WorldWideScience

Sample records for dissipationless minor mergers

  1. The Evolution of Stellar Velocity Dispersion during Dissipationless Galaxy Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickley, Nathaniel R.; Canalizo, Gabriela

    2012-03-01

    Using N-body simulations, we studied the detailed evolution of central stellar velocity dispersion, σ*, during dissipationless binary mergers of galaxies. Stellar velocity dispersion was measured using the common mass-weighting method as well as a flux-weighting method designed to simulate the technique used by observers. A toy model for dust attenuation was introduced in order to study the effect of dust attenuation on measurements of σ*. We found that there are three principal stages in the evolution of σ* in such mergers: oscillation, phase mixing, and dynamical equilibrium. During the oscillation stage, σ* undergoes damped oscillations of increasing frequency. The oscillation stage is followed by a phase mixing stage during which the amplitude of the variations in σ* is smaller and more chaotic than in the oscillation stage. Upon reaching dynamical equilibrium, σ* assumes a stable value. We used our data regarding the evolution of σ* during mergers to characterize the scatter inherent in making measurements of σ* in non-quiescent systems. In particular, we found that σ* does not fall below 70% nor exceed 200% of its final, quiescent value during a merger and that a random measurement of σ* in such a system is much more likely to fall near the equilibrium value than near an extremum. Our toy model of dust attenuation suggested that dust can systematically reduce observational measurements of σ* and increase the scatter in σ* measurements.

  2. Tidal Tales of Minor Mergers: Star Formation in the Tidal Tails of Minor Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knierman, Karen; Monkiewicz, Jacqueline; Scowen, Paul; Groppi, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    While major mergers and their tidal debris are well studied, equal mass galaxy mergers are relatively rare compared to minor mergers (mass ratio HI for 15 minor mergers, are providing a larger sample of environments to study the threshold for star formation that can inform star formation models, particularly at low densities.

  3. MINOR MERGERS AND THE SIZE EVOLUTION OF ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naab, Thorsten; Johansson, Peter H.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2009-01-01

    Using a high-resolution hydrodynamical cosmological simulation of the formation of a massive spheroidal galaxy we show that elliptical galaxies can be very compact and massive at high redshift in agreement with recent observations. Accretion of stripped infalling stellar material increases the size of the system with time and the central concentration is reduced by dynamical friction of the surviving stellar cores. In a specific case of a spheroidal galaxy with a final stellar mass of 1.5 x 10 11 M sun we find that the effective radius r e increases from 0.7 ± 0.2 kpc at z = 3 to r e = 2.4 ± 0.4 kpc at z = 0 with a concomitant decrease in the effective density of an order of magnitude and a decrease of the central velocity dispersion by approximately 20% over this time interval. A simple argument based on the virial theorem shows that during the accretion of weakly bound material (minor mergers) the radius can increase as the square of the mass in contrast to the usual linear rate of increase for major mergers. By undergoing minor mergers compact high-redshift spheroids can evolve into present-day systems with sizes and concentrations similar to observed local ellipticals. This indicates that minor mergers may be the main driver for the late evolution of sizes and densities of early-type galaxies.

  4. THE MAJOR AND MINOR GALAXY MERGER RATES AT z < 1.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotz, Jennifer M. [National Optical Astronomical Observatories, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Jonsson, Patrik [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Cox, T. J. [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA (United States); Croton, Darren [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn (Australia); Primack, Joel R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Somerville, Rachel S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Stewart, Kyle, E-mail: lotz@stsci.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Calculating the galaxy merger rate requires both a census of galaxies identified as merger candidates and a cosmologically averaged 'observability' timescale (T{sub obs}(z)) for identifying galaxy mergers. While many have counted galaxy mergers using a variety of techniques, (T{sub obs}(z)) for these techniques have been poorly constrained. We address this problem by calibrating three merger rate estimators with a suite of hydrodynamic merger simulations and three galaxy formation models. We estimate (T{sub obs}(z)) for (1) close galaxy pairs with a range of projected separations, (2) the morphology indicator G - M{sub 20}, and (3) the morphology indicator asymmetry A. Then, we apply these timescales to the observed merger fractions at z < 1.5 from the recent literature. When our physically motivated timescales are adopted, the observed galaxy merger rates become largely consistent. The remaining differences between the galaxy merger rates are explained by the differences in the ranges of the mass ratio measured by different techniques and differing parent galaxy selection. The major merger rate per unit comoving volume for samples selected with constant number density evolves much more strongly with redshift ({proportional_to}(1 + z){sup +3.0{+-}1.1}) than samples selected with constant stellar mass or passively evolving luminosity ({proportional_to}(1 + z){sup +0.1{+-}0.4}). We calculate the minor merger rate (1:4 merger rate from close pairs from the 'total' merger rate determined by G - M{sub 20}. The implied minor merger rate is {approx}3 times the major merger rate at z {approx} 0.7 and shows little evolution with redshift.

  5. THE MAJOR AND MINOR GALAXY MERGER RATES AT z < 1.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotz, Jennifer M.; Jonsson, Patrik; Cox, T. J.; Croton, Darren; Primack, Joel R.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Stewart, Kyle

    2011-01-01

    Calculating the galaxy merger rate requires both a census of galaxies identified as merger candidates and a cosmologically averaged 'observability' timescale (T obs (z)) for identifying galaxy mergers. While many have counted galaxy mergers using a variety of techniques, (T obs (z)) for these techniques have been poorly constrained. We address this problem by calibrating three merger rate estimators with a suite of hydrodynamic merger simulations and three galaxy formation models. We estimate (T obs (z)) for (1) close galaxy pairs with a range of projected separations, (2) the morphology indicator G – M 20 , and (3) the morphology indicator asymmetry A. Then, we apply these timescales to the observed merger fractions at z +3.0±1.1 ) than samples selected with constant stellar mass or passively evolving luminosity (∝(1 + z) +0.1±0.4 ). We calculate the minor merger rate (1:4 sat /M primary ∼ 20 . The implied minor merger rate is ∼3 times the major merger rate at z ∼ 0.7 and shows little evolution with redshift.

  6. Back to the Green Valley: How to Rejuvenate an S0 Galaxy through Minor Mergers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Mapelli

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available About half of the S0 galaxies in the nearby Universe show signatures of recent or ongoing star formation. Whether these S0 galaxies were rejuvenated by the accretion of fresh gas is still controversial. We study minor mergers of a gas-rich dwarf galaxy with an S0 galaxy, by means of N-body smoothed-particle hydrodynamics simulations. We find that minor mergers trigger episodes of star formation in the S0 galaxy, lasting for \\(\\sim\\10 Gyr. One of the most important fingerprints of the merger is the formation of a gas ring in the S0 galaxy. The ring is reminiscent of the orbit of the satellite galaxy, and its lifetime depends on the merger properties: polar and counter-rotating satellite galaxies induce the formation of long-lived smooth gas rings.

  7. The effects of a hot gaseous halo on disc thickening in galaxy minor mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moster, Benjamin P.; Macciò, Andrea V.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Naab, Thorsten; Cox, T. J.

    2012-07-01

    We employ hydrodynamical simulations to study the effects of dissipational gas physics on the vertical heating and thickening of disc galaxies during minor mergers. For the first time we present a suite of simulations that includes a diffuse, rotating, cooling, hot gaseous halo, as predicted by cosmological hydrodynamical simulations as well as models of galaxy formation. We study the effect of this new gaseous component on the vertical structure of a Milky Way-like stellar disc during 1:10 and 1:5 mergers. For 1:10 mergers, we find no increased final thin disc scale height compared to the isolated simulation, leading to the conclusion that thin discs can be present even after a 1:10 merger if a reasonable amount of hot gas is present. The reason for this is the accretion of new cold gas, leading to the formation of a massive new thin stellar disc that dominates the surface brightness profile. In a previous study, in which we included only cold gas in the disc, we showed that the presence of cold gas decreased the thickening by a minor merger relative to the no-gas case. Here, we show that the evolution of the scale height in the presence of a cooling hot halo is dominated by the formation of the new stellar disc. In this scenario, the thick disc is the old stellar disc that has been thickened in a minor merger at z≳ 1, while the thin disc is the new stellar disc that reforms after this merger. When galactic winds are also considered, the final scale height is larger due to two effects. First, the winds reduce the star formation rate, leading to a less massive new stellar disc, such that the thickened old disc still dominates. Secondly, the winds exert a pressure force on the gas in the disc, leading to a shallower gas profile and thus to a thicker new stellar disc. In addition, we study the evolution of the scale height during a 1:5 merger and find that a thin disc can be present even after this merger, provided enough hot gas is available. The final scale

  8. Cross-border mergers and minority protection
    An open-ended harmonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke Wyckaert

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Minority protection is an important, though difficult, issue in company law, and a subtle balance must be struck between the legitimate interests of the majority and minority shareholder(s. The rules on minority protection in the context of the Cross-border Mergers Directive, which was recently adopted and should have been transposed into Member States’ national law towards the end of 2007, are examined in this paper. The authors analyse how minority shareholders are protected within the scope of this Directive and how some of the Member States (such as Germany, Italy, Belgium and the Netherlands have transposed or will transpose some of these protective provisions. The different levels of minority protection (information rights, consultation rights, rights to challenge majority decisions and other specific rights are considered, as well as which types of shareholders can benefit from such protection, and why they should be afforded protection. With respect to the last question, the authors conclude that the change in corporate law encountered especially by the shareholders of the disappearing company seems to be the major rationale underlying the European legislator's decision to introduce minority protection (but not oblige Member States to do so. The authors submit that this reflects too narrow a vision on the need for minority protection because it ignores the fact that the change of the corporate form as a consequence of a merger is in itself sufficient rationale for protecting minority shareholders. It remains somewhat of a mystery as to why the European legislator, while confirming that a cross-border merger should be subject to the same rules as a national merger, has created one possible and very vague exception to that rule.

  9. On the Role of Minor Galaxy Mergers in the Formation of Active Galactic Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin

    2000-06-20

    The large-scale ( approximately 100 kpc) environments of Seyfert galaxies are not significantly different from those of non-Seyfert galaxies. In the context of the interaction model of the formation of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), it has thus been proposed that AGNs form via "minor mergers" of large disk galaxies with smaller companions. We test this hypothesis by comparing the nuclear spectra of 105 bright nearby galaxies with measurements of their R- or r-band morphological asymmetries at three successive radii. We find no significant differences between these asymmetries among the 13 Seyfert galaxies in the sample and galaxies having other nuclear spectral types (absorption, H ii region-like, LINER), nor is there strong qualitative evidence that such mergers have occurred among any of the Seyfert galaxies or LINERs. Thus, either any minor mergers began greater, similar1 Gyr ago and are essentially complete, or they did not occur at all, and AGNs form independently of any type of interaction. Support for the latter interpretation is provided by the growing evidence that supermassive black holes exist in the cores of most elliptical and early-type spiral galaxies, which in turn suggests that nuclear activity represents a normal phase in the evolution of the bulges of massive galaxies. Galaxy mergers may increase the luminosity of Seyfert nuclei to the level of QSOs, which could explain why the latter objects appear to be found in rich environments and in interacting systems.

  10. Dark influences II. Gas and star formation in minor mergers of dwarf galaxies with dark satellites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starkenburg, T. K.; Helmi, A.; Sales, L. V.

    2016-01-01

    Context. It has been proposed that mergers induce starbursts and lead to important morphological changes in galaxies. Most studies so far have focused on large galaxies, but dwarfs might also experience such events, since the halo mass function is scale-free in the concordance cosmological model.

  11. ANATOMY OF A POST-STARBURST MINOR MERGER: A MULTI-WAVELENGTH WFC3 STUDY OF NGC 4150

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crockett, R. Mark; Kaviraj, Sugata; Silk, Joseph I.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Mutchler, Max; Bond, Howard E.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Balick, Bruce; Calzetti, Daniela; Carollo, C. Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Paresce, Francesco; Saha, Abhijit; Trauger, John T.

    2011-01-01

    We present a spatially resolved near-UV/optical study, using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope, of NGC 4150, a sub-L * , early-type galaxy (ETG) of around 6 x 10 9 M sun , which has been observed as part of the WFC3 Early-Release Science Programme. Previous work indicates that this galaxy has a large reservoir of molecular hydrogen gas, exhibits a kinematically decoupled core (a likely indication of recent merging) and strong, central Hβ absorption (indicative of young stars). While relatively uninspiring in its optical image, the core of NGC 4150 shows ubiquitous near-UV emission and remarkable dusty substructure. Our analysis shows this galaxy to lie in the near-UV green valley, and its pixel-by-pixel photometry exhibits a narrow range of near-UV/optical colors that are similar to those of nearby E+A (post-starburst) galaxies and lie between those of M83 (an actively star-forming spiral) and the local quiescent ETG population. We parameterize the properties of the recent star formation (RSF; age, mass fraction, metallicity, and internal dust content) in the NGC 4150 pixels by comparing the observed near-UV/optical photometry to stellar models. The typical age of the RSF is around 0.9 Gyr, consistent with the similarity of the near-UV colors to post-starburst systems, while the morphological structure of the young component supports the proposed merger scenario. The typical RSF metallicity, representative of the metallicity of the gas fuelling star formation, is ∼0.3-0.5 Z sun . Assuming that this galaxy is a merger and that the gas is sourced mainly from the infalling companion, these metallicities plausibly indicate the gas-phase metallicity (GPM) of the accreted satellite. Comparison to the local mass-GPM relation suggests (crudely) that the mass of the accreted system is ∼3 x 10 8 M sun , making NGC 4150 a 1:20 minor merger. A summation of the pixel RSF mass fractions indicates that the RSF contributes ∼2%-3% of the

  12. Decoding Galactic Merger Histories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric F. Bell

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Galaxy mergers are expected to influence galaxy properties, yet measurements of individual merger histories are lacking. Models predict that merger histories can be measured using stellar halos and that these halos can be quantified using observations of resolved stars along their minor axis. Such observations reveal that Milky Way-mass galaxies have a wide range of stellar halo properties and show a correlation between their stellar halo masses and metallicities. This correlation agrees with merger-driven models where stellar halos are formed by satellite galaxy disruption. In these models, the largest accreted satellite dominates the stellar halo properties. Consequently, the observed diversity in the stellar halos of Milky Way-mass galaxies implies a large range in the masses of their largest merger partners. In particular, the Milky Way’s low mass halo implies an unusually quiet merger history. We used these measurements to seek predicted correlations between the bulge and central black hole (BH mass and the mass of the largest merger partner. We found no significant correlations: while some galaxies with large bulges and BHs have large stellar halos and thus experienced a major or minor merger, half have small stellar halos and never experienced a significant merger event. These results indicate that bulge and BH growth is not solely driven by merger-related processes.

  13. Starburst to Quiescent from HST/ALMA: Stars and Dust Unveil Minor Mergers in Submillimeter Galaxies at z ∼ 4.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Guijarro, C.; Toft, S.; Karim, A.; Magnelli, B.; Magdis, G. E.; Jiménez-Andrade, E. F.; Capak, P. L.; Fraternali, F.; Fujimoto, S.; Riechers, D. A.; Schinnerer, E.; Smolčić, V.; Aravena, M.; Bertoldi, F.; Cortzen, I.; Hasinger, G.; Hu, E. M.; Jones, G. C.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Lee, N.; McCracken, H. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Navarrete, F.; Pović, M.; Puglisi, A.; Romano-Díaz, E.; Sheth, K.; Silverman, J. D.; Staguhn, J.; Steinhardt, C. L.; Stockmann, M.; Tanaka, M.; Valentino, F.; van Kampen, E.; Zirm, A.

    2018-04-01

    Dust-enshrouded, starbursting, submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) at z ≥ 3 have been proposed as progenitors of z ≥ 2 compact quiescent galaxies (cQGs). To test this connection, we present a detailed spatially resolved study of the stars, dust, and stellar mass in a sample of six submillimeter-bright starburst galaxies at z ∼ 4.5. The stellar UV emission probed by HST is extended and irregular and shows evidence of multiple components. Informed by HST, we deblend Spitzer/IRAC data at rest-frame optical, finding that the systems are undergoing minor mergers with a typical stellar mass ratio of 1:6.5. The FIR dust continuum emission traced by ALMA locates the bulk of star formation in extremely compact regions (median r e = 0.70 ± 0.29 kpc), and it is in all cases associated with the most massive component of the mergers (median {log}({M}* /{M}ȯ )=10.49+/- 0.32). We compare spatially resolved UV slope (β) maps with the FIR dust continuum to study the infrared excess (IRX = L IR/L UV)–β relation. The SMGs display systematically higher IRX values than expected from the nominal trend, demonstrating that the FIR and UV emissions are spatially disconnected. Finally, we show that the SMGs fall on the mass–size plane at smaller stellar masses and sizes than the cQGs at z = 2. Taking into account the expected evolution in stellar mass and size between z = 4.5 and z = 2 due to the ongoing starburst and mergers with minor companions, this is in agreement with a direct evolutionary connection between the two populations.

  14. Conservative regularization of compressible dissipationless two-fluid plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswami, Govind S.; Sachdev, Sonakshi; Thyagaraja, A.

    2018-02-01

    This paper extends our earlier approach [cf. A. Thyaharaja, Phys. Plasmas 17, 032503 (2010) and Krishnaswami et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 022308 (2016)] to obtaining à priori bounds on enstrophy in neutral fluids and ideal magnetohydrodynamics. This results in a far-reaching local, three-dimensional, non-linear, dispersive generalization of a KdV-type regularization to compressible/incompressible dissipationless 2-fluid plasmas and models derived therefrom (quasi-neutral, Hall, and ideal MHD). It involves the introduction of vortical and magnetic "twirl" terms λl 2 ( w l + ( q l / m l ) B ) × ( ∇ × w l ) in the ion/electron velocity equations ( l = i , e ) where w l are vorticities. The cut-off lengths λl and number densities nl must satisfy λl 2 n l = C l , where Cl are constants. A novel feature is that the "flow" current ∑ l q l n l v l in Ampère's law is augmented by a solenoidal "twirl" current ∑ l ∇ × ∇ × λl 2 j flow , l . The resulting equations imply conserved linear and angular momenta and a positive definite swirl energy density E * which includes an enstrophic contribution ∑ l ( 1 / 2 ) λl 2 ρ l wl 2 . It is shown that the equations admit a Hamiltonian-Poisson bracket formulation. Furthermore, singularities in ∇ × B are conservatively regularized by adding ( λB 2 / 2 μ 0 ) ( ∇ × B ) 2 to E * . Finally, it is proved that among regularizations that admit a Hamiltonian formulation and preserve the continuity equations along with the symmetries of the ideal model, the twirl term is unique and minimal in non-linearity and space derivatives of velocities.

  15. THE STRUCTURES AND TOTAL (MINOR + MAJOR) MERGER HISTORIES OF MASSIVE GALAXIES UP TO z ∼ 3 IN THE HST GOODS NICMOS SURVEY: A POSSIBLE SOLUTION TO THE SIZE EVOLUTION PROBLEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluck, Asa F. L.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Buitrago, Fernando; Grützbauch, Ruth; Hoyos, Carlos; Mortlock, Alice; Bauer, Amanda E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the total major (>1:4 by stellar mass) and minor (>1:100 by stellar mass) merger history of a population of 80 massive (M * > 10 11 M ☉ ) galaxies at high redshifts (z = 1.7-3). We utilize extremely deep and high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope H-band imaging from the GOODS NICMOS Survey, which corresponds to rest-frame optical wavelengths at the redshifts probed. We find that massive galaxies at high redshifts are often morphologically disturbed, with a CAS (concentration, C; asymmetry, A; clumpiness, S) deduced merger fraction f m = 0.23 ± 0.05 at z = 1.7-3. We find close accord between close pair methods (within 30 kpc apertures) and CAS methods for deducing major merger fractions at all redshifts. We deduce the total (minor + major) merger history of massive galaxies with M * > 10 9 M ☉ galaxies, and find that this scales roughly linearly with log-stellar-mass and magnitude range. We test our close pair methods by utilizing mock galaxy catalogs from the Millennium Simulation. We compute the total number of mergers to be (4.5 ± 2.9)/(τ m ) from z = 3 to the present, to a stellar mass sensitivity threshold of ∼1:100 (where τ m is the merger timescale in Gyr which varies as a function of mass). This corresponds to an average mass increase of (3.4 ± 2.2) × 10 11 M ☉ over the past 11.5 Gyr due to merging. We show that the size evolution observed for these galaxies may be mostly explained by this merging.

  16. MERGERS AND BULGE FORMATION IN ΛCDM: WHICH MERGERS MATTER?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Bundy, Kevin; Wetzel, Andrew; Croton, Darren; Hernquist, Lars; Keres, Dusan; Younger, Joshua D.; Khochfar, Sadegh; Stewart, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    We use a suite of semi-empirical models to predict the galaxy-galaxy merger rate and relative contributions to bulge growth as a function of mass (both halo and stellar), redshift, and mass ratio. The models use empirical constraints on the halo occupation distribution, evolved forward in time, to robustly identify where and when galaxy mergers occur. Together with the results of high-resolution merger simulations, this allows us to quantify the relative contributions of mergers with different properties (e.g., mass ratios, gas fractions, redshifts) to the bulge population. We compare with observational constraints, and find good agreement. We also provide useful fitting functions and make public a code to reproduce the predicted merger rates and contributions to bulge mass growth. We identify several robust conclusions. (1) Major mergers dominate the formation and assembly of ∼L * bulges and the total spheroid mass density, but minor mergers contribute a non-negligible ∼30%. (2) This is mass dependent: bulge formation and assembly is dominated by more minor mergers in lower-mass systems. In higher-mass systems, most bulges originally form in major mergers near ∼L * , but assemble in increasingly minor mergers. (3) The minor/major contribution is also morphology dependent: higher B/T systems preferentially form in more major mergers, with B/T roughly tracing the mass ratio of the largest recent merger; lower B/T systems preferentially form in situ from minor mergers. (4) Low-mass galaxies, being gas-rich, require more mergers to reach the same B/T as high-mass systems. Gas-richness dramatically suppresses the absolute efficiency of bulge formation, but does not strongly influence the relative contribution of major versus minor mergers. (5) Absolute merger rates at fixed mass ratio increase with galaxy mass. (6) Predicted merger rates agree well with those observed in pair and morphology-selected samples, but there is evidence that some morphology

  17. Dissipationless Hall current in dense quark matter in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, E. J.; de la Incera, V.

    2017-06-01

    We show the realization of axion electrodynamics within the Dual Chiral Density Wave phase of dense quark matter in the presence of a magnetic field. The system exhibits an anomalous dissipationless Hall current perpendicular to the magnetic field and an anomalous electric charge density. Connection to topological insulators and 3D optical lattices, as well as possible implications for heavy-ion collisions and neutron stars are outlined.

  18. Mergers & Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomcenco, Alex

    MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS: Counseling and Choice of Method describes and analyzes the current state of law in Europe in regard to some relevant selected elements related to mergers and acquisitions, and the adviser’s counsel in this regard. The focus is aimed and maintained at application...

  19. SATELLITE DWARF GALAXIES IN A HIERARCHICAL UNIVERSE: THE PREVALENCE OF DWARF-DWARF MAJOR MERGERS

    OpenAIRE

    Deason, A; Wetzel, A; Garrison-Kimmel, S

    2014-01-01

    Mergers are a common phenomenon in hierarchical structure formation, especially for massive galaxies and clusters, but their importance for dwarf galaxies in the Local Group remains poorly understood. We investigate the frequency of major mergers between dwarf galaxies in the Local Group using the ELVIS suite of cosmological zoom-in dissipationless simulations of Milky Way- and M31-like host halos. We find that ~10% of satellite dwarf galaxies with M_star > 10^6 M_sun that are within the host...

  20. Satellite dwarf galaxies in a hierarchical universe: the prevalence of dwarf-dwarf major mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deason, Alis; Wetzel, Andrew; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea

    2014-01-01

    Mergers are a common phenomenon in hierarchical structure formation, especially for massive galaxies and clusters, but their importance for dwarf galaxies in the Local Group remains poorly understood. We investigate the frequency of major mergers between dwarf galaxies in the Local Group using the ELVIS suite of cosmological zoom-in dissipationless simulations of Milky Way- and M31-like host halos. We find that ∼10% of satellite dwarf galaxies with M star > 10 6 M ☉ that are within the host virial radius experienced a major merger of stellar mass ratio closer than 0.1 since z = 1, with a lower fraction for lower mass dwarf galaxies. Recent merger remnants are biased toward larger radial distance and more recent virial infall times, because most recent mergers occurred shortly before crossing within the virial radius of the host halo. Satellite-satellite mergers also occur within the host halo after virial infall, catalyzed by the large fraction of dwarf galaxies that fell in as part of a group. The merger fraction doubles for dwarf galaxies outside of the host virial radius, so the most distant dwarf galaxies in the Local Group are the most likely to have experienced a recent major merger. We discuss the implications of these results on observable dwarf merger remnants, their star formation histories, the gas content of mergers, and massive black holes in dwarf galaxies.

  1. Dissipationless Flow and Sharp Threshold of a Polariton Condensate with Long Lifetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Nelsen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report new results of Bose-Einstein condensation of polaritons in specially designed microcavities with a very high quality factor, on the order of 10^{6}, giving polariton lifetimes of the order of 100 ps. When the polaritons are created with an incoherent pump, a dissipationless, coherent flow of the polaritons occurs over hundreds of microns, which increases as density increases. At high density, this flow is suddenly stopped, and the gas becomes trapped in a local potential minimum, with strong coherence.

  2. Mergers + acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppszallern, Suzanna

    2002-05-01

    The hospital sector in 2001 led the health care field in mergers and acquisitions. Most deals involved a network augmenting its presence within a specific region or in a market adjacent to its primary service area. Analysts expect M&A activity to increase in 2002.

  3. Mergers & Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomcenco, Alex

    This dissertation is a legal dogmatic thesis, the goal of which is to describe and analyze the current state of law in Europe in regard to some relevant selected elements related to mergers and acquisitions, and the adviser’s counsel in this regard. Having regard to the topic of the dissertation...

  4. THE DIRT ON DRY MERGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Vandana; Soifer, B. T.; Dey, Arjun; Cohen, Emma; Le Floc'h, Emeric

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we analyze the mid-infrared (3-70 μm) spectral energy distributions of dry merger candidates in the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. These candidates were selected by previous authors to be luminous, red, early-type galaxies with morphological evidence of recent tidal interactions. We find that a significant fraction of these candidates exhibit 8 and 24 μm excesses compared to expectations for old stellar populations. We estimate that a quarter of dry merger candidates have mid-infrared-derived star formation rates greater than ∼1 M sun yr -1 . This represents a 'frosting' on top of a large old stellar population, and has been seen in previous studies of elliptical galaxies. Further, the dry merger candidates include a higher fraction of star-forming galaxies relative to a control sample without tidal features. We therefore conclude that the star formation in these massive ellipticals is likely triggered by merger activity. Our data suggest that the mergers responsible for the observed tidal features were not completely dry, and may be minor mergers involving a gas-rich dwarf galaxy.

  5. THE HALO MERGER RATE IN THE MILLENNIUM SIMULATION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR OBSERVED GALAXY MERGER FRACTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genel, Shy; Genzel, Reinhard; Bouche, Nicolas; Naab, Thorsten; Sternberg, Amiel

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a new method to extract halo merger rates from the Millennium Simulation. First, by removing superfluous mergers that are artifacts of the standard friends-of-friends (FOF) halo identification algorithm, we find a lower merger rate compared to previous work. The reductions are more significant at lower redshifts and lower halo masses, and especially for minor mergers. Our new approach results in a better agreement with predictions from the extended Press-Schechter model. Second, we find that the FOF halo finder overestimates the halo mass by up to 50% for halos that are about to merge, which leads to an additional ∼20% overestimate of the merger rate. Therefore, we define halo masses by including only particles that are gravitationally bound to their FOF groups. We provide new best-fitting parameters for a global formula to account for these improvements. In addition, we extract the merger rate per progenitor halo, as well as per descendant halo. The merger rate per progenitor halo is the quantity that should be related to observed galaxy merger fractions when they are measured via pair counting. At low-mass/redshift, the merger rate increases moderately with mass and steeply with redshift. At high enough mass/redshift (for the rarest halos with masses a few times the 'knee' of the mass function), these trends break down, and the merger rate per progenitor halo decreases with mass and increases only moderately with redshift. Defining the merger rate per progenitor halo also allows us to quantify the rate at which halos are being accreted onto larger halos, in addition to the minor and major merger rates. We provide an analytic formula that converts any given merger rate per descendant halo into a merger rate per progenitor halo. Finally, we perform a direct comparison between observed merger fractions and the fraction of halos in the Millennium Simulation that have undergone a major merger during the recent dynamical friction time, and find a

  6. Galaxy mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, N.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis contains a series of four papers dealing with the effects of interactions among galaxies during the epoch of cluster formation. Galaxy interactions are investigated and the results incorporated in numerical simulations of the formation of groups and clusters of galaxies. The role of galaxy interactions is analysed in the more general context of simulations of an expanding universe. The evolution of galaxies in rich clusters is discussed. The results of the investigations are presented and their relation to other work done in the field are briefly reviewed and an attempt is made to link galaxy mergers to the occurrence of activity in galactic nuclei. (Auth.)

  7. Observational evidence for mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweizer, F.

    1983-01-01

    Theory has long suggested that dynamical friction between colliding galaxies must lead to mergers. The problem for observers has been to find which galaxies are mergers. The author first reviews the available evidence for mergers in various kinds of galaxies, then proposes a tentative classification scheme for mergers, and finally discusses mergers in giant ellipticals and their relation to the evolution and perhaps even the formation of ellipticals. (Auth.)

  8. MERGERS IN ΛCDM: UNCERTAINTIES IN THEORETICAL PREDICTIONS AND INTERPRETATIONS OF THE MERGER RATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Bundy, Kevin; Wetzel, Andrew; Ma, Chung-Pei; Croton, Darren; Khochfar, Sadegh; Hernquist, Lars; Genel, Shy; Van den Bosch, Frank; Somerville, Rachel S.; Keres, Dusan; Stewart, Kyle; Younger, Joshua D.

    2010-01-01

    observations. The choice of mass used to define 'major' and 'minor' mergers also matters: stellar-stellar major mergers can be more or less abundant than halo-halo major mergers by an order of magnitude. At low masses, most true major mergers (mass ratio defined in terms of their baryonic or dynamical mass) will appear to be minor mergers in their stellar mass ratio-observations and models using just stellar criteria could underestimate major-merger rates by factors of ∼3-5. We discuss the uncertainties in relating any merger rate to spheroid formation (in observations or theory): in order to achieve better than factor of ∼3 accuracy, it is necessary to account for the distribution of merger orbital parameters, gas fractions, and the full efficiency of merger-induced effects as a function of mass ratio.

  9. Surviving mergers & acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Diane L

    2002-01-01

    Mergers and acquisitions are never easy to implement. The health care landscape is a minefield of failed mergers and uneasy alliances generating great turmoil and pain. But some mergers have been successful, creating health systems that benefit the communities they serve. Five prominent leaders offer their advice on minimizing the difficulties of M&As.

  10. Quantifying the impact of mergers on the angular momentum of simulated galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, Claudia del P.; Stevens, Adam R. H.; Bower, Richard G.; Davis, Timothy A.; Contreras, Sergio; Padilla, Nelson D.; Obreschkow, Danail; Croton, Darren; Trayford, James W.; Welker, Charlotte; Theuns, Tom

    2018-02-01

    We use EAGLE to quantify the effect galaxy mergers have on the stellar specific angular momentum of galaxies, jstars. We split mergers into dry (gas-poor)/wet (gas-rich), major/minor and different spin alignments and orbital parameters. Wet (dry) mergers have an average neutral gas-to-stellar mass ratio of 1.1 (0.02), while major (minor) mergers are those with stellar mass ratios ≥0.3 (0.1-0.3). We correlate the positions of galaxies in the jstars-stellar mass plane at z = 0 with their merger history, and find that galaxies of low spins suffered dry mergers, while galaxies of normal/high spins suffered predominantly wet mergers, if any. The radial jstars profiles of galaxies that went through dry mergers are deficient by ≈0.3 dex at r ≲ 10 r50 (with r50 being the half-stellar mass radius), compared to galaxies that went through wet mergers. Studying the merger remnants reveals that dry mergers reduce jstars by ≈30 per cent, while wet mergers increase it by ≈10 per cent, on average. The latter is connected to the build-up of the bulge by newly formed stars of high rotational speed. Moving from minor to major mergers accentuates these effects. When the spin vectors of the galaxies prior to the dry merger are misaligned, jstars decreases by a greater magnitude, while in wet mergers corotation and high orbital angular momentum efficiently spun-up galaxies. We predict what would be the observational signatures in the jstars profiles driven by dry mergers: (i) shallow radial profiles and (ii) profiles that rise beyond ≈10 r50, both of which are significantly different from spiral galaxies.

  11. Characterizing Black Hole Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John; Boggs, William Darian; Kelly, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Binary black hole mergers are a promising source of gravitational waves for interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Recent advances in numerical relativity have revealed the predictions of General Relativity for the strong burst of radiation generated in the final moments of binary coalescence. We explore features in the merger radiation which characterize the final moments of merger and ringdown. Interpreting the waveforms in terms of an rotating implicit radiation source allows a unified phenomenological description of the system from inspiral through ringdown. Common features in the waveforms allow quantitative description of the merger signal which may provide insights for observations large-mass black hole binaries.

  12. Simulations of galaxy mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villumsen, J.V.

    1982-01-01

    This work is a theoretical investigation of the mechanisms and results of mergers of elliptical galaxies. An N-body code is developed to simulate the dynamics of centrally concentrated collisionless systems. It is used for N-body simulations of the mergers of galaxies with mass ratios of 1:1, 2:1 and 3:1 with a total of 1200 or 2400 particles. The initial galaxies are spherical and non-rotating with Hubble type profiles and isotropic velocity distributions. The remnants are flattened (up to E4) and are oblate, triaxial or prolate depending on the impact parameter. Equal mass mergers are more flattened than unequal mass mergers and have significant velocity anisotropies. The remnants have Hubble type profiles with decreased central surface brightness and increased core radii and tidal radii. In some unequal mass mergers ''isothermal'' haloes tend to form. The density profiles are inconsistent with De Vaucouleurs profiles even though the initial profiles were not. The central velocity dispersion increases in 1:1 and 2:1 mass mergers but decreases in 3:1 mass mergers. Near head-on mergers lead to prolate systems with little rotation while high angular momentum mergers lead to oblate systems with strong rotation. The rotation curves show solid body rotation out to the half mass radius followed by a slow decline. Radial mixing is strong in equal mass mergers where it will weaken radial gradients. In unequal mass mergers there is little radial mixing but matter from the smaller galaxy ends up in the outer parts of the system where it can give rise to colour gradient

  13. ROLE OF INTERNATIONAL MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS IN CORPORATE INTEGRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia P. BLĂJUȚ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the role of international mergers and acquisitions in corporate integration. The factors that stimulate mergers and acquisitions activities bring real changes in the world economy. Mergers and acquisitions are a form of expansion: mergers can take place either as a statutory merger or consolidation and minority, majority or full acquisitions dominate the international market. It is very important to not confuse the meaning of the two terms. Multinational companies are forced by the competitive environment to adopt new strategies to penetrate a particular market and decrease the position of competition on global market or to counteract competitor action on the other market. Cross-border M and A is functionally classified in horizontal, vertical, concentric and conglomerate. The balance between these types of M and A has been changing over time and the distinction among these four categories is not always clear-cut.

  14. Breakdown of the dissipationless quantum Hall state: Quantised steps and analogies with classical and quantum fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaves, L.

    2001-01-01

    The breakdown of the integer quantum Hall effect at high currents sometimes occurs a series of regular steps in the dissipative voltage drop bars used to maintain the US Resistance Standard, but have also been reported in other devices. It is proposed that the origin of the steps can be understood in terms of instability in the dissipationless flow at high electron drift velocities. The instability is induced by impurity- or defect- related inter-Landau level scattering processes in local macroscopic regions of the Hall bar. Electron-hole pairs (magneto-excitons) are generated in the quantum Hall fluid in these regions and that the electronic motion can be envisaged as a quantum analogue of the Karman vortex street which forms when a classical fluid flows past an obstacle. (author)

  15. Mergers at z = 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Lancelot L.

    1993-01-01

    Multiband images of nearby interacting pairs of galaxies, mergers, and normal field galaxies are used to simulate images of high redshift mergers by identifying distinctive morphological features. Preliminary results indicate that it is feasible for the HST to detect these high redshift objects.

  16. Mergers and Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risberg, Annette

    , employee experiences and communication. Mergers and acquisitions remain one of the most common forms of growth, yet they present considerable challenges for the companies and management involved. The effects on stakeholders, including shareholders, managers and employees, must be considered as well......Introduction to the study of mergers and acquisitions. This book provides an understanding of the mergers and acquisitions process, how and why they occur, and also the broader implications for organizations. It presents issues including motives and planning, partner selection, integration...... by editorial commentaries and reflects the important organizational and behavioural aspects which have often been ignored in the past. By providing this in-depth understanding of the mergers and acquisitions process, the reader understands not only how and why mergers and acquisitions occur, but also...

  17. Mergers and Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risberg, Annette

    Introduction to the study of mergers and acquisitions. This book provides an understanding of the mergers and acquisitions process, how and why they occur, and also the broader implications for organizations. It presents issues including motives and planning, partner selection, integration......, employee experiences and communication. Mergers and acquisitions remain one of the most common forms of growth, yet they present considerable challenges for the companies and management involved. The effects on stakeholders, including shareholders, managers and employees, must be considered as well...... by editorial commentaries and reflects the important organizational and behavioural aspects which have often been ignored in the past. By providing this in-depth understanding of the mergers and acquisitions process, the reader understands not only how and why mergers and acquisitions occur, but also...

  18. Mergers: Success versus failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carley, G. R.

    1997-01-01

    Successful mergers in the context of long-term value creation, as measured by return realized on investor-provided capital, were discussed. In essence, a successful merger is characterized by being motivated by a sound business reason and strategy for the merger, a reasonable price and sound execution. The acquiror's pre-merger success in managing a company is a good indicator of future success. Poorly managed companies that acquire other companies generally continue to be poorly managed with no significant increase in shareholder value. Prior to the acquisition, identification of the potential target, assessment of the people involved on both sides of the transaction, thorough knowledge of the target's potential for value creation, financial implications (debt, equity, terms and demand, tax implications, the potential effect of the proposed acquisition on the acquiror's business plan) and finally the execution of the process itself, are the important determinants of successful mergers

  19. Hospital mergers: a panacea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Hospital mergers in Europe and North America have been launched to scale down expenditure, enhance the delivery of health care and elevate quality. However, the outcome of mergers suggest that they neither generated cost savings nor improved the quality of care. Almost all consolidations fall short, since those in leadership positions lack the necessary understanding and appreciation of the differences in culture, values and goals of the existing facilities. In spite of these shortcomings, hospital mergers will continue to be pursued in order to improve market share, eliminate excess capacity, gain access to capital and enhance the personal egos of the organizations' leaders.

  20. MERGER ACCOUTING FOR COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUCIU GHEORGHE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Companies, especially nowadays, are characterized through great mobility, fast circulation of capital, occurring in their chase for profit. In this context, companies look for alliances, economical and political assistance. These objectives can materialize through merging of companies. The merger can be internal (between Romanian companies or transboundary, which includes foreign companies. In order to correctly reflect these events, the merger operations must be regulated and must respect national and international regulations. One important request concerning the merger operations is that the accounting values of the assets, debts and ownership equity must be brought to the present financial value.

  1. RECOILING MASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN GAS-RICH GALAXY MERGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedes, Javiera; Madau, Piero; Mayer, Lucio; Callegari, Simone

    2011-01-01

    The asymmetric emission of gravitational waves produced during the coalescence of a massive black hole (MBH) binary imparts a velocity 'kick' to the system that can displace the hole from the center of its host. Here, we study the trajectories and observability of MBHs recoiling in three (one major, two minor) gas-rich galaxy merger remnants that were previously simulated at high resolution, and in which the pairing of the MBHs had been shown to be successful. We run new simulations of MBHs recoiling in the major merger remnant with Mach numbers in the range 1≤M≤6 and use simulation data to construct a semi-analytical model for the orbital evolution of MBHs in gas-rich systems. We show the following. (1) In major merger remnants the energy deposited by the moving hole into the rotationally supported, turbulent medium makes a negligible contribution to the thermodynamics of the gas. This contribution becomes significant in minor merger remnants, potentially allowing for an electromagnetic signature of MBH recoil. (2) In major merger remnants, the combination of both deeper central potential well and drag from high-density gas confines even MBHs with kick velocities as high as 1200 km s -1 within 1 kpc from the host's center. (3) Kinematically offset nuclei may be observable for timescales of a few Myr in major merger remnants in the case of recoil velocities in the range 700-1000 km s -1 . (4) In minor merger remnants the effect of gas drag is weaker, and MBHs with recoil speeds in the range 300-600 km s -1 will wander through the host halo for longer timescales. When accounting for the probability distribution of kick velocities, however, we find that the likelihood of observing recoiling MBHs in gas-rich galaxy mergers is very low even in the best-case scenario.

  2. Power plays - global mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Simon

    1997-01-01

    This article focuses on the increasing number of mergers and acquisitions by electric utilities in the face of growing competition in home markets. The liberalisation of the UK and Scandinavian electricity markets, the impact in Europe of the EU directive on liberalisation, mergers in Switzerland, the selling of Australian generators to UK electric utilities, the globalisation of the industry, and the growing trend for deals between gas and electric utilities are discussed. (UK)

  3. Simulations of galaxy mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villumsen, J.V.; Yale Univ., New Haven, CT

    1982-01-01

    A number of N-body simulations of mergers of equal and unequal galaxies are presented. A new code is presented which determines the potential from a mass distribution by a fourth-order expansion in Tesseral harmonics in three dimensions as an approximation to a collisionless system. The total number of particles in the system is 1200. Two galaxies, each a spherical non-rotating system with isothermal or Hubble density profile, are put in orbit around each other where tidal effects and dynamical friction lead to merging. The final system has a Hubble profile, and in some mergers an 'isothermal' halo forms as found in cD galaxies. Equal mass mergers are more flattened than unequal mass mergers. The central surface brightness decreases except in a merger of isothermal galaxies which shows a major redistribution of energy towards a Hubble profile. Mixing is severe in equal mass mergers, where radial gradients are weakened, while in unequal mass encounters gradients can build up due to less mixing and the formation of a halo. Oblate systems with strong rotation form in high angular momentum encounters while prolate systems with little rotation are formed in near head-on collisions. (author)

  4. EVOLUTION OF DARK MATTER PHASE-SPACE DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS IN EQUAL-MASS HALO MERGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vass, Ileana M.; Kazanzidis, Stelios; Valluri, Monica; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2009-01-01

    We use dissipationless N-body simulations to investigate the evolution of the true coarse-grained phase-space density distribution f(x, v) in equal-mass mergers between dark matter (DM) halos. The halo models are constructed with various asymptotic power-law indices ρ ∝ r -γ ranging from steep cusps to core-like profiles and we employ the phase-space density estimator 'EnBid' developed by Sharma and Steinmetz to compute f(x, v). The adopted force resolution allows robust phase-space density profile estimates in the inner ∼1% of the virial radii of the simulated systems. We confirm that merger events result in a decrease of the coarse-grained phase-space density in accordance with expectations from Mixing Theorems for collisionless systems. We demonstrate that binary mergers between identical DM halos produce remnants that retain excellent memories of the inner slopes and overall shapes of the phase-space density distribution of their progenitors. The robustness of the phase-space density profiles holds for a range of orbital energies, and a variety of encounter configurations including sequences of several consecutive merger events, designed to mimic hierarchical merging, and collisions occurring at different cosmological epochs. If the progenitor halos are constructed with appreciably different asymptotic power-law indices, we find that the inner slope and overall shape of the phase-space density distribution of the remnant are substantially closer to that of the initial system with the steepest central density cusp. These results explicitly demonstrate that mixing is incomplete in equal-mass mergers between DM halos, as it does not erase memory of the progenitor properties. Our results also confirm the recent analytical predictions of Dehnen regarding the preservation of merging self-gravitating central density cusps.

  5. Anti- versus Pro-Competitive Mergers

    OpenAIRE

    Fridolfsson, Sven-Olof

    2007-01-01

    In a framework where mergers are mutually excluding, I show that firms pursue anti- rather than (alternative) pro-competitive mergers. Potential outsiders to anti-competitive mergers refrain from pursuing pro-competitive mergers if the positive externalities from anti-competitive mergers are strong enough. Potential outsiders to pro-competitive mergers pursue anti-competitive mergers if the negative externalities from the pro-competitive mergers are strong enough. Potential participants in an...

  6. Merger relics of cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, S. K.; Lee, J.; Jung, I.; Ji, I.; Sheen, Y.-K.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Sheen and collaborators recently found that a surprisingly large portion (38%) of massive early-type galaxies in heavy clusters show strong merger-related disturbed features. This contradicts the general understanding that massive clusters are hostile environments for galaxy mergers. Considering the significance of mergers in galaxy evolution, it is important to understand this. Aims: We aim to present a theoretical foundation that explains galaxy mergers in massive clusters. Methods: We used the N-body simulation technique to perform a cosmological-volume simulation and derive dark-halo merger trees. Then, we used the semi-analytic modeling technique to populate each halo with galaxies. We ran hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy mergers to estimate the lifetime of merger features for the imaging condition used by Sheen and collaborators. We applied this merger feature lifetime to our semi-analytic models. Finally, we counted the massive early-type galaxies in heavy model clusters that would show strong merger features. Results: While there still are substantial uncertainties, our preliminary results are remarkably close to the observed fraction of galaxies with merger features. Key ingredients for the success are twofold: firstly, the subhalo motion in dark haloes has been accurately traced, and, second, the lifetime of merger features has been properly estimated. As a result, merger features are expected to last very long in cluster environments. Many massive early-type galaxies in heavy clusters therefore show merger features not because they experience mergers in the current clusters in situ, but because they still carry their merger features from their previous halo environments. Conclusions: Investigating the merger relics of cluster galaxies is potentially important, because it uniquely allows us to backtrack the halo merger history.

  7. Nonmarket strategy for merger reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clougherty, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Mergers and acquisitions can involve a significant review by antitrust authorities; however, neither the business strategy not the corporate political strategy literature has fully explored the antitrust dimensions of merger activity. This article considers the ability of corporate political

  8. Understanding FE Mergers. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Natasha

    2009-01-01

    This report presents research findings and discussion to help develop an understanding of what gives rise to mergers and, when they do happen, what makes them work. The research has focused on merger activity between further education (FE) colleges since incorporation in 1993. Mergers are highly contextual, and part of ensuring success is…

  9. EPISODIC ACTIVITIES OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES AT REDSHIFT z ≤ 2: DRIVEN BY MERGERS?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanrong; Wang Jianmin; Hu Chen; Zhang Shu; Yuan Yefei

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested for quite a long time that galaxy mergers trigger activities of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) on the grounds of imaging observations of individual galaxies. To quantitatively examine this hypothesis, we calculate quasar luminosity functions (LFs) by manipulating the observed galaxy LFs (z ∼ maj ∼ 0.2 at z ∼ 2 to f maj → 0 at z ∼ 0. As a consequence, the newly formed SMBHs from major mergers at z ∼ 2 may acquire a maximal spin due to the orbital angular momentum of the merging holes. Subsequently, random accretion led by minor mergers rapidly drives the SMBHs to spin down. Such an evolutionary trend of the SMBH spins is consistent with the fact that radiative efficiency of accreting SMBHs strongly declines with cosmic time, reported by Wang et al. This suggests that minor mergers are important in triggering activities of SMBHs at low redshift, while major mergers may dominate at high redshift.

  10. Mixing processes in galaxy mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, S.D.M.

    1980-01-01

    Previously published simulations of mergers between galaxies are used to examine the degree to which population gradients are weakened during the coalescence of two or more stellar systems. Although substantial mixing occurs during a merger, its effect on such gradients is quite moderate and can be overwhelmed by the effect of changes in structure. Experiment suggests that the centre-to-edge population difference in a merger remnant will be 20 per cent smaller than that in its progenitor galaxies if these are identical centrally concentrated systems. A sequence of three binary mergers is thus required to reduce such differences by a factor of 2. Because of changes in radial structure, population gradients are, in general, reduced more rapidly than is suggested by these numbers. Mixing is more efficient in mergers between less concentrated systems. In real merger remnants any weakening of gradients may often be masked by star-formation in residual interstellar gas. (author)

  11. Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A. Faber

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We review the current status of studies of the coalescence of binary neutron star systems. We begin with a discussion of the formation channels of merging binaries and we discuss the most recent theoretical predictions for merger rates. Next, we turn to the quasi-equilibrium formalisms that are used to study binaries prior to the merger phase and to generate initial data for fully dynamical simulations. The quasi-equilibrium approximation has played a key role in developing our understanding of the physics of binary coalescence and, in particular, of the orbital instability processes that can drive binaries to merger at the end of their lifetimes. We then turn to the numerical techniques used in dynamical simulations, including relativistic formalisms, (magneto-hydrodynamics, gravitational-wave extraction techniques, and nuclear microphysics treatments. This is followed by a summary of the simulations performed across the field to date, including the most recent results from both fully relativistic and microphysically detailed simulations. Finally, we discuss the likely directions for the field as we transition from the first to the second generation of gravitational-wave interferometers and while supercomputers reach the petascale frontier.

  12. Observing Galaxy Mergers in Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    I will describe results on mergers and morphology of distant galaxies. By mock-observing 3D cosmological simulations, we aim to contrast theory with data, design better diagnostics of physical processes, and examine unexpected signatures of galaxy formation. Recently, we conducted mock surveys of the Illustris Simulations to learn how mergers would appear in deep HST and JWST surveys. With this approach, we reconciled merger rates estimated using observed close galaxy pairs with intrinsic merger rates predicted by theory. This implies that the merger-pair observability time is probably shorter in the early universe, and therefore that major mergers are more common than implied by the simplest arguments. Further, we show that disturbance-based diagnostics of late-stage mergers can be improved significantly by combining multi-dimensional image information with simulated merger identifications to train automated classifiers. We then apply these classifiers to real measurements from the CANDELS fields, recovering a merger fraction increasing with redshift in broad agreement with pair fractions and simulations, and with statistical errors smaller by a factor of two than classical morphology estimators. This emphasizes the importance of using robust training sets, including cosmological simulations and multidimensional data, for interpreting observed processes in galaxy evolution.

  13. Welfare standards in hospital mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katona, Katalin; Canoy, Marcel

    2013-08-01

    There is a broad literature on the consequences of applying different welfare standards in merger control. Total welfare is usually defined as the sum of consumer and provider surplus, i.e., potential external effects are not considered. The general result is then that consumer welfare is a more restrictive standard than total welfare, which is advantageous in certain situations. This relationship between the two standards is not necessarily true when the merger has significant external effects. We model mergers on hospital markets and allow for not-profit-maximizing behavior of providers and mandatory health insurance. Mandatory health insurance detaches the financial and consumption side of health care markets, and the concept consumer in merger control becomes non-evident. Patients not visiting the merging hospitals still are affected by price changes through their insurance premiums. External financial effects emerge on not directly affected consumers. We show that applying a restricted interpretation of consumer (neglecting externality) in health care merger control can reverse the relation between the two standards; consumer welfare standard can be weaker than total welfare. Consequently, applying the wrong standard can lead to both clearing socially undesirable and to blocking socially desirable mergers. The possible negative consequences of applying a simple consumer welfare standard in merger control can be even stronger when hospitals maximize quality and put less weight on financial considerations. We also investigate the implications of these results for the practice of merger control.

