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Sample records for disorder screening program

  1. Dieting Behavior and Alcohol Use Behaviors among National Eating Disorders Screening Program Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidelberg, Natalie F.; Correia, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Research has shown that college students have elevated rates of alcohol use and problematic eating behaviors. The current study focused on the relationships between dieting behaviors and alcohol use among a sample of undergraduates attending National Eating Disorder Screening Program. Method: All participants (n=70, 100% female, average…

  2. [Pervasive developmental disorders screening program in the health areas of Salamanca and Zamora in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Primo, P; Santos Borbujo, J; Martín Cilleros, M V; Martínez Velarte, M; Lleras Muñoz, S; Posada de la Paz, M; Canal Bedia, R

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the results of the Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD) screening program currently ongoing in the public health services in the health area of Salamanca and Zamora, Spain, in terms of feasibility, reliability and costs, with the purpose of extending the program at regional and national levels. A total of 54 paediatric teams (nurses and paediatricians) from the provinces of Salamanca and Zamora participated in the training sessions for the PDD Screening Programme in September 2005, and agreed to administer the questionnaire M-CHAT(1) to all parents attending their clinics in any of these two visits: 18 months and/or 24 months within the Well-baby Check-up Program. A total of 9,524 children have participated up to December 2012. Additionally, we evaluated the participation and opinions of the paediatric teams using questionnaires, and costs per positive case have estimated. Out of a total of 852 (8.9%) children determined as PDD high-risk with the M-CHAT questionnaire results, 61 (7.1%) were confirmed as positive with the M-CHAT follow-up interview. Of these, 22 were diagnosed with a PDD and 31 other disorders of childhood onset according to DSM-IV-TR(2). Almost three-quarters (74%) of respondents felt the program was totally feasible, and 22% viable, but with reservations (n=54). This study has been able to show for the first time in Spain, the feasibility of a population-based PDD screening program within the public health system. Training in social and communicative development, and dissemination of the early signs of PDD among paediatricians, as well as the use of the M-CHAT, is essential for progress in the early detection of these disorders. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. A population-wide screening and tailored intervention platform for eating disorders on college campuses: the healthy body image program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Megan; Kass, Andrea E; Trockel, Mickey; Glass, Alan I; Wilfley, Denise E; Taylor, C Barr

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a new approach to intervention for eating disorders and body image concerns on college campuses, using a model of integrated eating disorder screening and intervention. Formative data on implementation feasibility are presented. College students enrolled at 2 universities between 2011 and 2012. The Healthy Body Image program is an evidence-based screening and intervention platform, enacted via community and online resources. An online screen was used to identify students at varying levels of risk or eating disorder symptom status; responses were used to direct students to universal or targeted online interventions or further evaluation. Universal prevention programs to improve healthy weight regulation and body image culture were offered to all students. Formative data from 1,551 students illustrates the application of this model. The Healthy Body Image program is feasible to deliver and provides a comprehensive system of screening, evidence-based intervention, and community culture change.

  4. Follow-up evaluation of a high school eating disorders screening program: knowledge, awareness and self-referral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Cheryl M; Forman, Sara F; Austin, S Bryn

    2005-03-01

    To conduct a regional, follow-up evaluation to assess the implementation and effectiveness of the National Eating Disorders Screening Program (NEDSP), conducted in high schools nationwide in the spring of 2000. Four New England high schools participated in a postscreen evaluation 1 to 2 months after implementation of NEDSP. A 35-item, self-report postscreen survey was administered to students in classrooms with assistance from school health staff and teachers. School staff involved in the screening were also interviewed. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds that students talked to an adult or peers about their screening score. Data from 592 girls and 435 boys were included in the analysis in the four high schools participating in the program evaluation. NEDSP helped to identify students at risk and encouraged students to speak to others about their screening score and eating disorder symptoms. One-quarter of girls and one-fifth of boys reported talking with at least one adult about their EAT-26 screening score. Girls felt more strongly than boys that the program helped them learn about eating disorders, change their thinking related to eating disorders and body image, and talk to friends about eating disorders. Overall, the students felt that the program was helpful and would recommend it to their friends. Early detection of eating disorders in adolescents may shorten the interval between onset of symptoms and treatment, which has the potential to reduce the length of illness and morbidity associated with untreated eating disorders. Our findings suggest that high-school-based screening may be an effective way to facilitate early detection of eating disorder symptoms in adolescents.

  5. Hierarchical screening for multiple mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterham, Philip J; Calear, Alison L; Sunderland, Matthew; Carragher, Natacha; Christensen, Helen; Mackinnon, Andrew J

    2013-10-01

    There is a need for brief, accurate screening when assessing multiple mental disorders. Two-stage hierarchical screening, consisting of brief pre-screening followed by a battery of disorder-specific scales for those who meet diagnostic criteria, may increase the efficiency of screening without sacrificing precision. This study tested whether more efficient screening could be gained using two-stage hierarchical screening than by administering multiple separate tests. Two Australian adult samples (N=1990) with high rates of psychopathology were recruited using Facebook advertising to examine four methods of hierarchical screening for four mental disorders: major depressive disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder and social phobia. Using K6 scores to determine whether full screening was required did not increase screening efficiency. However, pre-screening based on two decision tree approaches or item gating led to considerable reductions in the mean number of items presented per disorder screened, with estimated item reductions of up to 54%. The sensitivity of these hierarchical methods approached 100% relative to the full screening battery. Further testing of the hierarchical screening approach based on clinical criteria and in other samples is warranted. The results demonstrate that a two-phase hierarchical approach to screening multiple mental disorders leads to considerable increases efficiency gains without reducing accuracy. Screening programs should take advantage of prescreeners based on gating items or decision trees to reduce the burden on respondents. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Irregular Menses Linked to Vomiting in a Nonclinical Sample: Findings from the National Eating Disorders Screening Program in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, S. Bryn; Ziyadeh, Najat J.; Vohra, Sameer; Forman, Sara; Gordon, Catherine M.; Prokop, Lisa A.; Keliher, Anne; Jacobs, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Using data from an eating disorders screening initiative conducted in high schools across the United States, we examined the relationship between vomiting frequency and irregular menses in a nonclinical sample of adolescent females. Methods A self-report questionnaire was administered to students from U.S. high schools participating in the National Eating Disorders Screening Program in 2000. The questionnaire included items on frequency of vomiting for weight control in the past 3 months, other eating disorder symptoms, frequency of menses, height, and weight. Multivariable regression analyses were conducted using data from 2791 girls to estimate the risk of irregular menses (defined as menses less often than monthly) associated with vomiting frequency, adjusting for other eating disorder symptoms, weight status, age, race/ethnicity, and school clusters. Results Girls who vomited to control their weight one to three times per month were one and a half times more likely (risk ratio [RR] = 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2–2.2), and girls who vomited once per week or more often were more than three times more likely (RR = 3.2; 95% CI = 2.3–4.4), to experience irregular menses than were girls who did not report vomiting for weight control. Vomiting for weight control remained a strong predictor of irregular menses even when overweight and underweight participants were excluded. Conclusions Our study adds to the evidence that vomiting may have a direct effect on hormonal function in adolescent girls, and that vomiting for weight control may be a particularly deleterious component of eating disorders. PMID:18407039

  7. Newborn screening for six lysosomal storage disorders in a cohort of Mexican patients: Three-year findings from a screening program in a closed Mexican health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Martínez, Juana Inés; Limón-Rojas, Ana Elena; Gaytán-García, Maria de Jesús; Reyna-Figueroa, Jesús; Wakida-Kusunoki, Guillermo; Delgado-Calvillo, Ma Del Rocío; Cantú-Reyna, Consuelo; Cruz-Camino, Héctor; Cervantes-Barragán, David Eduardo

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the results of a lysosomal newborn screening (NBS) program in a cohort of 20,018 Mexican patients over the course of 3years in a closed Mexican Health System (Petróleos Mexicanos [PEMEX] Health Services). Using dried blood spots (DBS), we performed a multiplex tandem mass spectrometry enzymatic assay for six lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) including Pompe disease, Fabry disease, Gaucher disease, mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS-I), Niemann-Pick type A/B, and Krabbe disease. Screen-positive cases were confirmed using leukocyte enzymatic activity and DNA molecular analysis. From July 2012 to April 2016, 20,018 patients were screened; 20 patients were confirmed to have an LSD phenotype (99.9 in 100,000 newborns). Final distributions include 11 Pompe disease, five Fabry disease, two MPS-I, and two Niemann-Pick type A/B patients. We did not find any Gaucher or Krabbe patients. A final frequency of 1 in 1001 LSD newborn phenotypes was established. NBS is a major public health achievement that has decreased the morbidity and mortality of inborn errors of metabolism. The introduction of NBS for LSD presents new challenges. This is the first multiplex Latin-American study of six LSDs detected through NBS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Screening for Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

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  9. Screening for anxiety disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ellin; Bögels, Susan Maria

    2009-10-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and have negative consequences on individual and societal level. This study examined the usefulness of screening for anxiety disorders in primary school children. More specifically, the value of the screening method to discriminate between and to predict anxiety disorders was studied. Children and their parents were selected if the children had self-reported scores on the screening questionnaire Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders-71 (SCARED-71) within the top-15% (High-anxious) or from two points below to two points above the median (Median-anxious). Of the selected children, 183 high-anxious children and their parents, and 80 median-anxious children and their parents took part in a diagnostic interview, the Anxiety Disorder Interview Schedule (ADIS). Of the high-anxious children, 60% had an anxiety disorder versus 23% of the median-anxious children, whereas groups did not differ on rates of dysthymia/depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The diagnoses separation anxiety disorder, social phobia and specific phobia were specifically predicted by the corresponding subscales of the screening questionnaire, while the diagnosis generalised anxiety disorder was not predicted by any of the subscales. The screening method has proven its utility for discriminating between children with and without anxiety disorders when applying the top-15% cut-off. Moreover, separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, and specific phobia, all known to be prevalent and debilitating childhood anxiety disorders, can be predicted by the corresponding subscale of the screening instrument.

  10. Newborn Screening for inherited metabolic disorders; news and views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Pourfarzam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Newborn screening is important for the early detection of many congenital genetic and metabolic disorders, aimed at the earliest possible recognition and management of affected newborns, to prevent the morbidity, mortality, and disabilities associated with an inherited metabolic disorder. This comprehensive system includes; testing, education, follow up, diagnosis, treatment, management, and evaluation. There are major differences among many of the disorders being considered for inclusion in newborn screening programs. In recent times, advances in laboratory technology such as tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS, which is more specific, sensitive, reliable, and comprehensive than traditional assays, has increased the number of genetic conditions that can be diagnosed through neonatal screening programs at birth. With a single dried filter paper blood spot, MS/MS can identify more than 30 inherited metabolic disorders in around two to three minutes. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment and an increased understanding of the natural history of inborn errors of metabolism have produced pressure to implement expanded newborn screening programs in many countries. Even as many countries throughout the world have made newborn screening mandatory, in Iran, nationwide newborn screening for inherited metabolic disorders other than hypothyroidism has not been initiated, hence, there is little information about these diseases. This article aims to review the recent advances in newborn metabolic screening and its situation in Iran and other countries.

  11. SCREENING FOR EARLY DETECTION OF EATING DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisaveta Pavlova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eating Disorders (EDs are characterized by a persistent disturbance of eating or eating-related behavior that significantly impairs physical health or psychosocial functioning. EDs are caused by a complex interaction of genetic, biological, behavioral, psychological, and social factors. Their epidemiology is rising for the past decades, and EDs affect all races, social levels and both genders. Due to the long and expensive treatment, chronic course, and the fact that most of the sufferers do not realize the need for therapy or do not seek treatment, the demand on developing prevention programs, early detection and assessment is essential. Despite the fact, that many new EDs screening tools were developed already, there is a great lack of validated screening instruments, adapted to the Bulgarian conditions. Objects and methods: Our study aimed at eliciting a comprehensive battery for screening of not only specific ED pathology, but also some risk factors, such as negative body image, weight and depressive symptoms. The object of our study consisted of 201 females, aged 18 to 45 (mean 24.65. SCOOF- questionnaire, Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale (EDDS-5, Body Image Questionnaire-34 and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were applied. Results: Our preliminary results show that approximately 45% of the tested subjects show some of the: negative body image, eating disorders’ clinical pathology, distorted eating patterns, subclinical eating disorders pathology, overweight/obesity, or depressive symptoms. Conclusion: Our ongoing efforts in area of research also are aimed at developing and refining strategies for preventing and treating ED among adolescents and adults.

  12. Eating Disorder Prevention Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapia, Jennifer L.

    This paper provides information for school psychologists regarding the necessity and benefits of school-based prevention programming for students at risk for developing eating disorders (i.e., females). School-based programming is a cost-effective means of reaching the largest number of individuals at once and identifying those individuals…

  13. Screen for Disordered Eating: Improving the accuracy of eating disorder screening in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguen, Shira; Hebenstreit, Claire; Li, Yongmei; Dinh, Julie V; Donalson, Rosemary; Dalton, Sarah; Rubin, Emma; Masheb, Robin

    To develop a primary care eating disorder screen with greater accuracy and greater potential for generalizability, compared to existing screens. Cross-sectional survey to assess discriminative accuracy of a new screen, Screen for Disordered Eating (SDE), compared to Eating Disorders Screen for Primary Care (EDS-PC) and SCOFF screener, using prevalence rates of Binge Eating Disorder (BED), Bulimia Nervosa (BN), Anorexia Nervosa (AN), and Any Eating Disorder (AED), as measured by the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q). The SDE correctly classified 87.2% (CI: 74.3%-95.2%) of BED cases, all cases of BN and AN, and 90.5% (CI: 80.4%-96.4%) of AED cases. Sensitivity estimates were higher than the SCOFF, which correctly identified 69.6% (CI: 54.2%-82.3%) of BED, 77.8% (CI: 40.0%-97.2%) of BN, 37.5% (CI: 8.52%-75.5%) of AN, and 66.1% (CI: 53%-77.7%) of AED. While the EDS-PC had slightly higher sensitivity than the SDE, the SDE had better specificity. The SDE outperformed the SCOFF in classifying true cases, the EDS-PC in classifying true non-cases, and the EDS-PC in distinguishing cases from non-cases. The SDE is the first screen, inclusive of BED, valid for detecting eating disorders in primary care. Findings have broad implications to address eating disorder screening in primary care settings. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Screening for mental disorders in cardiology outpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birket-Smith, M.; Rasmussen, A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the frequency of mental disorders in cardiology outpatients to the number of patients with psychological problems identified by cardiologists. In a cardiology outpatient service, 103 consecutive patients were asked to participate in the study. Of these 86...... and mental problems in each patient on visual analogue scales (VAS-som and VAS-men). The current treatments, including psychiatric and psychological treatments, were noted, and the survival was followed for 3 years. Of the 86 patients included, 34 (40%) had a diagnosis of mental disorder. Eleven (12.8%) had...... were included and screened for mental disorder with the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD), Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) psychosis screening, the Clock Drawing Test, and the WHO-5 Well-being Index. The cardiologists were asked to rate the severity of somatic...

  15. Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program Reports to Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page includes EPA reports to congress on pesticide licensing and endocrine disruptor screening activities, Endocrine Disruptor Methods Validation Subcomittee (EDMVS) progress, and Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) implementation progress.

  16. Screening High School Students for Eating Disorders: Results of a National Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, S. Bryn; Ziyadeh, Najat J.; Forman, Sara; Prokop, Lisa A.; Keliher, Anne; Jacobs, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Early identification and treatment of disordered eating and weight control behaviors may prevent progression and reduce the risk of chronic health consequences. Methods: The National Eating Disorders Screening Program coordinated the first-ever nationwide eating disorders screening initiative for high schools in the United States in 2000. Students completed a self-report screening questionnaire that included the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) and items on vomiting or exercising ...

  17. A Qualitative Analysis of the MAYSI-2: Screening for Co-Occurring Disorders in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, William H.; Randolph, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the use of the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument (MAYSI-2) to screen for co-occurring disorders in an adolescent outpatient treatment program and to provide a preliminary assessment of those needs. The MAYSI-2 identified youth with co-occurring disorders and the results support existing recommendations for distinct…

  18. Screening High School Students for Eating Disorders: Validity of Brief Behavioral and Attitudinal Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Jess; Ziyadeh, Najat J.; Franko, Debra L.; McDonald, Julia; Mond, Jonathan M.; Austin, S. Bryn

    2011-01-01

    Background: Early identification can greatly impact the trajectory of eating disorders, and school-based screening is 1 avenue for identifying those at risk. To be feasible in a school setting, a screening program must use a brief, valid screening tool. The aim of this study was to assess how well brief attitudinal and behavioral survey items…

  19. Preconception carrier screening for multiple disorders: evaluation of a screening offer in a Dutch founder population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathijssen, Inge B.; Holtkamp, Kim C. A.; Ottenheim, Cecile P. E.; van Eeten-Nijman, Janneke M. C.; Lakeman, Phillis; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; van Maarle, Merel C.; Henneman, Lidewij

    2018-01-01

    Technological developments have enabled carrier screening for multiple disorders. This study evaluated experiences with a preconception carrier screening offer for four recessive disorders in a Dutch founder population. Questionnaires were completed by 182 attendees pretesting and posttesting and by

  20. Automated Screening for Three Inborn Metabolic Disorders: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha S

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inborn metabolic disorders (IMDs form a large group of rare, but often serious, metabolic disorders. Aims: Our objective was to construct a decision tree, based on classification algorithm for the data on three metabolic disorders, enabling us to take decisions on the screening and clinical diagnosis of a patient. Settings and Design: A non-incremental concept learning classification algorithm was applied to a set of patient data and the procedure followed to obtain a decision on a patient’s disorder. Materials and Methods: Initially a training set containing 13 cases was investigated for three inborn errors of metabolism. Results: A total of thirty test cases were investigated for the three inborn errors of metabolism. The program identified 10 cases with galactosemia, another 10 cases with fructosemia and the remaining 10 with propionic acidemia. The program successfully identified all the 30 cases. Conclusions: This kind of decision support systems can help the healthcare delivery personnel immensely for early screening of IMDs.

  1. Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program Tier 1 Assessments

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    EPA has completed weight-of-evidence (WoE) assessments under the Endocrine Distruptor Screening Program (EDSP) for 52 pesticides included in the final list of chemicals for Tier 1 screening. See weight of evidence reports and data evaluation records.

  2. Reliability of self-reported eating disorders : Optimizing population screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Sihvola, Elina; Raevuori, Anu; Kaukoranta, Jutta; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Hoek, Hans W.; Rissanen, Aila; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess whether short self-report eating disorder screening questions are useful population screening methods. Method: We screened the female participants (N = 2881) from the 1975-1079 birth cohorts of Finnish twins for eating disorders, using several

  3. [Screening for psychiatric disorders among prison inmates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamman, T; Linaker, O M

    2000-08-10

    Prison inmates have high frequencies of psychiatric disorders. Most prisons have little health-personnel resources, and methods to help focus resources towards those with serious health-care needs would be useful. The Global Symptom Index (GSI) of the Symptom Check List-90 (SCL-90) has performed well in other populations. Prisoners at Kristiansand County Prison, Norway were asked to participate in the study, and 187 of 206 (91%) consented. All filled in the SCL-90 during the first four days of incarceration, and were examined clinically by a psychiatrist. Clinical examination revealed 40 persons with psychiatric disorder. Of these, 37 had a GSI score > or = 1. There were three false negatives and two false positives. Based on various cut-off levels for the GSI, we found a GSI cut-off value at 1.5 to perform best with sensitivity = 0.78, specificity = 0.87, and Number Needed to Diagnose = 1.55. SCL-90 performs well as a screening instrument for psychiatric disorders among prison inmates.

  4. Anticipating anonymity in screening program databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Rafael; Sen, Sagar; Nygård, Jan F

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a technique for improving anonymity in screening program databases to increase the privacy for the participants in these programs. The data generated by the invitation process (screening centre, appointment date) is often made available to researchers for medical research and for evaluation and improvement of the screening program. This information, combined with other personal quasi-identifiers such as the ZIP code, gender or age, can pose a risk of disclosing the identity of the individuals participating in the program, and eventually their test results. We present two algorithms that produce a set of screening appointments that aim to increase anonymity of the resulting dataset. The first one, based on the constraint programming paradigm, defines the optimal appointments, while the second one is a suboptimal heuristic algorithm that can be used with real size datasets. The level of anonymity is measured using the new concept of generalized k-anonymity, which allows us to show the utility of the proposal by means of experiments, both using random data and data based on screening invitations from the Norwegian Cancer Registry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Screening for eating disorders and high-risk behavior: caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Corinna; Abascal, Liana; Taylor, C Barr

    2004-11-01

    The current study reviews the state of eating disorder screens. Screens were classified by their purported screening function: identification of cases with (a) anorexia nervosa only; (b) bulimia nervosa only; (c) eating disorders in general; (d) partial syndrome, eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS), or subclinical; (e) not a-d but at high risk. Information is presented on development, psychometric properties, and external validation (e.g., sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values). Screens differ widely with regard to objective, psychometric properties and the validation methodology used. Most screens that identify cases are not appropriate for the identification of at-risk behaviors. Little data on the external validity of screens are available. Screens should be used with caution. A sequential procedure, in which subjects identified as being at risk during the first stage is followed by more specific diagnostic tests during the second stage, might overcome some of the limitations of the one-stage screening approach.

  6. Eating disorders in female athletes: use of screening tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Jessica; Aerni, Giselle; Anderson, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Screening female athletes for eating disorders is not performed commonly even though the American College of Sports Medicine, National Athletic Trainer Association, and International Olympic Committee have guidelines recommending screening. Eating disorders are more prevalent in the female athlete population than in the general population and carry short-term and long-term consequences that can affect sport performance. There are several screening tools available that have been studied in the general population and fewer tools that were validated specifically in female athletes. Female athletes with eating disorder pathology often have different factors and environmental pressures contributing to their pathology that can be identified best with an athlete-specific screening tool. We will discuss various screening tools available and the evidence for each one. Screening for eating disorders in all female athletes is an important part of the preparticipation examination and should be done using a tool specifically validated for the female athlete.

  7. Adult hearing screening: the Cyprus Pilot Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Thodi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is the third most common condition affecting adults over 65 (Cruickshanks et al., 1998. It can affect quality of life, limiting the ability to communicate efficiently, and leading to isolation, psychological strain, and functional decline (LaForge, Spector, Sternberg, 1992; Yueh, Shapiro, MacLean, Shekelle, 2003. Communication limitations impinge on the person directly, as well as the family, friends, and social circle. Reports on hearing loss among adults indicate that less than 25% of people who can benefit from amplification are actually using hearing aids, and that people diagnosed with a hearing loss delay seeking amplification by about seven years (Kochkin, 1997. Often, family members are the driving force behind a person with a hearing loss who decides to seek help. Adult hearing screening programs might have a positive effect on raising public awareness on hearing loss and its implications, and shortening delay time for intervention. There is no routine hearing screening for the adult population in Cyprus. The health system provides hearing tests for beneficiaries upon physician recommendation or self-referral. The Cyprus pilot adult hearing screening program (ΑΠΑΣ- EVERYONE- Greek acronym for Screening- Intervention-Hearing-Participation to Life screened hearing in retired adults.

  8. Screening for anxiety disorders in patients with coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunevicius, A.; Staniute, M.; Brozaitiene, J.; Pop, V.J.M.; Neverauskas, J.; Bunevicius, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are prevalent and associated with poor prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, studies examining screening of anxiety disorders in CAD patients are lacking. In the present study we evaluated the prevalence of anxiety disorders in patients with

  9. Assessment and Treatment of Co-occurring Eating Disorders in Privately Funded Addiction Treatment Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, Therese K.; Greenfield, Shelly F.; Bride, Brian E.; Cohen, Lisa; Gordon, Susan Merle; Roman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Privately-funded addiction treatment programs were surveyed to increase understanding of assessment and current treatment options for patients with co-occurring substance use and eating disorders. Data were collected from face-to-face interviews with program administrators of a nationally representative sample of 345 private addiction treatment programs. Although the majority of programs reported screening for eating disorders, programs varied in screening instruments used. Sixty-seven percent reported admitting cases of low severity. Twenty-one percent of programs attempt to treat eating disorders. These results highlight the need for education of addiction treatment professionals in assessment, referral and treatment of eating disorders. PMID:21477048

  10. Evaluation of a Tay-Sachs disease screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gason, A A; Sheffield, E; Bankier, A; Aitken, M A; Metcalfe, S; Barlow Stewart, K; Delatycki, M B

    2003-05-01

    Tay-Sachs Disease (TSD) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder. TSD is prevalent in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, and carrier screening programs have been implemented worldwide in these communities. A screening program initiated in 1997 involving the Melbourne Jewish community (Australia) incorporated education, counselling and carrier testing of high-school students aged 15 to 18 years. This study aimed to assess the participation rates, level of knowledge obtained and predicted feelings and attitudes of the students involved. Seven hundred and ten students participated, there was a 67% uptake for testing with a carrier rate of 1 in 28 determined. The level of knowledge of the students following education was high and of relative importance in regard to decision making, as were their feelings and attitudes about genetic testing for carrier status. A significant impediment to test uptake was the need for blood sampling, resulting in a recommendation for the introduction of DNA analysis on cheek brush samples. The evaluation of this program has given a wider scope for further development as well as providing valuable information for the implementation of community screening programs.

  11. Screening high school students for eating disorders: results of a national initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, S Bryn; Ziyadeh, Najat J; Forman, Sara; Prokop, Lisa A; Keliher, Anne; Jacobs, Douglas

    2008-10-01

    Early identification and treatment of disordered eating and weight control behaviors may prevent progression and reduce the risk of chronic health consequences. The National Eating Disorders Screening Program coordinated the first-ever nationwide eating disorders screening initiative for high schools in the United States in 2000. Students completed a self-report screening questionnaire that included the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) and items on vomiting or exercising to control weight, binge eating, and history of treatment for eating disorders. Multivariate regression analyses examined sex and racial/ethnic differences. Almost 15% of girls and 4% of boys scored at or above the threshold of 20 on the EAT-26, which indicated a possible eating disorder. Among girls, we observed few significant differences between ethnic groups in eating disorder symptoms, whereas among boys, more African American, American Indian, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Latino boys reported symptoms than did white boys. Overall, 25% of girls and 11% of boys reported disordered eating and weight control symptoms severe enough to warrant clinical evaluation. Of these symptomatic students, few reported that they had ever received treatment. Population screening for eating disorders in high schools may identify at-risk students who would benefit from early intervention, which could prevent acute and long-term complications of disordered eating and weight control behaviors.

  12. Screening for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HANDs) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders necessitates community-based screening. In recent years, progress has been made in developing more localised comparative data for use in such screening on the African continent. These studies used measurements that are considered fair, easily accessible, ...

  13. Screening for mental disorders in cardiology outpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birket-Smith, M.; Rasmussen, A.

    2008-01-01

    major depression, six (7.0%) minor depression, six (7.0%) anxiety disorder, two unspecified somatoform disorder, seven (8.1%) dementia, one alcohol abuse and one psychosis. Three of the patients were in long-term psychopharmacological treatment. Although the cardiologists predicted mental disorder...... and mental problems in each patient on visual analogue scales (VAS-som and VAS-men). The current treatments, including psychiatric and psychological treatments, were noted, and the survival was followed for 3 years. Of the 86 patients included, 34 (40%) had a diagnosis of mental disorder. Eleven (12.8%) had...... significantly better than chance, none of the patients was in relevant treatment for their mental disorder. At 3-year follow-up, 20 (24%) of the patients had died. Age and severity of heart disease predicted mortality, while the presence of a mental disorder did not. Mental disorders, especially depression...

  14. Biochemical screening of 504,049 newborns in Denmark, the Faroe Islands and Greenland - Experience and development of a routine program for expanded newborn screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Hougaard, David Michael; Simonsen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    argue that newborn screening for these disorders should be standard of care, though unresolved issues remain, e.g. about newborns with a potential for remaining asymptomatic throughout life. Well organized logistics of the screening program from screening laboratory to centralized, clinical management......Expanded newborn screening for selected inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) in Denmark, the Faroe Islands and Greenland was introduced in 2002. We now present clinical, biochemical, and statistical results of expanded screening (excluding PKU) of 504,049 newborns during nine years as well...... as diagnoses and clinical findings in 82,930 unscreened newborns born in the same period. The frequencies of diagnoses made within the panel of disorders screened for are compared with the frequencies of the disorders in the decade preceding expanded newborn screening. The expanded screening was performed...

  15. Screening history in women with cervical cancer in a Danish population-based screening program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirschner, Benny; Poll, Susanne; Rygaard, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the screening histories of all cervical cancers in a Danish screening population. The intention was to decide suboptimal sides of the screening program and to evaluate the significance of routine screening in the development of cervical cancer.......The aim of this study was to explore the screening histories of all cervical cancers in a Danish screening population. The intention was to decide suboptimal sides of the screening program and to evaluate the significance of routine screening in the development of cervical cancer....

  16. Preconception carrier screening for multiple disorders: evaluation of a screening offer in a Dutch founder population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathijssen, Inge B; Holtkamp, Kim C A; Ottenheim, Cecile P E; van Eeten-Nijman, Janneke M C; Lakeman, Phillis; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; van Maarle, Merel C; Henneman, Lidewij

    2018-02-01

    Technological developments have enabled carrier screening for multiple disorders. This study evaluated experiences with a preconception carrier screening offer for four recessive disorders in a Dutch founder population. Questionnaires were completed by 182 attendees pretesting and posttesting and by 137 non-attendees. Semistructured interviews were conducted with seven of the eight carrier couples. Attendees were mainly informed about the existence of screening by friends/colleagues (49%) and family members (44%). Familiarity with the genetic disorders was high. Knowledge after counseling increased (p influencers (family/friends) can be used to raise awareness of a screening offer. Our findings provide lessons for the implementation of expanded carrier screening panels in other communities and other settings.

  17. Predictive validity of common mental disorders screening questionnaire as a screening instrument in long sickness absence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Hans Jørgen; Bech, Per

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: Screening instruments for detection of common mental disorders have not been validity tested in long term sickness absence (LSA), which is the aim of this study for the Common Mental Disorders Screening Questionnaire (CMD-SQ). METHODS: Of all 2,414 incident persons on continuous sick...... in Denmark there is not a legal requirement that sick-listed persons are certified as sick by a physician....

  18. Fetal programming of neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faa, Gavino; Manchia, Mirko; Pintus, Roberta; Gerosa, Clara; Marcialis, Maria Antonietta; Fanos, Vassilios

    2016-09-01

    Starting from the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypotheses proposed by David Barker, namely fetal programming, in the past years, there is a growing evidence of the major role played by epigenetic factors during the intrauterine life and the perinatal period. Furthermore, it has been assessed that these factors can affect the health status in infancy and even in adulthood. In this review, we focus our attention on the fetal programming of the brain, analyzing the most recent literature concerning the epigenetic factors that can influence the development of neuropsychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorders, major depressive disorders, and schizophrenia. The perinatal epigenetic factors have been divided in two main groups: maternal factors and fetal factors. The maternal factors include diet, smoking, alcoholism, hypertension, malnutrition, trace elements, stress, diabetes, substance abuse, and exposure to environmental toxicants, while the fetal factors include hypoxia/asphyxia, placental insufficiency, prematurity, low birth weight, drugs administered to the mother or to the baby, and all factors causing intrauterine growth restriction. A better comprehension of the possible mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these diseases may help researchers and clinicians develop new diagnostic tools and treatments to offer these patients a tailored medical treatment strategy to improve their quality of life. Birth Defects Research (Part C) 108:207-223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Screening for bipolar disorders in patients with alcohol or substance use disorders: Performance of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zaane, Jan; van den Berg, Belinda; Draisma, Stasja; Nolen, Willem A.; van den Brink, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Background: Screening properties of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) to detect bipolar disorder (BD) in patients with substance use disorders are unknown. Methods: 403 treatment seeking patients with a substance use disorder completed the MDQ and subsequently 111 MDQ positives and 59 MDQ

  20. Screening for bipolar disorders in patients with alcohol or substance use disorders : Performance of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zaane, Jan; van den Berg, Belinda; Draisma, Stasja; Nolen, Willem A.; van den Brink, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Background: Screening properties of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) to detect bipolar disorder (BD) in patients with substance use disorders are unknown. Methods: 403 treatment seeking patients with a substance use disorder completed the MDQ and subsequently 111 MDQ positives and 59 MDQ

  1. Eating Disorders and Disordered Eating in Type 1 Diabetes: Prevalence, Screening, and Treatment Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlan, Margo E; Griffith, Julie; Patel, Niral; Jaser, Sarah S

    2013-09-12

    This review is focused on the prevalence of eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Recent research indicates higher prevalence rates of eating disorders among people with type 1 diabetes compared with their peers without diabetes. Eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors-especially insulin omission-are associated with poorer glycemic control and serious risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Screening should begin in pre-adolescence and continue through early adulthood, as many disordered eating behaviors begin during the transition to adolescence and may persist for years. Available screening tools and treatment options are reviewed. Given the complexity of diabetes management in combination with eating disorder treatment, it is imperative to screen early and often, in order to identify those most vulnerable and begin appropriate treatment in a timely manner.

  2. Eating Disorders and Disordered Eating in Type 1 Diabetes: Prevalence, Screening, and Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlan, Margo E.; Griffith, Julie; Patel, Niral

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on the prevalence of eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Recent research indicates higher prevalence rates of eating disorders among people with type 1 diabetes, as compared to their peers without diabetes. Eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors – especially insulin omission – are associated with poorer glycemic control and serious risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Screening should begin in pre-adolescence and continue through early adulthood, as many disordered eating behaviors begin during the transition to adolescence and may persist for years. Available screening tools and treatment options are reviewed. Given the complexity of diabetes management in combination with eating disorder treatment, it is imperative to screen early and often, in order to identify those most vulnerable and begin appropriate treatment in a timely manner. PMID:24022608

  3. Neonatal screening for treatable congenital disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charoensiriwatana, W.; Janejai, N.; Boonwanich, W.; Krasao, P.; Waiyasilp, S.

    2001-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism is a treatable disease if detected at the early stage of life. It is one of the most frequent cause of mental retardation in children. In 85 % of cases, congenital hypothyroidism is a consequence of thyroid disgenesis, in which the gland is either absent, located ectopically and/or severely reduced in size. Early detection and treatment with thyroid hormone supplement can significantly reduce mental damage. In 1996, Thailand initiated a neonatal screening programme for congenital hypothyroidism (CHT) and phenylketonuria (PKU), with the objective of bringing a better quality of life to people throughout the country, but especially in the remote areas. The programme involves implementing routine screening nationwide. The plan of action was designed with the goal of having public health service units throughout the country provide neonatal screening by year 2002 for the 1.2 million babies born per annum in Thailand. The government supported the programme by allocating a five-year budget of approximately US$15 million. The programme received additional assistance through technical support and human resource development from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the US Centers for Disease Control. This assistance promoted self-sustainability and strengthened the programme's technical base. The programme is on track. It is expected that by year 2002 all new born babies in Thailand will be screened for CHT and PKU

  4. Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) 1998 Federal Register Notices

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA outlined the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP), which incorporated many of the Endocrine Disruptor Screening and Testing Advisory Committee's (EDSTAC) recommendations, in two Federal Register Notices published in 1998.

  5. Screening for Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with your daily life Having more than one illness at the same time can make it difficult to diagnose and treat the different conditions. Depression and substance abuse are among the conditions that occasionally complicate anxiety disorders. Yes No Have you experienced changes in sleeping ...

  6. Screening for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Store Taking Action - Raising Awareness Create Your Own Campaign Other Ways to Give Donate Online About ADAA Meet Us Board of Directors ADAA ... Future and Past Conferences Program Program View the Online ... Exhibiting & Advertising Awards Andrew Burns Memorial Scholarship 2018 Alies Muskin ...

  7. Cascade screening program for familial hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Marín, Patricia; Michán-Doña, Alfredo; Maraver-Delgado, Juan; Arroyo-Olivares, Raquel; Barrado Varea, Rosalía; Pérez de Isla, Leopoldo; Mata, Pedro

    2018-03-06

    Early detection of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HFH) is needed to prevent premature cardiovascular events. Our aim isto describe the course of an HFH screening detection day in the Northern Cadiz Health Area in Spain and to analyze the data recorded. Descriptive study of an FH cascade screening program. Index cases (ICs) and their 1st and 2nd grade relatives were appointed during a weekend by the FH Foundation. Venous blood samples were taken from the subjects for genetic, blood, and chemistry tests; specialized medical consultation and physical examination were performed. The study sample consisted of 132 subjects: 21 ICs and 111 relatives (16 under 18years old), with a mean age of 11.4years (SD4.57). Mean age of subjects over 18years was 45.2years. A gene mutation was found in 90 relatives. Mean age at diagnosis was 25years (SD17.7) for relatives and for 36.4years (SD17.2; P=.01) for ICs. Smoking rate was higher in relatives than in ICs (26.3% vs 4.8%; P=.02) and corneal arcus was more common in ICs as compared to relatives (47.6% vs 12.6%; P<.001). Prior myocardial infarction was recorded in 14.3% of ICs and 4.2% of relatives respectively (P=.07). Maximum lipid lowering treatment was being administered to 43.1%. The screening detection approach identified the estimated 4% population with HFH in the area, and allows for diagnosing HFH 11.4years earlier. Copyright © 2018 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. SCREENING FOR EARLY DETECTION OF EATING DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Elisaveta Pavlova; Mariana Arnaoudova; Ivan Aleksandrov; Yasen Yanev

    2016-01-01

    Background: Eating Disorders (EDs) are characterized by a persistent disturbance of eating or eating-related behavior that significantly impairs physical health or psychosocial functioning. EDs are caused by a complex interaction of genetic, biological, behavioral, psychological, and social factors. Their epidemiology is rising for the past decades, and EDs affect all races, social levels and both genders. Due to the long and expensive treatment, chronic course, and the fact that most of the ...

  9. [FETAL PROGRAMMING OF METABOLIC DISORDERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadinova, M R; Metodieva, R; Boyadzhieva, N

    2015-01-01

    Our knowledge of fetal programming has developed notably over the years and recent data suggest that an unbalanced diet prior and during pregnancy can have early-onset and long-lasting consequences on the health of the offspring. Specific negative influences of high dietary glucose and lipid consumption, as well as undernutrition, are associated with development of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and diabetes in the offspring. The mechanisms underlying the effects of maternal hyperglycemia on the fetus may involve structural, metabolic and epigenetic changes. The aim of this review is to illustrate how adverse intrauterine environment may influence molecular modifications in the fetus and cause epigenetic alterations in particular. It has been demonstrated that prenatal epigenetic modifications may be linked to the pathogenesis and progression of the adult chronic disorders. Studies on epigenetic alterations will contribute to a better understanding of the long-term effects of in utero exposure and may open new perspectives for disease prevention and treatment.

  10. Amblyopia prevention screening program in Northwest Iran (Ardabil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Ojaghi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The present investigation showed that coverage of amblyopia screening program was not enough in Ardabil Province. To increase the screening accuracy, standard instruments and examination room must be used; more optometrists must be involved in this program and increasing the validity of obtained results for future programming.

  11. Screening for Autism Spectrum Disorders in Children With Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGuiseppi, Carolyn; Hepburn, Susan; Davis, Jonathan M.; Fidler, Deborah J.; Hartway, Sara; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Miller, Lisa; Ruttenber, Margaret; Robinson, Cordelia

    2015-01-01

    Objective We assessed the prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and screening test characteristics in children with Down syndrome. Method Eligible children born in a defined geographic area between January 1, 1996, and December 31, 2003, were recruited through a population-based birth defects registry and community outreach, then screened with the modified checklist for autism in toddlers or social communication questionnaire, as appropriate. Screen-positive children and a random sample of screen-negative children underwent developmental evaluation. Results We screened 123 children (27.8% of the birth cohort). Mean age was 73.4 months (range, 31–142). Compared to screen-negative children, screen-positive children had similar sociodemo-graphic characteristics but a lower mean developmental quotient (mean difference: 11.0; 95% confidence interval: 4.8–17.3). Weighted prevalences of autistic disorder and total ASD were 6.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.6%–11.6%) and 18.2% (95% CI: 9.7%–26.8%), respectively. The estimated minimum ASD prevalence, accounting for unscreened children, is 5.1% (95% CI: 3.3%–7.4%). ASD prevalence increased with greater cognitive impairment. Screening test sensitivity was 87.5% (95% CI: 66.6%–97.7%); specificity was 49.9% (95% CI: 37.0%–61.4%). Conclusion The prevalence of ASD among children with Down syndrome aged 2 to 11 years is substantially higher than in the general population. The modified checklist for autism in toddlers and social communication questionnaire were highly sensitive in children with Down syndrome but could result in many false positive tests if universal screening were implemented using current algorithms. Research needs include development of specific ASD screening algorithms and improved diagnostic discrimination in children with Down syndrome. Timely identification of these co-occurring diagnoses is essential so appropriate interventions can be provided. PMID:20375732

  12. Potential Biomarkers for Diagnosis and Screening of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental condition, which is typically characterized by a triad of symptoms: impaired social communication, social reciprocity and repetitive stereotypic behavior. While the behavioral phenotype of ASD is well described, the search for reliable ‘autism biomarkers’ continues. CONTENT: Insulin growth factor (IGF is essential for the myelination of developing fetal neurons; this is in addition to the well-known links between IGF, maternal inflammation, infection and autism supporting IGF as a potential marker. Combining IGF data with data regarding levels of the known markers, serotonin and anti-myelin basic protein, in order to calculate an autism index, could provide a new diagnostic method for at-risk neonates. Disruptions to multiple pathophysiological systems, including redox, folate, methylation, tryptophan metabolism, and mitochondrial metabolism, have been well documented in autistic patients. Maternal infection and inflammation have known links with autism. Autoimmunity has therefore been a well-studied area of autism research. The potential of using autoantibodies as novel biomarkers for autism, in addition to providing insights into the neurodevelopmental processes that lead to autism. SUMMARY: The six proposed causes of autism involve both metabolic and immunologic dysfunctions and include: increased oxidative stress; decreased methionine metabolism and trans-sulfuration: aberrant free and bound metal burden; gastrointestinal (GI disturbances; immune/inflammation dysregulation; and autoimmune targeting. A newborn screening program for early-onset ASD should be capable of utilizing a combination of ASD-associated biomarkers representative of the six proposed causes of autism in order to identify newborns at risk. The biomarkers discussed in this article are useful to guide the selection, efficacy and sufficiency of biomedical interventions, which would likely

  13. Expanding Newborn Screening for Lysosomal Disorders: Opportunities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Darrel J.; Tan, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS), since its implementation in the 1960s, has traditionally been successful in reducing mortality and disability in children with a range of different conditions. Lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) are a heterogeneous group of inherited metabolic diseases that result from lysosomal dysfunction. Based on available treatment and…

  14. Screening for Borderline Personality Disorders with the MMPI-168.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Camille; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Investigated the possible use of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-168 as a screening instrument for identifying individuals (N=27) with borderline personality disorders. Results demonstrated that the MMPI-168 response pattern of borderline patients was clearly distinguishable from the great majority of college graduates. (WAS)

  15. Screening for thyroid disorders in asymptomatic adults from Brazilian populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Benseñor

    Full Text Available Advances in thyroid disorder diagnosis have created new thyroid disorder categories such as subclinical hyperthyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism. In the 1980s, immunometric assaying for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH emerged and became defined as the most cost-effective test in thyroid disorder screening. The second step in the screening of thyroid disorders is to determine free thyroxine (FT4, and cost-effective methods for its detection are now available. Using TSH and FT4, it is possible to determine four situations: clinical hyperthyroidism, clinical hypothyroidism, subclinical hyperthyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism. Subclinical hypothyroidism can be a strong indicator of risk for atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction in elderly women. Cardiovascular mortality among Brazilian women is one of the highest in the Western world. The best-known risk factors for cardiovascular diseases are high blood pressure, smoking, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia. Although these are recognized as primary risk factors, there are other risk factors that could be identified as primordial risk factors. This may be the case for subclinical hypothyroidism. Early detection of thyroid disorders in women over fifty could be a highly cost-effective option in the prevention of cardiovascular disorders among Brazilian women.

  16. Validation of screening instruments for neuroepidemiological surveys of tic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubo, Esther; Sáez Velasco, Sara; Delgado Benito, Vanesa; Villaverde, Vanesa Ausín; Gabriel Y Galán, Jose Maria Trejo; Santidrián, Asuncion Martín; Vicente, Jesús Macarrón; Guevara, José Cordero; Louis, Elan D; Benito-León, Julian

    2011-02-15

    The main purpose was to validate a multistage protocol to screen tic disorders in mainstream and special education centers and to investigate whether telephone-based interviews were accurate to diagnose tic disorders when compared with in-person neurological interviews. A school-based survey of children and adolescents (6-16 years). A proxy report questionnaire for tic disorders was completed by teachers, observers, and parents. The diagnosis was confirmed by the neurologist based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental disorders (DSM-IV TR) criteria. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, the likelihood ratio for a positive result (LR+), and the Kappa coefficients (k) for telephone-based interviews reliability were calculated. One hundred twenty subjects, 57 from special education center and 63 from a mainstream school were studied. The sensitivity of the proxy report questionnaire was 58% and 36% when completed by the observers (mainstream and special education center, respectively), 40 and 73% when completed by the teachers, and 58 and 36% when completed by the parents. Using any of these 3 screening sources, the sensitivity was 92%, the positive predictive value was 38%, and negative predictive value was 97% (mainstream schools), whereas the sensitivity was 82%, the positive predictive value was 20%, and negative predictive value was 82% (special education centers). Parents (mainstream schools) and teachers (special education center) produced the highest LR+ (7.25 and 1.26, respectively) and the intraobserver reliability of the telephone-based interviews versus in-person neurological interviews gave a k coefficient of 0.83. The efficiency of different screening instruments for tic disorders seems to vary in different settings. Telephone-based interviews may be a valid and convenient backup to ascertain the diagnosis of tic disorders when face-to-face neurological examination is not possible. Copyright © 2011 Movement

  17. Alcohol Screening among Opioid Agonist Patients in a Primary Care Clinic and an Opioid Treatment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, Jan; Muench, John; Wiest, Katharina; Croff, Raina; Rieckman, Traci; McCarty, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Problem alcohol use is associated with adverse health and economic outcomes, especially among people in opioid agonist treatment. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) are effective in reducing alcohol use; however, issues involved in SBIRT implementation among opioid agonist patients are unknown. To assess identification and treatment of alcohol use disorders, we reviewed clinical records of opioid agonist patients screened for an alcohol use disorder in a primary care clinic (n = 208) and in an opioid treatment program (n = 204) over a two-year period. In the primary care clinic, 193 (93%) buprenorphine patients completed an annual alcohol screening and six (3%) had elevated AUDIT scores. In the opioid treatment program, an alcohol abuse or dependence diagnosis was recorded for 54 (27%) methadone patients. Practitioner focus groups were completed in the primary care (n = 4 physicians) and the opioid treatment program (n = 11 counselors) to assess experience with and attitudes towards screening opioid agonist patients for alcohol use disorders. Focus groups suggested that organizational, structural, provider, patient, and community variables hindered or fostered alcohol screening. Alcohol screening is feasible among opioid agonist patients. Effective implementation, however, requires physician training and systematic changes in workflow.

  18. Internet-Based Cervical Cancer Screening Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilbur, David C; Crothers, Barbara A; Eichhorn, John H; Ro, Min S; Gelfand, Jeffrey A

    2008-01-01

    This project explores the combination of computerized automated primary screening of cervical cytology specimens in remote sites with interpretation of device-selected images transmitted via the Internet...

  19. Internet-Based Cervical Cytology Screening Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilbur, David C; Crothers, Barbara A; Eichhorn, John H; Ro, Min S; Gelfand, Jeffrey A

    2006-01-01

    This project explores the combination of computerized automated primary screening of cervical cytology specimens in remote sites with interpretation of device-selected images transmitted via the Internet...

  20. Is screening effective in detecting untreated psychiatric disorders among newly diagnosed breast cancer patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palmer, Steven C.; Taggi, Alison; DeMichele, Angela; Coyne, James C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A key purpose of routine distress screening is to ensure that cancer patients receive appropriate mental health care. Most studies validating screening instruments overestimate the effectiveness of screening by not differentiating between patients with untreated disorders and patients

  1. CDC’s Newborn Screening Program - Role of Laboratories

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    When newborn screening started in the U.S. 50 years ago, many questioned whether it was even possible to test every baby born in every state. Today, all states screen babies for at least 29 disorders that can be detected through laboratory testing. In this podcast, Dr. Carla Cuthbert talks about CDC’s Newborn Screening Quality Assurance Program and the role laboratories play in keeping babies healthy.  Created: 9/3/2013 by National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  2. Correlation between sleep disorder screening and executive dysfunction in children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Zambrano-Sanchez, Elizabeth; Martinez-Cortes, Jose A.; Dehesa-Moreno, Minerva; Rio-Carlos, Yolanda del; Poblano, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare frequency of sleep disorders (SD) and executive dysfunction (ED) in children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and a control group. Method We studied 156 children with ADHD with a mean age of 8.5 years, and a control group with 111 children with a mean age of 8.3 years. We utilized the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ) to screen SD and the working memory measurement from the Wechsler intelligence scale for children (WISC-IV) to screen ED. Results ...

  3. The universal newborn hearing screening program of Taipei City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hung-Meng; Chiang, Szu-Hui; Shiau, Yu-Shih; Yeh, Wen-Ying; Ho, Hui Chen; Wang, Lilly; Chen, Shou-Chen; Lin, Hung-Ching; Chen, Kwang-Chao; Chiang, Hung; Yang, Ming-Chuan; Yu, Li-Hui; Lin, Hsiu-Lian; Chiu, Allen Wen-Hsiang; Hsiao, Kwang-Jen

    2013-10-01

    To establish a hearing screening program with high coverage, low referral rate, high follow-up rate, and early intervention in Taipei City. From September 2009 to December 2010, 85% delivery units in Taipei City, which includes 20 hospitals and 14 obstetrics clinics, were recruited into the screening program in two stages. A total of 15,930 babies were born in these participating hospitals and clinics during the program period. Among these neonates, 15,790 underwent hearing screening test with automatic auditory brainstem response (AABR). The screening was free of charge to the parents. The hearing screening examination was performed 24-36 h after birth. The same test was repeated between 36 and 60 h of age if the baby failed the first hearing test. The neonate was referred to the diagnostic hospitals for further investigations if he failed the second test. The screening coverage rate was 99.1% (15,790/15,930). The incidence of bilateral moderate to severe and unilateral hearing loss was 1.4 per 1000 (22/15,790) and 1.5 per 1000 (24/15,790), respectively. Four percent (626/15,790) of newborns failed to pass the initial screening test and 1.0% of newborns failed to pass the second screening test. Therefore, 1.0% newborns were referred for diagnostic assessments. The follow-up rate was 94.4% (151/160). Sixty-four percent (14/22) of babies with bilateral hearing loss completed the full diagnostic hearing tests within 3 months of birth. The universal newborn hearing screening program is an adequate program for Taipei City with high coverage, low referral rate, and good follow-up rate. Screening fees covered by third parties, two-stage screening steps with AABR strategy, and the stringent monitoring system proved to be effective. 2b, individual cohort study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Universal prevention efforts should address eating disorder pathology across the weight spectrum: Implications for screening and intervention on college campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Andrea E; Jones, Megan; Kolko, Rachel P; Altman, Myra; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Eichen, Dawn M; Balantekin, Katherine N; Trockel, Mickey; Taylor, C Barr; Wilfley, Denise E

    2017-04-01

    Given shared risk and maintaining factors between eating disorders and obesity, it may be important to include both eating disorder intervention and healthy weight management within a universal eating disorder care delivery program. This study evaluated differential eating disorder screening responses by initial weight status among university students, to assess eating disorder risk and pathology among individuals with overweight/obesity versus normal weight or underweight. 1529 individuals were screened and analyzed. Screening was conducted via pilot implementation of the Internet-based Healthy Body Image program on two university campuses. Fifteen percent of the sample had overweight/obesity. Over half (58%) of individuals with overweight/obesity screened as high risk for an eating disorder or warranting clinical referral, and 58% of individuals with overweight/obesity endorsed a ≥10-pound weight change over the past year. Compared to individuals with normal weight or underweight, individuals with overweight/obesity were more likely to identify as Black, endorse objective binge eating and fasting, endorse that eating disorder-related concerns impaired their relationships/social life and made them feel badly, and endorse higher weight/shape concerns. Results suggest rates of eating disorder pathology and clinical impairment are highest among students with overweight/obesity, and targeted intervention across weight categories and diverse races/ethnicities is warranted within universal eating disorder intervention efforts. Integrating eating disorder intervention and healthy weight management into universal prevention programs could reduce the incidence and prevalence of eating disorders, unhealthy weight control practices, and obesity among university students. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 75 FR 77869 - Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Second List of Chemicals for Tier 1 Screening; Extension...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... CONTACT. List of Subjects Environmental protection, Chemicals, Drinking water, Endocrine disruptors... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [EPA-HQ-OPPT-2009-0477; FRL-8856-5] Endocrine Disruptor Screening... Federal Register issue of November 17, 2010, concerning the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program's (EDSP...

  6. Quality control in screening programs for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarduy Napoles, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    The malignancy of the cervix is one of the few locations avoidable cancers, if detected before it progresses to the infiltration. The most efficient way of early detection is through a screening program to provide women undertaking a regular and quality Pap smear. If this test results abnormal, the program offers easier access to specialized care, effective treatment, and follow-up. The objective of this article is to present usefulness of methods for quality control used in screening programs for cervical cancer to detect their inadequacies. Here are some factors and conditions that must be considered in each of the steps to take, for a cervical cancer screening program to be successful and to meet the objectives proposed in reducing mortality due to this cause. This document contains some useful indexes calculated to ensure quality throughout the process. There should be the measurement of quality throughout the screening process that allows collecting of reliable data as well as correcting deficiencies

  7. Screening newborns for metabolic disorders based on targeted metabolomics using tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Ran Yoon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of newborn screening is to diagnose genetic, metabolic, and other inherited disorders, at their earliest to start treatment before the clinical manifestations become evident. Understanding and tracing the biochemical data obtained from tandem mass spectrometry is vital for early diagnosis of metabolic diseases associated with such disorders. Accordingly, it is important to focus on the entire diagnostic process, including differential and confirmatory diagnostic options, and the major factors that influence the results of biochemical analysis. Compared to regular biochemical testing, this is a complex process carried out by a medical physician specialist. It is comprised of an integrated program requiring multidisciplinary approach such as, pediatric specialist, expert scientist, clinical laboratory technician, and nutritionist. Tandem mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to improve screening of newborns for diverse metabolic diseases. It is likely to be used to analyze other treatable disorders or significantly improve existing newborn tests to allow broad scale and precise testing. This new era of various screening programs, new treatments, and the availability of detection technology will prove to be beneficial for the future generations.

  8. Tandem walking as a quick screening test for vestibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Helen S; Stitz, Jasmine; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Williams, Susan P; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Peters, Brian T; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2017-12-11

    Although many screening tests of balance are available, few of them have been well validated for clinical or research uses. The goal of this study was to test an updated version of an old test, Tandem Walking, to determine how useful it is for screening patients with vestibular disorders. Case-control study. Subjects were 90 adult patients with vestibular disorders and 292 healthy adult controls. They were tested on the number of correct tandem steps they could perform with arms crossed and eyes closed in a series of 10 steps. Correct steps could be nonconsecutive. Subjects were given one practice trial with eyes open and three experimental trials with eyes closed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC), and sensitivity and specificity were calculated. ROC values, sensitivity, and specificity were, at best, only moderate, no matter how the age range was cut. Even for subjects in the age group with the highest ROC value (i.e., age less than 50 years), ROC = 0.8, sensitivity = 0.77, and specificity = 0.72. These results indicate that 23% of patients will not be identified. Therefore, we recommend that if this test is used for screening patients in the clinic or healthy volunteers, the result should be interpreted with care. 3b Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Newborn screening of inherited metabolic disorders: the Italian situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focardi, M; Pinchi, V; Defraia, B; Gualco, B; Varvara, G; Norelli, G A

    2016-01-01

    Starting from an international overview of the current status of screening programs, the present paper focuses on the legal situation in Italy and the great differences among Italian regions. Since the introduction of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in the ‘90s the paradigm “one spot-one disease” changed. Only recently, some regions issued legislative acts to promote expanded newborn screening with MS/MS. This approach raises medico-legal and ethical issues because a fast neonatal diagnosis of an inborn error of metabolism (IEM) could increase chances of an early treatment and reduce disabilities, therefore citizens ought to have the same access to care countrywide. Enacting a mandatory standard for a disease screening panel using MS/MS and a few centers specialized in diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients affected by IEM (inborn errors of metabolism) can reduce legal and ethical issues.

  10. Financing state newborn screening programs: sources and uses of funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kay; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele A; Mann, Marie Y; Ramos, Lauren Raskin; Therrell, Bradford L

    2006-05-01

    Financing for newborn screening is different from virtually all other public health programs. All except 5 screening programs collect fees as the primary source of program funding. A fee-based approach to financing newborn screening has been adopted by most states, to ensure consistent funding for this critical public health activity. Two types of data are reported here, ie, primary data from a survey of 37 state public health agencies and findings from exploratory case studies from 7 states. Most of the programs that participated in this survey (73%) reported that their newborn screening funding increased between 2002 and 2005, typically through increased fees and to a lesser extent through Medicaid, Title V Maternal and Child Health Services Block Grant, and state general revenue funding. All of the responding states that collect fees (n = 31) use such funds to support laboratory expenses, and most (70%) finance short-term follow-up services and program management. Nearly one half (47%) finance longer-term follow-up services, case management, or family support beyond diagnosis. Other states (43%) finance genetic or nutritional counseling and formula foods or treatment. Regardless of the source of funds, the available evidence indicates that states are committed to maintaining their programs and securing the necessary financing for the initial screening through diagnosis. Use of federal funding is currently limited; however, pressure to provide dedicated federal funding would likely increase if national recommendations for a uniform newborn screening panel were issued.

  11. A modified Delphi study of screening for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders in Australia

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    Watkins Rochelle E

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little reliable information on the prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD in Australia and no coordinated national approach to facilitate case detection. The aim of this study was to identify health professionals’ perceptions about screening for FASD in Australia. Method A modified Delphi process was used to assess perceptions of the need for, and the process of, screening for FASD in Australia. We recruited a panel of 130 Australian health professionals with experience or expertise in FASD screening or diagnosis. A systematic review of the literature was used to develop Likert statements on screening coverage, components and assessment methods which were administered using an online survey over two survey rounds. Results Of the panel members surveyed, 95 (73% responded to the questions on screening in the first survey round and, of these, 81 (85% responded to the second round. Following two rounds there was consensus agreement on the need for targeted screening at birth (76% and in childhood (84%. Participants did not reach consensus agreement on the need for universal screening at birth (55% or in childhood (40%. Support for targeted screening was linked to perceived constraints on service provision and the need to examine the performance, costs and benefits of screening. For targeted screening of high risk groups, we found highest agreement for siblings of known cases of FASD (96% and children of mothers attending alcohol treatment services (93%. Participants agreed that screening for FASD primarily requires assessment of prenatal alcohol exposure at birth (86% and in childhood (88%, and that a checklist is needed to identify the components of screening and criteria for referral at birth (84% and in childhood (90%. Conclusions There is an agreed need for targeted but not universal screening for FASD in Australia, and sufficient consensus among health professionals to warrant development and

  12. The direct cost of "Thriasio" school screening program

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    Maziotou Christina

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is great diversity in the policies for scoliosis screening worldwide. The initial enthusiasm was succeeded by skepticism and the worth of screening programs has been challenged. The criticisms of school screening programs cite mainly the negative psychological impact on children and their families and the increased financial cost of visits and follow-up radiographs. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the direct cost of performing the school screening in a district hospital. Methods A cost analysis was performed for the estimation of the direct cost of the "Thriasio" school-screening program between January 2000 and May 2006. The analysis involved all the 6470 pupils aged 6–18 years old who were screened at schools for spinal deformities during this period. The factors which were taken into consideration in order to calculate the direct cost of the screening program were a the number of the examiners b the working hours, c the examiners' salary, d the cost of transportation and finally e the cost of examination per child. Results During the examined period 20 examiners were involved in the program and worked for 1949 working hours. The hourly salary for the trainee doctors was 6.80 euro, for the Health Visitors 6.70 euro and for the Physiotherapists 5.50 euro in current prices. The cost of transportation was 32 euro per year. The direct cost for the examination of each child for the above studied period was calculated to be 2.04 euro. Conclusion The cost of our school-screening program is low. The present study provides a strong evidence for the continuation of the program when looking from a financial point of view.

  13. Screening for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Somali ex-combatants: A validation study

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    Rockstroh Brigitte

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Somalia, a large number of active and former combatants are affected by psychological problems such as Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD. This disorder impairs their ability to re-integrate into civilian life. However, many screening instruments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder used in post-conflict settings have limited validity. Here we report on development and validation of a screening tool for PTSD in Somali language with a sample of ex-combatants. Methods We adapted the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PDS to reflect linguistic and cultural differences within the Somali community so that local interviewers could be trained to administer the scale. For validation purposes, a randomly selected group of 135 Somali ex-combatants was screened by trained local interviewers; 64 of them were then re-assessed by trained clinical psychologists using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI and the Self-Report Questionnaire (SRQ-20. Results The screening instrument showed good internal consistency (Cronbach's α = .86, convergent validity with the CIDI (sensitivity = .90; specificity = .90 as well as concurrent validity: positive cases showed higher SRQ-20 scores, higher prevalence of psychotic symptoms, and higher levels of intake of the local stimulant drug khat. Compared to a single cut-off score, the multi-criteria scoring, in keeping with the DSM-IV, produced more diagnostic specificity. Conclusion The results provide evidence that our screening instrument is a reliable and valid method to detect PTSD among Somali ex-combatants. A future Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration Program in Somalia is recommended to screen for PTSD in order to identify ex-combatants with special psycho-social needs.

  14. Brief screening for co-occurring disorders among women entering substance abuse treatment

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    Chernoff Miriam

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the importance of identifying co-occurring psychiatric disorders in substance abuse treatment programs, there are few appropriate and validated instruments available to substance abuse treatment staff to conduct brief screen for these conditions. This paper describes the development, implementation and validation of a brief screening instrument for mental health diagnoses and trauma among a diverse sample of Black, Hispanic and White women in substance abuse treatment. With input from clinicians and consumers, we adapted longer existing validated instruments into a 14 question screen covering demographics, mental health symptoms and physical and sexual violence exposure. All women entering treatment (methadone, residential and out-patient at five treatment sites were screened at intake (N = 374. Results Eighty nine percent reported a history of interpersonal violence, and 70% reported a history of sexual assault. Eighty-eight percent reported mental health symptoms in the last 30 days. The screening questions administered to 88 female clients were validated against in-depth psychiatric diagnostic assessments by trained mental health clinicians. We estimated measures of predictive validity, including sensitivity, specificity and predictive values positive and negative. Screening items were examined multiple ways to assess utility. The screen is a useful and valid proxy for PTSD but not for other mental illness. Conclusion Substance abuse treatment programs should incorporate violence exposure questions into clinical use as a matter of policy. More work is needed to develop brief screening tools measures for front-line treatment staff to accurately assess other mental health needs of women entering substance abuse treatment

  15. Screening for personality disorder in incarcerated adolescent boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik; Kongerslev, Mickey; Moran, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Background: Personality disorder (PD) is associated with significant functional impairment and an elevated risk of violent and suicidal behaviour. The prevalence of PD in populations of young offenders is likely to be high. However, because the assessment of PD is time-consuming, it is not routin......Background: Personality disorder (PD) is associated with significant functional impairment and an elevated risk of violent and suicidal behaviour. The prevalence of PD in populations of young offenders is likely to be high. However, because the assessment of PD is time...... in adults (Standardised Assessment of Personality – Abbreviated Scale; SAPAS) for use with adolescents and then carried out a study of the reliability and validity of the adapted instrument in a sample of 80 adolescent boys in secure institutions. Participants were administered the screen and shortly after...

