WorldWideScience

Sample records for disposable elastomeric microfluidic

  1. Microfluidic fabrication and micromechanics of permeable and impermeable elastomeric microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncanson, Wynter J; Kodger, Thomas E; Babaee, Sahab; Gonzalez, Grant; Weitz, David A; Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-03-24

    We use droplet microfluidics to produce monodisperse elastomeric microbubbles consisting of gas encapsulated in a polydimethylsiloxane shell. These microbubbles withstand large, repeated deformations without rupture. We perform μN-scale compression tests on individual microbubbles and find their response to be highly dependent on the shell permeability; during deformation, the pressure inside impermeable microbubbles increases, resulting in an exponential increase in the applied force. Finite element models are used to interpret and extend these experimental results enabling the design and development of deformable microbubbles with a predictable mechanical response. Such microbubbles can be designed to repeatedly transit through the narrow constrictions found in a porous medium functioning as probes of the local pressure.

  2. A new UV-curing elastomeric substrate for rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvankarian, Jafar; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin

    2012-03-01

    Rapid prototyping in the design cycle of new microfluidic devices is very important for shortening time-to-market. Researchers are facing the challenge to explore new and suitable substrates with simple and efficient microfabrication techniques. In this paper, we introduce and characterize a UV-curing elastomeric polyurethane methacrylate (PUMA) for rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices. The swelling and solubility of PUMA in different chemicals is determined. Time-dependent measurements of water contact angle show that the native PUMA is hydrophilic without surface treatment. The current monitoring method is used for measurement of the electroosmotic flow mobility in the microchannels made from PUMA. The optical, physical, thermal and mechanical properties of PUMA are evaluated. The UV-lithography and molding process is used for making micropillars and deep channel microfluidic structures integrated to the supporting base layer. Spin coating is characterized for producing different layer thicknesses of PUMA resin. A device is fabricated and tested for examining the strength of different bonding techniques such as conformal, corona treating and semi-curing of two PUMA layers in microfluidic application and the results show that the bonding strengths are comparable to that of PDMS. We also report fabrication and testing of a three-layer multi inlet/outlet microfluidic device including a very effective fluidic interconnect for application demonstration of PUMA as a promising new substrate. A simple micro-device is developed and employed for observing the pressure deflection of membrane made from PUMA as a very effective elastomeric valve in microfluidic devices.

  3. Elastomeric microposts integrated into microfluidics for flow-mediated endothelial mechanotransduction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Raymond H W; Sun, Yubing; Chen, Weiqiang; Fu, Jianping

    2012-04-24

    Mechanotransduction is known as the cellular mechanism converting insoluble biophysical signals in the local cellular microenvironment (e.g. matrix rigidity, external mechanical forces, and fluid shear) into intracellular signalling to regulate cellular behaviours. While microfluidic technologies support a precise and independent control of soluble factors in the cellular microenvironment (e.g. growth factors, nutrients, and dissolved gases), the regulation of insoluble biophysical signals in microfluidics, especially matrix rigidity and adhesive pattern, has not yet been achieved. Here we reported an integrated soft lithography-compatible microfluidic methodology that could enable independent controls and modulations of fluid shear, substrate rigidity, and adhesive pattern in a microfluidic environment, by integrating micromolded elastomeric micropost arrays and microcontact printing with microfluidics. The geometry of the elastomeric micropost array could be regulated to mediate substrate rigidity and adhesive pattern, and further the elastomeric microposts could be utilized as force sensors to map live-cell subcellular contractile forces. To illustrate the general application of our methodology, we investigated the flow-mediated endothelial mechanotransduction process and examined specifically the involvement of subcellular contractile forces in the morphological realignment process of endothelial cells under a sustained directional fluid shear. Our results showed that the cytoskeletal contractile forces of endothelial cells were spatiotemporally regulated and coordinated to facilitate their morphology elongation process along the direction of flow. Together, our study provided an integrated microfluidic strategy to modulate the in vitro cellular microenvironment with both defined soluble and insoluble signals, and we demonstrated its application to investigate quantitatively the involvement of cytoskeletal contractile forces in the flow

  4. Low cost production of disposable microfluidics by blister packaging technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disch, A; Mueller, C; Reinecke, H

    2007-01-01

    Large scale production of disposable microfluidics mostly is accomplished by injection moulding techniques today. A cost effective alternative to injection moulding might be vacuum thermoforming of polymer films. Vacuum thermoforming is the basis for medical and pharmaceutical packaging such as pharmaceutical blister packs. It allows for cheap and reliable forming of polymer films and thus seems suitable for the fabrication of disposables. Our goal is to investigate and demonstrate the potential of vacuum thermoforming for the fabrication of microtechnology components. For this purpose we have developed a simple low cost process allowing for the fabrication of disposable microfluidics by vacuum thermoforming.

  5. Flexible packaging of solid-state integrated circuit chips with elastomeric microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Bowei Zhang; Quan Dong; Korman, Can E.; Zhenyu Li; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2013-01-01

    A flexible technology is proposed to integrate smart electronics and microfluidics all embedded in an elastomer package. The microfluidic channels are used to deliver both liquid samples and liquid metals to the integrated circuits (ICs). The liquid metals are used to realize electrical interconnects to the IC chip. This avoids the traditional IC packaging challenges, such as wire-bonding and flip-chip bonding, which are not compatible with current microfluidic technologies. As a demonstratio...

  6. Flexible packaging of solid-state integrated circuit chips with elastomeric microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bowei; Dong, Quan; Korman, Can E.; Li, Zhenyu; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2013-01-01

    A flexible technology is proposed to integrate smart electronics and microfluidics all embedded in an elastomer package. The microfluidic channels are used to deliver both liquid samples and liquid metals to the integrated circuits (ICs). The liquid metals are used to realize electrical interconnects to the IC chip. This avoids the traditional IC packaging challenges, such as wire-bonding and flip-chip bonding, which are not compatible with current microfluidic technologies. As a demonstration we integrated a CMOS magnetic sensor chip and associate microfluidic channels on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate that allows precise delivery of small liquid samples to the sensor. Furthermore, the packaged system is fully functional under bending curvature radius of one centimetre and uniaxial strain of 15%. The flexible integration of solid-state ICs with microfluidics enables compact flexible electronic and lab-on-a-chip systems, which hold great potential for wearable health monitoring, point-of-care diagnostics and environmental sensing among many other applications.

  7. Flexible packaging of solid-state integrated circuit chips with elastomeric microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bowei; Dong, Quan; Korman, Can E.; Li, Zhenyu; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2013-01-01

    A flexible technology is proposed to integrate smart electronics and microfluidics all embedded in an elastomer package. The microfluidic channels are used to deliver both liquid samples and liquid metals to the integrated circuits (ICs). The liquid metals are used to realize electrical interconnects to the IC chip. This avoids the traditional IC packaging challenges, such as wire-bonding and flip-chip bonding, which are not compatible with current microfluidic technologies. As a demonstration we integrated a CMOS magnetic sensor chip and associate microfluidic channels on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate that allows precise delivery of small liquid samples to the sensor. Furthermore, the packaged system is fully functional under bending curvature radius of one centimetre and uniaxial strain of 15%. The flexible integration of solid-state ICs with microfluidics enables compact flexible electronic and lab-on-a-chip systems, which hold great potential for wearable health monitoring, point-of-care diagnostics and environmental sensing among many other applications.

  8. Disposable world-to-chip interface for digital microfluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dam, R. Michael; Shah, Gaurav; Keng, Pei-Yuin

    2017-05-16

    The present disclosure sets forth incorporating microfluidic chips interfaces for use with digital microfluidic processes. Methods and devices according to the present disclosure utilize compact, integrated platforms that interface with a chip upstream and downstream of the reaction, as well as between intermediate reaction steps if needed. In some embodiments these interfaces are automated, including automation of a multiple reagent process. Various reagent delivery systems and methods are also disclosed.

  9. Automated microfluidic DNA/RNA extraction with both disposable and reusable components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungkyu; Johnson, Michael; Hill, Parker; Sonkul, Rahul S.; Kim, Jongwon; Gale, Bruce K.

    2012-01-01

    An automated microfluidic nucleic extraction system was fabricated with a multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) structure that consists of sample wells, microvalves, a micropump and a disposable microfluidic silica cartridge. Both the microvalves and micropump structures were fabricated in a single layer and are operated pneumatically using a 100 µm PDMS membrane. To fabricate the disposable microfluidic silica cartridge, two-cavity structures were made in a PDMS replica to fit the stacked silica membranes. A handheld controller for the microvalves and pumps was developed to enable system automation. With purified ribonucleic acid (RNA), whole blood and E. coli samples, the automated microfluidic nucleic acid extraction system was validated with a guanidine-based solid phase extraction procedure. An extraction efficiency of ~90% for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ~54% for RNA was obtained in 12 min from whole blood and E. coli samples, respectively. In addition, the same quantity and quality of extracted DNA was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The PCR also presented the appropriate amplification and melting profiles. Automated, programmable fluid control and physical separation of the reusable components and the disposable components significantly decrease the assay time and manufacturing cost and increase the flexibility and compatibility of the system with downstream components.

  10. Confocal epifluorescence detection for microspheres delivered on disposable microfluidic chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Honghua Hu; Xiyun Hou; Guoguang Yang

    2006-01-01

    @@ The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection system for 5-μm microspheres delivered on microfluidic chip is presented employing confocal optical scheme. The parameters of the optical system are specifically optimized for single microsphere detection. With the excitation laser spot size of 4.6 μm and optical sectioning power of 27 μm, the lowest concentration detection limit is 0.45 nmol/L, corresponding to only 122 molecules in probe volume. The microsphere detection is carried on successfully with the maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 55.7, which provides good detection sensitivity.

  11. Standard and high-throughput microfluidic disposables based on laminar fluid diffusion interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Bernhard H.; Morris, Chris; Kesler, Natasa; Battrell, Fred; Bardell, Ron L.

    2002-06-01

    Laminar Fluid Diffusion Interfaces are generated when tow or more streams flow in parallel in a microfluidic structure. This technology can be used for diffusion-based separation and detection applications, for example: DNA desalting, the extraction of small proteins from whole-blood samples, and the detection of various constituents in while blood. Additional applications are the establishment of stable concentration gradients, and the exposure of chemical constituents or biological particles to these concentration gradients, enabling the uniform and controlled exposure of cells to lysing agents, allowing the differentiation of cells by their sensitivity to specific agents in an on-chip cytometer coupled directly to the lysing structure. We have developed integrated systems using machine-controlled disposable cartridges and passive self-contained disposable cards including particle separators, flow cytometers, valves, detection channels, mixers, and diluters that are used in a hematology analyzer, stand-alone blood plasma separators, and a variety of chemical and biological assays. Microfluidic arrays compatible with common well-plate formats have been designed for high-throughout toxicology screening applications. All these devices were manufactured using Micronics' unique rapid-prototyping process yielding low-cost plastic disposable microfluidic chips.

  12. Manufacturing routes for disposable polymer blood diagnostic microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Griffiths, Christian; Azcarate, Sabino

    2008-01-01

    -cost and disposable µTBC devices, the micro injection moulding process was selected and therefore a micro tool was required. To overcome the limitations of current existing micro tooling capabilities, a new generation of micro hybrid tooling technologies for micro replication was developed. A metrological approach...... was applied to standardize the different tooling methods employed. The micro tools were then tested with different polymers on different injection moulding machines. The paper provides a comparison of these technologies with a particular focus on the obtainable feature sizes, surface finish, and aspect ratios...

  13. Molecular Detection of Schistosome Infections with a Disposable Microfluidic Cassette.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinzhao Song

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic helminths such as schistosomes, as well as filarial and soil-transmitted nematodes, are estimated to infect at least a billion people worldwide, with devastating impacts on human health and economic development. Diagnosis and monitoring of infection dynamics and efficacy of treatment depend almost entirely on methods that are inaccurate, labor-intensive, and unreliable. These shortcomings are amplified and take on added significance in mass drug administration programs, where measures of effectiveness depend on accurate monitoring of treatment success (or failure, changes in disease transmission rates, and emergence of possible drug resistance. Here, we adapt isothermal molecular assays such as loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP to a simple, hand-held, custom-made field-ready microfluidic device that allows sensitive and specific detection of schistosome cell-free nucleic acids in serum and plasma (separated with a point-of-care plasma separator from Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice. Cell-free S. mansoni DNA was detected with our device without prior extraction from blood. Our chip exhibits high sensitivity (~2 x 10(-17 g/μL, with a positive signal for S. mansoni DNA detectable as early as one week post infection, several weeks before parasite egg production commences. These results indicate that incorporation of isothermal amplification strategies with our chips could represent a strategy for rapid, simple, low-cost diagnosis of both pre-patent and chronic schistosome infections as well as potential monitoring of treatment efficacy.

  14. Disposable on-chip microfluidic system for buccal cell lysis, DNA purification, and polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Woong; Maeng, Joon-Ho; Ahn, Yoomin; Hwang, Seung Yong

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports the development of a disposable, integrated biochip for DNA sample preparation and PCR. The hybrid biochip (25 × 45 mm) is composed of a disposable PDMS layer with a microchannel chamber and reusable glass substrate integrated with a microheater and thermal microsensor. Lysis, purification, and PCR can be performed sequentially on this microfluidic device. Cell lysis is achieved by heat and purification is performed by mechanical filtration. Passive check valves are integrated to enable sample preparation and PCR in a fixed sequence. Reactor temperature is needed to lysis and PCR reaction is controlled within ±1°C by PID controller of LabVIEW software. Buccal epithelial cell lysis, DNA purification, and SY158 gene PCR amplification were successfully performed on this novel chip. Our experiments confirm that the entire process, except the off-chip gel electrophoresis, requires only approximately 1 h for completion. This disposable microfluidic chip for sample preparation and PCR can be easily united with other technologies to realize a fully integrated DNA chip.

  15. A Disposable Microfluidic Device with a Screen Printed Electrode for Mimicking Phase II Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Vasiliadou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human metabolism is investigated using several in vitro methods. However, the current methodologies are often expensive, tedious and complicated. Over the last decade, the combination of electrochemistry (EC with mass spectrometry (MS has a simpler and a cheaper alternative to mimic the human metabolism. This paper describes the development of a disposable microfluidic device with a screen-printed electrode (SPE for monitoring phase II GSH reactions. The proposed chip has the potential to be used as a primary screening tool, thus complementing the current in vitro methods.

  16. Non-contact reflectometric readout of disposable microfluidic devices by near infra-red low-coherence interferometry

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We are here demonstrating the functionality of infra-red low-coherence reflectometry for the spot optical readout of solution concentrations in commercially available microfluidic devices. Disposable polymeric microfluidic devices composed by 100-µm-deep channels were connected to an external fluidic path that allowed flow-through of water-glucose solutions at different concentrations. Measurements were performed with near-infrared low-power sources, namely a tungsten lamp and a Superluminesc...

  17. Bioprocess Control in Microscale: Scalable Fermentations in Disposable and User-Friendly Microfluidic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Carsten

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficiency of biotechnological production processes depends on selecting the best performing microbial strain and the optimal cultivation conditions. Thus, many experiments have to be conducted, which conflicts with the demand to speed up drug development processes. Consequently, there is a great need for high-throughput devices that allow rapid and reliable bioprocess development. This need is addressed, for example, by the fiber-optic online-monitoring system BioLector which utilizes the wells of shaken microtiter plates (MTPs as small-scale fermenters. To further improve the application of MTPs as microbioreactors, in this paper, the BioLector technology is combined with microfluidic bioprocess control in MTPs. To realize a user-friendly system for routine laboratory work, disposable microfluidic MTPs are utilized which are actuated by a user-friendly pneumatic hardware. Results This novel microfermentation system was tested in pH-controlled batch as well as in fed-batch fermentations of Escherichia coli. The pH-value in the culture broth could be kept in a narrow dead band of 0.03 around the pH-setpoint, by pneumatically dosing ammonia solution and phosphoric acid to each culture well. Furthermore, fed-batch cultivations with linear and exponential feeding of 500 g/L glucose solution were conducted. Finally, the scale-up potential of the microscale fermentations was evaluated by comparing the obtained results to that of fully controlled fermentations in a 2 L laboratory-scale fermenter (working volume of 1 L. The scale-up was realized by keeping the volumetric mass transfer coefficient kLa constant at a value of 460 1/h. The same growth behavior of the E. coli cultures could be observed on both scales. Conclusion In microfluidic MTPs, pH-controlled batch as well as fed-batch fermentations were successfully performed. The liquid dosing as well as the biomass growth kinetics of the process-controlled fermentations

  18. Design and integration of a generic disposable array-compatible sensor housing into an integrated disposable indirect microfluidic flow injection analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Bastian E; Schickling, Benjamin; Prokop, Jürgen; Piotter, Volker; Rapp, Michael; Länge, Kerstin

    2011-10-01

    We describe an integration strategy for arbitrary sensors intended to be used as biosensors in biomedical or bioanalytical applications. For such devices ease of handling (by a potential end user) as well as strict disposable usage are of importance. Firstly we describe a generic array compatible polymer sensor housing with an effective sample volume of 1.55 μl. This housing leaves the sensitive surface of the sensor accessible for the application of biosensing layers even after the embedding. In a second step we show how this sensor housing can be used in combination with a passive disposable microfluidic chip to set up arbitrary 8-fold sensor arrays and how such a system can be complemented with an indirect microfluidic flow injection analysis (FIA) system. This system is designed in a way that it strictly separates between disposable and reusable components- by introducing tetradecane as an intermediate liquid. This results in a sensor system compatible with the demands of most biomedical applications. Comparative measurements between a classical macroscopic FIA system and this integrated indirect microfluidic system are presented. We use a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor as an exemplary detector in this work.

  19. A Disposable Microfluidic Virus Concentration Device Based on Evaporation and Interfacial Tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M. Klapperich

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a disposable and highly effective polymeric microfluidic viral sample concentration device capable of increasing the concentration of virus in a human nasopharyngeal specimen more than one order of magnitude in less than 30 min without the use of a centrifuge. The device is fabricated using 3D maskless xurography method using commercially available polymeric materials, which require no cleanroom operations. The disposable components can be fabricated and assembled in five minutes. The device can concentrate a few milliliters (mL of influenza virus in solution from tissue culture or clinical nasopharyngeal swab specimens, via reduction of the fluid volume, to tens of microliters (mL. The performance of the device was evaluated by nucleic acid extraction from the concentrated samples, followed by a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. The viral RNA concentration in each sample was increased on average over 10-fold for both cultured and patient specimens compared to the starting samples, with recovery efficiencies above 60% for all input concentrations. Highly concentrated samples in small fluid volumes can increase the downstream process speed of on-chip nucleic acid extraction, and result in improvements in the sensitivity of many diagnostic platforms that interrogate small sample volumes.

  20. A novel temperature control method for shortening thermal cycling time to achieve rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bu, Minqiang; R. Perch-Nielsen, Ivan; Sørensen, Karen Skotte

    We present a new temperature control method capable of effectively shortening the thermal cycling time of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device with external heater and temperature sensor. The method employs optimized temperature overshooting and undershooting...

  1. Screening of peptide libraries against protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis in a disposable microfluidic cartridge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M Kogot

    Full Text Available Bacterial surface peptide display has gained popularity as a method of affinity reagent generation for a wide variety of applications ranging from drug discovery to pathogen detection. In order to isolate the bacterial clones that express peptides with high affinities to the target molecule, multiple rounds of manual magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS followed by multiple rounds of fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS are conventionally used. Although such manual methods are effective, alternative means of library screening which improve the reproducibility, reduce the cost, reduce cross contamination, and minimize exposure to hazardous target materials are highly desired for practical application. Toward this end, we report the first semi-automated system demonstrating the potential for screening bacterially displayed peptides using disposable microfluidic cartridges. The Micro-Magnetic Separation platform (MMS is capable of screening a bacterial library containing 3 × 10¹⁰ members in 15 minutes and requires minimal operator training. Using this system, we report the isolation of twenty-four distinct peptide ligands that bind to the protective antigen (PA of Bacilus anthracis in three rounds of selection. A consensus motif WXCFTC was found using the MMS and was also found in one of the PA binders isolated by the conventional MACS/FACS approach. We compared MMS and MACS rare cell recovery over cell populations ranging from 0.1% to 0.0000001% and found that both magnetic sorting methods could recover cells down to 0.0000001% initial cell population, with the MMS having overall lower standard deviation of cell recovery. We believe the MMS system offers a compelling approach towards highly efficient, semi-automated screening of molecular libraries that is at least equal to manual magnetic sorting methods and produced, for the first time, 15-mer peptide binders to PA protein that exhibit better affinity and specificity than peptides

  2. Disposable micro-fluidic biosensor array for online parallelized cell adhesion kinetics analysis on quartz crystal resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cama, G.; Jacobs, T.; Dimaki, Maria

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution we present a new disposable micro-fluidic biosensor array for the online analysis of adherent Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK-II) cells on quartz crystal resonators (QCRs). The device was conceived for the parallel cultivation of cells providing the same experimental conditions...... molding process was simulated in order to optimize the mold geometry and minimize the shrinkage and the warpage of the parts. MDCK-II cells were cultivated in the biosensor array. Parallel cultivation of cells on the gold surface of the QCRs led to first observations of the impact of the cell distribution...

  3. A disposable and multifunctional capsule for easy operation of microfluidic elastomer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorslund, Sara; Nguyen, Hugo; Läräng, Thomas; Barkefors, Irmeli; Kreuger, Johan

    2011-12-01

    The global lab-on-chip and microfluidic markets for cell-based assays have been predicted to grow considerably, as novel microfluidic systems enable cell biologists to perform in vitro experiments at an unprecedented level of experimental control. Nevertheless, microfluidic assays must, in order to compete with conventional assays, be made available at easily affordable costs, and in addition be made simple to operate for users having no previous experience with microfluidics. We have to this end developed a multifunctional microfluidic capsule that can be mass-produced at low cost in thermoplastic material. The capsule enables straightforward operation of elastomer inserts of optional design, here exemplified with insert designs for molecular gradient formation in microfluidic cell culture systems. The integrated macro-micro interface of the capsule ensures reliable connection of the elastomer fluidic structures to an external perfusion system. A separate compartment in the capsule filled with superabsorbent material is used for internal waste absorption. The capsule assembly process is made easy by integrated snap-fits, and samples within the closed capsule can be analyzed using both inverted and upright microscopes. Taken together, the capsule concept presented here could help accelerate the use of microfluidic-based biological assays in the life science sector.

  4. Non-contact reflectometric readout of disposable microfluidic devices by near infra-red low-coherence interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Rigamonti

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We are here demonstrating the functionality of infra-red low-coherence reflectometry for the spot optical readout of solution concentrations in commercially available microfluidic devices. Disposable polymeric microfluidic devices composed by 100-µm-deep channels were connected to an external fluidic path that allowed flow-through of water-glucose solutions at different concentrations. Measurements were performed with near-infrared low-power sources, namely a tungsten lamp and a Superluminescent Light Emitting Diode (SLED, allowing the read-out in a wavelength region of minimum invasiveness for biological fluids. The selected optical scheme based on an all-fiber Michelson configuration is well suited for non-contact, remote investigations of the fluids flowing in plastic microfluidic devices, with arbitrary layout and thickness. For the first time, using the SLED, we exploited the double round trip of light in the fluid channel for doubling the sensitivity with respect to the standard single pass set-up, previously demonstrated.

  5. A temperature control method for shortening thermal cycling time to achieve rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bu, Minqiang; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R.; Sørensen, Karen Skotte

    2013-01-01

    We present a temperature control method capable of effectively shortening the thermal cycling time of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device with an external heater and a temperature sensor. The method employs optimized temperature overshooting and undershooting...

  6. An elastomeric grating coupler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocabas, A.; Ay, F.; Dana, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a novel nondestructive and reversible method for coupling free space light to planar optical waveguides. In this method, an elastomeric grating is used to produce an effective refractive index modulation on the surface of the optical waveguide. The external elastomeric grating binds to

  7. Microfluidic tectonics platform: A colorimetric, disposable botulinum toxin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, Jaisree; Mensing, Glennys A; Kim, Dongshin; Mohanty, Swomitra; Eddington, David T; Tepp, William H; Johnson, Eric A; Beebe, David J

    2004-06-01

    A fabrication platform for realizing integrated microfluidic devices is discussed. The platform allows for creating specific microsystems for multistep assays in an ad hoc manner as the components that perform the assay steps can be created at any location inside the device via in situ fabrication. The platform was utilized to create a prototype microsystem for detecting botulinum neurotoxin directly from whole blood. Process steps such as sample preparation by filtration, mixing and incubation with reagents was carried out on the device. Various microfluidic components such as channel network, valves and porous filter were fabricated from prepolymer mixture consisting of monomer, cross-linker and a photoinitiator. For detection of the toxoid, biotinylated antibodies were immobilized on streptavidin-functionalized agarose gel beads. The gel beads were introduced into the device and were used as readouts. Enzymatic reaction between alkaline phosphatase (on secondary antibody) and substrate produced an insoluble, colored precipitate that coated the beads thus making the readout visible to the naked eye. Clinically relevant amounts of the toxin can be detected from whole blood using the portable enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system. Multiple layers can be realized for effective space utilization and creating a three-dimensional (3-D) chaotic mixer. In addition, external materials such as membranes can be incorporated into the device as components. Individual components that were necessary to perform these steps were characterized, and their mutual compatibility is also discussed.

  8. A microfluidic control system with re-usable micropump/valve actuator and injection moulded disposable polymer lab-on-a-slide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bu, Minqiang; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R.; Yi, Sun

    2011-01-01

    A microfluidic control system consisting of micropump/valves with a re-usable pneumatic actuator and a disposable polymer lab-on-a-slide is presented. The lab-on-a-slide was fabricated using low cost methods, such as injection moulding of TOPAS® cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) slide, lamination...... of different layers of polymer, and ultrasonic welding of TOPAS® lid to the slide. The re-usable pneumatic actuator not only simplifies the design of the lab-on-a-slide and reduces the fabrication cost, but also reduces the possibility of cross contamination during replacement of the disposable lab...

  9. Crude oil water-cut sensing with disposable laser ablated and inkjet printed RF microfluidics

    KAUST Repository

    McKerricher, Garret

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents the first microwave microfluidic crude oil/water cut sensor. Anhydrous crude oil is been tested and the device provides a measurable frequency shift of 500MHz at 50% (vol.) water content and a 50MHz shift for a 5% (vol.) water concentration. The sensor is realized with a low-cost direct write fabrication method. This involves laser ablation, inkjet printing, laser heating, along with low temperature thermal compression bonding of Poly (methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) sheets. By using localized laser sintering a conductivity of 2.5e6 S/m is achieved for silver nanoparticle ink without the need to heat the entire substrate above its glass transition temperature of (105 °C). The dielectric properties of PMMA are characterized to 1 GHz and a simulation model is offered for analyzing the dielectric properties of crude oil. This work demonstrates that a small form factor and low cost device is capable of precise water-cut measurements. © 2014 IEEE.

  10. Elastomeric actuator devices for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubowsky, Steven (Inventor); Hafez, Moustapha (Inventor); Jolesz, Ferenc A. (Inventor); Kacher, Daniel F. (Inventor); Lichter, Matthew (Inventor); Weiss, Peter (Inventor); Wingert, Andreas (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is directed to devices and systems used in magnetic imaging environments that include an actuator device having an elastomeric dielectric film with at least two electrodes, and a frame attached to the actuator device. The frame can have a plurality of configurations including, such as, for example, at least two members that can be, but not limited to, curved beams, rods, plates, or parallel beams. These rigid members can be coupled to flexible members such as, for example, links wherein the frame provides an elastic restoring force. The frame preferably provides a linear actuation force characteristic over a displacement range. The linear actuation force characteristic is defined as .+-.20% and preferably 10% over a displacement range. The actuator further includes a passive element disposed between the flexible members to tune a stiffness characteristic of the actuator. The passive element can be a bi-stable element. The preferred embodiment actuator includes one or more layers of the elastomeric film integrated into the frame. The elastomeric film can be made of many elastomeric materials such as, for example, but not limited to, acrylic, silicone and latex.

  11. Design, microfabrication, and characterization of a moulded PDMS/SU-8 inkjet dispenser for a Lab-on-a-Printer platform technology with disposable microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bsoul, Anas; Pan, Sheng; Cretu, Edmond; Stoeber, Boris; Walus, Konrad

    2016-08-16

    In this paper, we present a disposable inkjet dispenser platform technology and demonstrate the Lab-on-a-Printer concept, an extension of the ubiquitous Lab-on-a-Chip concept, whereby microfluidic modules are directly integrated into the printhead. The concept is demonstrated here through the integration of an inkjet dispenser and a microfluidic mixer enabling control over droplet composition from a single nozzle in real-time during printing. The inkjet dispenser is based on a modular design platform that enables the low-cost microfluidic component and the more expensive actuation unit to be easily separated, allowing for the optional disposal of the former and reuse of the latter. To limit satellite droplet formation, a hydrophobic-coated and tapered micronozzle was microfabricated and integrated with the fluidics to realize the dispenser. The microfabricated devices generated droplets with diameters ranging from 150-220 μm, depending mainly on the orifice diameter, with printing rates up to 8000 droplets per second. The inkjet dispenser is capable of dispensing materials with a viscosity up to ∼19 mPa s. As a demonstration of the inkjet dispenser function and application, we have printed type I collagen seeded with human liver carcinoma cells (cell line HepG2), to form patterned biological structures.

  12. Micro-fabricated Helmholtz coil featuring disposable microfluidic sample inserts for applications in nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, N.; Moazenzadeh, A.; Meier, R. Ch; Badilita, V.; Korvink, J. G.; Wallrabe, U.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we report on a novel, multi-use, high-resolution NMR/MRI micro-detection probe for the screening of flat samples. It is based on a Helmholtz coil pair in the centre of the probe, built out of two 1.5 mm diameter wirebonded copper coils, resulting in a homogeneous distribution of the magnetic field. For liquids and suspensions, custom fabricated, disposable sample inserts are placed inside the pair and aligned automatically, preventing the sensor and the samples from contamination. The sensor was successfully tested in a 500 MHz (11.7 T) spectrometer where we achieved a linewidth of 1.79 Hz (3.58 ppb) of a water phantom. Nutation experiments revealed an overall B1-field uniformity of 92% (ratio in signal intensity at flip angles of 810°/90°), leading to a homogeneous excitation of concentration limited samples. To demonstrate the imaging capabilities of the detector, we acquired images of a solid and a liquid sample—of a piece of leaf, directly inserted into the probe and of a sample insert, filled with a suspension of 50 μm diameter polymer beads and deionized water, with in-plane resolutions of 20 × 20 μ m2 and 10 × 10 μ m2, respectively.

  13. A temperature control method for shortening thermal cycling time to achieve rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Minqiang; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R.; Sørensen, Karen S.; Skov, Julia; Sun, Yi; Duong Bang, Dang; Pedersen, Michael E.; Hansen, Mikkel F.; Wolff, Anders

    2013-07-01

    We present a temperature control method capable of effectively shortening the thermal cycling time of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device with an external heater and a temperature sensor. The method employs optimized temperature overshooting and undershooting steps to achieve a rapid ramping between the temperature steps for DNA denaturation, annealing and extension. The temperature dynamics within the microfluidic PCR chamber was characterized and the overshooting and undershooting parameters were optimized using the temperature-dependent fluorescence signal from Rhodamine B. The method was validated with the PCR amplification of mecA gene (162 bp) from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacterium (MRSA), where the time for 30 cycles was reduced from 50 min (without over- and undershooting) to 20 min.

  14. An elastomeric grating coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Askin; Ay, Feridun; Dâna, Aykutlu; Aydinli, Atilla

    2006-01-01

    We report on a novel nondestructive and reversible method for coupling free space light to planar optical waveguides. In this method, an elastomeric grating is used to produce an effective refractive index modulation on the surface of the optical waveguide. The external elastomeric grating binds to the surface of the waveguide with van der Waals forces and makes conformal contact without any applied pressure. As a demonstration of the feasibility of the approach, we use it to measure the refractive index of a silicon oxynitride film. This technique is nondestructive, reversible, low cost and can easily be applied to the characterization of optical materials for integrated optics.

  15. Elastomeric shutter mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Clifford M.

    1995-05-01

    An elastomeric shutter mechanism for opening and closing a passageway in the wall of a vessel, such as a submarine hull is presented. A single, unitary, retractable shutter member made of an elastomeric material is partially attached to the wall around a portion of a passageway. The single, unitary, retractable shutter member is moveable from a closed position when the unattached portion of the shutter member is abutting the wall around the passageway to an open position when the unattached portion of the shutter member is retracted away from the wall around the passageway. Cables are attached to the inside surface of the shutter member for retracting the shutter member and opening the passageway. Mechanical stops are positioned inside of the vessel for abutting the shutter member when retracted to the open position by the cables. On an underwater vessel such as a submarine, the shutter member is sealed in the closed position by a pressure differential between the inside surface and the outside surface of the shutter member or latched in place in the closed position. Split ribs are included on the inside surface of the shutter member to resist the expansion of the shutter member when maintained in the closed position by the pressure differential.

  16. Microfluidics - Sorting particles with light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, J.

    2004-01-01

    Microfluidic systems have great potential to perform complex chemical and biological processing and analysis on a single disposable chip. That goal is now a step closer with the demonstration of an efficient all-optical particle sorter.......Microfluidic systems have great potential to perform complex chemical and biological processing and analysis on a single disposable chip. That goal is now a step closer with the demonstration of an efficient all-optical particle sorter....

  17. Cell lysis and DNA extraction of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria from whole blood in a disposable microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalanabis, Madhumita; Al-Muayad, Hussam; Kulinski, M Dominika; Altman, Dave; Klapperich, Catherine M

    2009-10-07

    Sepsis caused by gram positive and gram negative bacteria is the leading cause of death in noncoronary ICUs and the tenth leading cause of death in the United States. We have developed a microfluidic sample preparation platform for rapid on-chip detection of infectious organisms for point-of-care diagnostics. The microfluidic chips are made of a robust thermoplastic and can be easily multiplexed for high throughput applications. Bacteria are lysed on-chip via hybrid chemical/mechanical method. Once lysed, the bacterial DNA is isolated using a microscale silica bead/polymer composite solid-phase-extraction (SPE) column. Lysis was confirmed using off-chip real time PCR. We isolated and detected both gram-negative (Escherichia coli) and gram-positive (Bacillussubtilis and Enterococcus faecalis) bacterial genomic DNA from microliter scale spiked whole human blood samples. The system performs better for gram-negative bacteria than it does for gram-positive bacteria, with limits of detection at 10(2) CFU/ml and 10(3)-10(4) CFU/ml, respectively. Total extraction times are less than one hour and can be further decreased by altering the channel geometry and pumping configuration.

  18. Evaluation of Force Degradation Pattern of Elastomeric Ligatures and Elastomeric Separators in Active Tieback State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Mohammadi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The purpose of this study was to evaluate initial force and force decay of commercially available elastomeric ligatures and elastomeric separators in active tieback state in a simulated oral environment. Materials and methods. A total of 288 elastomeric ligatures and elastomeric separators from three manufacturers (Dentaurum, RMO, 3M Unitek were stretched to 100% and 150% of their original inner diameter. Force levels were measured initially and at 3-minute, 24-hour, and 1-, 2-, 3- and 4-week intervals. Data were analyzed by univariate analysis of variance and a post hoc Tukey test. Results. The means of initial forces of elastomeric ligatures and separators from three above-mentioned companies, when stretched to 100% of their inner diameters, were 199, 305 and 284 g, and 330, 416, 330 g; when they were stretched to 150% of their inner diameters the values were 286, 422 and 375 g, and 433, 540 and 504 g, respectively. In active tieback state, 11‒18% of the initial force of the specimens was lost within the first 3 minutes and 29‒63% of the force decay occurred in the first 24 hours; then force decay rate decreased. 62‒81% of the initial force was lost in 4 weeks. Although force decay pattern was identical in all the products, the initial force and force decay of Dentaurum elastomeric products were less than the similar products of other companies (P<0.05. Under the same conditions, the force of elastomeric separators was greater than elastomeric ligatures of the same company. Conclusion. Regarding the force pattern of elastomeric ligatures and separators and optimal force for tooth movement, many of these products can be selected for applying orthodontic forces in active tieback state.

  19. Microfluidic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2012-08-21

    Microfluidics, a field that has been well-established for several decades, has seen extensive applications in the areas of biology, chemistry, and medicine. However, it might be very hard to imagine how such soft microfluidic devices would be used in other areas, such as electronics, in which stiff, solid metals, insulators, and semiconductors have previously dominated. Very recently, things have radically changed. Taking advantage of native properties of microfluidics, advances in microfluidics-based electronics have shown great potential in numerous new appealing applications, e.g. bio-inspired devices, body-worn healthcare and medical sensing systems, and ergonomic units, in which conventional rigid, bulky electronics are facing insurmountable obstacles to fulfil the demand on comfortable user experience. Not only would the birth of microfluidic electronics contribute to both the microfluidics and electronics fields, but it may also shape the future of our daily life. Nevertheless, microfluidic electronics are still at a very early stage, and significant efforts in research and development are needed to advance this emerging field. The intention of this article is to review recent research outcomes in the field of microfluidic electronics, and address current technical challenges and issues. The outlook of future development in microfluidic electronic devices and systems, as well as new fabrication techniques, is also discussed. Moreover, the authors would like to inspire both the microfluidics and electronics communities to further exploit this newly-established field.

  20. Biodegradable elastomeric scaffolds for soft tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pêgo, A.P.; Poot, Andreas A.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Feijen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Elastomeric copolymers of 1,3-trimethylene carbonate (TMC) and ε-caprolactone (CL) and copolymers of TMC and D,L-lactide (DLLA) have been evaluated as candidate materials for the preparation of biodegradable scaffolds for soft tissue engineering. TMC-DLLA copolymers are amorphous and degrade more

  1. Biodegradable elastomeric scaffolds for soft tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pego, Ana Paula; Poot, André A.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Feijen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Elastomeric copolymers of 1,3-trimethylene carbonate (TMC) and ε-caprolactone (CL) and copolymers of TMC and D,L-lactide (DLLA) have been evaluated as candidate materials for the preparation of biodegradable scaffolds for soft tissue engineering. TMC-DLLA copolymers are amorphous and degrade more r

  2. Evaluation of Force Degradation Pattern of Elastomeric Ligatures and Elastomeric Separators in Active Tieback State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Amir; Mahmoodi, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The purpose of this study was to evaluate initial force and force decay of commercially available elastomeric ligatures and elastomeric separators in active tieback state in a simulated oral environment. Materials and methods. A total of 288 elastomeric ligatures and elastomeric separators from three manufacturers (Dentaurum, RMO, 3M Unitek) were stretched to 100% and 150% of their original inner diameter. Force levels were measured initially and at 3-minute, 24-hour, and 1-, 2-, 3- and 4-week intervals. Data were analyzed by univariate analysis of variance and a post hoc Tukey test. Results. The means of initial forces of elastomeric ligatures and separators from three above-mentioned companies, when stretched to 100% of their inner diameters, were 199, 305 and 284 g, and 330, 416, 330 g; when they were stretched to 150% of their inner diameters the values were 286, 422 and 375 g, and 433, 540 and 504 g, respectively. In active tieback state, 11-18% of the initial force of the specimens was lost within the first 3 minutes and 29-63% of the force decay occurred in the first 24 hours; then force decay rate decreased. 62-81% of the initial force was lost in 4 weeks. Although force decay pattern was identical in all the products, the initial force and force decay of Dentaurum elastomeric products were less than the similar products of other companies (Pcompany. Conclusion. Regarding the force pattern of elastomeric ligatures and separators and optimal force for tooth movement, many of these products can be selected for applying orthodontic forces in active tieback state.

  3. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-07

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  4. Chemical control of Vorticella bioactuator using microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Moeto; Ryu, Sangjin; Thorsen, Todd; Matsudaira, Paul; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2010-06-21

    In this report, we demonstrate a microfluidic platform to control the stalk contraction and extension of Vorticella convallaria by changing concentration of Ca2+ with pneumatically-actuated elastomeric microvalves. Habitation, extraction and control of V. convallaria were carried out in a PDMS-based microfluidic device. By treating the cells with the permeant saponin, external actuation of cell-anchoring stalk between an extended and contracted state was achieved by cyclic exposure of the cells to a Ca2+ buffer (10(-6) M) and a rinse buffer containing EGTA as a chelation agent. When solutions were switched, the stalk contracted and extended responding to the ambient Ca2+ concentration change. The length of the stalk changed between 20 and 60 microm, resulting in a working distance of about 40 microm.

  5. High-refractive-index measurement with an elastomeric grating coupler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocabas, Askin; Ay, Feridun; Dana, Aykutiu; Kiyat, Isa; Aydinli, Atilla

    2005-01-01

    An elastomeric grating coupler fabricated by the replica molding technique is used to measure the modal indices of a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) planar waveguide structure. Because of the van der Waals interaction between the grating mold and the waveguide, the elastomeric stamp makes conformal conta

  6. ELASTOMERIC REACTIVE MICROGELS AS TOUGHENER FOR EPOXY ADHESIVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zheng; XUE Ruilan; YU Yunchao

    1987-01-01

    Elastomeric reactive microgels were evaluated as toughener for epoxy adhesives. It turned out that elastomeric microgels can improve lap shear strength and peel strength greatly. The glass transition temperature of the resin matrix was not affected by the presence of dispersed microgel particles, and thus the microgel-toughened adhesives have a good bond strength at elevated temperatures.

  7. Frictional characteristics of the newer orthodontic elastomeric ligatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A V Arun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elastomeric ligatures reduce chairside time but increase friction. Polymeric coatings and 45° angulations have been introduced to the ligature modules to combat its disadvantages and reduce friction. This in vitro study compared the frictional characteristics of six different types of the most commonly used elastomeric modules. Materials and Methods: Thecoefficient of friction for six ligation methods: the non-coated Mini Stix† and coated Super Slick Mini Stix™ (TP Orthodontics, 45° angulated but non-coated Alastik Easy-To-Tie™ (3M Unitek elastomerics and non-angulated non-coated Alastik QuiK-StiK FNx01 , 0.110′- and 0.120′-diameter elastomerics™ (Reliance Orthodontics were measured in dry conditions utilizing a jig according to the protocol of Tidy. Results: A significant difference was observed between the various types of elastomeric ligatures (P<.01. Among the six types of elastomeric ligatures, the 45° angulated elastomeric ligatures produced the least friction, followed by the coated Super Slick† elastomers. No difference in the friction was noted when the diameter of the elastomeric ligatures was varied. Conclusions: Polymeric surface coatings and introduction of angulations into elastomeric ligatures reduce the friction during sliding; however, the diameter of the ligature made no difference to sliding friction.

  8. Portable Fluorescence Detection System Integrated with Disposable Microfluidic Chip%集成一次性微流控芯片的便携式荧光检测系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈兴; 崔大付; 张璐璐

    2009-01-01

    A novel biochemical analysis system including a portable fluorescence detection instrument and a microfluidic chip integrated with an optical fiber was developed. When fluid sample containing analyte and fluorescent reagent was transported to the microfluidie chip by a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-based micropump, the fluorescent light, which was induced by the excitation light from light emitting diode (LED) coupled into the microchannel through an optical fiber, was detected by photomultiplier tube (PMT). The intensity of fluorescent light is related to the concentration of the analyte. Along with fluid flowing in the microchannel, different samples could be continually detected and analyzed. The system was able to detect fluorescein within the concentration range from 1 μg/L to 1 000 μg/L and the correlation coefficient was 0.966. And then 5 ng/μL nitro compound solution was detected using this system based on the principle of fluorescence quenching. This biochemical analysis system has several advantages of lower cost, lower reagent and sample consumption, and less analytical time besides portability and disposability, which enables the implementation of on-site detection in the fields of point-of-care clinical testing, environmental testing, and biological warfare agent detection.%本文研究了一种新型的生物化学分析系统,该系统包括便携式荧光检测仪和带光纤的微流控芯片.采用基于MEMS技术的微泵将待测物与荧光试剂的混合物导入微流控芯片,采用PMT检测受激发产生的荧光,荧光强度与待测物浓度成一定比例.激发光则通过光纤将光源LED光信号导入微沟道中.随着液体在微沟道中的流动,可连续分析和检测不同的样品.该系统检测1~1 000μg/L浓度的荧光素具有0.966的相关系数.基于荧光猝灭原理,该系统还可检测浓度为5 ng/μL的硝基化合物.该生化分析系统除具有便携式和一次性微流控芯片优点外,

  9. Theoretical microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    in complexity, a proper theoretical understanding becomes increasingly important. The basic idea of the book is to provide a self-contained formulation of the theoretical framework of microfluidics, and at the same time give physical motivation and examples from lab-on-a-chip technology. After three chapters...

  10. Theoretical microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    , complex flow patterns and acousto-fluidics, as well as the new fields of opto- and nano-fluidics. Throughout the book simple models with analytical solutions are presented to provide the student with a thorough physical understanding of order of magnitudes and various selected microfluidic phenomena...

  11. Caterpillar locomotion-inspired valveless pneumatic micropump using a single teardrop-shaped elastomeric membrane

    KAUST Repository

    So, Hongyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic pump operated by an asymmetrically deformed membrane, which was inspired by caterpillar locomotion. Almost all mechanical micropumps consist of two major components of fluid halting and fluid pushing parts, whereas the proposed caterpillar locomotion-inspired micropump has only a single, bilaterally symmetric membrane-like teardrop shape. A teardrop-shaped elastomeric membrane was asymmetrically deformed and then consecutively touched down to the bottom of the chamber in response to pneumatic pressure, thus achieving fluid pushing. Consecutive touchdown motions of the teardrop-shaped membrane mimicked the propagation of a caterpillar\\'s hump during its locomotory gait. The initial touchdown motion of the teardrop-shaped membrane at the centroid worked as a valve that blocked the inlet channel, and then, the consecutive touchdown motions pushed fluid in the chamber toward the tail of the chamber connected to the outlet channel. The propagation of the touchdown motion of the teardrop-shaped membrane was investigated using computational analysis as well as experimental studies. This caterpillar locomotion-inspired micropump composed of only a single membrane can provide new opportunities for simple integration of microfluidic systems. © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  12. Thermomechanical behavior of shape memory elastomeric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qi; Luo, Xiaofan; Rodriguez, Erika D.; Zhang, Xiao; Mather, Patrick T.; Dunn, Martin L.; Qi, H. Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) can fix a temporary shape and recover their permanent shape in response to environmental stimuli such as heat, electricity, or irradiation. Most thermally activated SMPs use the macromolecular chain mobility change around the glass transition temperature ( Tg) to achieve the shape memory (SM) effects. During this process, the stiffness of the material typically changes by three orders of magnitude. Recently, a composite materials approach was developed to achieve thermally activated shape memory effect where the material exhibits elastomeric response in both the temporary and the recovered configurations. These shape memory elastomeric composites (SMECs) consist of an elastomeric matrix reinforced by a semicrystalline polymer fiber network. The matrix provides background rubber elasticity while the fiber network can transform between solid crystals and melt phases over the operative temperature range. As such it serves as a reversible "switching phase" that enables shape fixing and recovery. Shape memory elastomeric composites provide a new paradigm for the development of a wide array of active polymer composites that utilize the melt-crystal transition to achieve the shape memory effect. This potentially allows for material systems with much simpler chemistries than most shape memory polymers and thus can facilitate more rapid material development and insertion. It is therefore important to understand the thermomechanical behavior and to develop corresponding material models. In this paper, a 3D finite-deformation constitutive modeling framework was developed to describe the thermomechanical behavior of SMEC. The model is phenomenological, although inspired by micromechanical considerations of load transfer between the matrix and fiber phases of a composite system. It treats the matrix as an elastomer and the fibers as a complex solid that itself is an aggregate of melt and crystal phases that evolve from one to the other during a

  13. Highly Stretchable and Transparent Microfluidic Strain Sensors for Monitoring Human Body Motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sun Geun; Koo, Hyung-Jun; Chang, Suk Tai

    2015-12-16

    We report a new class of simple microfluidic strain sensors with high stretchability, transparency, sensitivity, and long-term stability with no considerable hysteresis and a fast response to various deformations by combining the merits of microfluidic techniques and ionic liquids. The high optical transparency of the strain sensors was achieved by introducing refractive-index matched ionic liquids into microfluidic networks or channels embedded in an elastomeric matrix. The microfluidic strain sensors offer the outstanding sensor performance under a variety of deformations induced by stretching, bending, pressing, and twisting of the microfluidic strain sensors. The principle of our microfluidic strain sensor is explained by a theoretical model based on the elastic channel deformation. In order to demonstrate its capability of practical usage, the simple-structured microfluidic strain sensors were performed onto a finger, wrist, and arm. The highly stretchable and transparent microfluidic strain sensors were successfully applied as potential platforms for distinctively monitoring a wide range of human body motions in real time. Our novel microfluidic strain sensors show great promise for making future stretchable electronic devices.

  14. Excitation of a surface plasmon with an elastomeric grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, A.; Dâna, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2006-07-01

    We report on a new method to excite surface plasmon polaritons on a thin metal slab surface using an elastomeric grating which is fabricated by replica molding technique. The grating is placed on the metal surface which creates a periodic perturbation on the surface matching the momentum of the incident light to that of the surface plasmon. The conformal contact between the metal surface and the elastomeric grating changes the dielectric medium periodically and allows the observation of an effective surface plasmon polariton at the metal-air and metal-polymer interfaces of the grating. To clarify the nature of the observed plasmon, comparison of the elastomeric grating with elastomeric slabs was performed with the attenuated total reflection method.

  15. Contact angle of unset elastomeric impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menees, Timothy S; Radhakrishnan, Rashmi; Ramp, Lance C; Burgess, John O; Lawson, Nathaniel C

    2015-10-01

    Some elastomeric impression materials are hydrophobic, and it is often necessary to take definitive impressions of teeth coated with some saliva. New hydrophilic materials have been developed. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare contact angles of water and saliva on 7 unset elastomeric impression materials at 5 time points from the start of mixing. Two traditional polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) (Aquasil, Take 1), 2 modified PVS (Imprint 4, Panasil), a polyether (Impregum), and 2 hybrid (Identium, EXA'lence) materials were compared. Each material was flattened to 2 mm and a 5 μL drop of distilled water or saliva was dropped on the surface at 25 seconds (t0) after the start of mix. Contact angle measurements were made with a digital microscope at initial contact (t0), t1=2 seconds, t2=5 seconds, t3=50% working time, and t4=95% working time. Data were analyzed with a generalized linear mixed model analysis, and individual 1-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD post hoc tests (α=.05). For water, materials grouped into 3 categories at all time-points: the modified PVS and one hybrid material (Identium) produced the lowest contact angles, the polyether material was intermediate, and the traditional PVS materials and the other hybrid (EXA'lence) produced the highest contact angles. For saliva, Identium, Impregum, and Imprint 4 were in the group with the lowest contact angle at most time points. Modified PVS materials and one of the hybrid materials are more hydrophilic than traditional PVS materials when measured with water. Saliva behaves differently than water in contact angle measurement on unset impression material and produces a lower contact angle on polyether based materials. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Surface reproduction of elastomeric materials: viscosity and groove shape effects

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmood, N.; Abu Kasim, N.H.; Azuddin, M.; Kasim, N.L. Abu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of viscosity and type of grooves on surface detail reproduction of elastomeric impression materials. Methods: Express putty/light-, Impregum medium- and heavy/light-bodied and Aquasil medium- and putty/light-bodied elastomeric impression materials were chosen for this study. Five impressions were made using a cylindrical aluminum reference block with U- and V- shaped grooves and to produce 35 master dies. Each master die was immersed in distilled water at 370...

  17. Wearable tactile sensor based on flexible microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Joo Chuan; Yu, Jiahao; Koh, Zhao Ming; Wang, Zhiping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-08-16

    In this work, we develop a liquid-based thin film microfluidic tactile sensor of high flexibility, robustness and sensitivity. The microfluidic elastomeric structure comprises a pressure sensitive region and parallel arcs that interface with screen-printed electrodes. The microfluidic sensor is functionalized with a highly conductive metallic liquid, eutectic gallium indium (eGaIn). Microdeformation on the pressure sensor results in fluid displacement which corresponds to a change in electrical resistance. By emulating parallel electrical circuitry in our microchannel design, we reduced the overall electrical resistance of the sensor, therefore enhancing its device sensitivity. Correspondingly, we report a device workable within a range of 4 to 100 kPa and sensitivity of up to 0.05 kPa(-1). We further demonstrate its robustness in withstanding >2500 repeated loading and unloading cycles. Finally, as a proof of concept, we demonstrate that the sensors may be multiplexed to detect forces at multiple regions of the hand. In particular, our sensors registered unique electronic signatures in object grasping, which could provide better assessment of finger dexterity.

  18. Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  19. Unvulcanized elastomeric waterproofing materials for construction application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Karmanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the construction was widespread elastomer profiles, which have the ability to swell in water. Such products should have a high capacity for swelling, elasticity, resistance to weathering. At the present time for these purposes are used materials, mostly of foreign origin. With the increasing pace of construction in Russia the problem of replacement of imported materials is particularly relevant. The work was dedicated to the creation of water-swellable elastomer materials using bentonite powders and study of their properties. Сomparative testing of imported and domestic hydrophilic sealants were held. Rationale and choice of components for the cords of bentonite was conducted. Polymer base is saturated ethylene-propylene rubber. Bentonite from different manufacturers used to increase the swelling of the samples. Filler added in an amount of 50–100 phr. The elastomeric compositions were prepared using laboratory roller at a temperature of 60 ± 5° C. Profiling was performed on a syringe-machine at a temperature of 120° C. Extrusion indicator of the mixtures were evaluated on a 10-point scale (German-Russian system. It is found that high swelling products provided using field Azerbaijan bentonite. It is noted that the dosage of bentonite than 150 w.p. deteriorates technological properties of bentonite cords. It has been shown that activation of the bentonite and sodium carbonate chloride can significantly improve product swelling, wherein the bentonite content of the composition was 150–200 w.p.