  14. Competition and Mergers among Nonprofits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prüfer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Should mergers among nonprofit organizations be regulated differently than mergers among for-profit firms? The relevant empirical literature is highly controversial, the theoretical literature is scarce. We analyze the question by modeling duopoly competition with quality-differentiated goods. We

  15. Competition and Mergers among Nonprofits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prüfer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Should mergers among nonprofit organizations be regulated differently than mergers among for-profit firms? The relevant empirical literature is highly controversial, the theoretical literature is scarce. I analyze the question by modeling duopoly competition with quality-differentiated goods. I

  16. Welfare Standards in Hospital Mergers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katona, K.; Canoy, M.F.M.

    2011-01-01

    There is a broad literature on the consequences of applying different welfare standards in merger control. Specific aspects of health care mergers, however, have not yet been considered. Two features of the health care sector are especially relevant. First, health care providers are possi-bly not

  17. On universality in ergoregion mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elvang, Henriette; Figueras, Pau; Hubeny, Veronika E; Rangamani, Mukund; Horowitz, Gary T

    2009-01-01

    We study non-dynamical mergers of ergoregions in d + 1-dimensional vacuum gravity. At the merger point, where the ergosurfaces bounding each ergoregion just touch, solutions exhibit universal behavior when there is rotation only in one plane: the angle between the merging ergosurfaces depends only on the symmetries of the solution, not on any other details of the configuration. We show that universality follows from the fact that the relevant component of Einstein's equation reduces to Laplace's equation at the point of merger. Thus ergoregion mergers mimic mergers of Newtonian equipotentials and have similar universal behavior. For solutions with rotation in more than one plane, universality is lost. We demonstrate universality and non-universality in several explicit examples.

  18. The Insignificance of Major Mergers in Driving Star Formation at z approximately equal to 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviraj, S.; Cohen, S.; Windhorst, R. A.; Silk, J.; O'Connell, R. W.; Dopita, M. A.; Dekel, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Straughn, A.; Rutkowski, M.

    2012-01-01

    We study the significance of major mergers in driving star formation in the early Universe, by quantifying the contribution of this process to the total star formation budget in 80 massive (M(*) > 10(exp 10) Solar M) galaxies at z approx = 2. Employing visually-classified morphologies from rest-frame V-band HST imaging, we find that 55(exp +/-14)% of the star formation budget is hosted by non-interacting late-types, with 27(exp +/-18% in major mergers and 18(exp +/- 6)% in spheroids. Given that a system undergoing a major merger continues to experience star formation driven by other processes at this epoch (e.g. cold accretion, minor mergers), approx 27% is a likely upper limit for the major-merger contribution to star formation activity at this epoch. The ratio of the average specific star formation rate in major mergers to that in the non-interacting late-types is approx 2.2:1, suggesting that the typical enhancement of star formation due to major merging is modest and that just under half the star formation in systems experiencing major mergers is unrelated to the merger itself. Taking this into account, we estimate that the actual major-merger contribution to the star formation budget may be as low as approx 15%. While our study does not preclude a major-merger-dominated. era in the very early Universe, if the major-merger contribution to star formation does not evolve significantly into larger look-back times, then this process has a relatively insignificant role in driving stellar mass assembly over cosmic time.

  19. Endogenous mergers: bidder momentum and market reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kling, G.; Weitzel, G.U.

    2010-01-01

    Recent empirical studies on stock misvaluation as a possible determinant of mergers are inconclusive concerning the central hypothesis that over (under) valuation is negatively (positively) associated with merger announcement returns in stock mergers, but not in cash mergers. We provide empirical

  20. Endogenous mergers: Bidder momentum and market reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kling, G.; Weitzel, U.

    Recent empirical studies on stock misvaluation as a possible determinant of mergers are inconclusive concerning the central hypothesis that over(under)valuation is negatively (positively) associated with merger announcement returns in stock mergers, but not in cash mergers. We provide empirical

  1. Differential-geometrical approach to the dynamics of dissipationless incompressible Hall magnetohydrodynamics: I. Lagrangian mechanics on semidirect product of two volume preserving diffeomorphisms and conservation laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Keisuke

    2015-05-01

    The dynamics of a dissipationless incompressible Hall magnetohydrodynamic (HMHD) medium is formulated using Lagrangian mechanics on a semidirect product of two volume preserving diffeomorphism groups. In the case of {{{T}}3} or E3, the generalized Elsässer variables (GEV) introduced by (Galtier 2006 J. Plasma Phys. 72 721-69) yield remarkably simple expressions of basic formulas and equations such as the structure constants of Lie algebra, the equation of motion, and the conservation laws. Four constants of motion, where three of the four are independent, are naturally derived from the GEV representation of the equation of motion for the HMHD system: total plasma energy, magnetic helicity, hybrid helicity, and the modified cross helicity.

  2. Galaxy Mergers Moulding the CGM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hani, Maan H.; Sparre, Martin; Ellison, Sara L.; Torrey, Paul; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2017-07-01

    Galaxies are surrounded by sizeable gas reservoirs which host a significant amount of metals: the circum-galactic medium (CGM). The CGM acts as a mediator between the galaxy and the extra-galactic medium. However, our understanding of how galaxy mergers, a major evolutionary transformation, impact the CGM remains deficient. We present a theoretical study of the effect of galaxy mergers on the CGM: We use hydrodynamical cosmological zoom-in simulations of a major merger selected from the Illustris project such that the z=0 descendant is a Milky Way-like galaxy, and then re-simulated at a 40 times higher mass resolution. We include post-processing ionization modelling. This work demonstrates the effect the merger has on the characteristic size of the CGM, its metallicity and the predicted covering fraction of various commonly observed gas-phase species, such as H I, C IV and O VI. We show that merger-induced outflows can increase the CGM metallicity by 0.2-0.3 dex within 0.5 Gyr post-merger. These effects last up to 6 Gyr post-merger. While the merger increases the total metal covering fractions by factors of 2-3, the covering fractions of commonly observed UV ions decrease due to the hard ionizing radiation from the active galactic nucleus. The case study of the single simulated major merger presented in this work demonstrates the significant impact that a galaxy interaction can have on the size, metallicity and observed column densities of the CGM (Hani et al. in prep).

  3. Creating lenticular galaxies with mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querejeta, Miguel; Eliche-Moral, M. Carmen; Tapia, Trinidad; Borlaff, Alejandro; van de Ven, Glenn; Lyubenova, Mariya; Martig, Marie; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Méndez-Abreu, Jairo; Zamorano, Jaime; Gallego, Jesús

    2017-03-01

    Lenticular galaxies (S0s) represent the majority of early-type galaxies in the local Universe, but their formation channels are still poorly understood. While galaxy mergers are obvious pathways to suppress star formation and increase bulge sizes, the marked parallelism between spiral and lenticular galaxies (e.g. photometric bulge-disc coupling) seemed to rule out a potential merger origin. Here, we summarise our recent work in which we have shown, through N-body numerical simulations, that disc-dominated lenticulars can emerge from major mergers of spiral galaxies, in good agreement with observational photometric scaling relations. Moreover, we show that mergers simultaneously increase the light concentration and reduce the angular momentum relative to their spiral progenitors. This explains the mismatch in angular momentum and concentration between spirals and lenticulars recently revealed by CALIFA observations, which is hard to reconcile with simple fading mechanisms (e.g. ram-pressure stripping).

  4. 76 FR 37895 - Merger Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ....treas.gov . OTS will post comments and the related index on the OTS Internet Site at http://www.ots... Act. OTS merger regulations are found at 12 CFR 563.22(a), and corporate governance requirements are...

  5. PAIRING OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN UNEQUAL-MASS GALAXY MERGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callegari, Simone; Mayer, Lucio; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Colpi, Monica; Governato, Fabio; Quinn, Thomas; Wadsley, James

    2009-01-01

    We examine the pairing process of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) down to scales of 20-100 pc using a set of N-body/SPH simulations of binary mergers of disk galaxies with mass ratios of 1:4 and 1:10. Our numerical experiments are designed to represent merger events occurring at various cosmic epochs. The initial conditions of the encounters are consistent with the ΛCDM paradigm of structure formation, and the simulations include the effects of radiative cooling, star formation (SF), and supernovae feedback. We find that the pairing of SMBHs depends sensitively on the amount of baryonic mass preserved in the center of the companion galaxies during the last phases of the merger. In particular, due to the combination of gasdynamics and SF, we find that a pair of SMBHs can form efficiently in 1:10 minor mergers, provided that galaxies are relatively gas-rich (gas fractions of 30% of the disk mass) and that the mergers occur at relatively high redshift (z ∼ 3), when dynamical friction timescales are shorter. Since 1:10 mergers are most common events during the assembly of galaxies, and mergers are more frequent at high redshift when galaxies are also more gas-rich, our results have positive implications for future gravitational wave experiments such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna.

  6. Trade Union Mergers: A Survey of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, Grant

    2000-01-01

    Examines trade union mergers highlighting merger forms, merger motivation, role played by union officers, and merger waves. Discusses the consequences of mergers on members and union performance and concludes that union merger activity has had little impact. (Contains 74 references.) (JOW)

  7. University Mergers in Finland: Mediating Global Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Välimaa, Jussi; Aittola, Helena; Ursin, Jani

    2014-01-01

    University mergers have become a common strategy for increasing global competitiveness. In this chapter, the authors analyze the implementation of mergers in Finnish universities from the perspective of social justice as conceived within Finland and other Nordic countries.

  8. DARK MATTER HALO MERGERS: DEPENDENCE ON ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hester, J. A.; Tasitsiomi, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the specific major merger rate as a function of group membership, local environment, and redshift in a very large, 500 h -1 Mpc, cosmological N-body simulation, the Millennium Simulation. The goal is to provide environmental diagnostics of major merger populations in order to test simulations against observations and provide further constraints on major merger driven galaxy evolution scenarios. A halo sample is defined using the maximum circular velocity, which is both well defined for subhalos and closely correlated with galaxy luminosity. Subhalos, including the precursors of major mergers, are severely tidally stripped. Major mergers between subhalos are therefore rare compared to mergers between subhalos and their host halos. Tidal stripping also suppresses dynamical friction, resulting in long major merger timescales when the more massive merger progenitor does not host other subhalos. When other subhalos are present, however, major merger timescales are several times shorter. This enhancement may be due to inelastic unbound collisions between subhalos, which deplete their orbital angular momentum and lead to faster orbital decay. Following these results, we predict that major mergers in group environments are dominated by mergers involving the central galaxy, that the specific major merger rate is suppressed in groups when all group members are considered together, and that the frequency of fainter companions is enhanced for major mergers and their remnants. We also measure an 'assembly bias' in the specific major merger rate in that major mergers of galaxy-like halos are slightly suppressed in overdense environments while major mergers of group-like halos are slightly enhanced. A dynamical explanation for this trend is advanced which calls on both tidal effects and interactions between bound halos beyond the virial radii of locally dynamically dominant halos.

  9. Bundling and mergers in energy markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granier, Laurent; Podesta, Marion

    2010-01-01

    Does bundling trigger mergers in energy industries? We observe mergers between firms belonging to various energy markets, for instance between gas and electricity providers. These mergers enable firms to bundle. We consider two horizontally differentiated markets. In this framework, we show that bundling strategies in energy markets create incentives to form multi-market firms in order to supply bi-energy packages. Moreover, we find that this type of merger is detrimental to social welfare. (author)

  10. Nurse Executive Leadership During Organizational Mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Letty Roth; Schneider, Maureen

    2015-12-01

    The recent growth in hospital mergers and the resultant mergers of nursing service departments (NSDs) have produced a need for chief nursing officers (CNOs) to be aware of implications and anticipated dynamic changes. This article addresses the major issues raised by mergers for NSDs and presents an operational step-by-step checklist for CNOs.

  11. 12 CFR 708b.101 - Mergers generally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mergers generally. 708b.101 Section 708b.101 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS MERGERS OF FEDERALLY-INSURED CREDIT UNIONS; VOLUNTARY TERMINATION OR CONVERSION OF INSURED STATUS Mergers § 708b.101...

  12. 7 CFR 3575.89 - Mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mergers. 3575.89 Section 3575.89 Agriculture... GENERAL Community Programs Guaranteed Loans § 3575.89 Mergers. (a) General. The Agency may approve mergers or consolidations (herein referred to as “mergers”) when the resulting organization will be eligible...

  13. 7 CFR 1779.89 - Mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mergers. 1779.89 Section 1779.89 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE DISPOSAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED LOANS § 1779.89 Mergers. (a) General. The Agency may approve mergers or consolidations (herein referred to as “mergers”) when the resulting organization will...

  14. Is Education Getting Lost in University Mergers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursin, Jani; Aittola, Helena; Henderson, Charles; Valimaa, Jussi

    2010-01-01

    Mergers are common phenomena in higher education institutions. Improving educational quality is typically one of the stated goals of university mergers. Yet, little information exists about how merging institutions approach this goal. This paper presents results from a study of planning documents created prior to four mergers in the Finnish higher…

  15. Accounting for distress in bank mergers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetter, M.; Bos, J. W. B.; Heid, F.; Kolari, J. W.; Kool, C. J. M.; Porath, D.

    2007-01-01

    Most bank merger studies do not control for hidden bailouts, which may lead to biased results. In this study we employ a unique data set of approximately 1000 mergers to analyze the determinants of bank mergers. We use undisclosed information on banks' regulatory intervention history to distinguish

  16. Cross-border merger and domestic welfare

    OpenAIRE

    Arijit Mukherjee

    2006-01-01

    We consider the welfare effect of cross-border merger in presence of international R&D competition. Cross-border merger increases domestic welfare if the bargaining power of the foreign firm and the slope of the marginal cost of R&D are sufficiently low. Otherwise, domestic welfare is lower under cross-border merger.

  17. Matter in compact binary mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jocelyn; LIGO Scientific Collaboration, Virgo Scientific Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Mergers of binary neutron stars or neutron-star/black-hole systems are promising targets for gravitational-wave detection. The dynamics of merging compact objects, and thus their gravitational-wave signatures, are primarily determined by the mass and spin of the components. However, the presence of matter can make an imprint on the final orbits and merger of a binary system. I will outline efforts to understand the impact of neutron-star matter on gravitational waves, using both theoretical and computational input, so that gravitational-wave observations can be used to measure the properties of source systems with neutron-star components.

  18. Medical group mergers: strategies for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Will

    2014-01-01

    As consolidation sweeps over the healthcare industry, many medical groups are considering mergers with other groups as an alternative to employment. While mergers are challenging and fraught with risk, an organized approach to the merger process can dramatically increase the odds for success. Merging groups need to consider the benefits they seek from a merger, identify the obstacles that must be overcome to merge, and develop alternatives to overcome those obstacles. This article addresses the benefits to be gained and issues to be addressed, and provides a tested roadmap that has resulted in many successful medical group mergers.

  19. Essays on mergers and acquisitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faelten, A.I.

    2016-01-01

    “Essays on Mergers and Acquisitions" tackles some of the most prominent business challenges related to M&A activity. The Introduction examines the reasons why deals fail through well-known case studies; Chapter 1 presents a new index measuring countries M&A maturity worldwide; Chapter 2 focus on the

  20. Mergers in galaxy groups. I. Structure and properties of elliptical remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taranu, Dan S.; Dubinski, John; Yee, H. K. C.

    2013-01-01

    We present collisionless simulations of dry mergers in groups of 3 to 25 galaxies to test the hypothesis that elliptical galaxies form at the centers of such groups. Mock observations of the central remnants confirm their similarity to ellipticals, despite having no dissipational component. We vary the profile of the original spiral's bulge and find that ellipticals formed from spirals with exponential bulges have too low Sersic indices. Mergers of spirals with de Vaucouleurs (classical) bulges produce remnants with larger Sersic indices correlated with luminosity, as with Sloan Digital Sky Survey ellipticals. Exponential bulge mergers are better fits to faint ellipticals, whereas classical bulge mergers better match luminous ellipticals. Similarly, luminous ellipticals are better reproduced by remnants undergoing many (>5) mergers, and fainter ellipticals by those with fewer mergers. The remnants follow tight size-luminosity and velocity dispersion-luminosity (Faber-Jackson) relations (<0.12 dex scatter), demonstrating that stochastic merging can produce tight scaling relations if the merging galaxies also follow tight scaling relations. The slopes of the size-luminosity and Faber-Jackson relations are close to observations but slightly shallower in the former case. Both relations' intercepts are offset—remnants are too large but have too low dispersions at fixed luminosity. Some remnants show substantial (v/σ > 0.1) rotational support, although most are slow rotators and few are very fast rotators (v/σ > 0.5). These findings contrast with previous studies concluding that dissipation is necessary to produce ellipticals from binary mergers of spirals. Multiple, mostly minor and dry mergers can produce bright ellipticals, whereas significant dissipation could be required to produce faint, rapidly rotating ellipticals.

  1. HI Absorption in Merger Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Veileux, Sylvain; Baker, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) pass through a luminous starburst phase, followed by a dust-enshrouded AGN phase, and finally evolve into optically bright "naked" quasars once they shed their gas/dust reservoirs through powerful wind events. We present the results of our recent 21- cm HI survey of 21 merger remnants with the Green Bank Telescope. These remnants were selected from the QUEST (Quasar/ULIRG Evolution Study) sample of ULIRGs and PG quasars; our targets are all bolometrically dominated by AGN and sample all phases of the proposed ULIRG -> IR-excess quasar -> optical quasar sequence. We explore whether there is an evolutionary connection between ULIRGs and quasars by looking for the occurrence of HI absorption tracing neutral gas outflows; our results will allow us to identify where along the sequence the majority of a merger's gas reservoir is expelled.

  2. Mergers in European Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, Vera; Teixeira, Pedro N.; Biscaia, Ricardo

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, mergers have been widely used in higher education (HE) to achieve a variety of purposes, ranging from problems of institutional fragmentation to the lack of financial and academic viability, and low institutional efficiency and quality. However, despite a large stream of HE...... experience of 25 European countries with these processes, aiming at identifying main patterns regarding key drivers and motivations. We also analyze the main difficulties identified, the role of funding and financial incentives and, whenever possible, the main impacts and economic gains associated with those...... literature addressing those issues, there has been little attention to the link between funding-related problems and merger processes. Moreover, there is very little comparative research among different higher education systems experiencing those processes. In this paper, we map and characterize the recent...

  3. Can consumers bank on mergers?

    OpenAIRE

    Kerton, Robert / R

    2003-01-01

    How big do banks need to be to gain all the economies of scale? The largest Canadian banks already achieve scale economies and further increases in size can make them "too big to fail." Available evidence indicates normal monopoly risks will be passed on to Canadian firms and consumers if the largest banks merge. Improved service will make Canada's banks world competitive. Despite the banks' enthusiasm for heft to enter the US market, policy measures exist to prevent mergers that are contr...

  4. Disclosure requirements for merger and acquisition transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, D.I.

    1998-01-01

    The legal disclosure requirements for merger and acquisition transactions involving Canadian public companies are described. The focus is on issues regarding merger and acquisition related disclosure, including the potential consequences of failing to provide proper information, Ontario Securities Commission Policy 9.1 considerations regarding valuation, review, and approval, cross border considerations and financing a merger and acquisition transaction. Legal and practical consequences for failing to provide proper disclosure, including the steps involved in establishing the due diligence defence, are also discussed

  5. Mergers and acquisitions: valuation and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVeigh, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    An overview of various aspects of mergers and acquisition transactions in the petroleum industry were presented. Incentives to mergers and acquisitions were reviewed and discussed, among them value opportunity, critical size, incremental tax pools, financial distress, shareholder dissatisfaction, strategic infrastructure position, complementary assets, and undeveloped land inventory. Current trends in mergers and acquisitions were highlighted. An industry checklist for risk assessments discussing financial position, engineering forecasts, and taxation was also included

  6. Potential gains from hospital mergers in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Troels; Bogetoft, Peter; Pedersen, Kjeld Moeller

    2010-12-01

    The Danish hospital sector faces a major rebuilding program to centralize activity in fewer and larger hospitals. We aim to conduct an efficiency analysis of hospitals and to estimate the potential cost savings from the planned hospital mergers. We use Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) to estimate a cost frontier. Based on this analysis, we calculate an efficiency score for each hospital and estimate the potential gains from the proposed mergers by comparing individual efficiencies with the efficiency of the combined hospitals. Furthermore, we apply a decomposition algorithm to split merger gains into technical efficiency, size (scale) and harmony (mix) gains. The motivation for this decomposition is that some of the apparent merger gains may actually be available with less than a full-scale merger, e.g., by sharing best practices and reallocating certain resources and tasks. Our results suggest that many hospitals are technically inefficient, and the expected "best practice" hospitals are quite efficient. Also, some mergers do not seem to lower costs. This finding indicates that some merged hospitals become too large and therefore experience diseconomies of scale. Other mergers lead to considerable cost reductions; we find potential gains resulting from learning better practices and the exploitation of economies of scope. To ensure robustness, we conduct a sensitivity analysis using two alternative returns-to-scale assumptions and two alternative estimation approaches. We consistently find potential gains from improving the technical efficiency and the exploitation of economies of scope from mergers.

  7. Relics as Probes of Galaxy Cluster Mergers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/joaa/032/04/0505-0508. Keywords. Cosmology: large-scale structure of Universe; galaxies: clusters: general, intracluster medium. Abstract. Galaxy clusters grow by mergers with other clusters and galaxy groups. These mergers create shocks within the intracluster medium ...

  8. Mergers and integrated care: the Quebec experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Demers

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available As a researcher, I have studied the efforts to increase the integration of health and social services in Quebec, as well as the mergers in the Quebec healthcare system. These mergers have often been presented as a necessary transition to break down the silos that compartmentalize the services dispensed by various organisations. A review of the studies about mergers and integrated care projects in the Quebec healthcare system, since its inception, show that mergers cannot facilitate integrated care unless they are desired and represent for all of the actors involved an appropriate way to deal with service organisation problems. Otherwise, mergers impede integrated care by creating increased bureaucratisation and standardisation and by triggering conflicts and mistrust among the staff of the merged organisations. It is then preferable to let local actors select the most appropriate organisational integration model for their specific context and offer them resources and incentives to cooperate.

  9. Mergers and integrated care: the Quebec experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Louis

    2013-01-01

    As a researcher, I have studied the efforts to increase the integration of health and social services in Quebec, as well as the mergers in the Quebec healthcare system. These mergers have often been presented as a necessary transition to break down the silos that compartmentalize the services dispensed by various organisations. A review of the studies about mergers and integrated care projects in the Quebec healthcare system, since its inception, show that mergers cannot facilitate integrated care unless they are desired and represent for all of the actors involved an appropriate way to deal with service organisation problems. Otherwise, mergers impede integrated care by creating increased bureaucratisation and standardisation and by triggering conflicts and mistrust among the staff of the merged organisations. It is then preferable to let local actors select the most appropriate organisational integration model for their specific context and offer them resources and incentives to cooperate.

  10. Impact of bank mergers on shareholders’ wealth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odero Naor Juma

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mergers and acquisitions (M&As perform a vital role in corporate finance in enabling firms achieve varied objectives and financial strategies. This study sought to comprehend the impacts that previous bank mergers have had on the shareholders’ wealth. The study location was in Kenya and it adopted the descriptive survey and correlation design in which the success of mergers was measured based on the objective oriented model using the annual accounts. The study computed the return on assets (ROA, return on equity (ROE and the efficiency ratio (EFF as indicators of shareholder value. The results of the commercial banks were analysed for a five-year period (2006-2010. The study reveals that mergers significantly influence shareholder value with banks that have undertaken mergers creating more value than those that have not. Such banks were ascertained to have posted better results than the overall sector.

  11. Risks of Mergers and Acquisitions Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skitsko Volodymyr I.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite structural changes both in the economies of individual countries and in the world at large, the size of the merger/acquisition market is not declining and is tending to grow further. However, uncertainty in the global environment increases the importance of proper analysis, assessment and risk management in merger/acquisition transactions. Using the relevant research and publications by various authors, we have built a general ranking of the significance of merger and acquisition risks according to phases of the indicated process, with comparison of individual risk ratings, based on the publications by authors from Central and Eastern Europe and other countries around the world. The ranking of risks and threats of mergers/acquisitions proposed in this work can be considered one of the most complete for today. Further research needs to focus on the analysis, evaluation, and modeling of merger/acquisition risks, which occupy the top of the ranking, presented by the article.

  12. Galaxy Mergers and Dark Matter Halo Mergers in LCDM: Mass, Redshift, and Mass-Ratio Dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, K.

    2009-01-01

    We employ a high-resolution LCDM N-body simulation to present merger rate predictions for dark matter halos and investigate how common merger-related observables for galaxies - such as close pair counts, starburst counts, and the morphologically disturbed fraction - likely scale with luminosity, stellar mass, merger mass ratio, and redshift from z = 0 to z = 4. We provide a simple 'universal' fitting formula that describes our derived merger rates for dark matter halos a function of dark halo mass, merger mass ratio, and redshift, and go on to predict galaxy merger rates using number density-matching to associate halos with galaxies. For example, we find that the instantaneous merger rate of m/M > 0.3 mass ratio events into typical L ∼> fL * galaxies follows the simple relation dN/dt ≅ 0.03(1+f)Gyr -1 (1+z) 2.1 . Despite the rapid increase in merger rate with redshift, only a small fraction of > 0.4L * high-redshift galaxies (∼ 3% at z = 2) should have experienced a major merger (m/M > 0.3) in the very recent past (t 0.3) in the last 700 Myr and conclude that mergers almost certainly play an important role in delivering baryons and influencing the kinematic properties of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs)

  13. 7 CFR 1782.15 - Mergers and consolidations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mergers and consolidations. 1782.15 Section 1782.15... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) SERVICING OF WATER AND WASTE PROGRAMS § 1782.15 Mergers and consolidations. Mergers... transaction under consideration and the unique facts involved in each transaction. Mergers occur when two or...

  14. An assessment of bank merger success in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetter, Michael

    German banks have experienced a merger wave since the early 1990s. However, the success or bank mergers remains a continuous matter or debate. This paper suggests a taxonomy to evaluate post-merger performance on the basis of cost and profit efficiency (CE and PE). I identify successful mergers as

  15. Analysis of International Mergers and Acquisitions in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božo Matić

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous researches which analyze mergers and acquisitions, but most of them do not focus on a certain industry, but their sample considers companies from different industries. This paper focuses on mergers and acquisitions in the pharmaceutical industry. It is assumed that pharmaceutical companies with no experience in mergers and acquisitions achieve better results in relatively small and domestic mergers and acquisitions while pharmaceutical companies with greater experience in mergers and acquisitions are successful even in bigger and international mergers and acquisitions. Bigger mergers and acquisitions and international mergers and acquisitions are more risky for the companies so lack of experience in mergers and acquisitions additionally increases risks during the process of mergers and acquisitions. On average, such increase of the risk results in lower returns for stock owners of pharmaceutical companies.

  16. Cost effects of hospital mergers in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Helda; Mateus, Céu

    2014-12-01

    The Portuguese hospital sector has been restructured by wide-ranging hospital mergers, following a conviction among policy makers that bigger hospitals lead to lower average costs. Since the effects of mergers have not been systematically evaluated, the purpose of this article is to contribute to this area of knowledge by assessing potential economies of scale to explore and compare these results with realized cost savings after mergers. Considering the period 2003-2009, we estimate the translog cost function to examine economies of scale in the years preceding restructuring. Additionally, we use the difference-in-differences approach to evaluate hospital centres (HC) that occurred between 2004 and 2007, comparing the years after and before mergers. Our findings suggest that economies of scale are present in the pre-merger configuration with an optimum hospital size of around 230 beds. However, the mergers between two or more hospitals led to statistically significant post-merger cost increases, of about 8 %. This result indicates that some HC become too large to explore economies of scale and suggests the difficulty of achieving efficiencies through combining operations and service specialization.

  17. Getting cold feet?: Why health care mergers are abandoned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Anne-Fleur; Postma, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Despite the frequent occurrence and sizeable consequences of merger abandonment in other sectors, there is no thorough understanding of merger abandonment in health care. The purpose of this study is to improve the understanding of determinants of health care merger abandonment. On the basis of the literature on merger abandonment, we formulated a framework on potential determinants of health care merger abandonment. We then constructed a survey that was sent to 70% of all executives of Dutch health care organizations (response rate = 35%, n = 291). We provide descriptive overviews of open, multiple-response, and multiple-choice questions on merger abandonment and use chi-square tests and Fisher's exact tests to test whether abandoned and completed merger processes differ. About 62% of the respondents were involved in at least one merger process during the period of 2005-2012. Thirty-eight percent of these respondents reported that their last merger case ended prematurely (n = 53). The most frequently mentioned determinants of merger abandonment are changing insights on the desirability and feasibility during merger processes, incompatibilities between executives, and insufficient support for the merger from internal stakeholders. We did not find significant relationships between merger abandonment and executives' previous merger experience, degree of organizational diversification, health care sector, size differences, or other organizational differences. Our findings partially confirm results from previous studies, especially with regard to the importance of changing insights and incompatibilities between the involved executives in merger abandonment. We also find that pressure from internal stakeholders, particularly nonexecutive directors, and distrust, fear, and animosity play an important role in merger abandonment. To minimize the organizational and societal costs of abandoned mergers, we advise executives who engage in mergers to construct backup plans with

  18. PENGATURAN MENGENAI HARGA SAHAM WAJAR SEBAGAI BENTUK PERLINDUNGAN HUKUM TERHADAP PEMEGANG SAHAM PUBLIK DALAM MERGER BANK YANG BERBENTUK PERSEROAN TERBUKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pande Yogantara S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Banking crisis that occurred in 1997 and the issuance of Bank Indonesia regulations Number 8/16/PBI/2006 Regarding Single Presence on Indonesian Banking, led to a merger in the banking industry. Merger action is a legal act, not only causes economic and financial consequences but also the juridical consequences. The consequences of the merger to be seen is the impact on the public shareholders especially in the of bank in form public company.In the event of a merger, position of public shareholders is very weak in regard to corporate decision-making (the company. If the views of the ownership of shares, public shareholders are almost always going to lose when dealing with shareholders, because for every share issued has one vote. The results of this research showedCapital Markets Law and BAPEPAM regulation Number IX.G.1 About Merger or Consolidation Enterprises Public Company or the Issuerdoes not regulate further the understanding and clear criteria of "reasonable stock price". But in bank merger the form of public company,necessary services as a professional independent appraisal supporting the capital markets as mentioned in Article 64 and Article 67 of Act Number 8 Year 1995 About Capital Market,which in turn can make a reasonable assessment of the stock price that reflects fairness for public or minority shareholders.

  19. Do municipal mergers improve fiscal outcomes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sune Welling; Houlberg, Kurt; Pedersen, Lene Holm

    2014-01-01

    relationship between municipal mergers and fiscal outcomes is analysed. Measured on the balance between revenues and expenses, liquid assets and debts, municipal mergers improve the fiscal outcomes of the municipalities in a five-year perspective, although the pre-reform effects tend to be negative....... For liquidity and debt, however, the improvement only entails re-establishing the levels prior to the reform. The testing ground is the recent mergers of Danish municipalities, which, it is argued, constitute a quasi-experiment. This forms the basis of a Difference-in-Difference design, allowing the alleviation...

  20. Mergers and acquisitions: a most strategic decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Mike; Tyler, David

    2007-11-01

    Five steps are basic to successfully concluding (or deciding not to conclude) a merger or acquisition: Identify targets. Begin with the end in mind. Choose a transaction team. Perform due diligence. Commit to the deal--or to no deal.

  1. DATA MINING THE GALAXY ZOO MERGERS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DATA MINING THE GALAXY ZOO MERGERS STEVEN BAEHR, ARUN VEDACHALAM, KIRK BORNE, AND DANIEL SPONSELLER Abstract. Collisions between pairs of galaxies usually end in the...

  2. French bank mergers and acquisitions performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houda Ben Said

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we empirically investigate the impact of mergers and acquisitions on French bank performance. Performance is measured by potential gains in efficiency and value creation. We first analyzed efficiency using the data envelopment analysis (DEA under input oriented with variable returns to scale to obtain the efficiency scores. Second, we analyzed the impact on French bank value creation following mergers-acquisitions operations of a set of control variables (model 1 and explicative variables measuring strategic similarities between bidders and targets (model 2. The sample studied is composed of French bank mergers-acquisitions happening between 1996 and 2006 and implying one of the 14 greatest French banking groups. Empirical result showed that mergers and acquisitions have been traduced by an improvement in the overall efficiency by 17.82% and a shareholder value reduction by 5.14%

  3. Avoiding potential pitfalls in mergers and acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanstein, J; Sallis, M

    1992-01-01

    The single most important factor in determining the success of mergers and acquisitions, write Joy Glanstein, Ph.D., and Mary Sallis, is the human equation and in particular benefit plans--the focus of this article.

  4. Multiemployer Pension Plan Terminations, Mergers, and Insolvencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation — A listing of multiemployer pension plan terminations, mergers, and insolvencies reported to the PBGC for the current fiscal year. This data set will be updated...

  5. Managing Employees’ Adaptation in Mergers: Theoretical Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stravinskienė Inga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of scientific literature analysis, the article focuses on the conceptual framework of adaptation of employees and management of this adaptation in the merged organisations. The article reasons the aspect of change and transition in the post-merger context. The author discusses psychological and behavioural responses of organisation staff towards the post-merger and introduces transition phases of employees. There are also highlighted specific features of staff adaptation management in the merged organisations.

  6. SMBH accretion and mergers: removing the symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Andrew; Nixon, Chris

    2013-01-01

    We review recent progress in studying accretion flows on to supermassive black holes (SMBH). Much of this removes earlier assumptions of symmetry and regularity, such as aligned and prograde disc rotation. This allows a much richer variety of effects, often because cancellation of angular momentum allows rapid infall. Potential applications include lower SMBH spins allowing faster mass growth and suppressing gravitational-wave reaction recoil in mergers, gas-assisted SMBH mergers, and near-dynamical accretion in galaxy centres. (paper)

  7. TAX ASPECTS REGARDING THE MERGER AND DIVISION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRAGĂ FILOFTEIA VIORICA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we want to present the tax issues that influencing the merger and division starting from the economic context characterized by a lack of liquidity, business reorganization to streamline the business and from the advantages and disadvantages of this operation achievement. The documentation was performed by consulting the Tax Code, the Methodological Norms regarding the accounting operations of merger, division, liquidation and professional literature.

  8. Double neutron stars: merger rates revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruslinska, Martyna; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Klencki, Jakub; Benacquista, Matthew

    2018-03-01

    We revisit double neutron star (DNS) formation in the classical binary evolution scenario in light of the recent Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo DNS detection (GW170817). The observationally estimated Galactic DNS merger rate of R_MW = 21^{+28}_{-14} Myr-1, based on three Galactic DNS systems, fully supports our standard input physics model with RMW = 24 Myr-1. This estimate for the Galaxy translates in a non-trivial way (due to cosmological evolution of progenitor stars in chemically evolving Universe) into a local (z ≈ 0) DNS merger rate density of Rlocal = 48 Gpc-3 yr-1, which is not consistent with the current LIGO/Virgo DNS merger rate estimate (1540^{+3200}_{-1220} Gpc-3 yr-1). Within our study of the parameter space, we find solutions that allow for DNS merger rates as high as R_local ≈ 600^{+600}_{-300} Gpc-3 yr-1 which are thus consistent with the LIGO/Virgo estimate. However, our corresponding BH-BH merger rates for the models with high DNS merger rates exceed the current LIGO/Virgo estimate of local BH-BH merger rate (12-213 Gpc-3 yr-1). Apart from being particularly sensitive to the common envelope treatment, DNS merger rates are rather robust against variations of several of the key factors probed in our study (e.g. mass transfer, angular momentum loss, and natal kicks). This might suggest that either common envelope development/survival works differently for DNS (˜10-20 M⊙ stars) than for BH-BH (˜40-100 M⊙ stars) progenitors, or high black hole (BH) natal kicks are needed to meet observational constraints for both types of binaries. Our conclusion is based on a limited number of (21) evolutionary models and is valid within this particular DNS and BH-BH isolated binary formation scenario.

  9. Black hole mergers in the universe

    OpenAIRE

    Zwart, Simon Portegies; McMillan, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    Mergers of black-hole binaries are expected to release large amounts of energy in the form of gravitational radiation. However, binary evolution models predict merger rates too low to be of observational interest. In this paper we explore the possibility that black holes become members of close binaries via dynamical interactions with other stars in dense stellar systems. In star clusters, black holes become the most massive objects within a few tens of millions of years; dynamical relaxation...

  10. What Drive the Damage to Post-Merger Operating Performance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soegiharto Soegiharto

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examines whether bidders’ post-merger operat-ing performance are affected by their CEO behavior, premiumspaid to the target firms, the period of mergers, the method ofpayment, the industry of merged firms, capital liquidity, andtheir pre-merger operating performance. Testing the U.S. suc-cessful merger and acquisition data for the period of 1990s, thisstudy finds that in-wave mergers, intra-industry mergers, thepayment of lower premiums, and better pre-merger operatingperformance drive the bidders to produce better post-mergeroperating performance. Three measures of CEO behavior—themain predictor scrutinezed in this study—are proposed andexamined, and the results demonstrate that the effects of thesemeasures on post-merger operating performance are mixed,suggesting that each of the behavioral measures designed in thisstudy may capture CEO behavior in different ways. Keywords: capital liquidity; CEO overconfidence; merger waves, method of pay-ment operating performance

  11. Particle ejection during mergers of dark matter halos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carucci, Isabella P.; Sparre, Martin; Hansen, Steen H. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, Copenhagen, 2100 Denmark (Denmark); Joyce, Michael, E-mail: carucci@dark-cosmology.dk, E-mail: sparre@dark-cosmology.dk, E-mail: hansen@dark-cosmology.dk, E-mail: joyce@lpnhe.in2p3.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Nucléaire et Hautes Énergies, Université Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6, CNRS IN2P3 UMR 7585, 4 Place Jussieu, Paris Cedex 05, 75752 France (France)

    2014-06-01

    Dark matter halos are built from accretion and merging. During merging some of the dark matter particles may be ejected with velocities higher than the escape velocity. We use both N-body simulations and single-particle smooth-field simulations to demonstrate that rapid changes to the mean field potential are responsible for such ejection, and in particular that dynamical friction plays no significant role in it. Studying a range of minor mergers, we find that typically between 5–15% of the particles from the smaller of the two merging structures are ejected. We also find that the ejected particles originate essentially from the small halo, and more specifically are particles in the small halo which pass later through the region in which the merging occurs.

  12. Change commitment in low-status merger partners: The role of information processing, relative ingroup prototypicality, and merger patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Miriam; Kavanagh, Eithne; Kounov, Pavel; Jarosz, Sywlia; Waldzus, Sven; Collins, Elizabeth C; Giessner, Steffen

    2017-09-01

    Merger announcements cause stress among employees, often leading to low change commitment, especially among employees from the lower-status merger partner. Such stress influences how deeply employees process merger-relevant information. Previous research examined how merger patterns that preserve versus change status differences impact merger support, but did not address how employees' information processing may influence this relationship. The current research addresses this gap through a scenario experiment, focusing on the low-status merger partner. The interplay between merger patterns and information processing was examined regarding employees' prototypicality claims in relation to merger support. Results suggest that an integration-equality merger pattern increases change commitment via prototypicality claims in the new organization, conditional to employees' systematic information processing. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  13. When Mergers Fail: A Case Study on the Critical Role of External Stakeholders in Merger Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensaker, Bjørn; Persson, Mats; Pinheiro, Rómulo

    2016-01-01

    One can, in principle, identify numerous arguments for mergers in higher education (HE), including efficiency, diversity, quality, and regional needs. This diversity can be explained by the growing societal interest in the sector, not least concerning the contributions from HE to society at large. However, research on merger processes has tended…

  14. The challenge of merging : Merger patterns, premerger status, and merger support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giessner, [No Value; Täuber, Susanne; Viki, GT; Otten, S; Terry, DJ; Giessner, S.R

    Employees of merging organizations often show resistance to the merger. The employees' support depends on the companies' premerger status and on the merger pattern. Based on an inter-group perspective, three studies were conducted to investigate the influence of premerger status (high, low) and

  15. Binary neutron star merger simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruegmann, Bernd [Jena Univ. (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Our research focuses on the numerical tools necessary to solve Einstein's equations. In recent years we have been particularly interested in spacetimes consisting of two neutron stars in the final stages of their evolution. Because of the emission of gravitational radiation, the objects are driven together to merge; the emitted gravitational wave signal is visualized. This emitted gravitational radiation carries energy and momentum away from the system and contains information about the system. Late last year the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) began searches for these gravitational wave signals at a sensitivity at which detections are expected. Although such systems can radiate a significant amount of their total mass-energy in gravitational waves, the gravitational wave signals one expects to receive on Earth are not strong, since sources of gravitational waves are often many millions of light years away. Therefore one needs accurate templates for the radiation one expects from such systems in order to be able to extract them out of the detector's noise. Although analytical models exist for compact binary systems when the constituents are well separated, we need numerical simulation to investigate the last orbits before merger to obtain accurate templates and validate analytical approximations. Due to the strong nonlinearity of the equations and the large separation of length scales, these simulations are computationally demanding and need to be run on large supercomputers. When matter is present the computational cost as compared to pure black hole (vacuum) simulations increases even more due to the additional matter fields. But also more interesting astrophysical phenomena can happen. In fact, there is the possibility for a strong electromagnetic signal from the merger (e.g., a short gamma-ray burst or lower-energy electromagnetic signatures from the ejecta) and significant neutrino emission. Additionally, we can expect that

  16. The Dynamics and Cold Gas Content of Luminous Infrared Galaxy Mergers in the Local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privon, G. C.

    2014-08-01

    Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs; 10^11 ≤ L_IR [8 - 1000 μm]/L_sun selected sample. The proximity of these systems enables high spatial resolution study of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and extreme star formation in these objects. New maps of the neutral hydrogen (HI) emission are presented for systems morphologically classified in the optical and mid-infrared as non-merging or pre-merger systems. The results of this study suggests that some infrared-selected galaxies may be minor mergers or interactions which are being viewed so soon after first pass that the stellar disk has not yet been significantly disturbed. Galaxy mergers appear to drive much of the enhanced activity observed in U/LIRGs; understanding the merger state of these systems provides a context for observations of star formation and AGN properties. In order to constrain the merger stage, dynamical models for a sample of nine systems were matched to the observed kinematics and morphology as obtained from optical imaging and interferometric HI maps. The resulting models are used not only to constrain the merger stage, but also the encounter geometry of the precursor. Based on these dynamical models a new merger stage classification is presented, which re-scales objects to a common timeline is used to place the observations in context. Applications of this dynamical merger stage to the study of star formation rates and indicators of AGN activity are presented. Finally, newly obtained measurements of the galaxy-integrated 1-0 rotational transitions of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and formylium (HCO^+) in a sample of U/LIRGs are used to investigate the ratio of HCN (1-0) to HCO (1-0) and its dependence on mid-infrared indicators of AGN strength. In contrast to previous claims, it is demonstrated that high values of this ratio are not uniquely linked to the presence of an AGN, but can be achieved in systems dominated by star formation. This suggests the excitation of these high critical density molecular gas

  17. Chandra Observations of Galaxy Zoo Mergers: Frequency of Binary Active Nuclei in Massive Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Oh, Kyuseok; Bonning, Erin W.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 1011 M that already have optical AGN signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N(sub H) approx merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGN in these mergers are rare (0-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

  18. The DaimlerChrysler merger – a cultural mismatch? The DaimlerChrysler merger – a cultural mismatch?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Hollmann

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false PT-BR X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabela normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} American company Chrysler Corporation due to differences in the organizational cultures involved or due to a so-called ‘clash of culture'. What happens when two successful car producers with different know-how and a different knowledge background, different work processes, different product portfolios and last but not least, completely different corporate cultures decide to merge? Daimler-Benz and Chrysler wanted to strengthen their position during economically difficult times for the car industry by juggling the crisis together and they hoped to be able to combine their strengths. Therefore the two companies decided to fuse in 1998. But not even ten years later Daimler-Benz once again sold all its shares of the Chrysler division. The dream to become the third biggest car producer of the world, behind General Motors and Ford, burst. The expected and wished for synergy effects stayed out. Instead of gaining competitive advantage over their competitors, the merger rushed the two car producers ever deeper into the crisis and did not provide the companies with the necessary tools to overcome the recession. The presented paper deals with the failed merger of the German company Daimler-Benz with the U.S. American company Chrysler

  19. Risk Management in Mergers and Acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry O. Verdiev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available M&A statistics show that less than a third of newly merged companies has realized their planned synergistic effects and increased shareholder value. According to the author, such disgusting situation is due to improper planning and failure of corporate management to understand the importance of risk management in M&A. Lack of practice in identification, evaluation, mitigation and regular monitoring of risks leads to the situation when many companies merge despite the fact that the merger bears substantial risks. Corporate management fails to include risk mitigation expenses in merger costs. In many cases, risk mitigation expenses may be so substantive that the merger loses its attractiveness. Only few companies implement risk management methodology while planning M&A activity. This methodology may anticipate and minimize the consequences of various risk factors that negatively influence integration process. The article suggests an implementation of risk management best practice. This risk management best practice may act as an effective tool of successful realization of synergistic effects in M&A and may be helpful in increasing shareholder value in post-merger period. Risk management is conducted throughout the stages of merger and includes identification, analysis, assessment, management and monitoring of risks. Implementation of risk management at early stages of merger planning significantly decreases uncertainty in relation to achievement of financial and operational goals of newly merged company. The article provides with typical M&A risk matrix that may be adapted for specific M&A project. Risk matrix includes a register of risks sorted by stages of M&A deal, quality assessment of their probability, influence and impact on merger as well as risk mitigation methods.

  20. Radioactively powered emission from black hole-neutron star mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Wanajo, Shinya; Hotokezaka, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Kiuchi, Kenta; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Shibata, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Detection of the electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) sources is important to unveil the nature of compact binary coalescences. We perform three-dimensional, time-dependent, multi-frequency radiative transfer simulations for radioactively powered emission from the ejecta of black hole (BH)-neutron star (NS) mergers. Depending on the BH to NS mass ratio, spin of the BH, and equations of state of dense matter, BH-NS mergers can eject more material than NS-NS mergers. In such cases, radioactively powered emission from the BH-NS merger ejecta can be more luminous than that from NS-NS mergers. We show that, in spite of the expected larger distances to BH-NS merger events, the observed brightness of BH-NS mergers can be comparable to or even higher than that of NS-NS mergers. We find that, when the tidally disrupted BH-NS merger ejecta are confined to a small solid angle, the emission from BH-NS merger ejecta tends to be bluer than that from NS-NS merger ejecta for a given total luminosity. Thanks to this property, we might be able to distinguish BH-NS merger events from NS-NS merger events by multi-band observations of the radioactively powered emission. In addition to the GW observations, such electromagnetic observations can potentially provide independent information on the progenitors of GW sources and the nature of compact binary coalescences.

  1. Spin Complicates Eccentric BH-NS Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    When a neutron star (NS) has a glancing encounter with a black hole (BH), its spin has a significant effect on the outcome, according to new simulations run by William East of Stanford University and his collaborators. Spotting an Eccentric Merger. In a traditional BH-NS merger, the two objects orbit each other quasi-circularly as they spiral in. But there's another kind of merger that's possible in high-density environments like galactic nuclei or globular clusters: a dynamical capture merger, in which a NS and BH pass each other just close enough that the gravity of the black hole "catches" the NS, leading the two objects to merge with very eccentric orbits. During an eccentric merger, the NS can be torn apart -- at which point some fraction of the tidally-disrupted material will escape the system, while some fraction instead accretes back onto the BH. Knowing these fractions is important for being able to model the expected electromagnetic signatures for the merger: the unbound material can power transients like kilonovae, whereas the accreting material may be the cause of short gamma-ray bursts. The amount of material available for events like these would change their observable strengths. Testing the Effects of Spin. To see whether NS spin has an impact on the behavior of the merger, East and collaborators use a general-relativistic hydrodynamic code to simulate the glancing encounter of a BH and a NS with dimensionless spin between a=0 (non-spinning) and a=0.756 (rotation period of 1 ms). They also vary the separation of the first encounter. The group finds that changing the NS's spin can change a number of outcomes of the merger. To start with, it can affect whether the NS is captured by the BH, or if the encounter is glancing and then both objects carry on their merry way. And if the NS is trapped by the BH and torn apart, then the higher the NS's spin, the more matter outside of the BH ends up unbound, instead of getting trapped into an accretion disk

  2. [Effects of hospital mergers on health economy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebrigtsen, Tor

    2010-05-06

    Norwegian hospitals have been characterised by increasing activity, expansion of services and increasing costs for a long time. Differences in quality and accessibility have been documented between hospitals in various geographic locations. Transferral of hospital ownership to the state (from 2002) aimed at increasing capacities and improving quality of services, but also at restricting the increase of costs. These goals have only been partly met. The structure of hospital trusts and organisation of services are therefore continuously debated. This literature review aims at examining whether hospital mergers can reduce costs and at the same time increase the quality of services offered. Literature was identified through a Medline search using the terms "hospital", "merger" and "cost saving". The results are summarized and discussed. Seven original studies of totally 476 hospital mergers (in the USA, Great Britain and Norway) were identified in the period 1982 - 2000. The literature indicates that hospital mergers have a potential to reduce costs by about 10 % if the process achieves complete fusion of previously independent organisations, with a more optimal dimensioning of services and development of a common organizational culture. Collaboration between top management and the professional bureaucracy are prerequisites for success. Mergers are associated with a significant risk of unexpected problems and temporary reduced quality of the services.

  3. Can mergers make slowly rotating elliptical galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, S.D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The results of numerical experiments are used to guide an analytic discussion of hyperbolic mergers among an uncorrelated galaxy population. The expected merger rate is derived as a function of progenitor mass and relative angular momentum, and is used to predict the distribution of the parameter V/sub c//sigma 0 for merger products where V/sub c/ is the maximum observed rotation velocity in a galaxy and sigma 0 is its central velocity dispersion. The median value of this parameter for mergers between comparable galaxies is estimated to be 0.65 and is higher than the observed value in any of the 14 galaxies for which data are available. It seems unlikely that most elliptical galaxies are the result of single or multiple mergers between initially unbound stellar systems; further observational and theoretical work is suggested which should lead to a conclusive test of this picture. The present arguments cannot, however, exclude formation from low angular momentum elliptical orbits

  4. BPASS predictions for binary black hole mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, J. J.; Stanway, E. R.

    2016-11-01

    Using the Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis code, BPASS, we have calculated the rates, time-scales and mass distributions for binary black hole (BH) mergers as a function of metallicity. We consider these in the context of the recently reported first Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) event detection. We find that the event has a very low probability of arising from a stellar population with initial metallicity mass fraction above Z = 0.010 (Z ≳ 0.5 Z⊙). Binary BH merger events with the reported masses are most likely in populations below 0.008 (Z ≲ 0.4 Z⊙). Events of this kind can occur at all stellar population ages from 3 Myr up to the age of the Universe, but constitute only 0.1-0.4 per cent of binary BH mergers between metallicities of Z = 0.001 and 0.008. However at metallicity Z = 10-4, 26 per cent of binary BH mergers would be expected to have the reported masses. At this metallicity, the progenitor merger times can be close to ≈10 Gyr and rotationally mixed stars evolving through quasi-homogeneous evolution, due to mass transfer in a binary, dominate the rate. The masses inferred for the BHs in the binary progenitor of GW 150914 are amongst the most massive expected at anything but the lowest metallicities in our models. We discuss the implications of our analysis for the electromagnetic follow-up of future LIGO event detections.