  16. Screening for Binge Eating Disorder in people with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wever, Mirjam C M; Dingemans, Alexandra E; Geerets, Tiny; Danner, Unna N

    2018-03-09

    The Risk factors for Binge Eating Disorder in Overweight (REO) questionnaire is a screening tool for nutritionists to discriminate between individuals with obesity with and without Binge Eating Disorder (BED). The first study tested the discriminative ability of the REO and identified an optimal cut-off value. In the second study this cut-off value was used to identify individuals with and without BED from a sample of individuals with obesity visiting a nutritionist and compared clinical and personality characteristics with a group of individuals officially diagnosed with BED. Results showed that the REO has a sensitivity of 95.1%, specificity of 81.5%, a good internal consistency of α=.96, and an exploratory factor analysis showed four underlying factors of the REO that explained a total variance of 63.7%. Characteristics of individuals with BED symptoms identified by the REO and those officially diagnosed with BED were comparable and differed from individuals with obesity without BED symptoms. By screening individuals with obesity with the REO those presenting with BED symptoms are more easily identified, and can be referred to psychological treatment facilities for further assessment and appropriate treatment. Copyright © 2018 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Knowledge and Attitude of University Students Towards Premarital Screening Program

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    Rahma Al Kindi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the knowledge and attitude of Sultan Qaboos University students towards premarital screening program.Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted at the students’ clinic from January to April 2011. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 590 unmarried Omani students of both genders. The questionnaire consisted of 3 main parts; the first part was based on socio-demographic data, the second part dealt with the students’ knowledge about the premarital screening program while the third part explored their attitudes towards the screening program.Results: Most of the participants (n=469; 79% were aware about the availability of premarital screening program in Oman. The main sources of information were: school/college (n=212; 36%, media (n=209; 35%, family and friends (n=197; 33%, and/or health services (n=181, 31%. The vast majority of the participants (n=540; 92% thought it is important to carry out premarital screening and agreed to do it. Around half of the participants (n=313; 53% favored having premarital screening as an obligatory procedure before marriage and about one third (n=212; 36% favored making laws and regulation to prevent marriage in case of positive results.Conclusion: Even though the majority of the participants thought it is important to carry out premarital screening; only half favored making it obligatory before marriage and one third favored making laws and regulations to prevent marriage in case of positive results. This reflects the importance of health education as a keystone in improving knowledge and attitude towards premarital screening program.

  18. Knowledge and Attitude of University Students Towards Premarital Screening Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kindi, Rahma; Al Rujaibi, Salha; Al Kendi, Maya

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to explore the knowledge and attitude of Sultan Qaboos University students towards premarital screening program. Methods A cross-sectional study conducted at the students’ clinic from January to April 2011. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 590 unmarried Omani students of both genders. The questionnaire consisted of 3 main parts; the first part was based on socio-demographic data, the second part dealt with the students’ knowledge about the premarital screening program while the third part explored their attitudes towards the screening program. Results Most of the participants (n=469; 79%) were aware about the availability of premarital screening program in Oman. The main sources of information were: school/college (n=212; 36%), media (n=209; 35%), family and friends (n=197; 33%), and/or health services (n=181, 31%). The vast majority of the participants (n=540; 92%) thought it is important to carry out premarital screening and agreed to do it. Around half of the participants (n=313; 53%) favored having premarital screening as an obligatory procedure before marriage and about one third (n=212; 36%) favored making laws and regulation to prevent marriage in case of positive results. Conclusion Even though the majority of the participants thought it is important to carry out premarital screening; only half favored making it obligatory before marriage and one third favored making laws and regulations to prevent marriage in case of positive results. This reflects the importance of health education as a keystone in improving knowledge and attitude towards premarital screening program. PMID:23071880

  19. The Eating Disorder Inventory in the screening for DSM-5 binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustelin, Linda; Kärkkäinen, Ulla; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna

    2016-08-01

    We assessed whether the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI) is suitable for screening binge eating disorder (BED) in young women. Young women (N=2825) from the 1975-79 birth cohorts of Finnish twins were assessed by questionnaires, including subscales of the EDI. For a subset of women (N=548), we established DSM-5 diagnoses of BED; 16 women had lifetime BED. We compared screening properties of the EDI scales using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, determined optimal cutoff points, and calculated sensitivities and specificities. The best screen for DSM-5 BED was the global score of three subscales (Bulimia, Drive for Thinness, Body Dissatisfaction) with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.86. Its sensitivity was 87% and specificity 76% at cutoff ≥21. Three individual subscales had acceptable screening properties: Bulimia (AUC 0.83; sensitivity 80%, specificity 78% at cutoff ≥2), Drive For Thinness (AUC 0.82; sensitivity 87%, specificity 72% at cutoff ≥7), and Body Dissatisfaction (AUC 0.81; sensitivity 93%, specificity 60% at cutoff ≥8). The EDI performed well as a screening tool for BED in our community-based sample of young twin women. Future studies should assess its value in other populations and in clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Screening for idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder: usefulness of actigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, A; Heidbreder, A; Brandauer, E; Guaita, M; Neier, L M; Mitterling, T; Santamaria, J; Iranzo, A; Videnovic, A; Trenkwalder, C; Sixel-Döring, F; Wenning, G K; Chade, A; Poewe, W; Gershanik, O S; Högl, B

    2018-03-15

    To evaluate the utility of multimodal low-cost approaches including actigraphy, a wrist-worn device monitoring rest/activity cycles, in identifying patients with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD). Seventy patients diagnosed with sleep disorders causing different motor manifestations during sleep (iRBD, sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome) and 20 subjects without any relevant motor manifestation during sleep, underwent video-polysomnography (vPSG) and two-week actigraphy, completed six validated RBD screening questionnaires, and sleep apps use was assessed. Actigraphy was analyzed automatically, and visually by seven blinded sleep medicine experts who rated as "no", "possible" and "probable" RBD. Quantitative actigraphy analysis distinguished patients from controls, but not between patients with different types of motor activity during sleep. Visual actigraphy rating by blinded experts in sleep medicine using pattern recognition identified vPSG confirmed iRBD with 85-95% sensitivity, 79-91% specificity, 81-91% accuracy, 57.7±11.3% positive predictive value, 95.1±3.3% negative predictive value, 6.8±2.2 positive likelihood ratio, 0.14±0.05 negative likelihood ratio and 0.874-0.933 AUC. AUC of the best performing questionnaire was 0.868. Few patients used sleep apps, therefore their potential utility in the evaluated patients' groups is limited. Visual analysis of actigraphy using pattern recognition can identify subjects with iRBD, is able to distinguish iRBD from other motor activity during sleep, even when patients are not aware of the disease in contrast to questionnaires. Therefore, actigraphy can be a reliable screening instrument for RBD potentially useful in the general population. Therefore, actigraphy can be a reliable screening instrument for RBD potentially useful in the general population.

  1. Comparative analysis of three screening instruments for autism spectrum disorder in toddlers at high risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterling, I.J.; Swinkels, S.H.N.; Gaag, R.J. van der; Visser, J.C.; Dietz, C.; Buitelaar, J.K.

    2009-01-01

    Several instruments have been developed to screen for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in high-risk populations. However, few studies compare different instruments in one sample. Data were gathered from the Early Screening of Autistic Traits Questionnaire, Social Communication Questionnaire,

  2. Overcoming barriers in HPV vaccination and screening programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Vorsters

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Human Papillomavirus Prevention and Control Board brought together experts to discuss optimizing HPV vaccination and screening programs.Board members reviewed the safety profile of licensed HPV vaccines based on clinical and post-marketing data, reaching a consensus that current safety data is reassuring.Successful vaccination programs used well-coordinated communication campaigns, integrating (social media to spread awareness. Communication of evidence supporting vaccine effectiveness had beneficial effects on the perception of the vaccine. However, anti-vaccination campaigns have threatened existing programs in many countries.Measurement and monitoring of HPV vaccine confidence over time could help understand the nature and scale of waning confidence, define issues and intervene appropriately using context-specific evidence-based strategies. Finally, a broad group of stakeholders, such as teachers, health care providers and the media should also be provided with accurate information and training to help support prevention efforts through enhanced understanding of the risks and benefits of vaccination.Similarly, while cervical cancer screening through population-based programs is highly effective, barriers to screening exist: awareness in countries with population-based screening programs, access for vulnerable populations, and access and affordability in low- and middle-income countries. Integration of primary and secondary prevention has the potential to accelerate the decrease in cervical cancer incidence. Keywords: (max 6 Human papillomavirus, Vaccine, Screening, Barriers, Vaccine confidence

  3. Newborn screening for lysosomal storage disorders: clinical evaluation of a two-tier strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meikle, Peter J; Ranieri, Enzo; Simonsen, Henrik; Rozaklis, Tina; Ramsay, Steve L; Whitfield, Phillip D; Fuller, Maria; Christensen, Ernst; Skovby, Flemming; Hopwood, John J

    2004-10-01

    To evaluate the use of protein markers using immune-quantification assays and of metabolite markers using tandem mass spectrometry for the identification, at birth, of individuals who have a lysosomal storage disorder. A retrospective analysis was conducted of Guthrie cards that were collected from newborns in Denmark during the period 1982-1997. Patients whose lysosomal storage disorder (LSD; 47 representing 12 disorders) was diagnosed in Denmark during the period 1982-1997 were selected, and their Guthrie cards were retrieved from storage. Control cards (227) were retrieved from the same period. Additional control cards (273) were collected from the South Australian Screening Centre (Australia). From 2 protein and 94 metabolite markers, 15 were selected and evaluated for their use in the identification of LSDs. Glycosphingolipid and oligosaccharide markers showed 100% sensitivity and specificity for the identification of Fabry disease, alpha-mannosidosis, mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IVA, MPS IIIA, Tay-Sachs disease, and I-cell disease. Lower sensitivities were observed for Gaucher disease and sialidosis. No useful markers were identified for Krabbe disease, MPS II, Pompe disease, and Sandhoff disease. The protein markers LAMP-1 and saposin C were not able to differentiate individuals who had an LSD from the control population. Newborn screening for selected LSDs is possible with current technology. However, additional development is required to provide a broad coverage of disorders in a single, viable program.

  4. Mental Health and Mental Disorder Recommendation Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchiwit, Manyat

    2017-12-01

    The characteristic differences among the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) countries in terms of trade and investment, society and cultural values, medical information and technology, and the living and working environment have become major health problems in terms of mental disorders. The purpose of this article is to identify the gaps in those aspects, to propose mental health and mental disorder recommendation programs, and to recommend policies for policy makers and research investors. A comparative analysis and literature review of existing policy, including overviews of previous research were used to generate a synthesis of the existing knowledge of the mental health and mental disorder recommendation programs. The review results recommend mental health and mental disorder programs for policy makers, research investors, and stakeholders in order to strengthen the directions for implementing these programs in the future. The healthcare provision in each country will not be limited only to its citizens; the healthcare markets and target groups are likely to expand to the neighboring countries in the context of changes in domestic and international factors, which have both positive and negative impacts according to the political, economic, and social situations of the influencing countries.

  5. Newborn screening program for hemoglobinopathies in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Clarisse Lopes de Castro; Ballas, Samir K; Domingos, Ana Carolina Bonini; Moura, Patricia G; do Nascimento, Emilia Matos; Cardoso, Gilberto Perez; de Carvalho, Silvia Maia Farias

    2014-01-01

    Newborn screening for hemoglobinopathy in Brazil has been decentralized until 2001 when the Health Ministry of Brazil established the National Newborn Hemoglobinopathy Screening Program. The State of Rio de Janeiro started a program in collaboration with the State Health Department and the Institute of Hematology in Rio (HEMORIO). The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the first 10 years of the Newborn Hemoglobinopathy Screening Program in identifying and managing infants with Sickle cell disease (SCD) in the State of Rio de Janeiro. Blood samples from 1,217,833 neonates were analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Infants with SCD were enrolled in comprehensive treatment programs. Data showed that 4.87% of the newborns were heterozygous for a hemoglobin variant, 0.08% were homozygous or doubly heterozygous for abnormal hemoglobins and 95.02% had normal hemoglobin. All the 912 newborns with SCD were referred for treatment at HEMORIO, 34 (3.7%) of these died due to acute chest syndrome, sepsis or splenic sequestration. Four more children died of unknown causes. The implementation of the Rio de Janeiro Newborn Screening Program gradually increased the area of the State covered by the program. Data collected during the 10 years of the program showed reduction in mortality of patients with SCD in comparison to available historical statistical data before the implementation of the national screening program. This 10-year study showed that early diagnosis and treatment of newborns was associated with improved survival and quality of life of Brazilian children with SCD. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Screening of Hemoglobin disorder in non-endemic region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Raj K.C.

    2017-09-01

    them of their risk, and possibilities for reducing it, usually leads to a fall in births and deaths of affected children. Requirements are the same for thalassaemias and sickle-cell disorders.  To prevent and minimize the disease regular screening; in all the communities; should be conducted at least in anaemic individuals with microcytic hypochromic anaema.  Population screening is not the only useful strategy: family studies can be cost-effective.The effects of screening depend on the choices made by informed individuals. Birth prevalence of thalassaemia can fall by over 90%6,7 because most at-risk couples limit their family to two healthy children,6,7 there is very high uptake of prenatal diagnosis, and some carriers avoid risk by selecting a non-carrier partner.6,7 Available data for sickle-cell disorders shows lower use of prenatal diagnosis8 and improved survival of affected children with neonatal diagnosis.

  7. Optimising the expansion of the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenin, Dayna R; St John, D James B; Ledger, Melissa J N; Slevin, Terry; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris

    2014-10-20

    To estimate the impact of various expansion scenarios of the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) on the number of bowel cancer deaths prevented; and to investigate the impact of the expansion scenarios on colonoscopy demand. MISCAN-Colon, a well established, validated computer simulation model for bowel cancer screening, was adjusted to reflect the Australian situation. In July 2013, we simulated the effects of screening over a 50-year period, starting in 2006. The model parameters included rates of participation in screening and follow-up, rates of identification of cancerous and precancerous lesions, bowel cancer incidence, mortality and the outcomes of the NBCSP. Five implementation scenarios, based on biennial screening using an immunochemical faecal occult blood test, were developed and modelled. A sensitivity analysis that increased screening participation to 60% was also conducted. Australian residents aged 50 to 74 years. Comparison of the impact of five implementation scenarios on the number of bowel cancer deaths prevented and demand for colonoscopy. MISCAN-Colon calculated that in its current state, the NBCSP should prevent 35 169 bowel cancer deaths in the coming 40 years. Accelerating the expansion of the program to achieve biennial screening by 2020 would prevent more than 70 000 deaths. If complete implementation of biennial screening results in a corresponding increase in participation to 60%, the number of deaths prevented will increase across all scenarios. The findings strongly support the need for rapid implementation of the NBCSP. Compared with the current situation, achieving biennial screening by 2020 could result in 100% more bowel cancer deaths (about 35 000) being prevented in the coming 40 years.

  8. Screening and Evaluation of Medications for Treating Cannabis Use Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panlilio, Leigh V.; Justinova, Zuzana; Trigo, Jose M.; Le Foll, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis use has been increasingly accepted legally and in public opinion. However, cannabis has the potential to produce adverse physical and mental health effects and can result in cannabis use disorder (CUD) in a substantial percentage of both occasional and daily cannabis users. Many people have difficulty discontinuing use. Therefore, it would be beneficial to develop safe and effective medications for treating CUD. To achieve this, methods have been developed for screening and evaluating potential medications using animal models and controlled experimental protocols in human volunteers. In this chapter we describe: 1) animal models available for assessing the effect of potential medications on specific aspects of CUD; 2) the main findings obtained so far with these animal models; 3) the approaches used to assess potential medications in humans in laboratory experiments and clinical trials; and 4) the effectiveness of several potential pharmacotherapies on the particular aspects of CUD modeled in these human studies. PMID:27055612

  9. Performance of a four-step newborn screening strategy for CF in the Dutch screening program: WS 10.4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dankert-Roelse,J.; Bouva, M.; Winter-de Groot, Y. de; Schönbeck, Y.; Gille, H.; Gulmans, V.A.M.; Verschoof-Puite, R.; Dompeling, E.; Schielen, P.; Verkerk, P.

    2017-01-01

    Workshop. Since May 1, 2011, newborn screening for Cystic Fibrosis (NBSCF) is part of the Dutch NBS program Objectives: To assess the validity of the four-step screening strategy when applied in a routine newborn screening program. Methods: NBSCF was carried out as a 4-step strategy

  10. Knowledge, Attitude, and Satisfaction of University Students Regarding Premarital Screening Programs in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Al-Enezi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of genetic blood disorders is high, ranging from 10-25%, in Kuwait. This high prevalence is mainly due to a preventable cause, namely, consanguineous marriages. One of the most successful programs in Kuwait implemented to reduce such high prevalence is premarital screening program. The aim of the study was to determine the level of knowledge, attitude and satisfaction among university students regarding premarital screening program, and to find out the factors influencing knowledge, attitude, and satisfaction of the people toward premarital screening program. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 809 students of Kuwait University during July-October 2016. A self-administered questionnaire including 51 questions was handed out to the participants after taking informed consent. The main outcome variables of this study were: knowledge of hereditary diseases, premarital screening, attitude, and satisfaction toward premarital screening program. The mean ± SD of knowledge score about hereditary diseases was 5.80 ± 2.9 out of a total of 14, and the knowledge score for premarital screening was 3.99 ± 1.2 out of 6. In univariate analysis, knowledge scores about hereditary diseases were significantly associated with marital status (P = 0.043, education in medical faculties (P < 0.001, higher education of father (P = 0.027, higher education of mother (P = 0.001, and presence of hereditary disease in the family (P = 0.003. The level of attitude toward premarital screening program was significantly associated with female gender (P < 0.001, marital status (P = 0.023, higher years of study (P = 0.002, higher family income (P = 0.019. In multivariate analysis, education in medical faculties and presence of hereditary disease in the family were significant predictors of knowledge about hereditary disease. This study identified some demographic factors which determined the outcome of knowledge about premarital screening and hereditary

  11. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and risk of screening positive for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder : A cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porcel, Jacqueline; Feigal, Christine; Poye, Laney; Postma, Ineke R.; Zeeman, Gerda G.; Olowoyeye, Abiola; Tsigas, Eleni; Wilson, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy (HDP) encompass a spectrum of disorders that affect 6-8% of US pregnancies. We aim to determine the impact of self-reported history of HDP as a risk factor for screening positive for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), which results from exposure to

  12. Self-collection for under-screened women in a National Cervical Screening Program: pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, M.; Hawkes, D; Mclachlan, E.; Anderson, S.; Arabena, K.

    2018-01-01

    Background Commencing 1 December 2017, Australia introduced human papillomavirus (hpv)-based cervical screening. As part of this Australian renewed National Cervical Screening Program (ncsp) women who are either never- or under-screened and who refuse a practitioner collected sample will be able to collect their own sample for cervical screening. The aim of this study is to examine the quantitative results of a pilot study into the acceptability of the self-collection alternative pathway. Methods Eligible participants were offered the opportunity to collect their own sample. Those who agreed were given a flocked swab and an instruction sheet and took their own sample in an area of the health care clinic that afforded them adequate privacy. These samples were then given to clinic staff who returned them to Victorian Cytology Service (vcs) Pathology for hpv nucleic acid testing. Results Of 98 eligible women, seventy-nine undertook self-collection for hpv-based cervical screening. Seventy-seven produced valid results, 14 were positive for oncogenic hpv, with 10 undertaking follow-up. Three women were found to have cervical squamous abnormalities with two of those being high-grade intraepithelial squamous lesions. Conclusion The pilot study for self-collection for cervical screening produced quantitative data that were similar to that already reported in the literature, but had a much higher rate of acceptance compared with self-collection programs based in the home. PMID:29507492

  13. Newborn Screening for Lysosomal Storage Disorders in Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois Eyskens MD, PhD

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs are a group of metabolic disorders with various clinical presentations, which complicate diagnosis. A pilot study was performed to test the appropriateness and effectiveness of the newborn screening method for Pompe disease, Fabry disease and mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS I in dried blood spots using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Around 20 000 newborn samples were analyzed for 3 lysosomal enzyme activities: α-glucosidase (deficient in Pompe disease, α-galactosidase (deficient in Fabry disease and α-iduronidase (IDUA, deficient in MPS I. Data were used for statistical analysis and to establish sex- and age-dependent reference ranges. Statistically significant higher α-glucosidase, α-galactosidase, and IDUA enzyme activities were observed in female newborns compared to male newborns. Newborns with a higher gestational age have a statistically significant lower α-glucosidase, α-galactosidase, and IDUA enzyme activities compared to newborns with a lower gestational age. For the first time, the data of a large-scale LSD study were used to assess statistical differences in enzyme activity in the newborn population, and these data highlight the importance of using reference intervals for lysosomal enzyme activities in function of sex and gestational age.

  14. [Cigarette smoking among women attending cervical cancer screening program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walentowicz-Sadłecka, Małgorzata; Sadłecki, Paweł; Marszałek, Andrzej; Grabiec, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is recognized as tobacco-related malignancy. HPV vaccination and introducing screening protocols were found as the best way to decrease cervical cancer related mortality. Besides the cytological screening programs of the uterine cervix smear, nowadays co-factors of carcinogenesis are taken into consideration, also. The aim of our study was to analyse data included in questionnaire of 310 women who underwent cytological examination wi thin cervical cancer screening program in our Department in 2011. There were no differences found between studied groups on rate of oral contraceptive or hormonal therapy use, as well as age and tobacco smoking. However, taking into account education and smoking, there was a significant correlation observed. Patients with higher education level smoked less often. The special attention should be paid to promote smoking cessation in the group of women who finished education on elementary level.

  15. National screening program vs. standardized neurodevelopmental follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maschke, Cornelia; Ellenrieder, Birte; Hecher, Kurt; Bartmann, Peter

    Background: Long-term follow-up is urgently needed to decide on the consequences of new therapies. Objective: This study assesses the use of a national child development screening program for a follow-up examination of a defined patient group. Patients and methods: Neurodevelopmental outcome of 139

  16. Comparison of three questionnaires to screen for borderline personality disorder in adolescents and young adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alebeek, A. van; Heijden, P.T. van der; Hessels, C.; Thong, M.S.Y.; Aken, M.A.G. van

    2017-01-01

    One of the most common personality disorders among adolescents and young adults is the Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). The objective of current study was to assess three questionnaires that can reliably screen for BPD in adolescents and young adults (N = 53): the McLean Screening Instrument

  17. Indicators for monitoring screening programs with primary HPV test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Manuel; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    following scientific evidence produced in numerous studies, as well as national and international guidelines, organized cervical cancer screening programs in Italy have gradually introduced the HPV test as primary screening test, replacing cytology. As public health interventions, screening programs must ensure equity, improvement in quality of life, and adequate information for the population involved with regards to benefits and possible risks; therefore, it is essential for quality to be constantly checked at every phase of the project.The Italian Cervical Screening Group (Gruppo Italiano per lo Screening Cervicale, GISCi) has written a handbook for the calculation and interpretation of cervical screening program monitoring indicators that take into account the new protocol based on primary HPV test with cytology triage. based on the European guidelines and Italian recommendations on primary HPVbased screening, the working group, which includes professionals from all the fields involved in cervical screening, identified the essential points needed to monitor the screening process, the accuracy of individual tests, and early outcomes, defining a specific indicator for each aspect. The indicators were grouped as follows: baseline indicators, indicators for test repeat after one year, cumulative indicators, and waiting times. For every indicator, the source of data, calculation formula, any standards or critical thresholds, and interpretation were defined. The standards are based on the results of NTCC trials or Italian pilot studies. the main indicators proposed for the organization are the following: number of invitations, compliance with first invitation, with one-year test repeat and with colposcopy; for test and process accuracy, a cohort approach was utilised, where indicators are based on women who must be followed for at least one year, so as to integrate the results obtained after the first HPV test with the outcome of the test's repetition after one year

  18. Fetal programming and eating disorder risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Candace; Pearce, Brad; Barrera, Ingrid; Mummert, Amanda

    2017-09-07

    Fetal programming describes the process by which environmental stimuli impact fetal development to influence disease development later in life. Our analysis summarizes evidence for the role of fetal programming in eating disorder etiology through review of studies demonstrating specific obstetric complications and later eating risk of anorexia or bulimia. Using Pubmed, we found thirteen studies investigating obstetric factors and eating disorder risk published between 1999 and 2016. We then discuss modifiable maternal risk factors, including nutrition and stress, that influence anorexia or bulimia risk of their offspring. Translation of these findings applies to preventative strategies by health organizations and physicians to provide optimal health for mothers and their children to prevent development of medical and psychiatric illnesses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Progression of diabetes retinal status within community screening programs and potential implications for screening intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leese, Graham P; Stratton, Irene M; Land, Martin; Bachmann, Max O; Jones, Colin; Scanlon, Peter; Looker, Helen C; Ferguson, Brian

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to follow the natural progression of retinal changes in patients with diabetes. Such information should inform decisions with regard to the screening intervals for such patients. An observational study was undertaken linking the data from seven diabetes retinal screening programs across the U.K. for retinal grading results between 2005 and 2012. Patients with absent or background retinopathy were followed up for progression to the end points referable retinopathy and treatable retinopathy (proliferative retinopathy). In total, 354,549 patients were observed for up to 4 years during which 16,196 patients progressed to referable retinopathy. Of patients with no retinopathy in either eye for two successive screening episodes at least 12 months apart, the conditions of between 0.3% (95% CI 0.3-0.8%) and 1.3% (1.0-1.6%) of patients progressed to referable retinopathy, and rates of treatable eye disease were screening episodes were 13-29% and up to 4%, respectively, in the different programs. It may be possible to stratify patients for risk, according to baseline retinal criteria, into groups with low and high risk of their conditions progressing to proliferative retinopathy. Screening intervals for such diverse groups of patients could safely be modified according to their risk. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  20. A single-question screen for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postuma, Ronald B; Arnulf, Isabelle; Hogl, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia that is an important risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD) and Lewy body dementia. Its prevalence is unknown. One barrier to determining prevalence is that current screening tools are too long for large......-scale epidemiologic surveys. Therefore, we designed the REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Single-Question Screen (RBD1Q), a screening question for dream enactment with a simple yes/no response....

  1. Enhancing the quality and efficiency of newborn screening programs through the use of health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Gregory J; Zuckerman, Alan E; Coon, Constanze; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele A

    2010-04-01

    A variety of efforts are underway at national, state, regional, and local levels to enhance the performance of programs for early detection of inherited diseases and conditions of newborn infants. Newborn screening programs serve a vital purpose in identifying nonsymptomatic clinical conditions and enabling early intervention strategies that lessen morbidity and mortality. Currently, the programs of most intense focus are early hearing detection and intervention, using physiological techniques for audiology screening and use of newborn dried blood spots for detection of metabolites or proteins representing inherited disorders. One of the primary challenges to effective newborn screening programs to date has been the inability to provide information in a timely and easily accessible way to a variety of users. Other challenging communication issues being faced include the complexity introduced by the diversity of conditions for which testing is conducted and laboratory methods being used by each state's screening programs, lack of an electronic information infrastructure to facilitate information exchange, and variation in policies that enable access to information while protecting patient privacy and confidentiality. In this study, we address steps being taken to understand these challenges, outline progress made to date to overcome them, and provide examples of how electronic health information exchange will enhance the utility of newborn screening. It is likely that future advances in science and technology will bring many more opportunities to prevent and preempt disabilities among children through early detection programs. To take their advantage, effective communication strategies are needed among the public health, primary care practice, referral/specialty service, and consumer advocacy communities to provide continuity of information required for medical decision-making throughout prenatal, newborn, and early childhood periods of patient care. Published by

  2. Fundus Autofluorescence Imaging in an Ocular Screening Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Kolomeyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe integration of fundus autofluorescence (FAF imaging into an ocular screening program. Methods. Fifty consecutive screening participants were included in this prospective pilot imaging study. Color and FAF (530/640 nm exciter/barrier filters images were obtained with a 15.1MP Canon nonmydriatic hybrid camera. A clinician evaluated the images on site to determine need for referral. Visual acuity (VA, intraocular pressure (IOP, and ocular pathology detected by color fundus and FAF imaging modalities were recorded. Results. Mean ± SD age was 47.4 ± 17.3 years. Fifty-two percent were female and 58% African American. Twenty-seven percent had a comprehensive ocular examination within the past year. Mean VA was 20/39 in the right eye and 20/40 in the left eye. Mean IOP was 15 mmHg bilaterally. Positive color and/or FAF findings were identified in nine (18% individuals with diabetic retinopathy or macular edema (n=4, focal RPE defects (n=2, age-related macular degeneration (n=1, central serous retinopathy (n=1, and ocular trauma (n=1. Conclusions. FAF was successfully integrated in our ocular screening program and aided in the identification of ocular pathology. Larger studies examining the utility of this technology in screening programs may be warranted.

  3. Cost-effectiveness analysis of neonatal hearing screening program in china: should universal screening be prioritized?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Li-Hui

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neonatal hearing screening (NHS has been routinely offered as a vital component of early childhood care in developed countries, whereas such a screening program is still at the pilot or preliminary stage as regards its nationwide implementation in developing countries. To provide significant evidence for health policy making in China, this study aims to determine the cost-effectiveness of NHS program implementation in case of eight provinces of China. Methods A cost-effectiveness model was conducted and all neonates annually born from 2007 to 2009 in eight provinces of China were simulated in this model. The model parameters were estimated from the established databases in the general hospitals or maternal and child health hospitals of these eight provinces, supplemented from the published literature. The model estimated changes in program implementation costs, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs, average cost-effectiveness ratio (ACER, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER for universal screening compared to targeted screening in eight provinces. Results and discussion A multivariate sensitivity analysis was performed to determine uncertainty in health effect estimates and cost-effectiveness ratios using a probabilistic modeling technique. Targeted strategy trended to be cost-effective in Guangxi, Jiangxi, Henan, Guangdong, Zhejiang, Hebei, Shandong, and Beijing from the level of 9%, 9%, 8%, 4%, 3%, 7%, 5%, and 2%, respectively; while universal strategy trended to be cost-effective in those provinces from the level of 70%, 70%, 48%, 10%, 8%, 28%, 15%, 4%, respectively. This study showed although there was a huge disparity in the implementation of the NHS program in the surveyed provinces, both universal strategy and targeted strategy showed cost-effectiveness in those relatively developed provinces, while neither of the screening strategy showed cost-effectiveness in those relatively developing provinces. This

  4. Screening of Inherited Metabolic Disorders in Infants with Infantile Spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Ming; Li, Rui; Chen, Sheng-Zhi; Sang, Yan; Chen, Jiao; Fan, Cong-Hai

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the incidence of inherited metabolic disorders (IMD) in infants with infantile spasms (IS), with an attempt to improve the early diagnosis and etiological and symptomatic treatment. Urine and blood samples were collected from 60 IS patients and analyzed for the quantification of amino acids, organic acids, and fatty acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrum. Routine urine tests, hepatic function tests, blood biochemistry, brain imaging, as well as examinations of the brain stem auditory/visual evoked potentials were also examined. In addition to antiepileptic therapy, etiological and symptomatic treatments were also conducted in infants with confirmed IMD and the follow-up lasted for 6 months in these pediatric patients. Metabolic disorders were found in 28 (46.67 %) of 60 IS infants, among them 13 (21.67 %) were confirmed to be with IMD. Twelve of these 13 IS patients with definite IMD diagnoses (92.31 %) experienced varying degrees of delayed development of intelligence and motor function, 8 patients (61.54 %) had abnormal cranial CT or MRI findings, 11 patients (84.61 %) had abnormal brain stem evoked potentials, 4 patients (30.77 %) had abnormal hepatic functions, 3 patients (23.07 %) had abnormal blood biochemistry, 2 patients (15.38 %) had positive (+ to ++) results for routine urine ketones, and 2 patients (15.38 %) had skin lesions. After treatment in children who were diagnosed IMD, the well controlled epileptic seizures and the satisfactory developments in mental and motor were found in 4 cases of methylmalonic acidemia, 2 cases of classical phenylketonuria, and one case of biotin deficiency disease, glutaric acidemia type I, and 4-hydroxybutyric aciduria in each. IMD is a key biological cause in IS. Early screening for IMD is warranted in IS infants to facilitate the improvement for the prognosis and an early etiological treatment.

  5. Whole-Genome Screening of Newborns? The Constitutional Boundaries of State Newborn Screening Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jaime S; Smith, Monica E

    2016-01-01

    State newborn screening (NBS) programs routinely screen nearly all of the 4 million newborns in the United States each year for ∼30 primary conditions and a number of secondary conditions. NBS could be on the cusp of an unprecedented expansion as a result of advances in whole-genome sequencing (WGS). As WGS becomes cheaper and easier and as our knowledge and understanding of human genetics expand, the question of whether WGS has a role to play in state NBS programs becomes increasingly relevant and complex. As geneticists and state public health officials begin to contemplate the technical and procedural details of whether WGS could benefit existing NBS programs, this is an opportune time to revisit the legal framework of state NBS programs. In this article, we examine the constitutional underpinnings of state-mandated NBS and explore the range of current state statutes and regulations that govern the programs. We consider the legal refinements that will be needed to keep state NBS programs within constitutional bounds, focusing on 2 areas of concern: consent procedures and the criteria used to select new conditions for NBS panels. We conclude by providing options for states to consider when contemplating the use of WGS for NBS. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Screening for Familial Hypercholesterolemia in Children: What Can We Learn From Adult Screening Programs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidewij Henneman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH, an autosomal dominant atherosclerotic disease, is a common monogenic subtype of cardiovascular disease. Patients with FH suffer an increased risk of early onset heart disease. Early identification of abnormally elevated cholesterol signpost clinicians to interventions that will significantly decrease risk of related morbidity and mortality. Cascade genetic testing can subsequently identify at-risk relatives. Accordingly, a number of screening approaches have been implemented for FH in countries including the UK and the Netherlands. However, incomplete identification of cases remains a challenge. Moreover, the potential for early intervention is now raising questions about the value of implementing universal cholesterol screening approaches that focus on children. In this report, we briefly discuss the potential benefit of such screening. Additionally, we submit that ever increasing genome technological capability will force a discussion of including genetic tests in these screening programs. We discuss the opportunities and challenges presented by such an approach. We close with recommendations that the success of such screening endeavors will rely on a better integrated practice model in public health genomics that bridges stakeholders including practitioners in primary care, clinical genetics and public health.

  7. Breast cancer screening results 5 years after introduction of digital mammography in a population-based screening program.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssemeijer, N.; Bluekens, A.M.; Beijerinck, D.; Deurenberg, J.J.; Beekman, M.; Visser, R.; Engen, R. van; Bartels-Kortland, A.; Broeders, M.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare full-field digital mammography (FFDM) using computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) with screen-film mammography (SFM) in a population-based breast cancer screening program for initial and subsequent screening examinations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was approved by the regional

  8. Correlation between sleep disorder screening and executive dysfunction in children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Zambrano-Sanchez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To compare frequency of sleep disorders (SD and executive dysfunction (ED in children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and a control group. Method We studied 156 children with ADHD with a mean age of 8.5 years, and a control group with 111 children with a mean age of 8.3 years. We utilized the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ to screen SD and the working memory measurement from the Wechsler intelligence scale for children (WISC-IV to screen ED. Results We did not observe an increased frequency of SD in children with ADHD compared with the controls. However, we did identify ED in children with ADHD; additionally a significant correlation was observed between the type of ADHD and SD and among ED, WISC-IV measurements, and type of SD in children with ADHD. Conclusion An increase of SD frequency in children with ADHD was not observed, but we did identify ED in children with ADHD. Additionally, a correlation among ADHD types, SD, ED, and WISC-IV measurements was observed in children with ADHD.

  9. Parental Intentions to Enroll Children in a Voluntary Expanded Newborn Screening Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquin, Ryan S.; Peay, Holly L.; Gehtland, Lisa M.; Lewis, Megan A.; Bailey, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Nearly all babies in the United States are tested at birth for rare, serious, and treatable disorders through mandatory state newborn screening (NBS). Recently, there have been calls for an expanded, voluntary model to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment of a wider range of disorders. We applied the reasoned action framework to examine parental intentions to participate in voluntary expanded screening. Methods We recruited a national cohort of recent and expectant parents living in the U.S. who completed a self-administered online survey (N = 1,001). Using a mixed-level fractional factorial experiment, we studied parental participation intentions and preferences for timing of consent, cost, consent format, and testing options. Results We conducted a hierarchical regression analysis assessing parental intentions to participate in voluntary expanded NBS. Attitudes, perceived normative influence, and perceived behavioral control explained substantial variance in intention, with perceived normative influence emerging as the strongest predictor. We found no evidence that the manipulated program features altered mean levels of intention, but timing of parental permission, cost, and permission format moderated the relative importance of reasoned action constructs on intention. Conclusion Program design features may impact the psychological mechanisms underlying parental decision making for voluntary expanded screening. These results have important implications for parent education, outreach, and informed parental permission procedures. PMID:27526258

  10. Parental intentions to enroll children in a voluntary expanded newborn screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquin, Ryan S; Peay, Holly L; Gehtland, Lisa M; Lewis, Megan A; Bailey, Donald B

    2016-10-01

    Nearly all babies in the United States are tested at birth for rare, serious, and treatable disorders through mandatory state newborn screening (NBS). Recently, there have been calls for an expanded, voluntary model to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment of a wider range of disorders. We applied the reasoned action framework to examine parental intentions to participate in voluntary expanded screening. We recruited a national cohort of recent and expectant parents living in the U.S. who completed a self-administered online survey (N = 1001). Using a mixed-level fractional factorial experiment, we studied parental participation intentions and preferences for timing of consent, cost, consent format, and testing options. We conducted a hierarchical regression analysis assessing parental intentions to participate in voluntary expanded NBS. Attitudes, perceived normative influence, and perceived behavioral control explained substantial variance in intention, with perceived normative influence emerging as the strongest predictor. We found no evidence that the manipulated program features altered mean levels of intention, but timing of parental permission, cost, and permission format moderated the relative importance of reasoned action constructs on intention. Program design features may impact the psychological mechanisms underlying parental decision making for voluntary expanded screening. These results have important implications for parent education, outreach, and informed parental permission procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Program spending to increase adherence: South African cervical cancer screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D Goldhaber-Fiebert

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Adherence is crucial for public health program effectiveness, though the benefits of increasing adherence must ultimately be weighed against the associated costs. We sought to determine the relationship between investment in community health worker (CHW home visits and increased attendance at cervical cancer screening appointments in Cape Town, South Africa.We conducted an observational study of 5,258 CHW home visits made in 2003-4 as part of a community-based screening program. We estimated the functional relationship between spending on these visits and increased appointment attendance (adherence. Increased adherence was noted after each subsequent CHW visit. The costs of making the CHW visits was based on resource use including both personnel time and vehicle-related expenses valued in 2004 Rand. The CHW program cost R194,018, with 1,576 additional appointments attended. Adherence increased from 74% to 90%; 55% to 87%; 48% to 77%; and 56% to 80% for 6-, 12-, 24-, and 36-month appointments. Average per-woman costs increased by R14-R47. The majority of this increase occurred with the first 2 CHW visits (90%, 83%, 74%, and 77%; additional cost: R12-R26.We found that study data can be used for program planning, identifying spending levels that achieve adherence targets given budgetary constraints. The results, derived from a single disease program, are retrospective, and should be prospectively replicated.

  12. Identifying Non-Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy-Positive and False Negative Results in Prior Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Newborn Screening Programs: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatheridge, Michele A; Kwon, Jennifer M; Mendell, Jerry M; Scheuerbrandt, Günter; Moat, Stuart J; Eyskens, François; Rockman-Greenberg, Cheryl; Drousiotou, Anthi; Griggs, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a candidate for the recommended universal screening panel based on evidence that early corticosteroid treatment improves outcomes and on new genetic therapies that require early diagnosis for effectiveness. Elevated creatine kinase levels in the neonatal period are the initial screening marker in DMD newborn screening programs but is found in inherited muscle disorders other than DMD. Data are needed to inform protocols for future screening and follow-up testing and care in these patients. To review non-DMD muscle disorders identified by prior DMD screening programs and to investigate whether these programs failed to identify patients later diagnosed as having DMD (false-negative findings). Since 1975, 10 DMD newborn screening programs have provided opportunities to study screening protocols, outcomes, and parental responses. These programs used elevated creatine kinase levels in dried blood spots for the initial screening, with the diagnosis of DMD based on findings of clinical follow-up, muscle biopsy, or direct mutational testing of the DMD gene. Literature regarding these prior programs was reviewed in PubMed, and the programs were discussed directly with the directors when possible to identify diagnoses of non-DMD disorders and false negative results from 1975 to July 12, 2015. Data were collected from screening programs, which were active between 1975 and December 2011. Data were analyzed from March 26, 2015, to August 24, 2015. The 10 screening programs screened more than 1.8 million newborns between 1975 and 2011, and 344 were diagnosed with DMD. Of those screened, the majority were boys. Across all programs, 80 patients had positive results for non-DMD disorders, including Becker muscular dystrophy and forms of limb-girdle and congenital muscular dystrophies, and 21 patients had false-negative findings for DMD. Screening for DMD will result in identification of other muscle diseases. Future screening protocols should

  13. Should asymptomatic men be included in chlamydia screening programs? Cost-effectiveness of chlamydia screening among male and female entrants to a national job training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Diane R; Quinn, Thomas C; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2008-01-01

    To compare the cost-effectiveness of various chlamydia screening strategies within a population of male and female youth entering a national job training program. Cost-effectiveness analysis of various chlamydia screening strategies among a cohort of 4000 female and male New England job training students. Strategies for women include (a) no screening, (b) universal endocervical DNA probe screening, (c) universal urine based NAAT screening, and (d) universal endocervical NAAT screening. Strategies for men include (a) no screening, (b) selective urine NAAT screening of leukocyte esterase (LE)-positive urines, and (c) universal urine-based NAAT screening. Universal endocervical NAAT screening of women and universal urine NAAT screening of men were the most effective and cost-effective strategies individually and in combination. Endocervical NAAT screening of women prevented 23 more cases of PID and saved $27,000 more than endocervical DNA probe screening. Likewise, universal urine NAAT screening of men prevented 21 more cases of PID in their female partners and saved $16,000 more than selective urine NAAT screening of LE positive men. Use of a sensitive NAAT to screen both men and women for chlamydia upon entry to a National Job Training Program is cost-effective, cost-saving, and provides a public health opportunity to substantially reduce chlamydia infections among youth at risk for sexually transmitted diseases.

  14. [Problems in mass screening program for prostatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, H

    1984-05-01

    We developed transrectal ultrasonotomography for practical use in 1967 and started a model trial mass screening program for prostatic diseases with the method in 1975. A mobile unit "Dolphin" for mass screening, in which two sets of special chair-type scanner for the method was loaded, was developed successfully in 1980. Up to March, 1983, 2394 males over the age of 55 were submitted to the primary study. Among them, 12 cases (0.5%) of prostatic cancer (PC) and 755 cases (31.5%) of benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) were finally detected in the secondary study. Thus the prevalence of BPH was significant and even the detection rate of PC was still remarkably higher than that in mass screening for other malignancies. The diagnostic accuracy in transrectal ultrasonotomography in PC was calculated from the results of patients visiting our out-patient clinic during 7 years until March, 1983. The sensitivity was 96.5% and the specificity was 84.6%. On the other hand, the sensitivity of digital examination in the same series was 80.7%. We concluded from this study that the efficacy of digital examination was thought to be insufficient for the screening of PC. The cost-benefit balance in our mass screening system was estimated from the above mentioned results. We needed yen 2,000,000 to find out each case of early PC in the system. In our clinic, patients with early PC paid yen 2,000,000 in average for treatments including radical surgery and were cured. On the contrary, patients with advanced PC paid yen 5,000,000 approximately yen 8,000,000 and died eventually. The minimum difference of treatment fee between early and advanced PC was yen 3,000,000, accordingly. Since the cost of detecting each early PC in mass screening was yen 2,000,000, we are contributing approximately yen 1,000,000 to the national finance on each time when we pick up one case of early PC. This doesn't include benefits from detecting BPH and from life prolongation. Thus the balance seems to be

  15. Military Personnel: DOD and the Coast Guard Need to Screen for Gambling Disorder Addiction and Update Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Gambling disorder is also associated with poor physical health and financial or legal consequences . Like other addictions, gambling disorder can...MILITARY PERSONNEL DOD and the Coast Guard Need to Screen for Gambling Disorder Addiction and Update Guidance...Need to Screen for Gambling Disorder Addiction and Update Guidance What GAO Found Department of Defense (DOD) data show 514 DOD and Coast Guard (CG

  16. Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-06-01

    The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

  17. Diabetic Retinopathy in Italy: Epidemiology Data and Telemedicine Screening Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela Vujosevic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, the number of people living with diabetes is about 3.5 million (5.5% of the population, with an increase by about 60% in the last 20 years and with 1 person out of 3 older than 65 years. The Italian Health Service system estimates that 10 billion euros is spent annually on caring for patients with diabetes, a figure that increases yearly. No national data on prevalence and incidence of legal blindness in patients with diabetes and no national registry of patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR are currently available. However, the available epidemiological data (in several locations throughout the country are consistent with those reported in other European countries. The use of telemedicine for the screening of DR in Italy is confined to geographically limited locations. The available data in the literature on implementation and use of telematic screening proved to be successful from patient, caregiver, and authorities point of view. This review addresses the available epidemiological data on DR and telematic screening realities in Italy and thus may help in establishing a national screening program.

  18. Body Image Screening Questionnaire for eating disorder early detection: A Romanian replication

    OpenAIRE

    Tomsa, Raluca; Istfan, Nicoleta; Jenaro, Cristina; Flores, Noelia; Belén, M.; Bermejo, G.

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders adversely affect physical health, eating habits, social and family relationships, mood, work and school performance. We tested for cross-cultural validity of the Body Image Screening Questionnaire (BISQ), a screening measure validated in Spain, which assesses potential eating disorders related to anorexia, perception of obesity, orthorexia and vigorexia, in a Romanian sample from both clinical and general populations. The measure showed adequate internal consistency and allow...

  19. Evaluation of Automated Teleretinal Screening Program for Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, O Bennett; Garoon, Robert B; Weng, Christina Y; Gross, Jacob; Young, Alex K; Camero, Kathryn A; Jin, Haoxing; Carvounis, Petros E; Coffee, Robert E; Chu, Yvonne I

    2016-02-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness, but its detrimental effects are preventable with early detection and treatment. Screening for diabetic retinopathy has the potential to increase the number of cases treated early, especially in populations with limited access to care. To determine the efficacy of an automated algorithm in interpreting screening ophthalmoscopic photographs from patients with diabetes compared with a reading center interpretation. Retrospective cohort analysis of 15,015 patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes in the Harris Health System in Harris County, Texas, who had undergone a retinal screening examination and nonmydriatic fundus photography via the Intelligent Retinal Imaging System (IRIS) from June 2013 to April 2014 were included. The IRIS-based interpretations were compared with manual interpretation. The IRIS algorithm population statistics were calculated. Sensitivity and false-negative rate of the IRIS computer-based algorithm compared with reading center interpretation of the same images. A total of 15 015 consecutive patients (aged 18-98 years); mean 54.3 years with known type 1 or 2 diabetes underwent nonmydriatic fundus photography for a diabetic retinopathy screening examination. The sensitivity of the IRIS algorithm in detecting sight-threatening diabetic eye disease compared with the reading center interpretation was 66.4% (95% CI, 62.8%-69.9%) with a false-negative rate of 2%. The specificity was 72.8% (95% CI, 72.0%-73.5%). In a population where 15.8% of people with diabetes have sight-threatening diabetic eye disease, the IRIS algorithm positive predictive value was 10.8% (95% CI, 9.6%-11.9%) and the negative predictive value was 97.8% (95% CI, 96.8%-98.6%). In this large urban setting, the IRIS computer algorithm-based screening program had a high sensitivity and a low false-negative rate, suggesting that it may be an effective alternative to conventional reading center image interpretation. The IRIS algorithm

  20. A meta-analysis of the social communication questionnaire: Screening for autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnut, Steven R; Wei, Tianlan; Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Richman, David M

    2017-11-01

    The current meta-analysis examines the previous research on the utility of the Social Communication Questionnaire as a screening instrument for autism spectrum disorder. Previously published reports have highlighted the inconsistencies between Social Communication Questionnaire-screening results and formal autism spectrum disorder diagnoses. The variations in accuracy resulted in some researchers questioning the validity of the Social Communication Questionnaire. This study systematically examined the accuracy of the Social Communication Questionnaire as a function of the methodological decisions made by researchers screening for autism spectrum disorder over the last 15 years. Findings from this study suggest that the Social Communication Questionnaire is an acceptable screening instrument for autism spectrum disorder (area under the curve = 0.885). Variations in methodological decisions, however, greatly influenced the accuracy of the Social Communication Questionnaire in screening for autism spectrum disorder. Of these methodological variations, using the Current instead of the Lifetime version of the Social Communication Questionnaire resulted in the largest detrimental effect ( d = -3.898), followed by using the Social Communication Questionnaire with individuals younger than 4 years of age ( d = -2.924) and relying upon convenience samples ( d = -4.828 for clinical samples, -2.734 for convenience samples, and -1.422 for community samples). Directions for future research and implications for using the Social Communication Questionnaire to screen for autism spectrum disorder are discussed.

  1. Screening of psychiatric outpatients for borderline personality disorder with the McLean Screening Instrument for Borderline Personality Disorder (MSI-BPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melartin, Tarja; Häkkinen, Miikka; Koivisto, Maaria; Suominen, Kirsi; Isometsä, Erkki T

    2009-11-01

    Detecting patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) is important, and feasible screening instruments are needed. To investigate our Finnish translation of the McLean Screening Instrument for Borderline Personality Disorder (MSI-BPD) as a screen for BPD among psychiatric outpatients, its psychometric and screening properties, and feasibility in improving the recognition of BPD. We screened 302 consecutive psychiatric outpatients at the Department of Psychiatry at the Helsinki University Central Hospital in Finland for BPD using the Finnish MSI-BPD. Of the patients, 69 (23%) were assigned to a random sample that was stratified according to the number of screens returned to the outpatient clinics, and further stratified into the three strata, high scores deliberately enriched, according to the MSI-BPD scores. Finally, a stratified random sample of 45 patients was interviewed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders (SCID-II) by the interviewers blind to the patients' MSI-BPD scores. One third (29%) of 302 screened patients had a positive MSI-BPD. The internal consistency of the MSI-BPD was good (Cronbach's alpha = 0.77). Of the 45 patients interviewed with the SCID-II, 11 (24%) were found to have BPD, five (46%) of whom a previously clinical diagnosis. In a ROC analysis, the optimal cut-off score was 7. The translated MSI-BPD was found to be a feasible screen for BPD in Finnish psychiatric outpatient care. Further studies investigating the clinical utility of MSI-BPD in larger clinical samples are warranted.

  2. Program- and service-level costs of seven screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Jeremy W; Mallonee, Erin; Dowd, William; Aldridge, Arnie; Cowell, Alexander J; Vendetti, Janice

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the costs of delivering screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) services within the first seven demonstration programs funded by the US Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Service-level costs were estimated and compared across implementation model (contracted specialist, inhouse specialist, inhouse generalist) and service delivery setting (emergency department, hospital inpatient, outpatient). Program-level costs were estimated and compared across grantee recipient programs. Service-level data were collected through timed observations of SBIRT service delivery. Program-level data were collected during key informant interviews using structured cost interview guides. At the service level, support activities that occur before or after engaging the patient comprise a considerable portion of the cost of delivering SBIRT services, especially short duration services. At the program level, average costs decreased as more patients were screened. Comparing across program and service levels, the average annual operating costs calculated at the program level often exceeded the cost of actual service delivery. Provider time spent in support of service provision may comprise a large share of the costs in some cases because of potentially substantial fixed and quasifixed costs associated with program operation. The cost structure of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment is complex and discontinuous of patient flow, causing annual operating costs to exceed the costs of actual service provision for some settings and implementation models.

  3. Comparison of a Broad-Based Screen versus Disorder-Specific Screen in Detecting Young Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Lisa D; Piazza, Vivian; Robins, Diana L

    2014-01-01

    The goals of our study were to (a) compare agreement between autism spectrum disorder diagnosis and outcome of the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers and Parents Evaluation of Developmental Status in a sample of toddlers and (b) examine specific concerns noted for toddlers who screened negative on the Modified Checklist for Autism in…

  4. Predictive validity of common mental disorders screening questionnaire as a screening instrument in long term sickness absence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Hans Jørgen; Bech, Per

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: Screening instruments for detection of common mental disorders have not been validity tested in long term sickness absence (LSA), which is the aim of this study for the Common Mental Disorders Screening Questionnaire (CMD-SQ). METHODS: Of all 2,414 incident persons on continuous sick......-leave for more than eight weeks in a Danish population of 120,000 inhabitants 1,121 participated in a two-phased study by being screened for mental disorders by CMD-SQ in Phase 1. A subgroup of 337 was examined by a psychiatrist and diagnosed with Present State Examination in Phase 2. Results performed on Phase......-scale in CMD-SQ, SCL-8AD, compiled of SCL-ANX4, SCL-8, and SCL-DEP6, showed the best psychometric properties in detection of any mental disorder (AUC 0.80). Other scales were tested as well. The psychometric properties were dependent on sex and age. The plots of Q, SE, and 1-SP against decreasing cut...

  5. An adult version of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED-A)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steensel, F.J.A.; Bögels, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Many questionnaires exist for measuring anxiety; however, most are developed for children or adults only, or do not capture symptoms of all anxiety disorders. The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) is a well-validated questionnaire for children, measuring symptoms of most

  6. Validation of two screening instruments for PTSD in Dutch substance use disorder inpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, T.; Haan, H.A. de; Velden, H.J.W. van der; Meer, M. van der; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2013-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is highly prevalent in substance use disorder (SUD) populations. Because resources for extensive and thorough diagnostic assessment are often limited, reliable screening instruments for PTSD are needed. The aim of the current study was to test two short PTSD

  7. Guideline for Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment of ADHD in Adults with Substance Use Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthys, Frieda; Stes, Steven; van den Brink, Wim; Joostens, Peter; Mobius, David; Tremmery, Sabine; Sabbe, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Currently there is no guideline for the screening, diagnosis and treatment of adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in patients with a substance use disorder (SUD). The aim was to develop such a guideline, starting out from a systematic review and based on the methodology of the

  8. A brief web-based screening questionnaire for common mental disorders: Development and validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, T.; van Straten, A.; Marks, I.M.; Cuijpers, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The advent of Internet-based self-help systems for common mental disorders has generated a need for quick ways to triage would-be users to systems appropriate for their disorders. This need can be met by using brief online screening questionnaires, which can also be quickly used to

  9. Screening for personality disorder in incarcerated adolescent boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongerslev, Mickey Toftkjær; Moran, Paul; Bo, Sune

    2012-01-01

    in adults (Standardised Assessment of Personality - Abbreviated Scale; SAPAS) for use with adolescents and then carried out a study of the reliability and validity of the adapted instrument in a sample of 80 adolescent boys in secure institutions. Participants were administered the screen and shortly after......, and usefulness of the screen in secure institutions for adolescent male offenders. It can be used in juvenile offender institutions with limited resources, as a brief, acceptable, staff-administered routine screen to identify individuals in need of further assessment of PD or by researchers conducting...

  10. Perinatal depression screening in a Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program: perception of feasibility and acceptability among a multidisciplinary staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabb, Karen M; Choi, Shinwoo; Pineros-Leano, Maria; Meline, Brandon; McDonald, Hellen G; Kester, Rachel; Huang, Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Best practices for addressing women's mental health and screening for depression in public health clinics are not available. Clinic staff are often responsible for screening for depression; however, few studies examine staff perceptions on feasibility and acceptability of using perinatal screening for mood disorders in ethnically diverse public health clinics. During December 2012, we conducted four focus groups using a semistructured interview guide with public health clinic staff of varying disciplines (n=25) in a Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children. All interviews were audio recorded and analyzed using thematic analysis. We found five descriptive themes related to acceptability and feasibility of screening for perinatal depression in a public health clinic. The main themes include (1) literacy barriers, (2) need for referrals and follow-up with outside services, (3) training and capacity needs, (4) stigma of depression, and (5) location and privacy of screening. Although multiple barriers to universal depression screening in a public health clinic were identified, participants found value in practice of screening low-income women for depression. Factors for facilitating implementation of systematic depression screening in a public health clinic have been identified. Implications discuss how policy makers and public health clinic administrators can improve the universal depression screening process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Screening synteny blocks in pairwise genome comparisons through integer programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haibao; Lyons, Eric; Pedersen, Brent; Schnable, James C; Paterson, Andrew H; Freeling, Michael

    2011-04-18

    It is difficult to accurately interpret chromosomal correspondences such as true orthology and paralogy due to significant divergence of genomes from a common ancestor. Analyses are particularly problematic among lineages that have repeatedly experienced whole genome duplication (WGD) events. To compare multiple "subgenomes" derived from genome duplications, we need to relax the traditional requirements of "one-to-one" syntenic matchings of genomic regions in order to reflect "one-to-many" or more generally "many-to-many" matchings. However this relaxation may result in the identification of synteny blocks that are derived from ancient shared WGDs that are not of interest. For many downstream analyses, we need to eliminate weak, low scoring alignments from pairwise genome comparisons. Our goal is to objectively select subset of synteny blocks whose total scores are maximized while respecting the duplication history of the genomes in comparison. We call this "quota-based" screening of synteny blocks in order to appropriately fill a quota of syntenic relationships within one genome or between two genomes having WGD events. We have formulated the synteny block screening as an optimization problem known as "Binary Integer Programming" (BIP), which is solved using existing linear programming solvers. The computer program QUOTA-ALIGN performs this task by creating a clear objective function that maximizes the compatible set of synteny blocks under given constraints on overlaps and depths (corresponding to the duplication history in respective genomes). Such a procedure is useful for any pairwise synteny alignments, but is most useful in lineages affected by multiple WGDs, like plants or fish lineages. For example, there should be a 1:2 ploidy relationship between genome A and B if genome B had an independent WGD subsequent to the divergence of the two genomes. We show through simulations and real examples using plant genomes in the rosid superorder that the quota

  12. Screening synteny blocks in pairwise genome comparisons through integer programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paterson Andrew H

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is difficult to accurately interpret chromosomal correspondences such as true orthology and paralogy due to significant divergence of genomes from a common ancestor. Analyses are particularly problematic among lineages that have repeatedly experienced whole genome duplication (WGD events. To compare multiple "subgenomes" derived from genome duplications, we need to relax the traditional requirements of "one-to-one" syntenic matchings of genomic regions in order to reflect "one-to-many" or more generally "many-to-many" matchings. However this relaxation may result in the identification of synteny blocks that are derived from ancient shared WGDs that are not of interest. For many downstream analyses, we need to eliminate weak, low scoring alignments from pairwise genome comparisons. Our goal is to objectively select subset of synteny blocks whose total scores are maximized while respecting the duplication history of the genomes in comparison. We call this "quota-based" screening of synteny blocks in order to appropriately fill a quota of syntenic relationships within one genome or between two genomes having WGD events. Results We have formulated the synteny block screening as an optimization problem known as "Binary Integer Programming" (BIP, which is solved using existing linear programming solvers. The computer program QUOTA-ALIGN performs this task by creating a clear objective function that maximizes the compatible set of synteny blocks under given constraints on overlaps and depths (corresponding to the duplication history in respective genomes. Such a procedure is useful for any pairwise synteny alignments, but is most useful in lineages affected by multiple WGDs, like plants or fish lineages. For example, there should be a 1:2 ploidy relationship between genome A and B if genome B had an independent WGD subsequent to the divergence of the two genomes. We show through simulations and real examples using plant genomes

  13. Screening for alcohol and drug use disorders among adults in primary care: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilowsky DJ

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Daniel J Pilowsky1, Li-Tzy Wu21Departments of Epidemiology and Psychiatry, Columbia University, and the New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York City, NY, 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USABackground: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 supports integration of substance abuse interventions and treatments into the mainstream health care system. Thus, effective screening and intervention for substance use disorders in health care settings is a priority.Objective: This paper reviews the prevalence of alcohol and drug use disorders (abuse or dependence in primary care settings and emergency departments, as well as current screening tools and brief interventions.Methods: MEDLINE was searched using the following keywords: alcohol use, alcohol use disorder, drug use, drug use disorder, screening, primary care, and emergency departments. Using the related-articles link, additional articles were screened for inclusion. This review focuses on alcohol and drug use and related disorders among adults in primary care settings.Conclusion: Screening, brief intervention, and referral for treatment are feasible and effective in primary care settings, provided that funding for screening is available, along with brief interventions and treatment facilities to which patients can be referred and treated promptly.Keywords: brief intervention, emergency departments

  14. Screening for mental disorders in leprosy patients: comparing the internal consistency and screening properties of HADS and GHQ-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senturk, Vesile; Stewart, Robert; Sagduyu, Afsin

    2007-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the internal consistency and screening properties of the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in Turkish patients with leprosy. The two screening instruments and a fully structured diagnostic interview (CIDI) were administered to 65 people drawn from all leprosy inpatient units in Turkey between March and June of 2001. The scales were evaluated using Cronbach's alpha and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) analyses. For each scale, criterion validity was assessed for any psychiatric disorder, depressive disorder and anxiety disorder. The Cronbach alpha coefficients for the GHQ-12 and HADS were 0.84 and 0.81 respectively. For detecting any psychiatric disorder, the optimal cut-off for the GHQ-12 was 4/5 (sensitivity 0.82, specificity 0.62). The optimal cut-off for the HADS total score was 12/13 (sensitivity 0.80, specificity 0.77). The results indicate that the General Health Questionnaire-12 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale have satisfactory internal consistency, and performed well to a similar extent for detecting psychiatric disorders in leprosy patients.

