WorldWideScience

Sample records for disease related factors

  1. Factors influencing the relation between alcohol and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbaek, Morten

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Light-to-moderate alcohol intake is known to have cardioprotective properties in some subsets of the population. This review focuses on factors that modify the relation between alcohol and cardiovascular disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Several large American studies have shown...... to a binge - intake of alcohol have benefits with regard to cardiovascular disease. Prospective studies from the UK, Sweden and Denmark have further suggested that wine drinkers have a lower mortality than beer and spirits drinkers. SUMMARY: The J-shaped relation between alcohol intake and cardiovascular...... that the J-shaped relation is influenced by age and coronary heart disease risk-factor status since only middle-aged and elderly and those already at risk of developing coronary heart disease seem protected by drinking alcohol. It has also been suggested that only those who have a steady - in contrast...

  2. Splicing regulatory factors, ageing and age-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Eva; Harries, Lorna W

    2017-07-01

    Alternative splicing is a co-transcriptional process, which allows for the production of multiple transcripts from a single gene and is emerging as an important control point for gene expression. Alternatively expressed isoforms often have antagonistic function and differential temporal or spatial expression patterns, yielding enormous plasticity and adaptability to cells and increasing their ability to respond to environmental challenge. The regulation of alternative splicing is critical for numerous cellular functions in both pathological and physiological conditions, and deregulated alternative splicing is a key feature of common chronic diseases. Isoform choice is controlled by a battery of splicing regulatory proteins, which include the serine arginine rich (SRSF) proteins and the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) classes of genes. These important splicing regulators have been implicated in age-related disease, and in the ageing process itself. This review will outline the important contribution of splicing regulator proteins to ageing and age-related disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Disease-free survival related factors in breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila-Arias, Cristina; Ocón, Olga; Fernández, Mariana F; Arrebola, Juan Pedro; Sánchez, María José; Aneiros, José; Torné, Pablo; Olea, Nicolás

    2014-10-07

    To evaluate the relationship between the clinical and pathological parameters of the primary tumor and disease-free survival (DFS) in a sample of hospital cases of invasive breast cancer. We performed a retrospective cohort study in 635 patients recruited at San Cecilio University Hospital in Granada (Spain) between 1994 and 2006. Information on the primary tumor and the outcomes of patients was collected by reviewing the medical records. Predictors of recurrence and/or metastasis and DFS (follow up of 3, 5 and 10 years) were analyzed by using Cox regression analysis. Multivariate models adjusted for age, tumor size, lymph nodal status, histological grade and estrogen and progesterone receptor expression showed a higher risk of recurrence and/or metastasis and lower DFS (adjusted relative risk, 95% confidence intervals) with tumor size (3 yrs: 3.00, 1.79-5.03; 5 yrs: 2.56, 1.65-3.98; 10 yrs: 2.16, 1.44-3.24), lymph nodal status (3 yrs: 4.58, 2.42-8.65; 5 yrs: 3.84, 2.35-6.30; 10 yrs: 3.08, 2.05-4.61), lymphovascular invasion (5 yrs: 1.88, 1.16-3.04; 10 yrs: 2.19, 1.43-3.35), multifocal and/or multicenter tumors (3 yrs: 2.69, 1.46-4.96; 5 yrs: 1.90, 1.08-3.35) and p53 protein expression (3 yrs: 2.03, 1.00-4.09). DFS was positively associated with an increased expression of progesterone receptor (3 yr: 0.48, 0.26-0.89; 5 yrs: 0.58, 0.35-0.97; 10 yrs: 0.59, 0.38-0.90). The biological characteristics of the primary tumor can be used to identify patients with distinctive prognoses and DFS, and could be helpful in making individual follow up strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence of peripheral arterial disease and related risk factors in Turkish elders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesilkayali Teoman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that prevalence of peripheral arterial disease being a widespread atherosclerotic vascular disease increases by age. On the other hand, no comprehensive study showing the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in Turkish elders is seen. In this study, it is aimed to assess prevalence of peripheral arterial disease and related risk factors in Turkish elders in primary health center. Methods 507 elderly staying at Narlidere Geriatric Care Center and Residential Home and accepting to participate in the study were included in the study. Epidemiological data for diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease, risk factors, findings of physical examination and ankle brachial index measurements were assessed in the study. Data were analyzed in terms of prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, age and gender relation and other cardiovascular risk factors. Results Of the participants, 317 (62.5% were female. The mean age was 77.61 ± 6.93 years (62-102. The most wide-spread chronic diseases in elderly included hypertension, coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia and Type 2 DM, respectively. On the other hand, only 7 (1.4% elderly were diagnosed with peripheral arterial disease. The number of elderly ABI of whom was measured as Conclusions Peripheral arterial disease is expected to be seen prevailing in elderly. However, it was determined at very low rate before the study due to the fact that the disease cannot be diagnosed clinically especially in early-period. Peripheral arterial disease determined in the study is lower than expected as per the age group. This can be associated with practices of geriatrics nursing and family practice including continuous care to reduce cardiovascular risk factors of patients staying at the unit.

  5. Factors Associated with Myelosuppression Related to Low-Dose Methotrexate Therapy for Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shunsuke; Hidaka, Michihiro; Kawakita, Toshiro; Hidaka, Toshihiko; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Yoshitama, Tamami; Migita, Kiyoshi; Ueki, Yukitaka

    2016-01-01

    Objective Severe myelosuppression is a serious concern in the management of rheumatic disease patients receiving methotrexate (MTX) therapy. This study was intended to explore factors associated with the development of MTX-related myelosuppression and its disease severity. Methods We retrospectively examined a total of 40 cases of MTX-related myelosuppression that had been filed in the registries of participating rheumatology and hematology divisions. Data before onset were compared with those of 120 controls matched for age and sex. Cytopenia was graded according to the National Cancer Institute criteria for adverse events. Data before and at onset were compared between the severe and non-severe groups. Results Non-use of folic acid supplements, concurrent medications, and low renal function were significantly associated with the development of myelosuppression (p disease severity was not dependent on MTX doses. Serum albumin levels and folic acid supplementation are the important factors affecting the severity of MTX-related pancytopenia and neutropenia. PMID:27128679

  6. Work-related psychosocial factors and the development of ischemic heart disease: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eller, Nanna H; Netterstrøm, Bo; Gyntelberg, Finn

    2009-01-01

    The literature on the relationship between work-related psychosocial factors and the development of ischemic heart disease (IHD) was systematically reviewed: 33 articles presented 51 analyses of studies involving male participants, 18 analyses involving female participants, and 8 analyses with both...... risk. Insufficient evidence was found for a relationship between IHD and effort-reward imbalance, injustice, job insecurity, or long working hours. Studies involving women are too few to draw any conclusion concerning women, work stress, and IHD....

  7. Related factors of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy in patents with Graves' disease after 131I treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Lian; Lu Keyi; Chen Xia; Zhao Deshan; Liu Jianzhong; Li Sijin; Li Xianfeng; Sun Bin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analysis the related factors of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy(TAO) in patients with Graves' disease after 131 I treatment. Methods: Five hundred and sixty two patients with Graves' disease were followed up after 131 I treatment, included 243 cases with TAO and 319 cases without TAO. Logistic multivariate regression analysis was used to analyse the data of the improvement of the TAO, stability and progression. Results: Of the patients without TAO, 10 new cases of TAO were diagnosed (3.13%). Of the patients with TAO, 134 (55.14%) had experienced improvement, 99 (40.74%) cases with stable disease and 10 (4.12%) cases with progressed disease. The progression rate were no difference between the part of patients with and without TAO (χ 2 =0.576, P>0.05), and were difference between simple and invasive prominent eyes groups (χ 2 =11.893, P 2 =10.621, P 131 I therapy had no obviously influence between Graves' disease with and without TAO, and early controling the risk factors and treatment with glucocorticoid could prevent aggravation of TAO. (authors)

  8. Nutrition-Related Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors In Chronic Kidney Disease: Relationship With Clinical Outcome

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    Emma McMahon

    2012-06-01

    Traditional CV-risk factors in this CKD population were not associated with clinical outcome. Despite being within clinical reference range, serum phosphate and albumin were independently associated with clinical outcome. This may highlight a potential therapeutic target for risk management to delay or prevent renal end-points in CKD.

  9. Acantosis nigricansis associated with risk factors related to cardiovascular disease in Mexican children with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Rojano, Hugo; Pizano-Zárate, María Luisa; Sánchez-Jiménez, Bernarda; Sámano, Reyna; López-Portillo, Armando

    2016-09-20

    The prevalence of obesity in Mexican children has increased during the last decade, as has the risk of early onset metabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease. To determine the association ofAcantosis nigricans (AN)with dyslipidemia, high blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and risk factors related to eating behavior in overweight and obese children. This transverse analytical study, conducted in two Mexico City primary schools, included 300 boys and girls. Information was gathered on hereditary and perinatal background. A physical examination provided data on the presence/absence of AN, blood pressure, weight and height. The BMI and Z-score were calculated. The serum concentration of glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides was quantified and the lipoprotein profile determined. The prevalence of AN was 41.7%. An association was found between ANand risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including BMI (rS 0.432; p 48%) (RM: 3.591; p = 0.001). A high prevalence of ANwas found in overweight and obese children. There was an association between ANand risk factors of cardiovascular disease, including Z-score, BMI, dyslipidemia, and high blood pressure.

  10. Literature-Related Discovery: Common Factors for Parkinson’s Disease and Crohn’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    cytoplasm of human cells. Synthetic dsRNA Dicer substrates enhance RNAi potency and efficacy. MicroRNAs: genomics, biogenesis, mechanism, and...tetrahydrocannabinol 0.7%, marijuana 0.6%, delta.thc 0.6%, extinct 0.6%, cannabinoid.receptors 0.6%, acid 0.5%, 940 0.5%, cisaprid 0.5%, antagonist 0.4...0.6%, receptor 0.6%, patient 0.6%, endogen 0.5%, tetrahydrocannabinol 0.5%, delta 0.5%, genom 0.4%, kinas 0.4%, factor 0.4%, marijuana 0.4% Single

  11. [Financial burden of hepatitis B-related diseases and factors influencing the costs in Shenzhen, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Sen; Zhang, Shun-xiang; Ma, Qi-shan; Xiao, He-wei; Lü, Qiu-ying; Xie, Xu; Mei, Shu-jiang; Hu, Dong-sheng; Zhou, Bo-ping; Li, Bing; Chen, Jing-fang; Cui, Fu-qiang; Wang, Fu-zhen; Liang, Xiao-feng

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the direct, indirect and intangible costs due to hepatitis B-related diseases and to explore main factors associated with the costs in Shenzhen. Cluster sampling for cases collected consecutively during the study period was administrated. Subjects were selected from eligible hepatitis B-related patients. By pre-trained professional investigators, health economics-related information was collected, using a structured questionnaire. Hospitalization expenses were obtained through hospital records after the patients were discharged from hospital. Total economic burden of hepatitis B-related patients would involve direct, indirect and intangible costs. Direct costs were further divided into direct medical costs and direct nonmedical costs. Human Capital Approach was employed to measure the indirect costs both on patients and the caregivers in 1-year time span. Willing to pay method was used to estimate the intangible costs. Multiple linear stepwise regression models were conducted to determine the factors linked to the economic burden. On average, the total annual cost of per patient with hepatitis B-related diseases was 81 590.23 RMB Yuan. Among which, direct, indirect and intangible costs were 30 914.79 Yuan (account for 37.9%), 15 258.01 Yuan (18.7%), 35 417.43 Yuan (43.4%), respectively. The total annual costs per patient for hepatocellular carcinoma, severe hepatitis B, decompensated cirrhosis, compensated cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis B and acute hepatitis B were 194 858.40 Yuan, 144 549.20 Yuan, 120 333.60 Yuan, 79 528.81 Yuan, 66 282.46 Yuan and 39 286.81 Yuan, respectively. The ratio of direct to indirect costs based on the base-case estimation foot add to 2.0:1, increased from hepato-cellular carcinoma (0.7:1) to compensated cirrhosis (3.5:1), followed by acute hepatitis B (3.3:1), severe hepatitis B (2.8:1), decompensate cirrhosis (2.3:1) and chronic hepatitis B (2.2:1). Direct medical costs were more than direct nonmedical. Ratio between the

  12. [The salivary factors related to caries and periodontal disease in children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng-xing; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Zhi; Qin, Man

    2013-09-01

    To detect the salivary factors related to caries and periodontal disease and to analyze the risk of caries and periodontal disease in children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus. The study comprised 30 children with diabetic mellitus, aged 7-15 years old, and 60 healthy age-and gender-matched children. Caries and periodontal indexes were recorded and saliva related factors were analyzed. Caries indexes of diabetes children [permanent teeth: decay missing filling tooth (DMFT) M (Q1,Q3) = 0(0, 4), deciduous teeth: decay missing filling tooth (dmft) M (Q1,Q3) = 0(0, 1)] were not significantly different with those of healthy children [DMFT M (Q1,Q3) = 1(0, 3), dmft M (Q1,Q3) = 0(0, 4)], but plaque index (PLI) (1.25 ± 0.33) and bleeding index (BI) (0.74 ± 0.45) of diabetes children were significantly higher than those of healthy children (PLI was 0.93 ± 0.31,BI was 0.34 ± 0.22) (P 0.05). Salivary glucose, immunoglobulin sIgA and sIgG were not significantly different between the two groups (P > 0.05).Salivary lysozyme of diabetes children was significantly higher than that of healthy children (P 0.05). Diabetes mellitus can lead to the changes of some salivary factors related to gingivitis in diabetes children. Children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus may have a higher risk of periodontal disease.

  13. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  14. Prevalence and risk factors associated with nutrition-related noncommunicable diseases in the Eastern Mediterranean region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musaiger AO

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abdulrahman O Musaiger1, Hazzaa M Al-Hazzaa21Nutrition and Health Studies Unit, Deanship of Scientific Research, University of Bahrain, Bahrain, and Arab Center for Nutrition, Bahrain; 2Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Department of Physical Education and Movement Science, College of Education, and Scientific Board, Obesity Research Chair, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: This paper reviews the current situation concerning nutrition-related noncommunicable diseases (N-NCDs and the risk factors associated with these diseases in the Eastern Mediterranean region (EMR. A systematic literature review of studies and reports published between January 1, 1990 and September 15, 2011 was conducted using the PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, obesity, cancer, and osteoporosis have become the main causes of morbidity and mortality, especially with progressive aging of the population. The estimated mortality rate due to cardiovascular disease and diabetes ranged from 179.8 to 765.2 per 100,000 population, with the highest rates in poor countries. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was very high, ranging from 19% to 45%. The prevalence of overweight and obesity (body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 has reached an alarming level in most countries of the region, ranging from 25% to 82%, with a higher prevalence among women. The estimated mortality rate for cancer ranged from 61.9 to 151 per 100,000 population. Osteoporosis has become a critical problem, particularly among women. Several risk factors may be contributing to the high prevalence of N-NCDs in EMR, including nutrition transition, low intake of fruit and vegetables, demographic transition, urbanization, physical inactivity, hypertension, tobacco smoking, stunting of growth of preschool children, and lack of nutrition and health awareness. Intervention programs to prevent and control N-NCDs are urgently needed, with special focus

  15. Fluorescent nanodiamond tracking reveals intraneuronal transport abnormalities induced by brain-disease-related genetic risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haziza, Simon; Mohan, Nitin; Loe-Mie, Yann; Lepagnol-Bestel, Aude-Marie; Massou, Sophie; Adam, Marie-Pierre; Le, Xuan Loc; Viard, Julia; Plancon, Christine; Daudin, Rachel; Koebel, Pascale; Dorard, Emilie; Rose, Christiane; Hsieh, Feng-Jen; Wu, Chih-Che; Potier, Brigitte; Herault, Yann; Sala, Carlo; Corvin, Aiden; Allinquant, Bernadette; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Treussart, François; Simonneau, Michel

    2017-05-01

    Brain diseases such as autism and Alzheimer's disease (each inflicting >1% of the world population) involve a large network of genes displaying subtle changes in their expression. Abnormalities in intraneuronal transport have been linked to genetic risk factors found in patients, suggesting the relevance of measuring this key biological process. However, current techniques are not sensitive enough to detect minor abnormalities. Here we report a sensitive method to measure the changes in intraneuronal transport induced by brain-disease-related genetic risk factors using fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs). We show that the high brightness, photostability and absence of cytotoxicity allow FNDs to be tracked inside the branches of dissociated neurons with a spatial resolution of 12 nm and a temporal resolution of 50 ms. As proof of principle, we applied the FND tracking assay on two transgenic mouse lines that mimic the slight changes in protein concentration (∼30%) found in the brains of patients. In both cases, we show that the FND assay is sufficiently sensitive to detect these changes.

  16. [Major nutrition-related risk factors of ischemic heart disease: dyslipoproteinemia, obesity, hypertension, glucose intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pados, G

    1999-07-11

    Of the major risk factors of coronary heart disease dyslipoproteinemia, obesity, hypertension, and diabetes are nutrition related and can be considered of metabolic origin. Dyslipoproteinemia affects 2/3 of the adult population. The risk of coronary heart disease can be decreased 2-5 fold by lowering hypercholesterinemia; atherosclerosis in the coronaries may regress and total mortality may decrease. Atherogenic dyslipidemia (i.e. hypertriglyceridaemia, low HDL cholesterol levels, elevated concentrations of small dense LDL) increases the risk as part of the metabolic syndrome. Obesity is already highly prevalent, and it is affecting ever growing proportions of the adult population. Abdominal obesity furthermore predisposes patients to complications. No effective therapy is available for obesity. 3/4 of hypertensive patients are obese and more than half of them have insulin resistance. By decreasing blood pressure, the risk of stroke decreases by about 40%, that of coronary heart disease by 14-30%. Slimming cures are the most important non-pharmacological way of treating hypertension. 5% of the population has diabetes mellitus, and a further 5% has impaired glucose tolerance. Type 2 diabetes predisposes patients to macrovascular complications. The risk of coronary heart disease can be decreased by controlling diabetes by e.g. metformin.

  17. Cognitive patterns in relation to biomarkers of cerebrovascular disease and vascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralbell, Júlia; López-Cancio, Elena; López-Oloriz, Jorge; Arenillas, Juan Francisco; Barrios, Maite; Soriano-Raya, Juan José; Galán, Amparo; Cáceres, Cynthia; Alzamora, Maite; Pera, Guillem; Toran, Pere; Dávalos, Antoni; Mataró, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Risk factors for vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) are the same as traditional risk factors for cerebrovascular disease (CVD). Early identification of subjects at higher risk of VCI is important for the development of effective preventive strategies. In addition to traditional vascular risk factors (VRF), circulating biomarkers have emerged as potential tools for early diagnoses, as they could provide in vivo measures of the underlying pathophysiology. While VRF have been consistently linked to a VCI profile (i.e., deficits in executive functions and processing speed), the cognitive correlates of CVD biomarkers remain unclear. In this population-based study, the aim was to study and compare cognitive patterns in relation to VRF and circulating biomarkers of CVD. The Barcelona-AsIA Neuropsychology Study included 747 subjects older than 50, without a prior history of stroke or coronary disease and with a moderate to high vascular risk (mean age, 66 years; 34.1% women). Three cognitive domains were derived from factoral analysis: visuospatial skills/speed, verbal memory and verbal fluency. Multiple linear regression was used to assess relationships between cognitive performance (multiple domains) and a panel of circulating biomarkers, including indicators of inflammation, C-reactive protein (CRP) and resistin, endothelial dysfunction, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), thrombosis, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), as well as traditional VRF, metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance (homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance index). Analyses were adjusted for age, gender, years of education and depressive symptoms. Traditional VRF were related to lower performance in verbal fluency, insulin resistance accounted for lower performance in visuospatial skills/speed and the metabolic syndrome predicted lower performance in both cognitive domains. From the biomarkers of CVD, CRP was negatively related to verbal fluency performance and increasing ADMA

  18. Relating Education, Brain Structure, and Cognition: The Role of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyra E. Mortby

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The protective effect of education on cognitive and brain health is well established. While the direct effects of individual cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors (i.e., hypertension, smoking, diabetes, and obesity on cerebral structure have been investigated, little is understood about the possible interaction between the protective effect of education and the deleterious effects of CVD risk factors in predicting brain ageing and cognition. Using data from the PATH Through Life study (N=266, we investigated the protective effect of education on cerebral structure and function and tested a possible mediating role of CVD risk factors. Higher education was associated with larger regional grey/white matter volumes in the prefrontal cortex in men only. The association between education and cognition was mediated by brain volumes but only for grey matter and only in relation to information processing speed. CVD risk factors did not mediate the association between regional volumes and cognition. This study provides additional evidence in support for a protective effect of education on cerebral structures and cognition. However, it does not provide support for a mediating role of CVD risk factors in these associations.

  19. Prevalence and risk factors associated with nutrition-related noncommunicable diseases in the Eastern Mediterranean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaiger, Abdulrahman O; Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the current situation concerning nutrition-related noncommunicable diseases (N-NCDs) and the risk factors associated with these diseases in the Eastern Mediterranean region (EMR). A systematic literature review of studies and reports published between January 1, 1990 and September 15, 2011 was conducted using the PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, obesity, cancer, and osteoporosis have become the main causes of morbidity and mortality, especially with progressive aging of the population. The estimated mortality rate due to cardiovascular disease and diabetes ranged from 179.8 to 765.2 per 100,000 population, with the highest rates in poor countries. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was very high, ranging from 19% to 45%. The prevalence of overweight and obesity (body mass index ≥25 kg/m2) has reached an alarming level in most countries of the region, ranging from 25% to 82%, with a higher prevalence among women. The estimated mortality rate for cancer ranged from 61.9 to 151 per 100,000 population. Osteoporosis has become a critical problem, particularly among women. Several risk factors may be contributing to the high prevalence of N-NCDs in EMR, including nutrition transition, low intake of fruit and vegetables, demographic transition, urbanization, physical inactivity, hypertension, tobacco smoking, stunting of growth of preschool children, and lack of nutrition and health awareness. Intervention programs to prevent and control N-NCDs are urgently needed, with special focus on promotion of healthy eating and physical activity. PMID:22399864

  20. Clinical Factors and Disease Course Related to Diagnostic Delay in Korean Crohn's Disease Patients: Results from the CONNECT Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Mo Moon

    Full Text Available Diagnostic delay frequently occurs in Crohn's disease (CD patients because of diagnostic limitations. However, diagnostic delay and its related factors remain poorly defined. Therefore, we aimed to identify the predictors associated with diagnostic delay and to evaluate the impact of diagnostic delay on clinical course in a Korean CD patient cohort. We performed a multicenter retrospective analysis of 1,047 CD patients registered in the Crohn's Disease Clinical Network and Cohort study in Korea. The mean interval of diagnostic delay was 16.0 ± 33.1 months. Multivariate analysis showed that older age at diagnosis (≥40 years (p = 0.014, concomitant upper gastrointestinal (UGI disease (p = 0.012 and penetrating disease behavior at diagnosis (p = 0.001 were positively associated with long diagnostic delay (≥18 months. During the longitudinal follow-up, long diagnostic delay was independently predictive of further development of intestinal stenosis (hazard ratio [HR], 1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.93; p = 0.017, internal fistulas (HR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.12-2.33; p = 0.011, and perianal fistulas (HR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.06-1.80; p = 0.016. However, as for the risk of abscess formation, bowel perforation, and CD-related abdominal surgery, no significant association with diagnostic delay was observed. Older age at diagnosis, UGI involvement, and penetrating behavior are associated with long diagnostic delay in Korean CD patients. Moreover, diagnostic delay is associated with an increased risk of CD-related complications such as intestinal stenosis, internal fistulas, and perianal fistulas.

  1. [Study on risk factors and behavior features related to chronic diseases among adults in Shanghai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ji-ying; Li, Xin-jian; Yao, Hai-hong; Yan, Qing-hua; Lu, Wei; Zhong, Wei-jian

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the risk factors and behavior features related to chronic diseases among adults in Shanghai. A total of 15 516 subjects aged over 18 years old were selected from the investigation project on chronic diseases and relevant risk factors in Shanghai in 2010. Questionnaire were used to investigate the general information of the subjects, such as behavior features as smoking, drinking, diet, physical activity as well as the prevalence and control of chronic diseases as hypertension and diabetes. The physical examination included height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, blood glucose and blood lipids. Being preprocessed by complex weighting method, the data showed that the overweight rate of Shanghai adults aged above 18 was 32.4% (5288), separately 32.2% (2506) and 32.5% (2782) (χ(2) = 0.10, P = 0.844) in urban and rural areas; the obesity rate was 8.8% (1538), separately 8.7% (738) and 8.8% (800) (χ(2) = 0.06, P = 0.901) in urban and rural areas. The overweight rate was separately 36.0% (2888) in males and 28.6% (2400) in females (χ(2) = 96.61, P smoking rate was 25.0% (3813), separately 48.4% (3722) and 1.2% (91) in males and females (χ(2) = 4572.06, P smoking rate was 22.1% (3402). The rate of having the habit of drinking at least once a month in males was 39.5% (3102), separately 35.1% (1262) and 42.7% (1840) in urban and rural areas (χ(2) = 45.98, P = 0.012). The rate of drinking almost every day was 16.3% (1380), and the percentage of excessive alcohol consumption was 28.9% (2483). The percentage in group of subjects aging between 45-59 years old was 38.5% (1191), which was higher than that in any other groups (22.8% (641) in group aging 18-44 years old and 22.9% (651) in group aging ≥ 60 years old) (χ(2) = 241.38, P excess consumption of sodium (52.0%, 8257) and oil (51.7%, 7884). The risk factors of chronic diseases were highly prevalent in Shanghai. The prevalence of risk factors as overweight or obesity, lack of physical

  2. Myeloid differentiation factor 88-deficient bone marrow cells improve Alzheimer's disease-related symptoms and pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, W.; Liu, Y.; Liu, S.; Walter, S.; Grimm, M.O.; Kiliaan, A.J.; Penke, B.; Hartmann, T.; Rube, C.E.; Menger, M.D.; Fassbender, K.

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by extracellular deposits of amyloid beta peptide in the brain. Increasing evidence suggests that amyloid beta peptide injures neurons both directly and indirectly by triggering neurotoxic innate immune responses. Myeloid differentiation factor 88 is the key

  3. Work and diet-related risk factors of cardiovascular diseases: comparison of two occupational groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Danielle; Stadeler, Martina; Grieshaber, Romano; Keller, Sylvia; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2010-03-22

    Although work related risk factors associated with Cardiovascular Diseases (CD) have been well researched, there is no detailed knowledge regarding disparate occupational groups each with a different risk exposition. Therefore, two occupational groups (chefs and office workers) were compared with a focus on nutritional and psychosocial factors. Two groups of subjects were tested for work and diet-related risks of CD (45 chefs and 48 office workers). The groups matched both for gender (male) and age (30 to 45 years). The study included a medical check-up, bioelectrical impedance analysis as well as an evaluation of questionnaires on health, nutritional behaviour and coping capacity. In addition, volunteers were required to compile a 7-day-dietary-record and collect their urine 24 h prior to their check-up. Blood samples drawn were analysed for glucose and lipid metabolism, homocysteine, vitamin B12, folic acid; C-reactive protein, uric acid, red blood cell fatty acids, plant sterols, antioxidative capacity and oxidative stress. On average, the chefs showed one risk factor more compared to the office workers. The most frequent risk factors in both groups included overweight/obesity (chef group [CG]: 62.2%; office group [OG]: 58.3%) and elevated TC (CG: 62.2%; OG: 43.8%]. Moreover, although the chefs often had higher CRP-concentrations (40.0%), more office workers suffered from hypertension (37.5%).Chefs showed significant higher concentrations of saturated fatty acids and oleic acid, whereas docosahexaenoic acid, Omega-6- and trans fatty acids were found more frequently in the red blood cell membranes of office workers. While there were no significant differences in analysed plant sterols between the two occupational groups, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine was significantly increased in office workers.Concerning the work-related psychosocial factors, the chefs were characterised by a stronger subjective importance of work, a greater degree of professional

  4. Falls, a fear of falling and related factors in older adults with complex chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JuHee; Choi, MoonKi; Kim, Chang Oh

    2017-12-01

    To identify factors influencing falls and the fear of falling among older adults with chronic diseases in Korea. The fear of falling and falls in older adults are significant health problems towards which healthcare providers should direct their attention. Further investigation is needed to improve nursing practice specifically decreasing risk of falls and the fear of falling in Korea. Descriptive, cross-sectional survey. A convenience sample of 108 patients was recruited at the geriatric outpatient department of a tertiary hospital in Seoul, Korea. Demographic characteristics, comorbidities, medication use, fall history, level of physical activity, activities of daily living, mobility, muscle strength, and a fear of falling were investigated. Student's t tests, chi-square tests and multiple linear regressions were used in statistical analysis. Thirty-six participants (33.3%) among 108 subjects reported experiencing ≥1 falls in the past year. Marital status and the use of antipsychotics were associated with falls, while other factors were not significantly related to falls. Only benign prostatic hypertrophy and polypharmacy were significantly related to the fear of falling in the analysis of the relationships between chronic disease, medication use and fear of falling. In the regression model, the number of comorbidities, level of physical activity, activities of daily living and mobility were predictors of a fear of falling. Medication use was marginally significant, in the model. Increasing physical activity, functional fitness and physical independence is important to decrease the fear of falling, and to encourage active and healthy lives in older adults. The findings from this study provide evidence for the development of nursing interventions for older adults. We recommend early screening for a fear of falling and nursing interventions to decrease the fear of falling through enhancing physical activity level and function. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Elevated uric acid and obesity-related cardiovascular disease risk factors among hypertensive youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, Lauren D; Miller, Edgar R; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J; Loeffler, Lauren F; Holmes, Kathryn W; Appel, Lawrence J; Brady, Tammy M

    2015-12-01

    Uric acid (UA) is associated with high blood pressure in adolescents and with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adults. We sought to determine if UA is independently associated with CVD risk factors and left ventricular mass (LVM) over time in hypertensive youth. This was a 1-year prospective observational study of hypertensive children aged 3-19 years. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of serum UA with CVD risk factors and LVM were explored. Of the 49 children who completed both the baseline and 12-month assessments, at baseline the mean age was 13.8 years and mean UA was 5.5 mg/dL; 24% had elevated UA, 51% were overweight/obese and 39% had LVH. Measures of adiposity, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, LVM and LVH were all significantly associated with elevated UA at baseline, but not with change over time. Each 1 mg/dL increase in baseline UA was associated with a 2.5 g/m(2.7) increase in the LVM index at follow-up (95% confidence interval 0.64, 4.39; p = 0.01); after adjustment for age, sex, race, body mass index z-score, change in UA, time, blood pressure and medication use, this association was no longer significant. Hypertensive children with elevated UA have a higher prevalence of obesity-related CVD risk factors. Among hypertensive children, UA may be a marker of adiposity and not an independent CVD risk factor.

  6. Health-related needs of people with multiple chronic diseases: differences and underlying factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, P.; Schellevis, F.G.; Rijken, M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the health-related needs of people with multiple chronic diseases in the Netherlands compared to people with one chronic disease, and to identify different subgroups of multimorbid patients based on differences in their health problems. Methods: Participants were 1092 people with

  7. Age-related macular disease : studies on incidence, risk factors, and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Leeuwen (Redmer)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAge-related macular disease (AMD) is a new name, recently coined by Bird,25 for a progressive and degenerative disease in elderly persons affecting the macula lutea. Dysfunction of this part of the retina, and especially its centre, the fovea, results in the inability to read,

  8. Acute Myocardial Infarction: The First Manifestation of Ischemic Heart Disease and Relation to Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfroi Waldomiro Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between cardiovascular risk factors and acute myocardial infarction as the first manifestation of ischemic heart disease, correlating them with coronary angiographic findings. METHODS: We carried out a cross-sectional study of 104 patients with previous acute myocardial infarction, who were divided into 2 groups according to the presence or absence of angina prior to acute myocardial infarction. We assessed the presence of angina preceding acute myocardial infarction and risk factors, such as age >55 years, male sex, smoking, systemic arterial hypertension, lipid profile, diabetes mellitus, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and familial history of ischemic heart disease. On coronary angiography, the severity of coronary heart disease and presence of left ventricular hypertrophy were assessed. RESULTS: Of the 104 patients studied, 72.1% were males, 90.4% were white, 73.1% were older than 55 years, and 53.8% were hypertensive. Acute myocardial infarction was the first manifestation of ischemic heart disease in 49% of the patients. The associated risk factors were systemic arterial hypertension (RR=0.19; 95% CI=0.06-0.59; P=0.04 and left ventricular hypertrophy (RR=0.27; 95% CI=0,.8-0.88; P=0.03. The remaining risk factors were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of acute myocardial infarction as the first manifestation of ischemic heart disease is high, approximately 50%. Hypertensive individuals more frequently have symptoms preceding acute myocardial infarction, probably due to ventricular hypertrophy associated with high blood pressure levels.

  9. The relations between musculoskeletal diseases and mobility among old people: Are they influenced by socio-economic, psychosocial, and behavioral factors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, Kirsten; Osler, Merete; Damsgaard, Mogens Trab

    2000-01-01

    Social medicin, musculoskeletal diseases, mobility, physical activity, social relations, well-being, socio-economic factors......Social medicin, musculoskeletal diseases, mobility, physical activity, social relations, well-being, socio-economic factors...

  10. Contribution of genetic background, traditional risk factors, and HIV-related factors to coronary artery disease events in HIV-positive persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R; Junier, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D; Poloni, Estella S; van 't Wout, Angélique B; Lubomirov, Rubin; Colombo, Sara; Martinez, Raquel; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Wentworth, Deborah; van Manen, Danielle; Gras, Luuk A; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Albini, Laura; Torti, Carlo; Jacobson, Lisa P; Li, Xiuhong; Kingsley, Lawrence A; Carli, Federica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Ford, Emily S; Sereti, Irini; Hadigan, Colleen; Martinez, Esteban; Arnedo, Mireia; Egaña-Gorroño, Lander; Gatell, Jose M; Law, Matthew; Bendall, Courtney; Petoumenos, Kathy; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Kabamba, Kabeya; Delforge, Marc; De Wit, Stephane; Berger, Florian; Mauss, Stefan; de Paz Sierra, Mariana; Losso, Marcelo; Belloso, Waldo H; Leyes, Maria; Campins, Antoni; Mondi, Annalisa; De Luca, Andrea; Bernardino, Ignacio; Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Torrecilla-Rodriguez, Ana; Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan; Arribas, José R; Fanti, Iuri; Gel, Silvia; Puig, Jordi; Negredo, Eugenia; Gutierrez, Mar; Domingo, Pere; Fischer, Julia; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Macken, Alan; Woo, James; McGinty, Tara; Mallon, Patrick; Mangili, Alexandra; Skinner, Sally; Wanke, Christine A; Reiss, Peter; Weber, Rainer; Bucher, Heiner C; Fellay, Jacques; Telenti, Amalio; Tarr, Philip E; Schölvinck, Elisabeth H.

    BACKGROUND: Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the

  11. Contribution of genetic background, traditional risk factors, and HIV-related factors to coronary artery disease events in HIV-positive persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R.; Junier, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D.; Poloni, Estella S.; van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Lubomirov, Rubin; Colombo, Sara; Martinez, Raquel; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Wentworth, Deborah; van Manen, Danielle; Gras, Luuk A.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Albini, Laura; Torti, Carlo; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Li, Xiuhong; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Carli, Federica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Ford, Emily S.; Sereti, Irini; Hadigan, Colleen; Martinez, Esteban; Arnedo, Mireia; Egaña-Gorroño, Lander; Gatell, Jose M.; Law, Matthew; Bendall, Courtney; Petoumenos, Kathy; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Kabamba, Kabeya; Delforge, Marc; de Wit, Stephane; Berger, Florian; Mauss, Stefan; de Paz Sierra, Mariana; Losso, Marcelo; Belloso, Waldo H.; Leyes, Maria; Campins, Antoni; Mondi, Annalisa; de Luca, Andrea; Bernardino, Ignacio; Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Torrecilla-Rodriguez, Ana; Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan; Arribas, José R.; Fanti, Iuri; Gel, Silvia; Puig, Jordi; Negredo, Eugenia; Gutierrez, Mar; Domingo, Pere; Fischer, Julia; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Macken, Alan; Woo, James; McGinty, Tara; Mallon, Patrick; Mangili, Alexandra; Skinner, Sally; Wanke, Christine A.; Reiss, Peter; Weber, Rainer; Bucher, Heiner C.; Fellay, Jacques; Telenti, Amalio; Tarr, Philip E.; Gras, A. Luuk; van Wout, Angelique B.; Arnedo-Valero, Mireia; Sierra, Mariana de Paz; Rodriguez, Ana Torrecilla; Garcia, Juan Gonzalez; Arribas, Jose R.; Aubert, V.; Barth, J.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H. C.; Burton-Jeangros, C.; Calmy, A.; Cavassini, M.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fehr, J.; Fellay, J.; Francioli, P.; Furrer, H.; Fux, C. A.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Haerry, D.; Hasse, B.; Hirsch, H. H.; Hirschel, B.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, C.; Kaiser, L.; Keiser, O.; Kind, C.; Klimkait, T.; Kovari, H.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez de Tejada, B.; Metzner, K.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schöni-Affolter, F.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffé, P.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Prins, Yerly S. J. M.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Scherpbier, H. J.; Boer, K.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Wit, F. W. M. N.; Godfried, M. H.; van der Poll, T.; Nellen, F. J. B.; Lange, J. M. A.; Geerlings, S. E.; van Vugt, M.; Vrouenraets, S. M. E.; Pajkrt, D.; Bos, J. C.; van der Valk, M.; Schreij, G.; Lowe, S.; Oude Lashof, A.; Pronk, M. J. H.; Bravenboer, B.; van der Ende, M. E.; de Vries-Sluijs, T. E. M. S.; Schurink, C. A. M.; van der Feltz, M.; Nouwen, J. L.; Gelinck, L. B. S.; Verbon, A.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; van de Ven-de Ruiter, E. D.; Slobbe, L.; Haag, Den; Kauffmann, R. H.; Schippers, E. F.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; Alleman, M. A.; Bouwhuis, J. W.; ten Kate, R. W.; Soetekouw, R.; Kroon, F. P.; van den Broek, P. J.; van Dissel, J. T.; Arend, S. M.; van Nieuwkoop, C.; de Boer, M. J. G.; Jolink, H.; den Hollander, J. G.; Pogany, K.; Bronsveld, W.; Kortmann, W.; van Twillert, G.; van Houte, D. P. F.; Polée, M. B.; van Vonderen, M. G. A.; ten Napel, C. H. H.; Kootstra, G. J.; Brinkman, K.; Blok, W. L.; Frissen, P. H. J.; Schouten, W. E. M.; van den Berk, G. E. L.; Juttmann, J. R.; van Kasteren, M. E. E.; Brouwer, A. E.; Mulder, J. W.; van Gorp, E. C. M.; Smit, P. M.; Weijer, S.; van Eeden, A.; Verhagen, D. W. M.; Sprenger, H. G.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E. H.; van Assen, S.; Stek, C. J.; Hoepelman, I. M.; Mudrikova, T.; Schneider, M. M. E.; Jaspers, C. A. J. J.; Ellerbroek, P. M.; Peters, E. J. G.; Maarschalk-Ellerbroek, L. J.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Arends, J. E.; Wassenberg, M. W. M.; van der Hilst, J. C. H.; Richter, C.; van der Berg, J. P.; Gisolf, E. H.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Plankey, Michael; Crain, Barbara; Dobs, Adrian; Farzadegan, Homayoon; Gallant, Joel; Johnson-Hill, Lisette; Sacktor, Ned; Selnes, Ola; Shepard, James; Thio, Chloe; Phair, John P.; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Badri, Sheila; Conover, Craig; O'Gorman, Maurice; Ostrow, David; Palella, Frank; Ragin, Ann; Detels, Roger; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Aronow, Aaron; Bolan, Robert; Breen, Elizabeth; Butch, Anthony; Fahey, John; Jamieson, Beth; Miller, Eric N.; Oishi, John; Vinters, Harry; Visscher, Barbara R.; Wiley, Dorothy; Witt, Mallory; Yang, Otto; Young, Stephen; Zhang, Zuo Feng; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Becker, James T.; Cranston, Ross D.; Martinson, Jeremy J.; Mellors, John W.; Silvestre, Anthony J.; Stall, Ronald D.; Muñoz, Alvaro; Abraham, Alison; Althoff, Keri; Cox, Christopher; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Gange, Stephen J.; Golub, Elizabeth; Schollenberger, Janet; Seaberg, Eric C.; Su, Sol; Huebner, Robin E.; Dominguez, Geraldina; Moroni, M.; Angarano, G.; Antinori, A.; Carosi, G.; Cauda, R.; Monforte, A. d'Arminio; Di Perri, G.; Galli, M.; Iardino, R.; Ippolito, G.; Lazzarin, A.; Perno, C. F.; Sagnelli, E.; Viale, P. L.; Von Schlosser, F.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Ammassari, A.; Andreoni, M.; Balotta, C.; Bonfanti, P.; Bonora, S.; Borderi, M.; Capobianchi, M. R.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; de Luca, A.; Gargiulo, M.; Gervasoni, C.; Girardi, E.; Lichtner, M.; Lo Caputo, S.; Madeddu, G.; Maggiolo, F.; Marcotullio, S.; Monno, L.; Murri, R.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Torti, C.; Fanti, I.; Formenti, T.; Galli, Laura; Lorenzini, Patrizia; Montroni, M.; Giacometti, A.; Costantini, A.; Riva, A.; Tirelli, U.; Martellotta, F.; Ladisa, N.; Lazzari, G.; Verucchi, G.; Castelli, F.; Scalzini, A.; Minardi, C.; Bertelli, D.; Quirino, T.; Abeli, C.; Manconi, P. E.; Piano, P.; Vecchiet, J.; Falasca, K.; Carnevale, G.; Lorenzotti, S.; Sighinolfi, L.; Segala, D.; Leoncini, F.; Mazzotta, F.; Pozzi, M.; Cassola, G.; Viscoli, G.; Viscoli, A.; Piscopo, R.; Mazzarello, G.; Mastroianni, C.; Belvisi, V.; Caramma, I.; Chiodera, A.; Castelli, P.; Rizzardini, G.; Ridolfo, A. L.; Foschi, A.; Salpietro, S.; Galli, A.; Bigoloni, A.; Spagnuolo, V.; Merli, S.; Carenzi, L.; Moioli, M. C.; Cicconi, P.; Bisio, L.; Gori, A.; Lapadula, G.; Abrescia, N.; Chirianni, A.; de Marco, M.; Ferrari, C.; Borghi, R.; Baldelli, F.; Belfiori, B.; Parruti, G.; Ursini, T.; Magnani, G.; Ursitti, M. A.; Narciso, P.; Tozzi, V.; Vullo, V.; d'Avino, A.; Zaccarelli, M.; Gallo, L.; Acinapura, R.; Capozzi, M.; Libertone, R.; Trotta, M. P.; Tebano, G.; Cattelan, A. M.; Mura, M. S.; Caramello, P.; Orofino, G. C.; Sciandra, M.; Raise, N. N.; Ebo, F.; Pellizzer, G.; Manfrin, V.; Law, M.; Petoumenos, K.; McManus, H.; Wright, S.; Bendall, C.; Moore, R.; Edwards, S.

    2013-01-01

    Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the setting of HIV

  12. Effect of minimally invasive surgery on related serum factors in patients with lumbar degenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Zhong Sun

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of minimally invasive surgery and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF on the related serum factors in patients with lumbar degenerative disease. Methods: A total of 100 patients with lumbar degenerative disease who were admitted in our hospital from May, 2014 to May, 2016 were included in the study and divided into the observation group and the control group according to different surgical methods. The patients in the observation group were given MIS-TLIF, while the patients in the control group were given the traditional TLIF. The peripheral venous blood before operation, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h and 24 h after operation in the two groups was collected, and centrifuged for the serum. ELISA was used to detect the serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels. The peripheral venous blood before operation, 1 h, 3 h, 5 h and 7 d after operation in the two groups was collected. DGKC velocity method was used to detect CK activity and fusion rate. The fusion grade was evaluated 6 months after operation according to Bridwell fusion grading standard. Results: The serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels 2 h, 4 h, 8 h and 24 h after operation in the two groups were significantly elevated when compared with before operation, and the serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels at each timing point after operation in the observation group were significantly lower than those in the control group. CK activity 1 d, 3 d, 5 d, and 7d after operation in the two groups was significantly elevated when compared with before operation, and CK activity at each timing point after operation in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group. Conclusions: MISTLIF has a small damage on the tissues, can effectively alleviate the inflammatory reaction, and preferably retain the stable structure of posterior column, whose advantage is significantly superior to that by the traditional TLIF.

  13. The Occurrence of Diseases and Related Factors in a Center for Asylum Seekers in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firenze Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Italy is the main recipient of asylum seekers in the European region, and Sicily is their first point of arrival. This geographical position creates a large job for Health Authorities to identify and deal with the health of immigrants. This study evaluates the prevalence of disease among asylum seekers, assessing which are associated factors.

  14. Structural and functional characterization of the product of disease-related factor H gene conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Andrew P; Kavanagh, David; Johansson, Conny; Morgan, Hugh P; Blaum, Bärbel S; Hannan, Jonathan P; Barlow, Paul N; Uhrín, Dušan

    2012-03-06

    Numerous complement factor H (FH) mutations predispose patients to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) and other disorders arising from inadequately regulated complement activation. No unifying structural or mechanistic consequences have been ascribed to these mutants beyond impaired self-cell protection. The S1191L and V1197A mutations toward the C-terminus of FH, which occur in patients singly or together, arose from gene conversion between CFH encoding FH and CFHR1 encoding FH-related 1. We show that neither single nor double mutations structurally perturbed recombinant proteins consisting of the FH C-terminal modules, 19 and 20 (FH19-20), although all three FH19-20 mutants were poor, compared to wild-type FH19-20, at promoting hemolysis of C3b-coated erythrocytes through competition with full-length FH. Indeed, our new crystal structure of the S1191L mutant of FH19-20 complexed with an activation-specific complement fragment, C3d, was nearly identical to that of the wild-type FH19-20:C3d complex, consistent with mutants binding to C3b with wild-type-like affinity. The S1191L mutation enhanced thermal stability of module 20, whereas the V1197A mutation dramatically decreased it. Thus, although mutant proteins were folded at 37 °C, they differ in conformational rigidity. Neither single substitutions nor double substitutions increased measurably the extent of FH19-20 self-association, nor did these mutations significantly affect the affinity of FH19-20 for three glycosaminoglycans, despite critical roles of module 20 in recognizing polyanionic self-surface markers. Unexpectedly, FH19-20 mutants containing Leu1191 self-associated on a heparin-coated surface to a higher degree than on surfaces coated with dermatan or chondroitin sulfates. Thus, potentially disease-related functional distinctions between mutants, and between FH and FH-related 1, may manifest in the presence of specific glycosaminoglycans.

  15. Prevalence and risk factors associated with nutrition-related noncommunicable diseases in the Eastern Mediterranean region

    OpenAIRE

    Musaiger, Abdulrahman O; Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M

    2012-01-01

    Abdulrahman O Musaiger1, Hazzaa M Al-Hazzaa21Nutrition and Health Studies Unit, Deanship of Scientific Research, University of Bahrain, Bahrain, and Arab Center for Nutrition, Bahrain; 2Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Department of Physical Education and Movement Science, College of Education, and Scientific Board, Obesity Research Chair, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: This paper reviews the current situation concerning nutrition-related noncommunicable diseases (N-NCDs) ...

  16. Comprehensive analysis of the related factors of early hypothyroidism occurring in patients with Graves' disease after 131I treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Jian; Wang Peng; Zhang Lijuan; He Yajing; Wang Renfei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To make a comprehensive analysis of the related factors of early hypothyroidism occurring in patients with Graves' disease after 131 I treatment. Methods: The information of 131 I treated Graves' disease was collected including general data, clinical observation, laboratory data, thyroid function test, etc. Then a retrospective statistical analysis was carried out, using cluster analysis, factor analysis, discriminant analysis, multivariate regression analysis, etc. Results: 1) Cluster analysis and factor analysis showed that among clinical observation such as clinical course, treatment course, patients' state and disease occurrance, the first three factors correlated highly; among laboratory data such as thyrotrophin receptor antibody (TRAb), thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins (TSI), thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) and thyroid microsomal antibody (TMAb), both the first two and the last two correlated highly, each two factors had the similar effect. 2) Fsher discriminant analysis showed that among the thyroid weight, the effective half life, the maximum 131 I uptake percentage, total dose of 131 I and the average dose of 131 I per gram of thyroid, the last one had the most predicting value for incidence of early hypothyroidism. 3) Logistic regression analysis showed that among all the related factors of early hypothyroidism occurred after 131 I treated Graves' disease, thyroid weight, average dose of 131 I per gram of thyroid, the maximum 131 I uptake percentage and the level of TSI were effective factors. Conclusions: The occurrence of early hypothyroidism for 131 I-treated Graves' disease is probably affected by many factors. If more factors are taken into consideration before therapy and the theraputic dose is well adjusted accordingly, it can reduce the incidence of early hypothroidism to a certain extent. (authors)

  17. Factors promoting health-related quality of life in people with rheumatic diseases: a 12 month longitudinal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Rheumatic diseases have a significant adverse impact on the individual from physical, mental and social aspects, resulting in a low health-related quality of life (HRQL). There is a lack of longitudinal studies on HRQL in people with rheumatic diseases that focus on factors promoting HRQL instead of risk factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between suggested health promoting factors at baseline and outcome in HRQL at a 12 month follow-up in people with rheumatic diseases. Methods A longitudinal cohort study was conducted in 185 individuals with rheumatic diseases with questionnaires one week and 12 months after rehabilitation in a Swedish rheumatology clinic. HRQL was assessed by SF-36 together with suggested health factors. The associations between SF-36 subscales and the health factors were analysed by multivariable logistic regressions. Results Factors predicting better outcome in HRQL in one or several SF-36 subscales were being younger or middle-aged, feeling painless, having good sleep structure, feeling rested after sleep, performing low effort of exercise more than twice per week, having strong sense of coherence (SOC), emotional support and practical assistance, higher educational level and work capacity. The most important factors were having strong SOC, feeling rested after sleep, having work capacity, being younger or middle-aged, and having good sleep structure. Conclusions This study identified several factors that promoted a good outcome in HRQL to people with rheumatic diseases. These health factors could be important to address in clinical work with rheumatic diseases in order to optimise treatment strategies. PMID:21599884

  18. Contribution of genetic background, traditional risk factors, and HIV-related factors to coronary artery disease events in HIV-positive persons

    OpenAIRE

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R; Junier, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D; Poloni, Estella S; van 't Wout, Angélique B; Lubomirov, Rubin; Colombo, Sara; Martinez, Raquel; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Wentworth, Deborah; van Manen, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the setting of HIV infection. METHODS: In the general population, 23 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were shown to be associated with CAD through genome-wide association analysis. Using the ...

  19. The Occurrence of Diseases and Related Factors in a Center for Asylum Seekers in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    FIRENZE, Alberto; ALEO, Nicola; FERRARA, Clara; MARANTO, Marianna; LA CASCIA, Caterina; RESTIVO, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Italy is the main recipient of asylum seekers in the European region, and Sicily is their first point of arrival. This geographical position creates a large job for Health Authorities to identify and deal with the health of immigrants. This study evaluates the prevalence of disease among asylum seekers, assessing which are associated factors. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted to analyse demographic and clinical data in an Acceptance Centres for Asylum Seekers from February 2012 to May 2013. All variables that were found to be significant on unvariable analysis for the most frequent pathologies were included in a multivariable logistic regression model. Results Post-traumatic stress disorders with 17.4% and major depression with 7.3% were the most frequent diseases. The factors associated with post-traumatic stress disorders among asylum seekers were: major depression diagnosis (OR=2.91, p=0.004), Pakistan as a country of origin (OR=3.88, pasylum seekers needs special attention, and interventions should be done to prevent the consolidation of psychiatric morbidity. A short psychological screening after the arrival might prove helpful here. Moreover, carefully designed longitudinal studies should be carried out when political recommendations try to change the organization of psychological and healthcare services. PMID:27647085

  20. Effects of Tea and Coffee Consumption on Cardiovascular Diseases and Relative Risk Factors: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Arianna; Curti, Valeria; Tenore, Gian C; Nabavi, Seyed M; Daglia, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Tea and coffee are the second and third most consumed beverages after water, respectively. The high consumption of these beverages is due to the sensorial properties and effects on psychological and physiological functions, induced by caffeine and many other bioactive components responsible for the protective effects on human health generally ascribed to these beverages. The goal of this review article is to collect the scientific data obtained from clinical trials published in the last five years on the role of tea and coffee consumption against cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and CVD risk factors such as hypertension, hyperglicemia, and hyperlipidaemia. In normal weight subjects, clinical trials showed that the consumption of tea is inversely associated to CVD risk factors or no association was found. Differently, in overweight subjects, the clinical trials and the metaanalyses showed an inverse correlation between tea consumption and CVDs. As regards coffee, it has long been suspected to be associated to high risk of CVDs. Nevertheless, some recent investigations reported that moderate coffee consumption have no effect or even protective effects against CVDs risk factors. The results of the metaanalyses confirm this trend suggesting that moderate coffee drinkers could be associated to a lower risk of CVDs than non- or occasional coffee drinkers or no association can be demonstrated between coffee consumption and CVDs. Literature data on tea consumption and CVD risk factors support that tea consumption reduces some risk factors especially in overweight people and obese subjects. Therefore, these results seem to suggest that tea could exert a protective effects against CVD development. As regards coffee, the results are controversial and did not allow to draw conclusions. Therefore, further research is needed before definitive recommendations for coffee consumption against CVD development can be made. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please

  1. Arterial properties in acromegaly: relation to disease activity and associated cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaron, Marianna; Izkhakov, Elena; Sack, Jessica; Azzam, Ibrahim; Osher, Etty; Tordjman, Karen; Stern, Naftali; Greenman, Yona

    2016-06-01

    Acromegaly is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality when inadequately treated, which may be secondary to associated comorbidities or to direct IGF-1 effects on the cardiovascular system. By using a control group carefully matched for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, we aimed to assess the direct contribution of disease activity and IGF-1 levels to arterial damage as assessed by measurements of arterial stiffness and endothelial function. Twenty-nine subjects with acromegaly (11 males, 52 ± 14 year; 15 active acromegaly) and 24 matched controls underwent evaluation of large and small artery compliance using applanation tonometry, pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (Alx), carotid ultrasonography intima-media thickness, (IMT) and flow-mediated dilatation (FMD). IGF-1 expressed as times the upper limit of the normal range (x ULN) was 2.2 ± 1.1 in patients with active disease versus 0.7 ± 0.2 in patients in remission. Irrespective of disease activity, FMD was lower in patients with acromegaly than in control subjects, (3.4 ± 2.7 % in active acromegaly, 4.4 ± 3.3 % in controlled acromegaly and 7.5 ± 3.8 % in controls; p = 0.004). There were no significant differences in PWV, Alx, and IMT between groups. A positive correlation was found between IGF-1× ULN and IMT (r = 0.4; P = 0.02). Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a novel cardiovascular risk factor, was positively correlated to arterial stiffness (r = 0.46; p = 0.017) and negatively with small vessel compliance (r = -0.44, p = 0.02). Patients with acromegaly have significantly impaired endothelial function as assessed by FMD, but other tested vascular parameters were similar to a control group that was adequately matched for cardiovascular risk factors.