  5. Merger 1980: The Organizational Integration of College Mental Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Thomas V., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The merger of a traditional counseling center with a traditional comprehensive student health center at Indiana University, Bloomington is described. Important variables, costs and benefits, suggestions for similar mergers, and the outcome of the Indiana University program are discussed. (CJ)

  6. Minority Games

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzler, R

    2005-01-01

    New branches of scientific disciplines often have a few paradigmatic models that serve as a testing ground for theories and a starting point for new inquiries. In the late 1990s, one of these models found fertile ground in the growing field of econophysics: the Minority Game (MG), a model for speculative markets that combined conceptual simplicity with interesting emergent behaviour and challenging mathematics. The two basic ingredients were the minority mechanism (a large number of players have to choose one of two alternatives in each round, and the minority wins) and limited rationality (each player has a small set of decision rules, and chooses the more successful ones). Combining these, one observes a phase transition between a crowded and an inefficient market phase, fat-tailed price distributions at the transition, and many other nontrivial effects. Now, seven years after the first paper, three of the key players-Damien Challet, Matteo Marsili and Yi-Cheng Zhang-have published a monograph that summarizes the current state of the science. The book consists of two parts: a 100-page overview of the various aspects of the MG, and reprints of many essential papers. The first chapters of Part I give a well-written description of the motivation and the history behind the MG, and then go into the phenomenology and the mathematical treatment of the model. The authors emphasize the 'physics' underlying the behaviour and give coherent, intuitive explanations that are difficult to extract from the original papers. The mathematics is outlined, but calculations are not carried out in great detail (maybe they could have been included in an appendix). Chapter 4 then discusses how and why the MG is a model for speculative markets, how it can be modified to give a closer fit to observed market statistics (in particular, reproducing the 'stylized facts' of fat-tailed distributions and volatility clustering), and what conclusions one can draw from the behaviour of the MG when

  7. Financial Synergy in Mergers and Acquisitions in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Basmah Al Qudaiby; Muhammad Rahatullah Khan

    2013-01-01

    Businesses today consider mergers and acquisitions a new strategy for their company’s growth. Companies aim to grow through sales’ increase, assets purchase, profits’ accumulation and market share gains. The better way for achieving these targets is by getting into either a Merger or an Acquisition. As a matter of fact, growth through mergers and acquisitions has been a critical part of the success of many companies operating in the new economy. Mergers and Acquisitions are an important facto...

  8. Galaxy mergers moulding the circum-galactic medium - I. The impact of a major merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hani, Maan H.; Sparre, Martin; Ellison, Sara L.; Torrey, Paul; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2018-03-01

    Galaxies are surrounded by sizeable gas reservoirs which host a significant amount of metals: the circum-galactic medium (CGM). The CGM acts as a mediator between the galaxy and the extragalactic medium. However, our understanding of how galaxy mergers, a major evolutionary transformation, impact the CGM remains deficient. We present a theoretical study of the effect of galaxy mergers on the CGM. We use hydrodynamical cosmological zoom-in simulations of a major merger selected from the Illustris project such that the z = 0 descendant has a halo mass and stellar mass comparable to the Milky Way. To study the CGM we then re-simulated this system at a 40 times better mass resolution, and included detailed post-processing ionization modelling. Our work demonstrates the effect the merger has on the characteristic size of the CGM, its metallicity, and the predicted covering fraction of various commonly observed gas-phase species, such as H I, C IV, and O VI. We show that merger-induced outflows can increase the CGM metallicity by 0.2-0.3 dex within 0.5 Gyr post-merger. These effects last up to 6 Gyr post-merger. While the merger increases the total metal covering fractions by factors of 2-3, the covering fractions of commonly observed UV ions decrease due to the hard ionizing radiation from the active galactic nucleus, which we model explicitly. Our study of the single simulated major merger presented in this work demonstrates the significant impact that a galaxy interaction can have on the size, metallicity, and observed column densities of the CGM.

  9. 7 CFR 1735.62 - Approval of acquisitions and mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Approval of acquisitions and mergers. 1735.62 Section 1735.62 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE... Mortgage Controls on Acquisitions and Mergers § 1735.62 Approval of acquisitions and mergers. (a) If a...

  10. 7 CFR 1717.152 - Required documentation for all mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Required documentation for all mergers. 1717.152... ELECTRIC LOANS Mergers and Consolidations of Electric Borrowers § 1717.152 Required documentation for all mergers. In order for RUS to advance funds, send bills, and otherwise conduct business with a successor...

  11. 29 CFR 4231.3 - Requirements for mergers and transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for mergers and transfers. 4231.3 Section 4231..., REORGANIZATION, TERMINATION, AND OTHER RULES APPLICABLE TO MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS MERGERS AND TRANSFERS BETWEEN MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS § 4231.3 Requirements for mergers and transfers. (a) General requirements. A plan sponsor...

  12. 7 CFR 1735.19 - Mergers and consolidations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mergers and consolidations. 1735.19 Section 1735.19... Basic Policies § 1735.19 Mergers and consolidations. RUS does not make loans for the sole purpose of merging or consolidating telephone organizations. After a merger or consolidation, RUS will consider...

  13. 7 CFR 1710.108 - Mergers and consolidations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mergers and consolidations. 1710.108 Section 1710.108... and Basic Policies § 1710.108 Mergers and consolidations. (a) RUS encourages its borrowers to consider... operating efficiency and financial soundness. (b) After a merger or consolidation, RUS will give priority...

  14. 29 CFR 4011.6 - Mergers, consolidations, and spinoffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mergers, consolidations, and spinoffs. 4011.6 Section 4011... REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS DISCLOSURE TO PARTICIPANTS § 4011.6 Mergers, consolidations, and spinoffs. In the case of a plan involved in a merger, consolidation, or spinoff transaction that becomes...

  15. 7 CFR 1717.615 - Consolidations and mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consolidations and mergers. 1717.615 Section 1717.615... Controls § 1717.615 Consolidations and mergers. A distribution or power supply borrower may without the..., merger, conveyance or transfer shall be on such terms as shall fully preserve the lien and security of...

  16. Rethinking and re-imagining mergers in further and higher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Higher and Further Education in South Africa has been characterized by major changes regarding the shape and size of the system. One of these changes has been the so-called mergers. This article addresses the scenario which contributed to the mergers. An overview of various frameworks or models for mergers is ...

  17. The Fate of Neutron Star Binary Mergers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piro, Anthony L. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Giacomazzo, Bruno [Physics Department, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Perna, Rosalba, E-mail: piro@carnegiescience.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Following merger, a neutron star (NS) binary can produce roughly one of three different outcomes: (1) a stable NS, (2) a black hole (BH), or (3) a supramassive, rotationally supported NS, which then collapses to a BH following angular momentum losses. Which of these fates occur and in what proportion has important implications for the electromagnetic transient associated with the mergers and the expected gravitational wave (GW) signatures, which in turn depend on the high density equation of state (EOS). Here we combine relativistic calculations of NS masses using realistic EOSs with Monte Carlo population synthesis based on the mass distribution of NS binaries in our Galaxy to predict the distribution of fates expected. For many EOSs, a significant fraction of the remnants are NSs or supramassive NSs. This lends support to scenarios in which a quickly spinning, highly magnetized NS may be powering an electromagnetic transient. This also indicates that it will be important for future GW observatories to focus on high frequencies to study the post-merger GW emission. Even in cases where individual GW events are too low in signal to noise to study the post merger signature in detail, the statistics of how many mergers produce NSs versus BHs can be compared with our work to constrain the EOS. To match short gamma-ray-burst (SGRB) X-ray afterglow statistics, we find that the stiffest EOSs are ruled out. Furthermore, many popular EOSs require a significant fraction of ∼60%–70% of SGRBs to be from NS–BH mergers rather than just binary NSs.

  18. Mergers and acquisitions in the oil and gas industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corlay, C.; Huby, D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper focuses on mergers and acquisitions in the oil and gas industries, and lists the most important mergers in terms of transaction value for the period 1981-1997, and plots oil and gas mergers and acquisitions activity by sector and by major region. The mean operation indicator in 1998 in terms of reserves, production and refining capacity of the major companies are tabulated. The impact of the mergers on the oil and gas markets are examined, and issues concerning these mergers and acquisitions are explored. (UK)

  19. Convergence properties of halo merger trees; halo and substructure merger rates across cosmic history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Gregory B.; Mutch, Simon J.; Croton, Darren J.; Wyithe, Stuart

    2017-12-01

    We introduce GBPTREES: an algorithm for constructing merger trees from cosmological simulations, designed to identify and correct for pathological cases introduced by errors or ambiguities in the halo finding process. GBPTREES is built upon a halo matching method utilizing pseudo-radial moments constructed from radially sorted particle ID lists (no other information is required) and a scheme for classifying merger tree pathologies from networks of matches made to-and-from haloes across snapshots ranging forward-and-backward in time. Focusing on SUBFIND catalogues for this work, a sweep of parameters influencing our merger tree construction yields the optimal snapshot cadence and scanning range required for converged results. Pathologies proliferate when snapshots are spaced by ≲0.128 dynamical times; conveniently similar to that needed for convergence of semi-analytical modelling, as established by Benson et al. Total merger counts are converged at the level of ∼5 per cent for friends-of-friends (FoF) haloes of size np ≳ 75 across a factor of 512 in mass resolution, but substructure rates converge more slowly with mass resolution, reaching convergence of ∼10 per cent for np ≳ 100 and particle mass mp ≲ 109 M⊙. We present analytic fits to FoF and substructure merger rates across nearly all observed galactic history (z ≤ 8.5). While we find good agreement with the results presented by Fakhouri et al. for FoF haloes, a slightly flatter dependence on merger ratio and increased major merger rates are found, reducing previously reported discrepancies with extended Press-Schechter estimates. When appropriately defined, substructure merger rates show a similar mass ratio dependence as FoF rates, but with stronger mass and redshift dependencies for their normalization.

  20. THE POPULATION OF HELIUM-MERGER PROGENITORS: OBSERVATIONAL PREDICTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryer, Chris L.; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Bulik, Tomasz; Berger, Edo; Thöne, Christina; Ellinger, Carola

    2013-01-01

    The helium-merger gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitor is produced by the rapid accretion onto a compact remnant (neutron star or black hole) when it undergoes a common envelope inspiral with its companion's helium core. This merger phase produces a very distinct environment around these outbursts and recent observations suggest that, in some cases, we are detecting the signatures of the past merger in the GRB afterglow. These observations allow us, for the first time, to study the specific features of the helium-merger progenitor. In this paper, we couple population synthesis calculations to our current understanding of GRB engines and common envelope evolution to make observational predictions for the helium-merger GRB population. Many mergers do not produce GRB outbursts and we discuss the implications of these mergers with the broader population of astrophysical transients.

  1. Black Hole Mergers as Probes of Structure Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea-Munoz, Emily

    2008-01-01

    Observations of gravitational waves from massive black hole (MBH) mergers can provide us with important clues about the era of structure formation in the early universe. Previous research in this field has been limited to calculating merger rates of MBHs using different models where many assumptions are made about the specific values of physical parameters of the mergers, resulting in merger rate estimates that span 5 to 6 orders of magnitude. We develop a semi-analytical, phenomenological model that includes plausible combinations of several physical parameters involved in the mergers. which we then turn around to determine how well LISA observations will be able to enhance our understanding of the universe during the critical z approximately equal to 5-30 structure formation era. We do this by generating synthetic LISA observable data (masses, redshifts, merger rates), which are then analyzed using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. This allows us to constrain the physical parameters of the mergers.

  2. DRY MERGER RATE AND POST-MERGER FRACTION IN THE COMA CLUSTER CORE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero, Juan P.; Campusano, Luis E.; Haines, Christopher P.; De Propris, Roberto; Weinzirl, Tim; Jogee, Shardha

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the dry merger activity in the Coma cluster, using a spectroscopically complete sample of 70 red-sequence (RS) galaxies, most of which (∼75%) are located within 0.2R 200 (∼0.5 Mpc) from the cluster center, with data from the Coma Treasury Survey obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. The fraction of close galaxy pairs in the sample is the proxy employed for the estimation of the merger activity. We identify 5 pairs and 1 triplet, enclosing a total of 13 galaxies, based on limits on projected separation and line-of-sight velocity difference. Of these systems, none show signs of ongoing interaction, and therefore we do not find any true mergers in our sample. This negative result sets a 1σ upper limit of 1.5% per Gyr for the major dry merger rate, consistent with the low rates expected in present-day clusters. Detailed examination of the images of all the RS galaxies in the sample reveals only one with low surface brightness features identifiable as the remnant of a past merger or interaction, implying a post-merger fraction below 2%

  3. Mergers and acquisitions involving equine veterinary practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Brad R; McCafferty, Owen E

    2009-12-01

    This article discusses mergers and acquisitions involving equine veterinary practices. Combining practices can be professionally and economically advantageous but requires a great deal of thought, planning, and implementation. If due diligence is performed and true business teamwork is undertaken, the benefits can be enormous and rewarding.

  4. Mergers and alliances the wider view

    CERN Document Server

    Woodsworth, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Volume 36 of Advances in Librarianship seeks to provide a broad review of the factors that lead to mergers and other alliances, the methods used to ensure effective and successful collaborations, and descriptions of the factors which contributed to less successful efforts at consolidation.

  5. Resilience and Coping After Hospital Mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Cynthia; Calo, Oriana; Harrison, Georgia; Mahoney, Kathleen; Zavotsky, Kathleen Evanovich

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between resilience and coping in frontline nurses working in a healthcare system that has recently undergone a merger. Hospital mergers are common in the current healthcare environment. Mergers can provide hospital nurses the opportunity to use and develop positive coping strategies to help remain resilient during times of change. An anonymous-survey, quantitative, exploratory, descriptive study design was used. Data were obtained from an electronic survey that was made available to all nurses working in a 3-hospital system located in the northeast. Overall, the results showed that, when nurses reported using positive coping strategies, they report higher levels of resilience. The levels of resilience also varied from campus to campus. The campus that has been through 2 recent mergers reported the highest levels of resilience. This study suggests that, during times of change in the workplace, if nurses are encouraged to use positive coping strategies, they may have higher levels of resilience. This changing environment provides the clinical nurse specialists/clinical nurse educators the opportunity to foster and support frontline nurses in the use of healthy coping strategies and to help improve and maintain a high level of resilience, which is critical in today's healthcare environment.

  6. Fueling QSOs: the relevance of mergers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bennert, N.; Canalizo, G.; Jungwiert, Bruno; Stockton, A.; Schweizer, F.; Peng, Ch.; Lacy, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 4 (2008), s. 1247-1250 ISSN 0037-8720 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : galaxy mergers * quasars * photometry Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  7. Mergers and innovation in the pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comanor, William S; Scherer, F M

    2013-01-01

    Conflicting trends confound the pharmaceutical industry. The productivity of pharmaceutical innovation has declined in recent years. At the same time, the cohort of large companies who are the leading engines of pharmaceutical R&D has become increasingly concentrated. The concurrent presence of these trends is not sufficient to determine causation. In response to lagging innovation prospects, some companies have sought refuge in mergers and acquisitions to disguise their dwindling prospects or gain R&D synergies. On the other hand, the increased concentration brought on by recent mergers may have contributed to the declining rate of innovation. In this paper, we consider the second of these causal relationships: the likely impact of the recent merger wave among the largest pharmaceutical companies on the rate of innovation. In other words, have recent mergers, which may have been taken in response to lagging innovation, represented a self-defeating strategy that only made industry outcomes worse? Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficiency Effects of Bank Mergers and Acquisitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P. Huizinga; J.H.M. Nelissen (Jan); R. Vander Vennet

    2001-01-01

    textabstractNext to technological progress and deregulation, the introduction of the euro is widely considered to be an important catalyst for bank consolidation in Europe. In order to assess the public policy issues surrounding bank mergers, this paper analyzes the efficiency effects of 52

  9. Merger and Acquisition in the Banking Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Szewczyk

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents situation on mergers and acquisitions (MA in banking sector during last twenty years. The main motives are selected and analyzed. All is explained on the base on research reports of the Deutsche Bundesbank and the European Central Bank.

  10. Black Hole Mergers in the Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portegies Zwart SF; McMillan

    2000-01-01

    Mergers of black hole binaries are expected to release large amounts of energy in the form of gravitational radiation. However, binary evolution models predict merger rates that are too low to be of observational interest. In this Letter, we explore the possibility that black holes become members of close binaries via dynamical interactions with other stars in dense stellar systems. In star clusters, black holes become the most massive objects within a few tens of millions of years; dynamical relaxation then causes them to sink to the cluster core, where they form binaries. These black hole binaries become more tightly bound by superelastic encounters with other cluster members and are ultimately ejected from the cluster. The majority of escaping black hole binaries have orbital periods short enough and eccentricities high enough that the emission of gravitational radiation causes them to coalesce within a few billion years. We predict a black hole merger rate of about 1.6x10-7 yr-1 Mpc-3, implying gravity-wave detection rates substantially greater than the corresponding rates from neutron star mergers. For the first-generation Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO-I), we expect about one detection during the first 2 years of operation. For its successor LIGO-II, the rate rises to roughly one detection per day. The uncertainties in these numbers are large. Event rates may drop by about an order of magnitude if the most massive clusters eject their black hole binaries early in their evolution.

  11. Synergy disclosures in mergers and acquisitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D.R.P. Dutordoir (Marie); P.G.J. Roosenboom (Peter); M. Teixeira de Vasconcelos (Manuel)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe examine bidding firms’ motives for disclosing a synergy forecast when announcing a merger or acquisition. Our sample consists of 1,990 M&A deals, of which 345 announce synergy estimates. Our results suggest that synergy disclosures serve to obtain a more favorable market reception for

  12. Shareholders’ expectations, aspiration levels, and mergers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diecidue, E.; van de Ven, J.; Weitzel, U.

    This paper offers a new explanation of value-reducing mergers and stock market driven takeovers by introducing recent research on aspiration levels and individual decision making under risk. If market valuation constitutes an aspiration level for managers, we show that managers may be tempted to

  13. A CEO roundtable on making mergers succeed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, A; Bohnett, D; Liddy, E; Komansky, D; Kozlowski, D; Leschly, J; Gupta, R; McDonald, M; Avery, B; Moore, N; Krekel, T

    2000-01-01

    The announcement in January of the merger between America Online and Time Warner marked the convergence of the two most important business trends of the last five years--the rise of the Internet and the resurgence of mergers and acquisitions. M&A activity is at a fever pitch, spurred in large part by the breathtaking influx of capital into the Internet space. And all signs indicate the trend will only accelerate. Against this background, an impressive group of experienced deal makers came together to share their experiences of what makes mergers work. They were assembled in Scottsdale, Arizona, under the auspices of the M&A Group, a professional society formed in 1999 for CEOs interested in M&A as a business strategy. Participants included top executives from Internet start-ups like Teligent; venture capital firms like Baroda Ventures; financial institutions like Merrill Lynch and PricewaterhouseCoopers; and major corporations like Allstate, Tyco International, SmithKline Beecham, Rohm and Haas, VF, Crown Cork & Seal, and Hughes Space and Communications. The spirited and surprisingly frank discussion cut a wide swath, considering issues such as whether most mergers fail to pan out as well as expected, how to increase the odds of success, the nuts and bolts of the integration process, the trade-offs between acquiring a company and growing from within, the importance of cultural issues, and why anyone would want to be on the board of a merged company.

  14. DO ROMANIAN MERGERS REALLY CREATE VALUE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca-Simona HROMEI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The realities of our modern society demonstrate that businesses operate in a competitive environment, which requires continuous improvement and development of production and sales. In this context, for financial, economic and fiscal reasons, companies resort to a process of concentration, through the merger of all the factors involved in the fulfilment and diversification of their activities. Often, the reasons for engaging in a merger refer to the fact that two merged companies create, in terms of value, an entity that exceeds the individual values of the two participants if they were to continue to activate separately. This paper aims at analysing whether the well-known relationship ‘1+1=3’, which describes merger synergies, applies at the Romanian level. For this reason, each of the values of 77 merged companies were compared with the sum of the individual values of the firms that initially created them. It was found that 56% of the mergers analysed generated added value for shareholders.

  15. Estimating the potential gains from mergers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogetoft, Peter; Wang, Dexiang

    2005-01-01

    We introduce simple production economic models to estimate the potential gains from mergers. We decompose the gains into technical ef¿ciency, size (scale) and harmony (mix) gains, and we discuss alternative ways to capture these gains. We propose to approximate the production processes using...

  16. Corporate Employee-Engagement and Merger Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, H.; Renneboog, Luc

    2017-01-01

    Extending the theories of employee incentives and inalienability of human capital, we investigate the link between a firm’s engagement in employee issues and the returns to shareholders around mergers and acquisitions (M&As) and analyze an international sample of 4,565 M&A deals from 48 countries.

  17. Ultraluminous Infrared Mergers: Elliptical Galaxies in Formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L. J.; Rigopoulou, D.; Lutz, D.; Tecza, M.

    2001-12-01

    We report high-quality near-IR spectroscopy of 12 ultraluminous infrared galaxy mergers (ULIRGs). Our new VLT and Keck data provide ~0.5" resolution, stellar and gas kinematics of these galaxies, most of which are compact systems in the last merger stages. We confirm that ULIRG mergers are ``ellipticals in formation.'' Random motions dominate their stellar dynamics, but significant rotation is common. Gasdynamics and stellar dynamics are decoupled in most systems. ULIRGs fall on or near the fundamental plane of hot stellar systems, and especially on its less evolution-sensitive, reff-σ projection. The ULIRG velocity dispersion distribution, their location in the fundamental plane, and their distribution of vrotsini/σ closely resemble those of intermediate-mass (~L*), elliptical galaxies with moderate rotation. As a group ULIRGs do not resemble giant ellipticals with large cores and little rotation. Our results are in good agreement with other recent studies indicating that disky ellipticals with compact cores or cusps can form through dissipative mergers of gas-rich disk galaxies while giant ellipticals with large cores have a different formation history. Based on observations at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (ESO 65.N-0266, 65.N-0289), and on observations at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, The University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Keck Observatory was made possible by the general financial support by the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  18. Technology-based Mergers and Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan; Moini, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an updated review of what is known about the performance of technology-based mergers and acquisitions (TBM&As) and their determinants. This review brings together papers published from 1990 to 2012 in top-rated academic journals within nearly all fields...

  19. Cross-border Mergers and Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan

    This paper focuses on three topics in cross-border mergers and acquisitions (CBM&As) field: motivations for CBM&As, valuation techniques and CBM&A performance (assessment and the determinants). By taking an overview of what have been found so far in academic field and investigating...

  20. Models for mergers in higher education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    creativity. New York: Cambridge University Press. Eggleston J 1992. Teaching design and technology. Buckingham: Open University. Press. Fisher R 1990. Teaching children to ... Creative thinking as a self-regulatory metacognitive process — a model ..... merger between companies with “identical products operating in.

  1. Mergers and acquisitions: valuation and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvin, B.N.

    1996-01-01

    An independent review of all facets of risk management, as it pertains to mergers and acquisitions within the petroleum industry, with no transactional motivation, was provided by a representative of a firm specializing in all phases of risk assessment. The following topics received attention: (1) the forward curve versus industry expectations, (2) investor expectations, (3) financial versus physical transactions, and (4) synthetic debt

  2. Merger mania: mergers and acquisitions in the generic drug sector from 1995 to 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marc-André; Volesky, Karena D

    2017-08-22

    Drug shortages and increasing generic drug prices are associated with low levels of competition. Mergers and acquisitions impact the level of competition. Record merger and acquisition activity was reported for the pharmaceutical sector in 2014/15, yet information on mergers and acquisitions in the generic drug sector are absent from the literature. This information is necessary to understand if and how such mergers and acquisitions can be a factor in drug shortages and increasing prices. Data on completed merger and acquisition deals that had a generic drug company being taken over (i.e. 'target') were extracted from Bloomberg Finance L.P. The number and announced value of deals are presented globally, for the United States, and globally excluding the United States annually from 1995 to 2016 in United States dollars. Generic drug companies comprised 9.3% of the value of all deals with pharmaceutical targets occurring from 1995 to 2016. Globally, in 1995 there were no deals, in 2014 there were 22 deals worth $1.86 billion, in 2015 there were 34 deals totalling $33.56 billion, and in 2016 there were 42 deals worth in excess of $44 billion. This substantial increase was partially attributed to Teva's 2016 acquisition of Allergan's generic drug business. The surge in mergers and acquisitions for 2015/16 was driven by deals in the United States, where they represented 89.7% of the dollar value of deals in those years. The recent blitz in mergers and acquisitions signals that the generic drug industry is undergoing a transformation, especially in the United States. This restructuring can negatively affect the level of competition that might impact prices and shortages for some products, emphasizing the importance of updating regulations and procurement policies.

  3. Synergic motives and economic success of mergers of Czech companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Sedláček

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the motives for mergers and acquisitions is the synergy effect, which can take several forms. This paper tries to find out whether mergers implemented at the Czech market bring positive or negative synergies. The basis of our investigation is the database of the companies that implemented a merger within 2001–2009; out of these, the companies that published their financial statements in a digitalized form were selected. We monitored the development of six indicators characterizing the economic status of a company. The values of these indicators were compared for all participating companies before the merger and for the successor company three years after the merger. The hypotheses were formulated so that they expressed an expectation of a positive synergy brought about by mergers. However, hypothesis testing has not provided a clear result. A positive effect of a merger on the key indicator of net assets, whose growth means an increase in the accounting value of the company after the merger, has been proved for small and medium-sized companies only. The effect of mergers on the increase in indicators has been confirmed for retained earnings from past years and personal costs. Further research will concentrate on the relations between the indicators with the aim to create an integral indicator for the economic success of mergers.

  4. Financial Synergy in Mergers and Acquisitions in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basmah Al Qudaiby (Basmah, A. Q.,

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Businesses today consider mergers and acquisitions a new strategy for their company’s growth. Companies aim to grow through sales’ increase, assets purchase, profits’ accumulation and market share gains. The better way for achieving these targets is by getting into either a Merger or an Acquisition. As a matter of fact, growth through mergers and acquisitions has been a critical part of the success of many companies operating in the new economy. Mergers and Acquisitions are an important factor in building up market capitalization. Based on three detailed and in depth structured interviews with major Saudi Arabian banks it has been found that, Mergers motivated by economies of scale should be approached cautiously. Companies should also approach vertical mergers cautiously because it is often difficult to gain synergy through a vertical merger and firms should also seek out mergers which allow the firm to acquire specialized knowledge. It has also been found that the firms should look for mergers that increase market power and avoid unrelated or conglomerate mergers.

  5. Minorities and Language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, D.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between minorities and language is complicated and related to the development of nation-states. Language minorities, as a social group, are distinguished from minority languages. The definition of minority is problematic. The size of a minority can differ widely. For membership,

  6. Mergers and acquisitions for the radiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishon, Howard B

    2008-05-01

    In 2006 and the first half of 2007, the rapid pace of global activity contributed to the popularity of mergers and acquisitions (M&A). In fact, the medical imaging industry has a significant history in M&A as well. Along with the expectation of continued growth in medical imaging utilization and other industry trends, radiologists may become more involved in M&A transactions. There is little in the radiology literature dealing with the logistics and pitfalls of M&A. This article is an introduction for radiologists who might consider buying or selling their practices or merging with strategic partners. Although there are significant differences in the approaches of buy or sell situations compared with mergers, they do share several concepts that are outlined. One key to success in M&A transactions is the "process" or approach, which is described with some practical guidelines. Some basic terms and suggestions are also presented for reference.

  7. Kilonova Counterparts of Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian

    2018-01-01

    The merger of a binary neutron star is accompanied by the ejection of neutron-rich matter into space at velocities up to several tenths that of light, which synthesizes rare heavy isotopes through the rapid neutron capture process (r-process). The radioactive decay of these nuclei was predicted by Metzger et al. (2010) to power an optical transient roughly 1000 times more luminous than a classical nova (a "kilonova"), which is among the most promising electromagnetic counterparts to accompany gravitational wave signal from the merger. I will describe how the luminosities, color, and spectra of the kilonova emission inform the properties of the merging binary (neutron star masses/radii and inclination angle) and the long sought origin of the heaviest elements in the Universe. Results will be discussed in the context of recent discoveries by Advanced LIGO/Virgo.

  8. Minority engineering scholarships, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Scholarships for Minority Students Studying Engineering and Science: Support will make scholarships available to minority students : interested in engineering and science and will increase significantly the number of minority students that Missouri S...

  9. Estimating the potential gains from mergers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogetoft, Peter; Wang, Dexiang

    2005-01-01

    We introduce simple production economic models to estimate the potential gains from mergers. We decompose the gains into technical ef¿ciency, size (scale) and harmony (mix) gains, and we discuss alternative ways to capture these gains. We propose to approximate the production processes using...... the non-parametric. Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) approach, and we use the resulting operational approach to estimate the potential gains from merging agricultural extension of¿ces in Denmark....

  10. Maximum Redshift of Gravitational Wave Merger Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koushiappas, Savvas M.; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-12-01

    Future generations of gravitational wave detectors will have the sensitivity to detect gravitational wave events at redshifts far beyond any detectable electromagnetic sources. We show that if the observed event rate is greater than one event per year at redshifts z ≥40 , then the probability distribution of primordial density fluctuations must be significantly non-Gaussian or the events originate from primordial black holes. The nature of the excess events can be determined from the redshift distribution of the merger rate.

  11. ACEC and AES Merger Workshop Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    AD-A261 194 . WL-TR-93- 1004 ACEC & AES MERGER WORKSHOP REPORT RAYMOND SZYMANSKI WRIGHT LABORATORY AVOINICS DIRECTORATE WL/AAAF-2 WRIGHT-PATTERSON...34-_’ WýAYMOND SZYMANSKI TA 28 WU 53 E--FOI1MJNG ORGANJZATiK2;J AA\\TlES ,’,D -ýDRESS(E(- £’C:.i-NG ORGANIZATION WRIGHT LABORATORY -;EPOT NUMBER AVOINICS

  12. GRAVITATIONAL MEMORY IN BINARY BLACK HOLE MERGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollney, Denis; Reisswig, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the dominant oscillatory gravitational wave signals produced during binary inspirals, a non-oscillatory component arises from the nonlinear 'memory' effect, sourced by the emitted gravitational radiation. The memory grows significantly during the late-inspiral and merger, modifying the signal by an almost step-function profile, and making it difficult to model by approximate methods. We use numerical evolutions of binary black holes (BHs) to evaluate the nonlinear memory during late-inspiral, merger, and ringdown. We identify two main components of the signal: the monotonically growing portion corresponding to the memory, and an oscillatory part which sets in roughly at the time of merger and is due to the BH ringdown. Counterintuitively, the ringdown is most prominent for models with the lowest total spin. Thus, the case of maximally spinning BHs anti-aligned to the orbital angular momentum exhibits the highest signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for interferometric detectors. The largest memory offset, however, occurs for highly spinning BHs, with an estimated value of h tot 20 ≅ 0.24 in the maximally spinning case. These results are central to determining the detectability of nonlinear memory through pulsar timing array measurements.

  13. Experimentally, How Dark Are Black Hole Mergers?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annis, James [Fermilab; Soares-Santos, Marcelle [Fermilab

    2016-09-29

    The first Advanced LIGO observing run detected two black hole merger events with confidence and likely a third. Many groups organized to followup the events in the optical even though the strong theoretical prior that no optical emission should be seen. We carry through the logic of this by asking about the experimental upper limits to the optical light from Advanced LIGO black hole mergere events. We inventory the published optical searches for transient events associated with the black hole mergers. We describe the factors that go into a formal limit on the visibility of an event (sky area coverage, the coverage factor of the camera, the fraction of sky not covered by intervening objects), and list what is known from the literature of the followup teams quantitative assessment of each factor. Where possible we calculate the total probability from each group that the source was imaged. The calculation of confidence level is reviewed for the case of no background. We find that an experimental 95% upper limit on the magnitude of a black hole requires the sum of the total probabilities over all events to be more than 3. In the first Advanced LIGO observing run we were far from reaching that threshold.

  14. Gravitational waves from primordial black hole mergers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raidal, Martti; Vaskonen, Ville; Veermäe, Hardi, E-mail: martti.raidal@cern.ch, E-mail: ville.vaskonen@kbfi.ee, E-mail: hardi.veermae@cern.ch [NICPB, Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia)

    2017-09-01

    We study the production of primordial black hole (PBH) binaries and the resulting merger rate, accounting for an extended PBH mass function and the possibility of a clustered spatial distribution. Under the hypothesis that the gravitational wave events observed by LIGO were caused by PBH mergers, we show that it is possible to satisfy all present constraints on the PBH abundance, and find the viable parameter range for the lognormal PBH mass function. The non-observation of a gravitational wave background allows us to derive constraints on the fraction of dark matter in PBHs, which are stronger than any other current constraint in the PBH mass range 0.5−30 M {sub ⊙}. We show that the predicted gravitational wave background can be observed by the coming runs of LIGO, and its non-observation would indicate that the observed events are not of primordial origin. As the PBH mergers convert matter into radiation, they may have interesting cosmological implications, for example in the context of relieving the tension between high and low redshift measurements of the Hubble constant. However, we find that these effects are suppressed as, after recombination, no more that 1% of dark matter can be converted into gravitational waves.

  15. Cosmic Collisions: Galaxy Mergers and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouille, Laura; Willett, Kyle; Masters, Karen; Lintott, Christopher; Whyte, Laura; Lynn, Stuart; Tremonti, Christina A.

    2014-08-01

    Over the years evidence has mounted for a significant mode of galaxy evolution via mergers. This process links gas-rich, spiral galaxies; starbursting galaxies; active galactic nuclei (AGN); post-starburst galaxies; and gas-poor, elliptical galaxies, as objects representing different phases of major galaxy mergers. The post-starburst phase is particularly interesting because nearly every galaxy that evolves from star-forming to quiescent must pass through it. In essence, this phase is a sort of galaxy evolution “bottleneck” that indicates that a galaxy is actively evolving through important physical transitions. In this talk I will present the results from the ‘Galaxy Zoo Quench’ project - using post-starburst galaxies to place observational constraints on the role of mergers and AGN activity in quenching star formation. `Quench’ is the first fully collaborative research project with Zooniverse citizen scientists online; engaging the public in all phases of research, from classification to data analysis and discussion to writing the article and submission to a refereed journal.

  16. Simulated galaxy remnants produced by binary and multiple mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Gregory S.

    2008-10-01

    I compute simulated integral field kinematic data for the remnants produced in a large suite of hydrodynamic binary galaxy merger simulations in order to compare to the galaxies observed as part of the SAURON survey. I find that binary mergers are plausibly the formation mechanism for the ~80% of SAURON galaxies with fast rotation velocities, in agreement with previous studies. However, the simulations of gas-rich binary mergers produce virtually no slow rotators observed to make up ~20% of the SAURON galaxies. In order to identify the origin of these slow rotators, I perform a new set of galaxy merger simulations involving merger histories more complex than single binary mergers of disk galaxies. I set up simple, idealized simulations with four or eight progenitor galaxies in order to build intuition about how a simulated galaxy's merger history affects its kinematic structure. I find that if the merger tree consists solely of roughly equal mass binary mergers, then the remnant is a fast rotator similar to that produced by a single binary merger of disk galaxies. However, if the progenitors merge with the central galaxy one after another in a sequence of mergers with decreasing mass ratios, then the remnant does not rotate. This is a plausible formation scenario for the observed SAURON slowly-rotating galaxies. To see how frequently this happens with realistic initial conditions, I extract halos from a large-scale cosmological simulation and re-simulate the region with higher resolution. These simulations include intergalactic gas that is able to replenish the galaxies' gas supply as the simulation runs. In all cases, I get rapidly rotating remnant galaxies in spite of having several halos with diverse merger histories.

  17. The benefit of mergers and taking-overs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nillesen, P.H.L.; Keats, K.; Pollitt, M.

    2001-01-01

    Electricity companies can realize considerable efficiency benefits through mergers by using management skills of a more efficient company and the resulting changed mix of inputs. In this article a pattern of thought is introduced by means of which cost savings of mergers can be identified in a strategic and scientific way. Such a way of thinking can be applied, e.g. in a cash flow analysis, in the valuation of companies and in the merger and taking-over process. 7 refs

  18. Value Creation through ICT Integration in Merger & Acquisition Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm Larsen, Michael

    2005-01-01

    As deals are becoming more complex, and as technology, and the people supporting it, are becoming key drivers of merger and acquisition processes, planning of information and communication technologies in early stages of the integration process is vital to the realization of benefits of an Merger...... & Acquisition process. This statement is substantiated through review of literature from academics as well as practitioners, and case exemplifications of the financial service organization, the Nordea Group. Keywords: ICT Integration, Mergers & Acquisitions, Nordea Group....

  19. Strategy and Tactics of International Mergers and Acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denys Kiriakov

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews contemporary strategy and tactics issues in terms of international mergers and acquisitions, along with displaying cyclical waves of mergers and acquisitions over the last century as well as motivation thereof. Five strategies adhered to by international companies initiating conclusion of such agreements as well as challenges accompanying execution thereof have been analyzed. Modern strategic and tactical tools of international mergers and acquisitions process management have been researched on exemplary buyer (a corporation case-study.

  20. An Empirical Analysis of Post-Merger Organizational Integration

    OpenAIRE

    Smeets, Valerie Anne Rolande; Gibbs, Michael; Ierulli, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    We study post-merger organizational integration using linked employer-employee data. Integration is implemented by reassigning a small number of high skilled workers, especially in R&D and management. Workforce mixing is concentrated to establishments set up after merger rather than to previously existing establishments. Worker turnover is high after merger, but new hiring yields stable total employment. Target employees have higher turnover and reassignment, particularly if the target fi...

  1. 24 CFR 242.67 - New corporations, subsidiaries, affiliations, and mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., affiliations, and mergers. 242.67 Section 242.67 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... Reporting, and Financial Requirements § 242.67 New corporations, subsidiaries, affiliations, and mergers... written approval for all future mergers. ...

  2. When what we get is not what we want-The role of implemented versus desired merger patterns in support for mergers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Täuber, Susanne; Gleibs, Ilka H.; Viki, G. Tendayi; Giessner, Steffen R.

    2013-01-01

    Integrating an intergroup perspective on mergers with discrepancy theories, we argue that merger partners aim for merger patterns that benefit their group’s standing best. Importantly, we hypothesize and show that the discrepancy between what merger partners want and what they get affects outcomes

  3. A BARYONIC EFFECT ON THE MERGER TIMESCALE OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Congyao; Yu, Qingjuan; Lu, Youjun

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of the merger timescales of galaxy clusters is important for understanding the cluster merger process and further understanding the formation and evolution of the large-scale structure of the universe. In this paper, we explore a baryonic effect on the merger timescale of galaxy clusters by using hydrodynamical simulations. We find that the baryons play an important role in accelerating the merger process. The merger timescale decreases upon increasing the gas fraction of galaxy clusters. For example, the merger timescale is shortened by a factor of up to 3 for merging clusters with gas fractions of 0.15, compared with the timescale obtained with 0 gas fractions. The baryonic effect is significant for a wide range of merger parameters and is particularly more significant for nearly head-on mergers and high merging velocities. The baryonic effect on the merger timescale of galaxy clusters is expected to have an impact on the structure formation in the universe, such as the cluster mass function and massive substructures in galaxy clusters, and a bias of “no-gas” may exist in the results obtained from the dark matter-only cosmological simulations

  4. Using Black Hole Mergers to Explore Structure Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea-Munoz, E.; Miller, M. Coleman

    2009-01-01

    Observations of gravitational waves from massive black hole mergers will open a new window into the era of structure formation in the early universe. Past efforts have concentrated on calculating merger rates using different physical assumptions, resulting in merger rate estimates that span a wide range (0.1 - 10(exp 4) mergers/year). We develop a semi-analytical, phenomenological model of massive black hole mergers that includes plausible combinations of several physical parameters, which we then turn around to determine how well observations with the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) will be able to enhance our understanding of the universe during the critical z approximately equal to 5-30 epoch. Our approach involves generating synthetic LISA observable data (total BH masses, BH mass ratios, redshifts, merger rates), which are then analyzed using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, thus finding constraints for the physical parameters of the mergers. We find that our method works well at estimating merger parameters and that the number of merger events is a key discriminant among models, therefore making our method robust against observational uncertainties. Our approach can also be extended to more physically-driven models and more general problems in cosmology. This work is supported in part by the Cooperative Education Program at NASA/GSFC.

  5. Role of Human Resources in the Mergers and Acquisitions Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Szewczyk

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The human resources are one of the most important topics when you talk about the value and importance of a company itself. The article tries to show the different aspects where the human resource affects a merger in the different states of a merger process, especially to the pre-merger-phase, and to which problems it can lead when you not pay attention to it. Finally the question, which is indeed the most important aim concerning mergers namely: how and in which degree the human resource effects the goodwill, is tried to answer.

  6. Maximizing value through mergers and acquisitions in the petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    An 'Insight' conference was held in February 1996 to help understand the economics of mergers and acquisitions in the petroleum industry. Speaking notes, overhead projection slides and full text of the presentations (where available) from seven contributors at the conference were combined in this volume of proceedings. Specific topics of discussion included a review of the current scene in mergers and acquisitions, assessing management and employees, optimizing tax advantages, looking for synergies, the value of human perspective in mergers and acquisitions, tips on analyzing the engineering report, and the market's perception of merger and acquisition reporting. tabs., figs

  7. Efficiency Gains and Myopic Antitrust Authority in a Dynamic Merger Game

    OpenAIRE

    MOTTA, Massimo; VASCONCELOS, Helder

    2003-01-01

    This Paper models a sequential merger formation game with endogenous efficiency gains in which every merger has to be submitted for approval to the Antitrust Authority (AA). Two different types of AA are studied: first, a myopic AA, which judges a given merger without considering that subsequent mergers may occur; and, second, a forward-looking AA, which anticipates the ultimate market structure a given merger will lead to. By contrasting the decisions of these two types of AA, merger policy ...

  8. MERGER SIGNATURES IN THE DYNAMICS OF STAR-FORMING GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Chao-Ling; Sanders, D. B.; Hayward, Christopher C.; Smith, Howard A.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Martínez-Galarza, Juan R.; Zezas, Andreas; Lanz, Lauranne

    2016-01-01

    The recent advent of integral field spectrographs and millimeter interferometers has revealed the internal dynamics of many hundreds of star-forming galaxies. Spatially resolved kinematics have been used to determine the dynamical status of star-forming galaxies with ambiguous morphologies, and constrain the importance of galaxy interactions during the assembly of galaxies. However, measuring the importance of interactions or galaxy merger rates requires knowledge of the systematics in kinematic diagnostics and the visible time with merger indicators. We analyze the dynamics of star-forming gas in a set of binary merger hydrodynamic simulations with stellar mass ratios of 1:1 and 1:4. We find that the evolution of kinematic asymmetries traced by star-forming gas mirrors morphological asymmetries derived from mock optical images, in which both merger indicators show the largest deviation from isolated disks during strong interaction phases. Based on a series of simulations with various initial disk orientations, orbital parameters, gas fractions, and mass ratios, we find that the merger signatures are visible for ∼0.2–0.4 Gyr with kinematic merger indicators but can be approximately twice as long for equal-mass mergers of massive gas-rich disk galaxies designed to be analogs of z ∼ 2–3 submillimeter galaxies. Merger signatures are most apparent after the second passage and before the black holes coalescence, but in some cases they persist up to several hundred Myr after coalescence. About 20%–60% of the simulated galaxies are not identified as mergers during the strong interaction phase, implying that galaxies undergoing violent merging process do not necessarily exhibit highly asymmetric kinematics in their star-forming gas. The lack of identifiable merger signatures in this population can lead to an underestimation of merger abundances in star-forming galaxies, and including them in samples of star-forming disks may bias the measurements of disk

  9. INSPIRALLING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES: A NEW SIGNPOST FOR GALAXY MERGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comerford, Julia M.; Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Marc; Yan, Renbin; Cooper, Michael C.; Coil, Alison L.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Rosario, D. J.; Dutton, Aaron A.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new technique for observationally identifying galaxy mergers spectroscopically rather than through host galaxy imaging. Our technique exploits the dynamics of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) powering active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in merger-remnant galaxies. Because structure in the universe is built up through galaxy mergers and nearly all galaxies host a central SMBH, some galaxies should possess two SMBHs near their centers as the result of a recent merger. These SMBHs spiral to the center of the resultant merger-remnant galaxy, and one or both of the SMBHs may power AGNs. Using the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, we have examined 1881 red galaxies, of which 91 exhibit [O III] and Hβ emission lines indicative of Seyfert 2 activity. Of these, 32 AGNs have [O III] emission-line redshifts significantly different from the redshifts of the host galaxies' stars, corresponding to velocity offsets of ∼50 km s -1 to ∼300 km s -1 . Two of these AGNs exhibit double-peaked [O III] emission lines, while the remaining 30 AGNs each exhibit a single set of velocity-offset [O III] emission lines. After exploring a variety of physical models for these velocity offsets, we argue that the most likely explanation is inspiralling SMBHs in merger-remnant galaxies. Based on this interpretation, we find that roughly half of the red galaxies hosting AGNs are also merger remnants, which implies that mergers may trigger AGN activity in red galaxies. The AGN velocity offsets we find imply a merger fraction of ∼30% and a merger rate of ∼3 mergers Gyr -1 for red galaxies at redshifts 0.34 < z < 0.82.

  10. Merger market power analysis: Pacific Enterprises and Enova Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Pacific Enterprises - Enova (PE-Enova) merger may be viewed as an example of the new breed of gas and power 'convergence' mergers. The merger involved the combination of a large gas distribution utility and a contiguous gas and electric utility located in Southern California. As with most mergers, the PE-Enova merger was proposed to federal and state regulators as an opportunity to achieve ratepayer savings. However, the merger also presented an issue of vertical market power involving the substantial electric generation capacity served by Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas) and its potential impact on electric market prices, and the associated revenues for generation assets owned by San Diego Gas and Electric (SDGandE). In order for the merger to proceed, the approval of at least five separate State and federal regulators would be required. Although much of the attention of state regulators, proponents, and intervenors surrounded the division of synergy savings between ratepayers and shareholders, the analysis of the potential for market power abuse was extensive. Intervenors presented numerous complex arguments regarding the potential adverse effects of the merger on competition. In particular, intervenors argued that the combined company would manipulate its storage and transport operations to influence the delivered price of gas to California generators, and therefore, the price of power in the wholesale electric market. The arguments surrounding the existence and impacts of market power in this case are of interest in the understanding the nature and complexity of factors that may be considered in evaluating mergers. The proceeding also provides insight into how regulators are grappling with market power issues associated with convergence mergers, and weigh merger costs and benefits

  11. A MULTIWAVELENGTH STUDY OF A SAMPLE OF 70 μm SELECTED GALAXIES IN THE COSMOS FIELD. II. THE ROLE OF MERGERS IN GALAXY EVOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Sanders, D. B.; Le Floc'h, E.; Frayer, D. T.; Aussel, H.; Arnouts, S.; Ilbert, O.; Cassata, P.; Le Fevre, O.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N. Z.; Capak, P.; Surace, J.; Yan, L.; Caputi, K.; Carollo, C. M.; Lilly, S.; Civano, F.; Hasinger, G.; Koekemoer, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the morphological properties of a large sample of 1503 70 μm selected galaxies in the COSMOS field spanning the redshift range 0.01 8 IR (8 - 1000 μm) 14 L sun with a median luminosity of 10 11.4 L sun . In general, these galaxies are massive, with a stellar mass range of 10 10 -10 12 M sun , and luminous, with -25 K IR , with the fraction at the highest luminosity (L IR > 10 12 L sun ) being up to ∼50%. We also find that the fraction of spirals drops dramatically with L IR . Minor mergers likely play a role in boosting the infrared luminosity for sources with low luminosities (L IR 11.5 L sun ). The precise fraction of mergers in any given L IR bin varies by redshift due to sources at z > 1 being difficult to classify and subject to the effects of bandpass shifting; therefore, these numbers can only be considered lower limits. At z 1, the fraction of major mergers is lower, but is at least 30%-40% for ULIRGs. In a comparison of our visual classifications with several automated classification techniques we find general agreement; however, the fraction of identified mergers is underestimated due to automated classification methods being sensitive to only certain timescales of a major merger. Although the general morphological trends agree with what has been observed for local (U)LIRGs, the fraction of major mergers is slightly lower than seen locally. This is in part due to the difficulty of identifying merger signatures at high redshift. The distribution of the U - V color of the galaxies in our sample peaks in the green valley ((U - V) = 1.1) with a large spread at bluer and redder colors and with the major mergers peaking more strongly in the green valley than the rest of the morphological classes. We argue that, given the number of major gas-rich mergers observed and the relatively short timescale that they would be observable in the (U)LIRG phase, it is plausible for the observed red sequence of massive ellipticals ( 12 M sun ) to have been

  12. GALAXY MERGERS AND DARK MATTER HALO MERGERS IN ΛCDM: MASS, REDSHIFT, AND MASS-RATIO DEPENDENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2009-01-01

    We employ a high-resolution ΛCDM N-body simulation to present merger rate predictions for dark matter (DM) halos and investigate how common merger-related observables for galaxies-such as close pair counts, starburst counts, and the morphologically disturbed fraction-likely scale with luminosity, stellar mass, merger mass ratio, and redshift from z = 0 to z = 4. We investigate both rate at which subhalos first enter the virial radius of a larger halo (the 'infall rate'), and the rate at which subhalos become destroyed, losing 90% of the mass they had at infall (the d estruction rate ) . For both merger rate definitions, we provide a simple 'universal' fitting formula that describes our derived merger rates for DM halos a function of dark halo mass, merger mass ratio, and redshift, and go on to predict galaxy merger rates using number density matching to associate halos with galaxies. For example, we find that the instantaneous (destruction) merger rate of m/M > 0.3 mass-ratio events into typical L ∼> f L * galaxies follows the simple relation dN/dt ≅ 0.03(1 + f) Gyr -1 (1 + z) 2.1 . Despite the rapid increase in merger rate with redshift, only a small fraction of >0.4 L * high-redshift galaxies (∼3% at z = 2) should have experienced a major merger (m/M > 0.3) in the very recent past (t 0.3) in the previous 700 Myr and conclude that mergers almost certainly play an important role in delivering baryons and influencing the kinematic properties of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs).

  13. Migrating Legacy Systems in the Global Merger & Acquisition Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katerattanakul, Pairin; Kam, Hwee-Joo; Lee, James J.; Hong, Soongoo

    2009-01-01

    The MetaFrame system migration project at WorldPharma, while driven by merger and acquisition, had faced complexities caused by both technical challenges and organizational issues in the climate of uncertainties. However, WorldPharma still insisted on instigating this post-merger system migration project. This project served to (1) consolidate the…

  14. University Mergers in Russia: Four Waves of Educational Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, K. R.; Lisyutkin, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    This article is aimed at identifying distinctive features of the educational policy of university mergers--their main stages, types, and declared goals. We analyzed cases of university mergers and acquisitions (M&A) from the 1990s to the present, which allowed us to identify and describe four Russia-specific waves of educational policy. Based…

  15. Integrating organizational and human behavior perspectives on mergers and acquisitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, Yaakov; Drori, Israel

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a conceptual framework for investigating merger and acquisition (M&A) performance through a multistage and multilevel approach. First, human resource challenges during the integration process following a merger are explored to help explain the inconsistencies among empirical

  16. Strategic Mergers of Strong Institutions to Enhance Competitive Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Grant; Harman, Kay

    2008-01-01

    Strategic mergers are formal combinations or amalgamations of higher education institutions with the aim of enhancing competitive advantage, or merging for "mutual growth". Recently, in a number of countries, there has been a decided shift from mergers initiated by governments, and dealing mainly with "problem" cases, towards…

  17. What Drives Private and Public Merger Waves in Europe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Jan; Blunck, Benjamin

    What drives merger waves? Harford 2005 argues that mergers are an efficient response to economic shocks to an industry, whereas Rhodes-Kropf, Robinson & Viswanathan 2005 argues that merger waves are driven by overvaluation of the acquiring firm, and to a lesser extent, the target firm. Both paper...... significant differences between driving forces for listed firms and for private firms. Public or listed firm mergers and acquisitions are primarily driven by overvaluation or behavioural factors, whereas private transactions are driven by economic factors.......What drives merger waves? Harford 2005 argues that mergers are an efficient response to economic shocks to an industry, whereas Rhodes-Kropf, Robinson & Viswanathan 2005 argues that merger waves are driven by overvaluation of the acquiring firm, and to a lesser extent, the target firm. Both papers...... are based on empirical analyses of listed US firms. This paper presents additional evidence of merger waves in the European Union (EU). The use of European data allows a more detailed analysis, since firm level data is available for both listed as well as private transactions. This analysis reveals...