  15. Program- and service-level costs of seven screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bray JW

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Jeremy W Bray,1 Erin Mallonee,2 William Dowd,2 Arnie Aldridge,2 Alexander J Cowell,2 Janice Vendetti31Department of Economics, Bryan School of Business and Economics, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC, USA; 2RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; 3Department of Community Medicine and Health Care, School of Medicine, UCONN Health, Farmington, CT, USAAbstract: This paper examines the costs of delivering screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT services within the first seven demonstration programs funded by the US Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Service-level costs were estimated and compared across implementation model (contracted specialist, inhouse specialist, inhouse generalist and service delivery setting (emergency department, hospital inpatient, outpatient. Program-level costs were estimated and compared across grantee recipient programs. Service-level data were collected through timed observations of SBIRT service delivery. Program-level data were collected during key informant interviews using structured cost interview guides. At the service level, support activities that occur before or after engaging the patient comprise a considerable portion of the cost of delivering SBIRT services, especially short duration services. At the program level, average costs decreased as more patients were screened. Comparing across program and service levels, the average annual operating costs calculated at the program level often exceeded the cost of actual service delivery. Provider time spent in support of service provision may comprise a large share of the costs in some cases because of potentially substantial fixed and quasifixed costs associated with program operation. The cost structure of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment is complex and discontinuous of patient flow, causing annual operating costs to exceed the costs of actual service

  16. The impact of compression force and pressure at prevalent screening on subsequent re-attendance in a national screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshina, Nataliia; Sebuødegård, Sofie; Holen, Åsne S; Waade, Gunvor G; Tsuruda, Kaitlyn; Hofvind, Solveig

    2018-03-01

    Adherence to screening may indirectly help assess whether a prior screening examination deters women from returning for a subsequent examination. We investigated whether compression force and pressure in mammography were associated with re-attendance among prevalently screened women in the organized breast cancer screening program in Norway. Data on compression force (kg) and pressure (kPa) from women's first screening examination in the program (prevalent screening) and subsequent re-attendance were available for 31,225 women aged 50-68, screened during 2007-2013. Crude re-attendance rates and log-binomial regression models estimating the prevalence ratio of re-attendance were used to identify the association between compression force or pressure and re-attendance two-years later. Age and year at prevalent screening, county of residence, screening result (negative or false positive), breast volume, and breast density were included in analyses. Overall, 27,197 (87.1%) women re-attended the program. Re-attendance was highest for women who received a compression force of 10.0-13.9 kg (87.5%) or pressure of 9.0-17.9 kPa (87.8%) and lowest for those who received a compression force of attendance was 3% lower for women who received low compression force (attendance should also include information about women's experience of pain, anxiety and stress, as well as image quality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Is it time for Newborn Screening for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: A Commentary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth A PASS

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD is one of the most common causes of acquired mental retardation in the United States and worldwide. The fetal brain is highly susceptible to the teratogenic effects of alcohol from maternal consumption during pregnancy resulting in newborns with mental deficits and congenital malformations. FAS diagnosis is difficult to diagnose in newborns where distinct anatomical defects are not apparent from mothers of moderate to light alcohol use. Hence, medical diagnoses are often not ascertained until mid-childhood after irreparable brain damage has already occurred. Such infants will have been deprived of available socioclinical interventions, trainings, measures, and future treatments that may someday be implemented soon after birth. Presently, there are no FASD newborn biomarker screening programs in place despite cost benefit analyses revealing an annual societal cost of $1.3 million per FASD incident case. Since newborn biomarkers have been reported in the biomedical literature, can we afford not to implement newborn screening for FASD?

  18. Screening for mental disorders in cancer, cardiovascular and musculoskeletal diseases. Comparison of HADS and GHQ-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härter, Martin; Woll, Sonja; Wunsch, Alexandra; Bengel, Jürgen; Reuter, Katrin

    2006-01-01

    The early detection of patients with comorbid mental illness is of high clinical importance in chronic somatic diseases. To identify cases, screening instruments are recommended. The study compared the discriminant validity of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) to detect mental disorders in the most frequent chronic somatic diseases. Five hundred sixty-nine patients with musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and cancer diseases participated in the cross-sectional, two-stage survey. First, patients were assessed with the GHQ-12 and the HADS. Second, they were examined for DSM-IV mental disorders by clinical standardized interview (CIDI). Using CIDI diagnosis as a criterion, the validity of the instruments for the detection of any mental disorder as well as of depressive and anxiety disorders was analyzed with receiver-operating characteristics analyses. The HADS performed better in all analyses compared to the GHQ-12. Best screening results with the HADS total scale were achieved for depressive disorders with an area under the curve of 0.82, a sensitivity of 74%, a specificity of 80%, and a misclassification rate of 21% (cutoff point=18). The positive predictive value is best (44%) for the detection of any mental disorder, with a cutoff point of 17. The HADS total scale can be recommended as a valid screening instrument for the detection of comorbid mental disorders in patients with chronic somatic diseases. The use of the single HADS subscales has no advantage for screening performance.

  19. Predictor Variables and Screening Protocol for Depressive and Anxiety Disorders in Cancer Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Manuela Polidoro; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Osório, Flávia L

    2016-01-01

    Cancer patients are at increased risk of persistent depressive and anxiety symptoms and disorders compared to the general population. However, these issues are not always identified, which may worsen the prognosis and increase morbidity and mortality. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to identify predictor variables (demographic and clinical) for the development of mood and anxiety disorders in cancer outpatients and to propose a probabilistic screening protocol considering these variables and certain standardized screening instruments. A total of 1,385 adults, of both genders, receiving outpatient cancer care were evaluated using a questionnaire and screening instruments. Thereafter, 400 of these subjects responded to the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (SCID-IV) by telephone to confirm or rule out the presence of a Current Major Depressive Episode (CMDE) or Anxiety Disorder (AD). Of the patients surveyed, 64% met the criteria for CMDE and 41% for AD. Female gender was found to be a risk factor for both disorders, and the presence of previous psychiatric history and marital status (divorced and widowed) were risk factors for anxiety disorders. When scoring above the recommended cutoff score, the screening instruments also indicated a risk of the studied disorders. Based on these findings, a screening protocol and nomograms were created for the quantification, combination and probabilistic estimate of risk, with accuracy indicators >0.68. The prevalence rates for the disorders under study are extremely high in cancer patients. The use of the proposed protocol and nomogram can facilitate rapid and wide screening, thus refining triage and supporting the establishment of criteria for referral to mental health professionals, so that patients can be properly diagnosed and treated.

  20. WE-D-207-03: CT Protocols for Screening and the ACR Designated Lung Screening Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNitt-Gray, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, Lung Cancer is responsible for more cancer deaths than the next four cancers combined. In addition, the 5 year survival rate for lung cancer patients has not improved over the past 40 to 50 years. To combat this deadly disease, in 2002 the National Cancer Institute launched a very large Randomized Control Trial called the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). This trial would randomize subjects who had substantial risk of lung cancer (due to age and smoking history) into either a Chest X-ray arm or a low dose CT arm. In November 2010, the National Cancer Institute announced that the NLST had demonstrated 20% fewer lung cancer deaths among those who were screened with low-dose CT than with chest X-ray. In December 2013, the US Preventive Services Task Force recommended the use of Lung Cancer Screening using low dose CT and a little over a year later (Feb. 2015), CMS announced that Medicare would also cover Lung Cancer Screening using low dose CT. Thus private and public insurers are required to provide Lung Cancer Screening programs using CT to the appropriate population(s). The purpose of this Symposium is to inform medical physicists and prepare them to support the implementation of Lung Screening programs. This Symposium will focus on the clinical aspects of lung cancer screening, requirements of a screening registry for systematically capturing and tracking screening patients and results (such as required Medicare data elements) as well as the role of the medical physicist in screening programs, including the development of low dose CT screening protocols. Learning Objectives: To understand the clinical basis and clinical components of a lung cancer screening program, including eligibility criteria and other requirements. To understand the data collection requirements, workflow, and informatics infrastructure needed to support the tracking and reporting components of a screening program. To understand the role of the medical physicist in

  1. Validity of cognitive screens for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder: a systematic review and an informed screen selection guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamminga, Jody; Cysique, Lucette A; Lu, Grace; Batchelor, Jennifer; Brew, Bruce J

    2013-12-01

    Various screening tools have been proposed to identify HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder (HAND). However, there has been no systematic review of their strengths and weaknesses in detecting HAND when compared to gold standard neuropsychological testing. Thirty-five studies assessing HAND screens that were conducted in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy were retrieved using standard search procedures. Of those, 19 (54 %) compared their screen to standard neuropsychological testing. Studies were characterised by a wide variation in criterion validity primarily due to non-standard definition of neurocognitive impairment, and to the demographic and clinical heterogeneity of samples. Assessment of construct validity was lacking, and longitudinal useability was not established. To address these limitations, the current review proposed a summary of the most sensitive and specific studies (>70 %), as well as providing explicit caution regarding their weaknesses, and recommendations for their use in HIV primary care settings.

  2. Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases in Costa Rica: a feasibility study toward a national screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesseling, Catharina; Román, Norbel; Quirós, Indiana; Páez, Laura; García, Vilma; Mora, Ana María; Juncos, Jorge L; Steenland, Kyle N

    2013-12-27

    The integration of mental and neurologic services in healthcare is a global priority. The universal Social Security of Costa Rica aspires to develop national screening of neurodegenerative disorders among the elderly, as part of the non-communicable disease agenda. This study assessed the feasibility of routine screening for Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) within the public healthcare system of Costa Rica. The population (aged ≥65) in the catchment areas of two primary healthcare clinics was targeted for motor and cognitive screening during routine annual health check-ups. The screening followed a tiered three-step approach, with increasing specificity. Step 1 involved a two-symptom questionnaire (tremor-at-rest; balance) and a spiral drawing test for motor assessment, as well as a three-word recall and animal category fluency test for cognitive assessment. Step 2 (for those failing Step 1) was a 10-item version of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale and the Mini-Mental State Examination. Step 3 (for those failing Step 2) was a comprehensive neurologic exam with definitive diagnosis of PD, AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), other disorders, or subjects who were healthy. Screening parameters and disease prevalence were calculated. Of the 401 screened subjects (80% of target population), 370 (92%), 163 (45%), and 81 (56%) failed in Step 1, Step 2, and Step 3, respectively. Thirty-three, 20, and 35 patients were diagnosed with PD, AD, and MCI, respectively (7 were PD with MCI/AD); 90% were new cases. Step 1 sensitivities of motor and cognitive assessments regarding Step 2 were both 93%, and Step 2 sensitivities regarding definitive diagnosis 100 and 96%, respectively. Specificities for Step 1 motor and cognitive tests were low (23% and 29%, respectively) and for Step 2 tests acceptable (76%, 94%). Based on international data, PD prevalence was 3.7 times higher than expected; AD prevalence was as expected. Proposed protocol adjustments

  3. Neonatal hearing screening program in Ahvaz, Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Amiri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP established standards for neonatal hearing screening programs in 1999. The main purpose of this study was to achieve exact statistical data of this program in Ahvaz, Iran, and to compare these results with the standards of American Academy of Pediatrics.Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, the data of neonatal hearing program in Ahvaz west health center from 2008 to 2011 were reviewed. Data were analysed by descriptive statistics.Results: From 25073 neonates, 25 had hearing loss. The false positive and referral ratio to the diagnosis stage were 2.6 and 0.48 percent, respectively. 92 percent of hard of hearing infants were diagnosed before three months of life.Conclusion: In comparison with the standards of American Academy of Pediatrics, all of the items, except two, were included completely or relatively complete. But, more efforts must be done to achieve the whole standards which are available.

  4. Prevalence of screening-detected eating disorders in chinese females and exploratory associations with dietary practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Hunna J; Hamer, Robert M; Thornton, Laura M; Peat, Christine M; Kleiman, Susan C; Du, Shufa; Wang, Huijin; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2015-01-01

    China is undergoing dramatic Westernization, hence may be able to provide unique insights into the role of sociocultural factors in disease. The purpose of this exploratory study was two-fold: to describe the prevalence of screening-detected eating disorders and disordered eating in China at the first occasion of assessment in the large-scale China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) and to explore the associations between dietary practices and disordered eating. Regarding the first objective, participants are provincially representative and in subsequent waves will be followed longitudinally. CHNS participants were recruited using multistage, cluster random sampling, beginning in 1989. In this study, participants comprised 259 female adolescents (12-17 years) and 979 women (18-35 years) who participated in the CHNS 2009 survey, which is the first CHNS survey to assess disordered eating. Dietary practice-disordered eating associations were investigated with logistic regression adjusting for age, body mass index, and urbanization. Of the participants, 6.3% (95% CI: 4.8, 8.2) of adults and 7.8% (95% CI: 5.0, 12.0) of adolescents had a screening-detected eating disorder. Dietary practices had non-significant associations with disordered eating at the general population level, except for protein consumption among women. There was evidence that skipping meals and a high-fat diet may confer risk. Screening-detected eating disorders in China are lower in prevalence than in developed countries. Dietary practices had fairly limited associations with disordered eating at the general population level; protein consumption, skipping meals, and a high-fat diet are candidate dietary practice exposures for disordered eating. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  5. Impact of a CAD system in a screen-film mammography screening program: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Gómez, S.; Torres Tabanera, M.; Vega Bolivar, A.; Sainz Miranda, M.; Baroja Mazo, A.; Ruiz Diaz, M.; Martinez Miravete, P.; Lag Asturiano, E.; Muñoz Cacho, P.; Delgado Macias, T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to perform a prospective assessment of the impact of a CAD system in a screen-film mammography screening program during a period of 3 years. Materials and methods: Our study was carried out on a population of 21,855 asymptomatic women (45–65 years). Mammograms were processed in a CAD system and independently interpreted by one of six radiologists. We analyzed the following parameters: sensitivity of radiologist's interpretation (without and with CAD), detection increase, recall rate and positive predictive value of biopsy, CAD's marks, radiologist's false negatives and comparative analysis of carcinomas detected and non-detected by CAD. Results: Detection rate was 4.3‰. CAD supposed an increase of 0.1‰ in detection rate and 1% in the total number of cases (p < 0.005). The impact on recall rate was not significant (0.4%) and PPV of percutaneous biopsy was unchanged by CAD (20.23%). CAD's marks were 2.7 per case and 0.7 per view. Radiologist's false negatives were 13 lesions which were initially considered as CAD's false positives. Conclusions: CAD supposed a significant increase in detection, without modifications in recall rates and PPV of biopsy. However, better results could have been achieved if radiologists had considered actionable those cases marked by CAD but initially misinterpreted.

  6. Evaluation of an online training program in eating disorders for health professionals in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlow, Rachel S; Maguire, Sarah; O'Dell, Adrienne; Dias-da-Costa, Catia; Touyz, Stephen; Russell, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Early detection and treatment of eating disorders is instrumental in positive health outcomes for this serious public health concern. As such, workforce development in screening, diagnosis and early treatment of eating disorders is needed. Research has demonstrated both high rates of failure to accurately diagnose and treat cases early and low levels of perceived access to training in eating disorders by health professionals-representing an urgent need for clinician training in this area. However, significant barriers to the access of evidence-based training programs exist, including availability, cost and time, particularly when large geographic distances are involved. Online learning presents a solution to workforce challenges, as it can be delivered anywhere, at a fraction of the cost of traditional training, timing is user controlled, and a growing body of research is demonstrating it as effective as face-to-face training. The Centre for Eating and Dieting Disorders in Australia has developed an Online Training Program In Eating Disorders, to educate health professionals in the nature, identification, assessment and management of eating disorders. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the ability of this online learning course to improve clinician levels of knowledge, skill and confidence to treat eating disorders. As well as its effect on stigmatised beliefs about eating disorders known to effect treatment delivery. One-hundred-eighty-seven health professionals participated in the program. A pre training questionnaire and a post training evaluation examined participants' levels of knowledge, skill and confidence to treat eating disorders, as well attitudes and beliefs about people with eating disorders. Significant improvements in knowledge, skill, and confidence to treat eating disorders was found between pre and post program assessment in health professionals who completed the course, along with a significant decrease in stigmatised beliefs about

  7. Screening for personality disorders among adults seeking speech treatment for stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverach, Lisa; Jones, Mark; O'Brian, Sue; Block, Susan; Lincoln, Michelle; Harrison, Elisabeth; Hewat, Sally; Menzies, Ross G; Packman, Ann; Onslow, Mark

    2009-09-01

    Stuttering is frequently associated with negative consequences which typically begin in early childhood. Despite this, no previous studies have investigated the presence of personality disorders among adults who stutter. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to screen for personality disorders among adults who stutter, and to compare these screening estimates with matched controls from a national population sample. Using a matched case-control design, participants were 94 adults seeking treatment for stuttering, 92 of whom completed the International Personality Disorders Examination Questionnaire (IPDEQ) as a first-stage screener, and 920 age- and gender-matched controls from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being (ANSMHWB). A conditional logistic regression model was used to estimate odds ratios for the primary outcome: first-stage presence of any personality disorder; as well as specific personality disorders. Based on first-stage screening, the presence of any personality disorder was significantly higher for adults in the stuttering group than matched controls, demonstrating almost threefold increased odds. This difference between groups remained significant for all specific personality disorders, with four- to sevenfold increased odds found for Dissocial, Anxious, Borderline, Dependent and Paranoid personality disorders, and two- to threefold increased odds found for Histrionic, Impulsive, Schizoid and Anankastic personality disorders. In conclusion, stuttering appears to be associated with a heightened risk for the development of personality disorders. These results highlight the need for research regarding the assessment and treatment of personality disorders among adults who stutter. The reader will be able to: (1) describe the nature of personality disorders, including factors thought to contribute to their development; (2) identify some of the negative consequences associated with stuttering which may contribute to the

  8. Prevalence and Correlates of Screen-Based Media Use among Youths with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Mazurek, Micah O.; Shattuck, Paul T.; Wagner, Mary; Cooper, Benjamin P.

    2012-01-01

    Anecdotal reports indicate that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are often preoccupied with television, computers, and video games (screen-based media). However, few studies have examined this issue. The current study examined screen-based media use among a large, nationally representative sample of youths participating in the National Longitudinal Transition Study – 2 (NLTS2). The majority of youths with ASD (64.2%) spent most of their free time using non-social media (televi...

  9. [Screening for posttraumatic stress disorder in people affected by the 2010 earthquake in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Alicia Ruth; Estario, Juan Carlos; Enders, Julio Enrique; Neira, María Josefina López de; Abeldaño, Roberto Ariel

    2014-11-01

    The authors conducted an assessment of post-traumatic stress disorder screening in the Chilean population following the February 2010 earthquake, based on the Post Earthquake Survey with a multistage sample of 24,982 individuals over 18 years of age, applying the Davidson Trauma Scale. Multivariate analysis was performed with significance set at pearthquake proved to be a protective factor as compared to other social or neighborhood groups, and more years of schooling were also protective (p<0.05). Positive screening for posttraumatic stress disorders revealed clear social inequalities.

  10. [Screening for bipolar disorder in primary care patients with psychological symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonès, Enric; López-Rodríguez, Juan A; Escobar-Rabadán, Francisco; Téllez-Lapeira, Juan; Mínguez, José; Párraga, Ignacio; Suárez-Hernández, Tatiana; Piñero, María José; Guzón, Marta-Magdalena

    2015-03-01

    To estimate the proportion of positive results in the screening of bipolar disorder (BD) among primary care patients presenting with psychological symptoms, and to analyze their characteristics. Multicenter cross-sectional study. Nineteen Primary Care clinics in different Spanish regions. A total of 360 consecutive primary care patients aged 18 to 70, presenting with psychological symptoms. Screening for BP was performed by means of the Mood Disorders Questionnaire. Data on quality of life (EuroQol-5D) and functional impairment (Sheehan Disability Inventory) were obtained. Data on psychiatric comorbidity and data on the use of psychotropic medication were acquired by review of medical records. Of the patients screened, 11.9% were positive (95%CI: 8.8%-15.7%). Only two patients had a diagnosis of BP in their clinical records and, although more than half received treatment with antidepressants, only two received treatment with mood stabilizers. Positive screening is associated with work, social and family dysfunction, greater perceived stress and poor quality of life. BD screening in primary care patients with psychological problems leads to a striking proportion of positive results, indicating that there may be a significant prevalence of BP patients, most of them undiagnosed and untreated. Further research is needed to determine the role that Primary Care can or should assume in the screening, diagnosis and management of this disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Dissociative symptoms and dissociative disorders comorbidity in obsessive compulsive disorder: Symptom screening, diagnostic tools and reflections on treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Hasan

    2014-08-16

    Borderline personality disorder, conversion disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder frequently have dissociative symptoms. The literature has demonstrated that the level of dissociation might be correlated with the severity of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and that those not responding to treatment had high dissociative symptoms. The structured clinical interview for DSM-IV dissociative disorders, dissociation questionnaire, somatoform dissociation questionnaire and dissociative experiences scale can be used for screening dissociative symptoms and detecting dissociative disorders in patients with OCD. However, a history of neglect and abuse during childhood is linked to a risk factor in the pathogenesis of dissociative psychopathology in adults. The childhood trauma questionnaire-53 and childhood trauma questionnaire-40 can be used for this purpose. Clinicians should not fail to notice the hidden dissociative symptoms and childhood traumatic experiences in OCD cases with severe symptoms that are resistant to treatment. Symptom screening and diagnostic tools used for this purpose should be known. Knowing how to treat these pathologies in patients who are diagnosed with OCD can be crucial.

  12. Comprehensive newborn screening program: ARAMCO experience, the national need and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Osba, Y K; Mallouh, A; Salamah, M; Hann, R; Thalji, A; Hamdan, J; Sa'di, A A

    1992-05-01

    Comprehensive screening programs for congenital diseases of newborn infants are lacking at a national or regional level. A comprehensive newborn screening program modified to the needs and resources available was established in ARAMCO Dhahran Health Center. This program includes screening for congenital hypothyroidism, phenylketonuria, abnormal hemoglobins, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficienc, and blood group incompatibilities. Several problems were encountered during the operation which required several modifications of the program. The organization and procedures of the program are described. Since the program was started in 1980, more than 70,000 newborn infants have been screened. Valuable epidemiological data have been collected and necessary information for direct clinical use was obtained. A national program to screen all neonates in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is achievable and urgently needed. Recommendations based on ARAMCO experience are given.

  13. Screening for Language Disorders in Stroke: German Validation of the Language Screening Test (LAST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig-Bruhin, M; Vanbellingen, T; Schumacher, R; Pflugshaupt, T; Annoni, J M; Müri, R M; Bohlhalter, S; Nyffeler, T

    2016-01-01

    Screening of aphasia in acute stroke is crucial for directing patients to early language therapy. The Language Screening Test (LAST), originally developed in French, is a validated language screening test that allows detection of a language deficit within a few minutes. The aim of the present study was to develop and validate two parallel German versions of the LAST. The LAST includes subtests for naming, repetition, automatic speech, and comprehension. For the translation into German, task constructs and psycholinguistic criteria for item selection were identical to the French LAST. A cohort of 101 stroke patients were tested, all of whom were native German speakers. Validation of the LAST was based on (1) analysis of equivalence of the German versions, which was established by administering both versions successively in a subset of patients, (2) internal validity by means of internal consistency analysis, and (3) external validity by comparison with the short version of the Token Test in another subset of patients. The two German versions were equivalent as demonstrated by a high intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.91. Furthermore, an acceptable internal structure of the LAST was found (Cronbach's α = 0.74). A highly significant correlation (r = 0.74, p German version of the LAST, available in two parallel versions, is a new and valid language screening test in stroke.

  14. Development and validation of a screening instrument for bipolar spectrum disorder: The Mood Disorder Questionnaire Thai version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleeprakhon P

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Punjaporn Waleeprakhon,1 Pichai Ittasakul,1 Manote Lotrakul,1 Pattarabhorn Wisajun,1 Sudawan Jullagate,1 Terence A Ketter2 1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Background: The Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ has been translated to many languages and has been used in many countries as a screening instrument for bipolar disorder. The main objective of this study was to evaluate validity of the Thai version of the MDQ as a screening instrument for bipolar disorder in a psychiatric outpatient sample, and to determine its optimum question #1 item threshold value for bipolar disorder.Methods: The English language Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ was translated into Thai. The process involved back-translation, cross-cultural adaptation, field testing of the prefinal version, as well as final adjustments. Two hundred and fifty major depressive disorder outpatients were further assessed by the Thai version of the MDQ and the Thai version of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI. During the assessment, reliability and validity analyses, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC analysis were performed.Results: The Thai version of the MDQ screening had adequate internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha =0.791, omega total =0.68, and omega hierarchical =0.69. The optimal question #1 item threshold value was at least five positive items, which yielded adequate sensitivity (76.5%, specificity (72.7%, positive predictive value (74.3%, and negative predictive value (75.0%. The ROC area under the curve (AUC for this study was 0.82 (95% confidence interval: 0.70 to 0.90.Conclusion: The Thai version of the MDQ had some useful psychometric properties for screening for bipolar disorder in a mood disorder clinic setting, with a recommended question #1 item

  15. Screening for Bipolar Disorder Symptoms in Depressed Primary Care Attenders: Comparison between Mood Disorder Questionnaire and Hypomania Checklist (HCL-32

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sasdelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe the prevalence of patients who screen positive for bipolar disorder (BD symptoms in primary care comparing two screening instruments: Mood Disorders Questionnaire (MDQ and Hypomania Checklist (HCL-32. Participants. Adult patients presenting to their primary care practitioners for any cause and reporting current depression symptoms or a depressive episode in the last 6 months. Methods. Subjects completed MDQ and HCL-32, and clinical diagnosis was assessed by a psychiatrist following DSM-IV criteria. Depressive symptoms were evaluated in a subgroup with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9. Results. A total of 94 patients were approached to participate and 93 completed the survey. Among these, 8.9% screened positive with MDQ and 43.0% with HCL-32. MDQ positive had more likely features associated with BD: panic disorder and smoking habit (. The best test accuracy was performed by cut-off 5 for MDQ (sensitivity = .91; specificity = .67 and 15 for HCL-32 (sensitivity = .64; specificity = .57. Higher total score of PHQ-9 was related to higher total scores at the screening tests (. Conclusion. There is a significant prevalence of bipolar symptoms in primary care depressed patients. MDQ seems to have better accuracy and feasibility than HCL-32, features that fit well in the busy setting of primary care.

  16. Investigation of newborns with abnormal results in a newborn screening program for four lysosomal storage diseases in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heydy Bravo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs are genetic disorders, clinically heterogeneous, mainly caused by defects in genes encoding lysosomal enzymes that degrade macromolecules. Several LSDs already have specific therapies that may improve clinical outcomes, especially if introduced early in life. With this aim, screening methods have been established and newborn screening (NBS for some LSDs has been developed. Such programs should include additional procedures for the confirmation (or not of the cases that had an abnormal result in the initial screening. We present here the methods and results of the additional investigation performed in four babies with positive initial screening results in a program of NBS for LSDs performed by a private laboratory in over 10,000 newborns in Brazil. The suspicion in these cases was of Mucopolysaccharidosis I - MPS I (in two babies, Pompe disease and Gaucher disease (one baby each. One case of pseudodeficiency for MPS I, 1 carrier for MPS I, 1 case of pseudodeficiency for Pompe disease and 1 carrier for Gaucher disease were identified. This report illustrates the challenges that may be encountered by NBS programs for LSDs, and the need of a comprehensive protocol for the rapid and precise investigation of the babies who have an abnormal screening result.

  17. Prevalence of Screening-Detected Eating Disorders in Chinese Females and Exploratory Associations with Dietary Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Hunna J.; Hamer, Robert M.; Thornton, Laura M.; Peat, Christine M.; Kleiman, Susan C.; Du, Shufa; Wang, Huijin; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective China is undergoing dramatic Westernization, hence may be able to provide unique insights into the role of sociocultural factors in disease. The purpose of this exploratory study was two-fold: to describe the prevalence of screening-detected eating disorders and disordered eating in China at the first occasion of assessment in the large-scale China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) and to explore the associations between dietary practices and disordered eating. Regarding the first objective, participants are provincially representative and in subsequent waves will be followed longitudinally. Method CHNS participants were recruited using multistage, cluster random sampling, beginning in 1989. In this study, participants comprised 259 female adolescents (12–17 years) and 979 women (18–35 years) who participated in the CHNS 2009 survey, which is the first CHNS survey to assess disordered eating. Dietary practice-disordered eating associations were investigated with logistic regression adjusting for age, body mass index, and urbanization. Results Of the participants, 6.3% (95% CI: 4.8, 8.2) of adults and 7.8% (95% CI: 5.0, 12.0) of adolescents had a screening-detected eating disorder. Dietary practices had non-significant associations with disordered eating at the general population level, except for protein consumption among women. There was evidence that skipping meals and a high-fat diet may confer risk. Discussion Screening-detected eating disorders in China are lower in prevalence than in developed countries. Dietary practices had fairly limited associations with disordered eating at the general population level; protein consumption, skipping meals, and a high-fat diet are candidate dietary practice exposures for disordered eating. PMID:25407415

  18. Cancer Recognition and Screening for Common Breast Disorders and Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohon, Constance

    2017-06-01

    Breast cancer is predicted to be the most common newly diagnosed cancer in women in 2016. Screening mammography is the most commonly used method for the detection of breast cancer in women of average risk. A genetic risk assessment is recommended for women with a greater than 20% to 25% chance of having a predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer. Evaluation of a breast mass begins with a detailed history, assessment for cancer risk, and physical examination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Screening newborns for metabolic disorders based on targeted metabolomics using tandem mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Hye-Ran

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of newborn screening is to diagnose genetic, metabolic, and other inherited disorders, at their earliest to start treatment before the clinical manifestations become evident. Understanding and tracing the biochemical data obtained from tandem mass spectrometry is vital for early diagnosis of metabolic diseases associated with such disorders. Accordingly, it is important to focus on the entire diagnostic process, including differential and confirmatory diagnostic options, and ...

  20. What Disorders Are Newborns Screened for in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OLPP) Office of Science Policy, Reporting, and Program Analysis (OSPRA) Division of Extramural Research (DER) Extramural Scientific ... sugars that make up lactose, the sugar in milk. People with galactosemia cannot have any milk or ...

  1. 77 FR 35745 - Highway Safety Programs; Conforming Products List of Screening Devices To Measure Alcohol in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    ... the DRIVESAFE alcohol screening device. This is a handheld, battery powered device with a fuel cell...-0062] Highway Safety Programs; Conforming Products List of Screening Devices To Measure Alcohol in... Screening Devices to Measure Alcohol in Bodily Fluids dated, March 31, 2008 (73 FR 16956). DATES: Effective...

  2. The utility of screen for child anxiety related emotional disorders (SCARED) as a tool for identifying children at high risk for prevalent anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muris, P.; Merckelbach, H.; Kindt, M.; Bögels, S.; Dreessen, L.; van Dorp, C.; Habets, A.; Rosmuller, S.; Snieder, N.

    2001-01-01

    The current study examined the utility of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) as a screening tool for the identification of children at high risk for prevalent childhood anxiety disorders. The child version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM (KSCID) was used

  3. Estimation of radiation exposure from lung cancer screening program with low-dose computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Yeon; Jun, Jae Kwan [Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated that screening with Low-dose Computed Tomography (LDCT) screening reduced lung cancer mortality in a high-risk population. Recently, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) gave a B recommendation for annual LDCT screening for individuals at high-risk. With the promising results, Korea developed lung cancer screening guideline and is planning a pilot study for implementation of national lung cancer screening. With widespread adoption of lung cancer screening with LDCT, there are concerns about harms of screening, including high false-positive rates and radiation exposure. Over the 3 rounds of screening in the NLST, 96.4% of positive results were false-positives. Although the initial screening is performed at low dose, subsequent diagnostic examinations following positive results additively contribute to patient's lifetime exposure. As with implementing a large-scale screening program, there is a lack of established risk assessment about the effect of radiation exposure from long-term screening program. Thus, the purpose of this study was to estimate cumulative radiation exposure of annual LDCT lung cancer screening program over 20-year period.

  4. Triagem neonatal de distúrbios metabólicos Neonatal screening of metabolic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina F. Moura de Souza

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversos distúrbios metabólicos que se manifestam de forma grave e precoce podem ter sua história natural substancialmente alterada pela introdução de um tratamento em sua fase pré-clínica. O diagnóstico pré-sintomático só é possível com a realização de testes de triagem populacional em recém-nascidos. O esforço para realizar um programa de triagem neonatal deve ser empreendido quando um distúrbio metabólico preenche os seguintes requisitos: 1 o distúrbio traz, se não tratado, conseqüências graves para a saúde do afetado; 2 existe um tratamento que pode modificar substancialmente a história natural da doença; 3 o tratamento é significativamente mais eficaz quando implantado na fase pré-clínica da doença; 4 existe um teste de triagem que seja simples, eficiente, aplicável em larga escala e de baixo custo. Baseados nessas premissas, programas de triagem neonatal foram inicialmente implantados para fenilcetonúria e hipotireoidismo congênito, e hoje estão sendo aplicados para um número crescente de situações. Esses programas já estão bem-consolidados nos países desenvolvidos, mas é ainda um desafio a sua eficiente aplicação nos países do Terceiro Mundo.Several metabolic disorders which have early and severe manifestations may have their natural history significantly modified by the introduction of a treatment still on the pre-clinical phase. Pre-symptomatic diagnosis is only possible with the performance of screening tests in target populations, like newborns. The effort to perform a neonatal screening test should be done when a metabolic disorder fulfill the following criteria: 1 the disorders bring, if not treated, early and severe consequences to the health of the affected subject; 2 a treatment, which could substantially modify the natural history of the disease, is available; 3 the treatment is significantly more effective when introduced in the pre-clinical phase of the disease; 4 a laboratory test

  5. Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) for Monogenic Disorders: the Value of Concurrent Aneuploidy Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Kara N; Nazem, Taraneh; Berkeley, Alan; Palter, Steven; Grifo, Jamie A

    2016-12-01

    Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has changed the landscape of clinical genetics by helping families reduce the transmission of monogenic disorders. However, given the high prevalence of embryonic aneuploidy, particularly in patients of advanced reproductive age, unaffected embryos remain at high risk of implantation failure or pregnancy loss due to aneuploidy. 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening has become widely utilized in routine in vitro fertilization (IVF) to pre-select embryos with greater pregnancy potential, but concurrent 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening has not become standard practice in embryos biopsied for PGD. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent PGD with or without 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening to explore the value of concurrent screening. Among the PGD + aneuploidy-screened group (n = 355 blastocysts), only 25.6 % of embryos were both Single Gene Disorder (SGD)-negative (or carriers) and euploid; thus the majority of embryos were ineligible for transfer due to the high prevalence of aneuploidy. Despite a young mean age (32.4 ± 5.9y), 49.9 % of Blastocysts were aneuploid. The majority of patients (53.2 %) had ≥1 blastocyst that was Single Gene Disorder (SGD)-unaffected but aneuploid; without screening, these unaffected but aneuploid embryos would likely have been transferred resulting in implantation failure, pregnancy loss, or a pregnancy affected by chromosomal aneuploidy. Despite the transfer of nearly half the number of embryos in the aneuploidy-screened group (1.1 ± 0.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.6, p aneuploidy screening when performed concurrently with PGD provides valuable information for embryo selection, and notably improves single embryo transfer rates.

  6. Comorbidity of Drug Abuse in Adolescents: Screening for Depression, Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, and Conduct Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Jazayeri

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To screen comorbidity with substance abuse in adolescents. Among different disorders, 3 disorders of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, conduct disorder, and depression were studied in a sample of Iranian adolescents.   Materials & Methods: A total of 33 substance abusers, 35 criminal substance abusers, 34 non-substance abusers were selected from Tehran correctional and rehabilitation center for adolescents and 33 normal subjects (girl and boy were studied from schools of Tehran south using Achenbach youth self-report questionnaire (YSR (Achenbach, 1991, demographic and history of drug abuse questionnaire (designed by researchers. Results: There was a significant different regarding attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder between two groups of substance abuser and non-substance abuser, but the difference was not significant between boys and girls. Regarding conduct disorder, there was a significant difference between two sexes. In boys, there was a significant difference between substance abusers and normal groups. In depression disorder, the difference between two sexes was significant regarding boys differences were observed between three groups selected from correctional and rehabilitation center and normal group regarding girls, there was a significant difference between substance abusers with criminals and normal group. Conclusion: Apparently, these 3 disorders have shown significant difference between two sexes. ADHD pattern was the same in two sexes. There was a significant difference between two sexes with regard to depression and conduct disorder. In both sexes, ADHD was not correlated with substance abuse. The conduct disorder was not related to substance abuse in both sexes and depression disorder was only related to substance abuse in girls. Considering the youth self-report test (YSR, there is a special mental profile for substance abusers, which separates them from non-substance abusers.

  7. Predictive validity of common mental disorders screening questionnaire as a screening instrument in long sickness absence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Hans Jørgen; Bech, Per

    2010-01-01

    -scale in CMD-SQ, SCL-8AD, compiled of SCL-ANX4, SCL-8, and SCL-DEP6, showed the best psychometric properties in detection of any mental disorder (AUC 0.80). Other scales were tested as well. The psychometric properties were dependent on sex and age. The plots of Q, SE, and 1-SP against decreasing cut...

  8. 75 FR 58203 - Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Additional Screening Requirements...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    .... Ambulatory surgical centers, end-stage renal disease facilities, Federally qualified health centers... Parts 405, 424, 438, et al. Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Additional...-AQ20 Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Additional Screening Requirements...

  9. Evaluation of two-year Jewish genetic disease screening program in Atlanta: insight into community genetic screening approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yunru; Liu, Shuling; Grinzaid, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Improvements in genetic testing technologies have led to the development of expanded carrier screening panels for the Ashkenazi Jewish population; however, there are major inconsistencies in current screening practices. A 2-year pilot program was launched in Atlanta in 2010 to promote and facilitate screening for 19 Jewish genetic diseases. We analyzed data from this program, including participant demographics and outreach efforts. This retrospective analysis is based on a de-identified dataset of 724 screenees. Data were obtained through medical chart review and questionnaires and included demographic information, screening results, response to outreach efforts, and follow-up behavior and preferences. We applied descriptive analysis, chi-square tests, and logistic regression to analyze the data and compare findings with published literature. The majority of participants indicated that they were not pregnant or did not have a partner who was pregnant were affiliated with Jewish organizations and reported 100 % AJ ancestry. Overall, carrier frequency was 1 in 3.9. Friends, rabbis, and family members were the most common influencers of the decision to receive screening. People who were older, had a history of pregnancy, and had been previously screened were more likely to educate others (all p influencers who then encouraged screening in the target population. Educating influencers and increasing overall awareness were the most effective outreach strategies.

  10. Pilot treatment program for shoplifting in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, C L; Hlynsky, J; Russell, B; Gritzner, S

    2005-12-01

    There are no established treatment programs for shoplifting in eating disorder patients. Our objective was to observe the effect of an established behavioural treatment program in a series of eating disorder patients. Patients with eating disorders who shoplift voluntarily took part in an 8-week behavioral treatment program at the Elizabeth Fry Society of Greater Vancouver, British Columbia. They completed assessments at the first session, last session, and at 1 and 6 months post intervention. Six patients enrolled in the study and three patients completed the treatment program. Only one patient reported a decrease in shoplifting frequency. All subjects reported an increase in self-esteem and ability to control shoplifting impulses. Our findings suggest that behavioral therapy may be effective in treating shoplifting in eating disorders, but that longer sessions and follow-up may be necessary to show benefit. A randomized control trial with longer-term follow-up is needed to determine whether there is a benefit.

  11. Preventing eating disorder pathology: common and unique features of successful eating disorders prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciao, Anna C; Loth, Katie; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2014-07-01

    Over the past two decades, the field of eating disorders has made remarkable strides in identifying, evaluating, and disseminating successful prevention programs. The current review identifies and discusses nine distinct eating disorders prevention programs that reduce existing eating disorder pathology or prevent the onset of future pathology. Each program was evaluated in one or more controlled trial with a follow-up period of at least six months. We review the evidence base for these nine successful programs and discuss their common and unique features. Based on authors' descriptions of their programs in published trials, we found that all programs were theory-driven, targeted one or more eating disorder risk factor (e.g., body dissatisfaction), were delivered across multiple group sessions, and included at least some interactive content. Most programs included content related to healthy eating/nutrition, media literacy/sociocultural pressures, and body acceptance/body satisfaction. Notably, there was wide variation in some participant features (e.g., participant age, sex, risk status) and intervention features (e.g., setting and format, length and dose, providers), suggesting that a variety of programs are beneficial in impacting eating disorder pathology. Implications and directions for future research are discussed, including an increased focus on universal and indicated prevention programs, expanding programs to a wider age range and a broader spectrum of weight-related problems, and rigorous evaluation of programs through efficacy, effectiveness, and implementation research.

  12. Preventing Eating Disorder Pathology: Common and Unique Features of Successful Eating Disorders Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciao, Anna C.; Loth, Katie; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the field of eating disorders has made remarkable strides in identifying, evaluating, and disseminating successful prevention programs. The current review identifies and discusses nine distinct eating disorders prevention programs that reduce existing eating disorder pathology or prevent the onset of future pathology. Each program was evaluated in one or more controlled trial with a follow-up period of at least six months. We review the evidence base for these nine successful programs and discuss their common and unique features. Based on authors’ descriptions of their programs in published trials, we found that all programs were theory-driven, targeted one or more eating disorder risk factor (e.g., body dissatisfaction), were delivered across multiple group sessions, and included at least some interactive content. Most programs included content related to healthy eating/nutrition, media literacy/sociocultural pressures, and body acceptance/body satisfaction. Notably, there was wide variation in some participant features (e.g., participant age, sex, risk status) and intervention features (e.g., setting and format, length and dose, providers), suggesting that a variety of programs are beneficial in impacting eating disorder pathology. Implications and directions for future research are discussed, including an increased focus on universal and indicated prevention programs, expanding programs to a wider age range and a broader spectrum of weight-related problems, and rigorous evaluation of programs through efficacy, effectiveness, and implementation research. PMID:24821099

  13. A single-question screen for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: a multicenter validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postuma, Ronald B; Arnulf, Isabelle; Hogl, Birgit; Iranzo, Alex; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Dauvilliers, Yves; Oertel, Wolfgang; Ju, Yo-El; Puligheddu, Monica; Jennum, Poul; Pelletier, Amelie; Wolfson, Christina; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Frauscher, Birgit; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Cochen De Cock, Valerie; Unger, Marcus M; Stiasny-Kolster, Karin; Fantini, Maria Livia; Montplaisir, Jacques Y

    2012-06-01

    Idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia that is an important risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD) and Lewy body dementia. Its prevalence is unknown. One barrier to determining prevalence is that current screening tools are too long for large-scale epidemiologic surveys. Therefore, we designed the REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Single-Question Screen (RBD1Q), a screening question for dream enactment with a simple yes/no response. Four hundred and eighty-four sleep-clinic-based participants (242 idiopathic RBD patients and 242 controls) completed the screen during a multicenter case-control study. All participants underwent a polysomnogram to define gold-standard diagnosis according to standard criteria. We found a sensitivity of 93.8% and a specificity of 87.2%. Sensitivity and specificity were similar in healthy volunteers, compared to controls or patients with other sleep diagnoses. A single-question screen for RBD may reliably detect disease, with psychometric properties favorably comparable to those reported for longer questionnaires. Copyright © 2012 Movement Disorder Society.

  14. The impact of stratifying by family history in colorectal cancer screening programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Simon Lucas; Rabeneck, Linda; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Zauber, Ann G; Paszat, Lawrence F; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Yong, Jean H E; van Hees, Frank; Tinmouth, Jill; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein

    2015-09-01

    In the province-wide colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program in Ontario, Canada, individuals with a family history of CRC are offered colonoscopy screening and those without are offered guaiac fecal occult blood testing (gFOBT, Hemoccult II). We used microsimulation modeling to estimate the cumulative number of CRC deaths prevented and colonoscopies performed between 2008 and 2038 with this family history-based screening program, compared to a regular gFOBT program. In both programs, we assumed screening uptake increased from 30% (participation level in 2008 before the program was launched) to 60%. We assumed that 11% of the population had a family history, defined as having at least one first-degree relative diagnosed with CRC. The programs offered screening between age 50 and 74 years, every two years for gFOBT, and every ten years for colonoscopy. Compared to opportunistic screening (2008 participation level kept constant at 30%), the gFOBT program cumulatively prevented 6,700 more CRC deaths and required 570,000 additional colonoscopies by 2038. The family history-based screening program increased these numbers to 9,300 and 1,100,000, a 40% and 93% increase, respectively. If biennial gFOBT was replaced with biennial fecal immunochemical test (FIT), annual Hemoccult Sensa or five-yearly sigmoidoscopy screening, both the added benefits and colonoscopies required would decrease. A biennial gFOBT screening program that identifies individuals with a family history of CRC and recommends them to undergo colonoscopy screening would prevent 40% (range in sensitivity analyses: 20-51%) additional deaths while requiring 93% (range: 43-116%) additional colonoscopies, compared to a regular gFOBT screening program. © 2015 UICC.

  15. The Applicability of the Short Sensory Profile for Screening Sensory Processing Disorders among Israeli Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel-Yeger, Batya

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the applicability of the short sensory profile (SSP) for screening sensory processing disorders (SPDs) among typical children in Israel, and to evaluate the relationship between SPDs and socio-demographic parameters. Participants were 395 Israeli children, aged 3 years to 10 years 11 months, with typical…

  16. Screening for Autism Spectrum Disorders Using the PEDS and M-CHAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Valsamma; Crncec, Rudi; Woolfenden, Susan; Blackmore, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is a prerequisite for early intervention. Questionnaires may offer a cost-effective alternative to clinician-led screening in identifying toddlers and preschoolers in primary-care settings requiring specialized ASD assessment. Parents of 97 children aged 16-60 months attending childcare centers…

  17. Preliminary Validation of a Screening Tool for Adolescent Panic Disorder in Pediatric Primary Care Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen, Alexander H.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Hershorin, Eugene R.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the validity of a brief screening tool for adolescent panic disorder (PD) in a primary care setting. A total of 165 participants (ages 12-17 years) seen in two pediatric primary care clinics completed the Autonomic Nervous System Questionnaire (ANS; Stein et al. in Psychosomatic Med 61:359-364, 40). A subset of those screening…

  18. Utility of the impact of event scale in screening for posttraumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, Anke B.; Bramsen, Inge; Hovens, Johannes E.; van der Ploeg, Henk M.

    2005-01-01

    This study assesses the optimal cut-off point for the Impact of Event Scale and compares its screening properties with those of the Self-rating Inventory for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among war-related trauma victims. 74 patients with war-related trauma were administered the Impact of Event

  19. Using the Cascade Model to Improve Antenatal Screening for the Hemoglobin Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Dinah; Papadopoulos, Irena; Kelly, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The inherited hemoglobin disorders constitute a major public health problem. Facilitators (experienced hemoglobin counselors) were trained to deliver knowledge and skills to "frontline" practitioners to enable them to support parents during antenatal screening via a cascade (train-the-trainer) model. Objectives of…

  20. De Nederlandstalige versie van de McLean Screening Instrument for borderline personality disorder (MSI-BPD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuere, B.; Tibboel, H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Borderline personality disorder is a severe and disabling condition, with suicide rates up to 10%. A simple and valid screening instrument for borderline symptomatology would be of great use. Method We translated the McLean Screening Instrument for borderline personality disorder (MSI-BPD)

  1. Proposal of Screening Method of Sleep Disordered Breathing Using Fiber Grating Vision Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hirooki; Nakamura, Hidetoshi; Nakajima, Masato

    Every conventional respiration monitoring technique requires at least one sensor to be attached to the body of the subject during measurement, thereby imposing a sense of restraint that results in aversion against measurements that would last over consecutive days. To solve this problem, we developed a respiration monitoring system for sleepers, and it uses a fiber-grating vision sensor, which is a type of active image sensor to achieve non-contact respiration monitoring. In this paper, we verified the effectiveness of the system, and proposed screening method of the sleep disordered breathing. It was shown that our system could equivalently measure the respiration with thermistor and accelerograph. And, the respiratory condition of sleepers can be grasped by our screening method in one look, and it seems to be useful for the support of the screening of sleep disordered breathing.

  2. Second screening for news: Effects of presentation on information processing and program liking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, G.J.; Kleemans, M.; Cauwenberge, A.M.R. van

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of second screen presentation mode on information processing and program liking. In an experiment, 121 participants watched a television news program. One group was assigned to a dual screen condition in which participants were required to actively look up

  3. Composite International Diagnostic Interview screening scales for DSM-IV anxiety and mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, R C; Calabrese, J R; Farley, P A; Gruber, M J; Jewell, M A; Katon, W; Keck, P E; Nierenberg, A A; Sampson, N A; Shear, M K; Shillington, A C; Stein, M B; Thase, M E; Wittchen, H-U

    2013-08-01

    Lack of coordination between screening studies for common mental disorders in primary care and community epidemiological samples impedes progress in clinical epidemiology. Short screening scales based on the World Health Organization (WHO) Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), the diagnostic interview used in community epidemiological surveys throughout the world, were developed to address this problem. Expert reviews and cognitive interviews generated CIDI screening scale (CIDI-SC) item pools for 30-day DSM-IV-TR major depressive episode (MDE), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD) and bipolar disorder (BPD). These items were administered to 3058 unselected patients in 29 US primary care offices. Blinded SCID clinical reinterviews were administered to 206 of these patients, oversampling screened positives. Stepwise regression selected optimal screening items to predict clinical diagnoses. Excellent concordance [area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC)] was found between continuous CIDI-SC and DSM-IV/SCID diagnoses of 30-day MDE (0.93), GAD (0.88), PD (0.90) and BPD (0.97), with only 9-38 questions needed to administer all scales. CIDI-SC versus SCID prevalence differences are insignificant at the optimal CIDI-SC diagnostic thresholds (χ2 1 = 0.0-2.9, p = 0.09-0.94). Individual-level diagnostic concordance at these thresholds is substantial (AUC 0.81-0.86, sensitivity 68.0-80.2%, specificity 90.1-98.8%). Likelihood ratio positive (LR+) exceeds 10 and LR- is 0.1 or less at informative thresholds for all diagnoses. CIDI-SC operating characteristics are equivalent (MDE, GAD) or superior (PD, BPD) to those of the best alternative screening scales. CIDI-SC results can be compared directly to general population CIDI survey results or used to target and streamline second-stage CIDIs.

  4. [The Body Dysmorphic Disorder in Plastic Surgery - A Systematic Review of Screening Methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houschyar, K S; Philipps, H M; Duscher, D; Rein, S; Weissenberg, K; Nietzschmann, I; Maan, Z N; Pyles, M N; Siemers, F

    2017-12-01

    The body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is considered to be a sub-form of somatoform disorders. BDD can express itself in a delirious experience, an excessive evaluation and employment of the external appearance, in particular the face. Preliminary results suggest that individuals with BDD do not benefit from plastic surgery, so that aesthetic surgery often results in aggravation of their symptoms. Thus, the identification of signs for a BDD is crucial, whether a patient should be operated plastically-aesthetically. This overview explains the often difficult diagnostics of the BDD by summarizing the current literature on its screening. Systematic overview METHODS: An electronic search was conducted in the German and English-language literature in order to identify all screening instruments for the BDD. The specific development and validation processes are assessed whether the screening instruments have a positive predictive value for the BDD. Six different screening instruments were identified for the BDD. Only two of these were evaluated in a cosmetic setting: the "Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire Dermatology Version" (BDDQ-DV) and the "Dysmorphic Concern Questionnaire" (DCQ). The influence on the subjective results after a plastic-aesthetic procedure was measured only for the DCQ. The limited availability of validated screening instruments for BDD in plastic surgery is markedly in contrast to the supposedly high prevalence of the disease of 2.4 %. Among the currently used screening tools, the BDDQ-DV and the DCQ appear to be most suitable. Further research efforts are needed to establish better screening methods for the BDD in the plastic surgical patient population and to examine the effects of BDD on treatment results. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Colorectal cancer prevention in Europe: burden of disease and status of screening programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altobelli, E; Lattanzi, A; Paduano, R; Varassi, G; di Orio, F

    2014-05-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major public health challenge worldwide. In Europe it is the first malignancy in terms of incidence and the second in terms of mortality in both genders. Despite evidence indicating that removal of premalignant and early-stage cancer lesion scan greatly reduce mortality, remarkable differences are still found among countries both in terms of organized screening programs and of the tests used. In 2003 the European Council recommended that priority be given to activation of organized cancer screening programs, and various states have been making significant efforts to adopt effective prevention programs with international quality standards and centralizing screening organization and result evaluation. After a 2008 European Union report on the state of screening program, activation highlighted that little more than 50% (12/22) of Member States had colorectal cancer screening programs, Screening programs have been adopted or earlier pilot projects have been extended nationwide. This paper examines the state of activation and the screening strategies of colorectal cancer screening programs in EU States as of July 2013. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Screening disordered eating attitudes and eating disorders in a sample of Turkish female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Ozcan; Güleç, Nurdan; Ozşahin, Aytekin; Doruk, Ali; Ozdemir, Barbaros; Calişkan, Ufuk

    2006-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that college women are particularly susceptible to the development and maintenance of disturbed eating behaviors. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of disordered eating attitudes and eating disorders in a sample of Turkish female college students. The Eating Attitudes Test was administered to a sample of 414 female college students. The subjects who had a score of 30 or higher were accepted as having disordered eating attitudes, and all of them have been examined using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition for eating disorders. Of the overall sample, 17.1% of subjects were classified as having disordered eating attitudes. This subgroup of subjects was then compared with the remainder on all the other measures. The differences between students with disordered eating attitudes and those without on sociodemographic variables (except for age) were not statistically significant. The rate was 1% for eating disorders including anorexia nervosa (0.5%) and bulimia nervosa (0.5%). This study suggested that the prevalences of disordered eating attitudes and anorexia nervosa among female college students in Turkey were similar to those found in Western societies, but the rate for bulimia nervosa was lower compared with Western societies.

  7. Self-Sampling for Human Papillomavirus Testing: Increased Cervical Cancer Screening Participation and Incorporation in International Screening Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sarah; Palmer, Christina; Bik, Elisabeth M.; Cardenas, Juan P.; Nuñez, Harold; Kraal, Laurens; Bird, Sara W.; Bowers, Jennie; Smith, Alison; Walton, Nathaniel A.; Goddard, Audrey D.; Almonacid, Daniel E.; Zneimer, Susan; Richman, Jessica; Apte, Zachary S.

    2018-01-01

    In most industrialized countries, screening programs for cervical cancer have shifted from cytology (Pap smear or ThinPrep) alone on clinician-obtained samples to the addition of screening for human papillomavirus (HPV), its main causative agent. For HPV testing, self-sampling instead of clinician-sampling has proven to be equally accurate, in particular for assays that use nucleic acid amplification techniques. In addition, HPV testing of self-collected samples in combination with a follow-up Pap smear in case of a positive result is more effective in detecting precancerous lesions than a Pap smear alone. Self-sampling for HPV testing has already been adopted by some countries, while others have started trials to evaluate its incorporation into national cervical cancer screening programs. Self-sampling may result in more individuals willing to participate in cervical cancer screening, because it removes many of the barriers that prevent women, especially those in low socioeconomic and minority populations, from participating in regular screening programs. Several studies have shown that the majority of women who have been underscreened but who tested HPV-positive in a self-obtained sample will visit a clinic for follow-up diagnosis and management. In addition, a self-collected sample can also be used for vaginal microbiome analysis, which can provide additional information about HPV infection persistence as well as vaginal health in general. PMID:29686981

  8. Self-Sampling for Human Papillomavirus Testing: Increased Cervical Cancer Screening Participation and Incorporation in International Screening Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Gupta

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In most industrialized countries, screening programs for cervical cancer have shifted from cytology (Pap smear or ThinPrep alone on clinician-obtained samples to the addition of screening for human papillomavirus (HPV, its main causative agent. For HPV testing, self-sampling instead of clinician-sampling has proven to be equally accurate, in particular for assays that use nucleic acid amplification techniques. In addition, HPV testing of self-collected samples in combination with a follow-up Pap smear in case of a positive result is more effective in detecting precancerous lesions than a Pap smear alone. Self-sampling for HPV testing has already been adopted by some countries, while others have started trials to evaluate its incorporation into national cervical cancer screening programs. Self-sampling may result in more individuals willing to participate in cervical cancer screening, because it removes many of the barriers that prevent women, especially those in low socioeconomic and minority populations, from participating in regular screening programs. Several studies have shown that the majority of women who have been underscreened but who tested HPV-positive in a self-obtained sample will visit a clinic for follow-up diagnosis and management. In addition, a self-collected sample can also be used for vaginal microbiome analysis, which can provide additional information about HPV infection persistence as well as vaginal health in general.

  9. Evaluation Of Cervical Cancer Screening Program At A Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    But the condition is preventable through regular screening of women those are 'at risk\\' for abnormal changes in the cervix and treating them who have positive results. Although screening facilities are ... Keywords: Cervical cancer, Pap smear test, knowledge, practice, programme coverage. East African Journal of Public ...

  10. Implementation of a fall screening program in a high risk of fracture population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchey, Katherine; Olney, Amanda; Shofer, Jane; Phelan, Elizabeth A; Matsumoto, Alvin M

    2017-10-31

    Fall prevention is an important way to prevent fractures in person with osteoporosis. We developed and implemented a fall screening program in the context of routine osteoporosis care. This program was found to be feasible and showed that a significant proportion of persons with osteoporosis are at risk of falling. Falls are the most common cause of fracture in persons with osteoporosis. However, osteoporosis care rarely includes assessment and prevention of falling. We thus sought to assess the feasibility of a fall screening and management program integrated into routine osteoporosis care. The program was developed and offered to patients with osteoporosis or osteopenia seen at an outpatient clinic between May 2015 and May 2016. Feasibility was measured by physical therapist time required to conduct screening and ease of integrating the screening program into the usual clinic workflow. Self-report responses and mobility testing were conducted to describe the fall and fracture risk profile of osteoporosis patients screened. Effects on fall-related care processes were assessed via chart abstraction of patient participation in fall prevention exercise. Of the 154 clinic patients who presented for a clinic visit, 68% met screening criteria and completed in two thirds of persons. Screening was completed in a third of the time typically allotted for traditional PT evaluations and did not interfere with clinic workflow. Forty percent of those screened reported falling in the last year, and over half had two or more falls in the past year. Over half reported a balance or lower extremity impairment, and over 40% were below norms on one or more performance tests. Most patients who selected a group exercise fall prevention program completed all sessions while only a quarter completed either supervised or independent home-based programs. Implementation of a fall risk screening program in an outpatient osteoporosis clinic appears feasible. A substantial proportion of people

  11. Infrastructure and Educational Needs of Newborn Screening Short-Term Follow-Up Programs within the Southeast Regional Newborn Screening & Genetics Collaborative: A Pilot Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecelia A. Bellcross

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Newborn screening (NBS follow-up protocols vary significantly by state, and there is a need to better understand the infrastructure and communication flow of NBS programs. In addition, assessment of the educational needs of families and providers with regard to the implications of NBS results is required to inform the development of appropriate informational resources and training opportunities. To begin to address these issues, we administered a web-based survey to state NBS coordinators within the Southeast Regional Newborn Screening & Genetics Collaborative (SERC. Fourteen coordinators responded to the survey, including at least one from each of the 10 SERC states/territories. Over one-third of respondents had never received formal training regarding the metabolic conditions identified on NBS. Most communicated results via telephone or fax, though two centers indicated use of a web-based platform. Only two programs were involved in directly reporting results to the family. Four programs reported a long-term follow-up protocol. Deficits were noted for primary care provider (PCP knowledge of metabolic disorders identified on NBS, and how to inform parents of abnormal results. Close to half indicated that the adequacy of the number of genetic counselors, dietitians, and medical/biochemical geneticists was minimal to insufficient. Respondents uniformly recognized the importance of providing additional educational and informational resources in multiple categories to NBS staff, PCPs, and families.

  12. Evaluation of Cannabidiol in Animal Seizure Models by the Epilepsy Therapy Screening Program (ETSP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Brian D; Jacobson, Catherine A; Metcalf, Cameron S; Smith, Misty D; Wilcox, Karen S; Hampson, Aidan J; Kehne, John H

    2017-07-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a cannabinoid component of marijuana that has no significant activity at cannabinoid receptors or psychoactive effects. There is considerable interest in CBD as a therapy for epilepsy. Almost a third of epilepsy patients are not adequately controlled by clinically available anti-seizure drugs (ASDs). Initial studies appear to demonstrate that CBD preparations may be a useful treatment for pharmacoresistant epilepsy. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) funded Epilepsy Therapy Screening Program (ETSP) investigated CBD in a battery of seizure models using a refocused screening protocol aimed at identifying pharmacotherapies to address the unmet need in pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Applying this new screening workflow, CBD was investigated in mouse 6 Hz 44 mA, maximal electroshock (MES), corneal kindling models and rat MES and lamotrigine-resistant amygdala kindling models. Following intraperitoneal (i.p.) pretreatment, CBD produced dose-dependent protection in the acute seizure models; mouse 6 Hz 44 mA (ED 50 164 mg/kg), mouse MES (ED 50 83.5 mg/kg) and rat MES (ED 50 88.9 mg/kg). In chronic models, CBD produced dose-dependent protection in the corneal kindled mouse (ED 50 119 mg/kg) but CBD (up to 300 mg/kg) was not protective in the lamotrigine-resistant amygdala kindled rat. Motor impairment assessed in conjunction with the acute seizure models showed that CBD exerted seizure protection at non-impairing doses. The ETSP investigation demonstrates that CBD exhibits anti-seizure properties in acute seizure models and the corneal kindled mouse. However, further preclinical and clinical studies are needed to determine the potential for CBD to address the unmet needs in pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

  13. Results of a Targeted Screening Program for Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection in Infants Who Fail Newborn Hearing Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancor, Emily; Shapiro, Eugene D; Loyal, Jaspreet

    2018-01-24

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a major cause of sensorineural hearing loss. By law, newborns in Connecticut who fail newborn hearing screening are tested for infection with CMV. This targeted screening is controversial, because most children with congenital CMV infection are asymptomatic, and CMV-related hearing loss can have a delayed onset. Our hospital uses a saliva polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay (confirmed by a urine PCR assay) to detect CMV. Here, we report the results of the first year of our screening program. We reviewed the medical records of newborns in the Yale New Haven Health System who failed the newborn hearing screening test between January 1 and December 31, 2016. Of 10964 newborns, 171 failed newborn hearing screening, and 3 of these newborns had positive saliva CMV PCR test results. Of these 3 newborns, 2 had positive results on the confirmatory test (for 1 of them the confirmatory test was not performed until the infant was 10 weeks old), and 1 had a negative result on the confirmatory test. Three additional newborns with congenital CMV infection were tested because of clinical indications (1 for ventriculomegaly on prenatal ultrasound and 2 for CMV infection of the mother). Results of audiology follow-up were available for 149 (87.1%) of the 171 newborns who failed newborn hearing screening; 127 (85.2%) had normal results. Our targeted screening program for congenital CMV infection had a low yield. Consideration should be given to other strategies for identifying children at risk of hearing loss as a result of congenital CMV infection. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. The utility of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder screening instruments in individuals seeking treatment for substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakwar, Elias; Mahony, Amy; Pavlicova, Martina; Glass, Andrew; Brooks, Daniel; Mariani, John J; Grabowski, John; Levin, Frances Rudnick

    2012-11-01

    Several screening tools for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been validated in non-substance-abusing populations, but limited data are available regarding their utility in adults with current substance use disorders. The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 3 commonly used ADHD screening instruments in cocaine-dependent individuals. Adults seeking treatment for cocaine dependence (N = 102) were administered 3 self-report instruments between May 2009 and April 2011: the Conners Adult ADHD Rating Scale (CAARS), the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS), and the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale-Version 1.1 (ASRS-V1.1). They then met with master's-level clinicians who administered the Conners Adult ADHD Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV (CAADID). With the CAADID serving as the gold standard, the validity of the screening instruments was determined, both singly and in combination. Twenty-five (25%) of the 102 patients met DSM-IV criteria for ADHD or ADHD not otherwise specified (NOS) based on the CAADID. Kappa scores determining agreement between the screening tools and the CAADID (with ADHD NOS labeled as ADHD or labeled as not ADHD) ranged from 0.37 to 0.69. Sensitivity scores for the broadest range of ADHD cases were 80.0%, 87.5%, and 60.9% for the CAARS, WURS, and ASRS-V1.1, respectively. Positive predictive value was highest for the CAARS, at 74.1%, and negative predictive value was highest for the WURS, at 95.1%. The highest sensitivity (96.0%) was found with coadministration of the WURS and CAARS. While all of the screening instruments were found to have adequate sensitivity and specificity, the CAARS outperformed the other instruments in regard to agreement with the CAADID and positive predictive values. However, the WURS, with the highest sensitivity in regard to the broadest range of ADHD cases, may be the single best instrument for preliminary screening purposes. Further

  15. Implementing a screening programme for post-traumatic stress disorder following violent crime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan I. Bisson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The emergence of validated means to determine which individuals will develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD following a traumatic event has raised the possibility of designing and implementing effective screening programmes following traumatic events. Objective: This study aimed to study the usefulness and implementation of a PTSD screening programme for victims of violent crime presenting to an emergency unit. Design: 3,349 individuals who presented to an emergency unit following a violent crime were asked to complete the Trauma Screening Questionnaire 2 weeks later. Those who scored above a standard cut-off were invited to attend a mental health assessment and subsequently offered treatment according to their needs. Results: Of the 3,349 individuals contacted, 572 (17.1% responded, 338 (10.1% screened positive, 26 (0.78% attended for assessment, and 9 (0.27% received treatment for PTSD. Conclusions: This simple screening programme was not as useful as was hoped raising questions regarding how best to develop screening programmes for PTSD following violent crime and other traumatic events.