  2. Evaluation of Knee Proprioception and Factors Related to Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Ribeiro Artigas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Changes in proprioception may contribute to postural instability in individuals with neurological disorders. Objectives. Evaluate proprioception in the lower limbs of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD and the association between proprioception and cognitive ability, motor symptoms, postural instability, and disease severity. Methods. This is a cross-sectional, controlled study that evaluated proprioception in PD patients and healthy age- and sex-matched individuals. Kinetic postural proprioception of the knee was evaluated using an isokinetic dynamometer (Biodex® Multi-Joint System 4 Pro. Participants were evaluated using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, the Hoehn and Yahr rating scale and postural instability (pull test and stabilometric analysis, and motor function (UPDRS-III tests. Results. A total of 40 individuals were enrolled in the study: 20 PD patients and 20 healthy controls (CG. The PD patients had higher angular errors on the proprioceptive ratings than the CG participants (p=0.002. Oscillations of the center of pressure (p=0.002 were higher in individuals with PD than in the controls. Proprioceptive errors in the PD patients were associated with the presence of tremors as the dominant symptom and more impaired motor performance. Conclusion. These findings show that individuals with PD have proprioceptive deficits, which are related to decreased cognitive ability and impaired motor symptoms.

  3. A case presenting concurrence of Marfan syndrome, Basedow's disease and Arg353Gln polymorphism-related factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kotoko; Seino, Yoshihiko; Inokuchi, Koiti; Ohmura, Kazuko; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Takano, Teruo

    2005-02-15

    We report the case of a 48-year-old Japanese man who suffered from Marfan syndrome with severe aortic regurgitation, mitral regurgitation and rapid atrial fibrillation, which were aggravated by hyperdynamic circulatory conditions associated with coexistent Basedow's disease. Furthermore, concurrence of Arg353Gln polymorphism-related factor VII deficiency was discovered at the preoperative assessments. Both of his two brothers suffered from Marfan syndrome; however they had no findings of Arg353Glu polymorphism-related factor VII deficiency or Basedow's disease. After normalization of thyroid function, he had successfully the operations of Bentall procedure: a composite prosthetic graft: replacement of both the ascending aorta and aortic valve, and mitral valve annuloplasty. No specific therapy such as fresh frozen plasma or factor VII replacement therapy was required. He completely returned to his business work 6 weeks after the operation. Concurrence of Marfan syndrome and factor VII deficiency induced by two-hit genomic abnormalities and furthermore Basedow's disease, which significantly compromised the pathophysiological condition of Marfan syndrome, is extremely rare.

  4. Nature Versus Nurture: Does Proteostasis Imbalance Underlie the Genetic, Environmental, and Age-Related Risk Factors for Alzheimer's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikis, Elise A

    2017-08-22

    Aging is a risk factor for a number of "age-related diseases", including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD affects more than a third of all people over the age of 85, and is the leading cause of dementia worldwide. Symptoms include forgetfulness, memory loss, and cognitive decline, ultimately resulting in the need for full-time care. While there is no cure for AD, pharmacological approaches to alleviate symptoms and target underlying causes of the disease have been developed, albeit with limited success. This review presents the age-related, genetic, and environmental risk factors for AD and proposes a hypothesis for the mechanistic link between genetics and the environment. In short, much is known about the genetics of early-onset familial AD (EO-FAD) and the central role played by the Aβ peptide and protein misfolding, but late-onset AD (LOAD) is not thought to have direct genetic causes. Nonetheless, genetic risk factors such as isoforms of the protein ApoE have been identified. Additional findings suggest that air pollution caused by the combustion of fossil fuels may be an important environmental risk factor for AD. A hypothesis suggesting that poor air quality might act by disrupting protein folding homeostasis (proteostasis) is presented.

  5. Risk factors for infections in international travelers: an analysis of travel-related notifiable communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Atar; Libassi, Lisa; Lloyd, Jennifer K; Benoliel, Eileen; Brucker, Rachel; Jones, Megan Q; Kwan-Gett, Tao Sheng; McKeirnan, Shelly; Pecha, Monica; Rietberg, Krista; Serafin, Lauri; Walkinshaw, Lina P; Duchin, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    We sought to describe travel-related illness among our residents and gain insight into targeting pre-travel health advice to prevent travel-related illness. A supplemental travel questionnaire was developed and administered for cases with a legally notifiable communicable disease reported in 2011-2012, who spent at least part of their exposure period outside the United States. Among 451 cases meeting the eligibility criteria, 259 were interviewed. Forty four percent reported receiving pre-travel advice. Two-thirds adhered fully with risk behavior recommendations; 94% followed immunization recommendations partially or fully; and 84% adhered fully with malaria prophylaxis recommendations. The primary reasons for not obtaining pre-travel advice were being unaware of the need (47.5%), or believing they already knew what to do (34.5%). Adults (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.4-5.5), males (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1-3.0), those born outside the United States (OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.1-3.7), and those with planning time under two weeks (OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.5-15.9) or travel duration less than 7 days (OR = 7.9, 95% CI = 3.0-20.9) were more likely to travel without seeking pre-travel advice. The majority of cases reported not receiving pre-travel advice. Understanding the predictors of failure to receive pre-travel advice may help target public health prevention efforts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Changes in Ghrelin-Related Factors in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Rats

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    Miwa Nahata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To examine gastrointestinal hormone profiles and functional changes in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, blood levels of the orexigenic hormone ghrelin were measured in rats with experimentally induced GERD. During the experiment, plasma acyl ghrelin levels in GERD rats were higher than those in sham-operated rats, although food intake was reduced in GERD rats. Although plasma levels of the appetite-suppressing hormone leptin were significantly decreased in GERD rats, no changes were observed in cholecystokinin levels. Repeated administration of rat ghrelin to GERD rats had no effect on the reduction in body weight or food intake. Therefore, these results suggest that aberrantly increased secretion of peripheral ghrelin and decreased ghrelin responsiveness may occur in GERD rats. Neuropeptide Y and agouti-related peptide mRNA expression in the hypothalamus of GERD rats was significantly increased, whereas proopiomelanocortin mRNA expression was significantly decreased compared to that in sham-operated rats. However, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH and prepro-orexin mRNA expression in the hypothalamus of GERD rats was similar to that in sham-operated rats. These results suggest that although GERD rats have higher plasma ghrelin levels, ghrelin signaling in GERD rats may be suppressed due to reduced MCH and/or orexin synthesis in the hypothalamus.

  7. Factors related to cardiovascular disease risk reduction in midlife and older women: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folta, Sara C; Goldberg, Jeanne P; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Seguin, Rebecca; Reed, Peter N; Nelson, Miriam E

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death for women in the United States. A healthy diet and appropriate physical activity can help reduce the risk for CVD. However, many women do not follow recommendations for these behaviors. In this study, we used qualitative methods to better understand knowledge and awareness about CVD in women, perceived threat of CVD, barriers to heart-healthy eating and physical activity, and intervention strategies for behavior change. We conducted four focus groups with 38 white women aged 40 years or older in Kansas and Arkansas. We also interviewed 25 Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service agents in those states. Environmental audits of grocery stores and the physical environment were done in three communities. Most women were aware of the modifiable risk factors for CVD. Although they realized they were susceptible, they thought CVD was something they could overcome. Common barriers to achieving a heart-healthy diet included time and concern about wasting food. Most women had positive attitudes toward physical activity and reported exercising in the past, but found it difficult to resume when their routine was disrupted. The environmental audits suggested that there are opportunities to be physically active and that with the exception of fresh fish in Kansas, healthful foods are readily available in local food stores. Interventions to change behavior should be hands-on, have a goal-setting component, and include opportunities for social interaction. It is especially important to offer interventions as awareness increases and women seek opportunities to build skills to change behavior.

  8. Trends in nutritional intakes and nutrition-related cardiovascular disease risk factors in Lebanon: the need for immediate action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasreddine, Lara; Naja, Farah A; Sibai, Abla-Mehio; Helou, Khalil; Adra, Nada; Hwalla, Nahla

    2014-01-01

    To examine the burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and their association with dietary variables in the Lebanese population while reviewing secular trends in the population's nutritional intakes and nutrition-related CVD risk factors. Data on CVD risk factors and food consumption patterns in Lebanon were collected from scholarly papers, including individual studies and systematic review articles. Electronic databases were searched using combinations of key terms. The prevalence of obesity in Lebanon followed an alarming increasing trend over time, paralleled by an escalation in the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Food consumption surveys illustrate an increasing trend in energy intake and the proportion of energy derived from fat and animal products, with a concomitant decrease in carbohydrates and cereals intakes. The shift towards an atherogenic diet coupled with the alarming increase in nutrition-related cardiovascular risk factors suggest that the Lebanese population is at an increased risk for CVDs. This should alert to the importance of formulating multicomponent intervention strategies at both the individual and population levels to halt the progression of nutrition-related diseases in the country, while highlighting the need for immediate public health efforts to promote the adoption of healthy dietary habits.

  9. Risk factors for Neospora caninum infection in dairy cattle and their possible cause-effect relation for disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fávero, Juscivete F; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Campigotto, Gabriela; Machado, Gustavo; Daniel de Barros, Luiz; Garcia, João Luis; Vogel, Fernanda F; Mendes, Ricardo E; Stefani, Lenita M

    2017-09-01

    Neospora caninum causes reproductive problems in cattle such as abortion, premature birth, retention of fetal membranes, and metritis. Therefore, this study aimed to verify possible risk factors for N. caninum infection in dairy cattle and their cause-effect relation to neosporosis. Serum samples of 1518 dairy cows from the West of Santa Catarina State, Southern Brazil were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for N. caninum, where 466 were found to be positives (30.69%-CI 95% ; 28.3-33.0). In addition, an epidemiological survey was conducted in order to verify possible risk factors for neosporosis and their relation to the disease. The presence of dogs in the farm was strongly associated with IFA positive results for N. caninum, and lack of history for neosporosis in the farm increased the chances of positivity in 66%. It was found a significant cause-effect relation between the occurrence of reproductive problems and the presence of antibodies against N. caninum (p = 0.05). It is possible to conclude that N. caninum is widely distributed in dairy farms of the Western part of Santa Catarina state, Brazil, and that the occurrence of reproductive problems is directly related to the disease with the presence of dogs as a risk factor for N. caninum infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Disease-related growth factor and embryonic signaling pathways modulate an enhancer of TCF21 expression at the 6q23.2 coronary heart disease locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint L Miller

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD is the leading cause of mortality in both developed and developing countries worldwide. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have now identified 46 independent susceptibility loci for CHD, however, the biological and disease-relevant mechanisms for these associations remain elusive. The large-scale meta-analysis of GWAS recently identified in Caucasians a CHD-associated locus at chromosome 6q23.2, a region containing the transcription factor TCF21 gene. TCF21 (Capsulin/Pod1/Epicardin is a member of the basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor family, and regulates cell fate decisions and differentiation in the developing coronary vasculature. Herein, we characterize a cis-regulatory mechanism by which the lead polymorphism rs12190287 disrupts an atypical activator protein 1 (AP-1 element, as demonstrated by allele-specific transcriptional regulation, transcription factor binding, and chromatin organization, leading to altered TCF21 expression. Further, this element is shown to mediate signaling through platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFR-β and Wilms tumor 1 (WT1 pathways. A second disease allele identified in East Asians also appears to disrupt an AP-1-like element. Thus, both disease-related growth factor and embryonic signaling pathways may regulate CHD risk through two independent alleles at TCF21.

  11. Health-related quality of life and risk factor control: the importance of educational level in prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ose, Dominik; Rochon, Justine; Campbell, Stephen M; Wensing, Michel; Freund, Tobias; van Lieshout, Jan; Längst, Gerda; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Ludt, Sabine

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to describe and to analyse the importance of educational level for controlled risk factors and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). This observational study was conducted in nine European countries (5632 patients in 249 practices). We compared patients with a low level of education (up to 9 years) with patients with a high level of education (>9 years), with regard to controlled cardiovascular disease risk factors and HRQoL. A multilevel approach was used for statistical analysis. Patients with a low level of education were older (P education, female gender, living as single, patient group (coronary heart disease patients) and the number of other conditions were negatively associated with HRQoL. A higher sum of controlled risk factors were positively associated with higher HRQoL in the whole sample (r = 0.0086, P educational-level groups (r = 0.0075, P = 0.038 in the low-level group and r = 0.0082, P = 0.001 in the high-level group). Patients with a lower educational level were more often females, singles, had a higher number of other conditions, a higher number of uncontrolled risk factors and a lower HRQoL. However, the higher the control of risk factors was, the higher the HRQoL was overall as well as in both educational-level groups. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct economic burden and influencing factors in patients with hepatitis B virus related diseases in Jiangsu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Chao, Jianqian; Zhu, Liguo; Song, Long; Li, Xiyan; Liu, Pei

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore direct economic burden and its influencing factors in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) related diseases. Time phasing continuous sampling was used to select patients from August 1, 2012, to December 31, 2012, in 3 county hospitals of 3 model regions in Jiangsu Province, China. A total of 436 outpatients and 196 inpatients were observed. The average direct economic burden of HBV-associated admission was US$107.11 for outpatients, and drug fees accounted for 74%; the burden was US$3193.47 for inpatients, and the direct medical costs accounted for 96%. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that drug fee, examination fee, and antiviral therapy were influencing factors for outpatients, while hospitalization stay, drug ratio, and patient's age were influencing factors for inpatients. It can be concluded that the direct economic burden of patients with HBV-related diseases was high compared to their household income. Measures should be taken to reduce the economic burden of patients. © 2014 APJPH.

  13. Health promotion behaviors and related factors in end stage renal disease patients treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechpradit, Apinya; Thaiyuenwong, Jutiporn; Kanjanabuch, Talerngsak

    2011-09-01

    To present study health promotion behaviors and related factors in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Questionnaires of Pender to evaluate health promotion behaviors which measure 5 aspects of health-affected behaviors were examined in 90 CAPD patients at dialysis unit of Udornthani Hospital. Results were categorized into 3 groups according to Bloom's scale as follows: high, moderate, and low levels. The data were displayed as ranges or means +/- standard deviation, according to the characteristics of each variable, with a 5% (p cherish health behaviors of the patients.

  14. Dehydroepiandrosterone in relation to other adrenal hormones during an acute inflammatory stressful disease state compared with chronic inflammatory disease: role of interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Rainer H; Lehle, Karin; Herfarth, Hans; Weber, Markus; Falk, Werner; Preuner, Jurgen; Scholmerich, Jurgen

    2002-03-01

    Serum levels of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulphate (DHEAS) are low in chronic inflammatory diseases, although the reasons are unexplained. Furthermore, the behaviour of serum levels of these hormones during an acute inflammatory stressful disease state is not well known. In this study in patients with an acute inflammatory stressful disease state (13 patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery) and patients with chronic inflammation (61 patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD)) vs. 120 controls, we aimed to investigate adrenal hormone shifts looking at serum levels of DHEA in relation to other adrenal hormones. Furthermore, we tested the predictive role of serum tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) for a change of serum levels of DHEA in relation to other adrenal hormones. The molar ratio of serum levels of DHEA/androstenedione (ASD) was increased in patients with an acute inflammatory stressful disease state and was decreased in patients with chronic inflammation. The molar ratio of serum levels of DHEAS/DHEA was reduced during an acute inflammatory stressful disease state and was increased in patients with chronic inflammation. A multiple linear regression analysis revealed that elevated serum levels of TNF were associated with a high ratio of serum levels of DHEA/ASD in all groups (for IL-6 in patients with an acute inflammatory stressful disease state only), and, similarly, elevated serum levels of TNF were associated with a high ratio of serum levels of DHEAS/DHEA only in IBD (for IL-6 only in healthy subjects). This study indicates that changes of serum levels of DHEA in relation to serum levels of other adrenal hormones are completely different in patients with an acute inflammatory stressful disease state compared with patients with chronic inflammation. The decrease of serum levels of DHEAS and DHEA is typical for chronic inflammation and TNF and IL-6 play a predictive role for these changes.

  15. Update on work-related psychosocial factors and the development of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pejtersen, Jan Hyld; Burr, Hermann; Hannerz, Harald

    2014-01-01

    were included in the original review: (1) STUDY: a prospective or case-control study if exposure was not self-reported (prognostic studies excluded); (2) OUTCOME: definite IHD determined externally; (3) EXPOSURE: psychosocial factors at work (excluding shift work, trauma, violence or accidents......, and social capital); and (4) Statistical power: acceptable to detect a 20% increased risk in IHD. Eleven new papers met the inclusion criteria 1-3; a total of 44 papers were evaluated regarding inclusion criteria 4. Of 169 statistical analyses, only 10 analyses in 2 papers had acceptable statistical power...... to determine to what extent psychosocial factors at work are risk factors of IHD. There is a need for considering statistical power when planning studies....

  16. Anxious and depressive symptoms in the French Asbestos-Related Diseases Cohort: risk factors and self-perception of risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounchetrou Njoya, Ibrahim; Paris, Christophe; Dinet, Jerome; Luc, Amandine; Lighezzolo-Alnot, Joelle; Pairon, Jean-Claude; Thaon, Isabelle

    2017-04-01

    Asbestos is known to be an independent risk factor for lung and pleural cancers. However, to date, little attention has been paid to the psychological effects of asbestos exposure among exposed subjects. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of anxious and depressive symptoms among >2000 French participants of the Asbestos-Related Diseases Cohort (ARDCO), 6 years after their inclusion, to identify the risk factors associated with those anxious and depressive symptoms and to evaluate the impact of the asbestos-risk perception. The ARDCO was constituted in four regions of France between October 2003 and December 2005, by including former asbestos workers. Between 2011 and 2012, participants of the ARDCO program were invited to undergo another chest CT scan 6 years after the previous scan. Participants were asked to complete questionnaires including asbestos exposure assessment, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), asbestos-risk perception and self-perception of asbestos-related diseases. Among the 2225 participants, 2210 fully completed questionnaires were collected and analyzed. The prevalence of symptoms of probable anxiety and probable depression was 19.7% and 9.9%, respectively. The risk of anxious and depressive symptoms was independently associated with self-perception of the intensity of asbestos exposure, asbestos-risk perception and self-perception of asbestos-related diseases. The results obtained in this large study confirm that previously asbestos-exposed subjects are likely to develop anxious and depressive symptoms. Finally, implications related to the prevention of anxiety and depression among asbestos-exposed workers is discussed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  17. The Role of Carbohydrate Related Factors in Pathogenesis of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Sherafatmanesh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is among the most common causes of chronic liver disease worldwide and its prevalence is increasing nowadays. This review article discusses the role of carbohydrate in NAFLD. We reviewed 57 papers out of which 48 randomized controlled trials and review articles with good quality were collected. The key words used for the search were: “Carbohydrate”, “Fructose”, “Weight”, “Low carbohydrate, ketogenic diet”, in combination with “NAFLD” for searching in “Pubmed”, ”Science direct” and “Google Scholar” databases. We limited our search to studies published in English. The available data provided adequate scientific evidence which pointed toward the considerable potential effects between high intake of carbohydrates, fructose, high glycemic index foods and low dietary fiber and incidence of the NAFLD. This review provided sufficient evidence that higher consumption of carbohydrates and fructose sources may exacerbate NAFLD which leads to more accumulation of fat in the liver; while higher intake of fiber and low GI carbohydrate tends to ameliorate NAFLD.

  18. The relation between ankle-brachial index (ABI and coronary artery disease severity and risk factors: an angiographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Sadeghi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The current study aims to determine the relation between ankle–brachialindex (ABI and angiographic findings and major cardiovascular risk factors in patients withsuspected coronary artery diseases (CAD in Isfahan.METHODS: In this cross-sectional descriptive-analytic research, patients with suspected CADwere studied. Characteristics of studied subjects including demographics, familial history, pastmedical history and atherosclerotic risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension,hyperlipidemia and smoking were obtained using a standard questionnaire. ABI was measuredin all studied patients. ABI ≤ 0.9 (ABI+ was considered as peripheral vessel disease and ABI >0.9 (ABI- was considered as normal. Then, all studied patients underwent coronary arteryangiography. The results of the questionnaire and angiographic findings were compared in ABI+and ABI- groups. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15 using ANOVA, t-test, Spearman's rankcorrelation coefficient, and discriminant analysis.RESULTS: In this study, 125 patients were investigated. ABI ≤ 0.9 was seen in 25 patients (20%.The prevalence of ABI+ among men and women was 25.9% and 7.5%, respectively (P = 0.01. Theprevalence of atherosclerotic risk factors was significantly higher in ABI+ patients than in ABIones(P < 0.05. ABI+ patients had more significant stenosis than ABI- ones. The mean ofocclusion was significantly higher in ABI+ patients with left main artery (LMA, right coronaryartery (RCA, left anterior descending artery (LAD, diagonal artery 1 (D1 and left circumflexartery (LCX involvements (P < 0.05.CONCLUSION: The findings of this research indicated that ABI could be a useful method inassessing both the atherosclerotic risk factors and the degree of coronary involvements insuspected patients. However, in order to make more accurate decisions for using this method indiagnosing and preventing CAD, we should plan further studies in large sample sizes of generalpopulation

  19. Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and early exit from paid employment in Europe; the impact of work-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouwenhoven-Pasmooij, T A; Burdorf, A; Roos-Hesselink, J W; Hunink, M G M; Robroek, S J W

    2016-07-15

    The aims of the study were to examine (i) the association between cardiovascular disease (CVD) or diabetes and exit from paid employment via disability benefits, unemployment, early retirement or other exit routes; and (ii) the impact of work-related factors on exit from paid employment among individuals with CVD or diabetes. Respondents of the longitudinal Survey of Health and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) were included if they were aged >50years, had paid employment at baseline, and a known employment status after 2 or 6years (n=5182). A baseline-interview provided information on the presence of diagnosed CVD and diabetes, and physical and psychosocial work-related factors. During follow-up interviews information on work status was collected. Multinomial regression analyses were used to investigate the association between CVD, diabetes and exit from paid employment, and the impact of work-related factors. Workers with CVD or diabetes had significantly increased probabilities of disability benefits (OR 2.50, 95% CI 1.69-3.70) and early retirement (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.05-1.74), but a comparable probability of unemployment (OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.71-1.71). Regarding disability benefits, individuals who had a stroke had the highest probability (OR 3.48, 95% CI 1.31-9.23). Perceived high job demands with low rewards or with low control at work further increased the probability of early exit among individuals with CVD or diabetes. Our study shows a prominent role of CVD and diabetes in premature losses to the workforce, and it shows that optimizing psychosocial work-related factors could be beneficial in people with CVD or diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. (Health-related) quality of life and psychosocial factors in adolescents with chronic disease: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Teresa; de Matos, Margarida Gaspar; Simões, Celeste; Leal, Isabel; do Céu Machado, Maria

    2017-11-23

    Background Research on living with a chronic disease (CD) in adolescence is increasing. However, studies on the relevance of psychosocial factors are still needed. The present review, focuses on the impact of living with a CD in adolescence on on quality of life (QoL), health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and psychosocial factors. Methods A literature review of articles identified through PubMed, PsycINFO and PsycARTICLES (these last two ones comprise the Ebsco Host platform) and original peer-reviewed research papers, published between 2010 and 2015, with no restrictions regarding the format/source of interventions, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or types of comparisons were included. Results Eighteen papers met the inclusion criteria and contradictory results were found: the majority showed a significantly higher risk of impairment on QoL/HRQoL and psychosocial factors, whereas others reported a significantly lower risk of impairment (highlighting possible protective factors), or no significant differences. Heterogeneity in the assessment procedures and substantial difficulties in considering adolescence as a single and independent age group, were also noted. Conclusion The higher risk of impairment and the heterogeneity observed between cohorts, reinforce the need to work towards consensual procedures, which allow for more accurate comparisons among studies. Additionally, it conveys the challenge to find more effective interventions. Furthermore, it is highly suggested to routinely assess HRQoL/psychosocial factors within an individualized framework, to considerer adolescents as a single/independent group, to emphasize potential protective factors, and, to increase youth's participation in their own adaptation process and in health promotion in general. These are possible future directions that could enable multidisciplinary responses to improve HRQoL and psychosocial care in adolescents with a CD.

  1. Cardiovascular risk in lupus nephritis: Do renal disease-related and other traditional risk factors play a role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoshi Atukorala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to evaluate the prevalence of thickened carotid intima media thickness (CIMT in a Sri Lankan cohort of lupus nephritis (LN patients and to identify associations between traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD and LN-related risk factors with increased CIMT. Consecutive patients with biopsy-proven LN were evaluated for conventional CVD risk factors, renal parameters and extent of organ involvement in this cross-sectional study. Current disease activity and damage were assessed by the British Isles Lupus Activity Group (BILAG score and the Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (SLICC/ACR damage index, respectively. CIMT was assessed by B Mode grey scale ultrasonography. Increased CIMT was defined as CIMT more than the 75th percentile based on cutoffs from the "Carotid Atherosclerosis Progression Study." Forty patients (98% female, with a mean age of 38 years (age range of 20-50 and of South Asian descent, were evaluated. The mean duration of disease of 6.15 years (SD = 4.66. The overall prevalence of cardiovascular events was low and included previous acute coronary syndromes in 7.5%, stable angina in 5%, cerebrovascular accidents in 7.5% and transient ischemic attacks in 2.5% of the patients; 72.5% had hypertension (HTN [mean blood pressure (BP 140/80 mm Hg]; 32.5% had dyslipidemias (mean serum cholesterol 5.9; SD = 5.6 and 25% had diabetes (mean blood sugar 103.7; SD = 15.6. Forty percent were obese and 20% were overweight (Asian cutoffs. Increased CIMT (57.5% and atherosclerotic plaques (15.36% indicated a high CVD risk in this cohort. Diabetes (P = 0.016, HTN (P = 0.002, dyslipidemia (P = 0.002 and obesity (P = 0.048 were associated with thickened CIMT. The only LN-related risk factor associated with thickened CIMT (P <0.05 was the SLICC/ACR damage index. The independent predictors of thickened CIMT determined by logistic regression analysis were HTN and dyslipidemia.

  2. Nutritional related cardiovascular risk factors in patients with coronary artery disease in IRAN: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afzali Naser

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aims There are limited findings available on coronary artery disease (CAD risk factors and nutritional pattern of CAD patients in Iran. The purpose of this study was to compare nutritional-related risk factors of CAD patients with that of matched controls. Methods In a case-control design, dietary patterns and CAD risk factors of 108 documented patients (determined by cardiac catheterization showing greater than 70% stenosis or established myocardial infarction whom were admitted to coronary care units (CCU of Ahvaz teaching hospitals were compared with that of 108 gender- and age-matched subjects of normal cardiac catheterization (lesser than 40% stenosis. Measured variables consisted of blood lipid profile, smoking habits, dietary patterns, anthropometric indices and blood pressure levels. Results Almost all patients had hypertriglyceridemia and high LDL-C levels. Odds ratios (CI 95% for consuming fish, tea, vegetable oils were 0.55(0.31-0.91, 0.3(0.15-0.65, 0.23(0.13-0.42, respectively. However, consumption of hydrogenated fats, and full-fat yoghurt was associated with higher CAD risk (OR = 2.12(1.23-3.64 and 2.35(1.32-4.18, respectively. Patients' serum lipid profiles, sugar concentrations, and blood pressure levels were significantly higher than defined cut-off points of the known risk factors. Considerable numbers of the control group also showed high levels of the known risk factors. Conclusions Consumption of fish, tea and vegetable oils shown to have protective effect on CAD while full fat yoghurt and hydrogenated fats increase the risk of CAD. Moreover, CAD patients obviously have higher blood lipids and sugar concentrations, blood pressure, body fat percent and BMI levels compared with their matched counterparts. We need to define specific local cut-off points with more practical criteria to detect CAD patients.

  3. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  4. Renal Abnormalities Among Egyptian Children With Hemophilia A Using Renal Scintigraphy: Relation to Risk Factors and Disease Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Ahmed Alsaeed; Shalaby, Mennatallah Hatem; El-Kinawy, Nihal Saad; Elamawy, Alaa Adel; Abd El-Ghany, Shereen Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    Many risk factors may contribute to renal disease in patients with hemophilia A. We aimed to evaluate functional and structural renal abnormalities among a group of Egyptian children with severe and moderate hemophilia A using technetium-99m diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid ( 99m Tc-DTPA) and technetium-99 m dimercaptusuccinic acid ( 99m Tc-DMSA) scan. We also aimed to determine the relation between these abnormalities and different risk factors and disease severity. Forty male patients, 16 with severe and 24 with moderate hemophilia A, were enrolled in this study. Their mean age was 10.2 ± 4.3 years (range, 5-17 years). Full history taking, clinical examination, laboratory, and radionuclide investigations including serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urine analysis, creatinine clearance, 24-hour urinary protein, 99m Tc-DTPA scan, and 99m Tc-DMSA scan were performed to all enrolled patients. Serum creatinine and BUN were normal in all patients, and corrected creatinine clearance was diminished in 2 patients. However, 99m Tc-DTPA results yielded 19 (47.5%) patients with diminished glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Moreover, it showed that 14 (35%) had obstructive uropathy, 15 (37.5%) had obstructive nephropathy, while 11 (27.5%) patients showed normal scan. One patient had atrophy of 1 kidney on 99m Tc-DMSA scan. Among our cohort, 5 (12.5%) patients were hypertensive. Microscopic hematuria was detected in 14 (35%) patients while 72.5% had proteinuria. We found an association between hematuria and hypertension with diminished GFR. Despite normal kidney functions (serum creatinine and BUN), we found a high rate of diminished GFR and obstructive uropathy and nephropathy as detected by 99m Tc-DTPA scan among children with hemophilia A.

  5. Evaluation of a short Food Frequency Questionnaire to assess cardiovascular disease-related diet and lifestyle factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karianne Svendsen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Vascular lifestyle-Intervention and Screening in phArmacies (VISA study investigates diet and lifestyle factors associated with risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD. As part of the study methodology, a short Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ, the VISA-FFQ, was adapted from the Norwegian NORDIET-FFQ. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the VISA-FFQ and its ability to estimate intakes of foods and lifestyle factors in screening for elevated risk of CVD. The evaluation included assessment of relative validity of intake of milk fat and assessment of reproducibility of several foods and lifestyle factors. Design: Relative validity of milk fat estimated from the VISA-FFQ was assessed in 307 participants by comparing estimated dietary intake of the fatty acids pentadecanoic acid (15:0 and heptadecanoic acid (17:0, from milk fat with whole blood biomarkers 15:0 and 17:0. Reproducibility was evaluated in 122 participants by comparing consistency in intakes of different foods and lifestyle factors reported by the VISA-FFQ and administered twice with a 4-week interval. Results: Dietary 15:0 milk fat estimated from the VISA-FFQ correlated positively with whole blood 15:0 (r = 0.32, P < 0.05. Men presented higher correlations than women did. Acceptable and consistent reproducibility (r = 0.44–0.94 and no large difference between test and retest was observed for most beverages, milk products, spreads on bread and meat (all of which included food items categorised into at least two fat categories and also for eggs, fruits and vegetables, nuts, pasta and rice, dessert/sweets, smoking and physical activity. Reproducibility did not consistently meet a satisfactory standard (r ≤ 0.41 or large difference between test and retest for unsweetened cereals, fatty fish, cakes, oils, white-, bread, crispbread and rice. Conclusion: The validity of the VISA-FFQ was acceptable for intake of milk fat, and there was an overall satisfactory

  6. Connective Tissue Growth Factor Domain 4 Amplifies Fibrotic Kidney Disease through Activation of LDL Receptor-Related Protein 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bryce G; Ren, Shuyu; Karaca, Gamze; Gomez, Ivan G; Fligny, Cécile; Smith, Benjamin; Ergun, Ayla; Locke, George; Gao, Benbo; Hayes, Sebastian; MacDonnell, Scott; Duffield, Jeremy S

    2017-06-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a matrix-associated protein with four distinct cytokine binding domains, has roles in vasculogenesis, wound healing responses, and fibrogenesis and is upregulated in fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in disease. Here, we investigated the role of CTGF in fibrogenic cells. In mice, tissue-specific inducible overexpression of CTGF by kidney pericytes and fibroblasts had no bearing on nephrogenesis or kidney homeostasis but exacerbated inflammation and fibrosis after ureteral obstruction. These effects required the WNT receptor LDL receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6). Additionally, pericytes isolated from these mice became hypermigratory and hyperproliferative on overexpression of CTGF. CTGF is cleaved in vivo into distinct domains. Treatment with recombinant domain 1, 1+2 (N terminus), or 4 (C terminus) independently activated myofibroblast differentiation and wound healing responses in cultured pericytes, but domain 4 showed the broadest profibrotic activity. Domain 4 exhibited low-affinity binding to LRP6 in in vitro binding assays, and inhibition of LRP6 or critical signaling cascades downstream of LRP6, including JNK and WNT/ β -catenin, inhibited the biologic activity of domain 4. Administration of blocking antibodies specifically against CTGF domain 4 or recombinant Dickkopf-related protein-1, an endogenous inhibitor of LRP6, effectively inhibited inflammation and fibrosis associated with ureteral obstruction in vivo Therefore, domain 4 of CTGF and the WNT signaling pathway are important new targets in fibrosis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  7. Risk factors for Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlin, Michael; Wikell, Helena; Sundin, Mikael; Blennow, Ola; Maeurer, Markus; Ringden, Olle; Winiarski, Jacek; Ljungman, Per; Remberger, Mats; Mattsson, Jonas

    2014-02-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a successful treatment for hematologic malignancies and a variety of genetic and metabolic disorders. In the period following stem cell transplantation, the immune-compromised milieu allows opportunistic pathogens to thrive. Epstein-Barr virus-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease can be a life-threatening complication for transplanted patients because of suppressed T-cell-mediated immunity. We analyzed possible risk factors associated with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in a cohort of over 1,000 patients. The incidence of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease was 4%. Significant risk factors identified by multivariate analysis were: human leukocyte antigen-mismatch (PEpstein-Barr virus mismatch recipient-/donor+ (Pdisease grade II to IV (P=0.006), pre-transplant splenectomy (P=0.008) and infusion of mesenchymal stromal cells (P=0.015). The risk of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease has increased in more recent years, from less than 2% before 1998 to more than 6% after 2011. Additionally, we show that long-term survival of patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease is poor despite initial successful treatment. The 3-year survival rate among the 40 patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease was 20% as opposed to 62% among patients without post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (Pdisease after transplantation in need of pre-emptive measures.

  8. Contribution of Genetic Background, Traditional Risk Factors, and HIV-Related Factors to Coronary Artery Disease Events in HIV-Positive Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R.; Junier, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D.; Poloni, Estella S.; van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Lubomirov, Rubin; Colombo, Sara; Martinez, Raquel; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Wentworth, Deborah; van Manen, Danielle; Gras, Luuk A.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Albini, Laura; Torti, Carlo; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Li, Xiuhong; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Carli, Federica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Ford, Emily S.; Sereti, Irini; Hadigan, Colleen; Martinez, Esteban; Arnedo, Mireia; Egaña-Gorroño, Lander; Gatell, Jose M.; Law, Matthew; Bendall, Courtney; Petoumenos, Kathy; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Kabamba, Kabeya; Delforge, Marc; De Wit, Stephane; Berger, Florian; Mauss, Stefan; de Paz Sierra, Mariana; Losso, Marcelo; Belloso, Waldo H.; Leyes, Maria; Campins, Antoni; Mondi, Annalisa; De Luca, Andrea; Bernardino, Ignacio; Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Torrecilla-Rodriguez, Ana; Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan; Arribas, José R.; Fanti, Iuri; Gel, Silvia; Puig, Jordi; Negredo, Eugenia; Gutierrez, Mar; Domingo, Pere; Fischer, Julia; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Macken, Alan; Woo, James; McGinty, Tara; Mallon, Patrick; Mangili, Alexandra; Skinner, Sally; Wanke, Christine A.; Reiss, Peter; Weber, Rainer; Bucher, Heiner C.; Fellay, Jacques; Telenti, Amalio; Tarr, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the setting of HIV infection. Methods In the general population, 23 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were shown to be associated with CAD through genome-wide association analysis. Using the Metabochip, we genotyped 1875 HIV-positive, white individuals enrolled in 24 HIV observational studies, including 571 participants with a first CAD event during the 9-year study period and 1304 controls matched on sex and cohort. Results A genetic risk score built from 23 CAD-associated SNPs contributed significantly to CAD (P = 2.9×10−4). In the final multivariable model, participants with an unfavorable genetic background (top genetic score quartile) had a CAD odds ratio (OR) of 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–2.04). This effect was similar to hypertension (OR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.06–1.73), hypercholesterolemia (OR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.16–1.96), diabetes (OR = 1.66; 95% CI, 1.10–2.49), ≥1 year lopinavir exposure (OR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.06–1.73), and current abacavir treatment (OR = 1.56; 95% CI, 1.17–2.07). The effect of the genetic risk score was additive to the effect of nongenetic CAD risk factors, and did not change after adjustment for family history of CAD. Conclusions In the setting of HIV infection, the effect of an unfavorable genetic background was similar to traditional CAD risk factors and certain adverse antiretroviral exposures. Genetic testing may provide prognostic information complementary to family history of CAD. PMID:23532479

  9. Geriatic Disability Related Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Adib Hajbagheri

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Reports are indicating of increasing trend of aging and disability in the developing countries while such disabilities are decreasing within the developed countries. This study designed to evaluate the disability and some of its related factors among the elderly population (65 and older in Kashan, Iran. Methods & Materials: A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted on a multi-stage random sample of 350 elderly people (65 year and older in Kashan. The WHO-DAS-II was used as the generic disability measure. The questionnair had 48 questions. The range of score could be between 0-144. Chi-square, t-test analysis and ANOVA were utilized to check significant differences between subgroups. Results: 61% were men and 12% were living lonely. One fourth had some type of addiction, the majority were ilitrate and two thired had not regular phisycal activity.Twenty percent of the old people had a modereate disability and 4.3% were extremely disabled. A significant relationship was found between the disability and variables such as sex, age, living style, needing help, marriage status, living location, addiction, job, level of physical activity, education, and having multiple diseases. Conclusion: In conclusion, geriatric population in Iran, has a lower levels of disability in compare to those of other developed countries. Need of geriatric cares must be be increasing, since the populationpattern of elderly people is increasing in Iran. Female and ilitrate elders were sufering of more disability. These findings indicated the nessesity to more attention to these voulnarable subgroups of population.

  10. The relative contribution of physical and cognitive fall risk factors in people with Parkinson's disease: a large prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Serene S; Sherrington, Catherine; Canning, Colleen G; Fung, Victor S C; Close, Jacqueline C T; Lord, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    In order to develop multifaceted fall prevention strategies for people with Parkinson's disease (PD), greater understanding of the impact of physical and cognitive performance on falls is required. We aimed to identify the relative contribution of a comprehensive range of physical and cognitive risk factors to prospectively-measured falls in a large sample of people with PD and develop an explanatory multivariate fall risk model in this group. METHODS MEASURES: of PD signs and symptoms, freezing of gait, balance, mobility, proprioception, leg muscle strength, and cognition were collected on 205 community-dwelling people with PD. Falls were monitored prospectively for 6 months using falls diaries. A total of 120 participants (59%) fell during follow-up. Freezing of gait (P falls in univariate analyses. Freezing of gait (risk ratio [RR] = 1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.00-1.05, P = .02), impaired anticipatory (RR = 1.01, 95% CI = 1.00-1.02, P = .03) and reactive (RR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.01-1.58, P = .04) balance, and impaired orientation (RR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.01-1.62, P = .04) maintained significant associations with falls in multivariate analysis. The study findings elucidate important physical and cognitive determinants of falls in people with PD and may assist in developing efficacious fall prevention strategies for this high-risk group.

  11. DNA dynamics is likely to be a factor in the genomic nucleotide repeats expansions related to diseases.

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    Boian S Alexandrov

    Full Text Available Trinucleotide repeats sequences (TRS represent a common type of genomic DNA motif whose expansion is associated with a large number of human diseases. The driving molecular mechanisms of the TRS ongoing dynamic expansion across generations and within tissues and its influence on genomic DNA functions are not well understood. Here we report results for a novel and notable collective breathing behavior of genomic DNA of tandem TRS, leading to propensity for large local DNA transient openings at physiological temperature. Our Langevin molecular dynamics (LMD and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC simulations demonstrate that the patterns of openings of various TRSs depend specifically on their length. The collective propensity for DNA strand separation of repeated sequences serves as a precursor for outsized intermediate bubble states independently of the G/C-content. We report that repeats have the potential to interfere with the binding of transcription factors to their consensus sequence by altered DNA breathing dynamics in proximity of the binding sites. These observations might influence ongoing attempts to use LMD and MCMC simulations for TRS-related modeling of genomic DNA functionality in elucidating the common denominators of the dynamic TRS expansion mutation with potential therapeutic applications.

  12. Urological comorbidities in Egyptian rheumatoid arthritis patients: Risk factors and relation to disease activity and functional status

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    Marwa Niazy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the work: To assess the urological disorders in rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients, analyse the risk factors and to find their relation to disease activity and functional status. Patients and methods: 291 RA patients (253 females and 38 males; F:M 6.7:1 and 242 matched controls were included. Urological disorders in the form of urinary tract infections (UTI, urolithiasis and acute urine retention (AUR were assessed, risk factors were analysed. Disease activity score (DAS-28 and modified health assessment questionnaire (mHAQ were calculated. Results: RA patients had more frequent urological disorders (38.14% than controls (20.66%, more UTI (p < 0.001 and this difference persisted in females (p < 0.001. Urolithiasis tended to be more frequent in RA patients (p = 0.3; the difference was significant between the female patients and controls (p = 0.04. Urinary stones were comparable between the male patients and controls (p = 0.2. RA patients had more AUR (4.8% than the controls (2.1% (p = 0.07. Asthmatic patients particularly the females had more UTI (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001 respectively. UTIs were observed with higher steroid doses (p = 0.04 and urolithiasis were noticed more in hypertensive female patients (p = 0.03. Patients with higher DAS-28 and mHAQ developed more urological comorbidities (p0.49 and p = 0.82 respectively. UTI and urolithiasis were detected in patients with higher DAS 28 (p = 0.1 and p = 0.4 respectively. Conclusion: RA patients were found to have more urological disorders. Bronchial asthma, hypertension and higher steroid doses may increase risk for urinary comorbidities in RA. Patients with higher DAS28 and mHAQ had more urological comorbidities, however without statistically significant difference.

  13. Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Their Relation to Future Surgery for Valvular Heart Disease or Ascending Aortic Disease: A Case-Referent Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungberg, Johan; Johansson, Bengt; Engström, Karl Gunnar; Albertsson, Elin; Holmer, Paul; Norberg, Margareta; Bergdahl, Ingvar A; Söderberg, Stefan

    2017-05-05

    Risk factors for developing heart valve and ascending aortic disease are based mainly on retrospective data. To elucidate these factors in a prospective manner, we have performed a nested case-referent study using data from large, population-based surveys. A total of 777 patients operated for heart valve disease or disease of the ascending aorta had previously participated in population-based health surveys in Northern Sweden. Median time (interquartile range) from survey to surgery was 10.5 (9.0) years. Primary indications for surgery were aortic stenosis (41%), aortic regurgitation (12%), mitral regurgitation (23%), and dilatation/dissection of the ascending aorta (17%). For each case, referents were allocated, matched for age, sex, and geographical area. In multivariable models, surgery for aortic stenosis was predicted by hypertension, high cholesterol levels, diabetes mellitus, and active smoking. Surgery for aortic regurgitation was associated with a low cholesterol level, whereas a high cholesterol level predicted surgery for mitral regurgitation. Hypertension, blood pressure, and previous smoking predicted surgery for disease of the ascending aorta whereas diabetes mellitus was associated with reduced risk. After exclusion of cases with coronary atherosclerosis, only the inverse associations between cholesterol and aortic regurgitation and between diabetes mellitus and disease of the ascending aorta remained. This is the first truly prospective study of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and their association with valvular heart disease and disease of the ascending aorta. We confirm the strong association between traditional risk factors and aortic stenosis, but only in patients with concomitant coronary artery disease. In isolated valvular heart disease, the impact of traditional risk factors is varying. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  14. CARCINOMA OF UNKNOWN PRIMARY WITH SECONDARY METASTASIS TO NECKANALYSIS OF PATIENT AND DISEASE RELATED FACTORS PREDICTING SUPERIOR PATIENT OUTCOMES IN CUPS NECK

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    Preeti Singh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Carcinoma of unknown primary with secondary metastasis to neck (CUPS Neck is involvement of cervical nodes with squamous cell carcinoma without identifiable primary lesion in oral cavity, oropharynx and upper aerodigestive tract. Most commonly affects older male with history of tobacco and alcohol abuse. Commonly involved neck nodes are level II and III. Metastasis to these nodes usually comes from head and neck tumours. The aims of this study are to evaluate the factors (relating to patient and disease associated with improved outcomes following treatment in patients with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of neck with unknown primary site. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study was done in ENT and Head Neck Centre, Base Hospital, Delhi Cantt. The investigation and treatment of such cases aim to detect a primary lesion, if possible in the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT and in any case to institute the optimal management protocol. Many factors impact the outcomes of treatment in terms of survival and quality of life. RESULTS After followup of 0.5 to 2 years data were compared among various groups, various disease related factors like volume of disease, staging of neck node, extracapsular spread in final HPE report and various patient related factors like age and sex of patient, performance status of patient, and presence of comorbidities were compared with final outcome in terms of recurrence or disease free survival with less complications. CONCLUSION 1. Most prominent tumour related prognostic factors were low volume nodal disease in the neck and absence of extracapsular spread. Patients with TNM stage I (T0N1M0 were associated with lower recurrence and less complication postoperatively as compared to advanced stage disease (T0N2M0 and T0N3M0. 2. In our study, patient related variables associated with superior patient outcomes in terms of locoregional recurrence or disease free survival were good performance status, females, young age

  15. Spatial Analysis of Environmental Factors Related to Lyme Disease in Alabama by Means of NASA Earth Observation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renneboog, Nathan; Capilouto, Emily G.; Firsing, Stephen L., III; Levy, Kyle; McAllister, Marilyn; Roa, Kathryn; Setia,Shveta; Xie, Lili; Burnett, Donna; Luvall, Jeffrey C.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the epidemiology of Lyme Disease that accounts for more than 95% or vector borne diseases in the United States. The history, symptoms and the life cycle of the tick, the transmitting agent of Lyme Disease, a map that shows the cases reported to the CDC between1990 and 2006 and the number of cases in Alabama by year from 1986 to 2007. A NASA project is described, the goals of which are to (1) Demonstrate the presence of the chain of infection of Lyme disease in Alabama (2) Identify areas with environmental factors that support tick population using NASA Earth Observation Systems data in selected areas of Alabama and (3) Increase community awareness of Lyme disease and recommend primary and secondary prevention strategies. The remote sensing methods included: Analyzed Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and DigitalGlobe Quickbird satellite imagery from summer months and Performed image analyses in ER Mapper 7.1. Views from the ASTER and Quickbird land cover are shown, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) algorithm was applied to all ASTER and Quickbird imagery. The use of the images to obtain the level of soil moisture is reviewed, and this analysis was used along with the NDVI, was used to identify the areas that support the tick population.

  16. Inflammation-modulating cytokine profile and lipid interaction in HIV-related risk factors for cardiovascular diseases

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    Gori E

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Gori,1,2 Takafira Mduluza,3,4 Mudavanhu Nyagura,2 Babill Stray-Pedersen,5 Zvenyika Alfred Gomo1 1Chemical Pathology Department, College of Health Sciences, 2Preclinical Veterinary Studies Department, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, 3Biochemistry Department, University of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe; 4School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa; 5Institute of Clinical Medicine, University in Oslo, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway Abstract: HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART are associated with changes in plasma levels of lipoproteins, thus posing the risk of cardiovascular complications in infected individuals. The alteration in plasma lipoprotein levels results from dysregulation of inflammation-modulating cytokines that control lipid metabolism. Little is understood regarding the relationship between the cytokines and serum lipid levels, which have been reported to be altered in adults receiving ART. The objective of this study was to describe the profiles of inflammation-modulating cytokines and their relationship to lipids as cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors in HIV infection. This observational cross-sectional study measured plasma levels of interleukin (IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, IL-4, total cholesterol (TC, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c in HIV-infected and uninfected adults. A total of 219 HIV-infected participants were enrolled from an HIV treatment center; of them, 187 were receiving ART and 32 were ART naïve, while 65 were HIV-uninfected blood donors. HIV-infected individuals had higher levels of IL-10 (HIV-infected ART-naïve [P=0.0024] and ART-receiving [P=0.033] than their uninfected counterparts. ART-naïve subjects had significantly higher plasma levels of IL-10 than ART-receiving subjects (P=0.0014. No significant difference was observed in plasma levels of IL-4 and TNF

  17. An Epidemiological Study of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Related Risk Factors in Urban Population of Mashhad, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossoughinia, Hassan; Salari, Masoumeh; Mokhtari Amirmajdi, Elham; Saadatnia, Hassan; Abedini, Siavash; Shariati, Alireza; Shariati, Mohammadjavad; Khosravi Khorashad, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) is a chronic and common disease, which is characterized by heartburn and regurgitation. In the last couple of decades, GERD has received much attention and studies have shown an increase in its prevalence. Although there have been a few studies on the prevalence of GERD in Iran, no study has yet been done in the northeastern part of the country. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of GERD and its risk factors in a population from Mashhad. Objectives: To evaluate the epidemiology of GERD based on a population study in Mashhad. Patients and Methods: This was a cross sectional descriptive study conducted in 2010. In total, 2500 participants were selected based on cluster sampling. Modified and validated Mayo Clinic questionnaire for GERD was used for data collection. Overall, 1685 questionnaires were retrieved. Fifty-one participants were excluded because of pregnancies, history of abdominal surgery and being less than 18 years old. We analyzed data using the SPSS software version 16. Prevalence of GERD and significant risk factors (P value < 0.05) were determined. Results: In total, 420 participants (25.7%) had GERD symptoms. Risk factors with significant effects consisted of smoking, consumption of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NASIDs), overeating, chronic diseases, tea and coffee consumption and GERD in spouse. Conclusions: The prevalence of GERD among people living in Mashhad was above the average prevalence in other cities of Iran. However, risk factors seemed to be similar to those reported by other studies. PMID:25763231

  18. Bioinformatics Identification of Modules of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Alzheimer's Disease-Related Genes by In Silico Promoter Analysis and Microarrays

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    Regina Augustin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms and genetic risk factors underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis are only partly understood. To identify new factors, which may contribute to AD, different approaches are taken including proteomics, genetics, and functional genomics. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach and found that distinct AD-related genes share modules of transcription factor binding sites, suggesting a transcriptional coregulation. To detect additional coregulated genes, which may potentially contribute to AD, we established a new bioinformatics workflow with known multivariate methods like support vector machines, biclustering, and predicted transcription factor binding site modules by using in silico analysis and over 400 expression arrays from human and mouse. Two significant modules are composed of three transcription factor families: CTCF, SP1F, and EGRF/ZBPF, which are conserved between human and mouse APP promoter sequences. The specific combination of in silico promoter and multivariate analysis can identify regulation mechanisms of genes involved in multifactorial diseases.

  19. Heart Disease Risk Factors

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    ... About CDC.gov . Home About Heart Disease Coronary Artery Disease Heart Attack Heart Attack Signs and Symptoms ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  20. Are factors related to dual-task performance in people with Parkinson's disease dependent on the type of dual task?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouwen, Carolien; Molenaar, Esther A L M; Keus, Samyra H J; Münks, Liesbeth; Heremans, Elke; Vandenberghe, Wim; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2016-02-01

    Impaired dual-task performance significantly impacts upon functional mobility in people with Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study was to identify determinants of dual-task performance in people with PD in three different dual tasks to assess their possible task-dependency. We recruited 121 home-dwelling patients with PD (mean age 65.93 years; mean disease duration 8.67 years) whom we subjected to regular walking (control condition) and to three dual-task conditions: walking combined with a backwards Digit Span task, an auditory Stroop task and a Mobile Phone task. We measured dual-task gait velocity using the GAITRite mat and dual-task reaction times and errors on the concurrent tasks as outcomes. Motor, cognitive and descriptive variables which correlated to dual-task performance (p task gait velocity and executive function, tested by the alternating intake test, was significantly associated with gait velocity during the Digit Span (R(2) = 0.65; p task (R(2) = 0.62; p task. Age was a surplus determinant of gait velocity while using a mobile phone. Single-task gait velocity and executive function as measured by a verbal fluency switching task were independent determinants of dual-task gait performance in people with PD. In contrast to expectation, these factors were the same across different tasks, supporting the robustness of the findings. Future study needs to determine whether these factors predict dual-task abnormalities prospectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative study of risk factors related to cardiovascular disease in children from Bogotá, Colombia and Toluca, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Devia, Lizeth Johana; Monroy Romero, Paola Andrea; Almonacid Urrego, Carmen Cecilia; Orjuela, Olga Lucía; Huérfano, Myriam Judith; Mendieta Zerón, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Currently, cardiovascular risk factors have not been studied so extensively in young people. To compare the cardiovascular risk factor between Colombian and Mexican children. This was a transversal, descriptive, comparative and clinical study. 30 children of primary school aged 6-12 from Bogotá, Colombia were matched by age with a sample of 30 children from Toluca, Mexico. Cardiovascular risk factors measured were Body Mass Index (BMI), serum lipid profile, glucose and homocystein (Hcy). Besides we applied the validated surveys formats for food (dietary history), physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaire, IPAQ), alcohol consumption and smoking. BMI was higher in Mexican children than in Colombian (20.43±3.35 vs 16.92±3.46) (p≤0.001). Among Mexican children, 20% (6) of them had blood glucose concentration greater than 100 mg/dl, 6.6% (2) had triglycerides greater than 200 mg/dl, 36.6% (11) had cholesterol levels greater than 170 mg/dl, 16% (53.3) had HDL lower than the recommended limits, and 60% (18) had LDL above the normal limit. For the Colombian population these percentages were of 0, 3.3, 46.6, 13.33 and 53.3 respectively. Mexican children had a stronger correlation between BMI and atherogenic indices and less physical activity than Colombian. Of the 30 Mexican children enrolled in the study only 13% had none of the cardiovascular risk factors, while in the Colombian this percentage was of 33. Latin American children are not metabolically homogeneous, Mexican children are at high risk of cardiovascular disease.