  18. Star formation in mergers with comologically motivated initial conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karman, Wouter; Macciò, Andrea V.; Kannan, Rahul; Moster, Benjamin P.; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2015-01-01

    We use semi-analytic models and cosmological merger trees to provide the initial conditions for multimerger numerical hydrodynamic simulations, and exploit these simulations to explore the effect of galaxy interaction and merging on star formation (SF). We compute numerical realizations of 12 merger

  19. Major Mergers in CANDELS up to z=3: Calibrating the Close-Pair Method Using Semi-Analytic Models and Baryonic Mass Ratio Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantha, Kameswara; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Conselice, Christopher; Cook, Joshua S.; Croton, Darren J.; Dekel, Avishai; Ferguson, Henry C.; Hathi, Nimish; Kodra, Dritan; Koo, David C.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Popping, Gergo; Rafelski, Marc; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Simmons, Brooke D.; Somerville, Rachel; Straughn, Amber N.; Snyder, Gregory; Wuyts, Stijn; Yu, Lu; Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) Team

    2018-01-01

    Cosmological simulations predict that the rate of merging between similar-mass massive galaxies should increase towards early cosmic-time. We study the incidence of major (stellar mass ratio SMR 10.3 galaxies spanning 01.5 in strong disagreement with theoretical merger rate predictions. On the other hand, if we compare to a simulation-tuned, evolving timescale prescription from Snyder et al., 2017, we find that the merger rate evolution agrees with theory out to z=3. These results highlight the need for robust calibrations on the complex and presumably redshift-dependent pair-to-merger-rate conversion factors to improve constraints of the empirical merger history. To address this, we use a unique compilation of mock datasets produced by three independent state-of-the-art Semi-Analytic Models (SAMs). We present preliminary calibrations of the close-pair observability timescale and outlier fraction as a function of redshift, stellar-mass, mass-ratio, and local over-density. Furthermore, to verify the hypothesis by previous empirical studies that SMR-selection of major pairs may be biased, we present a new analysis of the baryonic (gas+stars) mass ratios of a subset of close pairs in our sample. For the first time, our preliminary analysis highlights that a noticeable fraction of SMR-selected minor pairs (SMR>4) have major baryonic-mass ratios (BMR<4), which indicate that merger rates based on SMR selection may be under-estimated.

  20. Discriminating strange star mergers from neutron star mergers by gravitational-wave measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauswein, A.; Oechslin, R.; Janka, H.-T.

    2010-01-01

    We perform three-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamical simulations of the coalescence of strange stars and explore the possibility to decide on the strange matter hypothesis by means of gravitational-wave measurements. Self-binding of strange quark matter and the generally more compact stars yield features that clearly distinguish strange star from neutron star mergers, e.g. hampering tidal disruption during the plunge of quark stars. Furthermore, instead of forming dilute halo structures around the remnant as in the case of neutron star mergers, the coalescence of strange stars results in a differentially rotating hypermassive object with a sharp surface layer surrounded by a geometrically thin, clumpy high-density strange quark matter disk. We also investigate the importance of including nonzero temperature equations of state in neutron star and strange star merger simulations. In both cases we find a crucial sensitivity of the dynamics and outcome of the coalescence to thermal effects, e.g. the outer remnant structure and the delay time of the dense remnant core to black hole collapse depend on the inclusion of nonzero temperature effects. For comparing and classifying the gravitational-wave signals, we use a number of characteristic quantities like the maximum frequency during inspiral or the dominant frequency of oscillations of the postmerger remnant. In general, these frequencies are higher for strange star mergers. Only for particular choices of the equation of state the frequencies of neutron star and strange star mergers are similar. In such cases additional features of the gravitational-wave luminosity spectrum like the ratio of energy emitted during the inspiral phase to the energy radiated away in the postmerger stage may help to discriminate coalescence events of the different types. If such characteristic quantities could be extracted from gravitational-wave signals, for instance with the upcoming gravitational-wave detectors, a decision on the

  1. MORTUARY MERGERS AND THE INTERNATIONALIZATION OF INTERMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David O. Whitten

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available “Mortuary Mergers and the Internationalization of Interment” is a study ofthe death services industry’s response to a changing market. Throughout the industry and across national borders, independent mortuaries and cemeteries are merging or consolidating. International death services firms are structured much as the automobile, oil, and communications multinationals are. Monopolistic competition is increasingly replaced by national and international oligopoly that may well translate into monopoly in isolated markets and lead to antitrust action and regulation. The study develops the historical roots of the death services industry but concentrates on the revolution underway. The prospects for the industry in the twenty-first century conclude the paper.

  2. Performance Assessment of Mergers and Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan; Moini, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Corporate mergers and acquisitions (M&As) have been increasing popular during these decades. However, a majority of research show failure rate (40% - 80%) has not significantly changed. This “success paradox” triggers us to reflect on performance assessment of M&As: how the performance of M...... on the performance measures and benchmarks adopted in M&A research field and the relevant empirical results. We find that the definitions of performance varied in terms of accounting, financial, operational and perceptual metrics. And performance assessment is sensitive to the definition of performance, methodology...

  3. The human resources in mergers and acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Martínez Caraballo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In view of intangible resources -and, among them, human capital- play a significant role in the managerial strategy, this article aims to analyze the fit of human resources in companies that has been target of mergers and/or acquisitions processes. In this sense, the present paper will be centered in carrying out a state of the art of this topic and in showing some evidences about the top managers perceptions of the target company with the purpose of better understanding which are the reasons for the departure and the permanence of them.

  4. Impact of HMO mergers and acquisitions on financial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This study examines the effect of health maintenance organization (HMO) mergers and acquisitions on financial performance, as indicated by cash flow returns, profitability ratios, and efficiency indicators. Pooled, cross-sectional files of financial performance data were created for HMO mergers occurring in the period of 1988 to 1994. The study uses a time-series design involving the analysis of pre- and post-acquisition financial performance measured over a period of four years. Change scores for the industry-adjusted financial performance measures were calculated and then evaluated using t-tests. The study showed that HMO mergers had a positive effect on financial performance and efficiency. This effect disappeared, however, after adjusting for HMO industry returns. Potential synergies arising from HMO mergers have been largely illusory. Mergers may have been a result of non-value enhancing motives or management overconfidence.

  5. Energy mergers, acquisitions and trusts : no end in sight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiry, J.

    1998-01-01

    An overview of Canadian export of natural gas to the U.S. and mergers in the Canadian gas industry was presented. Issues discussed included: (1) the Canadian role in U.S. gas markets, (2) growth, returns, and reinvestment rates in the Canadian gas industry, (3) current and historical mergers and acquisitions activity, (4) the driving forces of continued mergers, and (5) the role of trusts in mergers and acquisitions. It was stressed that the recent trend of energy industry mergers is reshaping the industry. Canadian gas producers are currently finding themselves in a high risk, low-return, capital intensive industry caught in a 10-year major growth trend driven by U.S. exports. Unfortunately, for the immediate future there is no end in sight. figs

  6. Neutron Star Mergers and the R process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joniak, Ronald; Ugalde, Claudio

    2017-09-01

    About half of the elements of the periodic table that are present today in the Solar System were synthesized before the formation of the Sun via a rapid neutron capture process (r process). However, the astrophysical site of the r process is a longstanding problem that has captivated both experimental and theoretical astrophysicists. Up to date, two possible scenarios for the site of the r process have been suggested: the first involves the high entropy wind of core collapse supernovae, and the second corresponds to the merger of two compact stellar objects such as neutron stars. We will study the robustness of the nucleosynthesis abundance pattern between the second and third r process peaks as produced by neutron star mergers with r process-like neutron exposures. First, we will vary parameters to obtain an understanding of the astrophysical mechanisms that create the r process. Next, we will create a program to obtain the best possible parameters based on a chi-squared test. Once we have the best fits, we will test the effect of fission in the overall isotope abundance pattern distribution. Later on, we will vary the ratio of masses of the two fission fragments and study its effect on elemental abundances. This research was supported by the UIC College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Research Initiative (LASURI).

  7. Pair fireball precursors of neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Zivancev, Charles

    2016-10-01

    If at least one neutron star (NS) is magnetized in a binary NS merger, then the orbital motion of the conducting companion during the final inspiral induces a strong voltage and current along the magnetic field lines connecting the NSs. If a modest fraction η of the extracted electromagnetic power extracted accelerates relativistic particles, the resulting gamma-ray emission a compact volume will result in the formation of an electron-positron pair fireball. Applying a steady-state pair wind model, we quantify the detectability of the precursor fireball with gamma-ray satellites. For η ˜ 1 the gamma-ray detection horizon of Dmax ≈ 10(Bd/1014 G)3/4 Mpc is much closer than the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo horizon of 200 Mpc, unless the NS surface magnetic field strength is very large, B_d ≲ 10^{15} G. Given the quasi-isotropic nature of the emission, mergers with weaker NS fields could contribute a nearby population of short gamma-ray bursts. Power not dissipated close to the binary is carried to infinity along the open field lines by a large-scale Poynting flux. Reconnection within this outflow, well outside of the pair photosphere, provides a potential site for non-thermal emission, such as a coherent millisecond radio burst.

  8. 17 CFR 270.17a-8 - Mergers of affiliated companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mergers of affiliated... (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270.17a-8 Mergers of affiliated companies. (a) Exemption of affiliated mergers. A Merger of a registered investment company (or a series thereof...

  9. Galaxy Mergers from the Largest to the Smallest Scales: Introduction and Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy mergers encompass a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, including cosmological considerations, gas and stellar dynamics, AGN evolution, and mergers of the central SMBHs. Astrophysical signatures of galaxy mergers can be observed across most of the electromagnetic spectrum and through gravitational radiation. This talk provides an introduction and overview of the meeting, highlighting the key aspects of galaxy mergers from large to small scales.

  10. 12 CFR 250.182 - Terms defining competitive effects of proposed mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... mergers. 250.182 Section 250.182 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS... competitive effects of proposed mergers. Under the Bank Merger Act (12 U.S.C. 1828(c)), a Federal Banking agency receiving a merger application must request the views of the other two banking agencies and the...

  11. 7 CFR 1717.159 - Applications for RUS approvals of mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applications for RUS approvals of mergers. 1717.159... ELECTRIC LOANS Mergers and Consolidations of Electric Borrowers § 1717.159 Applications for RUS approvals of mergers. If a proposed merger requires RUS approval according to RUS regulations and/or the loan...

  12. Decomposition of potential efficiency gains from hospital mergers in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flokou, Angeliki; Aletras, Vassilis; Niakas, Dimitris

    2017-12-01

    This paper evaluates the technical efficiency of 71 Greek public hospitals and examines potential efficiency gains from 13 candidate mergers among them. Efficiency assessments are performed using bootstrapped Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) whilst merger analysis is conducted by applying the Bogetoft and Wang methodology which allows the overall potential merger gains to be decomposed into three main components of inefficiency, namely technical (or learning), scope (or harmony) and scale (or size) effects. Thus, the analysis provides important insights not only on the magnitude of the potential total efficiency gains but also on their sources. The overall analysis is conducted in the context of a complete methodological framework where methods for outlier detection, returns to scale identification, and bias corrections for DEA estimations are also applied. Mergers are analyzed under the assumptions of constant, variable and non-decreasing returns to scale in an input oriented DEA model with three inputs and three outputs. The main finding of the study indicates that almost all mergers show substantial potential room for efficiency improvement, which is mainly attributed to the pre-merger technical inefficiencies of the individual hospitals and therefore it might be possible to be achieved without the need of implementing full-scale mergers. The same -though, at a lower extent- applies to the harmony effect whilst the size effect shows marginal or even negative gains.

  13. Single and simultaneous binary mergers in Wright-Fisher genealogies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melfi, Andrew; Viswanath, Divakar

    2018-04-12

    The Kingman coalescent is a commonly used model in genetics, which is often justified with reference to the Wright-Fisher (WF) model. Current proofs of convergence of WF and other models to the Kingman coalescent assume a constant sample size. However, sample sizes have become quite large in human genetics. Therefore, we develop a convergence theory that allows the sample size to increase with population size. If the haploid population size is N and the sample size is N 1∕3-ϵ , ϵ>0, we prove that Wright-Fisher genealogies involve at most a single binary merger in each generation with probability converging to 1 in the limit of large N. Single binary merger or no merger in each generation of the genealogy implies that the Kingman partition distribution is obtained exactly. If the sample size is N 1∕2-ϵ , Wright-Fisher genealogies may involve simultaneous binary mergers in a single generation but do not involve triple mergers in the large N limit. The asymptotic theory is verified using numerical calculations. Variable population sizes are handled algorithmically. It is found that even distant bottlenecks can increase the probability of triple mergers as well as simultaneous binary mergers in WF genealogies. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. On the consequences of low-mass white dwarf mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iben, I. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The theory of binary star evolution suggests that about 10 percent of all main-sequence binary systems should evolve into a close pair of light white dwarfs which merge within a Hubble time. This paper explores the consequences of such mergers on the assumption that a merger can be approximated by a mass-transfer event which occurs on a time scale shorter than that given by the Eddington accretion limit. The evolution of He + He mergers and of CO + He and of hybrid + He mergers are discussed. The birthrate of helium degenerate pairs which merge in less than a Hubble time is estimated, and the space density of low-luminosity merger products currently present in the Galaxy is predicted. It is shown that the evolutionary tracks of models of simulated mergers pass through the region in the H-R diagram occupied by subdwarfs, but that the predicted space density of merger products exceeds by over a factor of three the space density of subdwarf estimated form the known sample of such stars. 61 refs

  15. EUROPEAN CROSS-BORDER MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS- REALITIES AND PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vancea Mariana

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the impact of the economic and financial crisis on merger and acquisition activity in Europe and the latest trends manifested on the cross-border merger and acquisition market involving European companies. Thus, a first objective of this research is to reveal the evolution of the European cross-border merger and acquisition activity in terms of dynamics, volume and structure. Another objective of this research is to reveal the short and medium term perspectives on mergers and acquisitions in Europe. Thus, under the continuous economic recovery of the European countries and the other worldwide economies, the recovery of financial markets and the growth of corporate profits, we shall witness an intensive cross-border merger and acquisition activity in Europe. The expansion engine of these operations seems to be represented by the emerging economies. This research is based on a systematic, logical and comparative analysis of scientific literature and statistical data regarding the cross-border mergers and acquisitions that involve European companies in recent years. This paper is part of the doctoral thesis Mergers and acquisitions- strategies of growth and development of enterprises. European and national particularities, coordinated by professor Ph.D. Alina Bădulescu from University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics. The doctoral research is supported by The Sectorial Operational Program for Human Resources Development 2007-2013, Contract POSDRU 59/1.5/S/1- Romanian researchers through modern and efficient doctoral programs.

  16. Waves in strong centrifugal fields: dissipationless gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    2015-04-01

    Linear waves are investigated in a rotating gas under the condition of strong centrifugal acceleration of the order 106 g realized in gas centrifuges for separation of uranium isotopes. Sound waves split into three families of the waves under these conditions. Dispersion equations are obtained. The characteristics of the waves strongly differ from the conventional sound waves on polarization, velocity of propagation and distribution of energy of the waves in space for two families having frequencies above and below the frequency of the conventional sound waves. The energy of these waves is localized in rarefied region of the gas. The waves of the third family were not specified before. They propagate exactly along the rotational axis with the conventional sound velocity. These waves are polarized only along the rotational axis. Radial and azimuthal motions are not excited. Energy of the waves is concentrated near the wall of the rotor where the density of the gas is largest.

  17. Properties of Kilonovae from Dynamical and Post-merger Ejecta of Neutron Star Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Kato, Daiji; Gaigalas, Gediminas; Rynkun, Pavel; Radžiūtė, Laima; Wanajo, Shinya; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Tanuma, Hajime; Murakami, Izumi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.

    2018-01-01

    Ejected material from neutron star mergers gives rise to electromagnetic emission powered by radioactive decays of r-process nuclei, the so-called kilonova or macronova. While properties of the emission are largely affected by opacities in the ejected material, available atomic data for r-process elements are still limited. We perform atomic structure calculations for r-process elements: Se (Z = 34), Ru (Z = 44), Te (Z = 52), Ba (Z = 56), Nd (Z = 60), and Er (Z = 68). We confirm that the opacities from bound–bound transitions of open f-shell, lanthanide elements (Nd and Er) are higher than those of the other elements over a wide wavelength range. The opacities of open s-shell (Ba), p-shell (Se and Te), and d-shell (Ru) elements are lower than those of open f-shell elements, and their transitions are concentrated in the ultraviolet and optical wavelengths. We show that the optical brightness can be different by > 2 mag depending on the element abundances in the ejecta such that post-merger, lanthanide-free ejecta produce brighter and bluer optical emission. Such blue emission from post-merger ejecta can be observed from the polar directions if the mass of the preceding dynamical ejecta in these regions is small. For the ejecta mass of 0.01 {M}ȯ , observed magnitudes of the blue emission will reach 21.0 mag (100 Mpc) and 22.5 mag (200 Mpc) in the g and r bands within a few days after the merger, which are detectable with 1 m or 2 m class telescopes.

  18. Mergers and acquisitions in the international banking sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botis, S.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The economic crisis emphasized the risks that banks assume and run. Reducing them is a strong reason for the acceleration of mergers and acquisitions in the international banking field. The merger of banking entities has established itself as a modern method of global credit risk management within every country and internationally. The main objective of this article is to highlight the latest developments on the bank mergers and acquisitions market in the U.S. and EU and on emerging market trends.

  19. An Empirical Analysis of Post-Merger Organizational Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smeets, Valerie Anne Rolande; Ierulli, Kathryn; Gibbs, Michael

    2016-01-01

    existing establishments. Worker turnover is high after merger, but new hiring yields stable total employment. Target employees have higher turnover and reassignment, particularly if the target firm is small relative to the acquiring firm. These findings may suggest integration is costly, but can......We study post-merger organizational integration using linked employer-employee data. Integration is implemented by reassigning a small number of high skilled workers, especially in R&D and management. Workforce mixing is concentrated to establishments set up after merger rather than to previously...... be achieved by focusing on key employees. Alternatively, reassigning a few key employees is sufficient for achieving integration....

  20. MAJOR-MERGER GALAXY PAIRS IN THE COSMOS FIELD—MASS-DEPENDENT MERGER RATE EVOLUTION SINCE z = 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, C. Kevin; Zhao, Yinghe; Gao, Y.; Scoville, N.; Capak, P.; Drory, N.

    2012-01-01

    We present results of a statistical study of the cosmic evolution of the mass-dependent major-merger rate since z = 1. A stellar mass limited sample of close major-merger pairs (the CPAIR sample) was selected from the archive of the COSMOS survey. Pair fractions at different redshifts derived using the CPAIR sample and a local K-band-selected pair sample show no significant variations with stellar mass. The pair fraction exhibits moderately strong cosmic evolution, with the best-fitting function of f pair = 10 –1.88(±0.03) (1 + z) 2.2(±0.2) . The best-fitting function for the merger rate is R mg (Gyr –1 ) = 0.053 × (M star /10 10.7 M ☉ ) 0.3 (1 + z) 2.2 /(1 + z/8). This rate implies that galaxies of M star ∼ 10 10 -10 11.5 M ☉ have undergone ∼0.5-1.5 major mergers since z = 1. Our results show that, for massive galaxies (M star ≥ 10 10.5 M ☉ ) at z ≤ 1, major mergers involving star-forming galaxies (i.e., wet and mixed mergers) can account for the formation of both ellipticals and red quiescent galaxies (RQGs). On the other hand, major mergers cannot be responsible for the formation of most low mass ellipticals and RQGs of M star ∼ 10.3 M ☉ . Our quantitative estimates indicate that major mergers have significant impact on the stellar mass assembly of the most massive galaxies (M star ≥ 10 11.3 M ☉ ), but for less massive galaxies the stellar mass assembly is dominated by the star formation. Comparison with the mass-dependent (ultra)luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRG) rates suggests that the frequency of major-merger events is comparable to or higher than that of (U)LIRGs.

  1. Electromagnetic Counterparts to Black Hole Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.

    2011-01-01

    During the final moments of a binary black hole (BH) merger, the gravitational wave (GW) luminosity of the system is greater than the combined electromagnetic (EM) output of the entire observable universe. However, the extremely weak coupling between GWs and ordinary matter makes these waves very difficult to detect directly. Fortunately, the inspirating BH system will interact strongly-on a purely Newtonian level-with any surrounding material in the host galaxy, and this matter can in turn produce unique EM signals detectable at Earth. By identifying EM counterparts to GW sources, we will be able to study the host environments of the merging BHs, in turn greatly expanding the scientific yield of a mission like LISA. Here we present a comprehensive review of the recent literature on the subject of EM counterparts, as well as a discussion of the theoretical and observational advances required to fully realize the scientific potential of the field.

  2. Post-Merger Evolution of Betelgeuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, James; Wheeler, J. Craig; Nance, Sarafina; Diaz, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Betelgeuse appears to rotate anomalously rapidly. One possible explanation is that if merged with a companion of about 1 solar mass when it evolved up the Hyashi track to become a red giant. We have used the MESA evolutionary code to explore the effects of such a merger. We have added a solar mass of matter with angular momentum corresponding to the Keplerian angular velocity at the current radius of Betelgeuse and then followed the evolution of that mass and angular momentum. A wave of angular momentum propagates in toward the core where it is stalled by the composition barrier at the boundary with the helium core. There is also a rearrangement of the envelope material that results in a decrease in the surface gravity, yielding a result in closer agreement with observations than either non-rotating models or models evolved from rotating ZAMS models.

  3. Managing mergers in the petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartout, H. B.

    1997-01-01

    The size and scope of various acquisitions by Precision Drilling Corporation over the last decade were examined from the point of view of the acquiror. Also examined were Precision Drilling's approach to acquisitions and the probable reasons for the Corporation's success in acquiring other companies. In a series of 15 acquisitions from 1985 to 1997, the company went from the initial three drilling rigs to 205 rigs and from $4.5 million in revenues in 1985 to $455 million in 1997. Knowing the drilling business and the customers' business, an informed assessment of the target company's long term potential, decisive action, efficient and knowledgeable negotiators able to assess what is driving the other side, and a flexible, creative approach to financing mergers, were identified as most responsible for the Corporation's success

  4. Mergers and acquisitions: some implications of cultural change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, S J

    1996-01-01

    A result of recent National Health Service reforms is the need to investigate, and possibly change, the culture of the professional working relationship between members of staff and their employer. This is particularly the case in situations of mergers and acquisitions where staff working from different cultural environments must work together. Mergers are becoming a feature of health service provision, perhaps this becomes most obvious with the recent moves by colleges of nursing and midwifery into the higher education sector and amalgamations of some purchasing authorities. Mergers highlight the practical issues of bringing together different organizational and work cultures to deliver a high quality service. This article discusses some aspects of the nature of organizational culture, the human impact of mergers and acquisitions and offers strategies for managing these events.

  5. Black Hole Mergers and Gravitational Waves: Opening the New Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes produces a powerful burst of gravitational waves, emitting more energy than all the stars in the observable universe combined. Since these mergers take place in the regime of strong dynamical gravity, computing the gravitational waveforms requires solving the full Einstein equations of general relativity on a computer. For more than 30 years, scientists tried to simulate these mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes were plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. In the past several years, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will highlight these breakthroughs and the resulting 'gold rush' of new results that is revealing the dynamics of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  6. A radio counterpart to a neutron star merger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinan, G; Corsi, A; Mooley, K P; Hotokezaka, K; Nakar, E; Kasliwal, M M; Kaplan, D L; Frail, D A; Myers, S T; Murphy, T; De, K; Dobie, D; Allison, J R; Bannister, K W; Bhalerao, V; Chandra, P; Clarke, T E; Giacintucci, S; Ho, A Y Q; Horesh, A; Kassim, N E; Kulkarni, S R; Lenc, E; Lockman, F J; Lynch, C; Nichols, D; Nissanke, S; Palliyaguru, N; Peters, W M; Piran, T; Rana, J; Sadler, E M; Singer, L P

    2017-12-22

    Gravitational waves have been detected from a binary neutron star merger event, GW170817. The detection of electromagnetic radiation from the same source has shown that the merger occurred in the outskirts of the galaxy NGC 4993, at a distance of 40 megaparsecs from Earth. We report the detection of a counterpart radio source that appears 16 days after the event, allowing us to diagnose the energetics and environment of the merger. The observed radio emission can be explained by either a collimated ultrarelativistic jet, viewed off-axis, or a cocoon of mildly relativistic ejecta. Within 100 days of the merger, the radio light curves will enable observers to distinguish between these models, and the angular velocity and geometry of the debris will be directly measurable by very long baseline interferometry. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Efficiency defense and administrative fuzziness in merger regulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medvedev, Andrei

    -, č. 234 (2004), s. 1-42 ISSN 1211-3298 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7085904 Keywords : merger regulation * efficiency defense Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp234.pdf

  8. Quality competition and hospital mergers-An experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Johann; Kairies-Schwarz, Nadja; Vomhof, Markus

    2017-12-01

    On the basis of a Salop model with regulated prices, we investigate quality provision behaviour of competing hospitals before and after a merger. For this, we use a controlled laboratory experiment where subjects decided on the level of treatment quality as head of a hospital. We find that the post-merger average quality is significantly lower than the average pre-merger quality. However, for merger insiders and outsiders, average quality choices are significantly higher than predicted for pure profit-maximising hospitals. This upward deviation is potentially driven by altruistic behaviour towards patients. Furthermore, we find that in the case where sufficient cost synergies are realised by the merged hospitals, there is a significant increase in average quality choices compared to the scenario without synergies. Finally, we find that our results do not change when comparing individual decisions to team decisions. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Modeling the Effects of Mergers in the Retail Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomgren-Hansen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    According to EU competition law, mergers that significantly impedes effective competition, particularly by creating or strengthening a dominant position are prohibited. To identify these cases, authorities need a quantifiable model of the relationship between the variables that are affected...... by the merger and some measure of competition. Furthermore, the authorities must make their decision quickly, rendering deliberate data collection and econometric analyses infeasible in practice. The decision must be based on easily accessible data. In this paper, a simple model of the interaction between...... the retail and wholesale markets is constructed, calibrated and simulated based on a concrete case (the acquisition and merger of 250 shops previously organized in a voluntary chain of shops comprising roughly half of the market for high-end cosmetics in Denmark). Model simulations predicts that the merger...

  10. Black Hole Mergers, Gravitational Waves, and Multi-Messenger Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for both ground-based detectors such as LIGO and VIRGO, as well as the space-based LISA. Since the merger takes place in the regime of strong dynamical gravity, computing the resulting gravitational waveforms requires solving the full Einstein equations of general relativity on a computer. Although numerical codes designed to simulate black hole mergers were plagued for many years by a host of instabilities, recent breakthroughs have conquered these problems and opened up this field dramatically. This talk will focus on the resulting gold rush of new results that is revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, astrophysics, and testing general relativity.

  11. Modeling the Complete Gravitational Wave Spectrum of Neutron Star Mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Dietrich, Tim; Nagar, Alessandro

    2015-08-28

    In the context of neutron star mergers, we study the gravitational wave spectrum of the merger remnant using numerical relativity simulations. Postmerger spectra are characterized by a main peak frequency f2 related to the particular structure and dynamics of the remnant hot hypermassive neutron star. We show that f(2) is correlated with the tidal coupling constant κ(2)^T that characterizes the binary tidal interactions during the late-inspiral merger. The relation f(2)(κ(2)^T) depends very weakly on the binary total mass, mass ratio, equation of state, and thermal effects. This observation opens up the possibility of developing a model of the gravitational spectrum of every merger unifying the late-inspiral and postmerger descriptions.

  12. Horizontal mergers and weak and strong competition commissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Bojan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse the horizontal merger of companies in an already concentrated industry. The participants in mergers are obliged to submit notification to the Competition Commission but they also have the option of rejecting the merger. At the time of the notification submission the participants do not know whether the Commission is strong or weak, and they can complain to the Court if the Commission prohibits the merger. We model the strategic interaction between Participants and Commission in a dynamic game of incomplete information and determine weak perfect Bayesian equilibria. The main finding of our paper is that Participants will base their decision to submit notification on their belief in a weak Commission decision and will almost completely ignore the possibility of a strong Commission decision. We also provide a detailed examination of one case from Serbian regulatory practice, which coincides with the results of our game theoretical model.

  13. Black-hole Merger Simulations for LISA Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard J.; Baker, John G.; vanMeter, James R.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan M.; McWilliams, Sean T.

    2009-01-01

    The strongest expected sources of gravitational waves in the LISA band are the mergers of massive black holes. LISA may observe these systems to high redshift, z>10, to uncover details of the origin of massive black holes, and of the relationship between black holes and their host structures, and structure formation itself. These signals arise from the final stage in the development of a massive black-hole binary emitting strong gravitational radiation that accelerates the system's inspiral toward merger. The strongest part of the signal, at the point of merger, carries much information about the system and provides a probe of extreme gravitational physics. Theoretical predictions for these merger signals rely on supercomputer simulations to solve Einstein's equations. We discuss recent numerical results and their impact on LISA science expectations.

  14. Numerical Relativity Simulations for Black Hole Merger Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2010-01-01

    Massive black hole mergers are perhaps the most energetic astronomical events, establishing their importance as gravitational wave sources for LISA, and also possibly leading to observable influences on their local environments. Advances in numerical relativity over the last five years have fueled the development of a rich physical understanding of general relativity's predictions for these events. Z will overview the understanding of these event emerging from numerical simulation studies. These simulations elucidate the pre-merger dynamics of the black hole binaries, the consequent gravitational waveform signatures ' and the resulting state, including its kick velocity, for the final black hole produced by the merger. Scenarios are now being considered for observing each of these aspects of the merger, involving both gravitational-wave and electromagnetic astronomy.

  15. Modeling the Effects of Mergers in the Retail Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomgren-Hansen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    the retail and wholesale markets is constructed, calibrated and simulated based on a concrete case (the acquisition and merger of 250 shops previously organized in a voluntary chain of shops comprising roughly half of the market for high-end cosmetics in Denmark). Model simulations predicts that the merger......According to EU competition law, mergers that significantly impedes effective competition, particularly by creating or strengthening a dominant position are prohibited. To identify these cases, authorities need a quantifiable model of the relationship between the variables that are affected...... by the merger and some measure of competition. Furthermore, the authorities must make their decision quickly, rendering deliberate data collection and econometric analyses infeasible in practice. The decision must be based on easily accessible data. In this paper, a simple model of the interaction between...

  16. Understanding Information Systems Integration Deficiencies in Mergers and Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan; Kettinger, William J.

    2017-01-01

    Information systems (IS) integration is a critical challenge for value-creating mergers and acquisitions. Appropriate design and implementation of IS integration is typically a precondition for enabling a majority of the anticipated business benefits of a combined organization. Often...

  17. The Role of Occupational Identification During Post-Merger Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, David P; Noorderhaven, Niels G

    2018-04-01

    Integration processes after mergers are fraught with difficulties, and constitute a main cause of merger failure. This study focuses on the human aspect of post-merger integration, and in particular, on the role of occupational identification. We theorize and empirically demonstrate by means of a survey design that employees' identification with their occupation is positively related to their willingness to cooperate in the post-merger integration process, over and above the effect of organization members' organizational identification. This positive effect of occupational identification is stronger for uniformed personnel but attenuates in the course of the integration process. Qualitative interviews further explore and interpret the results from our statistical analysis. Together, these findings have important practical implications and suggest future research directions.

  18. COMPANIES’ MERGERS AND AQUISITIONS AS A SOCIAL PROCESS: MODERN REALITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Barkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mergers and acquisitions have become one of the main business strategies in the past decades. However, as the international experience indicates, the impact of mergers and acquisitions is rather ambiguous. On the one hand, mergers accelerate the evolution of organizations, strengthen their market positions and competitive advantages, create opportunities for the future development. On the other hand, mergers and acquisitions often lead to severe system crises, caused by various confrontations and risks. From the social and administrative point of view, mergers and acquisitions are commonly perceived as troublesome transformation processes instilling distrust and fear in the workers. Fear of the upcoming mergers is typical not only for ordinary employees, but also for senior management, who remains the most vulnerable unit in the M&A process. Mergers are considered as a stress and challenge for all the categories of employees. The employees realize the instability and the vulnerability of their current statuses, the limited ability to influence the situation and job insecurity. The uncertainty and fear lead to the employees’ resistance of different kinds, which eventually destroys the corporate unity, exacerbates the contradictions between various groups of employees and destabilizes the operation of companies. The authors assume that in the post-industrial age the employees’ perceptions of the merger processes can change and study the trends and factors which determine employees’ attitude towards mergers and acquisitions. Nowadays management strategies and the logic of administrative processes change radically, the structure of companies and the relationships in organizations networks undergo crucial transformations. The tendency to the democratization of organizations has received widespread recognition; companies become more flexible and are more frequently perceived and operate as open systems. The companies start to use the project

  19. Galaxy-Wide Shocks in the H$\\alpha$ Emission of Nearby Galaxy Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, S. Alireza; Lotz, Jennifer M.

    2018-01-01

    We examine the properties of shocked gas produced as a result of binary galaxy interactions, using H$\\alpha$ emission in a sample 22 mergers observed with SparsePak Integral Field Unit (IFU) at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO). Our sample consists of major and minor tidally interacting galaxies (mass ratio $1text{f}_\\text{shocked}$, and examine the spatial distribution of shocks. We find that close galaxy pairs have, on average, a higher shock fraction than wide pairs, and our coalesced mergers have the highest average $\\text{f}_\\text{shocked}$. Additionally, we find for the first time, correlations between mass ratio, mass of the companion, and $\\text{f}_\\text{shocked}$ in tidally interacting galaxy pairs. Among the non-coalesced systems in our sample, the galaxy pairs with more equal light ratio (stellar mass ratio) tend to have a higher average $\\text{f}_\\text{shocked}$. Also, the primary (more massive) companions are on average slightly more shocked than the secondary (less massive) ones. Utilizing dynamical models in the literature and this work, we inspect trends between $\\text{f}_\\text{shocked}$ and the reconstructed encounter parameters. In this very limited sample, we find that the orbital pericentric separation is correlated with shock fraction, consistent with shocks being produced by the chain of events caused by the tidal impulse during the first passage. These results lay a basis for furture analysis using the higher statistics provided by the on-going and future IFU galaxy surveys.

  20. Analisis Kinerja Keuangan Perusahaan Sebelum dan Sesudah Merger dan Akuisisi

    OpenAIRE

    Esterlina, Prisya; Firdausi, Nila Nuzula

    2017-01-01

    The research aimed to examine the conditions of companies' financial performance before and after conducting merger and acquisition. Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX known as BEI) noticed that a whole sector in thirty companies did a merger and acquisition during 2010-2012 periods, except financial sector.Using financial ratio as the parameter of financial performance, it turned out to be the variables that used in this research were current ratio, total asset turnover, fixed asset turnover, deb...

  1. Galaxy pairs as a probe for mergers at z ~ 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Man, A.W.S.; Zirm, Andrew Wasmuth; Toft, Sune

    2011-01-01

    In this work I investigate the redshift evolution of pair fraction of a sample of 196 massive galaxies from z = 0 to 3, selected from the COSMOS field. We find that on average a massive galaxy undergoes ~ 1.1 \\pm 0.5 major merger since z = 3. I will review the current limitations of using the pair...... fraction as a probe for quantifying the impact of mergers on galaxy evolution. This work is based on the paper Man et al. (2011)....

  2. Numerical Relativity, Black Hole Mergers, and Gravitational Waves: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This series of 3 lectures will present recent developments in numerical relativity, and their applications to simulating black hole mergers and computing the resulting gravitational waveforms. In this second lecture, we focus on simulations of black hole binary mergers. We hig hlight the instabilities that plagued the codes for many years, the r ecent breakthroughs that led to the first accurate simulations, and the current state of the art.

  3. Autonomy and minority rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barten, Ulrike

    2008-01-01

    in the cultural, educational, religious and social sectors which have of course are exercised in a limited territory; however, do not threaten the state's sovereignty in the same way as independent political decisions could do. How far minority rights have the same dimensions, will be another issue. Minorities......'? I will look at this in connection with minority rights, as minority rights accord special rights and procedures to a specific group. For example, minorities have sometimes far reaching competences in the educational field: setting up and running their own schools and to a certain degree also decide......, are they at odds with each other or do they possibly overlap? This last possibility would be that minority rights are so extensive that they actually amount to autonomy. Autonomy has a range of dimensions and one must distinguish between political autonomy which is largely territorial in nature and autonomy...

  4. The Detection and Parameter Estimation of Binary Black Hole Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biwer, Christopher M.

    In this dissertation we study gravitational-wave data analysis techniques for binary neutron star and black hole mergers. During its first observing run, the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO) reported the first, direct observations of gravitational waves from two binary black hole mergers. We present the results from the search for binary black hole mergers which unambiguously detected the binary black hole mergers. We determine the effect of calibration errors on the detection statistic of the search. Since the search is not designed to precisely measure the astrophysical parameters of the binary neutron star and black hole mergers, we use Bayesian methods to develop a new parameter estimation analysis. We demonstrate the performance of the analysis on the binary black hole mergers detected during Advanced LIGO's first observing run. We use the parameter estimation analysis to assess the ability of gravitational-wave observatories to observe a gap in the black hole mass distribution between 52 M and 133 M due to pair-instability supernovae. Finally, we use simulated signals added to the Advanced LIGO detectors to validate the search and parameter estimation analyses used to publish the detection of the astrophysical events.

  5. Merger and Industrial Acceleration: Study at Indonesian Islamic Banking Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kindy Miftah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research tries to feed the alternatives of merger between Islamic banks which becomes a form of recommendation to optimize the merger result, so it will contribute to the development of Indonesia’s banking sector in particular. Methodolgy of this study is using comparison technique utilize result of calculation valuation based on valuation theory in general with method discounted cash flaw (DCF. Valuation data processing using data past performance sharia banks is to plan future financial performance. Results of valuation will be conducted both with individual banks that will be merged and alternative merger determined. These findings implied from various possibility alternative mergers between sharia banks, there are 5 alternatives that are feasible considering the internal aspect such as tendency shareholder and condition sharia bank to be merged related to internal interest and external aspect namely scale of assets from merger banks and probability success from merger process.DOI:  10.15408/sjie.v6i1.4728

  6. FIESTA; Minority Television Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Wes; And Others

    The suggestions for planning, running, and evaluating minority television programing presented in this handbook are based on the experience and example of the FIESTA project (Tucson, Arizona). After initiating the reader into the topic of minority programing, the document disucsses the following topics: broadcast research, origins of the FIESTA…

  7. Surveying ethnic minorities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joost Kappelhof

    2015-01-01

    Obtaining accurate survey data on ethnic minorities is not easy. Ethnic minorities are usually underrepresented in surveys, and it is moreover not certain that those who do take part in surveys are representative of the group the researcher is interested in. For example, is it only people with

  8. Black Hole Mergers and Recoils in Low-Mass Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecha, Laura; Kelley, Luke; Koss, Michael; Satyapal, Shobita

    2018-01-01

    Mergers between massive black holes (BHs) in the intermediate-mass range are one of the most promising sources of gravitational waves (GWs) detectable with LISA. These highly energetic GW events could be observed out to very high redshift, in the epoch where massive BH seeds are thought to form. Despite recent progress, however, much is still not known about the low-mass BH population even in the local Universe. The rates of BH binary formation, inspiral, and merger are also highly uncertain across the BH mass scale. To address these pressing issues in advance of LISA, cosmological hydrodynamics simulations and semi-analytic modeling are being used to model the formation and evolution of BH binaries, and the GW signals they produce. Efforts are also underway to understand the electromagnetic (EM) signatures of the BH binary population. These have proven largely elusive thus far, but an increasing population of BH pairs has been found, and advances in the coming years will provide important comparisons for models of GW sources. Moreover, asymmetry in the GW emission from BH mergers imparts a recoil kick to the merged BH, which in extreme cases can eject the BH from its host galaxy. This creates additional uncertainty in the BH merger rate, but the remnant recoiling BH could be observed as an offset quasar. Identifications of such objects would provide another EM signature of BH mergers that would help pave the way for LISA. We will review model predictions of the BH inspiral and merger rate across the mass scale. We will also describe how the EM signatures of active, merging BHs can be used to constrain theoretical merger rates. Finally, we will discuss the predicted observability of recoiling BHs and ongoing efforts to identify and confirm candidate recoils.

  9. A comprehensive, holistic people integration process for mergers and acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina P. Steynberg

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Mergers and Acquisitions (M&As are a frequent, alternative strategic growth option to organic growth for organisations. The failure rate of mergers and acquisitions is alarmingly high (70% plus failures. The people factor is seen as one of the main contributors to this failure.Research purpose: To develop and validate a comprehensive, holistic model for the people integration process during mergers and acquisitions.Motivation for the study: The literature on a comprehensive, holistic people integration process for mergers and acquisitions is sparse and fragmented.Research design, approach and method: A qualitative approach was adopted consisting of a three step process which solicited the views of seasoned M&A Practioners; these views were compared against the available literature. Finally, practioners were asked to critique the final model from a practice perspective. The utility of the final model was assessed against two mergers and acquisitions case studies.Main findings: A comprehensive, holistic people integration process model for mergers and acquisitions was developed and validated. However, this model will only significantly enhance mergers and acquisitions value realisation if it is applied from the appropriate vantage point.Practical/managerial implications: The proposed approach will increase the probability of a successful M&A people-wise and M&A value realisation.Contribution/value add: Theoretically, the development and validation of a M&A people process integration model; practically, guidelines for successful people integration; organisationally, significantly enhancing the chances of M&A success; and community wise, the reduction of the negative effects of M&A failure on communities.

  10. Integrated delivery systems: mergers and acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, S

    1999-01-01

    Mergers and acquisitions are usually the way an IDS is built. The CNO and/or CNOs/DONs have an integral role in the resolution of the M/A process. During this time of significant change, during which there may even be chaos, the CNOs work to maintain stability so there is as little impact as possible on patient outcomes, a core responsibility of the CNOs. The CNOs should focus on identifying and working with the highly skilled individuals in the organization to get to the recovery stage of the M/A process, at which time a high-performing organization is achieved. To build this new organization or IDS, the old organizations of the M/A must be changed (Moss Kanter, 1994). The successful CNOs will manage the trade-offs and will become experts in collaboration. The CNO's goals are to maximize the quality of patient care, the professional satisfaction of the nurse, and the goals of achieving cost effectiveness for the system (Clifford, 1998), and keeping this focus through the M/A process will yield success.

  11. The Galaxy Cluster Merger Catalog: An Online Repository of Mock Observations from Simulated Galaxy Cluster Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZuHone, J. A.; Kowalik, K.; Öhman, E.; Lau, E.; Nagai, D.

    2018-01-01

    We present the “Galaxy Cluster Merger Catalog.” This catalog provides an extensive suite of mock observations and related data for N-body and hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster mergers and clusters from cosmological simulations. These mock observations consist of projections of a number of important observable quantities in several different wavebands, as well as along different lines of sight through each simulation domain. The web interface to the catalog consists of easily browsable images over epoch and projection direction, as well as download links for the raw data and a JS9 interface for interactive data exploration. The data are presented within a consistent format so that comparison between simulations is straightforward. All of the data products are provided in the standard Flexible Image Transport System file format. The data are being stored on the yt Hub (http://hub.yt), which allows for remote access and analysis using a Jupyter notebook server. Future versions of the catalog will include simulations from a number of research groups and a variety of research topics related to the study of interactions of galaxy clusters with each other and with their member galaxies. The catalog is located at http://gcmc.hub.yt.

  12. A comprehensive, holistic people integration process for mergers and acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina P. Steynberg

    2011-03-01

    Research purpose: To develop and validate a comprehensive, holistic model for the people integration process during mergers and acquisitions. Motivation for the study: The literature on a comprehensive, holistic people integration process for mergers and acquisitions is sparse and fragmented. Research design, approach and method: A qualitative approach was adopted consisting of a three step process which solicited the views of seasoned M&A Practioners; these views were compared against the available literature. Finally, practioners were asked to critique the final model from a practice perspective. The utility of the final model was assessed against two mergers and acquisitions case studies. Main findings: A comprehensive, holistic people integration process model for mergers and acquisitions was developed and validated. However, this model will only significantly enhance mergers and acquisitions value realisation if it is applied from the appropriate vantage point. Practical/managerial implications: The proposed approach will increase the probability of a successful M&A people-wise and M&A value realisation. Contribution/value add: Theoretically, the development and validation of a M&A people process integration model; practically, guidelines for successful people integration; organisationally, significantly enhancing the chances of M&A success; and community wise, the reduction of the negative effects of M&A failure on communities.

  13. Observing Mergers of Non-Spinning Black-Hole Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Sean T.; Boggs, William D.; Baker, John G.; Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in the field of numerical relativity now make it possible to calculate the final, most powerful merger phase of binary black-hole coalescence for generic binaries. The state of the art has advanced well beyond the equal-mass case into the unequal-mass and spinning regions of parameter space. We present a study of the nonspinning portion of parameter space, primarily using an analytic waveform model tuned to available numerical data, with an emphasis on observational implications. We investigate the impact of varied m8BS ratio on merger signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) for several detectors, and compare our results with expectations from the test-mass limit. We note a striking similarity of the waveform phasing of the merger waveform across the available mass ratios. Motivated by this, we calculate the match between our equal-mass and 4:1 mass-ratio waveforms during the merger as a function of location on the source sky, using a new formalism for the match that accounts for higher harmonics. This is an indicator of the amount of degeneracy in mass ratio for mergers of moderate mass ratio systems.

  14. THE MAIN OPERATIONS OF REORGANIZATION THROUGH MERGERS OF TRADING COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra-Gabriela Rolea

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Notwithstanding the optimistic forecasts issued by experts a couple of years ago, the economic predicaments of the European Union’s member states, including Romania, are far from being settled. The extension of the economic and financial dowturn, the continuing process of globalization and the financial markets’ volatility have imposed an unparalleled flexibility upon the economic agents, in that the amount of mergers and acquisitions has risen at a both national and international level. This background calls for a detailed but nonetheless approachable study of the reorganization of the trading companies though mergers, aimed mainly at the business environment. In order to reach the aforementioned objectives, the theoretical endeavor seeks to explore the relevant legal provisions, including the European Directives. The juridical and accounting operations of mergers, their legal consequences and concrete implications on the activity of the trading companies will also be analysed. Some particular approaches embraced by the legal practice are to be presented, as in Romania mergers are submitted to the control of the court. The study will have a positive impact on the economic agents, who are fostered to conclude this type of restructuring, by altering the line of thought shaped a few years ago, according to which mergers are difficult, isolated and sometimes even unacceptable operations.

  15. Specification of merger gains in the Norwegian electricity distribution industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saastamoinen, Antti; Bjørndal, Endre; Bjørndal, Mette

    2017-01-01

    Electricity distribution often exhibits economies of scale. In Norway, a number of smaller distribution system operators exist and thus there is potential to restructure the industry, possibly through mergers. However, the revenue cap regulatory model in Norway does not incentivize firms to merge as merging leads to a stricter revenue cap for the merged company. Thus the regulator compensates the firms in order to create such incentives. The amount of compensation is based on the potential gains of the merger estimated using a data envelopment analysis (DEA) based frontier approach introduced by Bogetoft and Wang (2005). DEA is however only one of many possible frontier estimators that can be used in estimation. Furthermore, the returns to scale assumption, the operating environment of firms and the presence of stochastic noise and outlier observations are all known to affect to the estimation of production technology. In this paper we explore how varying assumptions under two alternative frontier estimators shape the distribution of merger gains within the Norwegian distribution industry. Our results reveal that the restructuring policies of the industry may be significantly altered depending how potential gains from the mergers are estimated. - Highlights: • The merger gains of Norwegian electricity distribution firm are investigated. • Different estimators and model specifications are applied. • Results show that the gains are significantly affected by the model choice. • Incentives to merge may be shaped through the estimation of gains.

  16. Mergers between governmental research institutes and Universities in the Danish HE sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Kaare; Hansen, Hanne Foss; Rasmussen, Jørgen Gulddahl

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the mergers in the Danish Higher Education (HE)-sector with a particular emphasis on the 2007 mergers involving universities and Government Research Institutes (GRIs). Furthermore, it follows the post-merger processes up to 2014/2015 at two Danish universities...... and the outcomes. Finally, it is shown that it makes a significant difference whether a federal or a unitary structure is implemented after the merger, although each solution has both strengths and weaknesses....

  17. BINARY MINOR PLANETS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The data set lists orbital and physical properties for well-observed or suspected binary/multiple minor planets including the Pluto system, compiled from the...

  18. Teaching minority children hygiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rheinländer, Thilde; Samuelsen, Helle; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Ethnic minority children in Vietnam experience high levels of hygiene- and sanitation-related diseases. Improving hygiene for minority children is therefore vital for improving child health. The study objective was to investigate how kindergarten and home environments influence...... the learning of hygiene of pre-school ethnic minority children in rural Vietnam. Design. Eight months of ethnographic field studies were conducted among four ethnic minority groups living in highland and lowland communities in northern Vietnam. Data included participant observation in four kindergartens and 20...... homes of pre-school children, together with 67 semi-structured interviews with caregivers and five kindergarten staff. Thematic analysis was applied and concepts of social learning provided inputs to the analysis. Findings. This study showed that poor living conditions with lack of basic sanitation...

  19. Minority Veteran Report 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report is the first comprehensive report that chronicles the history of racial and ethnic minorities in the military and as Veterans, profiles characteristics...

  20. Minorities in Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elling, Rasmus Christian

    Contrary to the popular understanding of Iran as a Persian nation, half of the country's population consists of minorities, among whom there has been significant ethnic mobilization at crucial stages in Iranian history. One such stage is now: suppressed minority demands, identity claims, and deba......Contrary to the popular understanding of Iran as a Persian nation, half of the country's population consists of minorities, among whom there has been significant ethnic mobilization at crucial stages in Iranian history. One such stage is now: suppressed minority demands, identity claims......, and debates on diversity have entered public discourse and politics. In 2005–2007, Iran was rocked by the most widespread ethnic unrest experienced in that country since the revolution. The same period was also marked by the re-emergence of nationalism. This interdisciplinary book takes a long-overdue step...

  1. Minority Veteran Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report is the first comprehensive report that chronicles the history of racial and ethnic minorities in the military and as Veterans, profiles characteristics...

  2. BCDC Minor Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — An administrative permit can be issued for an activity that qualifies as a minor repair or improvement in a relatively short period of time and without a public...