  16. Sensorimotor speech disorders in Parkinson's disease: Programming and execution deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Zazo Ortiz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Dysfunction in the basal ganglia circuits is a determining factor in the physiopathology of the classic signs of Parkinson's disease (PD and hypokinetic dysarthria is commonly related to PD. Regarding speech disorders associated with PD, the latest four-level framework of speech complicates the traditional view of dysarthria as a motor execution disorder. Based on findings that dysfunctions in basal ganglia can cause speech disorders, and on the premise that the speech deficits seen in PD are not related to an execution motor disorder alone but also to a disorder at the motor programming level, the main objective of this study was to investigate the presence of sensorimotor disorders of programming (besides the execution disorders previously described in PD patients. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 60 adults matched for gender, age and education: 30 adult patients diagnosed with idiopathic PD (PDG and 30 healthy adults (CG. All types of articulation errors were reanalyzed to investigate the nature of these errors. Interjections, hesitations and repetitions of words or sentences (during discourse were considered typical disfluencies; blocking, episodes of palilalia (words or syllables were analyzed as atypical disfluencies. We analysed features including successive self-initiated trial, phoneme distortions, self-correction, repetition of sounds and syllables, prolonged movement transitions, additions or omissions of sounds and syllables, in order to identify programming and/or execution failures. Orofacial agility was also investigated. Results: The PDG had worse performance on all sensorimotor speech tasks. All PD patients had hypokinetic dysarthria. Conclusion: The clinical characteristics found suggest both execution and programming sensorimotor speech disorders in PD patients.

  17. [German Prevention Programs for Eating Disorders - A Systematic Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickhardt, Mara; Adametz, Luise; Richter, Felicitas; Strauß, Bernhard; Berger, Uwe

    2018-02-13

    In the past years a considerable amount of primary and secondary prevention programs for eating disorders was developed in German speaking countries. However, up to now there has been no systematic review of contents and evaluation studies. The main objective of the present systematic review is to identify and outline German prevention programs for eating disorders. This should facilitate the selection of appropriate and effective interventions for medical experts, other professionals and teachers. A systematic literature research was conducted and 22 German-language primary and secondary prevention programs were identified. Half of them were evaluated. The programs were conducted either in school, on the internet or in a group setting. The findings show that throughout almost all programs a reduction in weight and shape concerns and drive for thinness as well as an increase of (body) self-esteem could be observed in either the total sample or the high-risk sample. However, programs were inconsistently effective in reducing disordered eating behavior in the target population. All studies were effective in reducing at least one risk factor. Overall, higher effect sizes were found for secondary prevention programs than for primary prevention programs. Lastly, limitations of the studies and suggestions for future prevention efforts are discussed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Optimising screening for cognitive dysfunction in bipolar disorder: Validation and evaluation of objective and subjective tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Johan Høy; Støttrup, Mette Marie; Nayberg, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    by correlation with established objective and subjective cognitive measures, and decision validity was determined with Receiver-Operating-Characteristic analyses. Correlations and linear regression analyses were conducted to determine the associations between objective and subjective cognitive impairment......Introduction Cognitive impairment is common in bipolar disorder and contributes to socio-occupational difficulties. The objective was to validate and evaluate instruments to screen for and monitor cognitive impairments, and improve the understanding of the association between cognitive measures...

  19. Development of a Newborn Screening Program for Critical Congenital Heart Disease (CCHD) in Taipei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Pei-Chen; Shiau, Yu-Shih; Chiang, Szu-Hui; Ho, Hui-Chen; Liu, Yu-Ling; Chung, Yuan-Fang; Lin, Li-Ju; Chen, Ming-Ren; Chang, Jia-Kan; Soong, Wen-Jue; Lin, Hsiu-Lian; Hwang, Betau; Hsiao, Kwang-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) can significantly reduce morbidity and mortality among newborns. We investigate the feasibility of implementing a community-based newborn CCHD screening program in Taipei. Twelve birthing facilities in Taipei participated in a trial screening program between October 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014. Newborns underwent pulse oximetry at 24-36 h old, with probes attached to the right hand and one lower limb. Any screening saturation ≥95% in either extremity, with an absolute difference of ≤3% between the right hand and foot, was accepted as a screening pass. A screening result was considered as a fail if the oxygen saturation was <95% at either probe site, on 3 separate occasions, each separated by 30 min or the first result was <95% at either probe site, and any subsequent oxygen saturation measurement was <90%. Public health nurses would follow up all missed or refused cases. Of the 6,387 live births, 6,296 newborns (coverage rate: 6,296/6,387 = 98.6%) underwent appropriate pulse oximetry screening. Sixteen newborns (0.25%) were reported to have a failed screening result. Five of these screen positive newborns were confirmed with CCHD; two of them were diagnosed solely attributed to the failed screening results. The false-positive rate was 0.18%. Implementing a 6-month screening program for CCHD produced good case detection rate, while using efficient screening and referral systems. This program was successful in integrating screening, referral and public health tracking systems. The protocol outlined in this report could provide a community-based model for worldwide implementation.

  20. Newborn screening for congenital cytomegalovirus: Options for hospital-based and public health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Scott D; Dollard, Sheila; Ross, Danielle S; Cannon, Michael

    2009-12-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a leading cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and developmental disability in children. Early identification of infected children through screening could allow for early intervention and improvement in functional outcomes among the subset who develop sequelae. To outline potential options and strategies for screening newborns for congenital CMV infection and to discuss barriers to screening and data needs to inform future policy decisions. Commentary based on the literature and expert opinion on newborn dried blood spot screening, newborn hearing screening/Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) programs, and congenital CMV. Although no population-based screening for congenital CMV is underway, pilot newborn screening studies using a variety of assays with urine or dried blood spot specimens are underway. Challenges to screening are both practical-uncertain sensitivity of blood spot assays suitable for large-scale screening and lack of infrastructure for collection of urine specimens; and evidentiary-the need to demonstrate improved outcomes and value of screening to offset the expense and potential adverse psychosocial consequences for children and families whose children require periodic monitoring but never develop sequelae. Screening for congenital CMV infection is a potentially important intervention that merits additional research, including the logistical feasibility of different screening options and psychosocial consequences for families.

  1. Acoustic Reflex Screening of Conductive Hearing Loss for Third Window Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Robert S; Metz, Christopher M; Bojrab, Dennis I; Babu, Seilesh C; Zappia, John; Sargent, Eric W; Chan, Eleanor Y; Naumann, Ilka C; LaRouere, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of acoustic reflexes in screening for third window disorders (eg, superior semicircular canal dehiscence) prior to middle ear exploration for conductive hearing loss. Case series with chart review. Outpatient tertiary otology center. A review was performed of 212 ears with acoustic reflexes, performed as part of the evaluation of conductive hearing loss in patients without evidence of chronic otitis media. The etiology of hearing loss was determined from intraoperative findings and computed tomography imaging. The relationship between acoustic reflexes and conductive hearing loss etiology was assessed. Eighty-eight percent of ears (166 of 189) demonstrating absence of all acoustic reflexes had an ossicular etiology of conductive hearing loss. Fifty-two percent of ears (12 of 23) with at least 1 detectable acoustic reflex had a nonossicular etiology. The positive and negative predictive values for an ossicular etiology were 89% and 57% when acoustic reflexes were used alone for screening, 89% and 39% when third window symptoms were used alone, and 94% and 71% when reflexes and symptoms were used together, respectively. Acoustic reflex testing is an effective means of screening for third window disorders in patients with a conductive hearing loss. Questioning for third window symptoms should complement screening. The detection of even 1 acoustic reflex or third window symptom (regardless of reflex status) should prompt further workup prior to middle ear exploration. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  2. The impact of stratifying by family history in colorectal cancer screening programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L. Goede (S. Lucas); L. Rabeneck (L.); I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris); A. Zauber (Ann); L.F. Paszat (Lawrence F.); J.S. Hoch (Jeffrey S.); J.H.E. Yong (Jean H.E.); F. Van Hees (Frank); J. Tinmouth (Jill); M. van Ballegooijen (Marjolein)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn the province-wide colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program in Ontario, Canada, individuals with a family history of CRC are offered colonoscopy screening and those without are offered guaiac fecal occult blood testing (gFOBT, Hemoccult II). We used microsimulation modeling to

  3. Costs of promoting cancer screening: Evidence from CDC's Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangka, Florence K L; Subramanian, Sujha; Hoover, Sonja; Royalty, Janet; Joseph, Kristy; DeGroff, Amy; Joseph, Djenaba; Chattopadhyay, Sajal

    2017-06-01

    The Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP) provided funding to 29 grantees to increase colorectal cancer screening. We describe the screening promotion costs of CRCCP grantees to evaluate the extent to which the program model resulted in the use of funding to support interventions recommended by the Guide to Community Preventive Services (Community Guide). We analyzed expenditures for screening promotion for the first three years of the CRCCP to assess cost per promotion strategy, and estimated the cost per person screened at the state level based on various projected increases in screening rates. All grantees engaged in small media activities and more than 90% used either client reminders, provider assessment and feedback, or patient navigation. Based on all expenditures, projected cost per eligible person screened for a 1%, 5%, and 10% increase in state-level screening proportions are $172, $34, and $17, respectively. CRCCP grantees expended the majority of their funding on Community Guide recommended screening promotion strategies but about a third was spent on other interventions. Based on this finding, future CRC programs should be provided with targeted education and information on evidence-based strategies, rather than broad based recommendations, to ensure that program funds are expended mainly on evidence-based interventions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. 76 FR 60022 - Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Weight-of-Evidence Guidance Document; Notice of Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... identify the need for Tier 2 testing. List of Subjects Environmental protection, Endocrine disruptors... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [EPA-HQ-OPPT-2010-0877; FRL-8890-7] Endocrine Disruptor Screening... Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) is announcing...

  5. 75 FR 81605 - Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP); Announcing the Availability of a Draft for Weight...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ..., Endocrine disruptors, Screening assays, Weight-of-evidence. Dated: December 20, 2010. Stephen A. Owens... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [EPA-HQ-OPPT-2010-0877; FRL-8858-9] Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP); Announcing the Availability of a Draft for Weight-of-Evidence Guidance Document...

  6. Parent Reactions to a School-Based Body Mass Index Screening Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Suzanne Bennett; Pilkington, Lorri L.; Lamp, Camilla; He, Jianghua; Deeb, Larry C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study assessed parent reactions to school-based body mass index (BMI) screening. Methods: After a K-8 BMI screening program, parents were sent a letter detailing their child's BMI results. Approximately 50 parents were randomly selected for interview from each of 4 child weight-classification groups (overweight, at risk of…

  7. Adherence to the cervical cancer screening program in women living with HIV in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Ladelund, Steen; Jensen-Fangel, Søren

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Women living with HIV (WLWH) are at increased risk of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). International HIV guidelines suggest cervical screening twice the first year after HIV diagnosis and thereafter annually. Adherence to the HIV cervical screening program in Denmark is unknown. METHODS...

  8. Newborn screening of inherited metabolic disorders by tandem mass spectrometry: past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Scaturro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Inborn errors of metabolism are inherited biochemical disorders caused by lack of a functional enzyme, transmembrane transporter, or similar protein, which then results in blockage of the corresponding metabolic pathway. Taken individually, inborn errors of metabolism are rare. However, as a group these diseases are relatively frequent and they may account for most of neonatal mortality and need of health resources. The detection of genetic metabolic disorders should occur in a pre-symptomatic phase. Recently, the introduction of the tandem mass spectrometric methods for metabolite analysis has changed our ability to detect intermediates of metabolism in smaller samples and provides the means to detect a large number of metabolic disorders in a single analytical run. Screening panels now include a large number of disorders that may not meet all the criteria that have been used as a reference for years. The rationale behind inclusion or exclusion of a respective disorder is difficult to understand in most cases and it may impose an ethical dilemma. The current organization is an important tool of secondary preventive medicine, essential for children’s healthcare, but the strong inhomogeneity of the regional models of screening applied today create in the Italian neonatal population macroscopic differences with regards to healthcare, which is in effect mainly diversified by the newborn’s place of birth, in possible violation of the universal criterion of the equality of all citizens. Carefully weighed arguments are urgently needed since patient organizations, opinion leaders and politicians are pressing to proceed with expansion of neonatal population screening.

  9. Calcium channelopathies in inherited neurological disorders: relevance to drug screening for acquired channel disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lory, Philippe; Mezghrani, Alexandre

    2010-07-01

    Mutations located in the human genes encoding voltage-gated calcium channels are responsible for a variety of diseases referred to as calcium channelopathies, including familial hemiplegic migraine, episodic ataxia type 2, spinocerebellar ataxia type 6, childhood absence epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder, all of which are rare inherited forms of common neurological disorders. The genetic basis of these calcium channelopathies provides a unique opportunity to investigate their underlying mechanisms from the molecular to whole-organism levels. Studies of channelopathies provide insight on the relationships between channel structure and function, and reveal diverse and unexpected physiological roles for the channels. Importantly, these studies may also lead to the identification of drugs for the treatment of genetically acquired channel disorders, as well as to novel therapeutic practices. In this feature review, recent findings regarding neurological calcium channelopathies are discussed.

  10. A screening program for dancers administered by dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Margaret; Deckert, Jennifer L

    2009-01-01

    Students enrolled in a dance kinesiology class were trained to administer a screening protocol on younger dancers in the same department. The dance kinesiology students gained experience assessing alignment and functional symmetry in their peers, and then recommended exercises for gaining awareness and developing balanced patterns of movement. This "low stakes" assessment created both dialogue and peer support centered on helping the screened dancers understand and effectively work with their individual capacities and limitations. The project was designed to contribute to a culture of wellness and education within the dance department.

  11. Screening Doses for Induction of Cancers Calculated with the Interactive RadioEpidemiological Program (IREP)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kocher, David C; Apostoaei, Julian A

    2007-01-01

    .... Screening doses for 32 cancer types were calculated with the Interactive RadioEpidemiological Program, which is used by the Department of Veterans Affairs in adjudicating claims for compensation...

  12. Costs of colorectal cancer screening provision in CDC's Colorectal Cancer Control Program: Comparisons of colonoscopy and FOBT/FIT based screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Sujha; Tangka, Florence K L; Hoover, Sonja; Royalty, Janet; DeGroff, Amy; Joseph, Djenaba

    2017-06-01

    We assess annual costs of screening provision activities implemented by 23 of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP) grantees and report differences in costs between colonoscopy and FOBT/FIT-based screening programs. We analysed annual cost data for the first three years of the CRCCP (July 2009-June 2011) for each screening provision activity and categorized them into clinical and non-clinical screening provision activities. The largest cost components for both colonoscopy and FOBT/FIT-based programs were screening and diagnostic services, program management, and data collection and tracking. During the first 3 years of the CRCCP, the average annual clinical cost for screening and diagnostic services per person served was $1150 for colonoscopy programs, compared to $304 for FIT/FOBT-based programs. Overall, FOBT/FIT-based programs appear to have slightly higher non-clinical costs per person served (average $1018; median $838) than colonoscopy programs (average $980; median $686). Colonoscopy-based CRCCP programs have higher clinical costs than FOBT/FIT-based programs during the 3-year study timeframe (translating into fewer people screened). Non-clinical costs for both approaches are similar and substantial. Future studies of the cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening initiatives should consider both clinical and non-clinical costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) Comprehensive Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EDSP Comprehensive Management Plan describes the technical review processes that will be used in implementing this program and how the agency intends to factor technology advancements into the program.

  14. Implementation and Evaluation of Two Educational Strategies to Improve Screening for Eating Disorders in Pediatric Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Holly C; Cheever, Elizabeth; Forman, Sara F; Hatoun, Jonathan; Jooma, Farah; Touloumtzis, Currie; Vernacchio, Louis

    2017-05-01

    Routine screening for disordered eating or body image concerns is recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics. We evaluated the ability of two educational interventions to increase screening for eating disorders in pediatric primary care practice, predicting that the "active-learning" group would have an increase in documented screening after intervention. We studied 303 practitioners in a large independent practice association located in the northeastern United States. We used a quasi-experimental design to test the effect of printed educational materials ("print-learning" group, n = 280 participants) compared with in-person shared learning followed by on-line spaced education ("active-learning" group, n = 23 participants) on documented screening of adolescents for eating disorder symptoms during preventive care visits. A subset of 88 participants completed additional surveys regarding knowledge of eating disorders, comfort screening for, diagnosing, and treating eating disorders, and satisfaction with their training regarding eating disorders. During the preintervention period, 4.5% of patients seen by practitioners in both the print-learning and active-learning groups had chart documentation of screening for eating disorder symptoms or body image concerns. This increased to 22% in the active-learning group and 5.7% in the print-learning group in the postintervention period, a statistically significant result. Compared with print-learning participants, active-learning group participants had greater eating disorder knowledge scores, increases in comfort diagnosing eating disorders, and satisfaction with their training in this area. In-person shared learning followed by on-line spaced education is more effective than print educational materials for increasing provider documentation of screening for eating disorders in primary care. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Personality disorders in heart failure patients requiring psychiatric management: comorbidity detections from a routine depression and anxiety screening protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Phillip J; Selkow, Terina

    2014-12-30

    Several international guidelines recommend routine depression screening in cardiac disease populations. No previous study has determined the prevalence and comorbidities of personality disorders in patients presenting for psychiatric treatment after these screening initiatives. In the first stage 404 heart failure (HF) patients were routinely screened and 73 underwent structured interview when either of the following criteria were met: (a) Patient Health Questionnaire ≥10; (b) Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire ≥7); (c) Response to one item panic-screener. Or (d) Suicidality. Patients with personality disorders were compared to the positive-screen patients on psychiatric comorbidities. The most common personality disorders were avoidant (8.2%), borderline (6.8%) and obsessive compulsive (4.1%), other personality disorders were prevalent in less than disorder patients had significantly greater risk of major depression (risk ratio (RR) 1.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-13.3), generalized anxiety disorder (RR 3.2; 95% CI 1.0-10.0), social phobia (RR 3.8; 95% CI 1.3-11.5) and alcohol abuse/dependence (RR 3.2; 95% 1.0-9.5). The findings that HF patients with personality disorders presented with complex psychiatric comorbidity suggest that pathways facilitating the integration of psychiatric services into cardiology settings are warranted when routine depression screening is in place. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Icelandic and Nordic cervical screening programs: trends in incidence and mortality rates through 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, K

    1999-07-01

    The objective of cervical cancer screening is to lower the incidence and mortality rates of the disease. This study evaluates the effectiveness of cervical screening and the UICC and EC screening recommendations based on the Nordic screening experience. The study analyzes the features of the Icelandic and the Nordic screening programs and the observed trends in the incidence and mortality rates in these countries through 1995. Organized screening started in all the Nordic countries soon after 1960 and had nation-wide coverage in all these countries, except in Denmark (45% coverage in 1991), by around 1973 but in Norway screening was only spontaneous up to late in 1994. Up to 1985 the target age group and screening interval were most intensive in Iceland, followed by Finland, Sweden and Denmark. All countries except Finland lowered the lower age limit and intensified the screening intervals after 1985. Through the period 1986-1995 the reduction in both the mortality and the incidence rates was greatest in Iceland (mortality: 76% and incidence: 67%) and Finland (73% and 75%, respectively), intermediate in Sweden (60% and 55%, respectively) and Denmark (55% and 54%, respectively), and lowest in Norway (43% and 34%, respectively). The age-specific incidence in the 20-29 age group has been increasing since 1971 in all the Nordic countries, except in Finland, where the yearly registered age-specific incidence has been increasing in the targeted 30-54 age group since 1991. In Iceland screening has greatly affected the rate of all stages of squamous cell carcinoma, but not the rate of adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas. In fact the rate of adenocarcinoma has been increasing. Organized screening is more effective than spontaneous screening in reducing the risk of cervical cancer. Although differences in environmental, biological and ethnic factors may call for different screening strategies, screening should preferably start soon after age 20 with a screening interval of 2

  17. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment: overview of and student satisfaction with an undergraduate addiction training program for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Ann M; Puskar, Kathryn; Hagle, Holly; Gotham, Heather J; Talcott, Kimberly S; Terhorst, Lauren; Fioravanti, Marie; Kane, Irene; Hulsey, Eric; Luongo, Peter; Burns, Helen K

    2013-10-01

    Preparing nursing students to apply an evidence-based screening and brief intervention approach with patients has the potential to reduce patients' risky alcohol and drug use. Responding to Mollica, Hyman, and Mann's article published in 2011, the current article describes implementation results of an Addiction Training for Nurses program of Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) embedded within an undergraduate nursing curriculum. Results reveal that students in other schools of nursing would benefit from similar, significant training on substance use disorders and SBIRT. Training satisfaction surveys (N = 488) indicate students were satisfied with the quality of the training experience. More than 90% of students strongly agreed or agreed that the training was relevant to their nursing careers and would help their patients. Additional clinical practice and skill development may increase students' reported effectiveness in working with the topic area of substance use and SBIRT. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. The importance of retesting the hearing screening as an indicator of the real early hearing disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Polo Camargo da Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Early diagnosis of hearing loss minimizes its impact on child development. We studied factors that influence the effectiveness of screening programs.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between gender, weight at birth, gestational age, risk factors for hearing loss, venue for newborn hearing screening and "pass" and "fail" results in the retest.METHODS: Prospective cohort study was carried out in a tertiary referral hospital. The screening was performed in 565 newborns through transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in three admission units before hospital discharge and retest in the outpatient clinic. Gender, weight at birth, gestational age, presence of risk indicators for hearing loss and venue for newborn hearing screening were considered.RESULTS: Full-term infants comprised 86% of the cases, preterm 14%, and risk factors for hearing loss were identified in 11%. Considering the 165 newborns retested, only the venue for screening, Intermediate Care Unit, was related to "fail" result in the retest.CONCLUSIONS: Gender, weight at birth, gestational age and presence of risk factors for hearing loss were not related to "pass" and/or "fail" results in the retest. The screening performed in intermediate care units increases the chance of continued "fail" result in the Transient Otoacoustic Evoked Emissions test.

  19. Eating Disorder Prevention Programs: A Meta-Analytic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Shaw, Heather

    2004-01-01

    This meta-analysis of eating disorder prevention programs found that intervention effects ranged from an absence of any effects to reductions in current and future eating pathology. Certain effects persisted as long as 2 years and were superior to minimal-intervention control conditions. Larger effects occurred for selected (vs. universal),…

  20. Individualized Education Programs for Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczynski, Susan M.; Menousek, Kathryn; Hunter, Melissa; Mudgal, Dipti

    2007-01-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) present with a broad array of deficits and excesses that require educational intervention. The Individualized Education Program (IEP) serves as the blueprint for educational intervention but it can sometimes be difficult to identify which goals and objectives should be addressed with this population.…

  1. Training General Practitioners to Detect Probable Mental Disorders in Young People During Health Risk Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambresin, Anne-Emmanuelle; Otjes, Christiaan P; Patton, George C; Sawyer, Susan M; Thuraisingam, Sharmala; English, Dallas R; Haller, Dagmar M; Sanci, Lena A

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate whether a training intervention increases general practitioners' (GPs) detection sensitivity for probable mental disorders in young people. Forty general practices were randomized to an intervention (29 GPs) or comparison arm (49 GPs). Intervention GPs participated in 9 hours of interactive training on youth-friendly care, psychosocial health risk screening, and responding to risk-taking behavior with motivational interviewing approaches, followed by practice visits assisting with integration of screening processes and tools. Youth aged 14-24 years attending GPs underwent a computer-assisted telephone interview about their consultation and psychosocial health risks. Having a "probable mental disorder" was defined as either scoring high on Kessler's scale of psychological distress (K10) or self-perceived mental illness. Other definitions tested were high K10; self-perceived mental illness; and high K10 and self-perceived mental illness. Psychosocial health risk screening rates, detection sensitivity, and other accuracy parameters (specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value) were estimated. GPs' detection sensitivity improved after the intervention if having probable mental disorder was defined as high K10 score and self-perceived mental illness (odds ratio: 2.81; 95% confidence interval: 1.23-6.42). There was no significant difference in sensitivity of GPs' detection for our preferred definition, high K10 or self-perceived mental illness (.37 in both; odds ratio: .93; 95% confidence interval: .47-1.83), and detection accuracy was comparable (specificity: .84 vs. .87, positive predictive values: .54 vs. .60, and negative predictive values: .72 vs. .72). Improving recognition of mental disorder among young people attending primary care is likely to require a multifaceted approach targeting young people and GPs. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc

  2. Optimal Screening Methods to Detect Cardiac Disorders in Athletes: An Evidence-Based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Zachary K; Crossway, Ashley K

    2017-12-01

    Reference/Citation:  Harmon KG, Zigman M, Drezner JA. The effectiveness of screening history, physical exam, and ECG to detect potentially lethal cardiac disorders in athletes: a systematic review/meta-analysis. J Electrocardiol. 2015;48(3):329-338.   Which screening method should be considered best practice to detect potentially lethal cardiac disorders during the preparticipation physical examination (PE) of athletes?   The authors completed a comprehensive literature search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Embase, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), and SPORTDiscus from January 1996 to November 2014. The following key words were used individually and in combination: ECG, athlete, screening, pre-participation, history, and physical. A manual review of reference lists and key journals was performed to identify additional studies. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed for this review.   Studies selected for this analysis involved (1) outcomes of cardiovascular screening in athletes using the history, PE, and electrocardiogram (ECG); (2) history questions and PE based on the American Heart Association recommendations and guidelines; and (3) ECGs interpreted following modern standards. The exclusion criteria were (1) articles not in English, (2) conference abstracts, and (3) clinical commentary articles. Study quality was assessed on a 7-point scale for risk of bias; a score of 7 indicated the highest quality. Articles with potential bias were excluded.   Data included number and sex of participants, number of true- and false-positives and negatives, type of ECG criteria used, number of cardiac abnormalities, and specific cardiac conditions. The sensitivity, specificity, false-positive rate, and positive predictive value of each screening tool were calculated and summarized using a bivariate random-effects meta-analysis model.   Fifteen articles reporting on 47 137 athletes

  3. Screening for homelessness among individuals initiating medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachhuber, Marcus A; Roberts, Christopher B; Metraux, Stephen; Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of homelessness and risk for homelessness among veterans with opioid use disorder initiating treatment. Addiction treatment programs operated by the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). All veterans initiating treatment with methadone or buprenorphine for opioid use disorder between October 1, 2013 and September 30, 2014 (n = 2,699) who were administered the VA's national homelessness screener. Self-reported homelessness or imminent risk of homelessness. The prevalence of homelessness was 10.2 percent and 5.3 percent were at risk for homelessness. Compared to male veterans, women veterans were less likely to report homelessness (8.9 percent vs 10.3 percent) but more likely to be at risk (11.8 percent vs 4.9 percent). By age group, veterans aged 18-34 and 45-54 years most frequently reported homelessness (12.0 and 11.7 percent, respectively) and veterans aged 45-54 and 55-64 years most frequently reported risk for homelessness (6.5 and 6.8 percent, respectively). The prevalence of homelessness in this population is approximately 10 times that of the general veteran population accessing care at VA. Screening identified a substantial number of veterans who could benefit from VA housing assistance and had not received it recently. Programs to address veteran homelessness should engage with veterans seeking addiction treatment. Integration of homelessness services into addiction treatment settings may, in turn, improve outcomes.

  4. Hypersexual Disorder According to the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory in Help-Seeking Swedish Men and Women With Self-Identified Hypersexual Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Görts Öberg, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Öberg KG, Hallberg J, Kaldo V, et al. Hypersexual Disorder According to the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory in Help-Seeking Swedish Men and Women With Self-Identified Hypersexual Behavior. Sex Med 2017;5:e229–e236.

  5. Problem of item overlap between the psychopathy screening device and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder rating scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, G L

    2000-12-01

    Content validity requires a clear definition of the construct of interest and the delineation of the construct from similar constructs. Content validity also requires that the items be representative of the construct as well as specific to the construct. An examination of the items on the Psychopathy Screening Device (PSD), a parent- and teacher-rating scale of childhood psychopathy, indicates significant overlap with the symptoms and associated features of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and conduct disorder (CD). The failure of the PSD to have unique items results in poor discriminant validity with ADHD, ODD, and CD rating scales. More careful attention to content validation guidelines is required to develop a more useful measure of childhood psychopathy.

  6. Screening for Familial Hypercholesterolemia in Children: What Can We Learn From Adult Screening Programs?

    OpenAIRE

    Henneman, Lidewij; McBride, Colleen M.; Cornel, Martina C.; Duquette, Debra; Qureshi, Nadeem

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), an autosomal dominant atherosclerotic disease, is a common monogenic subtype of cardiovascular disease. Patients with FH suffer an increased risk of early onset heart disease. Early identification of abnormally elevated cholesterol signpost clinicians to interventions that will significantly decrease risk of related morbidity and mortality. Cascade genetic testing can subsequently identify at-risk relatives. Accordingly, a number of screening approaches hav...

  7. Effectiveness of a two-step population-based osteoporosis screening program using FRAX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubin, K H; Rothmann, M J; Holmberg, T

    2018-01-01

    The Risk-stratified Osteoporosis Strategy Evaluation (ROSE) study investigated the effectiveness of a two-step screening program for osteoporosis in women. We found no overall reduction in fractures from systematic screening compared to the current case-finding strategy. The group of moderate......- to high-risk women, who accepted the invitation to DXA, seemed to benefit from the program. INTRODUCTION: The purpose of the ROSE study was to investigate the effectiveness of a two-step population-based osteoporosis screening program using the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) derived from a self......-administered questionnaire to select women for DXA scan. After the scanning, standard osteoporosis management according to Danish national guidelines was followed. METHODS: Participants were randomized to either screening or control group, and randomization was stratified according to age and area of residence. Inclusion...

  8. A Scoping Review of Intimate Partner Violence Screening Programs for Health Care Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Sheila; Slobogean, Gerard P; Spurr, Hayley; McKay, Paula; Scott, Taryn; Arseneau, Erika; Memon, Muzammil; Bhandari, Mohit; Swaminathan, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Between 38 and 59 percent of women presenting to health care professionals have experienced intimate partner violence. Consequently, multiple intimate partner violence identification or screening programs within health care settings have been developed; however, substantial variations in program content and interpretation of program effectiveness has resulted in conflicting practice guidelines. The purpose of our scoping review is to broadly identify and synthesize the available literature evaluating intimate partner violence identification programs within health care settings to identify key areas for potential evidence-based recommendations and to focus research priorities in the field. We conducted a search of MEDLINE, Embase, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and psycINFO. We used broad eligibility criteria to identify studies that evaluated intimate partner violence identification programs in health care settings. We completed all screening and data extraction independently and in duplicate. We used descriptive statistics to summarize all data. We identified 59 eligible studies evaluating intimate partner violence identification programs within health care settings. The most commonly reported outcome themes were IPV disclosure (69%, n = 35), number of patients screened (39%, n = 20), HCP opinions towards screening (37%, n = 19), and patient opinions towards screening (29%, n = 15). The majority of studies (36 studies (70.6%)) reported positive program evaluation results. The majority of studies reported positive program evaluation results. This may suggest that many different intimate partner violence identification programs are beneficial for identifying victims of abuse, however, it remains unknown as to whether identification programs prevent future episodes of abuse. Additionally, the substantial heterogeneity of the intervention characteristics

  9. A Scoping Review of Intimate Partner Violence Screening Programs for Health Care Professionals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Sprague

    Full Text Available Between 38 and 59 percent of women presenting to health care professionals have experienced intimate partner violence. Consequently, multiple intimate partner violence identification or screening programs within health care settings have been developed; however, substantial variations in program content and interpretation of program effectiveness has resulted in conflicting practice guidelines. The purpose of our scoping review is to broadly identify and synthesize the available literature evaluating intimate partner violence identification programs within health care settings to identify key areas for potential evidence-based recommendations and to focus research priorities in the field.We conducted a search of MEDLINE, Embase, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and psycINFO. We used broad eligibility criteria to identify studies that evaluated intimate partner violence identification programs in health care settings. We completed all screening and data extraction independently and in duplicate. We used descriptive statistics to summarize all data.We identified 59 eligible studies evaluating intimate partner violence identification programs within health care settings. The most commonly reported outcome themes were IPV disclosure (69%, n = 35, number of patients screened (39%, n = 20, HCP opinions towards screening (37%, n = 19, and patient opinions towards screening (29%, n = 15. The majority of studies (36 studies (70.6% reported positive program evaluation results.The majority of studies reported positive program evaluation results. This may suggest that many different intimate partner violence identification programs are beneficial for identifying victims of abuse, however, it remains unknown as to whether identification programs prevent future episodes of abuse. Additionally, the substantial heterogeneity of the intervention

  10. Targeted breast cancer screening in women younger than 40: results from a statewide program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarff, MaryClare; Schmidt, Katherine; Vetto, John T

    2008-05-01

    Our state Breast and Cervical Cancer Program (BCCP) has previously reported a paucity of data supporting breast screening for asymptomatic women younger than 40 (cancer detection rate of .25% per screening-year). In partnership with the local Affiliate of the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation, we began a targeted "screening" program to evaluate women younger than 40 referred for symptoms or other concerns. Retrospective data review of program results, including demographics, symptoms, evaluations performed, and outcomes. A total of 176 women, ages 16 to 39 years, were referred to the BCCP/Komen program. Of the women with documented presenting symptoms, the most common was breast lump (81%). Evaluation triggered 75 surgical referrals and 69 biopsies, yielding 16 cancers (a biopsy positive rate of 23% and overall cancer detection rate from the program of 9%). For women younger than age 40, targeted breast cancer screening is a more efficient utilization of screening resources, with a higher cancer detection rate than asymptomatic screening.

  11. Screening foster children for mental disorders: properties of the strengths and difficulties questionnaire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stine Lehmann

    Full Text Available High prevalence of mental disorders among foster children highlight the need to examine the mental health of children placed out of home. We examined the properties of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ in screening school-aged foster children for mental disorders.Foster parents and teachers of 279 foster children completed the SDQ and the diagnostic interview Developmental and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA. Using the diagnoses derived from the DAWBA as the standard, we examined the performance of the SDQ scales as dimensional measures of mental health problems using receiver operating characteristic (ROC analyses. Recommended cut-off scores were derived from ROC coordinates. The SDQ predictive algorithms were also examined.ROC analyses supported the screening properties of the SDQ Total difficulties and Impact scores (AUC = 0.80-0.83. Logistic regression analyses showed that the prevalence of mental disorders increased linearly with higher SDQ Total difficulties scores (X2 = 121.47, df = 13, p<.001 and Impact scores (X2 = 69.93, df = 6, p<.001. Our results indicated that there is an additive value of combining the scores from the Total difficulties and Impact scales, where scores above cut-off on any of the two scales predicted disorders with high sensitivity (89.1%, but moderate specificity (62.1%. Scores above cut-off on both scales yielded somewhat lower sensitivity (73.4%, but higher specificity (81.1%. The SDQ multi-informant algorithm showed low discriminative ability for the main diagnostic categories, with an exception being the SDQ Conduct subscale, which accurately predicted the absence of behavioural disorders (LHR- = 0.00.The results support the use of the SDQ Total difficulties and Impact scales when screening foster children for mental health problems. Cut-off values for both scales are suggested. The SDQ multi-informant algorithms are not recommended for mental health screening of foster

  12. The panic disorder screener (PADIS): Development of an accurate and brief population screening tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterham, Philip J; Mackinnon, Andrew J; Christensen, Helen

    2015-07-30

    The Panic Disorder Screener (PADIS) was developed as a new screener to identify panic disorder in the community and to assess severity of symptoms. The PADIS was developed to fill a gap in existing screening measures, as there are no brief panic screeners available that assess severity. The current study aimed to test the performance of the screener relative to the Patient Health Questionnaire-panic scale (PHQ-panic). The 4-item PADIS was administered to 12,336 young Australian adults, together with the PHQ-panic. A subsample of 1674 participants also completed a phone-based clinical interview to determine whether they met DSM-IV criteria for panic disorder. The PADIS (77% sensitivity, 84% specificity) had higher sensitivity for identifying panic disorder based on clinical criteria than the PHQ-panic (57% sensitivity, 91% specificity), although with reduced specificity. Administration of the PADIS required a mean of 1.9 items, compared to 4.7 items for the PHQ-panic. Each one-point increase in PADIS score was associated with 69% increased odds of meeting clinical criteria for panic disorder. The PADIS was found to be a valid, reliable and brief panic screener that is freely available for use in research and clinical settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Telehealth Measures Screening for Developmental Language Disorders in Spanish-Speaking Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiberson, Mark

    2016-09-01

    This is the second of two studies that described the use of telehealth language screening measures for use with young Spanish-speaking children. The purpose of this study was to describe the classification accuracy of individual telehealth language screening measures as well as the accuracy of combinations of measures used with Spanish-speaking toddler-age children from rural and underserved areas of the country. This study applied an asynchronous hybrid telehealth approach that implemented parent-structured play activities with a standard set of stimuli, and interaction with a My First Words e-book. These interactions were recorded with a mini camcorder. In addition, a traditional pen and paper parent questionnaire measure was collected. Sixty-two mostly Spanish-speaking preschool-age children and their parents participated. Twenty-two children had developmental language disorders (DLDs) and 40 had typical language development. Although several of the individual measures were significantly and strongly associated with standardized language scores, only reported vocabulary had classification accuracy values that were desirable for screening for DLDs. An improvement was observed when reported vocabulary was combined with a number of different words children produced during interactions with parents. This research provides additional evidence showing the effectiveness of a hybrid telehealth model in screening the language development of Spanish-speaking children. More specifically, reported vocabulary combined with number of different words produced by a child can provide informative and accurate diagnostic information when screening Spanish-speaking toddler-age children for DLDs. These findings replicate the first study in showing that hybrid telehealth approaches that combine the use of video technology and traditional pen and paper surveys yield strong results, and may be a viable screening alternative when face-to-face access to a bilingual provider is not

  14. Evaluation of a screening instrument for autism spectrum disorders in prisoners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Robinson

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: There have been concerns that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are over-represented but not recognised in prison populations. A screening tool for ASDs in prisons has therefore been developed. AIMS: We aimed to evaluate this tool in Scottish prisoners by comparing scores with standard measures of autistic traits (Autism Quotient (AQ, neurodevelopmental history (Asperger Syndrome (and High-Functioning Autism Diagnostic Interview (ASDI, and social cognition (Ekman 60 Faces test. METHODS: Prison officers across all 12 publicly-run closed prisons in Scotland assessed convicted prisoners using the screening tool. This sample included male and female prisoners and both adult and young offenders. Prisoners with high scores, along with an equal number of age and sex-matched controls, were invited to take part in interviews. Prisoners' relatives were contacted to complete a neurodevelopmental assessment. RESULTS: 2458 prisoners were screened using the tool, and 4% scored above the cut-off. 126 prisoners were further assessed using standardised measures. 7 of those 126 assessed scored 32 or above (cut-off on the AQ. 44 interviews were completed with prisoners' relatives, no prisoner reached the cut-off score on the ASDI. Scores on the screening tool correlated significantly with AQ and ASDI scores, and not with the Ekman 60 Faces Test or IQ. Sensitivity was 28.6% and specificity 75.6%; AUC was 59.6%. CONCLUSIONS: Although this screening tool measures autistic traits in this population, sensitivity for scores of 32 or above on the AQ is poor. We consider that this limits its usefulness and do not recommend that the tool is routinely used to screen for ASDs in prisons.

  15. [Validity of a French screening questionnaire for binge eating disorders in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrard, I; Kruseman, M; Di Capua, D; Suringar, V; Chamay Weber, C

    2013-10-01

    Binge eating disorder is often associated with obesity. It has many psychosocial and somatic consequences and affects obesity treatment outcome. Binge eating has been observed in very young populations. Studies have shown that complications associated with binge eating disorder can appear in children, even when all the criteria included in the definition of the disorder for adults are not met. Therefore, provisional criteria have been proposed to investigate binge eating disorder among children and adolescents. There is an urgent need to enhance the screening of binge eating disorder in the young population, first in order to document the disorder and second to allow for tailored treatment of these populations. Currently, there is no scale in French to detect this type of disorder among children or adolescents. The aim of this study was to develop a self-administered questionnaire in French, which could be used as a screening tool for binge eating disorder among adolescents. We have developed a self-administered questionnaire, based on a previous questionnaire and provisional criteria proposed in the English-speaking world. In the present study, we assessed how the target population understood the expressions used in the questionnaire and refined terminology according to the results. Nineteen adolescents aged 11-18 years (normal weight or with obesity) were interviewed about their understanding of the questionnaire, using a structured individual interview. After completing the questions on their own, because the goal was to end up with a self-administered tool, they were asked to explain their own understanding of each question and to reformulate the terms used. The results highlighted that some words or sentences were misunderstood by adolescents, and we developed more adequate formulations as a consequence. Some terms used in their figurative sense had to be modified. Respondents found it difficult to assess duration and frequency of their behavior and suggested

  16. A Brief Screening Instrument for Emotionally Unstable and Dissocial Personality Disorder in Male Offenders with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John L.; Novaco, Raymond W.

    2013-01-01

    Personality disorder is prevalent among offenders with intellectual disabilities (ID), and it is associated with their risk for violence and recurrent offending behaviour. A new staff-rated instrument, the Personality Disorder Characteristics Checklist (PDCC), designed to screen for ICD-10 dissocial and emotionally unstable personality…

  17. Low priority main reason not to participate in a colorectal cancer screening program with a faecal occult blood test.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijn, AF van; Rossum, L.G.M. van; Deutekom, M.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Fockens, P.; Bossuyt, P.M.; Dekker, E. den; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Compared with screening programs for breast and cervical cancer, reported participation rates for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening are low. The effectiveness of a screening program is strongly influenced by the participation rate. The aim of this study was to investigate the main

  18. Low priority main reason not to participate in a colorectal cancer screening program with a faecal occult blood test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, A. F.; van Rossum, L. G. M.; Deutekom, M.; Laheij, R. J. F.; Fockens, P.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; Dekker, E.; Jansen, J. B. M. J.

    2008-01-01

    Compared with screening programs for breast and cervical cancer, reported participation rates for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening are low. The effectiveness of a screening program is strongly influenced by the participation rate. The aim of this study was to investigate the main reasons not to

  19. Improved Perinatal Depression Screening, Treatment, and Outcomes With a Universal Obstetric Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, Lyndsay A; Raine-Bennett, Tina; Chen, Hong; Adams, Alyce S; Flanagan, Tracy

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate whether universal prenatal and early postnatal screening for depression leads to increased detection, subsequent intervention, and improved depressive symptom outcomes. We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study of 97,678 pregnant Kaiser Permanente Northern California members during three phases of the Universal Perinatal Depression Screening Program (preimplementation, rollout, fully implemented) from 2007 through 2014. Depression screening scores (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), depression diagnoses, individual counseling visits, demographic characteristics, and medication dispensings were extracted from electronic health records and pharmacy databases. The percentage of women screened, new depression diagnoses, and women receiving treatment were compared among the three phases (tests of trend). Changes in depressive symptom scores up to 6 months postpartum were assessed (rollout and fully implemented phases). A significant increase emerged in the percentage of women screened over the three phases ranging from less than 1% (n=122) (preimplementation) to 98% (n=41,124) (fully implemented) (PHealth Questionnaire-9 scores of 15 or greater (greater severity), highlighting an increase in expected percentage of women receiving treatment (5.9% [preimplementation] to 81.9% [fully implemented]; Puniversal perinatal depression screening programs regarding depression identification and treatment receipt and suggest improvement in symptom outcomes for women in screening programs, especially among integrated health care systems.

  20. Individual Programming for Children with Learning Disabilities as Determined by Screening, Identification, and Differential Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Gladys

    A program for screening, identifying, and diagnosing learning disabilities is described. The multidisciplinary approach is emphasized. The school psychologist or counselor, the coordinator of the language therapy program, the administrative staff, and the classroom teacher meet to share findings and impressions, and the information is synthesized…

  1. Eating disorder prevention programs: a meta-analytic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Shaw, Heather

    2004-03-01

    This meta-analysis of eating disorder prevention programs found that intervention effects ranged from an absence of any effects to reductions in current and future eating pathology. Certain effects persisted as long as 2 years and were superior to minimal-intervention control conditions. Larger effects occurred for selected (vs. universal), interactive (vs. didactic), and multisession (vs. single session) programs; for programs offered solely to females and to participants over age 15; for programs without psychoeducational content; and for trials that used validated measures. The results identify promising prevention programs and delineate sample, format, and design features that are associated with larger effects, but they suggest the need for improved methodological rigor and statistical modeling of trials and enhanced theoretical rationale for interventions.

  2. Neighborhood disorder and screen time among 10-16 year old Canadian youth: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Valerie; Janssen, Ian

    2012-05-31

    Screen time activities (e.g., television, computers, video games) have been linked to several negative health outcomes among young people. In order to develop evidence-based interventions to reduce screen time, the factors that influence the behavior need to be better understood. High neighborhood disorder, which may encourage young people to stay indoors where screen time activities are readily available, is one potential factor to consider. Results are based on 15,917 youth in grades 6-10 (aged 10-16 years old) who participated in the Canadian 2009/10 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Survey (HBSC). Total hours per week of television, video games, and computer use were reported by the participating students in the HBSC student questionnaire. Ten items of neighborhood disorder including safety, neighbors taking advantage, drugs/drinking in public, ethnic tensions, gangs, crime, conditions of buildings/grounds, abandoned buildings, litter, and graffiti were measured using the HBSC student questionnaire, the HBSC administrator questionnaire, and Geographic Information Systems. Based upon these 10 items, social and physical neighborhood disorder variables were derived using principal component analysis. Multivariate multilevel logistic regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between social and physical neighborhood disorder and individual screen time variables. High (top quartile) social neighborhood disorder was associated with approximately 35-45% increased risk of high (top quartile) television, computer, and video game use. Physical neighborhood disorder was not associated with screen time activities after adjusting for social neighborhood disorder. However, high social and physical neighborhood disorder combined was associated with approximately 40-60% increased likelihood of high television, computer, and video game use. High neighborhood disorder is one environmental factor that may be important to consider for future public health

  3. Neighborhood disorder and screen time among 10-16 year old Canadian youth: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carson Valerie

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screen time activities (e.g., television, computers, video games have been linked to several negative health outcomes among young people. In order to develop evidence-based interventions to reduce screen time, the factors that influence the behavior need to be better understood. High neighborhood disorder, which may encourage young people to stay indoors where screen time activities are readily available, is one potential factor to consider. Methods Results are based on 15,917 youth in grades 6-10 (aged 10-16 years old who participated in the Canadian 2009/10 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Survey (HBSC. Total hours per week of television, video games, and computer use were reported by the participating students in the HBSC student questionnaire. Ten items of neighborhood disorder including safety, neighbors taking advantage, drugs/drinking in public, ethnic tensions, gangs, crime, conditions of buildings/grounds, abandoned buildings, litter, and graffiti were measured using the HBSC student questionnaire, the HBSC administrator questionnaire, and Geographic Information Systems. Based upon these 10 items, social and physical neighborhood disorder variables were derived using principal component analysis. Multivariate multilevel logistic regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between social and physical neighborhood disorder and individual screen time variables. Results High (top quartile social neighborhood disorder was associated with approximately 35-45% increased risk of high (top quartile television, computer, and video game use. Physical neighborhood disorder was not associated with screen time activities after adjusting for social neighborhood disorder. However, high social and physical neighborhood disorder combined was associated with approximately 40-60% increased likelihood of high television, computer, and video game use. Conclusion High neighborhood disorder is one environmental

  4. Neighborhood disorder and screen time among 10-16 year old Canadian youth: A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Screen time activities (e.g., television, computers, video games) have been linked to several negative health outcomes among young people. In order to develop evidence-based interventions to reduce screen time, the factors that influence the behavior need to be better understood. High neighborhood disorder, which may encourage young people to stay indoors where screen time activities are readily available, is one potential factor to consider. Methods Results are based on 15,917 youth in grades 6-10 (aged 10-16 years old) who participated in the Canadian 2009/10 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Survey (HBSC). Total hours per week of television, video games, and computer use were reported by the participating students in the HBSC student questionnaire. Ten items of neighborhood disorder including safety, neighbors taking advantage, drugs/drinking in public, ethnic tensions, gangs, crime, conditions of buildings/grounds, abandoned buildings, litter, and graffiti were measured using the HBSC student questionnaire, the HBSC administrator questionnaire, and Geographic Information Systems. Based upon these 10 items, social and physical neighborhood disorder variables were derived using principal component analysis. Multivariate multilevel logistic regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between social and physical neighborhood disorder and individual screen time variables. Results High (top quartile) social neighborhood disorder was associated with approximately 35-45% increased risk of high (top quartile) television, computer, and video game use. Physical neighborhood disorder was not associated with screen time activities after adjusting for social neighborhood disorder. However, high social and physical neighborhood disorder combined was associated with approximately 40-60% increased likelihood of high television, computer, and video game use. Conclusion High neighborhood disorder is one environmental factor that may be important

  5. [Coverage of a screening program and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in primary careç].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covarrubias, Trinidad; Delgado, Iris; Rojas, Daniel; Coria, Marcelo

    2017-05-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the first cause of blindness during working years. Provide knowledge of screening coverage, prevalence and level of diabetic retinopathy in patients that belong to the Cardiovascular Health Program in primary care. Analysis of retinographies performed to 9076 diabetic patients aged 61 ± 13 years (61% women) adscribed to a Cardiovascular Health program in primary care centers of South-East Metropolitan Santiago. The examination was carried out by the evaluation of retinographies by trained optometrists. The coverage of the screening program was 21%. The prevalence of sight threatening diabetic retinopathy was 3,1%. The prevalence of these entities was 45% higher in people aged between 18 and 44 years than in older people. Their prevalence in urban communities was 32% higher than in rural locations. The coverage of the screening program is low. Diabetic patients aged 18 to 44 years and those coming from urban communities have a higher prevalence of severe non-proliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

  6. Evaluation of a Colorectal Carcinoma Screening Program in Kota Setar and Kuala Muda Districts, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Hassan, Muhammad Radzi; Leong, Tan Wei; Othman Andu, Delarina Frimawati; Hat, Habshoh; Nik Mustapha, Nik Raihan

    2016-01-01

    A colorectal cancer screening program was piloted in two districts of Kedah in 2013. There is scarcity of information on colorectal cancer screening in Malaysia. Thus, this research was conducted to evaluate the colorectal cancer screening program in the districts to provide insights intop its efficacy. A cross sectional study was conducted using data on the colorectal cancer screening program in 2013 involving Kota Setar and Kuala Muda districts in Malaysia. We determined the response rate of immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT), colonoscopy compliance, and detection rates of neoplasia and carcinoma. We also compared the response of FOBT by demographic background. The response rate of FOBT for first iFOBT screening was 94.7% while the second iFOBT screening was 90.7%. Participants from Kuala Muda district were 27 times more likely to default while Indians had a 3 times higher risk of default compared to Malays. The colonoscopy compliance was suboptimal among those with positive iFOBT. The most common finding from colonoscopy was hemorrhoids, followed by tubular adenoma. Detection rate of carcinoma and neoplasia for our program was 1.2%. In summary, the response rate of iFOBT was encouraging but the colonoscopy compliance was suboptimal which led to a considerably low detection rate.

  7. Evaluation of staff performance and interpretation of the screening program for prevention of thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prommetta, Simaporn; Sanchaisuriya, Kanokwan; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Yamsri, Supawadee; Chaiboonroeng, Attawut; Fucharoen, Supan

    2017-06-15

    Thalassemia screening program has been implemented for years in Southeast Asia, but no external quality assessment program has been established. We have developed and initiated the proficiency testing (PT) program for the first time in Thailand with the aim to assess the screening performance of laboratory staff and their competency in interpretation of the screening results. Three PT cycles per year were organized. From the first to the third cycle of the PT scheme, a total number of participant laboratories increased from 59 to 67. In each cycle, 2 PT items (assigned as blood samples of the couple) were provided. Performance evaluation was based on the accuracy of screening results, i.e . mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) and the dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP) test for haemoglobin E, including the competency in interpretation of screening results and assessment of foetal risk. Performance was assessed by comparing the participants' result against the assigned value. Of all 3 cycles, most laboratories reported acceptable MCV and MCH values. From the first to the third cycle, incorrect DCIP test and misinterpretation rates were decreased while incorrect risk assessment varied by cycle to cycle. Combining the accuracy of thalassemia screening and the competency in interpretation and risk assessment, approximately half of participants showed excellent performance. Improved performance observed in many laboratories reflects the achievement and benefit of the PT program which should be regularly provided.

  8. Validation of the Spanish version of the McLean Screening Instrument for Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Joaquim; Domínguez-Clavé, Elisabet; García-Rizo, Clemente; Vega, Daniel; Elices, Matilde; Martín-Blanco, Ana; Feliu-Soler, Albert; Carmona, Cristina; Pascual, Juan C

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a common and severe mental illness. Early detection is important and reliable screening instruments are required. To date, however, there has been no evidence of any specific BPD screening tool validated for the Spanish-speaking population. The McLean Screening Instrument for Borderline Personality Disorder (MSI-BPD) is a 10-item self-report questionnaire that can detect the presence of BPD in a reliable and quick manner. The aim of the present study is the validation of the MSI-BPD for its use in the Spanish-speaking population. Psychometric properties of the MSI-BPD Spanish version were examined in a sample of 344 participants (170 outpatients with the possible diagnosis of BPD and 174 healthy controls). Exploratory factor analysis revealed the existence of a bi-factorial structure. The scale showed a high internal consistency (KR-20=0.873) and an optimal test-retest reliability (ICC=0.87). Using logistic regression analyses and taking the DIB-R as reference, a best cut-off of 7 was determined, obtaining a good sensitivity (0.71) and specificity (0.68). The area under the curve, was 0.742 (95% CI 0.660-0.824). The discriminant analysis showed a classification ability of 72.8%. The Spanish version of the MSI-BPD has good psychometric properties as a measure for the screening of BPD. Its ease and quickness of use make it valuable to detect the presence of BPD in clinical and research settings. Copyright © 2016 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabolic screening and metabolomics analysis in the Intellectual Developmental Disorders Mexico Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Ibarra-González

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM are genetic conditions that are sometimes associated with intellectual  developmental disorders (IDD. The aim of this study is to contribute to the metabolic characterization of IDD of unknown etiology in Mexico. Materials and methods. Metabolic screening using tandem mass spectrometry and fluorometry will be performed to rule out IEM. In addition,target metabolomic analysis will be done to characterize the metabolomic profile of patients with IDD. Conclusion. Identification of new metabolomic profiles associated withIDD of unknown etiology and comorbidities will contribute to the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic schemes for the prevention and treatment of IDD in Mexico.

  10. Newborn Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Laboratory Sciences Office of Public Health Genomics Publications & Articles Newborn Screening Lab Bulletin Laboratory Partners Multimedia Tools Newborn Screening Program – Role of Laboratories Meet the Scientist Newborn Screening: Family Stories Newborn Screening: Public Health ...

  11. [Validation of the Eating Attitudes Test as a screening instrument for eating disorders in general population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez-Fernández, María Angeles; Ruiz-Lázaro, Pedro Manuel; Labrador, Francisco Javier; Raich, Rosa María

    2014-02-20

    To validate the best cut-off point of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40), Spanish version, for the screening of eating disorders (ED) in the general population. This was a transversal cross-sectional study. The EAT-40 Spanish version was administered to a representative sample of 1.543 students, age range 12 to 21 years, in the Region of Madrid. Six hundred and two participants (probable cases and a random sample of controls) were interviewed. The best diagnostic prediction was obtained with a cut-off point of 21, with sensitivity: 88.2%; specificity: 62.1%; positive predictive value: 17.7%; negative predictive value: 62.1%. Use of a cut-off point of 21 is recommended in epidemiological studies of eating disorders in the Spanish general population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Primary care management of alcohol use disorder and at-risk drinking: Part 1: screening and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spithoff, Sheryl; Kahan, Meldon

    2015-06-01

    To provide primary care physicians with evidence-based information and advice on the screening and assessment of at-risk drinking and alcohol use disorder (AUD). A companion article outlines the management of at-risk drinking and AUD. We conducted a nonsystematic literature review, using search terms on primary care, AUD, alcohol dependence, alcohol abuse, alcohol misuse, unhealthy drinking, and primary care screening, identification, and assessment. Family physicians should screen all patients at least yearly for unhealthy drinking with a validated screening test. Screen patients who present with medical or psychosocial problems that might be related to alcohol use. Determine if patients who have positive screening results are at-risk drinkers or have AUD. If patients have AUD, categorize it as mild, moderate, or severe using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, criteria. Share this diagnosis with the patient and offer assistance. Do a further assessment for patients with AUD. Screen for other substance use, concurrent disorders, and trauma. Determine whether there is a need to report to child protection services or the Ministry of Transportation. Determine the need for medical management of alcohol withdrawal. Conduct a brief physical examination and order laboratory tests to assess complete blood count and liver transaminase levels, including γ-glutamyl transpeptidase. Primary care is well suited to screening and assessment of alcohol misuse. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  13. Screening for Voice Disorders in Older Adults (RAVI)-Part III: Cutoff Score and Clinical Consistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernambuco, Leandro; Espelt, Albert; Costa de Lima, Kenio

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the cutoff score and clinical consistency of "Screening for Voice Disorders in Older Adults" (RAVI-Rastreamento de Alterações Vocais em Idosos). This is a prospective, nonrandomized, cross-sectional diagnostic study. A sample of 301 subjects, including both sexes, aged 60 and more, and all of whom were living in either a community or an institution, was studied. To determine which subjects had or did not have voice problems, we used a composite reference standard (auditory-perceptual analysis of sustained vowel phonation, auditory-perceptual analysis of connected speech, and vocal self-assessment). The best cutoff score was identified using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The clinical consistency indicators were co-positivity, co-negativity, positive and negative predictive values, positive and negative likelihood ratio, and test efficiency. The significance level was 5%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.763 (95% confidence interval: 0.706-0.821), and the best cutoff score for determining which older adults had or did not have a voice disorder was 2. All clinical consistency indicators were satisfactory: co-positivity (79%), co-negativity (60%), predictive positive value (51%), negative predictive value (84%), positive likelihood ratio (2.01), negative likelihood ratio (0.34), and test efficiency (69%). RAVI has satisfactory indicators of clinical consistency and is able to determine which older adults have voice disorders by a cutoff score of 2. The use of RAVI as a screening tool is recommended to help determine the prevalence of voice disorders in older adults. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Preferences and satisfaction towards a screening program with self-administered human papilloma virus detection tests

    OpenAIRE

    Morán, Flavia; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú. Estudiante de Medicina; Cárcamo, César; Facultad de Salud Pública y Administración, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. médico, doctor en Epidemiología; Valderrama, María; Facultad de Salud Pública y Administración, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. obstetra, magister en Obstetricia; García, Patricia J.; Facultad de Salud Pública y Administración, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. médico, doctora en Medicina

    2017-01-01

    Cross-sectional study describing preferences and satisfaction towards a cervical cancer screening program with selfadministered rapid tests for the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV). Of 2 090 users picked by the program in Ventanilla Callao - Peru, 97 were randomly selected to be surveyed. In addition, interviews were conducted with women leaders of the community, in charge of providing the evidence. 74.2% of the users felt, at least, satisfied with the program. 68% of women prefer to t...

  15. A Scoping Review of Intimate Partner Violence Screening Programs for Health Care Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Sprague, Sheila; Slobogean, Gerard P.; Spurr, Hayley; McKay, Paula; Scott, Taryn; Arseneau, Erika; Memon, Muzammil; Bhandari, Mohit; Swaminathan, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Between 38 and 59 percent of women presenting to health care professionals have experienced intimate partner violence. Consequently, multiple intimate partner violence identification or screening programs within health care settings have been developed; however, substantial variations in program content and interpretation of program effectiveness has resulted in conflicting practice guidelines. The purpose of our scoping review is to broadly identify and synthesize the available ...

  16. Simulation of reduced breast cancer mortality in breast cancer screening programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamora, L. I.; Forastero, C.; Guirado, D.; Lallena, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    The breast cancer screening programs are an essential tool in the fight against breast cancer. Currently, many questions concerning the setup of these programs are open, namely: age range of women who undergo the same, frequency of mammography, ... The effectiveness of a program should be evaluated in terms of mortality reduction is its systematic implementation in the population. In this sense, we performed Monte Carlo simulations to assess that these reductions.

  17. Deployment and validation of a smart system for screening of language disorders in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Ruiz, María Luisa; Duboy, Miguel Ángel Valero; de la Cruz, Iván Pau

    2013-06-10

    Neuro-evolutive development from birth until the age of six years is a decisive factor in a child's quality of life. Early detection of development disorders in early childhood can facilitate necessary diagnosis and/or treatment. Primary-care pediatricians play a key role in its detection as they can undertake the preventive and therapeutic actions requested to promote a child's optimal development. However, the lack of time and little specific knowledge at primary-care avoid to applying continuous early-detection anomalies procedures. This research paper focuses on the deployment and evaluation of a smart system that enhances the screening of language disorders in primary care. Pediatricians get support to proceed with early referral of language disorders. The proposed model provides them with a decision-support tool for referral actions to trigger essential diagnostic and/or therapeutic actions for a comprehensive individual development. The research was conducted by starting from a sample of 60 cases of children with language disorders. Validation was carried out through two complementary steps: first, by including a team of seven experts from the fields of neonatology, pediatrics, neurology and language therapy, and, second, through the evaluation of 21 more previously diagnosed cases. The results obtained show that therapist positively accepted the system proposal in 18 cases (86%) and suggested system redesign for single referral to a speech therapist in three remaining cases.