  2. Factores relacionados con enfermedades transmitidas por alimentos en restaurantes de cinco ciudades de Colombia, 2007 Factors related to foodborne diseases in restaurants from 5 Colombian cities, 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Carolina Flórez

    2008-12-01

    food occurs mostly in homes and places where food is prepared for sale, by inadequate hygiene and handling. Objective: To identify factors related to the transmission of foodborne diseases in food shops. Materials and methods: In five Colombian cities, 300 establishments and 1,522 food handlers were surveyed; microbiological cultures from the hands were done in all cases; stool samples were taken from 1,286 food handlers, for ova and parasite examination. Results: 8.3% (25 of the food shops were not located in adequated places, 37.7% (113 had no sanitation plans and only 8.7% (26 realized correct food storage practices. 50.3% (765 of handlers had a medical examination before being admitted to work, and 60.7% (924 carried out a food handling course. Inappropriate working practices such as handling money and food simultaneously (17%, use of jewelry (15.2%, and having long nails with enamel (8.9% were found. 15.2% (231 manifested not washing their hands when handling money, this habit was 1.3 times greater than in those who received no training (RR=1.36; 95 CI%: 1.10-1.69. 26.9% were positive for intestinal parasites, 49 (3.8% for pathogenic parasites; 6 (0.46% for pathogenic entero-bacteria and 8 (0.52% hand cultures were positive for Staphylococccus aureus. Conclusion: Flaws in compliance of good manufacturing practices and bad hygienic habits of food handlers were found. These factors facilitate the presence of foodborne disease outbreaks.

  3. Epidemiologic study of end stage renal disease and related risk factors in patients under hemodialysis in Lorestan province

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    babak Hadian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevalence of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD is increasing in the world. Because of clinical importance of ESRD and absence of significant data, we studied the epidemiology of end stage renal failure in patients under hemodialysis in Lorestan province. Material and methods: This descriptive cross sectional study was carried out between January 2012 and January 2013 in dialysis centers of Lorestan university of medical sciences .Subject were selected by census method and data galhered using a questionnaire. At the end, collected data were analyzed by SPSS software, descriptive statistics and Chi-square test. Results: All the patients under hemodialysis were 318 cases, 182 out of them (57.2% and 136(42.8% were male and female respectively. The mean age of the subjects was 53.2± 16.4 years. The cause of renal failure in 38.1% of the patients were hypertension, diabetes (19.2% and unknown factors (27.4%. As well as 5.97% of the patients infected by HCV, HBV or HIV . A significant statistical difference was observed between causes of chronic renal failure and different ages of the subjects (p=0.002. Conclusion: Augmentation of screening programs and especially, early referral of high risk subjects to nephrologists is recommended for prevention of end stage renal disease.

  4. Attitudes toward mental illness in adults by mental illness-related factors and chronic disease status: 2007 and 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobau, Rosemarie; Zack, Matthew M

    2013-11-01

    We examined how attitudes toward mental illness treatment and its course differ by serious psychological distress, mental illness treatment, chronic disease, and sociodemographic factors using representative state-based data. Using data from jurisdictions supporting the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System's Mental Illness and Stigma Module (35 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico), we compared adjusted proportions of adults agreeing that "Treatment can help people with mental illness lead normal lives" (treatment effectiveness) and that "People are generally caring and sympathetic to people with mental illness" (supportive environment), by demographic characteristics, serious psychological distress, chronic disease status, and mental illness treatment. Attitudes regarding treatment effectiveness and a supportive environment for people with mental illness varied within and between groups. Most adults receiving mental illness treatment agreed that treatment is effective. Fewer adults with serious psychological distress than those without such distress agreed that treatment is effective. Fewer of those receiving treatment, those with psychological distress, and those with chronic disease perceived the environment as supportive. These data can be used to target interventions for population subgroups with less favorable attitudes and for surveillance.

  5. Estrogen-related and other disease diagnoses preceding Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latourelle, Jeanne C; Dybdal, Merete; Destefano, Anita L

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen exposure has been associated with the occurrence of Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as many other disorders, and yet the mechanisms underlying these relations are often unknown. While it is likely that estrogen exposure modifies the risk of various diseases through many different...... mechanisms, some estrogen-related disease processes might work in similar manners and result in association between the diseases. Indeed, the association between diseases need not be due only to estrogen-related factors, but due to similar disease processes from a variety of mechanisms....

  6. The role of sociodemographic factors in health - related quality of life of patients with end stage renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi Theofilou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Renal failure is a chronic disease that can have serious effects on patients’ quality of life (QoL.Objective: Gender, age, education and marital status were investigated in end-stage renal disease patients. Specifically, the relationship of QoL and mental health to sociodemographic variables was examined.Methodology: 144 patients in-centre haemodialysis (HD and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD were administered the World Health Organization QoL instrument (WHOQOLBREF, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28, the depression CES-D scale, the State-TraitAnxiety Inventory (STAI and the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scale (MHLC.Results: Female patients reported lower scores in the psychological and environmental QoL domains and higher scores in the Trait Anxiety measure. Elder patients reported higher scores in the GHQ-28 sub-scale of social dysfunction and in the CES-D depression scale, while less educated patients presented higher scores in the GHQ-28 sub-scales of anxiety/insomnia and severe depression. Divorced/widowed patients presented lower scores in the physical, social and environmental QoL domains and higher scores in the severe depression sub-scale. Regarding health locus of control, females and less educated patients reported higher scores in the attitudinal dimension of chance, while younger patients in the dimension of internal.Conclusions: Findings provide evidence that sociodemographic variables, like being female, older, less educated and divorced/widowed, relate to a more compromised QoL.

  7. History of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Relation to Cardiovascular Disease and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in US Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shostrom, Derrick C V; Sun, Yangbo; Oleson, Jacob J; Snetselaar, Linda G; Bao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Findings from previous studies examining the association between gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and subsequent risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been inconsistent and inconclusive. We aimed to examine the associations of a previous history of GDM with risk of CVD and status of cardiovascular risk factors in a nationwide population-based study in the United States. This study included 8,127 parous women aged 20 years or older in the 2007-2014 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in the United States. The exposure was self-reported diagnostic history of GDM and the outcomes were self-reported diagnostic history of CVD and measurements of cardiovascular risk factors, including blood pressure and blood lipids. Regression models with sample weights were used to examine the associations of GDM with CVD and cardiovascular risk factors. Among women with a history of both GDM and CVD, CVD was diagnosed on average 22.9 years after the diagnosis of GDM. After adjustment for demographic, socioeconomic, and lifestyle factors, a history of GDM was associated with 63% higher odds of CVD [odds ratio (OR) 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02, 2.62, p -value = 0.04]. Further adjustment for body mass index (BMI) modestly attenuated the association (OR 1.52, 95% CI 0.95, 2.44, p -value = 0.08). A history of GDM was significantly associated with lower serum level of HDL-cholesterol (adjusted β-coefficient -3.33, 95% CI -5.17, -1.50, p -value ≤ 0.001), but not associated with total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, or systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Similarly, the association between a history of GDM and HDL cholesterol was attenuated after additional adjustment for BMI (adjusted β-coefficient -1.68, 95% CI -3.38, 0.03, p -value = 0.54). Women with a previous history of GDM have significantly higher risk for developing CVD and lower serum level of HDL cholesterol, compared to women without a history of

  8. Ghrelin levels in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: relation to anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment and disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiozoglou-Lampoudi, Thomais; Trachana, Maria; Agakidis, Charalampos; Pratsidou-Gertsi, Polyxeni; Taparkou, Anna; Lampoudi, Sotiria; Kanakoudi-Tsakalidou, Florentia

    2011-10-01

    Studies in adults with rheumatoid arthritis reported low serum ghrelin that increased following anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) infusion. Data on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are lacking. The aim of this pilot study was to explore serum ghrelin levels in patients with JIA and the possible association with anti-TNF treatment, disease activity, and nutritional status. Fifty-two patients with JIA (14/52 on anti-TNF treatment) were studied. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis was inactive in 3 of 14 anti-TNF-treated patients and in 11 of 38 non-anti-TNF-treated patients. The nutritional status, energy intake/requirements, appetite, and fasting serum ghrelin levels were assessed. Ghrelin control values were obtained from 50 individuals with minor illness matched for age, sex, and body mass index. Ghrelin levels in patients with JIA were significantly lower than in controls (P ghrelin levels were comparable to control values only in 3 patients with anti-TNF-induced remission. Ghrelin in non-anti-TNF-treated patients in remission was low. Multiple regression analysis showed that disease activity (P = .002, CI = -84.16 to -20.01) and anti-TNF treatment (P = .003, CI = -82.51 to -18.33) were significant independent predictors of ghrelin after adjusting for other potential confounders. Ghrelin did not correlate with nutritional status, energy balance, and appetite. Serum ghrelin is low in patients with JIA and is restored to values similar to those in controls following anti-TNF-induced remission. Our study provides evidence that TNF blockade is independently associated with serum ghrelin, which possibly contributes to anti-TNF-induced remission. These preliminary results could form the basis for future research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Factors associated with generic health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Magdalena; Böhmer, Merle M; Brandstetter, Susanne; Finger, Tamara; Fischer, Wiebke; Pfeifer, Michael; Apfelbacher, Christian

    2018-02-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is impaired in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, but determining factors for HRQOL are still not unequivocal. This study measures HRQOL among patients with COPD and aims to determine factors associated with HRQOL. Data for cross-sectional analyses were obtained from the baseline of a cohort study. The study population includes adult COPD patients (disease duration ≥3 months), recruited from primary and secondary care settings in Germany, without acute psychiatric/neurologic disease (exception: affective/ anxiety disorders). HRQOL was assessed using the Short-Form 12 (SF-12) Health Survey Questionnaire, comprising a physical and mental component. Independent variables encompass socio-demographic, disease-specific, treatment-related and psychological factors. Multivariable linear regression analyses were conducted. In total, 206 COPD patients (60.7% male; mean age: 65.3 years) took part in the study. In multivariable analysis, the physical component score showed a significant negative association with the COPD Assessment Test (CAT) (PCOPD.

  10. Regular exercise and related factors in patients with Parkinson's disease: Applying zero-inflated negative binomial modeling of exercise count data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JuHee; Park, Chang Gi; Choi, Moonki

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to identify risk factors that influence regular exercise among patients with Parkinson's disease in Korea. Parkinson's disease is prevalent in the elderly, and may lead to a sedentary lifestyle. Exercise can enhance physical and psychological health. However, patients with Parkinson's disease are less likely to exercise than are other populations due to physical disability. A secondary data analysis and cross-sectional descriptive study were conducted. A convenience sample of 106 patients with Parkinson's disease was recruited at an outpatient neurology clinic of a tertiary hospital in Korea. Demographic characteristics, disease-related characteristics (including disease duration and motor symptoms), self-efficacy for exercise, balance, and exercise level were investigated. Negative binomial regression and zero-inflated negative binomial regression for exercise count data were utilized to determine factors involved in exercise. The mean age of participants was 65.85 ± 8.77 years, and the mean duration of Parkinson's disease was 7.23 ± 6.02 years. Most participants indicated that they engaged in regular exercise (80.19%). Approximately half of participants exercised at least 5 days per week for 30 min, as recommended (51.9%). Motor symptoms were a significant predictor of exercise in the count model, and self-efficacy for exercise was a significant predictor of exercise in the zero model. Severity of motor symptoms was related to frequency of exercise. Self-efficacy contributed to the probability of exercise. Symptom management and improvement of self-efficacy for exercise are important to encourage regular exercise in patients with Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cardiovascular Disease-Related Lifestyle Factors among People with Type 2 Diabetes in Pakistan: A Multicentre Study for the Prevalence, Clustering, and Associated Sociodemographic Determinants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuwaja, Ali Khan; Lalani, Saima; Azam, Iqbal Syed; Ali, Badar Sabir; Jabbar, Abdual; Dhanani, Raheem

    2011-01-01

    Background. We evaluated the prevalence and clustering pattern of cardiovascular disease (CVD) related lifestyle factors and their association with CVD among patients with type 2 diabetes. We also examined the association of these factors with various socio-demographic characteristics. Methods. A total of 1000 patients with type 2 diabetes were interviewed in a cross-sectional, multi-center study in out-patient clinics in Karachi, Pakistan. Results. In this study 30.3% study participants had CVD. Majority of the patients were physically inactive and had adverse psychosocial factors. Forty percent of the study participants were exposed to passive smoking while 12.7% were current smokers. Only 8.8% of study subjects had none of the studied lifestyle factor, 27.5% had one, while 63.7% had two or three factors. CVDs were independently associated with physical inactivity, adverse psychosocial factors, passive smoking and clustering of two or three lifestyle factors. Physical inactivity was more prevalent among females and patients with no/less education. Proportion of adverse psychosocial factors were higher among females, elders and patients with no/less education. Clustering of these lifestyle factors was significantly higher among females, elderly and no/less educated patients. Conclusion. These results suggest the need of comprehensive and integrated interventions to reduce the prevalence of lifestyle factors. PMID:21837274

  12. Serum transforming growth factor beta 1 in hepatitis c virus related chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-fouly, N.F.

    2007-01-01

    hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major type of primary liver cancer and one of the most frequent human malignant neoplasms. it is estimated to cause more than a quarter of a million deaths each year throughout the world. the aim of the present work was to assess the value of serum level of TGF-betal in patients with HCV related CLD and its level in patients with HCC and to evaluate its sensitivity and specificity in comparison to AFP in early diagnosis of HCC. the study was performed on two groups of egyptian patients, from the tropical medicine department and outpatient,s clinic for early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), Ain Shams university hospitals; croup 1 consisted of forty patients with chronic liver disease, their ages ranged between 85 and 35 years (mean 51.8+ 9.2 years) included 23 male patients (57.5%) and 17 female patients (42.5%), group 11 consisted of forty patients with HCC, their age ranged between 72 and 42 years (mean 54.0+ 7.5 years) included 30 male patients (75%) and 10 female patients (25%)

  13. An Evil Backstage Manipulator: Psychological Factors Correlated with Health-Related Quality of Life in Chinese Patients with Crohn’s Disease

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    Song Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Health-related quality of life (HRQoL is recommended as one of essential parameters to evaluate treatment effect and clinical outcome in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD. Recent studies reported that psychological factors might play a role in HRQoL in Western and American CD patients. Sufficient evidences in Chinese CD patients are still unavailable. This study is dedicated to investigate the correlation of various psychological factors with HRQoL in Chinese CD patients. We prospectively collected 40 active and 40 quiescent CD patients in China and found that psychological factors, especially neuroticism and anxiety, significantly correlate with and affect HRQoL in both active and quiescent CD groups. This is the first report revealing correlation between psychological factors and HRQoL in Chinese CD patients. Therefore, we assume that our results can contribute to a better understanding of etiology and tailoring of management in Chinese patients with Crohn’s disease and are beneficial to our colleagues to compare the heterogeneous characteristics of Crohn’s disease in different ethnic groups.

  14. Chronic renal disease in spain: prevalence and related factors in persons with diabetes mellitus older than 64 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Candela, Juan; Sangrós González, Javier; García Soidán, Francisco Javier; Millaruelo Trillo, José Manuel; Díez Espino, Javier; Bordonaba Bosque, Daniel; Ávila Lachica, Luis

    2018-02-07

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are conditions which have a high prevalence in individuals ≥ 65 years of age and represent a major public health problem. To determine the prevalence of CKD, its categories and its relationship with various demographic and clinical factors in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Spain. Observational, cross-sectional, multicenter, Spanish epidemiological study. Patients with known type 2 diabetes mellitus, age ≥ 65 years of age treated in Primary Care were included. We collected demographic, anthropometric and analytical variables from the previous 12 months, including the albumin-to-creatinine ratio and estimated glomerular filtration rate to evaluate renal function. The prevalence of CKD was 37.2% (95% CI, 34.1-40.3%), renal failure was 29.7% (95% CI, 26.8-32.6%) and increased albuminuria was 20.6% (95% CI, 17.3-23.9%), moderately increased albuminuria was 17.8% (95% CI, 14.7-20.9%) and severely increased albuminuria was 2.8% (95% CI, 1.4-4.2%). In turn, the prevalence of CKD categories were: G1 1.3% (95% CI, 0.6-2%), G2 6.2% (95% CI, 4.6-7.8%), G3a 17.2% (95% CI, 14.8-19.6%), G3b 9.8% (95% CI, 7.9-11.7%), G4 2% (95% CI, 1.1-2.9%) and G5 0.7% (95% CI, 0.2-1.2%). In the multivariate analysis, after adjusting for the remaining variables, CKD was associated with elderly age (OR 5.13, 95% CI, 3.15-8.35), high comorbidity (OR 3.36. 95% CI, 2.2-5.12) and presence of antihypertensive treatment (OR 2.43. 95% CI, 1.48-4.02). CKD is frequent in the diabetic population ≥ 65 years of age and is associated with elderly age, high comorbidity and with treated hypertension. No relationship has been found with gender and time in years since onset of diabetes. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Are religiosity and prayer use related with multiple behavioural risk factors for chronic diseases in European adults aged 50+ years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linardakis, M; Papadaki, A; Smpokos, E; Sarri, K; Vozikaki, M; Philalithis, A

    2015-05-01

    Behavioural risk factors for chronic diseases involve factors relating to lifestyle habits. This study examined the relationship of religious and spiritual beliefs with the adoption and presence of multiple behavioural risk factors (MBRFs) in European adults. Cross-sectional study. Data were used from 16,557 individuals, aged 50+ years, participating in the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (2004/05). MBRFs clustering was defined by high body weight, smoking, physical inactivity and risky alcohol consumption, and regression estimations with religiosity and prayer use were assessed based on sampling weights. In total, 79.4% of participants had received religious education, 33.4% had used prayer '≥1 time/day' and 53.3% had clustering of 2+ MBRFs. Lower prevalence of smoking was found in males (20.6% vs. 29.4%, P prayer use (standardized beta = 0.056, P prayer use were related to the presence of fewer MBRFs in European adults aged 50+ years. These lifestyle factors should be assessed as potential determinants of MBRFs adoption when examining chronic disease development in multicultural populations. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Environmental Factors and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Faruk Tekbas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and clinical observations have led to the hypothesis that the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases is influenced not only by genetic, lifestyle and major risk factors, but also by environmental factors. Environmental factors are considered key determinants of cardiovascular diseases. Although lifestyle choices such as smoking, diet, and exercise are viewed as major environmental influences, the contribution of pollutants and environmental chemicals is less clear. Accumulating evidence suggests that exposure to physically and chemical pollutants could elevate the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Many epidemiological studies report that exposure to physically, biologically and socio-cultural environmental factors are associated with an increase in cardiovascular mortality. Relationships between environmental factors and coronary arter disease, arhythmias, and cardiomyopathies have been reported. Exposures to arsenic, lead, cadmium, pollutant gases, solvents, and pesticides have also been linked to increased incidence of cardiovascular disease. In this paper, I review that relationships between exposure to physically, chemical, biologically and socio-cultural environmental factors and cardiovascular diseases. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(5.000: 435-444

  17. Microalbuminuria and its relation to cardiovascular disease and risk factors. A population-based study of 1254 hypertensive individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J S; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Borch-Johnsen, K

    1997-01-01

    subjects. The frequency of cardiovascular disease was similar in the two groups. In contrast, when analysed as a continuous variable, a one unit increase in the logarithmically transformed urinary albumin excretion significantly increased the likelihood of cardiovascular disease (odds ratio [95% confidence....... It is concluded that slightly elevated albumin excretion in the urine is not only a pressure-dependent functional phenomenon in the glomerular vessel walls, but associated with permanent atherosclerotic abnormalities in the entire vascular system....

  18. Vitamin D, cardiovascular disease and risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Thuesen, Betina H.; Linneberg, Allan

    2017-01-01

    of vitamin D effects from a cardiovascular health perspective. It focuses on vitamin D in relation to cardiovascular disease, i.e. ischemic heart disease, and stroke; the traditional cardiovascular risk factors hypertension, abnormal blood lipids, obesity; and the emerging risk factors hyperparathyroidism......, microalbuminuria, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Meta-analyses of observational studies have largely found vitamin D levels to be inversely associated with cardiovascular risk and disease. However, Mendelian randomization studies and randomized, controlled trials...... (RCTs) have not been able to consistently replicate the observational findings. Several RCTs are ongoing, and the results from these are needed to clarify whether vitamin D deficiency is a causal and reversible factor to prevent cardiovascular disease....

  19. Epstein-Barr virus: general factors, virus-related diseases and measurement of viral load after transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Cristina Fagundes Gequelin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr virus is responsible for infectious mononucleosis syndrome and is also closely associated to several types of cancer. The main complication involving Epstein-Barr virus infection, both in recipients of hematopoietic stem cells and solid organs, is post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. The importance of this disease has increased interest in the development of laboratory tools to improve post-transplant monitoring and to detect the disease before clinical evolution. Viral load analysis for Epstein-Barr virus through real-time polymerase chain reaction is, at present, the best tool to measure viral load. However, there is not a consensus on which sample type is the best for the test and what is its predictive value for therapeutic interventions.

  20. Employment status of patients with neuromuscular diseases in relation to personal factors, fatigue and health status : A secondary analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rob Oostendorp; Peter Huijbregts; Marie-Antoinette Minis; Joke Kalkman; Baziel Engelen; Reinier Akkermans; Gijs Bleijenberg; Josephine Engels

    2010-01-01

    To determine the number of employed people in a group of patients with neuromuscular diseases and in 3 separate subgroups (facioscapulo-humeral dystrophy, hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, and myotonic dystrophy) to investigate any differences in employment status between the patient groups,

  1. Employment status of patients with neuromuscular diseases in relation to personal factors, fatigue and health status: a secondary analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minis, M.A.H; Kalkman, J.S.; Akkermans, R.P.; Engels, J.A.; Huijbregts, P.A.; Bleijenberg, G.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the number of employed people in a group of patients with neuromuscular diseases and in 3 separate subgroups (facioscapulo-humeral dystrophy, hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, and myotonic dystrophy) to investigate any differences in employment status between the

  2. Caenorhabditis elegans DAF-16/FOXO Transcription Factor and Its Mammalian Homologs Associate with Age-Related Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesp, K.; Smant, G.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    The insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway is evolutionarily conserved and its function is mediated largely by FOXO transcription factors. Reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling leads to translocation of FOXO proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus where they activate a set of genes that mediate oxidative

  3. Periodontal disease and oral health-related behavior as factors associated with preterm birth: a case-control study in south-eastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, J F; Ribeiro, R A; Machado, F C; Assis, N M S P; Alves, R T; Oliveira, A S; Ribeiro, L C

    2014-08-01

    disease defined according to Definition 2 and unfavorable oral health-related behavior were factors associated with preterm birth. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Analysis of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Related Gene Expression Changes in a Cellular and Animal Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Su Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We employed transcriptome analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor related gene expression changes in cellular and animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD. We used a well-known Parkinsonian toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP+ to induce neuronal apoptosis in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. The MPP+-treatment of SH-SY5Y cells was capable of inducing neuro-apoptosis, but it remains unclear what kinds of transcriptional genes are affected by MPP+ toxicity. Therefore the pathways that were significantly perturbed in MPP+ treated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were identified based on genome-wide gene expression data at two time points (24 and 48 h. We found that the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR pathway-related genes showed significantly differential expression at all time points. The EGFR pathway has been linked to diverse cellular events such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Further, to evaluate the functional significance of the altered EGFR related gene expression observed in MPP+-treated SH-SY5Y cells, the EGFR related GJB2 (Cx26 gene expression was analyzed in an MPP+-intoxicated animal PD model. Our findings identify that the EGFR signaling pathway and its related genes, such as Cx26, might play a significant role in dopaminergic (DAergic neuronal cell death during the process of neuro-apoptosis and therefore can be focused on as potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  5. ABCC-JNIH Adult Health Study, Hiroshima 1958-1960. Cardiovascular Project Report 3. Prevalence of cardiovascular diseases related to associated factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Shoichi; Yano, Katsuhiko

    1962-12-12

    A long-term follow-up investigation of cardiovascular disease was organized primarily as an intensive substudy of the ABCC-JNIH Adult Health Study and secondarily for epidemiologic comparison with data on the Framingham, Massachusetts, population. One of the purposes of the present cardiovascular studies on a Hiroshima population was to obtain data comparable with that of the Framingham Study. An equally important aspect of the Hiroshima study is to explore radiation effects on the cardiovascular system. The sample is the Adult Health Study population and consists of 13,000 males and females in Hiroshima. This report provides the prevalence of cardiovascular disease in the first cross-section examined during 1958-1960 together with certain information on related factors. The overall attrition rate was 25%; 15% was caused by death or migration before the examination and 10% by refusal to participate. No significant difference was found in the blood pressure levels between the nonrespondents and the respondents in comparison with results of prior examinations at ABCC. The prevalence of various cardiovascular diseases was analyzed by sex and age. The analysis also extended to relationship of blood pressure, serum cholesterol, body weight, heart size, and occupation, with the prevalence of coronary heart disease for the sample over 40 years of age. 12 references, 15 tables.

  6. Household and familial resemblance in risk factors for type 2 diabetes and related cardiometabolic diseases in rural Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannie; Bahendeka, Silver K.; Whyte, Susan R.

    2017-01-01

    prevention and screening, we investigated the resemblance of T2D risk factors at household level and by type of familial dyadic relationship in a rural Ugandan community. Methods: This cross-sectional household-based study included 437 individuals ≥13 years of age from 90 rural households in south......-western Uganda. Resemblance in glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), anthropometry, blood pressure, fitness status and sitting time were analysed using a general mixed model with random effects (by household or dyad) to calculate household intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and dyadic regression coefficients...... (ICC=0.24), HbA1c (ICC=0.18) and systolic blood pressure (ICC=0.11). Regarding dyadic resemblance, the highest standardised regression coefficient was seen in fitness status for spouses (0.54, 95% CI 0.32 to 0.76), parent–offspring (0.41, 95% CI 0.28 0.54) and siblings (0.41, 95% CI 0.25 to 0...

  7. Methodical approaches to managing risks for endocrine diseases evolvement in children related to impacts of environmental factors occuring on areas aimed for development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.P. Luzhetskiy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is vital to develop systems of preventing risk-associated pathology due to constantly high levels of endocrine diseases in children exposed to chemicals with trophic effects on endocrine system (lead, cadmium, manganese, chromium, nickel, benzene, phenol, formaldehyde, benzpyrene, chlorine-organic compounds, and nitrates. Applying risk management techniques is one of the most promising trends in prevention of diseases related to environmental impacts. We offer methodical approaches based on system combination of activities at various management levels aimed at improving risk-oriented model of surveillance and control. These approaches enable allowing for detected thropic risk factors in regional social-hygienic monitoring programs, implementing algorithms of case monitoring over exposed children population, and applying contemporary prevention technologies. Social-hygienic monitoring improvement at territorial level implies stricter control and more comprehensive lists of monitored components. This can be achieved by studying compounds which form risks for endocrine system, by working out scientific-methodological grounds for accounting chemical compounds which are trophic for endocrine system, as well as by refining volumes and contents of scheduled inspections performed at high risks objects together with laboratory examination of chemical compounds including those thropic for endocrine system. Local level includes algorithms and schemes of prevention activities aimed at early detection of endocrine disorders related to chemicals impacts. When we give grounds for personified technologies of endocrine diseases prevention (alimentary disorders, physical retardation and obesity related to impacts exerted by chemicals which are trophic for endocrine system we should remember that individual programs choice is based not only on their capacity to eliminate priority compounds determining total chemical load on a person faster but also on

  8. Anti-Transforming Growth Factor β IgG Elicits a Dual Effect on Calcium Oxalate Crystallization and Progressive Nephrocalcinosis-Related Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Stefanie; Grill, Julia Felicitas; Ma, Qiuyue; Bäuerle, Tobias; Jordan, Jutta; Smolle, Michaela; Böhland, Claudia; Lech, Maciej; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2018-01-01

    Crystallopathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases caused by intrinsic or environmental microparticles or crystals, promoting tissue inflammation and scarring. Certain proteins interfere with crystal formation and growth, e.g., with intrarenal calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystal formation, a common cause of kidney stone disease or nephrocalcinosis-related chronic kidney disease (CKD). We hypothesized that immunoglobulins can modulate CaOx microcrystal formation and crystal growth and that therefore, biological IgG-based drugs designed to specifically target disease modifying proteins would elicit a dual effect on the outcome of CaOx-related crystallopathies. Indeed, both the anti-transforming growth factor (TGF)β IgG and control IgG1 antibody impaired CaOx crystallization in vitro , and decreased intrarenal CaOx crystal deposition and subsequent CKD in mice on an oxalate-rich diet compared to oxalate-fed control mice. However, the TGFβ-specific IgG antibody showed nephroprotective effects beyond those of control IgG1 and substantially reduced interstitial fibrosis as indicated by magnetic resonance imaging, silver and α-smooth muscle actin staining, RT-qPCR, and flow cytometry for pro-fibrotic macrophages. Suppressing interstitial fibrosis slowed the decline of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) compared to treatment with control IgG1 [slope of m  = -8.9 vs. m  = -14.5 μl/min/100 g body weight (BW)/day, Δ = 38.3%], an increased GFR at the end of the study (120.4 vs. 42.6 μl/min/100 g BW, Δ = 64.6%), and prolonged end stage renal disease (ESRD)-free renal survival by 10 days (Δ = 38.5%). Delayed onset of anti-TGFβ IgG from day 7 was no longer effective. Our results suggest that biological drugs can elicit dual therapeutic effects on intrinsic crystallopathies, such as anti-TGFβ IgG antibody treatment inhibits CaOx crystallization as well as interstitial fibrosis in nephrocalcinosis-related CKD.

  9. Anti-Transforming Growth Factor β IgG Elicits a Dual Effect on Calcium Oxalate Crystallization and Progressive Nephrocalcinosis-Related Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Steiger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Crystallopathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases caused by intrinsic or environmental microparticles or crystals, promoting tissue inflammation and scarring. Certain proteins interfere with crystal formation and growth, e.g., with intrarenal calcium oxalate (CaOx crystal formation, a common cause of kidney stone disease or nephrocalcinosis-related chronic kidney disease (CKD. We hypothesized that immunoglobulins can modulate CaOx microcrystal formation and crystal growth and that therefore, biological IgG-based drugs designed to specifically target disease modifying proteins would elicit a dual effect on the outcome of CaOx-related crystallopathies. Indeed, both the anti-transforming growth factor (TGFβ IgG and control IgG1 antibody impaired CaOx crystallization in vitro, and decreased intrarenal CaOx crystal deposition and subsequent CKD in mice on an oxalate-rich diet compared to oxalate-fed control mice. However, the TGFβ-specific IgG antibody showed nephroprotective effects beyond those of control IgG1 and substantially reduced interstitial fibrosis as indicated by magnetic resonance imaging, silver and α-smooth muscle actin staining, RT-qPCR, and flow cytometry for pro-fibrotic macrophages. Suppressing interstitial fibrosis slowed the decline of glomerular filtration rate (GFR compared to treatment with control IgG1 [slope of m = −8.9 vs. m = −14.5 μl/min/100 g body weight (BW/day, Δ = 38.3%], an increased GFR at the end of the study (120.4 vs. 42.6 μl/min/100 g BW, Δ = 64.6%, and prolonged end stage renal disease (ESRD-free renal survival by 10 days (Δ = 38.5%. Delayed onset of anti-TGFβ IgG from day 7 was no longer effective. Our results suggest that biological drugs can elicit dual therapeutic effects on intrinsic crystallopathies, such as anti-TGFβ IgG antibody treatment inhibits CaOx crystallization as well as interstitial fibrosis in nephrocalcinosis-related CKD.

  10. An assessment of non-communicable diseases, diabetes, and related risk factors in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Majuro Atoll: a systems perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiho, Henry M; deBrum, Ione; Kedi, Shra; Langidrik, Justina; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-associated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Majuro Atoll and describes the burdens due to selected NCD (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic kidney disease); and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifying the issues that need to be addressed. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and risky lifestyle behaviors are associated with overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that are significant factors in the morbidity and mortality of the population. The leading causes of death include sepsis, cancer, diabetes-related deaths, pneumonia, and hypertension. Population-based survey for the RMI show that 62.5% of the adults are overweight or obese and the prevalence of diabetes stands at 19.6%. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCD. There is no policy and procedure manual for the hospital or public health diabetes clinics and there is little communication, coordination, or collaboration between the medical and public health staff. There is no functional data system that allows for the identification, registry, or tracking of patients with diabetes or other NCDs. Based on these findings, priority issues and problems to be addressed for the administrative, clinical, and data systems were identified.

  11. Risk factors for chronic transplant dysfunction and cardiovascular disease are related to accumulation of advanced glycation end-products in renal transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, Jasper W. L.; de Vries, Aiko P. J.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Graaff, Reindert; van Son, Willem J.; van der Heide, Jaap J. Homan; Gans, Reinold O. B.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; de Jong, Paul E.; Smit, Andries J.

    Background. Accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic transplant dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in renal transplant recipients. We aimed to investigate which factors are associated with tissue AGE accumulation in renal

  12. Risk factors for chronic transplant dysfunction and cardiovascular disease are related to accumulation of advanced glycation end-products in renal transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, Jasper W. L.; de Vries, Aiko P. J.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Graaff, Reindert; van Son, Willem J.; Homan van der Heide, Jaap J.; Gans, Reinold O. B.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; de Jong, Paul E.; Smit, Andries J.

    2006-01-01

    Accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic transplant dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in renal transplant recipients. We aimed to investigate which factors are associated with tissue AGE accumulation in renal transplant

  13. Effects of a Whatsapp-delivered physical activity intervention to enhance health-related physical fitness components and cardiovascular disease risk factors in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntaner-Mas, Adrià; Vidal-Conti, Josep; Borràs, Pere A; Ortega, Francisco B; Palou, Pere

    2017-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of a 10-week WhatsApp-based intervention aimed at enhancing health-related physical fitness components and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors compared with a face-to-face condition. Participants (N.=32) were assigned to one of three groups: training group (N.=16), mobile group (N.=7) and control group (N.=9). Training group and mobile group performed the same training program, based on strength training with elastics bands and aerobic exercise, during 10 weeks; only the delivery mode differed. The mobile group increased handgrip strength, aerobic capacity and decreased systolic blood pressure and heart rate after exercise though there were no significant differences respect to control group. The training group decreased significantly systolic blood pressure (P=0.038), diastolic blood pressure (P=0.005), mean arterial pressure (P=0.006) and heart rate after exercise (P=0.002), respect to control group. Comparison between training and mobile group showed that WhatsApp-based physical activity intervention was less effective than face-to-face condition. The results indicate that the use of an online social network produced slight changes in some health-related physical fitness components and CVD risk factors.

  14. Risk factors for and prevalence of thyroid disorders in a cross-sectional study among healthy female relatives of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strieder, Thea G. A.; Prummel, Mark F.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Endert, Eric; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is a common disorder especially in women, and both genetic and environmental factors are involved in its pathogenesis. We wanted to gain more insight into the contribution of various environmental factors. Therefore, we started a large prospective cohort

  15. Health-related quality of life of people with HIV: an assessment of patient related factors and comparison with other chronic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhard, Esther A. N.; Smit, Colette; van Dijk, Peter R.; Kuijper, T. Martijn; Wermeling, Paulien R.; Weel, Angelique E.; de Boer, Michiel R.; Brinkman, Kees; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.

    2018-01-01

    The health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of people with HIV is lower than in the general population, but it is unknown how it compares with that of persons with other chronic medical conditions. We compared HRQOL in HIV with HRQOL in diabetes mellitus type 1, diabetes mellitus type 2 and

  16. Roles of HTLV-1 basic Zip Factor (HBZ in Viral Chronicity and Leukemic Transformation. Potential New Therapeutic Approaches to Prevent and Treat HTLV-1-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Mesnard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available More than thirty years have passed since human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 was described as the first retrovirus to be the causative agent of a human cancer, adult T-cell leukemia (ATL, but the precise mechanism behind HTLV-1 pathogenesis still remains elusive. For more than two decades, the transforming ability of HTLV-1 has been exclusively associated to the viral transactivator Tax. Thirteen year ago, we first reported that the minus strand of HTLV-1 encoded for a basic Zip factor factor (HBZ, and since then several teams have underscored the importance of this antisense viral protein for the maintenance of a chronic infection and the proliferation of infected cells. More recently, we as well as others have demonstrated that HBZ has the potential to transform cells both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we focus on the latest progress in our understanding of HBZ functions in chronicity and cellular transformation. We will discuss the involvement of this paradigm shift of HTLV-1 research on new therapeutic approaches to treat HTLV-1-related human diseases.

  17. Psychological factors and coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadži-Pešić Marina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CAD results from an interaction of different somatic, environmental and behavioral risk factors. Commonly, development of CAD is associated with arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, smoking, sedentary life style and the like. Psychological factors in their own sake or in combination with other risk factors are also important for genesis of CAD. In this study, 170 people that were diagnosed with CAD and 170 healthy controls of corresponding sex and age were compared for anxiety, aggressiveness and Eysenck's two personality dimension. The data indicate that patients with CAD have very low level of anxiety and aggressiveness and very high level of neuroticism relative to the controls. .

  18. The impact of personal-, disease- and work-related factors on work ability of women with breast cancer living in the community: a cross-sectional survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Kin; Ching, Siu Yin Shirley; Chan, Amy; Cheung, Doris; Cheung, Suk Yee Polly

    2017-11-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the work ability (WA) of breast cancer (BC) survivors during the course of their illness, and the relationships between personal-, disease-, and work-related factors, and their WA. This is a cross-sectional survey study. One hundred fifty-one participants with the response rate of 88.9% were recruited from the community in 2014 and 2015. BC survivors' WA was at its highest before diagnosis, and then dropped to the lowest during treatment. Although their current WA had improved, it has not bounced back to that before diagnosis. The resignation rate was 35.8%. Factors positively associated with current WA included (a) age and year of diagnosis, (b) physical and psychological health and (c) WA before diagnosis or during treatment, working years, work control and mastery. However, compliance with appropriate healthy eating habits and believing in personal health controlled by chance were negatively associated with current WA. Furthermore, the participants would more likely to have higher current WA if they (a) were more optimistic with good stress management; (b) currently were not receiving treatment or other illnesses; (c) perceived less effects of their health problems, physical workloads or their cancer diagnoses on their work and (d) perceived continue to work in the next 2 years, with good ability to handle physical and mental work. This study confirmed that most BC survivors continued to work after their diagnoses. The factors affecting their WA were multifactorial. It is important to enhance their positive thinking.

  19. Cardiometabolic factors and disease duration in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassani, Erica; Cereda, Emanuele; Barichella, Michela; Madio, Carmen; Cancello, Raffaella; Caccialanza, Riccardo; Zini, Michela; Cilia, Roberto; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have a favorable cardiometabolic risk profile. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cardiometabolic risk factors and the duration of disease. One hundred and fifty patients with PD (56.7% men) were studied, measuring body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), body fat percentage (BF%) by impedance, fasting glucose, serum lipids, and transaminases. In sex- and age-adjusted correlation models, duration of PD was inversely related to BMI (r = -0.20; P HDL) levels were positively correlated with disease duration (P HDL-cholesterol ratio was also inversely associated with duration of PD (P HDL levels and total HDL-cholesterol ratio were favorably associated with duration of PD. This factor may contribute to cardiometabolic protection in PD. The mechanisms underlying this association deserve further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sexual Dysfunctions in Men and Women with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: The Influence of IBD-Related Clinical Factors and Depression on Sexual Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bel, Linda G J; Vollebregt, Anna M; Van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Fidder, Herma H; Ten Hove, Willem R; Vliet-Vlieland, Cornelia W; Ter Kuile, Moniek M; de Groot, Helena E; Both, Stephanie

    2015-07-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is likely to have an impact on sexual function because of its symptoms, like diarrhea, fatigue, and abdominal pain. Depression is commonly reported in IBD and is also related to impaired sexual function. This study aimed to evaluate sexual function and its association with depression among patients with IBD compared with controls. IBD patients registered at two hospitals participated. The control group consisted of a general practitioner practice population. The web-based questionnaire included the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) for women and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) for men. Other variables evaluated were depression, disease activity, IBD-related quality of life, body image, and fatigue. In total, 168 female and 119 male patients were available for analysis (response rate 24%). Overall, patients with IBD did not significantly differ in prevalence of sexual dysfunctions from controls: female patients 52%, female controls 44%, male patients and male controls both 25%. However, men and women with an active disease scored significantly lower than patients in remission and controls, indicating impaired sexual functioning during disease activity. Significant associations were found between active disease, fatigue, depressive mood, quality of life, and sexual function for both male and female patients. The association between disease activity and sexual function was totally mediated by depression. Male and female IBD patients with an active disease show impaired sexual function relative to patients in remission and controls. Depression is the most important determinant for impaired sexual function in IBD. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  1. Cardiovascular disease risk factors and cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David T; Fillit, Howard

    2006-04-15

    The role of cardiovascular disease risk factors in the occurrence and progression of cognitive impairment has been the subject of a significant number of publications but has not achieved widespread recognition among many physicians and educated laymen. It is apparent that the active treatment of certain of these cardiovascular disease risk factors is accompanied by a reduced risk for cognitive impairment. Patients with hypertension who are treated experience fewer cardiovascular disease events as well as less cognitive impairment than similar untreated patients. Patients who exercise may present with less cognitive impairment, and obesity may increase the risk for cognitive impairment. Lipid abnormalities and genetic markers are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease and cognitive impairment. Autopsy studies have demonstrated a correlation between elevated levels of cholesterol and amyloid deposition in the brain. Research has demonstrated a relation between atherosclerotic obstruction lesions in the circle of Willis and dementia. Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease and cognitive impairment. A number of nonpharmacologic factors have a role in reducing the risk for cognitive impairment. Antioxidants, fatty acids, and micronutrients may have a role, and diets rich in fruits and vegetables and other dietary approaches may improve the outlook for patients considered at risk for cognitive impairment.

  2. Impact of work-related and psychosocial factors on the development of ischemic heart disease among urban bus drivers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netterstrøm, Bo; Juel, K

    1988-01-01

    From 1978 to 1985, 2,465 male bus drivers in the three major cities in Denmark were followed with regard to hospital admission due to myocardial infarction (MI) and death due to ischemic heart disease (IHD). In all 2,045 (83%) of these men responded in 1978 to a questionnaire on psychosocial well...... associated with the occurrence of MI. Smoking habits tended to be associated with the occurrence of MI, while stress symptoms and job dissatisfaction did not. The mental burden on bus drivers working in heavy traffic seems a possible explanation for the findings.......-being and work conditions. The respondents did not differ from the nonrespondents regarding hospital admissions and death in the follow-up period (1978-1984). Sixty-two cases of MI were registered among the 2,045 bus drivers in 1978-1984. On this basis relative risk for MI was calculated with a multiple...... regression model for independent variables regarding psychosocial well-being and work conditions. High work load (driving in heavy traffic) was significantly associated with the occurrence of MI. Of the psychosocial factors "no social contact with colleagues" and "increased work pace" were also significantly...

  3. Assessment of the frequency of regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+CD127-) in children with hemophilia A: relation to factor VIII inhibitors and disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Asrar, Mohamed Abo; Hamed, Ahmed El-Saeed; Darwish, Yasser Wagih; Ismail, Eman Abdel Rahman; Ismail, Noha Ali

    2016-01-01

    A rapidly growing evidence showed that regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial role in tolerance to coagulation factors and may be involved in the pathogenesis of inhibitor formation in patients with hemophilia. We determined the percentage of Tregs (CD4CD25CD127) in 45 children with hemophilia A compared with 45 healthy controls, and assessed their relation to the clinical characteristics of patients and factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors. Patients were studied stressing on frequency of bleeding attacks, joint pain, history of viral hepatitis, and the received therapy (FVIII precipitate/cryotherapy). FVIII activity and FVIII inhibitors were assessed with flow cytometric analysis of CD4CD25CD127 Tregs. According to residual FVIII activity levels, 30 patients (66.7%) had mild/moderate hemophilia A, whereas 15 (33.3%) patients had severe hemophilia A. The frequency of Tregs was significantly lower among all patients with hemophilia A compared with controls (2.59 ± 1.1 versus 3.73 ± 1.12%; P = 0.002). Tregs were significantly decreased among patients with FVIII inhibitors compared with the inhibitor-negative group (P hemophilia A had lower Tregs levels than those without (P = 0.34 and P = 0.011, respectively). A significant positive correlation was found between the percentage of Tregs and FVIII among hemophilia A patients. ROC curve analysis revealed that the cut-off value of Tregs at 1.91% could differentiate patients with and without FVIII inhibitors, with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 91.3%. We suggest that alteration in the frequency of Tregs in young patients with hemophilia A may contribute to inhibitor formation and disease severity.

  4. Vitamin D Deficiency : Universal Risk Factor for Multifactorial Diseases?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Borst, Martin H.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Slaets, Joris P. J.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Navis, Gerjan

    In the Western world, the majority of morbidity and mortality are caused by multifactorial diseases. Some risk factors are related to more than one type of disease. These so-called universal risk factors are highly relevant to the population, as reduction of universal risk factors may reduce the

  5. Mechanisms of disease: Helicobacter pylori virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2010-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori plays an essential role in the development of various gastroduodenal diseases; however, only a small proportion of people infected with H. pylori develop these diseases. Some populations that have a high prevalence of H. pylori infection also have a high incidence of gastric cancer (for example, in East Asia), whereas others do not (for example, in Africa and South Asia). Even within East Asia, the incidence of gastric cancer varies (decreasing in the south). H. pylori is a highly heterogeneous bacterium and its virulence varies geographically. Geographic differences in the incidence of gastric cancer can be explained, at least in part, by the presence of different types of H. pylori virulence factor, especially CagA, VacA and OipA. However, it is still unclear why the pathogenicity of H. pylori increased as it migrated from Africa to East Asia during the course of evolution. H. pylori infection is also thought to be involved in the development of duodenal ulcer, which is at the opposite end of the disease spectrum to gastric cancer. This discrepancy can be explained in part by the presence of H. pylori virulence factor DupA. Despite advances in our understanding of the development of H. pylori-related diseases, further work is required to clarify the roles of H. pylori virulence factors.

  6. Sexual Dysfunctions in Men and Women with Inflammatory Bowel Disease : The Influence of IBD-Related Clinical Factors and Depression on Sexual Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bel, Linda G J; Vollebregt, Anna M; Van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Fidder, Herma H; Ten Hove, Willem R; Vliet-Vlieland, Cornelia W; Ter Kuile, Moniek M; de Groot, Helena E; Both, Stephanie

    INTRODUCTION: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is likely to have an impact on sexual function because of its symptoms, like diarrhea, fatigue, and abdominal pain. Depression is commonly reported in IBD and is also related to impaired sexual function. This study aimed to evaluate sexual function and

  7. Interventions for age-related diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueira, Inês; Fernandes, Adelaide; Mladenovic Djordjevic, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Over 60% of people aged over 65 are affected by multiple morbidities, which are more difficult to treat, generate increased healthcare costs and lead to poor quality of life compared to individual diseases. With the number of older people steadily increasing this presents a societal challenge. Age...... is the major risk factor for age-related diseases and recent research developments have led to the proposal that pharmacological interventions targeting common mechanisms of ageing may be able to delay the onset of multimorbidity. Here we review the state of the knowledge of multimorbidity, appraise...... the available evidence supporting the role of mechanisms of ageing in the development of the most common age-related diseases and assess potential molecules that may successfully target those key mechanisms....

  8. HIGH-SENSITIVITY C-REACTIVE PROTEIN (hsCRP IN YOUNG ADULTS: RELATION TO AEROBIC CAPACITY, PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND RISK FACTORS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mazurek

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Atheromatosis develops as a result of a chronic inflammatory process of the arteries. Inflammatory biomarkers, particularly high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP, positively correlate with atheromatosis risk factors and can be used to estimate and predict the risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between hsCRP concentration and BMI, body composition, classical risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, energy expenditure for physical activity (WEE and  ·VO2max. 166 volunteers (78 women and 88 men were included in the examinations. Their mean age was 20.2±0.9 years. Health condition was described by the following variables: smoking, WEE,  ·VO2max, body mass index (BMI, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, fat mass (FM, fat-free mass (FFM, lipid profile, hsCRP, glucose and insulin concentration, and insulin resistance. Between the subgroups created on the basis of hsCRP concentration, in quartiles 1 to 3 and quartile 4, a comparative analysis was carried out. 79.5�0of women and 69.3�0of men had hsCRP values within the references ranges. Moderately high values were found in 14.1�0of women and 22.7�0of men and high in 6.4�0and 7.9�20respectively. Mean values of BMI, FFM, WHR, WEE,  ·VO2max, glucose and triglyceride concentration, and TC/HDL index were significantly lower, while FM and HDL were significantly higher, in women than in men. In the quartile 4 subgroup compared to the quartile 1-3 subgroup, we found significantly lower HDL concentration and a tendency for higher values of BMI (p=0.06 and TC (p=0.07 as well as higher percentages of smoking among men. In young, physically active, healthy persons, serum concentration of hsCRP is not related to physical activity or  ·VO2max.

  9. Peripheral intravenous catheter-related phlebitis and related risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassaji-Zavareh, M; Ghorbani, R

    2007-08-01

    Peripheral intravenous catheter-related phlebitis is a common and significant problem in clinical practice. This study aims to investigate the incidence of phlebitis and to evaluate some important related factors. 300 patients admitted to medical and surgical wards of hospitals in Semnan, Iran from April 2003 to February 2004 were prospectively studied. Variables evaluated were age, gender, site and size of catheter, type of insertion and underlying conditions (diabetes mellitus, trauma, infectious disease and burns). Phlebitis was defined when at least four criteria were fulfilled (erythema, pain, tenderness, warmth, induration, palpable cord and swelling). Any patient who was discharged or their catheter removed before three days were excluded. Phlebitis occurred in 26 percent (95 percent confidence interval [CI] 21- 31 percent) of patients. There was no significant relationship between age, catheter bore size, trauma and phlebitis. Related risk factors were gender (odds-ratio [OR] 1.50, 95 percent CI 1.01-2.22), site (OR 3.25, 95 percent CI 2.26-4.67) and type of insertion (OR 2.04, 95 percent CI 1.36-3.05) of catheter, diabetes mellitus (OR 7.78, 95 percent CI 4.59-13.21), infectious disease (OR 6.21, 95 percent CI 4.27-9.03) and burns (OR 3.96, 95 percent CI 3.26-4.82). Phlebitis is still an important and ongoing problem in medical practice. In patients with diabetes mellitus and infectious diseases, more attention is needed.

  10. Long-term effects of an occupational health guideline on employees' body weight-related outcomes, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and quality of life: Results from a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, L.M.; Proper, K.I.; Weel, A.N.H.; Hulshof, C.T.J.; Mechelen, W. van

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a draft occupational health guideline, aimed at preventing weight gain, on employees' body weight-related outcomes, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, and quality of life. Methods In a cluster randomized controlled trial including 16

  11. Severe chronic allergic (and related) diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Anto, J M; Demoly, P

    2012-01-01

    -up. Control is the degree to which therapy goals are currently met. These concepts have evolved over time for asthma in guidelines, task forces or consensus meetings. The aim of this paper is to generalize the approach of the uniform definition of severe asthma presented to WHO for chronic allergic...... and associated diseases (rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis, chronic urticaria and atopic dermatitis) in order to have a uniform definition of severity, control and risk, usable in most situations. It is based on the appropriate diagnosis, availability and accessibility of treatments, treatment responsiveness...... and associated factors such as comorbidities and risk factors. This uniform definition will allow a better definition of the phenotypes of severe allergic (and related) diseases for clinical practice, research (including epidemiology), public health purposes, education and the discovery of novel therapies....

  12. Significance of measurement of serum somatostatin (SS), growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and some related cytokines levels in patients with graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Bao; Ma Yunbao; Zhang Xiaoyi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the possible roles of the related hormones and cytokines in the pathogenesis of Graves' disease. Methods: Serum levels of SS, GH, IGF-1, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-6 were measured with RIA in 1) 36 patients with Graves' disease before any treatment 2) another 30 patients with Graves' disease after successful anti-thyroid drug therapy and 3) 35 controls. Results: In the untreated group, the serum levels of SS, GH, IGF-1, IL-4 and IL-6 were significantly higher but serum IL-2 levels were significantly lower than those in the controls (P<0.01). In the successfully treated group, the serum levels of SS, GH, IGF-1, IL-4 and IL-6 were significantly lower (P<0.05 or P<0.01), but serum IL-2 levels were significantly higher (P<0.01) than those in the untreated group. Conclusion: These parameters played significant roles in the pathogenesis of Graves' disease; however, the precise mechanism remained to be speculative and further studies required. (authors)

  13. Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameille, Jacques; Rosenberg, Nicole; Matrat, Mireille; Descatha, Alexis; Mompoint, Dominique; Hamzi, Lounis; Atassi, Catherine; Vasile, Manuela; Garnier, Robert; Pairon, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Automobile mechanics have been exposed to asbestos in the past, mainly due to the presence of chrysotile asbestos in brakes and clutches. Despite the large number of automobile mechanics, little is known about the non-malignant respiratory diseases observed in this population. The aim of this retrospective multicenter study was to analyse the frequency of pleural and parenchymal abnormalities on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in a population of automobile mechanics. The study population consisted of 103 automobile mechanics with no other source of occupational exposure to asbestos, referred to three occupational health departments in the Paris area for systematic screening of asbestos-related diseases. All subjects were examined by HRCT and all images were reviewed separately by two independent readers; who in the case of disagreement discussed until they reached agreement. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed to investigate factors associated with pleural plaques. Pleural plaques were observed in five cases (4.9%) and interstitial abnormalities consistent with asbestosis were observed in one case. After adjustment for age, smoking status, and a history of non-asbestos-related respiratory diseases, multiple logistic regression models showed a significant association between the duration of exposure to asbestos and pleural plaques. The asbestos exposure experienced by automobile mechanics may lead to pleural plaques. The low prevalence of non-malignant asbestos-related diseases, using a very sensitive diagnostic tool, is in favor of a low cumulative exposure to asbestos in this population of workers.

  14. Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameille, Jacques; Rosenberg, Nicole; Matrat, Mireille; Descatha, Alexis; Mompoint, Dominique; Hamzi, Lounis; Atassi, Catherine; Vasile, Manuela; Garnier, Robert; Pairon, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Automobile mechanics have been exposed to asbestos in the past, mainly due to the presence of chrysotile asbestos in brakes and clutches. Despite the large number of automobile mechanics, little is known about the non-malignant respiratory diseases observed in this population. The aim of this retrospective multicenter study was to analyze the frequency of pleural and parenchymal abnormalities on HRCT in a population of automobile mechanics. Methods The study population consisted of 103 automobile mechanics with no other source of occupational exposure to asbestos, referred to three occupational health departments in the Paris area for systematic screening of asbestos–related diseases. All subjects were examined by HRCT and all images were reviewed separately by two independent readers, with further consensus in the case of disagreement. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed to investigate factors associated with pleural plaques. Results Pleural plaques were observed in 5 cases (4.9%) and interstitial abnormalities consistent with asbestosis were observed in 1 case. After adjustment for age, smoking status, and a history of non-asbestos-related respiratory diseases, multiple logistic regression models showed a significant association between the duration of exposure to asbestos and pleural plaques. Conclusions The asbestos exposure experienced by automobile mechanics may lead to pleural plaques. The low prevalence of non-malignant asbestos-related diseases, using a very sensitive diagnostic tool, is in favor of a low cumulative exposure to asbestos in this population of workers. PMID:21965465

  15. Self-efficacy for exercise, more than disease-related factors, is associated with objectively assessed exercise time and sedentary behaviour in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, K M; Pieper, C F; Hall, K S; St Clair, E W; Kraus, W E

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, reports of physical activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were limited to self-report methods and/or leisure-time physical activity. Our objectives were to assess, determine correlates of, and compare to well-matched controls both exercise and sedentary time in a typical clinical cohort of RA. Persons with established RA (seropositive or radiographic erosions; n = 41) without diabetes or cardiovascular disease underwent assessments of traditional and disease-specific correlates of physical activity and 7 days of triaxial accelerometry. Twenty-seven age, gender, and body mass index (BMI)-matched controls were assessed. For persons with RA, objectively measured median (25th-75th percentile) exercise time was 3 (1-11) min/day; only 10% (n = 4) of participants exercised for ≥ 30 min/day. Time spent in sedentary activities was 92% (89-95%). Exercise time was not related to pain but was inversely related to disease activity (r = -0.3, p self-efficacy for endurance activity (r = 0.4, p self-efficacy for endurance activity (r = -0.4, p self-efficacy for physical activity but similar amounts of exercise and sedentary time. For persons with RA and without diabetes or cardiovascular disease, time spent in exercise was well below established guidelines and activity patterns were predominantly sedentary. For optimal care in RA, in addition to promoting exercise, clinicians should consider assessing sedentary behaviour and self-efficacy for exercise. Future interventions might determine whether increased self-efficacy can increase physical activity in RA.