  20. Unusual reversible elastomeric gels from Nostoc commune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Sol; Gonzales, Karen N; Romero, Eduardo G; Troncoso, Omar P; Torres, Fernando G

    2017-04-01

    Nostoc commune cyanobacteria grow in extreme conditions of desiccation and nutrient-poor soils. Their colonies form spherical gelatinous bodies are composed of a variety of polysaccharides that allow them to store water and nutrients. In this paper, we study this type of biological gel that shows characteristics of both chemical and physical gels. The structure of this gel was assessed by means of scanning electron microscopy, plate-plate rheometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and absorption/desorption tests. The storage modulus of this gel was found to be frequency independent, as is usual for chemical gels. The stress sweeps showed a reversible stress softening behaviour that was explained in terms of the physical nature of the interactions of this network. The high density of physical crosslinks probably allows this physical network to behave as a highly elastomeric chemical network, limiting the relaxation of individual chains. On the other hand, reversibility is associated with the physical nature of its bonds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sterilizing elastomeric chains without losing mechanical properties. Is it possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pithon, Matheus Melo; Ferraz, Caio Souza; Rosa, Francine Cristina Silva; Rosa, Luciano Pereira

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of different sterilization/disinfection methods on the mechanical properties of orthodontic elastomeric chains. METHODS: Segments of elastomeric chains with 5 links each were sent for sterilization by cobalt 60 (Co60) (20 KGy) gamma ray technology. After the procedure, the elastomeric chains were contaminated with clinical samples of Streptococcus mutans. Subsequently, the elastomeric chains were submitted to sterilization/disinfection tests carried out by means of different methods, forming six study groups, as follows: Group 1 (control - without contamination), Group 2 (70°GL alcohol), Group 3 (autoclave), Group 4 (ultraviolet), Group 5 (peracetic acid) and Group 6 (glutaraldehyde). After sterilization/disinfection, the effectiveness of these methods, by Colony forming units per mL (CFU/mL), and the mechanical properties of the material were assessed. Student's t-test was used to assess the number of CFUs while ANOVA and Tukey's test were used to assess elastic strength. RESULTS: Ultraviolet treatment was not completely effective for sterilization. No loss of mechanical properties occurred with the use of the different sterilization methods (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Biological control of elastomeric chains does not affect their mechanical properties. PMID:26154462

  2. Sterilizing elastomeric chains without losing mechanical properties. Is it possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Melo Pithon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of different sterilization/disinfection methods on the mechanical properties of orthodontic elastomeric chains. METHODS: Segments of elastomeric chains with 5 links each were sent for sterilization by cobalt 60 (Co60 (20 KGy gamma ray technology. After the procedure, the elastomeric chains were contaminated with clinical samples of Streptococcus mutans. Subsequently, the elastomeric chains were submitted to sterilization/disinfection tests carried out by means of different methods, forming six study groups, as follows: Group 1 (control - without contamination, Group 2 (70°GL alcohol, Group 3 (autoclave, Group 4 (ultraviolet, Group 5 (peracetic acid and Group 6 (glutaraldehyde. After sterilization/disinfection, the effectiveness of these methods, by Colony forming units per mL (CFU/mL, and the mechanical properties of the material were assessed. Student's t-test was used to assess the number of CFUs while ANOVA and Tukey's test were used to assess elastic strength. RESULTS: Ultraviolet treatment was not completely effective for sterilization. No loss of mechanical properties occurred with the use of the different sterilization methods (p > 0.05. CONCLUSION: Biological control of elastomeric chains does not affect their mechanical properties.

  3. Microfluidics on liquid handling stations (μF-on-LHS): an industry compatible chip interface between microfluidics and automated liquid handling stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldbaur, Ansgar; Kittelmann, Jörg; Radtke, Carsten P; Hubbuch, Jürgen; Rapp, Bastian E

    2013-06-21

    We describe a generic microfluidic interface design that allows the connection of microfluidic chips to established industrial liquid handling stations (LHS). A molding tool has been designed that allows fabrication of low-cost disposable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chips with interfaces that provide convenient and reversible connection of the microfluidic chip to industrial LHS. The concept allows complete freedom of design for the microfluidic chip itself. In this setup all peripheral fluidic components (such as valves and pumps) usually required for microfluidic experiments are provided by the LHS. Experiments (including readout) can be carried out fully automated using the hardware and software provided by LHS manufacturer. Our approach uses a chip interface that is compatible with widely used and industrially established LHS which is a significant advancement towards near-industrial experimental design in microfluidics and will greatly facilitate the acceptance and translation of microfluidics technology in industry.

  4. High-refractive-index measurement with an elastomeric grating coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Askin; Ay, Feridun; Dâna, Aykutlu; Kiyat, Isa; Aydinli, Atilla

    2005-12-01

    An elastomeric grating coupler fabricated by the replica molding technique is used to measure the modal indices of a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) planar waveguide structure. Because of the van der Waals interaction between the grating mold and the waveguide, the elastomeric stamp makes conformal contact with the waveguide surface, inducing a periodic index perturbation at the contact region. The phase of the incident light is changed to match the guided modes of the waveguide. The modal and bulk indices are obtained by measuring the coupling angles. This technique serves to measure the high refractive index with a precision better than 10-3 and allows the elastomeric stamp to be removed without damaging the surface of the waveguide.

  5. Enhancing retention of partial dentures using elastomeric retention rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakkirala Revathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents an alternative method for the retention of partial dentures that relies on the engagement of tooth undercuts by a lining material. The lab procedures are also presented. A new maxillary and mandibular acrylic partial dentures were fabricated using elastomeric retention technique for a partially dentate patient. A partially dentate man reported difficulty in retaining his upper removable partial denture (RPD. The maxillary RPD was designed utilizing elastomeric retention technique. During follow-up, it was necessary to replace the retention rings due to wear. The replacement of the retention rings, in this case, was done through a chairside reline technique. Elastomeric retention technique provides exceptionally good retention can be indicated to stabilize, cushion, splint periodontally involved teeth, no enough undercut for clasps, eliminate extractions, single or isolated teeth.

  6. Robust and Soft Elastomeric Electronics Tolerant to Our Daily Lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Atsuko; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Saito, Takeshi; Kuwahara, Yuki; Sakurai, Shunsuke; Futaba, Don N; Yamada, Takeo; Hata, Kenji

    2015-09-01

    Clothes represent a unique textile, as they simultaneously provide robustness against our daily activities and comfort (i.e., softness). For electronic devices to be fully integrated into clothes, the devices themselves must be as robust and soft as the clothes themselves. However, to date, no electronic device has ever possessed these properties, because all contain components fabricated from brittle materials, such as metals. Here, we demonstrate robust and soft elastomeric devices where every component possesses elastomeric characteristics with two types of single-walled carbon nanotubes added to provide the necessary electronic properties. Our elastomeric field effect transistors could tolerate every punishment our clothes experience, such as being stretched (elasticity: ∼ 110%), bent, compressed (>4.0 MPa, by a car and heels), impacted (>6.26 kg m/s, by a hammer), and laundered. Our electronic device provides a novel design principle for electronics and wide range applications even in research fields where devices cannot be used.

  7. Evaluation of Four Elastomeric Interocclusal Recording Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, P; Gupta, S H; Ramachandran, S; Sandhu, H S

    2007-07-01

    The fabrication of dental prosthesis requires the transfer of interocclusal records from patient's mouth to semi-adjustable articulators using different kinds of recording media. Any inaccuracy in these interocclusal records leads to occlusal errors in the final prosthesis. This study was conducted to evaluate the dimensional changes occurring in the interocclusal recording material over a given period of time and the material's resistance to compression during the cast mounting on the articulator. In this in vitro study, the linear dimensional change and compressive resistance of four commercially available elastomeric interocclusal recording media was tested. Three were addition silicones and the fourth was a polyether material. Cylindrical samples of 10mm diameter of each material were prepared in three different thicknesses of 2, 4 and 6mm. Ten samples each of thickness of 2, 4 and 6mm for all four materials were prepared (total of 120 samples). The linear dimensional changes of the samples were evaluated after 24 hours of fabrication. The compressive resistance was measured when each of these was subjected to a constant compressive load of 25 Newtons. The mean linear dimensional change in a horizontal plane was minimum for Kanibite Hard, an addition silicone. Ramitec showed the maximum linear dimensional change. The mean compression distance was least for Futar D Occlusion (an addition silicone) and maximum for Ramitec (a polyether). It was observed that the samples of thickness 2mm for all the materials underwent least compression. The compressive resistance of each elastomer was inversely proportional to the thickness of the sample. This implies that minimum thickness of the recording materials should be used for recording maxillomandibular relations without sacrificing the strength of the interocclusal record.

  8. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Ralph G [Champaign, IL; Mitrovski, Svetlana M [Urbana, IL

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  9. Disposable rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Leroy C.; Trammell, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A disposable rabbit for transferring radioactive samples in a pneumatic transfer system comprises aerated plastic shaped in such a manner as to hold a radioactive sample and aerated such that dissolution of the rabbit in a solvent followed by evaporation of the solid yields solid waste material having a volume significantly smaller than the original volume of the rabbit.

  10. Disposal rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, L.C.; Trammell, D.R.

    1983-10-12

    A disposable rabbit for transferring radioactive samples in a pneumatic transfer system comprises aerated plastic shaped in such a manner as to hold a radioactive sample and aerated such that dissolution of the rabbit in a solvent followed by evaporation of the solid yields solid waste material having a volume significantly smaller than the original volume of the rabbit.

  11. The upcoming 3D-printing revolution in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Urrios, Arturo; Kang, Shawn; Folch, Albert

    2016-05-21

    In the last two decades, the vast majority of microfluidic systems have been built in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) by soft lithography, a technique based on PDMS micromolding. A long list of key PDMS properties have contributed to the success of soft lithography: PDMS is biocompatible, elastomeric, transparent, gas-permeable, water-impermeable, fairly inexpensive, copyright-free, and rapidly prototyped with high precision using simple procedures. However, the fabrication process typically involves substantial human labor, which tends to make PDMS devices difficult to disseminate outside of research labs, and the layered molding limits the 3D complexity of the devices that can be produced. 3D-printing has recently attracted attention as a way to fabricate microfluidic systems due to its automated, assembly-free 3D fabrication, rapidly decreasing costs, and fast-improving resolution and throughput. Resins with properties approaching those of PDMS are being developed. Here we review past and recent efforts in 3D-printing of microfluidic systems. We compare the salient features of PDMS molding with those of 3D-printing and we give an overview of the critical barriers that have prevented the adoption of 3D-printing by microfluidic developers, namely resolution, throughput, and resin biocompatibility. We also evaluate the various forces that are persuading researchers to abandon PDMS molding in favor of 3D-printing in growing numbers.

  12. Microcontact printing-based fabrication of digital microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael W L; Abdelgawad, Mohamed; Ye, George; Yonson, Neal; Trottier, Justin; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2006-11-15

    Digital microfluidics is a fluid manipulation technique in which discrete droplets are actuated on patterned arrays of electrodes. Although there is great enthusiasm for the application of this technique to chemical and biological assays, development has been hindered by the requirement of clean room fabrication facilities. Here, we present a new fabrication scheme, relying on microcontact printing (microCP), an inexpensive technique that does not require clean room facilities. In microCP, an elastomeric poly(dimethylsiloxane) stamp is used to deposit patterns of self-assembled monolayers onto a substrate. We report three different microCP-based fabrication techniques: (1) selective etching of gold-on-glass substrates; (2) direct printing of a suspension of palladium colloids; and (3) indirect trapping of gold colloids from suspension. In method 1, etched gold electrodes are used for droplet actuation; in methods 2 and 3, colloid patterns are used to seed electroless deposition of copper. We demonstrate, for the first time, that digital microfluidic devices can be formed by microCP and are capable of the full range of digital microfluidics operations: dispensing, merging, motion, and splitting. Devices formed by the most robust of the new techniques were comparable in performance to devices formed by conventional methods, at a fraction of the fabrication time. These new techniques for digital microfluidics device fabrication have the potential to facilitate expansion of this technology to any research group, even those without access to conventional microfabrication tools and facilities.

  13. A Smartphone Controlled Handheld Microfluidic Liquid Handling System

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Baichen; Guan, Allan; Dong, Quan; Ruan, Kangcheng; Hu, Ronggui; Li, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip technologies have made it possible to manipulate small volume liquids with unprecedented resolution, automation and integration. However, most current microfluidic systems still rely on bulky off-chip infrastructures such as compressed pressure sources, syringe pumps and computers to achieve complex liquid manipulation functions. Here, we present a handheld automated microfluidic liquid handling system controlled by a smartphone, which is enabled by combining elastomeric on-chip valves and a compact pneumatic system. As a demonstration, we show that the system can automatically perform all the liquid handling steps of a bead-based sandwich immunoassay on a multi-layer PDMS chip without any human intervention. The footprint of the system is 6 by 10.5 by 16.5cm, and the total weight is 829g including battery. Powered by a 12.8V 1500mAh Li battery, the system consumed 2.2W on average during the immunoassay and lasted for 8.7 hrs. This handheld microfluidic liquid handling platform...

  14. Voltage-controlled surface wrinkling of elastomeric coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, D.A. van den; Kamminga, J.D.; Boersma, A.; Andritsch, T.; Steeneken, P.G.

    2013-01-01

    Wrinkling of elastomeric coatings by an electric field is reported. The associated changes in the coating's optical properties yield switchable mirrors and windows. The field Ec needed to induce wrinkling is a factor of 4.4 lower than the theoretically predicted value, which is attributed to space-c

  15. Voltage-controlled surface wrinkling of elastomeric coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, D.A. van den; Kamminga, J.D.; Boersma, A.; Andritsch, T.; Steeneken, P.G.

    2013-01-01

    Wrinkling of elastomeric coatings by an electric field is reported. The associated changes in the coating's optical properties yield switchable mirrors and windows. The field Ec needed to induce wrinkling is a factor of 4.4 lower than the theoretically predicted value, which is attributed to space-c

  16. Highly Magneto-Responsive Elastomeric Films Created by a Two-Step Fabrication Process

    KAUST Repository

    Marchi, Sophie

    2015-08-24

    An innovative method for the preparation of elastomeric magnetic films with increased magneto-responsivity is presented. Polymeric films containing aligned magnetic microchains throughout their thickness are formed upon the magnetophoretic transport and assembly of microparticles during polymer curing. The obtained films are subsequently magnetized at a high magnetic field of 3 T directed parallel to the orientation of the microchains. We prove that the combination of both alignment of the particles along a favorable direction during curing and the subsequent magnetization of the solid films induces an impressive increase of the films’ deflection. Specifically, the displacements reach few millimeters, up to 85 times higher than those of the nontreated films with the same particle concentration. Such a process can improve the performance of the magnetic films without increasing the amount of magnetic fillers and, thus, without compromising the mechanical properties of the resulting composites. The proposed method can be used for the fabrication of magnetic films suitable as components in systems in which large displacements at relatively low magnetic fields are required, such as sensors and drug delivery or microfluidic systems, especially where remote control of valves is requested to achieve appropriate flow and mixing of liquids.

  17. Polymer Microfluidics: Simple, Low-Cost Fabrication Process Bridging Academic Lab Research to Commercialized Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Wen Tsao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Using polymer materials to fabricate microfluidic devices provides simple, cost effective, and disposal advantages for both lab-on-a-chip (LOC devices and micro total analysis systems (μTAS. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS elastomer and thermoplastics are the two major polymer materials used in microfluidics. The fabrication of PDMS and thermoplastic microfluidic device can be categorized as front-end polymer microchannel fabrication and post-end microfluidic bonding procedures, respectively. PDMS and thermoplastic materials each have unique advantages and their use is indispensable in polymer microfluidics. Therefore, the proper selection of polymer microfabrication is necessary for the successful application of microfluidics. In this paper, we give a short overview of polymer microfabrication methods for microfluidics and discuss current challenges and future opportunities for research in polymer microfluidics fabrication. We summarize standard approaches, as well as state-of-art polymer microfluidic fabrication methods. Currently, the polymer microfluidic device is at the stage of technology transition from research labs to commercial production. Thus, critical consideration is also required with respect to the commercialization aspects of fabricating polymer microfluidics. This article provides easy-to-understand illustrations and targets to assist the research community in selecting proper polymer microfabrication strategies in microfluidics.

  18. Modeling friction phenomena and elastomeric dampers in multibody dynamics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Changkuan

    The first part of this dissertation focuses on the development, implementation and validation of models that capture the behavior of joints in a realistic manner. These models are presented within the framework of finite element based, nonlinear multibody dynamics formulations that ensure unconditional nonlinear stability of the computation for complex systems of arbitrary topology. The proposed approach can be divided into three parts. First, the joint configuration: this purely kinematic part deals with the description of the configuration of the joint and the evaluation of the relative distance and relative tangential velocity between the contacting bodies. Second, the contact conditions: in most cases, contact at the joint is of an intermittent nature. The enforcement of the unilateral contact condition is a critical aspect of the computational procedure. And finally, the contact forces: this last part deals with the evaluation of the forces that arise at the interface between contacting bodies. The advantage of the proposed approach is that the three parts of the problem can be formulated and implemented independently. Many articulated rotor helicopters use hydraulic dampers, which provide high levels of damping but are also associated with high maintenance costs and difficulties in evaluating their conditions due to the presence of seals, lubricants and numerous moving parts, all operating in a rotating frame. To avoid problems associated with hydraulic dampers, the industry is now switching to elastomeric lead-lag dampers that feature simpler mechanical design, lower part count, and result in "dry" rotors. However, the design of robust elastomeric dampers is hampered by the lack of reliable analytical tools that can be used to predict their damping behavior in the presence of large multi-frequency motions experienced by the rotor and thus the damper. The second part of this dissertation focuses on the development of an elastomeric damper model which predicts

  19. Tunable Microfluidic Devices for Hydrodynamic Fractionation of Cells and Beads: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Alvankarian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The adjustable microfluidic devices that have been developed for hydrodynamic-based fractionation of beads and cells are important for fast performance tunability through interaction of mechanical properties of particles in fluid flow and mechanically flexible microstructures. In this review, the research works reported on fabrication and testing of the tunable elastomeric microfluidic devices for applications such as separation, filtration, isolation, and trapping of single or bulk of microbeads or cells are discussed. Such microfluidic systems for rapid performance alteration are classified in two groups of bulk deformation of microdevices using external mechanical forces, and local deformation of microstructures using flexible membrane by pneumatic pressure. The main advantage of membrane-based tunable systems has been addressed to be the high capability of integration with other microdevice components. The stretchable devices based on bulk deformation of microstructures have in common advantage of simplicity in design and fabrication process.

  20. Microfluidic Dye Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders; Balslev, Søren; Gersborg-Hansen, Morten

    2006-01-01

    A technology for miniaturized, polymer based lasers, suitable for integration with planar waveguides and microfluidic networks is presented. The microfluidic dye laser device consists of a microfluidic channel with an embedded optical resonator. The devices are fabricated in a thin polymer film...

  1. Microfluidic sieve valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quake, Stephen R; Marcus, Joshua S; Hansen, Carl L

    2015-01-13

    Sieve valves for use in microfluidic device are provided. The valves are useful for impeding the flow of particles, such as chromatography beads or cells, in a microfluidic channel while allowing liquid solution to pass through the valve. The valves find particular use in making microfluidic chromatography modules.

  2. Microfluidic single sperm analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, de Bjorn

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic technology has been occasionally used for in vitro analysis and separation of cells. The small dimensions of microfluidic chips are very suitable to study cells on the single cell level rather than in whole populations. Also sperm cells have been studied and manipulated using microfluid

  3. Development of Elastomeric Optofluidic Devices for Lasing and Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Wuzhou

    2012-01-01

    The term of optofluidics defines an emergent research field that combines microfluidics and optics. In many lab-on-a-chip applications, these two technologies are used in combining the microfluidics for sample delivery and optics for sensing and controlling. Optofluidic represents the implementation of optics in microfluidic platform that produces an unprecedented level of integration. Moreover, optofluidic devices are easily and highly reconfigurable, which can be a significant advantag...

  4. Waste disposal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to remind you that you can have all commonplace, conventional waste (combustible, inert, wood, etc.) disposed of by the TS-FM Group. Requests for the removal of such waste should be made by contacting FM Support on tel. 77777 or by e-mail (Fm.Support@cern.ch). For requests to be acted upon, the following information must be communicated to FM Support: budget code to be debited for the provision and removal of the skip / container. type of skip required (1m3, 4 m3, 7 m3, 15 m3, 20 m3, 30 m3). nature of the waste to be disposed of (bulky objects, cardboard boxes, etc.). building concerned. details of requestor (name, phone number, department, group, etc.). We should also like to inform you that the TS-FM Group can arrange for waste to be removed from work-sites for firms under contract to CERN, provided that the prior authorisation of the CERN Staff Member in charge of the contract is obtained and the relevant disposal/handling charges are paid. You are reminded that the selective sorting o...

  5. Waste disposal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to remind you that you can have all commonplace, conventional waste (combustible, inert, wood, etc.) disposed of by the TS-FM Group. Requests for the removal of such waste should be made by contacting FM Support on tel. 77777 or by e-mail (Fm.Support@cern.ch). For requests to be acted upon, the following information must be communicated to FM Support: budget code to be debited for the provision and removal of the skip / container; type of skip required (1m3, 4 m3, 7 m3, 15 m3, 20 m3, 30 m3); nature of the waste to be disposed of (bulky objects, cardboard boxes, etc.); building concerned; details of requestor (name, phone number, department, group, etc.). We should also like to inform you that the TS-FM Group can arrange for waste to be removed from work-sites for firms under contract to CERN, provided that the prior authorisation of the CERN Staff Member in charge of the contract is obtained and the relevant disposal/handling charges are paid. You are reminded that the selective sorting...

  6. Physics of Friction in Disposable Plastic Syringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebmann-Vinson, A.; Vogler, E. A.; Martin, D. A.; Montgomery, D. B.; Sugg, H. W.; Monahan, L. A.

    1997-03-01

    Nosocomial applications of disposable plastic syringes demand excellent frictional behavior with no stick-slip over a broad velocity range and, simultaneously, a tight seal between stopper and barrel. However, when used in syringe pumps at slow injection speeds, stick-slip motion is frequently observed and high "break-out" forces are often necessary to initiate plunger movement after extended storage times. We have traced this frictional behavior to a velocity-dependent interaction between the elastomeric stopper and the plastic syringe barrel mediated by the syringe lubricant, almost universally a polydimethyl siloxane fluid. Lubricant properties were altered by crosslinking the surface of the silicone oil in an oxygen plasma. Changes in surface chemistry and morphology of the crosslinked oil were correlated with changes in frictional performance.

  7. New Soft Polymeric Materials Applicable as Elastomeric Transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejenariu, Anca Gabriela; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    between two compliant electrodes will reduce its thickness and expand its area. The electrical energy transformed into mechanical energy is called actuation and it is studied in the technology of elastomeric transducers. While DEs deform under high voltage, the actuation varies for different materials......). In the present study hyperswollen silicone networks are synthesized and rheologically characterized. Their viscoelastic properties make them good candidates for elastomeric transducers. Silicone networks are synthesized using a hydrosilylation reaction at room temperature between vinyl-terminated polydimethyl......An elastomer is a material characterized by the capability to regain its original size and shape after being deformed (stretched or distorted). An ideal elastomer for electroactive polymer (EAP) applications is a system characterized by high extensibility, flexibility and a good mechanical fatigue...

  8. Evaluation of dimensional stability of autoclavable elastomeric impression material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendra, G P; Anjum, Ayesha; Satish Babu, C L; Shetty, Shilpa

    2011-03-01

    Impressions are important sources of cross contamination between patients and dental laboratories. As a part of infection control impressions contaminated with variety of micro-organisms via blood and oral secretions should be cleaned and disinfected or sterilized before being handled in dental laboratory. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of autoclaving on dimensional stability of elastomeric impression material (polyvinyl siloxane-Affinis). In this in vitro study standardized stainless steel die as per ADA specification number 19 was fabricated. Polyvinyl siloxane (Affinis) light body and putty viscosity elastomeric impression materials were used. A total of 40 impressions of the stainless steel die were made and numeric coding system was used to identify the samples. Measurements were made using a measuring microscope. Distance between the cross lines CD and C'D' reproduced in the impression were measured before autoclaving, immediately after autoclaving and 24 hours after autoclaving and dimensional change was calculated. The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. The mean difference in dimensional change between the three groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). However the results revealed that there was higher mean dimensional change immediately after autoclaving when compared to the other 2 time intervals. It is desirable to delay the casting of an autoclavable elastomeric impression material by about 24 hours. Though disinfection of impression is routinely followed autoclaving of impression is an effective method of sterilization.

  9. Pigment effect on the long term elasticity of elastomeric ligatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika de Oliveira Dias de Macêdo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the response of elastomeric ligatures in several colors for a 4 mm traction over time. METHODS: Morelli® elastomeric ligatures, were submitted to traction forces using two rods of circular cross section, until a 4 mm distance was reached, matching the approximate diameter of an upper central incisor bracket of the same manufacturer. The ligatures were kept in artificial saliva immersion at 37 ºC. Forces levels were measured immediately (0 h, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96 hours, 1, 2, 3, 4 weeks and results were submitted to two-way repeated-measures ANOVA statistical analysis. RESULTS: The gray samples showed the higher initial values of tensile strength. The lowest values were presented by purple, light pink, green, black and red groups. The greater tensile strength instability was presented by red, black, silver, green and gray groups. The greater tensile strength stability was presented by deep pink, dark blue, blue, purple and light pink groups. CONCLUSION: Elastomeric ligatures do not present stable behavior when suffering traction forces over time and different colors display different behaviors. Deep pink, dark blue, blue, purple and light pink groups, displayed the most stable forces, suggesting that they should be used during the treatment to obtain constant forces.

  10. Soft hydrogel materials from elastomeric gluten-mimetic proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Mehran; Scott, Shane; Wan, Fan; Dick, Scott; Harden, James; Biomolecular Assemblies Team

    2014-03-01

    Elastomeric proteins are ubiquitous in both animal and plant tissues, where they are responsible for the elastic response and mechanical resilience of tissues. In addition to fundamental interest in the molecular origins of their elastic behaviour, this class of proteins has great potential for use in biomaterial applications. The structural and elastomeric properties of these proteins are thought to be controlled by a subtle balance between hydrophobic interactions and entropic effects, and in many cases their characteristic properties can be recapitulated by multi-block protein polymers formed from repeats of short, characteristic polypeptide motifs. We have developed biomimetic multi-block protein polymers based on variants of several elastomeric gluten consensus sequences. These proteins include constituents designed to maximize their solubility in aqueous solution and minimize the formation of extended secondary structure. Thus, they are examples of elastic intrinsically disordered proteins. In addition, the proteins have distributed tyrosine residues which allow for inter-molecular crosslinking to form hydrogel networks. In this talk, we present experimental and simulation studies of the molecular and materials properties of these proteins and their assemblies.

  11. Integrated Microfluidic Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Yu; Wang, Yanju; Wang, Shutao; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2009-12-01

    Microfluidic reactors exhibit intrinsic advantages of reduced chemical consumption, safety, high surface-area-to-volume ratios, and improved control over mass and heat transfer superior to the macroscopic reaction setting. In contract to a continuous-flow microfluidic system composed of only a microchannel network, an integrated microfluidic system represents a scalable integration of a microchannel network with functional microfluidic modules, thus enabling the execution and automation of complicated chemical reactions in a single device. In this review, we summarize recent progresses on the development of integrated microfluidics-based chemical reactors for (i) parallel screening of in situ click chemistry libraries, (ii) multistep synthesis of radiolabeled imaging probes for positron emission tomography (PET), (iii) sequential preparation of individually addressable conducting polymer nanowire (CPNW), and (iv) solid-phase synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides. These proof-of-principle demonstrations validate the feasibility and set a solid foundation for exploring a broad application of the integrated microfluidic system.

  12. Commercialization of microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpatti, Lisa R; Yetisen, Ali K

    2014-07-01

    Microfluidic devices offer automation and high-throughput screening, and operate at low volumes of consumables. Although microfluidics has the potential to reduce turnaround times and costs for analytical devices, particularly in medical, veterinary, and environmental sciences, this enabling technology has had limited diffusion into consumer products. This article analyzes the microfluidics market, identifies issues, and highlights successful commercialization strategies. Addressing niche markets and establishing compatibility with existing workflows will accelerate market penetration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Tunable Microfluidic Dye Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Helbo, Bjarne; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2003-01-01

    We present a tunable microfluidic dye laser fabricated in SU-8. The tunability is enabled by integrating a microfluidic diffusion mixer with an existing microfluidic dye laser design by Helbo et al. By controlling the relative flows in the mixer between a dye solution and a solvent......, the concentration of dye in the laser cavity can be adjusted, allowing the wavelength to be tuned. Wavelength tuning controlled by the dye concentration was demonstrated with macroscopic dye lasers already in 1971, but this principle only becomes practically applicable by the use of microfluidic mixing...

  14. Microfluidic lab-on-a-chip platforms: requirements, characteristics and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Daniel; Haeberle, Stefan; Roth, Günter; von Stetten, Felix; Zengerle, Roland

    2010-03-01

    This critical review summarizes developments in microfluidic platforms that enable the miniaturization, integration, automation and parallelization of (bio-)chemical assays (see S. Haeberle and R. Zengerle, Lab Chip, 2007, 7, 1094-1110, for an earlier review). In contrast to isolated application-specific solutions, a microfluidic platform provides a set of fluidic unit operations, which are designed for easy combination within a well-defined fabrication technology. This allows the easy, fast, and cost-efficient implementation of different application-specific (bio-)chemical processes. In our review we focus on recent developments from the last decade (2000s). We start with a brief introduction into technical advances, major market segments and promising applications. We continue with a detailed characterization of different microfluidic platforms, comprising a short definition, the functional principle, microfluidic unit operations, application examples as well as strengths and limitations of every platform. The microfluidic platforms in focus are lateral flow tests, linear actuated devices, pressure driven laminar flow, microfluidic large scale integration, segmented flow microfluidics, centrifugal microfluidics, electrokinetics, electrowetting, surface acoustic waves, and dedicated systems for massively parallel analysis. This review concludes with the attempt to provide a selection scheme for microfluidic platforms which is based on their characteristics according to key requirements of different applications and market segments. Applied selection criteria comprise portability, costs of instrument and disposability, sample throughput, number of parameters per sample, reagent consumption, precision, diversity of microfluidic unit operations and the flexibility in programming different liquid handling protocols (295 references).

  15. A microfluidic chip for ICPMS sample introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboket, Pascal E; Borovinskaya, Olga; Meyer, Nicole; Günther, Detlef; Dittrich, Petra S

    2015-03-05

    This protocol discusses the fabrication and usage of a disposable low cost microfluidic chip as sample introduction system for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The chip produces monodisperse aqueous sample droplets in perfluorohexane (PFH). Size and frequency of the aqueous droplets can be varied in the range of 40 to 60 µm and from 90 to 7,000 Hz, respectively. The droplets are ejected from the chip with a second flow of PFH and remain intact during the ejection. A custom-built desolvation system removes the PFH and transports the droplets into the ICPMS. Here, very stable signals with a narrow intensity distribution can be measured, showing the monodispersity of the droplets. We show that the introduction system can be used to quantitatively determine iron in single bovine red blood cells. In the future, the capabilities of the introduction device can easily be extended by the integration of additional microfluidic modules.

  16. An air-pressure-free elastomeric valve for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Wooseok; Barrett, Matthew; Brooks, Carla; Rivera, Andrew; Birdsell, Dawn N.; Wagner, David M.; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2015-12-01

    We present a new elastomeric valve for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis. The valve functions include metering to capture a designated volume of biological sample into a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber, sealing to preserve the sample during PCR cycling, and transfer of the PCR-products and on-chip formamide post-processing for the analysis of DNA fragments by capillary gel electrophoresis. This new valve differs from prior art polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) valves in that the valve is not actuated externally by air-pressure or vacuum so that it simplifies a DNA analysis system by eliminating the need for an air-pressure or vacuum source, and off-cartridge solenoid valves, control circuit boards and software. Instead, the new valve is actuated by a thermal cycling peltier assembly integrated within the hardware instrument that tightly comes in contact with a microfluidic cartridge for thermal activation during PCR, so that it spontaneously closes the valve without an additional actuator system. The valve has bumps in the designated locations so that it has a self-alignment that does not require precise alignment of a valve actuator. Moreover, the thickness of the new valve is around 600 μm with an additional bump height of 400 μm so that it is easy to handle and very feasible to fabricate by injection molding compared to other PDMS valves whose thicknesses are around 30-100 μm. The new valve provided over 95% of metering performance in filling the fixed volume of the PCR chamber, preserved over 97% of the sample volume during PCR, and showed very comparable capillary electrophoresis peak heights to the benchtop assay tube controls with very consistent transfer volume of the PCR-product and on-chip formamide. The new valve can perform a core function for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis.

  17. Ocean Disposal Site Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is responsible for managing all designated ocean disposal sites. Surveys are conducted to identify appropriate locations for ocean disposal sites and to monitor the impacts of regulated dumping at the disposal sites.

  18. Lateral Response Comparison of Unbonded Elastomeric Bearings Reinforced with Carbon Fiber Mesh and Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Karimzadeh Naghshineh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The vertical and horizontal stiffness used in design of bearings have been established in the last few decades. At the meantime, applicability of the theoretical approach developed to estimate vertical stiffness of the fiber-reinforced bearings has been verified in different academic studies. The suitability of conventional horizontal stiffness equation developed for elastomeric material, mainly for steel-reinforced elastomeric bearings, has not been tested in detail for use of fiber-reinforced elastomeric bearings. In this research, lateral response of fiber mesh-reinforced elastomeric bearings has been determined through experimental tests and the results have been compared by corresponding values pertaining to the steel-reinforced bearings. Within the test program, eight pairs of fiber mesh-reinforced bearings and eight pairs of steel-reinforced bearings are subjected to different levels of compressive stress and cyclic shear strains. Fiber-reinforced elastomeric bearings may be more favorable to be used in seismic regions due to lower horizontal stiffness that can result in mitigation of seismic forces for levels of 100% shear strain. Damping properties of these types of fiber mesh-reinforced bearings depend mostly on the selection of elastomeric material compounds. Suggestions have been made for the lateral response of fiber-reinforced elastomeric bearings. It has also been determined that the classical equation for lateral stiffness based on linear elastic behavior assumptions developed for elastomeric bearings does not always apply to the fiber-reinforced ones.

  19. Performance testing of elastomeric seal materials under low and high temperature conditions: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BRONOWSKI,DAVID R.

    2000-06-01

    The US Department of Energy Offices of Defense Programs and Civilian Radioactive Waste Management jointly sponsored a program to evaluate elastomeric O-ring seal materials for radioactive material shipping containers. The report presents the results of low- and high-temperature tests conducted on 27 common elastomeric compounds.

  20. Magnetoactive elastomeric composites: Cure, tensile, electrical and magnetic properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Sasikumar; G Suresh; K A Thomas; Reji John; V Natarajan; T Mukundan; R M R Vishnubhatla

    2006-11-01

    Magnetically active elastomer materials were prepared by incorporating nickel powder in synthetic elastomeric matrices, polychloroprene and nitrile rubber. Cure characteristics, mechanical, electrical and magnetic properties were experimentally determined for different volume fractions of magnetoactive filler. The cure time decreases sharply for initial filler loading and the decrease is marginal for additional loading of filler. The tensile strength and modulus at 100% strain was found to increase with increase in the volume fraction of nickel due to reinforcement action. The magnetic impedance and a.c. conductivity are found to increase with increase in volume fraction of nickel as well as frequency.

  1. Interaction of Reinforced Elastomeric Bearings in Bridge Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nittmannová Ľubica

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the behavior of reinforced elastomeric bearings under various loads. They are made of special types of bearings. The experimental verification of these special bearings has been tested on various types of loading. The results of the experimental measurements are compared with the results of the numerical modeling and calculations according to the standard assumptions in STN EN 1337-3. In the conclusion, the results are summarized for the selected types of bearings.

  2. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-04-21

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields-and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such "unconventional" microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline.

  3. Microfluidics and microbial engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Songzi; Cheng, Danhui; Sun, Fei; Hsing, I-Ming

    2016-02-01

    The combination of microbial engineering and microfluidics is synergistic in nature. For example, microfluidics is benefiting from the outcome of microbial engineering and many reported point-of-care microfluidic devices employ engineered microbes as functional parts for the microsystems. In addition, microbial engineering is facilitated by various microfluidic techniques, due to their inherent strength in high-throughput screening and miniaturization. In this review article, we firstly examine the applications of engineered microbes for toxicity detection, biosensing, and motion generation in microfluidic platforms. Secondly, we look into how microfluidic technologies facilitate the upstream and downstream processes of microbial engineering, including DNA recombination, transformation, target microbe selection, mutant characterization, and microbial function analysis. Thirdly, we highlight an emerging concept in microbial engineering, namely, microbial consortium engineering, where the behavior of a multicultural microbial community rather than that of a single cell/species is delineated. Integrating the disciplines of microfluidics and microbial engineering opens up many new opportunities, for example in diagnostics, engineering of microbial motors, development of portable devices for genetics, high throughput characterization of genetic mutants, isolation and identification of rare/unculturable microbial species, single-cell analysis with high spatio-temporal resolution, and exploration of natural microbial communities.

  4. Elastically stretchable thin film conductors on an elastomeric substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones Harris, Joyelle Elizabeth

    Imagine a large, flat screen television that can be rolled into a small cylinder after purchase in the store and then unrolled and mounted onto the wall of a home. The electronic devices within the television must be able to withstand large deformation and tensile strain. Consider a robot that is covered with an electronic skin that simulates human skin. The skin would enable the machine to lift an elderly person with care and sensitivity. The skin will endure repeated deformation with the highest tensile strains being experienced at the robot's joints. These applications and many others will benefit from stretchable electronic circuitry. While several different methods have been employed to create stretchable electronics, all methods use a common tool -- stretchable conductors. Therefore, the goal of this thesis work was to fabricate elastically stretchable conductors that can be used in stretchable electronics. We deposited Au thin films on an elastomeric substrate, and the resulting conductors remained electrically continuous when stretched by 30% and more. We developed photolithographic processes that can be used to pattern elastically stretchable conductors with a 10 mum resolution. We fabricated bi-level stretchable conductors that are separated by an elastomeric insulator and are electrically connected through via holes in the insulator. We applied our bi-level conductors to create a stretchable resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) circuit with a tunable resonant frequency. We also used stretchable conductors to measure action potentials in biological samples. This thesis describes the fabrication and application of our elastically stretchable conductors.

  5. Recombinant Exon-Encoded Resilins for Elastomeric Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guokui; Rivkin, Amit; Lapidot, Shaul; Hu, Xiao; Arinus, Shira B.; Dgany, Or; Shoseyov, Oded; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Resilin is an elastomeric protein found in specialized regions of the cuticle of most insects, providing outstanding material properties including high resilience and fatigue lifetime for insect flight and jumping needs. Two exons (1 and 3) from the resilin gene in Drosophila melanogaster were cloned and the encoded proteins expressed as soluble products in Escherichia coli. A heat and salt precipitation method was used for efficient purification of the recombinant proteins. The proteins were solution cast from water and formed into rubber-like biomaterials via horseradish peroxidase-mediated cross-linking. Comparative studies of the two proteins expressed from the two different exons were investigated by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Circular Dichrosim (CD) for structural features. Little structural organization was found, suggesting structural order was not induced by the enzyme-mediateed dityrosine cross-links. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to study the elastomeric properties of the uncross-linked and cross-linked proteins. The protein from exon 1 exhibited 90% resilience in comparison to 63% for the protein from exon 3, and therefore may be the more critical domain for functional materials to mimic native resilin. Further, the cross-linking of the recombinant exon 1 via the citrate-modified photo-Fenton reaction was explored as an alternative dityrosine mediated polymerization method and resulted in both highly elastic and adhesive materials. The citrate-modified photo-Fenton system may be suitable for in-vivo applications of resilin biomaterials. PMID:21963157

  6. ELASTOMERIC SEISMIC-PROTECTION ISOLATORS FOR BUILDINGS AND BRIDGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshio Nishi; Nobuo Murota

    2013-01-01

    A giant earthquake of magnitude 9.0 occurred in Pacific Ocean off of Tohoku District Japan on March 11,2011.The highest seismic intensity of 7 in JMA scale was recorded in Miyagi.In the Tohoku district,around 230 buildings are seismically isolated (hereafter,SI) mainly by elastomeric isolators (seismic rubber bearings).According to the official survey reports by several organizations (for example[1]),the records of those buildings have verified the effectiveness of the seismic isolation.The response acceleration of the SI buildings was reduced by 30% to 50% of the input ground acceleration.Additionally,the difference of the conditions inside the room between SI and the fixed-base buildings was obvious as well as the damage in main structures of the buildings.The displacements of the isolators by the earthquake were around 200 mm according to the records of the instruments.As a result,the performance of SI buildings and the elastomeric isolators in the Tohoku District-Off the Pacific Ocean Earthquake 2011 were excellent,and the efficiency of the seismic isolation was verified by the records of many buildings in wide area.

  7. In vitro study of cytotoxicity of orthodontic elastomeric ligatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Lacerda dos Santos

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the cytotoxicity of crystal-coloured orthodontic elastomeric ligatures of polyurethane. Six ligatures from distinct manufactures were divided into 6 groups of 10 elastics each: Groups P1, P2, P3, P4, P5 and P6 (Polyurethane. The cytotoxicity essay was performed using L-929 line cells, which were submitted to the cell viability test with neutral red ("dye-uptake" at time intervals of 1, 2, 3, 7 and 28 days. Analysis of variance (ANOVA with multiple comparisons and Tukey's test were used (p < .05. There were statistical differences (p < .05 in cell viability between Groups P1, P4, P2 and P3, and Groups P5 and P6 at 1 and 2 days. All elastomeric ligatures were considered suitable for clinical use. The hypothesis was accepted, the P5 and P6 elastomers and the processing route of injection molding for these ligatures showed the lowest cell viability, due the temperature and pressure distinct in the processing of these elastomers.

  8. Nanomaterials meet microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumera, Martin

    2011-05-28

    Nanomaterials and lab-on-a-chip platforms have undergone enormous development during the past decade. Here, we present an overview of how microfluidics benefited from the use of nanomaterials for the enhanced separation and detection of analytes. We also discuss how nanomaterials benefit from microfluidics in terms of synthesis and in terms of the simulation of environments for nanomotors and nanorobots. In our opinion, the "marriage" of nanomaterials and microfluidics is highly beneficial and is expected to solve vital challenges in related fields.

  9. Experimental and numerical investigation of energy dissipation in elastomeric rotational joint under harmonic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jrad, Hanen; Dion, Jean Luc; Renaud, Franck; Tawfiq, Imad; Haddar, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    This paper focuses on energy losses caused by inner damping and friction in an elastomeric rotational joint. A description of the design of a new experimental device intended to characterize dynamic stiffness in rotational elastomeric joint is presented. An original method based on Lagrange's equations, which allows accurately measuring forces and torques only with accelerometers, is proposed in order to identify dissipated energy in the rotational elastomeric joint. A rheological model developed taking into account dependence of the torque and the angular displacement (rotation). Experimental results and simulations used to quantify the dissipated energy in order to evaluate the damping ratio are presented and discussed.

  10. Comparison of Dimensional Accuracies Using Two Elastomeric Impression Materials in Casting Three-dimensional Tool Marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate two types of impression materials which were frequently used for casting three-dimensional tool marks in China, namely (i) dental impression material and (ii) special elastomeric impression material for tool mark casting. The two different elastomeric impression materials were compared under equal conditions. The parameters measured were dimensional accuracies, the number of air bubbles, the ease of use, and the sharpness and quality of the individual characteristics present on casts. The results showed that dental impression material had the advantage of special elastomeric impression material in casting tool marks in crime scenes; hence, it combined ease of use, dimensional accuracy, sharpness and high quality.

  11. Punch Card Programmable Microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Korir, George

    2014-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes a series of operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series ...

  12. Cell manipulation in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hoyoung; Kim, Kisoo; Lee, Won Gu

    2013-06-01

    Recent advances in the lab-on-a-chip field in association with nano/microfluidics have been made for new applications and functionalities to the fields of molecular biology, genetic analysis and proteomics, enabling the expansion of the cell biology field. Specifically, microfluidics has provided promising tools for enhancing cell biological research, since it has the ability to precisely control the cellular environment, to easily mimic heterogeneous cellular environment by multiplexing, and to analyze sub-cellular information by high-contents screening assays at the single-cell level. Various cell manipulation techniques in microfluidics have been developed in accordance with specific objectives and applications. In this review, we examine the latest achievements of cell manipulation techniques in microfluidics by categorizing externally applied forces for manipulation: (i) optical, (ii) magnetic, (iii) electrical, (iv) mechanical and (v) other manipulations. We furthermore focus on history where the manipulation techniques originate and also discuss future perspectives with key examples where available.

  13. Microfluidics in inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Hassan, Ali; Sandre, Olivier; Cabuil, Valérie

    2010-08-23

    The application of microfluidics in chemistry has gained significant importance in the recent years. Miniaturized chemistry platforms provide controlled fluid transport, rapid chemical reactions, and cost-saving advantages over conventional reactors. The advantages of microfluidics have been clearly established in the field of analytical and bioanalytical sciences and in the field of organic synthesis. It is less true in the field of inorganic chemistry and materials science; however in inorganic chemistry it has mostly been used for the separation and selective extraction of metal ions. Microfluidics has been used in materials science mainly for the improvement of nanoparticle synthesis, namely metal, metal oxide, and semiconductor nanoparticles. Microfluidic devices can also be used for the formulation of more advanced and sophisticated inorganic materials or hybrids.

  14. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  15. Microfluidic Bead Suspension Hopper

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Alexander K.; MacConnell, Andrew B.; Paegel, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Many high-throughput analytical platforms, from next-generation DNA sequencing to drug discovery, rely on beads as carriers of molecular diversity. Microfluidic systems are ideally suited to handle and analyze such bead libraries with high precision and at minute volume scales; however, the challenge of introducing bead suspensions into devices before they sediment usually confounds microfluidic handling and analysis. We developed a bead suspension hopper that exploits sedimentation to load b...

  16. Punch Card Programmable Microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    George Korir; Manu Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external component...

  17. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-09-21

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next.

  18. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  19. Surface effects on PCR reactions in multichip microfluidic platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaro, Nicholas J; Lou, Xing Jian; Fortina, Paolo; Kricka, Larry J; Wilding, Peter

    2004-03-01

    We evaluated the compatibility of several common plastics, commercially available plastic tubing and disposable syringes which might be useful in the construction of microfluidic platforms with respect to the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A simple and inexpensive plastic test module was constructed in order to evaluate some of the construction plastics. We also investigated the effect of addition of PEG 8000 to PCR reaction mixtures on the compatibility of materials. These studies identified several common plastics, plastic tubing, and disposable syringes which were compatible with the PCR reaction.

  20. Mechanical characterization of bulk Sylgard 184 for microfluidics and microengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, I. D.; McCluskey, D. K.; Tan, C. K. L.; Tracey, M. C.

    2014-03-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomers are extensively used for soft lithographic replication of microstructures in microfluidic and micro-engineering applications. Elastomeric microstructures are commonly required to fulfil an explicit mechanical role and accordingly their mechanical properties can critically affect device performance. The mechanical properties of elastomers are known to vary with both curing and operational temperatures. However, even for the elastomer most commonly employed in microfluidic applications, Sylgard 184, only a very limited range of data exists regarding the variation in mechanical properties of bulk PDMS with curing temperature. We report an investigation of the variation in the mechanical properties of bulk Sylgard 184 with curing temperature, over the range 25 °C to 200 °C. PDMS samples for tensile and compressive testing were fabricated according to ASTM standards. Data obtained indicates variation in mechanical properties due to curing temperature for Young's modulus of 1.32-2.97 MPa, ultimate tensile strength of 3.51-7.65 MPa, compressive modulus of 117.8-186.9 MPa and ultimate compressive strength of 28.4-51.7 GPa in a range up to 40% strain and hardness of 44-54 ShA.

  1. Seismic isolation of nuclear power plants using elastomeric bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish

    Seismic isolation using low damping rubber (LDR) and lead-rubber (LR) bearings is a viable strategy for mitigating the effects of extreme earthquake shaking on safety-related nuclear structures. Although seismic isolation has been deployed in nuclear structures in France and South Africa, it has not seen widespread use because of limited new build nuclear construction in the past 30 years and a lack of guidelines, codes and standards for the analysis, design and construction of isolation systems specific to nuclear structures. The nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi in March 2011 has led the nuclear community to consider seismic isolation for new large light water and small modular reactors to withstand the effects of extreme earthquakes. The mechanical properties of LDR and LR bearings are not expected to change substantially in design basis shaking. However, under shaking more intense than design basis, the properties of the lead cores in lead-rubber bearings may degrade due to heating associated with energy dissipation, some bearings in an isolation system may experience net tension, and the compression and tension stiffness may be affected by the horizontal displacement of the isolation system. The effects of intra-earthquake changes in mechanical properties on the response of base-isolated nuclear power plants (NPPs) were investigated using an advanced numerical model of a lead-rubber bearing that has been verified and validated, and implemented in OpenSees and ABAQUS. A series of experiments were conducted at University at Buffalo to characterize the behavior of elastomeric bearings in tension. The test data was used to validate a phenomenological model of an elastomeric bearing in tension. The value of three times the shear modulus of rubber in elastomeric bearing was found to be a reasonable estimate of the cavitation stress of a bearing. The sequence of loading did not change the behavior of an elastomeric bearing under cyclic tension, and there was no

  2. Investigation and Characterisation of Resizeable Nanopores in an Elastomeric Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmott, Geoff

    2008-03-01

    Experimental and theoretical work relating to the development of resizeable synthetic nanopores will be presented. The nanopores, which are roughly conical, are formed by puncturing a relatively thick (˜250 μm) elastomeric membrane with an STM tip. The aperture can be closed and the size can be dynamically controlled by stretching the elastomer [1]. Use of this technology presents a collection of interesting physical problems, covering topics that include the failure and mechanical properties of the elastomer, flow of ionic current through the aperture and particle sensing using the resistive pulse technique. Synthetic nanopores have potential applications in many fields, but especially relating to nanoscale sensing and diagnostic devices, and replication of ion channels in living cells. [1] S. J. Sowerby, M. F. Broom, G. B. Petersen, Dynamically Resizable Nanometre-Scale Apertures for Molecular Sensing, Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical 123 (1), pp. 325-330 (2007)

  3. Flexible Connection Elastomeric Rubber as a Pounding Resisting Element between Two Adjacent Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuskar Lase

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available To solve pounding problem of two adjacent buildings, structural designer usually employs a dilatation between the structures or make the two structures as a monolith structure. Other alternative is by using an elastomeric rubber as a pounding resisting element between the two structures. Effectiveness in applying elastomeric rubber component as flexible connection of two adjacent structures is the main focus of this paper. Various simulations such as structure models, earthquake excitations and openings in gap element are studied. Observation of maximum structural responses will be performed for structure model with elastomeric rubber in comparison with (1 monolith structure model and (2 structure model with rigid element (steel element. Simulation results show that application of elastomeric rubber component to prevent structures from pounding problem provides advantages especially in reducing internal forces in the shorter building. However, it slightly increases displacement of both structures.

  4. Hydraulic performance of elastomeric bonded permeable revetments and subsoil response to wave loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oumeraci, H.; Staal, T.; Pfoertner, S.; Kudella, M.; Schimmels, S.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Elastomeric bonded permeable revetments, also called PBA (Polyurethane bonded aggregate) revetments, are highly porous structures made of mineral aggregates (e.g. crushed stones) which are durably and elastically bonded by polyurethane (PU). Despite their numerous advantages as compared to

  5. Force-Degradation Pattern of Six Different Orthodontic Elastomeric Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Mirhashemi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: An ideal orthodontic force system should exert continuous light force. Thus, many efforts have been made to improve the memory characteristics of elastomeric chains. The aim of this study was to compare elastomeric chains (ECs claimed by their manufacturers to offer high memory with traditional ones according to their force-extension diagrams.Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, ECs were divided into six groups, each containing 40 pieces of chain, from three brands (American Orthodontics, GAC and Ortho-Technology. Each brand was divided into two groups with respect to their claimed characteristics (with or without memory. Each sample was stretched to twice its original length and kept constant in 37°C distilled water. Force-extension diagrams were drawn by universal testing machine at 0,1,8,24,72 hours and 1, 2, 4-week intervals. Additionally, the amounts of elongation required to deliver 200 g force were calculated. To compare the results, ANOVA and Tukey tests were performed.Results: Force-decay rate was significantly different between traditional and memory chains (p<0.05. For traditional chains, there was a substantial decay in force in the first hour and 30-40% of the force was retained at 4 weeeks. The memory chains demonstrated more constant force and retained 60% of the force. The maximum amount of elongation required to deliver 200 g force belonged to American Orthodontics memory chains (61.9% after 24hr and the minimum to Ortho-Technology ECs (23.4% initially.Conclusion: Memory chains exhibited superior mechanical properties compared to traditional ones. For delivering the same force, memory chains required more elongation. Memory chains of GAC and American Orthodontics showed better characteristics among all chains.

  6. Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Treated non-hazardous and non-radioactive liquid wastes are collected and then disposed of through the systems at the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). More...

  7. Novel Elastomeric Closed Cell Foam - Nonwoven Fabric Composite Material (Phase III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    AFRL-RX-TY-TR-2009-4577 NOVEL ELASTOMERIC CLOSED CELL FOAM – NONWOVEN FABRIC COMPOSITE MATERIAL (PHASE III) Davis, Stephen C...07-OCT-2009 Novel Elastomeric Closed Cell Foam - Nonwoven Fabric Composite Material (Phase III) FA4819-07-D-0001 62102F 4347 D2 4347D23A Davis...develop novel closed cell foam- nonwoven fabric composites to commercial scale evaluation. Armacell tasks focused on foam optimization for commercial

  8. Punch card programmable microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korir, George; Prakash, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word "PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS" using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world.

  9. Punch card programmable microfluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Korir

    Full Text Available Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word "PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS" using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world.

  10. Analysis of the Influence of Food Colorings in Esthetic Orthodontic Elastomeric Ligatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias da Silva, Vanessa; de Lima, Eduardo Martinelli S; Dias, Caroline; Osório, Leandro Berni

    2016-01-01

    Proposition: The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro the color changes of esthetic orthodontic elastomeric ligatures of different shades when exposed to four food colorings commonly found in the diet of patients. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of esthetic orthodontic elastomeric ligatures in the colors pearl, pearl blue, pearl white and colorless, which were immersed for 72 hours in five different solutions: distilled water (control group), coffee, tea, Coca-Cola ® and wine. The color changes of the esthetic orthodontic elastomeric ligatures were measured with the aid of a spectrophotometer, at T1 - as provided by the manufacturer; and T2 - after colorings process. Results: The results indicated that the esthetic orthodontic elastomeric ligatures of all initial hues are susceptible to pigmentation. Among the evaluated colors, all changed the finished look and the color of the samples tested. In ascending order, the color of the samples was as follows: distilled water, Coca-Cola®, black tea, wine and coffee. Conclusion: The substances that have a greater potential for pigmentation in esthetic orthodontic elastomeric ligatures were black tea, wine and coffee, respectively. All shades of esthetic orthodontic elastomeric ligatures are susceptible to color change. PMID:27733878

  11. Manufacturing routes for disposable polymer blood diagnostic microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Griffiths, Christian; Azcarate, Sabino

    2008-01-01

    The future vision of multi - analysis point of care testing (POCT) shows a hand-held device that patients can use with an ease similar to current blood sugar test systems. Additionally the mobile instrument would require transfer of the measured test results wirelessly to the doctor’s office, thus...

  12. Rapid Peptide Reagent Isolation in a Disposable Microfluidic Cartridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    a format that could serve as a single resource for many ligand isolation applications has not been reported. Through the 6.1 research component of...Kratzner, R.; Kolmar, H. The Cystine Knot of a Squash-type Protease Inhibitor as a Structural Scaffold for Escherichia coli Cell Surface Display of

  13. Liquid metal enabled microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhu, Jiu Yang; Schaefer, Samira; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Dickey, Michael D

    2017-03-14

    Several gallium-based liquid metal alloys are liquid at room temperature. As 'liquid', such alloys have a low viscosity and a high surface tension while as 'metal', they have high thermal and electrical conductivities, similar to mercury. However, unlike mercury, these liquid metal alloys have low toxicity and a negligible vapor pressure, rendering them much safer. In comparison to mercury, the distinguishing feature of these alloys is the rapid formation of a self-limiting atomically thin layer of gallium oxide over their surface when exposed to oxygen. This oxide layer changes many physical and chemical properties of gallium alloys, including their interfacial and rheological properties, which can be employed and modulated for various applications in microfluidics. Injecting liquid metal into microfluidic structures has been extensively used to pattern and encapsulate highly deformable and reconfigurable electronic devices including electrodes, sensors, antennas, and interconnects. Likewise, the unique features of liquid metals have been employed for fabricating miniaturized microfluidic components including pumps, valves, heaters, and electrodes. In this review, we discuss liquid metal enabled microfluidic components, and highlight their desirable attributes including simple fabrication, facile integration, stretchability, reconfigurability, and low power consumption, with promising applications for highly integrated microfluidic systems.