  18. Deployment and Validation of a Smart System for Screening of Language Disorders in Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Pau de la Cruz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuro-evolutive development from birth until the age of six years is a decisive factor in a child’s quality of life. Early detection of development disorders in early childhood can facilitate necessary diagnosis and/or treatment. Primary-care pediatricians play a key role in its detection as they can undertake the preventive and therapeutic actions requested to promote a child’s optimal development. However, the lack of time and little specific knowledge at primary-care avoid to applying continuous early-detection anomalies procedures. This research paper focuses on the deployment and evaluation of a smart system that enhances the screening of language disorders in primary care. Pediatricians get support to proceed with early referral of language disorders. The proposed model provides them with a decision-support tool for referral actions to trigger essential diagnostic and/or therapeutic actions for a comprehensive individual development. The research was conducted by starting from a sample of 60 cases of children with language disorders. Validation was carried out through two complementary steps: first, by including a team of seven experts from the fields of neonatology, pediatrics, neurology and language therapy, and, second, through the evaluation of 21 more previously diagnosed cases. The results obtained show that therapist positively accepted the system proposal in 18 cases (86% and suggested system redesign for single referral to a speech therapist in three remaining cases.

  19. First Trimester Aneuploidy Screening Program for Preeclampsia Prediction in a Portuguese Obstetric Population

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Cláudia; Tejera, Eduardo; Martins, Helena; Pereira, António Tomé; Costa-Pereira, Altamiro; Rebelo, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the performance of a first trimester aneuploidy screening program for preeclampsia (PE) prediction in a Portuguese obstetric population, when performed under routine clinical conditions. Materials and Methods. Retrospective cohort study of 5672 pregnant women who underwent routine first trimester aneuploidy screening in a Portuguese university hospital from January 2009 to June 2013. Logistic regression-based predictive models were developed for prediction of PE based o...

  20. Multimedia messages in genetics: design, development, and evaluation of a computer-based instructional resource for secondary school students in a Tay Sachs disease carrier screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gason, Alexandra A; Aitken, MaryAnne; Delatycki, Martin B; Sheffield, Edith; Metcalfe, Sylvia A

    2004-01-01

    Tay Sachs disease is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder, for which carrier screening programs exist worldwide. Education for those offered a screening test is essential in facilitating informed decision-making. In Melbourne, Australia, we have designed, developed, and evaluated a computer-based instructional resource for use in the Tay Sachs disease carrier screening program for secondary school students attending Jewish schools. The resource entitled "Genetics in the Community: Tay Sachs disease" was designed on a platform of educational learning theory. The development of the resource included formative evaluation using qualitative data analysis supported by descriptive quantitative data. The final resource was evaluated within the screening program and compared with the standard oral presentation using a questionnaire. Knowledge outcomes were measured both before and after either of the educational formats. Data from the formative evaluation were used to refine the content and functionality of the final resource. The questionnaire evaluation of 302 students over two years showed the multimedia resource to be equally effective as an oral educational presentation in facilitating participants' knowledge construction. The resource offers a large number of potential benefits, which are not limited to the Tay Sachs disease carrier screening program setting, such as delivery of a consistent educational message, short delivery time, and minimum financial and resource commitment. This article outlines the value of considering educational theory and describes the process of multimedia development providing a framework that may be of value when designing genetics multimedia resources in general.

  1. A program evaluation of Kids2Hear, a student-run hearing screening program for school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tina; Stead, Katherine; Fu, Terence; Papsin, Blake

    2016-09-26

    Hearing deficits in children are demonstrably negatively associated with language acquisition and cognition. Although universal neonatal hearing screening exists, it is not offered equally across Canada. Additionally, children emigrating from other countries are often not assessed. The objective of this study is to evaluate Kids2Hear, a free hearing screening program run by medical students at elementary schools, and to determine the rate of hearing deficits that were identified and referred for evaluation. Retrospective analysis of screening program data from 228 participants seen at three inner-city elementary schools over six months. In our sample, the mean age was 5.8 ± 1.0 years with 48 % males. Approximately 21 participants (9.3 %) were screened positive for a hearing deficit and required referral for supplementary audiological evaluation. About 44 participants (19.3 %) were referred to a family physician for otoscopic abnormalities. Females were significantly more likely to be identified for both hearing deficits and otoscopic abnormalities. Hearing deficits and otoscopic abnormalities are common among young children. Female children may be at higher risk for developing hearing issues or otoscopic abnormalities compared to males. Additional research is needed to determine the effectiveness of hearing screening programs.

  2. Community-Based Multidisciplinary Computed Tomography Screening Program Improves Lung Cancer Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel L; Mayfield, William R; Luu, Theresa D; Helms, Gerald A; Muster, Alan R; Beckler, Vickie J; Cann, Aaron

    2016-05-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Overall survival is less than 20%, with the majority of patients presenting with advanced disease. The National Lung Screening Trial, performed mainly in academic medical centers, showed that cancer mortality can be reduced with computed tomography (CT) screening compared with chest radiography in high-risk patients. To determine whether this survival advantage can be duplicated in a community-based multidisciplinary thoracic oncology program, we initiated a CT scan screening program for lung cancer within an established health care system. In 2008, we launched a lung cancer CT screening program within the WellStar Health System (WHS) consisting of five hospitals, three health parks, 140 outpatient medical offices, and 12 imaging centers that provide care in a five-county area of approximately 1.4 million people in Metro-Atlanta. Screening criteria incorporated were the International Early Lung Cancer Action Program (2008 to 2010) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines (2011 to 2013) for moderate- and high-risk patients. A total of 1,267 persons underwent CT lung cancer screening in WHS from 2008 through 2013; 53% were men, 87% were 50 years of age or older, and 83% were current or former smokers. Noncalcified indeterminate pulmonary nodules were found in 518 patients (41%). Thirty-six patients (2.8%) underwent a diagnostic procedure for positive findings on their CT scan; 30 proved to have cancer, 28 (2.2%) primary lung cancer and 2 metastatic cancer, and 6 had benign disease. Fourteen patients (50%) had their lung cancer discovered on their initial CT scan, 11 on subsequent scans associated with indeterminate pulmonary nodules growth and 3 patients who had a new indeterminate pulmonary nodules. Only 15 (54%) of these 28 patients would have qualified as a National Lung Screening Trial high-risk patient; 75% had stage I or II disease. Overall 5-year survival was 64% and 5-year

  3. Should metabolic diseases be systematically screened in nonsyndromic autism spectrum disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Schiff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the investigation of autism spectrum disorders (ASD, a genetic cause is found in approximately 10-20%. Among these cases, the prevalence of the rare inherited metabolic disorders (IMD is unknown and poorly evaluated. An IMD responsible for ASD is usually identified by the associated clinical phenotype such as dysmorphic features, ataxia, microcephaly, epilepsy, and severe intellectual disability (ID. In rare cases, however, ASD may be considered as nonsyndromic at the onset of a related IMD. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the utility of routine metabolic investigations in nonsyndromic ASD. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the results of a metabolic workup (urinary mucopolysaccharides, urinary purines and pyrimidines, urinary creatine and guanidinoacetate, urinary organic acids, plasma and urinary amino acids routinely performed in 274 nonsyndromic ASD children. RESULTS: The metabolic parameters were in the normal range for all but 2 patients: one with unspecific creatine urinary excretion and the other with persistent 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. CONCLUSIONS: These data provide the largest ever reported cohort of ASD patients for whom a systematic metabolic workup has been performed; they suggest that such a routine metabolic screening does not contribute to the causative diagnosis of nonsyndromic ASD. They also emphasize that the prevalence of screened IMD in nonsyndromic ASD is probably not higher than in the general population (<0.5%. A careful clinical evaluation is probably more reasonable and of better medical practice than a costly systematic workup.

  4. A screening tool for the risk of disability retirement due to musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Rahman; Heliövaara, Markku; Ahola, Kirsi; Kaila-Kangas, Leena; Haukka, Eija; Kausto, Johanna; Saastamoinen, Peppiina; Leino-Arjas, Päivi; Lallukka, Tea

    2018-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to develop and validate a risk screening tool using a points system to assess the risk of future disability retirement due to musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). Methods The development population, the Health 2000 Survey, consisted of a nationally representative sample of Finnish employees aged 30-60 years (N=3676) and the validation population, the Helsinki Health Study, consisted of employees of the City of Helsinki aged 40-60 years (N=6391). Both surveys were linked to data on disability retirement awards due to MSD from national register for an 11-year follow-up. Results The discriminative ability of the model with seven predictors was good (Gönen and Heller's K concordance statistic=0.821). We gave points to seven predictors: sex-dependent age, level of education, pain limiting daily activities, multisite musculoskeletal pain, history of arthritis, and surgery for a spinal disorder or carpal tunnel syndrome. A score of 3 or higher out of 7 (top 30% of the index) had good sensitivity (83%) and specificity (70%). Individuals at the top 30% of the risk index were at 29 [95% confidence interval (CI) 15-55) times higher risk of disability retirement due to MSD than those at the bottom 40%. Conclusion This easy-to-use screening tool based on self-reported risk factor profiles can help identify individuals at high risk for disability retirement due to MSD.

  5. The World Health Organization Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Self-Report Screening Scale for DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustun, Berk; Adler, Lenard A; Rudin, Cynthia; Faraone, Stephen V; Spencer, Thomas J; Berglund, Patricia; Gruber, Michael J; Kessler, Ronald C

    2017-05-01

    Recognition that adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is common, seriously impairing, and usually undiagnosed has led to the development of adult ADHD screening scales for use in community, workplace, and primary care settings. However, these scales are all calibrated to DSM-IV criteria, which are narrower than the recently developed DSM-5 criteria. To update for DSM-5 criteria and improve the operating characteristics of the widely used World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) for screening. Probability subsamples of participants in 2 general population surveys (2001-2003 household survey [n = 119] and 2004-2005 managed care subscriber survey [n = 218]) who completed the full 29-question self-report ASRS, with both subsamples over-sampling ASRS-screened positives, were blindly administered a semistructured research diagnostic interview for DSM-5 adult ADHD. In 2016, the Risk-Calibrated Supersparse Linear Integer Model, a novel machine-learning algorithm designed to create screening scales with optimal integer weights and limited numbers of screening questions, was applied to the pooled data to create a DSM-5 version of the ASRS screening scale. The accuracy of the new scale was then confirmed in an independent 2011-2012 clinical sample of patients seeking evaluation at the New York University Langone Medical Center Adult ADHD Program (NYU Langone) and 2015-2016 primary care controls (n = 300). Data analysis was conducted from April 4, 2016, to September 22, 2016. The sensitivity, specificity, area under the curve (AUC), and positive predictive value (PPV) of the revised ASRS. Of the total 637 participants, 44 (37.0%) household survey respondents, 51 (23.4%) managed care respondents, and 173 (57.7%) NYU Langone respondents met DSM-5 criteria for adult ADHD in the semistructured diagnostic interview. Of the respondents who met DSM-5 criteria for adult ADHD, 123 were male (45.9%); mean (SD) age was 33.1 (11.4) years

  6. Screening for body dysmorphic disorder in a dermatology outpatient setting at a tertiary care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fibin Thanveer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: A distressing pre-occupation with an imagined or slight defect in appearance with a marked negative effect on the patient's life is the core symptom of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD. Aim: To screen the patients attending a dermatology clinic at a tertiary care centre for BDD using the BDD-dermatology version (DV questionnaire. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study enrolled 245 consecutive patients from the dermatology outpatients clinic. Methods: The demographic details were collected and the DV of BDD screening questionnaire was administered. A 5-point Likert scale was used for objective scoring of the stated concern and patients who scored ≥3 were excluded from the study. Statistical Analysis Used: The results were statistically analysed. Differences between the groups were investigated by Chi-square analysis for categorical variables, and Fisher exact test wherever required. Results: A total of 177 patients completed the study, and of these, eight patients screened positive for BDD. The rate of BDD in patients presenting with cosmetic complaints was 7.5% and in those with general dermatology, complaints were 2.1%, with no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.156. Facial flaws (62.5% were the most common concern followed by body asymmetry (25%. Conclusion: The rates of BDD found in this study are comparable but at a lower rate than that reported in literature data.

  7. Early screening for autistic spectrum disorders in toddlers aged 16 to 30 months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD worldwide shows a significant rise. Screening and early diagnosis are extremely important and provide a possibility for an early intervention. Objectives: This study is a part of validation process for a Serbian translation of Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers, Revised with Follow-up (MCHAT- R/F. Another aim was to analyse the risk factors which are associated with the development of ASD. Methods: The study included parents of toddlers aged 16 to 30 months during a well-child care visits in Dom zdravlja Savski venac and parents of toddlers sent to see a psychiatrist in Institute for mental health (IMH. Children were screened using the M-CHATR/ F. Results: The study included 65 toddlers. The ones screened in Dom zdravlja were placed in a low-risk group, and others who were referred to IMH were classified as high-risk group. Comparing these two groups no statistically significant difference was found in terms of children's age or parents' age at birth. Statistically significant difference was found in terms of gestational week at birth, and significantly higher incidence of pregnancy complications in high-risk group. Conclusion: Further investigation should completely examine the psychometric characteristics of M-CHAT, but the preliminary findings show that M-CHAT can detect many cases of ASD during a routine pediatrician examination. Some prenatal and perinatal factors such as pregnancy complications and gestational age at birth can lead to increased risk of developing ASD.

  8. Body Dysmorphic Disorder in aesthetic rhinoplasty: Validating a new screening tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekakis, Garyfalia; Picavet, Valerie A; Gabriëls, Loes; Grietens, Jente; Hellings, Peter W

    2016-08-01

    To validate a new screening tool for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in patients seeking aesthetic rhinoplasty. We performed a prospective instrument validation study in an academic rhinology clinic. The Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire-Aesthetic Surgery (BDDQ-AS) is a seven-item short questionnaire validated in 116 patients undergoing aesthetic rhinoplasty. Screening was positive if the patient acknowledged on the BDDQ-AS that he/she was concerned about their appearance (question 1 = yes) AND preoccupied with these concerns (question 2 = yes) AND that these concerns caused at least moderate distress or impairment in different domains of daily life (question 3 or 4 or 5 or 6 ≥ 3 or question 7 = yes). Construct validity was assessed by comparing the BDDQ-AS to the Sheehan Disability Scale and the Derriford Appearance Scale-59. To determine concurrent validity, the BDDQ-AS was compared to the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale Modified for BDD. Finally, the predictive value of the BDDQ-AS on satisfaction 12 months after rhinoplasty was evaluated using a visual analogue scale and the Rhinoplasty Outcome Evaluation. Reliability of the BDDQ-AS was adequate, with Cronbach alpha = .83 for rhinoplasty patients and .84 for controls. Sensitivity was 89.6% and specificity 81.4%. BDDQ-AS-positive patients (n = 55) were more impaired in daily life and experienced more appearance-related distress and dysfunction compared to BDDQ-AS-negative patients. Moreover, they had more severe BDD symptoms. Finally, BDDQ-AS-positive patients were less satisfied after surgery compared to BDDQ-AS-negative patients. We hereby validated a new screening tool for BDD in an aesthetic rhinoplasty population. 3b. Laryngoscope, 126:1739-1745, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Drug Abuse Screening with Exhaled Breath and Oral Fluid in Adults with Substance Use Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, Michel; Ullah, Shahid; Franck, Johan; Dahl, Marja-Liisa; Beck, Olof

    2018-03-25

    In the treatment of substance use disorder regular laboratory-based testing has the dual purpose of monitoring compliance to the prescribed medication and the abstention from medically non-motivated substances (i.e. drug abuse screening). The principal specimen for testing is urine, but collection of urine has some disadvantages, e.g. being more time-consuming and more intrusive compared to other matrices, and there is also the risk of adulteration. This project aims to compare exhaled breath and oral fluid as alternative matrices for drug abuse screening in patients with substance use disorder. All 51 subjects included in the study were enrolled at the Drug Addiction Emergency Unit in Stockholm. Exhaled breath, oral fluid and urine samples were collected together with a self-report. Out of all 117 self-reported drug intakes during the previous week 72% were confirmed in urine, 73 % in oral fluid and 39 % in exhaled breath. In 31% of the subjects, additional substances other than those self-reported were detected analytically. For the purpose of substance abuse screening urine had the highest detection rate for buprenorphine, cannabis and benzodiazepines, while oral fluid had the highest detection rate for amphetamines and methadone. Exhaled breath showed the highest detection rate of all matrices for cocaine. To identify significant differences in detection rates between the matrices future studies with larger sampling sizes are needed. Both OF and EB are viable alternative specimens to urine depending on the circumstances and purpose of the testing. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Codeless Screen-Oriented Programming for Enterprise Mobile Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Abadi, Aharon; Dubinsky, Yael; Kirshin, Andrei; Mesika, Yossi; Ben-Harrush, Idan

    2013-01-01

    Designing the user interface (UI) of mobile applications in the enterprise is performed in many cases by the application users who represent the business needs. This is based on existing developed enterprise services that can be accessed by these applications. Design the UI of the mobile applications require programming environments that are as much as possible codeless and easy to use. In this paper, we present NitroGen which is a cloud-based platform-independent tool that provides with no i...

  11. Screening of alcohol use disorders in psychiatric outpatients: influence of gender, age, and psychiatric diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Autet, Mónica; Garriga, Marina; Zamora, Francisco Javier; González, Idilio; Usall, Judith; Tolosa, Leticia; Benítez, Concepción; Puertas, Raquel; Arranz, Belén

    2017-07-14

    Alcohol use disorders (AUD) are 2 times higher among psychiatric patients than in the general population. The under-recognition of this dual diagnosis can entail several negative outcomes. Early assessment with a screening tool like the CAGE questionnaire could be an opportunity to improve patients' prognoses. The objective of this study is to assess AUD risk in an outpatient psychiatric sample with a modified CAGE, considering the influence of age, gender and clinical psychiatric diagnosis. An observational, multicentric, descriptive study was carried out. The 4-item CAGE scale, camouflaged in a healthy lifestyle questionnaire, was implemented, using a cut-off point of one. 559 outpatients were assessed. 54% were female and the average age was 50.07 years. 182 patients presented a CAGE score ≥1 (45.1% of men and 21.9% of women). Gender was the strongest predictor of a positive result in CAGE, as men were 3.03 times more likely to score ≥1 on the CAGE questionnaire (p < .001, 95% CI: 0.22-0.49). Patients with bipolar and personality disorders had the highest rates of CAGE scores ≥1 (45.2 and 44.9%, respectively), with a significant association between diagnosis and a positive score (p = .002). Patients above 60 years were 2.5 times less likely to score ≥1 on the CAGE (p = .017, 95% CI: 0.19-0.85). Specific screening questionnaires, like the CAGE scale, can be an easy and useful tool in the assessment of AUD risk in psychiatric outpatients. Male patients with a bipolar or personality disorder present a higher risk of AUD.

  12. Utilization of Professional Mental Health Services Related to Population-Level Screening for Anxiety, Depression, and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Among Public High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, John D; Le, Vi Donna; Baillargeon, Jacques; Temple, Jeff R

    2016-08-01

    This study examines results from three mental health screening measures in a cohort of adolescent public school students in seven public schools in Southeast Texas affiliated with the Dating it Safe study. We estimated the odds of receiving professional mental health treatment in the previous year given results from different mental health screening batteries: the CES-D 10 battery for depression screening, the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders, and the Primary Care Posttraumatic Stress Disorder screen. Overall, students with higher scores on screening instruments for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and combinations of screening instruments were more likely to have sought past-year professional mental health treatment than non-symptomatic youth. However, the proportion of students screening positive and receiving professional treatment was low, ranging from 11 to 16 %. This study emphasizes the need for broader evaluation of population-based mental health screening among adolescents.

  13. Awareness of cervical cancer and willingness to participate in screening program: Public health policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Somdatta; Upadhyay, Madhu; Chhabra, Pragti

    2017-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common malignancies among women in India. There is a high mortality as patients usually present at an advanced stage because of lack of awareness and nonexistent screening programs. This study was planned to find out awareness about cervical cancer among women and their willingness to utilize screening services in an urban resettlement colony of Delhi, India. A community-based, cross-sectional study was carried out in a resettlement colony of North-West Delhi. Semi-structured interview schedule was used to collect information regarding different aspects of cervical cancer. Analysis was done using SPSS package (SPSS version 16 (UCMS and GTBH, Delhi, India)). A total of 373 women were included in the study. Mean age of study participants was 39.14 years. Two-third of the study population were illiterate. Half of the study population was aware of cervical cancer, and only one-fourth of population were willing to participate in a screening test. Willingness was higher among educated, ever user of family planning method and having knowledge about at least one risk factor, signs or symptoms, or possibility of early diagnosis of cancer cervix. The country's national program advocates for opportunistic and targeted screening of women. An understanding of the factors that influences womens' willingness to participate in screening program is essential for the success of such programs. Hence, this study emphasizes the need for dissemination of knowledge about various aspects of cancer cervix which is critical for uptake of any screening program in a developing country.

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of a Community Pharmacist-Led Sleep Apnea Screening Program - A Markov Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Perraudin

    Full Text Available Despite the high prevalence and major public health ramifications, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS remains underdiagnosed. In many developed countries, because community pharmacists (CP are easily accessible, they have been developing additional clinical services that integrate the services of and collaborate with other healthcare providers (general practitioners (GPs, nurses, etc.. Alternative strategies for primary care screening programs for OSAS involving the CP are discussed.To estimate the quality of life, costs, and cost-effectiveness of three screening strategies among patients who are at risk of having moderate to severe OSAS in primary care.Markov decision model.Published data.Hypothetical cohort of 50-year-old male patients with symptoms highly evocative of OSAS.The 5 years after initial evaluation for OSAS.Societal.Screening strategy with CP (CP-GP collaboration, screening strategy without CP (GP alone and no screening.Quality of life, survival and costs for each screening strategy.Under almost all modeled conditions, the involvement of CPs in OSAS screening was cost effective. The maximal incremental cost for "screening strategy with CP" was about 455€ per QALY gained.Our results were robust but primarily sensitive to the treatment costs by continuous positive airway pressure, and the costs of untreated OSAS. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that the "screening strategy with CP" was dominant in 80% of cases. It was more effective and less costly in 47% of cases, and within the cost-effective range (maximum incremental cost effectiveness ratio at €6186.67/QALY in 33% of cases.CP involvement in OSAS screening is a cost-effective strategy. This proposal is consistent with the trend in Europe and the United States to extend the practices and responsibilities of the pharmacist in primary care.

  15. Retrospective Evaluation of a Teleretinal Screening Program in Detecting Multiple Nondiabetic Eye Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maa, April Y; Patel, Shivangi; Chasan, Joel E; Delaune, William; Lynch, Mary G

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic teleretinal screening programs have been utilized successfully across the world to detect diabetic retinopathy (DR) and are well validated. Less information, however, exists on the ability of teleretinal imaging to detect nondiabetic ocular pathology. This study performed a retrospective evaluation to assess the ability of a community-based diabetic teleretinal screening program to detect common ocular disease other than DR. A retrospective chart review of 1,774 patients who underwent diabetic teleretinal screening was performed. Eye clinic notes from the Veterans Health Administration's electronic medical record, Computerized Patient Record System, were searched for each of the patients screened through teleretinal imaging. When a face-to-face examination note was present, the physical findings were compared to those obtained through teleretinal imaging. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for suspicious nerve, cataract, and age-related macular degeneration. A total of 903 patients underwent a clinical examination. The positive predictive value was highest for cataract (100%), suspicious nerve (93%), and macular degeneration (90%). The negative predictive value and the percent agreement between teleretinal imaging and a clinical examination were over 90% for each disease category. A teleretinal imaging protocol may be used to screen for other common ocular diseases. It may be feasible to use diabetic teleretinal photographs to screen patients for other potential eye diseases. Additional elements of the eye workup may be added to enhance accuracy of disease detection. Further study is necessary to confirm this initial retrospective review.

  16. [Classification and characteristics of interval cancers in the Principality of Asturias's Breast Cancer Screening Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto García, M A; Delgado Sevillano, R; Baldó Sierra, C; González Díaz, E; López Secades, A; Llavona Amor, J A; Vidal Marín, B

    2013-09-01

    To review and classify the interval cancers found in the Principality of Asturias's Breast Cancer Screening Program (PDPCM). A secondary objective was to determine the histological characteristics, size, and stage of the interval cancers at the time of diagnosis. We included the interval cancers in the PDPCM in the period 2003-2007. Interval cancers were classified according to the breast cancer screening program protocol, with double reading without consensus, without blinding, with arbitration. Mammograms were interpreted by 10 radiologists in the PDPCM. A total of 33.7% of the interval cancers could not be classified; of the interval cancers that could be classified, 40.67% were labeled true interval cancers, 31.4% were labeled false negatives on screening, 23.7% had minimal signs, and 4.23% were considered occult. A total of 70% of the interval cancers were diagnosed in the year of the period between screening examinations and 71.7% were diagnosed after subsequent screening. A total of 76.9% were invasive ductal carcinomas, 61.1% were stage II when detected, and 78.7% were larger than 10mm when detected. The rate of interval cancers and the rate of false negatives in the PDPCM are higher than those recommended in the European guidelines. Interval cancers are diagnosed later than the tumors detected at screening. Studying interval cancers provides significant training for the radiologists in the PDPCM. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Screening Program Reduced Melanoma Mortality at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 1984-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, MD, J S; II, PhD, D; MD, PhD, M

    2006-10-12

    Worldwide incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma has increased substantially, and no screening program has yet demonstrated reduction in mortality. We evaluated the education, self examination and targeted screening campaign at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from its beginning in July 1984 through 1996. The thickness and crude incidence of melanoma from the years before the campaign were compared to those obtained during the 13 years of screening. Melanoma mortality during the 13-year period was based on a National Death Index search. Expected yearly deaths from melanoma among LLNL employees were calculated by using California mortality data matched by age, sex, and race/ethnicity and adjusted to exclude deaths from melanoma diagnosed before the program began or before employment at LLNL. After the program began, crude incidence of melanoma thicker than 0.75 mm decreased from 18 to 4 cases per 100,000 person-years (p = 0.02), while melanoma less than 0.75mm remained stable and in situ melanoma increased substantially. No eligible melanoma deaths occurred among LLNL employees during the screening period compared with a calculated 3.39 expected deaths (p = 0.034). Education, self examination and selective screening for melanoma at LLNL significantly decreased incidence of melanoma thicker than 0.75 mm and reduced the melanoma-related mortality rate to zero. This significant decrease in mortality rate persisted for at least 3 yr after employees retired or otherwise left the laboratory.

  18. An evaluation of a health screening program for migrant women to Taiwan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chu Huang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to evaluate an integrated screening program for female migrants to Taiwan. Method: We performed a mixed methodological evaluation of a public health nurse (PHN-led intervention to promote an integrated screening program for female migrants to Taiwan. The clinical case yield was determined by an audit, and staff/client questionnaires were used for the evaluation. Screening comprised surveillance for four untreated chronic diseases (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, tuberculosis, and liver disease, four cancers (mouth, bowel, liver, and cervix, parasitic infection, and hyperlipidemia. Results: Three hundred and thirty-six PHNs and 4751 immigrant women – with an average age of 29.2 years, most of whom were from Vietnam (44% or mainland China (41% – took part in the programme. Two thirds of screened women had no abnormalities. Further investigation was required in 1523 women, of whom 1220 were found to have significant disease. The majority of 280 PHNs (85% found the content, processes, and waiting time to be ‘highly acceptable’ and thought the program was worthwhile and could be incorporated into standard care. Conclusions: The Taipei County Comprehensive Health Screening Programme provided an accessible, free-of-charge, and preventative intervention for female migrants to Taiwan and had a good clinical case yield.

  19. Australia's National Bowel Cancer Screening Program: does it work for Indigenous Australians?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katzenellenbogen Judith M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a lower incidence of bowel cancer overall, Indigenous Australians are more likely to be diagnosed at an advanced stage when prognosis is poor. Bowel cancer screening is an effective means of reducing incidence and mortality from bowel cancer through early identification and prompt treatment. In 2006, Australia began rolling out a population-based National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP using the Faecal Occult Blood Test. Initial evaluation of the program revealed substantial disparities in bowel cancer screening uptake with Indigenous Australians significantly less likely to participate in screening than the non-Indigenous population. This paper critically reviews characteristics of the program which may contribute to the discrepancy in screening uptake, and includes an analysis of organisational, structural, and socio-cultural barriers that play a part in the poorer participation of Indigenous and other disadvantaged and minority groups. Methods A search was undertaken of peer-reviewed journal articles, government reports, and other grey literature using electronic databases and citation snowballing. Articles were critically evaluated for relevance to themes that addressed the research questions. Results The NBCSP is not reaching many Indigenous Australians in the target group, with factors contributing to sub-optimal participation including how participants are selected, the way the screening kit is distributed, the nature of the test and comprehensiveness of its contents, cultural perceptions of cancer and prevailing low levels of knowledge and awareness of bowel cancer and the importance of screening. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the population-based approach to implementing bowel cancer screening to the Australian population unintentionally excludes vulnerable minorities, particularly Indigenous and other culturally and linguistically diverse groups. This potentially contributes to exacerbating

  20. Improving screening for mental disorders in the primary care setting by combining the GHQ-12 and SCL-90-R subscales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, N; Kruse, J; Tress, W

    2001-01-01

    Most of patients with mental disorders are cared for in the primary care sector, rather than in the mental health sector. Self-report questionnaires can be used as screening instruments to identify mental disorders in primary care. The 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) is a widely used screening questionnaire for common mental disorders. Unfortunately, the GHQ-12 generates many false presumptive positives and forces the employer to expend resources on confirmatory testing. Therefore, the aim of the present report was to investigate a two-stage questionnaire screening design in a primary care setting. The GHQ-12 was used as an initial screening test followed by the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90-R). A randomly selected sample of adult outpatients (N = 408) from 18 primary care offices was screened using the two questionnaires. A structured diagnostic interview and an impairment rating were used as standards. Subjects were classified into true-positives and false-positives based on their GHQ-12 score and the clinical interview. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic analysis were performed to determine whether the SCL-90-R increased accuracy in screening for mental disorders by discriminating between true-positive and false-positive cases. The SCL-90-R subscales Depression, Obsessive-Compulsive, and Somatization were identified as factors associated with the GHQ-12 classification. Therefore, a significant improvement in screening performance of the GHQ-12 is obtained by combination of the test results. The approach may reduce artifact due to high scoring tendencies not associated with psychological disorder. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company

  1. [Evaluation on the visual inspection with Lugol's iodine in cervical cancer screening program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ni; Ma, Cong-ping; Sun, Li-xin; Zhang, Yong-zhen; Shao, Shu-li; Xing, Ju-xia; Bao, Yan-ping; Huang, Rui-de; He, Li-ji; Qiao, You-lin

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate visual inspection with Lugol's iodine (VILI) in cervical cancer screening program and to provide evidence for designing a cervical cancer screening algorithm in high risk areas of existing low-resource settings to reduce the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer. Women in Yangcheng county, Shanxi province were screened with VILI, colposcopy, liquid-based cytology test and human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA test. The efficacy of different screening tests was compared by Youden's index based on the pathology as the gold standard. In the population being screened, the mean age was 40.80 +/- 10.75 years old. Based on pathological findings, 4.35% (32/735) of the subjects had >or= CIN (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia) II. The sensitivity and specificity for the VILI test (>or= positive) were 53.13 and 82.19, while 56.25 and 79.09 were for colposcopy (>or= low grade dysplasia) respectively. Comparing by the Youden's indexs, there was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05) between VILI and colposcopy. However, statistical significant difference (P 0.05) found between the experienced doctors and the newly-trained doctors working in the field station. With low sensitivity when using microscope but low cost of equipments, VILI can be one of the primary screening tests in China's rural area with low-resource settings if the screening frequency is to be increased.

  2. Eating Disorders Prevention Programming May Be Failing: Evaluation of 2 One-Shot Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martz, Denise M.; Bazzini, Doris G.

    1999-01-01

    Two studies (N=114; n=77) were conducted to evaluate the impact of one-shot interventions to prevent eating disorders. Results of the first study were positive but small. The second study showed minimal effects on dieting and body esteem at one-month follow-up. The overall utility of such programming is discussed. (Author/EMK)

  3. Validation of the Gambling Disorder Screening Questionnaire, a self-administered diagnostic questionnaire for gambling disorder based on the DSM-5 criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villella, Corrado; Pascucci, Marco; de Waure, Chiara; Bellomo, Antonello; Conte, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    The DSM-5 has modified the diagnostic criteria for gambling disorder, compared to the fourth edition of the manual; new diagnostic instruments are therefore needed. This study evaluated the psychometric characteristics of the Gambling Disorder Screening Questionnaire (GDSQ), a self-report questionnaire based on the DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria for Gambling Disorder, measuring its validity, internal consistency, and submitting the questionnaire to a principal components analysis. 71 patients from a gambling disorder outpatient clinic and 70 controls were evaluated with the GDSQ, the South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS), and a psychiatric interview. The test showed a good sensibility, specificity, internal consistency, concurrent validity with the SOGS. The exclusion of the “illegal acts” item, and the lowering of the cut-off score to four positive items, as suggested by the DSM-5 criteria, improved the test sensibility and internal consistency. The GDSQ can be considered a useful screening test for Gambling Disorder. Furthermore, this study confirms the improved diagnostic accuracy of the criteria listed in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, compared to the previous edition.

  4. Psychometrics of the screen for adult anxiety related disorders (SCAARED)- A new scale for the assessment of DSM-5 anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Melina; Rooks, Brian T; Gill, MaryKay; Goldstein, Tina; Sakolsky, Dara; Goldstein, Benjamin; Monk, Kelly; Hickey, Mary Beth; Diler, Rasim S; Hafeman, Danella; Merranko, John; Axelson, David; Birmaher, Boris

    2017-07-01

    To examine the psychometrics of the Screen for Adult Anxiety Related Disorders (SCAARED). The SCAARED was adapted from the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders. Participants (N=336) ages 18-27 years old were evaluated using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders (SCID). The SCAARED was completed at or within two-weeks before the SCID. The psychometrics of the SCAARED were analyzed using standard statistical analyses including principal components, and Receiver Operant Curve analyses. A replication was performed in an age/sex matched independent sample (N=158). The SCAARED showed four factors: somatic/panic/agoraphobia, generalized anxiety, separation anxiety, and social anxiety. The total and each factor scores demonstrated good internal consistency (α=0.86-0.97) and good discriminant validity between anxiety and other disorders and within anxiety disorders for generalized and social anxiety. Area Under the Curve for the total and each of the factor scores ranged between 0.72 and 0.84 (ppsychometric properties supporting its use to screen adults for anxiety disorders, longitudinal studies following youth into adulthood and studies comparing child and adult populations. Further replication studies in larger community and clinical samples are indicated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Pilot Program Integrating Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Screening into an Outpatient Endoscopy Unit Improves HBV Screening Among an Ethnically Diverse Safety-Net Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Brendan; Lopez, Aristeo; Liu, Benny; Bhuket, Taft; Wong, Robert J

    2018-01-01

    Safety-net hospitals are enriched in ethnic minorities and provide opportunities for high-impact hepatitis B virus (HBV) screening. We aim to evaluate the impact of a pilot program integrating HBV screening into outpatient endoscopy among urban safety-net populations. From July 2015 to May 2017, consecutive adults undergoing outpatient endoscopy were prospectively assessed for HBV screening eligibility using US Preventative Services Task Force guidelines. Rates of prior HBV screening were assessed, and those eligible but not screened were offered HBV testing. Multivariate logistic regression models evaluated predictors of test acceptance among eligible patients. Among 1557 patients (47.1% male, 69.4% foreign born), 65.1% were eligible for HBV screening, among which 24.5% received prior screening. In our pilot screening program in the endoscopy unit, 91.4% (n = 855) of eligible patients accepted HBV testing. However, only 55.3% (n = 415) of those that accepted actually completed HBV testing. While there was a trend toward higher rates of test acceptance among African-Americans compared to non-Hispanic whites (OR 3.31, 95% CI 0.96-11.38, p = 0.06), no other sex-specific or race/ethnicity-specific disparities in HBV test acceptance were observed. Among those who completed HBV testing, we identified 10 new patients with chronic HBV (2.4% prevalence). Only 24.5% of eligible patients received prior HBV screening among our cohort. Our pilot program integrating HBV screening into outpatient endoscopy successfully tested an additional 415 patients, improving overall HBV screening from 24.5 to 75.6%. Integrating HBV testing into non-traditional settings has potential to bridge the gap in HBV screening among safety-net systems.

  6. Rubella Immunity among Pregnant Women in a Canadian Provincial Screening Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Kearns

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are limited recent data on rubella immunity in women of childbearing age in Canada. In the present paper, the proportion of rubella seroreactivity and redundant testing (testing of women previously seropositive when tested by the same physician in the Alberta prenatal rubella screening program were studied.

  7. Expansion of HIV-1 screening and anti-retroviral treatment programs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To report the expansion of HIV-1 screening, enrollment in an ART program, and treatment outcomes over twelve months among HIV-positive patients at a nonprofit, non-governmental faith-based clinic providing free and holistic care in Jos City, Plateau State, Nigeria. Design: This was a retrospective analysis of ...

  8. Integrating Universal Behavioral Screening within Program-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Mack D.; Rispoli, Mandy; Clemens, Nathan H.; Lee, Yuan-Hsuan; Sanchez, Lisa; Hatton, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Universal behavioral screening is a major part of positive behavioral support and response to intervention systems. Program-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) focuses on establishing social, emotional, and behavioral competence through promotion of a small set of behavioral expectations that are agreed upon, taught, and…

  9. Cost-effectiveness of screening programs for Chlamydia trachomatis - A population-based dynamic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welte, R; Kretzschmar, M; Leidl, R; Van den Hoek, A; Jager, JC; Postma, MJ

    2000-01-01

    Background: Models commonly used for the economic assessment of chamydial screening programs do not consider population effects. Goal: To develop a novel dynamic approach for the economic evaluation of chlamydial prevention measures and to determine the cost-effectiveness of a general

  10. Quality Metrics of a Fecal Immunochemical Test-Based Colorectal Cancer Screening Program in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Cha, Jae Myung; Kwak, Min Seob; Yoon, Jin Young; Cho, Young-Hak; Jeon, Jung Won; Shin, Hyun Phil; Joo, Kwang Ro; Lee, Joung Il

    2018-03-15

    Knowledge regarding the quality metrics of fecal immunochemical test (FIT)-based colorectal cancer screening programs is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance and quality metrics of a FIT-based screening program. In our screening program, asymptomatic subjects aged ≥50 years underwent an annual FIT, and subjects with positive FIT results underwent a subsequent colonoscopy. The performance of the FIT and colonoscopy was analyzed in individuals with a positive FIT who completed the program between 2009 and 2015 at a university hospital. Among the 51,439 screened participants, 75.1% completed the FIT. The positive rate was 1.1%, and the colonoscopy completion rate in these patients was 68.6%. The positive predictive values of cancer and advanced neoplasia were 5.5% and 19.1%, respectively. The adenoma detection rate in the patients who underwent colonoscopy after a positive FIT was 48.2% (60.0% for men and 33.6% for women). The group with the highest tertile quantitative FIT level showed a significantly higher detection rate of advanced neoplasia than the group with the lowest tertile (odds ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.4 to 5.1; p<0.001). The quality metrics used in the United States and Europe may be directly introduced to other countries, including Korea. However, the optimal quality metrics should be established in each country.

  11. Developmental Review in the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Dorothy S.; And Others

    Reported are the recommendations resulting from a review of the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment Program (EPSDT). The concept of developmental assessment, as used in the EPSDT, is explained. The introduction provides a summary of the recommendations. Areas covered and for which recommendations are discussed include the role…

  12. Assessment of required resources for implementation of national breast cancer screening program in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majstorović Nemanja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. High values of standardized mortality and morbidity rates of standardized cancer mortality in Serbia, especially colorectal, cervical and breast cancer led to creation of national programs for their early detection and engagement of the international support for their implementation. Objective. Assessment of required resources (time, personnel, financial to implement the National program for screening of breast cancer in the Republic of Serbia. Methods. Three possible scenarios have been prepared (optimistic, realistic and pessimistic based on the expected coverage by screening of women aged 45 to 69 years, and time, personnel and financial feasibility estimates were made for a two-year screening cycle. Results. Time aspect of feasibility even under conditions of “relaxation” of the assumption on the number of working days during the year did not question feasibility of any of the scenarios. Personnel feasibility is only possible in the pessimistic scenario, while the financial feasibility only makes sense in optimistic scenario as the least unfavorable solution due to economies of scale. Conclusion. Establishment of the initial base of skilled radiologists and radiology technicians and the system for their continuous medical education as well as allocation of specific MoH budget line for screening program expenditures, along with donated mammographs and good organization and coordination, may provide unobstructed implementation of the National program for early detection of breast cancer in the Republic of Serbia.

  13. Culturally Competent Training Program: A Key to Training Lay Health Advisors for Promoting Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mei-yu; Song, Lixin; Seetoo, Amy; Cai, Cuijuan; Smith, Gary; Oakley, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    The lay health advisor (LHA) training program for breast cancer screening was conducted among Chinese-English bilingual trainees residing in Southeast Michigan. Guided by Bandura's Social Learning Theory, the development of the training curriculum followed the health communication process recommended by the National Cancer Institute. Data analysis…

  14. Dissociative symptoms and dissociative disorders comorbidity in obsessive compulsive disorder: Symptom screening, diagnostic tools and reflections on treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Belli, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder, conversion disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder frequently have dissociative symptoms. The literature has demonstrated that the level of dissociation might be correlated with the severity of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and that those not responding to treatment had high dissociative symptoms. The structured clinical interview for DSM-IV dissociative disorders, dissociation questionnaire, somatoform dissociation questionnaire and dissociative expe...

  15. Electrocardiogram-derived respiration in screening of sleep-disordered breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeizadeh, Saeed; Zhou, Sophia H; Pittman, Stephen D; White, David P

    2011-01-01

    Methods for assessment of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), including sleep apnea, range from a simple questionnaire to complex multichannel polysomnography. Inexpensive and efficient electrocardiogram (ECG)-based solutions could potentially fill the gap and provide a new SDB screening tool. In addition to the heart rate variability (HRV)-based SDB screening method that we reported a year ago, we have developed a novel method based on ECG-derived respiration (EDR). This method derives the respiratory waveform by (a) measuring peak-to-trough QRS amplitude in a single-channel ECG, (b) removing outlier introduced by noise and artifacts, (c) interpolating the derived values, and (d) filtering values within the respiration rates of 5 and 25 cycles per minute. Each 30 seconds of the respiratory waveform is then classified as normal, SDB, or indeterminate epoch. The previously reported HRV-based method, applied at the same time, is based on power spectrum of heart rate over a sliding 6-minute time window to classify the middle 30-second epoch. We then combined the EDR- and HRV-based techniques to optimize the classification of each epoch. The combined method further improved the accuracy of SDB screening in an independent test database with annotated SDB epochs. The development database was from PhysioNet (n = 25 polysomnograms). The test database was from Sleep Health Centers in Boston (n = 1907 polysomnogram) where the SDB epochs (n = 1,538,222 epochs) were scored using American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria. The first test was to classify every epoch in the evaluation data set. The combined EDR and HRV method classified 78% of the epochs as either normal or SDB and 22% as indeterminate, with a total accuracy of 88% for scored epochs (not indeterminate). The second test was to evaluate the SDB status for each patient. The algorithm correctly classified 71% of patients with either moderate-to-severe SDB or mild-to-no SDB. We believe that the ECG-based methods

  16. The WERCAP Screen and the WERC Stress Screen: psychometrics of self-rated instruments for assessing bipolar and psychotic disorder risk and perceived stress burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamah, Daniel; Owoso, Akinkunle; Sheffield, Julia M; Bayer, Chelsea

    2014-10-01

    Identification of individuals in the prodromal phase of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia facilitates early intervention and promises an improved prognosis. There are no current assessment tools for clinical risk symptoms of bipolar disorder, and psychosis-risk assessment generally involves semi-structured interviews, which are time consuming and rater dependent. We present psychometric data on two novel quantitative questionnaires: the Washington Early Recognition Center Affectivity and Psychosis (WERCAP) Screen for assessing bipolar and psychotic disorder risk traits, and the accompanying WERC Stress Screen for assessing individual and total psychosocial stressor severities. Prevalence rates of the WERCAP Screen were evaluated among 171 community youth (aged 13-24 years); internal consistency was assessed and k-means cluster analysis was used to identify symptom groups. In 33 participants, test-retest reliability coefficients were assessed, and ROC curve analysis was used to determine the validity of the psychosis section of the WERCAP Screen (pWERCAP) against the Structured Interview of Psychosis-Risk Symptoms (SIPS). Correlations of the pWERCAP, the affectivity section of the WERCAP Screen (aWERCAP) and the WERC Stress Screen were examined to determine the relatedness of scores with cognition and clinical measures. Cluster analysis identified three groups of participants: a normative (47%), a psychosis-affectivity (18%) and an affectivity only (35%) group. Internal consistency of the aWERCAP and pWERCAP resulted in alphas of 0.87 and 0.92, and test-retest reliabilities resulted in intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.76 and 0.86 respectively. ROC curve analysis showed the optimal cut-point on the pWERCAP as a score of >30 (sensitivity: 0.89; specificity: 1.0). There was a significant negative correlation between aWERCAP scores and total cognition (R=-0.42), and between pWERCAP scores and sensorimotor processing speed. Total stress scores correlated

  17. Application of Short Screening Tools for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in the Korean Elderly Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yu Jin; Chung, Hae Gyung; Choi, Jin Hee; Kim, Tae Yong; So, Hyung Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objective Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is often missed or incorrectly diagnosed in primary care settings. Although brief screening instruments may be useful in detecting PTSD, an adequate validation study has not been conducted with older adults. This study aimed to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Korean version of the primary care PTSD screen (PC-PTSD) and single-item PTSD screener (SIPS) in elderly veterans. Methods The PC-PTSD and SIPS assessments were translated into Korean, with a back-translation to the original language to verify accuracy. Vietnamese war veterans [separated into a PTSD group (n=41) and a non-PTSD group (n=99)] participated in several psychometric assessments, including the Korean versions of the PC-PTSD (PC-PTSD-K), SIPS (SIPS-K), a structured clinical interview from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV(SCID), and PTSD checklist(PCL). Results The PC-PTSD-K showed high internal consistency (Cronbach α=0.76), and the test-retest reliability of the PC-PTSD-K and SIPS-K were also high (r=0.97 and r=0.91, respectively). A total score of 3 from the PC-PTSD-K yielded the highest diagnostic efficiency, with sensitivity and specificity values of 0.90 and 0.86, respectively. The 'bothered a lot' response level from the SIPS-K showed the highest diagnostic efficiency, with sensitivity and specificity values of 0.85 and 0.89, respectively. Conclusion Our findings suggest that both PC-PTSD-K and SIPS-K have good psychometric properties with high validity and reliability for detecting PTSD symptoms in elderly Korean veterans. However, further research will be necessary to increase our understanding of PTSD characteristics in diverse groups with different types of trauma. PMID:27482241

  18. Sex/Gender Differences in Screening for Autism Spectrum Disorder: Implications for Evidence-Based Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Spencer C; Boan, Andrea D; Bradley, Catherine; Carpenter, Laura A

    2018-03-30

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is diagnosed more often in boys than in girls; however, little is known about the nature of this sex/gender discrepancy or how it relates to diagnostic assessment practices. This study examined the performance of the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ) in screening for ASD among boys and girls. Data were drawn from the South Carolina Children's Educational Surveillance Study, a population-based study of ASD prevalence among children 8-10 years of age. Analyses were conducted using SCQ data from 3,520 children, with direct assessment data from 272 with elevated SCQ scores. A bifactor model based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders's (5th ed.) two ASD symptom domains fit the data well and performed slightly better for girls. In the general population sample, girls exhibited fewer social communication/interaction and restricted-repetitive behavior symptoms than boys. In the direct assessment sample, however, girls with ASD showed greater impairment in social communication/interaction than boys with ASD. Items pertaining to social communication/interaction problems at ages 4-5 were among the most diagnostically efficient overall and particularly for girls. Similarly, receiver operating characteristic analyses suggested that the SCQ performs adequately among boys and well among girls. Results support the use of the SCQ in screening for ASD but do not indicate sex/gender-specific cutoffs. Girls with ASD may exhibit pronounced intraindividual deficits in social communication/interaction compared to male peers with ASD and female peers without ASD. Although more research is needed, careful attention to social communication/interaction deficits around 4-5 years of age may be especially useful for assessing ASD in girls.

  19. Applicability of the Nordic Occupational Skin Questionnaire for Screening Contact Dermatological Disorders in Sea Fishers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovreglio, Piero; Rotondi, Rossana; Chiarappa, Patrizia; Romita, Paolo; Drago, Ignazio; Guarneri, Fabrizio; Basso, Antonella; Soleo, Leonardo; Foti, Caterina

    2018-02-23

    This survey aimed to evaluate the applicability of the Nordic Occupational Skin Questionnaire (NOSQ) as a preliminary screening tool to investigate the presence of contact dermatological disorders in sea fishermen. The Italian version of the NOSQ was administered to 143 male fishermen working at an Apulia (Southern Italy) Fisheries, and 136 male workers who had never worked as sea fishers (controls). A significantly higher rate of frequency of transient itchy wheals on the hands, wrists, and forearms was recorded in the fishermen as compared to the controls (49.6% vs. 8.1%; p < 0.001), while there was no significant difference in the frequency of eczema (8.4% vs. 6.6%). In 46.1% of the fishermen, the onset of transient itchy wheals was associated with contact with specific agents and the most common causes were algae and aquatic plants (49.3%) and seabed sludge (25.3%). In conclusion, the administration of the NOSQ can be useful in preliminary screening for dermatitis in fishermen, although it could show a possible overestimation of the prevalence of transient itchy wheals.

  20. Design and screening of ASIC inhibitors based on aromatic diamidines for combating neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuanmao; Orser, Beverley A; MacDonald, John F

    2010-12-01

    Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are implicated in various brain functions including learning and memory and are involved in a number of neurological disorders such as pain, ischemic stroke, depression, and multiple sclerosis. We have recently defined ASICs as one of receptor targets of aromatic diamidines in neurons. Aromatic diamidines are DNA-binding agents and have long been used in the treatment of leishmaniasis, trypanosomiasis, pneumocystis pneumonia and babesiosis. Moreover, some aromatic diamidines are used as skin-care and baby products and others have potential to suppress tumor growth or to combat malaria. A large number of aromatic diamidines or analogs have been synthesized. Many efforts are being made to optimize the therapeutic spectrum of aromatic diamidines, i.e. to reduce toxicity, increase oral bioavailability and enhance their penetration of the blood-brain barrier. Aromatic diamidines therefore provide a shortcut of screening for selective ASIC inhibitors with therapeutic potential. Intriguingly nafamostat, a protease inhibitor for treating acute pancreatitis, also inhibits ASIC activities. Aromatic diamidines and nafamostat have many similarities although they belong to distinct classes of medicinal agents for curing different diseases. Here we delineate background, clinical application and drug development of aromatic diamidines that could facilitate the screening for selective ASIC inhibitors for research purposes. Further studies may lead to a drug with therapeutic value and extend the therapeutic scope of aromatic diamidines to combat neurological diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A Transparent Decision Support Tool in Screening for Laryngeal Disorders Using Voice and Query Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Minelga

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is a transparent tool for analysis of voice (sustained phonation /a/ and query data capable of providing support in screening for laryngeal disorders. In this work, screening is concerned with identification of potentially pathological cases by classifying subject’s data into ’healthy’ and ’pathological’ classes as well as visual exploration of data and automatic decisions. A set of association rules and a decision tree, techniques lending themselves for exploration, were generated for pathology detection. Data pairwise similarities, estimated in a novel way, were mapped onto a 2D metric space for visual inspection and analysis. Accurate identification of pathological cases was observed on unseen subjects using the most discriminative query parameter and six audio parameters routinely used by otolaryngologists in a clinical practice: equal error rate (EER of 11.1% was achieved using association rules and 10.2% using the decision tree. The EER was further reduced to 9.5% by combining results from these two classifiers. The developed solution can be a useful tool for Otolaryngology departments in diagnostics, education and exploratory tasks.

  2. Universal neonatal hearing screening program in Shanghai, China: An inter-regional and international comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xingang; Li, Xi; Zhang, Qi; Wan, Jin; Sun, Mei; Chang, Fengshui; Lü, Jun; Chen, Gang

    2016-11-01

    By comparing the Universal Neonatal Hearing Screening (UNHS) program as implemented in Shanghai and other regions in China and countries around the world, this study makes an assessment of the Shanghai model and summarizes the experiences implementing the UNHS program, so as to provide a valuable reference for other countries or regions to carry out UNHS more effectively. Since Shanghai is one of the most developed regions in China, we also examined the relationship between economic development and the UNHS starting year and coverage rate. The study conducted a systematic review of published studies in Chinese and English on the program status of neonatal hearing screening to compare and analyze the implementation of the UNHS program in 20 cities or provinces in China and 24 regions or countries around the world. The literature search in Chinese was conducted in the three most authoritative publication databases, CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure), WANFANGDATA, and CQVIP (http://www.cqvip.com/). We searched all publications in those databases with the keywords "neonatal hearing screening" (in Chinese) between 2005 and 2014. English literature was searched using the same keywords (in English). The publication database included Medline and Web of Science, and the search time period was 2000-2014. Shanghai was one of the first regions in China to implement UNHS, and its coverage rate was among the top regions by international comparison. The starting time of the UNHS program had no relationship with the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita in the same year. Economic level serves as a threshold for carrying out UNHS but is not a linear contributor to the exact starting time of such a program. The screening coverage rate generally showed a rising trend with the increasing GDP per capita in China, but it had no relationship with the area's GDP per capita in selected regions and countries around the world. The system design of UNHS is the key factor

  3. Screening for substance use disorders in first-episode psychosis: implications for readmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalla, Albert; Garcia-Rizo, Clemente; Castellví, Pere; Fernandez-Egea, Emili; Yücel, Murat; Parellada, Eduard; Kirkpatrick, Brian; Martin-Santos, Rocío; Bernardo, Miguel

    2013-05-01

    Screening of substance use may prove useful to prevent readmission after the first episode of psychosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of drug use on readmission risk in a first-episode psychosis sample, and to determine whether the cannabis/cocaine subscale of the Dartmouth Assessment of Lifestyle Inventory (DALI) is a better predictive instrument than urinary analysis. After admission, first-episode psychotic patients were interviewed for substance use and assessed with the DALI scale. They also underwent blood and urine sampling. Time to readmission was studied as a dependent outcome. The Kaplan-Meier estimator was applied to estimate the survival curves for bivariate analysis. The Cox proportional hazards model for multivariate analysis was assessed in order to control for potential confounders. ROC curve and validity parameters were used to assess validity to detect readmission. Fifty-eight patients were included. The DALI cannabis/cocaine subscale and urinalysis were associated with increased readmission risk in survival curves, mainly the first five years of follow-up. After controlling for potential confounding variables for readmission, only the DALI cannabis/cocaine subscale remained as a significant risk factor. In terms of validity, the DALI cannabis/cocaine subscale was more sensitive than urinalysis. Alcohol assessments were not related to readmission. The findings demonstrated that a quick screening self-report scale for cannabis/cocaine use disorders is superior to urinary analysis for predicting readmission. Future research should consider longitudinal assessments of brief validated screening tests in order to evaluate their benefits in preventing early readmission in first-episode psychosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Organization and evaluation of a pilot cervical cancer screening program in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmouni, Farida; Sauvaget, Catherine; Belakhel, Latifa; Lucas, Eric; Khouchoua, Mohamed; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate a pilot program for early detection of cervical cancer using visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) and the loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) in one region of Morocco. A descriptive analysis of the screening outcome measures of 43 participating primary care units and one reference center for LEEP was conducted in Meknès-Tafilalet between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2013. Data on the number of participants, VIA results, colposcopy, and treatment were used in analyses. Of the 308 197 women in the target age group (30-49 years), 18 586 (6.0%) were screened by VIA. Positive screening test results were recorded for 1628 (8.8%) women, of whom 1144 (70.3%) received diagnostic confirmation by colposcopy. Of the 87 (7.6%) women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, only 16 (18.4%) underwent LEEP; three cases of invasive cervical cancer were diagnosed. Issues with implementation of the screening program were found, including low compliance and a low treatment rate of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia by LEEP. By contrast, high rates of colposcopy referral were observed. Screen-and-treat by ablative methods (e.g. thermocoagulation) should be considered to increase treatment rates at national scale-up. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Screening program for tuberculosis among international exchange students in the Department of Isère].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albahary, M-V; Blanc-Jouvan, F; Recule, C; Dubey, C; Pavese, P

    2018-01-01

    France is a low-incidence country for tuberculosis (TB). Consequently screening is focused on high-risk populations, in particular migrants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology of TB among international exchange students in the Department of Isère and the screening programs used. We carried out an organizational audit based on interviews with physicians involved in the management of TB in Isère. We conducted a retrospective descriptive study based on a case series of foreign students treated for TB from 2003 to 2013 inclusively. Forty-six international exchange students were treated for active TB during this time, representing an average incidence of 284/100,000. Two thirds of our studied population were Africans, 72% were asymptomatic at the time of screening. A quarter of our cohort developed TB after the initial screening. Thirty-one cases were confirmed bacteriologically, mainly through bronchoscopy. Outcome (radiological and clinical) on quadruple therapy was satisfactory in all patients. Two patients relapsed, one of them with multi-drug resistant TB. Our work confirms that international exchange students are a population at high risk of TB and that screening of this population is essential. The significant number of active TB cases diagnosed after the initial screening stresses the importance of diagnosis and follow up of patients with latent TB infection. Copyright © 2017 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Quality control for the mammography screening program in Serbia: Physical and technical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Bozovic, P.; Lazarevic, D.; Arandjic, D.; Kosutic, D.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the major cause of mortality among female population in Serbia. It is presumed that the introduction of screening programme will reduce mortality and therefore, 47 new mammography units were installed for the purpose of population-based screening program in 2011. In parallel, Quality assurance and Quality control (QC) in mammography has received increasing attention as an essential element of the successful breast cancer campaign that is for the first time initialed in Serbia. The purpose of this study is to investigate the need for and the possible implementation of the comprehensive QC programme for the mammography screening in Serbia, with special focus on physical and technical aspect. In the first phase, a QC protocols containing list of parameters, methodology, frequency of tests and reference values for screen-film, computed radiography and full-filed digital mammography) units, were developed. The second phase is focused on the initial implementation of these protocols. The paper presents results of tests of the selected parameters in 35 mammography units, with special emphasis on patient dose and image quality descriptors. After initial implementation at the beginning of the population based breast cancer screening campaign, it is essential to establish system of regular and periodic QC equipment monitoring and to ensure high quality mammograms with minimal possible radiation dose to population included in the screening. (authors)

  7. Cervical Cancer Screening Program by Visual Inspection: Acceptability and Feasibility in Health Insurance Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horo, Apollinaire G.; Didi-Kouko Coulibaly, Judith; Koffi, Abdoul; Tchounga, Boris; Seni, Konan; Aka, Kacou Edèle; Kone, Mamourou

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess willingness to participate and diagnostic accuracy of visual inspection for early detection of cervical neoplasia among women in a health insurance company. Patients and Method. Cervical cancer screening was systematically proposed to 800 women after consecutive information and awareness sessions. The screening method was visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) or Lugol's iodine (VILI). Results. Among the 800 identified women, 640 (82%) have accepted the screening, their mean age was 39 years, and 12.0% of them were involved in a polygamist couple. 28.2% of women had prior cervical screening. VIA has been detected positive in 5.9% of women versus 8.6% for VILI. The sensitivity was 72.9% and specificity was 95.2% for VIA versus 71.2% and 97.3% for VILI respectively. The histological examination highlighted a nonspecific chronic cervicitis in 4.6%, CIN1 lesions in 5.91%, and CIN2/3 in 1.2% of the cases. Conclusion. Cervical cancer screening by visual inspection showed appropriate diagnostic accuracy when used to detect early cervical lesions. It is a simple and easy to perform method that could be introduced progressively in the health insurance policy while waiting for a national screening program. PMID:26167178

  8. Laboratory audit as part of the quality assessment of a primary HPV-screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortlund, Maria; Sundström, Karin; Lamin, Helena; Hjerpe, Anders; Dillner, Joakim

    2016-02-01

    As primary HPV screening programs are rolled out, methods are needed for routine quality assurance of HPV laboratory analyzes. To explore the use of similar design for audit as currently used in cytology-based screening, to estimate the clinical sensitivity to identify women at risk for CIN 3 or worse (CIN3+). Population-based cohort study conducted within the cervical screening program in Stockholm, Sweden, in 2011-2012. All women with histopathologically confirmed CIN3+ in the following two years were identified by registry analysis. Primary HPV and cytology screening results were collected. For women who had not been HPV tested, biobanked cytology samples were HPV-tested. If the original HPV result had been negative, the sample and subsequent biopsies were analyzed with broad HPV typing (general primer PCR and Luminex). 154 women had a biobanked prediagnostic cytology sample taken up to 2 years before a histopathologically confirmed CIN3+. The high-risk HPV-positivity was 97% (148/154 women), whereas 143/154 (94%) women had had a cytological abnormality. Among the six HPV-negative samples, one sample was HPV 33 positive in repeat testing whereas the other five cases were HPV-negative also on repeat testing, but HPV-positive in the subsequent tumor tissue. A sensitivity of the HPV test that is higher than the sensitivity of cytology suggests adequate quality of the testing. Regular audits of clinical sensitivity, similar to those of cytology-based screening, should be used also in HPV-based screening programs, in order to continuously monitor the performance of the analyzes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Implementing a Fee‐for‐Service Cervical Cancer Screening and Treatment Program in Cameroon: Challenges and Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    DeGregorio, Geneva; Manga, Simon; Kiyang, Edith; Manjuh, Florence; Bradford, Leslie; Cholli, Preetam; Wamai, Richard; Ogembo, Rebecca; Sando, Zacharie; Liu, Yuxin; Sheldon, Lisa Kennedy; Nulah, Kathleen; Welty, Thomas; Welty, Edith; Ogembo, Javier Gordon

    2017-01-01

    This report documents the strategies that led to the successful implementation of a nurse‐led cervical cancer screening program using visual inspection with acetic acid enhanced by digital cervicography, describes programmatic challenges, makes recommendations to optimize screening and treatment outcomes, and discusses the unique aspects of the Women's Health Program model developed in Cameroon.