  16. The mechanobiology of obesity and related diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Benayahu, Dafna

    2015-01-01

    This volume describes the state-of-knowledge in the study of the relationships between mechanical loading states in tissues and common pathophysiologies related to increase in mass of adipose tissues and/or hyperglycemia which eventually lead to obesity, diabetes, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, metabolic inflammations, certain types of cancer and other related diseases. There appears to be an interaction between the loading states in tissues and cells and these chronic conditions, as well as with factors such as age, gender and genetics of the individual. Bioengineering has made key contributions to this research field in providing technologies for cell biomechanics experimentation, microscopy and image processing, tissue engineering and multi-scale, multi-physics computational modeling. Topics at the frontier of this field of study include: the continuous monitoring of cell growth, proliferation and differentiation in response to mechanical factors such as stiffness of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and...

  17. Blood pressure level and relation to other cardiovascular risk factors in male hypertensive patients without clinical evidence of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C T; Sørum, C; Hansen, J F

    2000-01-01

    , duration of hypertension, cholesterol and triglyceride level, smoking status, information of regular exercise, a family history of ischemic heart disease (IHD) and drug treatment, in 220 men treated for arterial hypertension. In the univariate analyses we found a higher systolic blood pressure (SBP......) with older age, higher SBP in smoking patients and lower SBP in patients with regular exercise. In a multivariate model age (p = 0.0004), smoking status (p = 0.01) and regular exercise (p= 0.06) were independently associated with SBP. There was a lower diastolic blood pressure (DBP) with older age, and age...... cardiovascular risk factors--43% was smoking, 21% had a family history of IHD, 77% had a se-cholesterol above 5.5 mmol/l and 48% had a se-triglyceride above 1.6 mmol/l. In a consecutive group of asymptomatic male treated hypertensive patients SBP is independently associated with age and smoking status, and DBP...

  18. A componential analysis of proverb interpretation in patients with frontal lobe epilepsy and temporal lobe epilepsy: relationships with disease-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Carrie R; Delis, Dean C; Kramer, Joel H; Tecoma, Evelyn S; Iragui, Vicente J

    2008-05-01

    The ability to interpret nonliteral, metaphoric language was explored in patients with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and matched control participants, to determine (1) if patients with FLE were impaired in their interpretations relative to those with TLE and controls, and (2) if disease-related variables (e.g., age of seizure onset) predicted performances in either patient group. A total of 22 patients with FLE, 20 patients with TLE, and 23 controls were administered a test of proverb interpretation to assess their ability to grasp the abstract meaning of nonliteral language. Participants were presented with a series of proverbs and asked to provide an oral interpretation of each. Responses to each proverb were scored according to their accuracy and level of abstractness. Patients with FLE, but not TLE, were impaired relative to controls in their overall interpretation of proverbs. However, a subgroup analysis revealed that only patients with left FLE showed impaired interpretation accuracy relative to the other groups, whereas patients with both left FLE and left TLE showed impaired abstraction. Patients with FLE were also impaired when they were asked to select the best interpretation of the proverb from response alternatives. In patients with FLE, only a left-sided seizure focus was associated with poorer performance. In patients with TLE, both an early age of onset and a left-sided seizure focus predicted poorer performance. Overall, FLE patients exhibit greater impairment than TLE patients in interpreting proverbs. However, the nature and disease-specific correlates of impaired performances in proverb interpretation differ between the groups.

  19. An assessment of non-communicable diseases, diabetes, and related risk factors in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Kwajelein Atoll, Ebeye Island: a systems perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiho, Henry M; Seremai, Johannes; Trinidad, Richard; Paul, Irene; Langidrik, Justina; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been declared a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI). This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted on Ebeye Island of Kwajelein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) to describe the burdens due to selected NCD (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic kidney disease); assess the system of service capacity and activities for service delivery, data collection, and reporting; and identify the key issues that need to be addressed. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors lead to overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that impact the morbidity and mortality of the population. Population survey of the RMI show that 62.5% of the total population is overweight or obese with a dramatic increase from the 15-24 year old (10.6%) and the 25-64 year old (41.9%) age groups. The leading causes of death were septicemia, renal failure, pneumonia, cancer, and myocardial infarction. Other findings show gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, and support services to address these NCD. All health care in Ebeye is provided in one setting and there is collaboration, coordination, and communication among medical and health care providers. The Book of Protocols for the Kwajalein Atoll Health Care Bureau provides the guidelines, standards, and policy and procedures for the screening, diagnosis, and management of diabetes and other NCDs. Based on these findings, priority issues and problems to be addressed for the administrative, clinical, and data systems were identified.

  20. Comparison of central and intraesophageal factors between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients and those with GERD-related noncardiac chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, M; Simantov, R; Yair, M; Leitman, M; Blatt, A; Scapa, E; Broide, E

    2012-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) causes a wide range of symptoms. Some patients present with typical symptoms such as heartburn and regurgitation and others with atypical symptoms such as chest pain. The mechanism responsible for the varying clinical presentation of GERD is still not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate differences in central and local intraesophageal factors between patients with typical GERD symptoms and those with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). Patients presenting with typical and atypical symptoms suspicious of GERD underwent upper endoscopy and 24-hour pH monitoring with four sensors, each positioned at a different esophageal level. All patients completed GERD symptom, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Symptom Stress Rating questionnaires. From January 2006 to December 2009, 50 patients were recruited, 29 with typical symptoms, and 21 with NCCP. Patients with proven GERD and NCCP had higher proximal extension of acid during reflux episodes than patients with typical symptoms. They were found to be older, had a shorter history of symptom onset, worse anxiety scores, and more endoscopic findings compatible with gastritis. Proximal extension of acid during the reflux episodes in patients with GERD presenting with NCCP may play a role in symptom generation. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  1. The Influence of Psychological Factors in Meniere's Disease | Orji ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Influence of Psychological Factors in Meniere's Disease. ... Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research ... probably through disorders of the autonomic nervous system occasioned by the increased levels of stress‑related hormones.

  2. Environmental factors in respiratory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, D D

    1958-01-01

    Absence rates of postmen due to bronchitis was found to be definitely associated with pollution and even more so if the ratio of postmen-postal clerk morbidity is used as an index. Bronchitis morbidity correlated with frequency of heavy fogs but very little with population density or overcrowding. In contrast, infectious diseases showed strong correlation with the latter two but not with fog. Minor infections among younger bronchitics were similar in frequency in all areas but led to more frequent complications and absence from work in older postmen living in polluted areas. Smoking acts synergistically.

  3. Influence of socio-economic and lifestyle factors on overweight and nutrition-related diseases among Tunisian migrants versus non-migrant Tunisians and French

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delpeuch Francis

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migrant studies in France revealed that Mediterranean migrant men have lower mortality and morbidity than local-born populations for non-communicable diseases (NCDs. We studied overweight and NCDs among Tunisian migrants compared to the population of the host country and to the population of their country of origin. We also studied the potential influence of socio-economic and lifestyle factors on differential health status. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted to compare Tunisian migrant men with two non-migrant male groups: local-born French and Tunisians living in Tunisia, using frequency matching. We performed quota sampling (n = 147 based on age and place of residence. We used embedded logistic regression models to test socio-economic and lifestyle factors as potential mediators for the effect of migration on overweight, hypertension and reported morbidity (hypercholesterolemia, type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases (CVD. Results Migrants were less overweight than French (OR = 0.53 [0.33–0.84] and had less diabetes and CVD than Tunisians (0.18 [0.06–0.54] and 0.25 [0.07–0.88]. Prevalence of hypertension (grade-1 and -2 and prevalence of hypercholesterolemia were significantly lower among migrants than among French (respectively 0.06 [0.03–0.14]; 0.04 [0.01–0.15]; 0.11 [0.04–0.34] and Tunisians (respectively OR = 0.07 [0.03–0.18]; OR = 0.06 [0.02–0.20]; OR = 0.23 [0.08–0.63]. The effect of migration on overweight was mediated by alcohol consumption. Healthcare utilisation, smoking and physical activity were mediators for the effect of migration on diabetes. The effect of migration on CVD was mediated by healthcare utilisation and energy intake. No obvious mediating effect was found for hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. Conclusion Our study clearly shows that lifestyle (smoking and cultural background (alcohol are involved in the observed protective effect of migration.

  4. DNA-polymorphisms and plasma levels of vascular disease risk factors in Greenland Inuit--is there a relation with the low risk of cardiovascular disease in the Inuit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maat, M de; Bladbjerg, E-M; Johansen, L G

    1999-01-01

    Greenland Inuit are a population with a low risk of cardiovascular disease. Recently, we stated that frequencies of potentially high risk alleles of the apolipoproteins, fibrinogen, factor V, glycoprotein IIIa and factor VII (FVII) genes have different allele frequencies in the Inuit when compared...... and CVD risk in Caucasian populations, but for other measures this was not the case (allele frequencies of the PAI-1 polymorphism, and plasma levels of fibrinogen, FVII and t-PA). In conclusion there are clear differences in genetic background and plasma levels of risk factors in Greenland Inuit compared......, aged 30-34 gamma. In addition, we compared the plasma levels of these factors and those of C-reactive protein (CRP) and D-Dimer in Inuit and in Danes, comparable for age and gender. Frequencies (f) were assessed of the alleles that are known as the potential high risk alleles in Caucasians...

  5. Patient-related factors influencing detectability of coronary arteries in 320-row CT angiography in infants with complex congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Yuzo; Kawanami, Satoshi; Kamitani, Takeshi; Sagiyama, Koji; Shin, Seitaro; Hino, Takuya; Nagata, Hazumu; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Nagao, Michinobu; Honda, Hiroshi

    2018-05-05

    To investigate the performance of second-generation 320-row computed tomographic (CT) angiography (CTA) in detecting coronary arteries and identify factors influencing visibility of the coronary arteries in infants with complex congenital heart disease (CHD). Data of 60 infants (aged 0-2 years, median 2 months) with complex CHD who underwent examination using 320-row CTA with low-dose prospective electrocardiogram-triggered volume target scanning were reviewed. The coronary arteries of each infant were assessed using a 0-4-point scoring system based on the number of coronary segments with a visible course. Clinical parameters, the CT value in the ascending aorta, image noise, and the radiation dose were subjected to univariate and multivariate analyses. The mean coronary score for all examinations was 2.6 ± 1.5 points. The mean attenuation in the ascending aorta was 306.7 ± 66.2 HU and the mean standard deviation was 21.7 ± 4.4. The mean effective radiation dose was 1.27 ± 0.39 mSv. Multivariate regression analysis showed significant correlations between coronary score and body weight (p < 0.05) and between coronary score and the CT value in the ascending aorta (p < 0.02). Second-generation 320-row CTA with prospective electrocardiogram-triggered volume target scanning and hybrid iterative reconstruction allows good visibility of the coronary arteries in infants with complex CHD. Body weight and the CT value in the ascending aorta are important factors influencing the visibility of the coronary arteries in infants.

  6. Relation Between Demographic Factors And Hospitalization In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relation Between Demographic Factors And Hospitalization In Patients With Gastrointestinal Disorders, Using Quantail Regression Analysis. ... East African Journal of Public Health ... Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate relation between demographic factors and hospitalization in gastrointestinal disorders.

  7. Relevamiento de factores de riesgo y de enfermedad renal en familiares de pacientes en diálisis Survey of risk factors and renal disease in first-degree relatives of dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Inserra

    2007-02-01

    de enfermedad renal crónica.Background: It has been established that first-degree relatives of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD have a higher CKD risk than the overall population. This paper deals with the relative frequency of CKD markers and cardiovascular (CV risk factors within first-degree relatives of ESRD patients in Argentina. Methods: 810 family members volunteered to participate; of them 668 over 18 ys. old. Trained nurses interviewed them and completed a questionnaire dealing with family history of renal and cardiovascular disease. Blood pressure, urine and blood analysis and anthropometric data were collected. Selected parameters were: smoking habit, presence of high blood pressure, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, high plasma creatinine and creatinine clearance estimated by MDRD formula, proteinuria and microalbuminuria. In pediatric population, weight and blood pressure parameters were evaluated as percentiles. CKD were classified in stage (National Kidney Foundation. Results: The relative frequencies were: CKD: 29.6%; proteinuria: 13.9%; microalbuminuria: 8.7%. The prevalence values found for main CV risks factors, adjusted by sex and age, were: high blood pressure= 41.8%; overweight/obesity by BMI= 62.1%, hypercholesterolemia= 42.9% and hyperglycemia= 5.2%. Smoking habit was present in 34.8%. In conclusion: Prevalence of overweight/obesity, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia in first-degree relatives of ESRD patients is higher than previously communicated in studies of national reference populations. Prevalence of CKD is high, estimated as three-fold higher than for a general population as reported in poblational studies. These results support the fact that first-degree relatives of ESRD patients, as has been established elsewhere, constitute a population at high risk for developing ESRD.

  8. Factors Affecting Health-Related Quality of Life and Physical Activity after Liver Transplantation for Autoimmune and Nonautoimmune Liver Diseases: A Prospective, Single Centre Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kotarska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. With the improvement of the outcomes after liver transplantation (LTx, health-related quality of life (HRQoL and physical activity are becoming significant outcome parameters. We prospectively assessed these parameters in patients with autoimmune and nonautoimmune liver disorders undergoing LTx. Materials and Methods. Patients (n=107 were subdivided into 3 groups depending on the time after LTx: group-A (n=21: 6–12 months; group-B (n=48: 13–36 months; and group-C (n=38: >37 months. SF-36 and IPAQ were applied in HRQoL and physical activity assessment. Results. Females had impaired HRQoL in most SF-36 domains. Younger patients showed higher scores at SF-36 physical functioning domain but IPAQ was not influenced by age. Group-B had higher general health and physical component summary than group-A (P=0.037, P=0.04, resp. and total IPAQ than group-C (P=0.047. The sitting time domain was longer in group-A than in group-B and group-C (P=0.0157;  P=0.042, resp.. Employed patients had better HRQoL and higher physical activity than those not working. SF-36 and IPAQ were unrelated to the autoimmune etiology of liver disease. Conclusions. These findings show that female and unemployed patients have worse HRQoL, while gender and age at LTx time do not affect IPAQ’s physical activity. The autoimmune etiology of liver disease does not influence HRQoL and physical activity after LTx.

  9. Psychosocial factors in coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, J. R. P., Jr.; Chaplan, R. D.

    1969-01-01

    The relationship between job satisfaction and coronary heart disease is explored for blue and white collar groups, different personalities and physiological risk factors. Differences found among administrators, engineers and scientists with regard to variables associated with heart disease are in terms of physiology, personality, reported job stress, and smoking.

  10. Depression: risk factor for cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuehl, L.K.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Otte, C.

    2012-01-01

    Major depression is an independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. In patients with existing cardiovascular disease, major depression has a large impact on the quality of life and is associated with a poor course and prognosis. Potential mechanisms responsible for this

  11. Social class, psychosocial factors and disease : from deception towards explanation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranchor, Adelita Vijaynti

    1994-01-01

    This thesis deals with the question of the extent to which socioeconomic status (sas) is related to disease. The main focus is the explanation of this relation, applying a muitifactor approach aimed at the integration of socioeconomic, psychosocial factors and health-related behavior. ... Zie:

  12. Impaired health-related quality of life in Addison's disease--impact of replacement therapy, comorbidities and socio-economic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Nicolas; Matikainen, Niina; Sintonen, Harri; Ranki, Annamari; Roine, Risto P; Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla

    2014-10-01

    Patients with Addison's disease (AD) on conventional replacement therapy have impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL). It is possible that lower hydrocortisone (HC) doses recommended by current guidelines could restore HRQoL. We compared HRQoL in AD patients treated according to current HC recommendations to that of the age- and gender-standardized general population. We assessed HRQoL in a cross-sectional setting with the 15D instrument in a Finnish AD cohort (n = 107) and compared the results with those of a large sample of general population (n = 5671). We examined possible predictors of HRQoL in AD. Within the patient group, HRQoL was also assessed by SF-36. Mean HC dose was 22 mg/d, corresponding to 12 ± 4 mg/m2. HRQoL was impaired in AD compared with the general population (15D score; 0·853 vs 0·918, P < 0·001). Within single 15D dimensions, discomfort and symptoms, vitality and sexual activity were most affected. Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that Patient's Association membership (P = 0·02), female gender (P < 0·01), presence of other autoimmune or inflammatory comorbidity (P < 0·02), lower education (P < 0·02) and longer disease duration (P < 0·05) independently predicted impaired HRQoL, whereas replacement regimens, autoimmune-related comorbidities, total number of comorbidities or level of healthcare follow-up did not. In AD, HRQoL was impaired also as assessed by SF-36. HRQoL is significantly impaired in AD compared with the general population despite use of recommended HC doses. Patient's Association membership was the most significant predictor of impaired HRQoL. This finding should be explored in more detail in the future. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Job strain as a risk factor for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, G David

    2012-01-01

    Published work assessing psychosocial stress (job strain) as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is inconsistent and subject to publication bias and reverse causation bias. We analysed the relation between job strain and coronary heart disease with a meta-analysis of published and unpublished...

  14. Factors related to periodontal disease in a rural population Fatores associados à doença periodontal em uma população rural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taíze Cassia Nascimento de Macêdo

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the prevalence and related aspects of periodontitis in a rural area of the State of Bahia, Brazil, this cross-sectional study was carried out in the village of Matinha dos Pretos, Feira de Santana County, Bahia, among 172 subjects ranging from 20 to 60 years of age. During household visits, a full-mouth periodontal exam was performed on each subject, who also answered a questionnaire about socio-demographic, economic and health-related issues. The factors assessed were plaque index, bleeding on probing index, probing depth, gingival recession or hyperplasia measurements. Clinical attachment loss was also calculated. The multivariate logistic regression method was used to evaluate the relative contribution of these factors to the periodontitis condition. The prevalence of periodontitis was 24.4%. The following factors were all positively associated with the presence of periodontitis: being male (OR = 1.58; 1.00 - 2.53, being 30 years of age or older (OR = 2.80; 1.00 - 7.39, living in a house where there was more than one person per room (OR = 1.53; 0.96 - 2.45, being a cigarette or pipe smoker or ex-smoker (OR = 1.49; 0.92 - 2.39, having a plaque index of over 65% (OR = 2.97; 2.72 - 7.39 and more than four missing teeth (OR = 1.51; 0.82 - 2.78. The authors concluded that socioeconomic and biological factors, especially poor oral hygiene and older age, are positively associated with periodontitis in the rural population of a small village in the county of Feira de Santana, State of Bahia, Brazil.Para estimar a prevalência e os fatores associados à periodontite em uma área rural do Estado da Bahia foi realizado um estudo transversal com 172 indivíduos, de 20 a 60 anos de idade residentes no povoado de Matinha dos Pretos, Feira de Santana (BA. Durante visitas domiciliares, um exame clínico periodontal completo foi realizado para cada indivíduo, que também respondeu a um questionário a respeito de fatores sociodemográficos, econ

  15. Reproductive factors and Parkinson's disease risk in Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greene, N; Lassen, C F; Rugbjerg, K

    2014-01-01

    and lifestyle factors. RESULTS: After adjusting for smoking, caffeine and alcohol use, education, age, and family Parkinson's disease history, inverse associations between Parkinson's disease and early menarche (first period at ≤11 years), oral contraceptives, high parity (≥4 children) and bilateral...... and fertile life length, age at menopause or post-menopausal hormone treatment was found. CONCLUSIONS: Reproductive factors related to women's early- to mid-reproductive lives appear to be predictive of subsequent Parkinson's disease risk whereas factors occurring later in life seem less important....

  16. The influence of demographic factors and health-related quality of life on treatment satisfaction in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease treated with esomeprazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Dika Samer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The correlation between treatment satisfaction and demographic characteristics, symptoms, or health-related quality of life (HRQL in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is unknown. The objective of this study was to assess correlates of treatment satisfaction in patients with GERD receiving a proton pump inhibitor, esomeprazole. Methods Adult GERD patients (n = 217 completed demography, symptom, HRQL, and treatment satisfaction questionnaires at baseline and/or after treatment with esomeprazole 40 mg once daily for 4 weeks. We used multiple linear regressions with treatment satisfaction as the dependent variable and demographic characteristics, baseline symptoms, baseline HRQL, and change scores in HRQL as independent variables. Results Among the demographic variables only Caucasian ethnicity was positively associated with treatment satisfaction. Greater vitality assessed by the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD and worse heartburn assessed by a four-symptom scale at baseline, were associated with greater treatment satisfaction. The greater the improvement on the QOLRAD vitality (change score, the more likely the patient is to be satisfied with the treatment. Conclusions Ethnicity, baseline vitality, baseline heartburn severity, and change in QOLRAD vitality correlate with treatment satisfaction in patients with GERD.

  17. 459 Preventing Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    2011-01-18

    Jan 18, 2011 ... injury. Risk factors may be considered as characteristic indicators ... by examining the cardiovascular risk factors that are related to various forms .... Cross country race, Handball, Jogging, Rope jumping, Running Soccer,.

  18. STAT4 is a genetic risk factor for systemic sclerosis having additive effects with IRF5 on disease susceptibility and related pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieudé, P; Guedj, M; Wipff, J; Ruiz, B; Hachulla, E; Diot, E; Granel, B; Sibilia, J; Tiev, K; Mouthon, L; Cracowski, J L; Carpentier, P H; Amoura, Z; Fajardy, I; Avouac, J; Meyer, O; Kahan, A; Boileau, C; Allanore, Y

    2009-08-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) belongs to the group of connective tissue disorders (CTDs), among which are several disorders characterized by a type I interferon (IFN) signature. The recent identification of an association between IRF5 and SSc further highlights a key role for IFN. STAT4, which encodes STAT-4, contributes to IFN signaling, and its genetic variants were found to be associated with CTDs. The aim of this study was to determine whether the STAT4 rs7574865 single-nucleotide polymorphism is associated with SSc, and whether it interacts with IRF5. Both the STAT4 rs7574865 and IRF5 rs2004640 polymorphisms were genotyped in 1,855 individuals of French Caucasian origin comprising a discovery set of 440 patients with SSc and 485 control subjects and a replication set of 445 patients with SSc and an additional 485 control subjects. STAT4 rs7574865 was shown to be associated with SSc (P=0.001, odds ratio [OR] 1.29, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.11-1.51). This association was not restricted to a particular phenotype. An additive effect of the STAT4 rs7574865 T allele and the IRF5 rs2004640 T allele was observed, resulting in a multiple increased 1.28-fold risk of SSc. The OR for SSc was 2.72 (95% CI 1.86-3.99) for combinations of genotypes with >or=3 risk alleles. An additive effect was also detected for fibrosing alveolitis: carriage of at least 3 risk alleles appeared to be an independent risk factor (P=2.2x10(-4), OR 1.97, 95% CI 1.28-3.04). Our results establish STAT4 rs7574865 as a new SSc genetic susceptibility factor. STAT4 and IRF5 act with additive effects in terms of susceptibility to both SSc and SSc-related fibrosing alveolitis.

  19. Factors affecting relative pitch perception

    OpenAIRE

    McClaskey, Carolyn Marie

    2016-01-01

    Sounds that evoke a sense of pitch are ubiquitous in our environment and important for speech, music, and auditory scene analysis. The frequencies of these sounds rarely remain constant, however, and the direction and extent of pitch change is often more important than the exact pitches themselves. This dissertation examines the mechanisms underlying how we perceive relative pitch distance, focusing on two types of stimuli: continuous pitch changes and discrete pitch changes. In a series of e...

  20. Vascular endothelial growth factors and angiogenesis in eye disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witmer, A. N.; Vrensen, G. F. J. M.; van Noorden, C. J. F.; Schlingemann, R. O.

    2003-01-01

    The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family of growth factors controls pathological angiogenesis and increased vascular permeability in important eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy (DR) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The purpose of this review is to develop new insights

  1. Prevalence of anogenital HPV infection, related disease and risk factors among HIV-infected men in inner-city Johannesburg, South Africa: baseline findings from a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Admire Chikandiwa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV infection is associated with the development of anogenital cancers, particularly in men living with HIV (MLWH. We describe the prevalence of anogenital HPV infection, abnormal anal cytology and anogenital warts (AGWs in MLWH in Johannesburg, and explore whether HPV infection and receipt of antiretroviral treatment is associated with detection of abnormal anal cytology and AGWs. Methods We enrolled a cohort of 304 sexually-active MLWH ≥18 years, who completed a questionnaire and physical examination. Genital swabs were collected from all men and intra-anal swabs from 250 (82%. Swabs were tested for HPV DNA and genotypes, and anal smears graded using the Bethesda classification. Factors associated with anogenital disease were assessed by logistic regression models. Results Two thirds were receiving antiretroviral treatment, for a median 33 months (IQR = 15–58 and 54% were HIV-virologically suppressed. Only 5% reported ever having sex with men. Among 283 genital swabs with valid results, 79% had any HPV, 52% had HR-HPV and 27% had >1 HR-HPV infection. By comparison, 39% of the 227 valid intra-anal swabs had detectable HPV, 25% had any HR-HPV and 7% >1 HR infection. While most anal smears were normal (51%, 20% had ASCUS and 29% were LSIL. No cases had HSIL or cancer. Infection with >1 HR type (adjusted OR [aOR] = 2.39; 95%CI = 1.02–5.58 and alpha-9 types (aOR = 3.98; 95%CI = 1.42–11.16 were associated with having abnormal cytology. Prevalence of AGWs was 12%. Infection with any LR type (aOR = 41.28; 95%CI = 13.57–125.62, >1 LR type (aOR = 4.14; 95%CI = 1.60–10.69, being <6 months on antiretroviral treatment (aOR = 6.90; 95%CI = 1.63–29.20 and having a CD4+ count <200 cells/μL (aOR = 5.48; 95%CI: 1.60–18.78 were associated with having AGWs. Conclusions In this population, anogenital HR-HPV infection and associated low-grade disease is

  2. Coal Mining-Related Respiratory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COAL WORKERS' HEALTH SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Coal Mining-Related Respiratory Diseases Coal mining-related respiratory ...

  3. Celiac disease and new diseases related to gluten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Ortega, Ana Isabel; Martínez García, Rosa María; Quiles Blanco, María José; Majid Abu Naji, Jamil Abdel; González Iglesias, María José

    2016-07-12

    Celiac disease is the most common chronic intestinal disease. Nowadays it´s known that this is a multisistemic pathology of immune mechanism, triggered by gluten, which occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. It affects approximately 1% of the world population, which is a very high prevalence, affects all age groups and has symptoms both digestive and extra-digestive. Since it is a disease that requires maintaining a gluten-free diet and medical monitoring for life, it is important to know it and establish its diagnosis properly. Along with celiac disease a number of new diseases related to gluten are diagnosed increasingly, including the non celiac gluten sensitivity or wheat allergy. The suffering of celiac disease, or other related diseases, by conditioning diet changes of the affected individual, it may be associated with nutritional imbalances that need to monitor and try to solve. Therefore patients with this problem need special nutritional advice.

  4. Assessment of diabetic distress and disease related factors in patients with type 2 diabetes in Isfahan: A way to tailor an effective intervention planning in Isfahan-Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tol Azar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to assess diabetes distress and its related factors among type 2 diabetic patients to better tailor intervention planning in Isfahan-Iran. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011. Study population was patients with type 2 diabetes referring to Omolbanin, an outpatient diabetic center in Isfahan. 140 diabetic patients met the inclusion criteria and were all included in the study. Patient’s diabetes distress was measured by DDS. A 17-item self-report diabetes distress scale was used with subscales reflecting 5 domains: 1 Emotional burden (5 items, 2 Physician distress (4 items, 3 Regimen distress (5 items and 4 Interpersonal distress (3 items. The responses to each item were rated between 1 and 6 (1 = not a problem, 2 = a slight problem, 3 = a moderate problem, 4 = somewhat serious problem, 5 = a serious problem, 6 = a very serious problem. The minimum and the maximum of score in the scale were 17 and 114 respectively. Collected data was analyzed by using SPSS software version 11.5. Results Mean age of participants were 53.23 years (SD = 7.82. 54.3% was female, 97.1% was married, and 57.1% had education lower than diploma. The average score of total diabetes distress was 2.96 ± 0.83. The average score of each domain was (3.40 ± 1.18, (2.57 ± 0.88, (2.97 ± 0.90, (2.76 ± 0.91 respectively. ‘Emotional Burden’ was considered as the most important domain in measuring diabetes distress. Total diabetes distress had significant association with age (p = 0.02, duration of diabetes (plc (r = 0.63, p Conclusion It seems some keywords have a main role in diabetes distress such as emotional support, communication with patient and physician, self-efficacy and social support. All of these points are achievable through empowerment approach in diabetes care plan.

  5. Study on the mortality in Ecuador related to dietary factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira-Mosquera, Juan Alejandro; Pérez-Rodríguez, Fernando; Sánchez-Llaguno, Sungey; Moreno Rojas, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Diet is an important factor related to the development of numerous diseases. In developing countries like Ecuador, this aspect is not considered as priority however, the study of the incidence of certain diet-related diseases could help to assess consumption habits of a country from a Public Health perspective and support national nutrition policies and programs. The objective the present study is to investigate the mortality rate of certain diet-related diseases in Ecuador and its possible relationship with Ecuadorian consumption habits. For that, mortality rates (2001-2008) associated with five different disease groups related to dietary factors (cancer of colon, cerebrovascular diseases, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and liver diseases) were collected, analyzed and compared to consumption patterns in Ecuador. According to results, Ecuador has a low level of cancer of colon in comparison with developed countries (e.g. Spain). The group with the highest number of deaths corresponded to cardiovascular diseases followed by cerebrovascular diseases. The mortality study per province revealed that Amazonian provinces showed few deaths in relation to other provinces in Ecuador. This could be due to different factors including fails in the disease surveillance information systems, environmental factors and consumption patterns. In this sense, further investigation on native products consumption such as "chontaduro" might help to find valuable foods contributing to healthier Ecuadorian diet. These results, though preliminary, evidence that a major effort should be made by national and international organisations to collect data on consumption patterns and nutritional aspects of the Ecuadorian population in order to better support the development of effective food security and nutrition policies. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  6. LEARNERS SATISFACTION FACTORS IN NEUROLOGY RELATED MOOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionela MANIU

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to investigate the factors that are influencing student satisfaction in case of neurology related massive open online courses (MOOCs. We analyzed data collected from learners enrolled in 40 neurology related MOOCs, by manually looking for information in these courses reviews. The main identified satisfaction factors can be grouped into the following categories: content related factors: course content, additional materials, assignments, external research and teaching - learning related factors (teacher presentation techniques / style: engaging, clear, coherent, knowledgeable, sharing / explanation, interactive, excitement, considering student’s needs, inspiring, sense of humor. Competences, skills and objectives pursued by neurology related MOOCs are also discussed. Analyzing these factors can be useful in new courses management (design and implementation and also in understanding the needs (motivation, behaviors, perception of 21st century learners interested in neurology related fields.

  7. Imaging of macrophage-related lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, Katharina; Hansell, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Macrophage-related pulmonary diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by macrophage accumulation, activation or dysfunction. These conditions include smoking-related interstitial lung diseases, metabolic disorders such as Niemann-Pick or Gaucher disease, and rare primary lung tumors. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include pulmonary ground-glass opacification secondary to infiltration by macrophages, centrilobular nodules or interlobular septal thickening reflecting peribronchiolar or septal macrophage accumulation, respectively, emphysema caused by macrophage dysfunction, and honeycombing following macrophage-related lung matrix remodeling. (orig.)

  8. Kidney disease and aging: A reciprocal relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooman, Jeroen P; van der Sande, Frank M; Leunissen, Karel M L

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are overrepresented in elderly patients. This provides specific challenges for the treatment, as the start of dialysis in vulnerable elderly patients may be associated with a rapid decline in functional performance. However, prognosis in elderly patients with ESRD is quite variable and related to the presence of comorbidity and geriatric impairments. The decision to start dialysis in elderly patients should always be based on shared decision making, which may be aided by the use of prediction models which should however not be used to withhold dialysis treatment. The treatment of ESRD in elderly patients should be based on a multidimensional treatment plan with a role for active rehabilitation. Moreover, there also appears to be a reciprocal relationship between aging and CKD, as the presence of geriatric complications is also high in younger patients with ESRD. This has led to the hypothesis of a premature aging process associated with CKD, resulting in different phenotypes such as premature vascular aging, muscle wasting, bone disease, cognitive dysfunction and frailty. Prevention and treatment of this phenotype is based on optimal treatment of CKD, associated comorbidities, and lifestyle factors by established treatments. For the future, interventions, which are developed to combat the aging process in general, might also have relevance for the treatment of patients with CKD, but their role should always be investigated in adequately powered clinical trials, as results obtained in experimental trials may not be directly translatable to the clinical situation of elderly patients. In the meantime, physical exercise is a very important intervention, by improving both physical capacity and functional performance, as well as by a direct effect on the aging process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Preventing Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors through Aerobic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focused on the reduction of cardiovascular disease risk factors, through aerobic exercises. The central argument here is that through exercise there is the tendency for increased strength of the heart muscles. When this is the case, what follows is a reduction in body weight and ultimately less risk on the ...

  10. Lifestyle factors and risk of cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoevenaar-Blom, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    Background

    Evidence is accumulating that lifestyle factors influence the incidence of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular diseases (CVD). A healthy diet, being physically active, moderate alcohol consumption and not smoking are associated with a lower CVD risk. In

  11. Influence of atmospheric factors on the rheumatic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latman, N S

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the influence of atmospheric factors on rheumatic diseases - rheumatoid arthritis, unspecified arthritis, gout, and systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE). The authors state that there appears to be ample evidence to conclude that various atmospheric factors do exert a significant impact on some people with various rheumatic diseases. The data are, however, crude relative to the authors general understanding. They recommend as a logical progression of research the determination of the effects of the meteorological/atmospheric factors of concern on the specific intrinsic mediators of inflammation.

  12. Association of age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Neelesh; Smith, R Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of adult blindness in the developed world. Thus, major endeavors to understand the risk factors and pathogenesis of this disease have been undertaken. Reticular macular disease is a proposed subtype of age-related macular degeneration correlating histologically with subretinal drusenoid deposits located between the retinal pigment epithelium and the inner segment ellipsoid zone. Reticular lesions are more prevalent in females and in older age groups and are associated with a higher mortality rate. Risk factors for developing age-related macular degeneration include hypertension, smoking, and angina. Several genes related to increased risk for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease are also associated with cardiovascular disease. Better understanding of the clinical and genetic risk factors for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease has led to the hypothesis that these eye diseases are systemic. A systemic origin may help to explain why reticular disease is diagnosed more frequently in females as males suffer cardiovascular mortality at an earlier age, before the age of diagnosis of reticular macular disease and age-related macular degeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cardiovascular disease risk factors: a childhood perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, Pradeep A; Roy, Ambuj; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj

    2013-03-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide including in developing countries like India. Indians are known to be predisposed to CVD, which occur almost a decade earlier in them. Though these diseases manifest in the middle age and beyond, it is now clear that the roots of CVD lie in childhood and adolescence. Many of the conventional risk factors of CVD such as high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, tobacco use, unhealthy diet and obesity have their beginnings in childhood and then track overtime. It is thus important to screen and identify these risk factors early and treat them to prevent onset of CVD. Similarly community based strategies to prevent onset of these risk factors is imperative to tackle this burgeoning public health crisis especially in countries like ours with limited resources.

  14. Trends in absolute and relative educational inequalities in four modifiable ischaemic heart disease risk factors: repeated cross-sectional surveys from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT 1984–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernstsen Linda

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been an overall decrease in incident ischaemic heart disease (IHD, but the reduction in IHD risk factors has been greater among those with higher social position. Increased social inequalities in IHD mortality in Scandinavian countries is often referred to as the Scandinavian “public health puzzle”. The objective of this study was to examine trends in absolute and relative educational inequalities in four modifiable ischaemic heart disease risk factors (smoking, diabetes, hypertension and high total cholesterol over the last three decades among Norwegian middle-aged women and men. Methods Population-based, cross-sectional data from The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT: HUNT 1 (1984–1986, HUNT 2 (1995–1997 and HUNT 3 (2006–2008, women and men 40–59 years old. Educational inequalities were assessed using the Slope Index of Inequality (SII and The Relative Index of Inequality (RII. Results Smoking prevalence increased for all education groups among women and decreased in men. Relative and absolute educational inequalities in smoking widened in both genders, with significantly higher absolute inequalities among women than men in the two last surveys. Diabetes prevalence increased in all groups. Relative inequalities in diabetes were stable, while absolute inequalities increased both among women (p = 0.05 and among men (p = 0.01. Hypertension prevalence decreased in all groups. Relative inequalities in hypertension widened over time in both genders. However, absolute inequalities in hypertension decreased among women (p = 0.05 and were stable among men (p = 0.33. For high total cholesterol relative and absolute inequalities remained stable in both genders. Conclusion Widening absolute educational inequalities in smoking and diabetes over the last three decades gives rise to concern. The mechanisms behind these results are less clear, and future studies are needed to assess if educational

  15. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, K.

    2007-01-01

    The most important smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Although traditionally considered to be discrete entities, smoking-related ILDs often coexist, thus accounting for the sometimes complex patterns encountered on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative role of smoking in the development of pulmonary fibrosis

  16. [Sleep disorder and lifestyle-related disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Rei; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2015-06-01

    Sleep disorder is associated with the lifestyle-related diseases including obesity, insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Adipose tissue functions as an endocrine organ by producing bioactive secretory proteins, also known as adipokines, that can directly act on nearby or remote organs. Recently, the associations between these adipokines and sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea have been reported. In this review, we focus on the relationship between sleep disorder and lifestyle-related diseases.

  17. Factors contributing to malnutrition in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung R; Chung, Sun J; Yoo, Sung-Hee

    2016-04-01

    Our objective in this study was to evaluate the nutritional status and to identify clinical, psychosocial, and nutritional factors contributing to malnutrition in Korean patients with Parkinson's disease. We used a descriptive, cross-sectional study design. Of 102 enrolled patients, 26 (25.5%) were malnourished and 27 (26.5%) were at risk of malnutrition based on Mini-Nutritional Assessment scores. Malnutrition was related to activity of daily living score, Hoehn and Yahr stage, duration of levodopa therapy, Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger's Anxiety Inventory scores, body weight, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and body mass index. On multiple logistic regression analysis, anxiety score, duration of levodopa therapy, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and loss of body weight were significant factors predicting malnutrition in Parkinson's disease patients. Therefore, nutritional assessment, including psychological evaluation, is required for Parkinson's disease patients to facilitate interdisciplinary nutritional intervention for malnourished patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Cardiovascular risk factors and disease in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Sharon K

    2015-05-01

    Coronary artery disease and stroke predominantly affect older women as opposed to younger women, but the risk factors that contribute to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk often start in young women. Young women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), with migraine, and who use oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) have short-term increases in thrombotic complications that can result in coronary events or stroke. Attention should be focused on risk reduction in women of all ages. Screening for and discussing diabetes, hypertension, obesity, smoking, migraine, PCOS, and pregnancy complication history and discussing the pros and cons of hormone and statin medications are part of reducing cardiovascular risk for women. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Chronic disease risk factors among hotel workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawde, Nilesh Chandrakant; Kurlikar, Prashika R.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Non-communicable diseases have emerged as a global health issue. Role of occupation in pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases has not been explored much especially in the hospitality industry. Aims: Objectives of this study include finding risk factor prevalence among hotel workers and studying relationship between occupational group and chronic disease risk factors chiefly high body mass index. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted among non-managerial employees from classified hotels in India. Materials and Methods: The study participants self-administered pre-designed pilot-tested questionnaires. Statistical analysis used: The risk factor prevalence rates were expressed as percentages. Chi-square test was used for bi-variate analysis. Overweight was chosen as ‘outcome’ variable of interest and binary multi-logistic regression analysis was used to identify determinants. Results: The prevalence rates of tobacco use, alcohol use, inadequate physical activity and inadequate intake of fruits and vegetables were 32%, 49%, 24% and 92% respectively among hotel employees. Tobacco use was significantly common among those in food preparation and service, alcohol use among those in food service and security and leisure time physical activity among front office workers. More than two-fifths (42.7%) were overweight. Among the hotel workers, those employed in food preparation and security had higher odds of 1.650 (CI: 1.025 – 2.655) and 3.245 (CI: 1.296 – 8.129) respectively of being overweight. Conclusions: Prevalence of chronic disease risk factors is high among hotel workers. Risk of overweight is significantly high in food preparation and security departments and workplace interventions are necessary to address these risks PMID:27390474

  20. Chronic disease risk factors among hotel workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawde, Nilesh Chandrakant; Kurlikar, Prashika R

    2016-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases have emerged as a global health issue. Role of occupation in pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases has not been explored much especially in the hospitality industry. Objectives of this study include finding risk factor prevalence among hotel workers and studying relationship between occupational group and chronic disease risk factors chiefly high body mass index. A cross-sectional study was conducted among non-managerial employees from classified hotels in India. The study participants self-administered pre-designed pilot-tested questionnaires. The risk factor prevalence rates were expressed as percentages. Chi-square test was used for bi-variate analysis. Overweight was chosen as 'outcome' variable of interest and binary multi-logistic regression analysis was used to identify determinants. The prevalence rates of tobacco use, alcohol use, inadequate physical activity and inadequate intake of fruits and vegetables were 32%, 49%, 24% and 92% respectively among hotel employees. Tobacco use was significantly common among those in food preparation and service, alcohol use among those in food service and security and leisure time physical activity among front office workers. More than two-fifths (42.7%) were overweight. Among the hotel workers, those employed in food preparation and security had higher odds of 1.650 (CI: 1.025 - 2.655) and 3.245 (CI: 1.296 - 8.129) respectively of being overweight. Prevalence of chronic disease risk factors is high among hotel workers. Risk of overweight is significantly high in food preparation and security departments and workplace interventions are necessary to address these risks.

  1. Changes of individual perception in psychosocial stressors related to German reunification in 1989/1990 and cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular diseases in a population-based study in East Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohley, Stefanie; Kluttig, Alexander; Werdan, Karl; Nuding, Sebastian; Greiser, Karin Halina; Kuss, Oliver; Markus, Marcello Ricardo Paulista; Schmidt, Carsten Oliver; Völzke, Henry; Krabbe, Christine; Haerting, Johannes

    2016-01-04

    Aim was to examine the relationship between individually perceived changes in psychosocial stressors associated with German reunification and cardiovascular effects. We hypothesised that higher levels of psychosocial stress related to German reunification were associated with an increase in cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Cross-sectional data from 2 cohort studies in East Germany were used: Cardiovascular Disease, Living and Ageing in Halle Study (CARLA), and Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP). 2 populations in East Germany. CARLA study: 1779 participants, aged 45-83 years at baseline (812 women), SHIP study: 4308 participants, aged 20-79 years at baseline (2193 women). Psychosocial stressors related to reunification were operationalised by the Reunification Stress Index (RSI; scale from 0 to 10). This index was composed of questions that were related to individually perceived changes in psychosocial stressors (occupational, financial and personal) after reunification. To examine the associations between the RSI and each stressor separately with cardiovascular risk factors and CVD, regression models were used. RSI was associated with CVD in women (RR=1.15, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.33). Cardiovascular risk factors were associated with RSI for both men and women, with strongest associations between RSI and diabetes in women (RR=1.10, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.20) and depressive disorders in men (RR=1.15, 95% CI 1.07 to 2.77). The change in occupational situation related to reunification was the major contributing psychosocial stressor. We observed a strong association with CVD in women who experienced occupational deterioration after reunification (RR=4.04, 95% CI 1.21 to 13.43). Individually perceived deterioration of psychosocial stressors (occupational, financial and personal) related to German reunification was associated with cardiovascular risk factors and CVD. The associations were stronger for women than for men. An explanation for these

  2. IgG4-related disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Klöppel, Günter

    2018-01-01

    disease (IgG4-RD). The histologic key findings are lymphoplasmacytic infiltration rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells combined with storiform fibrosis and obliterative phlebitis. Among the organs mainly affected by IgG4-RD are the pancreas and the extrahepatic bile ducts. The pancreatic and biliary...... alterations have been described under the terms autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and sclerosing cholangitis, respectively. These diseases are currently more precisely called IgG4-related pancreatitis (or type 1 AIP to distinguish it from type 2 AIP that is unrelated to IgG4-RD) and IgG4-related sclerosing...... cholangitis (IgG4-related SC). Clinically and grossly, both diseases commonly imitate pancreatic and biliary adenocarcinoma, tumors that are well known for their dismal prognosis. As IgG4-RD responds to steroid treatment, making a resection of a suspected tumor unnecessary, a biopsy is often required...

  3. Asbestos-related pleuropulmonary diseases: iconographic essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavo de Souza Portes Meirelles; Rodrigues, Reynaldo Tavares; Nery, Luiz Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to illustrate the main imaging findings of asbestos-related diseases. Pleural and pulmonary asbestos-related diseases range from benign conditions, like pleural effusion and pleural plaques, to some neoplasias, such as lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma. Pleural effusion is the earliest finding after asbestos exposure, but the imaging findings are not specific. Diffuse pleural thickening involves the visceral pleura and pleural plaques are considered to be hallmarks of exposure. Asbestosis is the pulmonary fibrosis due to asbestos. Rounded atelectasis is a peripheral lung collapse in these individuals, generally related to pleural disease. Some neoplasias, like lung carcinoma and pleural mesothelioma, are more prevalent in asbestos-exposed subjects. (author)

  4. Disease-related malnutrition: influence on body composition and prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pirlich, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Disease-related malnutrition is a frequent clincal problem with severe medical and economic impact. This work summarizes studies on body composition analysis, risk factors, prevalence and prognostic impact of malnutrition. The diagnosis of malnutrition in patients with chronic liver disease is hampered by hyperhydration and requires body composition analysis. Using four different methods for body composition analysis (total body potassium counting, anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance analy...

  5. Aerobic fitness related to cardiovascular risk factors in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Magnus; Thorsson, Ola; Karlsson, Magnus K

    2012-01-01

    Low aerobic fitness (maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2PEAK))) is predictive for poor health in adults. In a cross-sectional study, we assessed if VO(2PEAK) is related to a composite risk factor score for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in 243 children (136 boys and 107 girls) aged 8 to 11 years. VO(2PEAK...

  6. Clinicopathological Analysis of Factors Related to Colorectal Tumor Perforation

    OpenAIRE

    Medina-Arana, Vicente; Martínez-Riera, Antonio; Delgado-Plasencia, Luciano; Rodríguez-González, Diana; Bravo-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Álvarez-Argüelles, Hugo; Alarcó-Hernández, Antonio; Salido-Ruiz, Eduardo; Fernández-Peralta, Antonia M.; González-Aguilera, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal tumor perforation is a life-threatening complication of this disease. However, little is known about the anatomopathological factors or pathophysiologic mechanisms involved. Pathological and immunohistochemical analysis of factors related with tumoral neo-angiogenesis, which could influence tumor perforation are assessed in this study. A retrospective study of patients with perforated colon tumors (Group P) and T4a nonperforated (controls) was conducted between 2001 and 20...

  7. Glaucoma and Alzheimer Disease: A Single Age-Related Neurodegenerative Disease of the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancino, Raffaele; Martucci, Alessio; Cesareo, Massimo; Giannini, Clarissa; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana; Bagetta, Giacinto; Nucci, Carlo

    2017-12-06

    Open Angle Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness worldwide. Elevated intraocular pressure is considered an important risk factor for glaucoma, however a subset of patients experience disease progression even in presence of normal intraocular pressure values. This implies that risk factors other than intraocular pressure are involved in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. A possible relationship between glaucoma and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer Disease has been suggested. In this regard, we have recently described a high prevalence of alterations typical of glaucoma, using Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph-3 (HRT-3), in a group of patients with Alzheimer Disease. Interestingly, these alterations were not associated with elevated intraocular pressure or abnormal Central Corneal Thickness values. Alzheimer Disease is the most common form of dementia associated with progressive deterioration of memory and cognition. Complaints related to vision are common among Alzheimer Disease patients. Features common to both diseases, including risk factors and pathophysiological mechanisms, gleaned from the recent literature do suggest that Alzheimer Disease and glaucoma can be considered age-related neurodegenerative diseases that may co-exist in the elderly. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. [Renal diseases related to MYH9 disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Dario; Zanoli, Luca; L'Imperio, Vincenzo; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Granata, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Mutations in MYH9 gene encoding the nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC-IIA) are related to a number of rare autosomal-dominant disorders which has been known as May-Hegglin disease, Sebastian syndrome, Fechtner syndrome and Epstein syndrome. Their common clinical features are congenital macrothrombocytopaenia and polymorphonuclear inclusion bodies, in addition to a variable risk of developing proteinuria, chronic kidney disease progressing toward end stage, sensorineural deafness and presenile cataracts. The term MYH9 related disease (MYH9-RD) describes the variable expression of a single illness encompassing all previously mentioned hereditary disorders. Renal involvement in MYH9- RD has been observed in 30% of patients. Mutant MYH9 protein, expressed in podocytes, mesangial and tubular cells, plays a main role in foot process effacement and in development of nephropathy. Interestingly, the MYH9 gene is currently under investigation also for his possible contribution to many other non-hereditary glomerulopathies such as focal global glomerulosclerosis (hypertensive nephrosclerosis), idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, C1q nephropathy and HIV-associated nephropathy. In this review we are aimed to describe renal diseases related to MYH9 disorders, from the hereditary disease to the acquired disorders, in which MYH9-gene acts as a "renal failure susceptibility gene". Copyright by Società Italiana di Nefrologia SIN, Rome, Italy.

  9. Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease: environmental risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campdelacreu, J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to update and summarise available evidence on environmental risk factors that have been associated with risk of Parkinson disease (PD) or Alzheimer disease (AD) and discuss their potential mechanisms. Evidence consistently suggests that a higher risk of PD is associated with pesticides and that a higher risk of AD is associated with pesticides, hypertension and high cholesterol levels in middle age, hyperhomocysteinaemia, smoking, traumatic brain injury and depression. There is weak evidence suggesting that higher risk of PD is associated with high milk consumption in men, high iron intake, chronic anaemia and traumatic brain injury. Weak evidence also suggests that a higher risk of AD is associated with high aluminium intake through drinking water, excessive exposure to electromagnetic fields from electrical grids, DM and hyperinsulinaemia, obesity in middle age, excessive alcohol consumption and chronic anaemia. Evidence consistently suggests that a lower risk of PD is associated with hyperuricaemia, tobacco and coffee use, while a lower risk of AD is associated with moderate alcohol consumption, physical exercise, perimenopausal hormone replacement therapy and good cognitive reserve. Weak evidence suggests that lower risk of PD is associated with increased vitamin E intake, alcohol, tea, NSAIDs, and vigorous physical exercise, and that lower risk of AD is associated with the Mediterranean diet, coffee and habitual NSAID consumption. Several environmental factors contribute significantly to risk of PD and AD. Some may already be active in the early stages of life, and some may interact with other genetic factors. Population-based strategies to modify such factors could potentially result in fewer cases of PD or AD. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Health actions and disease patterns related to coronary heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The health-related behaviour of the Cape Peninsula coloured population, which has been shown to have an adverse coronary heart disease (CHO) risk factor profile, is reported. Private medical services were used most often by participants: 54,1% and 51,6% of males and females respectively had made use of these ...

  11. Risk Factors and Biomarkers of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Nathan G.; Singh, Malkit K.; ElShelmani, Hanan; Mansergh, Fiona C.; Wride, Michael A.; Padilla, Maximilian; Keegan, David; Hogg, Ruth E.; Ambati, Balamurali K.

    2016-01-01

    A biomarker can be a substance or structure measured in body parts, fluids or products that can affect or predict disease incidence. As age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, much research and effort has been invested in the identification of different biomarkers to predict disease incidence, identify at risk individuals, elucidate causative pathophysiological etiologies, guide screening, monitoring and treatment parameters, and predict disease outcomes. To date, a host of genetic, environmental, proteomic, and cellular targets have been identified as both risk factors and potential biomarkers for AMD. Despite this, their use has been confined to research settings and has not yet crossed into the clinical arena. A greater understanding of these factors and their use as potential biomarkers for AMD can guide future research and clinical practice. This article will discuss known risk factors and novel, potential biomarkers of AMD in addition to their application in both academic and clinical settings. PMID:27156982

  12. Business factors related to manufacturing firms' performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stergios Vranakis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main goal is to understand the way many factors affect the investment decision making process and business performance. Design/methodology/approach: This study proposes a new conceptual framework for examining the reasons that manufacturing firms decide to invest on the acquisition of new machinery and equipment in order to improve their infrastructure. It incorporates various factors related to the internal business environment (quality management, investment decisions etc. Findings and Originality/value: A new conceptual framework, establishing the relations between many factors, has been developed, allowing the determinants of adoption of many implications to be discussed and to relate them to the peculiarities of the Greek manufacturing industry. Originality/value: This study presents an overview of the impact of machinery and equipment investment on firm’s performance, giving grasp for further research of the inter-organizational relationships that exist between them. 

  13. Clinical factors related to schizophrenia relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcelli, Stefano; Bianchini, Oriana; De Girolamo, Giovanni; Aguglia, Eugenio; Crea, Luciana; Serretti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Relapses represent one of the main problems of schizophrenia management. This article reviews the clinical factors associated with schizophrenia relapse. A research of the last 22 years of literature data was performed. Two-hundred nineteen studies have been included. Three main groups of factors are related to relapse: factors associated with pharmacological treatment, add-on psychotherapeutic treatments and general risk factors. Overall, the absence of a maintenance therapy and treatment with first generation antipsychotics has been associated with higher risk of relapse. Further, psychotherapy add-on, particularly with cognitive behaviour therapy and psycho-education for both patients and relatives, has shown a good efficacy for reducing the relapse rate. Among general risk factors, some could be modified, such as the duration of untreated psychosis or the substance misuse, while others could not be modified as male gender or low pre-morbid level of functioning. Several classes of risk factors have been proved to be relevant in the risk of relapse. Thus, a careful assessment of the risk factors here identified should be performed in daily clinical practice in order to individualise the relapse risk for each patient and to provide a targeted treatment in high-risk subjects.