  14. Microfluidic Flame Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Gregory S. (Inventor); Fisher, David J. (Inventor); Mungas, Christopher (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Propellants flow through specialized mechanical hardware that is designed for effective and safe ignition and sustained combustion of the propellants. By integrating a micro-fluidic porous media element between a propellant feed source and the combustion chamber, an effective and reliable propellant injector head may be implemented that is capable of withstanding transient combustion and detonation waves that commonly occur during an ignition event. The micro-fluidic porous media element is of specified porosity or porosity gradient selected to be appropriate for a given propellant. Additionally the propellant injector head design integrates a spark ignition mechanism that withstands extremely hot running conditions without noticeable spark mechanism degradation.

  15. Accuracy of newly formulated fast-setting elastomeric impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwani, Chandur P K; Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Raigrodski, Ariel J

    2005-06-01

    Elastomeric impression materials have been reformulated to achieve a faster set. The accuracy of fast-setting elastomeric impression materials should be confirmed, particularly with respect to disinfection. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of 2 types of fast-setting impression materials when disinfected with acid glutaraldehyde. Impressions of the mandibular arch of a modified dentoform master model were made, from which gypsum working casts and dies were formed. Measurements of the master model and working casts included anteroposterior (AP) and cross-arch (CA) dimensions. A stainless steel circular crown preparation incorporated within the master model was measured in buccolingual (BL), mesiodistal (MD), and occlusogingival (OG) dimensions and compared to measurements from recovered gypsum dies. The impression materials examined were a fast-set vinyl polysiloxane (VPS-FS, Aquasil Ultra Fast Set), a fast-set polyether (PE-FS, Impregum Penta Soft Quick Step), and a regular-setting polyether as a control (PE, Impregum Penta). Disinfection involved immersion in 3.5% acid glutaraldehyde (Banicide Advanced) for 20 minutes, and nondisinfected impressions served as a control. Linear measurements were made with a measuring microscope. Statistical analysis utilized a 2-way and single-factor analysis of variance with pair-wise comparison of mean values when appropriate. Hypothesis testing was conducted at alpha = .05 No differences were shown between the disinfected and nondisinfected conditions for all locations. However, there were statistical differences among the 3 materials for AP, CA, MD, and OG dimensions. AP and CA dimensions of all working casts were larger than the master model. Impressions produced oval-shaped working dies for all impression materials. PE and PE-FS working dies were larger in all dimensions compared to the stainless steel preparation, whereas VPS-FS-generated working dies were reduced in OG and MD dimensions. Differences

  16. Surfactants in microfluidics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michler, D.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of microfluidic techniques in the last two decades has revolutionized chemical and biological research. This technology has enabled scientists in a manifold of research fields to analyze and synthesize specimens with hither to unreached speed and precision. The number of applic

  17. Basic Microfluidics Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2015-01-01

    ,000 m−1, which is a huge difference and has a large impact on flow behavior. In this chapter the basic microfluidic theory will be presented, enabling the reader to gain a comprehensive understanding of how liquids behave at the microscale, enough to be able to engage in design of micro systems...

  18. Microfluidics for medical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Albert; van den Berg, A.; Segerink, L.I.; Segerink, Loes Irene; Unknown, [Unknown

    2015-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip devices for point of care diagnostics have been present in clinics for several years now. Alongside their continual development, research is underway to bring the organs and tissue on-a-chip to the patient, amongst other medical applications of microfluidics. This book provides the

  19. Enzyme detection by microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted...

  20. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  1. Enzyme detection by microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted...... by that enzyme...

  2. Elastomeric fluorescent POF for partial discharge detection: recent progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebler, Daniel; Hohberg, Michaela; Rohwetter, Philipp; Brusenbach, Roy; Plath, Ronald

    2015-09-01

    We present recent progress in our development of fibre-optic sensors for the detection of partial discharge (PD) in silicone cable accessories, based on detecting related low-level optical emission. We experimentally show that the sensitive optical detection of PD can dramatically enhance the performance of conventional electrical PD measurement in electromagnetically noisy environments, and that it can yield high sensitivity and specificity even when no synchronous electrical PD measurement is conducted. This is demonstrated using a real-scale model of a high voltage cable accessory with a surface-attached conventional thermoplastic fluorescent polymer optical fibre (F-POF) sensor. In order to increase light collection efficiency, as a prerequisite for a commercially competitive implementation using cost-efficient detectors, sensing fibres will have to be integrated into the silicone rubber insulation, close to the potential origin of PD-induced damage. This is the rationale for our efforts to develop elastomeric fluorescent sensing fibres, tailored to the requirements of the application. We discuss specific challenges to be tackled and report on the successful implementation of all-silicone rubber fluorescent POF, to our best knowledge for the first time.

  3. Thermal stability of the elastomeric anti-trauma pad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olszewska Karolina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The elastomeric anti-trauma pad (EA-TP based on shear thickening fluid (STF has been developed. Dynamic oscillatory shear experiment was conducted at constant strain amplitude of 5%. STF composed of 25% of volume fraction of 7 nm Fumed Silica, dispersed in polypropylene glycol with molar mass 400 gmol−1 shows elastic properties in entire investigated range of the frequency. Ballistic tests of EA-TP with 7.62 mm × 39 mm PS bullets were performed according to the PN-V-87000:2011 standard. The studies revealed about 60% reduction of the average backface signature depth (BSD for the EA-TP, when compared to the nowadays commonly used soft insert. The ATR-FTIR analysis confirmed slight impact of the elevated temperature and air (oxygen on the chemical degradation of the EA-TP surface. The UV-VIS spectroscopy has allowed to notice colour deviation of the aged samples towards green and yellow, as well as lack of dye resistance to accelerated aging process. Thermographic analysis has shown no visible changes of the EA-TP surface and sub-surface during accelerated aging process. The aforementioned small changes on the surface of EA-TP did not affect the ballistic properties of composite armour. EA-TP insert maintains ballistic properties after accelerated aging process which was simulating the period of 6 years according to ASTM F1980 – 07:2002 standard.

  4. Wettability of elastomeric impression materials: effect of selected surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, J T; Antony, S J; Dial, M L; Duncanson, M G; Shillingburg, H T

    1989-01-01

    This study evaluated seven classes of 65 impression materials for the effect of selected surfactants on contact angle values for high-strength stone. Uniform surfaces of the materials were treated with a surfactant, and stone samples were poured on each impression material surface. The samples were sectioned and photographed for measurement of the advancing contact angles. Statistical analysis supported four conclusions: No significant difference was found between the two surfactants. Both surfactants were significantly better than the control (water). Polyether impression materials were superior in wettability to the other elastomeric impression materials tested. With respect to contact angle, two distinct groups of impression materials emerged. Reversible hydrocolloid (47.7 +/- 1.5), irreversible hydrocolloid (36.8 +/- 8.8), and polyether (45.8 +/- 7.6) formed a hydrophilic group. A hydrophobic group consisted of the polysulfide (62.6 +/- 10.1), poly(vinyl siloxane) (71.1 +/- 12.3), condensation-reaction silicone (74.1 +/- 11.0), and polyethene (75.9 +/- 14.6) materials.

  5. Nanoscale Structure of Urethane/Urea Elastomeric Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Dennys; Trindade, Ana C.; Godinho, Maria Helena; Silva, Laura C.; do Carmo Gonçalves, Maria; Neto, Antônio M. Figueiredo

    2017-02-01

    The nanostructure of urethane/urea elastomeric membranes was investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) in order to establish relationships between their structure and mechanical properties. The networks were made up of polypropylene oxide (PPO) and polybutadiene (PB) segments. The structural differences were investigated in two types of membranes with the same composition but with different thermal treatment after casting. Type I was cured at 70-80 °C and type II at 20 °C. Both membranes showed similar phase separation by TEM, with nanodomains rich in PB or PPO and 25 nm dimensions. The main difference between type I and type II membranes was found by SAXS. The type I membrane spectra showed, besides a broad band at a 27-nm q value (modulus of the scattering vector), an extra band at 6 nm, which was not observed in the type II membrane. The SAXS spectra were interpreted in terms of PPO, PB soft segments, and urethane/urea links, as well as hard moiety segregation in the reaction medium. This additional segregation ( q = 7 nm), although subtle, results in diverse mechanical behavior of in both membranes.

  6. Diffusion of nanoparticles in solution through elastomeric membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemzem, Mohamed; Vinches, Ludwig; Hallé, Stéphane

    2017-04-01

    Diffusion phenomena encountered in mass transfer of liquids play an important role in many technological processes of polymer manufacturing and use. In addition and alongside the notable growth of nanoparticles use, particularly when in suspension in liquid solutions, it has become important to pay some attention to their interactions with polymeric structures. The aim of this work is to evaluate some diffusion parameters of gold nanoparticle solutions as well as of their liquid carrier (water) through elastomeric membranes. Gravimetric method was chosen as the main technique to quantify swelling phenomena and to assess kinetic properties. The dynamic liquid uptake measurements were conducted on gold nanoparticles (5 nm and 50 nm in diameter) in aqueous solutions when brought into contact with two types of nitrile material samples. Results showed that diffusion mechanism of the liquids lies between Fickian and sub-Fickian modes. Slight deviations were noticed with the gold nanoparticle solutions. A growth in liquid interaction with the rubbery structure in presence of the nanoparticles was also observed from comparison of K factor (characteristic of the elastomer-liquid interaction). Difference between the characteristics of the two membranes was also reported using this parameter. Besides, diffusion coefficients testified the impact of the membrane thickness on the penetration process, while no significant effect of the nature of the nanoparticle solution can be seen on this coefficient.

  7. Microintegrating smooth muscle cells into a biodegradable, elastomeric fiber matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankus, John J; Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro; Wagner, William R

    2006-02-01

    Electrospinning permits fabrication of biodegradable elastomers into matrices that can resemble the scale and mechanical behavior of the native extracellular matrix. However, achieving high-cellular density and infiltration with this technique remains challenging and time consuming. We have overcome this limitation by electrospraying vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) concurrently with electrospinning a biodegradable, elastomeric poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU). Trypan blue staining revealed no significant decrease in cell viability from the fabrication process and electrosprayed SMCs spread and proliferated similar to control unprocessed SMCs. The resulting SMC microintegrated PEUU constructs were cultured under static conditions or transmural perfusion. Higher cell numbers resulted with perfusion culture with 131% and 98% more viable cells versus static culture at days 4 and 7 (pfibers after perfusion culture. SMC microintegrated PEUU was strong, flexible and anisotropic with tensile strengths ranging from 2.0 to 6.5 MPa and breaking strains from 850 to 1,700% dependent on the material axis. The ability to microintegrate smooth muscle or other cell types into a biodegradable elastomer fiber matrix embodies a novel tissue engineering approach that could be applied to fabricate high cell density elastic tissue mimetics, blood vessels or other cardiovascular tissues.

  8. Impact-Induced Glass Transition in Elastomeric Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, C. M.

    2013-03-01

    When an elastomer layer is applied to the front surface of steel, the resistance to penetration by hard projectiles increases significantly. It is not obvious why a soft polymer should affect this property of metals, and most rubbers do not. However, we have found that a few are very effective; the requirement is that the polymer undergo a viscoelastic phase transition upon impact. This means that the frequency of its segmental dynamics correspond to the impact frequency. The latter is estimated as the ratio of the projectile velocity to the coating thickness, and is on the order of 105 s-1 for the experiments herein. Our data and a non-linear dynamics finite-element analysis offer support for this resonance condition as a primary mechanism underlying the penetration-resistance of elastomer-coated metal substrates. The impact-induced phase transition causes large energy absorption, decreasing the kinetic energy of the impacting projectile. However, this energy absorption only accounts for about half the enhanced stopping power of the elastomer/steel bilayer. An additional mechanism is lateral spreading of the impact force, resulting from the transient hardening of the elastomeric during its transition to the glassy state - the modulus of the rubber increases 1000-fold over a time period of microseconds. The penetration-resistance is a very nonlinear function of the coating thickness. Moreover, tests on various metals show that hardness is the principal substrate parameter controlling the contribution of the coating. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  9. Unification of reactor elastomeric sealing based on material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, N.K., E-mail: nksinha@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India); Raj, Baldev [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India)

    2012-02-15

    The unification of elastomeric sealing applications of Indian nuclear reactors based on a few qualified fluoroelastomer/perfluoroelastomer compounds and standardized approaches for finite element analysis (FEA) based design, manufacturing process and antifriction coatings is discussed. It is shown that the advance polymer architecture based Viton{sup Registered-Sign} formulation developed for inflatable seals of 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) and its four basic variations can encompass other sealing applications of PFBR with minimum additional efforts on development and validation. Changing the blend ratio of Viton{sup Registered-Sign} GBL 200S and 600S in inflatable seal formulation could extend its use to Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). The higher operating temperature of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) seals expands the choice to perfluoroelastomers. FEA based on plane-strain/axisymmetric modeling (with Mooney-Rivlin as the basic constitutive model), seal manufacture by cold feed extrusion and injection molding as well as plasma Teflon-like coating belonging to two variations obtained from the development of inflatable seals provide the necessary standardization for unification. The gains in simplification of design, development and operation of seals along with the enhancements of safety and reliability are expected to be substantial.

  10. Magnetic digital microfluidics - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2017-03-14

    A digital microfluidic platform manipulates droplets on an open surface. Magnetic digital microfluidics utilizes magnetic forces for actuation and offers unique advantages compared to other digital microfluidic platforms. First, the magnetic particles used in magnetic digital microfluidics have multiple functions. In addition to serving as actuators, they also provide a functional solid substrate for molecule binding, which enables a wide range of applications in molecular diagnostics and immunodiagnostics. Second, magnetic digital microfluidics can be manually operated in a "power-free" manner, which allows for operation in low-resource environments for point-of-care diagnostics where even batteries are considered a luxury item. This review covers research areas related to magnetic digital microfluidics. This paper first summarizes the current development of magnetic digital microfluidics. Various methods of droplet manipulation using magnetic forces are discussed, ranging from conventional magnetic particle-based actuation to the recent development of ferrofluids and magnetic liquid marbles. This paper also discusses several new approaches that use magnetically controlled flexible substrates for droplet manipulation. In addition, we emphasize applications of magnetic digital microfluidics in biosensing and medical diagnostics, and identify the current limitations of magnetic digital microfluidics. We provide a perspective on possible solutions to close these gaps. Finally, the paper discusses the future improvement of magnetic digital microfluidics to explore potential new research directions.

  11. Optimising patient safety when using elastomeric pumps to administer outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Gemma

    2016-10-27

    Outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) is a growing area of practice that has numerous benefits for both patients and the healthcare system. In order for OPAT services to be successful, strategies need to be in place to maximise efficiency while providing safe, high-quality care. The use of elastomeric pumps to deliver intravenous (IV) antibiotics can have many benefits for OPAT services; they are cost-effective, easy to use and allow the patient to be fully ambulant. However, plans need to be put in place to make sure their use is safe and effective. This article discusses the use of elastomeric pumps by a UK-based OPAT team and the governance processes the team put in place to optimise patient safety when using elastomeric pumps to deliver IV antibiotics. Furthermore, with experience of using elastomeric pumps for more than 4 years the OPAT team was asked to evaluate an elastomeric pump new to the UK market: the Accufuser pump (Vygon (UK) Limited). By collecting data on its use it was found to be safe and easy to use. The team felt that the Accufuser pump ran to time in 96% of completed evaluations and considered it to be clinically acceptable in all responses.

  12. PREFACE: Nano- and microfluidics Nano- and microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2011-05-01

    The field of nano- and microfluidics emerged at the end of the 1990s parallel to the demand for smaller and smaller containers and channels for chemical, biochemical and medical applications such as blood and DNS analysis [1], gene sequencing or proteomics [2, 3]. Since then, new journals and conferences have been launched and meanwhile, about two decades later, a variety of microfluidic applications are on the market. Briefly, 'the small flow becomes mainstream' [4]. Nevertheless, research in nano- and microfluidics is more than downsizing the spatial dimensions. For liquids on the nanoscale, surface and interface phenomena grow in importance and may even dominate the behavior in some systems. The studies collected in this special issue all concentrate on these type of systems and were part ot the priority programme SPP1164 'Nano- and Microfluidics' of the German Science Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG). The priority programme was initiated in 2002 by Hendrik Kuhlmann and myself and was launched in 2004. Friction between a moving liquid and a solid wall may, for instance, play an important role so that the usual assumption of a no-slip boundary condition is no longer valid. Likewise, the dynamic deformations of soft objects like polymers, vesicles or capsules in flow arise from the subtle interplay between the (visco-)elasticity of the object and the viscous stresses in the surrounding fluid and, potentially, the presence of structures confining the flow like channels. Consequently, new theories were developed ( see articles in this issue by Münch and Wagner, Falk and Mecke, Bonthuis et al, Finken et al, Almenar and Rauscher, Straube) and experiments were set up to unambiguously demonstrate deviations from bulk, or 'macro', behavior (see articles in this issue by Wolff et al, Vinogradova and Belyaev, Hahn et al, Seemann et al, Grüner and Huber, Müller-Buschbaum et al, Gutsche et al, Braunmüller et al, Laube et al, Brücker, Nottebrock et al

  13. Droplet microfluidics based microseparation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiliang; Niu, Menglei; Zhang, Bo

    2012-06-01

    Lab on a chip (LOC) technology is a promising miniaturization approach. The feature that it significantly reduced sample consumption makes great sense in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry. Since the start of LOC technology, much attention has been focused on continuous flow microfluidic systems. At the turn of the century, droplet microfluidics, which was also termed segmented flow microfluidics, was introduced. Droplet microfluidics employs two immiscible phases to form discrete droplets, which are ideal vessels with confined volume, restricted dispersion, limited cross-contamination, and high surface area. Due to these unique features, droplet microfluidics proves to be a versatile tool in microscale sample handling. This article reviews the utility of droplet microfluidics in microanalytical systems with an emphasize on separation science, including sample encapsulation at ultra-small volume, compartmentalization of separation bands, isolation of droplet contents, and related detection techniques.

  14. Improved fibre optic acoustic sensors for partial discharge in elastomeric insulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohwetter, Philipp; Lothongkam, Chaiyaporn; Habel, Wolfgang; Heidmann, Gerd; Pepper, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Partial discharge in elastomeric high voltage insulations is a major reason for device failure. The special challenges of the high voltage environment limit the use of conventional acoustic emission sensors. Fibre-optic sensors can cope with these challenges thanks to their optical sensing principle and the use of all-dielectric materials. In this contribution, improvements to a previously introduced design of ultrasonic fibre-optic acoustic partial discharge sensors for elastomeric insulations are presented. The improved performance of fibre-optic acoustic sensors in detecting AC partial discharge is demonstrated. Furthermore, their ability to detect low-level damage processes in elastomeric insulation under DC dielectric stress is shown to outperform the highly sensitive electrical detection method.

  15. Hybrid Integrated Silicon Microfluidic Platform for Fluorescence Based Biodetection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Darveau

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The desideratum to develop a fully integrated Lab-on-a-chip device capable ofrapid specimen detection for high throughput in-situ biomedical diagnoses and Point-of-Care testing applications has called for the integration of some of the novel technologiessuch as the microfluidics, microphotonics, immunoproteomics and Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS. In the present work, a silicon based microfluidic device hasbeen developed for carrying out fluorescence based immunoassay. By hybrid attachment ofthe microfluidic device with a Spectrometer-on-chip, the feasibility of synthesizing anintegrated Lab-on-a-chip type device for fluorescence based biosensing has beendemonstrated. Biodetection using the microfluidic device has been carried out usingantigen sheep IgG and Alexafluor-647 tagged antibody particles and the experimentalresults prove that silicon is a compatible material for the present application given thevarious advantages it offers such as cost-effectiveness, ease of bulk microfabrication,superior surface affinity to biomolecules, ease of disposability of the device etc., and is thussuitable for fabricating Lab-on-a-chip type devices.

  16. Disposable Diapers Are OK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poore, Patricia

    1992-01-01

    A personal account of measuring the pros and cons of disposable diaper usage leads the author to differentiate between a garbage problem and environmental problem. Concludes the disposable diaper issue is a political and economic issue with a local environmental impact and well within our abilities to manage. (MCO)

  17. Microfluidic Production of Multiple Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran T. Vladisavljević

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic devices are promising tools for the production of monodispersed tuneable complex emulsions. This review highlights the advantages of microfluidics for the fabrication of emulsions and presents an overview of the microfluidic emulsification methods including two-step and single-step methods for the fabrication of high-order multiple emulsions (double, triple, quadruple and quintuple and emulsions with multiple and/or multi-distinct inner cores. The microfluidic methods for the formation of multiple emulsion drops with ultra-thin middle phase, multi-compartment jets, and Janus and ternary drops composed of two or three distinct surface regions are also presented. Different configurations of microfluidic drop makers are covered, such as co-flow, T-junctions and flow focusing (both planar and three-dimensional (3D. Furthermore, surface modifications of microfluidic channels and different modes of droplet generation are summarized. Non-confined microfluidic geometries used for buoyancy-driven drop generation and membrane integrated microfluidics are also discussed. The review includes parallelization and drop splitting strategies for scaling up microfluidic emulsification. The productivity of a single drop maker is typically <1 mL/h; thus, more than 1000 drop makers are needed to achieve commercially relevant droplet throughputs of >1 L/h, which requires combining drop makers into twodimensional (2D and 3D assemblies fed from a single set of inlet ports through a network of distribution and collection channels.

  18. Methods of making microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Buttner, Ulrich

    2017-06-01

    Microfluidics has advanced in terms of designs and structures, however, fabrication methods are either time consuming or expensive to produce, in terms of the facilities and equipment needed. A fast and economically viable method is provided to allow, for example, research groups to have access to microfluidic fabrication. Unlike most fabrication methods, a method is provided to fabricate a microfluidic device in one step. In an embodiment, a resolution of 50 micrometers was achieved by using maskless high-resolution digital light projection (MDLP). Bonding and channel fabrication of complex or simple structures can be rapidly incorporated to fabricate the microfluidic devices.

  19. Baxter elastomeric pumps: Weighing as an alternative to visual inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusano, Ellen L; Ali, Raafi; Sawyer, Michael B; Chambers, Carole R; Tang, Patricia A

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Elastomeric pumps are used to administer 46-hour infusions of 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Baxter suggests patients visually monitor their pumps to ensure that infusions are proceeding correctly. This can be confusing and lead to concerns about under- or over-dosing. Baxter has not considered weighing pumps as a validated method for monitoring. This study aims to validate weighing as a more accurate method for patients and healthcare professionals, and describe real life Baxter Infusor™ variability. Methods Patients who had been started on a 46-hour 5FU infusion returned to the clinic approximately 24 h after starting treatment. The pump was weighed on a StarFrit kitchen scale, and date, time, and weights recorded. Patients were asked if they had a preference for weighing or visually inspecting their pump. Results Pumps ( n = 103) were weighed between 17.25 and 27.5 h after connection. The average weight of a pump was 189 g. Of 103 pumps weighed, 99 weighed less than expected, corresponding to average flow rates of 5.69 mL/h over the elapsed time. The expected flow rate is 5 mL/h with 10% variability. Average flow rates within the 17.25- to 27.5-hour window were 4.561 mL/h, which is 8.78% slower than expected, but within the 10% known variability. Forty-seven percent of patients didn't have a preference for either method, but for those who did have a preference, more than twice as many preferred weighing. Conclusion With proper education, weighing Baxter Infusors at home with kitchen scales can be an accepted and objective alternative to the current recommendation of visual inspection.

  20. Effect of storage period on the accuracy of elastomeric impressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Batista Franco

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To investigate the effect of the storage period on the accuracy of recently developed elastomeric materials. METHODS: Simultaneous impressions of a steel die were taken using a polyether (I: Impregum Soft Heavy and Light body, 3M ESPE and vinyl polysiloxane (P: Perfectim Blue Velvet and Flexi-Velvet, J.Morita. The trays were loaded with the heavy-bodied impression materials while the light-bodied impression materials were simultaneously spread on the steel die. The impressions were poured after 2 hours, 24 hours, and 7 days. Impressions were stored at approximately 55% relative humidity and room temperature. Ten replicas were produced for each experimental condition (n=60. Accuracy of the stone dies was assessed with a depth-measuring microscope. The difference in height between the surface of the stone die and a standard metallic ring was recorded in micrometers at four demarcated points, by two independent examiners. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (a = 0.05. RESULTS: Significant differences were found among the groups. Smaller discrepancies were observed when pouring was performed up to 24 hours (I-2h= 65.0 ± 15.68 µm; I-24h= 81.6 ± 11.13 µm for the polyether, and up to 7 days for the vinyl polysiloxane (P-2h= 79.1 ± 13.82 µm; P-24h= 96.8 ± 6.02 µm; P-7d= 81.4 ± 4.3 µm. Significant dimensional discrepancies, however, were observed when polyether was stored for 7 days (I-7d= 295.3 ± 17.4 µm. CONCLUSION: Storage may significantly affect the dimensional accuracy of impressions and, thus, a maximum period and storage condition should be specified for the recently developed materials.

  1. Thermally tailored gradient topography surface on elastomeric thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sudeshna; Bhandaru, Nandini; Das, Ritopa; Harikrishnan, G; Mukherjee, Rabibrata

    2014-05-14

    We report a simple method for creating a nanopatterned surface with continuous variation in feature height on an elastomeric thin film. The technique is based on imprinting the surface of a film of thermo-curable elastomer (Sylgard 184), which has continuous variation in cross-linking density introduced by means of differential heating. This results in variation of viscoelasticity across the length of the surface and the film exhibits differential partial relaxation after imprinting with a flexible stamp and subjecting it to an externally applied stress for a transient duration. An intrinsic perfect negative replica of the stamp pattern is initially created over the entire film surface as long as the external force remains active. After the external force is withdrawn, there is partial relaxation of the applied stresses, which is manifested as reduction in amplitude of the imprinted features. Due to the spatial viscoelasticity gradient, the extent of stress relaxation induced feature height reduction varies across the length of the film (L), resulting in a surface with a gradient topography with progressively varying feature heights (hF). The steepness of the gradient can be controlled by varying the temperature gradient as well as the duration of precuring of the film prior to imprinting. The method has also been utilized for fabricating wettability gradient surfaces using a high aspect ratio biomimetic stamp. The use of a flexible stamp allows the technique to be extended for creating a gradient topography on nonplanar surfaces as well. We also show that the gradient surfaces with regular structures can be used in combinatorial studies related to pattern directed dewetting.

  2. Elastomeric Seal Performance after Terrestrial Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Oravec, Heather A.; Mather, Janice L.; Taylor, Shawn C.; Dunlap, Patrick H.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation was evaluated to determine its negative effects on the performance of elastomeric gas pressure seals. The leak rates of the silicone elastomer S0383-70 O-ring test articles were used to quantify the degradation of the seals after exposure to vacuum-ultraviolet and/or middle-to-near-ultraviolet wavelength radiation. Three groups of seals were exposed in terrestrial facilities to 115-165 nm wavelength radiation, 230-500 nm wavelength radiation, or both spectrums, for an orbital spaceflight equivalent of 125 hours. The leak rates of the silicone elastomer S0383-70 seals were quantified and compared to samples that received no radiation. Each lot contained six samples and statistical t-tests were used to determine the separate and combined influences of exposure to the two wavelength ranges. A comparison of the mean leak rates of samples exposed to 115-165 nm wavelength radiation to the control specimens showed no difference, suggesting that spectrum was not damaging. The 230-500 nm wavelength appeared to be damaging, as the mean leak rates of the specimens exposed to that range of wavelengths, and those exposed to the combined 115-165 nm and 230-500 nm spectrums, were significantly different from the leak rates of the control specimens. Most importantly, the test articles exposed to both wavelength spectrums exhibited mean leak rates two orders of magnitude larger than any other exposed specimens, which suggested that both wavelength spectrums are important when simulating the orbital environment.

  3. Injectable Drug Eluting Elastomeric Polymer: A Novel Submucosal Injection Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Richard T.; Palmer, Michael; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Abell, Thomas L.; Yang, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Background Biodegradable hydrogels can deliver therapeutic payloads with great potentials in endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) to yield improvements in efficacy and foster mucosal regeneration. Objective To assess the efficacy of an injectable drug eluting elastomeric polymer (iDEEP) as a submucosal injection material. Design Comparative study among 3 different solutions using material characterization tests, ex vivo and in vivo porcine models. Setting Academic hospital. Interventions 30 gastric submucosal cushions were achieved with saline (0.9%), sodium hyaluronate (0.4%), and iDEEP (n = 10) in ex vivo porcine stomachs. Four porcine gastric submucosal cushions were then performed in vivo using iDEEP. Main outcome measurements Maximum injection pressure, Rebamipide release rate, submucosal elevation duration, and assessment of in vivo efficacy by en bloc resection. Results No significant difference in injection pressures between iDEEP (28.9 ± 0.3 PSI) and sodium hyaluronate (29.5 ± 0.4 PSI, P > .05) was observed. iDEEP gels displayed a controlled release of Rebamipide up to 2 weeks in vitro. The elevation height of iDEEP (5.7 ± 0.5 mm) was higher than saline (2.8 ± 0.2 mm, P < .01) and SH (4.2 ± 0.2 mm, P < .05). All EMR procedures were successfully performed after injection of iDEEP, and a large gel cushion was noted after the resection procedure. Limitations Benchtop, ex vivo, and non-survival pig study. Conclusions A novel injection solution was evaluated for endoscopic resection. These results suggest that iDEEP may provide a significant step towards the realization of an ideal EMR and ESD injection material. PMID:22301346

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Elastomeric Heptablock Terpolymers Structured by Crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonzo, C.Guillermo; Fleury, Guillaume; Chaffin, Kimberly A.; Bates, Frank S. (UMM); (Medtronic)

    2010-12-07

    We report the synthesis and characterization of fully saturated hydrocarbon block copolymer thermoplastic elastomers with competitive mechanical properties and attractive processing features. Block copolymers containing glassy poly(cyclohexylethylene) (C), elastomeric poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (P), and semicrystalline poly(ethylene) (E) were produced in a CEC-P-CEC heptablock architecture, denoted XPX, by anionic polymerization and catalytic hydrogenation. The X blocks contain equal volume fractions of C and E, totaling 40%-60% of the material overall. All the XPX polymers are disordered above the melt temperature for E (T{sub m,E} {approx_equal} 95 C) as evidenced by SAXS and dynamic mechanical spectroscopy measurements. Cooling below T{sub m,E} results in crystallization of the E blocks, which induces microphase segregation of E, C, and P into a complex morphology with a continuous rubbery domain and randomly arranged hard domains as shown by TEM. This mechanism of segregation decouples the processing temperature from the XPX molecular weight up to a limiting value. Tensile mechanical testing (simple extension and cyclic loading) demonstrates that the tensile strength (ca. 30 MPa) and strain at break (>500%) are comparable to the behavior of CPC triblock thermoplastic elastomers of similar molecular weight and glass content. However, in the CPC materials, processability is constrained by the order-disorder transition temperature, limiting the applications of these materials. Elastic recovery of the XPX materials following seven cycles of tensile deformation is correlated with the fraction of X in the heptablock copolymer, and the residual strain approaches that of CPC when the fraction of hard blocks f{sub X} {le} 0.39.

  5. Microfluidic bubble logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Manu; Gershenfeld, Neil

    2007-02-09

    We demonstrate universal computation in an all-fluidic two-phase microfluidic system. Nonlinearity is introduced into an otherwise linear, reversible, low-Reynolds number flow via bubble-to-bubble hydrodynamic interactions. A bubble traveling in a channel represents a bit, providing us with the capability to simultaneously transport materials and perform logical control operations. We demonstrate bubble logic AND/OR/NOT gates, a toggle flip-flop, a ripple counter, timing restoration, a ring oscillator, and an electro-bubble modulator. These show the nonlinearity, gain, bistability, synchronization, cascadability, feedback, and programmability required for scalable universal computation. With increasing complexity in large-scale microfluidic processors, bubble logic provides an on-chip process control mechanism integrating chemistry and computation.

  6. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” – often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level.

  7. The Microfluidic Jukebox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Say Hwa; Maes, Florine; Semin, Benoît; Vrignon, Jérémy; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2014-04-01

    Music is a form of art interweaving people of all walks of life. Through subtle changes in frequencies, a succession of musical notes forms a melody which is capable of mesmerizing the minds of people. With the advances in technology, we are now able to generate music electronically without relying solely on physical instruments. Here, we demonstrate a musical interpretation of droplet-based microfluidics as a form of novel electronic musical instruments. Using the interplay of electric field and hydrodynamics in microfluidic devices, well controlled frequency patterns corresponding to musical tracks are generated in real time. This high-speed modulation of droplet frequency (and therefore of droplet sizes) may also provide solutions that reconciles high-throughput droplet production and the control of individual droplet at production which is needed for many biochemical or material synthesis applications.

  8. Microfluidic redox battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-01

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications.

  9. Elastomeric Properties of Poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) Based Nanoparticle Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun-Joong; Li, Xinda; Hong, Albert T.-L.

    2014-03-01

    Owing to the unique combination of biocompatible, biodegradable, and elastomeric properties, poly(glycerol sebacate) and their derivatives are an emerging class of biomaterials for soft tissue replacement, drug delivery, tissue adhesive, and hard tissue regeneration. The mechanical properties of the polyester have been tailored to match a wide range of target organs, ranging from cardiac muscle to bones, by manipulating the process parameters to modulate cross-linking density. In the present study, we applied nanoparticles and cross-linking agents to further optimize their elastomeric properties. Especially, the study aims to enhance the practically important, but less studied, property of tear resistance. Microscopic origin of the property enhancement is discussed.

  10. Droplet based microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Ralf; Brinkmann, Martin; Pfohl, Thomas; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Droplet based microfluidics is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of research combining soft matter physics, biochemistry and microsystems engineering. Its applications range from fast analytical systems or the synthesis of advanced materials to protein crystallization and biological assays for living cells. Precise control of droplet volumes and reliable manipulation of individual droplets such as coalescence, mixing of their contents, and sorting in combination with fast analysis tools allow us to perform chemical reactions inside the droplets under defined conditions. In this paper, we will review available drop generation and manipulation techniques. The main focus of this review is not to be comprehensive and explain all techniques in great detail but to identify and shed light on similarities and underlying physical principles. Since geometry and wetting properties of the microfluidic channels are crucial factors for droplet generation, we also briefly describe typical device fabrication methods in droplet based microfluidics. Examples of applications and reaction schemes which rely on the discussed manipulation techniques are also presented, such as the fabrication of special materials and biophysical experiments.

  11. Droplet based microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Ralf; Brinkmann, Martin; Pfohl, Thomas; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Droplet based microfluidics is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of research combining soft matter physics, biochemistry and microsystems engineering. Its applications range from fast analytical systems or the synthesis of advanced materials to protein crystallization and biological assays for living cells. Precise control of droplet volumes and reliable manipulation of individual droplets such as coalescence, mixing of their contents, and sorting in combination with fast analysis tools allow us to perform chemical reactions inside the droplets under defined conditions. In this paper, we will review available drop generation and manipulation techniques. The main focus of this review is not to be comprehensive and explain all techniques in great detail but to identify and shed light on similarities and underlying physical principles. Since geometry and wetting properties of the microfluidic channels are crucial factors for droplet generation, we also briefly describe typical device fabrication methods in droplet based microfluidics. Examples of applications and reaction schemes which rely on the discussed manipulation techniques are also presented, such as the fabrication of special materials and biophysical experiments.

  12. Detection of heavy metal by paper-based microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yang; Gritsenko, Dmitry; Feng, Shaolong; Teh, Yi Chen; Lu, Xiaonan; Xu, Jie

    2016-09-15

    Heavy metal pollution has shown great threat to the environment and public health worldwide. Current methods for the detection of heavy metals require expensive instrumentation and laborious operation, which can only be accomplished in centralized laboratories. Various microfluidic paper-based analytical devices have been developed recently as simple, cheap and disposable alternatives to conventional ones for on-site detection of heavy metals. In this review, we first summarize current development of paper-based analytical devices and discuss the selection of paper substrates, methods of device fabrication, and relevant theories in these devices. We then compare and categorize recent reports on detection of heavy metals using paper-based microfluidic devices on the basis of various detection mechanisms, such as colorimetric, fluorescent, and electrochemical methods. To finalize, the future development and trend in this field are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Microfluidic desalination. Capacitive deionization on chip for microfluidic sample preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Susan Helena

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the work described in this thesis is to implement the desalination technique capacitive deionization (CDI) on a microfluidic chip to improve the reproducibility in the analysis of biological samples for drug development. Secondly, microfluidic CDI allows for the in situ study of ion

  14. Disposable cartridge biosensor platform for portable diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaras, Yusuf S.; Cakmak, Onur; Gunduz, Ali B.; Saglam, Gokhan; Olcer, Selim; Mostafazadeh, Aref; Baris, Ibrahim; Civitci, Fehmi; Yaralioglu, Goksen G.; Urey, Hakan

    2017-03-01

    We developed two types of cantilever-based biosensors for portable diagnostics applications. One sensor is based on MEMS cantilever chip mounted in a microfluidic channel and the other sensor is based on a movable optical fiber placed across a microfluidic channel. Both types of sensors were aimed at direct mechanical measurement of coagulation time in a disposable cartridge using plasma or whole blood samples. There are several similarities and also some important differences between the MEMS based and the optical fiber based solutions. The aim of this paper is to provide a comparison between the two solutions and the results. For both types of sensors, actuation of the cantilever or the moving fiber is achieved using an electro coil and the readout is optical. Since both the actuation and sensing are remote, no electrical connections are required for the cartridge. Therefore it is possible to build low cost disposable cartridges. The reader unit for the cartridge contains light sources, photodetectors, the electro coil, a heater, analog electronics, and a microprocessor. The reader unit has different optical interfaces for the cartridges that have MEMS cantilevers and moving fibers. MEMS based platform has better sensitivity but optomechanical alignment is a challenge and measurements with whole blood were not possible due to high scattering of light by the red blood cells. Fiber sensor based platform has relaxed optomechanical tolerances, ease of manufacturing, and it allows measurements in whole blood. Both sensors were tested using control plasma samples for activated-Partial-Thromboplastin-Time (aPTT) measurements. Control plasma test results matched with the manufacturer's datasheet. Optical fiber based system was tested for aPTT tests with human whole blood samples and the proposed platform provided repeatable test results making the system method of choice for portable diagnostics.

  15. Path to Low Cost Microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Govyadinov, Alexander N; Kornilovitch, Pavel; Markel, David

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes a novel concept for a low cost microfluidic platform utilizing materials and processes used in low cost thermal inkjet printing. The concept re-purposes the jetting elements to create pumps, mixers, and valves all necessary components for the transport of fluids in a broad range of microfluidic applications.

  16. Microfluidic devices for biological applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Potgieter, S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available , faster reaction times and process-specific designs. A microfluidic system typically consists of a series of channels with components like pumps, valves and actuators to control the flow of fluids. One of the applications being worked on is a microfluidic...

  17. Centrifugal microfluidics for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorkin, Robert; Park, Jiwoon; Siegrist, Jonathan; Amasia, Mary; Lee, Beom Seok; Park, Jong-Myeon; Kim, Jintae; Kim, Hanshin; Madou, Marc; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2010-07-21

    The centrifugal microfluidic platform has been a focus of academic and industrial research efforts for almost 40 years. Primarily targeting biomedical applications, a range of assays have been adapted on the system; however, the platform has found limited commercial success as a research or clinical tool. Nonetheless, new developments in centrifugal microfluidic technologies have the potential to establish wide-spread utilization of the platform. This paper presents an in-depth review of the centrifugal microfluidic platform, while highlighting recent progress in the field and outlining the potential for future applications. An overview of centrifugal microfluidic technologies is presented, including descriptions of advantages of the platform as a microfluidic handling system and the principles behind centrifugal fluidic manipulation. The paper also discusses a history of significant centrifugal microfluidic platform developments with an explanation of the evolution of the platform as it pertains to academia and industry. Lastly, we review the few centrifugal microfluidic-based sample-to-answer analysis systems shown to date and examine the challenges to be tackled before the centrifugal platform can be more broadly accepted as a new diagnostic platform. In particular, fully integrated, easy to operate, inexpensive and accurate microfluidic tools in the area of in vitro nucleic acid diagnostics are discussed.

  18. Acoustofluidics 1: Governing equations in microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Governing equations for microfluidics and basic flow solutions are presented. Equivalent circuit modeling for determining flow rates in microfluidic networks is introduced.......Governing equations for microfluidics and basic flow solutions are presented. Equivalent circuit modeling for determining flow rates in microfluidic networks is introduced....

  19. Integrated Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the center of the 586-square-mile Hanford Site is the Integrated Disposal Facility, also known as the IDF.This facility is a landfill similar in concept...

  20. Polypentapeptide of elastin: temperature dependence of ellipticity and correlation with elastomeric force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urry, D W; Shaw, R G; Prasad, K U

    1985-07-16

    Circular dichroism (CD) is used to follow the conformational changes that attend temperature dependent aggregation leading to the viscoelastic (coacervate) state of the polypentapeptide of elastin in water. Two concentrations are used, 2.3 mg/ml and 0.023 mg/ml. The former results in aggregates of a size that exhibit much particulate distortion of the CD spectra whereas the latter results in spectra that are relatively free of distortions. Given the CD spectra of the temperature dependent aggregation of the lower concentration, it is possible to show that the same conformational change is occurring at high concentration. The structure of the polypentapeptide is one of limited order below 20 degrees C which undergoes an inverse temperature transition to a conformation characterized by a regularly recurring beta-turn at 40 degrees C. The temperature profile for the conformational change is compared to the temperature dependence of elastomeric force of gamma-irradiation cross-linked polypentapeptide coacervate. The curves virtually superimpose. When there is little order, there is little elastomeric force and elastomeric force develops to a near maximal value as the repeating Type II beta-turn conformation develops. Not only is the elastomeric state non-random, the more nearly random state has very little elasticity. These results are the inverse of expectations based on the classical theory of rubber elasticity.

  1. A fiber-optic powered wireless sensor module made on elastomeric substrate for wearable sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, V; Lin, H; Chuang, J; Sailor, M; Lo, Y

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate an integrated sensor module that combines a photonic nano-porous sensor and a bias-free optical powered RF transducer. The sensor signal is encoded in the RF frequency ready for transmission. The entire sensor module does not include battery and is constructed with the flexible and biocompatible elastomeric polymer, PDMS. This technology holds promise for wearable sensors.

  2. MICROFLUIDIC COMPONENT CAPABLE OF SELF-SEALING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A microfluidic component (100) for building a microfluidic system is provided. The microfluidic component (100) can be mounted on a microf luidic breadboard (202) in a manner that allows it to be connected to other microfluidic components (204, 206) without the requirement of additional devices....... The microfluidic component (100) comprises at least one flexible tube piece (102) for transporting a fluid. The microfluidic component (100) also comprises means for applying and maintaining pressure (104) between the flexible tube piece (102) and a tube piece (208, 210) housed in another microfluidic component...

  3. Rapid, low-cost prototyping of centrifugal microfluidic devices for effective implementation of various microfluidic operations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hugo, S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The work presented here details the implementation of a centrifugal microfluidic platform – the first of its kind in South Africa – as a foundation for the development of various microfluidic operations. Microfluidic systems enable the precise...

  4. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Microfluidic scintillation detectors are devices of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles, developed within the EP-DT group at CERN. Most of the interest for such technology comes from the use of liquid scintillators, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to an increased radiation resistance. This feature, together with the high spatial resolution and low thickness deriving from the microfabrication techniques used to manufacture such devices, is desirable not only in instrumentation for high energy physics experiments but also in medical detectors such as beam monitors for hadron therapy.

  5. Rapid manufacturing for microfluidics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Land, K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available . Microfluidics is at the forefront of developing solutions for drug discovery, diagnostics (from glucose tests to malaria and TB testing) and environmental diagnostics (E-coli monitoring of drinking water). In order to quickly implement new designs, a rapid... stream_source_info Land_2012.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 2089 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Land_2012.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Rapid manufacturing...

  6. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  7. Spatial manipulation with microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eLin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical gradients convey information through space, time, and concentration, and are ultimately capable of spatially resolving distinct cellular phenotypes, such as differentiation, proliferation, and migration. How these gradients develop, evolve, and function during development, homeostasis, and various disease states is a subject of intense interest across a variety of disciplines. Microfluidic technologies have become essential tools for investigating gradient sensing in vitro due to their ability to precisely manipulate fluids on demand in well controlled environments at cellular length scales. This minireview will highlight their utility for studying gradient sensing along with relevant applications to biology.

  8. Pain and distress induced by elastomeric and spring separators in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Balbeesi, Hana O.; Bin Huraib, Sahar M.; AlNahas, Nadia W.; AlKawari, Huda M.; Abu-Amara, Abdulrahman B.; Vellappally, Sajith; Anil, Sukumaran

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The objective of the present investigation is to evaluate patients’ pain perception and discomfort, the duration of pain and the level of self-medication over time during tooth separation, and the effectiveness of elastomeric and spring types of orthodontic separators in Saudi population. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 30 female adolescent patients who had elastomeric/spring separators as part of their orthodontic treatment. A self-administrated questionnaire comprising 16 multiple choice questions and another with visual analog scale were used to record the patient's pain perceptions at 4 hours, 24 hours, 3 days, 5 days, and 7 days from the time of insertion. The level of pain and discomfort during these time periods were assessed by a visual analog scale. After a separation period of 7 days, the amount of separation was measured with a leaf gauge. Type and frequency of analgesic consumption was also recorded. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20 (IBM SPSS -Chicago, IL: SPSS Inc.,) was used for statistical analysis. Results: The data showed significant increase in the level of pain at 4 hours, 24 hours, and 3 days from separator placement. The elastomeric separators produced significantly more separation than the spring separators and also caused maximum pain during the first 3 days after insertion. However, there was no significant difference between the score of pain between two separators at all time intervals. Conclusion: Both elastomeric and spring separators showed comparative levels of pain and discomfort during the early phase of separation. Elastomeric separators were found to be more effective in tooth separation than spring separators. However, further studies are necessary to substantiate this preliminary observation. PMID:28032047

  9. Development of a multiplexed microfluidic proteomic reactor and its application for studying protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ruijun; Hoa, Xuyen Dai; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Pezacki, John Paul; Veres, Teodor; Figeys, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics techniques have been very successful for the identification and study of protein-protein interactions. Typically, immunopurification of protein complexes is conducted, followed by protein separation by gel electrophoresis and in-gel protein digestion, and finally, mass spectrometry is performed to identify the interacting partners. However, the manual processing of the samples is time-consuming and error-prone. Here, we developed a polymer-based microfluidic proteomic reactor aimed at the parallel analysis of minute amounts of protein samples obtained from immunoprecipitation. The design of the proteomic reactor allows for the simultaneous processing of multiple samples on the same devices. Each proteomic reactor on the device consists of SCX beads packed and restricted into a 1 cm microchannel by two integrated pillar frits. The device is fabricated using a combination of low-cost hard cyclic olefin copolymer thermoplastic and elastomeric thermoplastic materials (styrene/(ethylene/butylenes)/styrene) using rapid hot-embossing replication techniques with a polymer-based stamp. Three immunopurified protein samples are simultaneously captured, reduced, alkylated, and digested on the device within 2-3 h instead of the days required for the conventional protein-protein interaction studies. The limit of detection of the microfluidic proteomic reactor was shown to be lower than 2 ng of protein. Furthermore, the application of the microfluidic proteomic reactor was demonstrated for the simultaneous processing of the interactome of the histone variant Htz1 in wild-type yeast and in a swr1Δ yeast strain compared to an untagged control using a novel three-channel microfluidic proteomic reactor.

  10. Electro-Microfluidic Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, G. L.; Galambos, P. C.

    2002-06-01

    There are many examples of electro-microfluidic products that require cost effective packaging solutions. Industry has responded to a demand for products such as drop ejectors, chemical sensors, and biological sensors. Drop ejectors have consumer applications such as ink jet printing and scientific applications such as patterning self-assembled monolayers or ejecting picoliters of expensive analytes/reagents for chemical analysis. Drop ejectors can be used to perform chemical analysis, combinatorial chemistry, drug manufacture, drug discovery, drug delivery, and DNA sequencing. Chemical and biological micro-sensors can sniff the ambient environment for traces of dangerous materials such as explosives, toxins, or pathogens. Other biological sensors can be used to improve world health by providing timely diagnostics and applying corrective measures to the human body. Electro-microfluidic packaging can easily represent over fifty percent of the product cost and, as with Integrated Circuits (IC), the industry should evolve to standard packaging solutions. Standard packaging schemes will minimize cost and bring products to market sooner.

  11. Disposal of radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dorp, Frits; Grogan, Helen; McCombie, Charles

    The aim of radioactive and non-radioactive waste management is to protect man and the environment from unacceptable risks. Protection criteria for both should therefore be based on similar considerations. From overall protection criteria, performance criteria for subsystems in waste management can be derived, for example for waste disposal. International developments in this field are summarized. A brief overview of radioactive waste sorts and disposal concepts is given. Currently being implemented are trench disposal and engineered near-surface facilities for low-level wastes. For low-and intermediate-level waste underground facilities are under construction. For high-level waste site selection and investigation is being carried out in several countries. In all countries with nuclear programmes, the predicted performance of waste disposal systems is being assessed in scenario and consequence analyses. The influences of variability and uncertainty of parameter values are increasingly being treated by probabilistic methods. Results of selected performance assessments show that radioactive waste disposal sites can be found and suitable repositories can be designed so that defined radioprotection limits are not exceeded.

  12. Microfluidic fuel cells and batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Kjeang, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic fuel cells and batteries represent a special type of electrochemical power generators that can be miniaturized and integrated in a microfluidic chip. Summarizing the initial ten years of research and development in this emerging field, this SpringerBrief is the first book dedicated to microfluidic fuel cell and battery technology for electrochemical energy conversion and storage. Written at a critical juncture, where strategically applied research is urgently required to seize impending technology opportunities for commercial, analytical, and educational utility, the intention is

  13. The Effect of Disinfectants and a Surface Wetting Agent on the Wettability of Elastomeric Impression Materials: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lad, Pritam P; Gurjar, Minal; Gunda, Sachin; Gurjar, Vivek; Rao, Nandan K

    2015-06-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of two commercially available chemical disinfectants namely sodium hypochlorite and glutaraldehyde and a surface wetting agent on the wettability of three high precision elastomeric impression materials, addition silicone, condensation silicone and polyether. Three different types of elastomeric impression materials commonly used in prosthodontic practice were selected. The glutaraldehyde and sodium hypochloride solutions were employed to disinfect the impressions made with the above-mentioned elastomeric impression materials. True Blue surface wetting agent was selected. GBX contact angle analyzer was used to measure advancing and receding contact angle. The results of this study have demonstrated that the polyether impression material was the most hydrophilic of all the materials, followed by hydrophilic addition silicone. Condensation silicone was least hydrophilic. All materials showed improvement in the wettability when a topical surfactant was used. The short term disinfection of the three elastomeric impression materials does not affect the wettability of these impression materials.

  14. Microfluidic Multichannel Flow Cytometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a "Microfluidic Multichannel Flow Cytometer." Several novel concepts are integrated to produce the final design, which is compatible with...

  15. Whole-Teflon microfluidic chips

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kangning Ren; Wen Dai; Jianhua Zhou; Jing Su; Hongkai Wu

    2011-01-01

    .... In this work, we present a convenient strategy for fabricating whole-Teflon microfluidic chips with integrated valves that show outstanding inertness to various chemicals and extreme resistance against all solvents...

  16. Universal hydrophilic coating of thermoplastic polymers currently used in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilio, Caterina; Sola, Laura; Damin, Francesco; Faggioni, Lucia; Chiari, Marcella

    2014-02-01

    A number of materials used to fabricate disposable microfluidic devices are hydrophobic in nature with water contact angles on their surface ranging from 80° to over 100°. This characteristic makes them unsuitable for a number of microfluidic applications. Both the wettability and analyte adsorption parameters are highly dependent on the surface hydrophobicity. In this article, we propose a general method to coat the surface of five materials: polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polycarbonate (PC), and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). This fast and robust process, which is easily implementable in any laboratory including microfabrication clean room facilities, was devised by combining gas-phase and wet chemical modification processes. Two different coatings that improve the surface hydrophilicity were prepared via the "dip and rinse" approach by immersing the plasma oxidized materials into an aqueous solution of two different poly(dimethylacrylamide) copolymers incorporating a silane moiety and functionalized with either N-acryloyloxysuccinimide (NAS) (poly(DMA-NAS-MAPS) or glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) (poly(DMA-GMA-MAPS). The coating formation was confirmed by contact angle (CA) analysis comparing the variation of CAs of uncoated and coated surfaces subjected to different aging treatments. The antifouling character of the polymer was demonstrated by fluorescence and interferometric detection of proteins adsorbed on the surafce. This method is of great interest in microfluidics due to its broad applicability to a number of materials with varying chemical compositions.

  17. Perspective: microfluidic applications in microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh-Lakha, Saleema; Trevors, Jack T

    2010-07-01

    The application of microfluidics technology to microbiology research is an excellent platform for the analysis of microorganisms and their nucleic acids. This technology combines engineering, physics, chemistry, biology and computing to control the devices. In this perspective we discuss how microfluidics can be applied to microbiological research and used in diagnostic applications. We also summarize advantages and limitations of this technology, as well as highlight some recent microbiological applications.

  18. Passive microfluidic array card and reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Lawrence Christopher [Modesto, CA; Coleman, Matthew A [Oakland, CA

    2011-08-09

    A microfluidic array card and reader system for analyzing a sample. The microfluidic array card includes a sample loading section for loading the sample onto the microfluidic array card, a multiplicity of array windows, and a transport section or sections for transporting the sample from the sample loading section to the array windows. The microfluidic array card reader includes a housing, a receiving section for receiving the microfluidic array card, a viewing section, and a light source that directs light to the array window of the microfluidic array card and to the viewing section.

  19. Microfluidic Mechanics and Applications: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Arya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics involves the transportation, splitting and mixing of minute fluids to perform several chemical and biological reactions including drug screening, heating, cooling or dissolution of reagents. Efforts have been made to develop different microfluidic devices, droplets and valves that can stop and resume flow of liquids inside a microchannel. This paper provides the review related to the theory and mechanics of microfluidic devices and fluid flow. Different materials and techniques for fabricating microfluidic devices are discussed. Subsequently, the microfluidic components that are responsible for successful micrfluidic device formation are presented. Finally, recent applications related to the microfluidics are highlighted.

  20. Spiral microfluidic nanoparticle separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Ali Asgar S.; Kuntaegowdanahalli, Sathyakumar S.; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.; Papautsky, Ian

    2008-02-01

    Nanoparticles have potential applications in many areas such as consumer products, health care, electronics, energy and other industries. As the use of nanoparticles in manufacturing increases, we anticipate a growing need to detect and measure particles of nanometer scale dimensions in fluids to control emissions of possible toxic nanoparticles. At present most particle separation techniques are based on membrane assisted filtering schemes. Unfortunately their efficiency is limited by the membrane pore size, making them inefficient for separating a wide range of sizes. In this paper, we propose a passive spiral microfluidic geometry for momentum-based particle separations. The proposed design is versatile and is capable of separating particulate mixtures over a wide dynamic range and we expect it will enable a variety of environmental, medical, or manufacturing applications that involve rapid separation of nanoparticles in real-world samples with a wide range of particle components.