  10. A comparative examination of tuberculosis immigration medical screening programs from selected countries with high immigration and low tuberculosis incidence rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) in migrants is an ongoing challenge in several low TB incidence countries since a large proportion of TB in these countries occurs in migrants from high incidence countries. To meet these challenges, several countries utilize TB screening programs. The programs attempt to identify and treat those with active and/or infectious stages of the disease. In addition, screening is used to identify and manage those with latent or inactive disease after arrival. Between nations, considerable variation exists in the methods used in migration-associated TB screening. The present study aimed to compare the TB immigration medical examination requirements in selected countries of high immigration and low TB incidence rates. Methods Descriptive study of immigration TB screening programs Results 16 out of 18 eligible countries responded to the written standardized survey and phone interview. Comparisons in specific areas of TB immigration screening programs included authorities responsible for TB screening, the primary objectives of the TB screening program, the yield of detection of active TB disease, screening details and aspects of follow up for inactive pulmonary TB. No two countries had the same approach to TB screening among migrants. Important differences, common practices, common problems, evidence or lack of evidence for program specifics were noted. Conclusions In spite of common goals, there is great diversity in the processes and practices designed to mitigate the impact of migration-associated TB among nations that screen migrants for the disease. The long-term goal in decreasing migration-related introduction of TB from high to low incidence countries remains diminishing the prevalence of the disease in those high incidence locations. In the meantime, existing or planned migration screening programs for TB can be made more efficient and evidenced based. Cooperation among countries doing research in the areas outlined in this study should

  11. A comparative examination of tuberculosis immigration medical screening programs from selected countries with high immigration and low tuberculosis incidence rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagebiel Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB in migrants is an ongoing challenge in several low TB incidence countries since a large proportion of TB in these countries occurs in migrants from high incidence countries. To meet these challenges, several countries utilize TB screening programs. The programs attempt to identify and treat those with active and/or infectious stages of the disease. In addition, screening is used to identify and manage those with latent or inactive disease after arrival. Between nations, considerable variation exists in the methods used in migration-associated TB screening. The present study aimed to compare the TB immigration medical examination requirements in selected countries of high immigration and low TB incidence rates. Methods Descriptive study of immigration TB screening programs Results 16 out of 18 eligible countries responded to the written standardized survey and phone interview. Comparisons in specific areas of TB immigration screening programs included authorities responsible for TB screening, the primary objectives of the TB screening program, the yield of detection of active TB disease, screening details and aspects of follow up for inactive pulmonary TB. No two countries had the same approach to TB screening among migrants. Important differences, common practices, common problems, evidence or lack of evidence for program specifics were noted. Conclusions In spite of common goals, there is great diversity in the processes and practices designed to mitigate the impact of migration-associated TB among nations that screen migrants for the disease. The long-term goal in decreasing migration-related introduction of TB from high to low incidence countries remains diminishing the prevalence of the disease in those high incidence locations. In the meantime, existing or planned migration screening programs for TB can be made more efficient and evidenced based. Cooperation among countries doing research in the areas

  12. A comparative examination of tuberculosis immigration medical screening programs from selected countries with high immigration and low tuberculosis incidence rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Gonzalo G; Gushulak, Brian; Abu Rumman, Khaled; Altpeter, Ekkehardt; Chemtob, Daniel; Douglas, Paul; Erkens, Connie; Helbling, Peter; Hamilton, Ingrid; Jones, Jane; Matteelli, Alberto; Paty, Marie-Claire; Posey, Drew L; Sagebiel, Daniel; Slump, Erika; Tegnell, Anders; Valín, Elena Rodríguez; Winje, Brita Askeland; Ellis, Edward

    2011-01-04

    Tuberculosis (TB) in migrants is an ongoing challenge in several low TB incidence countries since a large proportion of TB in these countries occurs in migrants from high incidence countries. To meet these challenges, several countries utilize TB screening programs. The programs attempt to identify and treat those with active and/or infectious stages of the disease. In addition, screening is used to identify and manage those with latent or inactive disease after arrival. Between nations, considerable variation exists in the methods used in migration-associated TB screening. The present study aimed to compare the TB immigration medical examination requirements in selected countries of high immigration and low TB incidence rates. Descriptive study of immigration TB screening programs. 16 out of 18 eligible countries responded to the written standardized survey and phone interview. Comparisons in specific areas of TB immigration screening programs included authorities responsible for TB screening, the primary objectives of the TB screening program, the yield of detection of active TB disease, screening details and aspects of follow up for inactive pulmonary TB. No two countries had the same approach to TB screening among migrants. Important differences, common practices, common problems, evidence or lack of evidence for program specifics were noted. In spite of common goals, there is great diversity in the processes and practices designed to mitigate the impact of migration-associated TB among nations that screen migrants for the disease. The long-term goal in decreasing migration-related introduction of TB from high to low incidence countries remains diminishing the prevalence of the disease in those high incidence locations. In the meantime, existing or planned migration screening programs for TB can be made more efficient and evidenced based. Cooperation among countries doing research in the areas outlined in this study should facilitate the development of improved

  13. Best practices: implementation of a glucose screening program based on diffusion of innovation theory methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Ginger E; Morrato, Elaine H; Johnson, Mark C; Campagna, Elizabeth; Yingling, Michael D; Pham, Victor; Newcomer, John W

    2011-01-01

    There is public health interest in the identification and treatment of modifiable cardiometabolic risk factors among patients treated with antipsychotic medications. However, best-practice screening recommendations endorsed by multiple medical organizations have not translated into real-world clinical practice. Quality improvement strategies may help to address the gap between policy and implementation. This column describes the successful implementation of a best-practice glucose screening program in a large network of community mental health centers that was based on Six Sigma and diffusion of innovation theory.

  14. Airport sentinel surveillance and entry quarantine for dengue infections following a fever screening program in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Mei-Mei; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2012-08-06

    Dengue has not reached an endemic status in Taiwan; nevertheless, we have implemented a fever screening program at airports for the early detection of febrile passengers with a dengue infection. This study is intended to assess the performance of the airport screening procedures for dengue infection. We analyzed data from the national surveillance system of the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control. We included the imported dengue cases reported by sentinel airports and clinics as well as the domestic cases from 2007-2010. Approximately 44.9% (95%CI: 35.73-54.13%) of the confirmed imported dengue cases with an apparent symptom (febrile) in the viremic stage were detected via the airport fever screening program, with an estimated positive predictive value of 2.36% (95% CI: 0.96- 3.75%) and a negative predictive value > 99.99%. Fluctuations in the number of the symptomatic imported dengue cases identified in the airports (X) were associated with the total number of imported dengue cases (Y) based on a regression analysis of a biweekly surveillance (i.e., n = 104, R(2)(X:Y) = 0.61, P airports examined in this study indicated some limitations of the fever screening program for the prevention of importation. The screening program could assist in the rapid triage for self-quarantine of some symptomatic dengue cases that were in the viremic stage at the borders and contribute to active sentinel surveillance; however, the blocking of viral transmission to susceptible populations (neighbors or family) from all of the viremic travelers, including those with or without symptoms, is critical to prevent dengue epidemics. Therefore, the reinforcement of mosquito bite prevention and household vector control in dengue-endemic or dengue-competent hotspots during an epidemic season is essential and highly recommended.

  15. Psychometric analysis of common mental disorders -- Screening Questionnaire (CMD-SQ) in long-term sickness absence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Hans Jørgen; Bech, Per

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: Mental disorders often go undetected in primary care, for persons awarded disability pension, and in sick-leave certificates. No validity tests of instruments for detection and measurement of mental disorders have been performed in long-term sickness absence (LSA). This is the aim...... of the present study for Common Mental Disorders - Screening Questionnaire (CMD-SQ). METHODS: It is validity tested in a well-defined Danish population comprising all persons on continuous sickness absence just exceeding eight weeks. CMD-SQ is composed of SCL-SOM (somatization), Whiteley-7 (illness worry...

  16. Physical Activity, Screen-Time Behavior, and Obesity among 13-Year Olds in Ireland with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Sean; Haegele, Justin A.; Grenier, Michelle; Garcia, Jeanette M.

    2017-01-01

    The primary purposes of this study were to compare (a) physical activity participation, screen-time habits, obesity, and (b) reported reasons for lack of participation in sport, between a nationally representative sample of Irish children with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participation in moderate to vigorous activity, light…

  17. The Relationship between Clinicians' Confidence and Accuracy, and the Influence of Child Characteristics, in the Screening of Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley, Darren; Brewer, Neil; Nevill, Rose; Uljarevic, Mirko; Butter, Eric; Mulick, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The study examined the confidence accuracy relationship, and the influence of child characteristics on clinician confidence, when predicting a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder during screening of 125 referred children aged under 3.5 years. The diagnostic process included observation, interview, language and developmental testing. Clinical…

  18. Development and evaluation of RAMP I - a practitioner's tool for screening of musculoskeletal disorder risk factors in manual handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Carl Mikael; Forsman, Mikael; Rose, Linda Maria

    2017-10-16

    RAMP I is a screening tool developed to support practitioners in screening for work-related musculoskeletal disorder risk factors related to manual handling. RAMP I, which is part of the RAMP tool, is based on research-based studies combined with expert group judgments. More than 80 practitioners participated in the development of RAMP I. The tool consists of dichotomous assessment items grouped into seven categories. Acceptable reliability was found for a majority of the assessment items for 15 practitioners who were given 1 h of training. The usability evaluation points to RAMP I being usable for screening for musculoskeletal disorder risk factors, i.e., usable for assessing risks, being usable as a decision base, having clear results and that the time needed for an assessment is acceptable. It is concluded that RAMP I is a usable tool for practitioners.

  19. Screening for affective and anxiety disorders in medical patients - comparison of HADS, GHQ-12 and Brief-PHQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Daniela; Reuter, Katrin; Härter, Martin

    2006-12-11

    The detection of patients with comorbid mental disorders is of high clinical importance. Screening instruments can be recommended for early recognition. This study investigates the discriminant validity of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) and Patient Health Questionnaire (Brief-PHQ-D) in chronically ill patients. Two hundred and four patients with chronic illness participated in a two-stage survey. First patients were screened with HADS, Brief-PHQ and GHQ-12 and then examined for mental disorders by clinical standardized interview (M-CIDI). Validity of the three instruments was compared using ROC(receiver operating characteristics)-analysis and CIDI-diagnoses as criteria. The Brief-PHQ and the HADS performed better than GHQ-12 concerning affective and anxiety disorders without reaching significance. Even though the Brief-PHQ performs significantly better in the category of "any mental disorder", the differences between the Brief-PHQ and the HADS remain not significant considering anxiety and affective disorders. The Brief-PHQ performed slightly better considering depressive disorders with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.844, a sensitivity of 80% and a specifity of 75.7%. Screener can be used for the detection of mental disorders in patients with chronical illness. Especially the Brief-PHQ and the HADS can be recommended considering sensitivity and specifity. An advantage of the Brief-PHQ is the ability of categorial and dimensional analysis.

  20. [Validation of the Spanish version of the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder adult screening scale (ASRS v. 1.1): a novel scoring strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Quiroga, J A; Daigre, C; Valero, S; Bosch, R; Gómez-Barros, N; Nogueira, M; Palomar, G; Roncero, C; Casas, M

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neuropsychiatric disorder in the adulthood. It's diagnosis is a complex process in which a screening tool can be useful. To analyze the six-question Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS v. 1.1) validity in an outpatient clinical context. We performed a case-control study, involving 90 patients with ADHD and 90 controls without ADHD. They were outpatient treated in a program for adults ADHD in a hospital. The clinical disorder diagnosis was measured by the Conners Adult ADHD Diagnostic Interview. We analyzed the test accuracy for different ways to score and cut-offs. We found the best psychometric characteristics of ASRS v. 1.1 using a quantitative ranking between 0 and 24 points, setting as cut-off 12 points. We observed a sensitivity of 96.7%, specificity 91.1%, positive predictive value 91.6% negative predictive value 96.5%, kappa index 0.88 and area under the curve 0.94 (odds ratio = 297.3; 95% confidence interval = 76.2-1,159). The ASRS is a valid and useful tool for the adult ADHD screening in the clinical context.

  1. [Four year follow-up of a screening program for prostate cancer in workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinoso-Barbero, Luis; Díaz-Garrido, Ramón; Piñaga-Solé, Montserrat; Fernández-Fernández, Miguel; Belanger-Quintana, Diego; Gómez-Gallego, Félix

    2013-01-01

    To analyze our four-year follow-up experience (2008-2011) with a prostate cancer screening program offered to employees of a banking company. Data were obtained from the health examinations carried out by the bank's in-house occupational health service (with centers in Barcelona, Madrid and Valencia). PSA (prostate-specific antigen) blood levels were measured and cases with high levels (>4 ng/ml) were followed through diagnosis and treatment, including a telephone survey of confirmed cases. Personal and occupational characteristics of the participants were analyzed as well. 750 workers (99% with administrative and/or commercial jobs) met the inclusion criteria for the screening program. Of these, 110 had elevated PSA levels on at least one occasion. The diagnosis of prostate cancer was confirmed in 21 cases. There were no associations between a diagnosis of cancer and the remaining analyzed variables. Urology and pathology records were retrieved for 76% of the contacted cases. The most frequent histological type was adenocarcinoma (98%), the most common Gleason grade at diagnosis was 6-7% (88%), and the majority of cases were treated surgically (90%).With respect to adverse effects, 48% of cases described erectile dysfunction and 33% reported urinary incontinence. In our program the observed prevalence of prostate cancer was above that expected (respectively, 21 confirmed cases vs. 12 expected). The identified cases unanimously expressed their support for the screening program. Copyright belongs to the Societat Catalana de Seguretat i Medicina del Treball.

  2. Follow-up of abnormal or inadequate test results in the Danish Cervical Cancer Screening Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Bettina Kjær

    2014-01-01

    Denmark has a higher incidence of cervical cancer than other Nordic countries, although all Danish women (aged 23–65) are screened regularly to identify possible cervical dysplasia or asymptomatic invasive cancer. Annually 40 000 women receives an abnormal or inadequate test result and a follow......-up recommendation. However problems with delayed follow-up may threaten the effectiveness of the Danish Cervical Cancer Screening Program, as 20% of women are delayed and dysplasia potentially can progress into cancer. Delayed follow-up is found in situations where women either consciously or unconsciously postpone...... will be of great importance to the future organisation of cervical and colorectal cancer screening programmes in Denmark, but will also have international interest because of their similar challenges....

  3. Identification and management of eating disorders in gynecology: menstrual health as an underutilized screening tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisseau, Christina L

    2016-11-01

    Eating disorders are life-threatening conditions that disproportionately affect females, often during child-bearing years. Although the endocrinological and reproductive sequelae of these conditions often fall within the treatment purview of obstetrician-gynecologists, the assessment of eating pathology is challenging and often not part of routine clinical care. This commentary focuses on one of the common presenting symptoms of eating disorders in women, menstrual dysfunction, and discusses considerations for its clinical management in gynecology. Assessment of menstrual status provides a natural starting point for provider-patient discussion of disordered eating and weight behavior. Routine screening for eating disorders is critical and must be universal given the serious long-term consequences of these disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Interval breast cancers: Absolute and proportional incidence and blinded review in a community mammographic screening program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonaro, Luca A., E-mail: luca.carbonaro@gmail.com [Unità di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Piazza E. Malan 2, San Donato Milanese (Mi) 20097 (Italy); Azzarone, Antonio [Servizio di Radiologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Circolo di Melegnano, Via Pandina 1, Vizzolo Predabissi (Mi) 20070 (Italy); Paskeh, Bijan Babaei [Unità di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Piazza E. Malan 2, San Donato Milanese (Mi) 20097 (Italy); Brambilla, Giorgio [Dipartimento di Radiologia, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Via Manzoni 56, Rozzano (Mi) 20089 (Italy); Brunelli, Silvia [Centro di Prevenzione Senologica, ULSS 20, Piazza Lambranzi, Verona 37034 (Italy); Calori, Anna [Servizio di Radiologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Circolo di Melegnano, Via Pandina 1, Vizzolo Predabissi (Mi) 20070 (Italy); Caumo, Francesca [Centro di Prevenzione Senologica, ULSS 20, Piazza Lambranzi, Verona 37034 (Italy); Malerba, Paolo [Dipartimento di Radiologia, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Via Manzoni 56, Rozzano (Mi) 20089 (Italy); Menicagli, Laura [Unità di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Piazza E. Malan 2, San Donato Milanese (Mi) 20097 (Italy); Sconfienza, Luca M. [Unità di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Piazza E. Malan 2, San Donato Milanese (Mi) 20097 (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Vadalà, Giuseppe [Servizio di Radiologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Circolo di Melegnano, Via Pandina 1, Vizzolo Predabissi (Mi) 20070 (Italy); Brambilla, Gelma; Fantini, Luigi [Servizio di Medicina Preventiva delle Comunità, ASL Milano 2, Via Friuli 2, Lacchiarella (Mi) 20084 (Italy); Ciatto, Stefano [Screening Program, ULSS 16, Padova (Italy); and others

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of the first years since the beginning of a mammographic population-based screening program. Materials and methods: Women aged 49–69 were invited biennially for two-view film-screen mammography and double reading without arbitration was performed. Interval cancers (ICs) from 2001 to 2006 were identified using screening archives, local pathology archives, and hospital discharge records. The proportional incidence of IC was determined considering breast cancers expected without screening. Three offsite radiologists experienced in breast cancer screening blindly evaluated mammograms prior to diagnosis, randomly mixed with negative mammograms (1:2 ratio). Cases unrecalled at review were considered as true ICs, those recalled by only one reviewer as minimal signs, and those recalled by two or three reviewers as missed cancers. T and N stage of the reviewed ICs were evaluated and compared. Results: A total of 86,276 first level mammograms were performed. Mean recall rate was 6.8% at first and 4.6% at repeat screening. We had 476 screen-detected cancers and 145 ICs (10 of them ductal carcinomas in situ). Absolute incidence was 17 per 10,000 screening examinations. Invasive proportional incidence was 19% (44/234) in the first year, 39% (91/234) in the second year, and 29% (135/468) in the two-year interval. Of 145 ICs, 130 (90%) were reviewed mixed with 287 negative controls: 55% (71/130) resulted to be true ICs, 24% (31/130) minimal signs, and 22% (28/130) missed cancers. The rate of ICs diagnosed in the first year interval was 21% (15/71) for true ICs, 46% (13/28) for missed cancers, and 39% (12/31) for minimal signs, with a significant difference of true ICs rate compared to missed cancers rate (p = 0.012). A higher rate of T3 and T4 stages was found for missed cancers (18%, 5/28) compared to minimal signs (6%, 2/31) or true ICs (8%, 6/71), while the rate of N2 and N3 stage for both minimal signs (19%, 6/31) or missed cancers (25

  5. Compression force and radiation dose in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waade, Gunvor G.; Sanderud, Audun [Department of Life Sciences and Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, P.O. 4 St. Olavs Plass, 0130 Oslo (Norway); Hofvind, Solveig, E-mail: solveig.hofvind@kreftregisteret.no [Department of Life Sciences and Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, P.O. 4 St. Olavs Plass, 0130 Oslo (Norway); The Cancer Registry of Norway, P.O. 5313 Majorstuen, 0304 Oslo (Norway)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Compression force and radiation dose for 17 951 screening mammograms were analyzed. • Large variations in mean applied compression force between the breast centers. • Limited associations between compression force and radiation dose. - Abstract: Purpose: Compression force is used in mammography to reduce breast thickness and by that decrease radiation dose and improve image quality. There are no evidence-based recommendations regarding the optimal compression force. We analyzed compression force and radiation dose between screening centers in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP), as a first step towards establishing evidence-based recommendations for compression force. Materials and methods: The study included information from 17 951 randomly selected screening examinations among women screened with equipment from four different venors at fourteen breast centers in the NBCSP, January-March 2014. We analyzed the applied compression force and radiation dose used on craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral-oblique (MLO) view on left breast, by breast centers and vendors. Results: Mean compression force used in the screening program was 116N (CC: 108N, MLO: 125N). The maximum difference in mean compression force between the centers was 63N for CC and 57N for MLO. Mean radiation dose for each image was 1.09 mGy (CC: 1.04mGy, MLO: 1.14mGy), varying from 0.55 mGy to 1.31 mGy between the centers. Compression force alone had a negligible impact on radiation dose (r{sup 2} = 0.8%, p = < 0.001). Conclusion: We observed substantial variations in mean compression forces between the breast centers. Breast characteristics and differences in automated exposure control between vendors might explain the low association between compression force and radiation dose. Further knowledge about different automated exposure controls and the impact of compression force on dose and image quality is needed to establish individualised and evidence

  6. Validity of Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test-Korean Revised Version for Screening Alcohol Use Disorder according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jung Wei; Kim, Jong Sung; Jung, Jin Gyu; Kim, Sung Soo; Yoon, Seok Joon; Jang, Hak Sun

    2016-11-01

    The Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) has been widely used to identify alcohol use disorder (AUD). This study evaluated the validity of the AUDIT-Korean revised version (AUDIT-KR) for screening AUD according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5) criteria. This research was conducted with 443 subjects who visited the Chungnam National University Hospital for a comprehensive medical examination. All subjects completed the demographic questionnaire and AUDIT-KR without assistance. Subjects were divided into two groups according to DSM-5 criteria: an AUD group, which included patients that fit the criteria for AUD (120 males and 21 females), and a non-AUD group, which included 146 males and 156 females that did not meet AUD criteria. The appropriate cut-off values, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the AUDIT-KR were evaluated. The mean±standard deviation AUDIT-KR scores were 10.32±7.48 points in males and 3.23±4.42 points in females. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (95% confidence interval, CI) of the AUDIT-KR for identifying AUD was 0.884 (0.840-0.920) in males and 0.962 (0.923-0.985) in females. The optimal cut-off value of the AUDIT-KR was 10 points for males (sensitivity, 81.90%; specificity, 81.33%; positive predictive value, 77.2%; negative predictive value, 85.3%) and 5 points for females (sensitivity, 100.00%; specificity, 88.54%; positive predictive value, 52.6%; negative predictive value, 100.0%). The AUDIT-KR has high reliability and validity for identifying AUD according to DSM-5 criteria.

  7. Patient and System Factors Related to Missed Opportunities for Screening in an Electronic Medical Record-driven, Opt-out HIV Screening Program in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Janet; Baghikar, Sara; Mauntel-Medici, Cammeo; Heinert, Sara; Patel, Daven

    2017-11-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) have implemented HIV screening using a variety of strategies. This study investigates how specific patient and health system factors in the ED impact who is and is not screened in a combined targeted and nontargeted, electronic medical record (EMR)-driven, opt-out, HIV screening program. This was a retrospective, cross-sectional study of ED visits where patients were determined eligible for HIV screening by an EMR algorithm between November 18, 2014, and July 15, 2015. The HIV screening workflow included three sequential events, all of which were required to get screened for HIV at the ED visit. The events were having a blood draw, being informed of the HIV screening policy by an ED nurse at the point of blood draw, and the patient consenting to the HIV test. Each event represented a dichotomous outcome and its association with six patient factors (age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, preferred language, and Emergency Severity Index [ESI]) and two health system factors (ED crowding and program phase) was investigated using multivariable modeling. A total of 15,918 ED visits were analyzed. Blood was drawn in 8,388 of 15,918 visits (53%). Of 8,388 visits where blood was drawn, there were 5,947 (71%) visits where ED nurses documented informing patients of the HIV screening policy. Of those visits, patient consent to the HIV test was documented at 3,815 (64%) visits. Patients between 13 and 19 years of age were significantly less likely to have blood drawn, to be informed of the screening policy, and to consent to the HIV test compared to other age groups. Both ED crowding and a patient's ESI were associated with decreased odds of having a blood draw and being informed of HIV screening by an ED nurse, but showed no association with patients consenting to the HIV test. Many patients, particularly adolescents and young adults, are missed in ED HIV screening programs that require blood draw and depend on providers to obtain consent for

  8. Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening program using hand-held ultrasound in primary healthcare.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Sisó-Almirall

    Full Text Available We determined the feasibility of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA screening program led by family physicians in public primary healthcare setting using hand-held ultrasound device. The potential study population was 11,214 men aged ≥ 60 years attended by three urban, public primary healthcare centers. Participants were recruited by randomly-selected telephone calls. Ultrasound examinations were performed by four trained family physicians with a hand-held ultrasound device (Vscan®. AAA observed were verified by confirmatory imaging using standard ultrasound or computed tomography. Cardiovascular risk factors were determined. The prevalence of AAA was computed as the sum of previously-known aneurysms, aneurysms detected by the screening program and model-based estimated undiagnosed aneurysms. We screened 1,010 men, with mean age of 71.3 (SD 6.9 years; 995 (98.5% men had normal aortas and 15 (1.5% had AAA on Vscan®. Eleven out of 14 AAA-cases (78.6% had AAA on confirmatory imaging (one patient died. The total prevalence of AAA was 2.49% (95%CI 2.20 to 2.78. The median aortic diameter at diagnosis was 3.5 cm in screened patients and 4.7 cm (p<0.001 in patients in whom AAA was diagnosed incidentally. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified coronary heart disease (OR = 4.6, 95%CI 1.3 to 15.9 as the independent factor with the highest odds ratio. A screening program led by trained family physicians using hand-held ultrasound was a feasible, safe and reliable tool for the early detection of AAA.

  9. Introduction of a mammography screening program in Germany. Benefit-risk considerarions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekolla, E.A.; Griebel, J.; Brix, G.

    2005-01-01

    For women between 50 and 70 years of age, X-ray mammography presently represents the most effective method for early breast cancer detection. It is commonly accepted that quality assured mammography examinations conducted at regular intervals can reduce mortality from breast cancer. In the year 2002, the German Bundestag agreed to the implementation of a mammography screening program for Germany based on the European guidelines. The effectiveness of a mammography screening program is controversially discussed and two of the most commonly cited hazards are the occurrence of false-positive results and the so-called overdiagnosis. Another issue of criticism is the radiation risk due to the mammography examinations. However, in women aged 50-70 years the radiation risk has no substantial importance. In contrast to the present situation in Germany in which opportunistic screening is widespread, standardized quality assured screening will guarantee that false-positive rates are kept as low as possible and that further assessment diagnostics are effective and minimally invasive. (orig.) [de

  10. First Trimester Aneuploidy Screening Program for Preeclampsia Prediction in a Portuguese Obstetric Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Teixeira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the performance of a first trimester aneuploidy screening program for preeclampsia (PE prediction in a Portuguese obstetric population, when performed under routine clinical conditions. Materials and Methods. Retrospective cohort study of 5672 pregnant women who underwent routine first trimester aneuploidy screening in a Portuguese university hospital from January 2009 to June 2013. Logistic regression-based predictive models were developed for prediction of PE based on maternal characteristics, crown-rump length (CRL, nuchal translucency thickness (NT, and maternal serum levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A and free beta-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (free β-hCG. Results. At a false-positive rate of 5/10%, the detection rate for early-onset (EO-PE and late-onset (LO-PE PE was 31.4/45.7% and 29.5/35.2%, respectively. Although both forms of PE were associated with decreased PAPP-A, logistic regression analysis revealed significant contributions from maternal factors, free β-hCG, CRL, and NT, but not PAPP-A, for prediction of PE. Conclusion. Our findings support that both clinical forms of EO-PE and LO-PE can be predicted using a combination of maternal history and biomarkers assessed at first trimester aneuploidy screening. However, detection rates were modest, suggesting that models need to be improved with additional markers not included in the current aneuploidy screening programs.

  11. Results of a pediatric vision screening program in western South Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terveen, Daniel C; Moser, Jess M; Spencer, Terrence S

    2015-03-01

    South Dakota is one of eight states that do not require any vision screening for children. This study describes the results of the first children's vision screening program in the state. Children ages 6 months to 12 years were screened using the SPOT photoscreener by lay volunteers as part of the Northern Plains Eye Foundation's Western South Dakota Children's Vision Screening Initiative (CVSI). Referral criteria were based on the recommendations of the manufacturer. Data was stratified by age group, sex, and percentage of children referred for hyperopia, myopia, astigmatism, anisocoria, anisometropia, and ocular misalignment. The cost benefit of amblyopia treatment in South Dakota was also calculated. Screenings were completed on 4,784 children from August 2012 to May 2014 with 62 excluded due to age. Mean age of the 4,722 (2,373 females) subjects was 6 years 7 months. Overall, the SPOT device referred 563 (11.9 percent) children. There was no significant difference in referral rate based on sex (p = 0.598). Children aged 73-144 months had the highest referral rate (12.2 percent) and children aged 12-30 months had the lowest referral rate (7.9 percent). The suspected reasons for referral based upon the screenings were as follows: 371 (7.9 percent) astigmatism, 24 (0.5 percent) ocular misalignment, 101 (2.1 percent) anisometropia, 135 (2.9 percent) myopia, 36 (0.8 percent) hyperopia, and 16 (0.3 percent) anisocoria. The SPOT photoscreener yielded an acceptable referral rate of 11.9 percent. This study represents an effective model for pediatric vision screening in South Dakota.

  12. Psychological distress among Plains Indian mothers with children referred to screening for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Tassy

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological distress (PD includes symptoms of depression and anxiety and is associated with considerable emotional suffering, social dysfunction and, often, with problematic alcohol use. The rate of current PD among American Indian women is approximately 2.5 times higher than that of U.S. women in general. Our study aims to fill the current knowledge gap about the prevalence and characteristics of PD and its association with self-reported current drinking problems among American Indian mothers whose children were referred to screening for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD. Methods Secondary analysis of cross-sectional data was conducted from maternal interviews of referred American Indian mothers (n = 152 and a comparison group of mothers (n = 33 from the same Plains culture tribes who participated in an NIAAA-funded epidemiology study of FASD. Referred women were from one of six Plains Indian reservation communities and one urban area who bore children suspected of having an FASD. A 6-item PD scale (PD-6, Cronbach's alpha = .86 was constructed with a summed score range of 0-12 and a cut-point of 7 indicating serious PD. Multiple statistical tests were used to examine the characteristics of PD and its association with self-reported current drinking problems. Results Referred and comparison mothers had an average age of 31.3 years but differed (respectively on: education ( Conclusions Psychological distress among referred mothers is significantly associated with having a self-reported drinking problem. FASD prevention requires multi-level prevention efforts that provide real opportunities for educational attainment and screening and monitoring of PD and alcohol use during the childbearing years. Mixed methods studies are needed to illuminate the social and cultural determinants at the base of the experience of PD and to identify the strengths and protective factors of unaffected peers who reside within the same

  13. Sleep-disordered breathing in chronic heart failure: development and validation of a clinical screening score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisot, Juliette; Damy, Thibaud; Gellen, Barnabas; Covali-Noroc, Ala; Bodez, Diane; Rappeneau, Stéphane; Guellich, Aziz; Adnot, Serge; Bastuji-Garin, Sylvie; Hittinger, Luc; d'Ortho, Maria-Pia; Boyer, Laurent; Canouï-Poitrine, Florence

    2015-09-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is highly prevalent and of adverse prognostic significance in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Polygraphy is used for diagnosing SDB but polygraphy resources fall short of needs. Here, our aim was to develop a score for SDB screening in patients with CHF. Consecutive patients with stable chronic CHF referred to our CHF clinic for a scheduled follow-up evaluation were included prospectively between 2000 and 2012. SDB was defined as an apnoea-hypopnoea index ≥ 5/h as assessed by routine polygraphy. A screening score was developed as a linear combination of factors independently associated with SDB by multivariate logistic regression. Calibration and discrimination were evaluated using the Hosmer-Lemeshow (HL) test and area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve (AUC), respectively. Bootstrapping was performed to assess internal validity. Of 450 included patients (mean age, 59.5 ± 13.7 years), 397 (88%) had SDB. An easy-to-use score was based on age (2 points if ≥65 years), body mass index (2 points if ≥25 kg/m(2)), New York Heart Association (NYHA) class (2 points if ≥3 or 4) and male gender (3 points). A score cut-off of 5 was 78.9% sensitive and 61.5% specific for SDB. The final model exhibited adequate calibration (pHL ≥ 0.3) and discrimination (AUC, 0.737; 95% confidence interval, 0.663; 0.810). An easy-to-use clinical score combining age, body mass index, NYHA class, and gender may help to identify those CHF patients most likely to have SDB, thereby improving the allocation of scarce polygraphy resources and early diagnosis of SDB. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Peru Cervical Cancer Screening Study (PERCAPS): The Design and Implementation of a Mother/Daughter Screen, Treat, and Vaccinate Program in the Peruvian Jungle

    OpenAIRE

    Abuelo, Carolina E.; Levinson, Kimberly L.; Salmeron, Jorge; Sologuren, Carlos Vallejos; Fernandez, Maria Jose Vallejos; Belinson, Jerome L.

    2014-01-01

    Peru struggles to prevent cervical cancer (CC). In the jungle, prevention programs suffer from significant barriers although technology exists to detect CC precursors. This study used community based participatory research (CBPR) methods to overcome barriers. The objective was to evaluate the utility of CBPR techniques in a mother–child screen/treat and vaccinate program for CC prevention in the Peruvian jungle. The CC prevention program used self-sampling for human papillomavirus (HPV) for s...

  15. Economic evaluation of screening programs for hepatitis C virus infection: evidence from literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coretti S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Silvia Coretti,1 Federica Romano,1 Valentina Orlando,2 Paola Codella,1 Sabrina Prete,1 Eugenio Di Brino,1 Matteo Ruggeri1 1Post-Graduate School of Economics and Management (ALTEMS, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy; 2Center of Pharmacoeconomics (CIRFF, Department of Pharmacy, Federico II University, Naples, Italy Background: Hepatitis C is a liver infection caused by hepatitis C virus. Its main complications are cirrhosis and liver cancer. According to the World Health Organization (WHO, more than 185 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus and, of these, 350,000 die every year. Due to the high disease prevalence and the existence of effective (and expensive medical treatments able to dramatically change the prognosis, early detection programs can potentially prevent the development of serious chronic conditions, improve health, and save resources. Objective: To summarize the available evidence on the cost-effectiveness of screening programs for hepatitis C. Methods: A literature search was performed on PubMed and Scopus search engines. Trip database was queried to identify reports produced by the major Health Technology Assessment (HTA agencies. Three reviewers dealt with study selection and data extraction blindly. Results: Ten papers eventually met the inclusion criteria. In studies focusing on asymptomatic cohorts of individuals at general risk the cost/quality adjusted life year of screening programs ranged between US $4,200 and $50,000/quality adjusted life year gained, while in those focusing on specific risk factors the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio ranged between $848 and $128,424/quality adjusted life year gained. Age of the target population and disease prevalence were the main cost-effectiveness drivers. Conclusion: Our results suggest that, especially in the long run, screening programs represent a cost-effective strategy for the management of hepatitis C. Keywords: hepatitis C, screening

  16. Evaluation of a neonatal screening program for sickle-cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Rodrigo; da Silva, Denise Bousfield

    2016-01-01

    Evaluate the Neonatal Screening Program of the Health Secretariat of the State of Santa Catarina for sickle-cell disease, from January 2003 to December 2012, regarding program coverage and disease frequency. Descriptive, observational, cross-sectional study with retrospective data collection. The variables analyzed were: number of live births in the State of Santa Catarina; number of screened children; number of children diagnosed with sickle-cell trait and sickle-cell disease; type of sickle-cell disease diagnosed; age at the time of sample collection, ethnicity/skin color, gender, and origin of children with sickle-cell disease. Descriptive measures and frequency tables were used for data analysis. During the study period, there were 848,833 live births and 730,412 samples were screened by the program, resulting in a coverage of 86.0%. There were 6173 samples positive for sickle-cell trait and 39 for sickle-cell disease. Among children with sickle-cell disease, the median age at the time of sample collection was 6 days. Regarding the ethnicity/skin color, 25 (64.1%) children were white, seven were black, and seven others were not specified. The Midwest and the Highland (Planalto Serrano) of Santa Catarina were the regions with the highest incidence of sickle-cell disease. Coverage by the Neonatal Screening Program of Santa Catarina is good, but did not demonstrate an improvement trend over the years. The frequency of sickle-cell disease is low and lower than in the North, Northeast, and Midwest regions. The median age in days at the time of collection is older than the age recommended by the Ministry of Health. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Telemedicine-based diabetic retinopathy screening programs: an evaluation of utility and cost-effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Cuadros, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Jorge A Cuadros Optometry/Vision Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA Abstract: Diabetes is the main cause of blindness among working age adults, although treatment is highly effective in preventing vision loss. Eye examinations are recommended on a yearly basis for most patients for timely detection of retinal disease. Telemedicine-based diabetic retinopathy screening (TMDRS) programs have been developed to identify patients with sight-threatening diabetic eye disease becaus...

  18. Termination of pregnancy: development of a high-risk screening and counseling program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameau, B

    1993-01-01

    The Social Work Department of The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Adelaide, South Australia, developed a social work service for women presenting for elective termination of pregnancy. They used a high social risk identification and screening process and developed a protocol describing essential elements of the clinical social work practice. Program development was practice-based and empirical, using practice experience and drawing from relevant literature.

  19. [Breast cancer incidence related with a population-based screening program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natal, Carmen; Caicoya, Martín; Prieto, Miguel; Tardón, Adonina

    2015-02-20

    To compare breast cancer cumulative incidence, time evolution and stage at diagnosis between participants and non-participant women in a population-based screening program. Cohort study of breast cancer incidence in relation to participation in a population screening program. The study population included women from the target population of the screening program. The source of information for diagnostics and stages was the population-based cancer registry. The analysis period was 1999-2010. The Relative Risk for invasive, in situ, and total cancers diagnosed in participant women compared with non-participants were respectively 1.16 (0.94-1.43), 2.98 (1.16-7.62) and 1.22 (0.99-1.49). The Relative Risk for participants versus non-participants was 2.47 (1.55-3.96) for diagnosis at stagei, 2.58 (1.67-3.99) for T1 and 2.11 (1.38-3.23) for negative lymph node involvement. The cumulative incidence trend had two joint points in both arms, with an Annual Percent of Change of 92.3 (81.6-103.5) between 1999-2001, 18.2 (16.1-20.3) between 2001-2005 and 5.9 (4.0-7.8) for the last period in participants arm, and 72.6 (58.5-87.9) between 1999-2001, 12.6 (7.9-17.4) between 2001-2005, and 8.6 (6.5-10.6) in the last period in the non-participant arm. Participating in the breast cancer screening program analyzed increased the in situ cumulative cancer incidence, but not the invasive and total incidence. Diagnoses were earlier in the participant arm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of an online training program in eating disorders for health professionals in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Brownlow, Rachel S.; Maguire, Sarah; O?Dell, Adrienne; Dias-da-Costa, Catia; Touyz, Stephen; Russell, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Background Early detection and treatment of eating disorders is instrumental in positive health outcomes for this serious public health concern. As such, workforce development in screening, diagnosis and early treatment of eating disorders is needed. Research has demonstrated both high rates of failure to accurately diagnose and treat cases early and low levels of perceived access to training in eating disorders by health professionals?representing an urgent need for clinician training in thi...

  1. Screening for and treatments of congenital immunodeficiency diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbsky, James; Routes, John

    2014-12-01

    Although newborn screening (NBS) for inborn errors of metabolism has been successfully utilized in the US for decades, only recently has this screening program expanded to include disorders of immunity. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) became the first disorder of immunity to be screened on a population wide basis in 2008. While NBS for SCID has been successful, the implementation of population-based screening programs is not without controversy, and there remain barriers to the nationwide implementation of this test. In addition, as the program has progressed we have learned of new challenges in the management of newborns that fail this screen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. General and program-specific moderators of two eating disorder prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Marti, Nathan; Shaw, Heather; O'Neil, Kelly

    2008-11-01

    To investigate general and program-specific factors hypothesized to moderate the effects of two eating disorder prevention programs. High-risk adolescent girls (N = 481; M age = 17) were randomized to a dissonance-based thin-ideal internalization reduction program, a healthy weight management program, an expressive-writing control condition, or an assessment-only control condition. Participants completed diagnostic interviews and surveys at pretest, post-test, 6-month follow-up, and 12-month follow-up. Dissonance program effects on bulimic symptoms were stronger for participants with initial elevations in body image distress, bulimic symptoms, and thin-ideal internalization. Healthy weight program effects on bulimic symptoms were stronger for adolescents with initial elevations in body image distress, bulimic symptoms, readiness to change, body mass, and emotional eating. Overall, intervention effects tended to be amplified for high-risk versus low-risk adolescents. However, certain moderator effects appeared to be specific to the two different prevention programs.

  3. Weqaya: A Population-Wide Cardiovascular Screening Program in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Oliver; Al Siksek, Zaid

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to determine cardiovascular risk factor prevalence rates among adults in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Methods. We used self-reported indicators, anthropometric measures, and blood tests to screen 50 138 adults aged 18 years or older taking part in a population-wide cardiovascular screening program. Results. Participants’ mean age was 36.82 years (SD = 14.3); 43% were men. Risk factor prevalence rates were as follows: obesity, 35%; overweight, 32%; central obesity, 55%; diabetes, 18%; prediabetes, 27%; dyslipidemia, 44%; and hypertension, 23.1%. In addition, 26% of men were smokers, compared with 0.8% of women. Age-standardized diabetes and prediabetes rates were 25% and 30%, respectively, and age-standardized rates of obesity and overweight were 41% and 34%. Conclusions. This population-wide cardiovascular screening program demonstrated a high cardiovascular burden for our small sample in Abu Dhabi. The data form a baseline against which interventions can be implemented and progress monitored as part of the population-wide Abu Dhabi Cardiovascular Disease Program. PMID:21940918

  4. Weqaya: a population-wide cardiovascular screening program in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajat, Cother; Harrison, Oliver; Al Siksek, Zaid

    2012-05-01

    We sought to determine cardiovascular risk factor prevalence rates among adults in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. We used self-reported indicators, anthropometric measures, and blood tests to screen 50 ,138 adults aged 18 years or older taking part in a population-wide cardiovascular screening program. Participants' mean age was 36.82 years (SD = 14.3); 43% were men. Risk factor prevalence rates were as follows: obesity, 35%; overweight, 32%; central obesity, 55%; diabetes, 18%; prediabetes, 27%; dyslipidemia, 44%; and hypertension, 23.1%. In addition, 26% of men were smokers, compared with 0.8% of women. Age-standardized diabetes and prediabetes rates were 25% and 30%, respectively, and age-standardized rates of obesity and overweight were 41% and 34%. This population-wide cardiovascular screening program demonstrated a high cardiovascular burden for our small sample in Abu Dhabi. The data form a baseline against which interventions can be implemented and progress monitored as part of the population-wide Abu Dhabi Cardiovascular Disease Program.

  5. Comprehensive evaluation of cervical cancer screening programs: the case of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Murillo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify critical screening program factors for reducing cervical cancer mortality in Colombia. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Coverage, quality, and screening follow-up were evaluated in four Colombian states with different mortality rates. A case-control study (invasive cancer and healthy controls evaluating screening history was performed. RESULTS: 3-year cytology coverage was 72.7%, false negative rate 49%, positive cytology follow-up 64.2%. There was no association between screening history and invasive cancer in two states having high cytology coverage but high false negative rates. Two states revealed association between deficient screening history and invasive cancer as well as lower positive-cytology follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced number of visits between screening and treatment is more relevant when low access to health care is present. Improved quality is a priority if access to screening is available. Suitable interventions for specific scenarios and proper appraisal of new technologies are compulsory to improve cervical cancer screening. Comprehensive process-failure audits among invasive cancer cases could improve program evaluation since mortality is a late outcome.OBJETIVO: Identificar factores críticos para reducir la mortalidad por cáncer cervical en Colombia. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se evaluó cobertura, calidad y seguimiento del tamizaje en cuatro departamentos con tasas de mortalidad diferenciales. Un estudio de casos (cáncer invasor y controles (sanos evaluó historia de tamizaje. RESULTADOS: Cobertura 72,7%; falsos negativos 49%; acceso a diagnóstico-tratamiento de HSIL 64,2%. La historia de tamizaje no se asoció con cáncer invasor en dos departamentos con elevada cobertura pero elevada proporción de falsos negativos. Dos departamentos con asociación entre historia de tamizaje deficiente y cáncer invasor tuvieron cobertura aceptable pero bajo acceso a diagnóstico-tratamiento. No hubo relación entre mortalidad

  6. American College of Radiology Accreditation Program for mammographic screening sites: Physical evaluation criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrick, R.E.; Haus, A.G.; Hubbard, L.B.; Lasky, H.J.; McCrohan, J.; McLelland, R.; Rothenberg, L.N.; Tanner, R.L.; Zinninger, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    The American College of Radiology has initiated a program for the accreditation of mammographic screening sites, which includes evaluation by mail of image quality and average glandular breast dose. Image quality is evaluated by use of a specially designed phantom (a modified RMI 152D Mammographic Phantom) containing simulated microcalcifications, fibrils and masses. Average glandular dose to a simulated 4.5-cm-thick (50% glandular, 50% fat) compressed breast is evaluated by thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements of entrance exposure and half value layer. Standards for acceptable image quality and patient doses are presented and preliminary results of the accreditation program are discussed

  7. Evolution and Innovations of the National Neonatal and High Risk Screening Program in Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos de Céspedes; Manuel Saborío; Rafael Trejos; Gabriela Abarca; Avelino Sánchez

    2004-01-01

    We present the evolution, organization and results of the National Neonatal and High Risk Screening Program in Costa Rica (PNT). This program has been working uninterruptedly for more than fourteen years. Costa Rica currently has a literacy rate of 95%. To August 2004 the rate of infant mortality was 9.74 per 1000 births and to 2003, life expectancy was 76.3 years for men and 81.1 years for women. The control of infectious and parasitic diseases, as well as of severe malnutrition, has given r...

  8. Evolution and Innovations of the National Neonatal and High Risk Screening Program in Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    de Céspedes, Carlos; Saborío, Manual; Trejos, Rafael; Abarca, Gabriela; Sánchez, Avelino; Rojas, Laura

    2014-01-01

    We present the evolution, organization and results of the National Neonatal and High Risk Screening Program in Costa Rica (PNT). This program has been working uninterruptedly for more than fourteen years. Costa Rica currently has a literacy rate of 95%. To August 2004 the rate of infant mortality was 9.74 per 1000 births and to 2003, life expectancy was 76.3 years for men and 81.1 years for women. The control of infectious and parasitic diseases, as well as of severe malnutrition, has given r...

  9. Primary HPV testing versus cytology-based cervical screening in women in Australia vaccinated for HPV and unvaccinated: effectiveness and economic assessment for the National Cervical Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Jie-Bin; Simms, Kate T; Smith, Megan A; Hall, Michaela; Kang, Yoon-Jung; Xu, Xiang Ming; Caruana, Michael; Velentzis, Louiza Sofia; Bessell, Tracey; Saville, Marion; Hammond, Ian; Canfell, Karen

    2017-02-01

    Australia's National Cervical Screening Program currently recommends cytological screening every 2 years for women aged 18-69 years. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination was implemented in 2007 with high population coverage, and falls in high-grade lesions in young women have been reported extensively. This decline prompted a major review of the National Cervical Screening Program and new clinical management guidelines, for which we undertook this analysis. We did effectiveness modelling and an economic assessment of potential new screening strategies, using a model of HPV transmission, vaccination, natural history, and cervical screening. First, we evaluated 132 screening strategies, including those based on cytology and primary HPV testing. Second, after a recommendation was made to adopt primary HPV screening with partial genotyping and direct referral to colposcopy of women positive for HPV16/18, we evaluated the final effect of HPV screening after incorporating new clinical guidelines for women positive for HPV. Both evaluations considered both unvaccinated and vaccinated cohorts. Strategies entailing HPV testing every 5 years and either partial genotyping for HPV16/18 or cytological co-testing were the most effective. One of the most effective and cost-effective strategies comprised primary HPV screening with referral of women positive for oncogenic HPV16/18 direct to colposcopy, with reflex cytological triage for women with other oncogenic types and direct referral for those in this group with high-grade cytological findings. After incorporating detailed clinical guidelines recommendations, this strategy is predicted to reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality by 31% and 36%, respectively, in unvaccinated cohorts, and by 24% and 29%, respectively, in cohorts offered vaccination. Furthermore, this strategy is predicted to reduce costs by up to 19% for unvaccinated cohorts and 26% for cohorts offered vaccination, compared with the current programme

  10. Availability of tobacco cessation services in substance use disorder treatment programs: Impact of state tobacco control policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Amanda J; Bagwell-Adams, Grace; Jayawardhana, Jayani

    2017-08-01

    Given the high prevalence of smoking among substance use disorder (SUD) patients, the specialty SUD treatment system is an important target for adoption and implementation of tobacco cessation (TC) services. While research has addressed the impact of tobacco control on individual tobacco consumption, largely overlooked in the literature is the potential impact of state tobacco control policies on availability of services for tobacco cessation. This paper examines the association between state tobacco control policy and availability of TC services in SUD treatment programs in the United States. State tobacco control and state demographic data (n=51) were merged with treatment program data from the 2012 National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (n=10.413) to examine availability of TC screening, counseling and pharmacotherapy services in SUD treatment programs using multivariate logistic regression models clustered at the state-level. Approximately 60% of SUD treatment programs offered TC screening services, 41% offered TC counseling services and 26% offered TC pharmacotherapy services. Results of multivariate logistic regression showed the odds of offering TC services were greater for SUD treatment programs located in states with higher cigarette excise taxes and greater spending on tobacco prevention and control. Findings indicate cigarette excise taxes and recommended funding levels may be effective policy tools for increasing access to TC services in SUD treatment programs. Coupled with changes to insurance coverage for TC under the Affordable Care Act, state tobacco control policy tools may further reduce tobacco use in the United States. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. The Reliability and Validity of the Panic Disorder Self-Report: A New Diagnostic Screening Measure of Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Michelle G.; Holmes, Marilyn; Zuellig, Andrea R.; Kachin, Kevin E.; Behar, Evelyn

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the Panic Disorder Self-Report (PDSR), a new self-report diagnostic measure of panic disorder based on the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 1994). PDSR diagnoses were compared with structured interview diagnoses of individuals with generalized anxiety…

  12. Usefulness of the International Personality Disorder Examination Screening Questionnaire for borderline and impulsive personality pathology in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magallón-Neri, Ernesto M; Forns, Maria; Canalda, Gloria; De La Fuente, J Eugenio; García, Raquel; González, Esther; Lara, Anais; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the usefulness of the International Personality Disorder Examination Screening Questionnaire (IPDE-SQ) for identifying DSM-IV and ICD-10 Borderline and Impulsive personality disorders (PD) in Spanish adolescents. The DSM-IV and ICD-10 IPDE-SQ screeners were used and compared with the diagnoses obtained with the IPDE semistructured interview in a sample of 125 adolescents treated in a psychiatric department. For primary screening, the cutoff point with the best combination of sensitivity and specificity for ICD-10 impulsive and borderline PDs was obtained with three positive items, whereas for DSM-IV borderline the best PD cut-off was five positive items. For secondary screening, the best option would be one item above the cut-off points proposed for primary screening. The 3-item cut-off point in the IPDE-SQ produces a high proportion of false positives on impulsive and borderline PDs in clinical adolescents. We propose several cut-off points, depending on whether the study is designed to perform primary or secondary screening. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder on a psychiatric inpatient ward and the value of a screening question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David; Akyüz, Elvan U; Hodsoll, John

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) on an inpatient ward in the UK with a larger sample than previously studied and to investigate the value of a simple screening question during an assessment interview. Four hundred and thirty two consecutive admissions were screened for BDD on an adult psychiatric ward over a period of 13 months. Those who screened positive had a structured diagnostic interview for BDD. The prevalence of BDD was estimated to be 5.8% (C.I. 3.6-8.1%). Our screening question had a slightly low specificity (76.6%) for detecting BDD. The strength of this study was a larger sample size and narrower confidence interval than previous studies. The study adds to previous observations that BDD is poorly identified in psychiatric inpatients. BDD was identified predominantly in those presenting with depression, substance misuse or an anxiety disorder. The screening question could be improved by excluding those with weight or shape concerns. Missing the diagnosis is likely to lead to inappropriate treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Cost-benefit analysis of a population-based cervical cancer screening program designed for Cantabria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Barrón, M Á; Vázquez-Rodríguez, J A; García-Garrido, A B

    2014-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide in women, with an annual mortality of 3.6 per 100.000 women in Spain. An opportunistic screening protocol is currently being developed in Cantabria. The objective of the study is to propose a population-based screening program in Cantabria and assess its cost-benefits. The population-based program design has been carried out according to the description of the natural course of cervical cancer and its incidence and mortality in Cantabria during 2000-2009. There have been some proposals to increase participation in the program and to evaluate its quality. Costs and benefits (direct and indirect) have been analyzed in several scenarios by modifying the frequency of tests (3-5 years), the age at which the program can be accessed (21, 25 or 30 years), the coverage of the program (60-80%), and discount rates (0-3-6%). A program carried out with coverage of 80% and tests performed every 3 years generates annual costs of €893.000 (discount rate of 3%) compared to the current opportunistic protocol. Scenarios with tests performed every 5 years generate an annual benefit higher than €618.000, depending on the age of accessing the program. Scenarios with coverage lower than 60% or with women over 30 years old having access to the program are not of interest because of the lower health benefits. However, performing tests every 5 years is more economically advantageous than every 3 years, with similar health benefits. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of mortality in children with sickle cell disease diagnosed through the Newborn Screening Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra P. Sabarense

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize the deaths of 193 children with sickle cell disease screened by a neonatal program from 1998 to 2012 and contrast the initial years with the final years. METHODS: Deaths were identified by active surveillance of children absent to scheduled appointments in Blood Bank Clinical Centers (Hemominas. Clinical and epidemiological data came from death certificates, neonatal screening database, medical records, and family interviews. RESULTS: Between 1998 and 2012, 3,617,919 children were screened and 2,591 had sickle cell disease (1:1,400. There were 193 deaths (7.4%: 153 with SS/Sß0-talassemia, 34 SC and 6 Sß+thalassemia; 76.7% were younger than five years; 78% died in the hospital and 21% at home or in transit. The main causes of death were infection (45%, indeterminate (28%, and acute splenic sequestration (14%. In 46% of death certificates, the term "sickle cell" was not recorded. Seven-year death rate for children born between 1998 and 2005 was 5.43% versus 5.12% for those born between 2005 and 2012 (p = 0.72. Medical care was provided to 75% of children; 24% were unassisted. Medical care was provided within 6 hours of symptom onset in only half of the interviewed cases. In 40.5% of cases, death occurred within the first 24 hours. Low family income was recorded in 90% of cases, and illiteracy in 5%. CONCLUSIONS: Although comprehensive and effective, neonatal screening for sickle cell disease was not sufficient to significantly reduce mortality in a newborn screening program. Economic and social development and increase of the knowledge on sickle cell disease among health professionals and family are needed to overcome excessive mortality.

  16. Optical pre-screening in breast screening programs: Can we identify women who benefit most from limited mammography resources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Jane; Loshchenov, Maxim; Zhilkin, Vladimir; Peake, Rachel; Stone, Jennifer; Lilge, Lothar

    2017-04-01

    Background: In excess of 60% of all cancers are detected in low and middle-income countries, with breast cancer (BC) the dominant malignancy for women. Incidence rates continue to climb, most noticeably in the less than 50-year-old population. Expansion of mammography infrastructure and resources is lacking, resulting in over 60% of women diagnosed with stage III/IV BC in the majority of these countries. Optical Breast Spectroscopy (OBS) was shown to correlate well with mammographic breast density (MBD). OBS could aid breast screening programs in low- and middle-income countries by lowering the number of mammographs required for complete population coverage. However, its performance needs to be tested in large population trails to ensure high sensitivity and acceptable specificity. Methods: For the planned studies in low- and middle-income countries in different continents, online methods need to be implemented to monitor the performance and data collection by these devices, operated by trained nurses. Based on existing datasets, procedures were developed to validate an individual woman's data integrity and to identify operator errors versus system malfunctions. Results: Using a dataset comprising spectra from 360 women collected by 2 instruments in different locations and with 3 different trained operators, automated methods were developed to identify 100% of the source or photodetector malfunctions as well as incorrect calibrations and 96% of instances of insufficient tissue contact. Conclusions: Implementing the dataset validation locally in each instrument and tethered to a cloud database will allow the planned clinical trials to proceed.

  17. A pilot study of a school-based prevention and early intervention program to reduce oppositional defiant disorder/conduct disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Jo; Carlsson, Anthony; Vance, Alasdair

    2014-05-01

    Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) or conduct disorder (CD) occurs when children's disruptive and antisocial behaviours start to interfere with their academic, emotional and/or social development. Recently, there has been a considerable investment to implement national school-based early intervention programs to help prevent the onset of ODD/CD. This paper describes the delivery of the Royal Children's Hospital, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service and Schools Early Action Program: a whole school, multi-level, multidisciplinary approach to address emerging ODD/CD and pre- versus post-delivery assessment in 40 schools over a 4-year period (2007-2010). All children from preparatory to grade 3 (ages 4-10 years) were screened for conduct problems (n = 8546) using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Universal, targeted and indicated interventions were delivered in school settings. In total, 304 children participated in the targeted group program where the Child Behaviour Checklist was used as a pre- and post-intervention measure. Cohen's d effect sizes and a reliability change index were calculated to determine clinical significance. Significant reductions in both parent- and teacher-reported internalizing and externalizing symptoms were noted. Parent, teacher and child feedback were very positive. A future randomized controlled trial of the program would address potential placebo and selection bias effects. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Screening Obese Adolescents for Binge Eating Disorder in Primary Care: The Adolescent Binge Eating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamay-Weber, Catherine; Combescure, Christophe; Lanza, Lydia; Carrard, Isabelle; Haller, Dagmar M

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the performance of a simple and developmentally appropriate 10-item questionnaire (Adolescent Binge Eating Scale) for the prediction of binge eating disorder (BED) diagnosis in adolescents seen for obesity. We evaluated the performance of the questionnaire in comparison with a clinical interview, in a population of adolescents being seen for obesity. The ? 2 or Fisher exact tests were used. There were 94 adolescents aged 12-18 years (59.6% girls) who completed the study. The questionnaire demonstrated a good association with the clinical interview and distinguished different levels of risk for having a BED: participants who responded positively to questions 1 or 2 and had more than 6 positive answers to the 8 additional questions had a high risk of subclinical and clinical BED (83.3%); participants with 3 or fewer positive answers had a low risk of clinical BED (4%). The Adolescent Binge Eating Scale questionnaire is a potential screening tool to identify adolescents with obesity at high risk of BED and guide referral to a specialist to clarify the diagnosis and provide adequate care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Why does cervical cancer occur in a state-of-the-art screening program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Philip E; Kinney, Walter K; Cheung, Li C; Gage, Julia C; Fetterman, Barbara; Poitras, Nancy E; Lorey, Thomas S; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Befano, Brian; Schussler, John; Katki, Hormuzd A; Schiffman, Mark

    2017-09-01

    The goal of cervical screening is to detect and treat precancers before some become cancer. We wanted to understand why, despite state-of-the-art methods, cervical cancers occured in relationship to programmatic performance at Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC), where >1,000,000 women aged ≥30years have undergone cervical cancer screening by triennial HPV and cytology cotesting since 2003. We reviewed clinical histories preceding cervical cancer diagnoses to assign "causes" of cancer. We calculated surrogate measures of programmatic effectiveness (precancers/(precancers and cancers)) and diagnostic yield (precancers and cancers per 1000 cotests), overall and by age at cotest (30-39, 40-49, and ≥50years). Cancer was rare and found mainly in a localized (treatable) stage. Of 623 cervical cancers with at least one preceding or concurrent cotest, 360 (57.8%) were judged to be prevalent (diagnosed at a localized stage within one year or regional/distant stage within two years of the first cotest). Non-compliance with recommended screening and management preceded 9.0% of all cancers. False-negative cotests/sampling errors (HPV and cytology negative), false-negative histologic diagnoses, and treatment failures preceded 11.2%, 9.0%, and 4.3%, respectively, of all cancers. There was significant heterogeneity in the causes of cancer by histologic category (pstate-of-the-art intensive screening program results in very few cervical cancers, most of which are detected early by screening. Screening may become less efficient at older ages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Screening for thalassemia and other hemoglobinopathies in a tertiary care hospital of West Bengal: Implications for population screening

    OpenAIRE

    Bhawna Bhutoria Jain; Rabindra Nath Roy; Sulekha Ghosh; Tapan Ghosh; Uma Banerjee; Subodh Kumar Bhattacharya

    2012-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies are common genetic disorders of hemoglobin, which can be prevented by population screening and offering genetic counseling. In absence of population-based screening for hemoglobinopathies, the hospital-based diagnosis register provide idea about the extent of problem in the community. The present study was undertaken to find out the burden of hemoglobinopathies and spectrum of this disorders among the population who were screened in the hospital-based screening program. A r...

  1. Psychometric analysis of common mental disorders -- Screening Questionnaire (CMD-SQ) in long-term sickness absence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Hans Jørgen; Bech, Per

    2009-01-01

    of the present study for Common Mental Disorders - Screening Questionnaire (CMD-SQ). METHODS: It is validity tested in a well-defined Danish population comprising all persons on continuous sickness absence just exceeding eight weeks. CMD-SQ is composed of SCL-SOM (somatization), Whiteley-7 (illness worry...... and conviction), SCL-ANX4 (anxiety), SCL-DEP6 (depression), SCL-8 (emotional disorder), and CAGE (alcohol dependency). RESULTS: Of 2,414 incident persons on long-term sickness absence within one year, 1,121 participated in the study by filling in CMD-SQ and a subsample of 337 was diagnosed by a psychiatric......AIMS: Mental disorders often go undetected in primary care, for persons awarded disability pension, and in sick-leave certificates. No validity tests of instruments for detection and measurement of mental disorders have been performed in long-term sickness absence (LSA). This is the aim...

  2. Functional Genetic Screen to Identify Interneurons Governing Behaviorally Distinct Aspects of Drosophila Larval Motor Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Q. Clark

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila larval crawling is an attractive system to study rhythmic motor output at the level of animal behavior. Larval crawling consists of waves of muscle contractions generating forward or reverse locomotion. In addition, larvae undergo additional behaviors, including head casts, turning, and feeding. It is likely that some neurons (e.g., motor neurons are used in all these behaviors, but the identity (or even existence of neurons dedicated to specific aspects of behavior is unclear. To identify neurons that regulate specific aspects of larval locomotion, we performed a genetic screen to identify neurons that, when activated, could elicit distinct motor programs. We used 165 Janelia CRM-Gal4 lines—chosen for sparse neuronal expression—to ectopically express the warmth-inducible neuronal activator TrpA1, and screened for locomotor defects. The primary screen measured forward locomotion velocity, and we identified 63 lines that had locomotion velocities significantly slower than controls following TrpA1 activation (28°. A secondary screen was performed on these lines, revealing multiple discrete behavioral phenotypes, including slow forward locomotion, excessive reverse locomotion, excessive turning, excessive feeding, immobile, rigid paralysis, and delayed paralysis. While many of the Gal4 lines had motor, sensory, or muscle expression that may account for some or all of the phenotype, some lines showed specific expression in a sparse pattern of interneurons. Our results show that distinct motor programs utilize distinct subsets of interneurons, and provide an entry point for characterizing interneurons governing different elements of the larval motor program.