  14. Lifestyle Decreases Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavíček, Jaroslav; Kittnar, Otomar; Fraser, Gary E.; Medová, Eva; Konečná, Jana; Žižka, Robert; Dohnalová, Alena; Novák, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Summary The morbidity and mortality of the cardiovascular diseases is high in the developed countries. The lifestyle changes are capable to decrease it by 50%. The aim of the present study was to measure the parameters of some risk factors before and after a one-week NEW START rehabilitative retreat. 1,349 volunteers, 320 men, 1,029 woman, mean age 51±14.5 (SD) years participated in 30 rehabilitative retreats from 1999–2006 in the Czech Republic, using a low-fat, low-energy, lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet and exercise, in a stress-free environment. Body weight, height, BMI, blood pressure, heart rate, serum cholesterol and blood glucose were measured. Body weight decreased in 1,223 measured persons from 71.2±14.38 (SD) to 70.6±14.02 kg (pSeventh-day Adventists than in controls who never observed the diet and avail the lifestyle programs. The parameters were nonsignificantly changed one year after finishing the retreat in the sample of 68 persons showing the positive effect of retreats. Our results showed, that the intake of a low-fat, low-energy diet, over the course of one week in a stress-free environment, had positive impact on the risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:19256282

  15. Metabolic, endocrine, and related bone diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    Bone is living tissue, and old bone is constantly removed and replaced with new bone. Normally this exchange is in balance, and the mineral content remains relatively constant. This balance may be disturbed as a result of certain metabolic and endocrinologic disorders. The term dystrophy, referring to a disturbance of nutrition, is applied to metabolic and endocrine bone diseases and should be distinguished from the term dysplasia, referring to a disturbance of bone growth. The two terms are easily confused but are not interchangeable. Metabolic bone disease is caused by endocrine imbalance, vitamin deficiency or excess, and other disturbances in bone metabolism leading to osteoporosis and osteomalacia

  16. Talking about Relations : Factors Influencing the Production of Relational Descriptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltaretu, Adriana-Alexandra; Krahmer, Emiel; van Wijk, Carel; Maes, Alfons

    2016-01-01

    In a production experiment (Experiment 1) and an acceptability rating one (Experiment 2), we assessed two factors, spatial position and salience, which may influence the production of relational descriptions (such as “the ball between the man and the drawer”). In Experiment 1, speakers were asked to

  17. Factors Related to Parenting Practices in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu-Mei; Luster Tom

    2002-01-01

    This study examined factors related to authoritarian and authoritative parenting practices among 463 Chinese mothers with preschoolers in Taiwan. Questionnaire findings suggested that maternal depression, child temperament, and degree of parenting daily hassles might have cross-culturally universal influence on parenting practices. Chinese…

  18. EFFECTS OF PROCUREMENT RELATED FACTORS ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    2013-03-04

    Mar 4, 2013 ... Policy makers in government, clients, and private developers into housing projects should give adequate .... constraints, payment method, finding methods and ... price and negotiation of contract details and firm ... All these discussed .... Decision. Cost related factors. 31.83. 3. 9.34. 0.00. S*. Accept H1.

  19. Epidemiology, classification, and modifiable risk factors of peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas W Shammas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas W ShammasMidwest Cardiovascular Research Foundation, Cardiovascular Medicine, PC, Davenport, IA, USAAbstract: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is part of a global vascular problem of diffuse atherosclerosis. PAD patients die mostly of cardiac and cerebrovascular-related events and much less frequently due to obstructive disease of the lower extremities. Aggressive risk factors modification is needed to reduce cardiac mortality in PAD patients. These include smoking cessation, reduction of blood pressure to current guidelines, aggressive low density lipoprotein lowering, losing weight, controlling diabetes and the use of oral antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin or clopidogrel. In addition to quitting smoking and exercise, cilostazol and statins have been shown to reduce claudication in patients with PAD. Patients with critical rest limb ischemia or severe progressive claudication need to be treated with revascularization to minimize the chance of limb loss, reduce symptoms, and improve quality of life.Keywords: peripheral arterial disease, epidemiology, risk factors, classification

  20. IgG4-Related Perineural Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Inoue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To elucidate characteristics of IgG4-related disease involving the peripheral nervous system. Methods. Retrospective review of 106 patients with IgG4-related disease identified 21 peripheral nerve lesions in 7 patients. Clinicopathological and radiological features were examined. Results. Peripheral nerve lesions were commonly identified in orbital or paravertebral area, involving orbital (=9, optic (=4, spinal (=7, and great auricular nerves (=1. The predominant radiological feature was a distinct perineural soft tissue mass, ranging 8 to 30 mm in diameter. Histologically, the epineurium was preferentially involved by massive lymphoplasmacytic infiltration rich in IgG4+ plasma cells. All lesions were neurologically asymptomatic and steroid-responsive at the first presentation, but one recurrent lesion around the optic nerve caused failing vision. Conclusion. IgG4-related disease of the peripheral nervous system is characterized by orbital or paravertebral localization, perineural mass formation, and rare neurologic symptoms. The term “IgG4-related perineural disease” seems appropriate to describe this entity.

  1. Effects of fear factors in disease propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yubo; Xiao, Gaoxi; Wong, Limsoon; Fu, Xiuju; Ma, Stefan; Hiang Cheng, Tee

    2011-09-01

    Upon an outbreak of a dangerous infectious disease, people generally tend to reduce their contacts with others in fear of getting infected. Such typical actions apparently help slow down the spreading of infection. Thanks to today's broad public media coverage, the fear factor may even contribute to preventing an outbreak from happening. We are motivated to study such effects by adopting a complex network approach. First we evaluate the simple case where connections between individuals are randomly removed due to the fear factor. Then we consider a different case where each individual keeps at least a few connections after contact reduction. Such a case is arguably more realistic since people may choose to keep a few social contacts, e.g., with their family members and closest friends, at any cost. Finally, a study is conducted on the case where connection removals are carried out dynamically while the infection is spreading out. Analytical and simulation results show that the fear factor may not easily prevent an epidemic outbreak from happening in scale-free networks. However, it significantly reduces the fraction of the nodes ever getting infected during the outbreak.

  2. Effects of fear factors in disease propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yubo; Xiao Gaoxi; Cheng, Tee Hiang; Wong Limsoon; Fu Xiuju; Ma, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Upon an outbreak of a dangerous infectious disease, people generally tend to reduce their contacts with others in fear of getting infected. Such typical actions apparently help slow down the spreading of infection. Thanks to today's broad public media coverage, the fear factor may even contribute to preventing an outbreak from happening. We are motivated to study such effects by adopting a complex network approach. First we evaluate the simple case where connections between individuals are randomly removed due to the fear factor. Then we consider a different case where each individual keeps at least a few connections after contact reduction. Such a case is arguably more realistic since people may choose to keep a few social contacts, e.g., with their family members and closest friends, at any cost. Finally, a study is conducted on the case where connection removals are carried out dynamically while the infection is spreading out. Analytical and simulation results show that the fear factor may not easily prevent an epidemic outbreak from happening in scale-free networks. However, it significantly reduces the fraction of the nodes ever getting infected during the outbreak. (paper)

  3. IgG4-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzalla Cassione, Emanuele; Stone, John H

    2017-05-01

    Remarkable insights have been gleaned recently with regard to the pathophysiology of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). These findings have direct implications for the development of targeted strategies for the treatment of this condition. Oligoclonal expansions of cells of both the B and T lymphocyte lineages are present in the blood of patients with IgG4-RD. Oligoclonal expansions of plasmablasts are a good biomarker for disease activity. An oligoclonally expanded population of CD4+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes is found not only in the peripheral blood but also at tissue sites of active disease. This cell elaborates cytokines that may drive the fibrosis characteristic of IgG4-RD. T follicular helper cells (Tfhc), particularly the Tfhc2 subset, appear to play a major role in driving the class switch to IgG4 that typifies this disease. The relationship between malignancy and IgG4-RD remains an area of interest. Advances in understanding the pathophysiology of IgG4-RD have proceeded swiftly, leading to the identification of a number of potential targeted treatment strategies. The completion of classification criteria for IgG4-RD, an effort supported jointly by the American College of Rheumatology and the European League Against Rheumatism, will further facilitate studies on this disease.

  4. Immunoglobulin G4-Related Disease: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al-Mujaini

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD is an increasingly recognized immune-mediated condition comprised of a collection of disorders that share specific pathological, serological, and clinical features. IgG4-RD is a fibroinflammatory condition with a tendency to form tumors with inflammatory infiltrate with IgG4 rich plasma cells and elevation of serum IgG4, which may affect virtually every organ and tissue. IgG4-related ophthalmic disease may present as dacryoadenitis, myositis, or involvement of other orbital tissue. Hypophysitis or pachymeningitis may manifest as cranial neuropathies. The diagnosis of IgG4-RD is based on a typical clinical scenario, supportive laboratory test, expected radiological characteristics, and distinct histopathological and immunohistochemical features. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressives form the mainline treatment.

  5. Bovine Ephemeral Fever As A Disease Related To Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrawati Sendow

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Ephemeral Fever (BEF is one of arbovirus diseases infecting in ruminants especially cattle and buffaloes, which is transmitted by mosquito vectors. In general, vector borne disease is also related to climate change, that mosquito as a vector will significantly increase when the environment temperature increases. The disease was found in many countries in Asia, Africa and Australia. The clinical sign of the disease such as fever to paralysis causes economical impact to the farmer, eventhough the mortality is very low. This review will discuss the disease in relation to climate change, which affects vector population that spread the disease. The more population of vector is the higher chance of animal to be infected. This condition describes that the spread of BEF will depend on some factors included the increase of vectors, the availability of susceptible host and vector media facilities, climate condition and supportive ecology. This paper will discuss the feature of BEF, mode of transmission, the impact of environment and climate change, disease prevention and control, and other aspects to prevent further economical impact. It will also discuss how to the transmission, prevention and control of disease BEF. The information can be taken as an input for policy makers to prevent BEF infection in Indonesia.

  6. Happiness and related factors in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasvasti, Kanthika; Kanchanatawan, Buranee

    2005-09-01

    Pregnancy is a crisis in the human life cycle as an important turning point in aspects of anatomical, physiological and psychosocial changes. An unhappy pregnanus could influence the fetal growth and development and sense of maternal competence as well as bonding with the fetus which profoundly affect the nurture of the infant after delivery. The authors'purposes were to study happiness and related factors in pregnant women having antenatal care at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital. Four hundred and thirty-eight pregnant women from the antenatal clinic at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital were randomly selected to complete a set of questionnaires that consisted of personal information, pregnant information, The Oxford Happiness Questionnaire (OHQ), The Maudsley Personality Inventory (MPI) and The Marital Satisfaction Scale (MSS). Prevalence of happiness level was classified by descriptive analysis. Unpaired t-test, ANOVA and Pearson's Product Moment Correlation analyzed related factors to happiness in pregnant woman. Also Stepwise Multiple Regression Analysis was used to define predictive factors for happiness in pregnant women. The sample had a high level of happiness of 57.3%. Significant related factors to happiness were age between 31-35 years, high education level, high individual and family income, having saving deposition, no drug abuse, improved marital relationship, no conflict with relatives, extrovert and stable personality types and no concerns about post-partum body image. Four predictive factors for happiness in pregnant women were extrovert personality, stable personality, high family income and improved marital relationship. Level of happiness in pregnant women could be predicted by type of personality, family income and marital relationship.

  7. Addressing Disease-Related Malnutrition in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Maria Isabel; Hegazi, Refaat A.; Diaz-Pizarro Graf, José Ignacio; Gomez-Morales, Gabriel; Fuentes Gutiérrez, Catalina; Goldin, Maria Fernanda; Navas, Angela; Pinzón Espitia, Olga Lucia; Tavares, Gilmária Millere

    2015-01-01

    Alarmingly high rates of disease-related malnutrition have persisted in hospitals of both emerging and industrialized nations over the past 2 decades, despite marked advances in medical care over this same interval. In Latin American hospitals, the numbers are particularly striking; disease-related malnutrition has been reported in nearly 50% of adult patients in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, and Uruguay. The tolls of disease-related malnutrition are high in both human and financial terms—increased infectious complications, higher incidence of pressure ulcers, longer hospital stays, more frequent readmissions, greater costs of care, and increased risk of death. In an effort to draw attention to malnutrition in Latin American healthcare, a feedM.E. Latin American Study Group was formed to extend the reach and support the educational efforts of the feedM.E. Global Study Group. In this article, the feedM.E. Latin American Study Group shows that malnutrition incurs excessive costs to the healthcare systems, and the study group also presents evidence of how appropriate nutrition care can improve patients’ clinical outcomes and lower healthcare costs. To achieve the benefits of nutrition for health throughout Latin America, the article presents feedM.E.’s simple and effective Nutrition Care Pathway in English and Spanish as a way to facilitate its use. PMID:25883116

  8. Hepatic diseases related to triglyceride metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera-Méndez, Asdrubal; Álvarez-Delgado, Carolina; Hernández-Godinez, Daniel; Fernandez-Mejia, Cristina

    2013-10-01

    Triglycerides participate in key metabolic functions such as energy storage, thermal insulation and as deposit for essential and non-essential fatty acids that can be used as precursors for the synthesis of structural and functional phospholipids. The liver is a central organ in the regulation of triglyceride metabolism, and it participates in triglyceride synthesis, export, uptake and oxidation. The metabolic syndrome and associated diseases are among the main concerns of public health worldwide. One of the metabolic syndrome components is impaired triglyceride metabolism. Diseases associated with the metabolic syndrome promote the appearance of hepatic alterations e.g., non-alcoholic steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis and cancer. In this article, we review the molecular actions involved in impaired triglyceride metabolism and its association with hepatic diseases. We discuss mechanisms that reconcile the chronic inflammation and insulin resistance, and new concepts on the role of intestinal micro-flora permeability and proliferation in fatty liver etiology. We also describe the participation of oxidative stress in the progression of events leading from steatosis to steatohepatitis and fibrosis. Finally, we provide information regarding the mechanisms that link fatty acid accumulation during steatosis with changes in growth factors and cytokines that lead to the development of neoplastic cells. One of the main medical concerns vis-a-vis hepatic diseases is the lack of symptoms at the onset of the illness and, as result, its late diagnosis. The understandings of the molecular mechanisms that underlie hepatic diseases could help design strategies towards establishing markers for their accurate and timely diagnosis.

  9. Celiac Disease in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis-Related Bone Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa S. Putman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Both cystic fibrosis (CF and celiac disease can cause low bone mineral density (BMD and fractures. Celiac disease may occur at a higher frequency in patients with CF than the general population, and symptoms of these conditions may overlap. We report on two patients presenting with CF-related bone disease in the past year who were subsequently found to have concurrent celiac disease. Because adherence to a gluten-free diet may improve BMD in patients with celiac disease, this could have important implications for treatment. Clinicians should consider screening for celiac disease in patients with CF who have low BMD, worsening BMD in the absence of other risk factors, and/or difficult to treat vitamin D deficiency.

  10. Insulin resistance, obesity, hypofibrinolysis, hyperandrogenism, and coronary heart disease risk factors in 25 pre-perimenarchal girls age < or =14 years, 13 with precocious puberty, 23 with a first-degree relative with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glueck, Charles J; Morrison, John A; Wang, Ping

    2008-10-01

    Pre-peri-menarchal diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is important, because intervention with metformin-diet may prevent progression to full blown PCOS. In 25 girls age PCOS, 10 pre-, 15 post-menarchal, 13 with precocious puberty, 23 with a first-degree relative with PCOS, we hypothesized that reversible coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors, insulin resistance, clinical and biochemical hyperandrogenism, and hypofibrinolysis were already established. Fasting measures: insulin, glucose, total, LDL- (LDL-C), and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TG), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), plasminogen activator inhibitor activity (PAI-Fx), total (T) and free testosterone (FT), androstenedione, and DHEAS. Clinical and/or biochemical hyperandrogenism was present in all 25 girls, with elevations of T or FT, or androstenedione in seven of ten pre-menarchal girls and in all 15 post-menarche. PAI-Fx was high in 28% of the 25 girls vs 6.5% in age-gender-race matched controls (p = 0.013). Categorized by race-age-specific distributions in 870 schoolgirls, the 25 girls with probable familial PCOS were more likely to have top decile body mass index (BMI), insulin, HOMA-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), SBP, DBP, and TG, and bottom decile HDL-C. By analysis of variance, adjusting for race, age and BMI, PCOS girls had higher FT and waist circumference than controls, but did not differ for SBP, DBP, HDL-C, or TG (p>0.05). Pre-peri-menarchal acquisition of centripetal obesity amplifies CHD risk factors and hypofibrinolysis in hyperandrogenemic girls with probable familial PCOS and precocious puberty. When schoolgirls become as obese as girls with probable familial PCOS, they acquire the same CHD risk factors, and differ only by lower free T and less centripetal obesity.

  11. Fall risk factors in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, P; Hildebrand, K

    2000-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, gait disturbance, and postural instability. Patients with PD suffer frequent falls, yet little research has been done to identify risks specific to PD patients. The objective of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with falls for PD patients through the collection of demographic, environmental, and medical information as well as fall diaries completed during a 3-month period. Patients with a diagnosis of idiopathic PD, with and without falls, were included in the study provided they could stand and walk and had no other condition that could predispose them to falls. Of the 118 participants, 59% reported one or more falls. A total of 237 falls were reported. Duration and severity of PD symptoms, particularly freezing, involuntary movements, and walking and postural difficulties, were significantly associated with an increased risk of falls. Other factors associated with falls were postural hypotension and daily intake of alcohol. Forty percent of falls resulted in injury, but serious injury was rare. The findings have implications for reducing the risk of falls through patient education.

  12. Age-related changes in factor VII proteolysis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofosu, F A; Craven, S; Dewar, L; Anvari, N; Andrew, M; Blajchman, M A

    1996-08-01

    Previous studies have reported that pre-operative plasmas of patients over the age of 40 years who developed post-operative deep vein thrombosis (DVT) had approximately twice the amount of proteolysed factor VII found in plasmas of patients in whom prophylaxis with heparin or low M(r) heparin was successful. These and other studies also reported higher concentrations of thrombin-antithrombin III in pre- and post-operative plasmas of patients who developed post-operative thrombosis than in plasmas of patients in whom prophylaxis was successful. Whether the extent of factor VII proteolysis seen in the patients who developed post-operative DVT is related to the severity of their disease or age is not known. This report investigated age-related changes in the concentrations of total factor VII protein, factor VII zymogen, factor VIIa, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, thrombin-antithrombin III, and prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 in normal plasmas and the relationships between these parameters. With the exception of thrombin-antithrombin III, statistically significant increases in the concentrations of these parameters with age were found. Additionally, the differences between the concentrations of total factor VII protein and factor VII zymogen, an index factor VII proteolysis in vivo, were statistically significant only for individuals over age 40. Using linear regression analysis, a significant correlation was found to exist between the concentrations of plasma factor VIIa and prothrombin fragment 1 + 2. Since factor VIIa-tissue factor probably initiates coagulation in vivo, we hypothesize that the elevated plasma factor VIIa (reflecting a less tightly regulated tissue factor activity and therefore increased thrombin production in vivo) accounts for the high risk for post-operative thrombosis seen in individuals over the age of 40.

  13. Is tremor related to celiac disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameghino, Lucia; Rossi, Malco Damian; Cerquetti, Daniel; Merello, Marcelo

    2017-06-14

    Neurological features in celiac disease (CD) are not rare (5%-36%), but tremor is scarcely described. Subjects with CD and healthy controls completed an online survey using WHIGET tremor rating scale. One thousand five hundred and twelve subjects completed the survey, finally 674 CD patients and 290 healthy subjects were included. A higher prevalence of tremor in CD patients was observed in comparison to controls (28% vs 14%, P tremor in CD patients with and without tremor was 25% and 20% ( P = 0.2), while in the control group it was 41% and 10% ( P tremor showed a higher frequency of family history of tremor when compared to CD patients with tremor (41.5% vs 24.6%, P = 0.03). The results suggested that tremor in CD might be more frequent and possibly related to the disease itself and not due to associated essential tremor.

  14. Cancer-related fatigue: Mechanisms, risk factors, and treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Julienne E.

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment, and may persist for years after treatment completion in otherwise healthy survivors. Cancer-related fatigue causes disruption in all aspects of quality of life and may be a risk factor for reduced survival. The prevalence and course of fatigue in cancer patients has been well characterized, and there is growing understanding of underlying biological mechanisms. Inflammation has emerged as a key biological pathway for cancer-related fatigue, with studies documenting links between markers of inflammation and fatigue before, during, and particularly after treatment. There is considerable variability in the experience of cancer-related fatigue that is not explained by disease- or treatment-related characteristics, suggesting that host factors may play an important role in the development and persistence of this symptom. Indeed, longitudinal studies have begun to identify genetic, biological, psychosocial, and behavioral risk factors for cancer-related fatigue. Given the multi-factorial nature of cancer-related fatigue, a variety of intervention approaches have been examined in randomized controlled trials, including physical activity, psychosocial, mind-body, and pharmacological treatments. Although there is currently no gold standard for treating fatigue, several of these approaches have shown beneficial effects and can be recommended to patients. This report provides a state of the science review of mechanisms, risk factors, and interventions for cancer-related fatigue, with a focus on recent longitudinal studies and randomized trials that have targeted fatigued patients. PMID:25113839

  15. Relation between depression and sociodemographic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhtar-Danesh Noori

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is one of the most common mental disorders in Western countries and is related to increased morbidity and mortality from medical conditions and decreased quality of life. The sociodemographic factors of age, gender, marital status, education, immigrant status, and income have consistently been identified as important factors in explaining the variability in depression prevalence rates. This study evaluates the relationship between depression and these sociodemographic factors in the province of Ontario in Canada using the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 1.2 (CCHS-1.2 dataset. Methods The CCHS-1.2 survey classified depression into lifetime depression and 12-month depression. The data were collected based on unequal sampling probabilities to ensure adequate representation of young persons (15 to 24 and seniors (65 and over. The sampling weights were used to estimate the prevalence of depression in each subgroup of the population. The multiple logistic regression technique was used to estimate the odds ratio of depression for each sociodemographic factor. Results The odds ratio of depression for men compared with women is about 0.60. The lowest and highest rates of depression are seen among people living with their married partners and divorced individuals, respectively. Prevalence of depression among people who live with common-law partners is similar to rates of depression among separated and divorced individuals. The lowest and highest rates of depression based on the level of education is seen among individuals with less than secondary school and those with "other post-secondary" education, respectively. Prevalence of 12-month and lifetime depression among individuals who were born in Canada is higher compared to Canadian residents who immigrated to Canada irrespective of gender. There is an inverse relation between income and the prevalence of depression (p Conclusion The patterns uncovered in this

  16. Risk factors for age-related maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Paul P; Keane, Pearse A; O'Neill, Evelyn C; Altaie, Rasha W; Loane, Edward; Neelam, Kumari; Nolan, John M; Beatty, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Age-related maculopathy (ARM) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Although beneficial therapeutic strategies have recently begun to emerge, much remains unclear regarding the etiopathogenesis of this disorder. Epidemiologic studies have enhanced our understanding of ARM, but the data, often conflicting, has led to difficulties with drawing firm conclusions with respect to risk for this condition. As a consequence, we saw a need to assimilate the published findings with respect to risk factors for ARM, through a review of the literature appraising results from published cross-sectional studies, prospective cohort studies, case series, and case control studies investigating risk for this condition. Our review shows that, to date, and across a spectrum of epidemiologic study designs, only age, cigarette smoking, and family history of ARM have been consistently demonstrated to represent risk for this condition. In addition, genetic studies have recently implicated many genes in the pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy, including Complement Factor H, PLEKHA 1, and LOC387715/HTRA1, demonstrating that environmental and genetic factors are important for the development of ARM suggesting that gene-environment interaction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition.

  17. Risk Factors for Age-Related Maculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul P. Connell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related maculopathy (ARM is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Although beneficial therapeutic strategies have recently begun to emerge, much remains unclear regarding the etiopathogenesis of this disorder. Epidemiologic studies have enhanced our understanding of ARM, but the data, often conflicting, has led to difficulties with drawing firm conclusions with respect to risk for this condition. As a consequence, we saw a need to assimilate the published findings with respect to risk factors for ARM, through a review of the literature appraising results from published cross-sectional studies, prospective cohort studies, case series, and case control studies investigating risk for this condition. Our review shows that, to date, and across a spectrum of epidemiologic study designs, only age, cigarette smoking, and family history of ARM have been consistently demonstrated to represent risk for this condition. In addition, genetic studies have recently implicated many genes in the pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy, including Complement Factor H, PLEKHA 1, and LOC387715/HTRA1, demonstrating that environmental and genetic factors are important for the development of ARM suggesting that gene-environment interaction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition.

  18. Factors Related to Suicide in LGBT Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerrett, Delaney Michael; Kõlves, Kairi; De Leo, Diego

    2016-09-01

    There is evidence of heightened vulnerability to nonfatal suicidal behaviors among LGBT populations yet a paucity of studies into fatal behaviors. The specific aim of this article was to identify factors related to suicide in LGBT individuals in Australia. The psychological autopsy (PA) method with a matched case-control study design was used. PA interviews were conducted with 27 next-of-kin of an LGBT person that had died by suicide. Three living LGBT controls per suicide case, matched by age and gender, were also interviewed. The key factors relating to suicide in LGBT people were a lack of acceptance by family and self (reflected in higher internalized homophobia and shame), negative feelings about own sexuality/gender, and dissatisfaction with appearance. LGBT people who died by suicide also tended to go through coming out milestones 2 years earlier than controls. There was a higher prevalence of aggressive behaviors and a more predominant history of physical and sexual abuse. Additionally, there was greater incidence of depression and anxiety and alcohol and substance use disorders. Specific predictive factors for suicide in LGBT populations in Australia were identified, including significantly poorer mental health outcomes and more violence across an array of measures.

  19. Risk factors for age-related maculopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connell, Paul P

    2012-02-01

    Age-related maculopathy (ARM) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Although beneficial therapeutic strategies have recently begun to emerge, much remains unclear regarding the etiopathogenesis of this disorder. Epidemiologic studies have enhanced our understanding of ARM, but the data, often conflicting, has led to difficulties with drawing firm conclusions with respect to risk for this condition. As a consequence, we saw a need to assimilate the published findings with respect to risk factors for ARM, through a review of the literature appraising results from published cross-sectional studies, prospective cohort studies, case series, and case control studies investigating risk for this condition. Our review shows that, to date, and across a spectrum of epidemiologic study designs, only age, cigarette smoking, and family history of ARM have been consistently demonstrated to represent risk for this condition. In addition, genetic studies have recently implicated many genes in the pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy, including Complement Factor H, PLEKHA 1, and LOC387715\\/HTRA1, demonstrating that environmental and genetic factors are important for the development of ARM suggesting that gene-environment interaction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition.

  20. Geochemistry of water in relation to cardiovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Relations between trace and major element chemistry of drinking water and cardiovascular diseases are reviewed and documented. Several aspects of the problem, related both to the pathway that drinking water takes to man and to its transit through man, are reviewed. Several steps in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease that could be affected by water factors were explored. There is little evidence bearing on the contribution from drinking water to human tissue levels of cadmium, chromium, or zinc. Copper and magnesium levels of tissues may be related to drinking water, but confirmatory evidence is needed. Lead levels in blood and other tissues are most certainly affected by lead levels in drinking water in areas where these levels are unusually elevated. There is little evidence that relatively low levels of lead are toxic to the cardiovascular system, except for the causation of cardiomyopathy. The protective action of selenium and zinc applies mainly to cadmium toxicity. The mode of the protective action of silicon, if any, is unclear at present. Some epidemiological associations between the cadmium level or cadmium:zinc ratio and cardiovascular disease have been reported, but are contradictory. Some epidemiological support exists for a protective effect by selenium; results for zinc are equivocal. Interactions within the human system involving calcium and selected trace elements might be very important for the cardiovascular system. Review of the epidemiological literature indicates that there may be a water factor associated with cardiovascular disease. Its effects, if any, must be very weak in comparison with the effects of known risk factors. The reported inverse relationship between mortality from cardiovascular diseases and hardness of local drinking water supplies appears to be considerably less distinctive in small regional studies. (ERB)

  1. [Parkinson's disease(s): recent insight into genetic factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Scheffer, H.; Heutink, P.; Bloem, B.R.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, 5 genes have been identified that are unambiguously associated with genetic forms of Parkinson's disease. These genes probably explain less than 10% of all cases of Parkinson's disease. Clinically, these genetic forms can closely resemble idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Mutation

  2. Cancer-related fatigue--mechanisms, risk factors, and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Julienne E

    2014-10-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common adverse effects of cancer that might persist for years after treatment completion in otherwise healthy survivors. Cancer-related fatigue causes disruption in all aspects of quality of life and might be a risk factor of reduced survival. The prevalence and course of fatigue in patients with cancer have been well characterized and there is growing understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms. Inflammation seems to have a key role in fatigue before, during, and after cancer-treatment. However, there is a considerable variability in the presentation of cancer-related fatigue, much of which is not explained by disease-related or treatment-related characteristics, suggesting that host factors might be important in the development and persistence of this symptom. Indeed, longitudinal studies have identified genetic, biological, psychosocial, and behavioural risk factors associated with cancer-related fatigue. Although no current gold-standard treatment for fatigue is available, a variety of intervention approaches have shown beneficial effects in randomized controlled trials, including physical activity, psychosocial, mind-body, and pharmacological treatments. This Review describes the mechanisms, risk factors, and possible interventions for cancer-related fatigue, focusing on recent longitudinal studies and randomized trials that have targeted fatigued patients.

  3. Radiation-related pericardial effusions in patients with Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruckdeschel, J.C.; Chang, P.; Martin, R.G.; Byhardt, R.W.; O'Connell, M.J.; Sutherland, J.C.; Wiernik, P.H.

    1975-01-01

    Pericardial effusions following radiotherapy for Hodgkins Disease have previously been described as infrequent and related to the total dose of radiation received. Analysis of all chest x-rays on 81 patients who received upper-mantle radiotherapy for Hodgkins Disease at the Baltimore Cancer Research Center between 1968 and 1972 disclosed an incidence of pericardial effusions of 30.9% (25 of 81), with 13.6% (11 of 81) requiring limitation of activity (5) or pericardiectomy (6). Clinical presentation of radiation-related pericardial effusions was subtle, with signs and symptoms a late finding if they occurred. Radiotherapy data was reviewed and no difference in total dose (rads) or time-dose relationships (rets) was found between the groups who did or did not develop effusions. Analysis of multiple pre-treatment clinical and pathological characteristics disclosed four parameters that were felt to be related to the development of pericardial effusions; elevated ESR, normal absolute lymphocyte count, initial presence of extensive mediastinal adenopathy and the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy. The presence of increasing combinations of these pretreatment 'risk factors' led to an increasing likelihood of developing a radiation-related pericardial effusion such that six of seven patients with all four 'risk factors' developed a pericardial effusion. Nine of 13 clinically significanteffusions were associated with the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms that include factors other than radiation dosage and the clinical management of radiation-related pericardial effusions are discussed

  4. Factors related to attempted suicide in Davanagere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra Gouda M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Research Question: What are the factors responsible for suicidal attempts? Objectives: To study the socio-demographic factors, methods and reasons for suicidal attempts. Type of Study: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Bapuji and C.G. Hospitals attached to J.J.M. Medical College, Davanagere. Participants: A total of 540 suicidal attempters admitted to emergency wards. Methodology: A pretested proforma was administered to the subjects relating the factors responsible for the attempt. The data thus obtained was compiled and analyzed. Statistical Analysis: Proportions, Z -test and Chi-square test. Results: In this study, 61.3% were males and 38.7% were females. Peak occurrence of suicidal attempts was found in the second and third decades (15-29 years. Hindus constituted about 94.6% of the total suicidal attempters. Almost half (52.2% of the subjects had education below or up to matriculation and 83% of them were from the lower (classes IV and V socio-economic groups. Agriculturists, housewives and unskilled workers represented 75% of the total subjects. Fifty-five percent of the subjects were from nuclear families and most (62.4% of them were married; frequent mode of attempting suicides was by organo-phosphorus compounds (66.3% followed by overdosage of tablets (17.8%. Common cause was family problem (27.2% followed by illness (27%.

  5. MeCP2-Related Diseases and Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinelo D. Ezeonwuka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of epigenetics in human disease has become an area of increased research interest. Collaborative efforts from scientists and clinicians have led to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation is involved in the pathogenesis of many human diseases. Several neurological and non-neurological disorders are associated with mutations in genes that encode for epigenetic factors. One of the most studied proteins that impacts human disease and is associated with deregulation of epigenetic processes is Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2. MeCP2 is an epigenetic regulator that modulates gene expression by translating epigenetic DNA methylation marks into appropriate cellular responses. In order to highlight the importance of epigenetics to development and disease, we will discuss how MeCP2 emerges as a key epigenetic player in human neurodevelopmental, neurological, and non-neurological disorders. We will review our current knowledge on MeCP2-related diseases, including Rett Syndrome, Angelman Syndrome, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, Hirschsprung disease, and Cancer. Additionally, we will briefly discuss about the existing MeCP2 animal models that have been generated for a better understanding of how MeCP2 impacts certain human diseases.

  6. Risk factors for Alzheimer's disease : a genetic-epidemiologic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractThe work presented in this thesis has been motivated by the Jack of knowledge of risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. It has been long recognised that genetic factors are implicated, in particular in early-onset Alzheimer's disease.4 But to what extent are genetic factors involved?

  7. Predictive factors for intraoperative excessive bleeding in Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouchi, Kosho; Minami, Shigeki; Hayashida, Naomi; Sakimura, Chika; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Eguchi, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    In Graves' disease, because a thyroid tends to have extreme vascularity, the amount of intraoperative blood loss (AIOBL) becomes significant in some cases. We sought to elucidate the predictive factors of the AIOBL. A total of 197 patients underwent thyroidectomy for Graves' disease between 2002 and 2012. We evaluated clinical factors that would be potentially related to AIOBL retrospectively. The median period between disease onset and surgery was 16 months (range: 1-480 months). Conventional surgery was performed in 125 patients, whereas video-assisted surgery was performed in 72 patients. Subtotal and near-total/total thyroidectomies were performed in 137 patients and 60 patients, respectively. The median weight of the thyroid was 45 g (range: 7.3-480.0 g). Univariate analysis revealed that the strongest correlation of AIOBL was noted with the weight of thyroid (p Graves' disease, and preparation for blood transfusion should be considered in cases where thyroids weigh more than 200 g. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  8. Lung cancer in never smokers: disease characteristics and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallis, Athanasios G; Syrigos, Konstantinos N

    2013-12-01

    It is estimated that approximately 25% of all lung cancer cases are observed in never-smokers and its incidence is expected to increase due to smoking prevention programs. Risk factors for the development of lung cancer described include second-hand smoking, radon exposure, occupational exposure to carcinogens and to cooking oil fumes and indoor coal burning. Other factors reported are infections (HPV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis), hormonal and diatery factors and diabetes mellitus. Having an affected relative also increases the risk for lung cancer while recent studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with increased risk for lung cancer development in never smokers. Distinct clinical, pathology and molecular characteristics are observed in lung cancer in never smokers; more frequently is observed in females and adenocarcinoma is the predominant histology while it has a different pattern of molecular alterations. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of this disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sitting Time and Associated Factors among Chronic Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sitting Time and Associated Factors among Chronic Disease Patients in Cambodia, ... comprising those who had cardiovascular disease (n = 804), hypertension (n ... physical activity, no problem drinking and not having depression symptoms.

  10. Cardiovascular Disease Prevalence and Risk Factors of Persons with Mental Retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draheim, Christopher C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent literature on cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevalence, CVD-related mortality, physiological CVD risk factors, and behavioral CVD risk factors in adults with mental retardation (MR). The literature on the potential influences of modifiable behavioral CVD risk factors and the physiological CVD risk factors are also…

  11. Air pollution and other local factors in respiratory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, A S; Reid, D D

    1958-01-01

    A study was conducted of civil servants, principally postmen, to standardize social class and pay in morbidity and mortality correlations with air pollution. This group was also compared with the general population. Frequency of winter fog was related to severe chronic bronchitis in both groups studied. Bronchitis absence rate among postmen working outdoors in areas of high presumptive air pollution was higher than that of indoor male workers. Colds and sore throats show the same selective incidence. There was a steady rise in bronchitis rate with age among postmen whereas that of indoor male workers increased only after age 45. Lung cancer apparently was not related to air pollution. The urban factor in infectious diseases could be the increased chance of contact. Uncontrolled factors in this type of study include: difference in morale, individual-job type selection, job criteria, and sick leave and retirement policy.

  12. Demographic, genetic, and environmental factors that modify disease course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrie, Ruth Ann

    2011-05-01

    As with susceptibility to disease, it is likely that multiple factors interact to influence the phenotype of multiple sclerosis and long-term disease outcomes. Such factors may include genetic factors, socioeconomic status, comorbid diseases, and health behaviors, as well as environmental exposures. An improved understanding of the influence of these factors on disease course may reap several benefits, such as improved prognostication, allowing us to tailor disease management with respect to intensity of disease-modifying therapies and changes in specific health behaviors, in the broad context of coexisting health issues. Such information can facilitate appropriately adjusted comparisons within and between populations. Elucidation of these factors will require careful study of well-characterized populations in which the roles of multiple factors are considered simultaneously. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Factors controlling upper tropospheric relative humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kärcher

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Factors controlling the distribution of relative humidity in the absence of clouds are examined, with special emphasis on relative humidity over ice (RHI under upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric conditions. Variations of temperature are the key determinant for the distribution of RHI, followed by variations of the water vapor mixing ratio. Multiple humidity modes, generated by mixing of different air masses, may contribute to the overall distribution of RHI, in particular below ice saturation. The fraction of air that is supersaturated with respect to ice is mainly determined by the distribution of temperature. The nucleation of ice in cirrus clouds determines the highest relative humdity that can be measured outside of cirrus clouds. While vertical air motion and ice microphysics determine the slope of the distributions of RHI, as shown in a separate study companion (Haag et al., 2003, clouds are not required to explain the main features of the distributions of RHI below the ice nucleation threshold. Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (pressure, density and temperature; troposphere – composition and chemistry; general or miscellaneous

  14. Factors controlling upper tropospheric relative humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kärcher

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Factors controlling the distribution of relative humidity in the absence of clouds are examined, with special emphasis on relative humidity over ice (RHI under upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric conditions. Variations of temperature are the key determinant for the distribution of RHI, followed by variations of the water vapor mixing ratio. Multiple humidity modes, generated by mixing of different air masses, may contribute to the overall distribution of RHI, in particular below ice saturation. The fraction of air that is supersaturated with respect to ice is mainly determined by the distribution of temperature. The nucleation of ice in cirrus clouds determines the highest relative humdity that can be measured outside of cirrus clouds. While vertical air motion and ice microphysics determine the slope of the distributions of RHI, as shown in a separate study companion (Haag et al., 2003, clouds are not required to explain the main features of the distributions of RHI below the ice nucleation threshold.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (pressure, density and temperature; troposphere – composition and chemistry; general or miscellaneous

  15. Symptoms in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: pathophysiologic aspects and their relation with disease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minderhoud, I.M.

    2007-01-01

    Symptoms in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: pathophysiologic aspects and their relation with disease activity Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). IBD patients frequently complain of fatigue, and a substantial proportion of the patients have

  16. Impact of product-related factors on immunogenicity of biotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satish Kumar

    2011-02-01

    All protein therapeutics have the potential to be immunogenic. Several factors, including patient characteristics, disease state, and the therapy itself, influence the generation of an immune response. Product-related factors such as the molecule design, the expression system, post-translational modifications, impurities, contaminants, formulation and excipients, container, closure, as well as degradation products are all implicated. However, a critical examination of the available data shows that clear unequivocal evidence for the impact of these latter factors on clinical immunogenicity is lacking. No report could be found that clearly deconvolutes the clinical impact of the product attributes on patient susceptibility. Aggregation carries the greatest concern as a risk factor for immunogenicity, but the impact of aggregates is likely to depend on their structure as well as on the functionality (e.g., immunostimulatory or immunomodulatory) of the therapeutic. Preclinical studies are not yet capable of assessing the clinically relevant immunogenicity potential of these product-related factors. Simply addressing these risk factors as part of product development will not eliminate immunogenicity. Minimization of immunogenicity has to begin at the molecule design stage by reducing or eliminating antigenic epitopes and building in favorable physical and chemical properties. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Association of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-2 Alpha Gene Polymorphisms with the Risk of Hepatitis B Virus-Related Liver Disease in Guangxi Chinese: A Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liling Huang

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factor-2 alpha (HIF-2a plays a major role in the progression of disease, although the role of HIF-2α gene polymorphisms in hepatitis B virus (HBV-related diseases remains elusive. The aim of this study is to determine whether HIF-2a rs13419896 and rs6715787 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are associated with susceptibility to chronic hepatitis B (CHB, liver cirrhosis (LC, or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC.A case-control study of 107 patients with CHB, 83 patients with LC, 234 patients with HCC, and 224 healthy control subjects was carried out, and the HIF-2a rs13419896 and rs6715787 SNPs were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP.No significant differences were observed in the genotype or allele frequency of two HIF-2a SNPs between the cases and controls (all p>0.05. However, in subgroup analysis by gender, the HIF-2a rs13419896 GA and AA genotypes were significantly associated with a risk of CHB (odds ratio [OR] = 3.565, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.123-11.314, p = 0.031 and OR = 12.506, 95% CI = 1.329-117.716, p = 0.027 in females, and the A allele of rs13419896 was associated with a risk of CHB (OR = 2.624, 95% CI = 1.244-5.537, p = 0.011 and LC (OR = 2.351, 95% CI = 1.002-5.518, p = 0.050 in females. The rs6715787 CG genotype polymorphism may contribute to a reduced risk of LC in the Guangxi Zhuang Chinese population (OR = 0.152, 95% CI = 0.028-0.807, p = 0.027, as determined via subgroup analysis by ethnicity. Moreover, binary logistic regression analyses that were adjusted by drinking status indicated that the AA genotype of rs13419896 may contribute to an increased risk of LC in the non-alcohol-drinking population (OR = 3.124, 95% CI = 1.091-8.947, p = 0.034. In haplotype analysis, GG haplotype was significantly associated with a reduced risk of LC (OR = 0.601, 95% CI = 0.419-0.862, p = 0.005.The HIF-2a rs13419896 polymorphism is associated with an increased

  18. Use of cereal bars with quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa W. to reduce risk factors related to cardiovascular diseases Consumo de barras de cereais com quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa W. para reduzir fatores de risco de doenças cardiovasculares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Maria Vasques Farinazzi-Machado

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Quinoa is considered a pseudocereal with proteins of high biological value, carbohydrates of low glycemic index, phytosteroids, and omega-3 and 6 fatty acids that bring benefits to the human health. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of quinoa on the biochemical and anthropometric profile and blood pressure in humans, parameters for measuring risk of cardiovascular diseases. Twenty-two 18 to 45-year-old students were treated daily for 30 days with quinoa in the form of a cereal bar. Blood samples were collected before and after 30 days of treatment to determine glycemic and biochemical profile of the group. The results indicated that quinoa had beneficial effects on part of the population studied since the levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL-c showed reduction. It can be concluded that the use of quinoa in diet can be considered beneficial in the prevention and treatment of risk factors related to cardiovascular diseases that are among the leading causes of death in today's globalized world. However, further studies are needed to prove the benefits observed.A quinoa é considerada um pseudocereal com proteínas de alto valor biológico, carboidratos de baixo índice glicêmico, fitosteróis e ácidos graxos ômega 3 e 6. O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar os efeitos da quinoa no perfil bioquímico e antropométrico e pressão arterial em humanos, parâmetros dos fatores de risco para doenças cardiovasculares. Vinte e dois estudantes com 18 a 45 anos de idade foram tratados diariamente, por 30 dias, com quinoa sob a forma de barra de cereal. As amostras de sangue foram coletadas antes e após os 30 dias do tratamento para determinar o perfil glicêmico e bioquímico do grupo. Os resultados mostraram efeitos positivos do uso da quinoa já que se observou redução significativa nos valores de colesterol total, triglicerídeos e LDL-c. Conclui-se que o uso da quinoa na alimentação pode ser considerado

  19. [Work-related diseases and health-related compensation claims, Northeastern Brazil, 2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Norma Suely Souto; Santana, Vilma Sousa; Albuquerque-Oliveira, Paulo Rogério; Barbosa-Branco, Anadergh

    2008-08-01

    To estimate the contribution of work-related diseases to sick leaves due to general and occupational health problems. Sociodemographic, occupational and health data from 29,658 records of temporary disability benefits, granted on account of health problems by the Instituto Nacional do Seguro Social (National Institute of Social Security) in the state of Bahia (Northeastern Brazil), were analyzed. All constant ICD-10 clinical diagnoses were taken into consideration, except for those referring to external causes and factors that influence contact with health services. The link between diagnosis and occupation was based on the ICD-10 code and whether the type of compensation was due to a "work-related accident/disease" or not. From all the benefits, 3.1% were granted due to work-related diseases: 70% were musculoskeletal system and connective tissue diseases, while 14.5% were related to the nervous system. In general, benefits granted at more than two times the expected frequency were as follows: tenosynovitis in the manufacturing sector (Proportion Ratio-PR=2.70), carpal tunnel syndrome in the financial intermediation sector (PR=2.43), and lumbar disc degeneration in the transportation, postal service and telecommunications sectors (PR=2.17). However, no causal connection could be established for these diseases, in these activity sectors, in a significant percentage of benefits. Results suggest the existence of possible occupational risk factors for diseases in these fields of activity, as well as the underreporting of the link between diseases and work, thus disguising the responsibility of companies and the perspective of prevention through work reorganization.

  20. Socioeconomic Risk Factors for Celiac Disease Burden and Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, Sveta S; Akbari, Mona; Kelly, Ciarán P; Hansen, Joshua; Theethira, Thimmaiah; Tariq, Sohaib; Dennis, Melinda; Leffler, Daniel A

    2016-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) affects approximately 1% of the population and negatively affects aspects of life including physical and social function. The relationship between socioeconomic (SE) factors, symptom severity, and perceived burden of living with CD is not well understood. The objective of this study was to assess the relationships between income, symptoms, and perceived burden of CD. In this survey study conducted at a tertiary care center, 773 patients 18 years of age or more with biopsy confirmed CD were eligible to participate. Patients completed a survey with information on SE data, the validated Celiac Symptom Index (CSI), and visual analog scales (VAS) assessing overall health, CD-related health, difficulty in following a gluten-free diet (GFD), and importance of following a GFD. Three hundred forty one patients completed the survey. Higher income predicted better overall health, better CD related health, and fewer symptoms. In the logistic regression model, low income was associated with greater CD symptoms (odds ratio=6.04, P=0.002). Other factors associated with greater symptoms were younger age, poor overall health state, and more physician visits. Factors associated with increased burden of CD included hospitalizations, more symptoms, poor overall health state, and burden of following a GFD. Patients with lower incomes have worse CD-related health and greater symptoms. Those with low income had 6 times the odds of greater symptoms compared with those with high income. Our data suggest that income is associated with perceived overall health, CD-related health, and CD symptoms.

  1. Talking about relations: Factors influencing the production of relational descriptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana eBaltaretu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In a production experiment (Experiment 1 and an acceptability rating one (Experiment 2, we assessed two factors, spatial position and salience, which may influence the production of relational descriptions (such as the ball between the man and the drawer. In Experiment 1, speakers were asked to refer unambiguously to a target object (a ball. In Experiment 1a, we addressed the role of spatial position, more specifically if speakers mention the entity positioned leftmost in the scene as (first relatum. The results showed a preference to start with the left entity, however, only as a trend, which leaves room for other factors that could influence spatial reference. Thus, in the following studies, we varied salience systematically, by making one of the relatum candidates animate (Experiment 1b, and by adding attention capture cues, first subliminally by priming one relatum candidate with a flash (Experiment 1c, then explicitly by using salient colors for objects (Experiment 1d. Results indicate that spatial position played a dominant role. Entities on the left were mentioned more often as (first relatum than those on the right (Experiment 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d. Animacy affected reference production in one out of three studies (in Experiment 1d. When salience was manipulated by priming visual attention or by using salient colors, there were no significant effects (Experiment 1c, 1d. In the acceptability rating study (Experiment 2, participants expressed their preference for specific relata, by ranking descriptions on the basis of how good they thought the descriptions fitted the scene. Results show that participants preferred most the description that had an animate entity as the first mentioned relatum. The relevance of these results for models of reference production is discussed.

  2. Health related quality of life and influencing factors among welders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxiang Qin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Occupational exposure to welding fumes is a serious occupational health problem all over the world. Welders are exposed to many occupational hazards; these hazards might cause some occupational diseases. The aim of the study was to assess the health related quality of life (HRQL of electric welders in Shanghai China and explore influencing factors to HRQL of welders. METHODS: 301 male welders (without pneumoconiosis and 305 non-dust male workers in Shanghai were enrolled in this study. Short Form-36 (SF-36 health survey questionnaires were applied in this cross-sectional study. Socio-demographic, working and health factors were also collected. Multiple stepwise regress analysis was used to identify significant factors related to the eight dimension scores. RESULTS: Six dimensions including role-physical (RP, bodily pain (BP, general health (GH, validity (VT, social function (SF, and mental health (MH were significantly worse in welders compared to non-dust workers. Multiple stepwise regress analysis results show that native place, monthly income, quantity of children, drinking, sleep time, welding type, use of personal protective equipment (PPE, great events in life, and some symptoms including dizziness, discomfort of cervical vertebra, low back pain, cough and insomnia may be influencing factors for HRQL of welders. Among these factors, only sleep time and the use of PPE were salutary. CONCLUSIONS: Some dimensions of HRQL of these welders have been affected. Enterprises which employ welders should take measures to protect the health of these people and improve their HRQL.

  3. CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. D. Bazdyrev

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to detect previously undiagnosed arterial hypertension in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD as a risk factor for cardiovascular mortality.Materials and methods. 43 patients with stage I–II of COPD and the absence of clinical signs of cardiovascular diseases were examined. Spirometry, body plethysmography and diffusing lung capacity (DLCO were included in the respiratory system assessment. The cardiovascular system was assessed with echocardiography and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM.Results. Despite the absence of obvious signs of cardiovascular lesions (an increase of office blood pressure, intracardiac hemodynamic changes, the following cardiovascular risk factors were identified: age (58.2 ± 2.0 years, male gender, smoking, hypercholesterolemia and dyslipidemia (total cholesterol 5.9 ± 0.9 mmol / l, low density lipoproteins 3.8 ± 0.5 mmol / l, triglycerides 1.8 ± 0.2 mmol / l. Correlation analysis has revealed the relation between several respiratory parameters and the severity of dyspnea and quality of life in patients with COPD, as well as its relation with lipid levels.Conclusion. The patients with COPD have a large number of risk factors for CVD. According to ABPM data, arterial hypertension was verified in 18 (41.9 % of 43 patients with COPD at normal level of office blood pressure; moreover, 51.2 % of patients demonstrated low reduction of blood pressure during the night-time that nowadays, is considered to be a predictor of cardiovascular disease and sudden death.

  4. Patterns of coral disease across the Hawaiian archipelago: relating disease to environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta S Aeby

    Full Text Available In Hawaii, coral reefs occur across a gradient of biological (host abundance, climatic (sea surface temperature anomalies and anthropogenic conditions from the human-impacted reefs of the main Hawaiian Islands (MHI to the pristine reefs of the northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI. Coral disease surveys were conducted at 142 sites from across the Archipelago and disease patterns examined. Twelve diseases were recorded from three coral genera (Porites, Montipora, Acropora with Porites having the highest prevalence. Porites growth anomalies (PorGAs were significantly more prevalent within and indicative of reefs in the MHI and Porites trematodiasis (PorTrm was significantly more prevalent within and indicative of reefs in the NWHI. Porites tissue loss syndrome (PorTLS was also important in driving regional differences but that relationship was less clear. These results highlight the importance of understanding disease ecology when interpreting patterns of disease occurrence. PorTrm is caused by a parasitic flatworm that utilizes multiple hosts during its life cycle (fish, mollusk and coral. All three hosts must be present for the disease to occur and higher host abundance leads to higher disease prevalence. Thus, a high prevalence of PorTrm on Hawaiian reefs would be an indicator of a healthy coral reef ecosystem. In contrast, the high occurrence of PorGAs within the MHI suggests that PorGAs are related, directly or indirectly, to some environmental co-factor associated with increased human population sizes. Focusing on the three indicator diseases (PorGAs, PorTrm, PorTLS we used statistical modeling to examine the underlying associations between disease prevalence and 14 different predictor variables (biotic and abiotic. All three diseases showed positive associations with host abundance and negative associations with thermal stress. The association with human population density differed among disease states with PorGAs showing a positive and Por

  5. Patterns of coral disease across the Hawaiian Archipelago: Relating disease to environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeby, G.S.; Williams, G.J.; Franklin, E.C.; Kenyon, J.; Cox, E.F.; Coles, S.; Work, Thierry M.

    2011-01-01

    In Hawaii, coral reefs occur across a gradient of biological (host abundance), climatic (sea surface temperature anomalies) and anthropogenic conditions from the human-impacted reefs of the main Hawaiian Islands (MHI) to the pristine reefs of the northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI). Coral disease surveys were conducted at 142 sites from across the Archipelago and disease patterns examined. Twelve diseases were recorded from three coral genera (Porites, Montipora, Acropora) with Porites having the highest prevalence. Porites growth anomalies (PorGAs) were significantly more prevalent within and indicative of reefs in the MHI and Porites trematodiasis (PorTrm) was significantly more prevalent within and indicative of reefs in the NWHI. Porites tissue loss syndrome (PorTLS) was also important in driving regional differences but that relationship was less clear. These results highlight the importance of understanding disease ecology when interpreting patterns of disease occurrence. PorTrm is caused by a parasitic flatworm that utilizes multiple hosts during its life cycle (fish, mollusk and coral). All three hosts must be present for the disease to occur and higher host abundance leads to higher disease prevalence. Thus, a high prevalence of PorTrm on Hawaiian reefs would be an indicator of a healthy coral reef ecosystem. In contrast, the high occurrence of PorGAs within the MHI suggests that PorGAs are related, directly or indirectly, to some environmental co-factor associated with increased human population sizes. Focusing on the three indicator diseases (PorGAs, PorTrm, PorTLS) we used statistical modeling to examine the underlying associations between disease prevalence and 14 different predictor variables (biotic and abiotic). All three diseases showed positive associations with host abundance and negative associations with thermal stress. The association with human population density differed among disease states with PorGAs showing a positive and PorTrm showing

  6. Risk factors for tuberculosis in inflammatory bowel disease: anti-tumor necrosis factor and hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabino Riestra

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine risk factors for active tuberculosis in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. Methods: Retrospective, case-control study at 4 referral hospitals in Spain. Cases developed tuberculosis after a diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. Controls were inflammatory bowel disease patients who did not develop tuberculosis. For each case, we randomly selected 3 controls matched for sex, age (within 5 years and time of inflammatory bowel disease diagnosis (within 3 years. Inflammatory bowel disease characteristics, candidate risk factors for tuberculosis and information about the tuberculosis episode were recorded. Multivariate analysis and a Chi-squared automatic interaction detector were used. Results: Thirty-four cases and 102 controls were included. Nine of the 34 cases developed active tuberculosis between 1989 and 1999, and 25 became ill between 2000 and 2012. Multivariate regression showed an association between active tuberculosis and anti-TNF (tumor necrosis factor therapy in the previous 12 months (OR 7.45; 95% CI, 2.39-23.12; p = 0.001; hospitalization in the previous 6 months (OR 4.38; 95% CI, 1.18-16.20; p = 0.027; and albumin levels (OR 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.95; p = 0.001. The median time between the start of biologic therapy and the onset of active tuberculosis was 13 (interquartile range, 1-58 months. Tuberculosis developed after a year of anti-TNF therapy in 53%, and late reactivation occurred in at least 3 of 8 patients. Conclusions: The main risks factors for developing tuberculosis were anti-TNF therapy and hospitalization. Over half the cases related to anti-TNF treatment occurred after a year.

