of plutonium (1963); Etude des alliages uranium-plutonium aux concentrations comprises entre 0 et 20 pour cent de plutonium (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paruz, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-05-15

    The work is carried out on U-Pu alloys in the region of the solid solution uranium alpha and in the two-phase region uranium alpha + the zeta phase. The results obtained concern mainly the influence of the addition of plutonium on the physical properties of the uranium (changes in the crystalline parameters, the density, the hardness) in the region of solid solution uranium alpha. In view of the discrepancies between various published results as far as the equilibrium diagram for the system U-Pu is concerned, an attempt was made to verify the extent of the different regions of the phase diagram, in particular the two phased-region. Examinations carried out on samples after various thermal treatments (in particular quenching from the epsilon phase and prolonged annealings, as well as a slow cooling from the epsilon phase) confirm the results obtained at Los Alamos and Harwell. (author) [French] L'etude porte sur des alliages U-Pu du domaine de la solution solide uranium alpha et du domaine biphase uranium + phase zeta. Les resultats obtenus concernent en premier lieu l'influence de l'addition de plutonium sur les proprietes physiques de l'uranium (changement des parametres cristallins, densite, durete) dans le domaine de la solution solide uranium alpha. Compte tenu des divergences entre les differents resultats publies en ce qui concerne le diagramme d'equilibre du systeme U-Pu, on a essaye ensuite de verifier l'etendue des differents domaines du diagramme des phases, en particulier du domaine biphase zeta + uranium alpha. Les examens par micrographie et par diffraction des rayons X des echantillons apres differents traitements thermiques (notamment trempe a partir de la phase epsilon et recuits prolonges, ainsi qu'un refroidissement lent etage a partir de la phase epsilon) confirment les resultats obtenus a Los Alamos et a Harwell. (auteur)

  19. Technology survey for real-time monitoring of plutonium in a vitrifier off-gas system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, J.M.; Veirs, D.K.

    1996-01-01

    We surveyed several promising measurement technologies for the real-time monitoring of plutonium in a vitrifier off-gas system. The vitrifier is being developed by Westinghouse Savannah River Corp. and will be used to demonstrate vitrification of plutonium dissolved in nitric acid for fissile material disposition. The risk of developing a criticality hazard in the off-gas processing equipment can be managed by using available measurement technologies. We identified several potential technologies and methods for detecting plutonium that are sensitive enough to detect the accumulation of a mass sufficient to form a criticality hazard. We recommend gross alpha-monitoring technologies as the most promising option for Westinghouse Savannah River Corp. to consider because that option appears to require the least additional development. We also recommend further consideration for several other technologies because they offer specific advantages and because gross alpha-monitoring could prove unsuitable when tested for this specific application

  20. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.; Purdy, G.

    1994-01-01

    According to the measurements made in this study, the only situation in which chromium (+6) could exist in a plutonium process solution is one in which a feed containing chromium is dissolved in a glass pot dissolver in high nitric acid concentration and at high temperature. But when the resulting feed is prepared for ion exchange, the chemical treatment reduces chromium to the +3 state. Any solution being processed through the evaporator will only contain chromium in the +3 state and any chromium salts remaining in the evaporator bottoms will be chromium +3 salts

  1. Study of plutonium disposition using the GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-04-30

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the U.S. to disposition 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in parallel with a similar program in Russia. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study {open_quotes}Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium{close_quotes} identified light water reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a U.S. disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a 1350 MWe GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. The ABWR represents the integration of over 30 years of experience gained worldwide in the design, construction and operation of BWRs. It incorporates advanced features to enhance reliability and safety, minimize waste and reduce worker exposure. For example, the core is never uncovered nor is any operator action required for 72 hours after any design basis accident. Phase 1 of this study was documented in a GE report dated May 13, 1993. DOE`s Phase 1 evaluations cited the ABWR as a proven technical approach for the disposition of plutonium. This Phase 2 study addresses specific areas which the DOE authorized as appropriate for more in-depth evaluations. A separate report addresses the findings relative to the use of existing BWRs to achieve the same goal.

  2. Kinetics of the reaction between plutonium (4) and neptunium (4) in nitric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koltunov, V S; Zhuravleva, G I; Marchenko, V I

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the oxidation of neptunium(IV) to neptunium(V) by tetravalent plutonium ions in solutions of HNO/sub 3/ + NaNO/sub 3/ at constant (..mu.. = 2) and variable (..mu.. = 0.7-2.0) ionic strengths of the solution was investigated by a spectrophotometric method. It was established that in the range of concentrations (Np(IV)) = (4.25-10.6) x 10/sup 13/; (Pu(IV)) = (2.6-3.9)x10/sup -3/ M; (H/sup +/) 0.37-1.91 M, a first order is observed with respect to the reagents, while the order of the reaction with respect to H/sup +/ ions is equal to -3. The average value of the true rate constant of the reaction is k = 27.9+-1.3 M/sup 2/xmin/sup -1/ at ..mu..=2 and 39/sup 0/C. It was shown that with increasing analytical concentration of HNO/sub 3/ and NO/sub 3//sup -/ ions (in a mixture of HNO/sub 3/ +HClO/sub 4/), the value of K decreases. On the basis of an invetigation of the dependence of the reaction rate on the temperature in the interval 31-44.8/sup 0/, we calculated the values of the energy (E = 34.6 kcal/mole), enthalpy (..delta..H* = 34 kcal/mole), free energy (..delta..F* = 19.6 kcal/mole, entropy (..delta..S* = 49 entropy units) of activation of the reaction and the formal ionic entropy of the activated complex (PuOOHNp/sup 5 +/)*, S* = -87 entropy units. A reaction mechanism including an interaction of hydrolyzed neptunium and plutonium ions as the rate-determining step was proposed and discusses. The results obtained are compared with data for this reaction in perchloric acid wolution and for other similar redox reactions.

  3. Distribution of uranium, americium and plutonium in the biomass of freshwater macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotina, T.A.; Kalacheva, G.S.; Bolsunovsky, A.YA. [Institute of Biophysics SB RAS, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    Accumulation of uranium ({sup 238}U), americium ({sup 241}Am) and plutonium ({sup 242}Pu) and their distribution in cell compartments and biochemical components of the biomass of aquatic plants Elodea canadensis, Ceratophyllum demersum, Myrioplyllum spicatum and aquatic moss Fontinalis antipyretica have been investigated in laboratory batch experiments. Isotopes of uranium, americium and plutonium taken up from the water by Elodea canadensis apical shoots were mainly absorbed by cell walls, plasmalemma and organelles. A small portion of isotopes (about 6-13 %) could be dissolved in cytoplasm. The major portion (76-92 %) of americium was bound to cell wall cellulose-like polysaccharides of Elodea canadensis, Myriophyllum spicatum, Ceratophyllum demersum and Fontinalis antipyretica, 8-23 % of americium activity was registered in the fraction of proteins and carbohydrates, and just a small portion (< 1%) in lipid fraction. The distribution of plutonium in the biomass fraction of Elodea was similar to that of americium. Hence, americium and plutonium had the highest affinity to cellulose-like polysaccharides in Elodea biomass. Distribution of uranium in the biomass of Elodea differed essentially from that of transuranium elements: a considerable portion of uranium was recorded in the fraction of protein and carbohydrates (51 %). From our data we can assume that uranium has higher affinity to carbohydrates than proteins. (authors)

  4. Distribution of uranium, americium and plutonium in the biomass of freshwater macrophytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zotina, T.A.; Kalacheva, G.S.; Bolsunovsky, A.YA.

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of uranium ( 238 U), americium ( 241 Am) and plutonium ( 242 Pu) and their distribution in cell compartments and biochemical components of the biomass of aquatic plants Elodea canadensis, Ceratophyllum demersum, Myrioplyllum spicatum and aquatic moss Fontinalis antipyretica have been investigated in laboratory batch experiments. Isotopes of uranium, americium and plutonium taken up from the water by Elodea canadensis apical shoots were mainly absorbed by cell walls, plasmalemma and organelles. A small portion of isotopes (about 6-13 %) could be dissolved in cytoplasm. The major portion (76-92 %) of americium was bound to cell wall cellulose-like polysaccharides of Elodea canadensis, Myriophyllum spicatum, Ceratophyllum demersum and Fontinalis antipyretica, 8-23 % of americium activity was registered in the fraction of proteins and carbohydrates, and just a small portion (< 1%) in lipid fraction. The distribution of plutonium in the biomass fraction of Elodea was similar to that of americium. Hence, americium and plutonium had the highest affinity to cellulose-like polysaccharides in Elodea biomass. Distribution of uranium in the biomass of Elodea differed essentially from that of transuranium elements: a considerable portion of uranium was recorded in the fraction of protein and carbohydrates (51 %). From our data we can assume that uranium has higher affinity to carbohydrates than proteins. (authors)

  5. The plutonium fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigford, T.H.; Ang, K.P.

    1975-01-01

    The quantities of plutonium and other fuel actinides have been calculated for equilibrium fuel cycles for 1000-MW water reactors fueled with slightly enriched uranium, water reactors fueled with plutonium and natural uranium, fast-breder reactors, gas-cooled reactors fueled with thorium and highly enriched uranium, and gas-cooled reactors fueled with thorium, plutonium and recycled uranium. The radioactivity quantities of plutonium, americium and curium processed yearly in these fuel cycles are greatest for the water reactors fueled with natural uranium and recycled plutonium. The total amount of actinides processed is calculated for the predicted future growth of the U.S. nuclear power industry. For the same total installed nuclear power capacity, the introduction of the plutonium breeder has little effect upon the total amount of plutonium in this century. The estimated amount of plutonium in the low-level process wastes in the plutonium fuel cycles is comparable to the amount of plutonium in the high-level fission product wastes. The amount of plutonium processed in the nuclear fuel cycles can be considerably reduced by using gas-cooled reactors to consume plutonium produced in uranium-fueled water reactors. These, and other reactors dedicated for plutonium utilization, could be co-located with facilities for fuel reprocessing ad fuel fabrication to eliminate the off-site transport of separated plutonium. (author)

  6. COLORED DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER (CDOM) CHARACTERIZATION BY ABSORPTION AND FLUORESCENCE SPECTRA

    OpenAIRE

    Goncalves Araujo, Rafael; Ramirez-Perez, Marta; Kraberg, Alexandra; Piera, Jaume; Bracher, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) absorption and fluorescence spectra were analyzed from samples collected in the Lena River Delta region (Siberia, Russia; summer-2013) and in the Alfacs Bay (Ebro River Delta, Spain; summer-2013/winter-2014) in order to use optical measurements to infer loading and origin of CDOM. Absorbance spectra and Excitation-Emission matrices (EEMs) were obtained with a HORIBA Aqualog® spectrofluorometer. CDOM absorption at 443nm (a443) and terrestrial absorption ...

  7. Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Plutonium, which was obtained and identified for the first time in 1941 by chemist Glenn Seaborg - through neutron irradiation of uranium 238 - is closely related to the history of nuclear energy. From the very beginning, because of the high radiotoxicity of plutonium, a tremendous amount of research work has been devoted to the study of the biological effects and the consequences on the environment. It can be said that plutonium is presently one of the elements, whose nuclear and physico-chemical characteristics are the best known. The first part of this issue is a survey of the knowledge acquired on the subject, which emphasizes the sanitary effects and transfer into the environment. Then the properties of plutonium related to energy generation are dealt with. Fissionable, like uranium 235, plutonium has proved a high-performance nuclear fuel. Originally used in breeder reactors, it is now being more and more widely recycled in light water reactors, in MOX fuel. Reprocessing, recycling and manufacturing of these new types of fuel, bound of become more and more widespread, are now part of a self-consistent series of operations, whose technical, economical, industrial and strategical aspects are reviewed. (author)

  8. Learning more about plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This document offers chemical, metallurgical and economical information on the plutonium, a hard white radioelement. It deals also on the plutonium formation in the earth, the plutonium use in the nuclear industry, the plutonium in the environment and the plutonium toxicity. (A.L.B.)

  9. Civil plutonium management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicard, B.; Zaetta, A.

    2004-01-01

    During 1960 and 1970 the researches on the plutonium recycling in fast neutrons reactors were stimulated by the fear of uranium reserves diminishing. At the beginning of 1980, the plutonium mono-recycling for water cooled reactors is implementing. After 1990 the public opinion concerning the radioactive wastes management and the consequences of the disarmament agreements between Russia and United States, modified the context. This paper presents the today situation and technology associated to the different options and strategical solutions of the plutonium management: the plutonium use in the world, the neutronic characteristics, the plutonium effect on the reactors characteristics, the MOX behavior in the reactors, the MOX fabrication and treatment, the possible improvements to the plutonium use, the concepts performance in a nuclear park. (A.L.B.)

  10. Lifetime improvement and beam stabilization by longitudinal phase modulation at the DELTA electron storage ring; Lebensdauerverbesserung und Strahlstabilisierung durch longitudinale Phasenmodulation am Elektronenspreicherring DELTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuersch, Jonathan

    2014-10-16

    In DELTA especially at high beam currents often the occurence of an instability of a longitudinal oscillation mode is observed. In the framework of the present thesis first with different procedure the cause of the longitudinal oscillation mode, which is especially strongly excited at high beam currents, is searched for. Thereby connections between the occurrence of this mode and parameters from the region of the storage-ring high-frequency system is observed. It is shown by comparison of different procedures, simulation calculations, and experimental pre-examinations, that especially by a phase modulation of the storage-ring high frequency an essential improvement of especially the longitudinal beam stability and the beam lifetime can be reached. For the durable and reliable improvement of these beam properties in the framework of the present thesis a system for the longitudinal phase modulation of the after-acceleration voltage in the cavity resonator of the DELTA storage ring is concipated, developed, constructed, taken in operation, and tested. Finally the results aimed hereby are presented and discussed.

  11. The evolution of a subaqueous delta in the Anthropocene: A stratigraphic investigation of the Brazos River delta, TX USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Joseph A.; Dellapenna, Timothy M.

    2015-12-01

    Globally, deltas are increasingly threatened by anthropogenic activities. As a result, deltas now evolve through the combined effects of natural and human-induced processes occurring throughout the fluvial-deltaic system. The Brazos River delta, located along the Texas coast in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, and its watershed have been impacted by direct and indirect human activities since the late 19th century. This provides an opportunity to investigate how such alterations have shaped the evolution of a delta in the Anthropocene, a time when humans are drivers of geological change. Historic alteration to the delta and watershed include extensive agricultural activity, jetty construction at the mouth in the late 1890s, mouth diversion ~10 km to the southwest in 1929, and reservoir construction throughout the early and mid 20th Century. Three subaerial deltaic geometries provided the framework to connect subaerial deltaic responses, to the anthropogenic alterations, to the resulting stratigraphic characteristics observed in the subaqueous delta. This study utilized high-resolution geophysical data (swath bathymetry, side scan sonar, CHIRP subbottom profiling) on the subaqueous delta to investigate the subaqueous delta stratigraphy and infer the processes that shaped the deltaic record over time. The results showed distinct areas across the subaqueous delta that were dominated by erosion and deposition. Erosional areas corresponded to earlier growth phase depocenters being exposed at the surface, while the depositional areas corresponded to areas with the most recent growth phase depocenter overlying the earlier depocenters. These results highlight that the subaqueous depocenter has migrated westward over time, consistent with the observed changes to the subaerial delta. Additionally, the data showed that evidence for these past growth phases and depocenters may be preserved within the subaqueous delta, even after subaerial portions of the delta returned to pre

  12. Glass as a waste form for the immobilization of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Ellison, A.J.G.; Emery, J.W.; Hoh, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Several alternatives for disposal of surplus plutonium are being considered. One method is incorporating Pu into glass and in this paper we discuss the development and corrosion behavior of an alkali-tin-silicate glass and update results in testing Pu doped Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) reference glasses. The alkali-tin-silicate glass was engineered to accommodate a high Pu loading and to be durable under conditions likely to accelerate glass reaction. The glass dissolves about 7 wt% Pu together with the neutron absorber Gd, and under test conditions expected to accelerate the glass reaction with water, is resistant to corrosion. The Pu and the Gd are released from the glass at nearly the same rate in static corrosion tests in water, and are not segregated into surface alteration phases when the glass is reacted in water vapor. Similar results for the behavior of Pu and Gd are found for the DWPF reference glasses, although the long-term rate of reaction for the reference glasses is more rapid than for the alkali-tin-silicate glass

  13. Estimation of lung cancer risk from environmental exposure to airborne plutonium from the Rocky Flats Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, J.V.

    1983-01-01

    A three-phase study was undertaken to (1) determine the nature of disagreement among scientists concerning risk of environmental release of plutonium, (2) develop an analytic procedure for determining risk based on clearly stated principles defensible by reference to the literature, and (3) develop estimates of radiation dose to the lung from exposure to plutonium in ambient air for the purpose of evaluating risk to an individual with a specified age and smoking history. Eleven epidemiologists, biostatisticians and radiation scientists participated in Phase I of the study. It was shown that no clearly stated analytical principles for risk estimation were in common use, resulting in widely divergent risk estimates. Five of these disagreeing scientists in Phase I (including all cancer epidemiologists in the Denver metropolitan area) were chosen for Phase II of the study. A single analytic procedure was developed which was unanimously agreed upon. This procedure was dependent on the estimate of dose to the lung from ambient air levels of Rocky Flats plutonium. In Phase III of the study, a panel of four radiation scientists developed a procedure for estimation of dose to the lung from chronic exposure to plutonium ambient air levels. Results from all phases of the study were used to develop a method for estimation of relative risk of lung cancer for an individual, given plutonium dose to the lung, age, smoking history and other radiation exposure

  14. The plutonium society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mez, L.; Richter, M.

    1981-01-01

    The lectures of an institute are reported on, which took place between 25th and 27th January 1980 in Berlin. The subsequent public panel discussion with representations from the political parties is then documentated in a few press-reports. The themes of the 8 lectures are: views and facts on plutonium, plutonium as an energy resource, military aspects of the production of plutonium, economic aspects of the plutonium economy, the position of the trade unions on the industrial reconversion, the alleged inevitability of a plutonium society and the socio-political alternatives and perspectives of nuclear waste disposal. (UA) [de

  15. Dissolved Oxygen Availability on Traditional Pond Using Silvofishery Pattern in Mahakam Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Fahmy Almadi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of aquaculture system should meet the community’s basic need economically by taking into account the carrying capacity and environmental sustainability. The development of the environmentally friendly system such as silvofishery is being promoted by government however its yield has not reached the target yet. Dissolved oxygen availability is an important indicator which determines the success of the aquaculture system. The objective of the research was to determine dissolved oxygen availability on traditional pond systems using silvofishery pattern. Time series data collection was conducted once in 14 days with 2 measuring times; in the morning (06.00 am and in the evening (06.00 pm for 112 days. The research was conducted at four different silvofishery pond patterns, Pond Pattern 1 (0% mangrove canopy covered, Pond Pattern 2 (35% mangrove canopy covered, Pond Pattern 3 (67% mangrove canopy covered, and Pond Pattern 4 (75% mangrove canopy covered. Measurement was observed openly in the pond (in situ with parameters: dissolved oxygen, temperature, Water pH, Salinity, Transparency, Wind Speed, and Depth of Water Table, while chlorofil-a was ex-situ measured. The result from each parameter was compared to optimum concentration rate for shrimp growth. From the experiment, Pond Pattern 1 showed the most satisfaction results. Its dissolved oxygen availability during the research was ≥ 4 mg/L which was 5.88 mg/L ±0.48 mg/L in the evening (06.00 pm and 4.33 mg/L ±1.24 mg/L in the morning (06.00 am. It was also supported by optimum condition of other parameters such as temperature, Water pH, Salinity, Wind Speed, and Depth of Water Table. However, it was not supported by fertility and transparency of water. Thus, the traditional pattern of conservation still needs additional technology to maintain adequate dissolved oxygen availability for optimum shrimp growth.

  16. What is plutonium stabilization, and what is safe storage of plutonium?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1995-01-01

    The end of the cold war has resulted in the shutdown of nuclear weapons production and the start of dismantlement of significant numbers of nuclear weapons. This, in turn, is creating an inventory of plutonium requiring interim and long-term storage. A key question is, ''What is required for safe, multidecade, plutonium storage?'' The requirements for storage, in turn, define what is needed to stabilize the plutonium from its current condition into a form acceptable for interim and long-term storage. Storage requirements determine if research is required to (1) define required technical conditions for interim and long-term storage and (2) develop or improve current stabilization technologies. Storage requirements depend upon technical, policy, and economic factors. The technical issues are complicated by several factors. Plutonium in aerosol form is highly hazardous. Plutonium in water is hazardous. The plutonium inventory is in multiple chemical forms--some of which are chemically reactive. Also, some of the existing storage forms are clearly unsuitable for storage periods over a few years. Gas generation by plutonium compounds complicates storage: (1) all plutonium slowly decays creating gaseous helium and (2) the radiation from plutonium decay can initiate many chemical reactions-some of which generate significant quantities of gases. Gas generation can pressurize sealed storage packages. Last nuclear criticality must be avoided

  17. Complexation of Plutonium (IV) With Sulfate At Variable Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Xia; J.I. Friese; D.A. Moore; P.P. Bachelor; L. Rao

    2006-01-01

    The complexation of plutonium(IV) with sulfate at variable temperatures has been investigated by solvent extraction method. A NaBrO 3 solution was used as holding oxidant to maintain the plutonium(IV) oxidation state throughout the experiments. The distribution ratio of Pu(IV) between the organic and aqueous phases was found to decrease as the concentrations of sulfate were increased. Stability constants of the 1:1 and 1:2 Pu(IV)-HSO 4 - complexes, dominant in the aqueous phase, were calculated from the effect of [HSO 4 - ] on the distribution ratio. The enthalpy and entropy of complexation were calculated from the stability constants at different temperatures using the Van't Hoff equation

  18. Synthesis of complex plutonium oxides with alkaline-earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yasufumi; Nakajima, Kunihisa; Iwai, Takashi; Ohmichi, Toshihiko; Yamawaki, Michio.

    1995-03-01

    Complex plutonium(IV) oxides with strontium and barium, SuPuO 3 and BaPuO 3 , were synthesized and their crystal structure was analyzed. Compacted mixture of plutonium dioxide powder and the carbonate of strontium or barium was heated in a stream of argon gas using a cell with a small orifice. The products obtained were found to be composed of a nearly single phase showing the structure of orthorhombic slightly distorted from cubic. (author)

  19. Plutonium and surrogate fission products in a composite ceramic waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esh, D. W.; Frank, S. M.; Goff, K. M.; Johnson, S. G.; Moschetti, T. L.; O'Holleran, T.

    1999-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing a ceramic waste form to immobilize salt containing fission products and transuranic elements. Preliminary results have been presented for ceramic waste forms containing surrogate fission products such as cesium and the lanthanides. In this work results from scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction are presented in greater detail for ceramic waste forms containing surrogate fission products. Additionally, results for waste forms containing plutonium and surrogate fission products are presented. Most of the surrogate fission products appear to be silicates or aluminosilicates whereas the plutonium is usually found in an oxide form. There is also evidence for the presence of plutonium within the sodalite phase although the chemical speciation of the plutonium is not known

  20. Graphic-analytical determination of statics of reduction reextraction of plutonium using iron(2) as a reducing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pochinajlo, A.

    1977-01-01

    The grafic technological scheme of reduction reextraction of plutonium has been designed and the experiments on the laboratory 16-staged extractor of a mixer-settler type have been carried. From the concentration profiles found for a steady stage the content of plutonium(4) and plutonium(3) in organic and water phases in every stage is calculated. Then using the equations of material balance and extraction equilibrium a kinetic formula describing the reduction of plutonium(4) by iron(2f.) in a separate stage is deduced. Since the kinetic parameter A has been found to be close for all the staqes the analytical expression has been obtained with the help of which it is possible to determine a priori the plutonium(4) concentration profile in a reextraction part of the extractor for the given technological process conditions characterized by the defenite A. The plutonium(4) concentration profiles for the organic phase with different values A are presented

  1. Characterization of uranium- and plutonium-contaminated soils by electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.; Brown, N.R.

    1995-01-01

    Electron beam techniques have been used to characterize uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Site in Ohio, and also plutonium-bearing 'hot particles, from Johnston Island in the Pacific Ocean. By examining Fernald samples that had undergone chemical leaching it was possible to observe the effect the treatment had on specific uranium-bearing phases. The technique of Heap leaching, using carbonate solution, was found to be the most successful in removing uranium from Fernald soils, the Heap process allows aeration, which facilitates the oxidation of uraninite. However, another refractory uranium(IV) phase, uranium metaphosphate, was not removed or affected by any soil-washing process. Examination of ''hot particles'' from Johnston Island revealed that plutonium and uranium were present in 50--200 nm particles, both amorphous and crystalline, within a partially amorphous aluminum oxide matrix. The aluminum oxide is believed to have undergone a crystalline-to-amorphous transition caused by alpha-particle bombardment during the decay of the plutonium

  2. The availability of plutonium and americium in Irish Sea sediments for re-dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, P.; Vives i Batlle, J.; Bousher, A.; Whittall, A.; Chambers, N.

    2001-01-01

    The availability of plutonium and americium, for re-dissolution from offshore sediments into Irish Sea water, has been examined. Sediments collected from the mud-patch near the Cumbrian coast were characterized in terms of spatial location, particle size, partitioning of radionuclides with respect to physico-chemical bonds and availability of actinides for release into seawater. Sequential extraction investigations revealed that plutonium was predominantly associated with strongly bound sesquioxide and organic complex fractions. Americium was associated mainly with the organic complex fraction, but a significant fraction was in carbonate form. Sediment/water re-dissolution experiments with and without stirring were compared to simulate the effect of disturbing bed sediment. After 1 week, neither set of re-dissolution data provided significant trends between dissolved activity and time. Stirred systems appeared to release 2.5 times more plutonium and americium into seawater than unstirred systems. Measured 239,240Pu and 241Am distribution coefficients (K d values) were both typically approximately 10 5 l kg -1 . 241Am K d values are an order of magnitude lower than previously reported for the north-eastern Irish Sea, but similar to western Irish Sea values. Overall, the fractions of plutonium and americium available for re-dissolution from bed sediment are very low at <0.1%, with proportionally more plutonium being released than americium. These findings lend further support for the extrapolation of laboratory-derived information to environmental conditions

  3. Conceptual design report, plutonium stabilization and handling,project W-460

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, E.V.

    1997-03-06

    Project W-460, Plutonium Stabilization and Handling, encompasses procurement and installation of a Stabilization and Packaging System (SPS) to oxidize and package for long term storage remaining plutonium-bearing special nuclear materials currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), and modification of vault equipment to allow storage of resulting packages of stabilized SNM for up to fifty years. This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) provides conceptual design details for the vault modification, site preparation and site interface with the purchased SPS. Two concepts are described for vault configuration; acceleration of this phase of the project did not allow completion of analysis which would clearly identify a preferred approach.

  4. Relevance of the Paraná River hydrology on the fluvial water quality of the Delta Biosphere Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Alba; Olguín Salinas, Héctor F; Borús, Juan A

    2016-06-01

    The increasing frequency of extreme events in large rivers may affect not only their flow, but also their water quality. In the present study, spatial and temporal changes in fluvial physico-chemical variables were analyzed in a mega-river delta during two extreme hydrological years (La Niña-El Niño) and related to potential explanatory factors. Basic water variables were evaluated in situ at 13 points (distant 2-35 km from each other) in watercourses of the Delta Biosphere Reserve (890 km(2)) in the Lower Paraná River (Argentina) in nine surveys (October 2008-July 2010) without meteorological tides. Samples for laboratory analyses were collected from each main river. Multivariate tests by permutations were applied. The period studied was influenced by a drought, within a long period dominated by low flows combined with dry weather and wildfires, and a large (10 years of recurrence) and prolonged (7 months) flood. The hydrological phase, followed by the season and the hydrological year (according to the ENSO event) were the principal explanatory factors of the main water quality changes, whereas the drainage sub-basin and the fluvial environment (river or stream) were secondary explanatory factors. During the drought period, conductivity, turbidity, and associated variables (e.g., major ions, silicon, and iron concentrations) were maximal, whereas real color was minimal. In the overbanking flood phase, pH and dissolved oxygen concentration were minimal, whereas real color was maximal. Dissolved oxygen saturation was also low in the receding flood phase and total major ion load doubled after the arrival of the overbanking stage. The water quality of these watercourses may be affected by the combination of several influences, such as the Paraná River flow, the pulses with sediments and solutes from the Bermejo River, the export of the Delta floodplain properties mainly by the flood, the season, and the saline tributaries to the Lower Paraná River. The high

  5. Standard test method for radiochemical determination of plutonium in Soil by alpha spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of plutonium in soils at levels of detection dependent on count time, sample size, detector, background, and tracer yield. This test method describes one acceptable approach to the determination of plutonium in soil. 1.2 This test method is designed for 10 g of soil, previously collected and treated as described in Practices C998 and C999, but sample sizes up to 50 g may be analyzed by this test method. This test method may not be able to completely dissolve all forms of plutonium in the soil matrix. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Specific hazard statements are given in Section 9.

  6. Standard test method for quantitative determination of americium 241 in plutonium by Gamma-Ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1994-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the quantitative determination of americium 241 by gamma-ray spectrometry in plutonium nitrate solution samples that do not contain significant amounts of radioactive fission products or other high specific activity gamma-ray emitters. 1.2 This test method can be used to determine the americium 241 in samples of plutonium metal, oxide and other solid forms, when the solid is appropriately sampled and dissolved. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. Plutonium solubilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puigdomnech, I.; Bruno, J.

    1991-02-01

    Thermochemical data has been selected for plutonium oxide, hydroxide, carbonate and phosphate equilibria. Equilibrium constants have been evaluated in the temperature range 0 to 300 degrees C at a pressure of 1 bar to T≤100 degrees C and at the steam saturated pressure at higher temperatures. Measured solubilities of plutonium that are reported in the literature for laboratory experiments have been collected. Solubility data on oxides, hydroxides, carbonates and phosphates have been selected. No solubility data were found at temperatures higher than 60 degrees C. The literature solubility data have been compared with plutonium solubilities calculated with the EQ3/6 geochemical modelling programs, using the selected thermodynamic data for plutonium. (authors)

  8. Subsurface Bio-Immobilization of Plutonium: Experiment and Model Validation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Donald; Rittmann, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this project is to conduct a concurrent experimental and modeling study centered on the interactions of Shewanella algae BrY with plutonium and uranium species and phases. The most important objective of this research is to investigate the long-term stability of bioprecipitated immobilized actinide phases under changing redox conditions in biologically active systems. The long-term stability of bio-immobilized actinides (e.g. by bio-reduction) is a key criteria that defines the utility and effectiveness of a remediation/containment strategy for subsurface actinide contaminants. Plutonium, which is the focus of this project, is the key contaminant of concern at several DOE sites

  9. Plutonium in uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, D.; Fabryka-Martin, J.; Aguilar, R.; Attrep, M. Jr.; Roensch, F.

    1992-01-01

    Plutonium-239 (t 1/2 , 24,100 yr) is one of the most persistent radioactive constituents of high-level wastes from nuclear fission power reactors. Effective containment of such a long-lived constituent will rely heavily upon its containment by the geologic environment of a repository. Uranium ore deposits offer a means to evaluate the geochemical properties of plutonium under natural conditions. In this paper, analyses of natural plutonium in several ores are compared to calculated plutonium production rates in order to evaluate the degree of retention of plutonium by the ore. The authors find that current methods for estimating production rates are neither sufficiently accurate nor precise to provide unambiguous measures of plutonium retention. However, alternative methods for evaluating plutonium mobility are being investigated, including its measurement in natural ground waters. Preliminary results are reported and establish the foundation for a comprehensive characterization of plutonium geochemistry in other natural environments

  10. The use of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, W.

    1980-01-01

    The use of plutonium as a vital energy source producing maximum economic benefit with minimum proliferation risks is discussed. Having considered the production of plutonium, several possible plutonium fuel cycle options are identified and the economic value to be attached to plutonium for each examined. It is shown how the use of plutonium in fast reactors gives an opportunity for a non-proliferation policy not available when plutonium is used only in thermal reactors. From the technical considerations reviewed concerning plutonium and fast reactors it is shown that an economic regime involving international trade in spent thermal reactor fuel is possible which benefits equally those countries with fast reactors and those without and also assists in avoiding the proliferation of nuclear weapons. (U.K.)

  11. Plutonium-238 and plutonium-239 metabolism in dairy cows following ingestion of mixed oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patzer, R.G.; Mullen, A.A.; Sutton, W.W.; Potter, G.D.; Mosley, R.E.; Efurd, D.W.; Stalnaker, N.D.

    1985-01-01

    Dairy cows were given oral dosage of plutonium-238 and plutonium-239 dioxide particles in a study to determine the relative gastrointestinal absorption and tissue distribution of the nuclides. Two cows were given particles in which the two isotopes were homogeneously mixed within the particles. A third cow was given two batches of particles which contained either plutonium-238 or plutonium-239. Results indicate that, when the two isotopes of plutonium are homogeneous within the particles, there is no difference between plutonium-238 and plutonium-239 in the relative gastrointestinal absorption and tissue distribution

  12. High-temperature enthalpies of plutonium monocarbide and plutonium sesquicarbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oetting, F.L.

    1979-01-01

    The high-temperature enthalpies of plutonium monocarbide and plutonium sesquicarbide have been determined with a copper-block calorimeter of the isoperibol type. The experimental enthalpy data, which was measured relative to 298 K, covered the temperature range from 400 to 1500 K. The calculation of the temperature rise of the calorimeter takes into account the added heat evolution from the radioactive decay of the plutonium samples. These enthalpy results, combined with the heat capacity and entropy of the respective carbide at 298 K available from the literature, has made it possible to generate tables of thermodynamic functions for the plutonium carbides. The behavior of the heat capacity of both of the plutonium carbides, i.e., a relatively steep increase in the heat capacity as the temperature increases, may be attributed to a premelting effect with the formation of vacancies within the crystal lattice although a theoretical treatment of this phenomenon is not given

  13. Bifunctional groups grafted polyethersulfone magnetic beads for selective sequestration of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Sumana; Aggarwal, S.K.; Pandey, A.K.