  1. Interplay between materials and microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xu; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Santiago, Grissel Trujillo-De; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Ribas, João; Jonas, Steven J.; Weiss, Paul S.; Andrews, Anne M.; Aizenberg, Joanna; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Developments in the field of microfluidics have triggered technological revolutions in many disciplines, including chemical synthesis, electronics, diagnostics, single-cell analysis, micro- and nanofabrication, and pharmaceutics. In many of these areas, rapid growth is driven by the increasing synergy between fundamental materials development and new microfluidic capabilities. In this Review, we critically evaluate both how recent advances in materials fabrication have expanded the frontiers of microfluidic platforms and how the improved microfluidic capabilities are, in turn, furthering materials design. We discuss how various inorganic and organic materials enable the fabrication of systems with advanced mechanical, optical, chemical, electrical and biointerfacial properties — in particular, when these materials are combined into new hybrids and modular configurations. The increasing sophistication of microfluidic techniques has also expanded the range of resources available for the fabrication of new materials, including particles and fibres with specific functionalities, 3D (bio)printed composites and organoids. Together, these advances lead to complex, multifunctional systems, which have many interesting potential applications, especially in the biomedical and bioengineering domains. Future exploration of the interactions between materials science and microfluidics will continue to enrich the diversity of applications across engineering as well as the physical and biomedical sciences.

  2. Parallel imaging microfluidic cytometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Daniel J; McKenna, Brian K; Evans, James G; Belkina, Anna C; Denis, Gerald V; Sherr, David H; Cheung, Man Ching

    2011-01-01

    By adding an additional degree of freedom from multichannel flow, the parallel microfluidic cytometer (PMC) combines some of the best features of fluorescence-activated flow cytometry (FCM) and microscope-based high-content screening (HCS). The PMC (i) lends itself to fast processing of large numbers of samples, (ii) adds a 1D imaging capability for intracellular localization assays (HCS), (iii) has a high rare-cell sensitivity, and (iv) has an unusual capability for time-synchronized sampling. An inability to practically handle large sample numbers has restricted applications of conventional flow cytometers and microscopes in combinatorial cell assays, network biology, and drug discovery. The PMC promises to relieve a bottleneck in these previously constrained applications. The PMC may also be a powerful tool for finding rare primary cells in the clinic. The multichannel architecture of current PMC prototypes allows 384 unique samples for a cell-based screen to be read out in ∼6-10 min, about 30 times the speed of most current FCM systems. In 1D intracellular imaging, the PMC can obtain protein localization using HCS marker strategies at many times for the sample throughput of charge-coupled device (CCD)-based microscopes or CCD-based single-channel flow cytometers. The PMC also permits the signal integration time to be varied over a larger range than is practical in conventional flow cytometers. The signal-to-noise advantages are useful, for example, in counting rare positive cells in the most difficult early stages of genome-wide screening. We review the status of parallel microfluidic cytometry and discuss some of the directions the new technology may take.

  3. Digital Microfluidics Sample Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Michael G.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Eckhardt, Allen; Paik, Philip Y.; Sudarsan, Arjun; Shenderov, Alex; Hua, Zhishan; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2010-01-01

    Three innovations address the needs of the medical world with regard to microfluidic manipulation and testing of physiological samples in ways that can benefit point-of-care needs for patients such as premature infants, for which drawing of blood for continuous tests can be life-threatening in their own right, and for expedited results. A chip with sample injection elements, reservoirs (and waste), droplet formation structures, fluidic pathways, mixing areas, and optical detection sites, was fabricated to test the various components of the microfluidic platform, both individually and in integrated fashion. The droplet control system permits a user to control droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. Also, the programming system allows a user to develop software routines for controlling droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. A chip is incorporated into the system with a controller, a detector, input and output devices, and software. A novel filler fluid formulation is used for the transport of droplets with high protein concentrations. Novel assemblies for detection of photons from an on-chip droplet are present, as well as novel systems for conducting various assays, such as immunoassays and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The lab-on-a-chip (a.k.a., lab-on-a-printed-circuit board) processes physiological samples and comprises a system for automated, multi-analyte measurements using sub-microliter samples of human serum. The invention also relates to a diagnostic chip and system including the chip that performs many of the routine operations of a central labbased chemistry analyzer, integrating, for example, colorimetric assays (e.g., for proteins), chemiluminescence/fluorescence assays (e.g., for enzymes, electrolytes, and gases), and/or conductometric assays (e.g., for hematocrit on plasma and whole blood) on a single chip platform.

  4. Waste disposal package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M.J.

    1985-06-19

    This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

  5. Nanomaterial disposal by incineration

    Science.gov (United States)

    As nanotechnology-based products enter into widespread use, nanomaterials will end up in disposal waste streams that are ultimately discharged to the environment. One possible end-of-life scenario is incineration. This review attempts to ascertain the potential pathways by which ...

  6. Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krummel, J.R.; Policastro, A.J.; Olshansky, S.J.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1990-10-01

    As part of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program mandated by Public Law 99--145 (Department of Defense Authorization Act), an independent review is presented of the US Army Phase I environmental report for the disposal program at the Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) in Hermiston, Oregon. The Phase I report addressed new and additional concerns not incorporated in the final programmatic environmental impact statement (FPEIS). Those concerns were addressed by examining site-specific data for the Umatilla Depot Activity and by recommending the scope and content of a more detailed site-specific study. This independent review evaluates whether the new site-specific data presented in the Phase I report would alter the decision in favor of on-site disposal that was reached in the FPEIS, and whether the recommendations for the scope and content of the site-specific study are adequate. Based on the methods and assumptions presented in the FPEIS, the inclusion of more detailed site-specific data in the Phase I report does not change the decision reached in the FPEIS (which favored on-site disposal at UMDA). It is recommended that alternative assumptions about meteorological conditions be considered and that site-specific data on water, ecological, socioeconomic, and cultural resources; seismicity; and emergency planning and preparedness be considered explicitly in the site-specific EIS decision-making process. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krummel, J.R.; Policastro, A.J.; Olshansky, S.J.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1990-10-01

    As part of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program mandated by Public Law 99--145 (Department of Defense Authorization Act), an independent review is presented of the US Army Phase I environmental report for the disposal program at the Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) in Arkansas. The Phase I report addressed new and additional concerns not incorporated in the final programmatic environmental impact statement (FPEIS). Those concerns were addressed by examining site-specific data for the PBA and by recommending the scope and content of a more detailed site- specific study. This dependent review evaluates whether the new site-specific data presented in the Phase I report would alter the decision in favor of on-site disposal that was reached in the FPEIS, and whether the recommendations for the scope and content of the site-specific study are adequate. Based on the methods and assumptions presented in the FPEIS, the inclusion of more detailed site-specific data in the Phase I report does not change the decision reached in the FPEIS (which favored on-site disposal at PBA). It is recommended that alternative assumptions about meteorological conditions be considered and that site-specific data on water, ecological, socioeconomic, and cultural resources, and emergency planning and preparedness be considered explicitly in the site-specific EIS decision-making process. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Pattern transfer printing by kinetic control of adhesion to an elastomeric stamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuzzo, Ralph G [Champaign, IL; Rogers, John A [Champaign, IL; Menard, Etienne [Urbana, IL; Lee, Keon Jae [Tokyo, JP; Khang, Dahl-Young [Urbana, IL; Sun, Yugang [Champaign, IL; Meitl, Matthew [Champaign, IL; Zhu, Zhengtao [Urbana, IL

    2011-05-17

    The present invention provides methods, systems and system components for transferring, assembling and integrating features and arrays of features having selected nanosized and/or microsized physical dimensions, shapes and spatial orientations. Methods of the present invention utilize principles of `soft adhesion` to guide the transfer, assembly and/or integration of features, such as printable semiconductor elements or other components of electronic devices. Methods of the present invention are useful for transferring features from a donor substrate to the transfer surface of an elastomeric transfer device and, optionally, from the transfer surface of an elastomeric transfer device to the receiving surface of a receiving substrate. The present methods and systems provide highly efficient, registered transfer of features and arrays of features, such as printable semiconductor element, in a concerted manner that maintains the relative spatial orientations of transferred features.

  9. Seismic response analysis of coupled building involving MR damper and elastomeric base isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. Shrimali

    2015-06-01

    The present study investigates the comparative performance of three proposed schemes of coupled building control involving Magnetorheological (MR damper and elastomeric base isolation, named as, Semiactive, Hybrid 1 and Hybrid 2. The results of numerical study showed that Hybrid controls are more effective in controlling the response as compared to Semiactive control. Further, influence of device parameters on control performance has been investigated through a parametric study.

  10. Ten-Year Aging of Elastomeric Vulcanizates in Panama, Alaska, and Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-07-01

    stabilizer " added. Received as Molded Test Pads. Formulation Unknown. Eased on Texin hdCA Polyester Urethane. Test Pads. Formulation Unknown. Received as...Ibid ^Ossefort, Z,T, and Testroet, F,B,, "Hydrolytic Stability of Urethan Elastomere", Rubber Chemistry & Technology, Vol. 39, No. k, Part 2, pp...of percent changes in elongation from the original values. Also, SBR 1500 vulcanizates blended with various EPDM elastomers (compounds S206-5, S209

  11. Thermal degradation of the performance of elastomeric bearings for seismic isolation

    OpenAIRE

    Shirazi, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Concern about reliability of elastomeric bearings is increasing along with the rapid development in application of such devices. Studies on experimental and in-service bearings have revealed the occurrence of permanent and transient changes in engineering properties of these devices. This property loss, however, varies in quality and magnitude, depending on service or environmental conditions at which bearings are employed. Knowledge about the magnitude of the lost property and the rate of de...

  12. Integrated Microfluidic Nucleic Acid Isolation, Isothermal Amplification, and Amplicon Quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Mauk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic components and systems for rapid (<60 min, low-cost, convenient, field-deployable sequence-specific nucleic acid-based amplification tests (NAATs are described. A microfluidic point-of-care (POC diagnostics test to quantify HIV viral load from blood samples serves as a representative and instructive example to discuss the technical issues and capabilities of “lab on a chip” NAAT devices. A portable, miniaturized POC NAAT with performance comparable to conventional PCR (polymerase-chain reaction-based tests in clinical laboratories can be realized with a disposable, palm-sized, plastic microfluidic chip in which: (1 nucleic acids (NAs are extracted from relatively large (~mL volume sample lysates using an embedded porous silica glass fiber or cellulose binding phase (“membrane” to capture sample NAs in a flow-through, filtration mode; (2 NAs captured on the membrane are isothermally (~65 °C amplified; (3 amplicon production is monitored by real-time fluorescence detection, such as with a smartphone CCD camera serving as a low-cost detector; and (4 paraffin-encapsulated, lyophilized reagents for temperature-activated release are pre-stored in the chip. Limits of Detection (LOD better than 103 virons/sample can be achieved. A modified chip with conduits hosting a diffusion-mode amplification process provides a simple visual indicator to readily quantify sample NA template. In addition, a companion microfluidic device for extracting plasma from whole blood without a centrifuge, generating cell-free plasma for chip-based molecular diagnostics, is described. Extensions to a myriad of related applications including, for example, food testing, cancer screening, and insect genotyping are briefly surveyed.

  13. Integrated Microfluidic Nucleic Acid Isolation, Isothermal Amplification, and Amplicon Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, Michael G; Liu, Changchun; Song, Jinzhao; Bau, Haim H

    2015-10-20

    Microfluidic components and systems for rapid (microfluidic point-of-care (POC) diagnostics test to quantify HIV viral load from blood samples serves as a representative and instructive example to discuss the technical issues and capabilities of "lab on a chip" NAAT devices. A portable, miniaturized POC NAAT with performance comparable to conventional PCR (polymerase-chain reaction)-based tests in clinical laboratories can be realized with a disposable, palm-sized, plastic microfluidic chip in which: (1) nucleic acids (NAs) are extracted from relatively large (~mL) volume sample lysates using an embedded porous silica glass fiber or cellulose binding phase ("membrane") to capture sample NAs in a flow-through, filtration mode; (2) NAs captured on the membrane are isothermally (~65 °C) amplified; (3) amplicon production is monitored by real-time fluorescence detection, such as with a smartphone CCD camera serving as a low-cost detector; and (4) paraffin-encapsulated, lyophilized reagents for temperature-activated release are pre-stored in the chip. Limits of Detection (LOD) better than 10³ virons/sample can be achieved. A modified chip with conduits hosting a diffusion-mode amplification process provides a simple visual indicator to readily quantify sample NA template. In addition, a companion microfluidic device for extracting plasma from whole blood without a centrifuge, generating cell-free plasma for chip-based molecular diagnostics, is described. Extensions to a myriad of related applications including, for example, food testing, cancer screening, and insect genotyping are briefly surveyed.

  14. Surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of molds: influence of disinfectant solutions and elastomeric impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraldo, Ricardo D; Berger, Sandrine B; Siqueira, Ronaldo Mt; Grandi, Victor H; Lopes, Murilo B; Gonini-Júnior, Alcides; Caixeta, Rodrigo V; de Carvalho, Rodrigo V; Sinhoreti, Mário Ac

    2017-04-01

    This study compared the surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of molds after disinfection using 2% sodium hypochlorite, 2% chlorhexidine digluconate or 0.2% peracetic acid to those of molds that were not disinfected, for four elastomeric impression materials: polysulfide (Light Bodied Permlastic), polyether (Impregum Soft), polydimethylsiloxane (Oranwash L) andpolyvinylsiloxane (Aquasil Ultra LV). The molds were prepared on a matrix by applying pressure, using a perforated metal tray. The molds were removed following polymerization and either disinfected (by soaking in one of the solutions for 15 minutes) or not disinfected. The samples were thus divided into 16 groups (n=5). Surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy were evaluated using optical microscopy to assess the 20-μm line over its entire 25 mm length. The dimensional accuracy results (%) were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the means were compared by Tukey's test (a=5%). The 20-μm line was completely reproduced by all elastomeric impression materials, regardless of disinfection procedure. There was no significant difference between the control group and molds disinfected with peracetic acid for the elastomeric materials Impregum Soft (polyether) and Aquasil Ultra LV (polyvinylsiloxane). The high-level disinfectant peracetic acid would be the choice material for disinfection. Sociedad Argentina de Investigación Odontológica.

  15. Preliminary SEM Observations on the Surface of Elastomeric Impression Materials after Immersion or Ozone Disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prombonas, Anthony; Yannikakis, Stavros; Karampotsos, Thanasis; Katsarou, Martha-Spyridoula; Drakoulis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surface integrity of dental elastomeric impression materials that are subjected to disinfection is of major importance for the quality of the final prosthetic restorations. Aim The aim of this qualitative Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) study was to reveal the effects of immersion or ozone disinfection on the surface of four dental elastomeric impression materials. Materials and Methods Four dental elastomeric impression material brands were used (two vinyl polysiloxane silicones, one polyether, and one vinyl polyether silicone). Total of 32 specimens were fabricated, eight from each impression material. Specimens were immersion (0.525% sodium hypochlorite solution or 0.3% benzalkonium chloride solution) or ozone disinfected or served as controls and examined with SEM. Results Surface degradation was observed on several speci-mens disinfected with 0.525% sodium hypochlorite solution. Similar wavy-wrinkling surface structures were observed in almost all specimens, when treated either with 0.3% benzalkonium chloride solution or ozone. Conclusion The SEM images obtained from this study revealed that both immersion disinfectants and ozone show similar impression material surface alterations. Ozone seems to be non-inferior as compared to immersion disinfectants, but superior as to environmental protection. PMID:28208993

  16. Evaluation of the susceptibility to pigmentation of orthodontic esthetic elastomeric ligatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Soares Cavalcante

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this laboratory study was to evaluate changes in the pigmentation of esthetic elastomeric ligatures after immersion in a staining solution. METHODS: Sixty ligatures were selected and divided into 12 groups according to their brand and also considering their condition, i.e., unstretched or stretched. The groups were divided into: Morelli (clear, TP Orthodontics (clear, American Orthodontics (clear, 3M/Unitek (clear, American Orthodontics (pearl color and 3M/Unitek (pearl color, separated into groups of 5 unstretched and five stretched ligatures. Assessment of their color changes was performed by means of digital photograph and computer analysis using Adobe Photoshop. Standardized digital photographs were taken at T0 (before the staining process, with unstretched ligatures and at T1 (following the 5-days staining process. The staining solution was composed of artificial saliva and foods with staining potential. At T1 the ligatures were either stretched or unstretched. RESULTS: The results of this study showed that esthetic elastomeric ligatures are prone to staining. Among the evaluated brands, TP Orthodontics and American Orthodontics clear ligatures were the most stable. Moreover, 3M/Unitek pearl ligatures demonstrated statistically significant changes in all variables. CONCLUSIONS: Esthetic elastomeric ligatures are susceptible to staining and no statistically significant difference was found between unstretched or stretched ligatures, with the sole exception of the TP Orthodontics brand. The 3M/Unitek's pearl color ligatures displayed the greatest staining potential.

  17. Diaper area and disposable diapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasala, G N; Romain, C; Merlay, I

    2011-01-01

    Since the 1960s, cloth diapers have been replaced by disposable diapers. The evolution of healthier skin in the diaper area has been demonstrated in parallel to that of disposable diapers. The improvements of disposable diapers--fit, dryness, comfort--have been based on the understanding of factors playing a role in the development of diaper dermatitis.

  18. Geological disposal of nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Fourteen papers dealing with disposal of high-level radioactive wastes are presented. These cover disposal in salt deposits, geologic deposits and marine disposal. Also included are papers on nuclear waste characterization, transport, waste processing technology, and safety analysis. All of these papers have been abstracted and indexed. (AT)

  19. Electrorheological fluid-actuated microfluidic pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liyu; Chen, Xiaoqing; Niu, Xize; Wen, Weijia; Sheng, Ping

    2006-08-01

    The authors report the design and implementation of an electrorheological (ER) fluid-actuated microfluidic pump, with programmable digital control. Our microfluidic pump has a multilayered structure fabricated on polydimethylsiloxane by soft-lithographic technique. The ER microfluidic pump exhibits good performance at high pumping frequencies and uniform liquid flow characteristics. It can be easily integrated with other microfluidic components. The programmable control also gives the device flexibility in its operations.

  20. Integrated ionic liquid-based electrofluidic circuits for pressure sensing within polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chueh-Yu; Liao, Wei-Hao; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2011-05-21

    This paper reports a novel pressure sensor with an electrical readout based on electrofluidic circuits constructed by ionic liquid (IL)-filled microfluidic channels. The developed pressure sensor can be seamlessly fabricated into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic systems using the well-developed multilayer soft lithography (MSL) technique without additional assembly or sophisticated cleanroom microfabrication processes. Therefore, the device can be easily scaled up and is fully disposable. The pressure sensing is achieved by measuring the pressure-induced electrical resistance variation of the constructed electrofluidic resistor. In addition, an electrofluidic Wheatstone bridge circuit is designed for accurate and stable resistance measurements. The pressure sensor is characterized using pressurized nitrogen gas and various liquids which flow into the microfluidic channels. The experimental results demonstrate the great long-term stability (more than a week), temperature stability (up to 100 °C), and linear characteristics of the developed pressure sensing scheme. Consequently, the integrated microfluidic pressure sensor developed in this paper is promising for better monitoring and for characterizing the flow conditions and liquid properties inside the PDMS microfluidic systems in an easier manner for various lab on a chip applications.

  1. Microfluidic devices for cell cultivation and proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Tehranirokh, Masoomeh; Kouzani, Abbas Z.; Francis, Paul S.; Kanwar, Jagat R.

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic technology provides precise, controlled-environment, cost-effective, compact, integrated, and high-throughput microsystems that are promising substitutes for conventional biological laboratory methods. In recent years, microfluidic cell culture devices have been used for applications such as tissue engineering, diagnostics, drug screening, immunology, cancer studies, stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and neurite guidance. Microfluidic technology allows dynamic cell cul...

  2. Space disposal of nuclear wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, C. C.; Nixon, R. F.; Rice, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The DOE has been studying several options for nuclear waste disposal, among them space disposal, which NASA has been assessing. Attention is given to space disposal destinations noting that a circular heliocentric orbit about halfway between Earth and Venus is the reference option in space disposal studies. Discussion also covers the waste form, showing that parameters to be considered include high waste loading, high thermal conductivity, thermochemical stability, resistance to leaching, fabrication, resistance to oxidation and to thermal shock. Finally, the Space Shuttle nuclear waste disposal mission profile is presented.

  3. Vibration Induced Microfluidic Atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Leslie; Qi, Aisha; Friend, James

    2008-11-01

    We demonstrate rapid generation of micron aerosol droplets in a microfluidic device in which a fluid drop is exposed to surface vibration as it sits atop a piezoelectric substrate. Little, however, is understood about the processes by which these droplets form due to the complex hydrodynamic processes that occur across widely varying length and time scales. Through experiments, scaling theory and numerical modelling, we elucidate the interfacial destabilization mechanisms that lead to droplet formation. Droplets form due to the axisymmetric break-up of cylindrical liquid jets ejected as a consequence of interfacial destabilization. Their 10 μm size correlates with the jet radius and the instability wavelength, both determined from a viscous-capillary dominant force balance and confirmed through a numerical solution. With the exception of drops that spread into thin films with thicknesses on the order of the boundary layer dimension, the free surface is always observed to vibrate at the capillary-viscous resonance frequency despite the surface vibration frequency being several orders larger. This is contrary to common assumptions used in deriving subharmonic models resulting in a Mathieu equation, which has commonly led to spurious predictions in the droplet size.

  4. Microfluidic tools toward industrial biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Aline F; Pessoa, Amanda C S N; Bastos, Reinaldo G; de la Torre, Lucimara G

    2016-11-01

    Microfluidics is a technology that operates with small amounts of fluids and makes possible the investigation of cells, enzymes, and biomolecules and encapsulation of biocatalysts in a greater variety of conditions than permitted using conventional methods. This review discusses technological possibilities that can be applied in the field of industrial biotechnology, presenting the principal definitions and fundamental aspects of microfluidic parameters to better understand advanced approaches. Specifically, concentration gradient generators, droplet-based microfluidics, and microbioreactors are explored as useful tools that can contribute to industrial biotechnology. These tools present potential applications, inclusive as commercial platforms to optimizing in bioprocesses development as screening cells, encapsulating biocatalysts, and determining critical kinetic parameters. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1372-1389, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  5. Magnetic separation in microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smistrup, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis presents theory, modeling, design, fabrication, experiments and results for microfluidic magnetic separators. A model for magnetic bead movement in a microfluidic channel is presented, and the limits of the model are discussed. The effective magnetic field gradient is defined...... for fabrication of silicon based systems. This fabrication scheme is explained, and it is shown how, it is applied with variations for several designs of magnetic separators. An experimental setup for magnetic separation experiments has been developed. It has been coupled with an image analysis program....... It is shown conceptually how such a system can be applied for parallel biochemical processing in a microfluidic system. ’Passive’ magnetic separators are presented, where on-chip soft magnetic elements are magnetized by an external magnetic field and create strong magnetic fields and gradients inside...

  6. Microfluidic Technologies for Synthetic Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kuk Lee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic technologies have shown powerful abilities for reducing cost, time, and labor, and at the same time, for increasing accuracy, throughput, and performance in the analysis of biological and biochemical samples compared with the conventional, macroscale instruments. Synthetic biology is an emerging field of biology and has drawn much attraction due to its potential to create novel, functional biological parts and systems for special purposes. Since it is believed that the development of synthetic biology can be accelerated through the use of microfluidic technology, in this review work we focus our discussion on the latest microfluidic technologies that can provide unprecedented means in synthetic biology for dynamic profiling of gene expression/regulation with high resolution, highly sensitive on-chip and off-chip detection of metabolites, and whole-cell analysis.

  7. Applications of microfluidics in quantitative biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Gao, Meng; Wen, Lingling; He, Caiyun; Chen, Yuan; Liu, Chenli; Fu, Xiongfei; Huang, Shuqiang

    2017-10-04

    Quantitative biology is dedicated to taking advantage of quantitative reasoning and advanced engineering technologies to make biology more predictable. Microfluidics, as an emerging technique, provides new approaches to precisely control fluidic conditions on small scales and collect data in high-throughput and quantitative manners. In this review, we present the relevant applications of microfluidics to quantitative biology based on two major categories (channel-based microfluidics and droplet-based microfluidics), and their typical features. We also envision some other microfluidic techniques that may not be employed in quantitative biology right now, but have great potential in the near future. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Microfluidic 3D Helix Mixers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgette B. Salieb-Beugelaar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric microfluidic systems are well suited for miniaturized devices with complex functionality, and rapid prototyping methods for 3D microfluidic structures are increasingly used. Mixing at the microscale and performing chemical reactions at the microscale are important applications of such systems and we therefore explored feasibility, mixing characteristics and the ability to control a chemical reaction in helical 3D channels produced by the emerging thread template method. Mixing at the microscale is challenging because channel size reduction for improving solute diffusion comes at the price of a reduced Reynolds number that induces a strictly laminar flow regime and abolishes turbulence that would be desired for improved mixing. Microfluidic 3D helix mixers were rapidly prototyped in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS using low-surface energy polymeric threads, twisted to form 2-channel and 3-channel helices. Structure and flow characteristics were assessed experimentally by microscopy, hydraulic measurements and chromogenic reaction, and were modeled by computational fluid dynamics. We found that helical 3D microfluidic systems produced by thread templating allow rapid prototyping, can be used for mixing and for controlled chemical reaction with two or three reaction partners at the microscale. Compared to the conventional T-shaped microfluidic system used as a control device, enhanced mixing and faster chemical reaction was found to occur due to the combination of diffusive mixing in small channels and flow folding due to the 3D helix shape. Thus, microfluidic 3D helix mixers can be rapidly prototyped using the thread template method and are an attractive and competitive method for fluid mixing and chemical reactions at the microscale.

  9. Fluid control in microfluidic devices using a fluid conveyance extension and an absorbent microfluidic flow modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Po Ki

    2013-05-07

    This article presents a simple method for controlling fluid in microfluidic devices without the need for valves or pumps. A fluid conveyance extension is fluidly coupled to the enclosed outlet chamber of a microfluidic device. After a fluid is introduced into the microfluidic device and saturates the fluid conveyance extension, a fluid flow in the microfluidic device is generated by contacting an absorbent microfluidic flow modulator with the fluid conveyance extension to absorb the fluid from the fluid conveyance extension through capillary action. Since the fluid in the microfluidic device is fluidly coupled with the fluid conveyance extension and the fluid conveyance extension is fluidly coupled with the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator, the absorption rate of the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator, which is the rate at which the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator absorbs fluid, matches the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device. Thus, the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device is set by the absorption rate of the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator. Sheath flow and fluid switching applications are demonstrated using this simple fluid control method without the need for valves or pumps. Also, the ability to control the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device is demonstrated using absorbent microfluidic flow modulators with various absorbent characteristics and dimensions.

  10. Microfluidic device for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  11. Microfluidic devices for droplet injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, Donald; Akartuna, Ilke; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    As picoliter-scale reaction vessels, microfluidic water-in-oil emulsions have found application for high-throughput, large-sample number analyses. Often, the biological or chemical system under investigation needs to be encapsulated into droplets to prevent cross contamination prior to the introduction of reaction reagents. Previous techniques of picoinjection or droplet synchronization and merging enable the addition of reagents to individual droplets, but present limitations on what can be added to each droplet. We present microfluidic devices that couple the strengths of picoinjection and droplet merging, allowing us to selectively add precise volume to our droplet reactions.

  12. HLW Disposal System Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J. W.; Choi, H. J.; Lee, J. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    A KRS is suggested through design requirement analysis of the buffer and the canister which are the constituent of disposal system engineered barrier and HLW management plans are proposed. In the aspect of radionuclide retention capacity, the thickness of the buffer is determined 0.5m, the shape to be disc and ring and the dry density to be 1.6 g/cm{sup 3}. The maximum temperature of the buffer is below 100 .deg. which meets the design requirement. And bentonite blocks with 5 wt% of graphite showed more than 1.0 W/mK of thermal conductivity without the addition of sand. The result of the thermal analysis for proposed double-layered buffer shows that decrease of 7 .deg. C in maximum temperature of the buffer. For the disposal canister, the copper for the outer shell material and cast iron for the inner structure material is recommended considering the results analyzed in terms of performance of the canisters and manufacturability and the geochemical properties of deep groundwater sampled from the research area with granite, salt water intrusion, and the heavy weight of the canister. The results of safety analysis for the canister shows that the criticality for the normal case including uncertainty is the value of 0.816 which meets subcritical condition. Considering nation's 'Basic Plan for Electric Power Demand and Supply' and based on the scenario of disposing CANDU spent fuels in the first phase, the disposal system that the repository will be excavated in eight phases with the construction of the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) beginning in 2020 and commissioning in 2040 until the closure of the repository is proposed. Since there is close correlation between domestic HLW management plans and front-end/back-end fuel cycle plans causing such a great sensitivity of international environment factor, items related to assuring the non-proliferation and observing the international standard are showed to be the influential factor and acceptability

  13. Controlled Cavitation in Microfluidic Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, Ed; le Gac, Severine; Tsuji, Kinko; Ohl, C.D.

    2007-01-01

    We report on cavitation in confined microscopic environments which are commonly called microfluidic or lab-on-a-chip systems. The cavitation bubble is created by focusing a pulsed laser into these structures filled with a lght-absorbing liquid. At hte center of a 20 mu m thick and 1 mm wide channel,

  14. Membranes and microfluidics: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, J.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Wessling, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    The integration of mass transport control by means of membrane functionality into microfluidic devices has shown substantial growth over the last 10 years. Many different examples of mass transport control have been reported, demonstrating the versatile use of membranes. This review provides an

  15. Microfluidic fabrication of plasmonic microcapsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Jin, M.L.; Eijkel, J.C.T.; Berg, van den A.; Zhou, G.F.; Shui, L.L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the plasmonic microcapsules with well-ordered nanoparticles embedded in polymer network fabricated by using a microfluidic device. The well-ordered nanoparticle arrays on the microcapsule form high-density uniform “hot-spots” with a deposited metal film, on which the localized su

  16. Microfluidic technology for PET radiochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillies, J.M. [Cancer Research-UK/University of Manchester Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: jgillies@picr.man.ac.uk; Prenant, C. [Cancer Research-UK/University of Manchester Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom); School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Sciences, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Chimon, G.N. [Cancer Research-UK/University of Manchester Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom); School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Sciences, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Smethurst, G.J. [Cancer Research-UK/University of Manchester Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Dekker, B.A. [Cancer Research-UK/University of Manchester Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Zweit, J. [Cancer Research-UK/University of Manchester Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom); School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Sciences, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2006-03-15

    This paper describes the first application of a microfabricated reaction system to positron emission tomography (PET) radiochemistry. We have applied microfluidic technology to synthesise PET radiopharmaceuticals using {sup 18}F and {sup 124}I as labels for fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and Annexin-V, respectively. These reactions involved established methods of nucleophilic substitution on a mannose triflate precursor and direct iodination of the protein using iodogen as an oxidant. This has demonstrated a proof of principle of using microfluidic technology to radiochemical reactions involving low and high molecular weight compounds. Using microfluidic reactions, [{sup 18}F]FDG was synthesised with a 50% incorporation of the available F-18 radioactivity in a very short time of 4 s. The radiolabelling efficiency of {sup 124}I Annexin-V was 40% after 1 min reaction time. Chromatographic analysis showed that such reaction yields are comparable to conventional methods, but in a much shorter time. The yields can be further improved with more optimisation of the microfluidic device itself and its fluid mixing profiles. This demonstrates the potential for this technology to have an impact on rapid and simpler radiopharmaceutical synthesis using short and medium half-life radionuclides.

  17. Microfluidic Liquid-Liquid Contactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcculloch, Quinn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-25

    This report describes progress made on the microfluidic contactor. A model was developed to predict its failure, a surrogate chemical system was selected to demonstrate mass transfer, and an all-optical system has been invented and implemented to monitor carryover and flowrates.

  18. Mixing in a Microfluid Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Deryabin, Mikhail

    Mixing of fluids in microchannels cannot rely on turbulence since the flow takes place at extremly low Reynolds numbers. Various active and passive devices have been developed to induce mixing in microfluid flow devices. We describe here a model of an active mixer where a transverse periodic flow...

  19. Topology optimization of microfluidic mixers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Gersborg, Allan Roulund; Sigmund, Ole

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the application of the topology optimization method as a general and systematic approach for microfluidic mixer design. The mixing process is modeled as convection dominated transport in low Reynolds number incompressible flow. The mixer performance is maximized by altering...

  20. "Comparative evaluation of surface modified elastomeric ligatures for microbial colonization": An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, M Pavithra; Vaz, Anna Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Elastomeric ligatures are observed to reduce chair side time; however, they are also seen to have greater bacterial adhesion. Polymeric coating utilizing the Metafasix Technology and the OrthoShield Technology have been introduced in the Super Slick™** and Safe-T-Ties™** by TP Orthodontics, Ortho Organizers, respectively, to reduce bacterial adhesion. While each of the elastomers has been individually evaluated, no study compares the two elastomers manufactured by differing technologies together; hence the need for this study was felt. This in vivo study compared the Super Slick and Safe-T-Ties with their unmodified counterparts for bacterial adhesion. Thirty patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, between 12 and 25 years age group were selected and the modified, and the unmodified elastomers were randomly placed quadrant wise, on all the premolar brackets. After a period of 4 weeks, the elastomeric rings were removed and transported for culture on Mitis-Salivarius, Rogosa SL agar for Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli, respectively. The colonies were digitally counted (HiMedia) after 48 h of incubation at 37°C. There was a significant difference in the S. mutans and Lactobacilli counts in both surface modified and unmodified elastomeric modules (P modules Mini Stix™**, Hand-EE-Lasts™** was associated with higher mean values of colony-forming units/millimeter than the surface modified Super Slick™** and Safe-T-Ties™** ligatures. When compared pair-wise, the surface modified elastomers showed less bacterial accumulations than the unmodified counterparts for both S. mutans and Lactobacillus, and the differences were statistically significant. Technological modifications of the elastomers using the Metafasix or OrthoShield Technology, is a definite improvement over the regular elastomers with regard to adhesion of S. mutans and Lactobacilli.

  1. Influence of dispersants on aging and frost elastomeric compositions based on butadiene acrylonitrile rubbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Dolinskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of use of dispergators of various nature for production of rubber technical products with expanded temperature conditions of operation is studied. It is investigated influences of dispergators of Dispergator FL and INT 159 on properties of rubber mixes for receiving products with high resistance to thermal aging or frost resistance. Research of influence of modifiers was conducted for rubber mixes on the basis of butadienenitrile rubbers synthetic (BNRS-18 and BNRS-28. I’s established that at addition of a dispergator of Dispergator FL the indicator of relative deformatstion of compression (RDC and respectively heat stability of rubbers increases. Introduction to structure of elastomeric composition of a dispergator of INT 159 practically doesn’t influence frost resistance, and Dispergator FL worsens her (the coefficient of frost resistance decreases by 15.4–17.8%. Possibly it is connected with the fact that at the lowered temperatures in the presence of Dispergator FL there is a bigger delay of relaxation processes and decrease in energy of the thermal movement of links of macromolecules of rubbers. It becomes insufficient for overcoming of intermolecular interaction in the modified system and commission of conformational transitions of macromolecules under the influence of external loading. Mechanical energy is to a large extent mentioned not on change of a form of macromolecules, and on their mechanodestruction. However, it increases heat stability since it that is higher, than molecular mobility is lower. INT 159 dispergator components, settling down on borders of supramolecular formations of elastomers, increase mobility of links of macromolecules of rubbers, weaken chemical bonds in them, reduce thermal stability, but at the same time INT 159 dispergator practically doesn’t reduce frost resistance therefore it is expedient to apply it when receiving frost-resistant elastomeric composition. Thus, when receiving

  2. Microfluidic diagnostic tool for the developing world: contactless impedance flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emaminejad, Sam; Javanmard, Mehdi; Dutton, Robert W; Davis, Ronald W

    2012-11-07

    In this work, we demonstrate a novel and cost-effective approach to implement a disposable microfluidic contactless impedance cytometer. Conventional methods for single cell impedance cytometry use microfabricated electrodes in direct contact with the buffer to measure changes of its electrical impedance when cells pass through the applied electric field. However, this approach requires expensive microfabrication of electrodes, and also, the fabricated electrodes cannot be reused without thorough and time-consuming cleaning process. Here, we introduce a novel approach to allow for single cell impedance cytometry using electrodes that can be reused, without the need for microfabrication of the electrodes. This disposable device can be potentially inserted onto a printed circuit board (PCB) which has a non-disposable, yet inexpensive, electronic reading apparatus. This significantly reduces the manufacturing costs, making it suitable for low resource settings, such as point-of-care testing in the developing countries.

  3. A review on the cords & plies reinforcement of elastomeric polymer matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, S. S.; Husin, H.; Mat-Shayuti, M. S.; Hassan, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Steel, polyester, nylon and rayon are the main materials of cords & plies that have been reinforced in the natural rubber to produce quality tyres but there is few research reported on cord and plies reinforcement in silicone rubber. Taking the innovation of tyres as inspiration, this review's first objective is to compile the comprehensive studies about the cords & plies reinforcement in elastomeric polymer matrix. The second objective is to gather information about silicone rubber that has a high potential as a matrix phase for cords and plies reinforcement. All the tests and findings are gathered and compiled in sections namely processing preparation, curing, physical and mechanical properties, and adhesion between cords-polymer.

  4. The effect of various interim fixed prosthodontic materials on the polymerization of elastomeric impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sowygh, Zeyad H

    2014-08-01

    After tooth preparation, interim fixed prosthodontic materials are used to fabricate interim restorations until the definitive restoration can be delivered. The polymerization of elastomeric impression materials may be inhibited when in indirect contact with interim fixed prosthodontic materials. The purpose of this study was to detect whether the polymerization of 6 commonly used types of elastomeric impression materials was affected by direct contact with 6 commonly used interim fixed prosthodontic materials and to further evaluate the efficacy of several decontamination methods to eliminate the indirect effect of the interim fixed prosthodontic materials on the setting of elastomeric impression materials. Six brands of elastomeric impression material (Virtual, Aquasil, Genie, Correct Plus, Express, Impregum) were evaluated in vitro after direct contact with various interim fixed prosthodontic materials (Trim Plus, Unifast, Integrity, Systemp C&B, Tuff-Temp, Protemp IV) by 3 general practitioners. The setting of the impression materials was visually scored as either inhibited or noninhibited. Latex was used as a positive control. The decontamination part of the study was done indirectly on the dentin of prepared natural teeth after they had been relined with the interim fixed prosthodontic material. The decontamination methods were air-water rinse, mouthwash (chlorhexidine 0.12%), 3% hydrogen peroxide, and pumice. A Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric analysis was used to evaluate the results. Statistically significant setting inhibition was found with 5 brands of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials with all tested types of interim fixed prosthodontic material (P<.001) except Trim Plus. No tested interim fixed prosthodontic material caused inhibition with the polyether impression material, except for minimal inhibition with Protemp IV. The decontamination method performed with 3% H2O2 alone proved adequate in preventing impression material inhibition. Interexaminer

  5. Lakeview, Oregon, Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linard, Joshua [USDOE Office of Legacy Management (LM), Washington, DC (United States); Hall, Steve [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-03-01

    9.1 Compliance Summary The Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site was inspected September 16 and 17, 2015. Other than some ongoing concern with erosion-control rock riprap degradation, the disposal cell was in good condition. Some minor fence repairs and vegetation removal, and minor erosion repair work along the west site fence is planned. Inspectors identified no other maintenance needs or cause for a follow-up or contingency inspection. Disposal cell riprap is evaluated annually to ensure continued long-term protection of the cell from erosion during a severe precipitation event. Degradation of the rock riprap was first observed at the site in the mid-1990s. Rock gradation monitoring of the riprap on the west side slope has been performed as part of the annual inspection since 1997 to determine the mean diameter (D50) value. As prescribed by the monitoring procedure, the rock monitoring is routinely conducted at random locations. However, at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) request, the 2015 rock monitoring approach deviated from the normal procedure by using a pre-established monitoring grid in a subset area of the west side slope. This changed the monitoring approach from random sampling to biased sampling. The D50 value measured during the 2015 gradation monitoring is 2.39 inches, which falls below the original D50 design size range of 2.7–3.9 inches for the Type B size side slope riprap. At NRC’s request, rock durability monitoring was added to the gradation monitoring in 2009 to monitor durability by rock type. Results of the 2015 durability monitoring showed that74 percent of the total rock sampled is durability class code A rock with an assigned durability class of “highly durable” or durability class code B “durable” rock, and that over 90 percent of the 3-inch or larger rock is durability class code A or B. The rock durability

  6. Challenges in the Use of Compact Disc-Based Centrifugal Microfluidics for Healthcare Diagnostics at the Extreme Point of Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordon Gilmore

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Since its inception, Compact Disc (CD-based centrifugal microfluidic technology has drawn a great deal of interest within research communities due to its potential use in biomedical applications. The technology has been referred to by different names, including compact-disc microfluidics, lab-on-a-disk, lab-on-a-CD and bio-disk. This paper critically reviews the state-of-the-art in CD-based centrifugal microfluidics devices and attempts to identify the challenges that, if solved, would enable their use in the extreme point of care. Sample actuation, manufacturing, reagent storage and implementation, target multiplexing, bio-particle detection, required hardware and system disposal, and sustainability are the topics of focus.

  7. Low-power microfluidic electro-hydraulic pump (EHP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Clarissa; Stelick, Scott; Cady, Nathaniel; Batt, Carl

    2010-01-07

    Low-power electrolysis-based microfluidic pumps utilizing the principle of hydraulics, integrated with microfluidic channels in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates, are presented. The electro-hydraulic pumps (EHPs), consisting of electrolytic, hydraulic and fluidic chambers, were investigated using two types of electrodes: stainless steel for larger volumes and annealed gold electrodes for smaller-scale devices. Using a hydraulic fluid chamber and a thin flexible PDMS membrane, this novel prototype successfully separates the reagent fluid from the electrolytic fluid, which is particularly important for biological and chemical applications. The hydraulic advantage of the EHP device arises from the precise control of flow rate by changing the electrolytic pressure generated, independent of the volume of the reagent chamber, mimicking the function of a hydraulic press. Since the reservoirs are pre-filled with reagents and sealed prior to testing, external fluid coupling is minimized. The stainless steel electrode EHPs were manufactured with varying chamber volume ratios (1 : 1 to 1 : 3) as a proof-of-concept, and exhibited flow rates of 1.25 to 30 microl/min with electrolysis-based actuation at 2.5 to 10 V(DC). The miniaturized gold electrode EHPs were manufactured with 3 mm diameters and 1 : 1 chamber volume ratios, and produced flow rates of 1.24 to 7.00 microl/min at 2.5 to 10 V(AC), with a higher maximum sustained pressure of 343 KPa, suggesting greater device robustness using methods compatible with microfabrication. The proposed technology is low-cost, low-power and disposable, with a high level of reproducibility, allowing for ease of fabrication and integration into existing microfluidic lab-on-a-chip and analysis systems.

  8. Nuclear waste disposal in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R. E.; Causey, W. E.; Galloway, W. E.; Nelson, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Work on nuclear waste disposal in space conducted by the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and contractors are reported. From the aggregate studies, it is concluded that space disposal of nuclear waste is technically feasible.

  9. Melter Disposal Strategic Planning Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURBANK, D.A.

    2000-09-25

    This document describes the proposed strategy for disposal of spent and failed melters from the tank waste treatment plant to be built by the Office of River Protection at the Hanford site in Washington. It describes program management activities, disposal and transportation systems, leachate management, permitting, and safety authorization basis approvals needed to execute the strategy.

  10. Disposable diapers: safe and effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namita; Purthi, P K; Sachdev, Anupam; Gupta, Suresh

    2003-09-01

    Nappy rash is a common problem in infants due to their thinner skin, wetness, heat and friction under cloth nappy, fecal enzymes and alkaline urine. The disposable diapers containing Super Absorbent Material (SAM) reduce the incidence of nappy rash. SAM quickly absorbs urine and keeps the skin dry. Also disposable diapers prevent fecal contamination by absorbing the urine and containing stools.

  11. Integrated Disposal Facility Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MANN, F. M.

    2003-06-03

    An environmental risk assessment associated with the disposal of projected Immobilized Low-Activity Waste, solid wastes and failed or decommissioned melters in an Integrated Disposal Facility was performed. Based on the analyses all performance objectives associated with the groundwater, air, and intruder pathways were met.

  12. Korean Reference HLW Disposal System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Heui Joo; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, S. S. (and others)

    2008-03-15

    This report outlines the results related to the development of Korean Reference Disposal System for High-level radioactive wastes. The research has been supported around for 10 years through a long-term research plan by MOST. The reference disposal method was selected via the first stage of the research during which the technical guidelines for the geological disposal of HLW were determined too. At the second stage of the research, the conceptual design of the reference disposal system was made. For this purpose the characteristics of the reference spent fuels from PWR and CANDU reactors were specified, and the material and specifications of the canisters were determined in term of structural analysis and manufacturing capability in Korea. Also, the mechanical and chemical characteristics of the domestic Ca-bentonite were analyzed in order to supply the basic design parameters of the buffer. Based on these parameters the thermal and mechanical analysis of the near-field was carried out. Thermal-Hydraulic-Mechanical behavior of the disposal system was analyzed. The reference disposal system was proposed through the second year research. At the final third stage of the research, the Korean Reference disposal System including the engineered barrier, surface facilities, and underground facilities was proposed through the performance analysis of the disposal system.

  13. Microfluidic networks embedded in a printed circuit board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liangwei; Hu, Yueli

    2017-07-01

    In order to improve the robustness of microfluidic networks in printed circuit board (PCB)-based microfluidic platforms, a new method was presented. A pattern in a PCB was formed using hollowed-out technology. Polydimethylsiloxane was partly filled in the hollowed-out fields after mounting an adhesive tape on the bottom of the PCB, and solidified in an oven. Then, microfluidic networks were built using soft lithography technology. Microfluidic transportation and dilution operations were demonstrated using the fabricated microfluidic platform. Results show that this method can embed microfluidic networks into a PCB, and microfluidic operations can be implemented in the microfluidic networks embedded into the PCB.

  14. Elastomeric nanocomposite scaffolds made from poly(glycerol sebacate) chemically crosslinked with carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K; Patel, Alpesh; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Zhang, Hongbin; Rangarajan, Kaushik; Iviglia, Giorgio; Shin, Su-Ryon; Hussain, Mohammad Asif; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based nanocomposites often possess properties such as high stiffness, electrical conductivity, and thermal stability and have been studied for various biomedical and biotechnological applications. However, the current design approaches utilize CNTs as physical fillers, and thus, the true potential of CNT-based nanocomposites has not been realized. Here, we introduce a general approach to fabricating stiff, elastomeric nanocomposites from poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) and CNTs. The covalent crosslinking between the nanotubes and polymer chains resulted in novel property combinations that are not observed in conventional nanocomposites. The addition of 1% CNTs resulted in a five-fold increase in the tensile modulus and a six-fold increase in compression modulus compared with PGS alone, which is far superior to the previously reported studies for CNT-based nanocomposites. Despite a significant increase in mechanical stiffness, the elasticity of the network was not compromised and the resulting nanocomposites showed more than 94% recovery. This study demonstrates that the chemical conjugation of CNTs to a PGS backbone results in stiff and elastomeric nanocomposites. Additionally, in vitro studies using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) indicated that the incorporation of CNTs into the PGS network significantly enhanced the differentiation potential of the seeded hMSCs, rendering them potentially suitable for applications ranging from scaffolding in musculoskeletal tissue engineering to biosensors in biomedical devices.

  15. Utilizing stretch-tunable thermochromic elastomeric opal films as novel reversible switchable photonic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Christian G; Lederle, Christina; Zentel, Kristina; Stühn, Bernd; Gallei, Markus

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the preparation of highly thermoresponsive and fully reversible stretch-tunable elastomeric opal films featuring switchable structural colors is reported. Novel particle architectures based on poly(diethylene glycol methylether methacrylate-co-ethyl acrylate) (PDEGMEMA-co-PEA) as shell polymer are synthesized via seeded and stepwise emulsion polymerization protocols. The use of DEGMEMA as comonomer and herein established synthetic strategies leads to monodisperse soft shell particles, which can be directly processed to opal films by using the feasible melt-shear organization technique. Subsequent UV crosslinking strategies open access to mechanically stable and homogeneous elastomeric opal films. The structural colors of the opal films feature mechano- and thermoresponsiveness, which is found to be fully reversible. Optical characterization shows that the combination of both stimuli provokes a photonic bandgap shift of more than 50 nm from 560 nm in the stretched state to 611 nm in the fully swollen state. In addition, versatile colorful patterns onto the colloidal crystal structure are produced by spatial UV-induced crosslinking by using a photomask. This facile approach enables the generation of spatially cross-linked switchable opal films with fascinating optical properties. Herein described strategies for the preparation of PDEGMEMA-containing colloidal architectures, application of the melt-shear ordering technique, and patterned crosslinking of the final opal films open access to novel stimuli-responsive colloidal crystal films, which are expected to be promising materials in the field of security and sensing applications.

  16. Highly transparent AgNW/PDMS stretchable electrodes for elastomeric electrochromic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan-Shen; Pan, Bo-Cheng; Liou, Guey-Sheng

    2017-02-16

    Stretchable conductors based on silver nanowires (AgNWs) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) have been studied extensively for many years. However, it is still difficult to achieve high transparency with low resistance due to the low attractive force between AgNWs and PDMS. In this paper, we report an effective method to transfer AgNWs into PDMS by using substrates which have a hydrophobic surface, and successfully prepared stretchable AgNW/PDMS electrodes having high transparency and low sheet resistance at the same time. The obtained electrodes can be stretched, twisted, and folded without significant loss of conductivity. Furthermore, a novel elastomeric HV electrochromic device (ECD) fabricated based on these stretchable AgNW/PDMS hybrid electrodes exhibited excellent electrochromic behavior in the full AgNW electrode system and could change color between colorless and blue even after 100 switching cycles. As most existing electrochromic devices are based on ITO and other rigid conductors, elastomeric conductors demonstrate advantages for next-generation electronics such as stretchable, wearable, and flexible optoelectronic applications.

  17. Hemocompatibility evaluation of small elastomeric hollow fiber membranes as vascular substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado-Pagán, Ángel E; Ker, Dai Fei Elmer; Yang, Yunzhi

    2014-10-01

    One of the main challenges for clinical implementation of small diameter vascular grafts (SDVGs) is their limited hemocompatibility. Important design specifications for such grafts include features that minimize the long-term risks of restenosis, fouling, and thrombus formation. In our lab, we have developed elastomeric hollow fiber membranes (HFMs), using a phase inversion method, as candidates for SDVGs. Here, we present our results for in vitro hemocompatibility testing of our HFM under flow and static conditions. Our results showed that the polymer-based HFMs do not damage the integrity of human red blood cells (RBCs) as shown by their low hemolytic extent (less than 2%). When analyzed for blood cell lysis using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity as an indicator, no significant differences were observed between blood exposed to our HFMs and uncoagulated blood. Analysis of protein adsorption showed a low concentration of proteins deposited on the surfaces of HFM after 24 h. Platelet adhesion profiles using human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) showed that a low level of platelets adhered to the HFMs after 24 h, indicating minimal thrombotic potential. Under the majority of conditions, no significant differences were observed between medical-grade polymers and our HFMs. Eventual optimization of hemocompatible elastomeric HFM vessel grafts could lead to improved tissue vascularization as well as vascularized, tissue-engineered scaffolds for organ repair.

  18. A constrained maximization formulation to analyze deformation of fiber reinforced elastomeric actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gaurav; Krishnan, Girish

    2017-06-01

    Fiber reinforced elastomeric enclosures (FREEs) are soft and smart pneumatic actuators that deform in a predetermined fashion upon inflation. This paper analyzes the deformation behavior of FREEs by formulating a simple calculus of variations problem that involves constrained maximization of the enclosed volume. The model accurately captures the deformed shape for FREEs with any general fiber angle orientation, and its relation with actuation pressure, material properties and applied load. First, the accuracy of the model is verified with existing literature and experiments for the popular McKibben pneumatic artificial muscle actuator with two equal and opposite families of helically wrapped fibers. Then, the model is used to predict and experimentally validate the deformation behavior of novel rotating-contracting FREEs, for which no prior literature exist. The generality of the model enables conceptualization of novel FREEs whose fiber orientations vary arbitrarily along the geometry. Furthermore, the model is deemed to be useful in the design synthesis of fiber reinforced elastomeric actuators for general axisymmetric desired motion and output force requirement.

  19. A highly sensitive and flexible pressure sensor with electrodes and elastomeric interlayer containing silver nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Jiu, Jinting; Nogi, Masaya; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Koga, Hirotaka; He, Peng; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2015-02-21

    The next-generation application of pressure sensors is gradually being extended to include electronic artificial skin (e-skin), wearable devices, humanoid robotics and smart prosthetics. In these advanced applications, high sensing capability is an essential feature for high performance. Although surface patterning treatments and some special elastomeric interlayers have been applied to improve sensitivity, the process is complex and this inevitably raises the cost and is an obstacle to large-scale production. In the present study a simple printing process without complex patterning has been used for constructing the sensor, and an interlayer is employed comprising elastomeric composites filled with silver nanowires. By increasing the relative permittivity, εr, of the composite interlayer induced by compression at high nanowire concentration, it has been possible to achieve a maximum sensitivity of 5.54 kPa(-1). The improvement in sensitivity did not sacrifice or undermine the other features of the sensor. Thanks to the silver nanowire electrodes, the sensor is flexible and stable after 200 cycles at a bending radius of 2 mm, and exhibits outstanding reproducibility without hysteresis under similar pressure pulses. The sensor has been readily integrated onto an adhesive bandage and has been successful in detecting human movements. In addition to measuring pressure in direct contact, non-contact pressures such as air flow can also be detected.

  20. Experiment-Based Sensitivity Analysis of Scaled Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Elastomeric Isolators in Bonded Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Hedayati Dezfuli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-reinforced elastomeric isolators (FREIs are a new type of elastomeric base isolation systems. Producing FREIs in the form of long laminated pads and cutting them to the required size significantly reduces the time and cost of the manufacturing process. Due to the lack of adequate information on the performance of FREIs in bonded applications, the goal of this study is to assess the performance sensitivity of 1/4-scale carbon-FREIs based on the experimental tests. The scaled carbon-FREIs are manufactured using a fast cold-vulcanization process. The effect of several factors including the vertical pressure, the lateral cyclic rate, the number of rubber layers, and the thickness of carbon fiber-reinforced layers are explored on the cyclic behavior of rubber bearings. Results show that the effect of vertical pressure on the lateral response of base isolators is negligible. However, decreasing the cyclic loading rate increases the lateral flexibility and the damping capacity. Additionally, carbon fiber-reinforced layers can be considered as a minor source of energy dissipation.

  1. Testing of elastomeric liners used in limb prosthetics: classification of 15 products by mechanical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Joan E; Nicholson, Brian S; Zachariah, Santosh G; Cassisi, Damon V; Karchin, Ari; Fergason, John R

    2004-03-01

    The mechanical properties of 15 elastomeric liner products used in limb prosthetics were evaluated under compressive, frictional, shear, and tensile loading conditions. All testing was conducted at load levels comparable to interface stress measurements reported on transtibial amputee subjects. For each test configuration, materials were classified into four groups based on the shapes of their response curves. For the 15 liners tested, there were 10 unique classification sets, indicating a wide range of unique materials. In general, silicone gel liners classified within the same groups thus were quite similar to each other. They were of lower compressive, shear, and tensile stiffness than the silicone elastomer products, consistent with their lightly cross-linked, high-fluid content structures. Silicone elastomer products better spanned the response groups than the gel liners, demonstrating a wide range of compressive, shear, and tensile stiffness values. Against a skin-like material, a urethane liner had the highest coefficient of friction of any liner tested, although coefficients of friction values for most of the materials were higher than interface shear:pressure ratios measured on amputee subjects using Pelite liners. The elastomeric liner material property data and response groupings provided here can potentially be useful to prosthetic fitting by providing quantitative information on similarities and differences among products.