  7. Alzheimer's disease prevention: from risk factors to early intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crous-Bou, Marta; Minguillón, Carolina; Gramunt, Nina; Molinuevo, José Luis

    2017-09-12

    Due to the progressive aging of the population, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is becoming a healthcare burden of epidemic proportions for which there is currently no cure. Disappointing results from clinical trials performed in mild-moderate AD dementia combined with clear epidemiological evidence on AD risk factors are contributing to the development of primary prevention initiatives. In addition, the characterization of the long asymptomatic stage of AD is allowing the development of intervention studies and secondary prevention programmes on asymptomatic at-risk individuals, before substantial irreversible neuronal dysfunction and loss have occurred, an approach that emerges as highly relevant.In this manuscript, we review current strategies for AD prevention, from primary prevention strategies based on identifying risk factors and risk reduction, to secondary prevention initiatives based on the early detection of the pathophysiological hallmarks and intervention at the preclinical stage of the disease. Firstly, we summarize the evidence on several AD risk factors, which are the rationale for the establishment of primary prevention programmes as well as revising current primary prevention strategies. Secondly, we review the development of public-private partnerships for disease prevention that aim to characterize the AD continuum as well as serving as platforms for secondary prevention trials. Finally, we summarize currently ongoing clinical trials recruiting participants with preclinical AD or a higher risk for the onset of AD-related cognitive impairment.The growing body of research on the risk factors for AD and its preclinical stage is favouring the development of AD prevention programmes that, by delaying the onset of Alzheimer's dementia for only a few years, would have a huge impact on public health.

  8. Heart Disease in Women: Understand Symptoms and Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... unless you have no other options. Although several traditional risk factors for coronary artery disease — such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure and obesity — affect women and men, other factors may play a bigger role in the development of heart disease in women. ...

  9. Psychological Factors related to traffic accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serafín Aldea Muñoz

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Automobile drivers fine themselves affected by series psychological factors which are directly related to traffic accidents. In this study we intend to investigate these variables, basing our work on the most convenient sources of information, coming from the police, the General Direction of Traffic, the courts, insurance companies, the Red Cross, Social Security, and forensics. Neither could we ignore the influence which certain forces hold over people´s mental health; this can sometimes intensely affect how they drive. In fact, in the most diverse situations we can observe the way in which a person carries out a task can be conditioned by the presence of other person who may have no direct relationship to him. Society has established its limitations and rules, but speed itself feels omnipotence when imposing controls over the most profound behavior in others; man in usually not conscious of these controls. People generally drive their automobiles in a way similar to their habitual behavior and their personality traits. Nevertheless, it is also important to consider the adaptation of their way of driving to their state of mind at any given moment. The majority of subjects tend to adapt their driving to their emotional state.

  10. Incidence and risk factors of Parkinson's disease in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, A.; Collette, H.J.A.; Bartelds, A.I.M.

    1989-01-01

    The incidence and some risk factors of Parkinson's disease were investigated in a study performed in The Netherlands. The study was based on a disease register of the Sentinel Stations, which provide a complete ascertainment of new patients with Parkinson's disease in 60 general practices in The

  11. Absenteeism and Employer Costs Associated With Chronic Diseases and Health Risk Factors in the US Workforce

    OpenAIRE

    Asay, Garrett R. Beeler; Roy, Kakoli; Lang, Jason E.; Payne, Rebecca L.; Howard, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Employers may incur costs related to absenteeism among employees who have chronic diseases or unhealthy behaviors. We examined the association between employee absenteeism and 5 conditions: 3 risk factors (smoking, physical inactivity, and obesity) and 2 chronic diseases (hypertension and diabetes). Methods We identified 5 chronic diseases or risk factors from 2 data sources: MarketScan Health Risk Assessment and the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). Absenteeism was measur...

  12. Understanding disease control: influence of epidemiological and economic factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Oleś

    Full Text Available We present a model of disease transmission on a regular and small world network and compare different control options. Comparison is based on a total cost of epidemic, including cost of palliative treatment of ill individuals and preventive cost aimed at vaccination or culling of susceptible individuals. Disease is characterized by pre-symptomatic phase, which makes detection and control difficult. Three general strategies emerge: global preventive treatment, local treatment within a neighborhood of certain size and only palliative treatment with no prevention. While the choice between the strategies depends on a relative cost of palliative and preventive treatment, the details of the local strategy and, in particular, the size of the optimal treatment neighborhood depend on the epidemiological factors. The required extent of prevention is proportional to the size of the infection neighborhood, but depends on time till detection and time till treatment in a non-nonlinear (power law. The optimal size of control neighborhood is also highly sensitive to the relative cost, particularly for inefficient detection and control application. These results have important consequences for design of prevention strategies aiming at emerging diseases for which parameters are not nessecerly known in advance.

  13. Clinico - demographic factors associated with diarrhoeal disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the proportion of under-5 children presenting with diarrhoeal disease, and the clinicodemographic variables associated with the outcome at the emergency paediatric ward (CHER) of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, South- East Nigeria. Methods: Clinical and demographic ...

  14. Inflammatory bowel disease in relation to contact allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engkilde, Kåre; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2007-01-01

    for ulcerative colitis (UC) diagnosis. Using logistic regression, with the result of the patch test as the dependent variable, we calculated the odds ratios for IBD, CD and UC, adjusted for gender and age. RESULTS: An inverse association between CA and IBD was found, odds ratio adjusted for age and gender 0.......71 (CI 95% 0.53-0.94), which is mainly the result of an inverse association between CA and CD, odds ratio adjusted for age and gender 0.42 (CI 95% 0.23-0.76). CONCLUSIONS: The association found between CA and IBD might be related to shared genetic factors or common environmental determinates. It may also...... be that having either disease result in skewness of the immune system might lead to an inverse disease association....

  15. Cardiovascular Disease in Relation to Placental Abruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ananth, Cande V.; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Williams, Michelle A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular (CVD) complications stemming from vascular dysfunction have been widely explored in the setting of preeclampsia. However, the impact of abruption, a strong indicator of microvascular disturbance, on the risk of CVD mortality and morbidity remains poorly characterised...... person-years, respectively (HR 1.5, 95% CI 1.4, 1.8). The increased risks were evident for ischaemic heart disease, acute myocardial infarction, hypertensive heart disease, non-rheumatic valvular disease, and congestive heart failure. Conclusions: This study shows increased hazards of CVD morbidity...

  16. Current clinical research of immunoglobulin G4-related orbital disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin G4-related disease(IgG4-related diseasehas received lots of attention in medical community as a recently recognized fibro-inflammatory condition. It is characterized by infiltration of IgG4-immunopositive plasmacytes and concentration of elevated serum IgG4. IgG4-related disease shows organ enlargement or nodular/hyperplastic lesions in various organs including the pancreas, hepatobiliary tract and orbit, which is called IgG4-related orbital disease. The diagnostic criteria for IgG4-related disease and IgG4-related orbital disease has recently been established, which is based on clinical, imaging and histopathologic features of the orbital lesions. Besides, attention should be drawn to the differentiation from other diseases. The treatment is empirical including corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs, radiotherapy, and rituximab. This article reviews clinical progression of IgG4-related orbital disease.

  17. Prognostic Factors in Tuberculosis Related Mortalities in Hospitalized Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazal Haque

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Setting. The study was undertaken at the Department of Pulmonology at a public, tertiary care centre in Karachi, Pakistan. Objectives. To evaluate factors concerned with in-hospital deaths in patients admitted with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB. Design. A retrospective case-control audit was performed for 120 patients hospitalised with pulmonary TB. Sixty of those discharged after treatment were compared to sixty who did not survive. Radiological findings, clinical indicators, and laboratory values were compared between the two groups to identify factors related to poor prognosis. Results. Factors concerned with in-hospital mortality listed late presentation of disease (P<0.01, noncompliance to antituberculosis therapy (P<0.01, smoking (P<0.01, longer duration of illness prior to treatment (P<0.01, and low body weight (P<0.01. Most deaths occurred during the first week of admission (P<0.01 indicating late referrals as significant. Immunocompromised status and multi-drug resistance were not implicated in higher mortality. Conclusions. Poor prognosis was associated with noncompliance to therapy resulting in longer duration of illness, late patient referrals to care centres, and development of complications. Early diagnosis, timely referrals, and monitored compliance may help reduce mortality. Adherence to a more radically effective treatment regimen is required to eliminate TB early during disease onset.

  18. Asthma-Related School Absenteeism, Morbidity, and Modifiable Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Joy; Qin, Xiaoting; Beavers, Suzanne F; Mirabelli, Maria C

    2016-07-01

    Asthma is a leading cause of chronic disease-related school absenteeism. Few data exist on how information on absenteeism might be used to identify children for interventions to improve asthma control. This study investigated how asthma-related absenteeism was associated with asthma control, exacerbations, and associated modifiable risk factors using a sample of children from 35 states and the District of Columbia. The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Child Asthma Call-back Survey is a random-digit dial survey designed to assess the health and experiences of children aged 0-17 years with asthma. During 2014-2015, multivariate analyses were conducted using 2006-2010 data to compare children with and without asthma-related absenteeism with respect to clinical, environmental, and financial measures. These analyses controlled for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Compared with children without asthma-related absenteeism, children who missed any school because of asthma were more likely to have not well controlled or very poorly controlled asthma (prevalence ratio=1.50; 95% CI=1.34, 1.69) and visit an emergency department or urgent care center for asthma (prevalence ratio=3.27; 95% CI=2.44, 4.38). Mold in the home and cost as a barrier to asthma-related health care were also significantly associated with asthma-related absenteeism. Missing any school because of asthma is associated with suboptimal asthma control, urgent or emergent asthma-related healthcare utilization, mold in the home, and financial barriers to asthma-related health care. Further understanding of asthma-related absenteeism could establish how to most effectively use absenteeism information as a health status indicator. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Study Of Socio- Economic Factors In Relation To Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam Mahjabeen

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: what are the socio-economic factors in relation to leprosy and their implications? Objectives: (i To study the socio-economic factors in relation to leprosy.(ii To assess the impact of disease on patients’ job/income. Study design: Cross-sectional. Setting and Participants: Patients attending the dermatology OPD, J.N. Medical college hospital, A.M.U., Aligarh. Sample size: 200 leprosy patients. Study variables: education, occupation, social class, incapacitation, change in job, reduction in income. Statically analysis: Chi-square test Results: 46% of the leprosy patients were illiterate. A large majority of patients (78% were involved in heavy manual work as farmers and labourers. 68.5% patients belonged to low social classes (IV and V. More males (26.3% suffered from incapacitation than females (8.5%. 2.5% patients lost their job or were unable to work and 11.5% had to change their jobs due to the disease or disability caused by it. 17.5% patients had a history of reduction in their income after occurrence of leprosy.

  20. What Are Asbestos-Related Lung Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... asbestosis include: Fibrotic lung disease Pneumoconiosis (NOO-mo-ko-ne-O-sis) Interstitial (in-ter-STISH-al) ... tissue samples. One way is through bronchoscopy (bron-KOS-ko-pee). For this procedure, your doctor will ...

  1. Risk factors of cerebrovascular diseases and their intervention and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En XU

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular diseases are important causes of clinical death and disability because of high prevalence and morbidity and easy to recurrence. A number of risk factors have involved in the progress of cerebrovascular diseases, which include uncontrolled and controlled risk factors. The former refers to old age, gender, low birth weight, race/ethnicity, genetic factors, etc. The latter includes hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation and other cardiac diseases, dyslipidemia, asymptomatic carotid stenosis, obesity, smoking, unhealthy lifestyle, alcoholism, metabolic syndrome, hyperhomocysteinemia, etc. Meanwhile, hypertension is the most important one in the above-mentioned risk factors. It would effectively reduce or postpone the onset of cerebrovascular diseases through proper intervention and management on those risk factors. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.01.006

  2. Iatrogenic disease in the elderly: risk factors, consequences, and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sompol Permpongkosol

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Sompol PermpongkosolDivision of Urology, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, ThailandAbstract: The epidemiology of iatrogenic disease in the elderly has not been extensively reported. Risk factors of iatrogenic disease in the elderly are drug-induced iatrogenic disease, multiple chronic diseases, multiple physicians, hospitalization, and medical or surgical procedures. Iatrogenic disease can have a great psychomotor impact and important social consequences. To identify patients at high risk is the first step in prevention as most of the iatrogenic diseases are preventable. Interventions that can prevent iatrogenic complications include specific interventions, the use of a geriatric interdisciplinary team, pharmacist consultation and acute care for the elderly units.Keywords: iatrogenic disease, elderly, risk factors, prevention

  3. Fibroblast growth factor 10 haploinsufficiency causes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klar, Joakim; Blomstrand, Peter; Brunmark, Charlott; Badhai, Jitendra; Håkansson, Hanna Falk; Brange, Charlotte Sollie; Bergendal, Birgitta; Dahl, Niklas

    2011-10-01

    Genetic factors influencing lung function may predispose to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) signalling pathway is critical for lung development and lung epithelial renewal. The hypothesis behind this study was that constitutive FGF10 insufficiency may lead to pulmonary disorder. Therefore investigation of the pulmonary functions of patients heterozygous for loss of function mutations in the FGF10 gene was performed. The spirometric measures of lung function from patients and non-carrier siblings were compared and both groups were related to matched reference data for normal human lung function. The patients show a significant decrease in lung function parameters when compared to control values. The average FEV1/IVC quota (FEV1%) for the patients is 0.65 (80% of predicted) and reversibility test using Terbutalin resulted in a 3.7% increase in FEV1. Patients with FGF10 haploinsufficiency have lung function parameters indicating COPD. A modest response to Terbutalin confirms an irreversible obstructive lung disease. These findings support the idea that genetic variants affecting the FGF10 signalling pathway are important determinants of lung function that may ultimately contribute to COPD. Specifically, the results show that FGF10 haploinsufficiency affects lung function measures providing a model for a dosage sensitive effect of FGF10 in the development of COPD.

  4. Bioactive Nutrients and Nutrigenomics in Age-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Rescigno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased life expectancy and the expansion of the elderly population are stimulating research into aging. Aging may be viewed as a multifactorial process that results from the interaction of genetic and environmental factors, which include lifestyle. Human molecular processes are influenced by physiological pathways as well as exogenous factors, which include the diet. Dietary components have substantive effects on metabolic health; for instance, bioactive molecules capable of selectively modulating specific metabolic pathways affect the development/progression of cardiovascular and neoplastic disease. As bioactive nutrients are increasingly identified, their clinical and molecular chemopreventive effects are being characterized and systematic analyses encompassing the “omics” technologies (transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics are being conducted to explore their action. The evolving field of molecular pathological epidemiology has unique strength to investigate the effects of dietary and lifestyle exposure on clinical outcomes. The mounting body of knowledge regarding diet-related health status and disease risk is expected to lead in the near future to the development of improved diagnostic procedures and therapeutic strategies targeting processes relevant to nutrition. The state of the art of aging and nutrigenomics research and the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of bioactive nutrients on the main aging-related disorders are reviewed herein.

  5. [Risk factors for Parkinson disease: an epidemiologic study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Duarte; Garrett, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    The etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) remains in a certain part unknown. Both genetic susceptibility and environmental factors are sometimes considered to be putative contributors to its origin. Recent epidemiologic studies have focused on the possible role of environmental risk factors present during adult life or aging, once pure genetic forms of PD are rare. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible environmental and familial risk factors for PD. We performed a hospital based case-control study using 88 PD patients with neurologist confirmed diagnostic, and 176 sex, age, and residence similar controls. Several possible risk factors were evaluated related to life style, past history, family history, occupational history and other exposures to potential neurotoxin agents. Statistical differences, using a 95% confidence interval, were observed in positive family history of PD (p = 0,002), occupation category (p = 0,001), rural living (p = 0,037), living/working near a industry (p = 0,017), exposure to pesticides, herbicides and in-secticides (p coffee consumption (p = 0,036) and tea consumption (p = 0,001). Sex and age adjusted logistic regression showed as potential risk factors, a positive family history of PD (odds ratio [OR] = 9,996; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2,19-45,597), blue collar occupations (OR = 3,967; 95% CI = 1,670-9,426), exposure to pesticides, herbicides and insecticides (OR = 2,619 ; 95% CI = 1,170-5,862). An inverse relationship was found between tea consumption and the risk of PD (OR = 0,356; 95% CI = 0,174-0,727). The results of the study show that both familial and environmental factors may contribute to the development of PD. Like other studies suggest, PD is of unknown, but presumably multifactorial etiology.

  6. Shapes related to longitudinal studies of disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erleben, Lene Lillemark

    investigated four different proximity markers which lead to significantly improved marker values between NC and AD after correction for whole brain and hippocampus volume. Based on the different proximity markers we have chosen the surface connectivity marker that gave the best separation to investigate......This dissertation investigates novel markers for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Both CVD and AD are among the large diseases counted in morbidity and mortality in the western world, which makes them huge and increasing problems. By investigating and learning....... The first part of this dissertation studies the growth patterns of atherosclerotic calcified deposits in the lumbar aorta based on x-ray images over an 8-year time period. We have been able to find simple growth patterns that explain how the calcifications evolve. The calcifications grew on average 41 % (p...

  7. Imaging diagnosis of bronchial asthma and related diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Fumikazu; Fujimura, Mikihiko; Kimura, Fumiko; Fujimura, Kaori; Hayano, Toshio; Nishii, Noriko; Machida, Haruhiko; Toda, Jo; Saito, Naoko

    2002-01-01

    We describe imaging features of bronchial asthma and related diseases. The practical roles of imaging diagnosis are the evaluation of severity and complications of bronchial asthma and differential diagnosis of diseases showing asthmatic symptoms other than bronchial asthma. (author)

  8. Some interesting prognostic factors related to cutaneous malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joan Figueroa, AlejandroYuri; Diaz Anaya, Amnia; Montero Leon, Jorge Felipe; Jimenez Mendes, Lourdes

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of present research was to determine the independent prognostic value and the 3 and 5 years survival of more significant clinicopathological prognostic factors and in each stage, according to pathological staging system of tumor-nodule-metastasis (TNM) in patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). METHODS: A longitudinal, descriptive and retrospective study was conducted applying the Cox proportional risk form and the Kaplan-Meier method, aimed to search of different risk variables in patients with CMM. We studied 157 patients with CMM, seen during 8 years (1993 to 2001), diagnosed and treated in National Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology of La Habana. RESULTS: The more powerful prognostic variables related to localized disease (stage I and II) were the Breslow density (P: 0,000), the mitosis rate (P: 0,004), and the Clark level (P: 0,04); among the variables related to the regional disease (stage III) the number of lymphatic ganglia involved was the more weighthy (P:0,000) and the more important in Stage IV was the distant visceral metastasis (P:0,003). Survival was decreasing according to the advance of the pathological stage of disease. CONCLUSIONS: The more involved independent prognostic factors were the Breslow rate, the number of involved regional lymphatic nodules and the distant visceral metastasis, which is endorsed by a world consensus. However, variables as age, sex, lesion site, ulceration, host-tumor inflammatory response, histological subtype, satellitosis and transient metastasis, considered as independent prognostic indicators in big casuistries, had not statistical significance in present paper. (author)

  9. Prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and its prognostic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NI Manman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the prevalence, natural history, and causes of death of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, as well as related influencing factors. MethodsA total of 833 retired cadres and staff members who underwent physical examination in Shanghai Changzheng Hospital and Shanghai 85 Hospital of the PLA from January 1 to December 31, 2011 and received follow-up visits in either hospital every year since 2011 were enrolled as study subjects, and were divided into NAFLD group (459 patients who were diagnosed with NAFLD before December 31, 2011 and control group (374 patients without liver or biliary diseases. The patients′ clinical data were collected, including body height, body weight, systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, blood biochemical parameters, presence or absence of diabetes, hyperlipidemia, cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases, and malignant tumor, and smoking and drinking, and the death time and causes of death were clarified for the patients who died. The prevalence and natural course of NAFLD and related risk factors and prognostic factors were analyzed in this population. The t-test was applied for comparison of continuous data between groups, the chi-square test was applied for comparison of categorical data between groups, the multivariate binary logistic regression was applied to analyze the risk factors for the pathogenesis of NAFLD, and the multinomial logistic regression was applied to analyze the influencing factors for aggravation or alleviation of NAFLD. ResultsThe patients in NAFLD group accounted for 55.1% of all subjects, and the proportion of male patients was higher than that of female patients (58.0% vs 46.7%, χ2=4.962, P=0.026. Compared with the control group, the NAFLD group had significantly higher body mass index (BMI, systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, fasting blood glucose, serum uric acid, and triglyceride (TG, a significantly higher proportion of

  10. Hypoxia Induced Factor in Chronic Kidney Disease: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiying; Zhao, Yuliang; Fu, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have shown evidence that erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs), as a classic treatment for chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related anemia, have several disadvantages and may trigger various adverse events with long-term use. The hypoxia-induced factor (HIF) pathway has been intensively investigated in kidney disease, especially in CKD, as research has shown that HIF-mediated erythropoiesis might work as a potential therapeutic strategy for managing CKD-related anemia. Development of prolyl hydroxylase domain inhibitors (PHIs), as an effective HIF activator, is a valuable step toward finding a replacement for ESAs, which showed an effective erythropoiesis through a comprehensive and physiological approach by promoting erythropoietin production, increasing iron bioavailability and improving chronic inflammatory status. Heretofore no adverse events or obvious off-target effects have been reported in clinical trials of PHIs. Nevertheless, a cautious inspection with extended follow-up period is warranted to validate the safety of prolonged HIF elevation, especially considering its ambiguous role in fibrogenesis and inflammation responses and possible risks in accelerating vascular calcification and tumorigenesis. A weighed dosing strategy might be the key to circumvent the unexpected side-effect brought by pleotropic effects of HIF elevation and achieve a selective augmentation of HIF-mediated signaling pathway. New studies with longer follow-up period and adequate analysis about the risks for proinflammation, vascular calcification and tumorigenesis are needed to ensure the drugs are safe for long-term use before being widely accepted in daily clinical practice.

  11. Factors Associated with Periodontal Disease in Pregnant Diabetic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, N; Zaman, N; Nimmi, N; Chowdhury, T A; Khan, M H

    2016-04-01

    There have been an association between systemic diseases and hormonal changes particularly diabetes which has been cited as a risk factor in the progression of periodontitis in pregnant women. The incidence and severity of periodontal diseases are increasing at a higher rate and a common condition in pregnant diabetic women among Bangladeshi population. This cross sectional study included 200 pregnant women who were selected from gynecological department and examined at the dental unit. The clinical parameters used were the Silness and Loe plaque index (PI), gingival scores and periodontal status and any relationship to socio demographic variables (age, occupation, level of education and urban or rural residence) and clinical variables (gestation period, previous pregnancy, type of diabetes and periodontal maintenance) were evaluated. The results showed that these clinical parameters increased concomitantly with an increase in the stage of pregnancy and in women with multiple pregnancies. Increased age, lower level of education, unemployment and patients residing in rural areas were associated with significantly higher gingival scores and periodontal measures. Women with increased age and multiple pregnancies usually have less interest to frequent periodontal maintenance showing a significant statistical relation between an increased age and changes in gingival and periodontal status; however no significant association was found between increased age and plaque index. It is concluded that gingival inflammatory symptoms are aggravated during pregnancy in diabetic women and are related to different clinical and demographic variables.

  12. Travel related diseases and optimizing preventive strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieten, R.W.

    2016-01-01

    With the figure of 1 billion annual travellers continuously increasing, travel is becoming more and more common. The binding element of this thesis is the aim to contribute to the improvement of pre-travel healthcare. The diseases studied either carry a high mortality (rabies, malaria, yellow fever)

  13. Trace elements in relation to cardiovascular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masironi, R [World Health Organization, Cardiovascular Diseases Unit, Geneva (Switzerland); Parr, R M [International Atomic Energy Agency, Medical Applications Section, Vienna (Austria)

    1973-07-01

    For the past four years the World Health Organization and the International Atomic Energy-Agency have been jointly coordinating investigations at an international level on the role possibly played by stable trace elements in the aetiology of cardiovascular diseases, and the use of nuclear techniques in studying these elements. (author)

  14. Nutritional-related diseases and management: newspaper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study showed that many people are ignorant of the importance of eating a balanced diet and eating right to prevent nutritional diseases. This is why the newspapers topics or health tips on diet and nutrition had the highest percentage frequency, because of its importance the needed emphasis it requires. Therefore, it is ...

  15. The Acquired Immunedeficiency Syndrome and related diseases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HTLV-III are helpful but are not available. Other investigations may be required depending on clinical findings to exclude other diseases and confirm opportunistic infection. •. Treatment. There is no specific treatment for AIDS at present. Infections detected in such patie~ts, eg oral candidiasis or T.B., should be treated m the.

  16. Prevalence of Risk Factors for Coronary Artery Disease in Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (48.5 %), fatty food consumption (47.5 %), obesity (38 %) and smoking (37 %), respectively. Other less ... Keywords: Risk factors, Prevalence, Coronary artery disease, Diabetes, Southern Punjab ... developing world, including Pakistan [1]. The.

  17. Haptoglobin phenotypes as a risk factor for coronary artery disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gehan Hamdy

    2014-04-22

    Apr 22, 2014 ... Recognition of diabetic individuals at greatest risk of developing coronary ..... Early detection of the disease and timely interventions can reduce the morbidity ..... additional risk factor of retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  18. Behavioral Risk Factor Data: Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2011 to present. BRFSS is a continuous, state-based surveillance system that collects information about modifiable risk factors for chronic diseases and other...

  19. Autoimmune diseases and infections as risk factors for schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Mortensen, Preben B; Eaton, William W

    2012-01-01

    Immunological hypotheses have become increasingly prominent when studying the etiology of schizophrenia. Autoimmune diseases, and especially the number of infections requiring hospitalization, have been identified as significant risk factors for schizophrenia in a dose-response relationship, whic...... diseases and infections should be considered in the treatment of individuals with schizophrenia symptoms, and further research is needed of the immune system's possible contributing pathogenic factors in the etiology of schizophrenia....

  20. Air pollution and respiratory diseases – a problematic risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihălţan, Florin; Deleanu, Oana; Nemeș, Roxana; Ulmeanu, Ruxandra

    2016-01-01

    Pollution was a neglected factor for years in all the research that took in the viewfinder was examined in the risk factors in of respiratory diseases. Considering the concerns of politicians, scientists, doctors, which have intensified upgraded especially after the last climate “summit”, “summit” climatological we found it necessary to have a review of the effects of pollution, pathogenic mechanisms of interaction, and some diseases strongly influenced by pollutants such as COPD, asthma, bronchialand bronchial and lung cancer.

  1. Risk factors for motor neuron diseases : genes, environment and lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutedja, N.A.

    2010-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is to identify susceptibility factors in diseases affecting the motor neuron: both motor neuron disease (MND), in which primarily the cell body is affected, and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), in which primarily the axon is affected, are covered. Due to its

  2. Exploration of genetic susceptibility factors for Parkinson's disease ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Neurosciences Research Group, School of Medicine and Institute of Genetics, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá ... factors for Parkinson's disease in a South American sample. J. Genet. 89, ... In the current work, we report the results of a system- ..... Synaptic dysfunction and oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease:.

  3. Contextual factors and social consequences of incident disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ulla; Kriegbaum, Margit; Hougaard, Charlotte Ørsted

    2008-01-01

    practice modify the employment effect of disease. We have studied risk of labour market exclusion following incident hospitalization for ischaemic heart disease (IHD), and whether this risk may be modified by contextual factors on the municipal level. Methods: A cohort design on a 10% random sample...

  4. Conditioning and learning in relation to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, T A; Guy, W

    1985-12-01

    Of the two generally recognized processes through which learning occurs--imprinting and conditioning--only the latter with its two paradigms, classical and operant, has both practical and heuristic implications for disease. From the classical conditioning experiments of Pavlov's laboratory over 100 years ago to the later work in operant conditioning by Skinner and others in the past four decades has evolved much of the basis of modern learning theory and its applications to disease in the form of behavior therapy. Variants of behavior therapy have been employed in the treatment of wide variety of medical and psychiatric illnesses. Recent developments in the study of brain function and biochemistry have led to renewed interest in the conditioning paradigm and its value as tool in these areas of research.

  5. Leadership and Situational Factors Related to AWOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-07-01

    subsequent require- ment placed on military police, legal operations, personnel control facilities, stockades and the correctional training program increase...variables and particularly different aspects of the env,ronmtent. 7 -’:.- -.-’C. . *C? From this overviev , as well as a perusal of an in-depth review ’ of...variahles. The-3nalysis w•’s col•iieted at the University of Wisconsin Computer Center, U!I’,PC 1108 System. Ten factors, dealing with response to AWM

  6. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease: autoimmune pancreatitis and extrapancreatic manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alvarenga Fernandes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4-related disease with pancreatic and extrapancreatic involvement, including the biliary and renal systems. Given the importance of imaging methods for the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease and its differentiation from pancreatic adenocarcinoma, we emphasize important abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings related to this recently recognized systemic autoimmune disease.

  7. MOTHER – CHILD RELATION AND FACTORS AFFECTING THIS RELATION

    OpenAIRE

    TEZEL ŞAHİN, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    The social institution where a child first meet with his birth and sets his social relations is his family. The communication of parents and other members of family determines the place of child in the family. In the preschool period when the basis of future lives is formed, healthy relations made with child are of great importance. What kind of a person the child starting to perceive himself and his environment in this period will be is determined with the life in this period. Family and rel...

  8. MOTHER – CHILD RELATION AND FACTORS AFFECTING THIS RELATION

    OpenAIRE

    TEZEL ŞAHİN, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    The social institution where a child first meet with his birth and sets his social relations is his family. The communication of parents and other members of family determines the place of child in the family. In the preschool period when the basis of future lives is formed, healthy relations made with child are of great importance. What kind of a person the child starting to perceive himself and his environment in this period will be is determined with the life in this period. Family and rel...

  9. Clustering of Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases among Adolescents from Southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes, Heloyse Elaine Gimenes; Gon?alves, Eliane Cristina de Andrade; Vieira, J?ssika Aparecida Jesus; Silva, Diego Augusto Santos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the simultaneous presence of risk factors for non-communicable diseases and the association of these risk factors with demographic and economic factors among adolescents from southern Brazil. Methods The study included 916 students (14?19 years old) enrolled in the 2014 school year at state schools in S?o Jos?, Santa Catarina, Brazil. Risk factors related to lifestyle (i.e., physical inactivity, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, sede...

  10. Comprehensive Control of Human Papillomavirus Infections and Related Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, F. Xavier; Broker, Thomas R.; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L.; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L.; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E.; Schiller, John T.; Markowitz, Lauri E.; Fisher, William A.; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A.; Franco, Eduardo L.; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A.; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J.; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  11. Genetic factors and molecular mechanisms in dry eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ling; Garrett, Qian; Flanagan, Judith; Chakrabarti, Subhabrata; Papas, Eric

    2018-04-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a complex condition with a multifactorial etiology that can be difficult to manage successfully. While external factors are modifiable, treatment success is limited if genetic factors contribute to the disease. The purpose of this review is to compile research describing normal and abnormal ocular surface function on a molecular level, appraise genetic studies involving DED or DED-associated diseases, and introduce the basic methods used for conducting genetic epidemiology studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nutrition in Relation to Diseases and Heat stress in Poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Das

    Full Text Available Different diseases conditions and stress factors are responsible for high morbidity and mortality of present day poultry. Nutritional strategy and proper feed formulation with specific dietary regimen can combat this up to a certain extent. The incidence of various infectious diseases, nervous disorders and metabolic disorders can be minimized through proper feed regimen. There is a stiff competition and restrictions in the global market of poultry products which can be addressed with proper management of emerging and important diseases with economic productions and quality poultry products free of elements detrimental to human health. Researchers have made efforts to prevent such damage to poultry and poultry product through dietary manipulations. Heat stress can lead to a reduction in the defense mechanisms of birds or to a relative state of immunosuppression. The health status of the poultry is facing new challenges today which can be suitably addressed by the right scientific and advanced nutritional manoeuvres and make the poultry farming more profitable and presentable in the global market. [Vet. World 2011; 4(9.000: 429-432

  13. [Enviromental factors related to depressive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Benítez, Catalina Teresa; García-Rodríguez, Alfonso; Leal-Ugarte, Evelia; Peralta-Leal, Valeria; Durán-González, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    As a result of their high prevalence, mayor depressive disorder single episode (MDDSE); major depressive disorder recurrent episodes (MDDREC); and dysthymia are considered an important public health problem. The objective of this paper was to identify and correlate environmental factors in patients with MDDSE, MDDREC and dysthymia. 121 patients from the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social's Subzone General Hospital of San Andres Tuxtla, at Veracruz, were questioned by history with the risk variables. 16 of them were diagnosed with MDDREC, 72 with MDD and 33 with dysthymia; in all of those cases, females prevailed. Depressive disorders were observed more frequently in people over 40 years, married, with medium or low educational level, with dysfunctional family environment, victims of family violence and who were the middle siblings. The main comorbidities that arose were gastrointestinal disorders, obesity and hypertension. 16 of them were diagnosed with MDDREC, 72 with MDD and 33 with dysthymia; in all of those cases, females prevailed. Depressive disorders were observed more frequently in people over 40 years, married, with medium or low educational level, with dysfunctional family environment, victims of family violence and who were the middle siblings. The main comorbidities that arose were gastrointestinal disorders, obesity and hypertension. The main risk factors identified for developing depressive disorders were: being female, over 40 years old and being married. The differences obtained in this study, if it is compared with others, are probably due to sample size, selection criteria and ethnic origin.

  14. Cross-cultural variation in disease-related concerns among patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, S; Li, Z; Almer, S; Barbosa, A; Marquis, P; Moser, G; Sperber, A; Toner, B; Drossman, D A

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this work was to study cross-cultural variations in the impact of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) on health-related quality of life by an international comparison of disease-related concerns. Item and factor scores on the Rating Form of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patient Concerns and overall mean concern levels were compared by analysis of variance among 2002 IBD patients in eight countries. The overall level of concern varied from 51 out of 100 in Portugal to 19 in Sweden, with intermediate scores for Italy (43), Canada (40), United States (39), France (39), Austria (33), and Israel (25). Having surgery, an ostomy, the uncertain nature of the disease, and medication side effects were each rated among the first five in importance in six countries. Other items varied considerably. For example, concern regarding pain and suffering was high in Israel and low in Portugal, whereas concern over developing cancer was low in Italy. Concern over financial issues and access to high-quality health care were inversely associated with measures of national economic prosperity. 1) Cross-cultural comparisons of patient concerns related to IBD are feasible using translated scales. 2) Reporting tendencies vary greatly; within Europe, patients from southern countries report greater overall concern. 3) The complications and the variable evolution of disease elicit general concern, but the importance of specific issues varies among countries. 4) The reasons for national differences may have social, cultural, and/or economic determinants with relevance to the patient-physician relationship, patient education, and therapeutic decision making.

  15. Physical activity and cardiovascular disease risk factors among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) risk factors are increasing at an unprecedented rate in developing countries. However, fewer studies have evaluated the role of physical activity in preventing CVD in these countries. We assessed level physical activity and its relationship with CVD risk factors among young and ...

  16. Risk Factors for Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases at Gilgel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moreover, the distributions of the specific risk factors are not systematically identified in those countries hampering the designing of appropriate preventive and control strategies. The objective of this component of the study was to describe the distribution of risk factors for chronic non-communicable diseases. METHODS: ...

  17. Thrombophilic Risk Factors in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Ayten; Senturk, Omer; Aygun, Cem; Celebi, Altay; Caglayan, Cigdem; Hulagu, Sadettin

    2010-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients have an increased risk for thromboembolism. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of thrombophilic risk factors in IBD patients and to assess the associations of these factors with disease activity. Forty-eight patients with IBD (24 ulcerative colitis, 24 Crohn's disease) and 40 matched healthy control individuals were enrolled. In addition to routine biochemical analysis, fasting blood samples were studied for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, protein-C, protein-S, antithrombin III, factor VII, factor VIII, D-dimer, vitamin B 12 , folic acid and homocysteine. Levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, D-dimer and the number of platelets were significantly higher in patients with IBD. When compared to control group, in patients with Crohn's disease serum homocystein levels were significantly higher (p = 0.025) while serum folic acid levels were significantly lower (p homocystein and the number of platelets were found to be significantly higher in Crohn's disease patients who were in active period of the disease. Thrombophilic defects are multifactorial and might be frequently seen in IBD patients. They might contribute to thrombotic complications of this disease.

  18. Diagnosis and Treatment of IgG4-Related Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2017-01-01

    It is critical to differentiate IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) from malignant tumor and similar disease of the affected organ to apply appropriate therapy and avoid unnecessary surgery. IgG4-RD is diagnosed on combination of typical radiological findings; elevation of serum IgG4 levels; histopathological findings of abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells and lymphocytes, storiform fibrosis , and obliterative phlebitis ; association with other IgG4-related diseases; and response to steroids. Histopathological approach is particularly recommended. Systemic glucocorticoids are currently the first-line approach for IgG4-RD, and the indications are symptoms. The initial recommended dose of oral prednisolone for induction of remission is 0.6 mg/kg/day, administered for 2-4 weeks. This dose is gradually tapered to a maintenance dose of 2.5-5 mg/day over a period of 2-3 months. As IgG4-RD sometimes relapses after steroids, maintenance therapy is usually performed in Japan. However, as IgG4-RD patients are typically elderly and are at high risk of developing steroid-related complications, cessation of the medication should be attempted at least within 3 years. For relapsed IgG4-RD, re-administration or dose up of steroid is effective, but the addition of immunomodulatory drugs such as azathioprine has been considered to be appropriate. B cell depletion with rituximab (an anti-CD20 antibody) is effective, even in many patients in whom treatment with immunomodulatory drugs was unsuccessful. The short-term clinical, morphological, and functional outcomes of most IgG4-RD patients treated with steroid therapy are good, but the long-term outcomes are less clear due to several unknown factors such as relapse, developed fibrosis, and associated malignancy.

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Related Factors Protect against Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Kun Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a principal mediator of signal transduction in the cell, and disruption of its normal function (a mechanism known as ER stress has been associated with the pathogenesis of several diseases. ER stress has been demonstrated to contribute to onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR by induction of multiple inflammatory signaling pathways. Recent studies have begun to describe the gene expression profile of ER stress-related genes in DR; moreover, genes that play a protective role against DR have been identified. P58IPK was determined to be able to reduce retinal vascular leakage under high glucose conditions, thus protecting retinal cells. It has also been found by our lab that ER-associated protein degradation factors exhibit significantly different expression patterns in rat retinas under sustained high glucose conditions. Future research based upon these collective genomic findings will contribute to our overall understanding of DR pathogenesis as well as identify potential therapeutic targets.

  20. Relational factors in psychopathological responses to childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigoli, Vittorio; Gilli, Gabriella; Saita, Emanuela

    2006-06-01

    Childbirth can represent for women the time of greatest vulnerability experience, often associated with being out of control, loneliness or sadness. One hundred and sixty women who had 'normal' births were assessed within 48 hours on potential predictive measures and at 3-6 months post-partum for PTSD. Symptoms of depression, anxiety, perceived and desired support by family members, friends, medical personnel were also assessed. t-Test and chi-square were used to analyze, differences between 'risk group' and 'non-risk group'. Few women (1.25%) showed questionnaire responses suggesting clinically significant levels on PTSD; other women (28.75%) reported clinically significant symptoms for at least one subscale. Being at the first delivery experience, together with perceptions of low levels of support from family members and medical personnel, were found to be related to experience of post-traumatic stress symptoms. Anxiety for the child and previous depression are also related to such symptoms. Moreover, anxiety and depression are related to a difficult recognition of the support received, as well as to the desire for more support, in the care of the newborn, from medical professionals.

  1. Infections as risk factor for autoimmune diseases - A nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Philip Rising; Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Deleuran, Bent Winding

    2016-01-01

    Viruses, bacteria and other infectious pathogens are the major postulated environmental triggers of autoimmunity. In the present nation-wide study we describe the association between infections and 29 autoimmune diseases. We used the Danish Civil Registration System to identify 4.5 million persons...... to the etiology of autoimmune diseases together with genetic factors....... born between 1945 and 2000. Information on infections and autoimmune diseases was obtained from the Danish Hospital Register. The cohort was followed from 1977 to 2012. Incidence rate ratios for developing an autoimmune disease were estimated using poisson regression. We found an association between...

  2. Hypertensive heart disease and obesity: a complex interaction between hemodynamic and not hemodynamic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzani, Riccardo; Bordicchia, Marica; Spannella, Francesco; Dessì-Fulgheri, Paolo; Fedecostante, Massimiliano

    2014-06-01

    The worldwide prevalence of obesity has nearly doubled, with an increase in obesity-related cardiovascular disease and mortality. Several factors are involved in the genesis of hypertension and hypertensive heart disease (HHD) in overweight/obesity. This review is focused on bridging factors between excessive adiposity and HHD, presenting a unifying hypothesis of vascular-metabolic syndrome, where an "handicap" of the natriuretic peptide system has a central role both in adipocyte dysmetabolism as well as in increased blood pressure and HHD.

  3. Identification and Progression of Heart Disease Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients from Longitudinal Electronic Health Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Jonnagaddala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Therefore, assessing the risk of its occurrence is a crucial step in predicting serious cardiac events. Identifying heart disease risk factors and tracking their progression is a preliminary step in heart disease risk assessment. A large number of studies have reported the use of risk factor data collected prospectively. Electronic health record systems are a great resource of the required risk factor data. Unfortunately, most of the valuable information on risk factor data is buried in the form of unstructured clinical notes in electronic health records. In this study, we present an information extraction system to extract related information on heart disease risk factors from unstructured clinical notes using a hybrid approach. The hybrid approach employs both machine learning and rule-based clinical text mining techniques. The developed system achieved an overall microaveraged F-score of 0.8302.

  4. Relação de indicadores antropométricos com fatores de risco para doença cardiovascular Relación de indicadores antropométricos con factores de riesgo para enfermedad cardiovascular Relation between anthropometric indicators and risk factors for cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirele Arruda Michelotto de Oliveira

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: Estudos têm sido realizados para identificar o melhor preditor antropométrico de doenças crônicas em diferentes populações. OBJETIVO: Verificar a relação entre medidas antropométricas e fatores de risco (perfil lipídico e pressão arterial para doenças cardiovasculares. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com 180 homens e 120 mulheres, idade média de 39,6±10,6 anos. Avaliou-se: índice de massa corporal (IMC, circunferência da cintura (CC, percentual de gordura corporal (%GC, relação cintura quadril (RCQ, perfil lipídico, glicemia e pressão arterial. RESULTADOS: IMC, CC e RCQ foram maiores nos homens e %GC nas mulheres (pFUNDAMENTO: Se vienen efectuando estudios para identificar el mejor predictor antropométrico de enfermedades crónicas en diferentes poblaciones. OBJETIVO: Verificar la relación entre mediciones antropométricas y factores de riesgo (perfil lipídico y presión arterial para enfermedades cardiovasculares. MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal con 180 varones y 120 mujeres, edad promedio de 39,6 ± 10,6 años. Se evaluó: índice de masa corporal (IMC, circunferencia de la cintura (CC, porcentaje de grasa corporal (%GC, relación cintura cadera (RCC, perfil lipídico, glucemia y presión arterial. RESULTADOS: IMC, CC y RCC fueron mayores en los varones y %GC en las mujeres (p BACKGROUND: Studies have been carried out to identify the best anthropometric predictor of chronic diseases in different populations. OBJECTIVE: To verify the relation between anthropometric measures and risk factors (lipid profile and blood pressure for cardiovascular diseases. METHODS: Transversal study carried out with 180 males and 120 females, with mean age 39.6±10.6 years old. Body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, body fat percentage (%BF, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, lipid profile, glycemia and blood pressure were the variables assessed. RESULTS: BMI, WC and WHR were higher among males, and %BF were higher among females (p<0

  5. Life style factors and number of chronic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustehsan, Huma

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: People all around the world are more concerned with living a long and healthy life, rather than just living longer. Many studies have examined the effects of lifestyle on the risk of developing chronic diseases, but typically, they focus on only one specific behavior. Individuals often follow a lifestyle pattern which combines more than one behavior. This paper examines the combined effect of several lifestyle factors on the number of chronic diseases.OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to determine how different lifestyle factors influence the number of chronic diseases a person can have.METHODS: Data from the survey “Health and Well-being in the Transitions” (2000 were used. Dependent variable was number of chronic diseases which ranged from zero to five. Independent variables included the level of physical activity, variables based on food frequency questions, and other behavioral activities, adjusted for age and gender. Generalized linear model with Poisson distribution was used for analysis.RESULTS: The analysis showed that males have more diseases than females if other factors are controlled (B=0.182, p=0.001. Diseases increase by age (B=0.021, p=0.000. Those who used dairy products daily had smaller number of diseases (B= -0.145, p=0.012. Those who used vegetable oil 3-7 days a week had smaller number of diseases than those who use it 0-2 days a week (B= -0.224, p=0.058. Other food frequencies and ever smoking had no clear association with number of diseases.CONCLUSION: Increasing age and male gender are two factors which are associated with larger number of chronic diseases. Regular use of vegetable oil and dairy products seems to be important towards the path of a healthier life.

  6. Risk factors for congenital heart diseases in Alexandria, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassili, A.; Mokhtar, S.A.; Dabous, N.I.; Zaher, S.R.; Mokhtar, M.M.; Zaki, A.

    2000-01-01

    A matched case control study has been conducted in the children's hospitals in Alexandria, Egypt, during 2 years-period, aiming at investigating the risk factors for the occurrence of congenital heart diseases. Our results showed that the significant risk factors for developing any type of congenital heart disease and ventricular septal defects were: older paternal age at birth, positive consanguinity, positive family history, female sex hormones, irradiation, hazardous maternal occupation, diabetes mellitus and suburban or rural residence. However, some environmental/teratogenic factors were not implicated in the etiology of atrial septal defects or pulmonary stenosis. These findings strongly suggest that environmental factors vary according to the specific type of congenital heart disease. This study emphasizes on the need to instruct the public about the importance of pre-marital counselling and the deleterious effects of various teratogens in the environment

  7. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease: a rare disease with an unusual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Waqas; Hadley, Terrance; Kesler, Melissa; Gul, Zartash

    2016-07-01

    IgG4-RD can also present in the skeletal muscle, mimicking several other diseases. It is unusual for this relatively new classification of diseases to present in the muscles and can be mistakenly diagnosed as other autoimmune diseases rendering a delay in the appropriate management and progression of the disease.

  8. Clinical Relevance of Environmental Factors in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors contribute for about 70% to 80% and environmental factors for about 20% to 30% to the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Relatives of AITD patients carry a risk to contract AITD themselves. The 5-year risk can be quantified by the so-called Thyroid Events

  9. Extrapancreatic findings of IgG4-related disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, T.J.; Ng, Y.L.; Tan, D.; Fong, W.S.; Low, A.S.C.

    2014-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is a systemic fibro-inflammatory condition, which includes autoimmune pancreatitis as part of the disease spectrum. Imaging has been demonstrated to play a major role in the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Recognizing the wide spectrum of extrapancreatic manifestations of IgG4-related disease coupled with a high clinical index of suspicion will allow for an accurate and timely diagnosis to be made, thus avoiding unnecessary invasive procedures and ensuring that early effective corticosteroid therapy is commenced. This review aims to serve as a concise reference tool for both clinicians and radiologists in the diagnosis of extrapancreatic IgG4-related disease

  10. Autoimmune Disease in First-Degree Relatives and Spouses of Individuals With Celiac Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emilsson, Louise; Wijmenga, Cisca; Murray, Joseph A.; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: First-degree relatives of individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk for this disorder, but little is known about their risk for other autoimmune diseases. We assessed the risk of nonceliac autoimmune disease in first-degree relatives and spouses of people with celiac

  11. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-08-14

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori

  12. Predictive factors of thyroid cancer in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Meng; Wu, Mu Chao; Shang, Chang Zhen; Wang, Xiao Yi; Zhang, Jing Lu; Cheng, Hua; Xu, Ming Tong; Yan, Li

    2014-01-01

    The best preoperative examination in Graves' disease with thyroid cancer still remains uncertain. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the prevalence of thyroid cancer in Graves' disease patients, and to identify the predictive factors and ultrasonographic features of thyroid cancer that may aid the preoperative diagnosis in Graves' disease. This retrospective study included 423 patients with Graves' disease who underwent surgical treatment from 2002 to 2012 at our institution. The clinical features and ultrasonographic findings of thyroid nodules were recorded. The diagnosis of thyroid cancer was determined according to the pathological results. Thyroid cancer was discovered in 58 of the 423 (13.7 %) surgically treated Graves' disease patients; 46 of those 58 patients had thyroid nodules, and the other 12 patients were diagnosed with incidentally discovered thyroid carcinomas without thyroid nodules. Among the 58 patients with thyroid cancer, papillary microcarcinomas were discovered in 50 patients, and multifocality and lymph node involvement were detected in the other 8 patients. Multivariate regression analysis showed younger age was the only significant factor predictive of metastatic thyroid cancer. Ultrasonographic findings of calcification and intranodular blood flow in thyroid nodules indicate that they are more likely to harbor thyroid cancers. Because the influencing factor of metastatic thyroid cancers in Graves' disease is young age, every suspicious nodule in Graves' disease patients should be evaluated and treated carefully, especially in younger patients because of the potential for metastasis.

  13. Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors Past Issues / ... to learn more about the effects of sustained low-calorie diets in humans on factors affecting aging. ...

  14. Factors given by birth and oxygenotherapy in relation to development of retinopathy of prematurity

    OpenAIRE

    Olujić Maja; Oros Ana; Bregun-Doronjski Alekandra; Velisavljev-Filipović Gordana

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Retinopathy of prematurity is a disease of the eye which affects the blood vessels of the retina and represents the most important cause of blindness and low vision in children worldwide. There are many risk factors given by birth and parameters of general health status that may influence this disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the significance of the factors given by birth and use of oxygen in relation to the development of premature retinopathy. Material a...

  15. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Older People with Intellectual Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.F. de Winter (Channa)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Chapter 1 General introduction There is an increasing group of older people with intellectual disability in The Netherlands, reaching almost the same life expectancy as the general population. Age-related diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer and dementia

  16. Congenital Heart Disease: Vascular Risk Factors and Medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P.M. Smedts (Dineke)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCongenital heart disease (CHD) is among the most common congenital abnormalities and involves structural anomalies of the heart and/or related major blood vessels. Congenital heart disease arises in the fi rst trimester of pregnancy, occurring often and in many forms. The reported CHD

  17. [Research on prevalence and related factors in allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze-hai; Lin, Wen-sen; Li, Shu-yan; Zhao, Shao-cheng; Wang, Li; Yang, Zhong-gang; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Zhen-fu; Yu, Jin-zhen

    2011-03-01

    To obtain the prevalence and related factors in allergic rhinitis (AR) and other allergic diseases in rural area in China through epidemiological investigation with large sample and multi-faceted survey data. Face to face survey was conducted in different regions (rural areas of Cangzhou, Hebei, coastal fishing village of Bohai Bay, area of Wuling Mountain, Chengde, urban areas of Tianjin) from April 2007 to May 2009. In the same time, serum specific IgE (sIgE) was detected in the digits of every 0, 1or 5 in them. SPSS 13.0 software was used to analyze the data. Five thousand and ten cases were investigated. There were 823 cases with the symptoms or signs of AR (16.4%). Four hundred and two cases were found to have positive serum sIgE antibody in 1576 detected cases (25.5%). One hundred and fourty-six cases with nasal allergic symptoms or signs were diagnosed as AR. The incidence of AR was 9.3% (146/1576). The occurrence of allergic symptoms or signs had a significant statistical difference with factors such as age, occupation, atopic constitution (χ(2) value were 7.96, 9.73, 16.53, 8.95 respectively, all P cat epithelium in rural areas and dust mites in city. The incidence of AR is higher whether in urban or rural areas, it should be taken seriously as the impact on human health. The occurrence is closely related to physical characteristics and environmental factors.

  18. Nonadherence Behaviors and Some Related Factors in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, Pari; Shahgholian, Nahid; Ghadami, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the renal replacement therapy of choice for most patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), however, adherence to the recommended lifestyle is critical for a positive prognosis. The purpose of this study was to assess adherence to immunosuppressive therapy and lifestyle recommendations along with some related factors among kidney transplant patients. In this descriptive analytical study, all patients completed a questionnaire regarding medication intake and lifestyle recommendations (preventing of infection, self-monitoring, prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and sun protection). The participants were divided into 4 groups according to the level of adherence (good, partial, poor, and nonadherent) indicated in their responses. Most kidney recipients were adherent to their drug prescriptions, but were partial, poor, or nonadherent regarding lifestyle recommendations. Increased passage of time since transplantation and low family support and educational level resulted in nonadherence. Men showed greater adherence to medication intake than women. Patients with lower number of drugs and reported drug side-effects illustrated better adherence to medication intake. Women adhered to infection protection recommendations more than men, and older and married patients adhered to cardiovascular prevention recommendations more than others. However, younger patients showed greater adherence to self-monitoring recommendations, and singles, young individuals, and women were adherent to sun protection recommendations. Nonadherence is common among kidney transplant recipients. Thus, it is necessary to determine patients who are at risk of nonadherence and to introduce more educational programs to improve their adherence and their quality of life (QOL).

  19. The burden of high blood pressure and related risk factors in urban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To provide the current burden of high blood pressure and related risk factors in urban setting in Cameroon. Methods:We used the WHO STEPS approach for Surveillance of non-communicable diseases and their risk factors to collect data from 2,559 adults aged 15-99 years, residing at Cite des Palmiers in Douala ...