    2014-01-01

    The present study involves synthesis of polyethersulfone (PES) beads grafted with two different monomers viz. 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate phosphoric acid ester (HEMP) and 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane sulphonic acid (AMPS) by photo-induced free radical polymerization method. The selection of bifunctional polymer was based on our previous studies, which indicated its efficacy for selective preconcentration of Pu from 3-4 mol L -1 HNO 3 . The HEMP-co-AMPS grafted PES beads were used for selective extraction of plutonium from dissolver solution

  14. Evidence of plutonium bioavailability in pristine freshwaters of a karst system of the Swiss Jura Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusnir, Ruslan; Christl, Marcus; Steinmann, Philipp; Bochud, François; Froidevaux, Pascal

    2017-06-01

    The interaction of trace environmental plutonium with dissolved natural organic matter (NOM) plays an important role on its mobility and bioavailability in freshwater environments. Here we explore the speciation and biogeochemical behavior of Pu in freshwaters of the karst system in the Swiss Jura Mountains. Chemical extraction and ultrafiltration methods were complemented by diffusive gradients in thin films technique (DGT) to measure the dissolved and bioavailable Pu fraction in water. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used to accurately determine Pu in this pristine environment. Selective adsorption of Pu (III, IV) on silica gel showed that 88% of Pu in the mineral water is found in +V oxidation state, possibly in a highly soluble [PuO2+(CO3)n]m- form. Ultrafiltration experiments at 10 kDa yielded a similar fraction of colloid-bound Pu in the organic-rich and in mineral water (18-25%). We also found that the concentrations of Pu measured by DGT in mineral water are similar to the bulk concentration, suggesting that dissolved Pu is readily available for biouptake. Sequential elution (SE) of Pu from aquatic plants revealed important co-precipitation of potentially labile Pu (60-75%) with calcite fraction within outer compartment of the plants. Hence, we suggest that plutonium is fully available for biological uptake in both mineral and organic-rich karstic freshwaters.

  15. Study of plutonium-addition systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchar, L.; Wozniakova, B.

    1976-11-01

    Steady state phase diagrams and calculated values of concentrations on the solid and liquid curves, the steady state distribution coefficient and thermodynamic control are presented for temperatures ranging from the eutectic reaction temperatures to the Pu melting point temperature for binary systems plutonium-addition (Mg, Al, Si, Ti, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Zr, Ru, Os, Th, U, Np). (J.P.)

  16. Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1989-03-01

    This report contains with regard to 'plutonium' statements on chemistry, occurrence and reactions in the environment, handling procedures in the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation protection methods, biokinetics, toxicology and medical treatment to make available reliable data for the public discussion on plutonium especially its use in nuclear power plants and its radiological assessment. (orig.) [de

  17. Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Christiansen, K.; Wollesen, M.

    1979-01-01

    As emotions and fear of plutonium are neither useful for the non-professionals nor for the political decision makers and the advantages and disadvantages of plutonium can only put against each other under difficulties, the paper wants to present the most essential scientific data of plutonium in a generally understandable way. Each of the individual sections is concluded and they try to give an answer to the most discussed questions. In order to make understanding easier, the scientific facts are only brought at points where it cannot be done without for the correctness of the presentation. Many details were left out knowingly. On the other hand, important details are dealt with several times if it seems necessary for making the presentation correct. The graphical presentations and the figures in many cases contain more than said in the text. They give the interested reader hints to scientific-technical coherences. The total material is to enable the reader to form his own opinion on plutonium problems which are being discussed in public. (orig./HP) [de

  18. CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FOR THE DECOMMISSIONG AND DECONTAMINATION OF THE 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOPKINS, A.M.; MINETTE, M.J.; KLOS, D.B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the unique challenges encountered and subsequent resolutions to accomplish the deactivation and decontamination of a plutonium ash contaminated building. The 232-Z Contaminated Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant was used to recover plutonium from process wastes such as rags, gloves, containers and other items by incinerating the items and dissolving the resulting ash. The incineration process resulted in a light-weight plutonium ash residue that was highly mobile in air. This light-weight ash coated the incinerator's process equipment, which included gloveboxes, blowers, filters, furnaces, ducts, and filter boxes. Significant airborne contamination (over 1 million derived air concentration hours [DAC]) was found in the scrubber cell of the facility. Over 1300 grams of plutonium held up in the process equipment and attached to the walls had to be removed, packaged and disposed. This ash had to be removed before demolition of the building could take place

  19. Health physics manual of good practices for plutonium facilities. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Heid, K.R.; Herrington, W.N.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Munson, L.F.; Munson, L.H.; Selby, J.M.; Soldat, K.L.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Traub, R.J.

    1988-05-01

    This manual consists of six sections: Properties of Plutonium, Siting of Plutonium Facilities, Facility Design, Radiation Protection, Emergency Preparedness, and Decontamination and Decommissioning. While not the final authority, the manual is an assemblage of information, rules of thumb, regulations, and good practices to assist those who are intimately involved in plutonium operations. An in-depth understanding of the nuclear, physical, chemical, and biological properties of plutonium is important in establishing a viable radiation protection and control program at a plutonium facility. These properties of plutonium provide the basis and perspective necessary for appreciating the quality of control needed in handling and processing the material. Guidance in selecting the location of a new plutonium facility may not be directly useful to most readers. However, it provides a perspective for the development and implementation of the environmental surveillance program and the in-plant controls required to ensure that the facility is and remains a good neighbor. The criteria, guidance, and good practices for the design of a plutonium facility are also applicable to the operation and modification of existing facilities. The design activity provides many opportunities for implementation of features to promote more effective protection and control. The application of ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principles and optimization analyses are generally most cost-effective during the design phase. 335 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs.

  20. Rapid separation of lanthanides and actinides on small particle based reverse phase supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, A.; Sivaraman, N.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the results on the use of short columns (3-5 cm long) with small particle size (1.8 {mu}m) for high performance liquid chromatographic separation of individual lanthanides and uranium from plutonium as well as uranium from thorium to achieve rapid separations i.e. separation time as short as 3.6 min for individual lanthanides, 1 min for thorium-uranium and 4.2 min for uranium from plutonium. These advantages can be exploited to significantly reduce analysis time, liquid waste generation as well as dose to operator when radioactive samples are analysed e.g. burn-up determination. In the present work, a dynamic ion-exchange chromatographic separation technique was employed using camphor-10-sulfonic acid (CSA) as the ion-pairing reagent and {alpha}-hydroxy isobutyric acid ({alpha}-HIBA) as the complexing reagent for the isolation of individual lanthanides as well as the separation of uranium from thorium. Uranium was separated from Pu(III) as well as Pu(IV) by reverse phase HPLC technique. The reverse phase HPLC was also investigated for the isolation and quantitative determination of uranium from thorium as well as lanthanide group from uranium. The dynamic ion-exchange technique using small particle support was demonstrated for measuring the concentrations of lanthanide fission products such as La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in the dissolver solution of fast reactor fuel. Similarly, the assay of uranium in the dissolver solution of fast reactor was carried out using reverse phase HPLC technique. The rapid separation technique using reverse phase HPLC was also demonstrated for separation of lanthanides as a group from uranium matrix; samples of LiCl-KCl eutectic salt containing chlorides of lanthanides in uranium matrix (typically 1: 2000) were analysed. (orig.)

  1. Plutonium distribution and remobilization in sediments of the Rhone River mouth (North-Western Mediterranean); Distribution et remobilisation du plutonium dans les sediments du prodelta du Rhone (Mediterranee nord-occidentale)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lansard, B

    2004-06-15

    The aim of the present study was to describe the distribution and remobilization of plutonium (Pu) in the sediments off the Rhone river mouth. Most of the {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239,240}Pu isotopes introduced into the Rhone River were discharged by the liquid effluents released from the Marcoule reprocessing plant, located 120 km upstream the river mouth. Due to its high affinity for particles and its long half life, {sup 238}Pu is a promising tracer to follow the dispersion of particulate matter from the Rhone River to the Mediterranean Sea. During the 3 REMORA cruises, sediment samples were specifically collected in the Rhone pro-delta area and more offshore on the whole continental shelf of the Gulf of Lions. The measurements of alpha emitters gave a first detailed spatial distribution of Pu isotope concentrations in surface sediments off the Rhone mouth. Using {sup 137}Cs concentrations and their correlations with Pu isotopes, we were able to give a first estimate of Pu inventories for the sediments of the study area. In 2001, plutonium inventories were estimated to 92 {+-} 7 GBq of {sup 238}Pu and 522 {+-} 44 GBq of {sup 239,240}Pu for an area of 500 km{sup 2} in front of the Rhone River mouth. Roughly, 50 % of these inventories are trapped in an area of 100 km{sup 2} corresponding to the extent of the Rhone pro-delta zone. In spring 2002, an ADCP, with current velocity and wave measurements, was moored off the Rhone River mouth. This unique in situ dataset highlights the major role of South-East swells in the erosion of pro-deltaic sediments and their dispersion to the South-Westward direction. Plutonium remobilization was examined using a new experimental design based on sediment resuspension processes studied within a linear recirculating flume. For Gulf of Lions sediments and for a given hydrodynamic stress, remobilization fluxes raised a maximum of 0.08 Bq.m{sup -2}.h{sup -1} for {sup 238}Pu and 0.64 Bq.m{sup -2}.h{sup -1} for {sup 239,240}Pu. A first

  2. Plutonium storage phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szempruch, R.

    1995-12-01

    Plutonium has been produced, handled, and stored at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities since the 1940s. Many changes have occurred during the last 40 years in the sources, production demands, and end uses of plutonium. These have resulted in corresponding changes in the isotopic composition as well as the chemical and physical forms of the processed and stored plutonium. Thousands of ordinary food pack tin cans have been used successfully for many years to handle and store plutonium. Other containers have been used with equal success. This paper addressees the exceptions to this satisfactory experience. To aid in understanding the challenges of handling plutonium for storage or immobilization the lessons learned from past storage experience and the necessary countermeasures to improve storage performance are discussed

  3. The distribution of radionuclides between the dissolved and particulate phases of a contaminated freshwater stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdock, R.N.; Johnson, M.S.; Hemingway, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Streamwater concentrations of the radionuclides 137 Cs, 241 Am and 239,240 Pu from a contaminated freshwater stream showed significant relationships between total concentration and flow rate. When total concentrations were divided into their dissolved and particulate components 239,240 Pu was shown to exist mainly (>80%) in the solute phase ( 137 Cs and 241 Am were distributed equally between the two phases. 137 Cs was most likely present either as the dissolved ion or as the specifically adsorbed ion on particulate sediments. Particle-associated 241 Am and the small particulate component of 239,240 Pu, were believed to be bound to sediment surface coatings, such as organic or oxide/hydroxides, rather than the truly adsorbed ion. Solute phase 239,240 Pu was most likely associated with colloidal organic carbon species (such as humic or fulvic acids). This was also apparent, but to a lesser extent, for 241 Am. Distribution coefficients were determined for a number of discrete sites and environmental conditions. The response of the stream to removal of its source of radioactivity (via a re-routing scheme) was both significant and rapid. (author)

  4. Study of immiscibilities in the trilaurylamine - dodecane - nitric acid - plutonium system; Etude des immiscibilites dans le systeme trilaurylamine - dodecane - acide nitrique - plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saey, J C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    Phase equilibrium in systems made up of trilaurylamine, dodecane, nitric acid tetravalent plutonium is shown by drawing the triangular diagrams. the study of these diagrams provides informations concerning the causes of immiscibility. Heterogeneity of the organic mixtures can be related to some characteristics of the components- dipole moment, molecular polarizability and hydrogen bond exchanging ability-Depending on these, some rules may be established which can be used to make a proper choice of an additive in order to improve the miscibility. As an application a study on the partial substitution of dodecane with decalin, in plutonium extraction experiments, has been done showing a possible improvement of the extraction process. (author) [French] L equilibre des phases dans les systemes formes a partir de trilaurylamine, de dodecane, d'acide nitrique et de plutonium tetravalent est represente en tracant les diagrammes triangulaires. L'examen de ces diagrammes permet d'apporter certaines precisions en ce qui concerne l'origine des immiscibilites. Celles ci sont ensuite reliees a certaines caracteristiques des constituants: le moment dipolaire, la polarisabilite moleculaire et la tendance a former des liaisons hydrogene. Sur les memes bases, il est possible d'etablir un certain nombre de regles pouvant servir a guider le choix d'un additif ameliorant la miscibilite. En application, une etude sur le remplacement partiel du dodecane par la decaline montre l'interet de l'emploi de ce compose dans le procede de purification du plutonium. (auteur)

  5. Experimental studies to validate model calculations and maximum solubility limits for Plutonium and Americium; Experimentelle Arbeiten zur Absicherung von Modellrechnungen und Maximalkonzentrationen fuer Plutonium und Americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-02-16

    This report focuses on studies of KIT-INE to derive a significantly improved description of the chemical behaviour of Americium and Plutonium in saline NaCl, MgCl{sub 2} and CaCl{sub 2} brine systems. The studies are based on new experimental data and aim at deriving reliable Am and Pu solubility limits for the investigated systems as well as deriving comprehensive thermodynamic model descriptions. Both aspects are of high relevance in the context of potential source term estimations for Americium and Plutonium in aqueous brine systems and related scenarios. Americium and Plutonium are long-lived alpha emitting radionuclides which due to their high radiotoxicity need to be accounted for in a reliable and traceable way. The hydrolysis of trivalent actinides and the effect of highly alkaline pH conditions on the solubility of trivalent actinides in calcium chloride rich brine solutions were investigated and a thermodynamic model derived. The solubility of Plutonium in saline brine systems was studied under reducing and non-reducing conditions and is described within a new thermodynamic model. The influence of dissolved carbonate on Americium and Plutonium solubility in MgCl{sub 2} solutions was investigated and quantitative information on Am and Pu solubility limits in these systems derived. Thermodynamic constants and model parameter derived in this work are implemented in the Thermodynamic Reference Database THEREDA owned by BfS. According to the quality assurance approach in THEREDA, is was necessary to publish parts of this work in peer-reviewed scientific journals. The publications are focused on solubility experiments, spectroscopy of aquatic and solid species and thermodynamic data. (Neck et al., Pure Appl. Chem., Vol. 81, (2009), pp. 1555-1568., Altmaier et al., Radiochimica Acta, 97, (2009), pp. 187-192., Altmaier et al., Actinide Research Quarterly, No 2., (2011), pp. 29-32.).

  6. Plutonium controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity of plutonium is discussed, particularly in relation to controversies surrounding the setting of radiation protection standards. The sources, amounts of, and exposure pathways of plutonium are given and the public risk estimated

  7. Perspective on plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, L.S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is intended as a brief overview on the element plutonium. Plutonium is the first primarily man-made element to play a significant role not only in technological development, but also in the economic growth of many countries. The importance of plutonium centers around its enormous energy making it ideal for wide-scale use in reactors, while the nuclear industry continues to work toward improving safety and efficiency of plutonium as a reactor fuel politicians and the public still debate over the safety and benefits of nuclear power. (30 refs.)

  8. Expected behavior of plutonium in the IFR fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steunenberg, R.K.; Johnson, I.

    1985-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is a metal-fueled, sodium-cooled reactor that will consist initially of a U-Zr alloy core in which the enriched uranium will be replaced gradually by plutonium bred in a uranium blanket. The plutonium is concentrated to the required level by extraction from the molten blanket material with a CaCl 2 -BaCl 2 salt containing MgCl 2 as an oxidant (halide slagging). The CaCl 2 -BaCl 2 salt containing dissolved PuCl 3 and UCl 3 is added to the core process where fission products are removed by electrorefining, using a liquid cadmium anode, a metal cathode, and a LiCl-NaCl-CaCl 2 -BaCl 2 molten salt electrolyte. The product is recovered as a metallic deposit on the cathode. The halide slagging step is operated at about 1250 0 and the electrorefining step at about 450 0 C. These processes are expected to give low fission-product decontamination factors of the order of 100

  9. Plutonium controversy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity of plutonium is discussed, particularly in relation to controversies surrounding the setting of radiation protection standards. The sources, amounts of, and exposure pathways of plutonium are given and the public risk estimated. (ACR)

  10. Reduction stripping of plutonium (IV) with hydroxylamine nitrate in the centrifugal contactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zefu; Ding Dachun; Fei Hongcheng

    1989-01-01

    Reduction stripping of Pu(IV) with hydroxylamine nitrate under conditions of Purex 3B contactor is carried out with 16-stage mixer-centrifugal settler in laboratory scale. Results show that the apparent recovery of Pu is more than 99.9%. But there is a great difference in the concentration of plutonium of every stage in extraction equipment at different temperature. For example, plutonium concentrations in organic phase of several stages near the organic effluent at 45-50 deg C are lower than that at 20-24 deg C. Thus, recovery efficiency of plutonium can be assured only for the former. However, plutonium will probably be lost, if operating conditions are fluctuated. In addition, plutonium accumulated in the extraction equipment increased appreciably for the case of 20-24 deg C. Therefore, in order to ensure recovery efficiency of Pu, reduction stripping of Pu should be made at higher temperature

  11. Estrogenic and AhR activities in dissolved phase and suspended solids from wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnino, Sonia; Gomez, Elena; Picot, Bernadette; Cavaillès, Vincent; Casellas, Claude; Balaguer, Patrick; Fenet, Hélène

    2010-05-15

    The distribution of estrogen receptor (ERalpha) and Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) activities between the dissolved phase and suspended solids were investigated during wastewater treatment. Three wastewater treatment plants with different treatment technologies (waste stabilization ponds (WSPs), trickling filters (TFs) and activated sludge supplemented with a biofilter system (ASB)) were sampled. Estrogenic and AhR activities were detected in both phases in influents and effluents. Estrogenic and AhR activities in wastewater influents ranged from 41.8 to 79 ng/L E(2) Eq. and from 37.9 to 115.5 ng/L TCDD Eq. in the dissolved phase and from 5.5 to 88.6 ng/g E(2) Eq. and from 15 to 700 ng/g TCDD Eq. in the suspended solids. For both activities, WSP showed greater or similar removal efficiency than ASB and both were much more efficient than TF which had the lowest removal efficiency. Moreover, our data indicate that the efficiency of removal of ER and AhR activities from the suspended solid phase was mainly due to removal of suspended solids. Indeed, ER and AhR activities were detected in the effluent suspended solid phase indicating that suspended solids, which are usually not considered in these types of studies, contribute to environmental contamination by endocrine disrupting compounds and should therefore be routinely assessed for a better estimation of the ER and AhR activities released in the environment. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Deltas on the move. Making deltas cope with the effects of climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reker, J.; Van Winden, A.; Braakhekke, W.; Vermaat, J.; Eleveld, M.; Janssen, R.; De Reus, N.; Omzigt, N.

    2006-01-01

    This scoping study is the first phase of a study aimed at: (a) providing knowledge on the potential of a system-based approach to deal with the effects of climate change as an alternative for the more traditional technical measures such as dams, dikes and surge barriers. This should be shown for both rich and poor countries and should address hydrological, ecological as well as socio-economic aspects; and (b) identifying the potential to market these results worldwide. To reach these objectives four research steps are defined: (1) to make an inventory of deltas: their vulnerability to the effects of climate change; (2) development of indicators for successful use of a system-based approach; (3) to provide an overview of the potential of soft measures for these deltas; (4) to select a number of deltas with potential for marketing system-based measures and the development of strategies to link economic and ecological objectives. This scoping study addresses step 1 only. The results from step 1 will be used as a starting point for steps 2 and 3. The outputs of this scoping study are threefold: a background report (this report); a flyer with a brief description of the findings; a website with information on delta's and how these may be affected by climate change. The scoping study will roughly outline which deltas are still functioning in a more or less natural manner - or could be (re)developed in that direction - and thus would be good candidates for a system-based approach. Chapter 2 gives a description of the geomorphological and ecological processes in a delta. In addition, those aspects of climate change that can have an effect on deltas are described. The third chapter deals with human interventions in deltas and whether or not they fit within a system-based approach. In a system-based approach, as presented in Chapter 4, natural processes are given free reign where possible. Chapter 5 shows how available data on deltas could be used in such a system

  13. Plutonium, nuclear fuel; Le plutonium, combustible nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grison, E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay aux Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, Saclay

    1960-07-01

    A review of the physical properties of metallic plutonium, its preparation, and the alloys which it forms with the main nuclear metals. Appreciation of its future as a nuclear fuel. (author) [French] Apercu sur les proprietes physiques du plutonium metallique, sa preparation, ses alliages avec les principaux metaux nucleaires. Consideration sur son avenir en tant que combustible nucleaire. (auteur)

  14. Sensing dissolved sediment porewater concentrations of persistent and bioaccumulative poolutants using disposable solid-phase microextraction fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayer, P.; Vaes, W.H.J.; Wijnker, F.; Legierse, K.C.H.M.; Kraaij, R.H.; Tolls, J.; Hermens, J.L.M.

    2000-01-01

    Polymer coated glass fibers were applied as disposable samplers to measure dissolved concentrations of persistent and bioaccumulative pollutants (PBPs) in sediment porewater. The method is called matrix solid-phase microextraction (matrix-SPME), because it utilizes the entire sediment matrix as a

  15. A Study of the Stability and Characterization Plutonium Dioxide and Chemical Characterization [of] Rocky Flats and Los Alamos Plutonium-Containing Incinerator Ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, A.K.; Boettger, J.C.; Behrens, Robert G.

    1999-01-01

    In the presentation ''A Study of the Stability and Characterization of Plutonium Dioxide'', the authors discuss their recent work on actinide stabilities and characterization, in particular, plutonium dioxide PuO 2 . Earlier studies have indicated that PuO 2 has the fluorite structure of CaF 2 and typical oxide semiconductor properties. However, detailed results on the bulk electronic structure of this important actinide oxide have not been available. The authors have used all-electron, full potential linear combinations Gaussian type orbitals fitting function (LCGTO-FF) method to study PuO 2 . The LCGTO-FF technique characterized by its use of three independent GTO basis sets to expand the orbitals, charge density, and exchange-correlation integral kernels. Results will be presented on zero pressure using both the Hedin-Lundquist local density approximation (LDA) model or the Perdew-Wang generalized gradient approximation (GGA) model. Possibilities of different characterizations of PuO 2 will be explored. The paper ''Chemical Characterization Rocky Flats and Los Alamos Plutonium-Containing Incinerator Ash'' describes the results of a comprehensive study of the chemical characteristics of virgin, calcined and fluorinated incinerator ash produced at the Rocky Flats Plant and at the Los Alamos National Laboratory prior to 1988. The Rocky Flats and Los Alamos virgin, calcined, and fluorinated ashes were also dissolved using standard nitrate dissolution chemistry. Corresponding chemical evaluations were preformed on the resultant ash heel and the results compared with those of the virgin ash. Fluorination studies using FT spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool were also performed to evaluate the chemistry of phosphorus, sulfur, carbon, and silicon containing species in the ash. The distribution of plutonium and other chemical elements with the virgin ash, ash heel, fluorinated ash, and fluorinated ash heel particulates were studied in detail using microprobe analysis. Some

  16. Fused salt processing of impure plutonium dioxide to high-purity plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, L.J.; Christensen, D.C.; Babcock, B.R.

    1982-01-01

    A process for converting impure plutonium dioxide (approx. 96% pure) to high-purity plutonium metal (>99.9%) was developed. The process consists of reducing the oxide to an impure plutonium metal intermediate with calcium metal in molten calcium chloride. The impure intermediate metal is cast into an anode and electrorefined to produce high-purity plutonium metal. The oxide reduction step is being done now on a 0.6-kg scale with the resulting yield being >99.5%. The electrorefining is being done on a 4.0-kg scale with the resulting yield being 80 to 85%. The purity of the product, which averages 99.98%, is essentially insensitive to the purity of the feed metal. The yield, however, is directly dependent on the chemical composition of the feed. To date, approximately 250 kg of impure oxide has been converted to pure metal by this processing sequence. The availability of impure plutonium dioxide, together with the need for pure plutonium metal, makes this sequence a valuable plutonium processing tool

  17. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Bernot

    2005-07-13

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) relevant to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are provided in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log fCO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. Even though selection of an appropriate set of radionuclides documented in Radionuclide Screening (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160059]) includes actinium, transport of Ac is not modeled in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model because of its extremely short half-life. Actinium dose is calculated in the TSPA-LA by assuming secular equilibrium with {sup 231}Pa (Section 6.10); therefore, Ac is not analyzed in this report. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for TSPA-LA used to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for the actinides discussed in this report. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or

  18. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Bernot

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) relevant to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are provided in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log fCO 2 as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. Even though selection of an appropriate set of radionuclides documented in Radionuclide Screening (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160059]) includes actinium, transport of Ac is not modeled in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model because of its extremely short half-life. Actinium dose is calculated in the TSPA-LA by assuming secular equilibrium with 231 Pa (Section 6.10); therefore, Ac is not analyzed in this report. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for TSPA-LA used to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for the actinides discussed in this report. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise

  19. Seasonal changes in particulate and dissolved organic matter composition and quality in the Lena River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollenhauer, G.; Winterfeld, M.; Hefter, J.; Bodenstab, L.; Morgenstern, A.; Eulenburg, A.; Heim, B.; Koch, B.; Schefuss, E.; Moerth, C. M.; Rethemeyer, J.

    2016-12-01

    Arctic rivers are known to export large quantities of carbon by discharge of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), and in a warming and progressively moister Arctic, these exports may increase resulting in a reduction of arctic continental carbon stocks. These rivers have highly variable discharge rates with a pronounced maximum during the spring freshet associated with highest concentrations of DOC and POC. Most studies investigating the isotopic composition and quality of carbon exported by Arctic rivers rely on samples taken in summer during base flow, which is due to the logistical challenges associated with sampling in the remote Arctic permafrost regions. Here we present a record of δ13C and Δ14C of DOC and POC collected between late May during the freshet and late August 2014 in the Lena River Delta. POC Δ14C shows an initial trend towards older values in the spring samples, which is reversed in summer, associated with a shift towards more depleted δ13C values. We interpret this aging trend as reflecting progressive thawing throughout the ice-free season, resulting in mobilization of progressively older carbon from deeper thawed layers. The summer reversal indicates admixture of aquatic organic matter. DOC Δ14C, in contrast, remains at relatively modern levels with rather constant δ13C values throughout the sampling period. We furthermore analysed the biomarker composition of Lena Delta particulate OM collected in spring and summer. From spring to summer, we observe trends in abundance of individual leaf-wax derived biomarkers indicating higher abundance of algal biomass in the summer particles. Trends in soil microbial biomarkers and compound-specific δD of leaf-wax lipids suggest a shift in sources towards higher contributions from the southern catchment in summer. DOC composition investigated with FT-ICR-MS changes from spring with higher abundances of compounds with high H/C and low O/C ratios to late summer, when fewer compounds

  20. Selective leaching studies of deep-sea sediments loaded with americium, neptunium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, T.G.; Higgo, J.J.W.; Cronan, D.S.; Rees, L.V.C.

    1984-07-01

    A series of selective leaching experiments were undertaken to investigate the solid phase speciation and distribution of americium, neptunium and plutonium which had been experimentally loaded onto different marine sediment types. The chemical leaches employed showed rather poor selectivity but certain trends were evident. Adsorption was not by ion exchange. Americium showed a preferential affinity for carbonate and plutonium for organic matter. Neptunium appeared to have no preferential affinities. Americium was sorbed by acetic acid residues (CaCO 3 removed) and by unleached carbonate-rich sediments with equal efficiency. This indicates that it is able to diversify its solid phase affinity/distribution depending upon which solid phases are available. (author)

  1. EDF research scenarios for closing the Plutonium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Mer, Joël; Garzenne, Claude; Lemasson, David

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: → There are various solutions to plutonium fuel closure; → Natural uranium consumption is reduced: • Full generation IV fleet is obviously the most efficient; • Symbiotic fleet makes a better use of its advanced reactors. → Plutonium inventory reaches an equilibrium between 700 tons and 1150 tons. • The multi-recycling of spent MOX fuel must be a long term solution in order to reduce significantly the plutonium inventory. → Spent fuel storage is reduced when MOX spent fuel are reprocessed but sodium pools are challenging. → Fast reactors are not the only solution to use MOX spent fuel: • HCPWR is a roundabout solution: – the reduction of natural uranium is limited; – the high level waste production is high. – The reprocessing plant capacity must be increased during deployment phase → R&D must be continued to improve HCPWR design

  2. Plutonium storage criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, D. [Scientech, Inc., Germantown, MD (United States); Ascanio, X. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy has issued a technical standard for long-term (>50 years) storage and will soon issue a criteria document for interim (<20 years) storage of plutonium materials. The long-term technical standard, {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides,{close_quotes} addresses the requirements for storing metals and oxides with greater than 50 wt % plutonium. It calls for a standardized package that meets both off-site transportation requirements, as well as remote handling requirements from future storage facilities. The interim criteria document, {open_quotes}Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Solid Materials{close_quotes}, addresses requirements for storing materials with less than 50 wt% plutonium. The interim criteria document assumes the materials will be stored on existing sites, and existing facilities and equipment will be used for repackaging to improve the margin of safety.

  3. The relationship between sediment and plutonium budgets in a small macrotidal estuary: Esk Estuary, Cumbria, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, M.; Emptage, M.; Mudge, S.; Bradshaw, K.; Hamilton-Taylor, J.

    1991-01-01

    During a spring tide, measurements were made of sediment and 239,240 Pu discharges through a cross-section of the Esk estuary. These indicated that over the full tidal cycle, the inner estuary had a net gain of ca. 18 t of sediment and ca. 85 MBq of particulate phase 239,240 Pu, and a probable net loss of ca. 1 to 2 MBq of solution phase 239,240 Pu. Each of these was the net result of large gross discharges of sediment and plutonium into and out of the estuary for which the sea was the main source, with eroded estuarine sediment providing an additional minor source of sediment, of particulate phase plutonium and, via desorption, of solution phase plutonium. A net input with each tide, of sediment and its associated radionuclides, is considered to be typical for the Esk estuary under the normal conditions of low river flows. (author)

  4. Automated spectrophotometer for plutonium and uranium determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.D.; Hodgkins, D.J.; Hollen, R.M.; Rein, J.E.

    1975-09-01

    The automated spectrophotometer described is the first in a planned series of automated instruments for determining plutonium and uranium in nuclear fuel cycle materials. It has a throughput rate of 5 min per sample and uses a highly specific method of analysis for these elements. The range of plutonium and uranium measured is 0.5 to 14 mg and 1 to 14 mg, respectively, in 0.5 ml or less of solution with an option to pre-evaporate larger volumes. The precision of the measurements is about 0.02 mg standard deviation over the range corresponding to about 2 rel percent at the 1-mg level and 0.2 rel percent at the 10-mg level. The method of analysis involves the extraction of tetrapropylammonium plutonyl and uranyl trinitrate complexes into 2-nitropropane and the measurement of the optical absorbances in the organic phase at unique peak wavelengths. Various aspects of the chemistry associated with the method are presented. The automated spectrophotometer features a turntable that rotates as many as 24 samples in tubes to a series of stations for the sequential chemical operations of reagent addition and phase mixing to effect extraction, and then to a station for the absorbance measurement. With this system, the complications of sample transfers and flow-through cells are avoided. The absorbance measurement system features highly stable interference filters and a microcomputer that controls the timing sequence and operation of the system components. Output is a paper tape printout of three numbers: a four-digit number proportional to the quantity of plutonium or uranium, a two-digit number that designates the position of the tube in the turntable, and a one-digit number that designates whether plutonium or uranium was determined. Details of the mechanical and electrical components of the instrument and of the hardware and software aspects of the computerized control system are provided

  5. Toxicology of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    Data are reviewed from studies on the toxicity of Pu in experimental animals. Of the several plutonium isotopes, only 238 Pu and 239 Pu have been studied well. Sufficient results have been obtained to show that the behavior of 238 Pu in biological systems and the resulting biological effects cannot be precisely predicted from studies of 239 Pu. This probably applies also to other radiologically important plutonium isotopes which have half-lives ranging from 45 days to 10 7 years and decay by β-emission, electron capture, and spontaneous fission, as well as by emission of α-particles. All the biological effects of plutonium described in this review are attributed to alpha-particle radiation emitted by the plutonium. However, since plutonium is a chemically active heavy metal, one cannot ignore the possibility of chemical toxicity of the low-specific-activity isotopes, 239 Pu, 242 Pu, and 244 Pu. The preponderance of our knowledge of plutonium toxicology has come from short-term studies of relatively high dosage levels in several animal species. The consequences of high-level internal exposures can be predicted with confidence in experimental animals and probably also in man. However, considering the care with which plutonium is handled in the nuclear industry, a high-level contamination event is unlikely. Considerably less is known about the long-term effects of low levels of contamination. (250 references) (U.S.)

  6. A review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions and effects of decomposition temperature on the surface area of the plutonium dioxide product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orr, R.M.; Sims, H.E.; Taylor, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Plutonium (IV) and (III) ions in nitric acid solution readily form insoluble precipitates with oxalic acid. The plutonium oxalates are then easily thermally decomposed to form plutonium dioxide powder. This simple process forms the basis of current industrial conversion or ‘finishing’ processes that are used in commercial scale reprocessing plants. It is also widely used in analytical or laboratory scale operations and for waste residues treatment. However, the mechanisms of the thermal decompositions in both air and inert atmospheres have been the subject of various studies over several decades. The nature of intermediate phases is of fundamental interest whilst understanding the evolution of gases at different temperatures is relevant to process control. The thermal decomposition is also used to control a number of powder properties of the PuO_2 product that are important to either long term storage or mixed oxide fuel manufacturing. These properties are the surface area, residual carbon impurities and adsorbed volatile species whereas the morphology and particle size distribution are functions of the precipitation process. Available data and experience regarding the thermal and radiation-induced decompositions of plutonium oxalate to oxide are reviewed. The mechanisms of the thermal decompositions are considered with a particular focus on the likely redox chemistry involved. Also, whilst it is well known that the surface area is dependent on calcination temperature, there is a wide variation in the published data and so new correlations have been derived. Better understanding of plutonium (III) and (IV) oxalate decompositions will assist the development of more proliferation resistant actinide co-conversion processes that are needed for advanced reprocessing in future closed nuclear fuel cycles. - Highlights: • Critical review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions. • New analysis of relationship between SSA and calcination temperature. • New SEM

  7. Cycle downstream: the plutonium question; Aval du cycle la question du plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zask, G [Electricite de France, EDF/DAC, 75 - Paris (France); Rome, M [Electricite de France, EDF, Service Etudes et Projets Thermiques et Nucleaires, 92 - Courbevoie (France); Delpech, M [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Reacteurs/SPRC, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); and others

    1998-06-29

    This day, organized by the SFEN, took place at Paris the 4 june 1998. Nine papers were presented. They take stock on the plutonium physics and its utilization as a nuclear fuel. This day tried to bring information to answer the following questions: do people have to keep the plutonium in the UOX fuel or in the MOX fuel in order to use it for future fast reactors? Do people have to continue obstinately the plutonium reprocessing in the MOX for the PWR type reactors? Will it be realized a underground disposal? Can it be technically developed plutonium incinerators and is it economically interesting? The plutonium physics, the experimental programs and the possible solutions are presented. (A.L.B.)