  3. Maternal knowledge and attitudes to universal newborn hearing screening: Reviewing an established program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Maggie Yee Yan; Wong, Eddie Chi Ming; Law, Chi Wai; Lee, Helena Hui Ling; McPherson, Bradley

    2018-02-01

    To facilitate early diagnosis of infants with hearing loss, a universal newborn hearing screening program (UNHS) has been implemented in Hong Kong's public hospitals for over a decade. However, there have been no known studies investigating parent attitudes to, and satisfaction with, UNHS since its launch in Hong Kong. The present study aimed to investigate knowledge of UNHS as well as infant hearing development, and attitudes and satisfaction with UNHS, in Hong Kong mothers with newborns. The study was designed to help evaluate and improve an established UNHS public hospital program, based on the perspectives of service users. A researcher-developed questionnaire was administered to 102 mothers whose newborn had received UNHS in the postnatal wards of a large public hospital in Hong Kong. The questionnaire considered parental knowledge of UNHS and infant hearing development, attitudes and satisfaction toward public hospital UNHS. In the knowledge dimension, parents' preferred time and location for pre-test information delivery, interpretation of screening results, and knowledge of hearing developmental milestones were surveyed. In addition, maternal attitudes to and satisfaction with UNHS screening services, the potential impact of UNHS on parent emotions and parent-baby bonding, attitudes toward informed consent, and willingness to comply with diagnostic assessment referral were also be surveyed. Mean participant scores on knowledge of infant hearing development were relatively low (M = 2.59/6.0, SD = 0.90). Many mothers also underestimated the potential ongoing risks of hearing impairment in babies. Around 80% of mothers thought an infant could not have hearing impairment after passing the screening. In addition, one-third of mothers thought a baby could not later develop hearing impairment in infancy or childhood. In terms of attitudes and satisfaction, participants gave somewhat negative ratings for questions regarding receiving sufficient information

  4. The effectiveness of scoliosis screening programs: methods for systematic review and expert panel recommendations formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Literature on scoliosis screening is vast, however because of the observational nature of available data and methodological flaws, data interpretation is often complex, leading to incomplete and sometimes, somewhat misleading conclusions. The need to propose a set of methods for critical appraisal of the literature about scoliosis screening, a comprehensive summary and rating of the available evidence appeared essential. Methods To address these gaps, the study aims were: i) To propose a framework for the assessment of published studies on scoliosis screening effectiveness; ii) To suggest specific questions to be answered on screening effectiveness instead of trying to reach a global position for or against the programs; iii) To contextualize the knowledge through expert panel consultation and meaningful recommendations. The general methodological approach proceeds through the following steps: Elaboration of the conceptual framework; Formulation of the review questions; Identification of the criteria for the review; Selection of the studies; Critical assessment of the studies; Results synthesis; Formulation and grading of recommendations in response to the questions. This plan follows at best GRADE Group (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) requirements for systematic reviews, assessing quality of evidence and grading the strength of recommendations. Conclusions In this article, the methods developed in support of this work are presented since they may be of some interest for similar reviews in scoliosis and orthopaedic fields. PMID:23883346

  5. Worksite-screenings for hypertension with follow-up: experiences from the Munich Blood Pressure Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hense, H W; Keil, U

    1989-01-01

    In 1983/84, the Munich Blood Pressure Program (MBP) performed worksite screenings for arterial hypertension at 18 Munich companies. A participation of 51% (n = 7310) was achieved. After duplicate measurements of casual blood pressure 1084 participants were suspected of having actual hypertension. All suspected cases were invited for a reexamination to reduce the number of false-positive hypertensives. Individuals with persisting hypertension after this two-step-screening were predominantly male, on the average younger than 50 years and showed a low level of antihypertensive drug treatment. About 75% of all detected hypertensives saw a family physician subsequent to the screenings for further management. Referrals and patient compliance were frequently reinforced by a computer based reminder system. A follow-up examination was performed among the MBP participants after two years. It showed that in 417 confirmed hypertensives of the primary screenings a marked increase in the proportion of treated and controlled hypertensives had occurred. This was true for younger and older hypertensives.

  6. Using clinical decision support as a means of implementing a universal postpartum depression screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, Holly; Nentin, Farida; Silverman, Michael E

    2016-06-01

    A major barrier to the diagnosis of postpartum depression (PPD) includes symptom detection. The lack of awareness and understanding of PPD among new mothers, the variability in clinical presentation, and the various diagnostic strategies can increase this further. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of adding clinical decision support (CDS) to the electronic health record (EHR) as a means of implementing a universal standardized PPD screening program within a large, at high risk, population. All women returning to the Mount Sinai Hospital OB/GYN Ambulatory Practice for postpartum care between 2010 and 2013 were presented with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in response to a CDS "hard stop" built into the EHR. Of the 2102 women who presented for postpartum care, 2092 women (99.5 %) were screened for PPD in response to a CDS hard stop module. Screens were missing on ten records (0.5 %) secondary to refusal, language barrier, or lack of clarity in the EHR. Technology is becoming increasingly important in addressing the challenges faced by health care providers. While the identification of PPD has become the recent focus of public health concerns secondary to the significant social burden, numerous barriers to screening still exist within the clinical setting. The utility of adding CDS in the form of a hard stop, requiring clinicians to enter a standardized PPD mood assessment score to the patient EHR, offers a sufficient way to address a primary barrier to PPD symptom identification at the practitioner level.

  7. Development and Implementation of a Universal Suicide Risk Screening Program in a Safety-Net Hospital System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roaten, Kimberly; Johnson, Celeste; Genzel, Russell; Khan, Fuad; North, Carol S

    2018-01-01

    Many individuals who die by suicide present for nonbehavioral health care prior to death. The risk is often undetected. Universal suicide screening in health care may improve risk recognition. A quality improvement project involving a universal suicide screening program was designed and developed in a large safety-net health care system. The steps in developing and implementing this quality improvement program were gathering intelligence, examining resources, designing the screening program, creating a clinical response, constructing an electronic health record screening protocol, clinical workforce education, and program implementation. This project used the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale, Clinical Practice Screener-Recent, and a preliminary clinical decision support system. Prevalence data on suicide risk levels are provided for 328,064 adult encounters from the first six months of the screening program. Approximately half of the screens were completed in the outpatient clinics, more than 40% in the emergency department (ED), and slightly less than 5% in the hospital inpatient units. In the ED, 6.3% of the screens were positive, as were 1.6% in the inpatient units, and 2.1% in the outpatient clinics. The odds of a positive suicide screening in the ED was 4.29 times higher than the inpatient units and 3.13 times higher than the outpatient clinics. A new quality improvement program for universal suicide screening was successfully implemented in a large safety-net health care system. The burden to the system from universal screening was not overwhelming and was managed effectively through thoughtful allocation of clinical resources. Copyright © 2017 The Joint Commission. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. HPV vaccination impact on a cervical cancer screening program: methods of the FASTER-Tlalpan Study in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmerón, Jorge; Torres-Ibarra, Leticia; Bosch, F Xavier; Cuzick, Jack; Lörincz, Attila; Wheeler, Cosette M; Castle, Philip E; Robles, Claudia; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    To outline the design of a clinical trial to evaluate the impact of HPV vaccination as part of a hrHPV-based primary screening program to extend screening intervals. A total of 18,000 women aged 25-45 years, attending the regular cervical cancer-screening program in primary health care services in Tlalpan, Mexico City, will be invited to the study. Eligible participants will be assigned to one of three comparison groups: 1) HPV16/18 vaccine and hrHPV-based screening; 2) HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine and hrHPV-based screening; 3) Control group who will receive only hrHPV-based screening. Strict surveillance of hrHPV persistent infection and occurrence of precancerous lesions will be conducted to estimate safety profiles at different screening intervals; participants will undergo diagnosis confirmation and treatment as necessary. The FASTER-Tlalpan Study will provide insights into new approaches of cervical cancer prevention programs. It will offer valuable information on potential benefits of combining HPV vaccination and hrHPV-based screening to safety extend screening intervals.

  9. Airport sentinel surveillance and entry quarantine for dengue infections following a fever screening program in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue has not reached an endemic status in Taiwan; nevertheless, we have implemented a fever screening program at airports for the early detection of febrile passengers with a dengue infection. This study is intended to assess the performance of the airport screening procedures for dengue infection. Methods We analyzed data from the national surveillance system of the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control. We included the imported dengue cases reported by sentinel airports and clinics as well as the domestic cases from 2007–2010. Results Approximately 44.9% (95%CI: 35.73-54.13%) of the confirmed imported dengue cases with an apparent symptom (febrile) in the viremic stage were detected via the airport fever screening program, with an estimated positive predictive value of 2.36% (95% CI: 0.96- 3.75%) and a negative predictive value > 99.99%. Fluctuations in the number of the symptomatic imported dengue cases identified in the airports (X) were associated with the total number of imported dengue cases (Y) based on a regression analysis of a biweekly surveillance (i.e., n = 104, R2X:Y = 0.61, P dengue cases (X) with a 1–2 month lead time (t) was in parallel with that of the domestic dengue cases (Y) based on a consecutive 4-year surveillance (i.e., n = 48, R2X(t-1):Y = 0.22, R2X(t-2):Y = 0.31, P dengue at the airports examined in this study indicated some limitations of the fever screening program for the prevention of importation. The screening program could assist in the rapid triage for self-quarantine of some symptomatic dengue cases that were in the viremic stage at the borders and contribute to active sentinel surveillance; however, the blocking of viral transmission to susceptible populations (neighbors or family) from all of the viremic travelers, including those with or without symptoms, is critical to prevent dengue epidemics. Therefore, the reinforcement of mosquito bite prevention and household vector control in

  10. Influencing Cancer Screening Participation Rates—Providing a Combined Cancer Screening Program (a ‘One Stop’ Shop Could Be a Potential Answer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Bobridge

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionParticipation in established cancer screening programs remains variable. Therefore, a renewed focus on how to increase screening uptake, including addressing structural barriers such as time, travel, and cost is needed. One approach could be the provision of combined cancer screening, where multiple screening tests are provided at the same time and location (essentially a ‘One Stop’ screening shop. This cohort study explored both cancer screening behavior and the acceptability of a combined screening approach.MethodsParticipants of the North Western Adelaide Health Study (NWAHS, South Australia were invited to participate in a questionnaire about cancer screening behaviors and the acceptability of a proposed ‘One Stop’ cancer screening shop. Data were collected from 10th August 2015 to 18th January 2016, weighted for selection probability, age, and sex and analyzed using descriptive and multivariable logistic regression analysis.Results1,562 people, 52% female (mean age 54.1 years ± 15.2 participated. Reported screening participation was low, the highest being for Pap Smear (34.4%. Common reasons for screening participation were preventing sickness (56.1%, CI 53.2–59.0%, maintaining health (51%, CI 48–53.9%, and free program provision (30.9%, CI 28.2–33.6%. Females were less likely to state that screening is not beneficial [OR 0.37 (CI 0.21–0.66, p < 0.001] and to cite sickness prevention [OR 2.10 (CI 1.46–3.00, p < 0.001] and free program [OR 1.75 (CI 1.22–2.51, p < 0.003] as reasons for screening participation. Of those who did not participate, 34.6% (CI 30.3–39.1% stated that there was nothing that discouraged them from participation, with 55- to 64-year olds [OR 0.24 (CI 0.07–0.74, p < 0.04] being less likely to cite this reason. 21% (CI 17.2–24.8% thought they did not need screening, while a smaller proportion stated not having time (6.9%, CI 4.9–9.7% and the costs associated

  11. Detection of prostate cancer by an FDG-PET cancer screening program: results from a Japanese nationwide survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Senda, Michio; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Terauchi, Takashi; Inoue, Tomio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze detection rates and effectiveness of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) cancer screening program for prostate cancer in Japan, which is defined as a cancer-screening program for subjects without known cancer. It contains FDG-PET aimed at detection of cancer at an early stage with or without additional screening tests such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of 92,255 asymptomatic men underwent the FDG-PET cancer screening program. Of these, 504 cases with findings of possible prostate cancer in any screening method were analyzed. Of the 504 cases, 165 were verified as having prostate cancer. Of these, only 61 cases were detected by FDG-PET, which result in 37.0% relative sensitivity and 32.8% positive predictive value (PPV). The sensitivity of PET/computed tomography (CT) scanner was higher than that of dedicated PET (44.0% vs. 20.4%). However, the sensitivity of FDG-PET was lower than that of PSA and pelvic MRI. FDG-PET did not contribute to improving the sensitivity and PPV when performed as combined screening. PSA should be included in FDG-PET cancer screening programs to screen for prostate cancer

  12. From Cancer Screening to Treatment: Service Delivery and Referral in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline W.; Hanson, Vivien; Johnson, Gale D.; Royalty, Janet E.; Richardson, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to low-income and underserved women through a network of providers and health care organizations. Although the program serves women 40-64 years old for breast cancer screening and 21-64 years old for cervical cancer screening, the priority populations are women 50-64 years old for breast cancer and women who have never or rarely been screened for cervical cancer. From 1991 through 2011, the NBCCEDP provided screening and diagnostic services to more than 4.3 million women, diagnosing 54,276 breast cancers, 2554 cervical cancers, and 123,563 precancerous cervical lesions. A critical component of providing screening services is to ensure that all women with abnormal screening results receive appropriate and timely diagnostic evaluations. Case management is provided to assist women with overcoming barriers that would delay or prevent follow-up care. Women diagnosed with cancer receive treatment through the states' Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Programs (a special waiver for Medicaid) if they are eligible. The NBCCEDP has performance measures that serve as benchmarks to monitor the completeness and timeliness of care. More than 90% of the women receive complete diagnostic care and initiate treatment less than 30 days from the time of their diagnosis. Provision of effective screening and diagnostic services depends on effective program management, networks of providers throughout the community, and the use of evidence-based knowledge, procedures, and technologies. PMID:25099897

  13. Costs of promoting cancer screening: Evidence from CDC’s Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP)☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangka, Florence K.L.; Subramanian, Sujha; Hoover, Sonja; Royalty, Janet; Joseph, Kristy; DeGroff, Amy; Joseph, Djenaba; Chattopadhyay, Sajal

    2018-01-01

    The Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP) provided funding to 29 grantees to increase colorectal cancer screening. We describe the screening promotion costs of CRCCP grantees to evaluate the extent to which the program model resulted in the use of funding to support interventions recommended by the Guide to Community Preventive Services (Community Guide). We analyzed expenditures for screening promotion for the first three years of the CRCCP to assess cost per promotion strategy, and estimated the cost per person screened at the state level based on various projected increases in screening rates. All grantees engaged in small media activities and more than 90% used either client reminders, provider assessment and feedback, or patient navigation. Based on all expenditures, projected cost per eligible person screened for a 1%, 5%, and 10% increase in state-level screening proportions are $172, $34, and $17, respectively. CRCCP grantees expended the majority of their funding on Community Guide recommended screening promotion strategies but about a third was spent on other interventions. Based on this finding, future CRC programs should be provided with targeted education and information on evidence-based strategies, rather than broad based recommendations, to ensure that program funds are expended mainly on evidence-based interventions. PMID:27989647

  14. Superior performance of liquid-based versus conventional cytology in a population-based cervical cancer screening program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerman, H.; van Dorst, E. B. L.; Kuenen-Boumeester, V.; Hogendoorn, P. C. W.

    Objective. Liquid-based cytology may offer improvements over conventional cytology for cervical cancer screening. The two cytology techniques were compared in a group of 86,469 women who participated in a population-based screening program. Using a nation-wide pathology database containing both

  15. Development and validation of the Screen for Early Eating Disorder Signs (SEEDS) in persons with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Margaret A; Richter, Sara; Ackard, Diann; Craft, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    This study's objective was to develop and validate an instrument to identify those at risk of developing an eating disorder (ED) in persons with type 1 diabetes. The Screen for Early Eating Disorder Signs (SEEDS) instrument was developed using a multi-phase process including focus groups, cognitive interviews, and mailed questionnaires. Factor analysis revealed 20 items across three factors (Body Image, Feelings, Quality of Life) demonstrating strong psychometric properties. Scoring guidelines and interpretation are provided. SEEDS is a brief (20-item; 2-5 minutes to complete), self-administered, screen designed for use in clinical practice or research to identify or confirm suspicions of ED risk and does not include weight-control behavior items.

  16. Smoking and common mental disorders in patients with chronic conditions: An analysis of data collected via a web-based screening system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcham, Faith; Carroll, Amy; Chung, Natali; Crawford, Victoria; Galloway, James; Hames, Anna; Jackson, Karina; Jacobson, Clare; Manawadu, Dulka; McCracken, Lance; Moxham, John; Rayner, Lauren; Robson, Deborah; Simpson, Anna; Wilson, Nicky; Hotopf, Matthew

    Smoking is the largest preventable cause of death and disability in the UK and remains pervasive in people with mental disorders and in general hospital patients. We aimed to quantify the prevalence of mental disorders and smoking, examining associations between mental disorders and smoking in patients with chronic physical conditions. Data were collected via routine screening systems implemented across two London NHS Foundation Trusts. The prevalence of mental disorder, current smoking, nicotine dependence and wanting help with quitting smoking were quantified, and the relationships between mental disorder and smoking were examined, adjusting for age, gender and physical illness, with multiple regression models. A total of 7878 patients were screened; 23.2% screened positive for probable major depressive disorder, and 18.5% for probable generalised anxiety disorder. Overall, 31.4% and 29.2% of patients with probable major depressive disorder or generalised anxiety disorder respectively were current smokers. Probable major depression and generalised anxiety disorder were associated with 93% and 44% increased odds of being a current smoker respectively. Patients with depressive disorder also reported higher levels of nicotine dependence, and the presence of common mental disorder was not associated with odds of wanting help with quitting smoking. Common mental disorder in patients with chronic physical health conditions is a risk factor for markedly increased smoking prevalence and nicotine dependence. A general hospital encounter represents an opportunity to help patients who may benefit from such interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of Candidate Measures for Home-Based Screening of Sleep Disordered Breathing in Taiwanese Bus Drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Ting

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleepiness-at-the-wheel has been identified as a major cause of highway accidents. The aim of our study is identifying the candidate measures for home-based screening of sleep disordered breathing in Taiwanese bus drivers, instead of polysomnography. Methods: Overnight polysomnography accompanied with simultaneous measurements of alternative screening devices (pulse oximetry, ApneaLink, and Actigraphy, heart rate variability, wake-up systolic blood pressure and questionnaires were completed by 151 eligible participants who were long-haul bus drivers with a duty period of more than 12 h a day and duty shifting. Results: 63.6% of professional bus drivers were diagnosed as having sleep disordered breathing and had a higher body mass index, neck circumference, systolic blood pressure, arousal index and desaturation index than those professional bus drivers without evidence of sleep disordered breathing. Simple home-based candidate measures: (1 Pulse oximetry, oxygen-desaturation indices by ≥3% and 4% (r = 0.87~0.92; (2 Pulse oximetry, pulse-rising indices by ≥7% and 8% from a baseline (r = 0.61~0.89; and (3 ApneaLink airflow detection, apnea-hypopnea indices (r = 0.70~0.70, based on recording-time or Actigraphy-corrected total sleep time were all significantly correlated with, and had high agreement with, corresponding polysomnographic apnea-hypopnea indices [(1 94.5%~96.6%, (2 93.8%~97.2%, (3 91.1%~91.3%, respectively]. Conversely, no validities of SDB screening were found in the multi-variables apnea prediction questionnaire, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, night-sleep heart rate variability, wake-up systolic blood pressure and anthropometric variables. Conclusions: The indices of pulse oximetry and apnea flow detection are eligible criteria for home-based screening of sleep disordered breathing, specifically for professional drivers.

  18. Low priority main reason not to participate in a colorectal cancer screening program with a faecal occult blood test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijn, A F; van Rossum, L G M; Deutekom, M; Laheij, R J F; Fockens, P; Bossuyt, P M M; Dekker, E; Jansen, J B M J

    2008-12-01

    Compared with screening programs for breast and cervical cancer, reported participation rates for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening are low. The effectiveness of a screening program is strongly influenced by the participation rate. The aim of this study was to investigate the main reasons not to participate in a population-based, invitational CRC screening program. In the Dutch study program for CRC screening, a random selection of 20 623 persons were invited received a faecal occult blood test. Of the non-participants, 500 were randomly selected and contacted for a standardized telephone interview from November 2006 to May 2007 to document the main reason not to participate. In total, 312 (62%) non-participants could be included for analysis. Most frequently, reported reasons for non-participation were time-related or priority-related (36%), including 'did not notice test in mailbox' (13%) and 'forgot' (8%). Other reasons were health-related issues, such as 'severe illness' (9%), or emotional reasons, such as 'family circumstances' (7%). The majority of the reported reasons not to participate reflect low priority for screening. Adding extra instructions and information, and addressing specific concerns through additional interventions should be considered to improve individual decision-making about participation in future CRC population-based screening programs.

  19. Moving from Efficacy to Effectiveness in Eating Disorders Prevention: The Sorority Body Image Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Carolyn Black; Ciao, Anna C.; Smith, Lisa M.

    2008-01-01

    Although eating disorders prevention research has begun to produce programs with demonstrated efficacy, many such programs simply target individuals as opposed to engaging broader social systems (e.g., schools, sororities, athletic teams) as participant collaborators in eating disorders prevention. Yet, social systems ultimately will be…

  20. Socio-Cultural Influences in Eating Disorders: Focus on Sports/Fitness Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Dick; Moriarty, Mary

    This report notes that eating disorders are frequently described as a diet and fitness program gone wild. It outlines and describes five sociocultural influences which have been identified for eating disorders: (1) emphasis on thinness; (2) glorification of youth; (3) changing roles of women; (4) emphasis on fitness and sport programs; and (5) the…

  1. Description of an Intensive Dialectical Behavior Therapy Program for Multidiagnostic Clients with Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Anita; Wisniewski, Lucene; Ben-Porath, Denise

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe an intensive outpatient dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) program for multidiagnostic clients with eating disorders who had not responded adequately to standard, empirically supported treatments for eating disorders. The program integrates DBT with empirically supported cognitive behavior therapy approaches that are well…

  2. Physical Activity, Screen-Time Behavior, and Obesity Among 13-Year Olds in Ireland with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Sean; Haegele, Justin A; Grenier, Michelle; Garcia, Jeanette M

    2017-01-01

    The primary purposes of this study were to compare (a) physical activity participation, screen-time habits, obesity, and (b) reported reasons for lack of participation in sport, between a nationally representative sample of Irish children with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participation in moderate to vigorous activity, light activity, and sports was significantly lower among the group with ASD. On examination of screen time variables, no significant differences were seen between groups. However, time spent watching TV was higher among children with ASD. Overweight or obese status was more prevalent among the group with ASD (34.4 vs. 24.7 %). The findings are discussed in relation to international statistics on youth physical activity, screen-time, and weight status, and recommendations are provided for future research.

  3. Recommendations for cervical cancer screening programs in developing countries: the need for equity and technological development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazcano-Ponce Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The cervical cancer screening programs (CCSP have not been very efficient in the developing countries. This explains the need to foster changes on policies, standards, quality control mechanisms, evaluation and integration of new screening alternatives considered as low and high cost, as well as to regulate colposcopy practices and the foundation of HPV laboratories. Cervical cancer (CC is a disease most frequently found in poverty-stricken communities and reflecting a problem of equity at both levels gender and regional, and this, is not only due to social and economic development inequalities, but to the infrastructure and human resources necessary for primary care. For this reason, the CCSP program must be restructured, a to primarily address unprivileged rural and urban areas; b to foster actions aimed at ensuring extensive coverage as well as a similar quality of that coverage in every region; c to use screening strategies in keeping with the availability of health care services. In countries with a great regional heterogeneity, a variety of screening procedures must be regulated and standardized, including a combination of assisted visual inspection, cervical cytology and HPV detection; d regional community intervention must be set up to assess the effectiveness of using HPV detection as an strategy in addition to cervical cytology (pap smear; e the practice of colposcopy must be regulated to prevent the use of it in healthy women at a population level, thus preventing unnecessary diagnosis and treatment which not only are expensive but also causes unnecessary anxiety to women at risk; f the operation of those clinical laboratories using HPV as a detection strategy must likewise be accredited and regulated and g the CCSP program for assuring health care quality should meet the expectations of its beneficiaries, and increase the knowledge in cervical cancer related matters. Finally, though a variety of clinical tests on prophylactic and

  4. Emergency department patient perceptions and preferences on opt-in rapid HIV screening program components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Roland C.; Clark, Melissa A.; Seage, George R.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; DeGruttola, Victor G.; Becker, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to assess emergency department (ED) patients’ perceptions and preferences about an opt-in, universal, rapid HIV screening program and identify patient groups who expressed stronger beliefs about components of the testing program. From July 2005 to July 2006, ED patients in the opt-in, universal, rapid HIV screening program were interviewed in person. Multivariable regression models were used to compare participants on their beliefs about the program components. Of the 561 participants, 62.0% had previously been tested for HIV. The majority of participants (58.8%) believed the rapid and standard/conventional HIV tests to be equally accurate, 27.7% believed the rapid test to be less or much less accurate, and 8.7% believed the rapid test to be more or much more accurate. Almost two-thirds (65.1%) favored having a rapid instead of a standard/conventional HIV test, 94.6% wanted the test results within one hour, and 61.3% would be likely or very likely to undergo testing in the ED if it prolonged their ED visit. Almost all (92.5%) believed that their medical care was “not at all” delayed because of being tested, 94.1% believed that testing did “not at all” divert attention from the reason for their ED visit, and 80.9% thought that testing in the ED was “not at all” stressful. In multivariable logistic regression models, males and those with more than 12 years of formal education showed greater concerns about the rapid HIV test’s accuracy. Hispanic/Latinos, participants with governmental insurance, and those previously HIV tested were more apt to be screened for HIV even if testing delayed their ED departure. Overall, participants were highly accepting of the components of this opt-in rapid HIV screening program. However, concerns regarding the accuracy of the rapid HIV test might limit test acceptance and should be addressed during pre-test information procedures. PMID:19283644

  5. [Dairy cattle pregnancy rate in fixed time artificial insemination program with and without ultrasonic gynecologic screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Fernandes Grillo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the pregnancy rate and the importance of ultrasound gynecological screening (US performed prior to fixed time artificial insemination programs (TAI, 120 Girolando cows, over two breeding seasons (2013 and 2014, were divided into two groups: (C / T; n = 58 and without (S / T; n = 62 gynecological screening by ultrasound, using three protocols, and the same for the groups with and without screening. Protocol I - “OvSynch” (OV in which received 0.025 mg of buserelin acetate in D0; 0.15 mg d-cloprostenol on D7; 0.025 mg buserelin acetate D9; It is inseminated at fixed time in D10. Protocol II - “OvSynch” + progesterone (OP4 and III Protocol - “OvSynch” + LH + P4 (OP4LH. Protocols II and III followed the same dosages of “OvSynch” associated with the introduction of intravaginal device containing 1g first use of progesterone in D0 and D7 in withdrawal. In Protocol III, LH replaced buserelin acetate in ovulation induction (D9; 25mg. Gestation diagnosis was made by US 45 days after TAI, and the animals not pregnant were reinseminated as presented heat. Parameters pregnancy rate at TAI (TP, total pregnancy rate (TPT = TAI + Return heat were analyzed by Chi-square or Fisher’s exact with 5% significance level. The use of progesterone favored the pregnancy rate of cyclic and acyclic animals, this has not occurred with LH job as ovulation inductor, providing no increase in pregnancy rates and overall pregnancy rate of dairy cows referred to the rated protocol. The gynecological screening by ultrasonography allowed evaluating the cyclicity of the studied females, indicating that its previous execution to the TAI, can provide good results with the use of better efficiency protocols for TAI programs.

  6. Unintended adverse consequences of electronic health record introduction to a mature universal HIV screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medford-Davis, Laura N; Yang, Katharine; Pasalar, Siavash; Pillow, M Tyson; Miertschin, Nancy P; Peacock, William F; Giordano, Thomas P; Hoxhaj, Shkelzen

    2016-01-01

    Early HIV detection and treatment decreases morbidity and mortality and reduces high-risk behaviors. Many Emergency Departments (EDs) have HIV screening programs as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recent federal legislation includes incentives for electronic health record (EHR) adoption. Our objective was to analyze the impact of conversion to EHR on a mature ED-based HIV screening program. A retrospective pre- and post-EHR implementation cohort study was conducted in a large urban, academic ED. Medical records were reviewed for HIV screening rates from August 2008 through October 2013. On 1 November 2010, a comprehensive EHR system was implemented throughout the hospital. Before EHR implementation, labs were requested by providers by paper orders with HIV-1/2 automatically pre-selected on every form. This universal ordering protocol was not duplicated in the new EHR; rather it required a provider to manually enter the order. Using a chi-squared test, we compared HIV testing in the 6 months before and after EHR implementation; 55,054 patients presented before, and 50,576 after EHR implementation. Age, sex, race, acuity of presenting condition, and HIV seropositivity rates were similar pre- and post-EHR, and there were no major patient or provider changes during this period. Average HIV testing rate was 37.7% of all ED patients pre-, and 22.3% post-EHR, a 41% decline (p < 0.0001), leading to 167 missed new diagnoses after EHR. The rate of HIV screening in the ED decreased after EHR implementation, and could have been improved with more thoughtful inclusion of existing human processes in its design.

  7. Sensorineural and conductive hearing loss in infants diagnosed in the program of universal newborn hearing screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewska-Seniuk, Katarzyna; Dabrowski, Piotr; Greczka, Grazyna; Szabatowska, Katarzyna; Glowacka, Agata; Szyfter, Witold; Mazela, Jan

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze infants diagnosed with sensorineural or conductive hearing deficit and to identify risk factors associated with these defects. A retrospective analysis of infants diagnosed with hearing deficit based on the database of the universal newborn hearing screening program and medical records of the patients. 27 935 infants were covered by the universal neonatal hearing screening program. 109 (0.39%) were diagnosed with hearing deficit and referred for treatment and rehabilitation. 56 (51.4%) children were diagnosed with conductive, 38 (34.9%) with sensorineural and 15 (13.8%) with mixed type of hearing deficit. Children with sensorineural hearing deficit more frequently suffered from hyperbilirubinemia (p conductive hearing loss were more frequently diagnosed with isolated craniofacial anomalies (p hearing deficit occurred almost 3 times more often bilaterally than unilaterally (p hearing deficit, the difference was not significant. In children with conductive and mixed type of hearing loss the impairment was mainly mild while among those with sensorineural hearing deficit in almost 45% it was severe and profound (p hearing screening test by means of otoacoustic emissions and the final diagnosis of hearing deficit we found that the highest agreement rate was observed in children with sensorineural hearing loss (p hearing deficit was similar in children with sensorineural, conductive and mixed type of hearing loss, only hyperbilirubinemia seemed to predispose to sensorineural hearing deficit and isolated craniofacial malformations seemed to be associated with conductive hearing loss. Sensorineural hearing deficit usually occurred bilaterally and was severe or profound, while conductive and mixed type of hearing deficit were most often of mild degree. Most children with the final diagnosis of sensorineural hearing deficit had positive result of hearing screening by means of otoacoustic emissions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  8. Implementing and evaluating a program to facilitate chronic disease prevention and screening in primary care: a mixed methods program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, Donna Patricia; Aubrey-Bassler, Kris; Kandola, Kami; Aguilar, Carolina; Campbell-Scherer, Denise; Sopcak, Nicolette; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Meaney, Christopher; Faria, Vee; Baxter, Julia; Moineddin, Rahim; Salvalaggio, Ginetta; Green, Lee; Cave, Andrew; Grunfeld, Eva

    2014-10-08

    The objectives of this paper are to describe the planned implementation and evaluation of the Building on Existing Tools to Improve Chronic Disease Prevention and Screening in Primary Care (BETTER 2) program which originated from the BETTER trial. The pragmatic trial, informed by the Chronic Care Model, demonstrated the effectiveness of an approach to Chronic Disease Prevention and Screening (CDPS) involving the use of a new role, the prevention practitioner. The desired goals of the program are improved clinical outcomes, reduction in the burden of chronic disease, and improved sustainability of the health-care system through improved CDPS in primary care. The BETTER 2 program aims to expand the implementation of the intervention used in the original BETTER trial into communities across Canada (Alberta, Ontario, Newfoundland and Labrador, the Northwest Territories and Nova Scotia). This proactive approach provides at-risk patients with an intervention from the prevention practitioner, a health-care professional. Using the BETTER toolkit, the prevention practitioner determines which CDPS actions the patient is eligible to receive, and through shared decision-making and motivational interviewing, develops a unique and individualized 'prevention prescription' with the patient. This intervention is 1) personalized; 2) addressing multiple conditions; 3) integrated through linkages to local, regional, or national resources; and 4) longitudinal by assessing patients over time. The BETTER 2 program brings together primary care providers, policy/decision makers and researchers to work towards improving CDPS in primary care. The target patient population is adults aged 40-65. The reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, maintain (RE-AIM) framework will inform the evaluation of the program through qualitative and quantitative methods. A composite index will be used to quantitatively assess the effectiveness of the prevention practitioner intervention. The CDPS actions

  9. Impact of opportunistic testing in a systematic cervical cancer screening program: a nationwide registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranberg, Mette; Larsen, Mette Bach; Mikkelsen, Ellen M; Svanholm, Hans; Andersen, Berit

    2015-07-21

    Systematic screening for precancerous cervical lesions has resulted in decreased incidence and mortality of cervical cancer. However, even in systematic screening programs, many women are still tested opportunistically. This study aimed to determine the spread of opportunistic testing in a systematic cervical cancer screening program, the impact of opportunistic testing in terms of detecting cytological abnormalities and examine the associations between sociodemography and opportunistic testing. A nationwide registry study was undertaken including women aged 23-49 years (n = 807,624) with a cervical cytology between 2010 and 2013. The women were categorised into: 1) screening after invitation; 2) routine opportunistic testing, if they were either tested more than 9 months after the latest invitation or between 2.5 years and 3 years after the latest cervical cytology and 3) sporadic opportunistic testing, if they were tested less than 2.5 years after the latest cervical cytology. Cytological diagnoses of women in each of the categories were identified and prevalence proportion differences (PPD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to explore group differences. Associations between sociodemography and undergoing opportunistic testing were established by multinomial logistic regression. In total, 28.8% of the cervical cytologies were due to either routine (20.7%) or sporadic (8.1%) opportunistic testing. Among women undergoing routine opportunistic testing, a larger proportion had high-grade squamous intraepithelial abnormalities than invited women (PPD: 0.6%, 95 % CI: 0.03-1.17%). A similar proportion of cytological abnormalities among women undergoing sporadic opportunistic testing and invited women was found. In multivariate analyses, younger age, being single or a social welfare recipient and residence region (North Denmark) were especially associated with opportunistic testing (routine or sporadic). One fourth of cervical cytologies in this study were

  10. Measuring Liability for Substance Use Disorder among College Students: Implications for Screening and Early Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arria, Amelia M.; Vincent, Kathryn B.; Caldeira, Kimberly M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Heavy drinking and illicit drug use among college students has been a longstanding public health concern. Current methods to screen and identify college students at-risk for the development of substance use disorders (SUD) are somewhat limited. Objectives This study aimed to cross-validate the work by Kirisci et al., (1) who developed the Transmissible Liability Index (TLI), by deriving a set of items that would be potentially useful for characterizing SUD risk across multiple dimensions among college students. We examined: 1) variations in the TLI-college version (TLI-CV) by race, sex, SES, religiosity, and family history of substance use problems; 2) the association between the TLI-CV and alcohol and/or marijuana dependence, both cross-sectionally and prospectively, by race and sex; and, 3) the sensitivity and specificity of the TLI-CV for identifying cases of marijuana and/or alcohol dependence. Methods Data from an ongoing longitudinal study of college students (n=1,253) was used to conduct item response theory (IRT) analyses which resulted TLI-CV, comprised of 33 items. Results The TLI-CV was significantly associated with baseline dependence and significantly higher for non-dependent individuals who later became dependent during the subsequent three years of college. These associations were observed for both sexes, Whites, Blacks/African-Americans, Asians, and other racial minorities. The sensitivity and specificity were sub-optimal. Conclusions and Scientific Significance The TLI-CV advances prior research to identify college students at risk for SUD. This approach holds potential promise to identify and ultimately modify the trajectories of college students who may be at risk for the development of SUD. PMID:20180676

  11. Diagnosis of retinal detachments by a tele-ophthalmology screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Sarah A; Lynch, Mary G; Maa, April Y

    2018-01-01

    In 2015, a tele-ophthalmology program was undertaken at the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center to provide screening eye care for veterans in their primary care clinics. Though this program was developed as a screening tool, the availability of these services in primary care clinics has enabled triage of certain acute eye complaints. These case reports describe two patients who were diagnosed with retinal detachments through this program, although their primary care providers had triaged them as requiring non-urgent referrals to the eye clinic. Although many patients are seen for acute ocular complaints in primary care clinics and emergency departments, providers in such settings may lack the ability to adequately examine eyes and thus triage ocular complaints. These cases demonstrate the ability of tele-ophthalmology to assist in diagnosing urgent ocular conditions in primary care clinics. Though tele-ophthalmology has been accepted in some parts of the world, in the United States of America it remains widely underutilized. These cases highlight the ability of tele-ophthalmology to close the gap in acute eye care coverage that exists in the USA, most prominently in rural regions.

  12. A screening program to test and treat for Helicobacter pylori infection: Cost-utility analysis by age, sex and ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Andrea M; Kvizhinadze, Giorgi; Nair, Nisha; McLeod, Melissa; Wilson, Nick; Blakely, Tony

    2017-02-20

    The World Health Organization recommends all countries consider screening for H. pylori to prevent gastric cancer. We therefore aimed to estimate the cost-effectiveness of a H. pylori serology-based screening program in New Zealand, a country that includes population groups with relatively high gastric cancer rates. A Markov model was developed using life-tables and morbidity data from a national burden of disease study. The modelled screening program reduced the incidence of non-cardia gastric cancer attributable to H. pylori, if infection was identified by serology screening, and for the population expected to be reached by the screening program. A health system perspective was taken and detailed individual-level costing data was used. For adults aged 25-69 years old, nation-wide screening for H. pylori was found to have an incremental cost of US$196 million (95% uncertainty interval [95% UI]: $182-$211 million) with health gains of 14,200 QALYs (95% UI: 5,100-26,300). Cost per QALY gained was US$16,500 ($7,600-$38,400) in the total population and 17% (6%-29%) of future gastric cancer cases could be averted with lifetime follow-up. A targeted screening program for Māori only (indigenous population), was more cost-effective at US$8,000 ($3,800-$18,500) per QALY. This modeling study found that H. pylori screening was likely to be cost-effective in this high-income country, particularly for the indigenous population. While further research is needed to help clarify the precise benefits, costs and adverse effects of such screening programs, there seems a reasonable case for policy-makers to give pilot programs consideration, particularly for any population groups with relatively elevated rates of gastric cancer.

  13. Automated toxicological screening reports of modified Agilent MSD Chemstation combined with Microsoft Visual Basic application programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Sanggil; Kim, Suncheun; Choi, Hyeyoung; Choi, Hwakyoung; Chung, Heesun; Hwang, Bangyeon

    2010-06-15

    Agilent GC-MS MSD Chemstation offers automated library search report for toxicological screening using total ion chromatogram (TIC) and mass spectroscopy in normal mode. Numerous peaks appear in the chromatogram of biological specimen such as blood or urine and often large migrating peaks obscure small target peaks, in addition, any target peaks of low abundance regularly give wrong library search result or low matching score. As a result, retention time and mass spectrum of all the peaks in the chromatogram have to be checked to see if they are relevant. These repeated actions are very tedious and time-consuming to toxicologists. MSD Chemstation software operates using a number of macro files which give commands and instructions on how to work on and extract data from the chromatogram and spectroscopy. These macro files are developed by the own compiler of the software. All the original macro files can be modified and new macro files can be added to the original software by users. To get more accurate results with more convenient method and to save time for data analysis, we developed new macro files for reports generation and inserted new menus in the Enhanced Data Analysis program. Toxicological screening reports generated by these new macro files are in text mode or graphic mode and these reports can be generated with three different automated subtraction options. Text reports have Brief mode and Full mode and graphic reports have the option with or without mass spectrum mode. Matched mass spectrum and matching score for detected compounds are printed in reports by modified library searching modules. We have also developed an independent application program named DrugMan. This program manages drug groups, lists and parameters that are in use in MSD Chemstation. The incorporation of DrugMan with modified macro modules provides a powerful tool for toxicological screening and save a lot of valuable time on toxicological work. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  14. Tuberculosis in Antiretroviral Treatment Programs in Lower Income Countries: Availability and Use of Diagnostics and Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Lukas; Ballif, Marie; Graber, Claire; Nhandu, Venerandah; Dusingize, Jean Claude; Cortes, Claudia P.; Carriquiry, Gabriela; Anastos, Kathryn; Garone, Daniela; Jong, Eefje; Gnokoro, Joachim Charles; Sued, Omar; Ajayi, Samuel; Diero, Lameck; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Castelnuovo, Barbara; Lewden, Charlotte; Durier, Nicolas; Sterling, Timothy R.; Egger, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Objectives In resource-constrained settings, tuberculosis (TB) is a common opportunistic infection and cause of death in HIV-infected persons. TB may be present at the start of antiretroviral therapy (ART), but it is often under-diagnosed. We describe approaches to TB diagnosis and screening of TB in ART programs in low- and middle-income countries. Methods and findings We surveyed ART programs treating HIV-infected adults in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and Latin America in 2012 using online questionnaires to collect program-level and patient-level data. Forty-seven sites from 26 countries participated. Patient-level data were collected on 987 adult TB patients from 40 sites (median age 34.7 years; 54% female). Sputum smear microscopy and chest radiograph were available in 47 (100%) sites, TB culture in 44 (94%), and Xpert MTB/RIF in 23 (49%). Xpert MTB/RIF was rarely available in Central Africa and South America. In sites with access to these diagnostics, microscopy was used in 745 (76%) patients diagnosed with TB, culture in 220 (24%), and chest X-ray in 688 (70%) patients. When free of charge culture was done in 27% of patients, compared to 21% when there was a fee (p = 0.033). Corresponding percentages for Xpert MTB/RIF were 26% and 15% of patients (p = 0.001). Screening practices for active disease before starting ART included symptom screening (46 sites, 98%), chest X-ray (38, 81%), sputum microscopy (37, 79%), culture (16, 34%), and Xpert MTB/RIF (5, 11%). Conclusions Mycobacterial culture was infrequently used despite its availability at most sites, while Xpert MTB/RIF was not generally available. Use of available diagnostics was higher when offered free of charge. PMID:24147059

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of Elderly Health Examination Program: The Example of Hypertension Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-Hwa Deng

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The National Health Insurance (NHI and social welfare agencies have implemented the Elderly Health Examination Program (EHEP for years. No study has ever attempted to evaluate whether this program is cost-effective. The purposes of this study were, firstly, to understand the prevalence and incidence rates of hypertension and, secondly, to estimate the cost and effectiveness of the EHEP, focusing on hypertension screening. The data sources were: (1 hypertension and clinical information derived from the 1996 and 1997 EHEP, which was used to generate prevalence and incidence rates of hypertension; and (2 claim data of the NHI that included treatment costs of stroke patients (in-and outpatients. Hypothetical models were used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the hypertension screening program in various conditions. Sensitivity analysis was also employed to evaluate the effect of each estimation indicator on the cost and effectiveness of the hypertension screening program. A total of 28.3% of the elderly population in Kaohsiung (25,174 of 88,812 participated in the 1996 EHEP; 14,915 of them participated in the following 1997 EHEP, with a retention rate of 59.3%. Criteria from the Sixth Report of the Joint National Committee on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC VI (systolic blood pressure/diastolic blood pressure ≥ 160/95mmHg or taking antihypertensive drugs were used; we found that prevalence and incidence rates of hypertension were 24.6% and 6.6%, respectively. Hypertension rates are increasing in the aging process as shown in both prevalence and incidence models. In comparison with non-participants, the prevalence model indicates that each hypertension patient who had attended the EHEP not only saved NT$34,570–34,890 in medical and associated costs, but also increased their lifespan by 128 days. The present findings suggest that the EHEP is a cost-effective program with health and social welfare policy

  16. The Peru Cervical Cancer Screening Study (PERCAPS): the design and implementation of a mother/daughter screen, treat, and vaccinate program in the Peruvian jungle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, Carolina E; Levinson, Kimberly L; Salmeron, Jorge; Sologuren, Carlos Vallejos; Fernandez, Maria Jose Vallejos; Belinson, Jerome L

    2014-06-01

    Peru struggles to prevent cervical cancer (CC). In the jungle, prevention programs suffer from significant barriers although technology exists to detect CC precursors. This study used community based participatory research (CBPR) methods to overcome barriers. The objective was to evaluate the utility of CBPR techniques in a mother-child screen/treat and vaccinate program for CC prevention in the Peruvian jungle. The CC prevention program used self-sampling for human papillomavirus (HPV) for screening, cryotherapy for treatment and the HPV vaccine Gardasil for vaccination. Community health leaders (HL) from around Iquitos participated in a two half day educational course. The HLs then decided how to implement interventions in their villages or urban sectors. The success of the program was measured by: (1) ability of the HLs to determine an implementation plan, (2) proper use of research forms, (3) participation and retention rates, and (4) participants' satisfaction. HLs successfully registered 320 women at soup kitchens, schools, and health posts. Screening, treatment, and vaccination were successfully carried out using forms for registration, consent, and results with minimum error. In the screen/treat intervention 100% of participants gave an HPV sample and 99.7% reported high satisfaction; 81% of HPV + women were treated, and 57% returned for 6-month followup. Vaccine intervention: 98% of girls received the 1st vaccine, 88% of those received the 2nd, and 65% the 3rd. CBPR techniques successfully helped implement a screen/treat and vaccinate CC prevention program around Iquitos, Peru. These techniques may be appropriate for large-scale preventive health-care interventions.

  17. Screening for generalized anxiety disorder symptoms in the wake of terrorist attacks: a study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafoori, Bita; Neria, Yuval; Gameroff, Marc J; Olfson, Mark; Lantigua, Rafael; Shea, Steven; Weissman, Myrna M

    2009-06-01

    Little is known about the mental health impact of terrorism beyond posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. The associations between exposure to the September 11, 2001 (9/11) attacks in New York City and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) symptoms were examined in a sample of 929 primary care patients. After controlling for PTSD, depression, panic and substance use disorders, and pre-9/11 trauma, patients who screened positive (vs. negative) for GAD symptoms were roughly twice as likely to report having a loved one at the 9/11 disaster site, twice as likely to know someone who was killed by the attacks, and twice as likely to know someone who was involved with the rescue/recovery efforts after the disaster. Implications for treatment and future research are discussed.

  18. Beck Depression Inventory is a useful screening tool for major depressive disorder in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, A H; Robertson, M M; Orth, M

    2006-06-01

    This study determined the prevalence of and factors associated with comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD) in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS). How a simple self-report instrument, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), correlates with clinical assessment of comorbid MDD in this population was assessed. In a continuous sample of 114 adult patients with GTS, assessed clinically using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV criteria, 26 (23%) patients met criteria for MDD; more severe tics as measured with the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale, conduct disorder in childhood or higher age at the time of assessment were associated with MDD. The BDI score had a high negative predictive value for diagnosis of MDD, but a low positive predictive value. Using the BDI as a screening tool for comorbid MDD in patients with GTS is suggested.

  19. Screening for Psychiatric Disorders in Bariatric Surgery Candidates with the German Version of the Patient Health Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Palm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Obesity has been linked to psychiatric disorders in several studies. Prevalence and severity of psychiatric disorders are high in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Thus, psychiatric assessment of bariatric surgery candidates has become a standard procedure. However, socially desirable responding leads to biased results in self-reported questionnaires. Here, bariatric surgery candidates were screened with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-D additionally to the psychiatric examination. Method. 355 bariatric surgery candidates filled in the PHQ-D before the psychiatric examination as a part of the surgery assessment procedure. PHQ-D results were compared to psychiatric diagnoses and body mass index (BMI. Results. Gender ratio, mean BMI, and age were comparable to earlier studies. Depressive and somatization symptoms did not correlate to BMI. However, females showed higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders with elevated syndrome severity in depressive and somatization disorders, as well as more frequent antidepressant intake. Eating disorders and addiction disorders were rarely reported. Conclusion. The findings suggest a socially desirable responding when filling in the PHQ-D before bariatric surgery. The use of the PHQ-D in this patient sample could be augmented by psychometric tests with internal correction and validation scales. Furthermore, psychiatric examination should be separated from the surgery evaluation process.

  20. Current and future perspective of newborn screening: an Indian scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurjit; Thakur, Kiran; Kataria, Sandeep; Singh, Teg Rabab; Chavan, Bir Singh; Kaur, Gurpreet; Atwal, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Newborn screening comprises a paramount public health program seeking timely detection, diagnosis, and intervention for genetic disorders that may otherwise produce serious clinical consequences. Today newborn screening is part of the health care system of developed countries, whereas in India, newborn screening is still in the toddler stage. We searched PubMed with the keywords newborn screening for metabolic disorders, newborn screening in India, and congenital disorder in neonates, and selected publications that seem appropriate. In India, in spite of the high birth rate and high frequency of metabolic disorders, newborn screening programs are not part of the health care system. At Union Territory, Chandigarh in 2007, newborn screening was initiated and is currently ongoing for three disorders, that is, congenital hypothyroidism, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Prevalence of these disorders is found to be 1:1400 for congenital hypothyroidism, 1:6334 for congenital adrenal hyperplasia, and 1:80 for G6PD deficiency. Mandatory newborn screening for congenital hypothyroidism should be implemented in India, and other disorders can be added in the screening panel on the basis of region-wise prevalence. The objective of this review is to provide insight toward present scenario of newborn screening in India along with recommendations to combat the hurdles in the pathway of mandatory newborn screening.

  1. Adherence to the cervical cancer screening program in women living with HIV in Denmark: comparison with the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Ladelund, Steen; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Katzenstein, Terese L; Johansen, Isik Somuncu; Pedersen, Gitte; Junge, Jette; Helleberg, Marie; Storgaard, Merete; Lebech, Anne-Mette

    2014-05-13

    Women living with HIV (WLWH) are at increased risk of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). International HIV guidelines suggest cervical screening twice the first year after HIV diagnosis and thereafter annually. Adherence to the HIV cervical screening program in Denmark is unknown. We studied women from a population-based, nationwide HIV cohort in Denmark and a cohort of age-matched females from the general population. Screening behaviour was assessed from 1999-2010. Adjusted odds ratios (OR's) for screening attendance in the two cohorts and potential predictors of attendance to guidelines were estimated. Pathology specimens were identified from The Danish Pathology Data Bank. We followed 1143 WLWH and 17,145 controls with no prior history of ICC for 9,509 and 157,362 person-years. The first year after HIV diagnosis 2.6% of WLWH obtained the recommended two cervical cytologies. During the different calendar intervals throughout the study period between 29-46% of WLWH followed the HIV cervical screening guidelines. Adjusted OR's of attendance to the general population screening program for WLWH aged 30, 40 and 50 years, compared to controls, were 0.69 (95% CI: 0.56-0.87), 0.67 (0.55-0.80) and 0.84 (0.61-1.15). Predictors of attendance to the HIV cervical screening program were a CD4 count > 350 cells/μL and HIV RNA < 500 copies/mL. Calendar period after 2002 and HIV RNA < 500 copies/mL predicted attendance to the general population cervical screening program. The majority of WLWH do not follow the HIV guidelines for cervical screening. We support the idea of cytology as part of an annual review and integration of HIV care and cervical screening in a single clinic setting.

  2. Screening HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) among HIV positive patients attending antiretroviral therapy in South Wollo, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsegaw, Million; Andargie, Gashaw; Alem, Getnet; Tareke, Minale

    2017-02-01

    The vast majority of people living with HIV/AIDS reside in low and middle income countries, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa, including Ethiopia. Despite the huge number of service users in the local area, cognitive disorder among HIV patients has not been extensively studied and there is a dearth of knowledge on the subject. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence and associated factors of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder among people living with HIV/AIDS in antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinics. Institution based cross sectional study was conducted from April to May, 2015 at Dessie Referral Hospital & Kombolcha Health Center. International HIV Dementia Scale was used to screen HIV associated neurocognitive deficits. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess predictors of neurocognitive disorders. The risk of HIV associated neurocognitive disorder was 36.4%. Those who had CD4 count of 500 cells/dl or less (AOR = 2.368 (1.524, 3.680)), no formal education (AOR = 4.287 (2.619, 7.016)), poor medication adherence (AOR = 1.487 (1.010, 2.180)) and older age (AOR = 3.309 (1.259, 8.701)) were found to be significantly associated with HIV associated neurocognitive disorders. The risk of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder was found to be high among people living with HIV/AIDS. This emphasizes the need of regular cognitive screening for early identification and appropriate intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hypersexual Disorder According to the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory in Help-Seeking Swedish Men and Women With Self-Identified Hypersexual Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öberg, Katarina Görts; Hallberg, Jonas; Kaldo, Viktor; Dhejne, Cecilia; Arver, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    The Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory (HDSI) was developed by the American Psychiatric Association for clinical screening of hypersexual disorder (HD). To examine the distribution of the proposed diagnostic entity HD according to the HDSI in a sample of men and women seeking help for problematic hypersexuality and evaluate some psychometric properties. Data on sociodemographics, the HDSI, the Sexual Compulsivity Scale (SCS), and the Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes of Sexual Behavior were collected online from 16 women and 64 men who self-identified as hypersexual. Respondents were recruited by advertisements offering psychological treatment for hypersexual behavior. The HDSI, covering the proposed criteria for HD. Of the entire sample, 50% fulfilled the criteria for HD. Compared with men, women scored higher on the HDSI, engaged more often in risky sexual behavior, and worried more about physical injuries and pain. Men primarily used pornography, whereas women had sexual encounters. The HD group reported a larger number of sexual specifiers, higher scores on the SCS, more negative effects of sexual behavior, and more concerns about consequences compared with the non-HD group. Sociodemographics had no influence on HD. The HDSI's core diagnostic criteria showed high internal reliability for men (α = 0.80) and women (α = 0.81). A moderate correlation between the HDSI and the SCS was found (0.51). The vast majority of the entire sample (76 of 80, 95%) fulfilled the criteria for sexual compulsivity according to the SCS. The HDSI could be used as a screening tool for HD, although further explorations of the empirical implications regarding criteria are needed, as are refinements of cutoff scores and specific sexual behaviors. Hypersexual problematic behavior causes distress and impairment and, although not included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, HD should be endorsed as a diagnosis to develop evidence

  4. Effect of intervention programs in schools to reduce screen time: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Roggia Friedrich

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:to evaluate the effects of intervention program strategies on the time spent on activities such as watching television, playing videogames, and using the computer among schoolchildren.SOURCES:a search for randomized controlled trials available in the literature was performed in the following electronic databases: PubMed, Lilacs, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library using the following Keywords randomized controlled trial, intervention studies, sedentary lifestyle, screen time, and school. A summary measure based on the standardized mean difference was used with a 95% confidence interval.DATA SYNTHESIS: a total of 1,552 studies were identified, of which 16 were included in the meta-analysis. The interventions in the randomized controlled trials (n = 8,785 showed a significant effect in reducing screen time, with a standardized mean difference (random effect of: -0.25 (-0.37, -0.13, p < 0.01.CONCLUSION:interventions have demonstrated the positive effects of the decrease of screen time among schoolchildren.

  5. Understanding and promoting treatment-seeking for eating disorders and body image concerns on college campuses through online screening, prevention and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, Sarah Ketchen; Jones, J Megan; Taylor, C Barr; Wilfley, Denise E; Eichen, Dawn M; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    While there have been important recent advances in the development of effective universal prevention and intervention programs, it is not yet clear how to engage large numbers of students in these programs. In this paper, we report findings from a two-phase pilot study. In the first phase, we used a population-level, online survey to assess eating disorder symptom level and habits/attitudes related to service utilization (N=2180). Using validated screening tools, we found that roughly one in three students has significant symptoms of eating disorders or elevated weight concerns, the vast majority of whom (86.5%) have not received treatment. In the second phase, we referred students to online prevention and selective/indicated intervention programs based on symptom classification (N=1916). We find that program enrollment is highest for students in the indicated intervention (18.1%) and lowest for students in the universal prevention (4.1%). We find that traditionally-emphasized barriers such as stigma, misinformation, and financial limitations do not appear to be the most important factors preventing treatment-seeking. Rather students report not seeking help for reasons such as lack of time, lack of perceived need, and a desire to deal with the issue "on my own." Findings offer insight into the treatment-seeking habits and attitudes of college students, including those barriers that may be overcome by offering online programs and those that persist despite increased access to and convenience of relevant resources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The computerized adaptive diagnostic test for major depressive disorder (CAD-MDD): a screening tool for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Robert D; Hooker, Giles; Finkelman, Matthew D; Weiss, David J; Pilkonis, Paul A; Frank, Ellen; Moore, Tara; Kupfer, David J

    2013-07-01

    To develop a computerized adaptive diagnostic screening tool for depression that decreases patient and clinician burden and increases sensitivity and specificity for clinician-based DSM-IV diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD). 656 individuals with and without minor and major depression were recruited from a psychiatric clinic and a community mental health center and through public announcements (controls without depression). The focus of the study was the development of the Computerized Adaptive Diagnostic Test for Major Depressive Disorder (CAD-MDD) diagnostic screening tool based on a decision-theoretical approach (random forests and decision trees). The item bank consisted of 88 depression scale items drawn from 73 depression measures. Sensitivity and specificity for predicting clinician-based Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders diagnoses of MDD were the primary outcomes. Diagnostic screening accuracy was then compared to that of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). An average of 4 items per participant was required (maximum of 6 items). Overall sensitivity and specificity were 0.95 and 0.87, respectively. For the PHQ-9, sensitivity was 0.70 and specificity was 0.91. High sensitivity and reasonable specificity for a clinician-based DSM-IV diagnosis of depression can be obtained using an average of 4 adaptively administered self-report items in less than 1 minute. Relative to the currently used PHQ-9, the CAD-MDD dramatically increased sensitivity while maintaining similar specificity. As such, the CAD-MDD will identify more true positives (lower false-negative rate) than the PHQ-9 using half the number of items. Inexpensive (relative to clinical assessment), efficient, and accurate screening of depression in the settings of primary care, psychiatric epidemiology, molecular genetics, and global health are all direct applications of the current system. © Copyright 2013 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  7. NEWBORN SCREENING PROGRAM: WHY TO COLLECT IN HIGH THE HOSPITAL ONE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ribeiro Lacerda

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Program of Newborn Screening for research of the Phenylketonuria, Congenital Hypothyroidism,Cystic Fibrosis, Sickle Cell Disease and other Hemoglobinopathies, it has as objective precociously todetect and to treat illnesses that, if prevented, prevent sequels as the mental deficiency and others. We intend,through this article, to awake the attention of the health professionals, mainly of the nurses, who act in the attendanceof the just-been newborn, of the gestante, the woman in labor and in puerperium, on the importance of theprecocious diagnosis of the diseases searched in the Program, with primordial purposes to assist the suckle for itsgood physical, neurological, psychological and intellectual development, besides offering to familiar the o geneticadvise. The examination gratuitous and is supported by law, and so that the prevention is effective, all the Maternitiesmust always carry through the collections of sample of blood of the heel of the high baby in the hospital one.

  8. Comparison between different colon cleansing products for screening colonoscopy. A noninferiority trial in population-based screening programs in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Manuel; Valiante, Flavio; Germanà, Bastianello; Baldassarre, Gianluca; Coria, Bartolomea; Rinaldi, Michela; Heras Salvat, Helena; Carta, Alessandra; Bortoluzzi, Francesco; Cervellin, Erica; Polo, Maria Luisa; Bulighin, Gianmarco; Azzurro, Maurizio; Di Piramo, Daniele; Turrin, Anna; Monica, Fabio

    2016-03-01

    The high volume and poor palatability of 4 L of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based bowel cleansing preparation required before a colonoscopy represent a major obstacle for patients. The aim of this study was to compare two low volume PEG-based preparations with standard 4 L PEG in individuals with a positive fecal immunochemical test (FIT) within organized screening programs in Italy. A total of 3660 patients with a positive FIT result were randomized to receive, in a split-dose regimen, 4 L PEG or 2 L PEG plus ascorbate (PEG-A) or 2 L PEG with citrate and simethicone plus bisacodyl (PEG-CS). The noninferiority of the low volume preparations vs. 4 L PEG was tested through the difference in proportions of adequate cleansing. A total of 2802 patients were included in the study. Adequate bowel cleansing was achieved in 868 of 926 cases (93.7 %) in the 4 L PEG group, in 872 out of 911 cases in the PEG-A group (95.7 %, difference in proportions  + 1.9 %, 95 % confidence interval [CI]  - 0.1 to 3.9), and in 862 out of 921 cases in the PEG-CS group (93.6 %, difference in proportions  - 0.2 %, 95 %CI  - 2.4 to 2.0). Bowel cleansing was adequate in 95.5 % of cases when the preparation-to-colonoscopy interval was between 120 and 239 minutes, whereas it dropped to 83.3 % with longer intervals. Better cleansing was observed in patients with regular bowel movements (95.6 %) compared with those with diarrhea (92.4 %) or constipation (90.8 %). Low volume PEG-based preparations administered in a split-dose regimen guarantee noninferior bowel cleansing compared with 4 L PEG. Constipated patients require a personalized preparation. EudraCT 2012 - 003958 - 82. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Association Between Socioeconomic Status and Participation in Colonoscopy Screening Program in First Degree Relatives of Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhdari, Arezoo; Yavari, Parvin; Pourhoseingholi, Mohammad Amin; Sohrabi, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-04-01

    Approximately 15% to 25% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases have positive family history for disease. Colonoscopy screening test is the best way for prevention and early diagnosis. Studies have found that first degree relatives (FDRs) with low socioeconomic status are less likely to participate in colonoscopy screening program. The aim of this study is to determine the association between socioeconomic status and participation in colonoscopy screening program in FDRs. This descriptive cross-sectional, study has been conducted on 200 FDRs who were consulted for undergoing colonoscopy screening program between 2007 and 2013 in research institute for gastroenterology and liver disease of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. They were interviewed via phone by a valid questionnaire about socioeconomic status. For data analysis, chi-square, exact fisher and multiple logistic regression were executed by SPSS 19. The results indicated 58.5% participants underwent colonoscopy screening test at least once to the time of the interview. There was not an association between participation in colonoscopy screening program and socioeconomic status to the time of the interview in binomial analysis. But statistical significance between intention to participate and educational and income level were found. We found, in logistic regression analysis, that high educational level (Diploma and University degree in this survey) was a predictor to participate in colonoscopy screening program in FDRs. According to this survey low socioeconomic status is an important factor to hinder participation of FDRs in colonoscopy screening program. Therefore, planned interventions for elevation knowledge and attitude in FDRs with low educational level are necessary. Also, reducing colonoscopy test costs should be a major priority for policy makers.