  3. Hydrodynamic evolution of neutron star merger remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Men-Quan; Zhang, Jie

    2017-11-01

    Based on the special relativistic hydrodynamic equations and updated cooling function, we investigate the long-term evolution of neutron stars merger (NSM) remnants by a one-dimensional hydrodynamic code. Three NSM models from one soft equation of state, SFHo, and two stiff equations of state, DD2 and TM1, are used to compare their influences on the hydrodynamic evolution of remnants. We present the luminosity, mass and radius of remnants, as well as the velocity, temperature and density of shocks. For a typical interstellar medium (ISM) density with solar metallicity, we find that the NSM remnant from the SFHo model makes much more changes to ISM in terms of velocity, density and temperature distributions, compared with the case of DD2 and TM1 models. The maximal luminosity of the NSM remnant from the SFHo model is 3.4 × 1038 erg s-1, which is several times larger than that from DD2 and TM1 models. The NSM remnant from the SFHo model can maintain high luminosity (>1038 erg s-1) for 2.29 × 104 yr. Furthermore, the density and temperature of remnants at the maximal luminosity are not sensitive to the power of the original remnant. For the ISM with the solar metallicity and nH = 1 cm- 3, the density of the first shock ∼10-23 g cm-3 and the temperature ∼3 × 105 K in the maximal luminosity phase; The temperature of the first shock decreases and there is a thin 'dense' shell with density ∼10-21 g cm-3 after the maximal luminosity. These characteristics may be helpful for future observations of NSM remnants.

  4. BRIGHT 'MERGER-NOVA' FROM THE REMNANT OF A NEUTRON STAR BINARY MERGER: A SIGNATURE OF A NEWLY BORN, MASSIVE, MILLISECOND MAGNETAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yun-Wei; Zhang, Bing; Gao, He

    2013-01-01

    A massive millisecond magnetar may survive the merger of a neutron star (NS) binary, which would continuously power the merger ejecta. We develop a generic dynamic model for the merger ejecta with energy injection from the central magnetar. The ejecta emission (the m erger-nova ) powered by the magnetar peaks in the UV band and the peak of the light curve, progressively shifts to an earlier epoch with increasing frequency. A magnetar-powered merger-nova could have an optical peak brightness comparable to a supernova, which is a few tens or hundreds times brighter than the radioactive-powered merger-novae (the so-called macro-nova or kilo-nova). On the other hand, such a merger-nova would peak earlier and have a significantly shorter duration than that of a supernova. An early collapse of the magnetar could suppress the brightness of the optical emission and shorten its duration. Such millisecond-magnetar-powered merger-novae may be detected from NS-NS merger events without an observed short gamma-ray burst, and could be a bright electromagnetic counterpart for gravitational wave bursts due to NS-NS mergers. If detected, it suggests that the merger leaves behind a massive NS, which has important implications for the equation-of-state of nuclear matter

  5. Multichoice minority game

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ein-Dor, Liat; Metzler, Richard; Kanter, Ido; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    The generalization of the problem of adaptive competition, known as the minority game, to the case of K possible choices for each player, is addressed, and applied to a system of interacting perceptrons with input and output units of a type of K-state Potts spins. An optimal solution of this minority game, as well as the dynamic evolution of the adaptive strategies of the players, are solved analytically for a general K and compared with numerical simulations

  6. Implications of mergers and acquisitions in gas and electric markets: The role of yardstick competition in merger analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, H.L.

    1999-01-01

    There has been no shortage of proposed and consummated mergers of regulated utilities in the electric, natural gas, and telecommunication industries over the last decade. For example, the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association states that there have been thirty electric utility mergers since 1992 and dozens of so-called convergence mergers between electric and gas utilities during that period. Yardstick competition or the competition that occurs when the regulator can compare the relative performances of utilities it regulates with other utilities it regulates or with neighboring utilities in other jurisdictions, places pressure on the regulated utilities to perform better for fear of coming up short in the comparison process. There are three important questions regulators may ask about the importance of yardstick competition as regulatory tool and the weight regulators should give to diminution of yardstick competition in the merger context. First, does it make that much difference? In the electric industry, for example, distribution costs typically comprise less than ten percent of the delivered price of electricity. Second, to preserve theoretical yardstick competition, are regulators then going to block mergers that bring other efficiencies? And finally, are there sound tools at the regulators' disposal should they be inclined to take yardstick competition seriously as a factor in regulation of utilities?

  7. Astrophysics of Super-Massive Black Hole Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.

    2013-01-01

    We present here an overview of recent work in the subject of astrophysical manifestations of super-massive black hole (SMBH) mergers. This is a field that has been traditionally driven by theoretical work, but in recent years has also generated a great deal of interest and excitement in the observational astronomy community. In particular, the electromagnetic (EM) counterparts to SMBH mergers provide the means to detect and characterize these highly energetic events at cosmological distances, even in the absence of a space-based gravitational-wave observatory. In addition to providing a mechanism for observing SMBH mergers, EM counterparts also give important information about the environments in which these remarkable events take place, thus teaching us about the mechanisms through which galaxies form and evolve symbiotically with their central black holes.

  8. Employer-provided health insurance and hospital mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmon, Christopher

    2013-07-01

    This paper explores the impact of employer-provided health insurance on hospital competition and hospital mergers. Under employer-provided health insurance, employer executives act as agents for their employees in selecting health insurance options for their firm. The paper investigates whether a merger of hospitals favored by executives will result in a larger price increase than a merger of competing hospitals elsewhere. This is found to be the case even when the executive has the same opportunity cost of travel as her employees and even when the executive is the sole owner of the firm, retaining all profits. This is consistent with the Federal Trade Commission's findings in its challenge of Evanston Northwestern Healthcare's acquisition of Highland Park Hospital. Implications of the model are further tested with executive location data and hospital data from Florida and Texas.

  9. Galaxy pairs as a probe for mergers at z ~ 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Man, A.W.S.; Zirm, Andrew Wasmuth; Toft, Sune

    2011-01-01

    In this work I investigate the redshift evolution of pair fraction of a sample of 196 massive galaxies from z = 0 to 3, selected from the COSMOS field. We find that on average a massive galaxy undergoes ~ 1.1 \\pm 0.5 major merger since z = 3. I will review the current limitations of using the pai...... fraction as a probe for quantifying the impact of mergers on galaxy evolution. This work is based on the paper Man et al. (2011).......In this work I investigate the redshift evolution of pair fraction of a sample of 196 massive galaxies from z = 0 to 3, selected from the COSMOS field. We find that on average a massive galaxy undergoes ~ 1.1 \\pm 0.5 major merger since z = 3. I will review the current limitations of using the pair...

  10. The effects of union mergers and internal restructuring:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navrbjerg, Steen Erik; Larsen, Trine Pernille

    2016-01-01

    Trade union mergers and restructuring are often seen as strategy for union revitalisation and renewal and have been ongoing in the majority of European trade unions. This paper explores how recent union mergers and internal restructuring has affected unions service provision, union democracy...... and interest representation. This is analysed drawing on longitudinal data from two Danish shop steward surveys conducted in 1998 and 2010, comparing shop stewards in merged and non-merged unions respectively. The main results are that although it could be expected that union mergers and internal restructuring...... may entail lower service levels, democratic deficit and weakening of union identities, this is not always the case. Danish shop stewards appear more satisfied with their union’s service provision anno 2010 compared to 1998 and feel more able to influence union politics. However, variations also exist...

  11. How Enterprise Architecture Maturity Enables Post-merger IT Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Törmer, Robert Lorenz; Henningsson, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    While world-wide Mergers and Acquisitions (M&As) activity continues to accelerate, a substantial proportion of deals fails to yield the expected value. The inability to plan and implement post-merger integration of information technology contributes substantially to these failure rates. This paper...... advances the argument that a company’s pre-existing Enterprise Architecture decisively shapes the capability to implement post-merger IT integration and subsequently realize benefits from M&A. Our multiple-case study investigates three acquisition cases and develops an explanatory theory of how Enterprise...... Architecture maturity enables the implementation of distinct integration strategies. The results do not only enrich the academic literature on M&A, but also show the strategic value of Enterprise Architecture maturity....

  12. Merger Strategy, Cross-Cultural Involvement, and Polyphony

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Marita; Boje, David

    2014-01-01

    Structured Abstract: Purpose: The strategy is dynamic, however the cross-cultural polyphonic dynamics were ignored, with dire consequencs. Our purpose is to explore how the organisation tries to make sense of the happening through storytelling and how the leadership practices may change due...... (Aristotle, 350 BCE: 1450b: 25, p. 233). Design: We present a dialogic performance of the cross-cultural dynamics of a merger. The context is a two-year old merger. The merger was strategically a good decision that takes into the consideration that the market is highly competitive with a decreasing number......, the proliferation of ever more living stories, expanding the web of differences (Bakhtin, 1984). Gadamer (1975: 367) makes the point that "to conduct a dialogue requies first of all that the partners do not talk at cross purposes." The living story web expanded in ways that so may cross purpose proliferated...

  13. A Framework for Understanding Post-Merger Information Systems Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alaranta, Maria; Kautz, Karlheinz

    2012-01-01

    that researchers and managers of post-merger IS integration should pay particular attention to the IS and organizational merger contexts; the need to build relationships and collaboration between the merging parties; power struggles; and, perhaps most importantly, understanding and treating post......This paper develops a theoretical framework for the integration of information systems (IS) after a merger or an acquisition. The framework integrates three perspectives: a structuralist, an individualist, and an interactive process perspective to analyze and understand such integrations....... The framework is applied to a longitudinal case study of a manufacturing company that grew through an acquisition. The management decided to integrate the production control IS via tailoring a new system that blends together features of existing IS. The application of the framework in the case study confirms...

  14. 17 CFR 230.145 - Reclassification of securities, mergers, consolidations and acquisitions of assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., mergers, consolidations and acquisitions of assets. 230.145 Section 230.145 Commodity and Securities... § 230.145 Reclassification of securities, mergers, consolidations and acquisitions of assets.... A statutory merger or consolidation or similar plan or acquisition in which securities of such...

  15. Relics as Probes of Galaxy Cluster Mergers R. J. van Weeren1,∗ , M ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    waves from a binary cluster merger event, which develop after the core passage of two subclusters. The idea is that double relics can be used to put constraints on the merger time scale, mass ratio, impact parameter and viewing angle. 2. Simulating binary cluster mergers and double radio relics. We used the FLASH 3.2 ...

  16. Towards a Novel Conceptual Framework for Understanding Mergers in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuzhuo; Pinheiro, Rómulo; Geschwind, Lars; Aarrevaara, Timo

    2016-01-01

    This paper tries to develop a conceptual framework for a comprehensive understanding of the merger process, which is regarded as a matter of institutionalization of organizational innovation. In the framework, a number of factors affecting merger process or institutionalization of merger are identified, such as those related to environmental…

  17. Mergers in Chinese Higher Education: Lessons for Studies in a Global Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuzhuo; Yang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990s, there have been more than 400 cases of university mergers in China, representing various types and involving 1000 public institutions. While China has provided good and abundant cases for studies on university mergers, such an opportunity has not yet been fully exploited by international scholars of university merger research.…

  18. Discursive "Policy Logics" of Mergers in US Higher Education: Strategy or Tragedy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Sandria S.

    2011-01-01

    Mergers are part of the historical fabric of US higher education. However, the current economic recession and other policy issues have experts and academicians predicting an increase in higher education mergers in the USA. Consequently, this study analysed the discursive "policy logics" surrounding merger negotiations in US higher…

  19. 12 CFR 611.1125 - Treatment of associations not approving districtwide mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... districtwide mergers. 611.1125 Section 611.1125 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM ORGANIZATION Mergers, Consolidations, and Charter Amendments of Associations § 611.1125 Treatment of associations not approving districtwide mergers. (a) Issuance of charters. When issuing charters or...

  20. 17 CFR 240.16b-7 - Mergers, reclassifications, and consolidations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mergers, reclassifications...) § 240.16b-7 Mergers, reclassifications, and consolidations. (a) The following transactions shall be..., pursuant to a merger, reclassification or consolidation, in exchange for a security of a company that...

  1. 7 CFR 1717.158 - Mergers with borrowers who prepaid RUS loans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mergers with borrowers who prepaid RUS loans. 1717.158 Section 1717.158 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL... GUARANTEED ELECTRIC LOANS Mergers and Consolidations of Electric Borrowers § 1717.158 Mergers with borrowers...

  2. Mergers between Governmental Research Institutes and Universities in the Danish HE Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Kaare; Hansen, Hanne Foss; Rasmussen, Jørgen Gulddahl

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the mergers in the Danish Higher Education (HE)-sector with a particular emphasis on the 2007 mergers involving universities and Government Research Institutes (GRIs). Furthermore, it follows the post-merger processes up to 2014/2015 at two Danish universities and examines the consequences of the changes seen…

  3. MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS AND PRODUCTIVITY IN THE U.S. MEAT PRODUCTS INDUSTRIES: EVIDENCE FROM MICRODATA

    OpenAIRE

    Ollinger, Michael; Nguyen, Sang V.

    2001-01-01

    This paper investigates the motives for mergers and acquisitions in the U.S. meat products industry from 1977-92. Results show that acquired meat and poultry plants were highly productive before mergers, and that meat plants significantly improved productivity growth in the post-merger periods, but poultry plants did not.

  4. Creditor-focused corporate governance: Evidence from mergers and acquisitions in Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Mehrotra (Vikas); D. van Schaik (Dimitri); J. Spronk (Jaap); O.W. Steenbeek (Onno)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractMergers in Japan have the dubious distinction of not creating wealth for shareholders of target firms, in sharp contrast to what occurs in much of the rest of the world. Using a sample of 91 mergers from 1982 through 2003 we document several distinctive features of the merger market in

  5. 5 CFR 890.504 - Disposition of contingency reserves upon reorganization or merger of plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... reorganization or merger of plans. 890.504 Section 890.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Contributions and Withholdings § 890.504 Disposition of contingency reserves upon reorganization or merger of plans. Upon reorganization or merger of a plan, OPM must credit to the surviving plan the reserves of...

  6. From discs to bulges: effect of mergers on the morphology of galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kannan, Rahul; Macciò, Andrea V.; Fontanot, Fabio; Moster, Benjamin P.; Karman, Wouter; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2015-01-01

    We study the effect of mergers on the morphology of galaxies by means of the simulated merger tree approach first proposed by Moster et al. This method combines N-body cosmological simulations and semi-analytic techniques to extract realistic initial conditions for galaxy mergers. These are then

  7. REPRODUCING THE OBSERVED ABUNDANCES IN RCB AND HdC STARS WITH POST-DOUBLE-DEGENERATE MERGER MODELS—CONSTRAINTS ON MERGER AND POST-MERGER SIMULATIONS AND PHYSICS PROCESSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, Athira; Herwig, Falk; Denissenkov, Pavel A.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Staff, Jan; Pignatari, Marco; Paxton, Bill

    2013-01-01

    The R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are hydrogen-deficient, variable stars that are most likely the result of He-CO WD mergers. They display extremely low oxygen isotopic ratios, 16 O/ 18 O ≅ 1-10, 12 C/ 13 C ≥ 100, and enhancements up to 2.6 dex in F and in s-process elements from Zn to La, compared to solar. These abundances provide stringent constraints on the physical processes during and after the double-degenerate merger. As shown previously, O-isotopic ratios observed in RCB stars cannot result from the dynamic double-degenerate merger phase, and we now investigate the role of the long-term one-dimensional spherical post-merger evolution and nucleosynthesis based on realistic hydrodynamic merger progenitor models. We adopt a model for extra envelope mixing to represent processes driven by rotation originating in the dynamical merger. Comprehensive nucleosynthesis post-processing simulations for these stellar evolution models reproduce, for the first time, the full range of the observed abundances for almost all the elements measured in RCB stars: 16 O/ 18 O ratios between 9 and 15, C-isotopic ratios above 100, and ∼1.4-2.35 dex F enhancements, along with enrichments in s-process elements. The nucleosynthesis processes in our models constrain the length and temperature in the dynamic merger shell-of-fire feature as well as the envelope mixing in the post-merger phase. s-process elements originate either in the shell-of-fire merger feature or during the post-merger evolution, but the contribution from the asymptotic giant branch progenitors is negligible. The post-merger envelope mixing must eventually cease ∼10 6 yr after the dynamic merger phase before the star enters the RCB phase

  8. Spatially Offset Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Triggering in Galaxy Mergers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrows, R. Scott; Comerford, Julia M. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Greene, Jenny E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Pooley, David, E-mail: Robert.Barrows@Colorado.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Trinity University, San Antonio, TX 78212 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Galaxy mergers are likely to play a role in triggering active galactic nuclei (AGNs), but the conditions under which this process occurs are poorly understood. In Paper I, we constructed a sample of spatially offset X-ray AGNs that represent galaxy mergers hosting a single AGN. In this paper, we use our offset AGN sample to constrain the parameters that affect AGN observability in galaxy mergers. We also construct dual-AGN samples with similar selection properties for comparison. We find that the offset AGN fraction shows no evidence for a dependence on AGN luminosity, while the dual-AGN fractions show stronger evidence for a positive dependence, suggesting that the merger events forming dual AGNs are more efficient at instigating accretion onto supermassive black holes than those forming offset AGNs. We also find that the offset and dual-AGN fractions both have a negative dependence on nuclear separation and are similar in value at small physical scales. This dependence may become stronger when restricted to high AGN luminosities, although a larger sample is needed for confirmation. These results indicate that the probability of AGN triggering increases at later merger stages. This study is the first to systematically probe down to nuclear separations of <1 kpc (∼0.8 kpc) and is consistent with predictions from simulations that AGN observability peaks in this regime. We also find that the offset AGNs are not preferentially obscured compared to the parent AGN sample, suggesting that our selection may be targeting galaxy mergers with relatively dust-free nuclear regions.

  9. Valuation of Company Merger from the Shareholders’ Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Toll

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available By means of a company merger formerly legally and economically independent companies are tied up to an economic entity. To order the financial state of affairs after the merger, the current shareholders must revalue their stake in the merged company. The interest is focused on the valuation of shares and, consequently, on the allocation of the future economic benefits of the merged company to each owner. Despite the apparent relevance of company mergers in practice, the scientific literature deals with this topic only in an unsatisfying manner. After some early simple model-oriented approaches with the aim to define an ideal exchange ratio, the valuation problem of a merger was taken up again not earlier than in Hering (2004. Based on his considerations, the aim of our paper is to extend and generalize the valuation methods for a company merger and foremost to set the algebra for the computation of the critical share by using maximization of wealth as target function on a firm foundation. We assign a certain marginal quota to the shareholders representing the minimum share in the merged company which puts them in a financial position no worse than compared to the going concern basis. For this reason, we introduce the state marginal quota model as an innovative valuation approach that considers both existing market imperfections and individual expectations of a specific shareholder. To pinpoint our key finding: If private financial redistributions are available, our extended and generalized model shows that the marginal quota * in question cannot be “trivially” obtained as a ratio of utilities. Instead, it is essential to consider the private decision field of a shareholder to allow a restructuring of the dividend payout stream offered by the merged company in order to reach at least a level of utility which is comparable to the state before the merger.

  10. Minority engineering scholarships renewal, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Scholarships for Minority Students Studying Engineering and Science : Support will make scholarships available to minority students : interested in engineering and science and will increase significantly the number of minority students that Missouri ...

  11. THE L∝σ8 CORRELATION FOR ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES WITH CORES: RELATION WITH BLACK HOLE MASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kormendy, John; Bender, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    We construct the Faber-Jackson correlation between velocity dispersion σ and total galaxy luminosity L V separately for elliptical galaxies with and without cores. The coreless ellipticals show the well-known, steep relationship dlog σ/dlog L V = 0.268 or L V ∝σ 3.74 . This corresponds to dlog σ/dlog M = 0.203, where M is the stellar mass and we use M/L∝L 0.32 . In contrast, the velocity dispersions of core ellipticals increase much more slowly with L V and M: dlog σ/dlog L V = 0.120, L V ∝σ 8.33 , and dlog σ/dlog M = 0.091. Dissipationless major galaxy mergers are expected to preserve σ according to the simplest virial-theorem arguments. However, numerical simulations show that σ increases slowly in dry major mergers, with dlog σ/dlog M ≅ +0.15. In contrast, minor mergers cause σ to decrease, with dlog σ/dlog M ≅ –0.05. Thus, the observed relation argues for dry major mergers as the dominant growth mode of the most massive ellipticals. This is consistent with what we know about the formation of cores. We know no viable way to explain galaxy cores except through dissipationless mergers of approximately equal-mass galaxies followed by core scouring by binary supermassive black holes. The observed, shallow σ∝L V +0.12 relation for core ellipticals provides further evidence that they formed in dissipationless and predominantly major mergers. Also, it explains the observation that the correlation of supermassive black hole mass with velocity dispersion, M . ∝σ 4 , ''saturates'' at high M . such that M . becomes almost independent of σ.

  12. Hospital mergers and acquisitions: does market consolidation harm patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, V; Hamilton, B H

    2000-09-01

    Debate continues on whether consolidation in health care markets enhances efficiency or instead facilitates market power, possibly damaging quality. We compare the quality of hospital care before and after mergers and acquisitions in California between 1992 and 1995. We analyze inpatient mortality for heart attack and stroke patients, 90-day readmission for heart attack patients, and discharge within 48 h for normal newborn babies. Recent mergers and acquisitions have not had a measurable impact on inpatient mortality, although the associated standard errors are large. Readmission rates and early discharge increased in some cases. The adverse consequences of increased market power on the quality of care require further substantiation.

  13. The Scanfin Merger: Managing Organisational Change (Case C)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Pernille; Carugati, Andrea; Giangreco, Antonio

    This is the third of a four-case series (408-115-1, 908-025-1, 308-343-1 and 608-037-1). This case is about resistance to organisational change in relation to a merger. The case describes a major organisational change in a newly established department, which has been instituted to speed up...... the integration process of the merger. The main issue is how a middle manager constitutes an obstacle to this organisational change by re-inforcing the 'old' ways of working in his group. To solve this case satisfactorily students should be able to see the organisation from several different layers (employee...

  14. Antecedents of hospital ownership conversions, mergers, and closures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Frank A; Ostermann, Jan; Conover, Christopher J

    2003-01-01

    This study assesses the determinants of conversions in hospital ownership from 1986 through 1996. To place such changes in context, we also analyze causes of hospital mergers and closures, which are often alternatives to hospital ownership conversion. A consistent result from our analysis is that an important antecedent of ownership conversions is a low profit margin. Conversions from private nonprofit or government ownership to for-profit status are preceded by chronically low margins and high debt-to-asset ratios. By contrast, conversions from for-profit ownership occur quickly following declines in margins. Many mergers seem motivated by a desire to increase market power--a consideration not evident for conversions.

  15. Eccentric, nonspinning, inspiral, Gaussian-process merger approximant for the detection and characterization of eccentric binary black hole mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, E. A.; Moore, C. J.; Kumar, Prayush; George, Daniel; Chua, Alvin J. K.; Haas, Roland; Wessel, Erik; Johnson, Daniel; Glennon, Derek; Rebei, Adam; Holgado, A. Miguel; Gair, Jonathan R.; Pfeiffer, Harald P.

    2018-01-01

    We present ENIGMA, a time domain, inspiral-merger-ringdown waveform model that describes nonspinning binary black holes systems that evolve on moderately eccentric orbits. The inspiral evolution is described using a consistent combination of post-Newtonian theory, self-force and black hole perturbation theory. Assuming eccentric binaries that circularize prior to coalescence, we smoothly match the eccentric inspiral with a stand-alone, quasicircular merger, which is constructed using machine learning algorithms that are trained with quasicircular numerical relativity waveforms. We show that ENIGMA reproduces with excellent accuracy the dynamics of quasicircular compact binaries. We validate ENIGMA using a set of Einstein Toolkit eccentric numerical relativity waveforms, which describe eccentric binary black hole mergers with mass-ratios between 1 ≤q ≤5.5 , and eccentricities e0≲0.2 ten orbits before merger. We use this model to explore in detail the physics that can be extracted with moderately eccentric, nonspinning binary black hole mergers. In particular, we use ENIGMA to show that the gravitational wave transients GW150914, GW151226, GW170104, GW170814 and GW170608 can be effectively recovered with spinning, quasicircular templates if the eccentricity of these events at a gravitational wave frequency of 10 Hz satisfies e0≤{0.175 ,0.125 ,0.175 ,0.175 ,0.125 }, respectively. We show that if these systems have eccentricities e0˜0.1 at a gravitational wave frequency of 10 Hz, they can be misclassified as quasicircular binaries due to parameter space degeneracies between eccentricity and spin corrections. Using our catalog of eccentric numerical relativity simulations, we discuss the importance of including higher-order waveform multipoles in gravitational wave searches of eccentric binary black hole mergers.

  16. Disproportionate Minority Contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Rebecca L; Cyperski, Melissa A; Burkhart, Barry R

    2017-04-01

    The overrepresentation of racial/ethnic minorities within the criminal justice system relative to their population percentage, a phenomenon termed disproportionate minority contact, has been examined within general adult and adolescent offender populations; yet few studies have tested whether this phenomenon extends to juvenile sexual offenders (JSOs). In addition, few studies have examined whether offender race/ethnicity influences registration and notification requirements, which JSOs are subject to in some U.S. states. The present study assessed for disproportionate minority contact among general delinquent offenders and JSOs, meaning it aimed to test whether the criminal justice system treats those accused of sexual and non-sexual offenses differently by racial/ethnic group. Furthermore, racial/ethnic group differences in risk, legal classification, and sexual offending were examined for JSOs. Results indicated disproportionate minority contact was present among juveniles with non-sexual offenses and JSOs in Alabama. In addition, offense category and risk scores differed between African American and European American JSOs. Finally, registration classifications were predicted by offending characteristics, but not race/ethnicity. Implications and future directions regarding disproportionate minority contact among JSOs and social and legal policy affecting JSOs are discussed.

  17. Autonomy and minority rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barten, Ulrike

    2008-01-01

    to a specific group. The question never posed is, if there is a point and in that case at what point the group can actually talk about being autonomous. Is there a minimum in the number of special rights and procedures that has to be reached in order for the package of rights to qualify as ‘granting autonomy......'? I will look at this in connection with minority rights, as minority rights accord special rights and procedures to a specific group. For example, minorities have sometimes far reaching competences in the educational field: setting up and running their own schools and to a certain degree also decide...... with kin-states face a two-way situation regarding autonomy. First there is the autonomy from the home-state - the state the minority exists in. Secondly, though, there is the question of autonomy from the kin-state: How autonomous is a minority when it is (partly) financed by the kin-state? The discussion...

  18. Cross-border mergers between agricultural co-operatives -a governance perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jerker; Madsen, Ole Øhlenschlæger

    A merger between agricultural co-operatives involves two merger processes - one concerningthe two co-operative business firms and the other concerning the two co-operative societies,i.e., the ownership organisations. These two merger processes are mutually dependent. If amerger involves co......-operatives in different countries, each with its own institutional structures,farming conditions, legal framework, and other attributes, the merger between the cooperativesocieties is due to be difficult, requiring large efforts to attain the necessary degreeof homogeneity. At the same time it must be recognised......-border mergers between agricultural co-operatives....

  19. Learning from the politics of a merger: when being merged is not a choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, J G

    2001-03-01

    Organizational mergers have poor track records for success. Success usually refers to financial success, and little or no evaluation is planned to determine whether the merged partners have a good cultural fit. Therefore, the social and psychological costs of mergers and acquisitions are high. One factor that is part of every merger and acquisition is politics. Politics is both a positive and a negative force in organizational life. This article discusses the ways politics affects the process and outcome of a merger, using the reorganization of the campuses of a large university as an example, and presents lessons learned from managing around the politics of this merger.

  20. SEBACEOUS CYSTS MINOR SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ayu Agung Laksemi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Minor surgery is small surgery or localized example cut ulcers and boils, cyst excision, and suturing. Somethings that need to be considered in the preparation of the surgery is minor tools, operating rooms and operating tables, lighting, maintenance of tools and equipment, sterilization and desinfection equipment, preparation of patients and anesthesia. In general cysts is walled chamber that consist of fluid, cells and the remaining cells. Cysts are formed not due to inflammation although then be inflamed. Lining of the cysts wall is composed of fibrous tissue and usually coated epithelial cells or endothelial. Cysts formed by dilated glands and closed channels, glands, blood vessels, lymph channels or layers of the epidermis. Contents of the cysts wall consists of the results is serum, lymph, sweat sebum, epithelial cells, the stratum corneum, and hair. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  1. THE MERGER-TRIGGERED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS CONTRIBUTION TO THE ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY POPULATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, A. R.; Ballantyne, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    It has long been thought that there is a connection between ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), quasars, and major mergers. Indeed, simulations show that major mergers are capable of triggering massive starbursts and quasars. However, observations by the Herschel Space Observatory suggest that, at least at high redshift, there may not always be a simple causal connection between ULIRGs and mergers. Here, we combine an evolving merger-triggered active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity function with a merger-triggered starburst model to calculate the maximum contribution of major mergers to the ULIRG population. We find that major mergers can account for the entire local population of ULIRGs hosting AGNs and ∼25% of the total local ULIRG luminosity density. By z ∼ 1, major mergers can no longer account for the luminosity density of ULIRGs hosting AGNs and contribute ∼<12% of the total ULIRG luminosity density. This drop is likely due to high-redshift galaxies being more gas rich and therefore able to achieve high star formation rates through secular evolution. Additionally, we find that major mergers can account for the local population of warm ULIRGs. This suggests that selecting high-redshift warm ULIRGs will allow for the identification of high-redshift merger-triggered ULIRGs. As major mergers are likely to trigger very highly obscured AGNs, a significant fraction of the high-redshift warm ULIRG population may host Compton thick AGNs.

  2. Sex Trafficking of Minors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jessica L; Kaplan, Dana M; Barron, Christine E

    2017-04-01

    Sex trafficking is an increasingly recognized global health crisis affecting every country and region in the world. Domestic minor sex trafficking is a subset of commercial sexual exploitation of children, defined as engagement of minors (sexual acts for items of value (eg, food, shelter, drugs, money) involving children victimized within US borders. These involved youth are at risk for serious immediate and long-term physical and mental health consequences. Continued efforts are needed to improve preventive efforts, identification, screening, appropriate interventions, and subsequent resource provision for victimized and high-risk youth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Becoming (ethnic minority) teenagers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørslev, Mette Kirstine; Norredam, Marie; Vitus, Kathrine

    2017-01-01

    This article explores how everyday school life interacts with students’ practices of ‘becoming teenagers’ at a Danish school, analysing how age and ethnicity intersect with emotional well-being. The article builds on an ethnographic study at a public sports school following ethnic minority...... and majority students in two school classes from the fifth to seventh grades. Taking a practice approach, the article first analyses school as a social site before turning phenomenological attention to experiences and expectations of becoming teenagers, focusing on the experiences of ethnic minority students...

  4. The Efficiency of the Regulation for Horizontal Mergers Among Electricity Distribution Operators in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter; Gammeltvedt, Thor Erik

    2015-01-01

    Merger analysis is usually drawing on concepts derived from competitive horizontal markets, such as market concentration, predatory foreclosure and economies of scale in marketing. In evaluating horizontal mergers among energy network operators, regulators must use different tools to evaluate...... the attractiveness of mergers. Norway is one country having implemented an ex ante regulation for mergers among electricity distribution operators (DSOs). We investigate whether the actual mergers of Norwegian DSOs in the period 1995-2004 can be rationalized as cost saving exercises or whether they should...... be interpreted in other ways. We use Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) to estimate the potential cost savings from mergers ex ante, and we decompose the gains into gains from learning best practice and from improving economies of scale and scope. Moreover, we compare the sources of post merger performance...

  5. Mergers and acquisitions: A synthesis of theories and directions for future research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissal Ben Letaifa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to review a synthesis of theories and empirical studies dealing with the mergers and acquisitions in the recent decay in an attempt to provide directions for future research. The review focuses on four main streams including: first, the motives for mergers-acquisitions; which are the strategic profits, the overconfidence of managers and the desire to create a big empire resulting from merger. From second, corporate characteristics of firms that did merger or acquisition; third, the economic consequences of the operation of merger and acquisition and finally; fourth, the implication on the market with the impact of merger on the value of the firm. We think that this article can give another idea about the information disclosed by any company choosing to merge and can be analyzed by practitioners by giving them the theoretical background of the merger and acquisition problem.

  6. Downsizings, Mergers, and Acquisitions: Perspectives of Human Resource Development Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shook, LaVerne; Roth, Gene

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to provide perspectives of HR practitioners based on their experiences with mergers, acquisitions, and/or downsizings. Design/methodology/approach: This qualitative study utilized interviews with 13 HR practitioners. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative method. Findings: HR practitioners were not involved in…

  7. Topics in Finance: Part VIII--Mergers & Acquisitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Judy

    2012-01-01

    In this series, three key axioms--stockholder wealth maximization, the risk-return tradeoff, and agency conflicts--are applied to the major topics in financial management. The current article looks at mergers and acquisitions, reviewing the presumed motivations, the ethical challenges, and the literature dedicated to this financial activity.

  8. Astrophysical Implications of the Binary Black Hole Merger GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the gravitational-wave (GW) source GW150914 with the Advanced LIGO detectors provides the first observational evidence for the existence of binary black hole (BH) systems that in spiral and merge within the age of the universe. Such BH mergers have been predicted in two main types of formation models, involving isolated binaries in galactic fields or dynamical interactions in young and old dense stellar environments. The measured masses robustly demonstrate that relatively heavy BHs (> or approx. 25 Stellar Mass) can form in nature. This discovery implies relatively weak massive-star winds and thus the formation of GW150914 in an environment with a metallicity lower than about 12 of the solar value. The rate of binary-BH (BBH) mergers inferred from the observation of GW150914 is consistent with the higher end of rate predictions (> or approx. 1/cu Gpc/yr) from both types of formation models. The low measured redshift (z approx. = 0.1) of GW150914 and the low inferred metallicity of the stellar progenitor imply either BBH formation in a low-mass galaxy in the local universe and a prompt merger, or formation at high redshift with a time delay between formation and merger of several Gyr. This discovery motivates further studies of binary-BH formation astrophysics. It also has implications for future detections and studies by Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, and GW detectors in space.

  9. Electromagnetic Signals Following Stellar-mass Black Hole Mergers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mink, S.E.; King, A.

    2017-01-01

    It is often assumed that gravitational-wave (GW) events resulting from the merger of stellar-mass black holes are unlikely to produce electromagnetic (EM) counterparts. We point out that the progenitor binary has probably shed a mass ≳10 M⊙ during its prior evolution. If even a tiny fraction of this

  10. Transparency and Coordinated Effects in European Merger Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Svend; Møllgaard, Peter; Overgaard, Per Baltzer

    2010-01-01

    of that theory. Next, we discuss in more detail a recent Danish merger prohibition that was based on the presence of coordinated effects. This case poses special challenges to the theory of coordinated effects, because a very large number of products were involved, and significant, individualized discounts were...

  11. Can mergers-in-progress be unmerged in speech accommodation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babel, Molly; McAuliffe, Michael; Haber, Graham

    2013-01-01

    This study examines spontaneous phonetic accommodation of a dialect with distinct categories by speakers who are in the process of merging those categories. We focus on the merger of the NEAR and SQUARE lexical sets in New Zealand English, presenting New Zealand participants with an unmerged speaker of Australian English. Mergers-in-progress are a uniquely interesting sound change as they showcase the asymmetry between speech perception and production. Yet, we examine mergers using spontaneous phonetic imitation, which is phenomenon that is necessarily a behavior where perceptual input influences speech production. Phonetic imitation is quantified by a perceptual measure and an acoustic calculation of mergedness using a Pillai-Bartlett trace. The results from both analyses indicate spontaneous phonetic imitation is moderated by extra-linguistic factors such as the valence of assigned conditions and social bias. We also find evidence for a decrease in the degree of mergedness in post-exposure productions. Taken together, our results suggest that under the appropriate conditions New Zealanders phonetically accommodate to Australian English and that in the process of speech imitation, mergers-in-progress can, but do not consistently, become less merged.

  12. Can mergers-in-progress be unmerged in speech accommodation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly eBabel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examines spontaneous phonetic accommodation of a dialect with distinct categories by speakers who are in the process of merging those categories. We focus on the merger of the NEAR and SQUARE lexical sets in New Zealand English, presenting New Zealand participants with an unmerged speaker of Australian English. Mergers-in-progress are a uniquely interesting sound change as they showcase the asymmetry between speech perception and production. Yet, we examine mergers using spontaneous phonetic imitation, which is phenomenon that is necessarily a behavior where perceptual input influences speech production. Phonetic imitation is quantified by a perceptual measure and an acoustic calculation of mergedness using a Pillai-Bartlett trace. The results from both analyses indicate spontaneous phonetic imitation is moderated by extra-linguistic factors such as the valence of assigned conditions and social bias. We also find evidence for a decrease in the degree of mergedness in post-exposure productions. Taken together, our results suggest that under the appropriate conditions New Zealanders phonetically accommodate to Australian English and that in the process of speech imitation, mergers-in-progress can, but do not consistently, become less merged.

  13. Gravitational-Wave Luminosity of Binary Neutron Stars Mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Francesco; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Radice, David; Perego, Albino; Dietrich, Tim

    2018-03-16

    We study the gravitational-wave peak luminosity and radiated energy of quasicircular neutron star mergers using a large sample of numerical relativity simulations with different binary parameters and input physics. The peak luminosity for all the binaries can be described in terms of the mass ratio and of the leading-order post-Newtonian tidal parameter solely. The mergers resulting in a prompt collapse to black hole have the largest peak luminosities. However, the largest amount of energy per unit mass is radiated by mergers that produce a hypermassive neutron star or a massive neutron star remnant. We quantify the gravitational-wave luminosity of binary neutron star merger events, and set upper limits on the radiated energy and the remnant angular momentum from these events. We find that there is an empirical universal relation connecting the total gravitational radiation and the angular momentum of the remnant. Our results constrain the final spin of the remnant black hole and also indicate that stable neutron star remnant forms with super-Keplerian angular momentum.

  14. Early Experiences Implementing Voluntary School District Mergers in Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, John D.; Glesner, Talia J.; Meyers, Herman W.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of an initiative to encourage voluntary school district mergers in Vermont. The law was intended to increase educational opportunities for Vermont students while reducing costs. Three research activities were conducted to understand how districts and supervisory unions around the state responded to the new…

  15. Models for mergers in higher education | Botha | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As it is highly unlikely that no combinations whatsoever will be effected, it is valuable to investigate a combination/merger scenario. This article provides some basic information on various models for merging institutions/ companies, that has been sourced from the literature regarding the private sector. The appropriateness ...

  16. Financing and Regulatory Frictions in Mergers and Acquisitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Zhang (Quxian)

    2018-01-01

    markdownabstractThis dissertation studies how financial frictions and regulatory costs affect mergers and acquisitions (M&A). The first conclusion is that financial distress drives firms to make diversifying acquisitions. Acquisitions made by distressed firms in recent years are economically

  17. Effects of Mergers and Acquisitions to Shareholders' Wealth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper sets out to empirically analyse the impact of mergers and acquisitions on shareholders returns. it uses the U.K. data for 60 companies that were involved in takeovers in the period between 1992-95. The paper assesses stock market response to the announcement of takeover bids for these randomly chosen ...

  18. Multi-messenger Observations of a Binary Neutron Star Merger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.

    2017-01-01

    On 2017 August 17 a binary neutron star coalescence candidate (later designated GW170817) with merger time 12:41:04 UTC was observed through gravitational waves by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor independently detected a gamma-ray burst (GRB 17081...

  19. ASTROPHYSICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THE BINARY BLACK HOLE MERGER GW150914

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.A.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J. -D.; Franco, S; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magna-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R.M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Simakov, D.; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifir, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; Van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the gravitational-wave (GW) source GW150914 with the Advanced LIGO detectors provides the first observational evidence for the existence of binary black hole (BH) systems that inspiral and merge within the age of the universe. Such BH mergers have been predicted in two main types of

  20. Merger origin of radio galaxies investigated with HI observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emonts, BHC; Morganti, R; Oosterloo, TA; van der Hulst, JM; Tadhunter, CN; van Moorsel, G; Holt, J

    2006-01-01

    We present results of an H I study of a complete sample of nearby radio galaxies. Our goal is to investigate whether merger or interaction events could be at the origin of the radio-AGN activity. Around five of our radio galaxies, hosted mainly by early-type galaxies, we detect extended H I in

  1. Gravitational-Wave Luminosity of Binary Neutron Stars Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Francesco; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Radice, David; Perego, Albino; Dietrich, Tim

    2018-03-01

    We study the gravitational-wave peak luminosity and radiated energy of quasicircular neutron star mergers using a large sample of numerical relativity simulations with different binary parameters and input physics. The peak luminosity for all the binaries can be described in terms of the mass ratio and of the leading-order post-Newtonian tidal parameter solely. The mergers resulting in a prompt collapse to black hole have the largest peak luminosities. However, the largest amount of energy per unit mass is radiated by mergers that produce a hypermassive neutron star or a massive neutron star remnant. We quantify the gravitational-wave luminosity of binary neutron star merger events, and set upper limits on the radiated energy and the remnant angular momentum from these events. We find that there is an empirical universal relation connecting the total gravitational radiation and the angular momentum of the remnant. Our results constrain the final spin of the remnant black hole and also indicate that stable neutron star remnant forms with super-Keplerian angular momentum.

  2. The Impact of Belonging Groups in an Institutional Merger Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeng, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    for the discussions and worker's disaffection and anxieties about job security were brought to light in the research process. The analysis of the research process is informed by psychodynamic system theory and focuses on individual and group processes, and on the leaders' roles in the merger process. This leads...

  3. Marketing And Financial Prospects Of Development Bank Mergers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two research propositions (RPs) were put forward and treated using data from 42 randomly selected officials of the bank. The study empirically established that the merger portends significant enormous marketing, financial, and allied institutional economies. These could be actualized with the government and banks ...

  4. Multi-messenger observations of a binary neutron star merger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration; Fermi GBM; INTEGRAL; IceCube Collaboration; AstroSat Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager Team; IPN Collaboration; The Insight-HXMT Collaboration; ANTARES Collaboration; The Swift Collaboration; AGILE Team; The 1M2H Team; The Dark Energy Camera GW-EM Collaboration and the DES Collaboration; The DLT40 Collaboration; GRAWITA: GRAvitational Wave Inaf TeAm; The Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration; ATCA: Australia Telescope Compact Array; ASKAP: Australian SKA Path finder; Las Cumbres Observatory Group; OzGrav; DWF (Deeper, Wider, Faster Program); AST3; CAASTRO Collaborations; The VINROUGE Collaboration; MASTER Collaboration; J-GEM; GROWTH; JAGWAR; Caltech- NRAO; TTU-NRAO; NuSTAR Collaborations; Pan-STARR; The MAXI Team; TZAC Consortium; KU Collaboration; Nordic Optical Telescope; ePESSTO; GROND; Texas Tech University; SALT Group; TOROS: Transient Robotic Observatory of the South Collaboration; The BOOTES Collaboration; MWA: Murchison Wide field Array; The CALET Collaboration; IKI-GW Follow-up Collaboration; H.E.S.S. Collaboration; LOFAR Collaboration; LWA: Long Wavelength Array; HAWC Collaboration; The Pierre Auger Collaboration; ALMA Collaboration; Euro VLBI Team; Pi of the Sky Collaboration; The Chandra Team at McGill University; DFN: Desert Fireball Network; ATLAS; High Time Resolution Universe Survey; RIMAS and RATIR; SKA South Africa / MeerKAT

    2017-01-01

    On 2017 August 17 a binary neutron star coalescence candidate (later designated GW170817) with merger time 12:41:04 UTC was observed through gravitational waves by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor independently detected a gamma-ray burst (GRB 170817A)

  5. Organisational mergers: a behavioural perspective on identity management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.R. Giessner (Steffen)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractOrganisational mergers are one of the most extreme forms of organisational change processes. Consequently, they often result in difficulties for employees to adjust to the altered organisational conditions. This is often reflected in low levels of employee identification with the

  6. On order and chaos in the mergers of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervoort, Peter O.

    2018-03-01

    This paper describes a low-dimensional model of the merger of two galaxies. The governing equations are the complete sets of moment equations of the first and second orders derived from the collisionless Boltzmann equations representing the galaxies. The moment equations reduce to an equation governing the relative motion of the galaxies, tensor virial equations, and equations governing the kinetic energy tensors. We represent the galaxies as heterogeneous ellipsoids with Gaussian stratifications of their densities, and we represent the mean stellar motions in terms of velocity fields that sustain those densities consistently with the equation of continuity. We reduce and solve the governing equations for a head-on encounter of a dwarf galaxy with a giant galaxy. That reduction includes the effect of dynamical friction on the relative motion of the galaxies. Our criterion for chaotic behaviour is sensitivity of the motion to small changes in the initial conditions. In a survey of encounters and mergers of a dwarf galaxy with a giant galaxy, chaotic behaviour arises mainly in non-linear oscillations of the dwarf galaxy. The encounter disrupts the dwarf, excites chaotic oscillations of the dwarf, or excites regular oscillations. Dynamical friction can drive a merger to completion within a Hubble time only if the dwarf is sufficiently massive. The survey of encounters and mergers is the basis for a simple model of the evolution of a `Local Group' consisting of a giant galaxy and a population of dwarf galaxies bound to the giant as satellites on radial orbits.

  7. Multi-messenger Observations of a Binary Neutron Star Merger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.

    2017-01-01

    .26 . An extensive observing campaign was launched across the electromagnetic spectrum leading to the discovery of a bright optical transient (SSS17a, now with the IAU identification of AT 2017gfo) in NGC 4993 (at ) less than 11 hours after the merger by the One-Meter, Two Hemisphere (1M2H) team using the 1 m Swope...

  8. THE FATE OF THE COMPACT REMNANT IN NEUTRON STAR MERGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryer, Chris L. [Department of Physics, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Belczynski, Krzysztoff [Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw, Al Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warsaw (Poland); Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Rosswog, Stephan [The Oskar klein Center, Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Shen, Gang [Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Steiner, Andrew W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2015-10-10

    Neutron star (binary neutron star and neutron star–black hole) mergers are believed to produce short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). They are also believed to be the dominant source of gravitational waves to be detected by the advanced LIGO and advanced VIRGO and the dominant source of the heavy r-process elements in the universe. Whether or not these mergers produce short-duration GRBs depends sensitively on the fate of the core of the remnant (whether, and how quickly, it forms a black hole). In this paper, we combine the results of Newtonian merger calculations and equation of state studies to determine the fate of the cores of neutron star mergers. Using population studies, we can determine the distribution of these fates to compare to observations. We find that black hole cores form quickly only for equations of state that predict maximum non-rotating neutron star masses below 2.3–2.4 solar masses. If quick black hole formation is essential in producing GRBs, LIGO/Virgo observed rates compared to GRB rates could be used to constrain the equation of state for dense nuclear matter.

  9. Utah's uranium mines operated by new company as merger requirement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    When Utah International became a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Electric Company on December 20, 1976, a special provision of the merger was that Utah and General Electric would divest themselves of Utah's uranium operations. A new wholly-owned subsidiary of Utah was established, Lucky McUranium Corporation, to manage and operate Utah's uranium properties. The article briefly describes the operations

  10. 29 CFR 4231.8 - Notice of merger or transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 4231.6(b): (i) The present value of the accrued benefits and fair market value of plan assets under the... date of a merger or transfer is the earlier of— (i) The date on which one plan assumes liability for... transfers assets to another plan involved in the transaction. (2) Method of filing. The PBGC applies the...

  11. Merger, Akusisi dan Konsolidasi dalam Perspektif Hukum Persaingan Usaha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulus Aluk Fajar Dwi Santo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mergers, acquisitions and consolidation is a business strategy that is commonly used in the business world to be able to build competitive advantage company, which in time can enhance shareholder value while maximizing the prosperity of the company owners or shareholders. To achieve the above objective normative, policy-makers need a plan and steps of strategic and accurate information to avoid the risk of failure. However, the strategy of merger, acquisition and consolidation of certain potentially inhibit fair competition conditions, thus becoming one of the objects that need to be regulated in Law no. 5 Year 1999 concerning Prohibition of Monopolistic Practices and Unfair Business Competition. Market impact of mergers, acquisitions and consolidation is important for analysis because it can have significant legal consequences for businesses, so that the research method used is the juridical normative and empirical approaches. In practice of mergers, acquisitions and consolidation intersect with regulation in other sectors, especially banking and capital markets. That is, there should be equality of perception and interpretation among the institutions that issued the policy.

  12. Structural remedies in merger regulation in a Cournot framework

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medvedev, Andrei

    -, 2004-006 (2004), s. 1-21 ISSN 1572-4042 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7085904 Keywords : merger regulation * structural remedies * auction Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.tilburguniversity.nl/tilec/publications/discussionpapers/2004-006.pdf

  13. Staff perceptions of the merger between two South African regional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of various employee issues was conducted at the newly ... extrinsic motivation contributed to decreased job satisfaction and employee loyalty. ... However, significant positive factors identified in the study include intrinsically motivated staff and a consensus in support of merger objectives and educational benefits.

  14. The impact of mergers on pharmaceutical R&D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMattina, John L

    2011-08-01

    Mergers and acquisitions in the pharmaceutical industry have substantially reduced the number of major companies over the past 15 years. The short-term business rationale for this extensive consolidation might have been reasonable, but at what cost to research and development productivity?

  15. Capitalisation, Mergers and the Nigerian Economy: A Historical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper, seeks to give a historical insight into the story of mergers, capitalisation and the Nigerian economy, beginning from the earliest British economic adventures in the country in the 19th century up to the present time. It also examines the impact of the recent bank re-capitalisation exercise in the country and the ...

  16. Information Quality and Risk Around Mergers and Acquisition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We consolidate our understanding of the link between risk and quality of new around information intensive periods for a sample of 169 stocks from London Stock Exchange by using mergers and acquisitions announcements as a source of unscheduled news disclosure. We document that volatility of stock returns around ...

  17. Mergers & Acquisitions in Japan : Lessons for Dutch companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grotenhuis, F.D.J.

    2009-01-01

    This article deals with lessons learned from mergers and acquisitions in Japan. In general, such combinations are not success stories, since 50–80 percent of them do not bring the benefits that were expected. Several reasons for such failures have been brought up in the literature, but real-life

  18. Mergers and acquisitions's impact on financial performance: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences ... Though this method have enormous benefits but at the same time are firms are able to convert these qualitative aspects into quantitative form and if yes than do they ... Keywords: mergers and acquisitions; du pont analysis; long run; financial performance; return on assets ...

  19. Numerical Relativity, Black Hole Mergers, and Gravitational Waves: Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This series of 3 lectures will present recent developments in numerical relativity, and their applications to simulating black hole mergers and computing the resulting gravitational waveforms. In this first lecture, we introduce the basic ideas of numerical relativity, highlighting the challenges that arise in simulating gravitational wave sources on a computer.

  20. Numerical Relativity, Black Hole Mergers, and Gravitational Waves: Part III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This series of 3 lectures will present recent developments in numerical relativity, and their applications to simulating black hole mergers and computing the resulting gravitational waveforms. In this third and final lecture, we present applications of the results of numerical relativity simulations to gravitational wave detection and astrophysics.