  2. Resilin-PEG Hybrid Hydrogels Yield Degradable Elastomeric Scaffolds with Heterogeneous Microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, Christopher L; Akins, Robert E; Kiick, Kristi L

    2016-01-11

    Hydrogels derived from resilin-like polypeptides (RLPs) have shown outstanding mechanical resilience and cytocompatibility; expanding the versatility of RLP-based materials via conjugation with other polypeptides and polymers would offer great promise in the design of a range of materials. Here, we present an investigation of the biochemical and mechanical properties of hybrid hydrogels composed of a recombinant RLP and a multiarm PEG macromer. These hybrid hydrogels can be rapidly cross-linked through a Michael-type addition reaction between the thiols of cysteine residues on the RLP and vinyl sulfone groups on the multiarm PEG. Oscillatory rheology and tensile testing confirmed the formation of elastomeric hydrogels with mechanical resilience comparable to aortic elastin; hydrogel stiffness was easily modulated through the cross-linking ratio. Macromolecular phase separation of the RLP-PEG hydrogels offers the unique advantage of imparting a heterogeneous microstructure, which can be used to localize cells, through simple mixing and cross-linking. Assessment of degradation of the RLP by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) illustrated the specific proteolysis of the polypeptide in both its soluble form and when cross-linked into hydrogels. Finally, the successful encapsulation and viable three-dimensional culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) demonstrated the cytocompatibility of the RLP-PEG gels. Overall, the cytocompatibility, elastomeric mechanical properties, microheterogeneity, and degradability of the RLP-PEG hybrid hydrogels offer a suite of promising properties for the development of cell-instructive, structured tissue engineering scaffolds.

  3. A microfluidic D-subminiature connector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Adina; Au, Anthony K; Vinckenbosch, Elise; Folch, Albert

    2013-06-07

    Standardized, affordable, user-friendly world-to-chip interfaces represent one of the major barriers to the adoption of microfluidics. We present a connector system for plug-and-play interfacing of microfluidic devices to multiple input and output lines. The male connectors are based on existing standardized housings from electronics that are inexpensive and widely available. The female connectors are fabricated using familiar replica molding techniques that can easily be adopted by microfluidic developers.

  4. [Recent development of microfluidic diagnostic technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haifang; Zhang, Qianyun; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2011-04-01

    Microfluidic devices exhibit a great promising development in clinical diagnosis and disease screening due to their advantages of precise controlling of fluid flow, requirement of miniamount sample, rapid reaction speed and convenient integration. In this paper, the improvements of microfluidic diagnostic technologies in recent years are reviewed. The applications and developments of on-chip disease marker detection, microfluidic cell selection and cell drug metabolism, and diagnostic micro-devices are discussed.

  5. Dynamics of Microvalve Operations in Integrated Microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Alan T. H. Lau; Hon Ming Yip; Kathy C. C. Ng; Xin Cui; Lam, Raymond H. W.

    2014-01-01

    Pneumatic microvalves are widely used key components for automating liquid manipulation and flow control in microfluidics for more than one decade. Due to their robust operations and the ease of fabrication, tremendous microfluidic systems have been developed with the multiple microvalves for higher throughput and extended functionalities. Therefore, operation performance of the microvalves in the integrated microfluidic devices is crucial to the related applications, in fields such as micro-...

  6. Bio-microfluidics: biomaterials and biomimetic designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domachuk, Peter; Tsioris, Konstantinos; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G; Kaplan, David L

    2010-01-12

    Bio-microfluidics applies biomaterials and biologically inspired structural designs (biomimetics) to microfluidic devices. Microfluidics, the techniques for constraining fluids on the micrometer and sub-micrometer scale, offer applications ranging from lab-on-a-chip to optofluidics. Despite this wealth of applications, the design of typical microfluidic devices imparts relatively simple, laminar behavior on fluids and is realized using materials and techniques from silicon planar fabrication. On the other hand, highly complex microfluidic behavior is commonplace in nature, where fluids with nonlinear rheology flow through chaotic vasculature composed from a range of biopolymers. In this Review, the current state of bio-microfluidic materials, designs and applications are examined. Biopolymers enable bio-microfluidic devices with versatile functionalization chemistries, flexibility in fabrication, and biocompatibility in vitro and in vivo. Polymeric materials such as alginate, collagen, chitosan, and silk are being explored as bulk and film materials for bio-microfluidics. Hydrogels offer options for mechanically functional devices for microfluidic systems such as self-regulating valves, microlens arrays and drug release systems, vital for integrated bio-microfluidic devices. These devices including growth factor gradients to study cell responses, blood analysis, biomimetic capillary designs, and blood vessel tissue culture systems, as some recent examples of inroads in the field that should lead the way in a new generation of microfluidic devices for bio-related needs and applications. Perhaps one of the most intriguing directions for the future will be fully implantable microfluidic devices that will also integrate with existing vasculature and slowly degrade to fully recapitulate native tissue structure and function, yet serve critical interim functions, such as tissue maintenance, drug release, mechanical support, and cell delivery.

  7. Microfluidics for optics and quantitative cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, James Kyle

    2008-01-01

    Microfluidics is a quickly expanding field with numerous applications. The advent of rapid-prototyping and soft- lithography allow for easy and inexpensive fabrication of microfluidic devices. Fluid manipulation on the microscale allows for new functionalities of devices and components not available on the macroscale. Fluid flows on the microscale are laminar with chemical mixing defined strictly by diffusion allowing us to design microfluidic devices with precise control of fluid flow and ch...

  8. Microfluidics Integrated Biosensors: A Leading Technology towards Lab-on-a-Chip and Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luka, George; Ahmadi, Ali; Najjaran, Homayoun; Alocilja, Evangelyn; DeRosa, Maria; Wolthers, Kirsten; Malki, Ahmed; Aziz, Hassan; Althani, Asmaa; Hoorfar, Mina

    2015-01-01

    A biosensor can be defined as a compact analytical device or unit incorporating a biological or biologically derived sensitive recognition element immobilized on a physicochemical transducer to measure one or more analytes. Microfluidic systems, on the other hand, provide throughput processing, enhance transport for controlling the flow conditions, increase the mixing rate of different reagents, reduce sample and reagents volume (down to nanoliter), increase sensitivity of detection, and utilize the same platform for both sample preparation and detection. In view of these advantages, the integration of microfluidic and biosensor technologies provides the ability to merge chemical and biological components into a single platform and offers new opportunities for future biosensing applications including portability, disposability, real-time detection, unprecedented accuracies, and simultaneous analysis of different analytes in a single device. This review aims at representing advances and achievements in the field of microfluidic-based biosensing. The review also presents examples extracted from the literature to demonstrate the advantages of merging microfluidic and biosensing technologies and illustrate the versatility that such integration promises in the future biosensing for emerging areas of biological engineering, biomedical studies, point-of-care diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and precision agriculture. PMID:26633409

  9. Microfluidics Integrated Biosensors: A Leading Technology towards Lab-on-a-Chip and Sensing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luka, George; Ahmadi, Ali; Najjaran, Homayoun; Alocilja, Evangelyn; DeRosa, Maria; Wolthers, Kirsten; Malki, Ahmed; Aziz, Hassan; Althani, Asmaa; Hoorfar, Mina

    2015-12-01

    A biosensor can be defined as a compact analytical device or unit incorporating a biological or biologically derived sensitive recognition element immobilized on a physicochemical transducer to measure one or more analytes. Microfluidic systems, on the other hand, provide throughput processing, enhance transport for controlling the flow conditions, increase the mixing rate of different reagents, reduce sample and reagents volume (down to nanoliter), increase sensitivity of detection, and utilize the same platform for both sample preparation and detection. In view of these advantages, the integration of microfluidic and biosensor technologies provides the ability to merge chemical and biological components into a single platform and offers new opportunities for future biosensing applications including portability, disposability, real-time detection, unprecedented accuracies, and simultaneous analysis of different analytes in a single device. This review aims at representing advances and achievements in the field of microfluidic-based biosensing. The review also presents examples extracted from the literature to demonstrate the advantages of merging microfluidic and biosensing technologies and illustrate the versatility that such integration promises in the future biosensing for emerging areas of biological engineering, biomedical studies, point-of-care diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and precision agriculture.

  10. Microfluidics Integrated Biosensors: A Leading Technology towards Lab-on-a-Chip and Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Luka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor can be defined as a compact analytical device or unit incorporating a biological or biologically derived sensitive recognition element immobilized on a physicochemical transducer to measure one or more analytes. Microfluidic systems, on the other hand, provide throughput processing, enhance transport for controlling the flow conditions, increase the mixing rate of different reagents, reduce sample and reagents volume (down to nanoliter, increase sensitivity of detection, and utilize the same platform for both sample preparation and detection. In view of these advantages, the integration of microfluidic and biosensor technologies provides the ability to merge chemical and biological components into a single platform and offers new opportunities for future biosensing applications including portability, disposability, real-time detection, unprecedented accuracies, and simultaneous analysis of different analytes in a single device. This review aims at representing advances and achievements in the field of microfluidic-based biosensing. The review also presents examples extracted from the literature to demonstrate the advantages of merging microfluidic and biosensing technologies and illustrate the versatility that such integration promises in the future biosensing for emerging areas of biological engineering, biomedical studies, point-of-care diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and precision agriculture.

  11. Microfluidic-Enabled Print-to-Screen Platform for High-Throughput Screening of Combinatorial Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuzhe; Li, Jiannan; Xiao, Wenwu; Xiao, Kai; Lee, Joyce; Bhardwaj, Urvashi; Zhu, Zijie; Digiglio, Philip; Yang, Gaomai; Lam, Kit S; Pan, Tingrui

    2015-10-20

    Since the 1960s, combination chemotherapy has been widely utilized as a standard method to treat cancer. However, because of the potentially enormous number of drug candidates and combinations, conventional identification methods of the effective drug combinations are usually associated with significantly high operational costs, low throughput screening, laborious and time-consuming procedures, and ethical concerns. In this paper, we present a low-cost, high-efficiency microfluidic print-to-screen (P2S) platform, which integrates combinatorial screening with biomolecular printing for high-throughput screening of anticancer drug combinations. This P2S platform provides several distinct advantages and features, including automatic combinatorial printing, high-throughput parallel drug screening, modular disposable cartridge, and biocompatibility, which can potentially speed up the entire discovery cycle of potent drug combinations. Microfluidic impact printing utilizing plug-and-play microfluidic cartridges is experimentally characterized with controllable droplet volume and accurate positioning. Furthermore, the combinatorial print-to-screen assay is demonstrated in a proof-of-concept biological experiment which can identify the positive hits among the entire drug combination library in a parallel and rapid manner. Overall, this microfluidic print-to-screen platform offers a simple, low-cost, high-efficiency solution for high-throughput large-scale combinatorial screening and can be applicable for various emerging applications in drug cocktail discovery.

  12. Engineering geology of waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentley, S.P. [ed.] [University of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom). School of Engineering

    1996-12-31

    This volume covers a wide spectrum of activities in the field of waste disposal. These activities range from design of new landfills and containment properties of natural clays to investigation, hazard assessment and remediation of existing landfills. Consideration is given to design criteria for hard rock quarries when used for waste disposal. In addition, an entire section concerns the geotechnics of underground repositories. This covers such topics as deep drilling, in situ stress measurement, rock mass characterization, groundwater flows and barrier design. Engineering Geology of Waste Disposal examines, in detail, the active role of engineering geologists in the design of waste disposal facilities on UK and international projects. The book provides an authoritative mix of overviews and detailed case histories. The extensive spectrum of papers will be of practical value to those geologists, engineers and environmental scientists who are directly involved with waste disposal. (UK).

  13. Advances in microfluidics for environmental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokerst, Jana C; Emory, Jason M; Henry, Charles S

    2012-01-07

    During the past few years, a growing number of groups have recognized the utility of microfluidic devices for environmental analysis. Microfluidic devices offer a number of advantages and in many respects are ideally suited to environmental analyses. Challenges faced in environmental monitoring, including the ability to handle complex and highly variable sample matrices, lead to continued growth and research. Additionally, the need to operate for days to months in the field requires further development of robust, integrated microfluidic systems. This review examines recently published literature on the applications of microfluidic systems for environmental analysis and provides insight in the future direction of the field.

  14. Integrated lenses in polystyrene microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang

    2013-04-01

    This paper reports a new method for integrating microlenses into microfluidic devices for improved observation. Two demonstration microfluidic devices were provided which were fabricated using this new technique. The integrated microlenses were fabricated using a free-surface thermo-compression molding method on a polystyrene (PS) sheet which was then bonded on top of microfluidic channels as a cover plate, with the convex microlenses providing a magnified image of the channel for the easier observation of the flow in the microchannels. This approach for fabricating the integrated microlens in microfluidic devices is rapid, low cost and without the requirement of cleanroom facilities. © 2013 IEEE.

  15. The microfluidic Kelvin water dropper

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Alvaro G; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Shui, Lingling; Xie, Yanbo; Fontelos, Marco A; Eijkel, Jan C T; Berg, Albert van den; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-01-01

    The so-called "Kelvin water dropper" is a simple experiment demonstrating the spontaneous appearance of induced free charge in droplets emitted through a tube. As Lord Kelvin explained, water droplets spontaneously acquire a net charge during detachment from a faucet due to the presence of electrical fields in their surrounding created by any metallic object. In his experiment, two streams of droplets are allowed to drip from separated nozzles into separated buckets, which are at the same time interconnected through the dripping needles. In this paper we build a microfluidic water dropper and demonstrate that the droplets get charged and break-up due to electrohydrodynamic instabilities. A comparison with recent simulations shows the dependence of the acquired charge in the droplets on different parameters of the system. The phenomenon opens a door to cheap and accessible transformation of pneumatic pressure into electrical energy and to an enhanced control in microfluidic and biophysical manipulation of caps...

  16. 75 FR 47027 - In the Matter of: Certain Devices Having Elastomeric Gel and Components Thereof; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of: Certain Devices Having Elastomeric Gel and Components Thereof; Notice of.... Hearing impaired individuals are advised that information on this matter can be obtained by contacting the... the complaint is to be served: California Exotic Novelties, Inc., 14235 Ramona Avenue, Chino, CA...

  17. Glass interface effect on high-strain-rate tensile response of a soft polyurethane elastomeric polymer material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, J.T.; Weerheijm, J.; Sluys, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The glass interface effect on dynamic tensile response of a soft polyurethane elastomeric polymer material has been investigated by subjecting a glass-polymer system of this polymer material matrix embedded a single 3 mm-diameter glass particle to impact loading in a split Hopkinson tension bar (SHT

  18. Comparative Evaluation of Dimensional Accuracy of Elastomeric Impression Materials when Treated with Autoclave, Microwave, and Chemical Disinfection

    OpenAIRE

    Kamble, Suresh S.; Khandeparker, Rakshit Vijay; P.Somasundaram; Raghav, Shweta; Babaji, Rashmi P; Varghese, T Joju

    2015-01-01

    Background: Impression materials during impression procedure often get infected with various infectious diseases. Hence, disinfection of impression materials with various disinfectants is advised to protect the dental team. Disinfection can alter the dimensional accuracy of impression materials. The present study was aimed to evaluate the dimensional accuracy of elastomeric impression materials when treated with different disinfectants; autoclave, chemical, and microwave method. Materials and...

  19. 76 FR 13434 - In the Matter of Certain Devices Having Elastomeric Gel and Components Thereof; Notice of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... supplemented, of ] Interactive Life Forms, LLC of Austin, Texas (``ILF''). 75 FR 47027 (Aug. 4, 2010). The... add two respondents and correct the identification of two original respondents. 75 FR 64742 (Oct. 20... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Devices Having Elastomeric Gel and Components Thereof; Notice of...

  20. Plaque accumulation and Streptococcus mutans levels around self-ligating bracket clips and elastomeric modules: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaval Fadia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the effect of two different ligating systems that is, elastomeric modules and self-ligating (SL bracket systems (Smartclip - 3M Unitek with respect to harboring bacterial plaque in fixed orthodontic treatment. Objectives: To assess, evaluate, and compare the amount of plaque accumulation and Streptococcus mutans colonization around elastomeric ligation and SL clips in the smart clip appliance. Materials and Methods: A total of 111 orthodontic patients scheduled for fixed orthodontic treatments were selected for this split maxillary arch study. All the patients were bonded with smart-clip (3M Unitek SL brackets, and the wire was placed into the bracket slots, on the randomly selected hemi arch, elastomeric modules were placed for the study to be conducted. Microbial and periodontal plaque accumulation was recorded at 3-time intervals post ligation. Plaque index-by Silness and Loe, modified Quigely Hein index, bleeding on probing were evaluated, and biofilm was collected from the tooth surface after 30 days and placed in petri dishes containing Mitis Salivarius agar for bacterial culturing. Result: It was observed that the side where ligation was done with elastomeric modules accumulated more plaque and increase in S. mutans colony forming units as compared to the side without external ligation (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Reduced bacterial colonization and better plaque control was seen with SL orthodontic bracket appliance system as compared to conventional ligation method.

  1. Unreviewed Disposal Question Evaluation: Waste Disposal In Engineered Trench #3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamm, L. L.; Smith, F. G. III; Flach, G. P.; Hiergesell, R. A.; Butcher, B. T.

    2013-07-29

    Because Engineered Trench #3 (ET#3) will be placed in the location previously designated for Slit Trench #12 (ST#12), Solid Waste Management (SWM) requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) determine if the ST#12 limits could be employed as surrogate disposal limits for ET#3 operations. SRNL documented in this Unreviewed Disposal Question Evaluation (UDQE) that the use of ST#12 limits as surrogates for the new ET#3 disposal unit will provide reasonable assurance that Department of Energy (DOE) 435.1 performance objectives and measures (USDOE, 1999) will be protected. Therefore new ET#3 inventory limits as determined by a Special Analysis (SA) are not required.

  2. Acoustically-driven microfluidic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, A W; Benett, W J; Tarte, L R

    2000-06-23

    We have demonstrated a non-contact method of concentrating and mixing particles in a plastic microfluidic chamber employing acoustic radiation pressure. A flaw cell package has also been designed that integrates liquid sample interconnects, electrical contacts and a removable sample chamber. Experiments were performed on 1, 3, 6, and 10 {micro}m polystyrene beads. Increased antibody binding to a solid-phase substrate was observed in the presence of acoustic mixing due to improve mass transport.

  3. Optical detection in microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2009-01-01

    Optical detection schemes continue to be favoured for measurements in microfluidic systems. A selection of the latest progress mainly within the last two years is critically reviewed. Emphasis is on integrated solutions, such as planar waveguides, coupling schemes to the outside world, evanescent...... to ease commercialisation of the devices. This work will hopefully result in more commercial products that benefit from integrated optics, because the impact on commercial devices so far has been modest....

  4. Microfluidic fabrication of plasmonic microcapsules

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, J.; Jin, M. L.; Eijkel, J.C.T.; Berg, van den, A.E.; Zhou, G.F.; Shui, L.L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the plasmonic microcapsules with well-ordered nanoparticles embedded in polymer network fabricated by using a microfluidic device. The well-ordered nanoparticle arrays on the microcapsule form high-density uniform “hot-spots” with a deposited metal film, on which the localized surface plasmon resonance effect is obtained. These plasmonic microcapsules can be engineered and modified by nanoparticle size and the metal film thickness. Repeatable Surfaced-Enhanced Raman Scatte...

  5. A portable pressure pump for microfluidic lab-on-a-chip systems using a porous polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Kyoung Je; Kim, Dong Sung

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel portable and disposable pressure pump using a porous polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) sponge and demonstrate its application to a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip. The porous PDMS sponge was simply fabricated by a sugar leaching technique based on capillary suction of pre-cured PDMS into lumps of sugar, thereby enabling us to achieve the porous PDMS sponge composed of interconnected micropores. To indicate the characteristics of the porous PDMS sponge and pump, we measured the average porosities of them whose values were 0.64 and 0.34, respectively. A stress-strain relationship of the fabricated portable pressure pump represented a linear behavior in the compressive strain range of 0 to 20%. Within this range, a pumping volume of the pressure pump could be linearly controlled by the compressed strain. Finally, the fabricated porous PDMS pump was successfully demonstrated as a portable pressure pump for a disposable microfluidic lab-on-a-chip for efficient detection of agglutination. The proposed portable pressure pump can be potentially applicable to various disposable microfluidic lab-on-a-chip systems.

  6. Whole-Teflon microfluidic chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Kangning; Dai, Wen; Zhou, Jianhua; Su, Jing; Wu, Hongkai

    2011-05-17

    Although microfluidics has shown exciting potential, its broad applications are significantly limited by drawbacks of the materials used to make them. In this work, we present a convenient strategy for fabricating whole-Teflon microfluidic chips with integrated valves that show outstanding inertness to various chemicals and extreme resistance against all solvents. Compared with other microfluidic materials [e.g., poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)] the whole-Teflon chip has a few more advantages, such as no absorption of small molecules, little adsorption of biomolecules onto channel walls, and no leaching of residue molecules from the material bulk into the solution in the channel. Various biological cells have been cultured in the whole-Teflon channel. Adherent cells can attach to the channel bottom, spread, and proliferate well in the channels (with similar proliferation rate to the cells in PDMS channels with the same dimensions). The moderately good gas permeability of the Teflon materials makes it suitable to culture cells inside the microchannels for a long time.

  7. Microfluidic Devices for Blood Fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chwee Teck Lim

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood, a complex biological fluid, comprises 45% cellular components suspended in protein rich plasma. These different hematologic components perform distinct functions in vivo and thus the ability to efficiently fractionate blood into its individual components has innumerable applications in both clinical diagnosis and biological research. Yet, processing blood is not trivial. In the past decade, a flurry of new microfluidic based technologies has emerged to address this compelling problem. Microfluidics is an attractive solution for this application leveraging its numerous advantages to process clinical blood samples. This paper reviews the various microfluidic approaches realized to successfully fractionate one or more blood components. Techniques to separate plasma from hematologic cellular components as well as isolating blood cells of interest including certain rare cells are discussed. Comparisons based on common separation metrics including efficiency (sensitivity, purity (selectivity, and throughput will be presented. Finally, we will provide insights into the challenges associated with blood-based separation systems towards realizing true point-of-care (POC devices and provide future perspectives.

  8. Geological disposal system development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Chul Hyung; Kuh, J. E.; Kim, S. K. and others

    2000-04-01

    Spent fuel inventories to be disposed of finally and design base spent fuel were determined. Technical and safety criteria for a geological repository system in Korea were established. Based on the properties of spent PWR and CANDU fuels, seven repository alternatives were developed and the most promising repository option was selected by the pair-wise comparison method from the technology point of view. With this option preliminary conceptual design studies were carried out. Several module, e.g., gap module, congruent release module were developed for the overall assessment code MASCOT-K. The prominent overseas databases such as OECD/NEA FEP list were are fully reviewed and then screened to identify the feasible ones to reflect the Korean geo-hydrological conditions. In addition to this the well known scenario development methods such as PID, RES were reviewed. To confirm the radiological safety of the proposed KAERI repository concept the preliminary PA was pursued. Thermo-hydro-mechanical analysis for the near field of repository were performed to verify thermal and mechanical stability for KAERI repository system. The requirements of buffer material were analyzed, and based on the results, the quantitative functional criteria for buffer material were established. The hydraulic and swelling property, mechanical properties, and thermal conductivity, the organic carbon content, and the evolution of pore water chemistry were investigated. Based on the results, the candidate buffer material was selected.

  9. Molecular modeling of the elastomeric properties of repeating units and building blocks of resilin, a disordered elastic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, Md Shahriar K; Dudek, Daniel M; Beers, Eric P; Dillard, David A; Bevan, David R

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the properties of disordered elastomeric proteins are not well known. To better understand the relationship between elastomeric behavior and amino acid sequence, we investigated resilin, a disordered rubber-like protein, found in specialized regions of the cuticle of insects. Resilin of Drosophila melanogaster contains Gly-rich repetitive motifs comprised of the amino acids, PSSSYGAPGGGNGGR, which confer elastic properties to resilin. The repetitive motifs of insect resilin can be divided into smaller partially conserved building blocks: PSS, SYGAP, GGGN and GGR. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we studied the relative roles of SYGAP, and its less common variants SYSAP and TYGAP, on the elastomeric properties of resilin. Results showed that SYGAP adopts a bent structure that is one-half to one-third the end-to-end length of the other motifs having an equal number of amino acids but containing SYSAP or TYGAP substituted for SYGAP. The bent structure of SYGAP forms due to conformational freedom of glycine, and hydrogen bonding within the motif apparently plays a role in maintaining this conformation. These structural features of SYGAP result in higher extensibility compared to other motifs, which may contribute to elastic properties at the macroscopic level. Overall, the results are consistent with a role for the SYGAP building block in the elastomeric properties of these disordered proteins. What we learned from simulating the repetitive motifs of resilin may be applicable to the biology and mechanics of other elastomeric biomaterials, and may provide us the deeper understanding of their unique properties.

  10. Automated microfluidic platform of bead-based electrochemical immunosensor integrated with bioreactor for continual monitoring of cell secreted biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Reza; Shaegh, Seyed Ali Mousavi; Ghaderi, Masoumeh; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Shin, Su Ryon; Aleman, Julio; Massa, Solange; Kim, Duckjin; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-04-21

    There is an increasing interest in developing microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-a-chip platforms combined with sensing capabilities for continual monitoring of cell-secreted biomarkers. Conventional approaches such as ELISA and mass spectroscopy cannot satisfy the needs of continual monitoring as they are labor-intensive and not easily integrable with low-volume bioreactors. This paper reports on the development of an automated microfluidic bead-based electrochemical immunosensor for in-line measurement of cell-secreted biomarkers. For the operation of the multi-use immunosensor, disposable magnetic microbeads were used to immobilize biomarker-recognition molecules. Microvalves were further integrated in the microfluidic immunosensor chip to achieve programmable operations of the immunoassay including bead loading and unloading, binding, washing, and electrochemical sensing. The platform allowed convenient integration of the immunosensor with liver-on-chips to carry out continual quantification of biomarkers secreted from hepatocytes. Transferrin and albumin productions were monitored during a 5-day hepatotoxicity assessment in which human primary hepatocytes cultured in the bioreactor were treated with acetaminophen. Taken together, our unique microfluidic immunosensor provides a new platform for in-line detection of biomarkers in low volumes and long-term in vitro assessments of cellular functions in microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-chips.

  11. Automated microfluidic platform of bead-based electrochemical immunosensor integrated with bioreactor for continual monitoring of cell secreted biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Reza; Shaegh, Seyed Ali Mousavi; Ghaderi, Masoumeh; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Shin, Su Ryon; Aleman, Julio; Massa, Solange; Kim, Duckjin; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-04-01

    There is an increasing interest in developing microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-a-chip platforms combined with sensing capabilities for continual monitoring of cell-secreted biomarkers. Conventional approaches such as ELISA and mass spectroscopy cannot satisfy the needs of continual monitoring as they are labor-intensive and not easily integrable with low-volume bioreactors. This paper reports on the development of an automated microfluidic bead-based electrochemical immunosensor for in-line measurement of cell-secreted biomarkers. For the operation of the multi-use immunosensor, disposable magnetic microbeads were used to immobilize biomarker-recognition molecules. Microvalves were further integrated in the microfluidic immunosensor chip to achieve programmable operations of the immunoassay including bead loading and unloading, binding, washing, and electrochemical sensing. The platform allowed convenient integration of the immunosensor with liver-on-chips to carry out continual quantification of biomarkers secreted from hepatocytes. Transferrin and albumin productions were monitored during a 5-day hepatotoxicity assessment in which human primary hepatocytes cultured in the bioreactor were treated with acetaminophen. Taken together, our unique microfluidic immunosensor provides a new platform for in-line detection of biomarkers in low volumes and long-term in vitro assessments of cellular functions in microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-chips.

  12. Disposable diapers: a hygienic alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Maithili; Malkani, Ram

    2003-11-01

    The use of disposable diapers has offered improved health care benefits. Urine and fecal matter leakage from the cloth nappies and the hand-to-mouth behavior in infants leads to many illnesses with a feco-oral mode of transmission. Also, the tender skin of the infant is more prone to nappy rash. The modern age disposable diapers, when compared to cloth nappy, have displayed a superior ability in containment of urine and feces, thereby reducing contamination and transmission of infection. Also disposable diapers contain Super Absorbent Material (SAM) that successfully reduces the incidence of nappy rash.

  13. Wireless induction heating in a microfluidic device for cell lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung-ki; Min, Junghong; Park, Jung-Hwan

    2010-04-07

    ratio of 23S/16S obtained. In this study, wireless induction heating in a microfluidic device achieved convenience, portability, and economic efficiency by wireless operation, easy fabrication, disposability, and treatment of a large number of cells.

  14. Materials for microfluidic chip fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Kangning; Zhou, Jianhua; Wu, Hongkai

    2013-11-19

    Through manipulating fluids using microfabricated channel and chamber structures, microfluidics is a powerful tool to realize high sensitive, high speed, high throughput, and low cost analysis. In addition, the method can establish a well-controlled microenivroment for manipulating fluids and particles. It also has rapid growing implementations in both sophisticated chemical/biological analysis and low-cost point-of-care assays. Some unique phenomena emerge at the micrometer scale. For example, reactions are completed in a shorter amount of time as the travel distances of mass and heat are relatively small; the flows are usually laminar; and the capillary effect becomes dominant owing to large surface-to-volume ratios. In the meantime, the surface properties of the device material are greatly amplified, which can lead to either unique functions or problems that we would not encounter at the macroscale. Also, each material inherently corresponds with specific microfabrication strategies and certain native properties of the device. Therefore, the material for making the device plays a dominating role in microfluidic technologies. In this Account, we address the evolution of materials used for fabricating microfluidic chips, and discuss the application-oriented pros and cons of different materials. This Account generally follows the order of the materials introduced to microfluidics. Glass and silicon, the first generation microfluidic device materials, are perfect for capillary electrophoresis and solvent-involved applications but expensive for microfabriaction. Elastomers enable low-cost rapid prototyping and high density integration of valves on chip, allowing complicated and parallel fluid manipulation and in-channel cell culture. Plastics, as competitive alternatives to elastomers, are also rapid and inexpensive to microfabricate. Their broad variety provides flexible choices for different needs. For example, some thermosets support in-situ fabrication of

  15. A microfluidic platform for evaporation-based salt screening of pharmaceutical parent compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Sachit; Thorson, Michael R; Schneider, Cassandra L; Zhang, Geoff G Z; Gong, Yuchuan; Kenis, Paul J A

    2013-05-07

    We describe a microfluidic platform to screen for salt forms of pharmaceutical compounds (PCs) via controlled evaporation. The platform enables on-chip combinatorial mixing of PC and salt former solutions in a 24-well array (~200 nL/well), which is a drastic reduction in the amount of PC needed per condition screened compared to traditional screening approaches that require ~100 μL/well. The reduced sample needs enable salt screening at a much earlier stage in the drug development process, when only limited quantities of PCs are available. Compatibility with (i) solvents commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry, and (ii) Raman spectroscopy for solid form identification was ensured by using a hybrid microfluidic platform. A thin layer of elastomeric PDMS was utilized to retain pneumatic valving capabilities. This layer is sandwiched between layers of cyclic-olefin copolymer, a material with low air and solvent permeability and low Raman background to yield a physically rigid and Raman compatible chip. A solvent-impermeable thiolene layer patterned with evaporation channels permits control over the rate of solvent evaporation. Control over the rate of solvent evaporation (2-15 nL h(-1)) results in consistent, known rates of increase in the supersaturation levels attained on-chip, and increases the probability for crystalline solids to form. The modular nature of the platform enables on-chip Raman and birefringence analysis of the solid forms. Model compounds, tamoxifen and ephedrine, were used to validate the platform's ability to screen for salts. On-chip Raman analysis helped to identify six different salts each of tamoxifen and ephedrine.

  16. Integrating Electronics and Microfluidics on Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, Mahiar M; Ainla, Alar; Güder, Firat; Christodouleas, Dionysios C; Fernández-Abedul, M Teresa; Whitesides, George M

    2016-07-01

    Paper microfluidics and printed electronics have developed independently, and are incompatible in many aspects. Monolithic integration of microfluidics and electronics on paper is demonstrated. This integration makes it possible to print 2D and 3D fluidic, electrofluidic, and electrical components on paper, and to fabricate devices using them.

  17. Principles, Techniques, and Applications of Tissue Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Lawrence A.; Kartalov, Emil P.; Shibata, Darryl; Taylor, Clive

    2011-01-01

    The principle of tissue microfluidics and its resultant techniques has been applied to cell analysis. Building microfluidics to suit a particular tissue sample would allow the rapid, reliable, inexpensive, highly parallelized, selective extraction of chosen regions of tissue for purposes of further biochemical analysis. Furthermore, the applicability of the techniques ranges beyond the described pathology application. For example, they would also allow the posing and successful answering of new sets of questions in many areas of fundamental research. The proposed integration of microfluidic techniques and tissue slice samples is called "tissue microfluidics" because it molds the microfluidic architectures in accordance with each particular structure of each specific tissue sample. Thus, microfluidics can be built around the tissues, following the tissue structure, or alternatively, the microfluidics can be adapted to the specific geometry of particular tissues. By contrast, the traditional approach is that microfluidic devices are structured in accordance with engineering considerations, while the biological components in applied devices are forced to comply with these engineering presets.

  18. Cell Culture Microfluidic Biochips: Experimental Throughput Maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips offer a promising alternative to a conventional biochemical laboratory, integrating all necessary functionalities on-chip in order to perform biochemical applications. Researchers have started to propose computer-aided design tools for the synthesis of such biochips. Our focus...... metaheuristic for experimental design generation for the cell culture microfluidic biochips, and we have evaluated our approach using multiple experimental setups....

  19. Modular microfluidic system for biological sample preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Klint A.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Ness, Kevin Dean

    2015-09-29

    A reconfigurable modular microfluidic system for preparation of a biological sample including a series of reconfigurable modules for automated sample preparation adapted to selectively include a) a microfluidic acoustic focusing filter module, b) a dielectrophoresis bacteria filter module, c) a dielectrophoresis virus filter module, d) an isotachophoresis nucleic acid filter module, e) a lyses module, and f) an isotachophoresis-based nucleic acid filter.

  20. A microfluidic method to study demulsification kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krebs, T.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of experiments studying droplet coalescence in a dense layer of emulsion droplets using microfluidic circuits. The microfluidic structure allows direct observation of collisions and coalescence events between oil droplets dispersed in water. The coalescence rate of a flowing h

  1. Principles, Techniques, and Applications of Tissue Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Lawrence A.; Kartalov, Emil P.; Shibata, Darryl; Taylor, Clive

    2011-01-01

    The principle of tissue microfluidics and its resultant techniques has been applied to cell analysis. Building microfluidics to suit a particular tissue sample would allow the rapid, reliable, inexpensive, highly parallelized, selective extraction of chosen regions of tissue for purposes of further biochemical analysis. Furthermore, the applicability of the techniques ranges beyond the described pathology application. For example, they would also allow the posing and successful answering of new sets of questions in many areas of fundamental research. The proposed integration of microfluidic techniques and tissue slice samples is called tissue microfluidics because it molds the microfluidic architectures in accordance with each particular structure of each specific tissue sample. Thus, microfluidics can be built around the tissues, following the tissue structure, or alternatively, the microfluidics can be adapted to the specific geometry of particular tissues. By contrast, the traditional approach is that microfluidic devices are structured in accordance with engineering considerations, while the biological components in applied devices are forced to comply with these engineering presets. The proposed principles represent a paradigm shift in microfluidic technology in three important ways: Microfluidic devices are to be directly integrated with, onto, or around tissue samples, in contrast to the conventional method of off-chip sample extraction followed by sample insertion in microfluidic devices. Architectural and operational principles of microfluidic devices are to be subordinated to suit specific tissue structure and needs, in contrast to the conventional method of building devices according to fluidic function alone and without regard to tissue structure. Sample acquisition from tissue is to be performed on-chip and is to be integrated with the diagnostic measurement within the same device, in contrast to the conventional method of off-chip sample prep and

  2. Final disposal of radioactive waste

    OpenAIRE

    Freiesleben H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the origin and properties of radioactive waste as well as its classification scheme (low-level waste – LLW, intermediate-level waste – ILW, high-level waste – HLW) are presented. The various options for conditioning of waste of different levels of radioactivity are reviewed. The composition, radiotoxicity and reprocessing of spent fuel and their effect on storage and options for final disposal are discussed. The current situation of final waste disposal in a selected number of c...

  3. Clays in radioactive waste disposal

    OpenAIRE

    Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu-Jun; Tang, Anh-Minh

    2010-01-01

    Clays and argillites are considered in some countries as possible host rocks for nuclear waste disposal at great depth. The use of compacted swelling clays as engineered barriers is also considered within the framework of the multi-barrier concept. In relation to these concepts, various research programs have been conducted to assess the thermo-hydro-mechanical properties of radioactive waste disposal at great depth. After introducing the concepts of waste isolation developed in Belgium, Fran...

  4. Electrorheological fluid and its applications in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Limu; Gong, Xiuqing; Wen, Weijia

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics is a low-cost technique for fast-diagnosis and microsynthesis. Within a decade it might become the foundation of point-of-care and lab-on-a-chip applications. With microfluidic chips, high-throughput sample screening and information processing are made possible. The picoliter droplet runs in microfluidic chips are ideal miniaturized vessels for microdetection and microsynthesis. Meanwhile, individual manipulation of microdroplets remains a challenge: the shortcomings in automatic, reliable, and scalable methods for logic control prevent further integration of microfluidic applications. The giant electrorheological fluid (GERF), which is a kind of "smart" colloid, has tunable viscosity under the influence of external electric field. Therefore, GERF is introduced as the active controlling medium, with real-time response in on-chip fluid control. This review article introduces the working principles and fabrication methods of different types of electrorheological fluid, and extensively describes the strategies of GERF-assisted microfluidic controlling schemes.

  5. Manipulation of microfluidic droplets by electrorheological fluid

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Menying

    2009-09-01

    Microfluidics, especially droplet microfluidics, attracts more and more researchers from diverse fields, because it requires fewer materials and less time, produces less waste and has the potential of highly integrated and computer-controlled reaction processes for chemistry and biology. Electrorheological fluid, especially giant electrorheological fluid (GERF), which is considered as a kind of smart material, has been applied to the microfluidic systems to achieve active and precise control of fluid by electrical signal. In this review article, we will introduce recent results of microfluidic droplet manipulation, GERF and some pertinent achievements by introducing GERF into microfluidic system: digital generation, manipulation of "smart droplets" and droplet manipulation by GERF. Once it is combined with real-time detection, integrated chip with multiple functions can be realized. © 2009 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  6. Microfluidics: a new cosset for neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinyi; Ren, Li; Li, Li; Liu, Wenming; Zhou, Jing; Yu, Wenhao; Tong, Denwen; Chen, Shulin

    2009-03-07

    Recently, microfluidic systems have shown great potential in the study of molecular and cellular biology. With its excellent properties, such as miniaturization, integration and automation, to name just a few, microfluidics creates new opportunities for the spatial and temporal control of cell growth and environmental stimuli in vitro. In the field of neuroscience, microfluidic devices offer precise control of the microenvironment surrounding individual cells, and the delivery of biochemical or physical cues to neural networks or single neurons. The intent of this review is to outline recent advances in microfluidic-based applications in neurobiology, with emphasis on neuron culture, neuron manipulation, neural stem cell differentiation, neuropharmacology, neuroelectrophysiology, and neuron biosensors. It also aims to stimulate development of microfluidic-based applications in neurobiology by involving scientists from various disciplines, especially neurobiology and microtechnology.

  7. Microfluidic desalination techniques and their potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, S H; van den Berg, A; Odijk, M

    2015-09-07

    In this review we discuss recent developments in the emerging research field of miniaturized desalination. Traditionally desalination is performed to convert salt water into potable water and research is focused on improving performance of large-scale desalination plants. Microfluidic desalination offers several new opportunities in comparison to macro-scale desalination, such as providing a platform to increase fundamental knowledge of ion transport on the nano- and microfluidic scale and new microfluidic sample preparation methods. This approach has also lead to the development of new desalination techniques, based on micro/nanofluidic ion-transport phenomena, which are potential candidates for up-scaling to (portable) drinking water devices. This review assesses microfluidic desalination techniques on their applications and is meant to contribute to further implementation of microfluidic desalination techniques in the lab-on-chip community.

  8. Microfluidics for food, agriculture and biosystems industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neethirajan, Suresh; Kobayashi, Isao; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi; Wu, Dan; Nandagopal, Saravanan; Lin, Francis

    2011-05-07

    Microfluidics, a rapidly emerging enabling technology has the potential to revolutionize food, agriculture and biosystems industries. Examples of potential applications of microfluidics in food industry include nano-particle encapsulation of fish oil, monitoring pathogens and toxins in food and water supplies, micro-nano-filtration for improving food quality, detection of antibiotics in dairy food products, and generation of novel food structures. In addition, microfluidics enables applications in agriculture and animal sciences such as nutrients monitoring and plant cells sorting for improving crop quality and production, effective delivery of biopesticides, simplified in vitro fertilization for animal breeding, animal health monitoring, vaccination and therapeutics. Lastly, microfluidics provides new approaches for bioenergy research. This paper synthesizes information of selected microfluidics-based applications for food, agriculture and biosystems industries. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  9. Manipulation of microfluidic droplets by electrorheological fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Menying; Gong, Xiuqing; Wen, Weijia

    2009-09-01

    Microfluidics, especially droplet microfluidics, attracts more and more researchers from diverse fields, because it requires fewer materials and less time, produces less waste and has the potential of highly integrated and computer-controlled reaction processes for chemistry and biology. Electrorheological fluid, especially giant electrorheological fluid (GERF), which is considered as a kind of smart material, has been applied to the microfluidic systems to achieve active and precise control of fluid by electrical signal. In this review article, we will introduce recent results of microfluidic droplet manipulation, GERF and some pertinent achievements by introducing GERF into microfluidic system: digital generation, manipulation of "smart droplets" and droplet manipulation by GERF. Once it is combined with real-time detection, integrated chip with multiple functions can be realized.

  10. Research of Dielectric Breakdown Microfluidic Sampling Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic chip is mainly driven electrically by external electrode and array electrode, but there are certain disadvantages in both of ways, which affect the promotion and application of microfluidic technology. This paper discusses a scheme that uses the conductive solution in a microchannel made by PDMS, replacing electrodes and the way of dielectric breakdown to achieve microfluidic chip driver. It could reduce the driving voltage and simplify the chip production process. To prove the feasibility of this method, we produced a microfluidic chip used in PDMS material with the lithography technology and experimented it. The results showed that using the dielectric breakdown to achieve microfluidic chip driver is feasible, and it has certain application prospect.

  11. Curvilinear electronics formed using silicon membrane circuits and elastomeric transfer elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Heung Cho; Shin, Gunchul; Wang, Shuodao; Stoykovich, Mark P; Lee, Jeong Won; Kim, Dong-Hun; Ha, Jeong Sook; Huang, Yonggang; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Rogers, John A

    2009-12-01

    Materials and methods to achieve electronics intimately integrated on the surfaces of substrates with complex, curvilinear shapes are described. The approach exploits silicon membranes in circuit mesh structures that can be deformed in controlled ways using thin, elastomeric films. Experimental and theoretical studies of the micromechanics of such curvilinear electronics demonstrate the underlying concepts. Electrical measurements illustrate the high yields that can be obtained. The results represent significant experimental and theoretical advances over recently reported concepts for creating hemispherical photodetectors in electronic eye cameras and for using printable silicon nanoribbons/membranes in flexible electronics. The results might provide practical routes to the integration of high performance electronics with biological tissues and other systems of interest for new applications.

  12. Interface and properties of epoxy resin modified by elastomeric nano-particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Fan; LIU Yiqun; ZHANG Xiaohong; GAO Jianming; SONG Zhihai; TANG Banghui; WEI Genshuan; QIAO Jinliang

    2005-01-01

    Study on a new composite of epoxy resin/elastomeric nano-particles (ENP) is reported in this paper, which shows that, in comparison with pure epoxy resin and epoxy toughened with CTBN, the composites of epoxy resin/carboxylic nitrile-butadiene ENP and epoxy resin/styrene butadiene vinyl-pyridine ENP possess both higher toughness and heat resistance. Both ENPs used in the study have an average size of less than 100 nm. Study on the epoxy network's morphology and interface properties suggests that due to the chemical reaction between ENP and epoxy resin and more hydrogen bonds between nitrile groups of the rubber and hydroxyl groups of the epoxy resin, stronger interaction at the larger interface may lead to the observed excellent properties of the epoxy resin toughened with ENP.

  13. Optimization of fractional composition of the excipient in the elastomeric covering for asphalt highways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Nurullaev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The computational method of optimum fractional composition of a dispersible filler of polymeric composite on the basis of three-dimensionally linked elastomer is developed according to non-linear programming. The coefficient of dynamic viscosity of polymeric suspension or the initial module of a viscoelasticity of the join solidification low-molecular rubbers with the final functional groups, filled by many fractional dioxide of silicon are considered as criteria of optimization. Influence of the limiting volume filling on energy of mechanical destruction was investigated. The elastomeric material is offered for use as a covering of asphalt highways in the form of a frost-proof waterproofing layer, which allowing multiply to increase operating properties.

  14. A highly sensitive and flexible pressure sensor with electrodes and elastomeric interlayer containing silver nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Jiu, Jinting; Nogi, Masaya; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Koga, Hirotaka; He, Peng; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2015-02-01

    The next-generation application of pressure sensors is gradually being extended to include electronic artificial skin (e-skin), wearable devices, humanoid robotics and smart prosthetics. In these advanced applications, high sensing capability is an essential feature for high performance. Although surface patterning treatments and some special elastomeric interlayers have been applied to improve sensitivity, the process is complex and this inevitably raises the cost and is an obstacle to large-scale production. In the present study a simple printing process without complex patterning has been used for constructing the sensor, and an interlayer is employed comprising elastomeric composites filled with silver nanowires. By increasing the relative permittivity, εr, of the composite interlayer induced by compression at high nanowire concentration, it has been possible to achieve a maximum sensitivity of 5.54 kPa-1. The improvement in sensitivity did not sacrifice or undermine the other features of the sensor. Thanks to the silver nanowire electrodes, the sensor is flexible and stable after 200 cycles at a bending radius of 2 mm, and exhibits outstanding reproducibility without hysteresis under similar pressure pulses. The sensor has been readily integrated onto an adhesive bandage and has been successful in detecting human movements. In addition to measuring pressure in direct contact, non-contact pressures such as air flow can also be detected.The next-generation application of pressure sensors is gradually being extended to include electronic artificial skin (e-skin), wearable devices, humanoid robotics and smart prosthetics. In these advanced applications, high sensing capability is an essential feature for high performance. Although surface patterning treatments and some special elastomeric interlayers have been applied to improve sensitivity, the process is complex and this inevitably raises the cost and is an obstacle to large-scale production. In the present

  15. In situ studies of strain dependent transport properties of conducting polymers on elastomeric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Venugopalan; Rao, Arun D.; Narayan, K. S.

    2011-04-01

    We report the changes in the surface electrical resistance, R, of conducting polymer, Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) films coated on appropriate flexible substrates in stretched conditions. These studies are important in the context of flexible organic electronic applications. In situ conductivity measurements on pristine PEDOT:PSS thin films on elastomeric substrates upon stretching reveal a minima in R as a function of strain, x, prior to the expected increase at higher strain levels. The studies emphasize (i) role of substrates, (ii) stress-induced anisotropic features, and temperature dependence of R (iii) in comparison of R(x) in polymer films to that of conventional metal films. The stress induced changes is modeled in terms of effective medium approximation.

  16. Elastomeric 2D Grating and Hemispherical Optofluidic Chamber for Multifunctional Fluidic Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Zhida

    2014-01-01

    We present an optofluidic sensor based on an elastomeric two-dimensional (2D) grating integrated inside a hemispherical fluid chamber. Laser beam is diffracted before (reflection) and after (transmission) going through the grating and liquid in the dome chamber. The sensing mechanism is investigated and simulated with a finite difference time domain (FDTD) based electromagnetic (EM) method. For experiment, by analyzing the size, power and shape of the 2D diffraction patterns, we can retrieve multiple parameters of the liquid including the refractive index, pressure and opacity with high sensitivity. We demonstrate that glucose concentration can be monitored when mixed in different concentrated phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution. The free-solution binding of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and anti-BSA IgG is detected with this optical sensor. This low-cost, multifunctional and reliable optofluidic sensor has the potential to be used as monitor of biofluid such as blood in hemodialysis.

  17. The effect of rinsing time periods on wettability of elastomeric impression materials: in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Acar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether different rinsing time periods affected the wettability of polymerized elastomeric impression materials. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Panasil Contact Plus (PCP, Panasil Contact Non-Surfactant (PCNS, Panasil Initial Contact (PIC, Express (EXP and Impregum (IMP impression materials were tested. Standardized samples were rinsed with water for 10 s, 15 s or 20 s, and the wettability was determined by contact angle measurement through an evaluation period of 60 seconds (n=7. Non-rinsed groups were used as control. Measurements were made at 5 time points (at 0, 6, 15, 30 and 60 seconds. Kruskal Wallis test and Conover’s multiple comparison tests were used for all multiple comparisons. Bonferroni adjustment was applied for controlling Type I error (p0.002. CONCLUSION: Rinsing the surfactant-containing polyvinylsiloxane impression materials decreased their wettability, whereas no such effect was seen for the surfactant free polyvinylsiloxane and polyether impression materials.

  18. Printing transferable components using microstructured elastomeric surfaces with pressure modulated reversible adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menard, Etienne; Rogers, John A.; Kim, Seok; Carlson, Andrew

    2016-08-09

    In a method of printing a transferable component, a stamp including an elastomeric post having three-dimensional relief features protruding from a surface thereof is pressed against a component on a donor substrate with a first pressure that is sufficient to mechanically deform the relief features and a region of the post between the relief features to contact the component over a first contact area. The stamp is retracted from the donor substrate such that the component is adhered to the stamp. The stamp including the component adhered thereto is pressed against a receiving substrate with a second pressure that is less than the first pressure to contact the component over a second contact area that is smaller than the first contact area. The stamp is then retracted from the receiving substrate to delaminate the component from the stamp and print the component onto the receiving substrate. Related apparatus and stamps are also discussed.

  19. PRELIMINARY REPORT: EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION AND THERMAL EXPOSURE ON ELASTOMERIC SEALS FOR CASK TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verst, C.; Skidmore, E.; Daugherty, W.

    2014-05-30

    A testing and analysis approach to predict the sealing behavior of elastomeric seal materials in dry storage casks and evaluate their ability to maintain a seal under thermal and radiation exposure conditions of extended storage and beyond was developed, and initial tests have been conducted. The initial tests evaluate the aging response of EPDM elastomer O-ring seals. The thermal and radiation exposure conditions of the CASTOR® V/21 casks were selected for testing as this cask design is of interest due to its widespread use, and close proximity of the seals to the fuel compared to other cask designs leading to a relatively high temperature and dose under storage conditions. A novel test fixture was developed to enable compression stress relaxation measurements for the seal material at the thermal and radiation exposure conditions. A loss of compression stress of 90% is suggested as the threshold at which sealing ability of an elastomeric seal would be lost. Previous studies have shown this value to be conservative to actual leakage failure for most aging conditions. These initial results indicate that the seal would be expected to retain sealing ability throughout extended storage at the cask design conditions, though longer exposure times are needed to validate this assumption. The high constant dose rate used in the testing is not prototypic of the decreasingly low dose rate that would occur under extended storage. The primary degradation mechanism of oxidation of polymeric compounds is highly dependent on temperature and time of exposure, and with radiation expected to exacerbate the oxidation.

  20. A rheology model of soft elastomeric capacitor for Weigh-In-Motion application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollipara, Venkata Dharmateja

    As a result of fast growing industry, there is an increase in traffic congestion and deterioration of transportation inventory. Real-time traffic characterisation could be used to amoliorate the efficiency of our transportation system. Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) systems offer the advantages of vehicle classification, speed measurement, in addition to weight measurement while vehicles are moving. In this thesis, state-of-the-art WIM systems are discussed and limitations of current technologies are identified. A Soft Elastomeric Capacitor (SEC) that works as a large scale surface strain gauge is introduced to address the limitations in existing techniques and investigated for its applicability as a WIM sensor. Though the novel SEC has potential advantages, the relationship axial strain-to-stress needs to be modeled to enable its utilization as a WIM sensor. A Zener model is selected and modified by the addition of a slider to characterize the polymer behavior. An overstress approach is used to study the resultant stress-strain response owing to its simplicity and computational benefits. Since the overstress approach is data-driven, an experimental testing scheme is used to identify the model parameters. The tests comprise three types of applied strain loading: multi step relaxation, simple relaxation and cyclic compression. Specimens with varying stiffness are employed for these tests. Numerical simulations for the cyclic compression loading are presented to assess the model performance. The model is found to be capable of reproducing the experimental data with an absolute maximum error value of 0.085 MPa for slow loading rate tests and 0.175 MPa for high loading rate tests. Comparative studies are completed to investigate the impact of patch stiffness on the mechanical behavior of the soft elastomeric capacitor patches. It is observed that as stiffness decreases, the nonlinearity in stress-strain response increases

  1. Highly elastomeric poly(glycerol sebacate)-co-poly(ethylene glycol) amphiphilic block copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Alpesh; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K; Iviglia, Giorgio; Zhang, Hongbin; Mukundan, Shilpaa; Mihaila, Silvia M; Demarchi, Danilo; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-05-01

    Poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS), a tough elastomer, has been proposed for tissue engineering applications due to its desired mechanical properties, biocompatibility and controlled degradation. Despite interesting physical and chemical properties, PGS shows limited water uptake capacity (∼2%), thus constraining its utility for soft tissue engineering. Therefore, a modification of PGS that would mimic the water uptake and water retention characteristics of natural extracellular matrix is beneficial for enhancing its utility for biomedical applications. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of highly elastomeric poly(glycerol sebacate)-co-polyethylene glycol (PGS-co-PEG) block copolymers with controlled water uptake characteristics. By tailoring the water uptake property, it is possible to engineer scaffolds with customized degradation and mechanical properties. The addition of PEG results in almost 15-fold increase in water uptake capacity of PGS, and improves its mechanical stability under dynamic loading conditions. PGS-co-PEG polymers show elastomeric properties and can be subjected to serve deformation such as bending and stretching. The Young's modulus of PGS-co-PEG can be tuned from 13 kPa to 2.2 MPa by altering the amount of PEG within the copolymer network. Compared to PGS, more than six-fold increase in elongation was observed upon PEG incorporation. In addition, the rate of degradation increases with an increase in PEG concentration, indicating that degradation rate of PGS can be regulated. PGS-co-PEG polymers also support cell proliferation, and thus can be used for a range of tissue engineering applications.

  2. Kinetic ELISA in Microfluidic Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis Dutta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe the kinetic ELISA of Blue Tongue and Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease viral antibodies in microfluidic channels by monitoring the rate of generation of the enzyme reaction product under static conditions. It has been shown that this format of the immunoassay allows very reliable quantitation of the target species using inexpensive glass microchips and a standard epifluorescence microscope system coupled to a CCD camera. For the viral antibodies assayed here, the limit of detection (LOD for the analyte concentration in our microchips was established to be 3–5 times lower than that obtained on commercial microwell plates using a fiftieth of the sample volume and less than a third of the incubation time. Our analyses further show that when compared to the end-point ELISA format, the kinetic mode of this assay yields an improvement in the LOD by over an order of magnitude in microfluidic devices. This benefit is primarily realized as the observed variation in the background fluorescence (signal at the start of the enzyme reaction period was significantly larger than that in the rate of signal generation upon repeating these assays in different microchannels/microchips. Because the kinetic ELISA results depend only on the latter quantity, the noise level in them was substantially lower compared to that in its end-point counterpart in which the absolute fluorescence measurements are of greater significance. While a similar benefit was also recorded through implementation of kinetic ELISAs on the microwell platform, the improvement in LOD registered in that system was not as significant as was observed in the case of microfluidic assays.