  20. The Paradox of Nutrition-Related Diseases in the Arab Countries: The Need for Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaiger, Abdulrahman O.; Hassan, Abdelmonem S.; Obeid, Omar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review was to highlight the current situation of nutrition-related diseases in the Arab countries, and factors associated with prevalence of these diseases. PubMed and Google Scholar were searched for data relating to such nutrition-related diseases published between January 1990 and May 2011. The picture of nutritional status in the Arab countries has changed drastically over the past 30 years as a result of changes in the social and economic situation. Two contrasting nutrition-related diseases exist, those associated with inadequate intake of nutrients and unhealthy dietary habits such as growth retardation among young children and micronutrient deficiencies; and those associated with changes in lifestyle such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, osteoporosis, diabetes and obesity (diet-related non-communicable diseases). Factors contributing to nutritional problems vary from country to country, depending on socio-economic status. In general, unsound dietary habits, poor sanitation, poverty, ignorance and lack of access to safe water and health services are mainly responsible for under-nutrition. Changes in lifestyle and dietary habits as well as inactivity are associated with the occurrence of diet-related non-communicable diseases. Programs to prevent and control nutrition-related diseases are insufficient and ineffective, due mainly to a focus on curative care at the expense of preventive health care services, lack of epidemiological studies, lack of nutritional surveillance, inadequate nutrition information and lack of assessment of the cost-effectiveness of nutrition intervention programs. PMID:22016708

  1. Targeting Interferon Regulatory Factor for Cardiometabolic Diseases: Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaxing; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Li, Hongliang

    2017-01-01

    The pathological activation of innate immune system may contribute to the development of cardiometabolic diseases. The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family members, which are the major transcription factors in innate immune signaling, are implicated in cardiometabolic diseases. The aim of this review is to summary the current knowledge of the biological functions of IRFs in innate immune responses and immune cell development, and highlight our contemporary understanding of the functions and molecular mechanisms of IRFs in metabolic diseases, cardiovascular remodeling, and stroke. IRFs are the essential regulators of cardiometabolic diseases via immune-dependent and - independent manners. IRFs signaling is the promising target to manage the initiation and progression of cardiometabolic disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Sacrococcygeal pilonidal disease: analysis of previously proposed risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Harlak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Sacrococcygeal pilonidal disease is a source of one of the most common surgical problems among young adults. While male gender, obesity, occupations requiring sitting, deep natal clefts, excessive body hair, poor body hygiene and excessive sweating are described as the main risk factors for this disease, most of these need to be verified with a clinical trial. The present study aimed to evaluate the value and effect of these factors on pilonidal disease. METHOD: Previously proposed main risk factors were evaluated in a prospective case control study that included 587 patients with pilonidal disease and 2,780 healthy control patients. RESULTS: Stiffness of body hair, number of baths and time spent seated per day were the three most predictive risk factors. Adjusted odds ratios were 9.23, 6.33 and 4.03, respectively (p<0.001. With an adjusted odds ratio of 1.3 (p<.001, body mass index was another risk factor. Family history was not statistically different between the groups and there was no specific occupation associated with the disease. CONCLUSIONS: Hairy people who sit down for more than six hours a day and those who take a bath two or less times per week are at a 219-fold increased risk for sacrococcygeal pilonidal disease than those without these risk factors. For people with a great deal of hair, there is a greater need for them to clean their intergluteal sulcus. People who engage in work that requires sitting in a seat for long periods of time should choose more comfortable seats and should also try to stand whenever possible.

  3. IgG4-related Disease and the Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan H; Deshpande, Vikram

    2017-06-01

    Pathologists are likely to encounter IgG4-related disease in several organ systems. This article focuses on helping pathologists diagnose IgG4-related disease in the hepatobiliary system. Missing the diagnosis can result in unnecessary organ damage and/or unnecessary surgical and cancer therapy. In the liver, tumefactive lesion(s) involving the bile ducts with storiform fibrosis and an IgG4-enriched lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate are highly concerning for IgG4-related disease. The recent identification of oligoclonal populations of T cells and B cells in IgG4-related disease may lead to molecular tests, new therapeutics, and a greater mechanistic understanding of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Personality factors and cognitive functioning in elderly with Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neusa Maria de Oliveira Chardosim

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Parkinson's disease (PD is a chronic and progressive neurological disease, resulting from cell degeneration in the substantia nigra, responsible for the production of dopamine. Objective: This study aimed to characterize the cognitive functioning, personality factors and prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD. Furthermore, this study sought to analyze whether personality factors were predictors of cognitive functioning. Methods: The sample consisted of 30 elderly with PD. Participants completed a sociodemographic data sheet, the NEO-FFI-R (Five Factor Inventory NEO Revised, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, the Beta-III, the phonemic verbal fluency test and semantics (Animals, the digits span subtest of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Adults and the Boston Naming Test and the word list of the CERAD battery, the Geriatric Depression Scale and the Beck Anxiety Inventory. Results: The elderly with PD presented impairment in verbal episodic memory and executive functions. Most of the participants demonstrated low levels of neuroticism. The extraversion factor was positively correlated with executive functions and the openness to experience factor was positively correlated with verbal episodic memory. It was concluded that the elderly with PD presented memory and executive function impairments. The factor that most contributed to performance of the elderly with PD on memory and executive function tasks was the extraversion factor.

  5. Assessing peridomestic entomological factors as predictors for Lyme disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connally, N.P.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Mather, T.N.

    2006-01-01

    The roles of entomologic risk factors, including density of nymphal blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis), prevalence of nymphal infection with the etiologic agent (Borrelia burgdorferi), and density of infected nymphs, in determining the risk of human Lyme disease were assessed at residences in the endemic community of South Kingstown, RI. Nymphs were sampled between May and July from the wooded edge around 51 and 47 residential properties in 2002 and 2003, respectively. Nymphs were collected from all residences sampled. Tick densities, infection rates, and densities of infected nymphs were all significantly higher around homes reporting Lyme disease histories in 2003, while only infection rates were significantly higher in 2002. However, densities of infected nymphs did not significantly predict the probability of Lyme disease at a residence (by logistic regression) in either year. There were no significant differences in entomologic risk factors between homes with state-confirmed Lyme disease histories and homes with self-reported cases (not reported to the state health department). Therefore, although entomologic risk factors tended to be higher at residences with cases of Lyme disease, entomological indices, in the absence of human behavior measures, were not useful predictors of Lyme disease at the scale of individual residences in a tick-endemic community.

  6. Factors Related to Social Support in Neurological and Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenov, Kaloyan; Cabello, Maria; Caballero, Francisco Félix; Cieza, Alarcos; Sabariego, Carla; Raggi, Alberto; Anczewska, Marta; Pitkänen, Tuuli; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Despite the huge body of research on social support, literature has been primarily focused on its beneficial role for both physical and mental health. It is still unclear why people with mental and neurological disorders experience low levels of social support. The main objective of this study was to explore what are the strongest factors related to social support and how do they interact with each other in neuropsychiatric disorders. The study used cross-sectional data from 722 persons suffering from dementia, depression, epilepsy, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, and substance use disorders. Multiple linear regressions showed that disability was the strongest factor for social support. Extraversion and agreeableness were significant personality variables, but when the interaction terms between personality traits and disability were included, disability remained the only significant variable. Moreover, level of disability mediated the relationship between personality (extraversion and agreeableness) and level of social support. Moderation analysis revealed that people that had mental disorders experienced lower levels of support when being highly disabled compared to people with neurological disorders. Unlike previous literature, focused on increasing social support as the origin of improving disability, this study suggested that interventions improving day-to-day functioning or maladaptive personality styles might also have an effect on the way people perceive social support. Future longitudinal research, however, is warranted to explore causality. PMID:26900847

  7. Factors Related to Social Support in Neurological and Mental Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaloyan Kamenov

    Full Text Available Despite the huge body of research on social support, literature has been primarily focused on its beneficial role for both physical and mental health. It is still unclear why people with mental and neurological disorders experience low levels of social support. The main objective of this study was to explore what are the strongest factors related to social support and how do they interact with each other in neuropsychiatric disorders. The study used cross-sectional data from 722 persons suffering from dementia, depression, epilepsy, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, and substance use disorders. Multiple linear regressions showed that disability was the strongest factor for social support. Extraversion and agreeableness were significant personality variables, but when the interaction terms between personality traits and disability were included, disability remained the only significant variable. Moreover, level of disability mediated the relationship between personality (extraversion and agreeableness and level of social support. Moderation analysis revealed that people that had mental disorders experienced lower levels of support when being highly disabled compared to people with neurological disorders. Unlike previous literature, focused on increasing social support as the origin of improving disability, this study suggested that interventions improving day-to-day functioning or maladaptive personality styles might also have an effect on the way people perceive social support. Future longitudinal research, however, is warranted to explore causality.

  8. Environmental factors affecting inflammatory bowel disease: have we made progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is only partially understood; various environmental and host (e.g. genetic, epithelial, immune, and nonimmune) factors are involved. The critical role for environmental factors is strongly supported by recent worldwide trends in IBD epidemiology. One important environmental factor is smoking. A meta-analysis partially confirms previous findings that smoking was found to be protective against ulcerative colitis and, after the onset of the disease, might improve its course, decreasing the need for colectomy. In contrast, smoking increases the risk of developing Crohn's disease and aggravates its course. The history of IBD is dotted by cyclic reports on the isolation of specific infectious agents responsible for Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. The more recently published cold chain hypothesis is providing an even broader platform by linking dietary factors and microbial agents. An additional, recent theory has suggested a breakdown in the balance between putative species of 'protective' versus 'harmful' intestinal bacteria - this concept has been termed dysbiosis resulting in decreased bacterial diversity. Other factors such as oral contraceptive use, appendectomy, dietary factors (e.g. refined sugar, fat, and fast food), perinatal events, and childhood infections have also been associated with both diseases, but their role is more controversial. Nonetheless, there is no doubt that economic development, leading to improved hygiene and other changes in lifestyle ('westernized lifestyle') may play a role in the increase in IBD. This review article focuses on the role of environmental factors in the pathogenesis and progression of IBDs. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Can we Predict Disease Course with Clinical Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Kurti, Zsuzsanna; Golovics, Petra A; Lakatos, Peter L

    2018-01-01

    The disease phenotype at diagnosis and the disease course of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) show remarkable heterogeneity across patients. This review aims to summarize the currently available evidence on clinical and some environmental predictive factors, which clinicians should evaluate in the everyday practice together with other laboratory and imaging data to prevent disease progression, enable a more personalized therapy, and avoid negative disease outcomes. In recent population-based epidemiological and referral cohort studies, the evolution of disease phenotype of CD and UC varied significantly. Most CD and severe UC patients still require hospitalization or surgery/colectomy during follow-up. A change in the natural history of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) with improved outcomes in parallel with tailored positioning of aggressive immunomodulator and biological therapy has been suspected. According to the currently available literature, it is of major importance to refer IBD cases at risk for adverse disease outcomes as early during the disease course as possible. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Factors influencing the seasonal patterns of infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auda Fares

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The recognition of seasonal patterns in infectious disease occurrence dates back at least as far as the hippocratic era, but the mechanisms underlying these fluctuations remain poorly understood. Many classes of mechanistic hypotheses have been proposed to explain seasonality of various directly transmitted diseases, including at least the following; human activity, seasonal variability in human immune system function, seasonal variations in vitamin D levels, seasonality of melatonin, and pathogen infectivity. In this short paper will briefly discuss the role of these factors in the seasonal patterns of infectious diseases.

  11. Factors related to innovative output in the Dutch agrifood industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batterink, M.H.; Wubben, E.F.M.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2006-01-01

    The present study assessed the factors related to innovative output in the Dutch agrifood industry, a scale-intensive, supplierdominated industry. We concentrated on explanatory variables related to cooperation, information sources, innovation objectives, obstacles to innovation, and innovation

  12. Factors associated with long diagnostic delay in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Valma; Kurppa, Kalle; Huhtala, Heini; Collin, Pekka; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri

    2014-11-01

    Here, we investigated the factors associated with long diagnostic delay in celiac disease and the impact of the national Current Care Guidelines in reducing the delay. This population-based study involved 825 adult celiac disease patients. The diagnosis was considered delayed when the interval between first symptoms and diagnosis was >10 years. The patients were asked about the duration and type of symptoms before diagnosis, time and site (tertiary, secondary, or primary care) of the diagnosis, family history of the disease, and presence of significant comorbidities. Analysis was performed by binary logistic regression. Altogether, 261 (32%) out of 825 participants reported a diagnostic delay of >10 years. Female gender, neurological or musculoskeletal disorders and presence of diarrhea, abdominal pain, and malabsorption were associated with prolonged delay. Male gender, diagnosis after the introduction of the first Current Care Guidelines in 1997, and being detected by serological screening, and family history of celiac disease were associated with a lower risk of delayed diagnosis. Factors not associated with the delay were site of diagnosis, age, and presence of dermatitis herpetiformis, type 1 diabetes, or thyroidal disease. The number of long diagnostic delays in celiac disease has decreased over the past decades. The shift of diagnostics from secondary and tertiary care to primary care has not been detrimental. National guidelines together with increased awareness and active screening in at-risk groups of celiac disease are important in these circumstances.

  13. Risk factors of anxiety and depression in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahon, Stéphane; Lahmek, Pierre; Durance, Christelle; Olympie, Alain; Lesgourgues, Bruno; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Gendre, Jean-Pierre

    2012-11-01

    Little is known in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) regarding risk factors for psychological distress. The aim of this work was to study the disease characteristics and socioeconomic factors associated with anxiety and depression in IBD. From December 2008 to June 2009, 1663 patients with IBD (1450 were members of the Association Francois Aupetit, French association of IBD patients) answered a questionnaire about psychological and socioeconomic factors and adherence to treatment. In this study we focused the analysis on the characteristics of IBD (type, location, severity, treatment) and socioeconomic factors (professional, educational, and marital status and Evaluation of Precarity and Inequalities in Health Examination Centers [EPICES] score of socioeconomic deprivation; score established in medical centers in France; http://www.cetaf.asso.fr) associated with depression and anxiety. Anxiety and depression were assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Comparison between groups according to the existence of depression or anxiety was carried out using univariate and multivariate analysis. In all, 181 patients (11%) were depressed; 689 patients (41%) were anxious. By multivariate analysis, factors associated with anxiety were: severe disease (P = 0.04), flares (P = 0.05), nonadherence to treatment (P = 0.03), disabled or unemployed status (P = 0.002), and socioeconomic deprivation (P < 0.0001). Factors associated with depression were: age (P = 0.004), flares (P = 0.03), disabled or unemployed status (P = 0.03), and socioeconomic deprivation (P < 0.0001). In this large cohort of IBD patients, risk factors for anxiety and depression were severe and active disease and socioeconomic deprivation. Psychological interventions would be useful when these factors are identified. Copyright © 2012 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  14. Response to rituximab-based therapy and risk factor analysis in Epstein Barr Virus-related lymphoproliferative disorder after hematopoietic stem cell transplant in children and adults: a study from the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styczynski, Jan; Gil, Lidia; Tridello, Gloria; Ljungman, Per; Donnelly, J Peter; van der Velden, Walter; Omar, Hamdy; Martino, Rodrigo; Halkes, Constantijn; Faraci, Maura; Theunissen, Koen; Kalwak, Krzysztof; Hubacek, Petr; Sica, Simona; Nozzoli, Chiara; Fagioli, Franca; Matthes, Susanne; Diaz, Miguel A; Migliavacca, Maddalena; Balduzzi, Adriana; Tomaszewska, Agnieszka; Camara, Rafael de la; van Biezen, Anja; Hoek, Jennifer; Iacobelli, Simona; Einsele, Hermann; Cesaro, Simone

    2013-09-01

     The objective of this analysis was to investigate prognostic factors that influence the outcome of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after a rituximab-based treatment in the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) setting.  A total of 4466 allogeneic HSCTs performed between 1999 and 2011 in 19 European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation centers were retrospectively analyzed for PTLD, either biopsy-proven or probable disease.  One hundred forty-four cases of PTLD were identified, indicating an overall EBV-related PTLD frequency of 3.22%, ranging from 1.16% for matched-family donor, 2.86% for mismatched family donor, 3.97% in matched unrelated donors, and 11.24% in mismatched unrelated donor recipients. In total, 69.4% patients survived PTLD. Multivariable analysis showed that a poor response of PTLD to rituximab was associated with an age ≥30 years, involvement of extralymphoid tissue, acute GVHD, and a lack of reduction of immunosuppression upon PTLD diagnosis. In the prognostic model, the PTLD mortality increased with the increasing number of factors: 0-1, 2, or 3 factors being associated with mortality of 7%, 37%, and 72%, respectively (P disease, and acute graft-vs-host disease predicted poor outcome.

  15. IgG4-RELATED DISEASE. CLINICAL NOTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ivanovich Vasilyev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available IgG4-related diseases are a new nosological entity that encompasses a few previously known diseases. IgG4-related systemic disease is diagnosed if two or more affected organs are detected. This group of diseases has two similar signs: serological (elevated serum IgG4 subclass concentrations and histological (organ and tissue infiltration from plasmo-cytes secreting IgG4, and eosinophils, and the development of fibrosclerosis and phlebitis obliterans. The paper describes two cases. In one case, a multisystemic disease was observed virtually at its onset whereas in the other this lesion was diagnosed several years after the natural course of the disease.

  16. Total management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Katsuya

    2017-08-01

    Patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) often have multiple comorbid conditions that may interact with each other, confound the choice of treatments, and reduce mortality. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most important comorbidities of CVD, which causes serious consequences in patients with ischemic heart disease, stroke, arrhythmia, and heart failure. COPD shares common risk factors such as tobacco smoking and aging with CVD, is associated with less physical activity, and produces systemic inflammation and oxidative stress. Overall, patients with COPD have a 2-3-fold increased risk of CVD as compared to age-matched controls when adjusted for tobacco smoking. Chronic heart failure (HF) is a frequent and important comorbidity which has a significant impact on prognosis in COPD, and vice versa. HF overlaps in symptoms and signs and has a common comorbidity with COPD, so that diagnosis of COPD is difficult in patients with HF. The combination of HF and COPD presents many therapeutic challenges including beta-blockers (BBs) and beta-agonists. Inhaled long-acting bronchodilators including beta2-agonists and anticholinergics for COPD would not worsen HF. Diuretics are relatively safe, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are preferred to treat HF accompanied with COPD. BBs are only relatively contraindicated in asthma, but not in COPD. Low doses of cardioselective BBs should be aggressively initiated in clinically stable patients with HF accompanied with COPD combined with close monitoring for signs of airway obstruction and gradually up-titrated to the maximum tolerated dose. Encouraging appropriate and aggressive treatment for both HF and COPD should be recommended to improve quality of life and mortality in HF patients with COPD. Copyright © 2017 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A risk-factor analysis of medical litigation judgments related to fall injuries in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Insook; Won, Seonae; Lee, Mijin; Lee, Won

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find out the risk factors through analysis of seven medical malpractice judgments related to fall injuries. The risk factors were analysed by using the framework that approaches falls from a systems perspective and comprised people, organisational or environmental factors, with each factor being comprised of subfactors. The risk factors found in each of the seven judgments were aggregated into one framework. The risk factors related to patients (i.e. the people factor) were age, pain, related disease, activities and functional status, urination state, cognitive function impairment, past history of fall, blood transfusion, sleep endoscopy state and uncooperative attitude. The risk factors related to the medical staff and caregivers (i.e. people factor) were observation negligence, no fall prevention activities and negligence in managing high-risk group for fall. Organisational risk factors were a lack of workforce, a lack of training, neglecting the management of the high-risk group, neglecting the management of caregivers and the absence of a fall prevention procedure. Regarding the environment, the risk factors were found to be the emergency room, chairs without a backrest and the examination table. Identifying risk factors is essential for preventing fall accidents, since falls are preventable patient-safety incidents. Falls do not happen as a result of a single risk factor. Therefore, a systems approach is effective to identify risk factors, especially organisational and environmental factors.

  18. Physical inactivity and sedentary behavior: Overlooked risk factors in autoimmune rheumatic diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ana Jéssica; Roschel, Hamilton; de Sá Pinto, Ana Lúcia; Lima, Fernanda Rodrigues; Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues; Silva, Clovis Artur; Bonfá, Eloisa; Gualano, Bruno

    2017-07-01

    This review aims to (1) summarize the estimates of physical inactivity and sedentary behavior in autoimmune rheumatic diseases; (2) describe the relationship between physical (in)activity levels and disease-related outcomes; (3) contextualize the estimates and impact of physical inactivity and sedentary behavior in autoimmune diseases compared to other rheumatic diseases and chronic conditions; and (4) discuss scientific perspectives around this theme and potential clinical interventions to attenuate these preventable risk factors. We compiled evidence to show that estimates of physical inactivity and sedentary behavior in autoimmune rheumatic diseases are generally comparable to other rheumatic diseases as well as to other chronic conditions (e.g., type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and obesity), in which a lack of physical activity and excess of sedentary behavior are well-known predictors of morbimortality. In addition, we also showed evidence that both physical inactivity and sedentary behavior may be associated with poor health-related outcomes (e.g., worse disease symptoms and low functionality) in autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Thus, putting into practice interventions to make the patients "sit less and move more", particularly light-intensity activities and/or breaking-up sedentary time, is a simple and prudent therapeutic approach to minimize physical inactivity and sedentary behavior, which are overlooked yet modifiable risk factors in the field of autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Absenteeism and Employer Costs Associated With Chronic Diseases and Health Risk Factors in the US Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asay, Garrett R Beeler; Roy, Kakoli; Lang, Jason E; Payne, Rebecca L; Howard, David H

    2016-10-06

    Employers may incur costs related to absenteeism among employees who have chronic diseases or unhealthy behaviors. We examined the association between employee absenteeism and 5 conditions: 3 risk factors (smoking, physical inactivity, and obesity) and 2 chronic diseases (hypertension and diabetes). We identified 5 chronic diseases or risk factors from 2 data sources: MarketScan Health Risk Assessment and the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). Absenteeism was measured as the number of workdays missed because of sickness or injury. We used zero-inflated Poisson regression to estimate excess absenteeism as the difference in the number of days missed from work by those who reported having a risk factor or chronic disease and those who did not. Covariates included demographics (eg, age, education, sex) and employment variables (eg, industry, union membership). We quantified absenteeism costs in 2011 and adjusted them to reflect growth in employment costs to 2015 dollars. Finally, we estimated absenteeism costs for a hypothetical small employer (100 employees) and a hypothetical large employer (1,000 employees). Absenteeism estimates ranged from 1 to 2 days per individual per year depending on the risk factor or chronic disease. Except for the physical inactivity and obesity estimates, disease- and risk-factor-specific estimates were similar in MEPS and MarketScan. Absenteeism increased with the number of risk factors or diseases reported. Nationally, each risk factor or disease was associated with annual absenteeism costs greater than $2 billion. Absenteeism costs ranged from $16 to $81 (small employer) and $17 to $286 (large employer) per employee per year. Absenteeism costs associated with chronic diseases and health risk factors can be substantial. Employers may incur these costs through lower productivity, and employees could incur costs through lower wages.

  20. Impulse control and related disorders in Mexican Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; González-Latapi, Paulina; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Camacho-Ordoñez, Azyadeh; Weintraub, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs) are a relatively recent addition to the behavioral spectrum of PD-related non-motor symptoms. Social and economic factors may play a role on the ICD phenotype of PD patients. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and characterize the clinical profile of ICDs in a sample of low-income, low-education PD patients with no social security benefits from a Latin American country. We included 300 consecutive PD patients and 150 control subjects. The presence of ICD and related disorders was assessed using a structured interview. After the interview and neurological evaluation were concluded, all subjects completed the Questionnaire for Impulsive-compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease-Rating Scale (QUIP-RS). Regarding ICDs and related disorders (hobbyism-punding), 25.6% (n = 77) of patients in the PD group and 16.6% (n = 25) in the control group fulfilled criteria for at least one ICD or related disorder (p = 0.032). There was a statistically significant difference in the QUIP-RS mean score between PD and control subjects (5.6 ± 9.7 and 2.7 ± 4.21, p = 0.001). The most common ICD was compulsive eating for both PD (8.6%) and control (2.6%) groups. The results of this study confirm that for this population, symptoms of an ICD are significantly more frequent in PD subjects than in control subjects. Nevertheless, socioeconomic differences may contribute to a lower overall frequency and distinct pattern of ICDs in PD patients compared with what has been reported in other countries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nosocomial infections and related factors in southern khorasan hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Bijari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Nosocomial infections are defined as infections occurring during a patient's stay at hospital (48-72h after admission.Nosocomial infections are one of the important problems of health. This study aimed was determine the prevalence of nosocomial infections, and related factors in hospitals with more than 100 beds in south Khorasan Province. Materials and Methods: In this crass-sectional study, an investigator-administered questionnaire was completed for each patient with nosocomial infections diagnosis in hospitals with more than 100 beds in South Khorasan. This questionnaire conation demographic characteristic of patients, department, duration of admission, kind of pathogen and risk factors that was designed according to standard questionnaire of Iranian Nasocomial infections surveillance system (INIS of Center for communicable Disease Control, Ministry of Health. Data were analyzed with SPSS 16 software. Results and discussion: Number of patients with nosocomial infection was 358. The incidence of nosocomial infection was 0.9%. ICU had the highest incidence rate (17.3%. The most common nosocomial infection was pneumonia (43%, and urinary tract infection (UTI (15.1%. In 33.5% culture result were negative. In other cases, culture results showed klebsiella spp. (12.8% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (9.8% were the most prevalent bacteria. Most factors associated with nosocomial infection in patients were urinary catheters (70.4%, suction (66.8% and tracheal tube (54.2%. 24% of patients expired. The results showed lower ratio of nosocomial infection, that the main reason is failure to detection and reporting of actual cases of nosocomial infection. Promoting detection and reporting system for Prevention and control of nosocomial infection was recommended

  2. Respiratory disease mortality among uranium miners as related to height, radiation, smoking, and latent period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, V.E.; Gillam, J.D.; James, L.A.

    1975-11-01

    A prospective mortality study using a life table method was done on 3366 white underground uranium miners, and 1231 surface workers. Observed deaths were found to exceed those expected from respiratory cancer, pneumoconiosis and related diseases, and accidents related to work. Exposure - response relationships with radiation varied with cigarette smoking and with height of workers. Of four factors involved in both malignant and nonmalignant respiratory diseases (height, free silica, cigarette smoking and alpha radiation), radiation was considered to be most important

  3. Overview of IgG4 - Related Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opriţă, R; Opriţă, B; Berceanu, D; Diaconescu, I B

    2017-01-01

    Rationale (hypothesis): IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a pathological entity recently recognized by the medical world that can affect any organ or system. However, there is insufficient data about this disease in medical literature. Aim (objective): A more extensive clarification of the IgG4 molecule, the diversified aspects of IgG4-related disease, and the response of this disease to treatment, will provide a crucial understanding of the immune system and other diseases now known to be associated with IgG4. The MEDLINE online medical database was used, and, after a comprehensive review of medical articles regarding IgG4-RD, published after 2003, using the search words "IgG4- related disease" and "IgG4 molecule", we have described the clinical, pathological and therapeutic features of IgG4-RD, as well as the presence of the IgG4 molecule in the evolution, diagnosis and management of this syndrome. We characterized the potential disease mechanisms and discussed early observations related to treatment. Given the response to immunosuppressive therapy, it is hypothesized that IgG4-related disease is most likely an autoimmune disease. Therefore, IgG4-related disease is a fibro-inflammatory condition that can affect any organ and can lead to the formation of pseudotumoral lesions requiring differential diagnosis with various malignancies. Positive diagnostic criteria are histopathological and require at least two features out of the following three: dense limphoplasmocitary infiltrate, storiform fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis.

  4. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Emerging Adults in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, Demetrius Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to examine factors associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among emerging adults in college aged 18-25 years. CVD risks that develop during this period often persist into adulthood making it an ideal time to target CVD prevention. The specific aims of this dissertation were to 1) explore perceptions…

  5. Is diet an essential risk factor for coronary heart disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Ball, K. P.

    1980-01-01

    Cigarette smoking, hypertension and diet each play a major role in the development of coronary heart attacks in most industrialized nations. In some countries where cigarette smoking and hypertension are prevalent there is a low risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Hyperlipidaemia resulting from national food habits appears to be the essential factor in the high rates of CHD in developed countries.

  6. Chronic diseases risk factors and access to health exams among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using data from the World Health Survey (WHS) carried out in South Africa in 2003, the aim of this study is to establish chronic diseases risk factors and access to preventive exams for cervical and breast cancer among South African women. The sample included in this analysis included 1236 women 18 years and above.

  7. Haptoglobin phenotypes as a risk factor for coronary artery disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haptoglobin phenotypes as a risk factor for coronary artery disease in type 2 ... Recognition of diabetic individuals at greatest risk of developing coronary artery ... CAD, Group II: 48 type 2DM patients with developed CAD, Group III: 40 age and ...

  8. Risk factors for meningococcal disease in Cape Town | Moodley ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine the risk factors associated with meningococcal disease among children living in Cape Town. Design. A case-control study was conducted from October 1993 to January 1995. Setting. The study population consisted of all children tmder the age of 14 years who were resident in the Cape Town ...

  9. Factors Influencing Smoking Cessation in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Kryss; Higgins, Helen

    1997-01-01

    Ten sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics considered predictors of difficulty with smoking cessation in patients with coronary artery disease are reviewed. The compounding effects of nicotine addiction are discussed. Consideration of these factors may result in individualized programs for smoking cessation. A brief overview…

  10. Exploration of genetic susceptibility factors for Parkinson's disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 89; Issue 2. Exploration of genetic susceptibility factors for Parkinson's disease in a South American sample. Bruno A. Benitez Diego A. Forero Gonzalo H. Arboleda Luis A. Granados Juan J. Yunis William Fernandez Humberto Arboleda. Research Note Volume 89 Issue 2 ...

  11. Socio-economic status, risk factors and coronary heart disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationship of socio-economic status (SES) indicators and coronary risk factors (RFs) with coronary heart disease (CHD) prevalence was examined in 5620 subjects aged 20 ... The SES indicators had Iitlle or no independent effect on CHD prevalence in multivariate logistic analyses after, inclusion of the standard RFs.

  12. Congenital heart disease screening: which referral factors are most important

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayyaz, A.; Ahmed, W.

    2013-01-01

    To identify the referral factors for fetal echocardiography which are associated with congenital cardiac defects in the fetus. Study Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Radiology Department, CMH, Rawalpindi, from January 2007 to November 2010. Methodology: All patients referred for fetal echocardiography with one or more risk factors for the development of congenital heart disease, and those patients with incidental discovery of congenital heart disease on antenatal ultrasound were evaluated. Patients with no risk factors who were found to have normal fetal echocardiography were excluded from the study. Univariate logistic regression analysis was carried out for each variable. The variables with statistical significance of less than 0.05 were subjected to multivariate logistic regression. Fetal echocardiographic diagnosis was taken as the dependent variable and all other variables were the independent variables. Results: Two hundred and sixty four patients were evaluated by fetal echocardiography for congenital heart disease. The statistically significant factor was detection of congenital heart disease on routine ultrasound examination. Conclusion: A routine obstetric scan should include evaluation of the heart with four-chamber and base-of-heart views to exclude cardiac anomalies. A cardiac anomaly picked up on routine ultrasound scan is the most important indication for referral for fetal echocardiography. Fetal arrhythmias and echogenic focus in the left ventricle do not have a significant association with structural cardiac malformation. (author)

  13. HIV related renal disease in Africans | Elangovan | IMTU Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Renal disease is becoming an increasingly prevalent entity in human immunodefi ciency virus (HIV)–infected patients, first diagnosed in AIDS patients in 1984. The HIV-related renal disease represents a spectrum of clinical and histological conditions presenting as acute renal failure, chronic renal failure, glomerulopathies, ...

  14. The emerging mysteries of IgG4-related disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Wouter; Barnes, Eleanor

    2014-01-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is increasingly recognised in Western societies as a multi-system, inflammatory, fibrosing disease of unknown aetiology that typically, though not exclusively, presents in older men. The clinical manifestations are diverse and almost any organ may be affected. The

  15. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: histopathological and imaging perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, S.R.; Ryan, S.M.; Colby, T.V.

    2003-01-01

    The present review focuses on the interstitial lung diseases related to smoking. Thus, the pathology and radiology of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis and respiratory bronchiolitis-associated-interstitial lung disease are considered. The more tenuous association between pulmonary fibrosis and smoking is also discussed

  16. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: histopathological and imaging perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, S.R.; Ryan, S.M.; Colby, T.V

    2003-04-01

    The present review focuses on the interstitial lung diseases related to smoking. Thus, the pathology and radiology of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis and respiratory bronchiolitis-associated-interstitial lung disease are considered. The more tenuous association between pulmonary fibrosis and smoking is also discussed.

  17. Incidence and prevalence of pregnancy-related heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Karen; Böhm, Michael

    2014-03-15

    Worldwide, the numbers of women who have a pre-existing cardiovascular disease or develop cardiac problems during pregnancy are increasing and, due to the lack of evidenced-based data, this provides challenges for the treating physician. Cardiovascular disease in pregnancy is a complex topic as women can present either pre- or post-partum, due to a pre-existing heart disease such as operated on or unoperated on congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, chronic hypertension, or familial dilated cardiomyopathy. Women often present with symptoms and signs of acute heart failure. On the other hand, there are diseases which are directly related to pregnancy, such as hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and peripartum cardiomyopathy, or where pregnancy increases risk of a disease as, for example, the risk of myocardial infarction. These diseases can have long-term implications to the life of the affected women and their families. There is, in particular, a paucity of data from developing countries of this unique disease pattern and its presentations. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the incidence and prevalence of pregnancy-related cardiovascular disease in women presenting pre- or post-partum.

  18. Novel disease susceptibility factors for fungal necrotrophic pathogens in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobón, Albor; Canet, Juan Vicente; García-Andrade, Javier; Angulo, Carlos; Neumetzler, Lutz; Persson, Staffan; Vera, Pablo

    2015-04-01

    Host cells use an intricate signaling system to respond to invasions by pathogenic microorganisms. Although several signaling components of disease resistance against necrotrophic fungal pathogens have been identified, our understanding for how molecular components and host processes contribute to plant disease susceptibility is rather sparse. Here, we identified four transcription factors (TFs) from Arabidopsis that limit pathogen spread. Arabidopsis mutants defective in any of these TFs displayed increased disease susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea and Plectosphaerella cucumerina, and a general activation of non-immune host processes that contribute to plant disease susceptibility. Transcriptome analyses revealed that the mutants share a common transcriptional signature of 77 up-regulated genes. We characterized several of the up-regulated genes that encode peptides with a secretion signal, which we named PROVIR (for provirulence) factors. Forward and reverse genetic analyses revealed that many of the PROVIRs are important for disease susceptibility of the host to fungal necrotrophs. The TFs and PROVIRs identified in our work thus represent novel genetic determinants for plant disease susceptibility to necrotrophic fungal pathogens.

  19. Novel disease susceptibility factors for fungal necrotrophic pathogens in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albor Dobón

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Host cells use an intricate signaling system to respond to invasions by pathogenic microorganisms. Although several signaling components of disease resistance against necrotrophic fungal pathogens have been identified, our understanding for how molecular components and host processes contribute to plant disease susceptibility is rather sparse. Here, we identified four transcription factors (TFs from Arabidopsis that limit pathogen spread. Arabidopsis mutants defective in any of these TFs displayed increased disease susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea and Plectosphaerella cucumerina, and a general activation of non-immune host processes that contribute to plant disease susceptibility. Transcriptome analyses revealed that the mutants share a common transcriptional signature of 77 up-regulated genes. We characterized several of the up-regulated genes that encode peptides with a secretion signal, which we named PROVIR (for provirulence factors. Forward and reverse genetic analyses revealed that many of the PROVIRs are important for disease susceptibility of the host to fungal necrotrophs. The TFs and PROVIRs identified in our work thus represent novel genetic determinants for plant disease susceptibility to necrotrophic fungal pathogens.

  20. Pharmacogenetics of Vascular Risk Factors in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacabelos, Ramón; Meyyazhagan, Arun; Carril, Juan C.; Cacabelos, Pablo; Teijido, Óscar

    2018-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a polygenic/complex disorder in which genomic, epigenomic, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and environmental factors converge to define a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype. Pharmacogenetics is a major determinant of therapeutic outcome in AD. Different categories of genes are potentially involved in the pharmacogenetic network responsible for drug efficacy and safety, including pathogenic, mechanistic, metabolic, transporter, and pleiotropic genes. However, most drugs exert pleiotropic effects that are promiscuously regulated for different gene products. Only 20% of the Caucasian population are extensive metabolizers for tetragenic haplotypes integrating CYP2D6-CYP2C19-CYP2C9-CYP3A4/5 variants. Patients harboring CYP-related poor (PM) and/or ultra-rapid (UM) geno-phenotypes display more irregular profiles in drug metabolism than extensive (EM) or intermediate (IM) metabolizers. Among 111 pentagenic (APOE-APOB-APOC3-CETP-LPL) haplotypes associated with lipid metabolism, carriers of the H26 haplotype (23-TT-CG-AG-CC) exhibit the lowest cholesterol levels, and patients with the H104 haplotype (44-CC-CC-AA-CC) are severely hypercholesterolemic. Furthermore, APOE, NOS3, ACE, AGT, and CYP variants influence the therapeutic response to hypotensive drugs in AD patients with hypertension. Consequently, the implementation of pharmacogenetic procedures may optimize therapeutics in AD patients under polypharmacy regimes for the treatment of concomitant vascular disorders. PMID:29301387

  1. Pharmacogenetics of Vascular Risk Factors in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Cacabelos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a polygenic/complex disorder in which genomic, epigenomic, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and environmental factors converge to define a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype. Pharmacogenetics is a major determinant of therapeutic outcome in AD. Different categories of genes are potentially involved in the pharmacogenetic network responsible for drug efficacy and safety, including pathogenic, mechanistic, metabolic, transporter, and pleiotropic genes. However, most drugs exert pleiotropic effects that are promiscuously regulated for different gene products. Only 20% of the Caucasian population are extensive metabolizers for tetragenic haplotypes integrating CYP2D6-CYP2C19-CYP2C9-CYP3A4/5 variants. Patients harboring CYP-related poor (PM and/or ultra-rapid (UM geno-phenotypes display more irregular profiles in drug metabolism than extensive (EM or intermediate (IM metabolizers. Among 111 pentagenic (APOE-APOB-APOC3-CETP-LPL haplotypes associated with lipid metabolism, carriers of the H26 haplotype (23-TT-CG-AG-CC exhibit the lowest cholesterol levels, and patients with the H104 haplotype (44-CC-CC-AA-CC are severely hypercholesterolemic. Furthermore, APOE, NOS3, ACE, AGT, and CYP variants influence the therapeutic response to hypotensive drugs in AD patients with hypertension. Consequently, the implementation of pharmacogenetic procedures may optimize therapeutics in AD patients under polypharmacy regimes for the treatment of concomitant vascular disorders.

  2. Computational Modelling Approaches on Epigenetic Factors in Neurodegenerative and Autoimmune Diseases and Their Mechanistic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afroza Khanam Irin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative as well as autoimmune diseases have unclear aetiologies, but an increasing number of evidences report for a combination of genetic and epigenetic alterations that predispose for the development of disease. This review examines the major milestones in epigenetics research in the context of diseases and various computational approaches developed in the last decades to unravel new epigenetic modifications. However, there are limited studies that systematically link genetic and epigenetic alterations of DNA to the aetiology of diseases. In this work, we demonstrate how disease-related epigenetic knowledge can be systematically captured and integrated with heterogeneous information into a functional context using Biological Expression Language (BEL. This novel methodology, based on BEL, enables us to integrate epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation or acetylation of histones into a specific disease network. As an example, we depict the integration of epigenetic and genetic factors in a functional context specific to Parkinson’s disease (PD and Multiple Sclerosis (MS.

  3. Wildlife-related Zoonotic Diseases among Pastoralists in Uganda ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    While risk of zoonotic disease is related to wildlife-livestock-human ... public health, food security, wildlife protection and business (tourism, value chains). Using an Ecohealth approach, researchers will conduct a serological survey to ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: REN-related kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (5 links) Encyclopedia: Hyperkalemia Encyclopedia: Renin Health Topic: Anemia Health Topic: Gout Health Topic: Kidney Diseases Additional NIH Resources (2 ...

  5. Tay Sachs and Related Storage Diseases: Family Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Gerald; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Based on interviews with 24 families, the article discusses family planning and the choices available to those families in which a child has previously died from Tay-Sachs or related lipid storage diseases. (IM)

  6. IgG4-related disease in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Annick A J M; Seidl, Maximilian; Drendel, Vanessa; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Voll, Reinhard E; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Warnatz, Klaus; Kollert, Florian

    2017-07-01

    A patient with autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorder (ALPS) developed IgG4-related disease. In retrospect, he had high levels of serum IgG4 for several years prior to presenting with IgG4-related pancreatitis. These high IgG4 levels were masked by hypergammaglobulinemia, a common feature of ALPS. We next screened 18 ALPS patients; four of them displayed increased levels of IgG4. Hence, IgG4-related disease should be considered in ALPS patients, especially in those manifesting lymphocytic organ infiltration or excessive hypergammaglobulinaemia. Screening of IgG4-related disease patients for ALPS-associated mutations would provide further information on whether this disease could be a late-onset atypical presentation of ALPS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Physical inactivity: the "Cinderella" risk factor for noncommunicable disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Fiona C; Bauman, Adrian E

    2011-08-01

    There is strong evidence demonstrating the direct and indirect pathways by which physical activity prevents many of the major noncommunicable diseases (NCD) responsible for premature death and disability. Physical inactivity was identified as the 4th leading risk factor for the prevention of NCD, preceded only by tobacco use, hypertension, and high blood glucose levels, and accounting for more than 3 million preventable deaths globally in 2010. Physical inactivity is a global public health priority but, in most countries, this has not yet resulted in widespread recognition nor specific physical activity-related policy action at the necessary scale. Instead, physical inactivity could be described as the Cinderella of NCD risk factors, defined as "poverty of policy attention and resourcing proportionate to its importance." The pressing question is "Why is this so?" The authors identify and discuss 8 possible explanations and the need for more effective communication on the importance of physical activity in the NCD prevention context. Although not all of the issues identified will be relevant for any 1 country, it is likely that at different times and in different combinations these 8 problems continue to delay national-level progress on addressing physical inactivity in many countries. The authors confirm that there is sufficient evidence to act, and that much better use of well-planned, coherent communication strategies are needed in most countries and at the international level. Significant opportunities exist. The Toronto Charter on Physical Activity and the Seven Investments that Work are 2 useful tools to support increased advocacy on physical activity within and beyond the context of the crucial 2011 UN High-Level Meeting on NCDs.

  8. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases; Interstitielle Lungenerkrankungen bei Rauchern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marten, K. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinikum rechts der Isar, Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    2007-03-15

    The most important smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Although traditionally considered to be discrete entities, smoking-related ILDs often coexist, thus accounting for the sometimes complex patterns encountered on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative role of smoking in the development of pulmonary fibrosis.

  9. A etiological factors of chronic liver disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, A.; Malik, F.R.; Akhtar, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chronicity of liver disease is determined either by duration of liver disease or by evidence of either severe liver disease or physical stigmata of chronic liver disease. Chronic liver disease may be caused commonly by persistent viral infections, metabolic diseases, drugs, autoimmune hepatitis, or unknown factors. The objective of this study was to find out the aetiology of chronic liver disease (CLD) in children. Methodology: It was a descriptive, prospective study which used a structured proforma designed to collect data of cases of CLD from both indoor and outdoor Paediatrics units of Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi, and Children Hospital, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad. All children under 12 years having either clinical or biochemical evidence of liver disease and/or elevated liver enzymes for more than 3 months were included in this study. Results: Sixty cases of CLD were enrolled from indoor and outdoor units from January 2010 to July 201. Thirty nine (65%) cases were male and 21 (35%) were female. Eleven children were less than 1 year, 18 were 1-5 years old and 31 were 5-12 years of age. Viral hepatitis was the most common cause found in 22 (36.7%) cases. Out of these 22 patients with viral aetiology 19 (31.66%) patients had Hepatitis C and 3 (5%) had Hepatitis B. Glycogen storage disease was seen in 8.3% cases, and biliary atresia and Wilson disease in 6.7% each. Other less commonly found cases were autoimmune hepatitis, TORCH infections, hepatoma and drug induced hepatitis (1.7% each). Cause couldn't be established in 35% cases which remained idiopathic. Conclusion: Viral hepatitis is the leading cause of chronic liver disease in children, with the highest incidence of chronic Hepatitis C followed by metabolic disorders (glycogen storage disease and Wilson disease) and biliary atresia. Chronic viral hepatitis was most prevalent between 11 months to 12 years of age. Wilson disease was common in 3-7 years age group, and

  10. Rivastigmine in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease dementia: an ADAS-cog factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Daniel; Somogyi, Monique; Meng, Xiangyi

    2011-09-01

    Rivastigmine treatment is associated with significant improvements on the cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-cog) in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD). Both AD and PDD are purported to have different profiles of cognitive impairment, which may respond differentially to rivastigmine treatment. This was a retrospective analysis of 3 randomized, double-blind, rivastigmine trial databases (Investigation of transDermal Exelon in ALzheimer's disease [IDEAL; AD], EXelon in PaRkinson's disEaSe dementia Study [EXPRESS; PDD], and Alzheimer's Disease with ENA 713 [ADENA; AD]). Factor analyses of the 11 baseline ADAS-cog items derived the same factors in the 2 diseases, that is, "memory" and "language". Rivastigmine-treated AD and PDD patients showed significant improvements (P < .0001 versus placebo) on both factors. For both AD and PDD, rivastigmine had a numerically greater effect on memory than language. Treatment effect sizes were numerically greater in PDD compared with AD. Rivastigmine treatment is associated with improvement in memory and language in AD and PDD. The numerically greater response in PDD is consistent with greater cholinergic deficits in this disease state.

  11. Analysis on Developmental Factors of the Liver Diseases in Ultrasound Diagnosis of Healthcare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Mi Yeon [Dept. of Radiology of Healthcare Center Kyobo Life Insurance Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hong Ryang; Lim, Chang Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    The study found out developmental factors of the liver diseases in 29, 531 cases of the healthy adults who were diagnosed by using ultrasound at domestic healthcare centers in 6 cities. The results are as follows. Based on the result of the study, the liver diseases diagnosed by using ultrasound was revealed to show 43.1% of prevalence, and the occurrence was significantly higher in male (23.3%) than in female (19.8%). The prevalence of hepatic diseases related to the BMI was revealed to show highest prevalence of the fatty liver in obese group (BMI 25) by recording 44.3%. Smoking contributed to the high prevalence of all liver diseases. Although the fatty liver was the most frequently occurred form of liver diseases by recording the prevalence of 49.1% (22.2% in male, 26.9% in female), the significant difference was found only in female (p < 0.05), but male group did not show significant difference (p > 0.05). The prevalence of hepatic diseases related to the hypertension was revealed to show highest prevalence of the fatty liver in hypertension group by recording 67.7%. The prevalence of hepatic diseases related to the diabetes was revealed to show highest prevalence of the fatty liver in diabetes group by recording 66.2%. The high prevalence of all hepatic diseases was related to diabetes mellitus with statistical significance (p < 0.001). The multiple regression analysis for the related factors which affect the prevalence of the liver diseases showed the higher prevalence by age. Sex, obesity and diabetes mellitus were positively related to the prevalence (p < 0.05) while hypertension and smoking showed no significant relationship to the prevalence of the disease (p > 0.05).

  12. Absenteeism and Employer Costs Associated With Chronic Diseases and Health Risk Factors in the US Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kakoli; Lang, Jason E.; Payne, Rebecca L.; Howard, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Employers may incur costs related to absenteeism among employees who have chronic diseases or unhealthy behaviors. We examined the association between employee absenteeism and 5 conditions: 3 risk factors (smoking, physical inactivity, and obesity) and 2 chronic diseases (hypertension and diabetes). Methods We identified 5 chronic diseases or risk factors from 2 data sources: MarketScan Health Risk Assessment and the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). Absenteeism was measured as the number of workdays missed because of sickness or injury. We used zero-inflated Poisson regression to estimate excess absenteeism as the difference in the number of days missed from work by those who reported having a risk factor or chronic disease and those who did not. Covariates included demographics (eg, age, education, sex) and employment variables (eg, industry, union membership). We quantified absenteeism costs in 2011 and adjusted them to reflect growth in employment costs to 2015 dollars. Finally, we estimated absenteeism costs for a hypothetical small employer (100 employees) and a hypothetical large employer (1,000 employees). Results Absenteeism estimates ranged from 1 to 2 days per individual per year depending on the risk factor or chronic disease. Except for the physical inactivity and obesity estimates, disease- and risk-factor–specific estimates were similar in MEPS and MarketScan. Absenteeism increased with the number of risk factors or diseases reported. Nationally, each risk factor or disease was associated with annual absenteeism costs greater than $2 billion. Absenteeism costs ranged from $16 to $81 (small employer) and $17 to $286 (large employer) per employee per year. Conclusion Absenteeism costs associated with chronic diseases and health risk factors can be substantial. Employers may incur these costs through lower productivity, and employees could incur costs through lower wages. PMID:27710764

  13. Transforming growth factor beta signaling in adult cardiovascular diseases and repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doetschman, Thomas; Barnett, Joey V.; Runyan, Raymond B.; Camenisch, Todd D.; Heimark, Ronald L.; Granzier, Henk L.; Conway, Simon J.; Azhar, Mohamad

    2011-01-01

    The majority of children with congenital heart disease now live into adulthood due to the remarkable surgical and medical advances that have taken place over the past half century. Because of this, the adults now represent the largest age group with adult cardiovascular diseases. They include patients with heart diseases that were not detected or not treated during childhood, those whose defects were surgically corrected but now need revision due to maladaptive responses to the procedure, those with exercise problems, and those with age-related degenerative diseases. Because adult cardiovascular diseases in this population are relatively new, they are not well understood. It is therefore necessary to understand the molecular and physiological pathways involved if we are to improve treatments. Since there is a developmental basis to adult cardiovascular disease, transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling pathways that are essential for proper cardiovascular development may also play critical roles in the homeostatic, repair and stress response processes involved in adult cardiovascular diseases. Consequently, we have chosen to summarize the current information on a subset of TGFβ ligand and receptor genes and related effector genes that when dysregulated are known to lead to cardiovascular diseases and adult cardiovascular deficiencies and/or pathologies. A better understanding of the TGFβ signaling network in cardiovascular disease and repair will impact genetic and physiologic investigations of cardiovascular diseases in elderly patients and lead to an improvement in clinical interventions. PMID:21953136

  14. Chagas disease, a risk factor for high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicco, Miguel Hernán; Rodeles, Luz; Yódice, Agustina; Marcipar, Iván

    2014-12-01

    Chagas disease is a parasite infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Its most common complications is chronic Chagas heart disease but impairments of the systemic vasculature also has been observed. Although the different mechanisms that regulate blood pressure are disrupted, to our knowledge data on the association of hypertension and chronic Chagas disease are scarce. In this regard we evaluate whether Chagas disease constitutes a high blood pressure risk factor. We recruited 200 individuals, half of them with positive serology for T. cruzi. They were subjected to a complete clinical examination. The mean age of sampled individuals was 46.7 ± 12.3, and the mean of systolic and diastolic blood pressure were 124 ± 12 mmHg and 82 ± 10 mmHg, respectively. There were no between-group differences regarding age, sex distribution or body mass index. Chagas disease contributed significantly to high blood pressure (OR = 4, 95% CI 1.8323-7.0864, p = 0.0002). Our results reveal an important association between Chagas disease and high blood pressure, which should be contemplated by physicians in order to promote preventive cardiovascular actions in patients with Chagas disease.

  15. Is Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome a Risk Factor for Cerebro Vascular Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Emrah; Yılmaz, Ahmet; Demirağ, Mehmet Derya; Çalık, Murat

    2017-01-01

    To determine the relationship between cerebro vascular disease and pseudoexfoliation syndrome. This cross-sectional case control study consisted of 50 patients with ischemic-type cerebro vascular disease and 50 control subjects. All subjects were investigated for diabetes mellitus and hypertension status and underwent a detailed ophthalmic examination. A diagnosis of pseudoexfoliation syndrome was made if characteristic greyish particulate matter was found on the anterior lens capsule after pupillary dilatation by slit-lamp examination. All subjects were compared in terms of pseudoexfoliation syndrome, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Pearson Chi Square and Student's t test were used for statistical analysis. Logistic regression analyses of the risk factors between groups were also made. The presence of pseudoexfoliation syndrome was significantly higher in patients with cerebro vascular disease when compared to the control subjects (p = 0.02). The frequency of diabetes mellitus was similar between the two groups. Arterial hypertension was significantly more frequent in the patient group when compared to the control subjects (p cerebro vascular disease. In the present study, we found that pseudoexfoliation syndrome frequency was found to be higher in patients with cerebro vascular disease than in control subjects. A slit-lamp examination of the eye could be an important marker that indicates the risk of cerebro vascular disease. We recommend an evaluation of all subjects with pseudoexfoliation syndrome for the presence of cerebro vascular disease. Longitudinal studies with larger populations are needed to confirm this relationship.

  16. Health-related quality of life and related factors of military police officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Franciele Cascaes; Hernandez, Salma Stéphany Soleman; Arancibia, Beatriz Angélica Valdivia; Castro, Thiago Luis da Silva; Filho, Paulo José Barbosa Gutierres; da Silva, Rudney

    2014-04-27

    The present study aimed to determine the effect of demographic characteristics, occupation, anthropometric indices, and leisure-time physical activity levels on coronary risk and health-related quality of life among military police officers from the State of Santa Catarina, Brazil. The sample included 165 military police officers who fulfilled the study’s inclusion criteria. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire and the Short Form Health Survey were used, in addition to a spreadsheet of socio-demographic, occupational and anthropometric data. Statistical analyses were performed using descriptive analysis followed by Spearman Correlation and multiple linear regression analysis using the backward method. The waist-to-height ratio was identified as a risk factor low health-related quality of life. In addition, the conicity index, fat percentage, years of service in the military police, minutes of work per day and leisure-time physical activity levels were identified as risk factors for coronary disease among police officers. These findings suggest that the Military Police Department should adopt an institutional policy that allows police officers to practice regular physical activity in order to maintain and improve their physical fitness, health, job performance, and quality of life.

  17. Pathomorphological characteristic of IgG4-related diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Dyadyk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available IgG4-related diseases are a relatively new group of diseases of unknown etiology which are characterized by the development of fibrosis of organs with the presence of big amounts of IgG4-positive plasma-cells in the area of the lesions and increased levels of IgG4 in serum. The organs that may be affected are pancreas, salivary gland, and others, clinical cases of kidney damage are described as well. Renal involvement in IgG4-related diseases most often occurs on the type of tubulointerstitial nephritis, with the further development of acute or chronic kidney injury. The clinic may be represented by the pseudotumor of kidney, renal tissue heterogeneity on the results of CT-studies; acute or chronic renal disease; combination with other organ damage (autoimmune pancreatitis, sclerosing cholangitis, sclerosing lymphoplasmacytic cholecystitis, colitis, sialadenitis, retroperitoneal fibrosis, etc.. Laboratory findings include an increased level of IgG4 in the blood serum, hypocomplementemia, eosinophilia. Histologically, there is interstitial inflammation with many plasma cells, interstitial fibrosis, tubular atrophy, thickening of the tubular basement membrane, some cases are a type of membranous glomerulonephritis. The aim of the study is to identify the patients with IgG4-related diseases with renal impairment and widening the pathological database of such patients with renal impairment to determine the classification criteria of this pathological condition. Materials and methods will include the deceased kidney screening, screening of patients with autoimmune and allergic diseases, nephrological patients screening with the lifetime biopsy (in some cases – repeat biopsy with chronic or acute kidney impairment. There will be clinical and pathological comparison in kidney damage and other diseases with the development of criteria for the classification of lesions in the presence of IgG4-positive substrates and further development of practical

  18. Disease-Related Detection with Electrochemical Biosensors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapid diagnosis of diseases at their initial stage is critical for effective clinical outcomes and promotes general public health. Classical in vitro diagnostics require centralized laboratories, tedious work and large, expensive devices. In recent years, numerous electrochemical biosensors have been developed and proposed for detection of various diseases based on specific biomarkers taking advantage of their features, including sensitivity, selectivity, low cost and rapid response. This article reviews research trends in disease-related detection with electrochemical biosensors. Focus has been placed on the immobilization mechanism of electrochemical biosensors, and the techniques and materials used for the fabrication of biosensors are introduced in details. Various biomolecules used for different diseases have been listed. Besides, the advances and challenges of using electrochemical biosensors for disease-related applications are discussed.