  8. The handling of plutonium hexafluoride (1962); Manipulation de l'hexafluorure de plutonium (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berard, Ph [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-11-15

    The major problem posed in this work is the instability of plutonium hexafluoride. The influence of various factors on the decomposition of the fluoride has been studied: physical aspect of the walls, nature of the metal and its pretreatment, influence of the temperature. A means of detecting plutonium-239 in a metallic apparatus by {gamma}-ray counting has been developed; the sensitivity is of the order of half a milligram, but the precision is very low (about 50 per cent). Yields of over 95 per cent have been obtained for the transfer of plutonium during the preparation and sublimation of the hexafluoride. This study confirms the possibility of using plutonium hexafluoride for the extraction of plutonium from irradiated fuel elements by a dry method. (author) [French] Le probleme majeur de cette etude a ete l'instabilite de l'hexafluorure de plutonium. Nous avons etudie l'influence de divers facteurs sur la decomposition de l'hexafluorure: aspect physique des parois, nature du metal et de son pretraitement, influence de la temperature. Nous avons mis au point un mode de detection du plutonium-239 dans un appareillage metallique par comptage du rayonnement {gamma}; la sensibilite est de l'ordre du demi-milligramme, mais la precision est tres faible (50 pour cent environ). Nous avons obtenu des rendements depassant 95 pour cent dans le transfert du plutonium au cours de la fabrication et de la sublimation de l'hexafluorure. Cette etude confirme la possibilite d'utiliser l'hexafluorure de plutonium dans l'extraction du plutonium des combustibles irradies par voie seche. (auteur)

  9. Plutonium re-cycle in HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desoisa, J. A.

    1974-03-15

    The study of plutonium cycles in HTRs using reprocessed plutonium from Magnox and AGR fuel cycles has shown that full core plutonium/uranium loadings are in general not feasible, burn-up is limited due the need for lower loadings of plutonium to meet reload core reactivity limits, on-line refueling is not practicable due to the need for higher burnable poison loadings, and low conversion rates in the plutonium-uranium cycles cannot be mitigated by axial loading schemes so that fissile make-up is needed if HTR plutonium recycle is desired.

  10. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  11. The generation of denatured reactor plutonium by different options of the fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broeders, C.H.M.; Kessler, G. [Inst. for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Research Center Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    Denatured (proliferation resistant) reactor plutonium can be generated in a number of different fuel cycle options. First denatured reactor plutonium can be obtained if, instead of low enriched U-235 PWR fuel, re-enriched U-235/U-236 from reprocessed uranium is used (fuel type A). Also the envisaged existing 2,500 t of reactor plutonium (being generated world wide up to the year 2010), mostly stored in intermediate fuel storage facilities at present, could be converted during a transition phase into denatured reactor plutonium by the options fuel type B and D. Denatured reactor plutonium could have the same safeguards standard as present low enriched (<20% U-235) LWR fuel. It could be incinerated by recycling once or twice in PWRs and subsequently by multi-recycling in FRs (CAPRA type or IFRs). Once denatured, such reactor plutonium could remain denatured during multiple recycling. In a PWR, e.g., denatured reactor plutonium could be destroyed at a rate of about 250 kg/GWey. While denatured reactor plutonium could be recycled and incinerated under relieved IAEA safeguards, neptunium would still have to be monitored by the IAEA in future for all cases in which considerable amounts of neptunium are produced. (orig.)

  12. Optimization and plutonium equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1976-01-01

    The sequential simplex method has been used to estimate the extent of disproportionation of tetravalent plutonium in dilute acid. A method for simulating potentiometric titrations is proposed, and this method suggests that the stoichiometric end point and the inflection point may not always correspond in the potentiometric titration of plutonium. A possible characteristic equation for the nitrite-plutonium reaction is illustrated, and the method of proportional equations is extended to the iron-plutonium reaction

  13. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 2: Comparison of plutonium disposition options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S.

    1993-06-01

    The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate disposition options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offered to assist the NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the disposition options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. This report was prepared for the NAS to document the gathered information and results from the requested option evaluations. Evaluations were performed for 12 plutonium disposition options involving five reactor and one accelerator-based systems. Each option was evaluated in four technical areas: (1) fuel status, (2) reactor or accelerator-based system status, (3) waste-processing status, and (4) waste disposal status. Based on these evaluations, each concept was rated on its operational capability and time to deployment. A third rating category of option costs could not be performed because of the unavailability of adequate information from the concept sponsors. The four options achieving the highest rating, in alphabetical order, are the Advanced Light Water Reactor with plutonium-based ternary fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with plutonium-based fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with uranium-plutonium-based fuel, and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with plutonium-based fuel. Of these four options, the Advanced Light Water Reactor and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor do not propose reprocessing of their irradiated fuel. Time constraints and lack of detailed information did not allow for any further ratings among these four options. The INEL recommends these four options be investigated further to determine the optimum reactor design for plutonium disposition

  14. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 2: Comparison of plutonium disposition options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S. [and others

    1993-06-01

    The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate disposition options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offered to assist the NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the disposition options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. This report was prepared for the NAS to document the gathered information and results from the requested option evaluations. Evaluations were performed for 12 plutonium disposition options involving five reactor and one accelerator-based systems. Each option was evaluated in four technical areas: (1) fuel status, (2) reactor or accelerator-based system status, (3) waste-processing status, and (4) waste disposal status. Based on these evaluations, each concept was rated on its operational capability and time to deployment. A third rating category of option costs could not be performed because of the unavailability of adequate information from the concept sponsors. The four options achieving the highest rating, in alphabetical order, are the Advanced Light Water Reactor with plutonium-based ternary fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with plutonium-based fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with uranium-plutonium-based fuel, and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with plutonium-based fuel. Of these four options, the Advanced Light Water Reactor and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor do not propose reprocessing of their irradiated fuel. Time constraints and lack of detailed information did not allow for any further ratings among these four options. The INEL recommends these four options be investigated further to determine the optimum reactor design for plutonium disposition.

  15. Assesment of Plutonium 238 and Plutonium 239+240 in soils of different agricultural regions of Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Martinez, E.A.

    1998-02-01

    In this report an assesment and measurement of PLUTONIUM 238, PLUTONIUM 239, and PLUTONIUM 240 are made. Samples of cultivated soils in 15 provinces of Guatemala were taken. To separate plutonium isotopes a radiochemical method was made using extraction, precipitation and ionic interchange. By electrodeposition the plutonium was measured using an alpha spectroscopy by PIPS method. The radioactivity ranges from 2.84 mBq/Kg to 36.38 mBq/Kg for plutonium 238, and 8.46 mBq/Kg to 26.61 mBq/Kg for plutonium 239+240

  16. A simplified method for preparing micro-samples for the simultaneous isotopic analysis of uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.A.; Walker, R.L.; Eby, R.E.; Pritchard, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    In this simplified technique a basic anion resin is employed to selectively adsorb plutonium and uranium from 8M HNO 3 solutions containing dissolved spent reactor fuels. After a few beads of the resin are equilibrated with solution, a single bead is used for establishing the isotopic composition of plutonium and uranium. The resin-bead separation essentially removes all possible isobaric interference from such elements as americium and curium and at the same time eliminates most fission-product contamination in the mass spectrometer. Small aliquots of dissolver solution that contain 10 -6 g U and 10 -8 g Pu are adequate for preparing about ten resin beads. By employing a single focusing tandem magnet-type mass spectrometer, equipped with pulse counting for ion detection, simultaneous plutonium and uranium assays are obtained. The quantity of each element per bead may be as low as 10 -9 to 10 -10 g. The carburized bead, which forms as the filament is heated, acts as a reducing point source and emits a predominance of metallic ions as compared with oxide ion emission from direct solution loadings. In addition to isotopic abundance, the technique of isotope dilution can ve coupled with the ion-exchange bead separation and used effectively for measuring the total quantity of U and Pu. The technique possesses many advantages such as reduced radiation hazards from the infinitely smaller samples, thus less shielding and transport cost for sample handling; greatly simplified chemical preparations that eliminate fission products and actinide isobaric interferences; and the minor isotopes are more precisely established. (author)

  17. Linear alkylbenzenes in riverine runoff of the Pearl River Delta (China) and their application as anthropogenic molecular markers in coastal environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Honggang; Lu Fenghui; Wang Jizhong; Guan Yufeng; Luo Xianlin; Zeng, Eddy Y.

    2008-01-01

    The average concentrations of ΣLABs (sum of C 10 -C 13 -LABs) in runoff samples collected from the eight major riverine outlets of the Pearl River Delta (PRD) of China ranged from 1.4 to 6124 ng/L in the dissolved phase and from 0.01 to 11.4 μg/g dry weight in the particulate phase during March 2005-February 2006. The annual riverine flux of ΣLABs from the PRD to the coastal ocean was estimated at approximately 14 tons/yr. The inventories of ΣLABs in agricultural lands of Guangdong Province ranged from 313 to 1825 kg/yr. The early and late rice fields were the major sink of LABs, accounting for approximately 68% of total LABs inventory in agricultural lands. The social-economically estimated annual discharge of LABs from household detergents in the PRD was ∼696 tons/yr, more than an order of magnitude higher than that estimated from field measurements (about 14 tons/yr), which was attributed to several factors. - Occurrence of LABs in riverine runoff of the Pearl River Delta (China) was examined

  18. Plutonium roundtable discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penneman, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    The roundtable discussion began with remarks by the chairman who pointed out the complicated nature of plutonium chemistry. Judging from the papers presented at this symposium, he noticed a pattern which indicated to him the result of diminished funding for investigation of basic plutonium chemistry and funding focused on certain problem areas. Dr. G.L. silver pointed to plutonium chemists' erroneous use of a simplified summary equation involving the disproportionation of Pu(EV) and their each of appreciation of alpha coefficients. To his appreciation of alpha coefficients. To his charges, Dr. J.T. Bell spoke in defense of the chemists. This discussion was followed by W.W. Schulz's comments on the need for experimental work to determine solubility data for plutonium in its various oxidation states under geologic repository conditions. Discussion then turned to plutonium pyrachemical process with Dana C. Christensen as the main speaker. This paper presents edited versions of participants' written version

  19. The role of troublesome components in plutonium vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hong; Vienna, J.D.; Peeler, D.K.; Hrma, P.; Schweiger, M.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    One option for immobilizing surplus plutonium is vitrification in a borosilicate glass. Two advantages of the glass form are (1) high tolerance to feed variability and, (2) high solubility of some impurity components. The types of plutonium-containing materials in the United States inventory include: pits, metals, oxides, residues, scrap, compounds, and fuel. Many of them also contain high concentrations of carbon, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate, and chromium oxide. To vitrify plutonium-containing scrap and residues, it is critical to understand the impact of each component on glass processing and chemical durability of the final product. This paper addresses glass processing issues associated with these troublesome components. It covers solubility limits of chlorine, fluorine, phosphate, sulfate, and chromium oxide in several borosilicate based glasses, and the effect of each component on vitrification (volatility, phase segregation, crystallization, and melt viscosity). Techniques (formulation, pretreatment, removal, and/or dilution) to mitigate the effect of these troublesome components are suggested.

  20. Effects of duration of fast and animal age on the gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Larsen, R.P.; Oldham, R.D.; Moretti, E.S.; Spaletto, M.I.

    1986-01-01

    The fraction of plutonium absorbed after oral administration of Pu(VI) to 24-h-fasted mice was 19 X 10(-4), 13-fold higher than in fed mice, 1.4 X 10(-4). We have investigated the relevance of the high gastrointestinal (GI) absorption value for the 24-h-fasted animals in setting drinking water standards for humans. When fasting was initiated at the beginning of the active phase of the mouse's daily activity cycle (when they would normally eat), plutonium GI absorption rose from 2.8 X 10(-4) at zero-time to a level typical of the 24-h-fasted mouse after only 2 h of fasting. In contrast, in mice allowed to eat for 4 h into their active phase prior to initiation of the fast (meal-fed mice), 8 h of fasting were required before GI absorption rose to a level similar to that of the 24-h-fasted mouse. The fraction of plutonium retained after gavage administration of Pu(VI) to 1-day-old rats was 74 X 10(-4), 70-fold higher than the value for fed adults. Retention after GI absorption in neonates remained 30- to 70-fold higher than in adults until weaning. One week after weaning, the fraction absorbed and retained by fed weanling rats was the same as that for fed adults, 1 X 10(-4). Drinking water standards for plutonium have been set based on GI absorption values for fed adult animals. The 10- to 100-fold increases in plutonium absorption in young and fasted animals reported by ourselves and others, and the rapid rise to fasted levels of absorption at the start of the animal's active phase, indicate that consideration should be given to elevated levels of plutonium absorption in young and fasted individuals

  1. Effects of various moderators on the critical mass of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doherty, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    The fissile material storage tanks in the Hanford Plutonium Critical Mass Laboratory (CML) in Richland, Washington, are presently being upgraded. During the design and planning phase of this modification, criticality analysis was necessary to compare potential moderator/absorber materials used as isolators between tanks. A parameter study was performed to assist in determining the appropriate moderator material to be used in the plutonium nitrate storage tank system in the mix room at the CML. Four moderator/absorber materials were identified as providing adequate isolation between the tanks

  2. Study of uranium-plutonium alloys containing from 0 to 20 peri cent of plutonium (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paruz, H.

    1963-05-01

    The work is carried out on U-Pu alloys in the region of the solid solution uranium alpha and in the two-phase region uranium alpha + the zeta phase. The results obtained concern mainly the influence of the addition of plutonium on the physical properties of the uranium (changes in the crystalline parameters, the density, the hardness) in the region of solid solution uranium alpha. In view of the discrepancies between various published results as far as the equilibrium diagram for the system U-Pu is concerned, an attempt was made to verify the extent of the different regions of the phase diagram, in particular the two phased-region. Examinations carried out on samples after various thermal treatments (in particular quenching from the epsilon phase and prolonged annealings, as well as a slow cooling from the epsilon phase) confirm the results obtained at Los Alamos and Harwell. (author) [fr

  3. Investigation of plutonium (4) hydroxoformates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andryushin, V.G.; Belov, V.A.; Galaktionov, S.V.; Kozhevnikov, P.B.; Matyukha, V.A.; Shmidt, V.S.

    1982-01-01

    Deposition processes of plutonium (4) hydroxoformates in the system Pu(NO 3 ) 4 -HNO 3 -HCoOH-N6 4 OH-H 2 O have been studied in pH range 0.2-10.7 at total plutonium concentration in the system 100 g/l. It is shown that under the conditions plutonium (4) hydrolysis takes place with the formation of hydroxoformates. A local maximum of plutonium (4) hydroxoformate solubility in the range pH=3.8-4.8, which is evidently conditioned by the formation of soluble formate complex of plutonium in the region, is pointed out. The basic plutonium (4) formates of the composition PuOsub(x)(OH)sub(y)(COOH)sub(4-2x-y)xnHsub(2)O, where 1,3 >=x >= 0.7, 1.7 >= y >= 1.0 and n=1.5-7.0, are singled out, their thermal stability being studied. Density of the crystals and plutonium dioxide, formed during their thermal decomposition, is measured. It is established that for plutonium (4) hydroxoformates common regularities of the influence of salt composition (OH - -, CHOO - - and H 2 O-group numbers in the mulecule) on position of temperature decomposition effects and on the density of compounds, which have been previously found during the study of thorium and plutonium hydroxosalts are observed. It is shown that the density of plutonium dioxide decreases with the increase of hydration and hydrolysis degree of the initial plutonium hydroxoformate

  4. The determination of Plutonium content in urine using anion exchange resin method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukh-Syaifudin

    1996-01-01

    The possibility of internal contamination by plutonium is usually determined through urine analysis. The technique involved the co-precipitation of plutonium with rhodizonic acid by the addition of sodium hydroxide, the re-extraction of Pu into concentrated HCl, dissolution of Pu in 8 N HCI + Cl 2 solution, and the purification of plutonium through AGI-X8 anion exchange resin in columns with a diameter of 4 and 7 mm. The eluent was evaporated and the residu was dissolved in 8 N HCI and then deposited directly onto a Lexan slide or electrodeposited onto a stainless steel disc and the alpha emission of Pu was counted by using alpha spectrometry. The results showed that the recoveries of Pu-242 tracer by using column 7 mm and direct deposition and electrodeposition methods were 28.783% and 16.444%, respectively. The recoveries of Pu-242 by using column 4 mm and direct deposition and electrodeposition methods were 64.834% and 55.661%, respectively. From the percentage of recovery, it can be concluded that the direct deposition method was relatively better than the electrodeposition method. The recovery of Pu-242 by using column of 4 mm in diameter was higher than that of column 7 mm

  5. A method for the gravimetric determination of plutonium in pure plutonium nitrate concentrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, M.A.; Savage, D.J.

    1986-12-01

    Plutonium nitrate solution is treated with sulphuric acid before being heated and finally ignited. The stoichiometric plutonium dioxide so formed is weighed and hence the plutonium content is calculated. (author)

  6. F. Biological hazards of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Plutonium is an unavoidable result of present nuclear power programmes. Its predominant isotopes are extremely long-lived and very toxic if absorbed in the body. In view of the increasing potential for plutonium and man to come into contact, the consequences of any plutonium release into the environment should be scientifically examined. This report is an attempt to place in one document a fully referenced account of the on-going work in many areas. There are three sections. Part 1 deals with the amounts of plutonium available in the fuel cycle, its properties and the probability of routine or accidental release. Part 2 examines the ways in which plutonium can reach man, in particular through food chains or inhalation. Part 3 details the biological effects of plutonium once it is absorbed into the body, assesses the amounts likely to be harmful and discusses the adequacy of present standards for plutonium burdens. There are two appendices. The likely differences between Pu-239, the most studied isotope, and other plutonium isotopes or transuranic nuclides are outlined in Appendix A. Appendix B contains a fuller account of the ways in which the fate of ingested or inhaled plutonium have been determined

  7. Some Thermodynamic Features of Uranium-Plutonium Nitride Fuel in the Course of Burnup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinkevich, A. A.; Ivanov, A. S.; Belov, G. V.; Skupov, M. V.

    2017-12-01

    Calculation studies on the effect of carbon and oxygen impurities on the chemical and phase compositions of nitride uranium-plutonium fuel in the course of burnup are performed using the IVTANTHERMO code. It is shown that the number of moles of UN decreases with increasing burnup level, whereas UN1.466, UN1.54, and UN1.73 exhibit a considerable increase. The presence of oxygen and carbon impurities causes an increase in the content of the UN1.466, UN1.54 and UN1.73 phases in the initial fuel by several orders of magnitude, in particular, at a relatively low temperature. At the same time, the presence of impurities abruptly reduces the content of free uranium in unburned fuel. Plutonium in the considered system is contained in form of Pu, PuC, PuC2, Pu2C3, and PuN. Plutonium carbides, as well as uranium carbides, are formed in small amounts. Most of the plutonium remains in the form of nitride PuN, whereas unbound Pu is present only in the areas with a low burnup level and high temperatures.

  8. Fish Movement and Dietary History Derived from Otolith (delta)13C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, P K; Finlay, J C; Power, M E; Phillis, C C; Ramon, C E; Eaton, G F; Ingram, B L

    2005-09-08

    Habitat use and food web linkages are critical data for fish conservation and habitat restoration efforts, particularly for threatened salmonids species. Otolith microchemistry has been shown to be a powerful tool for reconstructing fish movement, but over small distances (kilometers), geology-derived differences in otolith chemistry are rare. Here, we demonstrate that otolith {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio (i.e. {delta}{sup 13}C) of anadromous steelhead trout can be used to distinguish residence in small streams from residence in larger streams and rivers. While previous research has shown that water dissolved inorganic carbon {delta}{sup 13}C is the primary source of carbon in otoliths, the downstream change in food {delta}{sup 13}C in this watershed appears to be the primary control on otolith {delta}{sup 13}C. As a result, this method can also be applied to the problem of reconstructing feeding history at a location.

  9. Use of plutonium for power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    The panel reviewed available information on various aspects of plutonium utilization, such as physics of plutonium, technology of plutonium fuels in thermal and fast reactors, behaviour of plutonium fuel under reactor irradiation, technological and economic aspects of plutonium fuel cycle. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Nondestructive determination of residual fuel on leached hulls and dissolver sludges from LWR fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuerz, H.; Wagner, K.; Becker, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    In reprocessing plants leached hulls and dissolver sludges represent rather important intermediate level α-waste streams. A control of the Pu content of these waste streams is desirable. The nondestructive assay method to be preferred would be passive neutron counting. However, before any decision on passive neutron monitoring becomes possible a characterization of hulls and sludges in terms of Pu content and neutron emission is necessary. For the direct determination of plutonium on hulls and in sludges, as coming from reprocessing, an active neutron measurement is required. A simple, and sufficiently sensitive active neutron method which can easily be installed uses as stationary Cf-252 neutron source. This method was used for the characterization of hulls and sludges in terms of plutonium content and total neutron emission in the WAK. Meanwhile a total of 28 batches of leached hulls and 22 batches of dissolver sludges from reprocessing of PWR fuel have been assayed. The paper describes the assay method used and gives an analysis of the error sources together with a discussion of the results and the accuracies obtained in a reprocessing plant. (orig./HP)

  11. World status report: plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dircks, W.

    1992-01-01

    In a recent speech in Japan, the Deputy Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said that the economic case for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel had been severely eroded. An edited version of the speech is given. The changed prospects for nuclear energy is given as the reason why the demand for plutonium has declined sharply. The oil crisis of the 1970s reduced the demand for electric power and the economic justification for the use of recycled plutonium. The stockpile of isolated plutonium is growing rapidly giving rise to worries about its security. From this point of view, isolated plutonium is best kept in reactor fuel not separated out. In this connection the IAEA has offered to help in the storage of plutonium so that vigorous safety and security requirements are met. In Japan there is a debate about the plutonium which is dependent on the future of the fast breeder reactor programme. (UK)

  12. Plutonium distribution and remobilization in sediments of the Rhone River mouth (North-Western Mediterranean)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lansard, B.

    2004-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the distribution and remobilization of plutonium (Pu) in the sediments off the Rhone river mouth. Most of the 238 Pu and 239,240 Pu isotopes introduced into the Rhone River were discharged by the liquid effluents released from the Marcoule reprocessing plant, located 120 km upstream the river mouth. Due to its high affinity for particles and its long half life, 238 Pu is a promising tracer to follow the dispersion of particulate matter from the Rhone River to the Mediterranean Sea. During the 3 REMORA cruises, sediment samples were specifically collected in the Rhone pro-delta area and more offshore on the whole continental shelf of the Gulf of Lions. The measurements of alpha emitters gave a first detailed spatial distribution of Pu isotope concentrations in surface sediments off the Rhone mouth. Using 137 Cs concentrations and their correlations with Pu isotopes, we were able to give a first estimate of Pu inventories for the sediments of the study area. In 2001, plutonium inventories were estimated to 92 ± 7 GBq of 238 Pu and 522 ± 44 GBq of 239,240 Pu for an area of 500 km 2 in front of the Rhone River mouth. Roughly, 50 % of these inventories are trapped in an area of 100 km 2 corresponding to the extent of the Rhone pro-delta zone. In spring 2002, an ADCP, with current velocity and wave measurements, was moored off the Rhone River mouth. This unique in situ dataset highlights the major role of South-East swells in the erosion of pro-deltaic sediments and their dispersion to the South-Westward direction. Plutonium remobilization was examined using a new experimental design based on sediment resuspension processes studied within a linear recirculating flume. For Gulf of Lions sediments and for a given hydrodynamic stress, remobilization fluxes raised a maximum of 0.08 Bq.m -2 .h -1 for 238 Pu and 0.64 Bq.m -2 .h -1 for 239,240 Pu. A first plutonium budget determined for the study area indicates that at least 85

  13. Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Plutonium Finishing Plant, also known as PFP, represented the end of the line (the final procedure) associated with plutonium production at Hanford.PFP was also...

  14. Selective permeation of plutonium(IV) through a supported liquid membrane containing tri-iso-amyl phosphate as an ionophore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, J.P.; Kedari, C.S.; Dharmapurikar, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    Selective ionophoric mobility of plutonium with ease of concentration upgradation from aqueous nitrate solutions was investigated. A thin flat-sheet supported liquid membrane (SLM) impregnated with tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TAP) was used. Accurel polypropylene hydrophobic microporous membrane 'Enka' was tested as the solid polymeric support. The source phase generally contained extremely dilute (ca. 10 -6 mol/dm -3 ) to moderately concentrated plutonium(IV) nitrate solutions (ca. 10 -3 mol/dm -3 ) in about 4 mol/dm -3 HNO 3 . Membrane permeability and selectivity dependency on variables like nitric acid concentration in the source phase, carrier concentration, receiving phase composition, etc. were systematically evaluated. More than 90% pertraction of plutonium could be easily accomplished in single run employing a feed solution consisting of about 1 mg/dm -3 Pu and 4 mol/dm -3 HNO 3 , carrier concentration of 0.8 mol/dm -3 TAP/dodecane; the receiving phase was 0.5 mol/dm -3 sodium carbonate or 0.5 mol/dm -3 ascorbic acid. The selective diffusivity of plutonium(IV) was observed from various effluents originating from fuel reprocessing operations. Reusability of membrane supports was also found to be satisfactory. (author)

  15. Double shell tanks plutonium inventory assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tusler, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides an evaluation that establishes plutonium inventory estimates for all DSTs based on known tank history information, the DST plutonium inventory tracking system, tank characterization measurements, tank transfer records, and estimated average concentration values for the various types of waste. These estimates use data through December 31, 1994, and give plutonium estimates as of January 1, 1995. The plutonium inventory values for the DSTs are given in Section 31. The plutonium inventory estimate is 224 kg for the DSTs and 854 kg for the SSTs for a total of 1078 kg. This value compares favorably with the total plutonium inventory value of 981 kg obtained from the total plutonium production minus plutonium recovery analysis estimates

  16. Calculation of thermodynamic equilibrium for reactions of plutonium with air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Lexi; Sun Ying; Luo Deli; Xue Weidong; Zhu Zhenghe; Wang Rong

    2000-01-01

    There are six independent component with 4 chemical elements, i.e. PuH 2.7 (s), PuN(s), Pu 2 O 3 (s), N 2 (g) and H 2 (g), therefore, the system described involves of 2 independent reactions, both ΔG degree << O. The mass balances calculated for gas and solid phases are in good agreement with those of experimental, indicating the chemical equilibrium is nearly approached. So, it is believed that the reaction ratio of plutonium hydride with air is extremely rapid. The results are meaningful to the storage of plutonium

  17. EXPECTED IMPACT OF HANFORD PROCESSING ORGANICS OF PLUTONIUM DURING TANK WASTE SLUDGE RETRIEVAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TROYER, G.L.; WINTERS, W.I.

    2004-01-01

    This document evaluates the potential for extracting plutonium from Hanford waste tanks into residual organic solvents and how this process may have an impact on criticality specifications during the retrieval of wastes. The two controlling factors for concentrating plutonium are the solubility of the plutonium in the wastes and the extraction efficiency of the potential organic extractants that may be found in these wastes. Residual Hanford tank sludges contain plutonium in solid forms that are expected to be primarily insoluble Pu(IV) hydroxides. Evaluation of thermodynamic Pourbaix diagrams, documentation on solubility studies of various components in waste tank matrices, and actual analysis of plutonium in tank supernates all indicate that the solubility of Pu in the alkaline waste is on the order of 10 -6 M. Based on an upper limit plutonium solubility of 10 -5 M in high pH and a conservative distribution coefficient for organic extractants of a 0 for plutonium in 30% TBP at 0.07 M HNO 3 ), the estimated concentration for plutonium in the organic phase would be -7 M. This is well below the process control criteria. A significant increase in plutonium solubility or the E a o would have to occur to raise this concentration to the 0.01 M concern level for organics. Measured tank chemical component values, expected operating conditions, and the characteristics of the expected chemistry and extraction mechanisms indicate that concentration of plutonium from Hanford tank residual sludges to associated process organic extractants is significantly below levels of concern

  18. The plutonium as transfer tracer and particulates contribution accumulating from the Rhone to the north-western Mediterranean sea; Le plutonium comme traceur du transfert et de l`accumulation des apports particulaires du Rhone en Mediterranee nord-occidentale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, M.H.

    1996-03-29

    To follow the alluvial deposits from the Rhone in Mediterranean Sea, since the principle hydroelectric constructions (1960), it was necessary to find an adequate tracer. The plutonium isotopes have satisfied to the different characteristics. The specificity of the Rhone contribution is bound to the existence of the irradiated spent fuels reprocessing plant of Marcoule; the releases of this plant are characterized by the predominance of Plutonium 238. The results of this study show that the percentage of sediments coming from the Rhone in the recent contribution, is low beyond the pro delta: less than 5% of the sediment of the continental shelf concern the Rhone contribution. However, there are two zones for which the contribution is important and could play a role in the particulate transfer towards the high sea. (N.C.). 157 refs., 60 figs., 50 tabs.

  19. Determination of plutonium in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakanoue, Masanobu

    1978-01-01

    Past and present methods of determining the amount of plutonium in the environment are summarized. Determination of the amount of plutonium in uranium ore began in 1941. Plutonium present in polluted environments due to nuclear explosions, nuclear power stations, etc. was measured in soil and sand in Nagasaki in 1951 and in ash in Bikini in 1954. Analytical methods of measuring the least amount of plutonium in the environment were developed twenty years later. Many studies on and reviews of these methods have been reported all over the world, and a standard analytical procedure has been adopted. A basic analytical method of measurement was drafted in Japan in 1976. The yield, treatment of samples, dissolution, separation, control of measurable ray sources determination by α spectrometry, cross-check determination, and treatment of samples containing hardly soluble plutonium were examined. At present, the amount of plutonium can be determined by all of these methods. The presence of plutonium was studied further, and the usefulness of determination of the plutonium isotope ratio is discussed. (Kumagai, S.)

  20. Multi-generational stewardship of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1997-01-01

    The post-cold war era has greatly enhanced the interest in the long-term stewardship of plutonium. The management of excess plutonium from proposed nuclear weapons dismantlement has been the subject of numerous intellectual discussions during the past several years. In this context, issues relevant to long-term management of all plutonium as a valuable energy resource are also being examined. While there are differing views about the future role of plutonium in the economy, there is a recognition of the environmental and health related problems and proliferation potentials of weapons-grade plutonium. The long-term management of plutonium as an energy resource will require a new strategy to maintain stewardship for many generations to come

  1. Phase compatibilities of YBa2Cu3O(9-delta) type structure in quintenary systems Y-Ba-Cu-O-X (impurity)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen, P.; Fjellvag, H.; Kjekshus, A.

    1990-01-01

    Electrical transport properties of the oxidic high T(sub c) superconductors are significantly affected by the presence of minor amounts of various elements adventing as impurities, e.g., from the chemical environment during manufacturing. YBa2Cu3O(9-delta) is prone to an extinction of the superconductivity on (partial) substitution of all four elemental components. E.g., Pr (for Y), La (for Ba), Zn (for Cu) or peroxygroup (for O) substituents will alter some of the superconductivity preconditions, like mixed valence state in Cu3O7/O(9-delta) network or structural distortion of the network. Although various pseudoternary chemical equilibrium phase diagrams of the Y(O)-Ba(O)-Cu(O) system now are available, no consensus is generally shown, however, this is partly due to lack of compatible definitions of the equilibrium conditions. Less information is available about the phase compatibilities in the appropriate quaternary phase diagram (including oxygen) and virtually no information exists about any pentenary phase diagrams (including one impurity). Unfortunately, complexity of such systems, stemming both from number of quaternary or pentenary compounds and from visualizing the five-component phase system, limits this presentation to more or less close surroundings of the YBa2Cu3O(9-delta) type phase in appropriate pseudoquaternary or pseudopseudoternary diagrams, involving Y-Ba-Cu and O, O-CO2, alkaline metals, Mg and alkaline earths, and Sc and most of the 3-d and 4-f elements. The systems were investigated by means of x ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and chemical analytical methods on samples prepared by sol-gel technique from citrates. The superconductivity was characterized by measuring the diamagnetic susceptibility by SQUID.

  2. Uranium and plutonium extraction from fluoride melts by lithium-tin alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashcheev, I.N.; Novoselov, G.P.; Zolotarev, A.B.