  3. Microfluidics and microscale transport processes

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Suman

    2012-01-01

    With an intense focus on micro- and nanotechnology from a fluidic perspective, this book details the research activities in key directions on both the theoretical and experimental fronts. As part of the IIT Kharagpur Research Monograph series, the text discusses topics such as capillary transport in microchannels, fluid friction and heat transfer in microchannels, electrokinetics, and interfacial transport in nanochannels. It also covers nanoparticle transport in colloidal suspensions, bubble generation in microfluidic channels, micro-heat pipe, the lattice Boltzmann method for phase changing

  4. Microfluidics and the life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Holger; Gärtner, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The field of microfluidics, often also referred to as "Lab-on-a-Chip" has made significant progress in the last 15 years and is an essential tool in the development of new products and protocols in the life sciences. This article provides a broad overview on the developments on the academic as well as the commercial side. Fabrication technologies for polymer-based devices are presented and a strategy for the development of complex integrated devices is discussed, together with an example on the use of these devices in pathogen detection.

  5. Simplified prototyping of perfusable polystyrene microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Reginald; Ahn, Byungwook; R. Myers, David; Qiu, Yongzhi; Sakurai, Yumiko; Moot, Robert; Mihevc, Emma; Trent Spencer, H.; Doering, Christopher; A. Lam, Wilbur

    2014-01-01

    Cell culture in microfluidic systems has primarily been conducted in devices comprised of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) or other elastomers. As polystyrene (PS) is the most characterized and commonly used substrate material for cell culture, microfluidic cell culture would ideally be conducted in PS-based microsystems that also enable tight control of perfusion and hydrodynamic conditions, which are especially important for culture of vascular cell types. Here, we report a simple method to prototype perfusable PS microfluidics for endothelial cell culture under flow that can be fabricated using standard lithography and wet laboratory equipment to enable stable perfusion at shear stresses up to 300 dyn/cm2 and pumping pressures up to 26 kPa for at least 100 h. This technique can also be extended to fabricate perfusable hybrid PS-PDMS microfluidics of which one application is for increased efficiency of viral transduction in non-adherent suspension cells by leveraging the high surface area to volume ratio of microfluidics and adhesion molecules that are optimized for PS substrates. These biologically compatible microfluidic devices can be made more accessible to biological-based laboratories through the outsourcing of lithography to various available microfluidic foundries. PMID:25379106

  6. Tank Waste Disposal Program redefinition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grygiel, M.L.; Augustine, C.A.; Cahill, M.A.; Garfield, J.S.; Johnson, M.E.; Kupfer, M.J.; Meyer, G.A.; Roecker, J.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Holton, L.K.; Hunter, V.L.; Triplett, M.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1991-10-01

    The record of decision (ROD) (DOE 1988) on the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland Washington identifies the method for disposal of double-shell tank waste and cesium and strontium capsules at the Hanford Site. The ROD also identifies the need for additional evaluations before a final decision is made on the disposal of single-shell tank waste. This document presents the results of systematic evaluation of the present technical circumstances, alternatives, and regulatory requirements in light of the values of the leaders and constitutents of the program. It recommends a three-phased approach for disposing of tank wastes. This approach allows mature technologies to be applied to the treatment of well-understood waste forms in the near term, while providing time for the development and deployment of successively more advanced pretreatment technologies. The advanced technologies will accelerate disposal by reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified. This document also recommends integration of the double-and single-shell tank waste disposal programs, provides a target schedule for implementation of the selected approach, and describes the essential elements of a program to be baselined in 1992.

  7. Enzymatic Reactions in Microfluidic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristenpart, W. D.; Wan, J.; Stone, H. A.

    2008-11-01

    We establish simple scaling laws for enzymatic reactions in microfluidic devices, and we demonstrate that kinetic parameters obtained conventionally using multiple stop-flow experiments may instead be extracted from a single microfluidic experiment. Introduction of an enzyme and substrate species in different arms of a Y-shaped channel allows the two species to diffuse across the parallel streamlines and to begin reacting. Measurements of the product concentration versus distance down the channel provide information about the kinetics of the reaction. In the limit where the enzyme is much larger (and thus less diffusive) than the substrate, we show that near the entrance the total amount of product (P) formed varies as a power law in the distance x down the channel. For reactions that follow standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics, the power law takes the form P˜(Vmax/Km) x^5/2, where Vmax and Km are the maximum reaction rate and Michaelis constant respectively. If a large excess of substrate is used, then Km is identified by measuring Vmax far downstream where the different species are completely mixed by diffusion. Numerical simulations and experiments using the bioluminescent reaction between luciferase and ATP as a model system are both shown to accord with the model. We discuss the implications for significant savings in the amount of time and enzyme required for determination of kinetic parameters.

  8. The microfluidic Kelvin water dropper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Álvaro G; van Hoeve, Wim; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Shui, Lingling; Xie, Yanbo; Fontelos, Marco A; Eijkel, Jan C T; van den Berg, Albert; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-12-07

    The so-called "Kelvin water dropper" is a simple experiment demonstrating the spontaneous appearance of induced free charge in droplets emitted through a tube. As Lord Kelvin explained, water droplets spontaneously acquire a net charge during detachment from a faucet due to the presence of electrical fields in their surroundings created by any metallic object. In his experiment, two streams of droplets are allowed to drip from separate nozzles into separate buckets, which are, at the same time, interconnected through the dripping needles. In this paper, we build a microfluidic water dropper and demonstrate that the droplets get charged and break up due to electrohydrodynamic instabilities. A comparison with recent simulations shows the dependence of the acquired charge in the droplets on different parameters of the system. The phenomenon opens a door to cheap and accessible transformation of pneumatic pressure into electrical energy and to an enhanced control in microfluidic and biophysical manipulation of capsules, cells and droplets via self-induced charging of the elements.

  9. Utilization of the UV laser with picosecond pulses for the formation of surface microstructures on elastomeric plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoszewski, B.; Tofil, S.; Scendo, M.; Tarelnik, W.

    2017-08-01

    Elastomeric plastics belong to a wide range of polymeric materials with special properties. They are used as construction material for seals and other components in many branches of industry and, in particular, in the biomedical industry, mechatronics, electronics and chemical equipment. The micromachining of surfaces of these materials can be used to build micro-flow, insulating, dispensing systems and chemical and biological reactors. The paper presents results of research on the effects of micro-machining of selected elastomeric plastics using a UV laser emitting picosecond pulses. The authors see the prospective application of the developed technology in the sealing technique in particular to shaping the sealing pieces co-operating with the surface of the element. The result of the study is meant to show parameters of the UV laser’s performance when producing typical components such as grooves, recesses for optimum ablation in terms of quality and productivity.

  10. Microfluidic Systems for Pathogen Sensing: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ertl

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Rapid pathogen sensing remains a pressing issue today since conventional identification methodsare tedious, cost intensive and time consuming, typically requiring from 48 to 72 h. In turn, chip based technologies, such as microarrays and microfluidic biochips, offer real alternatives capable of filling this technological gap. In particular microfluidic biochips make the development of fast, sensitive and portable diagnostic tools possible, thus promising rapid and accurate detection of a variety of pathogens. This paper will provide a broad overview of the novel achievements in the field of pathogen sensing by focusing on methods and devices that compliment microfluidics.

  11. Analogy among microfluidics, micromechanics, and microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng-Shian; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2013-10-07

    We wish to illuminate the analogous link between microfluidic-based devices, and the already established pairing of micromechanics and microelectronics to create a triangular/three-way scientific relationship as a means of interlinking familial disciplines and accomplishing two primary goals: (1) to facilitate the modeling of multidisciplinary domains; and, (2) to enable us to co-simulate the entire system within a compact circuit simulator (e.g., Cadence or SPICE). A microfluidic channel-like structure embedded in a micro-electro-mechanical resonator via our proposed CMOS-MEMS technology is used to illustrate the connections among microfluidics, micromechanics, and microelectronics.

  12. Microfluidic systems for pathogen sensing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairhofer, Jürgen; Roppert, Kriemhilt; Ertl, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Rapid pathogen sensing remains a pressing issue today since conventional identification methodsare tedious, cost intensive and time consuming, typically requiring from 48 to 72 h. In turn, chip based technologies, such as microarrays and microfluidic biochips, offer real alternatives capable of filling this technological gap. In particular microfluidic biochips make the development of fast, sensitive and portable diagnostic tools possible, thus promising rapid and accurate detection of a variety of pathogens. This paper will provide a broad overview of the novel achievements in the field of pathogen sensing by focusing on methods and devices that compliment microfluidics.

  13. Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.; Otis, M.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Waste Management Technology Div.

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ``waste,`` but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity.

  14. Antimicrobial effect of zataria multiflora extract in comparison with chlorhexidine mouthwash on experimentally contaminated orthodontic elastomeric ligatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Aghili

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-term use of orthodontic appliances and fixation ligatures creates a favorable environment for the accumulation of oral normal microflora and increases the risk of enamel demineralization and periodontal disease. The aim of this study was to compare the antimicrobial effects of Zataria Multiflora extract and 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX mouthwash on experimentally contaminated orthodontic elastomeric ligatures.In this lab trial study, Iranian and foreign-made elastomeric ligatures were experimentally contaminated in Streptococcus mutans, Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans suspensions. Ligatures were then decontaminated using 0.2% CHX as the control, 0.5 mg/ml Zataria multiflora extract mouthwashes as the test and phosphate buffered saline (PBS as the negative control for one hour. Antimicrobial properties of both solutions were evaluated by comparing the mean viable bacterial cell count on both rings after decontamination, using SPSS version 15 software.The mean viable bacterial cell count on Iranian ligatures was greater than that on foreign-made ligatures before disinfection (P=0.001, however this difference for C. albicans was not statistically significant (P=0.061. Chlorhexidine mouthwash completely eliminated all tested microorganisms attached to both elastomeric rings, but Zataria extract was only capable of completely eliminating C. albicans from both ligatures. Statistically significant differences were found in viable bacterial counts on both ligatures before and after disinfection with Zataria extract (P=0.0001.Zataria multiflora extract has antimicrobial properties and can be used for disinfection of elastomeric ligatures. In vivo studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of the incorporation of this herbal extract in mouthwashes for orthodontic patients.

  15. Evaluation of Low Level Laser Therapy on Pain Perception Following Orthodontic Elastomeric Separation: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almallah, Mai M.E.; Almahdi, Wael H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Periodontal pain caused by elastomeric separators is a very common problem in the commencement of orthodontic treatment. Previous studies have shown good results in reducing this pain by Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) and different protocols of application have been suggested in the literature. Aim This trial aimed to evaluate LLLT on managing orthodontic pain caused by elastomeric separators and to compare single versus double irradiation in possible pain reduction. Materials and Methods A clinical randomized compound (parallel-group and split-mouth design) trial was conducted on 36 patients between 12 and 26 years of age. Elastomeric separators were placed at the mesial and distal surfaces of the first molars in one jaw (upper or lower) for each patient and in only one side of the mouth (the other side served as the placebo side). The trial had two groups: the first group received single irradiation of LLLT [Gallium Aluminum Arsenide (GaAlAs): 830 nm, 4J/cm2, 100mW] immediately after separators insertion, where as the second group received double irradiation immediately after separators insertion and after 24hours. All patients were instructed to rate the level of pain at 1, 6, 24, 48, 96 hours on a Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The student ‘t’ tests, repeated measures ANOVA and LSD post-hoc tests were employed. Results LLLT was successful in reducing post-separation pain when the experimental side was compared to the placebo side at all assessment times in each group (p0.05). Conclusion GaAlAs LLLT application reduced early orthodontic pain caused by elastomeric separators by single or double irradiation. PMID:28050498

  16. A simple route to morphology-controlled polydimethylsiloxane films based on particle-embedded elastomeric masters for enhanced superhydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Dong-Wook; Kim, Seung-Jun; Park, Jong-Kweon; Kim, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Deug-Woo; Kim, Jong-Man

    2014-02-26

    We present a simple route for controlling the surface morphology of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films based on a standard replica molding technique incorporating a microparticle-embedded elastomeric master for enhancing surface wetting properties. The elastomeric masters are simply prepared by embedding microparticles (MPs) firmly into a surface of PDMS substrates using an abrasive air-jetting (AAJ) that can be potentially scaled up to large-area fabrication. The surface geometries of the PDMS masters can be easily controlled by using MPs with different shape and size in the AAJ process, resulting in easy control of the surface morphologies and resultant wetting and optical properties of the PDMS films after replicating. The PDMS masters are found to be highly durable, enabling repeated use to produce superhydrophobic PDMS films with similar characteristics. In addition, the fabricated PDMS films retain almost constant properties even under repetitive compressing and stretching deformations thanks to the mechanical robustness enabled by their all-elastomeric architectures. We show that the fabricated PDMS surfaces can be potentially employed as self-cleaning films in glass-based applications, even with complex surfaces, owing to their enhanced wetting properties, fairly good optical transparency, and superior mechanical stability.

  17. Stretchable array of metal nanodisks on a 3D sinusoidal wavy elastomeric substrate for frequency tunable plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Di; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Siyi; Tian, Limei; Song, Ningfang

    2017-03-01

    Metal nanostructures integrated with soft, elastomeric substrates provide an unusual platform with capabilities in plasmonic frequency tuning of mechanical strain. In this paper, we have prepared a tunable optical device, dense arrays of plasmonic nanodisks on a low-modulus, and high-elongation elastomeric substrate with a three-dimensional (3D) sinusoidal wavy, and their optical characteristics have been measured and analyzed in detail. Since surface plasmon is located and propagates along metal surfaces with sub-wavelength structures, and those dispersive properties are determined by the coupling strength between the individual structures, in this study, a 3D sinusoidal curve elastomeric substrate is used to mechanically control the inter-nanodisk spacing by applying straining and creating a frequency tunable plasmonic device. Here we study the optical resonance peak shifting generated by stretching this type of flexible device, and the role that 3D sinusoidal curve surface configuration plays in determining the tunable properties. Since only the hybrid dipolar mode has been observed in experiments, the coupled dipole approximation (CDA) method is employed to simulate the optical response of these devices, and the experimental and simulation results show that these devices have high tunability to shift optical resonance peaks at near-infrared wavelengths, which will provide strong potential for new soft optical sensors and wearable plasmonic sensors.

  18. Final disposal of radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiesleben, H.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper the origin and properties of radioactive waste as well as its classification scheme (low-level waste - LLW, intermediate-level waste - ILW, high-level waste - HLW) are presented. The various options for conditioning of waste of different levels of radioactivity are reviewed. The composition, radiotoxicity and reprocessing of spent fuel and their effect on storage and options for final disposal are discussed. The current situation of final waste disposal in a selected number of countries is mentioned. Also, the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency with regard to the development and monitoring of international safety standards for both spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management is described.

  19. Microfluidic Tools for Protein Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Bahige G.

    X-ray crystallography is the most widely used method to determine the structure of proteins, providing an understanding of their functions in all aspects of life to advance applications in fields such as drug development and renewable energy. New techniques, namely serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), have unlocked the ability to unravel the structures of complex proteins with vital biological functions. A key step and major bottleneck of structure determination is protein crystallization, which is very arduous due to the complexity of proteins and their natural environments. Furthermore, crystal characteristics govern data quality, thus need to be optimized to attain the most accurate reconstruction of the protein structure. Crystal size is one such characteristic in which narrowed distributions with a small modal size can significantly reduce the amount of protein needed for SFX. A novel microfluidic sorting platform was developed to isolate viable ~200 nm -- ~600 nm photosystem I (PSI) membrane protein crystals from ~200 nm -- ~20 ?m crystal samples using dielectrophoresis, as confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, second-order nonlinear imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC), and dynamic light scattering. The platform was scaled-up to rapidly provide 100s of microliters of sorted crystals necessary for SFX, in which similar crystal size distributions were attained. Transmission electron microscopy was used to view the PSI crystal lattice, which remained well-ordered postsorting, and SFX diffraction data was obtained, confirming a high-quality, viable crystal sample. Simulations indicated sorted samples provided accurate, complete SFX datasets with 3500-fold less protein than unsorted samples. Microfluidic devices were also developed for versatile, rapid protein crystallization screening using nanovolumes of sample. Concentration gradients of protein and precipitant were generated to crystallize PSI, phycocyanin, and lysozyme using modified counterdiffusion

  20. Overview of the microfluidic diagnostics commercial landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Lily

    2013-01-01

    Since its birth in the late 1980s, the field of microfluidics has continued to mature, with a growing number of companies pursuing diagnostic applications. In 2009 the worldwide in vitro diagnostics market was estimated at >$40 billion USD, and microfluidic diagnostics are poised to reap a significant part of this market across a range of areas including laboratory diagnostics, point-of-care diagnostics, cancer diagnostics, and others. The potential economic advantages of microfluidics are numerous and compelling: lower reagent and/or sample volumes, lower equipment costs, improved portability, increased automation, and increased measurement speed. All of these factors may help put more information in the hands of doctors and patients sooner, enabling earlier disease detection and more tailored, effective treatments. This chapter reviews the microfluidic diagnostics commercial landscape and discusses potential commercialization challenges and opportunities.

  1. Microfluidic Analytical Separator for Proteomics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SHOT proposes an innovative microfluidic device designed to effect a 2-dimensional resolution of a mixture of proteins based on isoelectric point (pI) and molecular...

  2. Microfluidic Analytical Separator for Proteomics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a microfluidic device designed to effect a 2-dimensional resolution of a mixture of proteins based on isoelectric point (pI) and molecular...

  3. 3D-printed microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Reza; Knowlton, Stephanie; Hart, Alexander; Yenilmez, Bekir; Ghaderinezhad, Fariba; Katebifar, Sara; Messina, Michael; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-06-20

    Microfluidics is a flourishing field, enabling a wide range of biochemical and clinical applications such as cancer screening, micro-physiological system engineering, high-throughput drug testing, and point-of-care diagnostics. However, fabrication of microfluidic devices is often complicated, time consuming, and requires expensive equipment and sophisticated cleanroom facilities. Three-dimensional (3D) printing presents a promising alternative to traditional techniques such as lithography and PDMS-glass bonding, not only by enabling rapid design iterations in the development stage, but also by reducing the costs associated with institutional infrastructure, equipment installation, maintenance, and physical space. With the recent advancements in 3D printing technologies, highly complex microfluidic devices can be fabricated via single-step, rapid, and cost-effective protocols, making microfluidics more accessible to users. In this review, we discuss a broad range of approaches for the application of 3D printing technology to fabrication of micro-scale lab-on-a-chip devices.

  4. Multiplex single particle analysis in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannhauser, D; Romeo, G; Causa, F; De Santo, I; Netti, P A

    2014-10-21

    A straightforward way to measure separated micrometric sized particles in microfluidic flow is reported. The light scattering profile (LSP) of each single particle is fully characterized by using a CMOS-camera based small angle light scattering (SALS) apparatus, ranging from 2° up to 30°. To ensure controlled particle passage through the incident laser, a viscoelastic 3D alignment effect by viscoelastic induced particle migration has been implemented in a simple and cost-effective microfluidic device. Different polystyrene particle sizes are measured in microfluidic flows and the obtained scattering signatures are matched with the Lorenz-Mie based scattering theory. The results confirm the possibility of using this apparatus for real multiplex particle analyses in microfluidic particle flows.

  5. Osmotic actuation for microfluidic components in point-of-care applications

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yu-Chih

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel design of micropumps and valves driven by osmotic force for point-of-care applications. Although there have been significant progresses in microfluidic components and control devices such as fluidic diodes, switches, resonators and digital-to-analog converters, the ultimate power source still depends on bulky off-chip components, which are expensive and cannot be easily miniaturized. For point-of-care applications, it is critical to integrate all the components in a compact size at low cost. In this work, we report two key active components actuated by osmotic mechanism for total integrated microfluidic system. For the proof of concept, we have demonstrated valve actuation, which can maintain stable ON/OFF switching operations under 125 kPa back pressure. We have also implemented an osmotic pump, which can pump a high flow rate over 30 μL/min for longer than 30 minutes. The experimental data demonstrates the possibility and potential of applying osmotic actuation in point-of-care disposable microfluidics. © 2013 IEEE.

  6. Integrating printed microfluidics with silicon photomultipliers for miniaturised and highly sensitive ATP bioluminescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, M F; Libertino, S; Turner, A P F; Filippini, D; Mak, W C

    2018-01-15

    Bioluminescence has been widely used for important biosensing applications such as the measurement of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the energy unit in biological systems and an indicator of vital processes. The current technology for detection is mainly based on large equipment such as readers and imaging systems, which require intensive and time-consuming procedures. A miniaturised bioluminescence sensing system, which would allow sensitive and continuous monitoring of ATP, with an integrated and low-cost disposable microfluidic chamber for handling of biological samples, is highly desirable. Here, we report the design, fabrication and testing of 3D printed microfluidics chips coupled with silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) for high sensitive real-time ATP detection. The 3D microfluidic chip reduces reactant consumption and facilitates solution delivery close to the SiPM to increase the detection efficiency. Our system detects ATP with a limit of detection (LoD) of 8nM and an analytical dynamic range between 15nM and 1µM, showing a stability error of 3%, and a reproducibility error below of 20%. We demonstrate the dynamic monitoring of ATP in a continuous-flow system exhibiting a fast response time, ~4s, and a full recovery to the baseline level within 17s. Moreover, the SiPM-based bioluminescence sensing system shows a similar analytical dynamic range for ATP detection to that of a full-size PerkinElmer laboratory luminescence reader. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An integrated microfluidic biosensor for the rapid screening of foodborne pathogens by surface plasmon resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zordan, Michael D.; Grafton, Meggie M. G.; Leary, James F.

    2011-03-01

    The rapid detection of foodborne pathogens is of vital importance to keep the food supply rid of contamination. Previously we have demonstrated the design of a hybrid optical device that performs real-time surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and epi-fluorescence imaging. Additionally we have developed a biosensor array chip that is able to specifically detect the presence of two known pathogens. This biosensor detects the presence of the pathogen strains by the selective capture of whole pathogens by peptide ligands functionalized to the spots of the array. We have incorporated this biosensor array into a self contained PDMS microfluidic chip. The enclosure of the biosensor array by a PDMS microfluidic chip allows for a sample to be screened for many strains of pathogens simultaneously in a safe one time use biochip. This disposable optical biochip is inserted into with the hybrid SPR/epi-fluorescence imaging device to form an integrated system for the detection of foodborne pathogens. Using this integrated system, we can selectively detect the presence of E. coli 0157:H7 or S. enterica in a simultaneously in real-time. Additionally, we have modeled the mechanical properties of the microfluidic biochip in order to manipulate the flow conditions to achieve optimal pathogen capture by the biosensor array. We have developed an integrated system that is able to screen a sample for multiple foodborne pathogens simultaneously in a safe, rapid and label-free manner.

  8. On-demand droplet loading for automated organic chemistry on digital microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Gaurav J; Ding, Huijiang; Sadeghi, Saman; Chen, Supin; Kim, Chang-Jin C J; van Dam, R Michael

    2013-07-21

    Organic chemistry applications on digital microfluidic devices often involve reagents that are volatile or sensitive and must be introduced to the chip immediately before use. We present a new technique for automated, on-demand loading of ~1 μL droplets from large (~1 mL), sealed, off-chip reservoirs to a digital microfluidic chip in order to address this challenge. Unlike aqueous liquids which generally are non-wetting to the hydrophobic surface and must be actively drawn into the electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) chip by electrode activation, organic liquids tend to be wetting and can spontaneously flood the chip, and hence require a retracting force for controlled liquid delivery. Using a combination of compressed inert gas and gravity to exert driving and retracting forces on the liquid, the simple loading technique enables precise loading of droplets of both wetting and non-wetting liquids in a reliable manner. A key feature from a practical point of view is that all of the wetted parts are inexpensive and potentially disposable, thus avoiding cross-contamination in chemical and biochemical applications. We provide a theoretical treatment of the underlying physics, discuss the effect of geometry and liquid properties on its performance, and show repeatable reagent loading using the technique. Its versatility is demonstrated with the loading of several aqueous and non-aqueous liquids on an EWOD digital microfluidic device.

  9. Direct-referencing Two-dimensional-array Digital Microfluidics Using Multi-layer Printed Circuit Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jian; Kim, Chang-Jin “CJ”

    2008-01-01

    Digital (i.e. droplet-based) microfluidics, by the electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) mechanism, has shown great potential for a wide range of applications, such as lab-on-a-chip. While most reported EWOD chips use a series of electrode pads essentially in one-dimensional line pattern designed for specific tasks, the desired universal chips allowing user-reconfigurable paths would require the electrode pads in two-dimensional pattern. However, to electrically access the electrode pads independently, conductive lines need to be fabricated underneath the pads in multiple layers, raising a cost issue especially for disposable chip applications. In this article, we report the building of digital microfluidic plates based on a printed-circuit-board (PCB), in which multilayer electrical access lines were created inexpensively using mature PCB technology. However, due to its surface topography and roughness and resulting high resistance against droplet movement, as-fabricated PCB surfaces require unacceptably high (~500 V) voltages unless coated with or immersed in oil. Our goal is EWOD operations of aqueous droplets not only on oil-covered but also on dry surfaces. To meet varying levels of performances, three types of gradually complex post-PCB microfabrication processes are developed and evaluated. By introducing land-grid-array (LGA) sockets in the packaging, a scalable digital microfluidics system with reconfigurable and low-cost chip is also demonstrated. PMID:19234613

  10. Defect-aware high-level synthesis and module placement for microfluidic biochips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao Xu; Chakrabarty, K; Fei Su

    2008-03-01

    Recent advances in microfluidics technology have led to the emergence of miniaturized biochip devices, also referred to as lab-on-a-chip, for biochemical analysis. A promising category of microfluidic biochips relies on the principle of electrowetting-on-dielectric, whereby discrete droplets of nanoliter volumes can be manipulated using an array of electrodes. As chemists adapt more bioassays for concurrent execution on such ldquodigitalrdquo droplet-based microfluidic platforms, system integration, design complexity, and the need for defect tolerance are expected to increase rapidly. Automated design tools for defect-tolerant and multifunctional biochips are important for the emerging marketplace, especially for low-cost, portable, and disposable devices for clinical diagnostics. We present a unified synthesis method that combines defect-tolerant architectural synthesis with defect-aware physical design. The proposed approach allows architectural-level design choices and defect-tolerant physical design decisions to be made simultaneously. We use a large-scale protein assay and the polymerase chain reaction procedure as case studies to evaluate the proposed synthesis method. We also carry out simulations based on defect injection to evaluate the robustness of the synthesized biochip designs.

  11. Biocompatible "click" wafer bonding for microfluidic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Saharil, Farizah; Carlborg, Carl Fredrik; Haraldsson, Tommy; van der Wijngaart, Wouter

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a novel dry wafer bonding concept designed for permanent attachment of micromolded polymer structures to surface functionalized silicon substrates. The method, designed for simultaneous fabrication of many lab-on-chip devices, utilizes a chemically reactive polymer microfluidic structure, which rapidly bonds to a functionalized substrate via "click" chemistry reactions. The microfluidic structure consists of an off-stoichiometry thiol-ene (OSTE) polymer with a very high density o...

  12. Paper based microfluidic devices for environmental diagnostics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govindasamy, K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available such as elevated temperatures and mechanical stresses. Paper based microfluidic chips are patterned with micron sized hydrophobic barriers which penetrate the paper?s cross section. These barriers guide the capillary movement of fluids through the cellulose... visual or electrochemical signal, indicating whether the analyte is present in the sample. Although based on a similar operational principal as lateral flow technologies (such as home pregnancy tests), paper based microfluidics seeks to offer a more...

  13. General Instructions for Disposable Respirators

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-09

    This podcast, intended for the general public, demonstrates how to put on and take off disposable respirators that are to be used in areas affected by the influenza outbreak.  Created: 4/9/2009 by CDC, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 4/29/2009.

  14. Disposables: saving by throwing away.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilton, G

    1980-07-18

    The demand for health care facilities and services will remain insatiable, concludes a report by Frost and Sullivan due to be published shortly. The report on trends in the European clinical soft goods market says growth is guaranteed but that the market penetration of disposables is not.

  15. Ocean Disposal of Dredged Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permits and authorizations for the ocean dumping of dredged material is issued by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Information is provided about where to dispose dredged material and the process for obtaining an ocean dumping permit for dredged material.

  16. Microfluidic Sample Preparation for Immunoassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visuri, S; Benett, W; Bettencourt, K; Chang, J; Fisher, K; Hamilton, J; Krulevitch, P; Park, C; Stockton, C; Tarte, L; Wang, A; Wilson, T

    2001-08-09

    Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are developing means to collect and identify fluid-based biological pathogens in the forms of proteins, viruses, and bacteria. to support detection instruments, they are developing a flexible fluidic sample preparation unit. The overall goal of this Microfluidic Module is to input a fluid sample, containing background particulates and potentially target compounds, and deliver a processed sample for detection. They are developing techniques for sample purification, mixing, and filtration that would be useful to many applications including immunologic and nucleic acid assays. Many of these fluidic functions are accomplished with acoustic radiation pressure or dielectrophoresis. They are integrating these technologies into packaged systems with pumps and valves to control fluid flow through the fluidic circuit.

  17. Surface Sensitive Microfluidic Optomechanical Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kyu Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The microfluidic optomechanical resonator (uFOMR) based on a thin-walled glass capillary supports high Q-factor (>1000) mechanical modes in the presence of liquids. In this Letter, the sensitivity of the uFOMR to the surface change is studied by layer-by-layer removal of SiO2 molecules from the uFOMR inner surface using various concentrations of hydrofluoric acid solutions. A frequency downshift is observed with a sensitivity of 1.2 Hz/(pg/mm2), which translates to a surface density detection limit of 83 pg/mm2. This work opens a door to using the optomechanical mode for detection and characterization of molecules present near the resonator surface.

  18. Sampling by Fluidics and Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tesař

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Selecting one from several available fluid samples is a procedure often performed especially in chemical engineering. It is usually done by an array of valves sequentially opened and closed. Not generally known is an advantageous alternative: fluidic sampling units without moving parts. In the absence of complete pipe closure, cross-contamination between samples cannot be ruled out. This is eliminated by arranging for small protective flows that clear the cavities and remove any contaminated fluid. Although this complicates the overall circuit layout, fluidic sampling units with these "guard" flows were successfully built and tested. Recent interest in microchemistry leads to additional problems due very low operating Reynolds numbers. This necessitated the design of microfluidic sampling units based on new operating principles.

  19. Microfluidic control of axonal guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ling; Black, Bryan; Ordonez, Simon; Mondal, Argha; Jain, Ankur; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2014-10-01

    The precision of axonal pathfinding and the accurate formation of functional neural circuitry are crucial for an organism during development as well as during adult central and peripheral nerve regeneration. While chemical cues are believed to be primarily responsible for axonal pathfinding, we hypothesize that forces due to localized fluid flow may directly affect neuronal guidance during early organ development. Here, we report direct evidence of fluid flow influencing axonal migration, producing turning angles of up to 90°. Microfluidic flow simulations indicate that an axon may experience significant bending force due to cross-flow, which may contribute to the observed axonal turning. This method of flow-based guidance was successfully used to fasciculate one advancing axon onto another, showcasing the potential of this technique to be used for the formation of in vitro neuronal circuits.

  20. A Review of Biomedical Centrifugal Microfluidic Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghui Tang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Centrifugal microfluidic or lab-on-a-disc platforms have many advantages over other microfluidic systems. These advantages include a minimal amount of instrumentation, the efficient removal of any disturbing bubbles or residual volumes, and inherently available density-based sample transportation and separation. Centrifugal microfluidic devices applied to biomedical analysis and point-of-care diagnostics have been extensively promoted recently. This paper presents an up-to-date overview of these devices. The development of biomedical centrifugal microfluidic platforms essentially covers two categories: (i unit operations that perform specific functionalities, and (ii systems that aim to address certain biomedical applications. With the aim to provide a comprehensive representation of current development in this field, this review summarizes progress in both categories. The advanced unit operations implemented for biological processing include mixing, valving, switching, metering and sequential loading. Depending on the type of sample to be used in the system, biomedical applications are classified into four groups: nucleic acid analysis, blood analysis, immunoassays, and other biomedical applications. Our overview of advanced unit operations also includes the basic concepts and mechanisms involved in centrifugal microfluidics, while on the other hand an outline on reported applications clarifies how an assembly of unit operations enables efficient implementation of various types of complex assays. Lastly, challenges and potential for future development of biomedical centrifugal microfluidic devices are discussed.

  1. Microfluidic Devices in Advanced Caenorhabditis elegans Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniesh Muthaiyan Shanmugam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of model organisms is very important in view of their potential for application to human therapeutic uses. One such model organism is the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. As a nematode, C. elegans have ~65% similarity with human disease genes and, therefore, studies on C. elegans can be translated to human, as well as, C. elegans can be used in the study of different types of parasitic worms that infect other living organisms. In the past decade, many efforts have been undertaken to establish interdisciplinary research collaborations between biologists, physicists and engineers in order to develop microfluidic devices to study the biology of C. elegans. Microfluidic devices with the power to manipulate and detect bio-samples, regents or biomolecules in micro-scale environments can well fulfill the requirement to handle worms under proper laboratory conditions, thereby significantly increasing research productivity and knowledge. The recent development of different kinds of microfluidic devices with ultra-high throughput platforms has enabled researchers to carry out worm population studies. Microfluidic devices primarily comprises of chambers, channels and valves, wherein worms can be cultured, immobilized, imaged, etc. Microfluidic devices have been adapted to study various worm behaviors, including that deepen our understanding of neuromuscular connectivity and functions. This review will provide a clear account of the vital involvement of microfluidic devices in worm biology.

  2. Dynamics of Microvalve Operations in Integrated Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan T. H. Lau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatic microvalves are widely used key components for automating liquid manipulation and flow control in microfluidics for more than one decade. Due to their robust operations and the ease of fabrication, tremendous microfluidic systems have been developed with the multiple microvalves for higher throughput and extended functionalities. Therefore, operation performance of the microvalves in the integrated microfluidic devices is crucial to the related applications, in fields such as micro-flows, cell analyses, drug discovery, and physical/chemical detections. It has been reported that operation performance of the microvalves are highly sensitive to the device configuration and pressurization scheme. This implies the further development of integrated microfluidics with a larger number of the valves may suffer the problems of undetermined microvalve behaviors during operations, which can become an unavoidable hurdle in the device design and optimization processes. Herein, we characterize responses of the individual microvalves for different operation configurations, e.g., membrane thicknesses and driving pressures. We investigate also the effects in microfluidics integrated with the more valves, through experiments, modeling and simulations. We show that dynamics of the microvalves is indeed influenced by the configurations, levels of design complexity and positions in the devices. Overall, taken dynamics of the microvalve responses into considerations, this work provides insights and guidelines for better designs of integrated microfluidics for the future applications requiring higher throughput and improved operation performance.

  3. Predicting Droplet Formation on Centrifugal Microfluidic Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebius, Jacob Alfred

    Centrifugal microfluidics is a widely known research tool for biological sample and water quality analysis. Currently, the standard equipment used for such diagnostic applications include slow, bulky machines controlled by multiple operators. These machines can be condensed into a smaller, faster benchtop sample-to-answer system. Sample processing is an important step taken to extract, isolate, and convert biological factors, such as nucleic acids or proteins, from a raw sample to an analyzable solution. Volume definition is one such step. The focus of this thesis is the development of a model predicting monodispersed droplet formation and the application of droplets as a technique for volume definition. First, a background of droplet microfluidic platforms is presented, along with current biological analysis technologies and the advantages of integrating such technologies onto microfluidic platforms. Second, background and theories of centrifugal microfluidics is given, followed by theories relevant to droplet emulsions. Third, fabrication techniques for centrifugal microfluidic designs are discussed. Finally, the development of a model for predicting droplet formation on the centrifugal microfluidic platform are presented for the rest of the thesis. Predicting droplet formation analytically based on the volumetric flow rates of the continuous and dispersed phases, the ratios of these two flow rates, and the interfacial tension between the continuous and dispersed phases presented many challenges, which will be discussed in this work. Experimental validation was completed using continuous phase solutions of different interfacial tensions. To conclude, prospective applications are discussed with expected challenges.

  4. Microfluidic dielectrophoretic sorter using gel vertical electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jason; Nelson, Edward L.; Li, G. P.; Bachman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We report the development and results of a two-step method for sorting cells and small particles in a microfluidic device. This approach uses a single microfluidic channel that has (1) a microfabricated sieve which efficiently focuses particles into a thin stream, followed by (2) a dielectrophoresis (DEP) section consisting of electrodes along the channel walls for efficient continuous sorting based on dielectric properties of the particles. For our demonstration, the device was constructed of polydimethylsiloxane, bonded to a glass surface, and conductive agarose gel electrodes. Gold traces were used to make electrical connections to the conductive gel. The device had several novel features that aided performance of the sorting. These included a sieving structure that performed continuous displacement of particles into a single stream within the microfluidic channel (improving the performance of downstream DEP, and avoiding the need for additional focusing flow inlets), and DEP electrodes that were the full height of the microfluidic walls (“vertical electrodes”), allowing for improved formation and control of electric field gradients in the microfluidic device. The device was used to sort polymer particles and HeLa cells, demonstrating that this unique combination provides improved capability for continuous DEP sorting of particles in a microfluidic device. PMID:24926390

  5. Microfluidic microwell and microcapillary biochips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minot, Michael J.; Stowe, David W.; Detarando, Michael A.; Krans, Joseph A.; Kass, Jason L.

    2006-02-01

    Utilizing nanotechnology, proprietary chemistry, and microfluidics, innovative firms are developing biochips and instrument systems that enable high-speed automated biomedical sequencing. Incom Inc. presents development results on five novel biochip technologies based on FiberOptic MicroSlide and microcapillary technology. FiberOptic MicroSlides are fiber optic interrogated (FOI) biochips made up of millions of fused optical fibers, and are uniquely suited as a platform for microarray applications. FiberOptic MicroSlides (henceforth referred to as "MicroSlides" or "slides" in this paper) act as a 'zero thickness substrate' transmitting optical signals from top to bottom without spreading, so that fluorescent or luminescent activity on the surface or within a well can be directly coupled to a CCD device without additional optics. In contrast to bulk optics, the slides are compact and have excellent light-gathering power. They are an alternative to conventional microscope slides for applications involving moderate-resolution bottom viewing (inverted microscopy). The surface of the MicroSlides can be etched or patterned with a permanent polymer to form microwell arrays, or microfluidic structures suitable for genomic and proteomic analysis, cell migration studies and other applications. Low-cost microcapillary array plates have also been developed. These plates act as microscopic test tubes, which enable picoliter reactions to be detected, counted and analyzed. Progress in developing large area (300 mm X 300 mm) arrays with up to 100 million capillaries, and diameter / length aspect ratios up to 10,000: 1 is presented. Results demonstrate negligible optical cross talk between capillaries, resulting in improved signal-to-noise ratios while minimizing false hits.

  6. From sample-to-answer: integrated genotyping and immunological analysis microfluidic platforms for the diagnostic and treatment of coeliac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, M.; Höth, J.; Erwes, J.; Latta, D.; Strobach, X.; Hansen-Hagge, T.; Klemm, R.; Gärtner, C.; Demiris, T. M.; O'Sullivan, C.; Ritzi-Lehnert, M.; Drese, K. S.

    2011-02-01

    Taking advantage of microfluidics technology, a Lab-on-Chip system was developed offering the possibility of performing HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigen) typing to test genetic predisposition to coeliac disease and measure the level of immunodeficiency at the point-of-care. These analysis procedures are implemented on two different microfluidic cartridges, both having identical interfacial connections to the identical automated instrument. In order to assess the concentration of the targeted analytes in human blood, finger prick samples are processed to either extract genomic DNA carrying the coeliac disease gene or blood plasma containing the disease specific antibodies. We present here the different microfluidic modules integrated in a common platform, capable of automated sample preparation and analyte detection. In summary, this new microfluidic approach will dramatically reduce the costs of materials (polymer for the disposable chips and minute amount of bio-reagents) and minimize the time for analysis down to less than 20 minutes. In comparison to the state of the art detection of coeliac disease this work represents a tremendous improvement for the patient's quality of live and will significantly reduce the cost burden on the health care system.

  7. Surface modification of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchannels with DNA capture-probes for potential use in microfluidic DNA analysis systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodakov, Dmitriy A.; Thredgold, Leigh D.; Lenehan, Claire E.; Andersson, Gunther A.; Kobus, Hilton; Ellis, Amanda V.

    2011-12-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is an elastomeric material used for microfluidic devices and is especially suited to medical and forensic applications. This is due to its relatively low cost, ease of fabrication, excellent optical transmission characteristics and its ability to support electroosmotic flow, required during electrophoretic separations. These aspects combined with its large range of surface modification chemistries, make PDMS an attractive substrate in microfluidic devices for, in particular, DNA separation. Here, we report the successful wet chemical surface modification of PDMS microchannels using a simple three step method to produce an isothiocyanate-terminated surface. Initially, PDMS was oxygen plasma treated to produce a silanol-terminated surface, this was then reacted with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with subsequent reaction of the now amine-terminated surface with p-phenylenediisothiocyanate. Water contact angle measurements both before and after modification showed a reduction in hydrophobicity from 101o for native PDMS to 94o for the isothiocyante-terminated PDMS. The isothiocyanate-terminated surface was then coupled with an amineterminated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotide capture probe via a thiourea linkage. Confirmation of capture probe attachment was observed using fluorescent microscopy after hybridization of the capture probes with fluorescently labeled complimentary ssDNA oligonucleotides.

  8. Influence of particle arrangement on the permittivity of an elastomeric composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Peiying J.; Nayak, Suchitra; Ghosh, Suvojit; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2017-01-01

    Elastomers are used as dielectric layers contained between the parallel conductive plates of capacitors. The introduction of filler particles into an elastomer changes its permittivity ɛ. When particle organization in a composite is intentionally varied, this alters its capacitance. Using numerical simulations, we examine how conductive particle chains introduced into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) alter ɛ. The effects of filler volume fraction ψ, interparticle d and interchain spacing a, zigzag angle θ between adjacent particles and overall chain orientation, particle size r, and clearance h between particles and the conductive plates are characterized. When filler particles are organized into chainlike structures rather than being just randomly distributed in the elastomer matrix, ɛ increases by as much as 85%. When particles are organized into chainlike forms, ɛ increases with increasing ψ and a, but decreases with increasing d and θ. A composite containing smaller particles has a higher ɛ when ψ <9 % while larger particles provide greater enhancement when ψ is larger than that value. To enhance ɛ, adjacent particles must be interconnected and the overall chain direction should be oriented perpendicular to the conductive plates. These results are useful for additive manufacturing on electrical applications of elastomeric composites.

  9. Biodegradable and elastomeric poly(glycerol sebacate) as a coating material for nitinol bare stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Ji; Hwang, Moon Young; Kim, JiHeung; Chung, Dong June

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized and evaluated biodegradable and elastomeric polyesters (poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS)) using polycondensation between glycerol and sebacic acid to form a cross-linked network structure without using exogenous catalysts. Synthesized materials possess good mechanical properties, elasticity, and surface erosion biodegradation behavior. The tensile strength of the PGS was as high as 0.28 ± 0.004 MPa, and Young's modulus was 0.122 ± 0.0003 MPa. Elongation was as high as 237.8 ± 0.64%, and repeated elongation behavior was also observed to at least three times the original length without rupture. The water-in-air contact angles of the PGS surfaces were about 60°. We also analyzed the properties of an electrospray coating of biodegradable PGS on a nitinol stent for the purpose of enhancing long-term patency for the therapeutic treatment of varicose veins disease. The surface morphology and thickness of coating layer could be controlled by adjusting the electrospraying conditions and solution parameters.

  10. Elastomeric PDMS Planoconvex Lenses Fabricated by a Confined Sessile Drop Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekgasit, S; Kaewmanee, N; Jangtawee, P; Thammacharoen, C; Donphoongpri, M

    2016-08-10

    The ubiquity of high quality smartphones at affordable prices not only accelerated the social penetration in the global population but also promoted nontraditional usage of smartphones as point-of-care medical diagnostic devices, sensors, and portable digital microscopes. This paper reveals a simple, rapid, cost-effective, and template-free technique for mass-scale production of an elastomeric PDMS (ePDMS) planoconvex lens capable of converting a smartphone into a portable digital microscope. By taking advantage of the resistance to spreading of liquid by a sharp edge, highly stable spherical cap of viscous liquid PDMS (lPDMS) on a smooth PMMA circular disk was fabricated. The axisymmetric spreading of lPDMS under the gravitational force and interfacial tension force enable the formation of spherical cap with a certain radius of curvature. A thermal treatment at 80 °C for 30 min cured the spherical cap lPDMS into a bubble-free ePDMS planoconvex lens. Lenses with focal lengths of 55.2-3.4 mm could be reproducibly fabricated by adjusting the volume of dispensed lPDMSs and diameter of PMMA disks. High-resolution panoramic microscope images without a distortion of small cylindrical object could be constructed on-the-fly using the imbedded smartphone app. Applications of the smartphone digital microscope equipped with an ePDMS planoconvex lens for imaging of micro printings, gun shot residues, cylindrical objects, and bullet toolmarks were explored.

  11. Validation of a Thermo-Ablative Model of Elastomeric Internal Insulation Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Heath T.

    2017-01-01

    In thermo-ablative material modeling, as in many fields of analysis, the quality of the existing models significantly exceeds that of the experimental data required for their validation. In an effort to narrow this gap, a laboratory-scale internal insulation test bed was developed that exposes insulation samples to realistic solid rocket motor (SRM) internal environments while being instrumented to record real-time rates of both model inputs (i.e., chamber pressure, total surface heat flux, and radiative heat flux) as well as model outputs (i.e., material decomposition depths (MDDs) and in-depth material temperatures). In this work, the measured SRM internal environment parameters were used in conjunction with equilibrium thermochemistry codes as inputs to one-dimensional thermo-ablative models of the PBINBR and CFEPDM insulation samples used in the lab-scale test firings. The computed MDD histories were then compared with those deduced from real-time X-ray radiography of the insulation samples, and the calculated in-depth temperatures were compared with those measured by embedded thermocouples. The results of this exercise emphasize the challenges of modeling and testing elastomeric materials in SRM environments while illuminating the path forward to improved fidelity.

  12. Rubbery electronics and sensors from intrinsically stretchable elastomeric composites of semiconductors and conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae-Jin; Sim, Kyoseung; Thukral, Anish; Yu, Cunjiang

    2017-01-01

    A general strategy to impart mechanical stretchability to stretchable electronics involves engineering materials into special architectures to accommodate or eliminate the mechanical strain in nonstretchable electronic materials while stretched. We introduce an all solution–processed type of electronics and sensors that are rubbery and intrinsically stretchable as an outcome from all the elastomeric materials in percolated composite formats with P3HT-NFs [poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) nanofibrils] and AuNP-AgNW (Au nanoparticles with conformally coated silver nanowires) in PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane). The fabricated thin-film transistors retain their electrical performances by more than 55% upon 50% stretching and exhibit one of the highest P3HT-based field-effect mobilities of 1.4 cm2/V∙s, owing to crystallinity improvement. Rubbery sensors, which include strain, pressure, and temperature sensors, show reliable sensing capabilities and are exploited as smart skins that enable gesture translation for sign language alphabet and haptic sensing for robotics to illustrate one of the applications of the sensors. PMID:28913428

  13. Surface detail reproduction of elastomeric impression materials related to rheological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Matthew J; Carrick, Thomas E; McCabe, John F

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to discern, for elastomeric impression materials, the important rheological properties and importance of hydrophilicity for detail reproduction. Viscosity, modulus and tan delta were measured using a controlled-stress rheometer in cone/plate configuration. The flow of the materials, immediately after mixing and at the manufacturer's stated working time, was measured using a shark fin test and the interaction with moist surfaces was determined by taking impressions from two different sized grooves in moist gypsum casts. Tan delta was found to be the parameter most indicative of the accuracy of the impression and the flow of the material. Impregum samples, a polyether material, exhibited the highest initial tan delta (7.4), the largest shark fins at both time periods and the most accurate impressions from both grooves. Aquasil, a polyvinylsiloxane material, had similar initial tan delta values (6.9) and impressions taken on the deep groove with this material closely matched the groove. The other two polyvinylsiloxane materials (Affinis and Flexitime) had significantly lower initial tan delta values (3.1 and 2.9, respectively), exhibited much smaller shark fins and a worse ability to accurately reproduce the deep groove. For large features, it is clear that the higher the initial tan delta of the impression material the better the ability to replicate larger features. However, with smaller features the relative hydrophobicity of the material becomes an important factor, with more hydrophilic materials better able to reproduce fine detail.

  14. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCHES OF ELASTOMERIC MATERIALS TO STABILIZE THE OSCILLATION OF POWER GRID STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iurii Priadko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new type of insulator, has both insulating and damping properties to improve the operational reliability of overhead power lines' structures (OHPL. In order to assess an effectiveness of the new insulator's design have made laboratory tests of a insulator model with different types of elastomer seals, differed of the rubber marks and the type of reinforcement. An experiment consist of two stages: at the first stage an object of study has been exposed to cyclical vibration, at the second – the impact of an impulsively load. Results of the research showed, that the most effective are the elastomeric gasket with a minimum rigidity characteristics without reinforcement. Using insulators with such dampers allows to reduce the first maximum impulse to a support by an average of 20% and reduce the frequency and amplitude characteristics of the system. Based on this was developed a new type of elastomer reinforcing with steel sheet elements in the form of a truncated cone.

  15. Synthesis of polyester urethane urea and fabrication of elastomeric nanofibrous scaffolds for myocardial regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamadi, Elham Sadat; Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh [Department of Textile engineering, Isfahan university of technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Morshed, Mohammad, E-mail: morshed@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Textile engineering, Isfahan university of technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Morteza [Department of Chemical Engineering, Isfahan university of technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Prabhakaran, Molamma P., E-mail: nanotechmpp@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, 2 Engineering Drive 3, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Ramakrishna, Seeram [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, 2 Engineering Drive 3, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2016-06-01

    Fabrication of bioactive scaffolds is one of the most promising strategies to reconstruct the infarcted myocardium. In this study, we synthesized polyester urethane urea (PEUU), further blended it with gelatin and fabricated PEUU/G nanofibrous scaffolds. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction were used for the characterization of the synthesized PEUU and properties of nanofibrous scaffolds were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ATR-FTIR, contact angle measurement, biodegradation test, tensile strength analysis and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). In vitro biocompatibility studies were performed using cardiomyocytes. DMA analysis showed that the scaffolds could be reshaped with cyclic deformations and might remain stable in the frequencies of the physiological activity of the heart. On the whole, our study suggests that aligned PEUU/G 70:30 nanofibrous scaffolds meet the required specifications for cardiac tissue engineering and could be used as a promising construct for myocardial regeneration. - Highlights: • PEUU was synthesized to fabricate elastomeric scaffolds for myocardial regeneration. • FTIR, DSC and XRD analysis showed that polymer synthesis was well. • PEUU/gelatin nanofibrous scaffolds could be reshaped with cyclic deformations of the heart. • Gelatin in structure of PEUU nanofibers improved proliferation of cardiomyocytes. • Aligned PEUU/gelatin 70:30 nanofibrous scaffold support the alignment of cardiomyocytes.

  16. Design and Fabrication of an Elastomeric Unit for Soft Modular Robots in Minimally Invasive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Falco, Iris; Gerboni, Giada; Cianchetti, Matteo; Menciassi, Arianna

    2015-11-14

    In recent years, soft robotics technologies have aroused increasing interest in the medical field due to their intrinsically safe interaction in unstructured environments. At the same time, new procedures and techniques have been developed to reduce the invasiveness of surgical operations. Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) has been successfully employed for abdominal interventions, however standard MIS procedures are mainly based on rigid or semi-rigid tools that limit the dexterity of the clinician. This paper presents a soft and high dexterous manipulator for MIS. The manipulator was inspired by the biological capabilities of the octopus arm, and is designed with a modular approach. Each module presents the same functional characteristics, thus achieving high dexterity and versatility when more modules are integrated. The paper details the design, fabrication process and the materials necessary for the development of a single unit, which is fabricated by casting silicone inside specific molds. The result consists in an elastomeric cylinder including three flexible pneumatic actuators that enable elongation and omni-directional bending of the unit. An external braided sheath improves the motion of the module. In the center of each module a granular jamming-based mechanism varies the stiffness of the structure during the tasks. Tests demonstrate that the module is able to bend up to 120° and to elongate up to 66% of the initial length. The module generates a maximum force of 47 N, and its stiffness can increase up to 36%.

  17. Elastomeric angled microflaps with reversible adhesion for transfer-printing semiconductor membranes onto dry surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Byungsuk; Cho, Sungbum; Seo, Seungwan; Lee, Jongho

    2014-11-12

    Recent research for unconventional types of electronics has revealed that it is necessary to transfer-print high-performance microelectronic devices onto diverse surfaces, including flexible or stretchable surfaces, to relieve mechanical constraints associated with conventional rigid electronics. Picking up and placing ultrathin microdevices without damage are critical procedures for the successful manufacture of various types of unconventional electronics. This paper introduces elastomeric angled microflaps that have reversible adhesion; i.e., they generate higher adhesion for picking up and low adhesion for printing because of their structural shapes and viscoelastic material properties. The microstructured stamp, fabricated in relatively simple ways, enables simultaneous transfer-printing of multiple silicon membranes that have irregular shapes in sizes ranging from micrometer to millimeter scales. Mechanical characterizations by experiment reveal optimal parameters for picking up and placing ultrathin membranes on a programmable custom-built microstage. Further refinement of the structures and materials should be useful for many applications requiring the microassembly of multiple semiconductor membranes in diverse shapes and sizes on dry surfaces without the aid of liquid adhesives.

  18. The effect of immersion disinfection procedures on dimensional stability of two elastomeric impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melilli, Dario; Rallo, Antonio; Cassaro, Angelo; Pizzo, Giuseppe

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of immersion disinfection procedures on the dimensional stability of two elastomeric impression materials. Impressions of a stainless steel die were made with polyether (PE) and with addition-polymerized silicone rubber (PVS). The test specimens underwent disinfection treatment by immersion in two commercially available solutions containing quaternary ammonium compounds (Sterigum Powder, SP) and glutaraldehyde plus an amino derivative (MD520, MD), respectively. The impressions were measured at 4 different time points: before any disinfection treatment (T0); after the first disinfection (T1); 6 hours after the first disinfection (T2); after the second disinfection, carried out 6 hours after the first one (T3). Impressions which were not disinfected served as controls. When both impression materials were disinfected with SP, significant differences were detected among all measurements (P 0.05). On the other hand, when MD was used, significant differences were found when T0 measurement was compared to T1, T2 and T3 measurements (P = 0.0043 for PE, and P = 0.0014 for PVS). The dimensional change of all material/disinfectant combinations was always disinfection on the dimension of elastomers in SP or MD are not clinically relevant.