  10. Telemedicine-based diabetic retinopathy screening programs: an evaluation of utility and cost-effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuadros JA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jorge A Cuadros Optometry/Vision Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA Abstract: Diabetes is the main cause of blindness among working age adults, although treatment is highly effective in preventing vision loss. Eye examinations are recommended on a yearly basis for most patients for timely detection of retinal disease. Telemedicine-based diabetic retinopathy screening (TMDRS programs have been developed to identify patients with sight-threatening diabetic eye disease because patients are often noncompliant with recommended live eye examinations. This article reviews the cost-effectiveness of the various forms of TMDRS. A review of relevant articles, mostly published since 2008, shows that societal benefits generally outweigh the costs of TMDRS. However, advances in technology to improve efficacy, lower costs, and broaden screening to other sight-threatening conditions, such as glaucoma and refractive error, are necessary to improve the sustainability of TMDRS within health care organizations. Patient satisfaction with these telemedicine programs is generally high. New models of shared care with primary care providers and staff are emerging to improve patient engagement and follow-up care when individuals are found to have sight-threatening eye disease. TMDRS programs are growing and provide valuable clinical benefit. The cost-utility is currently well proven in locations with limited access to regular eye care services, such as rural areas, poor communities, and prison systems; however, improvements over time are necessary for these programs to be cost-effective in mainstream medical settings in the future. Keywords: telemedicine, diabetes, retinopathy, retinal imaging

  11. Education and screening for chronic kidney disease in Indian youth: pilot program results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao PS

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Panduranga S Rao,1 Julie A Wright Nunes,1 Brenda W Gillespie,2 Rachel L Perlman,1 Rajan Ravichandran3 1Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, 2Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 3Department of Nephrology, Madras Institute of Nephrology, Madras Institute of Orthopedics and Trauma Hospitals, Chennai, India Background: There is a paucity of information on kidney education and screening programs in Indian youth.Methods: Participants (n=2,158 from Chennai colleges were educated about the kidneys and chronic kidney disease (CKD and screened in a pilot program from April to May 2013. This entailed: 1 a presentation and educational video and 2 an on-site assessment of weight, blood pressure, and demographic information. Urinalysis (UA kits were distributed and returned in ≤48 hours. We examined participant characteristics and their association with dipstick proteinuria using logistic regression.Results: The mean (standard deviation [SD] age was 18.9 (1.6 years, and 1,451 (68% were men. Mean (SD body mass index (BMI was 21.9 (4.3 kg/m2; 745 (36% had a BMI consistent with being overweight or obese. Mean (SD systolic blood pressure (SBP was 118.7 (13.1 mm Hg, and 94 (5% of the participants had SBP ≥140. Mean (SD diastolic blood pressure (DBP was 70.9 (11.4 mm Hg, with 119 participants (6% having ≥90 mm Hg. A total of 136 participants had glycosuria (UA≥1+ and 120 (6% had proteinuria (UA≥1+. In unadjusted analyses, sex (odds ratio [OR]=1.64 [confidence interval, CI 1.06–2.55]; p=0.026 men vs. women and age (OR=1.13 per year [CI 1.01–1.26]; p=0.032 were significantly associated with proteinuria. In the analysis adjusted for age, sex, SBP, DBP, glycosuria, and BMI, age remained independently associated with higher odds for proteinuria (OR=1.14 per year [1.02–1.29]; p=0.026. Males showed a trend of higher risk compared

  12. Does comorbid chronic pain affect posttraumatic stress disorder diagnosis and treatment? Outcomes of posttraumatic stress disorder screening in Department of Veterans Affairs primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outcalt, Samantha D; Hoen, Helena Maria; Yu, Zhangsheng; Franks, Tenesha Marie; Krebs, Erin E

    2016-01-01

    Because posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is both prevalent and underrecognized, routine primary care-based screening for PTSD has been implemented across the Veterans Health Administration. PTSD is frequently complicated by the presence of comorbid chronic pain, and patients with both conditions have increased symptom severity and poorer prognosis. Our objective was to determine whether the presence of pain affects diagnosis and treatment of PTSD among Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) patients who have a positive PTSD screening test. This retrospective cohort study used clinical and administrative data from six Midwestern VA medical centers. We identified 4,244 VA primary care patients with a positive PTSD screen and compared outcomes for those with and without a coexisting pain diagnosis. Outcomes were three clinically appropriate responses to positive PTSD screening: (1) mental health visit, (2) PTSD diagnosis, and (3) new selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) prescription. We found that patients with coexisting pain had a lower rate of mental health visits than those without pain (hazard ratio: 0.889, 95% confidence interval: 0.821-0.962). There were no significant differences in the rate of PTSD diagnosis or new SSRI prescription between patients with and without coexisting pain.

  13. Application of Adverse Outcome Pathways to U.S. EPA's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Patience; Noyes, Pamela D; Casey, Warren M; Dix, David J

    2017-09-01

    The U.S. EPA's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) screens and tests environmental chemicals for potential effects in estrogen, androgen, and thyroid hormone pathways, and it is one of the only regulatory programs designed around chemical mode of action. This review describes the EDSP's use of adverse outcome pathway (AOP) and toxicity pathway frameworks to organize and integrate diverse biological data for evaluating the endocrine activity of chemicals. Using these frameworks helps to establish biologically plausible links between endocrine mechanisms and apical responses when those end points are not measured in the same assay. Pathway frameworks can facilitate a weight of evidence determination of a chemical's potential endocrine activity, identify data gaps, aid study design, direct assay development, and guide testing strategies. Pathway frameworks also can be used to evaluate the performance of computational approaches as alternatives for low-throughput and animal-based assays and predict downstream key events. In cases where computational methods can be validated based on performance, they may be considered as alternatives to specific assays or end points. A variety of biological systems affect apical end points used in regulatory risk assessments, and without mechanistic data, an endocrine mode of action cannot be determined. Because the EDSP was designed to consider mode of action, toxicity pathway and AOP concepts are a natural fit. Pathway frameworks have diverse applications to endocrine screening and testing. An estrogen pathway example is presented, and similar approaches are being used to evaluate alternative methods and develop predictive models for androgen and thyroid pathways. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1304.

  14. Inter-rater reliability and stability of diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder in children identified through screening at a very young age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Daalen, Emma; Kemner, Chantal; Dietz, Claudine; Swinkels, Sophie H. N.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; van Engeland, Herman

    2009-01-01

    To examine the inter-rater reliability and stability of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnoses made at a very early age in children identified through a screening procedure around 14 months of age. In a prospective design, preschoolers were recruited from a screening study for ASD. The inter-rater

  15. Validation of the Cepstral Spectral Index of Dysphonia (CSID) as a Screening Tool for Voice Disorders: Development of Clinical Cutoff Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Shaheen N; Roy, Nelson; Zhang, Dong; Cohen, Seth M

    2016-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to (1) evaluate the performance of the Cepstral Spectral Index of Dysphonia (CSID--a multivariate estimate of dysphonia severity) as a potential screening tool for voice disorder identification and (2) identify potential clinical cutoff scores to classify voice-disordered cases versus controls. Subjects were 332 men and women (116 men, 216 women) comprised of subjects who presented to a physician with a voice-related complaint and a group of non-voice-related control subjects. Voice-disordered cases versus controls were initially defined via three reference standards: (1) auditory-perceptual judgment (dysphonia +/-); (2) Voice Handicap Index (VHI) score (VHI +/-); and (3) laryngoscopic description (laryngoscopic +/-). Speech samples were analyzed using the Analysis of Dysphonia in Speech and Voice program. Cepstral and spectral measures were combined into a CSID multivariate formula which estimated dysphonia severity for Rainbow Passage samples (i.e., the CSIDR). The ability of the CSIDR to accurately classify cases versus controls in relation to each reference standard was evaluated via a combination of logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses. The ability of the CSIDR to discriminate between cases and controls was represented by the "area under the ROC curve" (AUC). ROC classification of dysphonia-positive cases versus controls resulted in a strong AUC = 0.85. A CSIDR cutoff of ≈24 achieved the best balance between sensitivity and specificity, whereas a more liberal cutoff score of ≈19 resulted in higher sensitivity while maintaining respectable specificity which may be preferred for screening purposes. Weaker but adequate AUCs = 0.75 and 0.73 were observed for the classification of VHI-positive and laryngoscopic-positive cases versus controls, respectively. Logistic regression analyses indicated that subject age may be a significant covariate in the discrimination of dysphonia-positive and VHI

  16. Retinal photography screening programs to prevent vision loss from diabetic retinopathy in rural and urban Australia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapp, Robyn J; Svoboda, Jean; Fredericks, Bronwyn; Jackson, A Jonathan; Taylor, Hugh R

    2015-02-01

    This review assessed the effectiveness of diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening programs, using retinal photography in Australian urban and rural settings, and considered implications for public health strategy and policy. An electronic search of MEDLINE, PubMed, and Embase for studies published between 1 January 1996 and the 30 June 2013 was undertaken. Key search terms were "diabetic retinopathy," "screening," "retinal photography" and "Australia." Twelve peer-reviewed publications were identified. The 14 DR screening programs identified from the 12 publications were successfully undertaken in urban, rural and remote communities across Australia. Locations included a pathology collection center, and Indigenous primary health care and Aboriginal community controlled organizations. Each intervention using retinal photography was highly effective at increasing the number of people who underwent screening for DR. The review identified that prior to commencement of the screening programs a median of 48% (range 16-85%) of those screened had not undergone a retinal examination within the recommended time frame (every year for Indigenous people and every 2 years for non-Indigenous people in Australia). A median of 16% (range 0-45%) of study participants had evidence of DR. This review has shown there have been many pilot and demonstration projects in rural and urban Australia that confirm the effectiveness of retinal photography-based screening for DR.

  17. Management of headache disorders: design of a randomised clinical trial screening for prognostic patient characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaes Peter H

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of headache disorders is not always optimal. Patients are treated in multiple ways, and the lack of scientific arguments for referral and the insufficient implementation of guidelines result in unclear treatment strategies. The coexistence of headache and neck pain can lead to the referral to a musculoskeletal physiotherapist. This treatment can only be successful if an underlying cervical segmental dysfunction is present. In such cases a physical treatment can be a valuable option that should be considered. The aim of this study is to identify prognostic therapeutic patient characteristics and to increase the number of correct physiotherapy referrals. Methods/design This trial is designed to identify patient characteristics which can influence the prognosis of the patient. Patients with recurrent headache and co-existent neck pain are recruited via a multicenter setup. After screening for eligibility, subjects are tested at baseline and randomly allocated to one of two treatment groups. Testing includes the administering of questionnaires (a Headache Diagnosis Questionnaire, Headache Inventory List and the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6 and physical tests (Thermal Stimuli, Manual Cervical Spine Examination and Pressure Algometry. Treatment groups are a usual care group (UC administered by the General Practitioner (GP and a usual care plus musculoskeletal physiotherapy treatment group (UCMT. UC is based on the Dutch GP Guideline for Headache. UCMT consists of the UC plus a combination of exercises and spinal cervical mobilisations. Follow-up measurements consist of the completion of the Headache Inventory List, the HIT-6 and scoring of the global perceived effect (GPE. The latter allowing the distinction between responders (positive effect and non-responders (no effect or worse. Logistic regression analysis will be used to identify the specific patient characteristics of the responders and the non-responders. The

  18. Developmental Risk Signals as a Screening Tool for Early Identification of Sensory Processing Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaños, Cristina; Gomez, M Marlene; Ramos, Gregorio; Rios Del Rio, Janina

    2016-06-01

    The main purpose of this research was to determine if the indicators of risk included in the Indicators of Developmental Risk Signals (INDIPCD-R) could differentiate between children at risk of sensory processing disorders (SPDs) from those with normal development and if the SPD indicators correlated with a delay or altered development. A retrospective, descriptive, correlational design was used with a sample of 51 children, 36 referred because of clinical sensory processing indicators and 15 with non-clinical indicators. Participants were assessed with a developmental scale Revised Profile of Developmental Behaviors (PCD-R), the Sensory Profile, play and clinical observations. The INDIPCD-R showed a high correlation with developmental areas of PCD-R and a sensitivity and specificity of 100%, when compared with the Sensory Profile. T-test results for independent samples showed significant differences at p ≤ 0.01 level between the children with SPD indicators and those with no clinical signs in the PCD-R. The Mann-Whitney U-test was conducted for unpaired samples, to verify if there were significant differences between children with apparent SPD indicators and children with no apparent difficulties. The Spearman's rho was used to identify the correlations between the INDIPCD-R, with different areas of development. This study supports the use of the INDIPCD-R as a screening instrument that could be used by occupational therapists to discriminate children with and without indicators of SPD. The limitation of this study was that it did not cover all the ages of the INDIPCD-R. Additional studies are required to determine the utility of this instrument for outcome studies and whether it is valid and reliable to identify children at risk of different pathologies. The INDIPCD-R is a low-cost instrument that allows the occupational therapist to make a quick review of the different components that could be involved in SPD and therefore guide the more in

  19. Development of a screening tool for sleep disordered breathing in children using the phone Oximeter™.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainara Garde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sleep disordered breathing (SDB can lead to daytime sleepiness, growth failure and developmental delay in children. Polysomnography (PSG, the gold standard to diagnose SDB, is a highly resource-intensive test, confined to the sleep laboratory. AIM: To combine the blood oxygen saturation (SpO2 characterization and cardiac modulation, quantified by pulse rate variability (PRV, to identify children with SDB using the Phone Oximeter, a device integrating a pulse oximeter with a smartphone. METHODS: Following ethics approval and informed consent, 160 children referred to British Columbia Children's Hospital for overnight PSG were recruited. A second pulse oximeter sensor applied to the finger adjacent to the one used for standard PSG was attached to the Phone Oximeter to record overnight pulse oximetry (SpO2 and photoplethysmogram (PPG alongside the PSG. RESULTS: We studied 146 children through the analysis of the SpO2 pattern, and PRV as an estimate of heart rate variability calculated from the PPG. SpO2 variability and SpO2 spectral power at low frequency, was significantly higher in children with SDB due to the modulation provoked by airway obstruction during sleep (p-value <0.01. PRV analysis reflected a significant augmentation of sympathetic activity provoked by intermittent hypoxia in SDB children. A linear classifier was trained with the most discriminating features to identify children with SDB. The classifier was validated with internal and external cross-validation, providing a high negative predictive value (92.6% and a good balance between sensitivity (88.4% and specificity (83.6%. Combining SpO2 and PRV analysis improved the classification performance, providing an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 88%, beyond the 82% achieved using SpO2 analysis alone. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that the implementation of this algorithm in the Phone Oximeter will provide an improved portable, at

  20. Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Life Cycle Management/License Renewal Program: System, structure, and component screening. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroshuk, B.W.; Tilden, B.M.

    1994-09-01

    Central to the Life Cycle Management (LCM) Program for the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Plant is its Integrated Plant Assessment (IPA) process; a comprehensive, systematic evaluation of the effectiveness of age-related degradation management for the plant's important systems, structures, and components. The first step in this process is the screening of functionally important systems, structures that warrant further evaluation of aging issues. A detailed method and procedures for conducting this screening have been developed and thoroughly tested. The development and application of these procedures at Calvert Cliffs should permit other utilities to avoid implementation problems and avoid substantial front-end development costs. The IPA process is initiated by a screening step that identifies important systems, structures, and components for further evaluation. This report contains the screening methodology, provides procedures for System Level Screening and Component Level Screening, and summarizes results for five systems that represent a wide range of use. These are the Reactor Coolant System, Compressed Air System, Saltwater Cooling System, Electrical 4 Kv Transformers and Buses, and the Reactor Protective System. Examples of component screening are included for the Reactor Coolant System. These screening results show how to determine which equipment's maintenance programs should be checked for degradation management effectiveness

  1. An In-Depth Survey of the Screening and Assessment Practices of Highly Regarded Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Jeremy; Falco, Mathea; Schackman, Bruce R.; Winters, Ken C.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: To examine the quality of screening and assessment practices at some of the most highly regarded adolescent substance use treatment programs in the United States. Methods: Between March and September 2005, telephone surveys were administered to directors of highly regarded programs. Several different publications and databases were then used…

  2. Screening computer-assisted dosage programs for anticoagulation with warfarin and other vitamin K antagonists: minimum safety requirements for individual programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poller, L; Roberts, C; Ibrahim, S

    2009-01-01

    Based on the results of the previous European Action on Anticoagulation (EAA) multicenter study, a simplified minimum procedure is described for screening the safety and effectiveness of marketed programs for dosage of oral anticoagulant drugs (vitamin K antagonists). The aim was to demonstrate n...... study, that is, 57.5%. The simplified procedure proposed, although not an absolute guide to safety, is designed to screen against gross unreliability of a test program, without the need to repeat a massive clinical endpoint study for each and every program....

  3. Cost-effectiveness and budget impact analysis of a population-based screening program for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pil, L; Fobelets, M; Putman, K; Trybou, J; Annemans, L

    2016-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in Belgium. In Flanders (Belgium), a population-based screening program with a biennial immunochemical faecal occult blood test (iFOBT) in women and men aged 56-74 has been organised since 2013. This study assessed the cost-effectiveness and budget impact of the colorectal population-based screening program in Flanders (Belgium). A health economic model was conducted, consisting of a decision tree simulating the screening process and a Markov model, with a time horizon of 20years, simulating natural progression. Predicted mortality and incidence, total costs, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) with and without the screening program were calculated in order to determine the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of CRC screening. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted, taking into account uncertainty of the model parameters. Mortality and incidence were predicted to decrease over 20years. The colorectal screening program in Flanders is found to be cost-effective with an ICER of 1681/QALY (95% CI -1317 to 6601) in males and €4,484/QALY (95% CI -3254 to 18,163). The probability of being cost-effective given a threshold of €35,000/QALY was 100% and 97.3%, respectively. The budget impact analysis showed the extra cost for the health care payer to be limited. This health economic analysis has shown that despite the possible adverse effects of screening and the extra costs for the health care payer and the patient, the population-based screening program for CRC in Flanders is cost-effective and should therefore be maintained. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Implementing a Communication Coaching Program for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Postsecondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Amy L.; Rohland, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the operation of a Communication Coaching Program, which was designed to provide supports for students with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) attending the University of Rhode Island. To succeed in college programs, many students with ASDs need access to specialized programming and personnel who are able to foster their…

  5. Screening of 50 Cypriot Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders or Autistic Features Using 400K Custom Array-CGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Kousoulidou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs comprise a distinct entity of neurodevelopmental disorders with a strong genetic component. Despite the identification of several candidate genes and causative genomic copy number variations (CNVs, the majority of ASD cases still remain unresolved. We have applied microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH using Agilent 400K custom array in the first Cyprus population screening for identification of ASD-associated CNVs. A cohort of 50 ASD patients (G1, their parents (G2, 50 ethnically matched normal controls (G3, and 80 normal individuals having children with various developmental and neurological conditions (G4 were tested. As a result, 14 patients were found to carry 20 potentially causative aberrations, two of which were de novo. Comparison of the four population groups revealed an increased rate of rare disease-associated variants in normal parents of children with autism. The above data provided additional evidence, supporting the complexity of ASD aetiology in comparison to other developmental disorders involving cognitive impairment. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the rationale of a more targeted approach combining accurate clinical description with high-resolution population-oriented genomic screening for defining the role of CNVs in autism and identifying meaningful associations on the molecular level.

  6. Enhancing motivation to change in eating disorders with an online self-help program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Sau Fong; Ma, Joyce; Russell, Janice

    2013-08-01

    Ambivalence to change is a major obstacle to treating people with eating disorders. Enhancing motivation to change can contribute to recovery from the disorders. This study used an Internet-based self-help program developed in the Asia-Pacific region to identify the motivational stages of change in people with eating disorders. It explored their perceptions of the benefits and costs of taking action against their eating disorders, and assessed their involvement in motivational enhancement exercises and their improvement in eating disorder psychopathology. A total of 185 participants, aged 16-50 years (mean age, 26.5) were involved in the open-trial program with a motivational enhancement component and completed the Motivational Stages of Change Questionnaire (MSCARED), the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire version 5 (EDE-Q5) and the Eating Disorder Inventory version 3 (EDI-3). The results show that more participants perceived the benefits of taking action against their eating disorders than the costs. Completer analysis shows that they experienced significant improvement in motivational stages of change and eating disorder psychopathology, from a baseline assessment to 1-month and 3-month follow ups. The self-help program has potential benefit for people with eating disorders and its use could be encouraged by health-care professionals to enhance the motivation to change and facilitate recovery. © 2012 The Authors; International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  7. Implementing a Fee-for-Service Cervical Cancer Screening and Treatment Program in Cameroon: Challenges and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGregorio, Geneva; Manga, Simon; Kiyang, Edith; Manjuh, Florence; Bradford, Leslie; Cholli, Preetam; Wamai, Richard; Ogembo, Rebecca; Sando, Zacharie; Liu, Yuxin; Sheldon, Lisa Kennedy; Nulah, Kathleen; Welty, Thomas; Welty, Edith; Ogembo, Javier Gordon

    2017-07-01

    Cervical cancer screening is one of the most effective cancer prevention strategies, but most women in Africa have never been screened. In 2007, the Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Services, a large faith-based health care system in Cameroon, initiated the Women's Health Program (WHP) to address this disparity. The WHP provides fee-for-service cervical cancer screening using visual inspection with acetic acid enhanced by digital cervicography (VIA-DC), prioritizing care for women living with HIV/AIDS. They also provide clinical breast examination, family planning (FP) services, and treatment for reproductive tract infection (RTI). Here, we document the strengths and challenges of the WHP screening program and the unique aspects of the WHP model, including a fee-for-service payment system and the provision of other women's health services. We retrospectively reviewed WHP medical records from women who presented for cervical cancer screening from 2007-2014. In 8 years, WHP nurses screened 44,979 women for cervical cancer. The number of women screened increased nearly every year. The WHP is sustained primarily on fees-for-service, with external funding totaling about $20,000 annually. In 2014, of 12,191 women screened for cervical cancer, 99% received clinical breast exams, 19% received FP services, and 4.7% received treatment for RTIs. We document successes, challenges, solutions implemented, and recommendations for optimizing this screening model. The WHP's experience using a fee-for-service model for cervical cancer screening demonstrates that in Cameroon VIA-DC is acceptable, feasible, and scalable and can be nearly self-sustaining. Integrating other women's health services enabled women to address additional health care needs. The Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Services Women's Health Program successfully implemented a nurse-led, fee-for-service cervical cancer screening program using visual inspection with acetic acid-enhanced by digital cervicography in

  8. Evaluating a web-based clinical decision support system for language disorders screening in a nursery school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Ruiz, María Luisa; Valero Duboy, Miguel Ángel; Torcal Loriente, Carmen; Pau de la Cruz, Iván

    2014-05-28

    Early and effective identification of developmental disorders during childhood remains a critical task for the international community. The second highest prevalence of common developmental disorders in children are language delays, which are frequently the first symptoms of a possible disorder. This paper evaluates a Web-based Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) whose aim is to enhance the screening of language disorders at a nursery school. The common lack of early diagnosis of language disorders led us to deploy an easy-to-use CDSS in order to evaluate its accuracy in early detection of language pathologies. This CDSS can be used by pediatricians to support the screening of language disorders in primary care. This paper details the evaluation results of the "Gades" CDSS at a nursery school with 146 children, 12 educators, and 1 language therapist. The methodology embraces two consecutive phases. The first stage involves the observation of each child's language abilities, carried out by the educators, to facilitate the evaluation of language acquisition level performed by a language therapist. Next, the same language therapist evaluates the reliability of the observed results. The Gades CDSS was integrated to provide the language therapist with the required clinical information. The validation process showed a global 83.6% (122/146) success rate in language evaluation and a 7% (7/94) rate of non-accepted system decisions within the range of children from 0 to 3 years old. The system helped language therapists to identify new children with potential disorders who required further evaluation. This process will revalidate the CDSS output and allow the enhancement of early detection of language disorders in children. The system does need minor refinement, since the therapists disagreed with some questions from the CDSS knowledge base (KB) and suggested adding a few questions about speech production and pragmatic abilities. The refinement of the KB will address

  9. The performance of the K10, K6 and GHQ-12 to screen for present state DSM-IV disorders among disability claimants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelius, Bert L. R.; Groothoff, Johan W.; van der Klink, Jac J. L.; Brouwer, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Screening for mental disorders among disability claimants is important, since mental disorders seem to be seriously under-recognized in this population. However, performance of potentially suitable scales is unknown. We aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of three scales, the

  10. Positive posttraumatic stress disorder screens among first-time medical cannabis patients: prevalence and association with other substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, Kipling M; Perron, Brian E; Ashrafioun, Lisham; Kleinberg, Felicia; Jannausch, Mary; Ilgen, Mark A

    2014-10-01

    Twenty-one states and the District of Columbia have passed legislation allowing for the use of medical cannabis for those individuals with qualifying medical conditions, which include posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) for a growing number of states. Little information is available regarding PTSD among medical cannabis patients. This study seeks to provide initial data on this topic by examining the prevalence and correlates of positive PTSD screens among a sample of patients seeking medical cannabis certification for the first time (n=186). Twenty-three percent (42/186; 95% confidence interval [CI] =17%-29%) of the patients in the study sample screened positive for PTSD. Moreover, the group that screened positive for PTSD had higher percentages of lifetime prescription opioid, cocaine, prescription sedative, and street opioid use, as well as a higher percentage of recent prescription sedative use, than the group that screened negative for PTSD. These findings highlight the relatively common use of other substances among medical cannabis patients with significant PTSD symptoms, even when compared with other patients seeking medical cannabis for the first time. As a growing number of states include PTSD among the list of qualifying medical conditions for medical cannabis, additional research is needed to better characterize the longitudinal relationship between medical cannabis use and PTSD symptoms. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Establishing Clinical Cutoffs for Response and Remission on the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporino, Nicole E; Sakolsky, Dara; Brodman, Douglas M; McGuire, Joseph F; Piacentini, John; Peris, Tara S; Ginsburg, Golda S; Walkup, John T; Iyengar, Satish; Kendall, Philip C; Birmaher, Boris

    2017-08-01

    To determine optimal percent reduction and raw score cutoffs on the parent- and child-report Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) for predicting treatment response and remission among youth with anxiety disorders. Data were obtained from youth (N = 438; 7-17 years old) who completed treatment in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal treatment Study, a multisite, randomized clinical trial that examined the relative efficacy of medication (sertraline), cognitive-behavioral therapy (Coping Cat), their combination, and pill placebo for the treatment of separation anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and social phobia. The parent- and youth-report SCARED were administered at pre- and posttreatment. Quality receiver operating characteristic methods evaluated the performance of various SCARED percent reduction and absolute cutoff scores in predicting treatment response and remission, as defined by posttreatment ratings on the Clinical Global Impression scales and the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule. Reductions of 55% on the SCARED-Parent and 50% on the SCARED-Youth optimally predicted treatment response. Posttreatment absolute raw scores of 10 (SCARED-Parent) and 12 (SCARED-Youth) optimally predicted remission in the total sample, although separate SCARED-Parent cutoffs for children (12-13) and adolescents (9) showed greatest quality of efficiency. Each cutoff significantly predicted response and remission at 6-month follow-up. Results serve as guidelines for operationalizing treatment response and remission on the SCARED, which could help clinicians systematically monitor treatment outcomes of youth with anxiety disorders in a cost- and time-efficient manner. Clinical trial registration information-Child and Adolescent Anxiety Disorders (CAMS); http://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT00052078. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Development and Psychometric Properties of A Screening Tool for Assessing Developmental Coordination Disorder in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Carol J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting motor coordination. Evidence suggests this disorder persists into adulthood and may be associated with biomechanical dysfunction and pain. We report on the development and initial validation of a questionnaire to assess for DCD in adults. Methods: An initial item pool (13 items) was derived from the American Psychiatric Association criteria and World Health Organisation definition for DCD. An expe...

  13. Automated Assessment of Patients' Self-Narratives for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Screening Using Natural Language Processing and Text Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiwei; Veldkamp, Bernard P; Glas, Cees A W; de Vries, Theo

    2017-03-01

    Patients' narratives about traumatic experiences and symptoms are useful in clinical screening and diagnostic procedures. In this study, we presented an automated assessment system to screen patients for posttraumatic stress disorder via a natural language processing and text-mining approach. Four machine-learning algorithms-including decision tree, naive Bayes, support vector machine, and an alternative classification approach called the product score model-were used in combination with n-gram representation models to identify patterns between verbal features in self-narratives and psychiatric diagnoses. With our sample, the product score model with unigrams attained the highest prediction accuracy when compared with practitioners' diagnoses. The addition of multigrams contributed most to balancing the metrics of sensitivity and specificity. This article also demonstrates that text mining is a promising approach for analyzing patients' self-expression behavior, thus helping clinicians identify potential patients from an early stage.

  14. Do school physical activity policies and programs have a role in decreasing multiple screen time behaviours among youth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katapally, Tarun R; Laxer, Rachel E; Qian, Wei; Leatherdale, Scott T

    2018-05-01

    Screen time in youth has been associated with a wide range of poor health outcomes. Evidence indicates the need to develop physical activity (PA) school policies and programs that are aimed at decreasing youth screen time behaviours. This study aims to understand the association between PA policies and programs embedded into the functioning of 89 schools across two provinces in Canada and multiple screen time behaviours. As part of the COMPASS Study, a total of 44,861 youth aged between 13 and 18years and belonging to 89 schools in two Canadian provinces completed a validated questionnaire for health behaviours and outcomes data. PA policies and programs were measured using the School Policies and Practices Questionnaire, completed by the relevant school administrator. Participation in before-school, noon hour, or after-school intramural programs, participation in varsity sports, and access to indoor areas of PA during non-instructional time, was associated with significantly lower multiple screen time behaviours across both provinces. With exposure to multiple electronic and digital devices only predicted to increase among youth in the future, there is a need to conceptualize and integrate school-based screen time reducing PA policies and programs into the regular functioning of the schools. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Patient and Clinician Perspectives on Shared Decision-making in Early Adopting Lung Cancer Screening Programs: a Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Koppelman, Elisa; Bolton, Rendelle; Lasser, Karen E; Borrelli, Belinda; Au, David H; Slatore, Christopher G; Clark, Jack A; Kathuria, Hasmeena

    2018-02-21

    Guidelines recommend, and Medicare requires, shared decision-making between patients and clinicians before referring individuals at high risk of lung cancer for chest CT screening. However, little is known about the extent to which shared decision-making about lung cancer screening is achieved in real-world settings. To characterize patient and clinician impressions of early experiences with communication and decision-making about lung cancer screening and perceived barriers to achieving shared decision-making. Qualitative study entailing semi-structured interviews and focus groups. We enrolled 36 clinicians who refer patients for lung cancer screening and 49 patients who had undergone lung cancer screening in the prior year. Participants were recruited from lung cancer screening programs at four hospitals (three Veterans Health Administration, one urban safety net). Using content analysis, we analyzed transcripts to characterize communication and decision-making about lung cancer screening. Our analysis focused on the recommended components of shared decision-making (information sharing, deliberation, and decision aid use) and barriers to achieving shared decision-making. Clinicians varied in the information shared with patients, and did not consistently incorporate decision aids. Clinicians believed they explained the rationale and gave some (often purposely limited) information about the trade-offs of lung cancer screening. By contrast, some patients reported receiving little information about screening or its trade-offs and did not realize the CT was intended as a screening test for lung cancer. Clinicians and patients alike did not perceive that significant deliberation typically occurred. Clinicians perceived insufficient time, competing priorities, difficulty accessing decision aids, limited patient comprehension, and anticipated patient emotions as barriers to realizing shared decision-making. Due to multiple perceived barriers, patient

  16. Influence of risk category and screening round on the performance of an MR imaging and mammography screening program in carriers of the BRCA mutation and other women at increased risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreemann, Suzan; Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Schlooz-Vries, Margrethe S.; Bult, Peter; Van Gils, Carla H.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Karssemeijer, Nico; Mann, Ritse M.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the real-life performance of a breast cancer screening program for women with different categories of increased breast cancer risk with multiple follow-up rounds in an academic hospital with a large screening population. Materials and Methods: Screening examinations (magnetic

  17. Autism detection in early childhood (ADEC): reliability and validity data for a Level 2 screening tool for autistic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nah, Yong-Hwee; Young, Robyn L; Brewer, Neil; Berlingeri, Genna

    2014-03-01

    The Autism Detection in Early Childhood (ADEC; Young, 2007) was developed as a Level 2 clinician-administered autistic disorder (AD) screening tool that was time-efficient, suitable for children under 3 years, easy to administer, and suitable for persons with minimal training and experience with AD. A best estimate clinical Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) diagnosis of AD was made for 70 children using all available information and assessment results, except for the ADEC data. A screening study compared these children on the ADEC with 57 children with other developmental disorders and 64 typically developing children. Results indicated high internal consistency (α = .91). Interrater reliability and test-retest reliability of the ADEC were also adequate. ADEC scores reliably discriminated different diagnostic groups after controlling for nonverbal IQ and Vineland Adaptive Behavior Composite scores. Construct validity (using exploratory factor analysis) and concurrent validity using performance on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (Lord et al., 2000), the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (Le Couteur, Lord, & Rutter, 2003), and DSM-IV-TR criteria were also demonstrated. Signal detection analysis identified the optimal ADEC cutoff score, with the ADEC identifying all children who had an AD (N = 70, sensitivity = 1.0) but overincluding children with other disabilities (N = 13, specificity ranging from .74 to .90). Together, the reliability and validity data indicate that the ADEC has potential to be established as a suitable and efficient screening tool for infants with AD. 2014 APA

  18. Screening for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in a Civilian Emergency Department Population with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarbauer-Krupa, Juliet; Taylor, Christopher A; Yue, John K; Winkler, Ethan A; Pirracchio, Romain; Cooper, Shelly R; Burke, John F; Stein, Murray B; Manley, Geoffrey T

    2017-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a condition associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). While the importance of PTSD and TBI among military personnel is widely recognized, there is less awareness of PTSD associated with civilian TBI. We examined the incidence and factors associated with PTSD 6 months post-injury in a civilian emergency department population using measures from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke TBI Common Data Elements Outcome Battery. Participants with mild TBI (mTBI) from the Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury Pilot study with complete 6-month outcome batteries (n = 280) were analyzed. Screening for PTSD symptoms was conducted using the PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version. Descriptive measures are summarized and predictors for PTSD were examined using logistic regression. Incidence of screening positive for PTSD was 26.8% at 6 months following mTBI. Screening positive for PTSD was significantly associated with concurrent functional disability, post-concussive and psychiatric symptomatology, decreased satisfaction with life, and decreased performance in visual processing and mental flexibility. Multi-variable regression showed injury mechanism of assault (odds ratio [OR] 3.59; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.69-7.63; p = 0.001) and prior psychiatric history (OR 2.56; 95% CI 1.42-4.61; p = 0.002) remained significant predictors of screening positive for PTSD, while education (per year OR 0.88; 95% CI 0.79-0.98; p = 0.021) was associated with decreased odds of PTSD. Standardized data collection and review of pre-injury education, psychiatric history, and injury mechanism during initial hospital presentation can aid in identifying patients with mTBI at risk for developing PTSD symptoms who may benefit from closer follow-up after initial injury care.

  19. PS2-01: A Multimodal Reminder Program Improves Routine Mammogram Screening Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldstein, Adrianne C; Perrin, Nancy; Rosales, Gabriella; Schneider, Jennifer; Rix, Mary M; Morgan, Gail; Keels, Kara; Lassi, Michael; Schoap, Stephanie; Glasgow, Russell E.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims: This retrospective cohort study evaluated the effectiveness of implementation and maintenance phases of a multimodal reminder program to improve routine mammography screening. Methods: The program used automated reminder calls and was conducted at Kaiser Permanente Northwest, a nonprofit group-model HMO with an electronic medical record. Study participants were women HMO members aged 42 or older who were 20 months past their last mammogram (index date) during three time periods: pre-reminder (2004), post-reminder implementation phase (2006), and post-reminder maintenance phase (Jan 1–July 1, 2007) (Total n=35,104). The program targeted women aged 50–69 with a mammogram due followed by post card, followed by up to 2 automated phone calls and 1 live call for non-responders. Women aged 42–49 (for whom clinical guidelines also recommend mammography) receiving no reminders constituted the primary comparison group (CG 1). The primary outcome was time until mammogram in the 10 months following the index date. Results: Pre-reminder, 63.4% of targeted women completed a mammogram; this number increased to 75.4% in the post-reminder implementation; 80.6% completed a mammogram in the maintenance phases. After controlling for demographics and clinic visits, intervention women were 1.51 times more likely to complete a mammogram (CI 1.40–1.62) post-reminder implementation, compared to CG 1. The effect was maintained in 2007 (HR 1.81 [CI 1.65–1.99]). Women of other races (Asian, Pacific Island, or Native American) were less likely to complete a mammogram, as were those taking a greater number of medications. Women with a college education, who were married, or who had visited a primary care provider or gynecologist during follow-up were more likely to complete a mammogram. Conclusions: We found that a multimodal reminder system could be effectively implemented and maintained in a large health system. If widely implemented, this intervention could

  20. Improving Access to Maternity Care for Women with Opioid Use Disorders: Colocation of Midwifery Services at an Addiction Treatment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal drug and alcohol use is associated with serious medical and psychiatric morbidity for pregnant and postpartum women and their newborns. Participation in prenatal care has been shown to improve outcomes, even in the absence of treatment for substance use disorders. Unfortunately, women with substance use disorders often do not receive adequate prenatal care. Barriers to accessing care for pregnant women with substance use disorders include medical and psychiatric comorbidities, transportation, caring for existing children, housing and food insecurity, and overall lack of resources. In a health care system where care is delivered by each discipline separately, lack of communication between providers causes poorly coordinated services and missed opportunities. The integration of mental health and substance use treatment services in medical settings is a goal of health care reform. However, this approach has not been widely promoted in the context of maternity care. The Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center Perinatal Addiction Treatment Program provides an integrated model of care for pregnant and postpartum women with substance use disorders, including the colocation of midwifery services in the context of a dedicated addiction treatment program. A structured approach to screening and intervention for drug and alcohol use in the outpatient prenatal clinic facilitates referral to treatment at the appropriate level. Providing midwifery care within the context of a substance use treatment program improves access to prenatal care, continuity of care throughout pregnancy and the postpartum, and availability of family planning services. The evolution of this innovative approach is described. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice, education, interprofessional collaboration, health policy, and global health. © 2015 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  1. School program for screening students at risk for diabetes: the School Nurse Childhood Obesity Prevention Education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schantz, Shirley; Bobo, Nichole

    2009-07-01

    Accurate height and weight and BMI assessment by the school nurse is the first step in identifying students at risk for developing type 2 diabetes or other health consequences. Additional screening for children at or above the 95th percentile for BMI identifies those students most at risk. MAP affiliate sites indicate that when this assessment and communication is done in a private, sensitive, and caring manner--with emphasis on the health of the child-parents/ guardians are receptive to the information. School nurses, with the knowledge and skills provided by the S.C.O.P.E. program, alert parents/guardians to address their children's health risks and contact their health care providers. School nurses are also taught how they can provide guidance for school leadership and community coalitions to incorporate effective changes to food and physical activity offerings to students. The S.C.O.P.E. program can enhance the role of the school nurse in the global fight against childhood obesity so school-age children are healthy and ready to learn.

  2. [Efficacy of the population-based pilot colorectal screening program. Hungary, Csongrád county, 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutka, Mariann; Molnár, Tamás; Bor, Renáta; Farkas, Klaudia; Fábián, Anna; Győrfi, Márk; Bálint, Anita; Milassin, Ágnes; Szűcs, Mónika; Tiszlavicz, László; Nagy, Ferenc; Szepes, Zoltán

    2017-10-01

    In Hungary, a nationwide colorectal screening program is about to be introduced in order to improve the extremely high mortality rate of colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of our study was to summarize experiences and assess short-term efficacy of the population-based pilot colorectal screening program in 2015 in Csongrád County, Hungary. Asymptomatic individuals between the ages of 50 and 70 with average risk of colorectal cancer participated in the program that was based on the two-step screening method (i.e. immune fecal blood test and colonoscopy). The short-term efficacy of the screening program was assessed as the change in total CRC incidence and initial tumor stage in the screening year (2015) compared to a control year (2013) in Szeged and its surroundings. Participation rate, positive predictive value of the screening methods and tumor detection rate was assessed. 22,130 individuals were invited, the participation rate was 46.4%. Immune fecal blood test proved to be non-negative in 1,343 cases (13%), screening colonoscopy was performed in 766 of them (7.5%). Total colonoscopy was performed in 711 individuals. Based on the reports, adenoma was detected in 358 (50.3%) and malignancy in 42 (5.9%) individuals. In the background population, the incidence of colon cancer was significantly higher (183 vs. 228; p = 0.026) and was diagnosed at significantly earlier stage (p = 0.002). Lymph node involvement was significantly lower in 2015 (48.3% vs. 37.1%; p = 0.049). The Csongrád county population-based colorectal cancer screening was evidently successful on the short term considering participation rate, and the changes in CRC incidence and stage, thus its national extension is necessary. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(42): 1658-1667.

  3. From cancer screening to treatment: service delivery and referral in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline W; Hanson, Vivien; Johnson, Gale D; Royalty, Janet E; Richardson, Lisa C

    2014-08-15

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to low-income and underserved women through a network of providers and health care organizations. Although the program serves women 40-64 years old for breast cancer screening and 21-64 years old for cervical cancer screening, the priority populations are women 50-64 years old for breast cancer and women who have never or rarely been screened for cervical cancer. From 1991 through 2011, the NBCCEDP provided screening and diagnostic services to more than 4.3 million women, diagnosing 54,276 breast cancers, 2554 cervical cancers, and 123,563 precancerous cervical lesions. A critical component of providing screening services is to ensure that all women with abnormal screening results receive appropriate and timely diagnostic evaluations. Case management is provided to assist women with overcoming barriers that would delay or prevent follow-up care. Women diagnosed with cancer receive treatment through the states' Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Programs (a special waiver for Medicaid) if they are eligible. The NBCCEDP has performance measures that serve as benchmarks to monitor the completeness and timeliness of care. More than 90% of the women receive complete diagnostic care and initiate treatment less than 30 days from the time of their diagnosis. Provision of effective screening and diagnostic services depends on effective program management, networks of providers throughout the community, and the use of evidence-based knowledge, procedures, and technologies. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  4. Comparison of Child Behavior Checklist subscales in screening for obsessive-compulsive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia Aaron Skovby; Bilenberg, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a prevalent psychiatric disorder in children and adolescents associated with significant functional impairment. Early and correct diagnosis is essential for an optimal treatment outcome. The purpose of this study was to determine which of four subscales...... derived from the Child Behavior Checklist best discriminates OCD patients from clinical and population-based controls....

  5. Internet-Based Screening for Suicidal Ideation in Common Mental Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemelrijk, E.; van Ballegooijen, W.; Donker, T.; van Straten, A.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Common mental disorders have been found to be related to suicidal ideation and behavior. Research in the field of web-based interventions for common mental disorders, however, usually excludes participants with a suicidal risk, although a large proportion of participants might suffer

  6. Screening tools for body dysmorphic disorder in a cosmetic surgery setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picavet, Valerie; Gabriëls, Lutgardis; Jorissen, Mark; Hellings, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a well-established psychiatric disorder characterized by a marked, distressing, and impairing preoccupation with an imagined or slight defect in appearance. Despite the growing interest in and awareness of aesthetic surgeons for BDD, diagnosing BDD during a

  7. Mental health on screen: A DSM-5 dissection of portrayals of autism spectrum disorders in film and TV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordahl-Hansen, Anders; Tøndevold, Magnus; Fletcher-Watson, Sue

    2018-04-01

    Portrayals of characters with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in films and TV series are subject to intense debate over whether such representations are accurate. Inaccurate portrayals are a concern as they may lead to increased stereotypes toward the condition. We investigate whether portrayals of characters with autism spectrum disorder in film and TV-series align with DSM-5 diagnostic criteria. Our data show that characters present a full range of characteristics described in the DSM-5. The meaning of this finding is discussed in relation to potential educational value of on screen portrayals and the notion of authenticity in representing the autistic experience. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Group Counseling for Eating Disorders: A Two-Phase Treatment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Cherie R.; Orysh, Leslie K.

    1994-01-01

    University counseling centers have reported an increase in the number of eating-disordered clients at a time when counseling resources have been shrinking. This article describes a group counseling program designed to meet the varied needs of eating-disordered clients and manage the demand for services more efficiently. (Author/BF)

  9. Defragmenting paediatric anorexia nervosa: the Flinders Medical Centre Paediatric Eating Disorder Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetani, Shuichi; Yiu, Sau Man; Batterham, Michael

    2015-06-01

    To describe the establishment and the main characteristics of the Flinders Medical Centre Paediatric Eating Disorder Program. While the programme is still in its infancy, it is hoped that our model of care can provide a sustainable, long term contribution to the management of paediatric eating disorders. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  10. Effect of socioeconomic status on cardio-respiratory fitness: data from a health screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmueli, Hezzy; Rogowski, Ori; Toker, Sharon; Melamed, Shmuel; Leshem-Rubinow, Eran; Ben-Assa, Eyal; Shapira, Itzhak; Berliner, Shlomo; Steinvil, Arie

    2014-06-01

    Lower socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with reduced cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF) and predicts adverse cardiovascular outcomes. We questioned whether this association remains significant among an apparently healthy population with a presumed higher SES. This cross-sectional study enrolled attendees of a health screening program between September 2002 and November 2010. Linear regression models included the metabolic equivalents achieved during an exercise treadmill stress test as the dependent variable and adjusted for self-reported SES parameters (level of education, occupational status, financial strain and a combined variable), cardiovascular risk factors, as well as to multiple potential confounders. Data on 8471 individuals (5463 men and 3008 women) with a mean (SD) age of 44 (11) years were collected. We found a statistically significant difference in mean exercise capacity between the categories of SES, especially for the level of education and occupation, when adjusted for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, SES variables and multiple confounders. Multiple factors affect CRF in apparently healthy screened individuals. When adjusted for those factors, SES correlates with CRF even within a more specific highly educated cohort.

  11. Screening for common mental disorders and substance abuse among temporary hired cleaners in Egyptian Governmental Hospitals, Zagazig City, Sharqia Governorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, R A; Hammam, R A M; El-Gohary, S S; Sabik, L M E; Hunter, M S

    2013-01-01

    Informal employment is common in developing countries, including Egypt. This type of employment may have significant consequences on mental health. To determine the prevalence and risk factors of common mental disorders and substance abuse among temporary hired hospital cleaners. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 242 adult temporary cleaners and 209 permanent cleaners working in 4 governmental hospitals in Zagazig City, Sharqia Governorate, Egypt. All participants were invited to complete a structured questionnaire through a semi-structured interview which included the self-reporting questionnaire 20 items (SRQ-20) and the work stress scale. Assessment of drug use included urine-based screening tests for common substances abused. The prevalence of job stress, common mental disorders and substance abuse, particularly tramadol and cannabis (Bango), was significantly higher in the studied temporary cleaners compared to permanent cleaners. Risk factors associated with increased susceptibility of the temporary cleaners to common mental disorders were family history of substance abuse, high crowding index, history of physical illness, low educational level, and smoking; while being unmarried, male sex, family history of mental disorder, age ≥40 years, smoking, and length of service ≥8 years, were associated with substance abuse among the same group. Temporary hired hospital cleaners suffered from impaired mental health more than permanent cleaners. Therefore, expanding the coverage of current laws and occupational safety and health standards to cover workers in the informal sector especially in developing countries is recommended.

  12. [Would the Screening of Common Mental Disorders in Primary-Care Health Services Hyper-Frequent Patients Be Useful?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-Hoyos, Hernán G; López, Mérida R Rodríguez; Ruiz, Ana María Villa; Hernández, Carlos Augusto; Ramos, Martha Lucía

    2012-12-01

    Hyper-frequentation in health services is a problem for patients, their families and the institutions. This study is aimed at determining the frequency and characteristics of common mental disorders in hyper-frequent patients showing vague symptoms and signs at a primary healthcare service during the year 2007 in the city of Cali (Colombia). Cross sectional. The most frequent mental disorders in hyper-frequent patients were detected through a telephone interview which included several modules of the PRIME MD instrument. In general, healthcare service hyper-frequenters are working women, 38,7-year old in average. Basically, the consultation is due to cephalalgia but they also exhibit a high prevalence of common mental disorders (somatization, depression and anxiety) not easily diagnosed by physicians in primary care. Expenses for additional health activities generated by these patients are attributed basically to medical consultation and required procedures. Considering hyper-frequenters in health care services as a risk group in terms of common mental disorders involves screening as an efficient strategy to prevent abuse in service use and to improve satisfaction with the attention received. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Breast cancer correlates in a cohort of breast screening program participants in Riyadh, KSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Amri, F.; Saeedi, M.Y.; Al-Tahan, F.M.; Alomary, S.A.; Kassim, K.A.; Ali, A.M.; Mostafa Arafa, M.; Ibrahim, A.K.; Ali, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the first cancer among females in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, accounting for 27.4% of all newly diagnosed female cancers in 2010. There are several risk factors affecting the incidence of breast cancer where some factors influence the risk more than the others. Aim: We aimed to identify the different risk factors related to breast cancer among females participating in the breast-screening program in Riyadh, KSA. Methods: Based on data from phase-I of the breast-screening program, a case-control study was conducted on women living in Riyadh, KSA. A sample of 349 women (58 cases and 290 controls) was recruited to examine the different breast cancer correlates. Multivariate regression model was built to investigate the most important risk factors. Results: The mean age of cases was 48.5 ± 7.1 years. Age at marriage, number of pregnancy, age at menopause, oral contraceptive pills, breast feeding and family history of breast cancer in first-degree relative were identified as the most important correlates among the studied cohort. Conclusions: The findings of the current work suggested that age at marriage, age at menopause ≥50 years, and 1st degree family history of breast cancer were risk factors for breast cancer, while, age at menopause<50 years, number of pregnancies and practicing breast feeding were protective factors against breast cancer. There was no effect of body mass index or physical inactivity. Further studies are needed to explore the hereditary, familial and genetic background risk factors in Saudi population.

  14. The rationale behind screening programs for early detection of hepatitis C virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Leźnicka

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of the study was to collect the data on undetected hepatitis C virus (HCV in the frequently hospitalized residents of the Kujawsko-Pomorskie Voivodeship. Material and Methods: The analysis focused on empirical data. The research was conducted in 2013 among 6332 citizens of the Kujawsko-Pomorskie Voivodeship who had been hospitalized at least twice. The blood was tested for the presence of anti-HCV antibodies. The diagnostic survey with an anonymous questionnaire was developed and used for the purpose of the study. For the statistical analysis Statistica 10.0 was used. The hypothesis was verified using the Mann- -Whitney U test and Chi2 test of independence. A level of statistical significance was assumed at α = 0.05. The results were considered to be statistically significant if the probability fulfilled the inequality of p < 0.05. Results: Positive anti-HCV antigens were detected in 91 (1.44% examined individuals. The relationship was found between blood transfusions provided before 1992, the use of intravenous narcotics and doping, and minor surgical procedures and the infection. Conclusions: Asymptomatic infection was detected in 91 citizens of the Kujawsko-Pomorskie Voivodeship. The highest risk of HCV infection occurs during small surgery and usage of intravenous narcotics and doping. The percentage of positive results is slightly higher in the group of people with cosmetic and beauty treatments. Planning screening programs special attention should be paid to this group of risk. Blood and blood products transfusions before 1992 were associated with a higher risk of HCV infection. People with above-mentioned interventions should become a particular group of screening program participants. Occupational medicine service plays an important role in prevention. Med Pr 2014;65(5:633–637

  15. Validity of the Questionnaire for the Revised Version of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED-41

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Rabie

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: 4TThe revised version of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED-41 is a self-report questionnaire that measures symptoms (panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, school phobia, social phobia of DSM-IV linked anxiety disorders in children with aged 8 to 18 years. The aim of the present study was to examine the validation of the (SCARED-41 in a sample of 300 school children. Materials and Methods:4T After the translation of the original version of the mentioned Scale to Farsi and confirming it by two psychology and English language professors, the final version was administered to 300 students (150 males, 150 females of Isfahan who were selected through stratified-cluster sampling. The age range of the participants was between 19 to 35 years. To assess reliability, internal consistency and split half methods were used. Also, concurrent, validity of convergent and divergent and factorial structure were used to determine validity. Results: 4TThe range of Cronbach’s alpha and retest were from 0.52 to 0.93 for subscale. Also, the coefficients of total Cronbach’s alpha reliability and retest were 0.93, and 0.92 respectively. Moreover, results of the concurrent validity, validity of convergent and divergent and factorial structure showed that (SCARED-41 has satisfactory validity. Conclusion: 4TThe revised version of the SCARED-41 has satisfactory reliability and validity in the sample of Iranian students, and could be used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  16. The burden of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) in the Asia-Pacific region and recommendations for screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ian, Everall; Gwen, Chan Lai; Soo, Chow Ting; Melissa, Corr; Chun-Kai, Huang; Eosu, Kim; Hyo-Youl, Kim; Asad, Khan; Scott, Letendre; Chung-Ki, Li Patrick; Anekthananon, Thanomsak; Jordan, Treisman Glenn; Han-Ting, Wei; Wing-Wai, Wong

    2016-08-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder incurs a significant burden on HIV patients in Asia-Pacific countries; however, the incidence is difficult to estimate due to a lack of local epidemiological data. The impact of neurocognitive impairment in HIV patients is often underestimated due to a lack of education and awareness, and there are consequently gaps in the provision of screening and diagnosis to enable earlier intervention to limit neurocognitive impairment. This review seeks to redress the imbalance by promoting awareness and education among physicians concerning the neurovirulence of HIV and thereby increase screening efforts to improve diagnosis rates and clinical outcomes for underserved patients in this region. The Asia, Australia, and Middle East (AAME) HAND Advisory Board convened expert regional representatives to review current practice and recommend appropriate measures related to the implementation of standardised screening programmes and treatment recommendations to curb the developing HAND epidemic in the region. In particular, we recommend basic neuropsychological testing protocols that could be efficiently introduced into clinical practice for routine screening. We also propose simple guidelines for the management of HAND. We believe that HAND is a significant and under-reported diagnosis in HIV patients that warrants both greater recognition and further clinical investigation of the underlying pathophysiology and the impact of HIV disease progression, with HAND being associated with worse medication adherence and therefore possibly increased risk of ARV treatment failure. Widespread screening will lead to greater recognition of HAND and earlier intervention, which may lead to improved management strategies in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk factors for presumptive melanoma in skin cancer screening: American Academy of Dermatology National Melanoma/Skin Cancer Screening Program experience 2001-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Matthew S; Doucette, John T; Lim, Henry W; Spencer, James; Carucci, John A; Rigel, Darrell S

    2007-07-01

    Since its inception in 1985, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) National Melanoma/Skin Cancer Screening Program has strived to enhance early detection of cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM) by providing nationwide skin cancer education campaigns in combination with free skin cancer screenings. To analyze the AAD screening data from 2001 to 2005 in order to identify factors associated with MM detection, and thereby derive a model of increased likelihood for MM detection through visual skin examinations at screenings. Patients completed a standardized AAD pre-screening form with historical and phenotypic information. Clinicians then recorded suspected clinical findings noted at visual skin examination. Statistical analyses were conducted using SPSS 14 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Ill). Five factors, which can be remembered with the acronym HARMM, independently increased the likelihood of suspected MM being found in the 362,804 persons screened: History of previous melanoma (odds ratio [OR] = 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.9-3.8); Age over 50 (OR = 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3); Regular dermatologist absent (OR = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.3-1.5); Mole changing (OR = 2.0; 95% CI, 1.9-2.2); and Male gender (OR = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.3-1.5). Individuals at highest risk (4 or 5 factors) comprised only 5.8% of the total population, yet accounted for 13.6% of presumptive MM findings, and were 4.4 times (95% CI, 3.8-5.1) more likely to be diagnosed with suspected MM than individuals at lowest risk (0 or 1 factor). Receipt of a total skin examination at screening independently increased the likelihood for identifying suspected MM (OR = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.3-1.6). However, significantly fewer screenees in the highest risk group versus those in the lowest risk group underwent total skin examinations (53.7% vs 62.5%). Risk factors studied limited to variables collected in screenee enrollment form. A higher-risk subgroup of the skin cancer screening population can be identified through assessment of MM

  18. New software for collecting data from the organized cervical cancer screening program in Serbia. Are we on the threshold of a new screening registry? - A multicentric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumovic, Tamara; Lakic, Vesna; Jovicevic, Ana; Ilic, Dragan; Milosevic, Predrag; Stevic-Gajic, Vesna; Antonijevic, Ana; Milovanovic, Nada; Magdic, Ivica; Koricanac, Rajko; Malkov, Sasa; Grkavac, Igor; Mihajlovic, Milos; Djuricic, Slavisa; Zivkovic, Branislava; Stegic, Uros; Milovanovic, Zorka; Opric, Dejan; Knezevic, Marija; Jovanovic, Verica; Todorovic, Zoran; Todorovic, Dusan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present the Screening Registry and the results of organized cervical cancer screening program (OCCSP) in the Republic of Serbia using a database made as an output model, linked with the Screening Registry. Data were respectively collected over a onemonth period from 3 state primary health care centers (and related hospitals/clinical center) in central Serbia in which OCCSP was conducted. The sample consisted of women of the target population (25 to 64 years old) who responded the call for Pap test. The most frequent abnormal cytological diagnosis was in the 38-50 years age group, and consisted of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance - ASCUS (7.5%) and low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions - L-SIL (7.3%). The most frequent abnormal colposcopic finding in the youngest age group of women (25-37 years) was iodine negative epithelium (35.7%) and in the group of women aged 38-50 and 51-64 years acid-white epithelium. The most common histopathological diagnosis was L-SIL. Positive predictive value of colposcopy in relation to the Pap test was 0.64 (95% CI=0.56-0.70). Interrater agreement (between cytotechnicians and supervisors) measured by the Cohen's coefficient was 0.94 (95% CI=0.91 to 0.97), but between cytology (supervisors) and pathology findings it was 0.83 (95% CI = 0.67 to 0.99). The existence of a screening registry contributes to a better epidemiological surveillance of a screening program, and to a possibility for development of various epidemiological researches.

  19. Evaluation of a HIV voluntary opt-out screening program in a Singapore hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Quan Tan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV allows for appropriately timed interventions with improved outcomes, but HIV screening among asymptomatic persons and the general population in Singapore remains low. In 2008, Singapore's Ministry of Health implemented HIV voluntary opt-out screening (VOS for hospitalised adults. We evaluated the outcome of VOS and surveyed reasons for its low uptake in our institution. METHODS: We assessed the outcomes of the VOS programme from January 2010 to December 2013 at National University Hospital, a 1081-bed tertiary hospital in Singapore. We also examined reasons for opting-in and opting-out using an interviewer-administered structured questionnaire in a representative sample in January 2013. RESULTS: 107,523 patients fulfilled VOS criteria and were offered HIV screening, of which 5215 (4.9% agreed to testing. 4850 (93.1% of those who opted-in had an HIV test done. Three (0.06% tested positive for HIV. 238 patients (14.2% were surveyed regarding reasons for opting-in or out of VOS. 21 (8.8% had opted-in. Patients who opted-in were likely to be younger, more educated and reported having more regular sexual partners. Type of housing, number of casual sexual partners, sexual orientation, intravenous drug use, condom use and previous sexually transmitted infection were not associated with deciding to opt-in/out. Patients' most common reasons for opting-out were: belief that they were at low risk (50.2%, belief that they were too old (26.8%, cost (6.9% and aversion to venepuncture (6.5%. The most common reason for opting-in was desire to know their HIV status (47.6%. CONCLUSION: The success of an HIV-VOS program is largely determined by test uptake. Our study showed that the majority of eligible VOS patients opted-out of HIV screening. Given the considerable cost and low yield of this programme, more needs to be done to better equip patients in self-risk assessment and opting in to testing.

  20. Evaluation of a HIV voluntary opt-out screening program in a Singapore hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xin Quan; Goh, Wei-Ping; Venkatachalam, Indumathi; Goh, Diana; Sridhar, Revathi; Chan, Hwang Ching; Archuleta, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) allows for appropriately timed interventions with improved outcomes, but HIV screening among asymptomatic persons and the general population in Singapore remains low. In 2008, Singapore's Ministry of Health implemented HIV voluntary opt-out screening (VOS) for hospitalised adults. We evaluated the outcome of VOS and surveyed reasons for its low uptake in our institution. We assessed the outcomes of the VOS programme from January 2010 to December 2013 at National University Hospital, a 1081-bed tertiary hospital in Singapore. We also examined reasons for opting-in and opting-out using an interviewer-administered structured questionnaire in a representative sample in January 2013. 107,523 patients fulfilled VOS criteria and were offered HIV screening, of which 5215 (4.9%) agreed to testing. 4850 (93.1%) of those who opted-in had an HIV test done. Three (0.06%) tested positive for HIV. 238 patients (14.2%) were surveyed regarding reasons for opting-in or out of VOS. 21 (8.8%) had opted-in. Patients who opted-in were likely to be younger, more educated and reported having more regular sexual partners. Type of housing, number of casual sexual partners, sexual orientation, intravenous drug use, condom use and previous sexually transmitted infection were not associated with deciding to opt-in/out. Patients' most common reasons for opting-out were: belief that they were at low risk (50.2%), belief that they were too old (26.8%), cost (6.9%) and aversion to venepuncture (6.5%). The most common reason for opting-in was desire to know their HIV status (47.6%). The success of an HIV-VOS program is largely determined by test uptake. Our study showed that the majority of eligible VOS patients opted-out of HIV screening. Given the considerable cost and low yield of this programme, more needs to be done to better equip patients in self-risk assessment and opting in to testing.

  1. The Prevalence of Hemoglobinopathies in Young Adolescents in the Province of Muğla in Turkey: Results of a Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topal, Yaşar; Topal, Hatice; Ceyhan, Mustafa Nuri; Azik, Fatih; Çapanoğlu, Murat; Kocabaş, Can Naci

    2015-01-01

    Thalassemia is an autosomal recessive inherited blood disorder. It is prevalent in Mediterranean countries such as Sardinia, Greece, Cyprus, Turkey, Lebanon and also Southeast Asia. Our aim was to investigate the carrier prevalence of thalassemia and other hemoglobinopathies in adolescents who live in Muğla Province, Turkey. We analyzed retrospectively the surveys conducted at primary schools between 1997 and 2013. Complete blood count (CBC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used to screen for thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies. Patients were diagnosed as having thalassemia trait if the mean corpuscular volume (MCV) was ≤ 80.0 fL, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (Hb) was ≤ 27.0 pg and Hb A2 levels were ≥ 3.5%. A total of 164,814 students were analyzed. The median age of the students was 13.5 years (minimum 13.0, maximum 14.0). The total number of students with abnormal HPLC results was 5861 (3.8%). There was a significant decrease in the newborn of new thalassemia patients found with screening programs for hemoglobinopathies in Muğla Province from 1997 to 2013. The number of students with abnormal HPLC results for thalassemia, sickle cell disease and other Hb traits were 3.2, 0.15 and 0.4%, respectively. It is important to recognize that including Hb, MCV, red blood cell (RBC) count and HPLC tests for carrier screening are necessary to find hemoglobinopathies. Our study supported that the number of new patients significantly decreased using these screening programs from 1997 to 2013.

  2. Cervical cancer screening in adolescents: an evidence-based internet education program for practice improvement among advanced practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choma, Kim; McKeever, Amy E

    2015-02-01

    The literature reports great variation in the knowledge levels and application of the recent changes of cervical cancer screening guidelines into clinical practice. Evidence-based screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer offers healthcare providers the opportunity to improve practice patterns among female adolescents by decreasing psychological distress as well as reducing healthcare costs and morbidities associated with over-screening. The purpose of this pilot intervention study was to determine the effects of a Web-based continuing education unit (CEU) program