    1975-01-01

    Extraction of small amounts of uranium (12 wt. % concentration) and plutonium (less than 1.10sup(-10) % concentration) from lithium fluoride melts into the lithium-tin melts is studied. At an increase of temperature from 850 to 1150 deg the rate of process increases 2.5 times. At an increase of melting time the extraction rapidly enhances at the starting moment and than its rate reduces. Plutonium is extracted into the metallic phase for 120 min. (87-96%). It behaves analogously to uranium

  3. In situ studies of uranium-plutonium mixed oxides. Influence of composition on phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strach, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Due to their physical and chemical properties, mixed uranium-plutonium oxides are considered for fuel in 4. generation nuclear reactors. In this frame, complementary experimental studies are necessary to develop a better understanding of the phenomena that take place during fabrication and operation in the reactor. The focus of this work was to study the U-Pu-O phase diagram in a wide range of compositions and temperatures to ameliorate our knowledge of the phase equilibria in this system. Most of experiments were done using in situ X-ray diffraction at elevated temperatures. The control of the oxygen partial pressure during the treatments made it possible to change the oxygen stoichiometry of the sample, which gave us an opportunity to study rapidly different compositions and the processes involved. The experimental approach was coupled with thermodynamic modeling using the CALPHAD method, to precisely plan the experiments and interpret the obtained results. This approach enabled us to enhance the knowledge of phase equilibria in the U-Pu-O system. (author) [fr

  4. Plutonium in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, N.V.; Linder, P.W.; Wade, P.W.

    1994-01-01

    The shipping of plutonium from Europe to Japan around the Cape is a contentious issue which has raised public concern that South Africa may be at risk to plutonium exposure should an accident occur. The paper describes the containers in which the plutonium (in the form of plutonium oxide, PuO 2 ) is housed and consequences of the unlikely event of these becoming ruptured. Wind-borne pollution is considered not to be a likely scenario, with the plutonium oxide particles more likely to remain practically insoluble and sediment. Plutonium aqueous and environmental chemistry is briefly discussed. Some computer modelling whereby plutonium oxide is brought into contact with seawater has been performed and the results are presented. The impact on marine organisms is discussed in terms of studies performed at marine dump sites and after the crash of a bomber carrying nuclear warheads in Thule, Greenland in 1968. Various pathways from the sea to land are considered in the light of studies done at Sellafield, a reprocessing plant in the United Kingdom. Some recent debates in the popular scientific press, such as that on the leukemia cluster at Sellafield, are described. Plutonium biochemistry and toxicity are discussed as well as medical histories of workers exposed to plutonium. 35 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  5. Process for plutonium rextraction in aqueous solution from an organic solvent, especially for uranium plutonium partition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germain, M.; Gillet, B.; Pasquiou, J.Y.

    1989-01-01

    The organic solvent containing plutonium is contacted with an aqueous solution of a uranous salt, for instance uranous nitrate, and a hydroxylamine salt, for instance the nitrate. In these conditions uranous nitrate is a reducing agent of Pu III and hydroxylamine nitrate stabilizes Pu III and U IV in the aqueous phase. Performances are similar to these of the U IV-hydrazine nitrate without interference of hydrazine nitrate degradation products [fr

  6. A review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions and effects of decomposition temperature on the surface area of the plutonium dioxide product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, R.M.; Sims, H.E.; Taylor, R.J., E-mail: robin.j.taylor@nnl.co.uk

    2015-10-15

    Plutonium (IV) and (III) ions in nitric acid solution readily form insoluble precipitates with oxalic acid. The plutonium oxalates are then easily thermally decomposed to form plutonium dioxide powder. This simple process forms the basis of current industrial conversion or ‘finishing’ processes that are used in commercial scale reprocessing plants. It is also widely used in analytical or laboratory scale operations and for waste residues treatment. However, the mechanisms of the thermal decompositions in both air and inert atmospheres have been the subject of various studies over several decades. The nature of intermediate phases is of fundamental interest whilst understanding the evolution of gases at different temperatures is relevant to process control. The thermal decomposition is also used to control a number of powder properties of the PuO{sub 2} product that are important to either long term storage or mixed oxide fuel manufacturing. These properties are the surface area, residual carbon impurities and adsorbed volatile species whereas the morphology and particle size distribution are functions of the precipitation process. Available data and experience regarding the thermal and radiation-induced decompositions of plutonium oxalate to oxide are reviewed. The mechanisms of the thermal decompositions are considered with a particular focus on the likely redox chemistry involved. Also, whilst it is well known that the surface area is dependent on calcination temperature, there is a wide variation in the published data and so new correlations have been derived. Better understanding of plutonium (III) and (IV) oxalate decompositions will assist the development of more proliferation resistant actinide co-conversion processes that are needed for advanced reprocessing in future closed nuclear fuel cycles. - Highlights: • Critical review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions. • New analysis of relationship between SSA and calcination temperature.

  7. Plutonium Training Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatsky, Galya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wolkov, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-26

    This report was created to examine the current state of plutonium training in the United States and to discover ways in which to ensure that the next generation of plutonium workers are fully qualified.

  8. Recent developments in the dissolution and automated analysis of plutonium and uranium for safeguards measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Rein, J.E.; Waterbury, G.R.

    1975-01-01

    The status of a program to develop assay methods for plutonium and uranium for safeguards purposes is presented. The current effort is directed more toward analyses of scrap-type material with an end goal of precise automated methods that also will be applicable to product materials. A guiding philosophy for the analysis of scrap-type materials, characterized by heterogeneity and difficult dissolution, is relatively fast dissolution treatment to effect 90 percent or more solubilization of the uranium and plutonium, analysis of the soluble fraction by precise automated methods, and gamma-counting assay of any residue fraction using simple techniques. A Teflon-container metal-shell apparatus provides acid dissolutions of typical fuel cycle materials at temperatures to 275 0 C and pressures to 340 atm. Gas--solid reactions at elevated temperatures separate uranium from refractory materials by the formation of volatile uranium compounds. The condensed compounds then are dissolved in acid for subsequent analysis. An automated spectrophotometer is used for the determination of uranium and plutonium. The measurement range is 1 to 14 mg of either element with a relative standard deviation of 0.5 percent over most of the range. The throughput rate is 5 min per sample. A second-generation automated instrument is being developed for the determination of plutonium. A precise and specific electroanalytical method is used as its operational basis. (auth)

  9. Optimizing Plutonium stock management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niquil, Y.; Guillot, J.

    1997-01-01

    Plutonium from spent fuel reprocessing is reused in new MOX assemblies. Since plutonium isotopic composition deteriorates with time, it is necessary to optimize plutonium stock management over a long period, to guarantee safe procurement, and contribute to a nuclear fuel cycle policy at the lowest cost. This optimization is provided by the prototype software POMAR

  10. EXAFS and XANES analysis of plutonium and cerium edges from titanate ceramics for fissile materials disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortner, J. A.; Kropf, A. J.; Bakel, A. J.; Hash, M. C.; Aase, S. B.; Buck, E. C.; Chamerlain, D. B.

    1999-01-01

    We report x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra from the plutonium L III edge and XANES from the cerium L II edge in prototype titanate ceramic hosts. The titanate ceramics studied are based upon the hafnium-pyrochlore and zirconolite mineral structures and will serve as an immobilization host for surplus fissile materials, containing as much as 10 weight % fissile plutonium and 20 weight % (natural or depleted) uranium. Three ceramic formulations were studied: one employed cerium as a ''surrogate'' element, replacing both plutonium and uranium in the ceramic matrix, another formulation contained plutonium in a ''baseline'' ceramic formulation, and a third contained plutonium in a formulation representing a high-impurity plutonium stream. The cerium XANES from the surrogate ceramic clearly indicates a mixed III-IV oxidation state for the cerium. In contrast, XANES analysis of the two plutonium-bearing ceramics shows that the plutonium is present almost entirely as Pu(IV) and occupies the calcium site in the zirconolite and pyrochlore phases. The plutonium EXAFS real-space structure shows a strong second-shell peak, clearly distinct from that of PuO 2 , with remarkably little difference in the plutonium crystal chemistry indicated between the baseline and high-impurity formulations

  11. Treatment of plutonium contaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafuma, J.

    1983-01-01

    Three kinds of plutonium contaminations were considered: skin contamination; contaminated wounds; contamination by inhalation. The treatment of these contaminations was studied for insoluble (oxide and metal forms) and soluble plutonium (complexes). The use of DTPA and therapeutic problems encountered with stable plutonium complexes were analyzed. The new possibilities of internal decontamination using Puchel and LICAM were evaluated [fr

  12. Plutonium uptake by plants from soil containing plutonium-238 dioxide particles. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.W.; McFarlane, J.C.

    1977-05-01

    Three plant species--alfalfa, lettuce, and radishes were grown in soils contaminated with plutonium-238 dioxide (238)PuO2 at concentrations of 23, 69, 92, and 342 nanocuries per gram (nCi/g). The length of exposure varied from 60 days for the lettuce and radishes to 358 days for the alfalfa. The magnitude of plutonium incorporation as indicated by the discrimination ratios for these species, after being exposed to the relatively insoluble PuO2, was similar to previously reported data using different chemical forms of plutonium. Evidence indicates that the predominant factor in plutonium uptake by plants may involve the chelation of plutonium contained in the soils by the action of compounds such as citric acid and/or other similar chelating agents released from the plant roots

  13. The soil organic carbon content of anthropogenically altered organic soils effects the dissolved organic matter quality, but not the dissolved organic carbon concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Stefan; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Bechtold, Michel; Lücke, Andreas; Bol, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important link between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This is especially true for peatlands which usually show high concentrations of DOC due to the high stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC). Most previous studies found that DOC concentrations in the soil solution depend on the SOC content. Thus, one would expect low DOC concentrations in peatlands which have anthropogenically been altered by mixing with sand. Here, we want to show the effect of SOC and groundwater level on the quantity and quality of the dissolved organic matter (DOM). Three sampling sites were installed in a strongly disturbed bog. Two sites differ in SOC (Site A: 48%, Site B: 9%) but show the same mean annual groundwater level of 15 and 18 cm below ground, respectively. The SOC content of site C (11%) is similar to Site B, but the groundwater level is much lower (-31 cm) than at the other two sites. All sites have a similar depth of the organic horizon (30 cm) and the same land-use (low-intensity sheep grazing). Over two years, the soil solution was sampled bi-weekly in three depths (15, 30 and 60 cm) and three replicates. All samples were analyzed for DOC and selected samples for dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and delta-13C and delta-15N. Despite differences in SOC and groundwater level, DOC concentrations did not differ significantly (A: 192 ± 62 mg/L, B: 163 ± 55 mg/L and C: 191 ± 97 mg/L). At all sites, DOC concentrations exceed typical values for peatlands by far and emphasize the relevance even of strongly disturbed organic soils for DOC losses. Individual DOC concentrations were controlled by the temperature and the groundwater level over the preceding weeks. Differences in DOM quality were clearer. At site B with a low SOC content, the DOC:DON ratio of the soil solution equals the soil's C:N ratio, but the DOC:DON ratio is much higher than the C:N ratio at site A. In all cases, the DOC:DON ratio strongly correlates with delta-13C. There is no

  14. Plutonium isotopes in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, E.

    1977-12-01

    Determination of plutonium and americium by ion exchange and alpha-spectrometry. Deposition of global fall-out and accumulated area-content of 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 240 Pu, 241 Pu, 242 Pu and 241 Am in central Sweden (62.3 deg N, 12.4 deg E), by using the lichen species Cladonia alpestris as bioindicator. Retention and distribution of plutonium in carpets of lichen and soil. Transfer of plutonium from lichen to reindeer and man. Absorbed dose in reindeer and man from plutonium. Basic studies of plutonium and americium in the western Mediterranean surface waters, with emphases on particulate form of the transuranics. (author)

  15. Beiological behaviour of plutonium 239

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafuma, J.

    1976-01-01

    Plutonium is scarcely incorporated from the environment into the food chain because of its unability to penetrate biological membranes. Workers can be contaminated through inhalation or deposition in wounds. Pu present in the pulmonary alveoles or incorporated in wounds is redistributed in the organism either through cellular transport resulting in an important accumulation in the lymphatic ganglia either by blood transport as dissolved Pu bound to proteins. This mechanism results in a progressive accumulation of the radioelement in liver and bone. It is estimated that about 40% of the Pu present in the blood is deposited in the liver from which one half is eliminated every ten years. 50% is deposited in bone from which the elimination takes much longer and 10% is eliminated with the urines. Intravenous injection of DIPA is very useful for Pu elimination immediately after contamination. For elimination of pulmonary Pu the technique of ''pulmonary washing'' is suggested. This method reduces the pulmonary contamination in laboratory aniamls by a factor 10. (author)

  16. Plutonium oxides and uranium and plutonium mixed oxides. Carbon determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Determination of carbon in plutonium oxides and uranium plutonium mixed oxides, suitable for a carbon content between 20 to 3000 ppm. The sample is roasted in oxygen at 1200 0 C, the carbon dioxide produced by combustion is neutralized by barium hydroxide generated automatically by coulometry [fr

  17. The solubility of hydrogen and deuterium in alloyed, unalloyed and impure plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bridgewater, Jon S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ward, John W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allen, Thomas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Pressure-Composition-Temperature (PCT) data are presented for the plutonium-hydrogen (Pu-H) and plutonium-deuterium (Pu-D) systems in the solubility region up to terminal solubility (precipitation of PuH{sub 2}). The heats of solution for PuH{sub s} and PuD{sub s} are determined from PCT data in the ranges 350-625 C for gallium alloyed Pu and 400-575 C for unalloyed Pu. The solubility of high purity plutonium alloyed with 2 at.% gallium is compared to high purity unalloyed plutonium. Significant differences are found in hydrogen solubility for unalloyed Pu versus gallium alloyed Pu. Differences in hydrogen solubility due to an apparent phase change are observable in the alloyed and unalloyed solubilities. The effect of iron impurities on Pu-Ga alloyed Pu is shown via hydrogen solubility data as preventing complete homogenization.

  18. The solubility of hydrogen and deuterium in alloyed, unalloyed and impure plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, S; Bridgewater, J S; Ward, J W; Allen, T H

    2010-01-01

    Pressure-Composition-Temperature (PCT) data are presented for the plutonium-hydrogen (Pu-H) and plutonium-deuterium (Pu-D) systems in the solubility region up to terminal solubility (precipitation of PuH 2 ). The heats of solution for PuH S and PuD S are determined from PCT data in the ranges 350-625 deg. C for gallium alloyed Pu and 400-575 deg. C for unalloyed Pu. The solubility of high purity plutonium alloyed with 2 at.% gallium is compared to high purity unalloyed plutonium. Significant differences are found in hydrogen solubility for unalloyed Pu versus gallium alloyed Pu. Differences in hydrogen solubility due to an apparent phase change are observable in the alloyed and unalloyed solubilities. The effect of iron impurities on Pu-Ga alloyed Pu is shown via hydrogen solubility data as preventing complete homogenization.

  19. The β → α phase transformation in plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, T.E.; Hirth, J.P.; Schwartz, D.S.; Mitchell, J.N.

    2013-01-01

    The β → α transformation in plutonium is discussed in terms of the crystallography of the two phases and the resulting topological modeling of the β/α interface. There has been little microscopy work on the transformation, but it is probably martensitic. β-Pu is monoclinic I2/m, while α-Pu is monoclinic P2 1 /m. α-Pu has been described as a hexagonal close-packed pseudostructure with AB stacking of the (0 2 0) α planes with pseudo-close-packing along [1 0 0] α and two other directions. β-Pu is less obvious, but X-ray diffraction suggests that the (1 0 3) β planes, which are selected as the terrace plane, have the highest structure factor and are therefore among the closest-packed planes. Other pseudo-close-packed planes, such as {222 ¯ } β and {321 ¯ } β , could also act as terrace planes for the transformation. The (1 0 3) β planes have a pseudo-hexagonal grid of Pu atoms with AB stacking and pseudo-close-packing along [301 ¯ ] β and two other directions. A selection of terrace planes as (0 2 0) α //(1 0 3) β with disconnections along [100] α //[301 ¯ ] β provides the basis for topological modeling. The model predicts a habit plane that is ∼6° from the terrace plane. The extra Pu atoms in the β structure (17 for every 16 in α) are accommodated by having 16 (1 0 3) β planes transform into 17 (0 2 0) α planes at steps in the interface. Short-range interstitial diffusion of Pu atoms from β to α is required for the transformation to proceed. Possible lattice invariant deformation systems are discussed

  20. Cigarette smoke and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipy, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques with liquid photographic emulsion and cellulose nitrate track-etch film are being used to investigate the spatial distribution of inhaled plutonium in the lungs of beagle dogs exposed to cigarette smoke or to the plutonium aerosol only. More plutonium than expected was detected on the inner surfaces of bronchi, and particles were observed beneath the bronchial mucosa. 2 figures, 2 tables

  1. Plutonium mobilization from sedimentary sources to solution in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.

    1979-01-01

    Inventories of plutonium radionuclides greatly in excess of global fallout levels persists in the benthic environments of Bikini and Eniwetok Atolls. It now appears that the atolls have reached a chemical steadystate condition with respect to the partitioning of 239+240 Pu between solution and solid phases of the environment. The mobilized 239+240 Pu has solute-like characteristics, passes rapidly and readily through dialysis membranes, has adsorption characteristics similar to those of fallout plutonium in the open ocean, and exists in solution primarily as some oxidized +5 or +6 chemical species. Water-column profiles of 239+240 Pu taken outside the atolls show a plutonium excess in the deep water mass. This remobilized 239+240 Pu possibly originates from the contaminated sediments previously deposited on the outer slopes of the atolls and surrounding basins

  2. Post-depositional reactivity of the plutonium in different sediment facies from the English channel - an experimental approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouzy, A.; Boust, D.; Klein, A.

    2004-01-01

    The plutonium discharged into sea (in particular resulting from the activity of the reprocessing plants of nuclear fuels) presents a great affinity for the sedimentary particles. In the English Channel, the weakness of the plutonium concentrations met in the natural environment makes very difficult a direct study of the diagenetic phenomena which influences on the behavior of this radionuclide after its incorporation to the sedimentary column. On the scale of the all English Channel, the stock of plutonium immobilized in the sediments is significant (some TBq), this fact justifies the study of its becoming. With this intention, we constructed a set of experiments on series marine sediments with various sedimentological facies, which have been spiked with plutonium. After a one-month incubation period, various parameters describing the behavior of plutonium were given: (1) distribution of plutonium between the particulate phases and the pore waters; (2) quantification of plutonium associated with reactive sulphides; (3) distribution of plutonium between the particles and the seawater during a sediment resuspension episode. (author)

  3. An assessment of the validity of cerium oxide as a surrogate for plutonium oxide gallium removal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolman, D.G.; Park, Y.; Stan, M.; Hanrahan, R.J. Jr.; Butt, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    Methods for purifying plutonium metal have long been established. These methods use acid solutions to dissolve and concentrate the metal. However, these methods can produce significant mixed waste, that is, waste containing both radioactive and chemical hazards. The volume of waste produced from the aqueous purification of thousands of weapons would be expensive to treat and dispose. Therefore, a dry method of purification is highly desirable. Recently, a dry gallium removal research program commenced. Based on initial calculations, it appeared that a particular form of gallium (gallium suboxide, Ga 2 O) could be evaporated from plutonium oxide in the presence of a reducing agent, such as small amounts of hydrogen dry gas within an inert environment. Initial tests using ceria-based material (as a surrogate for PuO 2 ) showed that thermally-induced gallium removal (TIGR) from small samples (on the order of one gram) was indeed viable. Because of the expense and difficulty of optimizing TIGR from plutonium dioxide, TIGR optimization tests using ceria have continued. This document details the relationship between the ceria surrogate tests and those conducted using plutonia

  4. Hazards of plutonium and fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    Apart from the possibility that civil plutonium may be diverted to military use the main argument against the introduction of a plutonium economy seems to be the supposedly unmanageable biological risk attached to plutonium itself. The author points out weaknesses in many of the opponents' arguments against the increased use of plutonium and argues that current safety practices are more than adequate in handling plutonium and other radioactive materials

  5. Plutonium separation by reduction stripping. Application to processing of mixed oxide (U,Pu)O2 fuel fabrication wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnal, Thierry; Cousinou, Gerard; Ganivet, Michel.

    1978-11-01

    A procedure is described for separating plutonium from a uranium VI and plutonium IV mixture contained in an organic phase (tributyl phosphate diluted in dodecane). This separation is obtained by extracting the plutonium III using two organic reducers: hydrazine and paraminophenol. Paraminophenol has excellent reducing qualities, similar to those of ferrous sulphamate, but has the added advantage of not contaminating extracted plutonium. This procedure is currently used in processing production wastes from mixed oxide (U,Pu)O 2 fuels; the installation using this procedure is described in detail in this paper. Operating results show the remarkable efficiency of this procedure: the separated plutonium and uranium mass flows have been increased to 185 and 350 g.h -1 respectively; the uranium contains less than 0.1 ppm of plutonium on completion of the purification cycle [fr

  6. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy of plutonium solid species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropf, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    We present XANES at the L III edge for four plutonium solid phases: Pu(III)F 3 , Pu(IV)O 2 , NaPu(V)O 2 CO 3 , and Ba 3 Pu(VI)O 6 . These correspond to the four important oxidation states in the process chemistry and environmental chemistry of plutonium. By a fitting method that uses an arc tangent function and gaussian curves, it was possible to reproducibly determine the edge energy and distinguish among the four oxidation states. These data demonstrate a 1.85 ± 0.20 eV shift per oxidation state

  7. Geochemical association of plutonium in marine sediments from Palomares (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, M.P.; Gasco, C.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A.; Pujol, L.

    1994-01-01

    The geochemical association of plutonium in sediments from the marine ecosystem of Palomares has been studied. A sequential leaching technique using selective extractants has been employed to determine the percentages of Pu in the following forms: (a) readily available, (b) exchangeable and adsorbed to specific sites, (c) associated with organic matter, (d) sesquioxides, (e) residual. Plutonium was found to be associated mainly with phases (c), (d) and (e), and therefore, appears to be relatively immobile and not readily available to bottom feeding biota. The effect of different source terms on Pu distribution is also discussed. (orig.)

  8. Status of plutonium ceramic immobilization processes and immobilization forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Vance, E.R.; Jostsons, A.

    1996-01-01

    Immobilization in a ceramic followed by permanent emplacement in a repository or borehole is one of the alternatives currently being considered by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program for the ultimate disposal of excess weapons-grade plutonium. To make Pu recovery more difficult, radioactive cesium may also be incorporated into the immobilization form. Valuable data are already available for ceramics form R ampersand D efforts to immobilize high-level and mixed wastes. Ceramics have a high capacity for actinides, cesium, and some neutron absorbers. A unique characteristic of ceramics is the existence of mineral analogues found in nature that have demonstrated actinide immobilization over geologic time periods. The ceramic form currently being considered for plutonium disposition is a synthetic rock (SYNROC) material composed primarily of zirconolite (CaZrTi 2 O 7 ), the desired actinide host phase, with lesser amounts of hollandite (BaAl 2 Ti 6 O 16 ) and rutile (TiO 2 ). Alternative actinide host phases are also being considered. These include pyrochlore (Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 ), zircon (ZrSiO 4 ), and monazite (CePO 4 ), to name a few of the most promising. R ampersand D activities to address important technical issues are discussed. Primarily these include moderate scale hot press fabrications with plutonium, direct loading of PuO 2 powder, cold press and sinter fabrication methods, and immobilization form formulation issues

  9. The distribution and remobilisation of plutonium and americium in estuaries of the eastern Irish Sea: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toole, J.

    1993-01-01

    The plutonium and americium components in the authorised discharges from BNFL Sellafield are rapidly removed from Irish Sea seawater onto the particulate phase. These actinides tend to be concentrated in fine sediment deposits on the Irish Sea bed and in estuaries where fine sediment accumulates. This paper focuses on these estuarine areas and brings together the available data on the levels and distributions of Pu and Am within the estuarine sediments. The results from field and laboratory experiments which have been undertaken in order to determine the degree of Pu and Am remobilisation, and the mechanism responsible, are also reviewed. These sediment-associated actinides may undergo both chemical and physical remobilisation, leading to increased dissolved concentrations in low-salinity waters and to apparent losses from the estuary on the sediment phase under certain conditions. Saltmarsh sediments are demonstrated to be the most important reservoirs for Pu and Am. The radiological significance of the levels of Pu and Am found in these and in other sediments is summarised, by comparison with GDLs. The appropriateness of GDLs for assessing the radiological significance of Pu and Am in these saltmarsh sediments is discussed. A more site-specific assessment methodology is recommended. (author)

  10. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation's defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO 2 feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO 2 dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides

  11. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong [and others

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation`s defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO{sub 2} feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO{sub 2} dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides.

  12. Plutonium spectrophotometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, A.; Cassaniti, P.; Orosco, E.H.

    1990-01-01

    Plutonium ions in solution have absorption spectra so different that it is possible to use them for analytical purposes. Detailed studies have been performed in nitric solutions. Some very convenient methods for the determination of plutonium and its oxidation states, especially the ratios Pu(III):Pu(IV) and Pu(IV):Pu(VI) in a mixture of both, have been developed. These methods are described in this paper, including: a) Absorption spectra for plutonium (III), (IV), (VI) and mixtures. b) Relative extinction coefficients for the above mentioned species. c) Dependences of the relative extinction coefficients on the nitric acid concentration and the plutonium VI deviation from the Beer-Lambert law. The developed methods are simple and rapid and then, suitable in process control. Accuracy is improved when relative absorbance measurements are performed or controlled the variables which have effect on the spectra and extinction coefficients. (Author) [es

  13. Plutonium safe handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tvehlov, Yu.

    2000-01-01

    The abstract, prepared on the basis of materials of the IAEA new leadership on the plutonium safe handling and its storage (the publication no. 9 in the Safety Reports Series), aimed at presenting internationally acknowledged criteria on the radiation danger evaluation and summarizing the experience in the safe management of great quantities of plutonium, accumulated in the nuclear states, is presented. The data on the weapon-class and civil plutonium, the degree of its danger, the measures for provision of its safety, including the data on accident radiation consequences with the fission number 10 18 , are presented. The recommendations, making it possible to eliminate the super- criticality danger, as well as ignition and explosion, to maintain the tightness of the facility, aimed at excluding the radioactive contamination and the possibility of internal irradiation, to provide for the plutonium security, physical protection and to reduce irradiation are given [ru

  14. Swiss R and D on uranium-free LWR fuels for plutonium incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanculescu, A.; Chawla, R.; Degueldre, C.; Kasemeyer, U.; Ledergerber, G.; Paratte, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    The most efficient way to enhance the plutonium consumption in LWRs is to eliminate plutonium production altogether. This requirement leads to fuel concepts in which the uranium is replaced by an inert matrix. The inert matrix material studied at PSI is zirconium oxide. For reactivity control reasons, adding a burnable poison to this fuel proves to be necessary. The studies performed at PSI have identified erbium oxide as the most suitable candidate for this purpose. With regard to material technology aspects, efforts have concentrated on the evaluation of fabrication feasibility and on the determination of the physicochemical properties of the chosen single phase zirconium/ erbium/plutonium oxide material stabilised as a cubic solution by yttrium. The results to-date, obtained for inert matrix samples containing thorium or cerium as plutonium substitute, confirm the robustness and stability of this material. With regard to reactor physics aspects, our studies indicate the feasibility of uranium-free, plutonium-fuelled cores having operational characteristics quite similar to those of conventional UO 2 -fuelled ones, and much higher plutonium consumption rates, as compared to 100% MOX loadings. The safety features of such cores, based on results obtained from static neutronics calculations, show no cliff edges. However, the need for further detailed transient analyses is clearly recognised. Summarising, PSI's studies indicate the feasibility of a uranium-free plutonium fuel to be considered in 'maximum plutonium consumption LWRs' operating in a 'once-through' mode. With regard to reactor physics, future efforts will concentrate on strengthening the safety case of uranium-free cores, as well as on improving the integral data base for validation of the neutronics calculations. Material technology studies will be continued to investigate the physico-chemical properties of the inert matrix fuel containing plutonium and will focus on the planning and evaluation of

  15. Burning weapons-grade plutonium in reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.F.

    1993-06-01

    As a result of massive reductions in deployed nuclear warheads, and their subsequent dismantlement, large quantities of surplus weapons- grade plutonium will be stored until its ultimate disposition is achieved in both the US and Russia. Ultimate disposition has the following minimum requirements: (1) preclude return of plutonium to the US and Russian stockpiles, (2) prevent environmental damage by precluding release of plutonium contamination, and (3) prevent proliferation by precluding plutonium diversion to sub-national groups or nonweapons states. The most efficient and effective way to dispose of surplus weapons-grade plutonium is to fabricate it into fuel and use it for generation of electrical energy in commercial nuclear power plants. Weapons-grade plutonium can be used as fuel in existing commercial nuclear power plants, such as those in the US and Russia. This recovers energy and economic value from weapons-grade plutonium, which otherwise represents a large cost liability to maintain in safeguarded and secure storage. The plutonium remaining in spent MOX fuel is reactor-grade, essentially the same as that being discharged in spent UO 2 fuels. MOX fuels are well developed and are currently used in a number of LWRs in Europe. Plutonium-bearing fuels without uranium (non-fertile fuels) would require some development. However, such non-fertile fuels are attractive from a nonproliferation perspective because they avoid the insitu production of additional plutonium and enhance the annihilation of the plutonium inventory on a once-through fuel cycle

  16. Nondestructive determination of residual fuel on leached hulls and dissolver sludges from LWR fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuerz, H.; Wagner, K.; Becker, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    In reprocessing plants leached hulls and dissolver sludges represent rather important intermediate level α-waste streams. A control of the Pu content of these waste streams is desirable. The nondestructive assay method to be preferred would be passive neutron counting. However, before any decision on passive neutron monitoring becomes possible, a characterization of hulls and sludges in terms of Pu content and neutron emission is necessary. For the direct determination of Plutonium on hulls and in sludges, as coming from reprocessing, an active neutron measurement is required. A simple, and sufficiently sensitive active neutron method which can easily be installed uses a stationary 252 Cf neutron source. This method was used for the characterization of hulls and sludges in terms of Plutonium content and total neutron emission in the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant WAK

  17. METHOD OF PRODUCING PLUTONIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolley, W.B.; Smith, R.C.

    1959-12-15

    A process is presented for preparing plutonium tetrafluoride from plutonium(IV) oxalate. The oxalate is dried and decomposed at about 300 deg C to the dioxide, mixed with ammonium bifluoride, and the mixture is heated to between 50 and 150 deg C whereby ammonium plutonium fluoride is formed. The ammonium plutonium fluoride is then heated to about 300 deg C for volatilization of ammonium fluoride. Both heating steps are preferably carried out in an inert atmosphere.

  18. GLASS FABRICATION AND PRODUCT CONSISTENCY TESTING OF LANTHANIDE BOROSILICATE FRIT X COMPOSITION FOR PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J

    2006-11-15

    The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) plans to conduct the Plutonium Disposition Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to disposition excess weapons-usable plutonium. A plutonium glass waste form is the preferred option for immobilization of the plutonium for subsequent disposition in a geologic repository. A reference glass composition (Lanthanide Borosilicate (LaBS) Frit B) was developed during the Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) to immobilize plutonium in the late 1990's. A limited amount of performance testing was performed on this baseline composition before efforts to further pursue Pu disposition via a glass waste form ceased. Recent FY05 studies have further investigated the LaBS Frit B formulation as well as development of a newer LaBS formulation denoted as LaBS Frit X. The objectives of this present task were to fabricate plutonium loaded LaBS Frit X glass and perform corrosion testing to provide near-term data that will increase confidence that LaBS glass product is suitable for disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository. Specifically, testing was conducted in an effort to provide data to Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) personnel for use in performance assessment calculations. Plutonium containing LaBS glass with the Frit X composition with a 9.5 wt% PuO{sub 2} loading was prepared for testing. Glass was prepared to support Product Consistency Testing (PCT) at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The glass was thoroughly characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) prior to performance testing. A series of PCTs were conducted at SRNL using quenched Pu Frit X glass with varying exposed surface areas. Effects of isothermal and can-in-canister heat treatments on the Pu Frit X glass were also investigated. Another series of PCTs were performed on these different heat-treated Pu Frit X glasses. Leachates from all these PCTs

  19. Plutonium Plant, Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, J.S.; Agarwal, K.

    2017-01-01

    The journey of Indian nuclear fuel reprocessing started with the commissioning of Plutonium Plant (PP) at Trombay on 22"n"d January, 1965 with an aim to reprocess the spent fuel from research reactor CIRUS. The basic process chosen for the plant was Plutonium Uranium Reduction EXtraction (PUREX) process. In seventies, the plant was subjected to major design modifications and replacement of hardware, which later met the additional demand from research reactor DHRUVA. The augmented plutonium plant has been operating since 1983. Experience gained from this plant was very much helpful to design future reprocessing plant in the country

  20. The toxicity of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouse, P.L.

    1994-01-01

    Shipments of plutonium occasionally pass around the Cape coastal waters on its way to Japan from Europe. This invariably leads to a great deal of speculation of the dangers involved and of the extreme toxicity of plutonium, with the media and environmental groups claiming that (a) plutonium is the most toxic substance known to man, and that (b) a few kilograms of plutonium ground finely and dispersed in the atmosphere could kill every human being on earth. Comparisons with other poisons are drawn, e.g. common inorganic chemicals and biological agents. The original scare around the extraordinary toxicity of Pu seems to have started in 1974 with the claims of Tamplin and Cochran's hot particle theory about plutonium lodging in the sensitive portions of the lungs in small concentrated aggregates where they are much more effective in producing cancers. This theory, however, is regarded as thoroughly discredited by the experts in the field of radiotoxicity. 8 refs

  1. Stability with temperature of mixed uranium plutonium monocarbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riglet-Martial, Ch.; Dumas, J.C.; Piron, J.P.; Gueneau, Ch.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Among the different advanced fuel materials of concern for Generation IV systems, the mixed carbide of uranium and plutonium fuel is considered as one of the key materials for Gas Fast Reactors (GFR) systems. For purposes of optimising its fabrication process as well as its performances in various operating conditions, the losses of gaseous plutonium specially at elevated temperatures have to be controlled and minimized. The paper is therefore concerned with a parametric analysis of the stability with temperature of mixed carbides of uranium and plutonium. Previous published experimental studies have shown that mixed (U ,Pu) carbides undergo a highly incongruent sublimation at high temperatures: the vapour phase in equilibrium with the solid is mainly composed of gaseous plutonium (P Pu /P total > 99 % ) while the contribution of gaseous U and C remains very low. The composition of the system U 1-z Pu z C 1+x ' (z =Pu/(U+Pu) and x C/(U+Pu)), the temperature (T) and the expansion volume (V) of the gas are the main parameters in the loss of gaseous Pu. The calculations are carried out using the SAGE (Solgasmix Advanced Gibbs Energy) software, by assuming ideal solid solutions between UC and PuC, as well as between U 2 C 3 and Pu 2 C 3 . The validity of the model is previously tested using published equilibrium vapour pressure data. This work gives rise to a large description of the variations of Pu losses from mixed uranium plutonium carbides and leads to some basic recommendations in connection with the use of this advanced fuel materials

  2. Plutonium use in foreign countries (03)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otagaki, Takao

    2004-03-01

    European countries and Japan had been implementing the strategy of spent fuel reprocessing in order to use nuclear material to the maximum. Plutonium recovered from reprocessing, however, must be recycle on light water reactors (LWRs) because of considerable delay of fast reactor development. In Europe, much of experiences of plutonium recycling have been accumulated until now. Thus, the status of plutonium recycling up to the end of 2003 in France, Germany, The U.K., Belgium, Switzerland and other countries were studied based on the following scope. (1) Basic policy and present status of plutonium recycling in primary countries of France, Germany, The U.K., Belgium, Switzerland, and Sweden which plans to recycle a part of plutonium: Backend policy and the status of spent fuel management were studied, then integrated analysis and evaluation of the position of plutonium recycling in backend and the status of plutonium recycling development were performed. (2) Plan and experience of Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication and reprocessing of spent fuels: The data and information on plan and experience of MOX fuel fabrication and reprocessing in foreign countries were collected. (3) Plutonium inventories: The data and information of plutonium inventories of foreign countries were collected. (author)

  3. Cigarette smoke and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipy, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to obtain experimental data that are directly applicable to resolving the question of whether cigarette smokers are at greater risk than nonsmokers to potential health effects of inhaled plutonium. Because cigarette smokers constitute a large fraction of the population, a synergistic effect of plutonium and cigarette smoke might influence estimates of the health risk for plutonium and other transuranics released to the environment

  4. Cycle downstream: the plutonium question

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zask, G.; Rome, M.; Delpech, M.