  1. THE ELM SURVEY. IV. 24 WHITE DWARF MERGER SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilic, Mukremin [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 West Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Brown, Warren R.; Kenyon, S. J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Heinke, Craig O. [Department of Physics, CCIS 4-183, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E1 (Canada); Agueeros, M. A. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Kleinman, S. J., E-mail: kilic@ou.edu [Gemini Observatory, 670 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    We present new radial velocity and X-ray observations of extremely low mass (ELM, {approx}0.2 M{sub Sun }) white dwarf (WD) candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 area. We identify seven new binary systems with 1-18 hr orbital periods. Five of the systems will merge due to gravitational wave radiation within 10 Gyr, bringing the total number of merger systems found in the ELM Survey to 24. The ELM Survey has now quintupled the known merger WD population. It has also discovered the eight shortest period detached binary WD systems currently known. We discuss the characteristics of the merger and non-merger systems observed in the ELM Survey, including their future evolution. About half of the systems have extreme mass ratios. These are the progenitors of the AM Canum Venaticorum systems and Type Ia supernovae. The remaining targets will lead to the formation of extreme helium stars, subdwarfs, or massive WDs. We identify three targets that are excellent gravitational wave sources. These should be detected by the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna like missions within the first year of operation. The remaining targets are important indicators of what the Galactic foreground may look like for gravitational wave observatories.

  2. THE ELM SURVEY. II. TWELVE BINARY WHITE DWARF MERGER SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilic, Mukremin; Brown, Warren R.; Kenyon, S. J.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Agueeros, M. A.; Heinke, Craig

    2011-01-01

    We describe new radial velocity and X-ray observations of extremely low-mass white dwarfs (ELM WDs, ∼0.2 M sun ) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4 and the MMT Hypervelocity Star survey. We identify four new short period binaries, including two merger systems. These observations bring the total number of short period binary systems identified in our survey to 20. No main-sequence or neutron star companions are visible in the available optical photometry, radio, and X-ray data. Thus, the companions are most likely WDs. Twelve of these systems will merge within a Hubble time due to gravitational wave radiation. We have now tripled the number of known merging WD systems. We discuss the characteristics of this merger sample and potential links to underluminous supernovae, extreme helium stars, AM CVn systems, and other merger products. We provide new observational tests of the WD mass-period distribution and cooling models for ELM WDs. We also find evidence for a new formation channel for single low-mass WDs through binary mergers of two lower mass objects.

  3. The Effect of Merger on Performance: Evidence from the UAE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Page 88. Islamic banking clients. The total income of the two banks reached AED 7.1 billion, an increase of 50 per cent year on year. The group became a major player in the corporate banking arena with a joint market share of almost a fifth of corporate loans. This strategic merger was meant to create a bank with scale,.

  4. On the Progenitor of Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Angelova, S. V.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atallah, D. V.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Austin, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barkett, K.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bawaj, M.; Bayley, J. C.; Bazzan, M.; Bécsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Bero, J. J.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonilla, E.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bossie, K.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. D.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chase, E.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H.-P.; Chia, H.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Clearwater, P.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Cohen, D.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordero-Carrión, I.; Corley, K. R.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Dálya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Demos, N.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; De Pietri, R.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rossi, C.; DeSalvo, R.; de Varona, O.; Devenson, J.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Dovale Álvarez, M.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Dreissigacker, C.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dupej, P.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Estevez, D.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fee, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finstad, D.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fishbach, M.; Fisher, R. P.; Fitz-Axen, M.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Font, J. A.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garcia-Quiros, C.; Garufi, F.; Gateley, B.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glover, L.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gomes, S.; Goncharov, B.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Gretarsson, E. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Halim, O.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, E. Z.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hinderer, T.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holgado, A. M.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hreibi, A.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kamai, B.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katolik, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kemball, A. J.; Kennedy, R.; Kent, C.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimball, C.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinley-Hanlon, M.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knowles, T. D.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Krämer, C.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwang, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Larson, S. L.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Linker, S. D.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lo, R. K. L.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macas, R.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña Hernandez, I.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Markowitz, A.; Maros, E.; Marquina, A.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Massera, E.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McNeill, L.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Mejuto-Villa, E.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Milovich-Goff, M. C.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moffa, D.; Moggi, A.; Mogushi, K.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muñiz, E. A.; Muratore, M.; Murray, P. G.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Neilson, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Nevin, L.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Ng, K. K. Y.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nichols, D.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; North, C.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; O'Dea, G. D.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Okada, M. A.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R.; Ortega, L. F.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ossokine, S.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, Howard; Pan, Huang-Wei; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Parida, A.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patil, M.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pirello, M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Pratten, G.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rajbhandari, B.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Ramos-Buades, A.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ren, W.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Rutins, G.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sanchis-Gual, N.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheel, M.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaner, M. B.; Shao, L.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somala, S.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staats, K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Stops, D. J.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Strunk, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Suresh, J.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Tait, S. C.; Talbot, C.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Tasson, J. D.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Tewari, S. V.; Theeg, T.; Thies, F.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres-Forné, A.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tsukada, L.; Tsuna, D.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Wang, Y. F.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Weßels, P.; Westerweck, J.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Wilken, D.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, K. W. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wysocki, D. M.; Xiao, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, L.; Yap, M. J.; Yazback, M.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; (LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    On 2017 August 17 the merger of two compact objects with masses consistent with two neutron stars was discovered through gravitational-wave (GW170817), gamma-ray (GRB 170817A), and optical (SSS17a/AT 2017gfo) observations. The optical source was associated with the early-type galaxy NGC 4993 at a distance of just ˜40 Mpc, consistent with the gravitational-wave measurement, and the merger was localized to be at a projected distance of ˜2 kpc away from the galaxy’s center. We use this minimal set of facts and the mass posteriors of the two neutron stars to derive the first constraints on the progenitor of GW170817 at the time of the second supernova (SN). We generate simulated progenitor populations and follow the three-dimensional kinematic evolution from binary neutron star (BNS) birth to the merger time, accounting for pre-SN galactic motion, for considerably different input distributions of the progenitor mass, pre-SN semimajor axis, and SN-kick velocity. Though not considerably tight, we find these constraints to be comparable to those for Galactic BNS progenitors. The derived constraints are very strongly influenced by the requirement of keeping the binary bound after the second SN and having the merger occur relatively close to the center of the galaxy. These constraints are insensitive to the galaxy’s star formation history, provided the stellar populations are older than 1 Gyr.

  5. Merger rate of primordial black-hole binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2017-12-01

    Primordial black holes (PBHs) have long been a candidate for the elusive dark matter (DM), and remain poorly constrained in the ˜20 - 100 M⊙ mass range. PBH binaries were recently suggested as the possible source of LIGO's first detections. In this paper, we thoroughly revisit existing estimates of the merger rate of PBH binaries. We compute the probability distribution of orbital parameters for PBH binaries formed in the early Universe, accounting for tidal torquing by all other PBHs, as well as standard large-scale adiabatic perturbations. We then check whether the orbital parameters of PBH binaries formed in the early Universe can be significantly affected between formation and merger. Our analytic estimates indicate that the tidal field of halos and interactions with other PBHs, as well as dynamical friction by unbound standard DM particles, do not do significant work on nor torque PBH binaries. We estimate the torque due to baryon accretion to be much weaker than previous calculations, albeit possibly large enough to significantly affect the eccentricity of typical PBH binaries. We also revisit the PBH-binary merger rate resulting from gravitational capture in present-day halos, accounting for Poisson fluctuations. If binaries formed in the early Universe survive to the present time, as suggested by our analytic estimates, they dominate the total PBH merger rate. Moreover, this merger rate would be orders of magnitude larger than LIGO's current upper limits if PBHs make a significant fraction of the dark matter. As a consequence, LIGO would constrain ˜10 - 300 M⊙ PBHs to constitute no more than ˜1 % of the dark matter. To make this conclusion fully robust, though, numerical study of several complex astrophysical processes—such as the formation of the first PBH halos and how they may affect PBH binaries, as well as the accretion of gas onto an extremely eccentric binary—is needed.

  6. Housing Problems of Minorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Robert

    1975-01-01

    This testimony, before a public hearing of the New York City Commission on Human Rights in May 1974, reviews the status of minority group housing and the effects of federal programs upon it, advocating an approach which recognizes the intrinsic locational and real estate value of many black ghettos. (Author/JM)

  7. Britain's Ethnic Minorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Central Office of Information, London (England).

    This pamphlet discusses the situation of ethnic minorities--particularly those of Caribbean, Asian, or African origin--in the United Kingdom. Following introductory material, the background to immigration in Britain is described and the numbers and geographic distribution of the different ethnic groups are discussed. Next comes a general…

  8. Minority Language Teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monique Turkenburg

    2001-01-01

    Original title: Onderwijs in alochtone levende talen. At the request of the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, an exploratory study was carried out of minority Language teaching for primary school pupils. This exploratory study in seven municipalities not only shows the way in

  9. Sexual minorities seeking services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Tracey L; Emanuel, Kristen; Bradford, Judith

    2003-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding the mental health needs of lesbian and bisexual (sexual minority) women is an integral part of designing and providing appropriate mental health services and treatment for them. In an effort to understand the mental health needs of sexual minority women who seek community treatment, a chart review was conducted of the 223 lesbian and bisexual women who presented for services between July 1, 1997 and December 31, 2000 at Fenway Community Health in Boston, MA. Data are based on clients' self-reports and clinician assessments of clients' presenting problem, relevant developmental history, prior mental health and substance abuse treatment, current reports of emotional/psychological symptoms, and areas of impaired functioning. Although substance abuse and suicidal ideation were commonly reported problems, other concerns were more frequently reported. High percentages of lesbians and bisexual women reported relationship concerns and lack of adequate social networks; rates of depression and anxiety based on clinicians' assessments were also high. Overall, lesbians and bisexual women did not differ in the issues they brought to treatment or level or types of impairment. Compared with previous community survey samples, however, study participants appeared to be healthier than general, non-clinical samples of self-identified lesbians, possibly reflecting the special characteristics of sexual minority women who seek treatment in specialized community sites such as the Fenway. Although patients who come to these sites may not represent the more general population of sexual minority women, community health centers known to serve lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals may be fruitful access points for studying the mental health status and treatment needs of sexual minority women.

  10. EVOLUTION OF SHOCKS AND TURBULENCE IN MAJOR CLUSTER MERGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, S.; Mannheim, K.; Iapichino, L.; Miniati, F.; Bagchi, J.

    2011-01-01

    We performed a set of cosmological simulations of major mergers in galaxy clusters, in order to study the evolution of merger shocks and the subsequent injection of turbulence in the post-shock region and in the intra-cluster medium (ICM). The computations have been performed with the grid-based, adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamical code Enzo, using a refinement criterion especially designed for refining turbulent flows in the vicinity of shocks. When a major merger event occurs, a substantial amount of turbulence energy is injected in the ICM of the newly formed cluster. Our simulations show that the shock launched after a major merger develops an ellipsoidal shape and gets broken by the interaction with the filamentary cosmic web around the merging cluster. The size of the post-shock region along the direction of shock propagation is of the order of 300 kpc h -1 , and the turbulent velocity dispersion in this region is larger than 100 km s -1 . We performed a scaling analysis of the turbulence energy within our cluster sample. The best fit for the scaling of the turbulence energy with the cluster mass is consistent with M 5/3 , which is also the scaling law for the thermal energy in the self-similar cluster model. This clearly indicates the close relation between virialization and injection of turbulence in the cluster evolution. As for the turbulence in the cluster core, we found that within 2 Gyr after the major merger (the timescale for the shock propagation in the ICM), the ratio of the turbulent to total pressure is larger than 10%, and after about 4 Gyr it is still larger than 5%, a typical value for nearly relaxed clusters. Turbulence at the cluster center is thus sustained for several gigayears, which is substantially longer than typically assumed in the turbulent re-acceleration models, invoked to explain the statistics of observed radio halos. Striking similarities in the morphology and other physical parameters between our simulations and the

  11. Resolving the generation of starburst winds in Galaxy mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Kereš, Dusan; Murray, Norman; Hernquist, Lars; Narayanan, Desika; Hayward, Christopher C.

    2013-07-01

    We study galaxy superwinds driven in major mergers, using pc-scale resolution simulations with detailed models for stellar feedback that can self-consistently follow the generation of winds. The models include molecular cooling, star formation at high densities in giant molecular clouds, and gas recycling and feedback from supernovae (I and II), stellar winds and radiation pressure. We study mergers of systems from Small-Magellanic-Cloud-like dwarfs and Milky Way analogues to z ˜ 2 starburst discs. Multiphase superwinds are generated in all passages, with outflow rates up to ˜1000 M⊙ yr-1. However, the wind mass-loading efficiency (outflow rate divided by star formation rate, SFR) is similar to that in the isolated galaxy counterparts of each merger: it depends more on global galaxy properties (mass, size and escape velocity) than on the dynamical state or orbital parameters of the merger. Winds tend to be bi- or unipolar, but multiple `events' build up complex morphologies with overlapping, differently oriented bubbles and shells at a range of radii. The winds have complex velocity and phase structure, with material at a range of speeds up to ˜1000 km s-1 (forming a Hubble-like flow), and a mix of molecular, ionized and hot gas that depends on galaxy properties. We examine how these different phases are connected to different feedback mechanisms. These simulations resolve a problem in some `subgrid' models, where simple wind prescriptions can dramatically suppress merger-induced starbursts, often making it impossible to form Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs). Despite large mass-loading factors (≳10-20) in the winds simulated here, the peak SFRs are comparable to those in `no wind' simulations. Wind acceleration does not act equally, so cold dense gas can still lose angular momentum and form stars, while these stars blow out gas that would not have participated in the starburst in the first place. Considerable wind material is not unbound, and falls

  12. Minority Language Protection in Italy. Linguistic minorities and the Media

    OpenAIRE

    Sierp, Aline

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with the Italian case of minority language protection in the media. After providing a general introduction to the development of the protection of minority languages in Europe in general and of minority language broadcast media in Italy in particular, the article focuses on the role that mass media can play in the preservation or weakening of minority languages. By comparing different measures of protection adopted by national and regional authorities in Italy, the article ...

  13. Binary neutron star mergers: a review of Einstein's richest laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiotti, Luca; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2017-09-01

    In a single process, the merger of binary neutron star systems combines extreme gravity, the copious emission of gravitational waves, complex microphysics and electromagnetic processes, which can lead to astrophysical signatures observable at the largest redshifts. We review here the recent progress in understanding what could be considered Einstein's richest laboratory, highlighting in particular the numerous significant advances of the last decade. Although special attention is paid to the status of models, techniques and results for fully general-relativistic dynamical simulations, a review is also offered on the initial data and advanced simulations with approximate treatments of gravity. Finally, we review the considerable amount of work carried out on the post-merger phase, including black-hole formation, torus accretion onto the merged compact object, the connection with gamma-ray burst engines, ejected material, and its nucleosynthesis.

  14. Social Network Mixing Patterns In Mergers & Acquisitions - A Simulation Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Fabac

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary world of global business and continuously growing competition, organizations tend to use mergers and acquisitions to enforce their position on the market. The future organization’s design is a critical success factor in such undertakings. The field of social network analysis can enhance our uderstanding of these processes as it lets us reason about the development of networks, regardless of their origin. The analysis of mixing patterns is particularly useful as it provides an insight into how nodes in a network connect with each other. We hypothesize that organizational networks with compatible mixing patterns will be integrated more successfully. After conducting a simulation experiment, we suggest an integration model based on the analysis of network assortativity. The model can be a guideline for organizational integration, such as occurs in mergers and acquisitions.

  15. Compact binary merger and kilonova: outflows from remnant disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tuan; Gu, Wei-Min; Liu, Tong; Kumar, Rajiv; Mu, Hui-Jun; Song, Cui-Ying

    2018-05-01

    Outflows launched from a remnant disc of compact binary merger may have essential contribution to the kilonova emission. Numerical calculations are conducted in this work to study the structure of accretion flows and outflows. By the incorporation of limited-energy advection in the hyper-accretion discs, outflows occur naturally from accretion flows due to imbalance between the viscous heating and the sum of the advective and radiative cooling. Following this spirit, we revisit the properties of the merger outflow ejecta. Our results show that around 10-3 ˜ 10-1 M⊙ of the disc mass can be launched as powerful outflows. The amount of unbound mass varies with the disc mass and the viscosity. The outflow-contributed peak luminosity is around 1040 ˜ 1041 erg s-1. Such a scenario can account for the observed kilonovae associated with short gamma-ray bursts, including the recent event AT2017gfo (GW170817).

  16. A Framework for Operational Due Diligence in Mergers and Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsgaard, Chris Berg; Haubjerg, Mathias; Herbert-Hansen, Zaza Nadja Lee

    The number of mergers and acquisitions (M&As) has over the last five years increased greatly (Institute of Mergers, Acquisitions and Alliances, 2016). Furthermore, private equity professionals point to operational performance gains to drive an acquisition decision and attribute cost reductions...... as the most important lever for value creation, after a private equity firm acquires a company (PwC, 2016). However, the overall success rate of M&A activity remains low and the approach to understand an acquisition target’s operating model remains non-exhaustive and unstandardized. This paper investigates...... the pivotal eterminants for assessing operational performance and identifying improvement potentials in an acquisition target. The research question is: “What are the fundamental operational determinants influencing the acquisition decision for private equity firms in the due diligence phase?” This paper...

  17. POST-MERGER SIGNATURES OF RED-SEQUENCE GALAXIES IN RICH ABELL CLUSTERS AT z ∼< 0.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Lee, Jaehyun; Ree, Chang H.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the post-merger signatures of red-sequence galaxies in rich Abell clusters at z ∼ r < –20) cluster red-sequence galaxies show post-merger signatures in four clusters consistently. Most (∼71%) of the featured galaxies were found to be bulge dominated, and for the subsample of bulge-dominated red-sequence galaxies, the post-merger fraction rises to ∼38%. We also found that roughly 4% of bulge-dominated red-sequence galaxies interact (ongoing merger). A total of 42% (38% post-merger, 4% ongoing merger) of galaxies show merger-related features. Compared to a field galaxy study with a similar limiting magnitude by van Dokkum in 2005, our cluster study presents a similar post-merger fraction but a markedly lower ongoing merger fraction. The merger fraction derived is surprisingly high for the high density of our clusters, where the fast internal motions of galaxies are thought to play a negative role in galaxy mergers. The fraction of post-merger and ongoing merger galaxies can be explained as follows. Most of the post-merger galaxies may have carried over their merger features from their previous halo environment, whereas interacting galaxies interact in the current cluster in situ. According to our semi-analytic calculation, massive cluster halos may very well have experienced tens of halo mergers over the last 4-5 Gyr; post-merger features last that long, allowing these features to be detected in our clusters today. The apparent lack of dependence of the merger fraction on the clustocentric distance is naturally explained this way. In this scenario, the galaxy morphology and properties can be properly interpreted only when the halo evolution characteristics are understood first.

  18. Mergers and acquisitions. Frequently asked questions and answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S M; Smeltzer, C H; Thomas, C

    2000-03-01

    This article is structured in a question/answer format based on interviews with Dr. Carolyn Hope Smeltzer and Salima Manji Lin of PricewaterhouseCoopers, Chicago, and Chuck Thomas of Hinshaw & Culbertson, Rockford. The questions come from CEO's, healthcare executives, and nurse executives at hospitals that are contemplating mergers or that have both succeeded and failed to merge their institutions. The experts share their knowledge.

  19. Integral Field Spectroscopy of the Merger Remnant NGC 7252

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, John; Husemann, Bernd; Kuntschner, Harald; Martín-Navarro, Ignacio

    2018-01-01

    The merging of galaxies is a key aspect of the hierarchical ΛCDM Universe. The formation of massive quiescent elliptical galaxies may be explained through the merger of two star-forming disc galaxies. Despite nearly a century of effort, our understanding of this complex transformational process is remains incomplete and requires diligent observational study.NGC 7252 is one of the nearest starbursting major-merger galaxy remnants, formed about 1 Gyr after the collision of presumably two disc galaxies. It is therefore an ideal laboratory to study the underlying processes involved in transformation of two disc galaxies to an elliptical galaxy via a merger.We obtained wide-field IFU spectroscopy with the VLT-VIMOS integral-field spectrograph covering the central 50’’ × 50’’ of NGC 7252 to map the stellar and ionized gas kinematics, and the distribution and conditions of the ionized gas, revealing the extent of ongoing star formation and recent star formation history.Contrary to previous studies we find the inner gas disc not to be counter-rotating with respect to the overall stellar angular momentum. However, the stellar kinematics appear to be complex with a superposition of at least two nearly perpendicular angular momentum components. The host galaxy is still blue with g - i ~ 0.8 with an ongoing star formation rate of 2.2 ± 0.6 Msun/yr, placing NGC 7252 close to the blue cloud of galaxies and consistent with a disc-like molecular depletion time of ~2 Gyr.Although NGC 7252 appears as a fading starburst galaxy at the center, the elliptical-like major merger remnant appears to active, inconsistent with a fast quenching scenario. NGC 7252 may take several Gyr to reach the red sequence of galaxies unless star formation becomes quenched by either AGN feedback or inefficient gas conversion, leading to an H I-rich elliptical galaxy.

  20. Merger of Nuclear Data with Criticality Safety Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrien, H.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.

    1999-09-20

    In this paper we report on current activities related to the merger of differential/integral data (especially in the resolved-resonance region) with nuclear criticality safety computations. Techniques are outlined for closer coupling of many processes � measurement, data reduction, differential-data analysis, integral-data analysis, generating multigroup cross sections, data-testing, criticality computations � which in the past have been treated independently.

  1. Merger of Nuclear Data with Criticality Safety Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrien, H.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we report on current activities related to the merger of differential/integral data (especially in the resolved-resonance region) with nuclear criticality safety computations. Techniques are outlined for closer coupling of many processes measurement, data reduction, differential-data analysis, integral-data analysis, generating multigroup cross sections, data-testing, criticality computations which in the past have been treated independently

  2. THE EVOLUTION OF BLACK HOLE SCALING RELATIONS IN GALAXY MERGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Peter H.; Burkert, Andreas; Naab, Thorsten

    2009-01-01

    We study the evolution of black holes (BHs) on the M BH -σ and M BH -M bulge planes as a function of time in disk galaxies undergoing mergers. We begin the simulations with the progenitor BH masses being initially below (Δlog M BH,i ∼ -2), on (Δlog M BH,i ∼ 0), and above (Δlog M BH,i ∼ 0.5) the observed local relations. The final relations are rapidly established after the final coalescence of the galaxies and their BHs. Progenitors with low initial gas fractions (f gas = 0.2) starting below the relations evolve onto the relations (Δlog M BH,f ∼ -0.18), progenitors on the relations stay there (Δlog M BH,f ∼ 0), and finally progenitors above the relations evolve toward the relations, but still remain above them (Δlog M BH,f ∼ 0.35). Mergers in which the progenitors have high initial gas fractions (f gas = 0.8) evolve above the relations in all cases (Δlog M BH,f ∼ 0.5). We find that the initial gas fraction is the prime source of scatter in the observed relations, dominating over the scatter arising from the evolutionary stage of the merger remnants. The fact that BHs starting above the relations do not evolve onto the relations indicates that our simulations rule out the scenario in which overmassive BHs evolve onto the relations through gas-rich mergers. By implication our simulations thus disfavor the picture in which supermassive BHs develop significantly before their parent bulges.

  3. Diffuse X-Ray-emitting Gas in Major Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Beverly J.; Campbell, Kristen; Struck, Curtis; Soria, Roberto; Swartz, Douglas; Magno, Macon; Dunn, Brianne; Giroux, Mark L.

    2018-02-01

    Using archived data from the Chandra X-ray telescope, we have extracted the diffuse X-ray emission from 49 equal-mass interacting/merging galaxy pairs in a merger sequence, from widely separated pairs to merger remnants. After the removal of contributions from unresolved point sources, we compared the diffuse thermal X-ray luminosity from hot gas (L X(gas)) with the global star formation rate (SFR). After correction for absorption within the target galaxy, we do not see a strong trend of L X(gas)/SFR with the SFR or merger stage for galaxies with SFR > 1 M ⊙ yr‑1. For these galaxies, the median L X(gas)/SFR is 5.5 × 1039 ((erg s‑1)/M ⊙ yr‑1)), similar to that of normal spiral galaxies. These results suggest that stellar feedback in star-forming galaxies reaches an approximately steady-state condition, in which a relatively constant fraction of about 2% of the total energy output from supernovae and stellar winds is converted into X-ray flux. Three late-stage merger remnants with low SFRs and high K-band luminosities (L K ) have enhanced L X(gas)/SFR; their UV/IR/optical colors suggest that they are post-starburst galaxies, perhaps in the process of becoming ellipticals. Systems with L K < 1010 L ⊙ have lower L X(gas)/SFR ratios than the other galaxies in our sample, perhaps due to lower gravitational fields or lower metallicities. We see no relation between L X(gas)/SFR and Seyfert activity in this sample, suggesting that feedback from active galactic nuclei is not a major contributor to the hot gas in our sample galaxies.

  4. Neutron star mergers and gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    Under the support of grant NAG 5-1904, we have carried out research on several topics related to gamma-ray bursts (GRB's). In our proposal, we stated that we would study three topics: (1) fireball evolution; (2) neutron star mergers; and (3) statistics of bursts. We have completed a significant amount of work in each of these areas. Resulting papers from this work are presented.

  5. Mergers, Acquisitions and Restructuring: Types, Regulation, and Patterns of Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Coates, John C

    2014-01-01

    An important component of corporate governance is the regulation of significant transactions – mergers, acquisitions, and restructuring. This paper (a chapter in Oxford Handbook on Corporate Law and Governance, forthcoming) reviews how M&A and restructuring are regulated by corporate and securities law, listing standards, antitrust and foreign investment law, and industry-specific regulation. Drawing on real-world examples from the world’s two largest M&A markets (the US and the UK) and a rep...

  6. Towards a governance perspective to mergers and acquisitions

    OpenAIRE

    Parvinen, Petri M. T.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to conceptually integrate insights from governance theories of the firm to the research area of mergers and acquisitions (M & A). The primary governance theories of the firm are understood to consist of the neoclassical view of the firm, the nexus of contracts perspective, agency theory, early incomplete contracting theory, transaction cost economics and property rights theory. This study uses a bipartite research agenda, consisting of conceptual and biblio...

  7. Mergers and acquisitions : the case of Kraft Foods and Cadbury

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Sara Isabel de Paula

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation is to focus on a determinant aspect of Corporate Finance that is Mergers and Acquisitions (M&A). This dissertation not only provides a practical analysis of main issued regarding a process of M&A, but also provides a theoretical framework about M&A. Specifically, this dissertation explores the real case of Kraft Foods - world’s second largest manufacturer and packager food products – and Cadbury - the world’s second largest confectionery firm. ...

  8. Elucidate Innovation Performance of Technology-driven Mergers and Acquisitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, L.; Wang, K.; Yu, H.; Shang, L.; Mitkova, L.

    2016-07-01

    The importance and value of Mergers and Acquisitions (M&As) have increased with the expectancy to obtain key technology capabilities and rapid impact on innovation. This article develops an original analytical framework to elucidate the impact of the technology and product relatedness (similarity/complementarity) of the Technology-driven M&A’ partners on post-innovation performance. We present results drawing on a multiple case studies of Chinese High-Tech firms from three industries. (Author)

  9. Creditor protection in cross-border mergers; unfinished business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert T.M.J. Raaijmakers

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In cross-border mergers, creditor protection is important to facilitate a smooth, efficient and transparent process necessary to facilitate the single market. As all assets and liabilities are being transferred and there is a risk that the liabilities of the acquiring company will exceed the assets, creditor protection needs to be safeguarded in legal mergers. As the title suggests, creditor protection in the context of cross-border mergers and the recently adopted directive is examined in this paper, as well as the position of creditors under Dutch law and the Third Directive. The ex-ante and ex-post systems of creditor protection, both existing in the Member States of the EU, and which are both supported by strong arguments, are also discussed. The fact that differences in creditor protection rules nevertheless remain may create unjustifiable differences in the position of various groups of creditors involved in one single cross-border merger. The authors conclude that the case for leaving creditor protection to the Member States is weakening. Differences in national legislation on creditor protection, defendable as they may be, are ultimately of a technical nature and create unnecessary and unjustifiable impediments. There are strong arguments, in other words, to adopt the same provisions for all transactions for the sake of simplicity, but while this may be attractive, it can lead to undesired delay. Amending the Directive at this point in time thus seems equally unfeasible. This stresses the need to make haste with at least some further harmonization of creditor protection rules related to the Third Directive.

  10. Decoding Mode-mixing in Black-hole Merger Ringdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard J.; Baker, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Optimal extraction of information from gravitational-wave observations of binary black-hole coalescences requires detailed knowledge of the waveforms. Current approaches for representing waveform information are based on spin-weighted spherical harmonic decomposition. Higher-order harmonic modes carrying a few percent of the total power output near merger can supply information critical to determining intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of the binary. One obstacle to constructing a full multi-mode template of merger waveforms is the apparently complicated behavior of some of these modes; instead of settling down to a simple quasinormal frequency with decaying amplitude, some |m| = modes show periodic bumps characteristic of mode-mixing. We analyze the strongest of these modes the anomalous (3, 2) harmonic mode measured in a set of binary black-hole merger waveform simulations, and show that to leading order, they are due to a mismatch between the spherical harmonic basis used for extraction in 3D numerical relativity simulations, and the spheroidal harmonics adapted to the perturbation theory of Kerr black holes. Other causes of mode-mixing arising from gauge ambiguities and physical properties of the quasinormal ringdown modes are also considered and found to be small for the waveforms studied here.

  11. THE DRIVING MECHANISM OF STARBURSTS IN GALAXY MERGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teyssier, Romain; Chapon, Damien; Bournaud, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    We present hydrodynamic simulations of a major merger of disk galaxies, and study the interstellar medium (ISM) dynamics and star formation (SF) properties. High spatial and mass resolutions of 12 pc and 4 x 10 4 M sun allow us to resolve cold and turbulent gas clouds embedded in a warmer diffuse phase. We compare lower-resolution models, where the multiphase ISM is not resolved and is modeled as a relatively homogeneous and stable medium. While merger-driven bursts of SF are generally attributed to large-scale gas inflows toward the nuclear regions, we show that once a realistic ISM is resolved, the dominant process is actually gas fragmentation into massive and dense clouds and rapid SF therein. As a consequence, SF is more efficient by a factor of up to ∼10 and is also somewhat more extended, while the gas density probability distribution function rapidly evolves toward very high densities. We thus propose that the actual mechanism of starburst triggering in galaxy collisions can only be captured at high spatial resolution and when the cooling of gas is modeled down to less than 10 3 K. Not only does our model reproduce the properties of the Antennae system, but it also explains the 'starburst mode' recently revealed in high-redshift mergers compared to quiescent disks.

  12. Near-IR Explorations of Buried AGN in Advanced Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Jason; Constantin, Anca; Satyapal, Shobita; Rothberg, Barry

    2018-01-01

    Close separation dual AGNs provide unambiguous confirmation of ongoing mergers where the black holes experience their most rapid growth. Most of these systems have been discovered serendipitously, and confirmed cases remain, however, extremely rare. We present here the results of the analysis of new near-IR spectroscopy of nine advanced merger systems that display mid-IR colors suggestive of AGNs while lacking signatures of activity in the optical. Using the Large Binocular Telescope's LUCI (LBT Utility Camera for Infrared) 1 & 2 spectrographs we confirm the presence of broadened and/or high-excitation lines indicative of powerful AGN, reveal signs of hidden AGN feedback in the form of kinematic outflows, measure the properties of the host stellar populations, and begin to probe the gas-metallicities in these systems. Our results yield critical evidence that the epoch of peak black hole growth in mergers occurs in a highly obscured phase, consistent with theoretical predictions. We also confirm the effectiveness of using mid-IR colors as a pre-selection technique to identify dual AGN systems. This is one of the first detailed investigations into the physical environment of optically obscured dual AGNs, and provides key indications for finding and characterizing elusive black hole accretion.

  13. Prompt electromagnetic transients from binary black hole mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard J.; Baker, John G.; Etienne, Zachariah B.; Giacomazzo, Bruno; Schnittman, Jeremy

    2017-12-01

    Binary black hole (BBH) mergers provide a prime source for current and future interferometric gravitational wave observatories. Massive BBH mergers may often take place in plasma-rich environments, leading to the exciting possibility of a concurrent electromagnetic (EM) signal observable by traditional astronomical facilities. However, many critical questions about the generation of such counterparts remain unanswered. We explore mechanisms that may drive EM counterparts with magnetohydrodynamic simulations treating a range of scenarios involving equal-mass black-hole binaries immersed in an initially homogeneous fluid with uniform, orbitally aligned magnetic fields. We find that the time development of Poynting luminosity, which may drive jetlike emissions, is relatively insensitive to aspects of the initial configuration. In particular, over a significant range of initial values, the central magnetic field strength is effectively regulated by the gas flow to yield a Poynting luminosity of 1 045-1046ρ-13M8 2 erg s-1 , with BBH mass scaled to M8≡M /(108 M⊙) and ambient density ρ-13≡ρ /(10-13 g cm-3) . We also calculate the direct plasma synchrotron emissions processed through geodesic ray-tracing. Despite lensing effects and dynamics, we find the observed synchrotron flux varies little leading up to merger.

  14. Searching for the full symphony of black hole binary mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, Ian; Bustillo, Juan Calderón; Nitz, Alex

    2018-01-01

    Current searches for the gravitational-wave signature of compact binary mergers rely on matched-filtering data from interferometric observatories with sets of modeled gravitational waveforms. These searches currently use model waveforms that do not include the higher-order mode content of the gravitational-wave signal. Higher-order modes are important for many compact binary mergers and their omission reduces the sensitivity to such sources. In this work we explore the sensitivity loss incurred from omitting higher-order modes. We present a new method for searching for compact binary mergers using waveforms that include higher-order mode effects, and evaluate the sensitivity increase that using our new method would allow. We find that, when evaluating sensitivity at a constant rate-of-false alarm, and when including the fact that signal-consistency tests can reject some signals that include higher-order mode content, we observe a sensitivity increase of up to a factor of 2 in volume for high mass ratio, high total-mass systems. For systems with equal mass, or with total mass ˜50 M⊙, we see more modest sensitivity increases, applicable in searches for generic compact binaries.

  15. Merger and Acquisition Market: from World Experience to National Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrechana Svitlana I.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article lies in identification of tendencies and prospects of development of the merger and acquisition market of Ukraine in the context of influence of the world M and A experience upon this process under conditions of globalisation. In the result of the study the article analyses the most significant merger and acquisition operations that took place in the world practice and in Ukraine in recent years. The article reveals and deeply assesses the variety of motives and mechanisms of their realisation from the position of practice of developed countries and trans-national corporations and also domestic associations of enterprises. It shows that transactions of tough or forced character of acquisition prevail in Ukraine, specific features of which are not only the reduced cost but also direct belonging of buyers to oligarchic-political structures. It explains negative influence of these specific features upon volume and activity of the national M and A market. It formulates and offers a system of state and economic subjects measures, immediate application of which would allow creation of favourable conditions for development of the national merger and acquisition market.

  16. Gravitationally Consistent Halo Catalogs and Merger Trees for Precision Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wu, Hao-Yi; Busha, Michael T.; Klypin, Anatoly A.; Primack, Joel R.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for generating merger trees and halo catalogs which explicitly ensures consistency of halo properties (mass, position, and velocity) across time steps. Our algorithm has demonstrated the ability to improve both the completeness (through detecting and inserting otherwise missing halos) and purity (through detecting and removing spurious objects) of both merger trees and halo catalogs. In addition, our method is able to robustly measure the self-consistency of halo finders; it is the first to directly measure the uncertainties in halo positions, halo velocities, and the halo mass function for a given halo finder based on consistency between snapshots in cosmological simulations. We use this algorithm to generate merger trees for two large simulations (Bolshoi and Consuelo) and evaluate two halo finders (ROCKSTAR and BDM). We find that both the ROCKSTAR and BDM halo finders track halos extremely well; in both, the number of halos which do not have physically consistent progenitors is at the 1%-2% level across all halo masses. Our code is publicly available at http://code.google.com/p/consistent-trees. Our trees and catalogs are publicly available at http://hipacc.ucsc.edu/Bolshoi/.

  17. Energetic constraints on electromagnetic signals from double black hole mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lixin; McKinney, Jonathan C.; Miller, M. Coleman

    2017-09-01

    The possible Fermi detection of an electromagnetic counterpart to the double black hole merger GW150914 has inspired many theoretical models, some of which propose that the holes spiralled together inside a massive star. However, we show that the heat produced by the dynamical friction on such black hole orbits can exceed the stellar binding energy by a large factor, which means that this heat could destroy the star. The energy scale of the explosion and the terminal velocity of the gas can be much larger than those in conventional supernovae. If the star unbinds before the merger, it would be hard for enough gas to remain near the holes at the merger to produce a gamma-ray burst, and this consideration should be taken into account when models are proposed for electromagnetic counterparts to the coalescence of two stellar-mass black holes. We find that only when the two black holes form very close to the centre can the star certainly avoid destruction. In that case, dynamical friction can make the black holes coalesce faster than they would in vacuum, which leads to a modification of the gravitational waveform that is potentially observable by advanced LIGO.

  18. PECULIARITIES OF APPROACHES TO THE ASSESSMENT OF CORPORATE MERGERS IN THE BANKING SECTOR OF UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Naumenkova

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article peculiarities of existing approaches to the assessment of the results of corporate mergers and acquisitions are investigated, advantages and disadvantages of their application in the banking sector are identified, the algorithm of synergy effect from the merger of banks is substantiated, main sources of growth in the value of the corporation as a result of mergers(acquisitions are discovered.

  19. The success factors of technology-sourcing through mergers & acquisitions : an intuitive meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Schön, Benjamin; Pyka, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    With mergers & acquisitions playing an increasingly important role in today's business world, academic research has strived to follow this trend by investigating their underlying causes and consequences. For a long time this research focused on the analysis of the financial effect of mergers & acquisitions as measured by market value or debt level. Thus, despite being a major vehicle of industry concentration and method of reallocation of resources, the technological impact of mergers & acqui...

  20. Reasons for Mergers and Economic Groups: The Davivienda case - Bansuperior - Bancafé

    OpenAIRE

    Ingrid Suárez; Yuri Gorbaneff; Jorge Beltrán

    2009-01-01

    The article studies the motives for mergers. It groups them according to their theoretical roots and shows their usefulness in the case of the merger of Colombian banks Davivienda - Bansuperior - Bancafé. The theoretical frame compiles 17 typologies of motives for merger grouped into three blocks: scale and scope economies, transaction costs and resource based approach. We used the case study method. We obtained data from interviews with Davivienda executives and secondary sources. We used th...

  1. Minor actinide transmutation using minor actinide burner reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaiyama, T.; Yoshida, H.; Gunji, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of minor actinide burner reactor is proposed as an efficient way to transmute long-lived minor actinides in order to ease the burden of high-level radioactive waste disposal problem. Conceptual design study of minor actinide burner reactors was performed to obtain a reactor model with very hard neutron spectrum and very high neutron flux in which minor actinides can be fissioned efficiently. Two models of burner reactors were obtained, one with metal fuel core and the other with particle fuel core. Minor actinide transmutation by the actinide burner reactors is compared with that by power reactors from both the reactor physics and fuel cycle facilities view point. (author)

  2. Dynamical effects of successive mergers on the evolution of spherical stellar systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical investigations are carried out to study the dynamical effects of high-mass stars formed out of successive mergers among tidally captured binaries on the evolution of spherical stellar systems. It is assumed that all tidally captured systems become mergers in order to maximize these effects. Stellar systems with N greater than about 10 to the 7th are susceptible to merger instability which may lead to the formation of a central black hole. It is shown that globular clusters are likely to achieve postcollapse expansion due to three-body binary heating and stellar evolution, while galactic nuclei can easily be overcome by the merger instability in the core. 25 references

  3. The Impact of Mergers and Acquisitions on the Market Value of Shares of Erste Bank Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popovici Andreea Nicoleta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mergers and acquisitions are ways used by banks to improve their profitability and to obtain other advantages. The purpose of this study is to analyze the impact of mergers and acquisitions on the performance of the bidder bank. For this study, I have chosen to research the impact of acquisitions and mergers of Erste Group during 2000-2011, considering the target bank is in Central and Eastern Europe. Using the event study methodology, the result of the study shows that a merger or an acquisition does not improve the value market of the shares of the bidder bank.

  4. Domestic merger policy in an international oligopoly: the Nordic market for electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soergard, Lars

    1997-01-01

    Many domestic markets are becoming integrated in international markets. Is this an argument for permitting mergers between domestic producers? It is shown that a merger with no cost-saving effects will always be detrimental to domestic welfare if the country is an importer of the good in question, and may increase welfare if the country is an exporter and the price-cost margin is sufficiently low initially. We specify a general condition for a merger to improve welfare, and apply the condition on the Nordic market for electricity. Numerical calculations suggest that in this particular market the Norwegian competition authority should ban domestic mergers with no cost savings. (Author)

  5. The Impact of Mergers and Acquisitions on the Market Value of Shares of Erste Bank Group

    OpenAIRE

    Andreea Nicoleta POPOVICI

    2014-01-01

    Mergers and acquisitions are ways used by banks to improve their profitability and to obtain other advantages. The purpose of this study is to analyze the impact of mergers and acquisitions on the performance of the bidder bank. For this study, I have chosen to research the impact of acquisitions and mergers of Erste Group during 2000-2011, considering the target bank is in Central and Eastern Europe. Using the event study methodology, the result of the study shows that a merger or an acquisi...

  6. EVOLUTION OF THE MERGER-INDUCED HYDROSTATIC MASS BIAS IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Kaylea; Nagai, Daisuke; Rudd, Douglas H.; Shaw, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we examine the effects of mergers on the hydrostatic mass estimate of galaxy clusters using high-resolution Eulerian cosmological simulations. We utilize merger trees to isolate the last merger for each cluster in our sample and follow the time evolution of the hydrostatic mass bias as the systems relax. We find that during a merger, a shock propagates outward from the parent cluster, resulting in an overestimate in the hydrostatic mass bias. After the merger, as a cluster relaxes, the bias in hydrostatic mass estimate decreases but remains at a level of –5%-10% with 15%-20% scatter within r 500 . We also investigate the post-merger evolution of the pressure support from bulk motions, a dominant cause of this residual mass bias. At r 500 , the contribution from random motions peaks at 30% of the total pressure during the merger and quickly decays to ∼10%-15% as a cluster relaxes. Additionally, we use a measure of the random motion pressure to correct the hydrostatic mass estimate. We discover that 4 Gyr after mergers, the direct effects of the merger event on the hydrostatic mass bias have become negligible. Thereafter, the mass bias is primarily due to residual bulk motions in the gas which are not accounted for in the hydrostatic equilibrium equation. We present a hydrostatic mass bias correction method that can recover the unbiased cluster mass for relaxed clusters with 9% scatter at r 500 and 11% scatter in the outskirts, within r 200 .