  19. Biodegradable and biomimetic elastomeric scaffolds for tissue-engineered heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yingfei; Sant, Vinayak; Phillippi, Julie; Sant, Shilpa

    2017-01-15

    Valvular heart diseases are the third leading cause of cardiovascular disease, resulting in more than 25,000 deaths annually in the United States. Heart valve tissue engineering (HVTE) has emerged as a putative treatment strategy such that the designed construct would ideally withstand native dynamic mechanical environment, guide regeneration of the diseased tissue and more importantly, have the ability to grow with the patient. These desired functions could be achieved by biomimetic design of tissue-engineered constructs that recapitulate in vivo heart valve microenvironment with biomimetic architecture, optimal mechanical properties and possess suitable biodegradability and biocompatibility. Synthetic biodegradable elastomers have gained interest in HVTE due to their excellent mechanical compliance, controllable chemical structure and tunable degradability. This review focuses on the state-of-art strategies to engineer biomimetic elastomeric scaffolds for HVTE. We first discuss the various types of biodegradable synthetic elastomers and their key properties. We then highlight tissue engineering approaches to recreate some of the features in the heart valve microenvironment such as anisotropic and hierarchical tri-layered architecture, mechanical anisotropy and biocompatibility.

  20. Development and evaluation of elastomeric materials for geothermal applications. Annual report, October 1977-December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, W.A.; Kalfayan, S.H.; Reilly, W.W.; Yavrouian, A.H.; Mosesman, I.D.; Ingham, J.D.

    1979-05-15

    The research involved formulation of commercially available materials and synthesis of new elastomers. Formulation studies at JPL and elsewhere produced a material having about 250-350 psi tensile strength and 30 to 80% elongation at 260/sup 0/C for at least 24 hours in simulated brine. The relationship between these laboratory test results and sealing performance in actual or simulated test conditions is not entirely clear; however, it is believed that no conventional formation or casing packer design is likely to perform well using these materials. The synthetic effort focused on high temperature block copolymers and development of curable polystyrene. Procedures were worked out for synthesizing these new materials. Initial results with heat-cured unfilled polystyrene gum at 260/sup 0/C indicated a tensile strength of about 50 psi. Cast films of the first sample of polyphenyl quinoxaline-polystyrene block copolymer, which has a graft-block structure consisting of a polystyrene chain with pendant polyphenyl quinoxaline groups, showed elastomeric behavior in the required temperature range. Its tensile strength and elongation at 260/sup 0/C were 220 to 350 psi and 18 to 36%, respectively. All of these materials also showed satisfactory hydrolytic stability. A procedure for the synthesis of a linear block copolymer of this type has been devised, and the required new intermediates have been synthesized and characterized. A description of the previous year's work is included in an appendix.

  1. Shape-Memory Polymers Based on Fatty Acid-Filled Elastomeric Ionomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Elise; Weiss, Robert

    2009-03-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) have applications as medical devices, actuators, sensors, artificial muscles, switches, smart textiles, and self-deployable structures. All previous design of SMPs has involved synthesizing new polymers or modifying existing polymers. This paper describes a new type of SMP based on blends of an elastomeric ionomer and low molar mass fatty acids or their salts (FAS). Shape memory elastomers were prepared from mixtures of a sulfonated EPDM ionomer and various amounts of a FAS (e.g., zinc stearate, zinc oleate, and various aliphalic acids). Nanophase separation of the metal sulfonate groups provided the ``permanent'' crosslinks, while sub-microscopic crystals of the low molecular weight FAS provided a physical crosslink needed for the temporary shape. The material was deformed above the melting point of the FAS and the new shape was fixed by cooling the material while under stress to below the melting point of the FAS. Polar interactions between the ionomer and the FAS stabilized the dispersion of the FAS in the polymer and provided the continuity between the phases that allowed the crystals of the FAS to provide a second network of physical crosslinks. The temporary shape was erased and the material returned to the primary shape by heating above the melting point of the FAS.

  2. Probing Mechanoregulation of Neuronal Differentiation by Plasma Lithography Patterned Elastomeric Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Jamilpour, Nima; Mfoumou, Etienne; Wang, Fei-Yue; Zhang, Donna D.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-01-01

    Cells sense and interpret mechanical cues, including cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions, in the microenvironment to collectively regulate various physiological functions. Understanding the influences of these mechanical factors on cell behavior is critical for fundamental cell biology and for the development of novel strategies in regenerative medicine. Here, we demonstrate plasma lithography patterning on elastomeric substrates for elucidating the influences of mechanical cues on neuronal differentiation and neuritogenesis. The neuroblastoma cells form neuronal spheres on plasma-treated regions, which geometrically confine the cells over two weeks. The elastic modulus of the elastomer is controlled simultaneously by the crosslinker concentration. The cell-substrate mechanical interactions are also investigated by controlling the size of neuronal spheres with different cell seeding densities. These physical cues are shown to modulate with the formation of focal adhesions, neurite outgrowth, and the morphology of neuroblastoma. By systematic adjustment of these cues, along with computational biomechanical analysis, we demonstrate the interrelated mechanoregulatory effects of substrate elasticity and cell size. Taken together, our results reveal that the neuronal differentiation and neuritogenesis of neuroblastoma cells are collectively regulated via the cell-substrate mechanical interactions. PMID:25376886

  3. Investigation into the Impact of n-Decane, Decalin, and Isoparaffinic Solvent on Elastomeric Sealing Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the crucial aspects in the adoption of alternative fuels (e.g., GtL fuel in aviation industry is to investigate their compatibility with elastomeric materials used in current gas turbine engines. This study employed stress relaxation technique to investigate the effects of three solvents, namely, decalin (cycloparaffin, n-decane (normal paraffin, and ShellSol T solvent (isoparaffins on O-rings made from different materials. Results indicated that both fluorosilicone and fluorocarbon O-rings showed excellent compatibility with all 25 blends tested. The stress relaxation characteristic of nitrile O-ring was highly dependent on the composition of the solvents; the more decalin (n-decane is in the blend, the better (worse its sealing performance becomes. Effects of the three solvents presented in the tests indicated aromatics are not the only compounds that can swell nitrile O-ring. It is also important to notice that although decalin presents good O-ring swelling ability, it does not mean all cycloparaffins have the same property. n-decane also showed certain O-ring swelling ability but its main effect during the polymer-fuel interaction process is to extract materials out of nitrile O-ring. Isoparaffins do not participate in the O-ring swelling process. They only extract polymer materials; however, its extraction ability is relatively weaker than n-decane.

  4. Biomimetic preparation and multi-scale microstructures of nano-silica/polyurethane elastomeric fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanyong Liu; Li Gao; Lei Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Bioinspired by the spinning of spider silks, the biomimetic preparation of nano-silica/polyurethane (nano-SiO2/TPU) elastomeric fibers with distinctive multi-scale microstructures was successfully implemented. The formation mechanism of the nano-SiO2/TPU fibers was considered as the integrated mechanism of diffusion, coagulation, self-assembly, and microphase separation, same as that of the native spider silks. The mass ratio of nano-SiO2 to TPU greatly influenced the external and inner microstructures of the nano-SiO2/TPU fibers. The formation process of the nano-SiO2/TPU fibers was simply described as three main stages, and the second stage, such as the adding of the ethanol solvents and nano-SiO2 in different diameters, was thought to be very crucial for the final external and inner microstructures of the prepared fibers. For example, the adding of the ethanol and the nano-SiO2 spheres in diameter of 10 nm resulted in the existence of many TPU-self-assembled microspheres mostly spaced apart by the nano-SiO2 aggregates in the nano-SiO2/TPU fibers, while the adding of the ethanol and the nano-SiO2 spheres in diameter of 100 nm resulted in the existence of the nano-SiO2 spheres, instead of the TPU-self-assembled microspheres, distributed in the nano-SiO2/TPU fibers.

  5. Influence of particle arrangement on the permittivity of an elastomeric composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiying J. Tsai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Elastomers are used as dielectric layers contained between the parallel conductive plates of capacitors. The introduction of filler particles into an elastomer changes its permittivity ε. When particle organization in a composite is intentionally varied, this alters its capacitance. Using numerical simulations, we examine how conductive particle chains introduced into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS alter ε. The effects of filler volume fraction ψ, interparticle d and interchain spacing a, zigzag angle θ between adjacent particles and overall chain orientation, particle size r, and clearance h between particles and the conductive plates are characterized. When filler particles are organized into chainlike structures rather than being just randomly distributed in the elastomer matrix, ε increases by as much as 85%. When particles are organized into chainlike forms, ε increases with increasing ψ and a, but decreases with increasing d and θ. A composite containing smaller particles has a higher ε when ψ<9% while larger particles provide greater enhancement when ψ is larger than that value. To enhance ε, adjacent particles must be interconnected and the overall chain direction should be oriented perpendicular to the conductive plates. These results are useful for additive manufacturing on electrical applications of elastomeric composites.

  6. Biodegradable and Elastomeric Poly(glycerol sebacate as a Coating Material for Nitinol Bare Stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ji Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We synthesized and evaluated biodegradable and elastomeric polyesters (poly(glycerol sebacate (PGS using polycondensation between glycerol and sebacic acid to form a cross-linked network structure without using exogenous catalysts. Synthesized materials possess good mechanical properties, elasticity, and surface erosion biodegradation behavior. The tensile strength of the PGS was as high as 0.28 ± 0.004 MPa, and Young's modulus was 0.122 ± 0.0003 MPa. Elongation was as high as 237.8 ± 0.64%, and repeated elongation behavior was also observed to at least three times the original length without rupture. The water-in-air contact angles of the PGS surfaces were about 60°. We also analyzed the properties of an electrospray coating of biodegradable PGS on a nitinol stent for the purpose of enhancing long-term patency for the therapeutic treatment of varicose veins disease. The surface morphology and thickness of coating layer could be controlled by adjusting the electrospraying conditions and solution parameters.

  7. Characterization of a soft elastomeric capacitive strain sensor for fatigue crack monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangxiong; Li, Jian; Laflamme, Simon; Bennett, Caroline; Matamoros, Adolfo

    2015-04-01

    Fatigue cracks have been one of the major factors for the deterioration of steel bridges. In order to maintain structural integrity, monitoring fatigue crack activities such as crack initiation and propagation is critical to prevent catastrophic failure of steel bridges due to the accumulation of fatigue damage. Measuring the strain change under cracking is an effective way of monitoring fatigue cracks. However, traditional strain sensors such as metal foil gauges are not able to capture crack development due to their small size, limited measurement range, and high failure rate under harsh environmental conditions. Recently, a newly developed soft elastomeric capacitive sensor has great promise to overcome these limitations. In this paper, crack detection capability of the capacitive sensor is demonstrated through Finite Element (FE) analysis. A nonlinear FE model of a standard ASTM compact tension specimen is created which is calibrated to experimental data to simulate its response under fatigue loading, with the goal to 1) depict the strain distribution of the specimen under the large area covered by the capacitive sensor due to cracking; 2) characterize the relationship between capacitance change and crack width; 3) quantify the minimum required resolution of data acquisition system for detecting the fatigue cracks. The minimum resolution serves as a basis for the development of a dedicated wireless data acquisition system for the capacitive strain sensor.

  8. 48 CFR 245.603 - Disposal methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disposal methods. 245.603 Section 245.603 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractor Inventory 245.603 Disposal methods....

  9. Phytoextraction crop disposal--an unsolved problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sas-Nowosielska, A; Kucharski, R; Małkowski, E; Pogrzeba, M; Kuperberg, J M; Kryński, K

    2004-01-01

    Several methods of contaminated crop disposal after phytoextraction process (composting, compaction, incineration, ashing, pyrolysis, direct disposal, liquid extraction) have been described. Advantages and disadvantages of methods are presented and discussed. Composting, compaction and pyrolysis are the pretreatment steps, since significant amount of contaminated biomass will still exist after each of the process. Four methods of final disposal were distinguished: incineration, direct disposal, ashing and liquid extraction. Among them, incineration (smelting) is proposed as the most feasible, economically acceptable and environmentally sound.

  10. Small volume low mechanical stress cytometry using computer-controlled Braille display microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Yi-Chung; Torisawa, Yu-suke; Futai, Nobuyuki; Takayama, Shuichi

    2007-11-01

    This paper describes a micro flow cytometer system designed for efficient and non-damaging analysis of samples with small numbers of precious cells. The system utilizes actuation of Braille-display pins for micro-scale fluid manipulation and a fluorescence microscope with a CCD camera for optical detection. The microfluidic chip is fully disposable and is composed of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) slab with microchannel features sealed against a thin deformable PDMS membrane. The channels are designed with diffusers to alleviate pulsatile flow behaviors inherent in pin actuator-based peristaltic pumping schemes to maximize hydrodynamic focusing of samples with minimal disturbances in the laminar streams within the channel. A funnel connected to the microfluidic channel is designed for efficient loading of samples with small number of cells and is also positioned on the chip to prevent physical damages of the samples by the squeezing actions of Braille pins during actuation. The sample loading scheme was characterized by both computational fluidic dynamics (CFD) simulation and experimental observation. A fluorescein solution was first used for flow field investigation, followed by use of fluorescence beads with known relative intensities for optical detection performance calibration. Murine myoblast cells (C2C12) were exploited to investigate cell viability for the sample loading scheme of the device. Furthermore, human promyelocytic leukemia (HL60) cells stained by hypotonic DNA staining buffer were also tested in the system for cell cycle analysis. The ability to efficiently analyze cellular samples where the number of cells is small was demonstrated by analyzing cells from a single embryoid body derived from mouse embryonic stem cells. Consequently, the designed microfluidic device reported in this paper is promising for easy-to-use, small sample size flow cytometric analysis, and has potential to be further integrated with other Braille display-based microfluidic

  11. Finger-powered microfluidic systems using multilayer soft lithography and injection molding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Kosuke; Shih, Kuan Cheng; Lin, Xiao; Brubaker, Thomas A; Sochol, Ryan D; Lin, Liwei

    2014-10-07

    Point-of-care (POC) and disposable biomedical applications demand low-power microfluidic systems with pumping components that provide controlled pressure sources. Unfortunately, external pumps have hindered the implementation of such microfluidic systems due to limitations associated with portability and power requirements. Here, we propose and demonstrate a 'finger-powered' integrated pumping system as a modular element to provide pressure head for a variety of advanced microfluidic applications, including finger-powered on-chip microdroplet generation. By utilizing a human finger for the actuation force, electrical power sources that are typically needed to generate pressure head were obviated. Passive fluidic diodes were designed and implemented to enable distinct fluids from multiple inlet ports to be pumped using a single actuation source. Both multilayer soft lithography and injection molding processes were investigated for device fabrication and performance. Experimental results revealed that the pressure head generated from a human finger could be tuned based on the geometric characteristics of the pumping system, with a maximum observed pressure of 7.6 ± 0.1 kPa. In addition to the delivery of multiple, distinct fluids into microfluidic channels, we also employed the finger-powered pumping system to achieve the rapid formation of both water-in-oil droplets (106.9 ± 4.3 μm in diameter) and oil-in-water droplets (75.3 ± 12.6 μm in diameter) as well as the encapsulation of endothelial cells in droplets without using any external or electrical controllers.

  12. Rapid microfluidic thermal cycler for nucleic acid amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Vafai, Kambiz

    2015-10-27

    A system for thermal cycling a material to be thermal cycled including a microfluidic heat exchanger; a porous medium in the microfluidic heat exchanger; a microfluidic thermal cycling chamber containing the material to be thermal cycled, the microfluidic thermal cycling chamber operatively connected to the microfluidic heat exchanger; a working fluid at first temperature; a first system for transmitting the working fluid at first temperature to the microfluidic heat exchanger; a working fluid at a second temperature, a second system for transmitting the working fluid at second temperature to the microfluidic heat exchanger; a pump for flowing the working fluid at the first temperature from the first system to the microfluidic heat exchanger and through the porous medium; and flowing the working fluid at the second temperature from the second system to the heat exchanger and through the porous medium.

  13. Operation placement for application-specific digital microfluidic biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alistar, Mirela; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-based biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers, and are able to integrate onchip all the necessary functions for biochemical analysis using microfluidics. The digital microfluidic biochips are based on the manipulation of liquids not as a continuous flow, but as ......, such that the application completion time is minimized. The proposed algorithm has been evaluated using several benchmarks.......Microfluidic-based biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers, and are able to integrate onchip all the necessary functions for biochemical analysis using microfluidics. The digital microfluidic biochips are based on the manipulation of liquids not as a continuous flow......, but as discrete droplets on an array of electrodes. Microfluidic operations, such as transport, mixing, split, are performed on this array by routing the corresponding droplets on a series of electrodes. Researchers have proposed several approaches for the synthesis of digital microfluidic biochips. All previous...

  14. Concept for Underground Disposal of Nuclear Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Packaged waste placed in empty oil-shale mines. Concept for disposal of nuclear waste economically synergistic with earlier proposal concerning backfilling of oil-shale mines. New disposal concept superior to earlier schemes for disposal in hard-rock and salt mines because less uncertainty about ability of oil-shale mine to contain waste safely for millenium.

  15. 48 CFR 2845.603 - Disposal methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Disposal methods. 2845.603 Section 2845.603 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Contract Management GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Reporting, Redistribution, and Disposal of Contractor Inventory 2845.603 Disposal...

  16. 48 CFR 945.603 - Disposal methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disposal methods. 945.603 Section 945.603 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Reporting, Redistribution, and Disposal of Contractor Inventory 945.603 Disposal methods....

  17. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A LAB-ON-A-PAPER FOR LOW-COST AND DISPOSABLE POINT-OF CARE DIAGNOSTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afnidar Afnidar

    2017-01-01

      This paper presents a low-cost and disposable paper based microfluidic analysis system for point-of-care diagnostics. Detection is achieved by using a colorimetric or visual indicator. Immobilized specific reagent or enzymes designed for the parameter under consideration act as capture molecules on the surface of the detection zone. The sensor is integrated into a microfluidic system made of paper (cellulose. An additional component of the analysis system is a capillary unit which is used to introduce the analyte to the detection zone. For this purpose well- defined, millimeter-sized channel, comprising hydrophobic polymer bounded onto hydrophilic paper was created. Then the detection zone was coated with a sensitive reagent layer as a sensor region. The paper based microfluidics also called lab on paper, has been fabricated using screen printing technology as the basis for low-cost, disposable, portable and technically simple fabrication for mass production. Microfluidics in paper make it feasible to run single, dual or even multiple clinical analyses on one strip of paper while still using only small volumes of a single sample. The capability of lab on paper for detection of importance clinical analyte protein in urine, saliva and blood samples has been demonstrate successfully. Lab on paper as a diagnostic system is small, disposable, and easy to use and requires no external equipment, reagents, or power sources. This kind of diagnostic system is attractive for use in developing countries, in the field, or as a low-cost alternative to more-advanced technologies already used in clinical diagnostics.   Keywords: Lab-on-a-paper, Point-of-care, Visual detection, Clinical diagnostic, Disposable sensor

  18. Disposable microfluidic ELISA for the rapid determination of folic acid content in food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegger, Daniela; Morier, Patrick; Vollet, Christine; Heini, Dominique; Reymond, Frédéric; Rossier, Joël S

    2007-01-01

    A micro-analytical system for rapid and quantitative analysis by inhibition immunoassay is presented and applied to the detection of folic acid. Eight polymer microchannels of 65-nL volume each and containing microelectrodes are embedded in a cartridge so that they can be operated simultaneously. All fluidic steps as well as the amperometric detection in the channels are operated by an instrument and software developed in-house. The fluidic steps of the immunoassay occur through hydrodynamic loading of the different solutions through the channels. The speed and duration of the flow and incubation parameters can thus be adapted to the biological and testing requirements. The effectiveness of the system was demonstrated by analysing folic acid concentrations in real infant formula samples within 5 min. In an effort to get a fully monitored assay, each fluidic step is monitored thanks to continuous amperometric detection of oxygen in the microchannel.

  19. Screening of Peptide Libraries Against Protective Antigen of Bacillus Anthracis in a Disposable Microfluidic Cartridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    Andre de Fusco, H. Tom Soh, Nancy E. Stagliano University of California - Santa Barbara The Regents of the University of California, Santa Barbara...Paul Pagano2, Dimitra N. Stratis-Cullum1*, David Chang-Yen2, Marek Turewicz2, Paul M. Pellegrino1, Andre de Fusco2, H. Tom Soh4, Nancy E. Stagliano3 1...U S A 98: 3750–3755. 4. Bupp K, Roth MJ (2002) Altering retroviral tropism using a random-display envelope library. Mol Ther 5: 329–335. 5. Muller OJ

  20. Microfluidics: an enabling technology for the life sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Zengerle, Roland; Koltay, P.; Ducrée, Jens

    2004-01-01

    During the last year we have investigated existing and future markets, products and technologies for microfluidics in the life sciences. Within this paper we present some of the findings and discuss a major trend identified within this project: the development of microfluidic platforms for flexible design of application specific integrated microfluidic systems. We discuss two platforms in detail which are currently under development in our lab: microfluidics on a rotating CD ("Lab-CD") as wel...

  1. Final disposal of radioactive waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freiesleben H.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the origin and properties of radioactive waste as well as its classification scheme (low-level waste – LLW, intermediate-level waste – ILW, high-level waste – HLW are presented. The various options for conditioning of waste of different levels of radioactivity are reviewed. The composition, radiotoxicity and reprocessing of spent fuel and their effect on storage and options for final disposal are discussed. The current situation of final waste disposal in a selected number of countries is mentioned. Also, the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency with regard to the development and monitoring of international safety standards for both spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management is described.

  2. Disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This report addresses the topic of the mined geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Although some fuel processing options are identified, most of the information in this report relates to the isolation of spent fuel in the form it is removed from the reactor. The characteristics of the waste management system and research which relate to spent fuel isolation are discussed. The differences between spent fuel and processed HLW which impact the waste isolation system are defined and evaluated for the nature and extent of that impact. What is known and what needs to be determined about spent fuel as a waste form to design a viable waste isolation system is presented. Other waste forms and programs such as geologic exploration, site characterization and licensing which are generic to all waste forms are also discussed. R and D is being carried out to establish the technical information to develop the methods used for disposal of spent fuel. All evidence to date indicates that there is no reason, based on safety considerations, that spent fuel should not be disposed of as a waste.

  3. Separation of rare oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from brain using a high-throughput multilayer thermoplastic-based microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didar, Tohid Fatanat; Li, Kebin; Veres, Teodor; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2013-07-01

    Despite the advances made in the field of regenerative medicine, the progress in cutting-edge technologies for separating target therapeutic cells are still at early stage of development. These cells are often rare, such as stem cells or progenitor cells that their overall properties should be maintained during the separation process for their subsequent application in regenerative medicine. This work, presents separation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) from rat brain primary cultures using an integrated thermoplastic elastomeric (TPE)- based multilayer microfluidic device fabricated using hot-embossing technology. OPCs are frequently used in recovery, repair and regeneration of central nervous system after injuries. Indeed, their ability to differentiate in vitro into myelinating oligodendrocytes, are extremely important for myelin repair. OPCs form 5-10% of the glial cells population. The traditional macroscale techniques for OPCs separation require pre-processing of cells and/or multiple time consuming steps with low efficiency leading very often to alteration of their properties. The proposed methodology implies to separate OPCs based on their smaller size compared to other cells from the brain tissue mixture. Using aforementioned microfluidic chip embedded with a 5 μm membrane pore size and micropumping system, a separation efficiency more than 99% was achieved. This microchip was able to operate at flow rates up to 100 μl/min, capable of separating OPCs from a confluent 75 cm(2) cell culture flask in less than 10 min, which provides us with a high-throughput and highly efficient separation expected from any cell sorting techniques.

  4. Design, fabrication and test of a pneumatically controlled, renewable, microfluidic bead trapping device for sequential injection analysis applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Guocheng; Lu, Donglai; Fu, Zhifeng; Du, Dan; Ozanich, Richard M.; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of a pneumatically controlled,renewable, microfluidic device for conducting bead-based assays in an automated sequential injection analysis system. The device used a “brick wall”-like pillar array (pillar size: 20 μm length X 50 μm width X 45 μm height) with 5 μm gaps between the pillars serving as the micro filter. The flow channel where bead trapping occurred is 500 μm wide X 75 μm deep. An elastomeric membrane and an air chamber were located underneath the flow channel. By applying pressure to the air chamber, the membrane is deformed and pushed upward against the filter structure. This effectively traps beads larger than 5 μm and creates a “bed” or micro column of beads that can be perfused and washed with liquid samples and reagents. Upon completion of the assay process, the pressure is released and the beads are flushed out from underneath the filter structure to renew the device. Mouse IgG was used as a model analyte to test the feasibility of using the proposed device for immunoassay applications. Resulting microbeads from an on-chip fluorescent immunoassay were individually examined using flow cytometry. The results show that the fluorescence signal intensity distribution is fairly narrow indicating high chemical reaction uniformity among the beads population. Electrochemical onchip assay was also conducted. A detection limit of 0.1 ng/mL1 ppb was achieved and good device reliability and repeatability were demonstrated. The novel microfluidic-based beadstrapping device thus opens up a new pathway to design micro-bead based biosensor immunoassays for clinical and othervarious applications.

  5. Social dimensions of nuclear waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwald, Armin [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Technology Assessment and Systems Analysis

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear waste disposal is a two-faceted challenge: a scientific and technological endeavour, on the one hand, and confronted with social dimensions, on the other. In this paper I will sketch the respective social dimensions and will give a plea for interdisciplinary research approaches. Relevant social dimensions of nuclear waste disposal are concerning safety standards, the disposal 'philosophy', the process of determining the disposal site, and the operation of a waste disposal facility. Overall, cross-cutting issues of justice, responsibility, and fairness are of major importance in all of these fields.

  6. TECHNOLOGICAL WASTE DISPOSAL BY SUBSURFACE INJECTION TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Branimir

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of oilfield and solution mining technology to subsurface disposal of technological wastes has proven to be an environmentally, technically and economically suitable method for the disposal of the waste generated in petroleum industry as well as other industrial branches. This paper describes the subsurface injection technology, the disposal formation characteristics, the waste disposal well design, evaluates the environmental impact of above mentioned technology and proposes a solutions for disposing of technological wastes in Croatia or nerby region by implementing underground injection technology according to the world experience (the paper is published in Croatian.

  7. Material Biocompatibility for PCR Microfluidic Chips

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2010-04-23

    As part of the current miniaturization trend, biological reactions and processes are being adapted to microfluidics devices. PCR is the primary method employed in DNA amplification, its miniaturization is central to efforts to develop portable devices for diagnostics and testing purposes. A problem is the PCR-inhibitory effect due to interaction between PCR reagents and the surrounding environment, which effect is increased in high-surface-are-to-volume ration microfluidics. In this study, we evaluated the biocompatibility of various common materials employed in the fabrication of microfluidic chips, including silicon, several kinds of silicon oxide, glasses, plastics, wax, and adhesives. Two-temperature PCR was performed with these materials to determine their PCR-inhibitory effect. In most of the cases, addition of bovine serum albumin effectively improved the reaction yield. We also studied the individual PCR components from the standpoint of adsorption. Most of the materials did not inhibit the DNA, whereas they did show noticeable interaction with the DNA polymerase. Our test, instead of using microfluidic devices, can be easily conducted in common PCR tubes using a standard bench thermocycler. Our data supports an overview of the means by which the materials most bio-friendly to microfluidics can be selected.

  8. Valve Concepts for Microfluidic Cell Handling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grabowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present various pneumatically actuated microfluidic valves to enable user-defined fluid management within a microfluidic chip. To identify a feasible valve design, certain valve concepts are simulated in ANSYS to investigate the pressure dependent opening and closing characteristics of each design. The results are verified in a series of tests. Both the microfluidic layer and the pneumatic layer are realized by means of soft-lithographic techniques. In this way, a network of channels is fabricated in photoresist as a molding master. By casting these masters with PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane we get polymeric replicas containing the channel network. After a plasma-enhanced bonding process, the two layers are irreversibly bonded to each other. The bonding is tight for pressures up to 2 bar. The valves are integrated into a microfluidic cell handling system that is designed to manipulate cells in the presence of a liquid reagent (e.g. PEG – polyethylene glycol, for cell fusion. For this purpose a user-defined fluid management system is developed. The first test series with human cell lines show that the microfluidic chip is suitable for accumulating cells within a reaction chamber, where they can be flushed by a liquid medium.

  9. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kenneth K Y; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology.

  10. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-09-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology.

  11. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology. PMID:27610921

  12. Rapid wasted-free microfluidic fabrication based on ink-jet approach for microfluidic sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarujareet, Ungkarn; Amarit, Rattasart; Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun

    2016-11-01

    Realizing that current microfluidic chip fabrication techniques are time consuming and labor intensive as well as always have material leftover after chip fabrication, this research work proposes an innovative approach for rapid microfluidic chip production. The key idea relies on a combination of a widely-used inkjet printing method and a heat-based polymer curing technique with an electronic-mechanical control, thus eliminating the need of masking and molds compared to typical microfluidic fabrication processes. In addition, as the appropriate amount of polymer is utilized during printing, there is much less amount of material wasted. Our inkjet-based microfluidic printer can print out the desired microfluidic chip pattern directly onto a heated glass surface, where the printed polymer is suddenly cured. Our proof-of-concept demonstration for widely-used single-flow channel, Y-junction, and T-junction microfluidic chips shows that the whole microfluidic chip fabrication process requires only 3 steps with a fabrication time of 6 minutes.

  13. Microfluidic CODES: a scalable multiplexed electronic sensor for orthogonal detection of particles in microfluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruxiu; Wang, Ningquan; Kamili, Farhan; Sarioglu, A Fatih

    2016-04-21

    Numerous biophysical and biochemical assays rely on spatial manipulation of particles/cells as they are processed on lab-on-a-chip devices. Analysis of spatially distributed particles on these devices typically requires microscopy negating the cost and size advantages of microfluidic assays. In this paper, we introduce a scalable electronic sensor technology, called microfluidic CODES, that utilizes resistive pulse sensing to orthogonally detect particles in multiple microfluidic channels from a single electrical output. Combining the techniques from telecommunications and microfluidics, we route three coplanar electrodes on a glass substrate to create multiple Coulter counters producing distinct orthogonal digital codes when they detect particles. We specifically design a digital code set using the mathematical principles of Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) telecommunication networks and can decode signals from different microfluidic channels with >90% accuracy through computation even if these signals overlap. As a proof of principle, we use this technology to detect human ovarian cancer cells in four different microfluidic channels fabricated using soft lithography. Microfluidic CODES offers a simple, all-electronic interface that is well suited to create integrated, low-cost lab-on-a-chip devices for cell- or particle-based assays in resource-limited settings.

  14. Fit-to-Flow (F2F) interconnects: universal reversible adhesive-free microfluidic adaptors for lab-on-a-chip systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Arnold; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-02-21

    World-to-chip (macro-to-micro) interface continues to be one of the most complicated, ineffective, and unreliable components in the development of emerging lab-on-a-chip systems involving integrated microfluidic operations. A number of irreversible (e.g., adhesive gluing) and reversible techniques (e.g., press fitting) have attempted to provide dedicated fluidic passage from standard tubing to miniature on-chip devices, none of which completely addresses the above concerns. In this paper, we present standardized adhesive-free microfluidic adaptors, referred to as Fit-to-Flow (F2F) Interconnects, to achieve reliable hermetic seal, high-density tube packing, self-aligned plug-in, reworkable connectivity, straightforward scalability and expandability, and applicability to broad lab-on-a-chip platforms; analogous to the modular plug-and-play USB architecture employed in modern electronics. Specifically, two distinct physical packaging mechanisms are applied, with one utilizing induced tensile stress in elastomeric socket to establish reversible seal and the other using negative pressure to provide on demand vacuum shield, both of which can be adapted to a variety of experimental configurations. The non-leaking performance (up to 336 kPa) along with high tube-packing density (of 1 tube/mm(2)) and accurate self-guided alignment (of 10 μm) have been characterized. In addition, a 3D microfluidic mixer and a 6-level chemical gradient generator paired with the corresponding F2F Interconnects have been devised to illustrate the applicability of the universal fluidic connections to classic lab-on-a-chip operations.

  15. Microfluidic mixing using contactless dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmanzadeh, Alireza; Shafiee, Hadi; Davalos, Rafael V; Stremler, Mark A

    2011-09-01

    The first experimental evidence of mixing enhancement in a microfluidic system using contactless dielectrophoresis (cDEP) is presented in this work. Pressure-driven flow of deionized water containing 0.5 μm beads was mixed in various chamber geometries by imposing a dielectrophoresis (DEP) force on the beads. In cDEP the electrodes are not in direct contact with the fluid sample but are instead capacitively coupled to the mixing chamber through thin dielectric barriers, which eliminates many of the problems encountered with standard DEP. Four system designs with rectangular and circular mixing chambers were fabricated in PDMS. Mixing tests were conducted for flow rates from 0.005 to 1 mL/h subject to an alternating current signal range of 0-300 V at 100-600 kHz. When the time scales of the bulk fluid motion and the DEP motion were commensurate, rapid mixing was observed. The rectangular mixing chambers were found to be more efficient than the circular chambers. This approach shows potential for mixing low diffusivity biological samples, which is a very challenging problem in laminar flows at small scales.

  16. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore-surfactant interactions.

  17. Forces released during alignment with a preadjusted appliances with SPEED supercable wire and different types of elastomeric ligatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suruchi Jatol-Tekade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate a new combination of wire and ligature to reduce friction further by combining slide ligatures and supercable wires. Materials and Methods: The testing model consisted of five stainless steel 0.022 inch preadjusted brackets for second premolar, first premolar, canine, lateral incisor, and central incisor. The canine bracket was welded to a sliding bar that allowed different vertical positions. The forces generated by five sizes of wires superelastic nickel-titanium (SE Ni-Ti (Unitek Nitinol Super-Elastic Archwire of diameter 0.012", 0.014", 0.016", 0.018", and 0.020" inch and three sizes of SPEED supercable wires (0.016", 0.018", and 0.022" inch with the two types of elastomeric ligatures; conventional elastomeric ligatures (CELs (Unitek, silver mini modules, with inside diameter of 1.3 mm and thickness of 0.9 mm and nonconventional elastomeric ligatures (NCELs (Slide, Leone Orthodontic Products, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze, Italy at different amounts of upward canine misalignment (CM (1.5, 3, 4.5, and 6 mm were recorded. Results and Conclusions: Significant differences between CEL and NCEL were found for all tested variables (P - 0.01 a noticeable amount of force was generated with the NCEL at all four canine positions with all three wire sizes (from about 50 to about 150 g. With 4.5 mm of CM or more, the average amount of released force with the CEL was approximately zero.

  18. In vitro evaluation of force degradation of elastomeric chains used in Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Weissheimer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the in vitro force degradation of four different brands of elastomeric chains: American Orthodontics, Morelli, Ormco and TP Orthodontics. METHODS: The sample consisted of 80 gray elastomeric chains that were divided into four groups according to their respective manufacturers. Chain stretching was standardized at 21 mm with initial force release ranging from 300 g to 370 g. The samples were kept in artificial saliva at a constant temperature of 37°C and the degradation force was recorded at the following time intervals: initial, 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 hours, and 1, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant difference between the groups regarding the force degradation, mainly within the first day, as a force loss of 50-55% was observed during that time in relation to the initial force. The force delivered at 35 days ranged from 122 g to 148 g. CONCLUSION: All groups showed force degradation over time, regardless of their trademarks, a force loss of 59-69% was observed in the first hour compared to baseline. However, because the variation in force degradation depends on the trademark, studies such as the present one are important for guiding the clinical use of these materials.OBJETIVO: analisar, in vitro, a degradação de força, ao longo do tempo, de elastômeros das marcas comerciais American Orthodontics, Morelli, Ormco e TP Orthodontics. MÉTODOS: a amostra constituiu-se de 80 segmentos de elastômeros em cadeia fechada na cor cinza, divididos em quatro grupos, conforme o fabricante. A distensão foi padronizada em 21mm, com liberação de força inicial variando de 300 a 370g de força. As amostras foram mantidas em saliva artificial em temperatura constante de 37ºC, e a força avaliada nos seguintes intervalos: inicial, 1h, 3h, 5h, 7h, 9h, 1 dia, 7 dias, 14 dias, 21 dias, 28 dias e 35 dias. RESULTADOS: houve diferença estatisticamente significativa na degradação de força entre os

  19. Summary of experimental tests of elastomeric seismic isolation bearings for use in nuclear reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidensticker, R.W.; Chang, Y.W.; Kulak, R.F.

    1992-05-01

    This paper describes an experimental test program for isolator bearings which was developed to help establish the viability of using laminated elastomer bearings for base isolation of nuclear reactor plants. The goal of the test program is to determine the performance characteristics of laminated seismic isolation bearings under a wide range of loadings. Tests were performed on scale-size laminated seismic isolators both within the design shear strain range to determine the response of the bearing under expected earthquake loading conditions, and beyond the design range to determine failure modes and to establish safety margins. Three types of bearings, each produced from a different manufacturer, have been tested: (1) high shape factor-high damping-high shear modulus bearings; (2) medium shape factor-high damping-high shear modulus bearings; and (3) medium shape factor-high damping-low shear modulus bearings. All of these tests described in this report were performed at the Earthquake Engineering Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley, with technical assistance from ANL. The tests performed on the three types of bearings have confirmed the high performance characteristics of the high damping-high and low shear modulus elastomeric bearings. The bearings have shown that they are capable of having extremely large shear strains before failure occurs. The most common failure mechanism was the debonding of the top steel plate from the isolators. This failure mechanism can be virtually eliminated by improved manufacturing quality control. The most important result of the failure test of the isolators is the fact that bearings can sustain large horizontal displacement, several times larger than the design value, with failure. Their performance in moderate and strong earthquakes will be far superior to conventional structures.

  20. Summary of experimental tests of elastomeric seismic isolation bearings for use in nuclear reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidensticker, R.W.; Chang, Y.W.; Kulak, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental test program for isolator bearings which was developed to help establish the viability of using laminated elastomer bearings for base isolation of nuclear reactor plants. The goal of the test program is to determine the performance characteristics of laminated seismic isolation bearings under a wide range of loadings. Tests were performed on scale-size laminated seismic isolators both within the design shear strain range to determine the response of the bearing under expected earthquake loading conditions, and beyond the design range to determine failure modes and to establish safety margins. Three types of bearings, each produced from a different manufacturer, have been tested: (1) high shape factor-high damping-high shear modulus bearings; (2) medium shape factor-high damping-high shear modulus bearings; and (3) medium shape factor-high damping-low shear modulus bearings. All of these tests described in this report were performed at the Earthquake Engineering Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley, with technical assistance from ANL. The tests performed on the three types of bearings have confirmed the high performance characteristics of the high damping-high and low shear modulus elastomeric bearings. The bearings have shown that they are capable of having extremely large shear strains before failure occurs. The most common failure mechanism was the debonding of the top steel plate from the isolators. This failure mechanism can be virtually eliminated by improved manufacturing quality control. The most important result of the failure test of the isolators is the fact that bearings can sustain large horizontal displacement, several times larger than the design value, with failure. Their performance in moderate and strong earthquakes will be far superior to conventional structures.

  1. Inflatable Elastomeric Macroporous Polymers Synthesized from Medium Internal Phase Emulsion Templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebboth, Michael; Jiang, Qixiang; Kogelbauer, Andreas; Bismarck, Alexander

    2015-09-02

    Closed cell elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based polymerized medium internal phase emulsions (polyMIPEs) containing an aqueous solution of sodium hydrogen carbonate (NaHCO3) have been produced. Via thermal decomposition of NaHCO3, carbon dioxide was released into the polyMIPE structure to act as a blowing agent. When placed into an atmosphere with reduced pressure, these macroporous elastomers expanded to many times their original size, with a maximum expansion of 30 times. This expansion was found to be repeatable and reproducible. The extent of volume expansion was determined primarily by the dispersed phase volume ratio of the emulsion template; polyMIPEs with 60% dispersed phase content produced greater volume expansion ratios than polyMIPEs with 50% dispersed phase. Increasing the concentration of NaHCO3 in the dispersed phase also led to increased expansion due to the greater volume of gas forming within the porous structure of the silicone elastomer. The expansion ratio could be increased by doubling the agitation time during the emulsification process to form the MIPEs, as this decreased the pore wall thickness and hence the elastic restoring force of the porous silicone elastomer. Although MIPEs with 70% dispersed phase could be stabilized and successfully cured, the resultant polyMIPE was mechanically too weak and expanded less than polyMIPEs with a dispersed phase of 60%. It was also possible to cast the liquid emulsion into thin polyMIPE films, which could be expanded in vacuum, demonstrating that these materials have potential for use in self-sealing containers.

  2. Effect of Microstructure Constraints on the Homogenized Elastic Constants of Elastomeric Sylgard/GMB Syntactic Foam.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Judith Alice [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Steck, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, Judith Alice [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Long, Kevin Nicholas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Previous numerical studies of Sylgard filled with glass microballoons (GMB) have relied on various microstructure idealizations to achieve a large range of volume fractions with high mesh quality. This study investigates how different microstructure idealizations and constraints affect the apparent homogenized elastic constants in the virgin state of the material, in which all GMBs are intact and perfectly bonded to the Sylgard matrix, and in the fully damaged state of the material in which all GMBs are destroyed. In the latter state, the material behaves as an elastomeric foam. Four microstructure idealizations are considered relating to how GMBs are packed into a representative volume element (RVE): (1) no boundary penetration nor GMB-GMB overlap, (2) GMB-GMB overlap, (3) boundary penetration, and (4) boundary penetration and GMB-GMB overlap. First order computational homogenization with kinematically uniform displacement boundary conditions (KUBCs) was employed to determine the homogenized (apparent) bulk and shear moduli for the four microstructure idealizations in the intact and fully broken GMB material states. It was found that boundary penetration has a significant effect on the shear modulus for microstructures with intact GMBs, but that neither boundary penetration nor GMB overlap have a significant effect on homogenized properties for microstructures with fully broken GMBs. The primary conclusion of the study is that future investigations into Sylgard/GMB micromechanics should either force GMBs to stay within the RVE fully and/or use periodic BCs (PBCs) to eliminate the boundary penetration issues. The implementation of PBCs requires the improvement of existing tools in Sandia’s Sierra/SM code.

  3. Mechanical Consequences of Molecular Composition on Failure in Polyolefin Composites Containing Glassy, Elastomeric, and Semicrystalline Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahanthappa, Mahesh K.; Hillmyer, Marc A.; Bates, Frank S. (UMM)

    2008-10-24

    In order to gain insights into the mechanisms of deformation and ultimate failure in a homologous series of lamellae-forming polyolefin block copolymers comprised of glassy poly(cyclohexylethylene) (C), elastomeric poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (P), and semicrystalline poly(ethylene) (E), the anisotropic tensile properties of samples in which the microphase separate structure is oriented on a macroscopic length scale were probed. Reciprocating shear processing of monodisperse CPCPC and CPEPC-{xi} polymers having mass fraction w{sub c} 0.39--0.44 and 0 {<=} {xi} {<=} 1, where {xi} = w{sub E}/(w{sub E} + w{sub P}), produces 'single-grain' polymer samples with perpendicular-oriented lamellae. Tensile deformation studies in which the strain axis coincides with the lamellar normal direction yield varied mechanical responses ranging from brittle fracture for CEC ({xi} = 0) to ductile behavior for CPEPC ({xi} > 0) and CPCPC. Tandem small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering analysis of samples undergoing deformation shows that application of strain along the lamellar normal in the CPEPC materials results in formation of a folded lamellar structure or 'chevron' morpohology within which the E crystals cant relative to the strain direction. Since the ultimate failure mechanism for materials strained in this direction is chain pullout in the glassy domains, a simple mechanical model applied to the data enables quantitation of the stress required for chain pullout at {approx}4 MPa. Additionally, the mechanical properties of miscible blends of CEC and CPC polymers with matched segregation strengths are shown to mimic those of the covalently linked CPEPC pentablock copolymer.

  4. Linear dimensional changes in plaster die models using different elastomeric materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Ricardo Pereira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Dental impression is an important step in the preparation of prostheses since it provides the reproduction of anatomic and surface details of teeth and adjacent structures. The objective of this study was to evaluate the linear dimensional alterations in gypsum dies obtained with different elastomeric materials, using a resin coping impression technique with individual shells. A master cast made of stainless steel with fixed prosthesis characteristics with two prepared abutment teeth was used to obtain the impressions. References points (A, B, C, D, E and F were recorded on the occlusal and buccal surfaces of abutments to register the distances. The impressions were obtained using the following materials: polyether, mercaptan-polysulfide, addition silicone, and condensation silicone. The transfer impressions were made with custom trays and an irreversible hydrocolloid material and were poured with type IV gypsum. The distances between identified points in gypsum dies were measured using an optical microscope and the results were statistically analyzed by ANOVA (p < 0.05 and Tukey's test. The mean of the distances were registered as follows: addition silicone (AB = 13.6 µm, CD=15.0 µm, EF = 14.6 µm, GH=15.2 µm, mercaptan-polysulfide (AB = 36.0 µm, CD = 36.0 µm, EF = 39.6 µm, GH = 40.6 µm, polyether (AB = 35.2 µm, CD = 35.6 µm, EF = 39.4 µm, GH = 41.4 µm and condensation silicone (AB = 69.2 µm, CD = 71.0 µm, EF = 80.6 µm, GH = 81.2 µm. All of the measurements found in gypsum dies were compared to those of a master cast. The results demonstrated that the addition silicone provides the best stability of the compounds tested, followed by polyether, polysulfide and condensation silicone. No statistical differences were obtained between polyether and mercaptan-polysulfide materials.

  5. Moldable elastomeric polyester-carbon nanotube scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadian, Samad; Davenport Huyer, Locke; Estili, Mehdi; Yee, Bess; Smith, Nathaniel; Xu, Zhensong; Sun, Yu; Radisic, Milica

    2017-04-01

    Polymer biomaterials are used to construct scaffolds in tissue engineering applications to assist in mechanical support, organization, and maturation of tissues. Given the flexibility, electrical conductance, and contractility of native cardiac tissues, it is desirable that polymeric scaffolds for cardiac tissue regeneration exhibit elasticity and high electrical conductivity. Herein, we developed a facile approach to introduce carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into poly(octamethylene maleate (anhydride) 1,2,4-butanetricarboxylate) (124 polymer), and developed an elastomeric scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering that provides electrical conductivity and structural integrity to 124 polymer. 124 polymer-CNT materials were developed by first dispersing CNTs in poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether porogen and mixing with 124 prepolymer for molding into shapes and crosslinking under ultraviolet light. 124 polymers with 0.5% and 0.1% CNT content (wt) exhibited improved conductivity against pristine 124 polymer. With increasing the CNT content, surface moduli of hybrid polymers were increased, while their bulk moduli were decreased. Furthermore, increased swelling of hybrid 124 polymer-CNT materials was observed, suggesting their improved structural support in an aqueous environment. Finally, functional characterization of engineered cardiac tissues using the 124 polymer-CNT scaffolds demonstrated improved excitation threshold in materials with 0.5% CNT content (3.6±0.8V/cm) compared to materials with 0% (5.1±0.8V/cm) and 0.1% (5.0±0.7V/cm), suggesting greater tissue maturity. 124 polymer-CNT materials build on the advantages of 124 polymer elastomer to give a versatile biomaterial for cardiac tissue engineering applications.

  6. Tensile Properties and Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Investigation of Stereoblock Elastomeric Polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pople, John A

    2002-08-06

    Elastomeric polypropylene (ePP) produced from unbridged 2-arylindene metallocene catalysts was studied by uniaxial tensile and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques. The ePP can be separated into three fractions by successive boiling-solvent fractionation method to yield: a low-tacticity fraction soluble in ether (ES), an intermediate-tacticity fraction soluble in heptane (HS), and a high-tacticity fraction insoluble in heptane (HI). Tensile properties of ePP were compared to its solvent fractions, and the role of each solvent fraction residing within ePP was investigated by blending 5 weight % deuterated fraction with ePP. The tensile properties of each fraction vary considerably, exhibiting properties from a weak gum elastomer for ES, to a semi-crystalline thermoplastic for HI. The intermediate-tacticity HS fraction exhibits elastic properties similar to the parent elastomer (ePP). In the melt at 160 C, SANS shows that all deuterated fractions are homogeneously mixed with ePP in a one-phase system. At 25 C upon a slow cooling from the melt, the low-tacticity fraction is preferentially segregated in the amorphous domains induced by different crystallization temperatures and kinetics of the deuterated ES and high-tacticity components. The high-tacticity component within ePP (dHI-ePP) retains its plastic properties in the blend. Despite its low crystallinity ({le} 2%), the low-tacticity fraction can co-crystallize with the crystalline matrix. The dES-ePP shows little or no relaxation when held under strain and recovers readily upon the release of stress.

  7. Development and evaluation of elastomeric hollow fiber membranes as small diameter vascular graft substitutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado-Pagán, Ángel E.; Kang, Yunqing [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Findlay, Michael W. [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); University of Melbourne Department of Surgery, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, VIC (Australia); Yang, Yunzhi, E-mail: ypyang@stanford.edu [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Engineering of small diameter (< 6 mm) vascular grafts (SDVGs) for clinical use remains a significant challenge. Here, elastomeric polyester urethane (PEU)-based hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) are presented as an SDVG candidate to target the limitations of current technologies and improve tissue engineering designs. HFMs are fabricated by a simple phase inversion method. HFM dimensions are tailored through adjustments to fabrication parameters. The walls of HFMs are highly porous. The HFMs are very elastic, with moduli ranging from 1–4 MPa, strengths from 1–5 MPa, and max strains from 300–500%. Permeability of the HFMs varies from 0.5–3.5 × 10{sup −6} cm/s, while burst pressure varies from 25 to 35 psi. The suture retention forces of HFMs are in the range of 0.8 to 1.2 N. These properties match those of blood vessels. A slow degradation profile is observed for all HFMs, with 71 to 78% of the original mass remaining after 8 weeks, providing a suitable profile for potential cellular incorporation and tissue replacement. Both human endothelial cells and human mesenchymal stem cells proliferate well in the presence of HFMs up to 7 days. These results demonstrate a promising customizable PEU HFMs for small diameter vascular repair and tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • Hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) were fabricated and evaluated. • HFM properties could be tailored through adjustments to fabrication parameters. • Properties could match or exceed those of blood vessels. • HFM showed excellent compatibility in vitro. • HFMs have the potential to be used for small diameter vascular grafts.

  8. Fibre-optic sensors for partial discharge-generated ultrasound in elastomeric high-voltage insulation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohwetter, P.; Habel, W.

    2013-05-01

    Recent progress in the development of ultrasonic fibre-optic sensors for detecting acoustic emission from partial discharge in elastomeric insulations is presented. These sensors are an important part of a proposed comprehensive scheme for the fibre-optic monitoring of cable accessories. After specifying the underlying design goals the improved fibre-optic sensor design is outlined. It is experimentally shown that it offers about ten-fold improvement over a previously investigated resonant cantilever-type design in terms of detection limit, making it competitive with conventional piezoelectric transducers, however with the added compatibility with strong electrical fields and electromagnetically noisy environments.

  9. Controle sismique d'un batiment en acier de 1 etage par amortisseurs elastomeres et contreventements en Chevron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Olivier

    Actuellement, le principe de dimensionnement a la capacite est fortement utilise dans le domaine du genie parasismique. De maniere simplifiee, cette methode de dimensionnement consiste a dissiper l'energie injectee a une structure lors d'une secousse sismique par la deformation inelastique d'un element structural sacrificiel. Cette methode de dimensionne-ment permet d'obtenir des structures economiques, car cette dissipation d'energie permet de reduire substantiellement les efforts qui se retrouvent a l'interieur de la structure. Or, la consequence de ce dimensionnement est la presence de degats importants a la structure qui suivent a la secousse sismique. Ces degats peuvent engendrer des couts superieurs aux couts d'erection de la structure. Bien entendu, sachant que les secousses sismiques d'importances sont des phenomenes rares, l'ingenieur est pret a accepter ce risque afin de diminuer les couts initiaux de construction. Malgre que cette methode ait permis d'obtenir des constructions economiques et securitaires, il serait interessant de developper un systeme qui permettrait d'obtenir des performances de controle des efforts sismiques comparables a un systeme dimensionne selon un principe de dimensionnement a la capacite sans les consequences negatives de ces systemes. En utilisant les principes d'isolation a la base, il a ete possible de developper un systeme de reprise des forces sismiques (SRFS). qui permet d'obtenir un controle des efforts sismiques concurrentiels tout en gardant une structure completement elastique. Ce systeme consiste u inserer un materiel elastomere entre l'assemblage de la poutre et des contreventements a l'interieur d'un cadre contrevente conventionnel. Cette insertion permet de diminuer substantiellement la rigidite laterale du batiment, ce qui a pour consequence d'augmenter la valeur de la periode fondamentale du batiment dans lequel ces cadres sont inseres. Ce phenomene est appele le saut de periode. Ce saut de periode permet de

  10. Mechanically durable and highly conductive elastomeric composites from long single-walled carbon nanotubes mimicking the chain structure of polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Seisuke; Kobashi, Kazufumi; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2012-06-13

    By using long single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as a filler possessing the highest aspect ratio and small diameter, we mimicked the chain structure of polymers in the matrix and realized a highly conductive elastomeric composite (30 S/cm) with an excellent mechanical durability (4500 strain cycles until failure), far superior to any other reported conductive elastomers. This exceptional mechanical durability was explained by the ability of long and traversing SWNTs to deform in concert with the elastomer with minimum stress concentration at their interfaces. The conductivity was sufficient to operate many active electronics components, and thus this material would be useful for practical stretchable electronic devices.

  11. Microfluidic Pumps Containing Teflon [Trademark] AF Diaphragms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Peter; White, Victor; Grunthaner, Frank; Ikeda, Mike; Mathies, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Microfluidic pumps and valves based on pneumatically actuated diaphragms made of Teflon AF polymers are being developed for incorporation into laboratory-on-a-chip devices that must perform well over temperature ranges wider than those of prior diaphragm-based microfluidic pumps and valves. Other potential applications include implanted biomedical microfluidic devices, wherein the biocompatability of Teflon AF polymers would be highly advantageous. These pumps and valves have been demonstrated to function stably after cycling through temperatures from -125 to 120 C. These pumps and valves are intended to be successors to similar prior pumps and valves containing diaphragms made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) [commonly known as silicone rubber]. The PDMS-containing valves ae designed to function stably only within the temperature range from 5 to 80 C. Undesirably, PDMS membranes are somwehat porous and retain water. PDMS is especially unsuitable for use at temperatures below 0 C because the formation of ice crystals increases porosity and introduces microshear.

  12. Design and Testing of Digital Microfluidic Biochips

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Yang

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive methodology for automated design, test and diagnosis, and use of robust, low-cost, and manufacturable digital microfluidic systems. It focuses on the development of a comprehensive CAD optimization framework for digital microfluidic biochips that unifies different design problems. With the increase in system complexity and integration levels, biochip designers can utilize the design methods described in this book to evaluate different design alternatives, and carry out design-space exploration to obtain the best design point. Describes practical design automation tools that address different design problems (e.g., synthesis, droplet routing, control-pin mapping, testing and diagnosis, and error recovery) in a unified manner; Applies test pattern generation and error-recovery techniques for digital microfluidics-based biochips; Uses real bioassays as evaluation examples, e.g., multiplexed in vitro human physiological fluids diagnostics, PCR, protein crystallization.  

  13. Bridging Flows: Microfluidic End‐User Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabourin, David

    . A second practical challenge users face stems from the peripheral equipment, e.g. pumps, required to drive microfluidic devices. This equipment is often costly and bulky and results in limitations and restrictions on microfluidic device operation, such as the number of channels or devices which can...... be actuated or microscopic observation. To address the above issues interconnection and pumping solutions were developed. Methods for creating multiple, aligned, parallel and planar interconnections well suited to microscopy are described. Both reusable, non‐integrated, and permanent, integrated...... interconnection solutions are presented. The construction of twelve and eight channel miniaturized, mechanically actuated peristaltic pumps is also described. The small footprint of the pumps allows their placement adjacent to microfluidic devices and on microscope stages. The reusable, non...