    1998-01-01

    This day, organized by the SFEN, took place at Paris the 4 june 1998. Nine papers were presented. They take stock on the plutonium physics and its utilization as a nuclear fuel. This day tried to bring information to answer the following questions: do people have to keep the plutonium in the UOX fuel or in the MOX fuel in order to use it for future fast reactors? Do people have to continue obstinately the plutonium reprocessing in the MOX for the PWR type reactors? Will it be realized a underground disposal? Can it be technically developed plutonium incinerators and is it economically interesting? The plutonium physics, the experimental programs and the possible solutions are presented. (A.L.B.)

  5. The application of N,N-dimethylhydroxylamine as reductant for the separation of plutonium from uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinping Liu; Hui He; Hongbin Tang; Yanxin Chen

    2011-01-01

    Both single stage and multi-stages experiments on stripping plutonium with N,N-dimethylhydroxylamine (DMHAN) as reductant with methylhydrozine (MMH) as supporting reductant were carried out. The effect of contact time, temperature, acidity, concentration of DMHAN on back-extraction rate of plutonium was investigated in the single stage experiment. The results demonstrated that the reaction of stripping Pu(IV) in the organic phase (30% TBP-kerosene) 1BF solutions by DMHAN exhibits excellent stripping efficiency. Under the given conditions, the back-extraction rate of plutonium reaches 90% within 2 min. Higher temperature, lower acidity and the increased concentration of DMHAN benefit the stripping reaction. The concentration profile of HNO 3 , uranium and plutonium were determined in a multi-stages mixer-settler after the steady state of the back-extraction, and the multi-stages results show that the plutonium can be separated effectively from uranium. The recovery of plutonium and uranium reach 99.995% or over 99.99% respectively. The separation factor of U from Pu (SF Pu/U ) is about 2 x 10 4 . (author)

  6. Aqueous Solution Chemistry of Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, David L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-28

    Things I have learned working with plutonium: Chemistry of plutonium is complex; Redox equilibria make Pu solution chemistry particularly challenging in the absence of complexing ligands; Understanding this behavior is key to successful Pu chemistry experiments; There is no suitable chemical analog for plutonium.

  7. Test and evaluation of the in-line plutonium solution K-absorption-edge densitometer at the Savannah River Plant. Phase I. Off-line testing results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.A. Jr.; Marks, T.; Johnson, S.S.

    1982-04-01

    An in-line, plutonium-solution, K-edge absorption densitometer has been developed at Los Alamos and is currently undergoing test and evaluation at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The first phase of the test and evaluation (off-line instrument calibration and solution assays) was completed, and preparations are under way to install the instrument in-line, as soon as process schedules permit. Calibration data in the design concentration range of 25 to 40 g Pu/L demonstrate routine achievement of densitometry assay precisions of 0.5% or better in 40 min. Plutonium assays at concentrations outside the calibration range were investigated in an effort to define better the limitations of the instrument and address other possible assay situations at SRP. Densitometry precisions obtained for 40-min assays range from 3% to 5 g Pu/L down to 0.4% at 70 g Pu/L. At higher plutonium concentrations, the precision deteriorated due to increasing gamma-ray absorption by the solution. In addition, with actinide concentrations above approximately 100 g/L, the assay accuracy also suffered because of enhanced small-angle scattering effects in the large sample cell. Measurements on mixed U/Pu solutions demonstrated the feasibility of accurate plutonium assays with correction for the large uranium matrix contributions being determined from the measurement data. The 239 240 Pu weight fractions and 241 Pu/ 239 Pu and 238 Pu/ 239 Pu isotopic ratios can be determined. In a mockup of the in-line solution plumbing system, all assay sequences, error conditions, and interlock criteria were exercised and verified to be working properly

  8. Plutonium Proliferation: The Achilles Heel of Disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leventhal, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Plutonium is a byproduct of nuclear fission, and it is produced at the rate of about 70 metric tons a year in the world's nuclear power reactors. Concerns about civilian plutonium ran high in the 1970s and prompted enactment of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978 to give the United States a veto over separating plutonium from U.S.-supplied uranium fuel. Over the years, however, so-called reactor-grade plutonium has become the orphan issue of nuclear non-proliferation, largely as a consequence of pressures from plutonium-separating countries. The demise of the fast breeder reactor and the reluctance of utilities to introduce plutonium fuel in light-water reactors have resulted in large surpluses of civilian, weapons-usable plutonium, which now approach in size the 250 tons of military plutonium in the world. Yet reprocessing of spent fuel for recovery and use of plutonium proceeds apace outside the United States and threatens to overwhelm safeguards and security measures for keeping this material out of the hands of nations and terrorists for weapons. A number of historical and current developments are reviewed to demonstrate that plutonium commerce is undercutting efforts both to stop the spread of nuclear weapons and to work toward eliminating existing nuclear arsenals. These developments include the breakdown of U.S. anti-plutonium policy, the production of nuclear weapons by India with Atoms-for-Peace plutonium, the U.S.-Russian plan to introduce excess military plutonium as fuel in civilian power reactors, the failure to include civilian plutonium and bomb-grade uranium in the proposed Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty, and the perception of emerging proliferation threats as the rationale for development of a ballistic missile defense system. Finally, immobilization of separated plutonium in high-level waste is explored as a proliferation-resistant and disarmament-friendly solution for eliminating excess stocks of civilian and military plutonium.

  9. Gamma ray NDA assay system for total plutonium and isotopics in plutonium product solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowder, L.R.; Hsue, S.T.; Johnson, S.S.; Parker, J.L.; Russo, P.A.; Sprinkle, J.K.; Asakura, Y.; Fukuda, T.; Kondo, I.

    1979-01-01

    A LASL-designed gamma-ray NDA instrument for assay of total plutonium and isotopics of product solutions at Tokai-Mura is currently installed and operating. The instrument is, optimally, a densitometer that uses radioisotopic sources for total plutonium measurements at the K absorption edge. The measured transmissions of additional gamma-ray lines from the same radioisotopic sources are used to correct for self-attenuation of passive gamma rays from plutonium. The corrected passive data give the plutonium isotopic content of freshly separated to moderately aged solutions. This off-line instrument is fully automated under computer control, with the exception of sample positioning, and operates routinely in a mode designed for measurement control. A one-half percent precision in total plutonium concentration is achieved with a 15-minute measurement

  10. An autoradiographical method using an imaging plate for the analyses of plutonium contamination in a plutonium handling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasaki, Koji; Sagawa, Naoki; Kurosawa, Shigeyuki; Mizuniwa, Harumi

    2011-01-01

    An autoradiographical method using an imaging plate (IP) was developed to analyze plutonium contamination in a plutonium handling facility. The IPs were exposed to ten specimens having a single plutonium particle. Photostimulated luminescence (PSL) images of the specimens were taken using a laser scanning machine. One relatively large spot induced by α-radioactivity from plutonium was observed in each PSL image. The plutonium-induced spots were discriminated by a threshold derived from background and the size of the spot. A good relationship between the PSL intensities of the spots and α-radioactivities measured using a radiation counter was obtained by least-square fitting, taking the fading effect into consideration. This method was applied to workplace monitoring in an actual uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. Plutonium contaminations were analyzed in ten other specimens having more than two plutonium spots. The α-radioactivities of plutonium contamination were derived from the PSL images and their relative errors were evaluated from exposure time. (author)

  11. The plutonium as transfer tracer and particulates contribution accumulating from the Rhone to the north-western Mediterranean sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    To follow the alluvial deposits from the Rhone in Mediterranean Sea, since the principle hydroelectric constructions (1960), it was necessary to find an adequate tracer. The plutonium isotopes have satisfied to the different characteristics. The specificity of the Rhone contribution is bound to the existence of the irradiated spent fuels reprocessing plant of Marcoule; the releases of this plant are characterized by the predominance of Plutonium 238. The results of this study show that the percentage of sediments coming from the Rhone in the recent contribution, is low beyond the pro delta: less than 5% of the sediment of the continental shelf concern the Rhone contribution. However, there are two zones for which the contribution is important and could play a role in the particulate transfer towards the high sea. (N.C.). 157 refs., 60 figs., 50 tabs

  12. A review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions and effects of decomposition temperature on the surface area of the plutonium dioxide product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, R. M.; Sims, H. E.; Taylor, R. J.

    2015-10-01

    Plutonium (IV) and (III) ions in nitric acid solution readily form insoluble precipitates with oxalic acid. The plutonium oxalates are then easily thermally decomposed to form plutonium dioxide powder. This simple process forms the basis of current industrial conversion or 'finishing' processes that are used in commercial scale reprocessing plants. It is also widely used in analytical or laboratory scale operations and for waste residues treatment. However, the mechanisms of the thermal decompositions in both air and inert atmospheres have been the subject of various studies over several decades. The nature of intermediate phases is of fundamental interest whilst understanding the evolution of gases at different temperatures is relevant to process control. The thermal decomposition is also used to control a number of powder properties of the PuO2 product that are important to either long term storage or mixed oxide fuel manufacturing. These properties are the surface area, residual carbon impurities and adsorbed volatile species whereas the morphology and particle size distribution are functions of the precipitation process. Available data and experience regarding the thermal and radiation-induced decompositions of plutonium oxalate to oxide are reviewed. The mechanisms of the thermal decompositions are considered with a particular focus on the likely redox chemistry involved. Also, whilst it is well known that the surface area is dependent on calcination temperature, there is a wide variation in the published data and so new correlations have been derived. Better understanding of plutonium (III) and (IV) oxalate decompositions will assist the development of more proliferation resistant actinide co-conversion processes that are needed for advanced reprocessing in future closed nuclear fuel cycles.

  13. Recovery of plutonium by pyroredox processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeese, J.A.; Bowersox, D.F.; Christensen, D.C.

    1985-09-01

    Using pyrochemical oxidation and reduction, we have developed a process to recover the plutonium in impure scrap with less than 95% plutonium. This plutonium metal was further purified by pyrochemical electrorefining. During development of the procedures, depleted electrorefining anodes were processed, and over 80% of the plutonium was recovered as high-purity metal in one electrorefining cycle. Over 40 kg of plutonium has been recovered from 55 kg of impure anodes with our procedures. 6 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Recovery of plutonium by pyroredox processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeese, J.A.; Bowersox, D.F.; Christensen, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    Using pyrochemical oxidation and reduction, we have developed a process to recover the plutonium in impure scrap with less than 95% plutonium. This plutonium metal was further purified by pyrochemical electrorefining. During development of the procedures, depleted electrorefining anodes were processed, and over 80% of the plutonium was recovered as high-purity metal in one electrorefining cycle. Over 40 kg of plutonium has been recovered from 55 kg of impure anodes with our procedures. 6 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  15. The use of calorimetry for plutonium assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, J.A.

    1982-12-01

    Calorimetry is a technique for measuring the thermal power of heat-producing substances. The technique may be applied to the measurement of plutonium-bearing materials which evolve heat as a result of alpha and beta decay. A calorimetric measurement of the thermal power of a plutonium sample, combined with a knowledge or measurement of the plutonium isotopic mass ratios of the sample provides a convenient and accurate, non-destructive measure of the total plutonium mass of the sample. The present report provides a description, and an assessment of the calorimetry technique applied to the assay of plutonium-bearing materials. Types and characteristics of plutonium calorimeters are considered, as well as calibration and operating procedures. The instrumentation used with plutonium calorimeters is described and the use of computer control for calorimeter automation is discussed. A critical review and assessment of plutonium calorimetry literature since 1970 is presented. Both fuel element and plutonium-bearing material calorimeters are considered. The different types of plutonium calorimeters are evaluated and their relative merits are discussed. A combined calorimeter and gamma-ray measurement assay system is considered. The design principles of plutonium assay calorimeters are considered. An automatic, computer-based calorimeter control system is proposed in conjunction with a general plutonium assay calorimeter design. (author)

  16. Analytic determination of plutonium in the environment; Determination analytique du plutonium dans l'environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballada, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    The work described in this report was undertaken with a view to determining the plutonium content in the fall-out from nuclear explosions. In the first part are described in turn the importance of the problems due to the plutonium, the physico-chemical properties of the radioelement and the biological dangers which it presents. A detailed and critical analysis is made of the radio-toxicological determination of the plutonium as reported in the literature prior to this report. The second part consists in the presentation of a judicious choice of techniques making it possible to determine plutonium in air, rain-water, soils and ash. After a detailed description of the measurement equipment and the operational techniques which have been developed, a justification of these techniques is given with particular reference to their sensitivity and specificity. After a brief conclusion concerning the preceding chapters, the results are presented. These are then discussed in the ease of each element in which the plutonium has been determined. This discussion is concluded by a consideration of the importance of the occurrence of fall-out plutonium on problems relating to public health. From a consideration of 200 analyses carried out, it is concluded that the contribution of plutonium to the exposure of populations is still very small compared to that of natural radiation and that due to such fission products as strontium 90. The report includes 63 literature references, 26 figures and 11 tables. (author) [French] Les travaux decrits dans ce memoire ont ete entrepris et eflectues dans le but de mettre en evidence le plutonium des retombees radioactives consecutives aux explosions nucleaires. Dans la premiere partie nous etudions successivement l'importance des problemes poses par le plutonium puis les proprietes physicochimiques du radioelement et les dangers qu'il presente du point de vue biologique. Nous effectuons une analyse detaillee et critique des techniques

  17. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterbentz, J.W.; Olsen, C.S.; Sinha, U.P.

    1993-06-01

    This study is in response to a request by the Reactor Panel Subcommittee of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control (CISAC) to evaluate the feasibility of using plutonium fuels (without uranium) for disposal in existing conventional or advanced light water reactor (LWR) designs and in low temperature/pressure LWR designs that might be developed for plutonium disposal. Three plutonium-based fuel forms (oxides, aluminum metallics, and carbides) are evaluated for neutronic performance, fabrication technology, and material and compatibility issues. For the carbides, only the fabrication technologies are addressed. Viable plutonium oxide fuels for conventional or advanced LWRs include plutonium-zirconium-calcium oxide (PuO 2 -ZrO 2 -CaO) with the addition of thorium oxide (ThO 2 ) or a burnable poison such as erbium oxide (Er 2 O 3 ) or europium oxide (Eu 2 O 3 ) to achieve acceptable neutronic performance. Thorium will breed fissile uranium that may be unacceptable from a proliferation standpoint. Fabrication of uranium and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuels is well established; however, fabrication of plutonium-based oxide fuels will require further development. Viable aluminum-plutonium metallic fuels for a low temperature/pressure LWR include plutonium aluminide in an aluminum matrix (PuAl 4 -Al) with the addition of a burnable poison such as erbium (Er) or europium (Eu). Fabrication of low-enriched plutonium in aluminum-plutonium metallic fuel rods was initially established 30 years ago and will require development to recapture and adapt the technology to meet current environmental and safety regulations. Fabrication of high-enriched uranium plate fuel by the picture-frame process is a well established process, but the use of plutonium would require the process to be upgraded in the United States to conform with current regulations and minimize the waste streams

  18. Experimental studies to validate model calculations and maximum solubility limits for Plutonium and Americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This report focuses on studies of KIT-INE to derive a significantly improved description of the chemical behaviour of Americium and Plutonium in saline NaCl, MgCl 2 and CaCl 2 brine systems. The studies are based on new experimental data and aim at deriving reliable Am and Pu solubility limits for the investigated systems as well as deriving comprehensive thermodynamic model descriptions. Both aspects are of high relevance in the context of potential source term estimations for Americium and Plutonium in aqueous brine systems and related scenarios. Americium and Plutonium are long-lived alpha emitting radionuclides which due to their high radiotoxicity need to be accounted for in a reliable and traceable way. The hydrolysis of trivalent actinides and the effect of highly alkaline pH conditions on the solubility of trivalent actinides in calcium chloride rich brine solutions were investigated and a thermodynamic model derived. The solubility of Plutonium in saline brine systems was studied under reducing and non-reducing conditions and is described within a new thermodynamic model. The influence of dissolved carbonate on Americium and Plutonium solubility in MgCl 2 solutions was investigated and quantitative information on Am and Pu solubility limits in these systems derived. Thermodynamic constants and model parameter derived in this work are implemented in the Thermodynamic Reference Database THEREDA owned by BfS. According to the quality assurance approach in THEREDA, is was necessary to publish parts of this work in peer-reviewed scientific journals. The publications are focused on solubility experiments, spectroscopy of aquatic and solid species and thermodynamic data. (Neck et al., Pure Appl. Chem., Vol. 81, (2009), pp. 1555-1568., Altmaier et al., Radiochimica Acta, 97, (2009), pp. 187-192., Altmaier et al., Actinide Research Quarterly, No 2., (2011), pp. 29-32.).

  19. Recovery studies for plutonium machining oil coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, J.D.; Baldwin, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    Lathe coolant oil, contaminated with plutonium and having a carbon tetrachloride diluent, is generated in plutonium machining areas at Rocky Flats. A research program was initiated to determine the nature of plutonium in this mixture of oil and carbon tetrachloride. Appropriate methods then could be developed to remove the plutonium and to recycle the oil and carbon tetrachloride. Studies showed that the mixtures of spent oil and carbon tetrachloride contained particulate plutonium and plutonium species that are soluble in water or in oil and carbon tetrachloride. The particulate plutonium was removed by filtration; the nonfilterable plutonium was removed by adsorption on various materials. Laboratory-scale tests indicated the lathe-coolant oil mixture could be separated by distilling the carbon tetrachloride to yield recyclable products

  20. The plutonium: brief presentation of its nuclear, physical and chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.

    1993-01-01

    In this text we give a brief presentation of the nuclear properties (isotopes, isotopic composition of spent fuels, decay), of the physical properties (phase diagrams, alloys) and of the chemical properties (complexes, solvent extraction) of the plutonium

  1. Plutonium use in foreign countries (01)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otagaki, Takao

    2002-03-01

    European countries and Japan had been implementing the strategy of spent fuel reprocessing in order to use nuclear material to the maximum. Plutonium recovered from reprocessing, however, must be recycle on light water reactors (LWRs) because of considerable delay of fast reactor development. In Europe, much of experience of plutonium recycling have been accumulated until now. Thus, the status of plutonium recycling up to the end of 2001 in France, Germany, The U.K., Belgium, Switzerland and other countries were studied based on the following scope. (1) Basic policy and present status of plutonium recycling in primary countries of France, Germany, The U.K., Belgium, Switzerland, and Sweden which recently appears the move of recycling a part of plutonium. Backend policy and the status of spent fuel management were studied, then integrated analysis and evaluation of the position of plutonium recycling in backend and the status of plutonium recycling development were performed. (2) Plan and experience of Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication and reprocessing of spent fuels. The data and information on plan and experience of MOX fuel fabrication and reprocessing in foreign countries were collected. (3) Plutonium inventories. The data and information on plutonium inventories of foreign countries were collected. (author)

  2. Plutonium use in foreign countries (99)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otagaki, Takao

    2000-03-01

    European countries and Japan had been implementing the strategy of spent fuel reprocessing in order to use nuclear material to the maximum. Plutonium recovered from reprocessing, however, must be recycle on light water reactors (LWRs) because of considerable delay of fast reactor development. In Europe, much of experience of plutonium recycling have been accumulated until now. Thus, the status of plutonium recycling up to the end of 1999 in France, Germany, The U.K., Belgium, Switzerland and other countries were studied based on the following scope. (1) Basic policy and present status of plutonium recycling in primary countries of France, Germany, The U.K., Belgium, Switzerland, and Sweden which recently appears the move to recycling a part of plutonium backend policy and the status of spent fuel management were studied, then integrated analysis and evaluation of the position of plutonium recycling in backend and the status of plutonium recycling development were performed. (2) Plan and experience of Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication and reprocessing of spent fuels. The data and information on plan and experience of MOX fuel fabrication and reprocessing in foreign countries were collected. (3) Plutonium inventories. The data and information on plutonium inventories of foreign counties were collected. (author)

  3. Plutonium use in foreign countries (02)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otagaki, Takao

    2003-02-01

    European countries and Japan had been implementing the strategy of spent fuel reprocessing in order to use nuclear material to the maximum. Plutonium recovered from reprocessing, however, must be recycle on light water reactors (LWRs) because of considerable delay of fast reactor development. In Europe, much of experience of plutonium recycling have been accumulated until now. Thus, the status of plutonium recycling up to the end of 2002 in France, Germany, The U.K., Belgium, Switzerland and other countries were studied based on the following scope. (1) Basic policy and present status of plutonium recycling in primary countries of France, Germany, The U.K., Belgium, Switzerland, and Sweden which recently appears the move of recycling a part of plutonium. Backend policy and the status of spent fuel management were studied, then integrated analysis and evaluation of the position of plutonium recycling in backend and the status of plutonium recycling development were performed. (2) Plan and experience of Mixed Oside (MOX) fuel fabrication and reprocessing of spent fuels. The data and information on plan and experience of MOX fuel fabrication and reprocessing in foreign countries were collected. (3) Plutonium inventories. The data and information on plutonium inventories of foreign countries were collected. (author)

  4. Plutonium use in foreign countries. (04)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otagaki, Takao

    2005-03-01

    European countries and Japan had been implementing the strategy of spent fuel reprocessing in order to use nuclear material to the maximum. Plutonium recovered from reprocessing, however, must be recycle on light water reactors (LWRs) because of considerable delay of fast reactor development. In Europe, much of experience of plutonium recycling have been accumulated until now. Thus, the status of plutonium recycling up to the end of 2004 in France, Germany, The U.K., Belgium, Switzerland and other countries were studied based on the following scope. (1) Basic policy and present status of plutonium recycling in primary countries of France, Germany, the U.K., Belgium, Switzerland, and Sweden which plans to recycle a limited amount of plutonium: Backend policy and the status of spent fuel management were studied, then integrated analysis and evaluation of the position of plutonium recycling in backend and the status of plutonium recycling development were performed. (2) Plan and experience of Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication and reprocessing of spent fuels: The data and information on plan and experience of MOX fuel fabrication and reprocessing in foreign countries were collected. (3) Plutonium inventories: The data and information on plutonium inventories of foreign countries were collected. (author)

  5. Laboratory-scale evaluations of alternative plutonium precipitation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martella, L.L.; Saba, M.T.; Campbell, G.K.

    1984-01-01

    Plutonium(III), (IV), and (VI) carbonate; plutonium(III) fluoride; plutonium(III) and (IV) oxalate; and plutonium(IV) and (VI) hydroxide precipitation methods were evaluated for conversion of plutonium nitrate anion-exchange eluate to a solid, and compared with the current plutonium peroxide precipitation method used at Rocky Flats. Plutonium(III) and (IV) oxalate, plutonium(III) fluoride, and plutonium(IV) hydroxide precipitations were the most effective of the alternative conversion methods tested because of the larger particle-size formation, faster filtration rates, and the low plutonium loss to the filtrate. These were found to be as efficient as, and in some cases more efficient than, the peroxide method. 18 references, 14 figures, 3 tables

  6. The plutonium danger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiter, W. de

    1983-01-01

    Nobody can ignore the fact that plutonium is potentially very dangerous and the greatest danger concerning it lies in the spreading of nuclear weapons via nuclear energy programmes. The following seven different attitudes towards this problem are presented and discussed: 1) There is no connection between peaceful and military applications; 2) The problem cannot be prevented; 3) A technical solution must be found; 4) plutonium must be totally inaccessible to countries involved in acquiring nuclear weapons; 5) The use of plutonium for energy production should only occur in one multinational centre; 6) Dogmas in the nuclear industry must be enfeebled; 7) All developments in this area should stop. (C.F.)

  7. Solid dispersions based on inulin for the stabilisation and formulation of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Drooge, D J; Hinrichs, W L J; Wegman, K A M; Visser, M R; Eissens, A C; Frijlink, H W

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a dry powder formulation that stabilises the chemically labile lipophilic Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), that rapidly dissolves in water in order to increase the bioavailability and that opens new routes of administration. It was investigated whether these

  8. Adsorption and diffusion of plutonium in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relyea, J.F.; Brown, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    The behavior of plutonium in soil--water systems was studied by measuring its apparent diffusion coefficient in the aqueous and solid phases and by finding the adsorption--desorption relationships between soil and solution. Apparent diffusion coefficients of plutonium in soil were measured using a quick-freeze method. Aqueous diffusion was studied in a capillary-tube diffusion cell. Adsorption studies were done by equilibrating a tagged soil--water mixture on a rotary shaker before centrifuging and sampling. As expected from high adsorption coefficients (Kd) (300--10,000), the apparent diffusion coefficients were low compared with normal soil cations (1.4 x 10 -8 cm 2 /sec in a sandy soil to less than 2.4 x 10 -11 cm 2 /sec in a silt loam). The Kd of plutonium in aqueous solution containing the chelate ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was reduced compared with the Kd in dilute HNO 3 . As the EDTA concentration was increased, the Kd was decreased. The chelate diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) reduced the Kd more than EDTA at comparable concentrations. The aqueous diffusion coefficients varied from 3.1 x 10 -7 cm 2 /sec in a solution extracted from the silt loam up to 2.7 x 10 -5 cm 2 /sec in a solution extracted from the sandy soil

  9. Studies on O/M ratio determination in uranium oxide, plutonium oxide and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampath, S.; Chawla, K.L.

    1975-01-01

    Thermogravimetric studies were carried out in unsintered and sintered samples of uranium oxide, plutonium oxide and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide under different atmospheric conditions (air, argon and moist argon/hydrogen). Moisture loss was found to occur below 200 0 C for uranium dioxide samples, upto 700 0 C for sintered plutonium dioxide and negligible for sintered samples. The O/M ratios for non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide (sintered and unsintered), plutonium dioxide and mixed uranium and plutonium oxides (sintered) could be obtained with a precision of +- 0.002. Two reference states UOsub(2.000) and UOsub(2.656) were obtained for uranium dioxide and the reference state MOsub(2.000) was used for other cases. For unsintered plutonium dioxide samples, accurate O/M ratios could not be obtained of overlap of moisture loss with oxygen loss/gain. (author)

  10. The plutonium challenge for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper author deal with the weapons-usable plutonium and with the possibilities of their managing. Russia has not disclosed the amount of plutonium produced, but various estimates indicate that the production was about 130 tonnes. Production has been curtailed in Russia; three dual-purpose reactors still produce weapons-grade plutonium - two at Tomsk-7 (renamed Seversk) and one at Krasnoyarsk-26 (renamed Zheleznogorsk Mining and Chemical Combine). In a 1994 United States-Russian agreement that has yet to enter into force, Russia agreed to close the remaining operating reactors by the year 2000. Treaties between the United States and Russia have already cut the number of nuclear warheads from more than 10,000 to about 6,000 under START 1, which has been ratified, and to about 3,500 under START 2, which still awaits approval. If Russia and the United States conclude START 3, that number could drop to between 2,000 and 2,500. On September 2, 1998, the Presidents of the United States and Russia signed the 'Joint statement of principles for Management and Disposition of Plutonium, Designated as No Longer Required for Defense Purposes.' In this joint statement the Presidents affirm the intention of each country to remove by stages approximately 50 metric tons of plutonium and to convert the nuclear weapons programs, and to convert this material so that it can never be used in nuclear weapons. These 100 tonne of plutonium must be managed in proper way such that it becomes neither a proliferation for an environmental risk. The United States has proposed that it manage it's 50 tonnes by a dual approach-once through MOX burning of a portion of the plutonium and immobilization in a ceramic matrix followed by en- casement in high level waste glass. Russia has proposed that it manage its full 50 tonnes by burning in a reactor. The MOX program in the United States would bum the cleaner plutonium metal and residues. Weapons components would be converted to plutonium oxide

  11. Inhalation toxicology of industrial plutonium and uranium oxide aerosols I. Physical chemical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidson, A.F.; Mewhinney, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    In the fabrication of mixed plutonium and uranium oxide fuel, large quantities of dry powders are processed, causing dusty conditions in glove box enclosures. Inadvertent loss of glove box integrity or failure of air filter systems can lead to human inhalation exposure. Powdered samples and aerosol samples of these materials obtained during two fuel fabrication process steps have been obtained. A regimen of physical chemical tests of properties of these materials has been employed to identify physical chemical properties which may influence their biological behavior and dosimetry. Materials to be discussed are 750 deg. C heat-treated, mixed uranium and plutonium oxides obtained from the ball milling operation and 1750 deg. C heat-treated, mixed uranium and plutonium oxides obtained from the centerless grinding of fuel pellets. Results of x-ray diffraction studies have shown that the powder generated by the centerless grinding of fuel pellets is best described as a solid solution of UO x and PuO x consistent with its temperature history. In vitro dissolution studies of both mixed oxide materials indicate a generally similar dissolution rate for both materials. In one solvent, the material with the higher temperature history dissolves more rapidly. The x-ray diffraction and in vitro dissolution results as well as preliminary results of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses will be compared and the implications for the associated biological studies will be discussed. (author)

  12. Method to manufacture a nuclear fuel from uranium-plutonium monocarbide or uranium-plutonium mononitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauth, A.; Mueller, N.

    1977-01-01

    Pure uranium carbide or nitride is converted with plutonium oxide and carbon (all in powder form) to uranium-plutonium monocarbide or mononitride by cold pressing and sintering at about 1600 0 C. Pure uranium carbide or uranium nitride powder is firstly prepared without extensive safety measures. The pure uranium carbide or nitride powder can also be inactivated by using chemical substances (e.g. stearic acid) and be handled in air. The sinterable uranium carbide or nitride powder (or also granulate) is then introduced into the plutonium line and mixed with a nonstoichiometrically adjusted, prereacted mixture of plutonium oxide and carbon, pressed to pellets and reaction sintered. The surface of the uranium-plutonium carbide (higher metal content) can be nitrated towards the end of the sinter process in a stream of nitrogen. The protective layer stabilizes the carbide against the water and oxygen content in air. (IHOE) [de

  13. Monitoring the risks of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holliday, B.

    1978-01-01

    The difficulties in monitoring the environment in work areas where plutonium is handled are identified and both continuous and personal air sampling techniques considered. Methods of estimating the amounts of plutonium retained in the body are: (1) Direct external counting over the chest of the 'soft' low energy X-rays and gamma rays emitted by the plutonium deposited in the lungs. (2) Measuring plutonium excreted in urine. (3) Analysing faeces soon after a suspected contamination. Limitation of these techniques are discussed and it is shown that estimating the amount of plutonium in the body, or a specific organ, is extremely difficult, both because of the lack of sensitivity of the measuring techniques (especially chest scanning) and because of the problems in interpreting data, stemming from a lack of knowledge of crucial characteristics of the inhaled plutonium (such as particle size and solubility). Nevertheless it is felt that the judicious integration of all the options creates a level of certainty that no individual technique can possibly inspire. (U.K.)

  14. Progress on plutonium stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurt, D. [Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has safety oversight responsibility for most of the facilities where unstable forms of plutonium are being processed and packaged for interim storage. The Board has issued recommendations on plutonium stabilization and has has a considerable influence on DOE`s stabilization schedules and priorities. The Board has not made any recommendations on long-term plutonium disposition, although it may get more involved in the future if DOE develops plans to use defense nuclear facilities for disposition activities.

  15. Progress on plutonium stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurt, D.

    1996-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has safety oversight responsibility for most of the facilities where unstable forms of plutonium are being processed and packaged for interim storage. The Board has issued recommendations on plutonium stabilization and has has a considerable influence on DOE's stabilization schedules and priorities. The Board has not made any recommendations on long-term plutonium disposition, although it may get more involved in the future if DOE develops plans to use defense nuclear facilities for disposition activities

  16. Status of plutonium ceramic immobilization processes and immobilization forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Van Konynenburg, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Vance, E.R.; Jostsons, A. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Menai (Australia)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Immobilization in a ceramic followed by permanent emplacement in a repository or borehole is one of the alternatives currently being considered by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program for the ultimate disposal of excess weapons-grade plutonium. To make Pu recovery more difficult, radioactive cesium may also be incorporated into the immobilization form. Valuable data are already available for ceramics form R&D efforts to immobilize high-level and mixed wastes. Ceramics have a high capacity for actinides, cesium, and some neutron absorbers. A unique characteristic of ceramics is the existence of mineral analogues found in nature that have demonstrated actinide immobilization over geologic time periods. The ceramic form currently being considered for plutonium disposition is a synthetic rock (SYNROC) material composed primarily of zirconolite (CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}), the desired actinide host phase, with lesser amounts of hollandite (BaAl{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 16}) and rutile (TiO{sub 2}). Alternative actinide host phases are also being considered. These include pyrochlore (Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}), zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}), and monazite (CePO{sub 4}), to name a few of the most promising. R&D activities to address important technical issues are discussed. Primarily these include moderate scale hot press fabrications with plutonium, direct loading of PuO{sub 2} powder, cold press and sinter fabrication methods, and immobilization form formulation issues.