  7. Multi-messenger Observations of a Binary Neutron Star Merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Angelova, S. V.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atallah, D. V.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Austin, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barkett, K.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bawaj, M.; Bayley, J. C.; Bazzan, M.; Bécsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Bero, J. J.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonilla, E.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bossie, K.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chase, E.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Chatziioannou, K.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H.-P.; Chia, H.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Clearwater, P.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Cohen, D.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordero-Carrión, I.; Corley, K. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Dálya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D’Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Demos, N.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; De Pietri, R.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rossi, C.; DeSalvo, R.; de Varona, O.; Devenson, J.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Dovale Álvarez, M.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Dreissigacker, C.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dupej, P.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Estevez, D.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fee, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finstad, D.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fishbach, M.; Fisher, R. P.; Fitz-Axen, M.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Font, J. A.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. 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S.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X. B.; Li, X. F.; Li, Y. G.; Li, Z. J.; Li, Z. W.; Liang, X. H.; Liao, J. Y.; Liu, C. Z.; Liu, G. Q.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, S. Z.; Liu, X. J.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y. N.; Lu, B.; Lu, X. F.; Luo, T.; Ma, X.; Meng, B.; Nang, Y.; Nie, J. Y.; Ou, G.; Qu, J. L.; Sai, N.; Sun, L.; Tan, Y.; Tao, L.; Tao, W. H.; Tuo, Y. L.; Wang, G. F.; Wang, H. Y.; Wang, J.; Wang, W. S.; Wang, Y. S.; Wen, X. Y.; Wu, B. B.; Wu, M.; Xiao, G. C.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y. P.; Yan, L. L.; Yang, J. W.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y. J.; Zhang, A. M.; Zhang, C. L.; Zhang, C. M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, W. Z.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. F.; Zhang, Y. J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z. L.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J. L.; Zhao, X. F.; Zheng, S. J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhu, Y. X.; Zou, C. L.; The Insight-HXMT Collaboration; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Aublin, J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Belhorma, B.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bourret, S.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brânzaş, H.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Coleiro, A.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Díaz, A. F.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Di Palma, I.; Domi, A.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; El Bojaddaini, I.; El Khayati, N.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ettahiri, A.; Fassi, F.; Felis, I.; Fusco, L. A.; Gay, P.; Giordano, V.; Glotin, H.; Grégoire, T.; Ruiz, R. Gracia; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hössl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kiessling, D.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachaud, C.; Lahmann, R.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Lotze, M.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Mele, R.; Melis, K.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Navas, S.; Nezri, E.; Organokov, M.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Quinn, L.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Saldaña, M.; Salvadori, I.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Trovato, A.; Turpin, D.; Tönnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Versari, F.; Vivolo, D.; Vizzoca, A.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; ANTARES Collaboration; Beardmore, A. P.; Breeveld, A. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Cenko, S. B.; Cusumano, G.; D’Aì, A.; de Pasquale, M.; Emery, S. W. K.; Evans, P. A.; Giommi, P.; Gronwall, C.; Kennea, J. A.; Krimm, H. A.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Lien, A.; Marshall, F. E.; Melandri, A.; Nousek, J. A.; Oates, S. R.; Osborne, J. P.; Pagani, C.; Page, K. L.; Palmer, D. M.; Perri, M.; Siegel, M. H.; Sbarufatti, B.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tohuvavohu, A.; The Swift Collaboration; Tavani, M.; Verrecchia, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Evangelista, Y.; Pacciani, L.; Feroci, M.; Pittori, C.; Giuliani, A.; Del Monte, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; Ursi, A.; Cardillo, M.; Piano, G.; Longo, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Minervini, G.; Fioretti, V.; Parmiggiani, N.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Di Persio, G.; Antonelli, L. A.; Barbiellini, G.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Costa, E.; Colafrancesco, S.; D’Amico, F.; Ferrari, A.; Morselli, A.; Paoletti, F.; Picozza, P.; Pilia, M.; Rappoldi, A.; Soffitta, P.; Vercellone, S.; AGILE Team; Foley, R. J.; Coulter, D. A.; Kilpatrick, C. D.; Drout, M. R.; Piro, A. L.; Shappee, B. J.; Siebert, M. R.; Simon, J. D.; Ulloa, N.; Kasen, D.; Madore, B. F.; Murguia-Berthier, A.; Pan, Y.-C.; Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Rest, A.; Rojas-Bravo, C.; The 1M2H Team; Berger, E.; Soares-Santos, M.; Annis, J.; Alexander, K. D.; Allam, S.; Balbinot, E.; Blanchard, P.; Brout, D.; Butler, R. E.; Chornock, R.; Cook, E. R.; Cowperthwaite, P.; Diehl, H. T.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Drout, M. R.; Durret, F.; Eftekhari, T.; Finley, D. A.; Fong, W.; Frieman, J. A.; Fryer, C. L.; García-Bellido, J.; Gruendl, R. A.; Hartley, W.; Herner, K.; Kessler, R.; Lin, H.; Lopes, P. A. A.; Lourenço, A. C. C.; Margutti, R.; Marshall, J. L.; Matheson, T.; Medina, G. E.; Metzger, B. D.; Muñoz, R. R.; Muir, J.; Nicholl, M.; Nugent, P.; Palmese, A.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Quataert, E.; Sako, M.; Sauseda, M.; Schlegel, D. J.; Scolnic, D.; Secco, L. F.; Smith, N.; Sobreira, F.; Villar, V. A.; Vivas, A. K.; Wester, W.; Williams, P. K. G.; Yanny, B.; Zenteno, A.; Zhang, Y.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Banerji, M.; Bechtol, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Eifler, T. F.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Kent, S.; Krause, E.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; McMahon, R. G.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Stebbins, A.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, R. C.; Troxel, M. A.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Carlin, J. L.; Gill, M. S. S.; Li, T. S.; Marriner, J.; Neilsen, E.; The Dark Energy Camera GW-EM Collaboration; the DES Collaboration; Haislip, J. B.; Kouprianov, V. V.; Reichart, D. E.; Sand, D. J.; Tartaglia, L.; Valenti, S.; Yang, S.; The DLT40 Collaboration; Benetti, S.; Brocato, E.; Campana, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Covino, S.; D’Avanzo, P.; D’Elia, V.; Getman, F.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Limatola, L.; Nicastro, L.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Piranomonte, S.; Possenti, A.; Rossi, A.; Salafia, O. S.; Tomasella, L.; Amati, L.; Antonelli, L. A.; Bernardini, M. G.; Bufano, F.; Capaccioli, M.; Casella, P.; Dadina, M.; De Cesare, G.; Di Paola, A.; Giuffrida, G.; Giunta, A.; Israel, G. L.; Lisi, M.; Maiorano, E.; Mapelli, M.; Masetti, N.; Pescalli, A.; Pulone, L.; Salvaterra, R.; Schipani, P.; Spera, M.; Stamerra, A.; Stella, L.; Testa, V.; Turatto, M.; Vergani, D.; Aresu, G.; Bachetti, M.; Buffa, F.; Burgay, M.; Buttu, M.; Caria, T.; Carretti, E.; Casasola, V.; Castangia, P.; Carboni, G.; Casu, S.; Concu, R.; Corongiu, A.; Deiana, G. L.; Egron, E.; Fara, A.; Gaudiomonte, F.; Gusai, V.; Ladu, A.; Loru, S.; Leurini, S.; Marongiu, L.; Melis, A.; Melis, G.; Migoni, Carlo; Milia, Sabrina; Navarrini, Alessandro; Orlati, A.; Ortu, P.; Palmas, S.; Pellizzoni, A.; Perrodin, D.; Pisanu, T.; Poppi, S.; Righini, S.; Saba, A.; Serra, G.; Serrau, M.; Stagni, M.; Surcis, G.; Vacca, V.; Vargiu, G. P.; Hunt, L. K.; Jin, Z. P.; Klose, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Mazzali, P. A.; Møller, P.; Nava, L.; Piran, T.; Selsing, J.; Vergani, S. D.; Wiersema, K.; Toma, K.; Higgins, A. B.; Mundell, C. G.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Gótz, D.; Gao, W.; Gomboc, A.; Kaper, L.; Kobayashi, S.; Kopac, D.; Mao, J.; Starling, R. L. C.; Steele, I.; van der Horst, A. J.; GRAWITA: GRAvitational Wave Inaf TeAm; Acero, F.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Berenji, B.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Costantin, D.; Cuoco, A.; D’Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Dubois, R.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Green, D.; Grondin, M.-H.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Harding, A. K.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kamae, T.; Kensei, S.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Meyer, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ojha, R.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Palatiello, M.; Paliya, V. S.; Paneque, D.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Principe, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Rochester, L. S.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, M.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Troja, E.; Venters, T. M.; Vianello, G.; Zaharijas, G.; The Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration; Allison, J. R.; Bannister, K. W.; Dobie, D.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lenc, E.; Lynch, C.; Murphy, T.; Sadler, E. M.; Australia Telescope Compact Array, ATCA:; Hotan, A.; James, C. W.; Oslowski, S.; Raja, W.; Shannon, R. M.; Whiting, M.; Australian SKA Pathfinder, ASKAP:; Arcavi, I.; Howell, D. A.; McCully, C.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Hiramatsu, D.; Poznanski, D.; Barnes, J.; Zaltzman, M.; Vasylyev, S.; Maoz, D.; Las Cumbres Observatory Group; Cooke, J.; Bailes, M.; Wolf, C.; Deller, A. T.; Lidman, C.; Wang, L.; Gendre, B.; Andreoni, I.; Ackley, K.; Pritchard, T. A.; Bessell, M. S.; Chang, S.-W.; Möller, A.; Onken, C. A.; Scalzo, R. A.; Ridden-Harper, R.; Sharp, R. G.; Tucker, B. E.; Farrell, T. J.; Elmer, E.; Johnston, S.; Venkatraman Krishnan, V.; Keane, E. F.; Green, J. A.; Jameson, A.; Hu, L.; Ma, B.; Sun, T.; Wu, X.; Wang, X.; Shang, Z.; Hu, Y.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Yuan, X.; Li, X.; Tao, C.; Zhu, Z.; Zhang, H.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Zhou, J.; Yang, J.; Orange, B.; Morris, D.; Cucchiara, A.; Giblin, T.; Klotz, A.; Staff, J.; Thierry, P.; Schmidt, B. P.; OzGrav; (Deeper, DWF; Wider; program, Faster; AST3; CAASTRO Collaborations; Tanvir, N. R.; Levan, A. J.; Cano, Z.; de Ugarte-Postigo, A.; González-Fernández, C.; Greiner, J.; Hjorth, J.; Irwin, M.; Krühler, T.; Mandel, I.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; O’Brien, P.; Rol, E.; Rosetti, S.; Rosswog, S.; Rowlinson, A.; Steeghs, D. T. H.; Thöne, C. C.; Ulaczyk, K.; Watson, D.; Bruun, S. H.; Cutter, R.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Fujii, Y. I.; Fruchter, A. S.; Gompertz, B.; Jakobsson, P.; Hodosan, G.; Jèrgensen, U. G.; Kangas, T.; Kann, D. A.; Rabus, M.; Schrøder, S. L.; Stanway, E. R.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; The VINROUGE Collaboration; Lipunov, V. M.; Gorbovskoy, E. S.; Kornilov, V. G.; Tyurina, N. V.; Balanutsa, P. V.; Kuznetsov, A. S.; Vlasenko, D. M.; Podesta, R. C.; Lopez, C.; Podesta, F.; Levato, H. O.; Saffe, C.; Mallamaci, C. C.; Budnev, N. M.; Gress, O. A.; Kuvshinov, D. A.; Gorbunov, I. A.; Vladimirov, V. V.; Zimnukhov, D. S.; Gabovich, A. V.; Yurkov, V. V.; Sergienko, Yu. P.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Tlatov, A. G.; Ishmuhametova, Yu. V.; MASTER Collaboration; Abe, F.; Aoki, K.; Aoki, W.; Asakura, Y.; Baar, S.; Barway, S.; Bond, I. A.; Doi, M.; Finet, F.; Fujiyoshi, T.; Furusawa, H.; Honda, S.; Itoh, R.; Kanda, N.; Kawabata, K. S.; Kawabata, M.; Kim, J. H.; Koshida, S.; Kuroda, D.; Lee, C.-H.; Liu, W.; Matsubayashi, K.; Miyazaki, S.; Morihana, K.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.; Murata, K. L.; Nagai, H.; Nagashima, H.; Nagayama, T.; Nakaoka, T.; Nakata, F.; Ohsawa, R.; Ohshima, T.; Ohta, K.; Okita, H.; Saito, T.; Saito, Y.; Sako, S.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sumi, T.; Tajitsu, A.; Takahashi, J.; Takayama, M.; Tamura, Y.; Tanaka, I.; Tanaka, M.; Terai, T.; Tominaga, N.; Tristram, P. J.; Uemura, M.; Utsumi, Y.; Yamaguchi, M. S.; Yasuda, N.; Yoshida, M.; Zenko, T.; J-GEM; Adams, S. M.; Anupama, G. C.; Bally, J.; Barway, S.; Bellm, E.; Blagorodnova, N.; Cannella, C.; Chandra, P.; Chatterjee, D.; Clarke, T. E.; Cobb, B. E.; Cook, D. O.; Copperwheat, C.; De, K.; Emery, S. W. K.; Feindt, U.; Foster, K.; Fox, O. D.; Frail, D. A.; Fremling, C.; Frohmaier, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Ghosh, S.; Giacintucci, S.; Goobar, A.; Gottlieb, O.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hallinan, G.; Harrison, F.; Heida, M.; Helou, G.; Ho, A. Y. Q.; Horesh, A.; Hotokezaka, K.; Ip, W.-H.; Itoh, R.; Jacobs, Bob; Jencson, J. E.; Kasen, D.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Kassim, N. E.; Kim, H.; Kiran, B. S.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Kupfer, T.; Lau, R. M.; Madsen, K.; Mazzali, P. A.; Miller, A. A.; Miyasaka, H.; Mooley, K.; Myers, S. T.; Nakar, E.; Ngeow, C.-C.; Nugent, P.; Ofek, E. O.; Palliyaguru, N.; Pavana, M.; Perley, D. A.; Peters, W. M.; Pike, S.; Piran, T.; Qi, H.; Quimby, R. M.; Rana, J.; Rosswog, S.; Rusu, F.; Sadler, E. M.; Van Sistine, A.; Sollerman, J.; Xu, Y.; Yan, L.; Yatsu, Y.; Yu, P.-C.; Zhang, C.; Zhao, W.; GROWTH; JAGWAR; Caltech-NRAO; TTU-NRAO; NuSTAR Collaborations; Chambers, K. C.; Huber, M. E.; Schultz, A. S. B.; Bulger, J.; Flewelling, H.; Magnier, E. A.; Lowe, T. B.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.; Willman, M.; Pan-STARRS; Ebisawa, K.; Hanyu, C.; Harita, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hidaka, K.; Hori, T.; Ishikawa, M.; Isobe, N.; Iwakiri, W.; Kawai, H.; Kawai, N.; Kawamuro, T.; Kawase, T.; Kitaoka, Y.; Makishima, K.; Matsuoka, M.; Mihara, T.; Morita, T.; Morita, K.; Nakahira, S.; Nakajima, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Negoro, H.; Oda, S.; Sakamaki, A.; Sasaki, R.; Serino, M.; Shidatsu, M.; Shimomukai, R.; Sugawara, Y.; Sugita, S.; Sugizaki, M.; Tachibana, Y.; Takao, Y.; Tanimoto, A.; Tomida, H.; Tsuboi, Y.; Tsunemi, H.; Ueda, Y.; Ueno, S.; Yamada, S.; Yamaoka, K.; Yamauchi, M.; Yatabe, F.; Yoneyama, T.; Yoshii, T.; The MAXI Team; Coward, D. M.; Crisp, H.; Macpherson, D.; Andreoni, I.; Laugier, R.; Noysena, K.; Klotz, A.; Gendre, B.; Thierry, P.; Turpin, D.; Consortium, TZAC; Im, M.; Choi, C.; Kim, J.; Yoon, Y.; Lim, G.; Lee, S.-K.; Lee, C.-U.; Kim, S.-L.; Ko, S.-W.; Joe, J.; Kwon, M.-K.; Kim, P.-J.; Lim, S.-K.; Choi, J.-S.; KU Collaboration; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Malesani, D.; Xu, D.; Optical Telescope, Nordic; Smartt, S. J.; Jerkstrand, A.; Kankare, E.; Sim, S. A.; Fraser, M.; Inserra, C.; Maguire, K.; Leloudas, G.; Magee, M.; Shingles, L. J.; Smith, K. W.; Young, D. R.; Kotak, R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Lyman, J. D.; Homan, D. S.; Agliozzo, C.; Anderson, J. P.; Angus, C. R.; Ashall, C.; Barbarino, C.; Bauer, F. E.; Berton, M.; Botticella, M. T.; Bulla, M.; Cannizzaro, G.; Cartier, R.; Cikota, A.; Clark, P.; De Cia, A.; Della Valle, M.; Dennefeld, M.; Dessart, L.; Dimitriadis, G.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Firth, R. E.; Flörs, A.; Frohmaier, C.; Galbany, L.; González-Gaitán, S.; Gromadzki, M.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Hamanowicz, A.; Harmanen, J.; Heintz, K. E.; Hernandez, M.-S.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Hook, I. M.; Izzo, L.; James, P. A.; Jonker, P. G.; Kerzendorf, W. E.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Kromer, M.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Lawrence, A.; Manulis, I.; Mattila, S.; McBrien, O.; Müller, A.; Nordin, J.; O’Neill, D.; Onori, F.; Palmerio, J. T.; Pastorello, A.; Patat, F.; Pignata, G.; Podsiadlowski, P.; Razza, A.; Reynolds, T.; Roy, R.; Ruiter, A. J.; Rybicki, K. A.; Salmon, L.; Pumo, M. L.; Prentice, S. J.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Smith, M.; Sollerman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Szegedi, H.; Taddia, F.; Taubenberger, S.; Terreran, G.; Van Soelen, B.; Vos, J.; Walton, N. A.; Wright, D. E.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yaron, O.; pre="(">ePESSTO,

    2017-10-01

    On 2017 August 17 a binary neutron star coalescence candidate (later designated GW170817) with merger time 12:41:04 UTC was observed through gravitational waves by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor independently detected a gamma-ray burst (GRB 170817A) with a time delay of ∼ 1.7 {{s}} with respect to the merger time. From the gravitational-wave signal, the source was initially localized to a sky region of 31 deg2 at a luminosity distance of {40}-8+8 Mpc and with component masses consistent with neutron stars. The component masses were later measured to be in the range 0.86 to 2.26 {M}ȯ . An extensive observing campaign was launched across the electromagnetic spectrum leading to the discovery of a bright optical transient (SSS17a, now with the IAU identification of AT 2017gfo) in NGC 4993 (at ∼ 40 {{Mpc}}) less than 11 hours after the merger by the One-Meter, Two Hemisphere (1M2H) team using the 1 m Swope Telescope. The optical transient was independently detected by multiple teams within an hour. Subsequent observations targeted the object and its environment. Early ultraviolet observations revealed a blue transient that faded within 48 hours. Optical and infrared observations showed a redward evolution over ∼10 days. Following early non-detections, X-ray and radio emission were discovered at the transient’s position ∼ 9 and ∼ 16 days, respectively, after the merger. Both the X-ray and radio emission likely arise from a physical process that is distinct from the one that generates the UV/optical/near-infrared emission. No ultra-high-energy gamma-rays and no neutrino candidates consistent with the source were found in follow-up searches. These observations support the hypothesis that GW170817 was produced by the merger of two neutron stars in NGC 4993 followed by a short gamma-ray burst (GRB 170817A) and a kilonova/macronova powered by the radioactive decay of r-process nuclei synthesized in the ejecta

  8. Inverse Compton Scattered Merger-nova: Late X-Ray Counterpart of Gravitational-wave Signals from NS–NS/BH Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Shunke; Gao, He

    2018-01-01

    The recent observations of GW170817 and its electromagnetic (EM) counterparts show that double neutron star mergers could lead to rich and bright EM emissions. Recent numerical simulations suggest that neutron star and neutron star/black hole (NS–NS/BH) mergers would leave behind a central remnant surrounded by a mildly isotropic ejecta. The central remnant could launch a collimated jet and when the jet propagates through the ejecta, a mildly relativistic cocoon would be formed and the interaction between the cocoon and the ambient medium would accelerate electrons via external shock in a wide angle, so that the merger-nova photons (i.e., thermal emission from the ejecta) would be scattered into higher frequency via an inverse Compton (IC) process when they propagate through the cocoon shocked region. We find that the IC scattered component peaks at the X-ray band and it will reach its peak luminosity on the order of days (simultaneously with the merger-nova emission). With current X-ray detectors, such a late X-ray component could be detected out to 200 Mpc, depending on the merger remnant properties. It could serve as an important electromagnetic counterpart of gravitational-wave signals from NS–NS/BH mergers. Nevertheless, simultaneous detection of such a late X-ray signal and the merger-nova signal could shed light on the cocoon properties and the concrete structure of the jet.

  9. BOOK REVIEW: Minority Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, R.

    2005-02-01

    New branches of scientific disciplines often have a few paradigmatic models that serve as a testing ground for theories and a starting point for new inquiries. In the late 1990s, one of these models found fertile ground in the growing field of econophysics: the Minority Game (MG), a model for speculative markets that combined conceptual simplicity with interesting emergent behaviour and challenging mathematics. The two basic ingredients were the minority mechanism (a large number of players have to choose one of two alternatives in each round, and the minority wins) and limited rationality (each player has a small set of decision rules, and chooses the more successful ones). Combining these, one observes a phase transition between a crowded and an inefficient market phase, fat-tailed price distributions at the transition, and many other nontrivial effects. Now, seven years after the first paper, three of the key players—Damien Challet, Matteo Marsili and Yi-Cheng Zhang—have published a monograph that summarizes the current state of the science. The book consists of two parts: a 100-page overview of the various aspects of the MG, and reprints of many essential papers. The first chapters of Part I give a well-written description of the motivation and the history behind the MG, and then go into the phenomenology and the mathematical treatment of the model. The authors emphasize the `physics' underlying the behaviour and give coherent, intuitive explanations that are difficult to extract from the original papers. The mathematics is outlined, but calculations are not carried out in great detail (maybe they could have been included in an appendix). Chapter 4 then discusses how and why the MG is a model for speculative markets, how it can be modified to give a closer fit to observed market statistics (in particular, reproducing the `stylized facts' of fat-tailed distributions and volatility clustering), and what conclusions one can draw from the behaviour of the MG

  10. Neutron-Star Merger Detected By Many Eyes and Ears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    Where were you on Thursday, 17 August 2017? I was in Idaho, getting ready for Monday mornings solar eclipse. What I didnt know was that, at the time, around 70 teams around the world were mobilizing to point their ground- and space-based telescopes at a single patch of sky suspected to host the first gravitational-wave-detected merger of two neutron stars.Sudden Leaps for ScienceThe masses for black holes detected through electromagnetic observations (purple), black holes measured by gravitational-wave observations (blue), neutron stars measured with electromagnetic observations (yellow), and the neutron stars that merged in GW170817 (orange). [LIGO-Virgo/Frank Elavsky/NorthwesternUniversity]The process of science is long and arduous, generally occurring at a slow plod as theorists make predictions, and observations are then used to chip away at these theories, gradually confirming or disproving them. It is rare that science progresses forward in a giant leap, with years upon years of theories confirmed in one fell swoop.14 September 2015 marked the day of one such leap, as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detected gravitational waves for the first time simultaneously verifying that black holes exist, that black-hole binaries exist, and that they can merge on observable timescales, emitting signals that directly confirm the predictions of general relativity.As it turns out, 17 August 2017 was another such day. On this day, LIGO observed a gravitational-wave signal unlike its previous black-hole detections. Instead, this was a signal consistent with the merger of two neutron stars.Artists illustrations of the stellar-merger model for short gamma-ray bursts. In the model, 1) two neutron stars inspiral, 2) they merge and produce a gamma-ray burst, 3) a small fraction of their mass is flung out and radiates as a kilonova, 4) a massive neutron star or black hole with a disk remains after the event. [NASA, ESA, and A. Feild (STScI)]What We

  11. Late-stage galaxy mergers in cosmos to z ∼ 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackner, C. N.; Silverman, J. D.; Salvato, M.; Kampczyk, P.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Sanders, D.; Lee, N.; Capak, P.; Scoville, N.; Civano, F.; Halliday, C.; Ilbert, O.; Le Fèvre, O.; Jahnke, K.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Liu, C. T.; Sheth, K.; Toft, S.

    2014-01-01

    The role of major mergers in galaxy and black hole formation is not well-constrained. To help address this, we develop an automated method to identify late-stage galaxy mergers before coalescence of the galactic cores. The resulting sample of mergers is distinct from those obtained using pair-finding and morphological indicators. Our method relies on median-filtering of high-resolution images to distinguish two concentrated galaxy nuclei at small separations. This method does not rely on low surface brightness features to identify mergers, and is therefore reliable to high redshift. Using mock images, we derive statistical contamination and incompleteness corrections for the fraction of late-stage mergers. The mock images show that our method returns an uncontaminated (<10%) sample of mergers with projected separations between 2.2 and 8 kpc out to z∼1. We apply our new method to a magnitude-limited (m FW 814 <23) sample of 44,164 galaxies from the COSMOS HST/ACS catalog. Using a mass-complete sample with logM ∗ /M ⊙ >10.6 and 0.25mergers. Correcting for incompleteness and contamination, the fractional merger rate increases strongly with redshift as r merge ∝(1+z) 3.8±0.9 , in agreement both with earlier studies and with dark matter halo merger rates. Separating the sample into star-forming and quiescent galaxies shows that the merger rate for star-forming galaxies increases strongly with redshift, (1+z) 4.5±1.3 , while the merger rate for quiescent galaxies is consistent with no evolution, (1+z) 1.1±1.2 . The merger rate also becomes steeper with decreasing stellar mass. Limiting our sample to galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts from zCOSMOS, we find that the star formation rates and X-ray selected active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in likely late-stage mergers are higher by factors of ∼2 relative to those of a control sample. Combining our sample with more widely separated pairs, we find that 8

  12. Advanced LIGO constraints on neutron star mergers and r-process sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Côté, Benoit; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Fryer, Chris L.; Ritter, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The role of compact binary mergers as the main production site of r-process elements is investigated by combining stellar abundances of Eu observed in the Milky Way, galactic chemical evolution (GCE) simulations, and binary population synthesis models, and gravitational wave measurements from Advanced LIGO. We compiled and reviewed seven recent GCE studies to extract the frequency of neutron star–neutron star (NS–NS) mergers that is needed in order to reproduce the observed [Eu/Fe] versus [Fe/H] relationship. We used our simple chemical evolution code to explore the impact of different analytical delay-time distribution functions for NS–NS mergers. We then combined our metallicity-dependent population synthesis models with our chemical evolution code to bring their predictions, for both NS–NS mergers and black hole–neutron star mergers, into a GCE context. Finally, we convolved our results with the cosmic star formation history to provide a direct comparison with current and upcoming Advanced LIGO measurements. When assuming that NS–NS mergers are the exclusive r-process sites, and that the ejected r-process mass per merger event is 0.01 M ⊙ , the number of NS–NS mergers needed in GCE studies is about 10 times larger than what is predicted by standard population synthesis models. Here, these two distinct fields can only be consistent with each other when assuming optimistic rates, massive NS–NS merger ejecta, and low Fe yields for massive stars. For now, population synthesis models and GCE simulations are in agreement with the current upper limit (O1) established by Advanced LIGO during their first run of observations. Upcoming measurements will provide an important constraint on the actual local NS–NS merger rate, will provide valuable insights on the plausibility of the GCE requirement, and will help to define whether or not compact binary mergers can be the dominant source of r-process elements in the universe.

  13. National Tests and minorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Karen Egedal

    Assessment in school represent a technology and materiality with profound impact on the life, activities and interactions in school (eg. Lawn & Grosvenor, 2005). It can be considered as an integrated and in different ways also dominating part of pedagogic practice which influence processes of in......- and exclusion in both direct and in more indirect ways. Depending of its design and use it might also point to differences between pupils with references to categories such as clever, skilled, good, medium, average, below average, best etc.. These processes might be considered as problematic at the micro level...... language, and are often not adapted to the languages of minorities.However, regionally determined differences – for example, linguistic or cultural – often exhibit considerable influence over student performance in such national academic tests, with any such potential effects generally not considered...

  14. BANK MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS IN ROMANIA AFTER 1989

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Copil Crina Angela

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I proposed to myself to analyse the main bank acquisitions and mergers from Romania after 1989, causes that led to their appearance, their effects on the bank system and their future perspectives on the Romanian bank market. In the context of adherence to the European bank system a solution for the Romanian banks is the concentration of the bank system by mergers and acquisitions or the increase of the bank capitals because in the period of transition the smaller banks are vulnerable, don’t dispose of an infrastructure that would alow them to offer financial services comparable to those offered by the great bank groups, can’t offer large credits and is addressing to the smaller and average enterprise, which in their turn are exposed to all the shocks that are felt in the economy. The strategies of concentration and consolidation applied by the banks in this period implemented by the transactions with mergers and acquisitions are essential because of their success depends the existence of the bank, the rank it will have on the market, the profit of the bank, the efficiency, the increase of the satisfaction degree of the clients and the increase of the shares’ value. The increase of the interest of the investor in mergers and acquisitions determined the creating of the great financial conglomerates that offer a large range of services, operates simultaneously on many markets and include beside the bank activity insurance, leasing subsidiaries, investment funds, pension funds, subsidiaries specialized in credit saving. In the last decades the Romanian bank financial system suffered significant changes, registering an ample consolidation process, the number of bank institutions decreased and in the context of the present financial crisis, the continuing of the process of restructuring is anticipated.The main reason for choosing this subject if the fact that in the evolution of the concentration the bank mergers and acquisitions

  15. Numerical simulation of binary black hole and neutron star mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastaun, W.; Rezzolla, L.

    2016-01-01

    One of the last predictions of general relativity that still awaits direct observational confirmation is the existence of gravitational waves. Those fluctuations of the geometry of space and time are expected to travel with the speed of light and are emitted by any accelerating mass. Only the most violent events in the universe, such as mergers of two black holes or neutron stars, produce gravitational waves strong enough to be measured. Even those waves are extremely weak when arriving at Earth, and their detection is a formidable technological challenge. In recent years sufficiently sensitive detectors became operational, such as GEO600, Virgo, and LIGO. They are expected to observe around 40 events per year. To interpret the observational data, theoretical modeling of the sources is a necessity, and requires numerical simulations of the equations of general relativity and relativistic hydrodynamics. Such computations can only be carried out on large scale supercomputers, given that many scenarios need to be simulated, each of which typically occupies hundreds of CPU cores for a week. Our main goal is to predict the gravitational wave signal from the merger of two compact objects. Comparison with future observations will provide important insights into the fundamental forces of nature in regimes that are impossible to recreate in laboratory experiments. The waveforms from binary black hole mergers would allow one to test the correctness of general relativity in previously inaccessible regimes. The signal from binary neutron star mergers will provide input for nuclear physics, because the signal depends strongly on the unknown properties of matter at the ultra high densities inside neutron stars, which cannot be observed in any other astrophysical scenario. Besides mergers, we also want to improve the theoretical models of close encounters between black holes. A gravitational wave detector with even higher sensitivity, the Einstein Telescope, is already in the

  16. Numerical simulation of binary black hole and neutron star mergers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastaun, W.; Rezzolla, L. [Albert Einstein Institut, Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    One of the last predictions of general relativity that still awaits direct observational confirmation is the existence of gravitational waves. Those fluctuations of the geometry of space and time are expected to travel with the speed of light and are emitted by any accelerating mass. Only the most violent events in the universe, such as mergers of two black holes or neutron stars, produce gravitational waves strong enough to be measured. Even those waves are extremely weak when arriving at Earth, and their detection is a formidable technological challenge. In recent years sufficiently sensitive detectors became operational, such as GEO600, Virgo, and LIGO. They are expected to observe around 40 events per year. To interpret the observational data, theoretical modeling of the sources is a necessity, and requires numerical simulations of the equations of general relativity and relativistic hydrodynamics. Such computations can only be carried out on large scale supercomputers, given that many scenarios need to be simulated, each of which typically occupies hundreds of CPU cores for a week. Our main goal is to predict the gravitational wave signal from the merger of two compact objects. Comparison with future observations will provide important insights into the fundamental forces of nature in regimes that are impossible to recreate in laboratory experiments. The waveforms from binary black hole mergers would allow one to test the correctness of general relativity in previously inaccessible regimes. The signal from binary neutron star mergers will provide input for nuclear physics, because the signal depends strongly on the unknown properties of matter at the ultra high densities inside neutron stars, which cannot be observed in any other astrophysical scenario. Besides mergers, we also want to improve the theoretical models of close encounters between black holes. A gravitational wave detector with even higher sensitivity, the Einstein Telescope, is already in the

  17. The Growth in Mergers and Acquisitions in the United States Publishing Industry: 1984-1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Albert N.

    This paper argues that because of a recent, sizable increase in the number of mergers and acquisitions, especially by foreign corporations in the United States, it is possible that a small number of firms could dominate the publishing and information processing industry in the world. The paper outlines briefly the patterns of mergers and…

  18. 76 FR 68458 - Formations of, Acquisitions by, and Mergers of Bank Holding Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM Formations of, Acquisitions by, and Mergers of Bank Holding Companies The... acquisition of a nonbanking company, the review also includes whether the acquisition of the nonbanking... a result of the merger, to increase its ownership of West One Bank, Kalispell, Montana, from 34.92...

  19. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-5 - Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. [Reserved] 1.401(k)-5 Section 1.401(k)-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(k)-5 Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. [Reserved] [T...

  20. 78 FR 6326 - Formations of, Acquisitions by, and Mergers of Bank Holding Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM Formations of, Acquisitions by, and Mergers of Bank Holding Companies The... owned merger subsidiary, NM Lobo Acquisition Corporation, and thereby acquire First National Bank of... standards enumerated in the BHC Act (12 U.S.C. 1842(c)). If the proposal also involves the acquisition of a...

  1. 26 CFR 1.401(m)-4 - Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. [Reserved] 1.401(m)-4 Section 1.401(m)-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(m)-4 Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. [Reserved] ...

  2. College and University Mergers: Recent Trends. Policy Matters: A Higher Education Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Lesley

    2009-01-01

    Given the current economic turbulence characterized, in part, by unprecedented business consolidations, talk of mergers has spread to higher education. At first glance, merger discussions may seem more appropriate to the corporate world than academe because American colleges and universities were not created in accordance with a centralized…

  3. Mergers of black-hole binaries with aligned spins: Waveform characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Bernard J.; Baker, John G.; Centrella, Joan; Boggs, William D.; McWilliams, Sean T.

    2011-01-01

    We conduct a descriptive analysis of the multipolar structure of gravitational-radiation waveforms from equal-mass aligned-spin mergers, following an approach first presented in the complementary context of nonspinning black holes of varying mass ratio [J. G. Baker et al., Phys. Rev. D 78, 044046 (2008).]. We find that, as with the nonspinning mergers, the dominant waveform mode phases evolve together in lock-step through inspiral and merger, supporting the previous waveform description in terms of an adiabatically rigid rotator driving gravitational-wave emission--an implicit rotating source. We further apply the late-time merger-ringdown model for the rotational frequency introduced in [J. G. Baker et al., Phys. Rev. D 78, 044046 (2008).], along with an improved amplitude model appropriate for the dominant (2, ±2) modes. This provides a quantitative description of the merger-ringdown waveforms, and suggests that the major features of these waveforms can be described with reference only to the intrinsic parameters associated with the state of the final black hole formed in the merger. We provide an explicit model for the merger-ringdown radiation, and demonstrate that this model agrees to fitting factors better than 95% with the original numerical waveforms for system masses above ∼150M · . This model may be directly applicable to gravitational-wave detection of intermediate-mass black-hole mergers.

  4. 48 CFR 204.7205 - Novation agreements, mergers and sales of assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Novation agreements, mergers and sales of assets. 204.7205 Section 204.7205 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... 204.7205 Novation agreements, mergers and sales of assets. Contracting officers shall process and...

  5. CGCG 292-057: A Near-Distance Merger Galaxy with Double ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Interestingly, the host of this source is a near-distance bright galaxy named CGCG292-057, which is clearly disturbed, with tidal features and shells as plausible signs of a recent merger. Key words. Galaxies: active—individual: CGCG 292-057. 1. Introduction. Galaxy mergers and interactions are main triggers for many of ...

  6. Do legal frameworks direct merger outcomes? A study of the legal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article traces the legal challenges and contestations embedded in five recent cases of higher education mergers in South Africa. I am aware that there are a number of forms of mergers. For the purposes of this article I use the term as one that is descriptive of a policy decision. Where necessary I make a brief distinction ...

  7. Incipient merger of Cls 11 and 5 in Xhosa? | Gowlett | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Xhosa, there appears to be an incipient merger between Noun Classes 5 and 11, as revealed by frequent mismatches between Cl. 11 nouns and various concordial elements, and even the replacement of the Cl. 11 noun prefix by that of Cl. 5. In this article we explore possible reasons for this putative merger, and present ...

  8. Merger of noun classes 3 and 1: A case study with bilingual isiXhosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Class reduction (the loss of a noun class) in Southern Bantu languages is an acknowledged but under-researched phenomenon. A recent study of isiXhosa concords suggests an incipient merger of noun classes 11 and 5, but no research to date has examined other possible concord mergers or concord flux in the ...

  9. Binary Black Hole Mergers in the First Advanced LIGO Observing Run

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fong, H.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, R.G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton-Ayers, M.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Johnson-McDaniel, N. K.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Namjun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magana; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, D.M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D.S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2016-01-01

    The first observational run of the Advanced LIGO detectors, from September 12, 2015 to January 19, 2016, saw the first detections of gravitational waves from binary black hole mergers. In this paper, we present full results from a search for binary black hole merger signals with total masses up to

  10. The fraction of AGNs in major merger galaxies and its luminosity dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Anna K.; Schawinski, Kevin; Treister, Ezequiel; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Sanders, David B.

    2018-05-01

    We use a phenomenological model which connects the galaxy and active galactic nucleus (AGN) populations to investigate the process of AGNs triggering through major galaxy mergers at z ˜ 0. The model uses stellar mass functions as input and allows the prediction of AGN luminosity functions based on assumed Eddington ratio distribution functions (ERDFs). We show that the number of AGNs hosted by merger galaxies relative to the total number of AGNs increases as a function of AGN luminosity. This is due to more massive galaxies being more likely to undergo a merger and does not require the assumption that mergers lead to higher Eddington ratios than secular processes. Our qualitative analysis also shows that to match the observations, the probability of a merger galaxy hosting an AGN and accreting at a given Eddington value has to be increased by a factor ˜10 relative to the general AGN population. An additional significant increase of the fraction of high Eddington ratio AGNs among merger host galaxies leads to inconsistency with the observed X-ray luminosity function. Physically our results imply that, compared to the general galaxy population, the AGN fraction among merger galaxies is ˜10 times higher. On average, merger triggering does however not lead to significantly higher Eddington ratios.

  11. The Relationship between Organizational Culture and Performance: Merger in the Nigerian Banking Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Henrietta Mbamalu

    2010-01-01

    Recent merger waves in most organizations fail to increase organizational performance and sustain competitive advantage. Several U.S. organizational mergers failed to sustain market competition and retain employees. Most consolidated and merged banks in Nigeria are in distress and have failed to increase organizational performance. Currently,…

  12. Competitive Effects of Merger Remedies in Europe’s High-Tech Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angelov, P.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/35720865X; Rosenkranz, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/157222241; Schenk, E.J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074056344

    2012-01-01

    Using an event study methodology, this paper assesses the competitive effects of remedies implemented by the European Commission in 11 horizontal mergers in the ICT industry between 1990 and 2010. The estimates of merger announcement effects for both merging parties and competitors have

  13. The linkages between cultural differences, psychological states, and performance in international mergers and acquisitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, Yaakov; Drori, Israel

    2008-01-01

    A model focusing on the role of the individual in national and corporate culture clash situations, during post-merger integration, is presented. The theory of psychological contract is adapted to explain different individual expectations in domestic versus international mergers and acquisitions

  14. Integrating organizational and human behavior perspectives on mergers and acquisitions: Looking inside the black box

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, Yaakov; Drori, Israel

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a conceptual framework for investigating merger and acquisition (M&A) performance through a multistage and multilevel approach. First, human resource challenges during the integration process following a merger are explored to help explain the inconsistencies among empirical

  15. A Qualitative Multiple-Case Study of the Merger That Formed Twin Rivers Unified School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Christopher Hugh

    2013-01-01

    The history of public education in America is a history of school district mergers. Population growth and improvements in transportation and communication brought isolated communities together. Financial pressures and promises of economies of scale overcame reluctance to merger. In more recent times, federal and state legislation has provided…

  16. Ex-post Analysis of Mobile Telecom Mergers: The Case of Austria and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguzzoni, L. (Luca); Buehler, B. (Benno); Di Martile, L. (Luca); R.G.M. Kemp (Ron G.M.); Schwarz, A. (Anton)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractRecently there has been an increased attention towards the ex-post evaluation of competition policy enforcement decisions and in particular merger decisions. In this paper we study the effects of two mobile telecommunication mergers on prices. We apply a standard

  17. ENHANCING THE INTERNATIONALIZATION OF THE GLOBAL INSURANCE MARKET: CHANGING DRIVERS OF MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rasshyvalov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One-third of worldwide mergers and acquisitions involving firms from different countries make M&A one of the key drivers of internationalization. Over the past five years insurance cross-border merger and acquisition activities have globally paralleled deep financial crisis.

  18. Mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, and applications for market-based rates in a deregulating electric utility industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    In this article, the author reviews FERC's current procedures for undertaking competitive analysis. The current procedure for evaluating the competitive impact of transactions in the electric utility industry is described in Order 592, in particular Appendix A. These procedures effectively revised criteria that had been laid out in Commonwealth Edison and brought its merger policy in line with the EPAct and the provisions of Order 888. Order 592 was an attempt to provide more certainty and expedition in handling mergers. It established three criteria that had to be satisfied for a merger to be approved: Post-merger market power must be within acceptable thresholds or be satisfactorily mitigated, acceptable customer protections must be in place (to ensure that rates will not go up as a result of increased costs) and any adverse effect on regulation must be addressed. FERC states that its Order 592 Merger Policy Statement is based upon the Horizontal Merger Guidelines issued jointly by the Federal Trade Commission and the Antitrust Division Department of Justice (FTC/DOJ Merger Guidelines). While it borrows much of the language and basic concepts of the Merger Guidelines, FERC's procedures have been criticized as not following the methodology closely enough, leaving open the possibility of mistakes in market definition

  19. When galaxy clusters collide : the impact of merger shocks on cluster gas and galaxy evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroe, Andra

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy clusters mainly grow through mergers with other clusters and groups. Major mergers give rise to cluster-wide traveling shocks, which can be detected at radio wavelengths as relics: elongated, diffuse synchrotron emitting areas located at the periphery of merging clusters. The 'Sausage'

  20. Electromagnetic counterparts to structured jets from gravitational wave detected mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Gavin P.; Kobayashi, Shiho

    2017-12-01

    We show the peak magnitude for orphan afterglows from the jets of gravitational wave (GW) detected black hole/neutron star - neutron star (BH/NS-NS) mergers highly depend on the jet half-opening angle θj. Short γ-ray bursts (GRBs) with a homogeneous jet structure and θj > 10°, the orphan afterglow viewed at the typical inclination for a GW detected event, 38°, are brighter at optical frequencies than the comparable macronova emission. Structured jets, where the energetics and Lorentz factor Γ vary with angle from the central axis, may have low-Γ components where the prompt emission is suppressed; GW electromagnetic (EM) counterparts may reveal a population of failed-GRB orphan afterglows. Using a Monte Carlo method assuming an NS-NS detection limit we show the fraction of GW-EM counterparts from homogeneous, two-component, power-law structured and Gaussian jets where the variable structure models include a wide low energy and Γ component: for homogeneous jets, with a θj = 6° and typical short GRB parameters, we find r-band magnitude mr ≤ 21 counterparts for ∼13.6 per cent of GW detected mergers; where jet structure extends to a half-opening angle of 25°, two-component jets produce mr ≤ 21 counterparts in ∼30 per cent of GW detected mergers, power-law structured-jets result in ∼37 per cent and Gaussian jets with our parameters ∼13 per cent. We show the features in the light curves from orphan afterglows can be used to indicate the presence of extended structure.

  1. Kilonova/Macronova Emission from Compact Binary Mergers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaomi Tanaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We review current understanding of kilonova/macronova emission from compact binary mergers (mergers of two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole. Kilonova/macronova is emission powered by radioactive decays of r-process nuclei and it is one of the most promising electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave sources. Emission from the dynamical ejecta of ~0.01M⊙ is likely to have a luminosity of ~1040–1041 erg s−1 with a characteristic timescale of about 1 week. The spectral peak is located in red optical or near-infrared wavelengths. A subsequent accretion disk wind may provide an additional luminosity or an earlier/bluer emission if it is not absorbed by the precedent dynamical ejecta. The detection of near-infrared excess in short GRB 130603B and possible optical excess in GRB 060614 supports the concept of the kilonova/macronova scenario. At 200 Mpc distance, a typical peak brightness of kilonova/macronova with 0.01M⊙ ejecta is about 22 mag and the emission rapidly fades to >24 mag within ~10 days. Kilonova/macronova candidates can be distinguished from supernovae by (1 the faster time evolution, (2 fainter absolute magnitudes, and (3 redder colors. Since the high expansion velocity (v~0.1–0.2c is a robust outcome of compact binary mergers, the detection of smooth spectra will be the smoking gun to conclusively identify the gravitational wave source.

  2. 12 CFR 741.208 - Mergers of federally insured credit unions: voluntary termination or conversion of insured status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mergers of federally insured credit unions... Insured State-Chartered Credit Unions § 741.208 Mergers of federally insured credit unions: voluntary... 708a and 708b of this chapter concerning mergers and voluntary termination or conversion of insured...

  3. 26 CFR 1.414(l)-1 - Mergers and consolidations of plans or transfers of plan assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mergers and consolidations of plans or transfers... Plans, Etc. § 1.414(l)-1 Mergers and consolidations of plans or transfers of plan assets. (a) In general... qualified under section 403 (a) and 405 (a), unless, in the case of a merger or consolidation (as defined in...

  4. 26 CFR 1.401(a)-12 - Mergers and consolidations of plans and transfers of plan assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mergers and consolidations of plans and... Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(a)-12 Mergers and consolidations of plans and transfers of plan assets. A... in the case of any merger or consolidation with, or transfer of assets or liabilities to, another...

  5. Leadership, Change Management, and Acculturation in the Merger of Two Institutions of Higher Education: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelwood, Anita Cook

    2016-01-01

    Mergers and consolidations within the higher education sector are "relatively rare occurrences and each merger has a distinct set of circumstances, actors, and characteristics" (Etschmaier, 2010, p. 1). Institutional mergers and consolidations require well-planned and strategic organizational change and include an examination of…

  6. Impact of hospital mergers on staff job satisfaction: a quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ka Keat

    2014-12-12

    Hospital mergers began in the UK in the late 1990s to deal with underperformance. Despite their prevalence, there is a lack of research on how such organizational changes affect the staff morale. This study aims to assess the impact of NHS hospital mergers between financial years 2009/10 and 2011/12 on staff job satisfaction and to identify factors contributing to satisfaction. Data on staff job satisfaction were obtained from the annual NHS Staff Survey. A list of mergers was compiled using data provided by the Cooperation and Competition Panel and the Department of Health. Other sources of data included the NHS Hospital Estates and Facilities Statistics, the NHS 'Quarter' publication, official reports from health service regulators, individual hospitals' annual accounts, data from the NHS Information Centre and the NHS Recurrent Revenue Allocations Exposition Book. Only full mergers of acute and mental health hospitals were analyzed. Propensity scores were generated using observable factors likely to affect merger decision to select three comparable hospitals for every constituent hospital in a merger to act as a control group. A difference-in-difference was estimated between baseline (3 years before merger approval) and each subsequent year up to 4 years post-merger, controlling for work environment, drivers of job satisfaction, data year, type of hospital and occupation group. There were nine mergers during the study period. Only job satisfaction scores 1 to 2 years before (0.03 to 0.04 point) and 1 year after merger approval (0.06 point) were higher (P increase in autonomy, staff support, perceived quality and job clarity ratings would increase job satisfaction scores. Higher job satisfaction scores were also associated with being classified as medical, dental, management or administrative staff and working in a mental health trust. Hospital mergers have a small, transient positive impact on staff job satisfaction in the year immediately before and after

  7. Success Factors of the Companies Mergers and Acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sierpińska

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Mergers and acquisitions (MA are one of the most important phenomenons influencing dynamics of the world economy growth. At the same time, big number of acquisitions turns out to be unsuccessful which induces one to examine reasons for failures and factors having influence on success of MA. In the article an attempt to systematize researchersí and specialists-practitionersí opinions on factors that play a key role in acquisition success was made, as complexity of MA processes causes that only actions resulting from reliable analysis, that are afterwards well planned and carried out may bring results expected by the entities.

  8. Trade Liberalization, Mergers and Acquisitions, and Intra-Industry Reallocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Peter Arendorf

    This paper presents a Melitz-type model of international trade in final goods and Grossman-Hart-Antràs input sourcing by heterogeneous firms. We show how firms self-select into different organizational forms in a continuum of industries with different characteristics. Next, we show how a liberali...... a liberalization of trade leads to short run increases in the number of firm mergers and acquisitions and potentially new gains from trade. Finally, we show how the relative prevalence of integrating firms is increasing in some industries while constant in all others....

  9. PERBEDAAN PROFITABILITAS DAN TINGKAT PENGAWASAN SEBELUM DAN SESUDAH MERGER PADA BANK PERKREDITAN RAKYAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nyoman Nugraha Ardana Putra

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed at finding the influence of merger. Furthermore, it was also to find out the differenceof before and after merger to Profitability and Controlling in Society Credit Bank (BPR. In order to find outit, it included 46 Society Credit Bank (BPR-LKP doing merger in West Nusa Tenggara province as thesample. By using t-test paired, then it came the finding that there was difference of before and after merger toprofitability in Society Credit Bank (BPR-LKP compared with ROA indicator.  Further more, it was also tofind out the difference of before and after merger to Society Credit Bank (BPR-LKP controlled with NPLindicator.

  10. Faculty Experiences of Merger and Organizational Change in a Social Work Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedoyin, A Christson; Miller, Monte; Jackson, Mary S; Dodor, Bernice; Hall, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    Social work programs are experiencing unprecedented organizational changes due to budget cuts, dwindling resources, global, and technological challenges. However, there is limited information in the literature about the merger experiences of faculty in social work programs. On one hand undergoing merger and reorganization provides the opportunity to reorganize, reprioritize, re-assess, develop strategies, and explore previously untapped opportunities for social work programs. Conversely, merger experiences have caused frustration, intention to quit, confusion, and loss of professional identity for social work faculty. In this article the authors utilize a journaling method and sense-making approach of the merger experiences of some of the faculty members of a social work program in the United States. The authors suggest a framework to understand how the faculty confronted the challenges, overcame the pitfalls, and maximized the opportunities offered during the merger and organizational change process.

  11. Reasons for Mergers and Economic Groups: The Davivienda case - Bansuperior - Bancafé

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Suárez

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the motives for mergers. It groups them according to their theoretical roots and shows their usefulness in the case of the merger of Colombian banks Davivienda - Bansuperior - Bancafé. The theoretical frame compiles 17 typologies of motives for merger grouped into three blocks: scale and scope economies, transaction costs and resource based approach. We used the case study method. We obtained data from interviews with Davivienda executives and secondary sources. We used the Likert scale to capture the attitudes of the respondents. We found in the case the majority of motives studied in the literature. One new motive was identified. Particularly one motive for a horizontal merger of Davivienda was the transaction costs economizing by other firms of the economic group to which belongs Davivienda. The specific weight of the transaction costs vertical motives in an essentially horizontal merger deserves further research.

  12. Process and impact of mergers of NHS trusts: multicentre case study and management cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulop, Naomi; Protopsaltis, Gerasimos; Hutchings, Andrew; King, Annette; Allen, Pauline; Normand, Charles; Walters, Rhiannon

    2002-08-03

    To study the processes involved in and impact of mergers between NHS trusts, including the effect on management costs. Cross sectional study involving in depth interviews and documentary analysis; case study to compare savings in management costs between case trusts and control trusts. Nine trusts (cross sectional study) and four trusts (case study) in London. 96 interviews with trust board members, other senior managers, clinicians, service managers, and representatives of health authorities, regional office, community health councils, local authorities, other trusts in the area, and primary care groups and trusts. Stated and unstated drivers, and impact of merger on delivery and development of services, management structures, and staff recruitment, retention, and morale. Effects of difference in trust size before and after the merger. Savings in management costs two years after merger. Some important drivers for merger are not publicly stated. Mergers had a negative effect on delivery of services because of a loss of managerial focus on services. Planned developments in services were delayed by at least 18 months. Trusts' larger sizes after mergers had unintended negative consequences, as well as predicted advantages. The tendency for one trust's management team to dominate over the other resulted in tension. No improvement in recruitment or retention of clinical and managerial staff was reported. Perceived differences in organisational culture were an important barrier to bringing together two or more organisations. Two years after merger, merged trusts had not achieved the objective of saving pound 500 000 a year in management costs. Important unintended consequences need to be accounted for when mergers are planned. Mergers can cause considerable disruptions to services, and require greater management support than previously acknowledged. Other organisations undergoing restructuring, such as primary care groups developing into primary care trusts and health

  13. Cell Mergers and Their Impact on Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Over the Houston Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Michael L.; Petersen, Walter A.; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2009-01-01

    A previous hypothesis advanced from observational studies such as METROMEX suggests that the intensity, frequency, and organization of cumulus convection may be impacted by the forcing of enhanced merger activity downstream of urban zones. A resulting corollary is that cities may exert an indirect anthropogenic forcing of parameters related to convection and associated phenomena such as lightning and precipitation. This paper investigates the urban merger hypothesis by examining the role of convective cell mergers on the existence and persistence of the Houston lightning "anomaly", a local maximum in cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning activity documented to exist over and east of Houston. Using eight summer seasons of peak columnar radar reflectivity, CG lightning data and a cell-tracking algorithm, a two-dimensional cell merger climatology is created for portions of eastern Texas and Louisiana. Results from the tracking and analysis of over 3.8 million cells indicate that merger-driven enhancements in convection induce a positive response (O 46%) in ground-flash densities throughout the domain, with areas of enhanced lightning typically being co-located with areas of enhanced merger activity. However, while mergers over the Houston area (relative to elsewhere in the domain) do result in more vigorous convective cells that produce larger CG flash densities, we find that CG lightning contributions due to mergers are distributed similarly throughout the domain. Hence while we demonstrate that cell mergers do greatly impact the production of lightning, the urban cell merger hypothesis does not uniquely explain the presence of a local lightning maximum near and downstream of Houston.

  14. ARE ALL SHORT-HARD GAMMA-RAY BURSTS PRODUCED FROM MERGERS OF COMPACT STELLAR OBJECTS?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgili, Francisco J.; Zhang Bing; O'Brien, Paul; Troja, Eleonora

    2011-01-01

    The origin and progenitors of short-hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain a puzzle and a highly debated topic. Recent Swift observations suggest that these GRBs may be related to catastrophic explosions in degenerate compact stars, denoted as 'Type I' GRBs. The most popular models include the merger of two compact stellar objects (NS-NS or NS-BH). We utilize a Monte Carlo approach to determine whether a merger progenitor model can self-consistently account for all the observations of short-hard GRBs, including a sample with redshift measurements in the Swift era (z-known sample) and the CGRO/BATSE sample. We apply various merger time delay distributions invoked in compact star merger models to derive the redshift distributions of these Type I GRBs, and then constrain the unknown luminosity function of Type I GRBs using the observed luminosity-redshift (L-z) distributions of the z-known sample. The best luminosity function model, together with the adopted merger delay model, is then applied to confront the peak flux distribution (log N-log P distribution) of the BATSE and Swift samples. We find that for all the merger models invoking a range of merger delay timescales (including those invoking a large fraction of 'prompt mergers'), it is difficult to reconcile the models with all the data. The data are instead statistically consistent with the following two possible scenarios. First, that short/hard GRBs are a superposition of compact-star-merger-origin (Type I) GRBs and a population of GRBs that track the star formation history, which are probably related to the deaths of massive stars (Type II GRBs). Second, the entire short/hard GRB population is consistent with a typical delay of 2 Gyr with respect to the star formation history with modest scatter. This may point toward a different Type I progenitor than the traditional compact star merger models.

  15. Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Camp, Jordan B.; hide

    2016-01-01

    On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz with a peak gravitational-wave strain of 1.0 x 10(exp -21). It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ring down of the resulting single black hole. The signal was observed with a matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 24 and a false alarm rate estimated to be less than 1 event per 203 000 years, equivalent to a significance greater than 5.1 Sigma. The source lies at a luminosity distance of 410(+160/-180) Mpc corresponding to a redshift z = 0.09(+0.03/-0.04). In the source frame, the initial black hole masses are 36(+5/-4) Mass compared to the sun, and 29(+4/-4) Mass compared to the sun, and the final black hole mass is 62(+4/-4) Mass compared to the sun, with 3.0(+0.5/-0.5)sq c radiated in gravitational waves. All uncertainties define 90% credible intervals. These observations demonstrate the existence of binary stellar-mass black hole systems. This is the first direct detection of gravitational waves and the first observation of a binary black hole merger.

  16. Tomorrow is another day! Merger review and counterfactual analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pezzoli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The choice of a counterfactual scenario other than the status quo is quite challenging. The investigation has to be particularly convincing if the deterioration of the competitive process which is likely to arise in the absence of the merger is related to a failing firm scenario – a special case of the more general counterfactual analysis. Could counterfactual analysis provide alternative tools to those required by the failing firm defense? Alternative but equally rigorous?The extent to which a broader counterfactual analysis might be taken into consideration is discussed in the paper. More precisely it will be discussed i if and when it may be desirable to focus the assessment not only on the most likely counterfactual, ii if the incomplete fulfillment of the three requirements for the failing firm defense necessarily leads to a prohibition and iii the role which may be played by entry and dynamic competition in the application of the failing firm defense. Finally, merger policy based on a broader counterfactual analysis is discussed in a bidding market context where tender design is not already set.

  17. Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Birnholtz, O; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cabero, M; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Calderón Bustillo, J; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Casanueva Diaz, J; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Cerboni Baiardi, L; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dal Canton, T; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Da Silva Costa, C F; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; De, S; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R T; De Rosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fong, H; Fournier, J-D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Gleason, J R; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gonzalez Castro, J M; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Healy, J; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heinzel, G; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J-M; Isi, M; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M B; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Johnson-McDaniel, N K; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, K; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Keppel, D G; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, C; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y-M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Koranda, S; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Kwee, P; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; London, L T; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lousto, C O; Lovelace, G; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Pfeiffer, H P; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J H; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C R; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sampson, L M; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, G H; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Setyawati, Y; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shaffer, T; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stevenson, S P; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, H; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2016-02-12

    On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz with a peak gravitational-wave strain of 1.0×10(-21). It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ringdown of the resulting single black hole. The signal was observed with a matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 24 and a false alarm rate estimated to be less than 1 event per 203,000 years, equivalent to a significance greater than 5.1σ. The source lies at a luminosity distance of 410(-180)(+160)  Mpc corresponding to a redshift z=0.09(-0.04)(+0.03). In the source frame, the initial black hole masses are 36(-4)(+5)M⊙ and 29(-4)(+4)M⊙, and the final black hole mass is 62(-4)(+4)M⊙, with 3.0(-0.5)(+0.5)M⊙c(2) radiated in gravitational waves. All uncertainties define 90% credible intervals. These observations demonstrate the existence of binary stellar-mass black hole systems. This is the first direct detection of gravitational waves and the first observation of a binary black hole merger.