  14. Nanostructures for all-polymer microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matschuk, Maria; Bruus, Henrik; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2010-01-01

    We present a process for fabricating nanostructured surfaces with feature sizes down to at least 50 nm and aspect ratios of 1:1 by injection molding. We explored the effects of mold coatings and injection molding conditions on the final nanostructure quality. A plasma-polymerized fluorocarbon based...... antistiction coating was found to improve the replication fidelity (shape and depth) of nanoscale features substantially. Arrays of holes of 50 nm diameter/35 nm depth and 100 nm/100 nm diameter, respectively, were mass-produced in cyclic olefin copolymer (Topas 5013) by injection molding. Polymer microfluidic...... channel chip parts resulted from a separate injection molding process. The microfluidic chip part and the nanostructured chip part were successfully bonded to form a sealed microfluidic system using air plasma assisted thermal bonding....

  15. Microfluidics for research and applications in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant; Ebrahimi Warkiani, Majid; Jing, Tengyang; Kenry; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-01-21

    Cancer is currently one of the top non-communicable human diseases, and continual research and developmental efforts are being made to better understand and manage this disease. More recently, with the improved understanding in cancer biology as well as the advancements made in microtechnology and rapid prototyping, microfluidics is increasingly being explored and even validated for use in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. With inherent advantages such as small sample volume, high sensitivity and fast processing time, microfluidics is well-positioned to serve as a promising platform for applications in oncology. In this review, we look at the recent advances in the use of microfluidics, from basic research such as understanding cancer cell phenotypes as well as metastatic behaviors to applications such as the detection, diagnosis, prognosis and drug screening. We then conclude with a future outlook on this promising technology.

  16. Temperature Sensing in Modular Microfluidic Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisna C. Bhargava

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A discrete microfluidic element with integrated thermal sensor was fabricated and demonstrated as an effective probe for process monitoring and prototyping. Elements were constructed using stereolithography and market-available glass-bodied thermistors within the modular, standardized framework of previous discrete microfluidic elements demonstrated in the literature. Flow rate-dependent response due to sensor self-heating and microchannel heating and cooling was characterized and shown to be linear in typical laboratory conditions. An acid-base neutralization reaction was performed in a continuous flow setting to demonstrate applicability in process management: the ratio of solution flow rates was varied to locate the equivalence point in a titration, closely matching expected results. This element potentially enables complex, three-dimensional microfluidic architectures with real-time temperature feedback and flow rate sensing, without application specificity or restriction to planar channel routing formats.

  17. MEMS and microfluidics for diagnostics devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Y; Gurman, P

    2010-06-01

    There are conditions in clinical medicine demanding critical therapeutic decisions. These conditions necessitate accuracy, rapidity, accessibility, cost-effectiveness and mobility. New technologies have been developed in order to address these challenges. Microfluidics and Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems are two of such technologies. Microfluidics, a discipline that involves processing fluids at the microscale in etched microchannels, is being used to build lab- on-a-chip systems to run chemical and biological assays. These systems are being transformed into handheld devices designed to be used at remote settings or at the bedside. MEMS are microscale electromechanical elements integrated in lab chip systems or used as individual components. MEMS based sensors represents a highly developed field with successful commercialized products currently being incorporated into vitro,ex vivo and in vivo devices. In the present paper several examples of microfluidic devices and MEMS sensors are introduced together with some current examples of commercialized products. Future challenges and trends will be discussed.

  18. Microfluidics for miniaturized laboratories on a chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Thomas A; Wixforth, Achim

    2008-10-24

    Microfluidic systems promise solutions for high throughput and highly specific analysis for biology, medicine and chemistry while consuming only tiny amounts of reactants and space. On these lab-on-a-chip platforms often multiple physical effects such as electrokinetic, acoustic or capillary phenomena from various disciplines are exploited to gain the optimal functionality. The fluidics on these small length scales differ significantly from our experience of the macroscopic world. In this Review we survey some of the approaches and techniques to handle minute amounts of fluid volumes in microfluidic systems with special focus on surface acoustic wave driven fluidics, a technique developed in our laboratory. Here, we outline the basics of this technique and demonstrate, for example, how acoustic mixing and fluid actuation is realized. Furthermore we discuss the interplay of different physical effects in microfluidic systems and illustrate their usefulness for several applications.

  19. 3D-Printed Microfluidic Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Anthony K.; Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Horowitz, Lisa F.; Chang, Tim C.; Folch, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic automation – the automated routing, dispensing, mixing, and/or separation of fluids through microchannels – generally remains a slowly-spreading technology because device fabrication requires sophisticated facilities and the technology’s use demands expert operators. Integrating microfluidic automation in devices has involved specialized multi-layering and bonding approaches. Stereolithography is an assembly-free, 3D-printing technique that is emerging as an efficient alternative for rapid prototyping of biomedical devices. Here we describe fluidic valves and pumps that can be stereolithographically printed in optically-clear, biocompatible plastic and integrated within microfluidic devices at low cost. User-friendly fluid automation devices can be printed and used by non-engineers as replacement for costly robotic pipettors or tedious manual pipetting. Engineers can manipulate the designs as digital modules into new devices of expanded functionality. Printing these devices only requires the digital file and electronic access to a printer. PMID:25738695

  20. Thermophoresis of DNA determined by microfluidic fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhr, S; Arduini, S; Braun, D

    2004-11-01

    We describe a microfluidic all-optical technique to measure the thermophoresis of molecules. Within micrometer-thick chambers, we heat aqueous solutions with a micrometer-sized focus of infrared light. The temperature increase of about 1 K is monitored with temperature-sensitive fluorescent dyes. We test the approach in measuring the thermophoresis of DNA. We image the concentration of DNA in a second fluorescence-color channel. DNA is depleted away from the heated spot. The profile of depletion is fitted by the thermophoretic theory to reveal the Soret coefficient. We evaluate the method with numerical 3D calculations of temperature profiles, drift, convection and thermophoretic depletion using finite element methods. The approach opens new ways to monitor thermophoresis at the single molecule level, near boundaries and in complex mixtures. The flexible microfluidic setting is a good step towards microfluidic applications of thermophoresis in biotechnology.

  1. Microfluidic serpentine antennas with designed mechanical tunability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, YongAn; Wang, Yezhou; Xiao, Lin; Liu, Huimin; Dong, Wentao; Yin, Zhouping

    2014-11-07

    This paper describes the design and characterization of microfluidic serpentine antennas with reversible stretchability and designed mechanical frequency modulation (FM). The microfluidic antennas are designed based on the Poisson's ratio of the elastomer in which the liquid alloy antenna is embedded, to controllably decrease, stabilize or increase its resonance frequency when being stretched. Finite element modelling was used in combination with experimental verification to investigate the effects of substrate dimensions and antenna aspect ratios on the FM sensitivity to uniaxial stretching. It could be designed within the range of -1.2 to 0.6 GHz per 100% stretch. When the aspect ratio of the serpentine antenna is between 1.0 and 1.5, the resonance frequency is stable under stretching, bending, and twisting. The presented microfluidic serpentine antenna design could be utilized in the field of wireless mobile communication for the design of wearable electronics, with a stable resonance frequency under dynamic applied strain up to 50%.

  2. 3D-printed microfluidic automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Anthony K; Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Horowitz, Lisa F; Chang, Tim C; Folch, Albert

    2015-04-21

    Microfluidic automation - the automated routing, dispensing, mixing, and/or separation of fluids through microchannels - generally remains a slowly-spreading technology because device fabrication requires sophisticated facilities and the technology's use demands expert operators. Integrating microfluidic automation in devices has involved specialized multi-layering and bonding approaches. Stereolithography is an assembly-free, 3D-printing technique that is emerging as an efficient alternative for rapid prototyping of biomedical devices. Here we describe fluidic valves and pumps that can be stereolithographically printed in optically-clear, biocompatible plastic and integrated within microfluidic devices at low cost. User-friendly fluid automation devices can be printed and used by non-engineers as replacement for costly robotic pipettors or tedious manual pipetting. Engineers can manipulate the designs as digital modules into new devices of expanded functionality. Printing these devices only requires the digital file and electronic access to a printer.

  3. Recent Advancements towards Full-Systems Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Miled

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics is quickly becoming a key technology in an expanding range of fields, such as medical sciences, biosensing, bioactuation, chemical synthesis, and more. This is helping its transformation from a promising R&D tool to commercially viable technology. Fuelling this expansion is the intensified focus on automation and enhanced functionality through integration of complex electrical control, mechanical properties, in situ sensing and flow control. Here we highlight recent contributions to the Sensors Special Issue series called “Microfluidics-Based Microsystem Integration Research” under the following categories: (i Device fabrication to support complex functionality; (ii New methods for flow control and mixing; (iii Towards routine analysis and point of care applications; (iv In situ characterization; and (v Plug and play microfluidics.

  4. Planar microfluidics - liquid handling without walls

    CERN Document Server

    Rathgeber, A; Kutschera, H J; Wixforth, A

    2001-01-01

    The miniaturization and integration of electronic circuitry has not only made the enormous increase in performance of semiconductor devices possible but also spawned a myriad of new products and applications ranging from a cellular phone to a personal computer. Similarly, the miniaturization and integration of chemical and biological processes will revolutionize life sciences. Drug design and diagnostics in the genomic era require reliable and cost effective high throughput technologies which can be integrated and allow for a massive parallelization. Microfluidics is the core technology to realize such miniaturized laboratories with feature sizes on a submillimeter scale. Here, we report on a novel microfluidic technology meeting the basic requirements for a microfluidic processor analogous to those of its electronic counterpart: Cost effective production, modular design, high speed, scalability and programmability.

  5. Electroporation of cells in microfluidic droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yihong; Wang, Jun; Bao, Ning; Lu, Chang

    2009-03-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics has raised a lot of interest recently due to its wide applications to screening biological/chemical assays with high throughput. Despite the advances on droplet-based assays involving cells, gene delivery methods that are compatible with the droplet platform have been lacking. In this report, we demonstrate a simple microfluidic device that encapsulates cells into aqueous droplets and then electroporates the encapsulated cells. The electroporation occurs when the cell-containing droplets (in oil) flow through a pair of microelectrodes with a constant voltage established in between. We investigate the parameters and characteristics of the electroporation. We demonstrate delivering enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) plasmid into Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We envision the application of this technique to high-throughput functional genomics studies based on droplet microfluidics.

  6. A self-triggered picoinjector in microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiming; Liu, Songsheng; Jia, Chunping; Mao, Hongju; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Zhou, Hongbo

    2016-12-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics has recently emerged as a potential platform for studies of single-cell, directed evolution, and genetic sequencing. In droplet-based microfluidics, adding reagents into drops is one of the most important functions. In this paper, we develop a new self-triggered picoinjector to add controlled volumes of reagent into droplets at kilohertz rates. In the picoinjector, the reagent injecting is triggered by the coming droplet itself, without needing a droplet detection module. Meanwhile, the dosing volume can be precisely controlled. These features make the system more practical and reliable. We expect the new picoinjector will find important applications of droplet-based microfluidics in automated biological assay, directed evolution, enzyme assay, and so on.

  7. A microfluidic toolbox approach to CBRNE sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Claudia; Klemm, Richard; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Becker, Holger

    2012-06-01

    Microfluidics has proven to be a very effective technology for the identification of biological and chemical analytes in a CBRNE scenario. As it will be shown in the following, the required steps of those analytical processes are manifold making the development of an integrated microfluidic device a complicated project with a high level of technological risk, because all necessary analytical processes have to be implemented into a single device. The implementation is initiated by a dissection of the biochemical workflow into mandatory bio-analytical steps and the resulting protocol for each of those steps is translated into an appropriate design of a chip-based unit. In this report, examples for such chipbased functional modules are given. In addition, examples for a merging of positively tested modules into an integrated chip are shown and, finally, representatives for a smooth interaction between outer world, microfluidic chip, and chip driving instrument are presented.

  8. Microfluidic platforms for plant cells studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanati Nezhad, A

    2014-09-07

    Conventional methods of plant cell analysis rely on growing plant cells in soil pots or agarose plates, followed by screening the plant phenotypes in traditional greenhouses and growth chambers. These methods are usually costly, need a large number of experiments, suffer from low spatial resolution and disorderly growth behavior of plant cells, with lack of ability to locally and accurately manipulate the plant cells. Microfluidic platforms take advantage of miniaturization for handling small volume of liquids and providing a closed environment, with the purpose of in vitro single cell analysis and characterizing cell response to external cues. These platforms have shown their ability for high-throughput cellular analysis with increased accuracy of experiments, reduced cost and experimental times, versatility in design, ability for large-scale and combinatorial screening, and integration with other miniaturized sensors. Despite extensive research on animal cells within microfluidic environments for high-throughput sorting, manipulation and phenotyping studies, the application of microfluidics for plant cells studies has not been accomplished yet. Novel devices such as RootChip, RootArray, TipChip, and PlantChip developed for plant cells analysis, with high spatial resolution on a micrometer scale mimicking the internal microenvironment of plant cells, offering preliminary results on the capability of microfluidics to conquer the constraints of conventional methods. These devices have been used to study different aspects of plant cell biology such as gene expression, cell biomechanics, cellular mechanism of growth, cell division, and cells fusion. This review emphasizes the advantages of current microfluidic systems for plant science studies, and discusses future prospects of microfluidic platforms for characterizing plant cells response to diverse external cues.

  9. Rapid identification of ESKAPE bacterial strains using an autonomous microfluidic device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Y Ho

    Full Text Available This article describes Bacteria ID Chips ('BacChips': an inexpensive, portable, and autonomous microfluidic platform for identifying pathogenic strains of bacteria. BacChips consist of a set of microchambers and channels molded in the elastomeric polymer, poly(dimethylsiloxane (PDMS. Each microchamber is preloaded with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides and dried. Pressing the layer of PDMS into contact with a glass coverslip forms the device; the footprint of the device in this article is ∼6 cm(2. After assembly, BacChips are degased under large negative pressure and are stored in vacuum-sealed plastic bags. To use the device, the bag is opened, a sample containing bacteria is introduced at the inlet of the device, and the degased PDMS draws the sample into the central channel and chambers. After the liquid at the inlet is consumed, air is drawn into the BacChip via the inlet and provides a physical barrier that separates the liquid samples in adjacent microchambers. A pH indicator is admixed with the samples prior to their loading, enabling the metabolism of the dissolved saccharides in the microchambers to be visualized. Importantly, BacChips operate without external equipment or instruments. By visually detecting the growth of bacteria using ambient light after ∼4 h, we demonstrate that BacChips with ten microchambers containing different saccharides can reproducibly detect the ESKAPE panel of pathogens, including strains of: Enterococcus faecalis, Enteroccocus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Enterobacter cloacae. This article describes a BacChip for point-of-care detection of ESKAPE pathogens and a starting point for designing multiplexed assays that identify bacterial strains from clinical samples and simultaneously determine their susceptibility to antibiotics.

  10. Integrated Microfluidic Sensor System with Magnetostrictive Resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Cai

    2011-12-08

    The present embodiments describe a method that integrates a magnetostrictive sensor with driving and detecting elements into a microfluidic chip to detect a chemical, biochemical or biomedical species. These embodiments may also measure the properties of a fluid such as viscosity, pH values. The whole system can be referred to lab-on-a-chip (LOC) or micro-total-analysis-systems (.mu.TAS). In particular, this present embodiments include three units, including a microfluidics unit, a magnetostrictive sensor, and driving/detecting elements. An analyzer may also be provided to analyze an electrical signal associated with a feature of a target specimen.

  11. Diffusion dynamics in microfluidic dye lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Morten; Balslev, Søren; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the bleaching dynamics that occur in opto-fluidic dye lasers, where the liquid laser dye in a channel is locally bleached due to optical pumping. Our studies suggest that for micro-fluidic devices, the dye bleaching may be compensated through diffusion of dye molecules alone....... By relying on diffusion rather than convection to generate the necessary dye replenishment, our observation potentially allows for a significant simplification of opto-fluidic dye laser device layouts, omitting the need for cumbersome and costly external fluidic handling or on-chip micro-fluidic pumping...

  12. Micro-Fluidic Device for Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  13. Biocompatible "click" wafer bonding for microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharil, Farizah; Carlborg, Carl Fredrik; Haraldsson, Tommy; van der Wijngaart, Wouter

    2012-09-07

    We introduce a novel dry wafer bonding concept designed for permanent attachment of micromolded polymer structures to surface functionalized silicon substrates. The method, designed for simultaneous fabrication of many lab-on-chip devices, utilizes a chemically reactive polymer microfluidic structure, which rapidly bonds to a functionalized substrate via"click" chemistry reactions. The microfluidic structure consists of an off-stoichiometry thiol-ene (OSTE) polymer with a very high density of surface bound thiol groups and the substrate is a silicon wafer that has been functionalized with common bio-linker molecules. We demonstrate here void free, and low temperature (silane functionalized silicon wafer.

  14. Recent Advances in Applications of Droplet Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Lung Chou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Droplet-based microfluidics is a colloidal and interfacial system that has rapidly progressed in the past decade because of the advantages of low fabrication costs, small sample volumes, reduced analysis durations, high-throughput analysis with exceptional sensitivity, enhanced operational flexibility, and facile automation. This technology has emerged as a new tool for many recently used applications in molecular detection, imaging, drug delivery, diagnostics, cell biology and other fields. Herein, we review recent applications of droplet microfluidics proposed since 2013.

  15. Physics and applications of microfluidics in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, David J; Mensing, Glennys A; Walker, Glenn M

    2002-01-01

    Fluid flow at the microscale exhibits unique phenomena that can be leveraged to fabricate devices and components capable of performing functions useful for biological studies. The physics of importance to microfluidics are reviewed. Common methods of fabricating microfluidic devices and systems are described. Components, including valves, mixers, and pumps, capable of controlling fluid flow by utilizing the physics of the microscale are presented. Techniques for sensing flow characteristics are described and examples of devices and systems that perform bioanalysis are presented. The focus of this review is microscale phenomena and the use of the physics of the scale to create devices and systems that provide functionality useful to the life sciences.

  16. Microfluidic fuel cells for energy generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, M; Jänis, J; Sánchez, S

    2016-08-07

    Sustainable energy generation is of recent interest due to a growing energy demand across the globe and increasing environmental issues caused by conventional non-renewable means of power generation. In the context of microsystems, portable electronics and lab-on-a-chip based (bio)chemical sensors would essentially require fully integrated, reliable means of power generation. Microfluidic-based fuel cells can offer unique advantages compared to conventional fuel cells such as high surface area-to-volume ratio, ease of integration, cost effectiveness and portability. Here, we summarize recent developments which utilize the potential of microfluidic devices for energy generation.

  17. Microfluidic Assessment of Frying Oil Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei; Xie, Shaorong; Ge, Ji; Xu, Zhensong; Wu, Zhizheng; Ru, Changhai; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring the quality of frying oil is important for the health of consumers. This paper reports a microfluidic technique for rapidly quantifying the degradation of frying oil. The microfluidic device generates monodispersed water-in-oil droplets and exploits viscosity and interfacial tension changes of frying oil samples over their frying/degradation process. The measured parameters were correlated to the total polar material percentage that is widely used in the food industry. The results reveal that the steady-state length of droplets can be used for unambiguously assessing frying oil quality degradation.

  18. Microfluidic chip-capillary electrophoresis devices

    CERN Document Server

    Fung, Ying Sing; Du, Fuying; Guo, Wenpeng; Ma, Tongmei; Nie, Zhou; Sun, Hui; Wu, Ruige; Zhao, Wenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microfluidic chip (MC) devices are relatively mature technologies, but this book demonstrates how they can be integrated into a single, revolutionary device that can provide on-site analysis of samples when laboratory services are unavailable. By introducing the combination of CE and MC technology, Microfluidic Chip-Capillary Electrophoresis Devices broadens the scope of chemical analysis, particularly in the biomedical, food, and environmental sciences.The book gives an overview of the development of MC and CE technology as well as technology that now allows

  19. Generic Crystalline Disposal Reference Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painter, Scott Leroy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Perry, Frank Vinton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-20

    A generic reference case for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in crystalline rock is outlined. The generic cases are intended to support development of disposal system modeling capability by establishing relevant baseline conditions and parameters. Establishment of a generic reference case requires that the emplacement concept, waste inventory, waste form, waste package, backfill/buffer properties, EBS failure scenarios, host rock properties, and biosphere be specified. The focus in this report is on those elements that are unique to crystalline disposal, especially the geosphere representation. Three emplacement concepts are suggested for further analyses: a waste packages containing 4 PWR assemblies emplaced in boreholes in the floors of tunnels (KBS-3 concept), a 12-assembly waste package emplaced in tunnels, and a 32-assembly dual purpose canister emplaced in tunnels. In addition, three failure scenarios were suggested for future use: a nominal scenario involving corrosion of the waste package in the tunnel emplacement concepts, a manufacturing defect scenario applicable to the KBS-3 concept, and a disruptive glaciation scenario applicable to both emplacement concepts. The computational approaches required to analyze EBS failure and transport processes in a crystalline rock repository are similar to those of argillite/shale, with the most significant difference being that the EBS in a crystalline rock repository will likely experience highly heterogeneous flow rates, which should be represented in the model. The computational approaches required to analyze radionuclide transport in the natural system are very different because of the highly channelized nature of fracture flow. Computational workflows tailored to crystalline rock based on discrete transport pathways extracted from discrete fracture network models are recommended.

  20. Fracking, wastewater disposal, and earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarr, Arthur

    2016-03-01

    In the modern oil and gas industry, fracking of low-permeability reservoirs has resulted in a considerable increase in the production of oil and natural gas, but these fluid-injection activities also can induce earthquakes. Earthquakes induced by fracking are an inevitable consequence of the injection of fluid at high pressure, where the intent is to enhance permeability by creating a system of cracks and fissures that allow hydrocarbons to flow to the borehole. The micro-earthquakes induced during these highly-controlled procedures are generally much too small to be felt at the surface; indeed, the creation or reactivation of a large fault would be contrary to the goal of enhancing permeability evenly throughout the formation. Accordingly, the few case histories for which fracking has resulted in felt earthquakes have been due to unintended fault reactivation. Of greater consequence for inducing earthquakes, modern techniques for producing hydrocarbons, including fracking, have resulted in considerable quantities of coproduced wastewater, primarily formation brines. This wastewater is commonly disposed by injection into deep aquifers having high permeability and porosity. As reported in many case histories, pore pressure increases due to wastewater injection were channeled from the target aquifers into fault zones that were, in effect, lubricated, resulting in earthquake slip. These fault zones are often located in the brittle crystalline rocks in the basement. Magnitudes of earthquakes induced by wastewater disposal often exceed 4, the threshold for structural damage. Even though only a small fraction of disposal wells induce earthquakes large enough to be of concern to the public, there are so many of these wells that this source of seismicity contributes significantly to the seismic hazard in the United States, especially east of the Rocky Mountains where standards of building construction are generally not designed to resist shaking from large earthquakes.

  1. Recent developments in microfluidics-based chemotaxis studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiandong; Wu, Xun; Lin, Francis

    2013-07-07

    Microfluidic devices can better control cellular microenvironments compared to conventional cell migration assays. Over the past few years, microfluidics-based chemotaxis studies showed a rapid growth. New strategies were developed to explore cell migration in manipulated chemical gradients. In addition to expanding the use of microfluidic devices for a broader range of cell types, microfluidic devices were used to study cell migration and chemotaxis in complex environments. Furthermore, high-throughput microfluidic chemotaxis devices and integrated microfluidic chemotaxis systems were developed for medical and commercial applications. In this article, we review recent developments in microfluidics-based chemotaxis studies and discuss the new trends in this field observed over the past few years.

  2. Microfluidics and Raman microscopy: current applications and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrimes, Adam F; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Stoddart, Paul R; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2013-07-07

    Raman microscopy systems are becoming increasingly widespread and accessible for characterising chemical species. Microfluidic systems are also progressively finding their way into real world applications. Therefore, it is anticipated that the integration of Raman systems with microfluidics will become increasingly attractive and practical. This review aims to provide an overview of Raman microscopy-microfluidics integrated systems for researchers who are actively interested in utilising these tools. The fundamental principles and application strengths of Raman microscopy are discussed in the context of microfluidics. Various configurations of microfluidics that incorporate Raman microscopy methods are presented, with applications highlighted. Data analysis methods are discussed, with a focus on assisting the interpretation of Raman-microfluidics data from complex samples. Finally, possible future directions of Raman-microfluidic systems are presented.

  3. Waste Disposal: The PRACLAY Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bruyn, D

    2000-07-01

    Principal achievements in 2000 with regard to the PRACLAY programme are presented. The PRACLAY project has been conceived: (1) to demonstrate the construction and the operation of a gallery for the disposal of HLW in a clay formation; (2) to improve knowledge on deep excavations in clay through modelling and monitoring; (3) to design, install and operate a complementary mock-up test (OPHELIE) on the surface. In 1999, efforts were focussed on the operation of the OPHELIE mock-up and the CLIPEX project to monitor the evolution of hydro-mechanical parameters of the Boom Clay Formation near the face of a gallery during excavation.

  4. Microfluidics' great promise for Biology - Microfluidics as a new engine for the molecular sciences

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2010-06-04

    History of the Life Sciences Origins of life Discoveries and instrumentation The power of genetic variation Diagnostics based on DNA/ protein variation Genomic scanning providers DNA sequencing companies Microfluidics story Commercial products available P

  5. Development & Characterization of Multifunctional Microfluidic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Ahmet Burak

    The field of microfluidics has been mostly investigated for miniaturized lab on a chip devices for analytical and clinical applications. However, there is an emerging class of "smart" microfluidic materials, combining microfluidics with soft polymers to yield new functionalities. The best inspiration for such materials found in nature is skin, whose functions are maintained and controlled by a vascular "microfluidic" network. We report here the development and characterization of a few new classes of microfluidic materials. First, we introduced microfluidic materials that can change their stiffness on demand. These materials were based on an engineered microchannel network embedded into a matrix of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), whose channels were filled with a liquid photoresist (SU- 8). The elastomer filled with the photoresist was initially soft. The materials were shaped into a desired geometry and then exposed to UV-light. Once photocured, the material preserved the defined shape and it could be bent, twisted or stretched with a very high recoverable strain. As soon as the external force was removed the material returned back to its predefined shape. Thus, the polymerized SU-8 acted as the 'endoskeleton' of the microfluidic network, which drastically increased the composite's elastic and bending moduli. Second, we demonstrated a class of simple and versatile soft microfluidic materials that can be turned optically transparent or colored on demand. These materials were made in the form of flexible sheets containing a microchannel network embedded in PDMS, similar to the photocurable materials. However, this time the channels were filled with a glycerolwater mixture, whose refractive index was matched with that of the PDMS matrix. By pumping such dye solutions into the channel network and consecutively replacing the medium, we showed that we can control the material's color and light transmittance in the visible and near-infrared regions, which can be used for

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Dimensional Accuracy of Elastomeric Impression Materials when Treated with Autoclave, Microwave, and Chemical Disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, Suresh S; Khandeparker, Rakshit Vijay; Somasundaram, P; Raghav, Shweta; Babaji, Rashmi P; Varghese, T Joju

    2015-09-01

    Impression materials during impression procedure often get infected with various infectious diseases. Hence, disinfection of impression materials with various disinfectants is advised to protect the dental team. Disinfection can alter the dimensional accuracy of impression materials. The present study was aimed to evaluate the dimensional accuracy of elastomeric impression materials when treated with different disinfectants; autoclave, chemical, and microwave method. The impression materials used for the study were, dentsply aquasil (addition silicone polyvinylsiloxane syringe and putty), zetaplus (condensation silicone putty and light body), and impregum penta soft (polyether). All impressions were made according to manufacturer's instructions. Dimensional changes were measured before and after different disinfection procedures. Dentsply aquasil showed smallest dimensional change (-0.0046%) and impregum penta soft highest linear dimensional changes (-0.026%). All the tested elastomeric impression materials showed some degree of dimensional changes. The present study showed that all the disinfection procedures produce minor dimensional changes of impression material. However, it was within American Dental Association specification. Hence, steam autoclaving and microwave method can be used as an alternative method to chemical sterilization as an effective method.

  7. Low-level laser therapy effects on pain perception related to the use of orthodontic elastomeric separators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel D'Aurea Furquim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Some patients refer to pre-banding orthodontic separation as a painful orthodontic procedure. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT has been reported to have local analgesic effect. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this single-blind study was to investigate the perception of pain caused by orthodontic elastomeric separators with and without a single LLLT application (6J. METHODS: The sample comprised 79 individuals aged between 13 and 34 years old at orthodontic treatment onset. Elastomeric separators were placed in first maxillary molars at mesial and distal surfaces and kept in place for three days. The volunteers scored pain intensity on a visual analogue scale (VAS after 6 and 12 hours, and after the first, second and third days. One third of patients received laser applications, whereas another third received placebo applications and the remaining ones were controls. Applications were performed in a split-mouth design. Thus, three groups (laser, placebo and control were assessed. RESULTS: No differences were found among groups considering pain perception in all periods observed. CONCLUSION: The use of a single-dose of LLLT did not cause significant reduction in orthodontic pain perception. Overall pain perception due to orthodontic separator placement varied widely and was usually mild.

  8. Elastomeric Structural Attachment Concepts for Aircraft Flap Noise Reduction - Challenges and Approaches to Hyperelastic Structural Modeling and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekantamurthy, Thammaiah; Turner, Travis L.; Moore, James B.; Su, Ji

    2014-01-01

    Airframe noise is a significant part of the overall noise of transport aircraft during the approach and landing phases of flight. Airframe noise reduction is currently emphasized under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) and Fixed Wing (FW) Project goals of NASA. A promising concept for trailing-edge-flap noise reduction is a flexible structural element or link that connects the side edges of the deployable flap to the adjacent main-wing structure. The proposed solution is distinguished by minimization of the span-wise extent of the structural link, thereby minimizing the aerodynamic load on the link structure at the expense of increased deformation requirement. Development of such a flexible structural link necessitated application of hyperelastic materials, atypical structural configurations and novel interface hardware. The resulting highly-deformable structural concept was termed the FLEXible Side Edge Link (FLEXSEL) concept. Prediction of atypical elastomeric deformation responses from detailed structural analysis was essential for evaluating feasible concepts that met the design constraints. The focus of this paper is to describe the many challenges encountered with hyperelastic finite element modeling and the nonlinear structural analysis of evolving FLEXSEL concepts. Detailed herein is the nonlinear analysis of FLEXSEL concepts that emerged during the project which include solid-section, foamcore, hollow, extended-span and pre-stressed concepts. Coupon-level analysis performed on elastomeric interface joints, which form a part of the FLEXSEL topology development, are also presented.

  9. Effect of chemical cross-linking on the mechanical properties of elastomeric peptides studied by single molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbrana, Francesca; Lorusso, Marina; Canale, Claudio; Bochicchio, Brigida; Vassalli, Massimo

    2011-07-28

    Mechanical properties of animal tissues are mainly provided by the assembly of single elastomeric proteins into a complex network of filaments. Even if the overall elastic properties of such a reticulated structure depend on the mechanical characteristics of the constituents, it is not the only aspect to be considered. In addition, the aggregation mechanism has to be clarified to attain a full knowledge of the molecular basis of the elastic properties of natural nanostructured materials. This aim is even more crucial in the process of rational design of biomaterials with selected mechanical properties, in which not only the mechanics of single molecules but also of their assemblies has to be cared of. In this study, this aspect was approached by means of single molecule stretching experiments. In particular, the effect of chemical cross-linking on the mechanical properties of a naturally inspired elastomeric peptide was investigated. Accordingly, we observed that, in order to preserve the elastic properties of the single filament, the two strands of the dimer have to interact with each other. The results thus confirm that the influence of the aggregation process on the mechanical properties of a molecular assembly cannot be neglected.

  10. A Disposable Blood Cyanide Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yong; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Mahon, Sari B.; Ma, Jian; Brenner, Matthew; Wang, Jian-Hua; Boss, Gerry R.

    2013-01-01

    Deaths due to smoke inhalation in fires are often due to poisoning by HCN. Rapid administration of antidotes can result in complete resuscitation of the patient but judicious dosing requires the knowledge of the level of cyanide exposure. Rapid sensitive means for blood cyanide quantitation are needed. Hydroxocyanocobinamide (OH(CN)Cbi) reacts with cyanide rapidly; this is accompanied by a large spectral change. The disposable device consists of a pair of nested petri dish bottoms and a single top that fits the outer bottom dish. The top cover has a diametrically strung porous polypropylene membrane tube filled with aqueous OH(CN)Cbi. One end of the tube terminates in an amber (583 nm) light emitting diode; the other end in a photodiode via an acrylic optical fiber. An aliquot of the blood sample is put in the inner dish, the assembly covered and acid is added through a port in the cover. Evolved HCN diffuses into the OH(CN)Cbi solution and the absorbance in the long path porous membrane tube cell is measured within 160s. The LOD was 0.047, 1.0, 0.15, 5.0 and 2.2 μM, respectively, for water (1 mL), bovine blood (100 μL, 1 mL), and rabbit blood (20μL, 50 μL). RSDs were cyanide in rabbit and human blood. The disposable device permits field measurement of blood cyanide in < 4 min. PMID:23473259

  11. Disposable optics for microscopy diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilmi, Pauliina; Varjo, Sami; Sliz, Rafal; Hannuksela, Jari; Fabritius, Tapio

    2015-11-20

    The point-of-care testing (POCT) is having increasing role on modern health care systems due to a possibility to perform tests for patients conveniently and immediately. POCT includes lot of disposable devices because of the environment they are often used. For a disposable system to be reasonably utilized, it needs to be high in quality but low in price. Optics based POCT systems are interesting approach to be developed, and here we describe a low-cost fabrication process for microlens arrays for microscopy. Lens arrays having average lens diameter of 222 μm with 300 μm lens pitch were fabricated. The lenses were characterized to have standard deviation of 0.06 μm in height and 4.61 μm in diameter. The resolution limit of 3.9μm is demonstrated with real images, and the images were compared with ones made with glass and polycarbonate lens arrays. The image quality is at the same level than with the glass lenses and the manufacturing costs are very low, thus making them suitable for POCT applications.

  12. Disposable optics for microscopy diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilmi, Pauliina; Varjo, Sami; Sliz, Rafal; Hannuksela, Jari; Fabritius, Tapio

    2015-11-01

    The point-of-care testing (POCT) is having increasing role on modern health care systems due to a possibility to perform tests for patients conveniently and immediately. POCT includes lot of disposable devices because of the environment they are often used. For a disposable system to be reasonably utilized, it needs to be high in quality but low in price. Optics based POCT systems are interesting approach to be developed, and here we describe a low-cost fabrication process for microlens arrays for microscopy. Lens arrays having average lens diameter of 222 μm with 300 μm lens pitch were fabricated. The lenses were characterized to have standard deviation of 0.06 μm in height and 4.61 μm in diameter. The resolution limit of 3.9μm is demonstrated with real images, and the images were compared with ones made with glass and polycarbonate lens arrays. The image quality is at the same level than with the glass lenses and the manufacturing costs are very low, thus making them suitable for POCT applications.

  13. Inventions Utilizing Microfluidics and Colloidal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, David W.; Gong, Tieying; Oakey, John; Terray, Alexander V.; Wu, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Several related inventions pertain to families of devices that utilize microfluidics and/or colloidal particles to obtain useful physical effects. The families of devices can be summarized as follows: (1) Microfluidic pumps and/or valves wherein colloidal-size particles driven by electrical, magnetic, or optical fields serve as the principal moving parts that propel and/or direct the affected flows. (2) Devices that are similar to the aforementioned pumps and/or valves except that they are used to manipulate light instead of fluids. The colloidal particles in these devices are substantially constrained to move in a plane and are driven to spatially order them into arrays that function, variously, as waveguides, filters, or switches for optical signals. (3) Devices wherein the ultra-laminar nature of microfluidic flows is exploited to effect separation, sorting, or filtering of colloidal particles or biological cells in suspension. (4) Devices wherein a combination of confinement and applied electrical and/or optical fields forces the colloidal particles to become arranged into three-dimensional crystal lattices. Control of the colloidal crystalline structures could be exploited to control diffraction of light. (5) Microfluidic devices, incorporating fluid waveguides, wherein switching of flows among different paths would be accompanied by switching of optical signals.

  14. Microfluidic manipulation with artificial/bioinspired cilia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Toonder, Jaap M. J.; Onck, Patrick R.

    2013-01-01

    A recent development, inspired by nature, is the use of 'artificial cilia' to create pumping and/or mixing in microfluidic devices. Cilia are small hairs that can be found in biology and are used for (fluid) actuation and sensing. Microscopic actuators resembling cilia, actuated to move under the in

  15. Wax-bonding 3D microfluidic chips

    KAUST Repository

    Gong, Xiuqing

    2013-10-10

    We report a simple, low-cost and detachable microfluidic chip incorporating easily accessible paper, glass slides or other polymer films as the chip materials along with adhesive wax as the recycling bonding material. We use a laser to cut through the paper or film to form patterns and then sandwich the paper and film between glass sheets or polymer membranes . The hot-melt adhesive wax can realize bridge bonding between various materials, for example, paper, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) film, glass sheets, or metal plate. The bonding process is reversible and the wax is reusable through a melting and cooling process. With this process, a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip is achievable by vacuating and venting the chip in a hot-water bath. To study the biocompatibility and applicability of the wax-based microfluidic chip, we tested the PCR compatibility with the chip materials first. Then we applied the wax-paper based microfluidic chip to HeLa cell electroporation (EP ). Subsequently, a prototype of a 5-layer 3D chip was fabricated by multilayer wax bonding. To check the sealing ability and the durability of the chip, green fluorescence protein (GFP) recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were cultured, with which the chemotaxis of E. coli was studied in order to determine the influence of antibiotic ciprofloxacin concentration on the E. coli migration.

  16. Reaction and separation opportunities with microfluidic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic devices make precisely controlled processing of substances possible on a microliter level. The advantage is that, due to the small sizes, the driving forces for mass and heat transfer are high. The surface to volume ratios are also high, which can benefit many surface oriented processes

  17. Microfluidic desalination techniques and their potential applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Susan Helena; van den Berg, Albert; Odijk, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss recent developments in the emerging research field of miniaturized desalination. Traditionally desalination is performed to convert salt water into potable water and research is focused on improving performance of large-scale desalination plants. Microfluidic desalination

  18. Planar microcoil-based microfluidic NMR probes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massin, C.; Vincent, F.; Homsy, A.; Ehrmann, K.; Boero, G.; Besse, P-A; Daridon, A.; Verpoorte, E.; de Rooij, N.F.; Popovic, R.S.

    2003-01-01

    Microfabricated small-volume NMR probes consisting of electroplated planar microcoils integrated on a glass substrate with etched microfluidic channels are fabricated and tested. 1H NMR spectra are acquired at 300 MHz with three different probes having observed sample volumes of respectively 30, 120

  19. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  20. Designing Polymeric Microfluidic Platforms for Biomedical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedarethinam, Indumathi

    Micro- and Nanotechnology have the potential to offer a smart solution for diagnostics and academia research with rapid, low cost, robust analysis systems to facilitate biological analyses. New, high throughput microfluidic platforms have the potential to surpass in performance the conventional a...

  1. Porous Microfluidic Devices - Fabrication adn Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, J.; Geerken, M.J.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Wessling, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The major part of microfluidic devices nowadays consists of a dense material that defines the fluidic structure. A generic fabrication method enabling the production of completely porous micro devices with user-defined channel networks is developed. The channel walls can be used as a (selective) bar

  2. Nucleic acid amplification using microfluidic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chen-Min; Chang, Wen-Hsin; Wang, Chih-Hung; Wang, Jung-Hao; Mai, John D; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2013-04-07

    In the post-human-genome-project era, the development of molecular diagnostic techniques has advanced the frontiers of biomedical research. Nucleic-acid-based technology (NAT) plays an especially important role in molecular diagnosis. However, most research and clinical protocols still rely on the manual analysis of individual samples by skilled technicians which is a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. Recently, with advances in microfluidic designs, integrated micro total-analysis-systems have emerged to overcome the limitations of traditional detection assays. These microfluidic systems have the capability to rapidly perform experiments in parallel and with a high-throughput which allows a NAT analysis to be completed in a few hours or even a few minutes. These features have a significant beneficial influence on many aspects of traditional biological or biochemical research and this new technology is promising for improving molecular diagnosis. Thus, in the foreseeable future, microfluidic systems developed for molecular diagnosis using NAT will become an important tool in clinical diagnosis. One of the critical issues for NAT is nucleic acid amplification. In this review article, recent advances in nucleic acid amplification techniques using microfluidic systems will be reviewed. Different approaches for fast amplification of nucleic acids for molecular diagnosis will be highlighted.

  3. A microfluidic based optical particle detection method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, James; Chen, Lu; Nayyar, Rakesh; Aitchison, Stewart

    2012-03-01

    An optical particle detection and analysis method is presented. This method combines the capillary microfluidics, integrated optics and novel image acquisition and analysis algorithms to form the basis of a portable or handheld cytometer instrument. Experimental results provided shows the testing results are closely matched with conventional flow cytometer data.

  4. Microfluidic distillation chip for methanol concentration detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Nan; Liu, Chan-Chiung; Yang, Ruey-Jen; Ju, Wei-Jhong; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2016-03-17

    An integrated microfluidic distillation system is proposed for separating a mixed ethanol-methanol-water solution into its constituent components. The microfluidic chip is fabricated using a CO2 laser system and comprises a serpentine channel, a boiling zone, a heating zone, and a cooled collection chamber filled with de-ionized (DI) water. In the proposed device, the ethanol-methanol-water solution is injected into the microfluidic chip and driven through the serpentine channel and into the collection chamber by means of a nitrogen carrier gas. Following the distillation process, the ethanol-methanol vapor flows into the collection chamber and condenses into the DI water. The resulting solution is removed from the collection tank and reacted with a mixed indicator. Finally, the methanol concentration is inversely derived from the absorbance measurements obtained using a spectrophotometer. The experimental results show the proposed microfluidic system achieves an average methanol distillation efficiency of 97%. The practicality of the proposed device is demonstrated by detecting the methanol concentrations of two commercial fruit wines. It is shown that the measured concentration values deviate by no more than 3% from those obtained using a conventional bench top system.

  5. Microfluidics for Antibiotic Susceptibility and Toxicity Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Dai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recent emergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a major concern for worldwide policy makers as very few new antibiotics have been developed in the last twenty-five years. To prevent the death of millions of people worldwide, there is an urgent need for a cheap, fast and accurate set of tools and techniques that can help to discover and develop new antimicrobial drugs. In the past decade, microfluidic platforms have emerged as potential systems for conducting pharmacological studies. Recent studies have demonstrated that microfluidic platforms can perform rapid antibiotic susceptibility tests to evaluate antimicrobial drugs’ efficacy. In addition, the development of cell-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip platforms have enabled the early drug testing, providing more accurate insights into conventional cell cultures on the drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity, at the early and cheaper stage of drug development, i.e., prior to animal and human testing. In this review, we focus on the recent developments of microfluidic platforms for rapid antibiotics susceptibility testing, investigating bacterial persistence and non-growing but metabolically active (NGMA bacteria, evaluating antibiotic effectiveness on biofilms and combinatorial effect of antibiotics, as well as microfluidic platforms that can be used for in vitro antibiotic toxicity testing.

  6. Discrete elements for 3D microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Krisna C; Thompson, Bryant; Malmstadt, Noah

    2014-10-21

    Microfluidic systems are rapidly becoming commonplace tools for high-precision materials synthesis, biochemical sample preparation, and biophysical analysis. Typically, microfluidic systems are constructed in monolithic form by means of microfabrication and, increasingly, by additive techniques. These methods restrict the design and assembly of truly complex systems by placing unnecessary emphasis on complete functional integration of operational elements in a planar environment. Here, we present a solution based on discrete elements that liberates designers to build large-scale microfluidic systems in three dimensions that are modular, diverse, and predictable by simple network analysis techniques. We develop a sample library of standardized components and connectors manufactured using stereolithography. We predict and validate the flow characteristics of these individual components to design and construct a tunable concentration gradient generator with a scalable number of parallel outputs. We show that these systems are rapidly reconfigurable by constructing three variations of a device for generating monodisperse microdroplets in two distinct size regimes and in a high-throughput mode by simple replacement of emulsifier subcircuits. Finally, we demonstrate the capability for active process monitoring by constructing an optical sensing element for detecting water droplets in a fluorocarbon stream and quantifying their size and frequency. By moving away from large-scale integration toward standardized discrete elements, we demonstrate the potential to reduce the practice of designing and assembling complex 3D microfluidic circuits to a methodology comparable to that found in the electronics industry.

  7. Planar microcoil-based microfluidic NMR probes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massin, C.; Vincent, F.; Homsy, A.; Ehrmann, K.; Boero, G.; Besse, P-A; Daridon, A.; Verpoorte, E.; de Rooij, N.F.; Popovic, R.S.

    2003-01-01

    Microfabricated small-volume NMR probes consisting of electroplated planar microcoils integrated on a glass substrate with etched microfluidic channels are fabricated and tested. 1H NMR spectra are acquired at 300 MHz with three different probes having observed sample volumes of respectively 30, 120

  8. Microfluidic desalination techniques and their potential applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, S.H.; Berg, van den A.; Odijk, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss recent developments in the emerging research field of miniaturized desalination. Traditionally desalination is performed to convert salt water into potable water and research is focused on improving performance of large-scale desalination plants. Microfluidic desalination o

  9. Microfluidic enzymatic biosensing systems: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mross, Stefan; Pierrat, Sebastien; Zimmermann, Tom; Kraft, Michael

    2015-08-15

    Microfluidic biosensing systems with enzyme-based detection have been extensively studied in the last years owing to features such as high specificity, a broad range of analytes and a high degree of automation. This review gives an overview of the most important factors associated with these systems. In the first part, frequently used immobilization protocols such as physisorption and covalent bonding and detection techniques such as amperometry and fluorescence measurements are discussed with respect to effort, lifetime and measurement range. The Michaelis-Menten model describing the kinetics of enzymatic reactions, the role of redox mediators and the limitations of the linear measurement range of enzymatic sensors are introduced. Several possibilities of extending the linear measurement range in microfluidic systems such as diffusion-limiting membranes and the flow injection setup are presented. Regarding the integration of enzymes into microfluidic systems during the fabrication process, the constraints imposed by the biomolecules due to the limited usage of high temperatures and solvents are addressed. In the second part, the most common forms of enzyme integration into microfluidic systems, i.e. in channels and on electrodes, on microparticles, on paper and thread and as injected enzyme solutions, are reviewed, focusing on fabrication, applications and performance.

  10. High content screening in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Raymond; Paliwal, Saurabh; Levchenko, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Importance of the field Miniaturization is key to advancing the state-of-the-art in high content screening (HCS), in order to enable dramatic cost savings through reduced usage of expensive biochemical reagents and to enable large-scale screening on primary cells. Microfluidic technology offers the potential to enable HCS to be performed with an unprecedented degree of miniaturization. Areas covered in this review This perspective highlights a real-world example from the authors’ work of HCS assays implemented in a highly miniaturized microfluidic format. Advantages of this technology are discussed, including cost savings, high throughput screening on primary cells, improved accuracy, the ability to study complex time-varying stimuli, and ease of automation, integration, and scaling. What the reader will gain The reader will understand the capabilities of a new microfluidics-based platform for HCS, and the advantages it provides over conventional plate-based HCS. Take home message Microfluidics technology will drive significant advancements and broader usage and applicability of HCS in drug discovery. PMID:21852997

  11. Design of microfluidic bioreactors using topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Fridolin; Bruus, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    We address the design of optimal reactors for supporting biological cultures using the method of topology optimization. For some years this method have been used to design various optimal microfluidic devices.1-4 We apply this method to distribute optimally biologic cultures within a flow of nutr...

  12. Low pressure microfluidic-based DNA fragmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shui, Lingling; Sparreboom, Wouter; Bomer, Johan G.; Jin, Mingliang; Carlen, Edwin; van den Berg, Albert

    2011-01-01

    We report a low-pressure microfluidic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation device based on a combination of me-chanical hydrodynamic shearing and low temperature sample heating. Conventional DNA fragmentation based on hydrody-namic shearing is capable of achieving fragment lengths (FL) < 10k bp

  13. Integrated multifunctional microfluidics for automated proteome analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiri, John K; Shadpour, Hamed; Witek, Małgorzata A; Soper, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    Proteomics is a challenging field for realizing totally integrated microfluidic systems for complete proteome processing due to several considerations, including the sheer number of different protein types that exist within most proteomes, the large dynamic range associated with these various protein types, and the diverse chemical nature of the proteins comprising a typical proteome. For example, the human proteome is estimated to have >10(6) different components with a dynamic range of >10(10). The typical processing pipeline for proteomics involves the following steps: (1) selection and/or extraction of the particular proteins to be analyzed; (2) multidimensional separation; (3) proteolytic digestion of the protein sample; and (4) mass spectral identification of either intact proteins (top-down proteomics) or peptide fragments generated from proteolytic digestions (bottom-up proteomics). Although a number of intriguing microfluidic devices have been designed, fabricated and evaluated for carrying out the individual processing steps listed above, work toward building fully integrated microfluidic systems for protein analysis has yet to be realized. In this chapter, information will be provided on the nature of proteomic analysis in terms of the challenges associated with the sample type and the microfluidic devices that have been tested to carry out individual processing steps. These include devices such as those for multidimensional electrophoretic separations, solid-phase enzymatic digestions, and solid-phase extractions, all of which have used microfluidics as the functional platform for their implementation. This will be followed by an in-depth review of microfluidic systems, which are defined as units possessing two or more devices assembled into autonomous systems for proteome processing. In addition, information will be provided on the challenges involved in integrating processing steps into a functional system and the approaches adopted for device

  14. The effect of surface moisture on detail reproduction of elastomeric impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Aw, Tar Chee

    2003-10-01

    Monophase and dual-viscosity impression techniques are available with little knowledge of which one might render better quality under wet and dry surface conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether type of material, viscosity selection, and presence of moisture affect detail reproduction of elastomeric impressions. Single-viscosity systems were polyether (Impregum Penta) and vinyl polysiloxanes (President MonoBody, Extrude MPV, and Aquasil). Dual-viscosity systems included polyether (Impregum Penta/Permadyne Garant) and vinyl polysiloxanes (Dimension Penta H/Dimension Garant L, Extrude Extra/Extrude Wash, and Aquasil/Aquasil LV). Impressions were made of a surface analyzer calibration standard possessing a uniform "saw-tooth" pattern with a mean roughness (Ra) of 2.87 mum, which was one fourth of the peak-to-valley height. Each of the 8 impression groups was subjected to dry (control) and wet conditions. The wet condition consisted of 3 mL of distilled water applied to the surface of the standard but allowed to escape during the procedure. Eighty impressions were made, 5 for each test group. After setting, the surface of each impression was scanned at 5 locations using a Surfanalyzer 4000. A 3-factor ANOVA and Student-Newman-Kuels test were used to analyze the data (alpha=.05). There were significant differences between polyether and vinyl polysiloxane materials, dual and monophase techniques, and the 2 surface conditions (P<.05). Cross-product interactions were not significant, allowing comparison of mean values for each factor. The mean Ra for single viscosity was 2.21 mum versus 1.67 mum for dual viscosity; polyether was 2.12 mum versus 1.89 mum for addition silicone; and under dry conditions, the mean was 2.04 mum versus 1.86 mum for wet conditions. Single-viscosity systems reproduced the standard saw-tooth pattern better than the dual-viscosity systems, as did polyether impression materials compared to addition silicones. Moisture led to a

  15. Plaque retention by self-ligating vs elastomeric orthodontic brackets: quantitative comparison of oral bacteria and detection with adenosine triphosphate-driven bioluminescence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellegrini, P.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Finlayson, T.; McLeod, J.; Covell, D.A.; Maier, T.; Machida, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Enamel decalcification is a common problem in orthodontics. The objectives of this randomized clinical study were to enumerate and compare plaque bacteria surrounding 2 bracket types, self-ligating (SL) vs elastomeric ligating (E), and to determine whether adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-

  16. Mixing in polymeric microfluidic devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Davis, Robert H. (University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO); Brotherton, Christopher M. (University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO)

    2006-04-01

    This SAND report describes progress made during a Sandia National Laboratories sponsored graduate fellowship. The fellowship was funded through an LDRD proposal. The goal of this project is development and characterization of mixing strategies for polymeric microfluidic devices. The mixing strategies under investigation include electroosmotic flow focusing, hydrodynamic focusing, physical constrictions and porous polymer monoliths. For electroosmotic flow focusing, simulations were performed to determine the effect of electroosmotic flow in a microchannel with heterogeneous surface potential. The heterogeneous surface potential caused recirculations to form within the microchannel. These recirculations could then be used to restrict two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the mixing region surface potential to the average channel surface potential was made large in magnitude and negative in sign, and when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the characteristic diffusion time was minimized. Based on these results, experiments were performed to evaluate the manipulation of surface potential using living-radical photopolymerization. The material chosen to manipulate typically exhibits a negative surface potential. Using living-radical surface grafting, a positive surface potential was produced using 2-(Dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and a neutral surface was produced using a poly(ethylene glycol) surface graft. Simulations investigating hydrodynamic focusing were also performed. For this technique, mixing is enhanced by using a tertiary fluid stream to constrict the two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the tertiary flow stream flow-rate to the mixing streams flow-rate was maximized. Also, like the electroosmotic focusing mixer, mixing was also maximized when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the

  17. Interconnection blocks: a method for providing reusable, rapid, multiple, aligned and planar microfluidic interconnections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabourin, David; Snakenborg, Detlef; Dufva, Hans Martin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a method is presented for creating 'interconnection blocks' that are re-usable and provide multiple, aligned and planar microfluidic interconnections. Interconnection blocks made from polydimethylsiloxane allow rapid testing of microfluidic chips and unobstructed microfluidic...

  18. DOSE ASSESSMENTS FROM THE DISPOSAL OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTES IN RCRA-C DISPOSAL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modeling the long-term performance of the RCRA-C disposal cell and potential doses to off-site receptors is used to derive maximum radionuclide specific concentrations in the wastes that would enable these wastes to be disposed of safely using the RCRA-C disposal cell technology....

  19. NEP processing, operations, and disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancati, Mike

    Several recent studies by ASAO/NPO staff members at LeRC and by other organizations have highlighted the potential benefits of using Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) as the primary transportation means for some of the proposed missions of the Space Exploration Initiative. These include the potential to reduce initial mass in orbit and Mars transit time. Modular NEP configurations also introduce fully redundant main propulsion to Mars flight systems adding several abort or fall back options not otherwise available. Recent studies have also identified mission operations, such as on orbital assembly, refurbishment, and reactor disposal, as important discriminators for propulsion system evaluation. This study is intended to identify and assess 'end-to-end' operational issues associated with using NEP for transporting crews and cargo between Earth and Mars. We also include some consideration of lunar cargo transfer as well.

  20. Nuclear waste disposal educational forum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-10-18

    In keeping with a mandate from the US Congress to provide opportunities for consumer education and information and to seek consumer input on national issues, the Department of Energy's Office of Consumer Affairs held a three-hour educational forum on the proposed nuclear waste disposal legislation. Nearly one hundred representatives of consumer, public interest, civic and environmental organizations were invited to attend. Consumer affairs professionals of utility companies across the country were also invited to attend the forum. The following six papers were presented: historical perspectives; status of legislation (Senate); status of legislation (House of Representatives); impact on the legislation on electric utilities; impact of the legislation on consumers; implementing the legislation. All six papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base.