  17. Plutonium purification cycle in centrifugal extractors: comparative study of flowsheets using uranous nitrate and hydroxylamine nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, P.; Dinh, B.; Mauborgne, B.; Drain, F.; Gillet, B.

    1998-01-01

    The extension of the UP2 plant at La Hague includes a new plutonium purification cycle using multi-stage centrifugal extractors, to replace the present cycle which uses mixer/settler banks. The advantage of this type of extractor is basically the compactness of the equipment and the short residence time, which limits solvent degradation, particularly when reprocessing fuel containing a high proportion of plutonium 238. Two types of reducing agents have been considered for the plutonium stripping operation, uranous nitrate and hydroxylamine nitrate. Uranous nitrate displays a very fast reduction kinetics, ideal for the very short residence time of the phases in the centrifugal extractors. However, its extractability in the organic phase exacerbates the undesirable re-oxidation of plutonium, which is present in high concentration in this stage of the process. The short residence time of the centrifugal extractors is an advantage in as much as it could conceivably be adequate to obtain a sufficient reduction efficiency, while minimizing undesirable re-oxidation mechanisms. Hydroxylamine nitrate helps to minimize undesirable re-oxidation and is the normal choice for this type of operation. However, the plutonium (IV) reduction kinetics obtained is slower than with uranous nitrate, making it necessary to check whether its use is compatible with the very short residence times of centrifugal extractors.This article discusses the feasibility studies employing these two reducing agents. (author)

  18. The influence of freshwater and material export on sedimentary facies and benthic processes within the Fly Delta and adjacent Gulf of Papua (Papua New Guinea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alongi, D. M.; Christoffersen, P.; Tirendi, F.; Robertson, A. I.

    1992-02-01

    Large volumes of freshwater and suspended material debouch from the Fly River in southwestern Papua New Guinea into the Gulf of Papua, greatly influencing the hydrography and sedimentary processes within the river delta and adjacent shelf region. Sedimentary facies within the subtidal regions of the Fly Delta are composed mainly of compacted and eroded very fine black sand, and highly laminated, muddy sand and sandy mud, progressing to prodelta mud with intermixed primary and biogenic structures in the inner Gulf of Papua. These prodelta muds grade further to mixed terrigenous-carbonate deposits southwards into the northern Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait, and to well-bioturbated, fluid mud northwards into the Gulf of Papua. The transition from physically-dominated, estuarine conditions within the delta to more quiescent, marine conditions on the shelf leads to concomitant changes in sediment chemistry, microbial activity and infaunal and epifaunal communities. Particulate (C, N, P) and dissolved inorganic and organic nutrient concentrations were a function of sediment type (higher in finer deposits) rather than location (delta vs gulf). C: N: P ratios of solid-phase nutrients varied greatly, but were usually less than those predicted by the Redfield ratio. Mean interstitial concentrations of dissolved inorganic nutrients were low (μM range), but dissolved organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus levels were equivalent to those found in higher latitude systems. Fluxes of dissolved inorganic nutrients were generally low (μmol m -2 day -1). Flux rates were mostly negative (into the sediment) in the delta suggesting that these deposits are a sink for nutrients. In the offshore deposits, dissolved inorganic fluxes were higher and mostly positive indicating that they are a source for dissolved nutrients. Standing crops of bacteria (range: below detection limits— 2.5 × 10 10 cells g -1 dry wt), meiofauna (range: 5-750 individuals 10 cm -2; 9-1006 μg dry wt 10

  19. Excess Weapons Plutonium Immobilization in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardine, L.; Borisov, G.B.

    2000-01-01

    The joint goal of the Russian work is to establish a full-scale plutonium immobilization facility at a Russian industrial site by 2005. To achieve this requires that the necessary engineering and technical basis be developed in these Russian projects and the needed Russian approvals be obtained to conduct industrial-scale immobilization of plutonium-containing materials at a Russian industrial site by the 2005 date. This meeting and future work will provide the basis for joint decisions. Supporting R and D projects are being carried out at Russian Institutes that directly support the technical needs of Russian industrial sites to immobilize plutonium-containing materials. Special R and D on plutonium materials is also being carried out to support excess weapons disposition in Russia and the US, including nonproliferation studies of plutonium recovery from immobilization forms and accelerated radiation damage studies of the US-specified plutonium ceramic for immobilizing plutonium. This intriguing and extraordinary cooperation on certain aspects of the weapons plutonium problem is now progressing well and much work with plutonium has been completed in the past two years. Because much excellent and unique scientific and engineering technical work has now been completed in Russia in many aspects of plutonium immobilization, this meeting in St. Petersburg was both timely and necessary to summarize, review, and discuss these efforts among those who performed the actual work. The results of this meeting will help the US and Russia jointly define the future direction of the Russian plutonium immobilization program, and make it an even stronger and more integrated Russian program. The two objectives for the meeting were to: (1) Bring together the Russian organizations, experts, and managers performing the work into one place for four days to review and discuss their work with each other; and (2) Publish a meeting summary and a proceedings to compile reports of all the

  20. Plutonium use - Present status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dievoet, J. van; Fossoul, E.; Jonckheere, E.; Bemden, E. van den

    1977-01-01

    The use of plutonium in thermal and fast reactors is a demonstrated, if not proven, technology. Moreover, plutonium is being produced in increasing quantities. Evaluation of this production on a world scale shows that it would be theoretically possible to construct numerous breeders and thus to make the best use of plutonium, while considerably reducing uranium consumption. This source of plutonium is nevertheless dependent on the reprocessing of irradiated fuel. Long delays in installing and adequate world reprocessing capacity are weakening the prospects for introducing breeders. Furthermore, the critical situation regarding reprocessing may delay the development of complementary reprocessing methods for fuels with a high plutonium content and high burnup. The recycling of plutonium is now a well-known technique and any objections to it hardly bear analysis. Utilization of plutonium offers an appreciable saving in terms of uranium and separative work units; and it can also be shown that immediate reprocessing of the recycling fuel is not essential for the economics of the concept. Temporary storage of recycled fuel is a particularly safe form of concentrating plutonium, namely in irradiated plutonium-bearing fuel assemblies. Finally, recycling offers such flexibility that it represents no obstacle to fuel management at power plants with light-water reactors. These strategic considerations imply that the technology of using plutonium for fabricating thermal or fast reactor fuels is both technically reliable and economically viable. The methods used in industrial facilities are fully reassuring in this respect. Although various unsolved problems exist, none seems likely to impede current developments, while the industrial experience gained has enabled the economics and reliability of the methods to be improved appreciably. Apart from the techno-economic aspects, the plutonium industry must face extremely important problems in connection with the safety of personnel

  1. Plutonium recovery from carbonate wash solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.H.; Reif, D.J.; Chostner, D.F.; Holcomb, H.P.

    1991-01-01

    540Periodically higher than expected levels of plutonium are found in carbonate solutions used to wash second plutonium cycle solvent. The recent accumulation of plutonium in carbonate wash solutions has led to studies to determine the cause of that plutonium accumulation, to evaluate the quality of all canyon solvents, and to develop additional criteria needed to establish when solvent quality is acceptable. Solvent from three canyon solvent extraction cycles was used to evaluate technology required to measure tributyl phosphate (TBP) degradation products and was used to evaluate solvent quality criteria during the development of plutonium recovery processes. 1 fig

  2. Solubility of plutonium from rumen contents of cattle grazing on plutonium-contaminated desert vegetation in in vitro bovine gastrointestinal fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barth, J.

    1975-01-01

    Rumen contents of cattle grazing on plutonium-contaminated desert vegetation at the Nevada Test Site were incubated in simulated bovine gastrointestinal fluids to study the alimentary solubility of plutonium. Trials were run during November 1973, and during February, May, July and August 1974. During the May and July trials, a large increase in plutonium solubility accompanied by a marked reduction in plutonium concentration of the rumen contents was observed concurrently with a reduction in intake of Eurotia lanata and an increase in the intake of Oryzopsis hymenoides or Sitanion jubatum. However, during the November, February, and August trials, comparatively high concentration of plutonium, but low plutonium solubility, was associated with high levels of Eurotia lanata in the rumen contents. Plutonium-238 was generally more soluble than plutonium-239 in these fluids. Ratios of the percentage of soluble plutonium-238 to the percentage of soluble plutonium-239 varied fro []1:1 to 18:1 on a radioactivity basis. (auth)

  3. Plutonium metal burning facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausburg, D.E.; Leebl, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    A glove-box facility was designed to convert plutonium skull metal or unburned oxide to an oxide acceptable for plutonium recovery and purification. A discussion of the operation, safety aspects, and electrical schematics are included

  4. Analytic determination of plutonium in the environment; Determination analytique du plutonium dans l'environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballada, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    The work described in this report was undertaken with a view to determining the plutonium content in the fall-out from nuclear explosions. In the first part are described in turn the importance of the problems due to the plutonium, the physico-chemical properties of the radioelement and the biological dangers which it presents. A detailed and critical analysis is made of the radio-toxicological determination of the plutonium as reported in the literature prior to this report. The second part consists in the presentation of a judicious choice of techniques making it possible to determine plutonium in air, rain-water, soils and ash. After a detailed description of the measurement equipment and the operational techniques which have been developed, a justification of these techniques is given with particular reference to their sensitivity and specificity. After a brief conclusion concerning the preceding chapters, the results are presented. These are then discussed in the ease of each element in which the plutonium has been determined. This discussion is concluded by a consideration of the importance of the occurrence of fall-out plutonium on problems relating to public health. From a consideration of 200 analyses carried out, it is concluded that the contribution of plutonium to the exposure of populations is still very small compared to that of natural radiation and that due to such fission products as strontium 90. The report includes 63 literature references, 26 figures and 11 tables. (author) [French] Les travaux decrits dans ce memoire ont ete entrepris et eflectues dans le but de mettre en evidence le plutonium des retombees radioactives consecutives aux explosions nucleaires. Dans la premiere partie nous etudions successivement l'importance des problemes poses par le plutonium puis les proprietes physicochimiques du radioelement et les dangers qu'il presente du point de vue biologique. Nous effectuons une analyse detaillee et critique des techniques

  5. Design-Only Conceptual Design Report: Plutonium Immobilization Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiSabatino, A.; Loftus, D.

    1999-01-01

    This design-only conceptual design report was prepared to support a funding request by the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition for engineering and design of the Plutonium Immobilization Plant, which will be used to immobilize up to 50 tonnes of surplus plutonium. The siting for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant will be determined pursuant to the site-specific Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement in a Plutonium Deposition Record of Decision in early 1999. This document reflects a new facility using the preferred technology (ceramic immobilization using the can-in-canister approach) and the preferred site (at Savannah River). The Plutonium Immobilization Plant accepts plutonium from pit conversion and from non-pit sources and, through a ceramic immobilization process, converts the plutonium into mineral-like forms that are subsequently encapsulated within a large canister of high-level waste glass. The final immobilized product must make the plutonium as inherently unattractive and inaccessible for use in nuclear weapons as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors and must be suitable for geologic disposal. Plutonium immobilization at the Savannah River Site uses: (1) A new building, the Plutonium Immobilization Plant, which will convert non-pit surplus plutonium to an oxide form suitable for the immobilization process, immobilize plutonium in a titanate-based ceramic form, place cans of the plutonium-ceramic forms into magazines, and load the magazines into a canister; (2) The existing Defense Waste Processing Facility for the pouring of high-level waste glass into the canisters; and (3) The Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility to receive and store feed materials. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant uses existing Savannah River Site infra-structure for analytical laboratory services, waste handling, fire protection, training, and other support utilities and services. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant

  6. Plutonium isotopic measurements by gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, F.X.; Lemming, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    A nondestructive technique is described for calculating plutonium-238, plutonium-240, plutonium-241 and americium-241 relative to plutonium-239 from measured peak areas in the high resolution gamma-ray spectra of solid plutonium samples. Gamma-ray attenuation effects were minimized by selecting sets of neighboring peaks in the spectrum whose components are due to the different isotopes. Since the detector efficiencies are approximately the same for adjacent peaks, the accuracy of the isotopic ratios is dependent on the half-lives, branching intensities, and measured peak areas. The data presented describe the results obtained by analyzing gamma-ray spectra in the energy region from 120 to 700 keV. Most of the data analyzed were obtained from plutonium material containing 6 percent plutonium-240. Sample weights varied from 0.25 g to approximately 1.2 kg. The methods were also applied to plutonium samples containing up to 23 percent plutonium-240 with weights of 0.25 to 200 g. Results obtained by gamma-ray spectroscopy are compared to chemical analyses of aliquots taken from the bulk samples

  7. Bibliography on plutonium and its compounds; Bibliographie sur le plutonium et ses composes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirian, J; Choquet, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Collection of bibliographical references on plutonium and its principal compounds from 1942 to end of 1957. (author) [French] Compilation de references bibliographiques sur le plutonium et ses principaux composes de 1942 a fin 1957. (auteur)

  8. Headspace solid phase microextraction--GC/C-IRMS for delta13CVPDB measurements of mono-aromatic hydrocarbons using EA-IRMS calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebongué, Véronique Woule; Geypens, Benny; Berglund, Michael; Taylor, Philip

    2009-03-01

    This work aims at comparing the delta(13)C(VPDB) of mono-aromatic hydrocarbons benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene isomers (BTEX) measured by elemental analyser (EA)-isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) with the delta(13)C(VPDB) measured on the same compounds by headspace solid phase microextraction - GC/C-IRMS (hSPME - GC/C-IRMS) with the final goal of using these compounds as internal standards on the latter system. The EA-IRMS measurements were done using calcium and lithium carbonate isotopic reference materials: NBS19 and L-SVEC for establishing the delta(13)C(VPDB) scale. The EA-IRMS measurements with helium dilution of a set of five reference materials (USGS40, USGS41, IAEA-CH-6, IAEA-CH-3 and IAEA-601) show systematic bias of 1 per thousand relative to their assigned values. This bias due to the dilution mechanism in the used ConfloII interface device could not be avoided. As the selected hydrocarbons: BTEX could not be analysed by EA-IRMS without helium dilution, their delta(13)C(VPDB) must be corrected from this observed bias using an external calibration. The CO(2) gas calibrated using EA-IRMS without helium dilution, was used as an in-house reference for the delta(13)C(VPDB) measurements of the BTEX by the hSPME - GC/C-IRMS system. The comparison made between the delta(13)C(VPDB) measured on the same BTEX compounds by EA-IRMS (with external calibration) and by hSPME - GC/C-IRMS techniques showed good agreement.

  9. Plutonium speciation affected by environmental bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, M.P.; Icopini, G.A.; Boukhalfa, H.

    2005-01-01

    Plutonium has no known biological utility, yet it has the potential to interact with bacterial cellular and extracellular structures that contain metal-binding groups, to interfere with the uptake and utilization of essential elements, and to alter cell metabolism. These interactions can transform plutonium from its most common forms, solid, mineral-adsorbed, or colloidal Pu(IV), to a variety of biogeochemical species that have much different physico-chemical properties. Organic acids that are extruded products of cell metabolism can solubilize plutonium and then enhance its environmental mobility, or in some cases facilitate plutonium transfer into cells. Phosphate- and carboxylate-rich polymers associated with cell walls can bind plutonium to form mobile biocolloids or Pu-laden biofilm/mineral solids. Bacterial membranes, proteins or redox agents can produce strongly reducing electrochemical zones and generate molecular Pu(III/IV) species or oxide particles. Alternatively, they can oxidize plutonium to form soluble Pu(V) or Pu(VI) complexes. This paper reviews research on plutonium-bacteria interactions and closely related studies on the biotransformation of uranium and other metals. (orig.)

  10. Plutonium vulnerability issues at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldt, E.; Templeton, D.W.; Tholen, E.

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) at the Hanford, Washington Site was operated to produce plutonium (Pu) metal and oxide for national defense purposes. Due to the production requirements and methods utilized to meet national needs and the abrupt shutdown of the plant in the late 1980s, the plant was left in a condition that poses a risk of radiation exposure to plant workers, of accidental radioactive material release to the environment, and of radiation exposure to the public. In early 1994, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to determine the best methods for cleaning out and stabilizing Pu materials in the PFP was started. While the EIS is being prepared, a number of immediate actions have been completed or are underway to significantly reduce the greatest hazards in the PFP. Recently, increased attention his been paid to Pu risks at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities resulting in the Department-wide Plutonium Vulnerability Assessment and a recommendation by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) for DOE to develop integrated plans for managing its nuclear materials

  11. Physics of Plutonium Recycling in Thermal Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinchin, G.H.

    1967-01-01

    A substantial programme of experimental reactor physics work with plutonium fuels has been carried out in the UK; the purpose of this paper is to review the experimental and theoretical work, with emphasis on plutonium recycling in thermal reactors. Although the main incentive for some of the work may have been to study plutonium build-up in uranium-fuelled reactors, it is nevertheless relevant to plutonium recycling and no distinction is drawn between build-up and enrichment studies. A variety of techniques have been for determining reactivity, neutron spectrum and reaction rates in simple assemblies of plutonium-aluminium fuel with water, graphite and beryllia moderators. These experiments give confidence in the basic data and methods of calculation for near-homogeneous mixtures of plutonium and moderator. In the practical case of plutonium recycling it is necessary to confirm that satisfactory predictions can be made for heterogeneous lattices enriched with plutonium. In this field, experiments have been carried out with plutonium-uranium metal and oxide-cluster fuels in graphite-moderated lattices and in SGHW lattices, and the effects of 240 Pu have been studied by perturbation measurements with single fuel elements. The exponential and critical experiments have used tonne quantities of fuel with plutonium contents ranging from 0.25 to 1.2% and the perturbation experiments have extended both the range of plutonium contents and the range of isotopic compositions of plutonium. In addition to reactivity and reactivity coefficients, such as the temperature coefficients, attention has been concentrated on relative reaction rate distributions which provide evidence for variations of neutron spectrum. .Theoretical comparisons, together with similar comparisons for non-uniform lattices, establish the validity of methods of calculation which have been used to study the feasibility of plutonium recycling in thermal reactors. (author)

  12. Physics of Plutonium Recycling in Thermal Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinchin, G. H. [Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1967-09-15

    A substantial programme of experimental reactor physics work with plutonium fuels has been carried out in the UK; the purpose of this paper is to review the experimental and theoretical work, with emphasis on plutonium recycling in thermal reactors. Although the main incentive for some of the work may have been to study plutonium build-up in uranium-fuelled reactors, it is nevertheless relevant to plutonium recycling and no distinction is drawn between build-up and enrichment studies. A variety of techniques have been for determining reactivity, neutron spectrum and reaction rates in simple assemblies of plutonium-aluminium fuel with water, graphite and beryllia moderators. These experiments give confidence in the basic data and methods of calculation for near-homogeneous mixtures of plutonium and moderator. In the practical case of plutonium recycling it is necessary to confirm that satisfactory predictions can be made for heterogeneous lattices enriched with plutonium. In this field, experiments have been carried out with plutonium-uranium metal and oxide-cluster fuels in graphite-moderated lattices and in SGHW lattices, and the effects of {sup 240}Pu have been studied by perturbation measurements with single fuel elements. The exponential and critical experiments have used tonne quantities of fuel with plutonium contents ranging from 0.25 to 1.2% and the perturbation experiments have extended both the range of plutonium contents and the range of isotopic compositions of plutonium. In addition to reactivity and reactivity coefficients, such as the temperature coefficients, attention has been concentrated on relative reaction rate distributions which provide evidence for variations of neutron spectrum. .Theoretical comparisons, together with similar comparisons for non-uniform lattices, establish the validity of methods of calculation which have been used to study the feasibility of plutonium recycling in thermal reactors. (author)

  13. Computation Results from a Parametric Study to Determine Bounding Critical Systems of Homogeneously Water-Moderated Mixed Plutonium--Uranium Oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Y.

    2001-01-11

    This report provides computational results of an extensive study to examine the following: (1) infinite media neutron-multiplication factors; (2) material bucklings; (3) bounding infinite media critical concentrations; (4) bounding finite critical dimensions of water-reflected and homogeneously water-moderated one-dimensional systems (i.e., spheres, cylinders of infinite length, and slabs that are infinite in two dimensions) that were comprised of various proportions and densities of plutonium oxides and uranium oxides, each having various isotopic compositions; and (5) sensitivity coefficients of delta k-eff with respect to critical geometry delta dimensions were determined for each of the three geometries that were studied. The study was undertaken to support the development of a standard that is sponsored by the International Standards Organization (ISO) under Technical Committee 85, Nuclear Energy (TC 85)--Subcommittee 5, Nuclear Fuel Technology (SC 5)--Working Group 8, Standardization of Calculations, Procedures and Practices Related to Criticality Safety (WG 8). The designation and title of the ISO TC 85/SC 5/WG 8 standard working draft is WD 14941, ''Nuclear energy--Fissile materials--Nuclear criticality control and safety of plutonium-uranium oxide fuel mixtures outside of reactors.'' Various ISO member participants performed similar computational studies using their indigenous computational codes to provide comparative results for analysis in the development of the standard.

  14. Measurements of the oxidation state and concentration of plutonium in interstitial waters of the Irish Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.M.; Lovett, M.B.

    1980-01-01

    The question of plutonium movement in interstitial waters resulting from diffusion along concentration gradients or from advective flow is addressed. The results of measurements of both the concentration and the oxidation state of plutonium in interstitial water collected from sediments near the Windscale discharge, in the solid phases of these sediments and in seawater and suspended solids collected at the coring locations are discussed

  15. Cigarette smoke and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipy, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to obtain experimental data that are directly applicable to resolving the question of whether cigarette smokers are at greater risk than nonsmokers to potential health effects of inhaled plutonium. Progress was made on two fronts during the past year. The autoradiographic technique developed from detection of plutonium on the interior surface of pulmonary airways (Annual Report, 1978) has been adapted to routine use in examining tracheas and bronchi of rats. Also, dogs exposed to cigarette smoke for over a year after inhalation of plutonium were killed and necropsied

  16. Plutonium inventories for stabilization and stabilized materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.K.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of the breakout session was to identify characteristics of materials containing plutonium, the need to stabilize these materials for storage, and plans to accomplish the stabilization activities. All current stabilization activities are driven by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94-1 (May 26, 1994) and by the recently completed Plutonium ES&H Vulnerability Assessment (DOE-EH-0415). The Implementation Plan for accomplishing stabilization of plutonium-bearing residues in response to the Recommendation and the Assessment was published by DOE on February 28, 1995. This Implementation Plan (IP) commits to stabilizing problem materials within 3 years, and stabilizing all other materials within 8 years. The IP identifies approximately 20 metric tons of plutonium requiring stabilization and/or repackaging. A further breakdown shows this material to consist of 8.5 metric tons of plutonium metal and alloys, 5.5 metric tons of plutonium as oxide, and 6 metric tons of plutonium as residues. Stabilization of the metal and oxide categories containing greater than 50 weight percent plutonium is covered by DOE Standard {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides{close_quotes} December, 1994 (DOE-STD-3013-94). This standard establishes criteria for safe storage of stabilized plutonium metals and oxides for up to 50 years. Each of the DOE sites and contractors with large plutonium inventories has either started or is preparing to start stabilization activities to meet these criteria.

  17. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P. (eds.)

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

  18. Potential for radionuclide immobilization in the EBS/NFE: solubility limiting phases for neptunium, plutonium, and uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rard, J. A., LLNL

    1997-10-01

    Retardation and dispersion in the far field of radionuclides released from the engineered barrier system/near field environment (EBS/NFE) may not be sufficient to prevent regulatory limits being exceeded at the accessible environment. Hence, a greater emphasis must be placed on retardation and/or immobilization of radionuclides in the EBS/NFE. The present document represents a survey of radionuclide-bearing solid phases that could potentially form in the EBS/NFE and immobilize radionuclides released from the waste package and significantly reduce the source term. A detailed literature search was undertaken for experimental solubilities of the oxides, hydroxides, and various salts of neptunium, plutonium, and uranium in aqueous solutions as functions of pH, temperature, and the concentrations of added electrolytes. Numerous solubility studies and reviews were identified and copies of most of the articles were acquired. However, this project was only two months in duration, and copies of some the identified solubility studies could not be obtained at short notice. The results of this survey are intended to be used to assess whether a more detailed study of identified low- solubility phase(s) is warranted, and not as a data base suitable for predicting radionuclide solubility. The results of this survey may also prove useful in a preliminary evaluation of the efficacy of incorporating chemical additives to the EBS/NFE that will enhance radionuclide immobilization.

  19. Interference from radon-thoron daughters in plutonium channel of a continuous plutonium-in-air monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendharkar, K.A.; Krishnamony, S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarises the results of a study conducted to define the extent of interference from the daughter products of radon/thoron to the plutonium channel of a continuous plutonium-in-air monitor. The effect on the detection limits of the instrument due to chemical form (transportable or non-transportable) and isotopic composition of plutonium aerosol are briefly discussed. (author)

  20. Compositions of airborne plutonium-bearing particles from a plutonium finishing operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, S.M. Jr.

    1976-11-01

    The elemental composition of 111 plutonium-bearing particles was determined (using an electron microprobe) as part of a program to investigate the origin and behavior of the long-lived transuranic radionuclides released from fuel reprocessing facilities at the Savannah River Plant. These particles, collected from wet-cabinet and room-air exhausts from the plutonium finishing operation (JB-Line), were between 0.4 and 36 μm in diameter. Ninety-nine of the particles were found to be aggregates of various minerals and metals, six were quartz, and six were small (less than 2-μm-diameter) pieces of iron oxide. Collectively, these particles contained less minerals and more metals than natural dusts contain. The metallic constituents included elements normally not found in dusts, e.g., chromium, nickel, copper, and zinc. Concentrations of aluminum and iron exceeded those normally found in minerals. Elemental concentrations in individual particles covered a wide range: one 2-μm-diameter particle contained 97 percent NiO, a 9-μm-diameter particle contained 72 percent Cr 2 O 3 . Although the particles were selected because they produced plutonium fission tracks, the plutonium concentration was too low to be estimated by microprobe analysis in all but a 1-μm-diameter particle. This plutonium-bearing particle contained 73 percent PuO 2 by weight in combination with Fe 2 O 3 and mica; its activity was estimated at 0.17 pCi of 239 Pu

  1. Plutonium and americium recovery from spent molten-salt-extraction salts with aluminum-magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cusick, M.J.; Sherwood, W.G.; Fitzpatrick, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Development work was performed to determine the feasibility of removing plutonium and americium from spent molten-salt-extraction (MSE) salts using Al-Mg alloys. If the product buttons from this process are compatible with subsequent aqueous processing, the complex chloride-to-nitrate aqueous conversion step which is presently required for these salts may be eliminated. The optimum alloy composition used to treat spent 8 wt % MSE salts in the past yielded poor phase-disengagement characteristics when applied to 30 mol % salts. After a limited investigation of other alloy compositions in the Al-Mg-Pu-Am system, it was determined that the Al-Pu-Am system could yield a compatible alloy. In this system, experiments were performed to investigate the effects of plutonium loading in the alloy, excess magnesium, age of the spent salt on actinide recovery, phase disengagement, and button homogeneity. Experimental results indicate that 95 percent plutonium recoveries can be attained for fresh salts. Further development is required for backlog salts generated prior to 1981. A homogeneous product alloy, as required for aqueous processing, could not be produced

  2. Plutonium use - present status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dievoet, J. van; Fossoul, E.; Jonckheere, E.; Bemden, E. van den

    1977-01-01

    Plutonium is being produced in increasing quantities in the so-called proven reactors, which are mostly of the light-water type. Evaluation of this production on a world scale shows that it would be theoretically possible to construct a large number of breeders and thus to make the best use of the intrinsic qualities of plutonium as a fissionable material, while considerably reducing the consumption of uranium. This source of plutonium is nevertheless dependent on an essential stage of the fuel cycle, namely reprocessing of irradiated fuel. The long delays in installing an adequate world reprocessing capacity are substantially weakening the prospects for the introduction of breeders. Furthermore, the critical situation as regards reprocessing may delay the development of complementary reprocessing methods for fuels with a high plutonium content and high burn-up. When it is recalled that fast reactors themselves may suffer some delay in their technological development, if only because of the intention to build power plants of very high unit capacity immediately, it must be concluded that another use will have to be considered for the plutonium available in future -use in thermal reactors, i.e. recycling. The recycling of plutonium is a well-known technique today and the objections which could be raised against it hardly stand up to analysis. Utilization of plutonium offers an appreciable saving in terms of uranium and separative work units, the consumption being of a low order of magnitude in comparison with the total amount of plutonium needed for the eventual fabrication of the first fast reactor cores. It can also be shown that immediate reprocessing of the recycling fuel is not essential for the economics of the concept. Temporary storage of recycled fuel has the advantage of concentrating plutonium in a particularly safe form, namely in irradiated plutonium-bearing fuel assemblies. Lastly, recycling offers such flexibility that it does not in practice represent

  3. Plutonium biokinetics in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popplewell, D.; Ham, G.; McCarthy, W.; Lands, C.

    1994-01-01

    By using an 'unusual' isotope it is possible to carry out experiments with plutonium in volunteers at minimal radiation dose levels. Measurements have been made of the gut transfer factor and the urinary excretion of plutonium after intravenous injection. (author)

  4. Cigarette smoke and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The overall objective of this study is to determine whether cigarette smoking increases the probability of plutonium-induced lung cancer. Initial experiments, designed to characterize the effect of chronic cigarette smoke exposure on pulmonary clearance of plutonium aerosols, are described

  5. Uranium and plutonium determinations for evaluation of high burnup fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, R.R.; Popek, R.J.; Bowers, D.L.; Essling, A.M.; Callis, E.L.; Persiani, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose of this work is to experimentally test computational methods being developed for reactor fuel operation. Described are the analytical techniques used in the determination of uranium and plutonium compositions on PWR fuel that has spanned five power cycles, culminating in 55,000 to 57,000 MWd/T burnup. Analyses have been performed on ten samples excised from selected sections of the fuel rods. Hot cell operations required the separation of fuel from cladding and the comminution of the fuel. These tasks were successfully accomplished using a SpectroMil, a ball pestle impact grinding and blending instrument manufactured by Chemplex Industries, Inc., Eastchester, New York. The fuel was dissolved using strong mineral acids and bomb dissolution techniques. Separation of the fuel from fission products was done by solvent (hexone) extraction. Fuel isotopic compositions and assays were determined by the mass spectrometric isotope dilution (MSID) method using NBS standards SRM-993 and SRM-996. Alpha spectrometry was used to determine the 238 Pu composition. Relative correlations of composition with burnup were obtained by gamma-ray spectrometry of selected fission products in the dissolved fuel

  6. Natural and anthropogenic influences on depositional architecture of the Ural Delta, Kazakhstan, northern Caspian Sea, during the past 70 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarelli, Frederico M.; Cantelli, Luigi; Barboza, Eduardo G.; Gabbianelli, Giovanni

    2017-05-01

    This paper focuses on the Ural Delta in the northern zone of the Caspian Sea, an area with particular characteristics, where intense influence from anthropogenic and natural factors exists, which acts on the fragile delta system. We built a database to integrate the data from the published sources, bathymetric survey, and recent images in the geographical information system (GIS) environment. The results were linked to the Caspian Sea level (CSL) curve, which had many variations, changing the Ural Delta system's dynamics and in its architecture. In addition, the anthropogenic changes contribute to shaping the actual Ural Delta architecture. Through the link between the results and CSL, we reconstructed an evolution model for the Ural Delta system for the last century and identified three different architectures for the Ural Delta, determined by the energy that acted on the system in the last century and by the anthropogenic changes. This work identifies six different delta phases, which are shaped by CSL changes during the last 70 years and by anthropogenic changes. The delta phases recognized are: i) a Lobate Delta phase, shaped during high CSL before 1935; ii) Natural Elongate Delta 1935-1950 formed during rapid CSL fall; iii) Anthropogenic Elongate Delta 1950-1966, formed during rapid CSL fall and after the Ural-Caspian Sea canal construction, which modified the sedimentary deposition on the delta; iv) Anthropogenic Elongate Delta 1966-1982 shaped during low CSL phase; v) Anthropogenic Elongate Delta 1982-1996 formed during a rapid CSL rise phase; and vi) Anthropogenic Elongate Delta 1996-2009 shaped during high CSL that represent the last phase and actual Ural Delta architecture.

  7. Polarographic study of the electrochemical properties of plutonium; Etude polarographique des proprietes electrochimiques du plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guichard, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    The behaviour of the different degrees of oxidation of plutonium have been studied using a falling drop mercury electrode in a non-complexing medium: dilute perchloric acid. In this medium it is possible to carry out the polarographic determination of plutonium using the reduction step situated at - 0.54 V/ECS which corresponds to the passage from the degree of oxidation(V) to the degree(III). The modifications brought about by a complexing ion, acetate, are then observed and interpreted. The existence of two plutonium(IV) acetic complexes has been shown; one is a polymerized substance. (author) [French] Le comportement des differents degres d'oxydation du plutonium est etudie a l'electrode a gouttes de mercure dans un milieu non complexant: l'acide perchlorique dilue. Il est possible dans ce milieu d'effectuer le dosage polarographique du plutonium en utilisant la vague de reduction situee a - 0.54 V/ECS qui correspond au passage du degre d'oxydation(V) au degre(III). Les modifications apportees par un ion complexant, l'acetate, sont ensuite observees et interpretees. Deux complexes acetiques du plutonium(IV) ont ete mis en evidence, dont l'un est un compose polymerise. (auteur)

  8. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume I: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    At the conclusion of the Cold War, the Department of Energy (DOE) stopped plutonium processing for nuclear weapons production. Facilities used for that purpose now hold significant quantities of plutonium in various forms. Unless properly stored and handled, plutonium can present environment, safety and health (ES ampersand H) hazards. Improperly stored plutonium poses a variety of hazards. When containers or packaging fail to fully protect plutonium metal from exposure to air, oxidation can occur and cause packaging failures and personnel contamination. Contamination can also result when plutonium solutions leak from bottles, tanks or piping. Plutonium in the form of scrap or residues generated by weapons production are often very corrosive, chemically reactive and difficult to contain. Buildings and equipment that are aging, poorly maintained or of obsolete design contribute to the overall problem. Inadvertent accumulations of plutonium of any form in sufficient quantities within facilities can result in nuclear criticality events that could emit large amounts of radiation locally. Contamination events and precursors of criticality events are causing safety and health concerns for workers at the Department's plutonium facilities. Contamination events also potentially threaten the public and the surrounding environment

  9. Search for plutonium salt deposits in the plutonium extraction batteries of the Marcoule plant (1963); Recherche de depots de sels de plutonium dans les batteries d'extraction du plutonium de l'usine de Marcoule (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzigues, H; Reneaud, J M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Production de Plutonium, Marcoule (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    This report describes a method and a special apparatus making it possible to detach the insoluble plutonium salt deposits in the extraction chain of an irradiated fuel treatment plant. The process chosen allows the detection, in the extraction batteries or in the highly active chemical engineering equipment, of plutonium quantities of a few grains. After four years operation it has been impossible to detect measurable quantities of plutonium in any part of the extraction chain. The results have been confirmed by visual examinations carried out with a specially constructed endoscope. (authors) [French] Ce rapport decrit une methode et un montage special permettant de detacher les accumulations de sels de plutonium insolubles dans les chaines d'extraction d'une usine de traitement de combustible irradie. Le procede retenu permet de reperer, dans des batteries d'extraction ou dans l'appareillage de genie chimique fortement actif, des masses de plutonium de quelques grammes. Apres quatre annees de fonctionnement, il n'a pas ete possible de deceler des quantites ponderables de plutonium en aucun endroit de la chaine d'extraction. Ces resultats ont ete confirmes par les examens visuels effectues a l'aide d'un endoscope concu specialement pour cet usage. (auteurs)

  10. Neutron diffraction and NQR study of the intermediate turn angle phase formed during AFI to AFII recording in YBa2Cu3-xAlxO6+#delta#

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brecht, E.; Schmahl, W.W.; Fuess, H.