  18. MERGERS IN DOUBLE-PEAKED [O III] ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Hai; Djorgovski, S. G.; Myers, Adam D.; Yan Lin

    2011-01-01

    As a natural consequence of galaxy mergers, binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) should be commonplace. Nevertheless, observational confirmations are rare, especially for binaries with separations less than 10 kpc. Such a system may show two sets of narrow emission lines in a single spectrum owing to the orbital motion of the binary. We have obtained high-resolution near-infrared images of 50 double-peaked [O III]λ5007 AGNs with the Keck II laser guide star adaptive optics system. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey sample is compiled from the literature and consists of 17 type-1 AGNs between 0.18 BH -σ * relation because of overestimated stellar velocity dispersions, illustrating the importance of removing mergers from the samples defining the M BH -σ * relations. Finally, we find that the emission-line properties are indistinguishable for spatially resolved and unresolved sources, emphasizing that scenarios involving a single AGN can produce the same double-peaked line profiles and they account for at least 70% of the double-peaked [O III] AGNs.

  19. ELECTROMAGNETIC COUNTERPARTS TO BLACK HOLE MERGERS DETECTED BY LIGO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeb, Abraham, E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    Mergers of stellar-mass black holes (BHs), such as GW150914 observed by Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), are not expected to have electromagnetic counterparts. However, the Fermi GBM detector identified a γ-ray transient 0.4 s after the gravitational wave (GW) signal GW150914 with consistent sky localization. I show that the two signals might be related if the BH binary detected by LIGO originated from two clumps in a dumbbell configuration that formed when the core of a rapidly rotating massive star collapsed. In that case, the BH binary merger was followed by a γ-ray burst (GRB) from a jet that originated in the accretion flow around the remnant BH. A future detection of a GRB afterglow could be used to determine the redshift and precise localization of the source. A population of standard GW sirens with GRB redshifts would provide a new approach for precise measurements of cosmological distances as a function of redshift.

  20. Evaluating whether the merger created shareholder value: the market's perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallen, B. L.

    1997-01-01

    Factors that have a bearing on determining whether a particular merger created shareholder value were examined with the caveat that since there are a large number of factors that impact upon stock prices, it is not possible to attribute any one factor as the most significant determinant responsible for the current price of a stock. Cash flow is perhaps the most important measure of growth, however, per share growth is increasingly being recognized as important, particularly on the international scene. Mergers can also be rated by what was paid in dollars for every barrel of oil equivalent in reserves. Another indicator of value may be the price to cash flow comparison of each company involved in the transaction. Expensive paper of a company trading at a higher price/cash flow multiple exchanged for the assets of the cheaper paper of a company trading at a lower price/cash flow multiple will, in general, receive a higher multiple than it had before. This is especially true if the purchase includes good, growing assets, preferably complementary to the acquiring company's current holdings. The likelihood of success is also increased by the absence of personnel conflict, especially at the top. All of these indicators are useful, but no substitutes for caution and prudence in today's industry environment

  1. NONLINEAR GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE MEMORY FROM BINARY BLACK HOLE MERGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favata, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Some astrophysical sources of gravitational waves can produce a 'memory effect', which causes a permanent displacement of the test masses in a freely falling gravitational-wave detector. The Christodoulou memory is a particularly interesting nonlinear form of memory that arises from the gravitational-wave stress-energy tensor's contribution to the distant gravitational-wave field. This nonlinear memory contributes a nonoscillatory component to the gravitational-wave signal at leading (Newtonian-quadrupole) order in the waveform amplitude. Previous computations of the memory and its detectability considered only the inspiral phase of binary black hole coalescence. Using an 'effective-one-body' (EOB) approach calibrated to numerical relativity simulations, as well as a simple fully analytic model, the Christodoulou memory is computed for the inspiral, merger, and ringdown. The memory will be very difficult to detect with ground-based interferometers, but is likely to be observable in supermassive black hole mergers with LISA out to redshifts z ∼< 2. Detection of the nonlinear memory could serve as an experimental test of the ability of gravity to 'gravitate'.

  2. Rotational properties of hypermassive neutron stars from binary mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauske, Matthias; Takami, Kentaro; Bovard, Luke; Rezzolla, Luciano; Font, José A.; Galeazzi, Filippo; Stöcker, Horst

    2017-08-01

    Determining the differential-rotation law of compact stellar objects produced in binary neutron stars mergers or core-collapse supernovae is an old problem in relativistic astrophysics. Addressing this problem is important because it impacts directly on the maximum mass these objects can attain and, hence, on the threshold to black-hole formation under realistic conditions. Using the results from a large number of numerical simulations in full general relativity of binary neutron star mergers described with various equations of state and masses, we study the rotational properties of the resulting hypermassive neutron stars. We find that the angular-velocity distribution shows only a modest dependence on the equation of state, thus exhibiting the traits of "quasiuniversality" found in other aspects of compact stars, both isolated and in binary systems. The distributions are characterized by an almost uniformly rotating core and a "disk." Such a configuration is significantly different from the j -constant differential-rotation law that is commonly adopted in equilibrium models of differentially rotating stars. Furthermore, the rest-mass contained in such a disk can be quite large, ranging from ≃0.03 M⊙ in the case of high-mass binaries with stiff equations of state, up to ≃0.2 M⊙ for low-mass binaries with soft equations of state. We comment on the astrophysical implications of our findings and on the long-term evolutionary scenarios that can be conjectured on the basis of our simulations.

  3. Galaxy Zoo: Mergers - Dynamical models of interacting galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holincheck, Anthony J.; Wallin, John F.; Borne, Kirk; Fortson, Lucy; Lintott, Chris; Smith, Arfon M.; Bamford, Steven; Keel, William C.; Parrish, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The dynamical history of most merging galaxies is not well understood. Correlations between galaxy interaction and star formation have been found in previous studies, but require the context of the physical history of merging systems for full insight into the processes that lead to enhanced star formation. We present the results of simulations that reconstruct the orbit trajectories and disturbed morphologies of pairs of interacting galaxies. With the use of a restricted three-body simulation code and the help of citizen scientists, we sample 105 points in parameter space for each system. We demonstrate a successful recreation of the morphologies of 62 pairs of interacting galaxies through the review of more than 3 million simulations. We examine the level of convergence and uniqueness of the dynamical properties of each system. These simulations represent the largest collection of models of interacting galaxies to date, providing a valuable resource for the investigation of mergers. This paper presents the simulation parameters generated by the project. They are now publicly available in electronic format at http://data.galaxyzoo.org/mergers.html. Though our best-fitting model parameters are not an exact match to previously published models, our method for determining uncertainty measurements will aid future comparisons between models. The dynamical clocks from our models agree with previous results of the time since the onset of star formation from starburst models in interacting systems and suggest that tidally induced star formation is triggered very soon after closest approach.

  4. Numerical relativity simulations of precessing binary neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Tim; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Brügmann, Bernd; Ujevic, Maximiliano; Tichy, Wolfgang

    2018-03-01

    We present the first set of numerical relativity simulations of binary neutron mergers that include spin precession effects and are evolved with multiple resolutions. Our simulations employ consistent initial data in general relativity with different spin configurations and dimensionless spin magnitudes ˜0.1 . They start at a gravitational-wave frequency of ˜392 Hz and cover more than 1 precession period and about 15 orbits up to merger. We discuss the spin precession dynamics by analyzing coordinate trajectories, quasilocal spin measurements, and energetics, by comparing spin aligned, antialigned, and irrotational configurations. Gravitational waveforms from different spin configuration are compared by calculating the mismatch between pairs of waveforms in the late inspiral. We find that precession effects are not distinguishable from nonprecessing configurations with aligned spins for approximately face-on binaries, while the latter are distinguishable from nonspinning configurations. Spin precession effects are instead clearly visible for approximately edge-on binaries. For the parameters considered here, precession does not significantly affect the characteristic postmerger gravitational-wave frequencies nor the mass ejection. Our results pave the way for the modeling of spin precession effects in the gravitational waveform from binary neutron star events.

  5. Surviving neoliberalism, maintaining values: Community health mergers in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussy, Véronique; Livingstone, Charles

    2018-03-24

    Independent, not-for-profit community health services in the state of Victoria, Australia, provide one of that country's few models of comprehensive primary health care (PHC). Recent amalgamations among some such agencies created regional-sized community health organisations, in a departure from this sector's traditionally small local structure. This study explored the motivations, desired outcomes, and decision-making process behind these mergers. Qualitative exploratory study was based on 26 semistructured interviews with key informants associated with 2 community health mergers, which took place in 2014 in Victoria, Australia. Thematic data analysis was influenced by concepts derived from institutional theory. Becoming bigger by merging was viewed as the best way to respond to mounting external pressures, such as increasingly neoliberal funding mechanisms, perceived as threatening survival. Desired outcomes were driven by comprehensive PHC values, and related to creating organisational capacity to continue providing quality services to disadvantaged communities. This study offers insights into decision-making processes geared towards protecting the comprehensiveness of PHC service delivery for disadvantaged communities, ensuring financial viability, and surviving neoliberal economic policy whilst preserving communitarian values. These are relevant to an international audience, within a global context of rising health inequities, increasingly tight fiscal environments, and growing neoliberal influences on health policymaking and funding. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Ethnic minority dropout in economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, I.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the first-year study success of minority students in the bachelor program in economics at Erasmus University Rotterdam. We find that the gap in study success between minority and majority students can be attributed to differences in high school education. Students from

  7. Linguistic Landscape and Minority Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenoz, Jasone; Gorter, Durk

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the linguistic landscape of two streets in two multilingual cities in Friesland (Netherlands) and the Basque Country (Spain) where a minority language is spoken, Basque or Frisian. The paper analyses the use of the minority language (Basque or Frisian), the state language (Spanish or Dutch) and English as an international…

  8. Ethnic Minority Dropout in Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Ivo J. M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the first-year study success of minority students in the bachelor program in economics at Erasmus University Rotterdam. We find that the gap in study success between minority and majority students can be attributed to differences in high school education. Students from similar high school tracks show no significant…

  9. Development of mergers in the Czech Republic in 2001–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Hýblová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of consequences of the substantial market globalization is company transformations, which essentially affect the creation, existence or dissolution of companies; their number has been on the increase in recent years. They are mergers and acquisitions; mergers represent a combination of companies, whereas acquisitions involve selling, purchase or investments of companies. The main reason for a merger is economic growth which can be provided in various ways: these are e.g. decreases in costs, strengthening of a position in the market or access to new markets, decrease in prices and thus gaining new customers, access to knowledge or diversification of risks.The process of a merger is a highly demanding matter which includes the economic view (a choice of the right partner, setting merger objectives, preparation of merger project and the legal view as the merger involves commercial law, reporting and taxation legislation. Discrepancies in the legal, reporting and taxation procedures in the area can have a negative effect on the process of merger and economic practice. The development of mergers and acquisitions and their success rate is related to the development of the economic and legislative environment. An important aspect is also the successfulness of mergers in the following year which will confirm (or not the quality of all previous decisions.Research studies conducted in this field focus on mergers with the aim to evaluate procedures during mergers. An important part of research is an analysis of the effect of a merger on the evaluation of the successor company’s performance, changes in capital and capital structure of the entities. The aim of the paper is to publish first partial results in this direction of research. The first part of the research focuses on the creation of a database of companies as this is essential for practical verification of the results of the theoretical research. Due to the fact that there is no similar

  10. The Response of Performance to Merger Strategy in Indonesian Banking Industry: Analyses on Bank Mandiri, Bank Danamon, and Bank Permata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murti Lestari

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the responses of performances of BankMandiri, Bank Danamon, and Bank Permata to merger strategy.This paper harnesses the quantitative approach with structuralbreak analysis method and impulse response function. Theplausible findings indicate that the merger of Bank Permataproduces a better performance response in comparison to theconsolidation of Bank Mandiri and the merger of Bank Danamon.The merger of Bank Permata does not result in performanceshocks, and the structural break does not prevail either. On theother hand, the consolidation of Bank Mandiri and the mergerof Bank Danamon result in structural breaks, particularly in thespread performance. In order to return to the stable position, themergers of Bank Mandiri and Bank Danamon require a longertime than does the merger of Bank Permata. This researchindicates that for large banks, the mergers and acquisitions(retaining one existing bank will deliver a better performanceresponse than will the consolidations (no existing bank. Keywords: impulse response function; merger; structural break

  11. The rate of neutron star binary mergers in the universe - Minimal predictions for gravity wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinney, E. S.

    1991-01-01

    Of the many sources which gravitational wave observatories might see, merging neutron star binaries are the most predictable. Their waveforms at the observable frequencies are easy to calculate. And three systems which will merge in less than a Hubble time have already been observed as binary pulsars: two in the disk of the Galaxy, and one in a globular cluster. From the lifetimes and positions of these, a lower limit to the merger rate in the Galaxy and globular cluster system are inferred with confidence. Taking the merger rate in other galaxies to scale with the star formation rate, the merger rate expected in the local universe is computed. An ultraconservative lower limit to the rate gives three per year within 1 Gpc. The best estimate, still conservative in that it considers only systems like those already observed, gives three per year within 200 Mpc. An upper limit of three mergers per year within 23/h Mpc is set by the rate of Type Ib supernovae. The rates of black hole binary mergers and black hole-neutron star binary mergers are model-dependent, but could be comparable to the given rate of neutron-star binary mergers.

  12. A study on the impact of mergers & acquisitions on shareholders’ wealth and efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Tianqi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As nowadays mergers & acquisitions are becoming more and more prevalent, this paper concerns the impact of mergers & acquisition on shareholders’ wealth and efficiency. Choosing mergers & acquisitions events in bank industry, we apply literature analysis to see what previous scholars have found and CAPM model to calculate their CAR, which reflects the change of shareholders’ values (positive CAR means shareholders gain positive returns from mergers & acquisitions and vice versa. And finally, we find that bank mergers and acquisitions do create shareholder wealth for the target bank acquired and that in many cases the acquiring firm’s shareholders tend to lose out because their ownership in the newly formed bank is severely diluted and the same is with the efficiency. What’s more, when we take the financial crisis into consideration, mergers are seen to be a safe haven. Besides that, senior management must be skilled at corporate restructuring within the newly merged banks for merged banks to survive post-merger activity.

  13. Development of mergers and acquisitions in the conditions of the Czech economy 2001–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Sedláček

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first results of a research project which has the aims to identify the problems appearing during the preparation of mergers in compliance with valid Czech regulations and to analyze economic causes and consequences of mergers. At the first stage it was necessary to compile a basic dataset in a structure needed for a statistical analysis. The aim of the analysis presented in this paper is to ascertain, both theoretically and empirically, how the external environment affected the development of mergers of trading companies in the conditions of the Czech economy. The covered period is the past ten years, i.e. 2001–2010, when the development of the global economy was affected by the bank crisis in the USA and the economic recession. The analysis of the development of mergers and acquisitions focuses on three groups of factors affecting activities in the field of company combinations. These are mergers and acquisitions which are subject to approval by regulatory bodies, the effect of new regulations of financing (financial factors and the effect of the macroeconomic situation in the form of GDP indicator and PX index. Macroeconomic indicators are related to mergers whose development has not been published or explored within scientific research. The results of the analysis allowed us to describe the dependence of activities in the field of company mergers which took place in the Czech Republic in the past decade on the selected factors of the external environment.

  14. The Merger-Free Growth of Galaxies and Supermassive Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Brooke; Smethurst, Rebecca; Lintott, Chris; Martin, Garreth; Kaviraj, Sugata; Devriendt, Julien; Galaxy Zoo Team

    2018-01-01

    There is now clear evidence that the merger-driven pathway to black hole and galaxy growth is only half the story. Merger-free evolution contributes roughly equally to the overall growth of black holes in the Universe and is also responsible for a significant amount of galaxy growth over cosmic time. A recent study examining the growth of black holes in unambiguously disk-dominated galaxies shows these black holes reach quasar-like luminosities and black hole masses typical of those hosted in bulge-dominated and elliptical galaxies with major mergers in their evolutionary histories. However, while there appears to be no correlation between the size of the black hole and upper limits on the host galaxy bulges, the fitted correlation between black hole mass and total galaxy stellar mass in these merger-free systems is fully consistent with the canonical relationship based on merger-driven systems. There is further evidence via comparison between observed populations and cosmological simulations confirming that bulgeless systems are generally consistent with having merger-free histories. If bulgeless and disk-dominated galaxies are indeed signatures of systems with no violent mergers in their formation histories, the same correlation between black hole and galaxy in these systems versus that seen in elliptical galaxy samples indicates the black hole-galaxy connection must originate with a process more fundamental than the dynamical configuration of a galaxy's stars.

  15. Massive Black Hole Mergers: Can We "See" what LISA will "Hear"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2010-01-01

    The final merger of massive black holes produces strong gravitational radiation that can be detected by the space-borne LISA. If the black hole merger takes place in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Modeling such electromagnetic counterparts of the final merger requires evolving the behavior of both gas and fields in the strong-field regions around the black holes. We will review current efforts to simulate these systems, and discuss possibilities for observing the electromagnetic signals they produce.

  16. Development of measures on increase of economic security of merger and acquisition transactions in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khmelenko Galyna G.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the essence of merger and acquisition processes, characterises their types, analyses positive and negative consequences of these processes. It generalises main methods of assessment of effectiveness of merger and acquisition processes. It analyses dynamics, structure and effectiveness of activity of the banks with foreign capital in Ukraine. It offers measures on increase of effectiveness of regulation of merger and acquisition processes and develops an algorithm of assessment and analysis of the portfolio of bank products under conditions of consolidation of banking institutions.

  17. Impact of hospital mergers on staff job satisfaction: a quantitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Ka Keat

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospital mergers began in the UK in the late 1990s to deal with underperformance. Despite their prevalence, there is a lack of research on how such organizational changes affect the staff morale. This study aims to assess the impact of NHS hospital mergers between financial years 2009/10 and 2011/12 on staff job satisfaction and to identify factors contributing to satisfaction. Methods Data on staff job satisfaction were obtained from the annual NHS Staff Survey. A list of mergers ...

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE GALAXY MERGER RATE IN A ΛCDM UNIVERSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jian, Hung-Yu; Chiueh, Tzihong; Lin Lihwai

    2012-01-01

    We make use of four galaxy catalogs based on four different semi-analytical models (SAMs) implemented in the Millennium Simulation to study the environmental effects and the model dependence of the galaxy merger rate. We begin the analyses by finding that the galaxy merger rate in SAMs has a mild redshift evolution with luminosity-selected samples in the evolution-corrected B-band magnitude range,–21 ≤ M e B ≤ –19, consistent with the results of previous works. To study the environmental dependence of the galaxy merger rate, we adopt two estimators, the local overdensity (1 + δ n ), defined as the surface density from the nth nearest neighbor (n = 6 is chosen in this study), and the host halo mass M h . We find that the galaxy merger rate F mg shows a strong dependence on the local overdensity (1 + δ n ) and the dependence is similar at all redshifts. For the overdensity estimator, the merger rate F mg is found to be about twenty times larger in the densest regions than in underdense ones in two of the four SAMs, while it is roughly four times higher in the other two. In other words, the discrepancies of the merger rate difference between the two extremes can differ by a factor of ∼5 depending on the SAMs adopted. On the other hand, for the halo mass estimator, F mg does not monotonically increase with the host halo mass M h but peaks in the M h range between 10 12 and 10 13 h –1 M ☉ , which corresponds to group environments. The high merger rate in high local density regions corresponds primarily to the high merger rate in group environments. In addition, we also study the merger probability of 'close pairs' identified using the projected separation and the line-of-sight velocity difference C mg and the merger timescale T mg ; these are two important quantities for observations to convert the pair fraction N c into the galaxy merger rate. We discover that T mg has a weak dependence on environment and different SAMs, and is about 2 Gyr old at z

  19. Exploring the Impact of Mergers and Acquisitions on Supply Chain Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakkol, Mehmet; Finne, Max; Raja, Jawwad

    Whilst there is a surge of mergers and acquisitions across different industries, little is known about their supply chain implications. This research investigates how supply chains can be reconfigured during post-merger period. In so doing, a recent M&A was investigated using a supply chain...... perspective. The research contributes to the literature by developing an empirically grounded, theory-based narrative of post-merger supply chain integration process. In particular, the paper demonstrates how the supply chain as a whole drew on structural, cognitive and relational elements of social capital...

  20. THE MULTIPHASE STRUCTURE AND POWER SOURCES OF GALACTIC WINDS IN MAJOR MERGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupke, David S. N. [Department of Physics, Rhodes College, Memphis, TN 38112 (United States); Veilleux, Sylvain, E-mail: drupke@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Massive, galaxy-scale outflows are known to be ubiquitous in major mergers of disk galaxies in the local universe. In this paper, we explore the multiphase structure and power sources of galactic winds in six ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z < 0.06 using deep integral field spectroscopy with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) on Gemini North. We probe the neutral, ionized, and dusty gas phases using Na I D, strong emission lines ([O I], H{alpha}, and [N II]), and continuum colors, respectively. We separate outflow motions from those due to rotation and tidal perturbations, and find that all of the galaxies in our sample host high-velocity flows on kiloparsec scales. The properties of these outflows are consistent with multiphase (ionized, neutral, and dusty) collimated bipolar winds emerging along the minor axis of the nuclear disk to scales of 1-2 kpc. In two cases, these collimated winds take the form of bipolar superbubbles, identified by clear kinematic signatures. Less collimated (but still high-velocity) flows are also present on scales up to 5 kpc in most systems. The three galaxies in our sample with obscured QSOs host higher velocity outflows than those in the three galaxies with no evidence for an active galactic nucleus. The peak outflow velocity in each of the QSOs is in the range 1450-3350 km s{sup -1}, and the highest velocities (2000-3000 km s{sup -1}) are seen only in ionized gas. The outflow energy and momentum in the QSOs are difficult to produce from a starburst alone, but are consistent with the QSO contributing significantly to the driving of the flow. Finally, when all gas phases are accounted for, the outflows are massive enough to provide negative feedback to star formation.

  1. Company Mergers and Acquisitions on the Edge of Unlawful Competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena - Mădălina Rotaru

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of economy, transactions represent one of the fastest means available for improvingany company’s commercial and strategic position in the market. The context of technologicaldevelopments in recent years and the trend of globalization have largely influenced work in thefields of goods and services. Currently, geographical factors are no longer an obstacle andcompanies can expand their production without being influenced by state frontiers. Internationalmergers and acquisitions are, most often, joined by a true "cultural shock" [1] and must comply withregulations on competition both nationally and internationally. Since the penalties imposed byauthorities in charge of competition regulations are substantial, both internationally andnationally, this means that, when making mergers, one should be very cautious.

  2. Managers and mergers: functioning in a blended organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Charles R

    2008-01-01

    Health care is well along in its steady change from a cottage industry of scattered providers to an industry of larger organizations and multi-institutional systems. Various organizational combinations continue to occur, especially in the form of mergers, affiliations, and the creation and expansion of health care systems. In the midst of this ongoing dramatic change, the role of the individual manager remains essentially unchanged in concept, but the arena in which it is applied is rapidly changing. Areas of responsibility are becoming broader, staffs are becoming larger for individual managers, and many of the older "principles" of management are being tested and strained. Today's health care manager is learning that survival and success depend more than ever on flexibility and adaptability.

  3. Electromagnetic Chirps from Neutron Star–Black Hole Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Dal Canton, Tito; Camp, Jordan; Tsang, David; Kelly, Bernard J.

    2018-02-01

    We calculate the electromagnetic signal of a gamma-ray flare coming from the surface of a neutron star shortly before merger with a black hole companion. Using a new version of the Monte Carlo radiation transport code Pandurata that incorporates dynamic spacetimes, we integrate photon geodesics from the neutron star surface until they reach a distant observer or are captured by the black hole. The gamma-ray light curve is modulated by a number of relativistic effects, including Doppler beaming and gravitational lensing. Because the photons originate from the inspiraling neutron star, the light curve closely resembles the corresponding gravitational waveform: a chirp signal characterized by a steadily increasing frequency and amplitude. We propose to search for these electromagnetic chirps using matched filtering algorithms similar to those used in LIGO data analysis.

  4. The Final Merger of Black-Hole Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard J.; Centrealla, Joan; Baker, John G.; Kelly, Bernard J.; vanMeter, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in the field of numerical relativity have led to dramatic progress in understanding the predictions of General Relativity for the dynamical interactions of two black holes in the regime of very strong gravitational fields. Such black-hole binaries are important astrophysical systems and are a key target of current and developing gravitational-wave detectors. The waveform signature of strong gravitational radiation emitted as the black holes fall together and merge provides a clear observable record of the process. After decades of slow progress / these mergers and the gravitational-wave signals they generate can now be routinely calculated using the methods of numerical relativity. We review recent advances in understanding the predicted physics of events and the consequent radiation, and discuss some of the impacts this new knowledge is having in various areas of astrophysics

  5. In Search of Value Drivers in Mergers and Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Caspar; Sørheim, Daniel; Lerkerød, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    The international literature on M&As is extensive, but surprisingly little evidence exists for the Nordic countries. This article attempts to fill the gap by studying 184 merger announcements from 1995 to 2014. Our findings differ in a number of ways. “First, we extend the current literature since...... we find that diversifying acquisitions” generate a higher bidder abnormal return compared with focused transactions. A possible explanation is that in diversifying acquisitions acquirers overpay for target firms within their core industry because they overestimate operational synergies...... with excessive free cash flows experience negative returns prior to an announcement. Furthermore, our results imply that a bidder company must be able convincingly to justify an acquisition to the market by communicating the presence of a sound and coherent integration plan....

  6. A REVIEW OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE IN THE MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Caleb REMANDA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mergers and acquisitions (M&A are the most widespread and most reliable international operations in the strategic market. Theoretically, they can respond to a certain amount of conventional goals like creating intrinsic value and performance. Integrating an organizational culture in an M&A process can help top management from both organizations understand cultural differences as fast as possible, in order to reduce consequences. The question remains as to whether we can go from a theoretical case to a practical one and achieve results beyond expectations. In this 2015 study we took into account cultural changes, communicated them to the members going into the process, and demonstrated the fundamental role that organizational culture plays. By comparing several approaches surrounding organizational culture, we conclude that this concept should extended to further perspectives, such as the importance of acculturation, cultural tolerance and organizational identity, all present before, during, and after the M&A process.

  7. A method for estimating time-frequency characteristics of compact binary mergers to improve searches for inspiral, merger and ring-down phases separately

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, Chad; Megevand, Miguel; Palenzuela, Carlos; Ochsner, Evan

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in the description of compact binary systems have produced gravitational waveforms that include inspiral, merger and ring-down phases. Comparing results from numerical simulations with those of post-Newtonian, and related, expansions has provided motivation for employing post-Newtonian waveforms in near merger epochs when searching for gravitational waves and has encouraged the development of analytic fits to full numerical waveforms. Until searches employ full waveforms as templates, data analysts can still conduct separate inspiral, merger and ring-down searches. Improved knowledge about the end of the inspiral phase, the beginning of the merger and the ring-down frequencies will increase the efficiency of searches over each phase separately without needing the exact waveform. We will show that knowledge of the final spin, of which there are many theoretical models and analytic fits to simulations, may give an insight into the time-frequency properties of the merger. We also present implications on the ability to probe the tidal disruption of neutron stars through gravitational waves.

  8. Astrographic Positions of Minor Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskrecki, W.; Swierkowska, S.

    The paper presents the photographic position of minor planets taken in the years 1986/1987 at the Astronomical Observatory of A. Mickiewicz University, Poznan, with an astrograph of the F=1500 mm, d=300 mm.

  9. Dictionary of Minor Planet Names

    CERN Document Server

    Schmadel, Lutz D

    2007-01-01

    Dictionary of Minor Planet Names, Fifth Edition, is the official reference for the field of the IAU, which serves as the internationally recognised authority for assigning designations to celestial bodies and any surface features on them. The accelerating rate of the discovery of minor planets has not only made a new edition of this established compendium necessary but has also significantly altered its scope: this thoroughly revised edition concentrates on the approximately 10,000 minor planets that carry a name. It provides authoritative information about the basis for all names of minor planets. In addition to being of practical value for identification purposes, this collection provides a most interesting historical insight into the work of those astronomers who over two centuries vested their affinities in a rich and colorful variety of ingenious names, from heavenly goddesses to more prosaic constructions. The fifth edition serves as the primary reference, with plans for complementary booklets with newl...

  10. Demarketing, minorities, and national attachment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grinstein, A.; Nisan, Udi

    This study addresses two important global trends: protection of public goods, specifically the environment, and the emergence of multiethnic societies with influential minority groups. The study tests the effect of a government proenvironmental demarketing campaign on the deconsumption behavior of

  11. NAFTA Minor Use Joint Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA and Health Canada Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) worked together to develop a registration process that will permit a regulatory decision of pesticide uses for the minor use grower communities in both countries simultaneously.

  12. The NGC 454 system: anatomy of a mixed ongoing merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plana, H.; Rampazzo, R.; Mazzei, P.; Marino, A.; Amram, Ph.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.

    2017-12-01

    This paper focuses on NGC 454, a nearby interacting pair of galaxies (AM 0112-554, RR23), composed of an early-type (NGC 454 E) and a star-forming late-type companion (NGC 454 W). We aim at characterizing this wet merger candidate via a multi-λ analysis, from near-UV (NUV) to optical using Swift UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT), and mapping the H α intensity (I) distribution, velocity (Vr) and velocity dispersion (σ) fields with SAM+Fabry-Perot@SOAR observations. Luminosity profiles suggest that NGC 454 E is an S0. Distortions in its outskirts caused by the ongoing interaction are visible in both optical and NUV frames. In NGC 454 W, the NUV-UVOT images and the H α show a set of star-forming complexes connected by a faint tail. H α emission is detected along the line connecting NGC 454 E to the NGC 454 main H II complex. We investigate the (I-σ), (I-Vr) and (Vr-σ) diagnostic diagrams of the H II complexes, most of which can be interpreted in a framework of expanding bubbles. In the main H II complex, enclosed in the UV brightest region, the gas velocity dispersion is highly supersonic reaching 60 km s-1. However, H α emission profiles are mostly asymmetric indicating the presence of multiple components with an irregular kinematics. Observations point towards an advanced stage of the encounter. Our smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations with chemo-photometric implementation suggest that this mixed pair can be understood in terms of a 1:1 gas/halo encounter giving rise to a merger in about 0.2 Gyr from the present stage.

  13. Galaxy mergers and active nuclei. II. Cosmological evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, N.

    1985-01-01

    Galaxy mergers may produce active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by repopulating stellar loss-cone orbits around a central black hole. In the companion paper we derived a local bolometric luminosity function of AGNs based on this process. In this paper we interpret the observed cosmological evolution of the luminosity function of AGNs as due to evolution of the merging rate among galaxies after their formation at a redshift of approx.3. An important difference between our model and previous (empirical) models is that the evolution depends on galactic (stellar) luminosity instead of central nonthermal luminosity. The radio counts at 1.4 GHz and optical counts are reproduced by the model if the merging rate of the galaxies at the bright end of the galaxy luminosity function evolves considerably faster than the merging rate of the smaller galaxies. The theoretical and observed luminosity functions at high redshift have similar characteristics: (i) at high luminosity the evolution is best described by luminosity evolution, and (2) the luminosity function has a maximum at approx.10 3 Gpc -3 , which is the space density of the most massive galaxies. A large fraction of these galaxies are presumably formed in the precursors of rich clusters. Their merger rate is high initially and declines rapidly on a time scale of a few billion years. If the initial density fluctuation spectrum for protoclusters of mass M/sub cl/ has the form deltarho/rhoproportionalM/sup( -1+n//3)/2/sub cl/, then the steep evolution of the most luminous galaxies suggests nroughly-equal-1.3 at a redshift of approx.3, which is consistent with the observed clustering of galaxies

  14. Merger Activity and Radio Emission Within A2061

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Avery; Sarazin, Craig L.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Chatzikos, Marios; Hogge, Taylor; Wik, Daniel R.; Rudnick, Lawrence; Farnsworth, Damon; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Brown, Shea

    2015-01-01

    Abell 2061 is a galaxy cluster located in the Corona Borealis Supercluster that boasts radio and X-ray structures indicative of a merger. A2061 is located at a redshift z = .0784, contains two brightest cluster galaxies, and has another cluster (A2067) about 2.5 Mpc to the NE, falling towards it. Within A2061, there exists an elongated structure of soft X-ray emission extending to the NE of cluster's center (referred to as the 'Plume') along with a hard X-ray shock region (the 'Shock') located just NE of the cluster's center. Previous observations in the radio have indicated the presence of a extended, central radio halo/relic accompanying the cluster's main X-ray emission but with slight NE displacement and further NE extension. Also emitting in the radio, to the SW of A2061, is a radio relic. The X-ray structures of A2061 were previously examined in 2009 by a Chandra observation. Here we present the results of an August 2013 XMM-Newton observation of the cluster. This XMM-Newton observation, imaged by three detectors, covers a greater field of view with a longer exposure (48.6 ks) than the previous Chandra observation. We will present images and spectra of various regions of the cluster. In addition, we will discuss the dynamics of the cluster, the nature of the Plume, Shock and other features, and origin of the central diffuse radio halo/relic and SW radio relic. These X-ray observations will also be compared to a numerical simulation from the Simulation Library of Astrophysics cluster Mergers (SLAM).

  15. Properties of minor actinide nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Masahide; Itoh, Akinori; Akabori, Mitsuo; Arai, Yasuo; Minato, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The present status of the research on properties of minor actinide nitrides for the development of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle based on nitride fuel and pyrochemical reprocessing is described. Some thermal stabilities of Am-based nitrides such as AmN and (Am, Zr)N were mainly investigated. Stabilization effect of ZrN was cleary confirmed for the vaporization and hydrolytic behaviors. New experimental equipments for measuring thermal properties of minor actinide nitrides were also introduced. (author)

  16. Mergers and Acquisitions-1998 M&A: The Year in Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defendeifer, Linda

    1999-01-01

    Discusses mergers and acquisitions in the publishing industry, including alliances among the largest publishers and printers; planned and abandoned deals; issues in academia, including rising scholarly journal prices and electronic journals; smaller firm alliances; magazine publishing; and newspaper consolidations. (LRW)

  17. Accretion of satellites onto central galaxies in clusters: merger mass ratios and orbital parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipoti, Carlo; Giocoli, Carlo; Despali, Giulia

    2018-02-01

    We study the statistical properties of mergers between central and satellite galaxies in galaxy clusters in the redshift range 0 central region of the cluster, down to ≈0.06rvir, which can be considered a proxy for the accretion of satellite galaxies onto central galaxies. We find that the characteristic merger mass ratio increases for increasing values of Δc: more than 60% of the mass accreted by central galaxies since z ≈ 1 comes from major mergers. The orbits of satellites accreting onto central galaxies tend to be more tangential and more bound than orbits of haloes accreting at the virial radius. The obtained distributions of merger mass ratios and orbital parameters are useful to model the evolution of the high-mass end of the galaxy scaling relations without resorting to hydrodynamic cosmological simulations.

  18. The 0302/1802/1803 MOS Merger: Infantry and Combat Arms One in the Same

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, Brian R

    2008-01-01

    ...) 1802, 1802 and 0302 into a single entity. The aggregate result of this merger will provide commanders with a multi-talented ground combat officer thereby capitalizing on the Marine Corps' scarce manpower resources...

  19. Do large mergers increase or decrease the productivity of pharmaceutical R&D?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringel, Michael S; Choy, Michael K

    2017-12-01

    There is current uncertainty regarding the effects of mergers on pharmaceutical R&D productivity, with various mechanisms reported by which mergers could either help or harm R&D, and mixed empirical findings in prior analyses. Here, we present an analysis that is novel in several ways: we use downstream measures of R&D productivity, account for both inputs and outputs in our calculations, and use a self-controlled design. We find that recent large pharmaceutical mergers are associated with statistically significant increases in R&D productivity. These results are perhaps not surprising in light of the broader literature on R&D productivity that points to two factors as instrumental in driving higher R&D productivity (depth of scientific information, and objectivity of decision-making based on that information), both of which could be expected to increase because of a merger. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 13 CFR 108.470 - SBA approval of merger, consolidation, or reorganization of NMVC Company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Changes in Ownership, Structure, or... partnership) or reorganize without SBA's prior written approval. Any such merger or consolidation will be...

  1. 77 FR 18883 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds-Termination and Merger; Pioneer General Insurance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    .... Department of the Treasury, Financial Management Service, Financial Accounting and Services Division, Surety... Carrico, Director, Financial Accounting and Services Division, Financial Management Service. [FR Doc. 2012...--Termination and Merger; Pioneer General Insurance Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service...

  2. Electric power oligopoly and suspicious minds - a critique of a recently approved merger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, M.

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to discuss the welfare effects of a proposed merger in the Swedish electric power market, using firm level data on power capacity. By using a simulation model we calculate the unilateral effects of the merger on the welfare effects for society. The merger is then evaluated, using a tacit collusion (coordinated effects) framework highlighting important features of the institutional setting. The latter mimics the methodology some European competition authorities use to evaluate mergers in oligopolistic settings, when it is obvious that it is joint dominance, not single dominance that may result. The results from our simulations suggest that in most cases the unilateral effects will decrease the welfare. The outcome of the qualitative elaboration using the tacit collusion framework basically confirms these results. (author)

  3. Electric power oligopoly and suspicious minds--a critique of a recently approved merger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Mats

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to discuss the welfare effects of a proposed merger in the Swedish electric power market, using firm level data on power capacity. By using a simulation model we calculate the unilateral effects of the merger on the welfare effects for society. The merger is then evaluated, using a tacit collusion (coordinated effects) framework highlighting important features of the institutional setting. The latter mimics the methodology some European competition authorities use to evaluate mergers in oligopolistic settings, when it is obvious that it is joint dominance, not single dominance that may result. The results from our simulations suggest that in most cases the unilateral effects will decrease the welfare. The outcome of the qualitative elaboration using the tacit collusion framework basically confirms these results

  4. Effects of merger and acquisition on the performance of selected Commercial Banks in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJALA Oladayo Ayorinde

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper examined the effects of merger and acquisition on the performance of selected commercial banks in Nigeria with greater emphasis on gross earnings, profit after tax and deposit profile as financial efficiency parameters. For this paper, seven Nigerian commercial banks were selected using convenience and judgmental sample selection methods. Data were collected from the published annual report and accounts of the selected banks and were subsequently analyzed appling regression analysis through statistical package for social sciences. The results showed that post merger and acquisition period was more financially improved than the pre merger and acquisition period.Therefore, the study recommended that banks should be more proactive in driving for profit for enhanced financial performance to reap the benefit of mergers and acquisition bid in the Nigeria banking sector.

  5. 12 CFR 708b.106 - Approval of the merger proposal by members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... summary of the merger plan, including, but not necessarily limited to, current financial statements for each credit union, a consolidated financial statement for the continuing credit union, analyses of...

  6. Impact of Defense Industry Mergers on The Cost of Military Weapons Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alfonso, Grisko R

    2007-01-01

    .... The Selected Acquisition Reports (SARs) provided the data for this research. The analysis of the data suggests that the defense industry's consolidation did not result in higher costs for DoD's military weapons in the post-merger period...

  7. MASS GROWTH AND MERGERS: DIRECT OBSERVATIONS OF THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF LRG SATELLITE GALAXIES OUT TO z = 0.7 FROM SDSS AND BOSS IMAGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tal, Tomer; Wake, David A.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Van den Bosch, Frank C.; Schneider, Donald P.; Brinkmann, Jon; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a statistical study of the luminosity functions of galaxies surrounding luminous red galaxies (LRGs) at average redshifts (z) = 0.34 and (z) = 0.65. The luminosity functions are derived by extracting source photometry around more than 40,000 LRGs and subtracting foreground and background contamination using randomly selected control fields. We show that at both studied redshifts the average luminosity functions of the LRGs and their satellite galaxies are poorly fitted by a Schechter function due to a luminosity gap between the centrals and their most luminous satellites. We utilize a two-component fit of a Schechter function plus a log-normal distribution to demonstrate that LRGs are typically brighter than their most luminous satellite by roughly 1.3 mag. This luminosity gap implies that interactions within LRG environments are typically restricted to minor mergers with mass ratios of 1:4 or lower. The luminosity functions further imply that roughly 35% of the mass in the environment is locked in the LRG itself, supporting the idea that mass growth through major mergers within the environment is unlikely. Lastly, we show that the luminosity gap may be at least partially explained by the selection of LRGs as the gap can be reproduced by sparsely sampling a Schechter function. In that case LRGs may represent only a small fraction of central galaxies in similar mass halos.

  8. Financing and Value Creation Under Mergers and Acquisitions: Comparative Study OF 350 Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ankit

    2009-01-01

    In this study, 350 mergers and acquisitions has been undertaken to examine, what form of payment method was used for financing those deals and their post acquisition returns of acquirers in terms of share capital. An attempt has been made to investigate how important is the correct financing/ payment technique for shareholder value creation and what determines financing decision in a merger and acquisition process. After conducting a literature review and analyzing the theoretical background ...

  9. GRB 080503 LATE AFTERGLOW RE-BRIGHTENING: SIGNATURE OF A MAGNETAR-POWERED MERGER-NOVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, He; Ding, Xuan; Wu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Zi-Gao; Zhang, Bing

    2015-01-01

    GRB 080503 is a short gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by Swift and has been classified as a GRB originating from a compact star merger. The soft extended emission and the simultaneous late re-brightening in both the X-ray and optical afterglow light curves raise interesting questions regarding its physical origin. We show that the broadband data of GRB 080503 can be well explained within the framework of the double neutron star merger model, provided that the merger remnant is a rapidly rotating massive neutron star with an extremely high magnetic field (i.e., a millisecond magnetar). We show that the late optical re-brightening is consistent with the emission from a magnetar-powered “merger-nova.” This adds one more case to the growing sample of merger-novae associated with short GRBs. The soft extended emission and the late X-ray excess emission are well connected through a magnetar dipole spin-down luminosity evolution function, suggesting that direct magnetic dissipation is the mechanism to produce these X-rays. The X-ray emission initially leaks from a hole in the merger ejecta pierced by the short GRB jet. The hole subsequently closes after the magnetar spins down and the magnetic pressure drops below ram pressure. The X-ray photons are then trapped behind the merger-nova ejecta until the ejecta becomes optically thin at a later time. This explains the essentially simultaneous re-brightening in both the optical and X-ray light curves. Within this model, future gravitational-wave sources could be associated with a bright X-ray counterpart along with the merger-nova, even if the short GRB jet beams away from Earth

  10. MAJOR GALAXY MERGERS ONLY TRIGGER THE MOST LUMINOUS ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treister, E.; Schawinski, K.; Urry, C. M.; Simmons, B. D.

    2012-01-01

    Using multiwavelength surveys of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) across a wide range of bolometric luminosities (10 43 bol (erg s –1 ) 46 ) and redshifts (0 bol -f merger relation suggests that downsizing, i.e., the general decline in AGN and star formation activity with decreasing redshift, is driven by a decline in the frequency of major mergers combined with a decrease in the availability of gas at lower redshifts.

  11. Repeating and non-repeating fast radio bursts from binary neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Shotaro; Totani, Tomonori; Kiuchi, Kenta

    2018-04-01

    Most fast radio bursts (FRB) do not show evidence of repetition, and such non-repeating FRBs may be produced at the time of a merger of binary neutron stars (BNS), provided that the BNS merger rate is close to the high end of the currently possible range. However, the merger environment is polluted by dynamical ejecta, which may prohibit the radio signal from propagating. We examine this by using a general-relativistic simulation of a BNS merger, and show that the ejecta appears about 1 ms after the rotation speed of the merged star becomes the maximum. Therefore there is a time window in which an FRB signal can reach outside, and the short duration of non-repeating FRBs can be explained by screening after ejecta formation. A fraction of BNS mergers may leave a rapidly rotating and stable neutron star, and such objects may be the origin of repeating FRBs like FRB 121102. We show that a merger remnant would appear as a repeating FRB on a time scale of ˜1-10 yr, and expected properties are consistent with the observations of FRB 121102. We construct an FRB rate evolution model that includes these two populations of repeating and non-repeating FRBs from BNS mergers, and show that the detection rate of repeating FRBs relative to non-repeating ones rapidly increases with improving search sensitivity. This may explain why only the repeating FRB 121102 was discovered by the most sensitive FRB search with Arecibo. Several predictions are made, including the appearance of a repeating FRB 1-10 yr after a BNS merger that is localized by gravitational waves and subsequent electromagnetic radiation.

  12. Driving the growth of the earliest supermassive black holes with major mergers of host galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takamitsu L

    2014-01-01

    The formation mechanism of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in general, and of ∼10 9  m ⊙ SMBHs observed as luminous quasars at redshifts z>6 in particular, remains an open fundamental question. The presence of such massive BHs at such early times, when the Universe was less than a billion years old, implies that they grew via either super-Eddington accretion, or nearly uninterrupted gas accretion near the Eddington limit; the latter, at first glance, is at odds with empirical trends at lower redshifts, where quasar episodes associated with rapid BH growth are rare and brief. In this work, I examine whether and to what extent the growth of the z>6 quasar SMBHs can be explained within the standard quasar paradigm, in which major mergers of host galaxies trigger episodes of rapid gas accretion below or near the Eddington limit. Using a suite of Monte Carlo merger tree simulations of the assembly histories of 40 likely z>6 quasar host halos, I investigate (i) their growth and major merger rates out to z∼40, and (ii) how long the feeding episodes induced by host mergers must last in order to explain the observed z≳6 quasar population without super-Eddington accretion. The halo major merger rate scales roughly as ∝ (1+z) 5/2 , consistent with cosmological simulations at lower redshifts, with quasar hosts typically experiencing ≳10 major mergers between 15>z>6 (≈650 Myr), compared to ∼1 for typical massive galaxies at 3>z>0 (≈11 Gyr). The high rate of major mergers allows for nearly continuous SMBH growth if (for example) a merger triggers feeding for a duration comparable to the halo dynamical time. These findings suggest that the growth mechanisms of the earliest quasar SMBHs need not have been drastically different from their counterparts at lower redshifts. (paper)

  13. GRB 080503 LATE AFTERGLOW RE-BRIGHTENING: SIGNATURE OF A MAGNETAR-POWERED MERGER-NOVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, He; Ding, Xuan; Wu, Xue-Feng [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Dai, Zi-Gao [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 2100093 (China); Zhang, Bing, E-mail: hug18@psu.edu, E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2015-07-10

    GRB 080503 is a short gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by Swift and has been classified as a GRB originating from a compact star merger. The soft extended emission and the simultaneous late re-brightening in both the X-ray and optical afterglow light curves raise interesting questions regarding its physical origin. We show that the broadband data of GRB 080503 can be well explained within the framework of the double neutron star merger model, provided that the merger remnant is a rapidly rotating massive neutron star with an extremely high magnetic field (i.e., a millisecond magnetar). We show that the late optical re-brightening is consistent with the emission from a magnetar-powered “merger-nova.” This adds one more case to the growing sample of merger-novae associated with short GRBs. The soft extended emission and the late X-ray excess emission are well connected through a magnetar dipole spin-down luminosity evolution function, suggesting that direct magnetic dissipation is the mechanism to produce these X-rays. The X-ray emission initially leaks from a hole in the merger ejecta pierced by the short GRB jet. The hole subsequently closes after the magnetar spins down and the magnetic pressure drops below ram pressure. The X-ray photons are then trapped behind the merger-nova ejecta until the ejecta becomes optically thin at a later time. This explains the essentially simultaneous re-brightening in both the optical and X-ray light curves. Within this model, future gravitational-wave sources could be associated with a bright X-ray counterpart along with the merger-nova, even if the short GRB jet beams away from Earth.

  14. Merger rates of black hole binaries: prospects for gravitational wave detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Zwart, Simon Portegies; McMillan, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    Mergers of black-hole binaries are expected to release large amounts of energy in the form of gravitational radiation. However, binary evolution models predict merger rates too low to be of observational interest. In this paper we explore the possibility that black holes become members of close binaries via dynamical interactions with other stars in dense stellar systems. In star clusters, black holes become the most massive objects within a few tens of millions of years; dynamical relaxation...

  15. The Effects Of Competition Policy: Merger Approval, Entry Barrier Removal, Antitrust Enforcement Compared

    OpenAIRE

    Svetlana B. Avdasheva; Dina V. Tsytsulina

    2014-01-01

    There is little evidence on the comparative effectiveness of different competition policy measures, especially in transition economies. This research represents the effort to expand the financial event study method for the assessment of different competition policy measures: merger control, antitrust investigations on abuse of dominance, and changes of import tariffs in the Russian ferrous and non-ferrous metals markets from 2007 to 2012. According to the reaction of financial market, mergers...

  16. Diversity and identity: The merger of five research councils in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Hans Skoie

    2000-01-01

    The merger in 1993 of Norway's five research councils into a single organisation was a bold decision going against the normal funding arrangements in other OECD countries. There have been considerable teething problems and criticisms and complaints from many quarters. There is a lack of confidence in the new Council within the research community and among important users. Misgivings are today expressed by supporters of the merger, yet the very fact of the Council's survival as one body is rem...

  17. Global Trends of International Mergers and Acquisitions in the Energy Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Liubov Galperina; Yuliia Klen

    2017-01-01

    The article explores conditions, factors and results of mergers and acquisitions in international business with the example of the energy industry. The directions of world energy market transformation in the framework of PESTLE analysis have been determined by the factors influencing the efficiency and future of the companies that have effected mergers and acquisitions. The transformation of the global energy market is associated with changes in the main market parameters that ...

  18. STORIES OF ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE : Qualitative analyses of individuals' experiences in merger cases

    OpenAIRE

    Huttula, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    Organizational change is a complex phenomenon and always comes hand in hand with change management. In the modern world, mergers and acquisitions are common ways for companies to increase their market share and try to keep making profit. In merger situations, it is crucial for a business to have both, solid management and clever leadership. Change communication acquires a lot of effort and for gaining the trust of the employees it needs to be as truthful and honest as possible. The purpos...

  19. Assessment of Financial Performances of Indian Firms Involved in Domestic and Overseas Mergers & Acquisitions

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Sirsanath

    2016-01-01

    In order to increase competitiveness, portfolio expansion, minimize business risk, enter unchartered territories, make full use of the economies of scale, face the challenges of globalization and achieve competitive advantage over other companies, an unprecedented wave of mergers & acquisitions has engulfed the world in the past few decades. Today, India is on the world map for being a hotbed for mergers & acquisitions with transactions worth US$ 38.1 billion (IBEF, 2015) recorded in 2014 whi...

  20. LIGO Discovers the Merger of Two Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Big news: the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) has detected its first gravitational-wave signal! Not only is the detection of this signal a major technical accomplishment and an exciting confirmation of general relativity, but it also has huge implications for black-hole astrophysics.What did LIGO see?LIGO is designed to detect the ripples in space-time created by two massive objects orbiting each other. These waves can reach observable amplitudes when a binary system consisting of two especially massive objects i.e., black holes or neutron stars reach the end of their inspiral and merge.LIGO has been unsuccessfully searching for gravitational waves since its initial operations in 2002, but a recent upgrade in its design has significantly increased its sensitivity and observational range. The first official observing run of Advanced LIGO began 18 September 2015, but the instruments were up and running in engineering mode several weeks before that. And it was in this time frame before official observing even began! that LIGO spotted its first gravitational wave signal: GW150914.One of LIGOs two detection sites, located near Hanford in eastern Washington. [LIGO]The signal, detected on 14 September, 2015, provides astronomers with a remarkable amount of information about the merger that caused it. From the detection, the LIGO team has extracted the masses of the two black holes that merged, 36+5-4 and 29+4-4 solar masses, as well as the mass of the final black hole formed by the merger, ~62 solar masses. The team also determined that the merger happened roughly a billion light-years away (at a redshift of z~0.1), and the direction of the signal was localized to an area of ~600 square degrees (roughly 1% of the sky).Why is this detection a big deal?This is the firstdirect detection of gravitational waves, providing spectacular further confirmation of Einsteins theory of general relativity. But the implications of GW150914 go far beyond this