    1997-01-01

    The reordering mechanism from the antiferromagnetic phase AFI to the antiferromagnetic phase AFII in an oxygen-deficient YBa2Cu2.94Al0.06O6+delta single crystal with an oxygen content delta=0.18 in the Cu(1) layer has been studied by neutron diffraction and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR......). The crystal orders magnetically from the paramagnetic state to the antiferromagnetic AFI state at the Neel temperature T-N=403 K with an empirical critical exponent of beta = 0.26. Reordering to the antiferromagnetic AFII state sets in at T-2 = 12 K. In both the AFI and AFII phases the ordered magnetic...... as a function of temperature. This result indicates unequivocally that the AFIAFII reordering takes place via a noncollinear intermediate turn angle phase AFI+II....

  11. Marine mollusks as bio concentrators of uranium and plutonium; Moluscos marinos como bioconcentradores de uranio y plutonio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez R, E.; Almazan T, M. G.; Escalante G, D. C., E-mail: eduardo.ordonez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2017-09-15

    The sudden presence of certain radionuclides in the marine environment has been of global concern and has raised concerns about the nature and abundance of these, in an attempt to establish dispersion patterns from their discharge points. In the particular case of our country, there are few data on the presence and concentration of alpha emitters, such as uranium and plutonium in the littorals and due to this fact there is a need to establish their reference levels in some specific points of the Mexican littoral. This work thus raises the study of part of the biota that grows and develops in sites near the sampling points. Is known that bivalve mollusks are natural bio-concentrators due to their capacity to absorb some metals dissolved in water, being able to find contaminating metals in their soft bodies, but they also accumulate large quantities when they generate their shells from dissolved carbonates that are complex with uranium and plutonium. The shells of the mollusks were studied to determine the physicochemical characteristics of their shells and the U and Pu were also separated by means of radiochemical techniques, being then electrodeposited in steel discs and evaluated by means of alpha spectroscopy. The results of the methodology prototype are presented to determine the U and Pu dispersed in the littoral by means of the analysis of some mollusks of the zone. (Author)

  12. A World made of Plutonium?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1976-01-01

    This lecture by Engelbert Broda was written for the 26th Pugwash Conference in Mühlhausen, Germany, 26 – 31 August 1976: Public doubts about nuclear energy are generally directed at the problems of routine emissions of radionuclides, of catastrophic accidents, and of terminal waste disposal. Curiously, the most important problem is not being given sufficient attention: The use of plutonium from civilian reactors fpr weapons production. According to current ideas about a nuclear future, 5000 tons (order of magnitude) of plutonium are to be made annually by year 2000, and about 10 000 tons will all the time be in circulation (transport, reprocessing, reproduction of fuel elements, etc.). It is a misconception that plutonium from power reactors is unsuitable as a nuclear explosive. 5000 tons are enough for several hundred thousand (!) of bombs, Nagasaki type. By the year 2000 maybe 40 – 50 countries will have home-made plutonium. Plutonium production and proliferation are the most serious problems in a nuclear world. (author)

  13. Using Biomolecules to Separate Plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolski, Jarrod

    Used nuclear fuel has traditionally been treated through chemical separations of the radionuclides for recycle or disposal. This research considers a biological approach to such separations based on a series of complex and interdependent interactions that occur naturally in the human body with plutonium. These biological interactions are mediated by the proteins serum transferrin and the transferrin receptor. Transferrin to plutonium in vivo and can deposit plutonium into cells after interacting with the transferrin receptor protein at the cell surface. Using cerium as a non-radioactive surrogate for plutonium, it was found that cerium(IV) required multiple synergistic anions to bind in the N-lobe of the bilobal transferrin protein, creating a conformation of the cerium-loaded protein that would be unable to interact with the transferrin receptor protein to achieve a separation. The behavior of cerium binding to transferrin has contributed to understanding how plutonium(IV)-transferrin interacts in vivo and in biological separations.

  14. Interaction of Desulfovibrio aespoeensis with plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moll, H.; Merroun, M.; Selenska-Pobell, S.; Bernhard, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Microbes are widely distributed in nature and they can strongly influence the migration of actinides in the environment. Microorganisms in concentrations of 1 x 10 3 to 5 x 10 6 cells ml -1 were estimated by Pedersen et al. in the aquifer system of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (Aespoe HRL) in Sweden. The number of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was between 10 1 to 2 x 10 4 cells ml -1 . We investigated the interaction of the SRB Desulfovibrio aespoeensis, DSM 10631 T , with plutonium. The 242 Pu was provided as a mixture of ca. 46% Pu(VI) and ca. 34% Pu(IV)-polymer. Interactions between bacteria and plutonium in mixed oxidation states were not yet intensively investigated. In this study, accumulation experiments were performed in order to obtain information about the amount of the Pu bound by bacteria in dependence on the contact time and the [Pu] initial at pH 5. We used liquid-liquid-extractions and absorption spectroscopy to determine the Pu speciation. In agreement with the results obtained with U(VI) [2] and Np(V), we found a strong dependence of the amount of accumulated Pu with [Pu] initial . Based on our results and taking into consideration the findings of Panak et al. [3], we developed a model describing the interaction of Pu(VI) and Pu(IV)- polymers with D. aespoeensis. In a first step, the Pu(VI) and Pu(IV)-polymers are bound to the biomass. The Pu(VI) is reduced to Pu(V) due to the activity of the cells within the first 24 h of contact time. Most of the formed Pu(V) dissolves due to the weak complexing properties. The dissolved Pu(V) disproportionates to Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) which are then interacting with functional groups of the cell surface structure. Indications were found also for a penetration of Pu species inside the bacterial cells. [1] Pedersen, K.: Microbial processes in radioactive waste disposal. SKB Technical Report TR-00- 04 (2000). [2] Moll, H.; Merroun, M.; Stumpf, Th.; Geipel, G.; Selenska-Pobell, S

  15. Critical experiments on single-unit spherical plutonium geometries reflected and moderated by oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1997-05-01

    Experimental critical configurations are reported for several dozen spherical and hemispherical single-unit assemblies of plutonium metal. Most were solid but many were hollow-centered, thick, shell-like geometries. All were constructed of nested plutonium (mostly 2139 Pu) metal hemispherical shells. Three kinds of critical configurations are reported. Two required interpolation and/or extrapolation of data to obtain the critical mass because reflector conditions were essentially infinite. The first finds the plutonium essentially fully reflected by a hydrogen-rich oil; the second is essentially unreflected. The third kind reports the critical oil reflector height above a large plutonium metal assembly of accurately known mass (no interpolation required) when that mass was too great to permit full oil reflection. Some configurations had thicknesses of mild steel just outside the plutonium metal, separating it from the oil. These experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory in the late 1960s. They have not been published in a form suitable for benchmark-quality comparisons against state-of-the-art computational techniques until this paper. The age of the data and other factors lead to some difficulty in reconstructing aspects of the program and may, in turn, decrease confidence in certain details. Whenever this is true, the point is acknowledged. The plutonium metal was alpha-phase 239 Pu containing 5.9 wt-% 240 Pu. All assemblies were formed by nesting 1.667-mm-thick (nominal) bare plutonium metal hemispherical shells, also called hemishells, until the desired configuration was achieved. Very small tolerance gaps machined into radial dimensions reduced the effective density a small amount in all cases. Steel components were also nested hemispherical shells; but these were nominally 3.333-mm thick. Oil was used as the reflector because of its chemical compatibility with plutonium metal

  16. Continuous precipitation process of plutonium salts; Procede continu de precipitation des sels de plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-03-01

    This work concerns the continuous precipitation process of plutonium oxalate. Investigations about the solubility of different valence states in nitric-oxalic and in nitric-sulfuric-oxalic medium lead to select the precipitation process of tetravalent plutonium oxalate. Settling velocity and granulometry of tetravalent oxalate plutonium have been studied with variation of several precipitation parameters such as: temperature, acidity, excess of oxalic acid and aging time. Then are given test results of some laboratory continuous apparatus. Conditions of operation with adopted tubular apparatus are defined in conclusion. A flow-sheet is given for a process at industrial scale. (author) [French] Cette etude porte sur la precipitation continue de l'oxalate de plutonium. L'etude de la solubilite des differentes valences du plutonium dans des milieux acides nitrique-oxalique, puis nitrique-sulfurique-oxalique conduit a choisir la precipitation de l'oxalate de plutonium tetravalent. L'etude porte ensuite sur la sedimentation et la granulometrie de l'oxalate de Pu{sup 4+} obtenue en faisant varier differents parametres de la precipitation : la temperature, l'acidite, l'exces oxalique et le temps de murissement. La derniere partie traite des resultats obtenus avec plusieurs types d'appareils continus essayes au laboratoire. En conclusion sont donnees les conditions de marche de l'appareil tubulaire adopte, ainsi qu'une extrapolation a l'echelle industrielle sous forme d'un flow-sheet. (auteur)

  17. Plutonium helps probe protein, superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Scientists are finding that plutonium can be a useful research tool that may help them answer important questions in fields as diverse as biochemistry and solid-state physics. This paper reports that U.S. research involving plutonium is confined to the Department of Energy's national laboratories and centers around nuclear weapons technology, waste cleanup and disposal, and health effects. But at Los Alamos National Laboratory, scientists also are using plutonium to probe the biochemical behavior of calmodulin, a key calcium-binding protein that mediates calcium-regulated processes in biological systems. At Argonne National Laboratory, another team is trying to learn how a superconductor's properties are affected by the 5f electrons of an actinide like plutonium

  18. Technological alternatives for plutonium transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    This paper considers alternative transport modes (air, sea, road, rail) for moving (1) plutonium from a reprocessing plant to a store or a fuel fabrication facility, and (2) MOX fuel from the latter to a reactor. These transport modes and differing forms of plutonium are considered in terms of: their proliferation resistance and safeguards; environmental and safety aspects; and economic aspects. It is tentatively proposed that the transport of plutonium could continue by air or sea where long distances are involved and by road or rail over shorter distances; this would be acceptable from the non-proliferation, environmental impact and economic aspects - there may be advantages in protection if plutonium is transported in the form of mixed oxide

  19. Power from plutonium: fast reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, J.F.W.

    1981-01-01

    Points of similarity and of difference between fast reactor fuel and fuels for AGR and PWR plants are established. The flow of uranium and plutonium in fast and thermal systems is also mentioned, establishing the role of the fast reactor as a plutonium burner. A historical perspective of fast reactors is given in which the substantial experience accumulated in test and prototype is indicated and it is noted that fast reactors have now entered the commercial phase. The relevance of the data obtained in the test and prototype reactors to the behaviour of commercial fast reactor fuel is considered. The design concepts employed in fuel are reviewed, including sections on core support styles, pin support and pin detail. This is followed by a discussion of current issues under the headings of manufacture, performance and reprocessing. This section includes a consideration of gel fuel, achievable burn-up, irradiation induced distortions and material choices, fuel form, and fuel failure mechanisms. Future development possibilities are also discussed and the Paper concludes with a view on the logic of a UK fast reactor strategy. (U.K.)

  20. Gamma spectrometric methods for measuring plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnink, R.

    1978-01-01

    Nondestructive analyses of plutonium can be made by detecting and measuring the gamma rays emitted by a sample. Although qualitative and semiquantitative assays can be performed with relative ease, only recently have methods been developed, using computer analysis techniques, that provide quantitative results. This paper reviews some new techniques developed for measuring plutonium. The features of plutonium gamma-ray spectra are reviewed and some of the computer methods used for spectrum analysis are discussed. The discussion includes a description of a powerful computer method of unfolding complex peak multiplets that uses the standard linear least-squares techniques of data analysis. This computer method is based on the generation of response profiles for the isotopes composing a plutonium sample and requires a description of the peak positions, relative intensities, and line shapes. The principles that plutonium isotopic measurements are based on are also developed, followed by illustrations of the measurement procedures as applied to the quantitative analysis of plutonium liquid and solid samples

  1. Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miner, William N

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet discusses plutonium from discovery to its production, separation, properties, fabrication, handling, and uses, including use as a reactor fuel and use in isotope power generators and neutron sources.

  2. Plutonium Vulnerability Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This Plutonium Vulnerability Management Plan describes the Department of Energy's response to the vulnerabilities identified in the Plutonium Working Group Report which are a result of the cessation of nuclear weapons production. The responses contained in this document are only part of an overall, coordinated approach designed to enable the Department to accelerate conversion of all nuclear materials, including plutonium, to forms suitable for safe, interim storage. The overall actions being taken are discussed in detail in the Department's Implementation Plan in response to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1. This is included as Attachment B

  3. Effects Influencing Plutonium-Absorber Interactions and Distributions in Routine and Upset Waste Treatment Plant Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sinkov, Sergey I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fiskum, Sandra K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report is the third in a series of analyses written in support of a plan to revise the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation Report (CSER) that is being implemented at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Criticality Safety Group. A report on the chemical disposition of plutonium in Hanford tank wastes was prepared as Phase 1 of this plan (Delegard and Jones 2015). Phase 2 is the provision of a chemistry report to describe the potential impacts on criticality safety of waste processing operations within the WTP (Freer 2014). In accordance with the request from the Environmental and Nuclear Safety Department of the WTP (Miles and Losey 2012), the Phase 2 report assessed the potential for WTP process conditions within and outside the range of normal control parameters to change the ratio of fissile material to neutron-absorbing material in the waste as it is processed with an eye towards potential implications for criticality safety. The Phase 2 study also considered the implications should WTP processes take place within the credible range of chemistry upset conditions. In the present Phase 3 report, the 28 phenomena described in the Phase 2 report were considered with respect to the disposition of plutonium and various absorber elements. The phenomena identified in the Phase 2 report are evaluated in light of the Phase 1 report and other resources to determine the impacts these phenomena might have to alter the plutonium/absorber dispositions and ratios. The outcomes of the Phase 3 evaluations then can be used to inform subsequent engineering decisions and provide reasonable paths forward to mitigate or overcome real or potential criticality concern in plant operations.

  4. Preparation of plutonium hexafluoride. Recovery of plutonium from waste dross (1962); Preparation de l'hexafluorure de plutonium. Recuperation du plutonium des scories d'elaboration (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gendre, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    The object of this work is to study the influence of various physical factors on the rate of fluorination of solid plutonium tetrafluoride by fluorine. In a horizontal oven with a circulation for pure fluorine at atmospheric pressure and 520 deg. C, at a fluorine rate of 9 litres/hour, it is possible to transform 3 g of tetrafluoride to hexafluoride with about 100 per cent transformation and a recovery yield of over 90 per cent, in 4 to 5 hours. The fluorination rate is a function of the temperature, of the fluorine flow-rate, of the crucible surface, of the depth of the tetrafluoride layer and of the reaction time. It does not depend on the diffusion of the fluorine into the solid but is determined by the reaction at the gas-solid interface and obeys the kinetic law (1 - T{sub T}){sup 1/3} = kt + 1. The existence of intermediate fluorides, in particular Pu{sub 4} F{sub 17}, is confirmed by a break in the Arrhenius plot at about 370 deg. C, by differences in the fluorination rates inside the tetrafluoride layer, and by reversible colour changes. The transformation to hexafluoride occurs with a purification with respect of the foreign elements present in the initial plutonium. Recovery of plutonium from waste dross: The study is based on the transformation of occluded plutonium particles to gaseous hexafluoride which is then decomposed thermally to the tetrafluoride which can be reintroduced directly in the production circuit. Under the conditions considered this process is not applicable industrially. After milling, it is possible to separate the dross into enriched (75 per cent Pu in 2.6 per cent by weight of dross) and depleted portions. By prolonged fluorination (16 hours) of the various fractions it is possible to recover about 80 per cent of the plutonium. A treatment plant using fluidization, as described at the end of this study, should make it possible to substantially improve the yield. (author) [French] L'objet de l'etude est l'influence des differents

  5. The benefits of an advanced fast reactor fuel cycle for plutonium management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannum, W.H.; McFarlane, H.F.; Wade, D.C.; Hill, R.N.

    1996-01-01

    The United States has no program to investigate advanced nuclear fuel cycles for the large-scale consumption of plutonium from military and civilian sources. The official U.S. position has been to focus on means to bury spent nuclear fuel from civilian reactors and to achieve the spent fuel standard for excess separated plutonium, which is considered by policy makers to be an urgent international priority. Recently, the National Research Council published a long awaited report on its study of potential separation and transmutation technologies (STATS), which concluded that in the nuclear energy phase-out scenario that they evaluated, transmutation of plutonium and long-lived radioisotopes would not be worth the cost. However, at the American Nuclear Society Annual Meeting in June, 1996, the STATS panelists endorsed further study of partitioning to achieve superior waste forms for burial, and suggested that any further consideration of transmutation should be in the context of energy production, not of waste management. 2048 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an active program for the short-term disposition of excess fissile material and a 'focus area' for safe, secure stabilization, storage and disposition of plutonium, but has no current programs for fast reactor development. Nevertheless, sufficient data exist to identify the potential advantages of an advanced fast reactor metallic fuel cycle for the long-term management of plutonium. Advantages are discussed

  6. Surplus plutonium disposition draft environmental impact statement. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    On May 22, 1997, DOE published a Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register (62 Federal Register 28009) announcing its decision to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) that would tier from the analysis and decisions reached in connection with the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic EIS (Storage and Disposition PEIS). DOE's disposition strategy allows for both the immobilization of surplus plutonium and its use as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in existing domestic, commercial reactors. The disposition of surplus plutonium would also involve disposal of the immobilized plutonium and MOX fuel (as spent nuclear fuel) in a geologic repository. The Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement analyzes alternatives that would use the immobilization approach (for some of the surplus plutonium) and the MOX fuel approach (for some of the surplus plutonium); alternatives that would immobilize all of the surplus plutonium; and the No Action Alternative. The alternatives include three disposition facilities that would be designed so that they could collectively accomplish disposition of up to 50 metric tons (55 tons) of surplus plutonium over their operating lives: (1) the pit disassembly and conversion facility would disassemble pits (a weapons component) and convert the recovered plutonium, as well as plutonium metal from other sources, into plutonium dioxide suitable for disposition; (2) the immobilization facility would include a collocated capability for converting nonpit plutonium materials into plutonium dioxide suitable for immobilization and would be located at either Hanford or SRS. DOE has identified SRS as the preferred site for an immobilization facility; (3) the MOX fuel fabrication facility would fabricate plutonium dioxide into MOX fuel

  7. Using disposable solid-phase microextraction (SPME) to determine the freely dissolved concentration of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Fang; Cui Xinyi; Wang Wei; Delgado-Moreno, Laura; Gan, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are brominated flame retardants (BFRs). The ubiquity and persistence of PBDEs in sediment have raised concerns over their environmental fate and ecological risks. Due to strong affinity for sediment organic matter, environmental fate and bioavailability of PBDEs closely depend on their phase distribution. In this study, disposable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber was used to derive the freely dissolved concentration (C free ) of PBDEs in sediment porewater as a measurement of bioavailability. The PDMS-to-water partition coefficient (log K PDMS ) was 5.46–5.83 for BDE 47, 99, and 153. In sediments, PBDEs were predominantly sorbed to the sediment phase, with C free accounting for free of PBDEs decreased as their bromination or sediment organic carbon content increased. The strong association with dissolved organic matter (DOM) implies a potential for facilitated offsite transport and dispersion in the environment that depends closely on the stability of sediment aggregates. - Highlights: ► A disposable SPME method was developed for measuring C free of PBDEs in sediment. ► C free decreased with increasing congener bromination or sediment OC content. ► C free of PBDEs accounted for DOC values suggest a high probability for DOM-facilitated offsite transport. - A SPME method based on disposable PDMS fibers was developed for measuring the freely dissolved concentration of PBDEs (C free ) in sediment porewater.

  8. Prospects for the Use of Plutonium in Reactors; Prospective d'Utilisation du Plutonium dans les Reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fossoul, E.; Haubert, P. [BELGONUCLEAIRE (Belgium); Hirschberg, D.; Morlet, E. [International Business Machines of Belgium, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    1967-09-15

    The introduction, at an increasing rate, of power reactors using slightly enriched uranium will inevitably lead to the production of considerable quantities of plutonium over the next decade. Fast reactors will not be capable of absorbing this material before 1980. The question thus arises of whether one should store the plutonium far future use in fast reactors, recycle it in existing thermal reactors, or try to sell it. The problem has been studied for an electric power generating system that does not foresee selling the plutonium produced by its reactors and does not buy plutonium outside, which enables a good approximation to be made and eliminates the major unknown quantity represented by the future market price of plutonium. Assuming within this system a programme that provides for the construction of power reactors of a given type and capacity at specific dates, the utilization of the plutonium produced can be optimized by linear programming techniques so as to minimize the discounted total cost of the power generated over a given period. A later stage consists in optimizing, by various techniques, not only the utilization but also the production of plutonium by appropriate selection of the power reactor types to be constructed. (author) [French] L'implantation, a un rythme croissant, de centrales nucleaires a uranium legerement enrichi entrainera la production ineluctable d'une quantite importante de plutonium au cours de la prochaine decennie. Les reacteurs a neutrons rapides ne seront capables d'absorber cette production qu'apres 1980. La question se pose donc de savoir s'il est preferable de stocker le plutonium en vue de son utilisation ulterieure dans les reacteurs a neutrons rapides plutot que de le recycler dans les reacteurs actuels a neutrons thermiques ou d'essayer de le vendre. Ce probleme a ete etudie dans le cadre d'un systeme de production d'energie electrique qui ne prevoirait pas la vente du plutonium produit par ses reacteurs nucleaires ni

  9. Radiological safety aspects of handling plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundararajan, A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Department of Atomic Energy in its scheme of harnessing the nuclear energy for electrical power generation and strategic applications has given a huge role to utilization of plutonium. In the power production programme, fast reactors with plutonium as fuel are expected to play a major role. This would require establishing fuel reprocessing plants to handle both thermal and fast reactor fuels. So in the nuclear fuel cycle facilities variety of chemical, metallurgical, mechanical operations have to be carried out involving significant inventories of "2"3"9 Pu and associated radionuclides. Plutonium is the most radiotoxic radionuclide and therefore any facility handling it has to be designed and operated with utmost care. Two problems of major concern in the protection of persons working in plutonium handling facilities are the internal exposure to the operating personnel from uptake of plutonium and transplutonic nuclides as they are highly radiotoxic and the radiation exposure of hands and eye lens during fuel fabrication operations especially while handling recycled high burn up plutonium. In view of the fact that annual limit for intake is very small for "2"3"9Pu and its radiation emission characteristics are such that it is a huge challenge for the health physicists to detect Pu in air and in workers. This paper discusses the principles and practices followed in providing radiological surveillance to workers in plutonium handling areas. The challenges in protecting the workers from receiving exposures to hands and eye lens in handling high burn up plutonium are also discussed. The sites having Pu fuel cycle facilities should have trained medical staff to handle cases involving excessive intake of plutonium. (author)

  10. Plutonium-induced lymphadenitis in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.; Park, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    Plutonium oxide particles accumulate in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of beagles exposed by inhalation and in the popliteal lymph nodes after subcutaneous injection in the hind paws. The sequence of histopathologic changes after phagocytosis of particles included necrosis, increased numbers of macrophages, and fibroplasia. Scar tissue eventually replaced the normal architecture of the lymph nodes and sequestered the plutonium particles from surrounding parenchyma. Electron microscopy showed that plutonium particles were aggregated in phagolysosomes of macrophages

  11. Guidelines for international plutonium management: Overview and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryson, M.C.; Fitzgerald, C.P.; Kincaid, C.

    1998-01-01

    In September, 1997, nine of the world's plutonium-using countries agreed to a set of guidelines for international plutonium management, with acceptances to be submitted to the International Atomic Energy Agency on December 1. Following three years of discussion, the guidelines provide a unified package of accepted rules for the storage, handling, and transportation of civil plutonium as well as military plutonium that has been declared as no longer required for defense purposes. New requirements include a formal declaration of national plutonium strategies, which will recognize the environmental, economic, and proliferation concerns and the consequent importance of balancing plutonium supply and demand. Nations will also make annual declaration of their non-military stockpiles of unirradiated plutonium, together with estimates of the plutonium content in spent reactor fuel. These guidelines represent the first formally accepted recognition of the need for plutonium management of this scope and could thus provide a partial basis for future monitoring and policy regimes

  12. Six-kilogram-scale electrorefining of plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, L.J.; Morgan, A.N.; Apgar, S.A. III; Christensen, D.C.

    1982-09-01

    The electrorefining of metallic plutonium scrap to produce high purity metal has been an established procedure at Los Alamos since 1964. This is a batch process and was limited to 4-kg plutonium because of criticality safety considerations. Improvements in critical mass measurements have permitted us to develop a process for 6-kg plutonium. The 6-kg process is now operational. The increased size of the process, together with other improvements which have been made, makes plutonium electrorefining the principal industrial tool for processing and purifying metallic plutonium scrap

  13. Erosional losses of fallout plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, G.R.; Hakonson, T.E.

    1987-01-01

    Plutonium from fallout after atmospheric explosion of nuclear weapons in the 1950's and 1960s is being redistributed over the landscape by soil erosion and carried on sediment by streams to oceans. Erosion rates computed with the Universal Soil Loss Equation for more than 200,000 sample points on nonfederal land across the US were used to estimate plutonium removal rates by soil erosion. On the average, only about 4% of the eroded sediment reaches the outlet of a major river. The remaining sediment is deposited en route, and because deposition is a selective process, the sediment is enriched in fine particles having the highest concentration of plutonium because of the element's strong association with clay and silt-sized sediment. Estimated enrichment ratios, sediment delivery ratios, and erosion rates were used to estimate annual delivery of fallout plutonium. These estimates ranged from 0.002% of the initial fallout plutonium inventory for the Savannah River basin to 0.01% for the Columbia River basin, to 0.02% for the Hudson and Rio Grande River basins, to 0.08% for the Mississippi River basin. If the deposition of plutonium had been uniformly 1 mCi/km 2 , the estimated plutonium activity on suspended sediment would range from about 7 fCi/g of sediment of the Savannah River basin, to 9 fCi/g for the Mississippi River basin, to 12 fCi/g for the Hudson River basin, to 14 fCi/g for the Columbia and Rio Grande River basins. 45 references, 2 figures, 17 tables

  14. Plutonium story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1981-09-01

    The first nuclear synthesis and identification (i.e., the discovery) of the synthetic transuranium element plutonium (isotope 238 Pu) and the demonstration of its fissionability with slow neutrons (isotope 239 Pu) took place at the University of California, Berkeley, through the use of the 60-inch and 37-inch cyclotrons, in late 1940 and early 1941. This led to the development of industrial scale methods in secret work centered at the University of Chicago's Metallurgical Laboratory and the application of these methods to industrial scale production, at manufacturing plants in Tennessee and Washington, during the World War II years 1942 to 1945. The chemical properties of plutonium, needed to devise the procedures for its industrial scale production, were studied by tracer and ultramicrochemical methods during this period on an extraordinarily urgent basis. This work, and subsequent investigations on a worldwide basis, have made the properties of plutonium very well known. Its well studied electronic structure and chemical properties give it a very interesting position in the actinide series of inner transition elements

  15. Plutonium research and related activities at the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, R.S.; Beard, C.A.; Barnes, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    With the end of the Cold War, the US and Russia are reducing their nuclear weapons stockpiles. What to do with the materials from thousands of excess nuclear weapons is an important international challenge. How to handle the remaining US stockpile to ensure safe storage and reliability, in light of the aging support infrastructure, is an important national challenge. To help address these challenges and related issues, the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium is working on behalf of the State of Texas with the US Department of Energy (DOE). The center directs three major programs that address the key aspects of the plutonium management issue: (1) the Communications, Education, Training and Community Involvement Program, which focuses on informing the public about plutonium and providing technical education at all levels; (2) the Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Program, which investigates the key ES and H impacts of activities related to the DOE weapons complex in Texas; and (3) the Nuclear and Other Materials Program, which is aimed at minimizing safety and proliferation risks by helping to develop and advocate safe stewardship, storage, and disposition of nuclear weapons materials. This paper provides an overview of the center's nuclear activities described in four broad categories of international activities, materials safety, plutonium storage, and plutonium disposition

  16. Separation of uranium and plutonium isotopes for measurement by multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinelli, R.E.; Hamilton, T.F.; Kehl, S.R.; Williams, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopes in coral soils, contaminated by nuclear weapons testing in the northern Marshall Islands, were isolated by ion-exchange chromatography and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The soil samples were spiked with 233 U and 242 Pu tracers, dissolved in minerals acids, and U and Pu isotopes isolated and purified on commercially available ion-exchange columns. The ion-exchange technique employed a TEVA R column coupled to a UTEVA R column. U and Pu isotope fractions were then further isolated using separate elution schemes, and the purified fractions containing U and Pu isotopes analyzed sequentially using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MCICP-MS). High precision measurements of 234 U/ 235 U, 238 U/ 235 U, 236 U/ 235 U, and 240 Pu/ 239 Pu in soil samples were attained using the described methodology and instrumentation, and provide a basis for conducting more detailed assessments of the behavior and transfer of uranium and plutonium in the environment. (author)

  17. An Improved Plutonium Trifluoride Precipitation Flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, H.D.

    2001-06-26

    This report discusses results of the plutonium trifluoride two-stage precipitation study. A series of precipitation experiments was used to identify the significant process variables affecting precipitation performance. A mathematical model of the precipitation process was developed which is based on the formation of plutonium fluoride complexes. The precipitation model relates all process variables, in a single equation, to a single parameter which can be used to control the performance of the plutonium trifluoride precipitation process. Recommendations have been made which will optimize the FB-Line plutonium trifluoride precipitation process.

  18. An Improved Plutonium Trifluoride Precipitation Flowsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, H.D.

    2001-01-01

    This report discusses results of the plutonium trifluoride two-stage precipitation study. A series of precipitation experiments was used to identify the significant process variables affecting precipitation performance. A mathematical model of the precipitation process was developed which is based on the formation of plutonium fluoride complexes. The precipitation model relates all process variables, in a single equation, to a single parameter which can be used to control the performance of the plutonium trifluoride precipitation process. Recommendations have been made which will optimize the FB-Line plutonium trifluoride precipitation process

  19. Plutonium valence state distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1974-01-01

    A calculational method for ascertaining equilibrium valence state distributions of plutonium in acid solutions as a function of the plutonium oxidation number and the solution acidity is illustrated with an example. The method may be more practical for manual use than methods based upon polynomial equations. (T.G.)

  20. PRISM reactor. An option for plutonium disposition?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehlinger, Sebastian; Friess, Friederike; Kuett, Moritz [IANUS, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) is sodium cooled fast reactor model. The energy output depends on the core configuration, however with an energy output of approximately 300 MWe, the PRISM reactor belongs to the class of small modular reactors. Beside using the reactor as a breeder reactor or for the transmutation of nuclear waste, it might also be used as a burner reactor for separated plutonium. This includes for example U.S.-American excess weapon-grade plutonium as well as separated reactor-grade plutonium. Recently, there has been an ongoing discussion in GB to use the PRISM reactor to dispose their excess civilian plutonium. Depending on the task, the core configuration varies slightly. We will present different layouts and the matching MCNP models, these models can then be used to conduct depletion calculations. From these results, analysis of the change in the plutonium isotopics in the spent fuel, the amount of fissioned plutonium, and the possible annual plutonium throughputs is possible.

  1. The first milligrams of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1996-01-01

    This paper relates the discovery of the different plutonium chemical extraction processes in their historical context. The first experiments started during the second world war in 1942 with the American ''Metallurgical Laboratory'' project which brought together Arthur Compton, Enrico Fermi and Glenn Seaborg. During the same period, a competitive English-Canadian project, the ''Montreal Project'', was carried out to test different plutonium solvent extraction techniques. The author participated in both projects and joined the CEA in 1946, where he was in charge of the uranium and plutonium chemistry. By the end of 1949, his team could isolate the first milligrams of French plutonium from uranium oxide pellets of the ZOE reactor. In the beginning of 1952 he developed with his team the PUREX process. (J.S.)

  2. Plutonium production and utilization forecasts in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haijtink, B.

    1976-01-01

    The planned accelerated growth of nuclear energy generation in the near future will lead to a large production of plutonium in the thermal reactors. Therefore, up to 1985, the major part of the available plutonium will be plutonium recovered from spent uranium-metal, particularly in the United Kingdom and in France. Because of the low demand for fuelling the fast breeder reactors within the near future, a surplus of fissile plutonium will be accumulated in Europe. Even if the planned availability of the oxide reprocessing capacity will be delayed with two or three years, a plutonium surplus will still exist in Europe, e.g.; in 1985: 25-20 tons. On longer term, up to 2000, the plutonium production in thermal reactors will be sufficient to meet the estimated demand for fast breeder reactors at their commercial introduction foreseen for the nineties. That means that all the plutonium surplus needs not to be stocked for use in fast breeder reactors later on but could be recycled in thermal reactors. The magnitude of the available fissionable materials give an idea of the importance to promote, on an industrial scale, the plutonium recycling technology

  3. Plutonium titration by controlled potential coulometry; Dosage du plutonium par coulometrie a potentiel impose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leguay, N.

    2011-07-01

    The LAMMAN (Nuclear Materials Metrology Laboratory) is the support laboratory of the CETAMA (Analytical Method Committee), whose two main activities are developing analytic methods, and making and characterizing reference materials. The LAMMAN chose to develop the controlled potential coulometry because it is a very accurate analytical technique which allows the connection between the quantity of element electrolysed to the quantity of electricity measured thanks to the Faraday's law: it does not require the use of a chemical standard. This method was first used for the plutonium titration and was developed in the Materials Analysis and Metrology Laboratory (LAMM), for upgrading its performances and developing it to the titration of other actinides. The equipment and the material used were developed to allow the work in confined atmosphere (in a glove box), with all the restrictions involved. Plutonium standard solutions are used to qualify the method, and in particular to do titrations with an uncertainty better than 0.1 %. The present study allowed making a bibliographic research about controlled potential coulometry applied to the actinides (plutonium, uranium, neptunium, americium and curium). A full procedure was written to set all the steps of plutonium titration, from the preparation of samples to equipments storage. A method validation was done to check the full procedure, and the experimental conditions: working range, uncertainty, performance... Coulometric titration of the plutonium from pure solution (without interfering elements) was developed to the coulometric titration of the plutonium in presence of uranium, which allows to do accurate analyses for the analyses of some parts of the reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel. The possibility of developing this method to other actinides than plutonium was highlighted thanks to voltammetric studies, like the coulometric titration of uranium with a working carbon electrode in sulphuric medium. (author)

  4. Production of Plutonium Metal from Aqueous Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orth, D.A.

    2003-01-16

    The primary separation of plutonium from irradiated uranium by the Purex solvent extraction process at the Savannah River Plant produces a dilute plutonium solution containing residual fission products and uranium. A cation exchange process is used for concentration and further decontamination of the plutonium, as the first step in the final preparation of metal. This paper discusses the production of plutonium metal from the aqueous solutions.

  5. Automation of plutonium spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, J.J.; Boisde, G.; Goujon de Beauvivier, M.; Chevalier, G.; Isaac, M.

    1980-01-01

    Instrumentation was designed and constructed for automatic control of plutonium by molecular absorption spectrophotometry, on behalf of the reprocessing facilities, to meet two objectives: on-line measurement, of the valency state of plutonium, on by-pass, with the measured concentration covering the process concentration range up to a few mg.l -1 ; laboratory measurement of plutonium adjusted to valency VI, with operation carried out using a preparative system meeting the required containment specifications. For this two objectives, the photometer, optical cell connections are made by optical fibers resistant to β, γ radiation. Except this characteristic the devices are different according to the quality required for result [fr

  6. Plutonium Immobilization Program cold pour tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovis, G.L.; Stokes, M.W.; Smith, M.E.; Wong, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) is a joint venture between the Savannah River Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to carry out the disposition of excess weapons-grade plutonium. This program uses the can-in-canister (CIC) approach. CIC involves encapsulating plutonium in ceramic forms (or pucks), placing the pucks in sealed stainless steel cans, placing the cans in long cylindrical magazines, latching the magazines to racks inside Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters, and filling the DWPF canisters with high-level waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it attractive for reuse. At present, the DWPF pours glass into empty canisters. In the CIC approach, the addition of a stainless steel rack, magazines, cans, and ceramic pucks to the canisters introduces a new set of design and operational challenges: All of the hardware installed in the canisters must maintain structural integrity at elevated (molten-glass) temperatures. This suggests that a robust design is needed. However, the amount of material added to the DWPF canister must be minimized to prevent premature glass cooling and excessive voiding caused by a large internal thermal mass. High metal temperatures, minimizing thermal mass, and glass flow paths are examples of the types of technical considerations of the equipment design process. To determine the effectiveness of the design in terms of structural integrity and glass-flow characteristics, full-scale testing will be conducted. A cold (nonradioactive) pour test program is planned to assist in the development and verification of a baseline design for the immobilization canister to be used in the PIP process. The baseline design resulting from the cold pour test program and CIC equipment development program will provide input to Title 1 design for second-stage immobilization. The cold pour tests will be conducted in two

  7. Civil plutonium amounts in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naudet, G.

    1994-01-01

    The experience of plutonium reprocessing in water reactors is positive and today the use of this nuclear fuel is at industrial level. Plutonium quantities in spent fuel go on increasing, plutonium stock coming from reprocessing can be controlled: according to conjuncture, it will evolve by stabilization or decreasing at the beginning of next century

  8. Geomorphology of plutonium in the Northern Rio Grande

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, W.L. [Arizona Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept., of Geography

    1993-03-01

    Nearly all of the plutonium in the natural environment of the Northern Rio Grande is associated with soils and sediment, and river processes account for most of the mobility of these materials. A composite regional budget for plutonium based on multi-decadal averages for sediment and plutonium movement shows that 90 percent of the plutonium moving into the system is from atmospheric fallout. The remaining 10 percent is from releases at Los Alamos. Annual variation in plutonium flux and storage exceeds 100 percent. The contribution to the plutonium budget from Los Alamos is associated with relatively coarse sediment which often behaves as bedload in the Rio Grande. Infusion of these materials into the main stream were largest in 1951, 1952, 1957, and 1968. Because of the schedule of delivery of plutonium to Los Alamos for experimentation and weapons manufacturing, the latter two years are probably the most important. Although the Los Alamos contribution to the entire plutonium budget was relatively small, in these four critical years it constituted 71--86 percent of the plutonium in bedload immediately downstream from Otowi.

  9. Geomorphology of plutonium in the Northern Rio Grande

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, W.L.

    1993-03-01

    Nearly all of the plutonium in the natural environment of the Northern Rio Grande is associated with soils and sediment, and river processes account for most of the mobility of these materials. A composite regional budget for plutonium based on multi-decadal averages for sediment and plutonium movement shows that 90 percent of the plutonium moving into the system is from atmospheric fallout. The remaining 10 percent is from releases at Los Alamos. Annual variation in plutonium flux and storage exceeds 100 percent. The contribution to the plutonium budget from Los Alamos is associated with relatively coarse sediment which often behaves as bedload in the Rio Grande. Infusion of these materials into the main stream were largest in 1951, 1952, 1957, and 1968. Because of the schedule of delivery of plutonium to Los Alamos for experimentation and weapons manufacturing, the latter two years are probably the most important. Although the Los Alamos contribution to the entire plutonium budget was relatively small, in these four critical years it constituted 71--86 percent of the plutonium in bedload immediately downstream from Otowi

  10. Optimization of a radiochemistry method for plutonium determination in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerchetti, Maria L.; Arguelles, Maria G.

    2005-01-01

    Plutonium has been widely used for civilian an military activities. Nevertheless, the methods to control work exposition have not evolved in the same way, remaining as one of the major challengers for the radiological protection practice. Due to the low acceptable incorporation limit, the usual determination is based on indirect methods in urine samples. Our main objective was to optimize a technique used to monitor internal contamination of workers exposed to Plutonium isotopes. Different parameters were modified and their influence on the three steps of the method was evaluated. Those which gave the highest yield and feasibility were selected. The method involves: 1-) Sample concentration (coprecipitation); 2-) Plutonium purification; and 3-) Source preparation by electrodeposition. On the coprecipitation phase, changes on temperature and concentration of the carrier were evaluated. On the ion-exchange separation, changes on the type of the resin, elution solution for hydroxylamine (concentration and volume), length and column recycle were evaluated. Finally, on the electrodeposition phase, we modified the following: electrolytic solution, pH and time. Measures were made by liquid scintillation counting and alpha spectrometry (PIPS). We obtained the following yields: 88% for coprecipitation (at 60 C degree with 2 ml of CaHPO 4 ), 71% for ion-exchange (resins AG 1x8 Cl - 100-200 mesh, hydroxylamine 0.1N in HCl 0.2N as eluent, column between 4.5 and 8 cm), and 93% for electrodeposition (H 2 SO 4 -NH 4 OH, 100 minutes and pH from 2 to 2.8). The expand uncertainty was 30% (NC 95%), the decision threshold (Lc) was 0.102 Bq/L and the minimum detectable activity was 0.218 Bq/L of urine. We obtained an optimized method to screen workers exposed to Plutonium. (author)

  11. The low-temperature structures of Hgsub(3-delta)SbF6 and Hgsub(3-delta)TaF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tun, Z.; Brown, I.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Hg chains in both Hgsub(3-delta)SbF 6 and Hgsub(3-delta)TaF 6 order below room temperature. Down to about 190 K the ordering results from the interaction between parallel chains. It is short range and is different for the two compounds. Below 190 K both compounds transform to an isostructural long-range-ordered phase which is driven by the interaction between perpendicular chains. The structure of this phase in both compounds has been determined. Hgsub(3-delta)SbF 6 at 173 K, delta=0.134(1), Msub(r)=810.6(2). It is monoclinic but pseudotetragonal with I4 1 /amd, a=7.655(1), c=12.558(1) A, V=735.9(2) A 3 , Z=4, Dsub(x)=7.314(3) Mg m -3 , graphite-monochromated Mo Kα radiation, lambda=0.71069 A, μ=64.8 mm -1 , F(000)=1337.1(3). Hgsub(3-delta)TaF 6 at 150 K is isostructural but has delta=0.142(1), Msub(r)=868.2(2), a=7.634(1), c=12.610(2) A, V=734.9(2) A, Dsub(x)=7.844(3) Mg m -3 , μ=76.4 mm -1 , F(000)=1422.6(3). Comparison of the low-temperature structures with those at room temperature shows that the thermal contraction results from the shortening of interatomic distances associated with the weak bonds, with the result that the MF 6 (M=Sb, Ta) host lattice shrinks more than the Hg chains. Variation of the atomic displacement parameters with temperature indicates that the large librational displacements of the MF 6 ion result from thermal motion rather than static disorder. (orig.)

  12. Experimental Studies on Plutonium Kinetics in Marine Biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, S.; Heyraud, M.; Beasley, T.M.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were undertaken to measure plutonium flux through marine organisms and to clarify the pathways by which this important element is cycled in the marine environment. The use of a specially prepared isotope, plutonium-237, allowed measurements to be made with standard Nal(Tl) scintillation techniques. Mussels, shrimp and worms were allowed to accumulate plutonium-237 from sea water for up to 25 days. Accumulation by shrimp was relatively slow and the degree of uptake was strongly influenced by moulting. Cast moults contained large fractions of the shrimps ' plutonium content, indicating the high affinity of plutonium for surface areas. Only small amounts of the isotope in the moult are lost to water; hence, moulting is considered to be an important biological parameter in the biogeochemical cycling of plutonium. Mussels attained higher concentration factors than shrimp with most of the accumulated isotope (> 80%) located in the shell. Byssus threads often contained large fractions of the mussels' plutonium-237 content and reached concentration factors as high as 4100. Worms readily accumulated plutonium-237 in either the +4 or +6 state, reaching concentration factors of approximately 200, Retention studies indicated a relatively slow loss of plutonium-237 from all animals studied. In the case of mussels, a computed half-time for a large fraction of the animals plutonium content was of the order of 2 years. The more rapid loss from shrimp (Tb 1/2 = 1.5 months) was due principally to the large fraction of plutonium lost at moult. Food chain studies with shrimp indicated that tissue build-up via plutonium ingestion would be a slow process. Total excretion was not entirely a result of passing contaminated food through the gut; approximately 15% of the ingested plutonium was removed from the contaminated food and subsequently excreted by processes other than defaecation of labelled food. Ratios of four different plutonium isotopes used in

  13. Experimental studies on plutonium kinetics in marine biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, S.; Heyraud, M.; Beasley, T.M.

    1975-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were undertaken to measure plutonium flux through marine organisms and to clarify the pathways by which this important element is cycled in the marine environment. The use of a specially prepared isotope, plutonium-237, allowed measurements to be made with standard NaI(Tl) scintillation techniques. Mussels, shrimp and worms were allowed to accumulate plutonium-237 from seawater for up to 25 days. Accumulation by shrimp was relatively slow and the degree of uptake was strongly influenced by moulting. Cast moults contained large fractions of the shrimps' plutonium content, indicating the high affinity of plutonium for surface areas. Only small amounts of the isotope in the moult are lost to water; hence, moulting is considered to be an important biological parameter in the biogeochemical cycling of plutonium. Mussels attained higher concentration factors than shrimp with most of the accumulated isotope (>80%) located in the shell. Byssus threads often contained large fractions of the mussels' plutonium-237 content and reached concentration factors as high as 4100. Worms readily accumulated plutonium-237 in either the +4 or +6 state, reaching concentration factors of approximately 200. Retention studies indicated a relatively slow loss of plutonium-237 from all animals studied. In the case of mussels, a computed half-time for a large fraction of the animals' plutonium content was of the order of 2 years. The more rapid loss from shrimp (Tbsub(1/2)=1.5 months) was due principally to the large fraction of plutonium lost at moult. Food chain studies with shrimp indicated that tissue build-up via plutonium ingestion would be a slow process. Total excretion was not entirely a result of passing contaminated food through the gut; approximately 15% of the ingested plutonium was removed from the contaminated food and subsequently excreted by processes other than defaecation of labelled food. Ratios of four different plutonium isotopes used in the

  14. The MacDonald and savage titrimetric procedure for plutonium scaled-down to the milligram level: Automated procedure for routine analysis of safeguards samples containing 2 to 5 mg plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronesch, K.; Jammet, G.; Berger, J.; Doubek, N.; Bagliano, G.; Deron, S.

    1992-08-01

    A selective titrimetric procedure directly applicable to both input and product solutions from fast reactor fuel reprocessing was set up by MacDonald and Savage and scaled down to 3 mg of plutonium in sample aliquots at the request of the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory (SAL) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which needed to replace its silver (II) oxide titration procedure by a more selective electrochemical method. Although the procedure is very selective the following species still interfere: Vanadates (almost quantitatively), Neptunium (one electron exchange per mole); Nitrites, Fluorosilicates and Iodates present in mg amount yield slight biases. This paper describes the fully automatized procedure presently applied in SAL for the routine determination of 2 to 5 mg plutonium dissolved in nitric acid solution. The method allows the unattended analysis of 20 aliquots within a five hour period. The equipment including the reagent distribution system, the sample changer and the control units are introduced and the principle design of the software is shortly described. Safety requirements have been addressed and are also reviewed in the report. Results obtained on standard reference materials, international intercomparison samples and actual safeguards samples routinely analyzed with the proposed procedure are presented and compared with results achieved with the semiautomatic mode to demonstrate the performance. International requirements to reduce the amount of radioactive materials in waste will certainly lead to a further reduction of the amount of plutonium in one aliquot. Some future perspective to titrate 1 mg samples are presented in the discussion. 12 refs, 10 figs, 8 tabs

  15. DELTAS: A new Global Delta Sustainability Initiative (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.

    2013-12-01

    Deltas are economic and environmental hotspots, food baskets for many nations, home to a large part of the world population, and hosts of exceptional biodiversity and rich ecosystems. Deltas, being at the land-water interface, are international, regional, and local transport hubs, thus providing the basis for intense economic activities. Yet, deltas are deteriorating at an alarming rate as 'victims' of human actions (e.g. water and sediment reduction due to upstream basin development), climatic impacts (e.g. sea level rise and flooding from rivers and intense tropical storms), and local exploration (e.g. sand or aggregates, groundwater and hydrocarbon extraction). Although many efforts exist on individual deltas around the world, a comprehensive global delta sustainability initiative that promotes awareness, science integration, data and knowledge sharing, and development of decision support tools for an effective dialogue between scientists, managers and policy makers is lacking. Recently, the international scientific community proposed to establish the International Year of Deltas (IYD) to serve as the beginning of such a Global Delta Sustainability Initiative. The IYD was proposed as a year to: (1) increase awareness and attention to the value and vulnerability of deltas worldwide; (2) promote and enhance international and regional cooperation at the scientific, policy, and stakeholder level; and (3) serve as a launching pad for a 10-year committed effort to understand deltas as complex socio-ecological systems and ensure preparedness in protecting and restoring them in a rapidly changing environment. In this talk, the vision for such an international coordinated effort on delta sustainability will be presented as developed by a large number of international experts and recently funded through the Belmont Forum International Opportunities Fund. Participating countries include: U.S., France, Germany, U.K., India, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Brazil, Bangladesh

  16. Specification analysis of plutonium fuels : a potentiometric method for the determination of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Natarajan, P.R.

    1977-01-01

    A potentiometric method for the routine determination of plutonium in the specification analysis of plutonium fuels is described. Plutonium is oxidized to Pu(VI) with AgO and Pu(VI) is reduced with Fe(II) after the destruction of excess AgO with sulphamic acid. The excess Fe(II) is titrated potentiometrically against K 2 Cr 2 O 7 , the titration being carried out by adding a concentrated titrant solution from a weight burette and a suitably diluted solution from another weight burette near the end. The overall relative standard deviation obtained in 326 analyses of a working standard solution by eight experimenters is 0.14 percent. (author)

  17. Plutonium distribution in various components of natural organic matters and their role in plutonium migration in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlotskaya, F.I.; Goryachenkova, T.A.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to ascertain the links of plutonium with various components of the organic matter of different types of soils and their role in its migration in soils. The test objects were typical soils of forest and forest-steppe zones: sod-podzolic, gray forest, and leached chernozem contaminated with plutonium under laboratory conditions and stored in the air-dried state for three years, as also chernozem leached from an experimental site where agricultural plants were grown for a long time. The plutonium content in the fractions isolated from the contaminated soils was determined by its direct coprecipitation with microgram quantities of cerium hydroxide. The chemical yield of plutonium was determined by adding to a solution aliquot, equal to the analysis aliquot in volume, a known amount of plutonium and by its isolation under identical conditions. The ..gamma..-radiation of plutonium isolated on a nuclear filter with a pore size less than or equal to 15 ..mu..m was measured on a Protoka type gas flow counter.

  18. Subsurface Monitor for Dissolved Inorganic Carbon at Geological Sequestration Site Phase 1 SBIR Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng Wu

    2012-08-03

    Phase I research of this SBIR contract has yielded anticipated results and enable us to develop a practical new instrument to measure the Dissolved Inorganic Carbons (DIC) as well as Supercritical (SC) CO2 in underground brine water at higher sensitivity, lower cost, higher frequency and longer period of time for the Monitoring, Verification & Accounting (MVA) of CO2 sequestration as well as Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). We show that reduced cost and improved performance are possible; both future and emerging market exist for the proposed new instrument.

  19. A rapid method for determining the relative solubility of plutonium aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miglio, J.J.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Brooks, A.L.

    1977-01-01

    An in vitro system for rapidly determining the relative solubilities of plutonium-containing aerosols produced at various temperatures has been developed. Aerosols were prepared by nebulizing a solution of Pu IV in 1 M HCl and by subsequent heating at 50, 325, 600, 900, 1150 and 1300 degrees C. These aerosols were then evaluated as to relative solubility and the results compared with in vivo data from beagle dogs and Chinese hamsters. Aerosol samples from animal inhalation exposures were collected on filters and a section was sandwiched between 100 nm membranes held in a two-piece, cylindrical polyethylene holder. The holder and filter were placed in a container of solvent and stirred gently, after which the filter and solvent were separately analyzed for Pu. The effects of solvent composition, volume and temperature as well as immersion time were investigated. The results showed that using a solvent of 0.1 N HCl at 23 degrees C and an immersion time of 2 hr dissolved a sufficient amount of plutonium as to be easily assayed with a liquid scintillation counter and will provide a rapid estimate of the solubility rate of the aerosol. The in vivo and in vitro results were in relative agreement; as the production temperature of the aerosol increased, the solubility decreased. (author)

  20. Electrochemistry of plutonium in molten halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCurry, L.E.; Moy, G.M.M.; Bowersox, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    The electrochemistry of plutonium in molten halides is of technological importance as a method of purification of plutonium. Previous authors have reported that plutonium can be purified by electrorefining impure plutonium in various molten haldies. Work to eluciate the mechanism of the plutonium reduction in molten halides has been limited to a chronopotentiometric study in LiCl-KCl. Potentiometric studies have been carried out to determine the standard reduction potential for the plutonium (III) couple in various molten alkali metal halides. Initial cyclic voltammetric experiments were performed in molten KCL at 1100 K. A silver/silver chloride (10 mole %) in equimolar NaCl-KCl was used as a reference electrode. Working and counter electrodes were tungsten. The cell components and melt were contained in a quartz crucible. Background cyclic voltammograms of the KCl melt at the tungsten electrode showed no evidence of electroactive impurities in the melt. Plutonium was added to the melt as PuCl/sub 3/, which was prepared by chlorination of the oxide. At low concentrations of PuCl/sub 3/ in the melt (0.01-0.03 molar), no reduction wave due to the reduction of Pu(III) was observed in the voltammograms up to the potassium reduction limit of the melt. However on scan reversal after scanning into the potassium reduction limit a new oxidation wave was observed

  1. The development of a laterally confined laboratory fan delta under sediment supply reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Siqiang; Wu, Xi; Xu, Shun; Li, Zhangyong

    2016-03-01

    In previous fan delta experiments, the effect of lateral confinement was generally ignored as these fans were usually unconfined with semiconical geometries. However, in gorge areas, fan development is usually laterally confined by valley walls. This study investigates autogenic processes of fan deltas in a laterally confined experimental tank. The experiment is divided into three phases. The sediment supply is held constant within each phase, so the autogenic processes of the fan are separated from the allogenic forcings. Results indicate that laterally confined fan deltas have higher progradation and aggradation potential, more regular channel braiding, and more even transverse sedimentation than unconfined fans. Besides, responses of fan deltas to sediment supply reduction are investigated in this research. At the initiation of the second and third phases, sediment feed rates are instantaneously reduced so that the allogenic forcings are predominant. Observations show that under sediment supply reduction, channelization on fan deltas are more pronounced and durations of the fluvial cycles are longer. The adjustment of fan morphology becomes slower as the self-regulation capacity of the fan decreases with reduced sediment supply.

  2. Plutonium Speciation, Solubilization and Migration in Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, M.; Runde, W.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes research completed in the first half of a three-year project. As outlined in the authors' proposal they are focusing on (1) characterizing the plutonium at an actinide contaminated site, RFETS, including determining the origin, dispersion, and speciation of the plutonium, (2) studying environmentally important plutonium complexes, primarily hydroxides and carbonates, and (3) examining the interactions of plutonium species with manganese minerals. In the first year the authors focused on site based studies. This year they continue to characterize samples from the RFETS, study the formation and structural and spectroscopic features of environmentally relevant Pu species, and begin modeling the environmental behavior of plutonium

  3. Recent trends of plutonium facilities and their control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, T [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1974-02-01

    Much interest has been focussed on Pu recycle since the oil crisis because of an expected shortage of enriched uranium. Plutonium handling techniques and plutonium fuel fabricating facilities should be developed to meet the future demand of plutonium, but the radioactive property of plutonium to be reprocessed from spent fuel and recycled plutonium is remarkably different, and it has to be handled safely. Technical criteria for plutonium facilities are specified in the USAEC regulatory guides and other rules. Some of these criteria are location condition, quality of confinement, protection against accidents and so on. The control conditions for plutonium facilities are exposure control, criticality control, measurement control and new system of safeguard. These problems are under development to meet the future requirement for the safe handling of Pu material.

  4. Plutonium Oxide Process Capability Work Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, David E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tingey, Joel M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-02-28

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked to develop a Pilot-scale Plutonium-oxide Processing Unit (P3U) providing a flexible capability to produce 200g (Pu basis) samples of plutonium oxide using different chemical processes for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. Materials produced can also be used as exercise and reference materials.

  5. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 1: Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, D.L.; Sauerbrun, T.J.

    1993-06-01

    The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate dispositioning options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) assisted NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the dispositioning options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. Additionally, the INEL investigated the feasibility of using plutonium fuels (without uranium) for disposal in existing light water reactors and provided a preconceptual analysis for a reactor specifically designed for destruction of weapons-grade plutonium. This four-volume report was prepared for NAS to document the findings of these studies. Volume 2 evaluates 12 plutonium dispositioning options. Volume 3 considers a concept for a low-temperature, low-pressure, low-power-density, low-coolant-flow-rate light water reactor that quickly destroys plutonium without using uranium or thorium. This reactor concept does not produce electricity and has no other mission than the destruction of plutonium. Volume 4 addresses neutronic performance, fabrication technology, and fuel performance and compatibility issues for zirconium-plutonium oxide fuels and aluminum-plutonium metallic fuels. This volumes gives summaries of Volumes 2--4

  6. Plutonium assay of large waste burial containers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggard, D.L.; Newman, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    As one phase of an upgrade program at one of the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory facilities, two plutonium glovebox hoods were replaced. They were dismantled, packaged in plastic for contamination control, and loaded into waste burial boxes. All of the plutonium-contaminated waste material from the two glovebox hoods was placed into six stainless steel boxes with identification letters A through F. Boxes A through E have 104.8- x 196.2- x 119.4-cm i.d.'s. Box F has an i.d. of 154.9 x 266.7 x 192.4 cm. The loaded boxes were assayed for plutonium content using both neutron and gamma-ray techniques. The difference between the results were greater than anticipated. Because of the importance of accurate plutonium assay measurements, additional measurements of box contents were made using a variety of techniques and assumptions including downloading of boxes and measurement of individual packages. These measurements have shown that a far-field, gamma-ray assay of a loaded waste box usually provides adequate measurement of low-density plutonium content, such as that found in packages of plastic, cellulose, and clothing. Comparing the far-field assays of the loaded waste boxes to the quantities determined by the assays of the downloaded packages resulted in good agreement between the two methods for boxes with low attenuation. Based on these results, it was concluded that it was valid to use the far-field assay results for the boxes that were not downloaded

  7. VARIABILITY STUDY TO DETERMINE THE SOLUBILITY OF IMPURITIES IN PLUTONIUM-BEARING, LANTHANIDE BOROSILICATE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K; Elizabeth Hoffman, E; Charles Crawford, C; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; James Marra, J

    2007-09-26

    -} concentrations were well below their target values for all of the study glasses. This is likely due to volatilization of these species during melting of the glass batch. Note that the degree of volatilization that occurred in this crucible-scale study may differ from the full-scale melter. The measured HfO{sub 2} concentrations were below their target values for all of the surrogate glasses. It is likely that for HfO{sub 2}, the solubility limit in the glass was exceeded and some of the HfO{sub 2} batch material remained in the bottom of the crucibles after pouring the glasses. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results indicated that some crystalline HfO2 remained in some of the surrogate glasses with the lowest concentration of impurities. No other crystalline phases were identified. The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results showed that all 60 of the surrogate glass compositions tested were very durable, regardless of thermal history, with the highest normalized release for boron being 0.041 g/L. The pH of the leachate solutions was generally lower than that of conventional waste glasses due to the lack of alkali in the LaBS glass, which likely impacted the PCT results. The normalized release rates for the elements measured were generally too small to attempt to correlate the results with the compositions of the test glasses. The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure results showed that no hazardous metals were leached from the surrogate glasses in any measurable concentration. A plutonium-containing crystalline phase with a cross-shaped morphology was identified via SEM in the glasses fabricated with plutonium oxide. This phase was identified in a previous study of plutonium-bearing LaBS glasses and may provide an opportunity to intentionally crystallize some of the plutonium oxide into a highly insoluble form with an intrinsic neutron absorber. Additional work is necessary to better characterize the influence that this phase has on durability of

  8. Differential entrainment of neuroelectric delta oscillations in developmental dyslexia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fruzsina Soltész

    Full Text Available Oscillatory entrainment to the speech signal is important for language processing, but has not yet been studied in developmental disorders of language. Developmental dyslexia, a difficulty in acquiring efficient reading skills linked to difficulties with phonology (the sound structure of language, has been associated with behavioural entrainment deficits. It has been proposed that the phonological 'deficit' that characterises dyslexia across languages is related to impaired auditory entrainment to speech at lower frequencies via neuroelectric oscillations (<10 Hz, 'temporal sampling theory'. Impaired entrainment to temporal modulations at lower frequencies would affect the recovery of the prosodic and syllabic structure of speech. Here we investigated event-related oscillatory EEG activity and contingent negative variation (CNV to auditory rhythmic tone streams delivered at frequencies within the delta band (2 Hz, 1.5 Hz, relevant to sampling stressed syllables in speech. Given prior behavioural entrainment findings at these rates, we predicted functionally atypical entrainment of delta oscillations in dyslexia. Participants performed a rhythmic expectancy task, detecting occasional white noise targets interspersed with tones occurring regularly at rates of 2 Hz or 1.5 Hz. Both groups showed significant entrainment of delta oscillations to the rhythmic stimulus stream, however the strength of inter-trial delta phase coherence (ITC, 'phase locking' and the CNV were both significantly weaker in dyslexics, suggestive of weaker entrainment and less preparatory brain activity. Both ITC strength and CNV amplitude were significantly related to individual differences in language processing and reading. Additionally, the instantaneous phase of prestimulus delta oscillation predicted behavioural responding (response time for control participants only.

  9. Screening study for evaluation of the potential for system 80+ to consume excess plutonium - Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    As part of the U.S. effort to evaluate technologies offering solutions for the safe disposal or utilization of surplus nuclear materials, the fiscal year 1993 Energy and Water Appropriations legislation provided the Department of Energy (DOE) the necessary funds to conduct multi-phased studies to determine the technical feasibility of using reactor technologies for the triple mission of burning weapons grade plutonium, producing tritium for the existing smaller weapons stockpile, and generating commercial electricity. DOE limited the studies to five advanced reactor designs. Among the technologies selected is the ABB-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) System 80+. The DOE study, currently in Phase ID, is proceeding with a more detailed evaluation of the design's capability for plutonium disposition

  10. Screening study for evaluation of the potential for system 80+ to consume excess plutonium - Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    As part of the U.S. effort to evaluate technologies offering solutions for the safe disposal or utilization of surplus nuclear materials, the fiscal year 1993 Energy and Water Appropriations legislation provided the Department of Energy (DOE) the necessary funds to conduct multi-phased studies to determine the technical feasibility of using reactor technologies for the triple mission of burning weapons grade plutonium, producing tritium for the existing smaller weapons stockpile, and generating commercial electricity. DOE limited the studies to five advanced reactor designs. Among the technologies selected is the ABB-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) System 80+. The DOE study, currently in Phase ID, is proceeding with a more detailed evaluation of the design's capability for plutonium disposition

  11. Long time contamination from plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueloep, M.; Patzeltova, N.; Ragan, P.; Matel, L.

    1995-01-01

    Plutonium isotopes in the organism of the patient (who had participated in the liquidation works after the Chernobyl accident; for three month he had stayed in the epicenter, where he acted as a chauffeur driving a radioactive material to the place of destination) from urine were determined. For determination of the concentration of Pu-239, Pu-240 in urine a modified radiochemical method was used. After mineralization the sample was separated as an anion-nitrate complex with contact by the anion form of the resin in the column. The resin was washed by 8 M HNO 3 , the 8 M HCl with 0.3 M HNO 3 for removing the other radionuclides. The solution 0.36 M HCl with 0.01 M HF was used for the elution of plutonium. Using the lanthanum fluoride technique the sample was filtrated through a membrane filter. The plutonium was detected in the dry sample. The Pu-239 tracer was used for the evaluation of the plutonium separation efficiency. The alpha spectrometric measurements were carried out with a large area silicon detector. The samples were measured and evaluated in the energy region 4.98-5.18 MeV. The detection limit of alpha spectrometry measurements has been 0.01 Bq dm -3 . The concentration of plutonium in the 24-hour urine was determined three times in the quarter year intervals. The results are: 54 mBq, 63.2 mBq, 53 mBq, with average 56,7 mBq. From the results of the analyses of plutonium depositions calculated according to ICRP 54 the intake of this radionuclide for the patient was 56.7 kBq. To estimate a committed effective dose (50 years) from the intake of plutonium was used a conversion factor 6.8.10 -5 Sv.Bq -1 (class W). So the expressed committed effective dose received from the plutonium intake is 3.8 Sv. This number is relatively high and all the effective dose will be higher, because the patient was exposed to the other radionuclides too. For example the determination of the rate radionuclides Am-241/Pu-239,Pu-240 was 32-36 % in the fallout after the Chernobyl

  12. Plutonium gastrointestinal absorption by adults baboons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lataillade, G.; Madic, C.; Willemot, J.M.; Germain, P.; Colle, C.; Metivier, H.

    1991-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium was investigated in baboons after ingestion of plutonium solution (oxidation states III; IV; V; VI), and plutonium incorporated in soya bean and winkles. We studied the effects of oxidation state and ingested mass for masses ranging from 0.35 μg to 51.6 x 10 +3 μg (4 x 10 -2 to 7776 μg of plutonium per kg of body weight). No clear increase in plutonium retention was shown for concentrations of plutonium smaller than 1 μg/kg. From 1 μg/kg to 1 mg/kg no effects of mass or oxidation state was observed and the mean fractional retention value was 10 -4 . For ingested masses higher than 1 mg/kg the fractional retention values respectively increased for Pu(V) and Pu(III) to (0.9 + 0.2) x 10 -2 and (7.4 + 4.1) x 10 -4 of the ingested mass. This increase might be due to the weak hydrolysis of these oxidation states which would increase gastrointestinal absorption by decrease of hydroxide formation. The fraction of plutonium retained after ingestion of soya bean was (3.0 + 0.5) x 10 -4 about 3 fold higher than the value for 238 Pu nitrate solution. No clear increase in plutonium retention was shown after ingestion of winkles containing 238 Pu. In conclusion, except for high masses of ingested Pu, the retention of which could reach 1% of the ingested dose, our results show that the gastrointestinal transfer factor of 10 -4 proposed by ICRP for gastrointestinal absorption of soluble form of Pu is acceptable, but 10 -3 would provide better safety margin [fr

  13. Single-crystal elastic constants of