  19. Disease-Related Detection with Electrochemical Biosensors: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Xu, Jin; Liu, Junjie; Wang, Xiangyang; Chen, Bin

    2017-10-17

    Rapid diagnosis of diseases at their initial stage is critical for effective clinical outcomes and promotes general public health. Classical in vitro diagnostics require centralized laboratories, tedious work and large, expensive devices. In recent years, numerous electrochemical biosensors have been developed and proposed for detection of various diseases based on specific biomarkers taking advantage of their features, including sensitivity, selectivity, low cost and rapid response. This article reviews research trends in disease-related detection with electrochemical biosensors. Focus has been placed on the immobilization mechanism of electrochemical biosensors, and the techniques and materials used for the fabrication of biosensors are introduced in details. Various biomolecules used for different diseases have been listed. Besides, the advances and challenges of using electrochemical biosensors for disease-related applications are discussed.

  20. Climate change-related migration and infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Celia

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change will have significant impacts on both human migration and population health, including infectious disease. It will amplify and alter migration pathways, and will contribute to the changing ecology and transmission dynamics of infectious disease. However there has been limited consideration of the intersections between migration and health in the context of a changing climate. This article argues that climate-change related migration - in conjunction with other drivers of migration - will contribute to changing profiles of infectious disease. It considers infectious disease risks for different climate-related migration pathways, including: forced displacement, slow-onset migration particularly to urban-poor areas, planned resettlement, and labor migration associated with climate change adaptation initiatives. Migration can reduce vulnerability to climate change, but it is critical to better understand and respond to health impacts - including infectious diseases - for migrant populations and host communities.

  1. Nonadherence behaviors and some related factors in kidney transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pari Hedayati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kidney transplantation is the renal replacement therapy of choice for most patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD, however, adherence to the recommended lifestyle is critical for a positive prognosis. The purpose of this study was to assess adherence to immunosuppressive therapy and lifestyle recommendations along with some related factors among kidney transplant patients. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive analytical study, all patients completed a questionnaire regarding medication intake and lifestyle recommendations (preventing of infection, self-monitoring, prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD, and sun protection. The participants were divided into 4 groups according to the level of adherence (good, partial, poor, and nonadherent indicated in their responses. Results: Most kidney recipients were adherent to their drug prescriptions, but were partial, poor, or nonadherent regarding lifestyle recommendations. Increased passage of time since transplantation and low family support and educational level resulted in nonadherence. Men showed greater adherence to medication intake than women. Patients with lower number of drugs and reported drug side-effects illustrated better adherence to medication intake. Women adhered to infection protection recommendations more than men, and older and married patients adhered to cardiovascular prevention recommendations more than others. However, younger patients showed greater adherence to self-monitoring recommendations, and singles, young individuals, and women were adherent to sun protection recommendations. Conclusions: Nonadherence is common among kidney transplant recipients. Thus, it is necessary to determine patients who are at risk of nonadherence and to introduce more educational programs to improve their adherence and their quality of life (QOL.

  2. Effects of Vegetables on Cardiovascular Diseases and Related Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Yi Tang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown that vegetable consumption is inversely related to the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, research has indicated that many vegetables like potatoes, soybeans, sesame, tomatoes, dioscorea, onions, celery, broccoli, lettuce and asparagus showed great potential in preventing and treating cardiovascular diseases, and vitamins, essential elements, dietary fibers, botanic proteins and phytochemicals were bioactive components. The cardioprotective effects of vegetables might involve antioxidation; anti-inflammation; anti-platelet; regulating blood pressure, blood glucose, and lipid profile; attenuating myocardial damage; and modulating relevant enzyme activities, gene expression, and signaling pathways as well as some other biomarkers associated to cardiovascular diseases. In addition, several vegetables and their bioactive components have been proven to protect against cardiovascular diseases in clinical trials. In this review, we analyze and summarize the effects of vegetables on cardiovascular diseases based on epidemiological studies, experimental research, and clinical trials, which are significant to the application of vegetables in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Prevalence of celiac disease among first-degree relatives of Indian celiac disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Asha; Prakash, Shyam; Kaur, Gurvinder; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Ahuja, Vineet; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Makharia, Govind K

    2016-03-01

    Celiac disease, once thought to be uncommon in Asia, is now recognized in Asian nations as well. We investigated the prevalence of celiac disease in first-degree relatives of celiac disease patients followed in our centre. First-degree relatives were screened prospectively for celiac disease using questionnaire-based interview and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody. Serology positive first-degree relatives underwent duodenal biopsies. Diagnosis of celiac disease was made based on positive serology and villous abnormality Marsh grade 2 or higher. Human leucocyte antigen DQ2/-DQ8 was also assessed in 127 first-degree relatives. 434 first-degree relatives of 176 celiac disease patients were prospectively recruited; 282 were symptomatic (64.9%), 58 were positive for serology (13.3%). Seroprevalence was higher in female than in males (19% vs 8.5%; p=0.001) and highest in siblings (16.9%) than parents (13.6%) and children (5.9%) of celiac patients (p=0.055); 87.4% first-degree relatives were human leucocyte antigen-DQ2/-DQ8 positive. Overall prevalence of celiac disease was 10.9% amongst first-degree relatives. The prevalence of celiac disease in first-degree relatives of celiac disease patients was 10.9% in our cohort, and 87% had human leucocyte antigen-DQ2 or -DQ8 haplotype. All first-degree relatives of celiac disease patients should be screen for celiac disease even if asymptomatic or with atypical manifestations. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pilonidal sinus disease - Etiological factors, pathogenesis and clinical features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazim Duman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available and lsquo;Pilonidal sinus' disease, which is most commonly seen in reproductive populations, such as young adults - mostly in males who are in their twenties - is actually a controversial disease in that there is no consensus on its many facets. It is sometimes seen as an infected abscess draining from an opening or a lesion extending to the perineum. It may also present as a draining fistula opening to skin. In terms of etiological factors, various theories (main theories being congenital and acquired have been established since it was first described, no universal understanding achieved. A long and significant post-operative care period with different lengths of recovery depending on the type of operation are quite prevalent with regards to recurrence and complication status. In order to prevent recurrence and improve the quality of life, etiological and predisposing factors as well as clinical features of sacrococcygeal pilonidal disease should be well known, a detailed differential diagnosis should be made, and a suitable and timely intervention should be performed. It was aimed here to explain the etiological factors, pathogenesis and clinical features of the disease that may present with various clinical symptoms. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2016; 5(4.000: 228-232

  5. Uncertainty of relative sensitivity factors in glow discharge mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meija, Juris; Methven, Brad; Sturgeon, Ralph E.

    2017-10-01

    The concept of the relative sensitivity factors required for the correction of the measured ion beam ratios in pin-cell glow discharge mass spectrometry is examined in detail. We propose a data-driven model for predicting the relative response factors, which relies on a non-linear least squares adjustment and analyte/matrix interchangeability phenomena. The model provides a self-consistent set of response factors for any analyte/matrix combination of any element that appears as either an analyte or matrix in at least one known response factor.

  6. Perception of schizophrenic’s relatives about the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janmille Morais Xavier

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To understand the perception of schizophrenic’s relatives about the disease. Methods: This is a descriptive, qualitative study performed with ten family members of people with medical diagnosis of schizophrenia treated by the Center for Psychosocial Care (CAPS in a municipality of Ceará. Unstructured interview was used as a strategy to collect data. Data analysis was based on the method of content analysis proposed by Bardin (1997. Results: The identified categories were: identification of disease; treatment of schizophrenia; difficulties experienced by relatives; search for quality of life by people with schizophrenia. Conclusion: In the speech of schizophrenic’s relatives, gaps are perceived in knowledge concerning the diagnosis of the disease, which point at the importance of this aspect being clarified during the meetings between professionals, users and family members. However, other aspects of the disease, such as behavioral disorders and types of treatments, were mentioned by the study participants.

  7. The Histopathology of IgG4-Related Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avincsal, Mehmet Ozgur; Zen, Yoh

    2017-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is a multi-organ immune-mediated chronic fibroinflammatory condition characterized by elevated serum IgG4 concentrations, tumefaction, and tissue infiltration by IgG4-positive plasma cells. The exact etiology of IgG4-related disease remains unclear with no known role of the IgG4 molecule itself being identified. Although the pancreas and salivary glands are the main organs affected, the involvement of other organs has also been reported. This multi-organ disease mimics a large number of malignant, infectious, and inflammatory disorders; therefore, a prompt differential diagnosis is important for selecting the right therapeutic strategy. Early steroid therapy assists in preventing tissue fibrosis, parenchymal extinction, and severe functional impairments in the affected organs. The definitive and prompt diagnosis of IgG4-related disease requires both histopathological confirmation and clinicopathological correlations. A histopathological examination is mandatory to exclude neoplastic or inflammatory conditions that mimic IgG4-related disease. The histological changes that occur are basically similar in any organ manifestation, with several site-specific findings being recognized. This chapter summarizes general rules for the pathological examination of IgG4-related disease, as well as the histopathological features and differential diagnoses of major organ manifestations.

  8. Health behaviors of victims and related factors in Wenchuan earthquake resettlement sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiaolan; Zhou, Hongyu; Zhou, Huan; Yang, Yang; Yang, Xiaoyan; Yu, Lingyun; Qiu, Peiyuan; Ma, Xiao

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the health behaviors of earthquake victims related to gastrointestinal and respiratory infectious diseases in the centralized transitional earthquake resettlement sites in Wenchuan, China; and to identify key factors related to health behaviors that may inform local infectious diseases prevention and control strategies. Data were collected using a questionnaire that included questions about socio-demographic characteristics and health beliefs and behaviors. In total, 1411 participants were included through a two-stage random sampling strategy. A bivariate multilevel model was used to explore the related factors. Approximately 67% of the participants wash their hands after going to lavatories every time, and 87% felt uncomfortable spitting on the ground. The more the participants perceived their susceptibility to and the severity of infectious diseases, the better their health-related behaviors (P resettlement sites (P resettlement sites. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Imagiologic features and the relative imaging factors in hepatolenticular degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Wenqing; Liu Pengcheng; Huang Rong; Yan Weiqiang; Zhao Yan; Liu Yuanjian; Luo Lili; Zou Liqiu; Liu Hanqiao

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT, MR and ultrasound features of hepatolenticular degeneration (HLD), and investigate relative factors affecting the imaging manifestations. Methods: Fifty-four HLD were reported, and the 35 male and 19 female patients ranged in the age from 3 to 40 years. CT was performed in 29 patients, MR in 11, both CT and MR in 5, ultrasound in 26. Six cases were hospitalized for 3 times, and 9 for twice. Results: (1) The putamen was affected on MR in all cases (100%), the caudate nucleus in 8. The thalami in 5, the globus pallidum in 2, the red nucleus in 2, the substantia nigra in 3, the midbrain in 1, the pons in 2, the white matter of frontal lobi in 1. According to the different basal ganglia involved in brain, resembling 'woodpecker' or 'butterfly spreading the wing' in appearance were showed on the MR images respectively. (2) Positive signs were found by CT scans in 18 cases (72%), but negative in 7 cases (28%). It is important manifestation that low density in brain occurred bilaterally and symmetrically. (3) The sonographic changes of chronic liver disease were showed on US in all 26 cases. Among the number, 12 cases were regarded as cirrhosis at the same time. Conclusion: (1) T 2 signal intensity and CT density changes are often not parallel to the clinical symptoms. T 1 WI is suitable for the follow-up, but quantitative analysis is still difficult. (2) Damage of liver occurs almost in all HLD, and earlier than that of brain. On the early stage, the liver damage is reversible, the brain lesions are symmetric. Moderately, the liver damage changes static. Lately, the brain presents atrophic. (3) The investigation suggests that there are 4 factors affecting CT and MR imaging features: the systemic disease resulting from metabolic disorder and the selected affinity caused by gene defect, deposition of copper together with cellular damage, endogenous and autonomous discharge of copper and histiocyte repaired, and extro-generate expelled copper

  10. Predictive risk factors for chronic low back pain in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Erhan Arif; Kocer, Bilge Gonenli

    2018-01-01

    Although previous studies have reported that the prevalence of low back pain in Parkinson's disease was over 50% and low back pain was often classified as chronic, risk factors of chronic low back pain have not been previously investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the predictive risk factors of chronic low back pain in Parkinson's disease. One hundred and sixty-eight patients with Parkinson's disease and 179 controls were consecutively included in the study. Demographic data of the two groups and disease characteristics of Parkinson's disease patient group were recorded. Low back pain lasting for ≥3 months was evaluated as chronic. Firstly, the bivariate correlations were calculated between chronic low back pain and all possible risk factors. Then, a multivariate regression was used to evaluate the impact of the predictors of chronic low back pain. The frequency of chronic low back pain in Parkinson's disease patients and controls were 48.2% and 26.7%, respectively (p chronic low back pain in Parkinson's disease were general factors including age (odds ratio = 1.053, p = 0.032) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale - Depression subscore (odds ratio = 1.218, p = 0.001), and Parkinson's disease-related factors including rigidity (odds ratio = 5.109, p = 0.002) and posture item scores (odds ratio = 5.019, p = 0.0001). The chronic low back pain affects approximately half of the patients with Parkinson's disease. Prevention of depression or treatment recommendations for managing depression, close monitoring of anti- parkinsonian medication to keep motor symptoms under control, and attempts to prevent, correct or reduce abnormal posture may help reduce the frequency of chronic low back pain in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mental vulnerability--a risk factor for ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eplov, Lene Falgaard; Jørgensen, Torben; Birket-Smith, Morten

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to examine whether mental vulnerability is a risk factor for the development of ischemic heart disease (IHD) after adjustment for well-established risk factors. METHODS: In three prospective cohort studies in Copenhagen County, Denmark, we recorded the level...... of mental vulnerability and possible risk factors to IHD at baseline. For follow-up, the sample was linked to relevant registries to identify all cases of fatal and nonfatal IHD. The relationship between mental vulnerability and IHD was examined using both Kaplan-Meir and Cox proportional hazard models...... adjusting for possible confounding factors. RESULTS: Mental vulnerability was significantly associated with the risk for IHD (medium mental vulnerability: hazard ratio 1.41, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.91; and high mental vulnerability: hazard ratio 2.05; 95% confidence interval 1.46-2.88), after...

  12. Obesity-Related Diseases Dietary Modulation of the Gut Microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brahe, Lena Kirchner

    strategies to reduce obesity-related morbidity and mortality are essential. It has been hypothesized that the microbes in the human gut are involved in the development of obesity-related diseases and that intake of nutrients affecting the gut microbial community in specific ways, can be a new strategy...

  13. The intersection between growth factors, autophagy and ER stress: A new target to treat neurodegenerative diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Huerta, Paula; Troncoso-Escudero, Paulina; Jerez, Carolina; Hetz, Claudio; Vidal, Rene L

    2016-10-15

    One of the salient features of most neurodegenerative diseases is the aggregation of specific proteins in the brain. This proteostasis imbalance is proposed as a key event triggering the neurodegenerative cascade. The unfolded protein response (UPR) and autophagy pathways are emerging as critical processes implicated in handling disease-related misfolded proteins. However, in some conditions, perturbations in the buffering capacity of the proteostasis network may be part of the etiology of the disease. Thus, pharmacological or gene therapy strategies to enhance autophagy or UPR responses are becoming an attractive target for disease intervention. Here, we discuss current evidence depicting the complex involvement of autophagy and ER stress in brain diseases. Novel pathways to modulate protein misfolding are discussed including the relation between aging and growth factor signaling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Autophagy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. NAD+ Deficits in Age-Related Diseases and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Amanda; Djouder, Nabil

    2017-08-01

    The phenomenon of aging has gained widespread attention in recent times. Although significant advances have been made to better understand aging and its related pathologies including cancer, there is not yet a clear mechanism explaining why diseases and cancer are inherent parts of the aging process. Finding a unifying equation that could bridge aging and its related diseases would allow therapeutic development and solve an immense human health problem to live longer and better. In this review, we discuss NAD + reduction as the central mechanism that may connect aging to its related pathologies and cancer. NAD + boosters would ensure and ameliorate health quality during aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Modifiable risk factors in periodontitis: at the intersection of aging and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Mark A

    2014-02-01

    Chronic inflammation is a prominent feature of aging and of common age-related diseases, including atherosclerosis, cancer and periodontitis. This volume examines modifiable risk factors for periodontitis and other chronic inflammatory diseases. Oral bacterial communities and viral infections, particularly with cytomegalovirus and other herpesviruses, elicit distinct immune responses and are central in the initiation of periodontal diseases. Risk of disease is dynamic and changes in response to complex interactions of genetic, environmental and stochastic factors over the lifespan. Many modifiable risk factors, such as smoking and excess caloric intake, contribute to increases in systemic markers of inflammation and can modify gene regulation through a variety of biologic mechanisms (e.g. epigenetic modifications). Periodontitis and other common chronic inflammatory diseases share multiple modifiable risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, psychological stress and depression, alcohol consumption, obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and osteoporosis. Interventions that target modifiable risk factors have the potential to improve risk profiles for periodontitis as well as for other common chronic diseases. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Conflict and diarrheal and related diseases: a global analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, Bradley T; Khan, Maria R; Rehm, Jürgen; Sapkota, Amir

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association between deaths owing to terrorism, civil war and one-sided violence from 1994-2000 and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) attributable to diarrheal and related diseases, schistosomiasis, trachoma and the nematode infections (DSTN diseases) in 2002 among World Health Organization Member States. Deaths resulting from terrorism, civil war and one-sided violence were significantly related to DSTN DALYs across the majority of sex-age subgroups of the populace, after controlling for baseline levels of improved water/sanitation and a variety of economic measures: overall, a 1.0% increase in deaths owing to terrorism and related violence was associated with an increase of 0.16% in DALYs lost to DSTN diseases. Associations were greatest among 0-to-4-year olds. The results of the present study suggest that DSTN disease control efforts should target conflict-affected populations with particular attention to young children who suffer disproportionately from DSTN diseases in these settings. In view of the evidence that terrorism and related violence may influence DSTN DALYs in the longer term, control strategies should move beyond immediate responses to decrease the incidence and severity of DSTN diseases to seek solutions through bolstering health systems infrastructure development among conflict-affected populations. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Work-related chronic obstructive pulmo- nary disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite smoking being the most important risk factor for this disease, accounting .... fibre, glass transport workers, concrete/ cement manufacture, foundries, refrac- ... Welders, automobile industries – repairs, servicing, petrol stations, tobacco ... This assessment by the clinician depends ... workplace hazard control or, if not.

  18. Evaluation of some predisposing factors to malaria related anaemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of some predisposing factors to malaria related anaemia among children in Benin City, Nigeria. ... Tropical Journal of Health Sciences ... It was carried out at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City between June and ...

  19. Sport psychological skill levels and related psychosocial factors that ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sport psychological skill levels and related psychosocial factors that distinguish ... players' perceived ability to be psychologically well prepared for competitions. ... reference to practical implications for future sport psychological skills training

  20. Analysis on Developmental Factors of the Liver Diseases in Ultrasound Diagnosis of Healthcare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mi Yeon; Jung, Hong Ryang; Lim, Chang Hwan

    2009-01-01

    The study found out developmental factors of the liver diseases in 29, 531 cases of the healthy adults who were diagnosed by using ultrasound at domestic healthcare centers in 6 cities. The results are as follows. Based on the result of the study, the liver diseases diagnosed by using ultrasound was revealed to show 43.1% of prevalence, and the occurrence was significantly higher in male (23.3%) than in female (19.8%). The prevalence of hepatic diseases related to the BMI was revealed to show highest prevalence of the fatty liver in obese group (BMI 25) by recording 44.3%. Smoking contributed to the high prevalence of all liver diseases. Although the fatty liver was the most frequently occurred form of liver diseases by recording the prevalence of 49.1% (22.2% in male, 26.9% in female), the significant difference was found only in female (p 0.05). The prevalence of hepatic diseases related to the hypertension was revealed to show highest prevalence of the fatty liver in hypertension group by recording 67.7%. The prevalence of hepatic diseases related to the diabetes was revealed to show highest prevalence of the fatty liver in diabetes group by recording 66.2%. The high prevalence of all hepatic diseases was related to diabetes mellitus with statistical significance (p 0.05).

  1. Quantifying cardiovascular disease risk factors in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, I M; Skaaby, T; Ellervik, C

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a previous meta-analysis on categorical data we found an association between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease and associated risk factors. OBJECTIVES: To quantify the level of cardiovascular disease risk factors in order to provide additional data for the clinical management...... of the increased risk. METHODS: This was a meta-analysis of observational studies with continuous outcome using random-effects statistics. A systematic search of studies published before 25 October 2012 was conducted using the databases Medline, EMBASE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, PASCAL and BIOSIS......·65 mmol L(-1) )] and a higher HbA1c [1·09 mmol mol(-1) , 95% CI 0·87-1·31, P controls are significant, and therefore relevant to the clinical management of patients with psoriasis....

  2. Elderly Taiwanese's Intrinsic Risk Factors for Fall-related Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    In-Fun Li; Yvonne Hsiung; Hui-Fen Hsing; Mei-Yu Lee; Te-Hsin Chang; Ming-Yuan Huang

    2016-01-01

    Background: As a vital issue in geriatric research, risk factors for falls were concluded to be multifactorial, and prevention has been mostly aimed at decreasing situational and environmental risks that cause and aggravate fall-related injuries, particularly within the institutions. While knowledge is limited about older patients' intrinsic determinants, the purpose of this study was to explore elderly Taiwanese's intrinsic risk factors associated with severe fall-related injuries. Method...

  3. Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark Andrew

    2013-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presents with an exacerbation of Crohn's ileocolitis. He received a diagnosis of Crohn's disease 8 years ago and has been treated on three previous occasions with prednisone. Because of a recurrent need for glucocorticoids, treatment with azathioprine (150 mg per day) was starte...... colonoscopy show acute and chronic granulomatous inflammation, and the gastroenterologist recommends treatment with a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor....

  4. Risk factors for work-related eczema and urticaria among vocational students of agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śpiewak, Radosław; Góra-Florek, Anna; Horoch, Andrzej; Jarosz, Mirosław J; Doryńska, Agnieszka; Golec, Marcin; Dutkiewicz, Jacek

    2017-12-23

    Farmers are at high risk of occupational skin diseases which may start already during vocational training. This study was aimed at identification of risk factors for work-related skin diseases among vocational students of agriculture. The study involved 440 students (245 males, 195 females aged 17-21 years) in 11 vocational schools which were at least 100 km from each other. The protocol included a physician-managed questionnaire and medical examination, skin prick tests, patch tests, total IgE and Phadiatop. Logistic regression model was used for the identification of relevant risk factors. Work-related dermatoses were diagnosed in 29 study participants (6.6%, 95%CI: 4.3-8.9%): eczema in 22, urticaria in 14, and co-existence of both in 7 students. Significant risk factors for work-related eczema were: history of respiratory allergy (OR=10.10; pagriculture. Atopy, past history of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema (either atopic, allergic or irritant) are relevant risk factors for work-related eczema and urticaria in young farmers, along with family history of any skin disease. Positive skin prick tests seem relevant, especially in the case of urticaria. Asking simple, aimed questions during health checks while enrolling students into agricultural schools would suffice to identify students at risk for work-related eczema and urticaria, giving them the chance for selecting a safer profession, and hopefully avoiding an occupational disease in the future.

  5. RISK FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN PRISON POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Soares de OliveiraI

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to make a reflection about the risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease in the prison population, as well as the performance of the health care team in these spaces. It is a reflective approach, literature that included e-journal articles, published in the year 2003 to 2011, indexed at LILACS, Scielo, MEDLINE, and available in full. Textbooks were also consulted and ordinances of Ministry of health and Justice of Brazil. Used the descriptors "risk factors," "cardiovascular disease" and "Prisoners". It was noted that the current situation of overcrowding in prisons is, with unhealthy environment, which imposes risks the health of prisoners. The living habits, such as use of alcohol and drugs (cocaine, marijuana, tranquillizers and tobacco, increases the risk for cardiovascular disease. In addition, the authors emphasize, a priori, the low level of schooling of the detainees. The performance of the health care team must be based on educational practices for promoting and monitoring the health, with multidisciplinary support. Further studies need to be done in order to investigate the incidence of cardiovascular diseases, as well as evidence of the effectiveness of health care for this population.

  6. Longitudinal association between lifestyle and coronary heart disease risk factors among individuals with spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, S.; Post, M. W.; Snoek, G. J.; Schuitemaker, M.; van der Woude, L. H.

    Objective: To investigate: (1) the course of coronary heart disease risk factors (lipid profiles and body mass index (BMI)) in the first five years after discharge from inpatient spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation and (2) the association between lifestyle (physical activity, self-care related

  7. Risk of bleeding related to antithrombotic treatment in cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Olesen, Jonas B; Charlot, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy is a cornerstone of treatment in patients with cardiovascular disease with bleeding being the most feared complication. This review describes the risk of bleeding related to different combinations of antithrombotic drugs used for cardiovascular disease: acute coronary...... syndrome (ACS), atrial fibrillation (AF), cerebrovascular (CVD) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Different risk assessment schemes and bleeding definitions are compared. The HAS-BLED risk score is recommended in patients with AF and in ACS patients with AF. In patients with ACS with or without...

  8. Modifiable Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in the Population Aged 20-49 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carlos Valladares Mas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: evidence provided by the Framingham Heart Study established the critical role of risk factors in the development of coronary heart disease. Over half a century later, current detection and control are still inadequate. Objective: to identify modifiable risk factors of coronary heart disease in individuals aged 20 to 49 years. Methods: a descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 276 individuals from the doctor’s office No. 1 of the Fabio di Celmo Community Teaching Polyclinic in Cienfuegos. Patients were examined in the clinic visit and/or whole family visit. The studied variables included age, sex, skin color, risk factors (excess weight/obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and psychosocial factors, which were obtained from the medical interview, physical examination, laboratory tests (total cholesterol and triglycerides and review of individual medical records and family history. Results: risk factors most frequently identified were excess weight/obesity (42.4 %, physical inactivity (34.4 % and smoking (20.3 %. Presence of these risk factors increased with age, showing differences in the distribution by sex and was associated with psychosocial factors. Their coexistence and progress with age was significant. Conclusion: prevalence of modifiable risk factors for coronary heart disease in a young population was high, with frequent association, predominating factors related to unhealthy lifestyles.

  9. Site-characteristic expression and induction of trefoil factor family 1, 2 and 3 and malignant brain tumor-1 in normal and diseased intrahepatic bile ducts relates to biliary pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, Motoko; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Saito, Takahito

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: Trefoil factor family (TFF)1,2,3 are involved in a homeostasis/repair process of mucosal epithelia. In this study, the significance of TFF family and deleted in the malignant brain tumor-1 (DMBT1), a putative receptor of TFF2, in the intrahepatic biliary tree was investigated...

  10. [Exercise for prevention of osteoporosis and other lifestyle-related diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takao

    2011-05-01

    The prevalence of lifestyle-related diseases including hypertension, dyslipidemia (hyperlipidemia) and diabetes increases with aging, and all these conditions are risk factors of arteriosclerotic diseases such as cerebrovascular event (stroke) and myocardial infarction. The term "metabolic domino" has been used to describe the collective concept of the development and progression of these lifestyle-related diseases, the sequence of events, and the progression process of complications. Like the first tile of a domino toppling game, undesirable lifestyle such as overeating and underexercising first triggers obesity, and is followed in succession by onset of an insulin resistance state (underlied by a genetic background indigenous to Japanese) , hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and further postprandial hyperglycemia (the pre-diabetic state) , the so-called metabolic syndrome, at around the same time. On the other hand, apart from the other lifestyle-related diseases, the prevalence of osteoporosis also increases rapidly accompanying aging. Osteoporosis is known to be strongly related to disorders due to the metabolic domino such as arteriosclerosis and vascular calcification, and a new disease category called "osteo-vascular interaction" has attracted attention recently. Regarding "osteo-vascular interaction" , a close relation between bone density loss or osteoporotic changes and vascular lesion-associated lifestyle-related diseases such as hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes has been reported. Therefore, as a common preventive factor for bone mass loss or osteoporosis and lifestyle-related diseases including hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes (osteo-vascular interaction) , exercise has been recognized anew as an important non-pharmaceutical therapy that should take top priority. This article overviews the evidence of exercise therapy for the prevention of osteoporosis and other lifestyle-related diseases, from the viewpoint of health promotion, especially of

  11. Fetal programming of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases: the role of epigenetic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Piras

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the main epigenetic factors involved in shaping the brain’s physical structure during development will be reviewed, with special emphasis on those related to Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease in adulthood. These factors are: preterm delivery, maternal diet, trace metals, intrauterine infection, maternal stress, drugs, alcohol. Epigenetics may allow a novel therapeutic and preventive approach for neurodegeneration. Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · The last ten years, the next ten years in Neonatology Guest Editors: Vassilios Fanos, Michele Mussap, Gavino Faa, Apostolos Papageorgiou

  12. Physical Activity and Telomere Biology: Exploring the Link with Aging-Related Disease Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew T. Ludlow; Stephen M. Roth

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity is associated with reduced risk of several age-related diseases as well as with increased longevity in both rodents and humans. Though these associations are well established, evidence of the molecular and cellular factors associated with reduced disease risk and increased longevity resulting from physical activity is sparse. A long-standing hypothesis of aging is the telomere hypothesis: as a cell divides, telomeres shorten resulting eventually in replicative senescence and...

  13. Impulse Control and Related Disorders in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Daniel; Claassen, Daniel O

    2017-01-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs), such as compulsive gambling, buying, sexual, and eating behaviors, are a serious and increasingly recognized complication in Parkinson's disease (PD), occurring in up to 20% of PD patients over the course of their illness. Related behaviors include punding (stereotyped, repetitive, purposeless behaviors), dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS) (compulsive medication overuse), and hobbyism (e.g., compulsive internet use, artistic endeavors, and writing). These disorders have a significant impact on quality of life and function, strain interpersonal relationships, and worsen caregiver burden, and are associated with significant psychiatric comorbidity. ICDs have been most closely related to the use of dopamine agonists (DAs), while DDS is primarily associated with shorter acting, higher potency dopamine replacement therapy (DRT), such as levodopa. However, in preliminary research ICDs have also been reported to occur with monoamine oxidase inhibitor-B and amantadine treatment, and after deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. Other risk factors for ICDs may include sex (e.g., male sex for compulsive sexual behavior, and female sex for compulsive buying behavior); younger age overall at PD onset; a pre-PD history of an ICD; personal or family history of substance abuse, bipolar disorder, or gambling problems; and impulsive personality traits. Dysregulation of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system is thought to be the major neurobiological substrate for ICDs in PD, but there is preliminary evidence for alterations in opiate and serotonin systems too. The primary treatment of ICDs in PD is discontinuation of the offending treatment, but not all patients can tolerate this due to worsening motor symptoms or DA withdrawal syndrome. While psychiatric medications and psychosocial treatments are frequently used to treat ICDs in the general population, there is limited empirical evidence for their use in PD, so it is critical for patients to be

  14. Cardiovascular diseases and risk factors among Chinese immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhizhong; Zhao, Dong

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and major CVD risk factors, including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and smoking among Chinese immigrants by a systematic review of studies from various countries. PubMed and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched for studies of the prevalence of major CVDs and risk factors, and of CVD mortality among Chinese immigrants. The search identified 386 papers, 16 of which met the inclusion criteria for this review. In mainland China, there is a pattern of high stroke prevalence but low coronary heart disease (CHD) prevalence. Among Chinese immigrants, there is a much lower prevalence and mortality of stroke, but a higher prevalence and mortality of CHD, even though these are lower than the rates in immigrants of other ethnicities in the host country. The prevalence of CVD risk factors is also markedly different in immigrants. Compared with mainland Chinese, Chinese immigrants have a higher prevalence of diabetes and hypertension, higher serum cholesterol, poorer dietary patterns, and higher prevalence of obesity and smoking. Thus, the epidemiological pattern of CVD among Chinese immigrants changes compared with resident mainland Chinese. The less healthy environmental factor after immigration may be a major trigger in the adverse CVD status of Chinese immigrants. It is important for policy-makers to pay more attention to specific minority immigrant groups, and to implement more effective preventive measures to improve the health of immigrant populations.

  15. Health-related quality of life of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Which factors are of significance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, L.; Sørensen, J.; Ostergaard, M.

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease causing joint pain, loss of function and decreased health-related quality of life (HRQoL). HRQoL in RA patients is associated with several risk factors; in this paper the evidence relating to the most important risk factors is reviewed....... Modern medical therapy has improved HRQoL in RA patients, while demographic factors (female sex and older age), low socioeconomic status (in terms of education and position in the work force) and the presence of comorbid conditions appear to be associated with poorer HRQoL Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3/3...

  16. Improvements on Cardiovascular Diseases Risk Factors in Obese Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes Silva, Humberto José; Andersen, Lars Bo; Lofrano-Prado, Mara Cristina

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear how different exercise intensities affect cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in obese adolescents. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of high intensity (HIT) vs. low intensity (LIT) aerobic training on CVD risk factors in obese adolescents. METHODS......: Forty-three obese adolescents (age: 15.7±1.3y, BMI: 34.3±4.1kg/m2) participated this study either HIT (corresponding to ventilatory threshold-I, VT1; N=20) or LIT (20% below VT1; N=23) for 12 weeks (12W). All sessions were isocaloric (350 kcal). All participants received the same nutritional......, psychological and clinical counseling. Subjects were assessed in fatness, fitness, lipid profile and glucose at baseline and after 12W. The CVD risk factors assessed were waist circumference (WC), total cholesterol (TC), HDL, glucose and fitness, which were single and clustered analyzed (Z-scores sum). RESULTS...

  17. [The role of psychological factors and psychiatric disorders in skin diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta; Dudek, Bohdan; Krecisz, Beata; Swierczyńska-Machura, Dominika; Dudek, Wojciech; Garnczarek, Adrianna; Turczyn, Katarzyna

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the relation between psychological factors and psychiatric disorders in patients with skin diseases is discussed. On the one hand psychological factors (stress, negative emotions) can influence the generation and aggravation of skin disorders (urticaria, atopic dermatitis, vitiligo), on the other hand psychological disorders can result in some skin diseases (psoriasis, atopic dermatitis). In the majority of cases the quality of life is poorly estimated by patients with skin problems. Psychodermatology is divided into three categories according to the relationship between skin diseases and mental disorders: 1) psychophysiologic disorders caused by skin diseases triggering different emotional states (stress), but not directly combined with mental disorders (psoriasis, eczema); 2) primary psychiatric disorders responsible for self-induced skin disorders (trichotillomania); and 3) secondary psychiatric disorders caused by disfiguring skin (ichthyosis, acne conglobata, vitiligo), which can lead to states of fear, depression or suicidal thoughts.

  18. Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Parkinson's Disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritz, Beate; Lee, Pei-Chen; Hansen, Johnni

    2016-01-01

    -related air pollution and Parkinson's disease. METHODS: In a case-control study of 1,696 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients identified from Danish hospital registries and diagnosed 1996-2009 and 1,800 population controls matched by gender and year of birth we assessed long-term traffic-related air pollutant...... exposures (NO2) from a dispersion model, using residential addresses from 1971 to the date of diagnosis or first cardinal symptom for cases and the corresponding index date for their matched controls. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated with logistic regression adjusting...

  19. Mental disease-related emergency admissions attributable to hot temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suji; Lee, Hwanhee; Myung, Woojae; Kim, E Jin; Kim, Ho

    2018-03-01

    The association between high temperature and mental disease has been the focus of several studies worldwide. However, no studies have focused on the mental disease burden attributable to hot temperature. Here, we aim to quantify the risk attributed to hot temperatures based on the exposure-lag-response relationship between temperature and mental diseases. From data on daily temperature and emergency admissions (EA) for mental diseases collected from 6 major cities (Seoul, Incheon, Daejeon, Daegu, Busan, and Gwangju in South Korea) over a period of 11years (2003-2013), we estimated temperature-disease associations using a distributed lag non-linear model, and we pooled the data by city through multivariate meta-analysis. Cumulative relative risk and attributable risks were calculated for extreme hot temperatures, defined as the 99th percentile relative to the 50th percentile of temperatures. The strongest association between mental disease and high temperature was seen within a period of 0-4days of high temperature exposure. Our results reveal that 14.6% of EA for mental disease were due to extreme hot temperatures, and the elderly were more susceptible (19.1%). Specific mental diseases, including anxiety, dementia, schizophrenia, and depression, also showed significant risk attributed to hot temperatures. Of all EA for anxiety, 31.6% were attributed to extremely hot temperatures. High temperature was responsible for an attributable risk for mental disease, and the burden was higher in the elderly. This finding has important implications for designing appropriate public health policies to minimize the impact of high temperature on mental health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemical-induced disease relation extraction with various linguistic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jinghang; Qian, Longhua; Zhou, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the relations between chemicals and diseases is crucial in various biomedical tasks such as new drug discoveries and new therapy developments. While manually mining these relations from the biomedical literature is costly and time-consuming, such a procedure is often difficult to keep up-to-date. To address these issues, the BioCreative-V community proposed a challenging task of automatic extraction of chemical-induced disease (CID) relations in order to benefit biocuration. This article describes our work on the CID relation extraction task on the BioCreative-V tasks. We built a machine learning based system that utilized simple yet effective linguistic features to extract relations with maximum entropy models. In addition to leveraging various features, the hypernym relations between entity concepts derived from the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)-controlled vocabulary were also employed during both training and testing stages to obtain more accurate classification models and better extraction performance, respectively. We demoted relation extraction between entities in documents to relation extraction between entity mentions. In our system, pairs of chemical and disease mentions at both intra- and inter-sentence levels were first constructed as relation instances for training and testing, then two classification models at both levels were trained from the training examples and applied to the testing examples. Finally, we merged the classification results from mention level to document level to acquire final relations between chemicals and diseases. Our system achieved promisingF-scores of 60.4% on the development dataset and 58.3% on the test dataset using gold-standard entity annotations, respectively. Database URL:https://github.com/JHnlp/BC5CIDTask. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. Pathology consultation on anticoagulation monitoring: factor X-related assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wool, Geoffrey D; Lu, Chuanyi M

    2013-11-01

    To review various anticoagulation therapies and related laboratory monitoring issues, with a focus on factor X-related chromogenic assays. A case-based approach is used to review pertinent published literatures and product inserts of anticoagulation drugs and to look back on clinical use of factor X-related chromogenic assays. The number of anticoagulants available to clinicians has increased greatly in the past decade. Whether and how these anticoagulants should be monitored are areas of uncertainty for clinicians, which can lead to misuse of laboratory assays and suboptimal patient management. Factor X-related assays are of particular concern because of the similar and often confusing test names. Based on a common clinical case scenario and literature review regarding anticoagulant monitoring, an up-to-date discussion and review of the various factor X-related assays are provided, focusing on the differences in test designs and clinical utilities between the chromogenic anti-Xa and chromogenic factor X activity assays. Anticoagulation therapy and related laboratory monitoring are rapidly evolving areas of clinical practices. A good knowledge of relevant laboratory assays and their clinical applications is necessary to help optimize patient care.

  2. Medication-related risk factors associated with health-related quality of life among community-dwelling elderly in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sha; Meng, Long; Qiu, Feng; Yang, Jia-Dan; Sun, Shusen

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that medication adherence has an impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). However, other medication-related factors that may influence HRQoL have not been extensively studied, especially factors based on the Medication-Risk Questionnaire (MRQ), and such studies are mostly done in Western countries. Our objective was to explore risk factors associated with HRQoL among community-dwelling elderly with chronic diseases in mainland China, especially the medication-related risk factors regarding MRQ. The study was conducted in a community health service center through surveys to eligible patients. The main outcomes of HRQoL were assessed by the EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) scale and EQ-visual analog scale (EQ-VAS). Medication-related risk factors according to MRQ associated with HRQoL were identified using a multiple linear regression. A total of 311 patients were analyzed, averaging 71.19±5.33 years, and 68.8% were female. The mean EQ-5D index was 0.72±0.09, and the mean EQ-VAS score was 71.37±11.97. The most prevalent problem was pain/discomfort, and 90.0% believed that they could take care of themselves without any problems. Sex, age, educational level, frailty, function status, and certain medication-related factors regarding MRQ were found to be significant factors impacting the HRQoL. A multivariate analysis showed that MRQ factors of polypharmacy, multimorbidity, feeling difficultly with taking medicines as prescribed, and taking medicines with narrow therapeutic index had negative impacts on the quality of life. Patient's internal characteristics and medication-related risk factors according to MRQ were associated with quality of life. The results of the MRQ is an indicator of quality of life that can identify patients who need interventions.

  3. Risk factors for age-related macular degeneration: Pooled findings from three continents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, W.; Assink, J.; Klein, R.; Mitchell, P.; Klaver, C. C.; Klein, B. E.; Hofman, A.; Jensen, S.; Wang, J. J.; de Jong, P. T.

    2001-01-01

    To assess the prevalence and potential risk factors for late age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in three racially similar populations from North America, Europe, and AUSTRALIA: Combined analysis of population-based eye disease prevalence data. There were 14,752 participants with gradable

  4. Role of growth factors and the wound healing response in age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlingemann, Reinier O.

    2004-01-01

    Growth factors (GF) are important in several stages of the pathogenesis of age-related macular disease (AMD). In choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in exudative AMD, the GF involved are similar to those involved in wound healing of the skin. Like granulation tissue of skin, CNV is characterized by

  5. Longitudinal health-related quality of life outcomes and related factors after pediatric SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, M; Atenafu, E; Hancock, K

    2009-08-01

    Our purpose was to investigate longitudinally health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes and related factors up to 2 years post-pediatric SCT. A total of 99 mothers of patients, aged 1.5-17 years, completed two standardized HRQOL questionnaires, generic and disease specific (DS), about the child, and reported on their own symptoms of depression and family function pre-SCT, 12 and 24 months post-SCT. Clinical (diagnosis, radiation), child (age) and family (maternal depression) information was also obtained. Significant improvement in physical and psychosocial HRQOL from pre-SCT to 1 or 2 years post-SCT was reported. Survivors of ALL were reported to have poorer physical and psychosocial HRQOL than survivors of solid tumors on the DS measure. Maternal depression was negatively associated with physical and psychosocial HRQOL. Maternal education (higher) at pre-SCT predicted improvements in physical domains 2 years post-SCT; mother's age (older) and child's age (younger) also predicted improvements of physical and emotional HRQOL. We conclude that survivors of pediatric SCT improved physical and psychosocial HRQOL by 1 and 2 years post-SCT. Older survivors whose mothers are younger and distressed, with lower education at SCT have compromised HRQOL compared to other survivors. This study has important implications for the care of SCT survivors and their families.

  6. QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE: importance of clinical, demographic and psychosocial factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana MAGALHÃES

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Inflammatory bowel disease causes physical and psychosocial consequences that can affect the health related quality of life. Objectives To analyze the relationship between clinical and sociodemographic factors and quality of life in inflammatory bowel disease patients. Methods Ninety two patients with Crohn’s disease and 58 with ulcerative colitis, filled in the inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ-32 and a questionnaire to collect sociodemographic and clinical data. The association between categorical variables and IBDQ-32 scores was determined using Student t test. Factors statistically significant in the univariate analysis were included in a multivariate regression model. Results IBDQ-32 scores were significantly lower in female patients (P<0.001, patients with an individual perception of a lower co-workers support (P<0.001 and career fulfillment (P<0.001, patients requiring psychological support (P = 0.010 and pharmacological treatment for anxiety or depression (P = 0.002. A multivariate regression analysis identified as predictors of impaired HRQOL the female gender (P<0.001 and the perception of a lower co-workers support (P = 0.025 and career fulfillment (P = 0.001. Conclusions The decrease in HRQQL was significantly related with female gender and personal perception of disease impact in success and social relations. These factors deserve a special attention, so timely measures can be implemented to improve the quality of life of patients.

  7. Infectious Diseases - Diseases Related to Service in Gulf War, Iraq, and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... qualify for VA health care . Diseases related to Gulf War, Iraq and Afghanistan service VA presumes that the ... Southwest Asia theater of military operations during the Gulf War August 2, 1990 to present and in Afghanistan ...

  8. Searching for Factors that Distinguish Disease-Prone and Disease-Resistant Prions via Sequence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Kurgan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The exact mechanisms of prion misfolding and factors that predispose an individual to prion diseases are largely unknown. Our approach to identifying candidate factors in-silico relies on contrasting the C-terminal domain of PrPC sequences from two groups of vertebrate species: those that have been found to suffer from prion diseases, and those that have not. We propose that any significant differences between the two groups are candidate factors that may predispose individuals to develop prion disease, which should be further analyzed by wet-lab investigations. Using an array of computational methods we identified possible point mutations that could predispose PrPC to misfold into PrPSc. Our results include confirmatory findings such as the V210I mutation, and new findings including P137M, G142D, G142N, D144P, K185T, V189I, H187Y and T191P mutations, which could impact structural stability. We also propose new hypotheses that give insights into the stability of helix-2 and -3. These include destabilizing effects of Histidine and T188-T193 segment in helix-2 in the disease-prone prions, and a stabilizing effect of Leucine on helix-3 in the disease-resistant prions.

  9. Poverty-related and neglected diseases - an economic and epidemiological analysis of poverty relatedness and neglect in research and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Philipsborn, Peter; Steinbeis, Fridolin; Bender, Max E; Regmi, Sadie; Tinnemann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Economic growth in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) has raised interest in how disease burden patterns are related to economic development. Meanwhile, poverty-related diseases are considered to be neglected in terms of research and development (R&D). Developing intuitive and meaningful metrics to measure how different diseases are related to poverty and neglected in the current R&D system. We measured how diseases are related to economic development with the income relation factor (IRF), defined by the ratio of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) per 100,000 inhabitants in LMIC versus that in high-income countries. We calculated the IRF for 291 diseases and injuries and 67 risk factors included in the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. We measured neglect in R&D with the neglect factor (NF), defined by the ratio of disease burden in DALYs (as percentage of the total global disease burden) and R&D expenditure (as percentage of total global health-related R&D expenditure) for 26 diseases. The disease burden varies considerably with the level of economic development, shown by the IRF (median: 1.38; interquartile range (IQR): 0.79-6.3). Comparison of IRFs from 1990 to 2010 highlights general patterns of the global epidemiological transition. The 26 poverty-related diseases included in our analysis of neglect in R&D are responsible for 13.8% of the global disease burden, but receive only 1.34% of global health-related R&D expenditure. Within this group, the NF varies considerably (median: 19; IQR: 6-52). The IRF is an intuitive and meaningful metric to highlight shifts in global disease burden patterns. A large shortfall exists in global R&D spending for poverty-related and neglected diseases, with strong variations between diseases.

  10. The Rationale for Delaying Aging and the Prevention of Age-Related Diseases

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    Nir Barzilai

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available [Excerpt] We offer a different approach to delaying or preventing age-related diseases. To understand the necessity for a new approach we have plotted the mortality rates in Israelis in relation to specific age groups and diseases. With the common phenomenon of aging of Western populations it is of utmost importance to follow time-dependent and age-dependent mortality patterns to predict future needs of Western health systems. Age-specific, gender-specific, and cause-of-death-specific mortality rates were extracted from the statistical abstract of Israel1 and include data for the period of 1975–2010; these are presented in Figure 1, separately for men (A and women (B. Detailed age-specific causes of death data were available for the year 2009. Data presented were restricted to 5-year age groups starting at age 50, and for cause-specific mortality to the following age groups: 45–54, 55–64, 65–74, 75–84, and 85+. Causes of mortality were separated into malignant diseases, acute myocardial infarction, other ischemic heart diseases, other forms of heart diseases, cerebrovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, respiratory diseases, diseases of kidney, infectious diseases, all external causes, signs/symptoms and ill-defined conditions, and all other diseases. Figure 1 is similar to the one posted on the National Institute of Aging website and similar to data across the industrial world. The striking feature of this graph is that aging is a major log scale risk for most diseases, including the major killers: heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s. For example, while aging is a 100-fold risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD according to Figure 1, hypercholesterolemia is known to carry only a three-fold risk for CVD. For each of the mentioned diseases, aging is a log risk greater than the most important known risk factor for that disease.

  11. Anesthesiologist- and System-Related Risk Factors for Risk-Adjusted Pediatric Anesthesia-Related Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgleszewski, Steven E; Graham, Dionne A; Hickey, Paul R; Brustowicz, Robert M; Odegard, Kirsten C; Koka, Rahul; Seefelder, Christian; Navedo, Andres T; Randolph, Adrienne G

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric anesthesia-related cardiac arrest (ARCA) is an uncommon but potentially preventable adverse event. Infants and children with more severe underlying disease are at highest risk. We aimed to identify system- and anesthesiologist-related risk factors for ARCA. We analyzed a prospectively collected patient cohort data set of anesthetics administered from 2000 to 2011 to children at a large tertiary pediatric hospital. Pre-procedure systemic disease level was characterized by ASA physical status (ASA-PS). Two reviewers independently reviewed cardiac arrests and categorized their anesthesia relatedness. Factors associated with ARCA in the univariate analyses were identified for reevaluation after adjustment for patient age and ASA-PS. Cardiac arrest occurred in 142 of 276,209 anesthetics (incidence 5.1/10,000 anesthetics); 72 (2.6/10,000 anesthetics) were classified as anesthesia-related. In the univariate analyses, risk of ARCA was much higher in cardiac patients and for anesthesiologists with lower annual caseload and/or fewer annual days delivering anesthetics (all P risk adjustment for ASA-PS ≥ III and age ≤ 6 months, however, the association with lower annual days delivering anesthetics remained (P = 0.03), but the other factors were no longer significant. Case-mix explained most associations between higher risk of pediatric ARCA and anesthesiologist-related variables at our institution, but the association with fewer annual days delivering anesthetics remained. Our findings highlight the need for rigorous adjustment for patient risk factors in anesthesia patient safety studies.

  12. Co-occurrence of behavioral risk factors of common non-communicable diseases among urban slum dwellers in Nairobi, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haregu, Tilahun Nigatu; Oti, Samuel; Egondi, Thaddaeus; Kyobutungi, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The four common non-communicable diseases (NCDs) account for 80% of NCD-related deaths worldwide. The four NCDs share four common risk factors. As most of the existing evidence on the common NCD risk factors is based on analysis of a single factor at a time, there is a need to investigate the

  13. Factors Related To HPV Vaccine Practice Among Adult Women

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    Adelia Perwita Sari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cervical cancer is one of most common diseases among women worldwide. Human papilloma virus (HPV is known as precursor of cervical cancer. Cervical cancer can be prevented effectively by practicing hpv vaccine. But the coverage of HPV vaccine is remain low. The objection of study was to analyze factors related to HPV vaccine pratice among adult women. This study used case control design with sample size 25 for each group. Sample case was women who took HPV vaccine in IBI Kota Kediri on 2013, while sample control was neighboor from the sample case who didn’t take HPV vaccine. The independent variabels were age, education level, marital status, income level, knowledge, family support, family history of cervical cancer and the dependent variable was HPV vaccine practice. Those variables was analyzed with chi square or Fisher’s exact with significancy level at 95%. The result showed that there were correlation between education level (p = 0.006; c = 0.346, knowledge (p = 0.001; c = 0.464, and family support (p = 0.000; c = 0.516 with HPV vaccination practice. While there were no correlation between age (p = 0.275, marital status (0.490 and income level (p = 0.098 and family history of cervical cancer (p = 1.000 with HPV vaccination practice. Based on data from this study can be concluded that family support and knowledge had average strenght correlation withHPV vaccine practice among adult women. So, the intervention should be focused in increasing knowledge among women and their family about the important of HPV vaccine as a cervical cancer prevention. Keywords: practice, preventive, HPV, vaccine, adult women

  14. Factors Related to Job Satisfaction of Information Technology Professionals

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    İbrahim Halil SEYREK

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Job satisfaction of employees in any type of organization is important both for the employee and for the organization he/she works for. There are several factors researchers studied that are related to employee satisfaction. Even though there are several common factors for the job satisfaction of employees, there can be differences based on the personal and job characteristics. Information Technology (IT workers are important for current information economy and therefore factors related to their job satisfaction is an important research topic. In this study, based on survey data collected from 455 IT workers from different industries, the factors related to IT worker job satisfaction are investigated. As a result of analyses, it was found that demographic factors like gender, sector (public vs. private, work experience, and wage are not related to the job satisfaction of the worker. On the other hand, the results show that feel of belonging, feel of acceptance, job autonomy, burnout, role clarity and fairness of rewards are factors that affect job satisfaction.

  15. Rumination and behavioural factors in Parkinson's disease depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Camille L; Rimes, Katharine A; Brown, Richard G

    2016-03-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with high rates of depression. There is growing interest in non-pharmacological management including psychological approaches such as Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. To date, little research has investigated whether processes that underpin cognitive models of depression, on which such treatment is based, apply in patients with Parkinson's disease. The study aimed to investigate the contribution of core psychological factors to the presence and degree of depressive symptoms. 104 participants completed questionnaires measuring mood, motor disability and core psychological variables, including maladaptive assumptions, rumination, cognitive-behavioural avoidance, illness representations and cognitive-behavioural responses to symptoms. Regression analyses revealed that a small number of psychological factors accounted for the majority of depression variance, over and above that explained by overall disability. Participants reporting high levels of rumination, avoidance and symptom focusing experienced more severe depressive symptoms. In contrast, pervasive negative dysfunctional beliefs did not independently contribute to depression variance. Specific cognitive (rumination and symptom focusing) and behavioural (avoidance) processes may be key psychological markers of depression in Parkinson's disease and therefore offer important targets for tailored psychological interventions. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fibrosis-Related Gene Expression in Single Ventricle Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Stephanie J; Siomos, Austine K; Garcia, Anastacia M; Nguyen, Hieu; SooHoo, Megan; Galambos, Csaba; Nunley, Karin; Stauffer, Brian L; Sucharov, Carmen C; Miyamoto, Shelley D

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate fibrosis and fibrosis-related gene expression in the myocardium of pediatric subjects with single ventricle with right ventricular failure. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed on explanted right ventricular myocardium of pediatric subjects with single ventricle disease and controls with nonfailing heart disease. Subjects were divided into 3 groups: single ventricle failing (right ventricular failure before or after stage I palliation), single ventricle nonfailing (infants listed for primary transplantation with normal right ventricular function), and stage III (Fontan or right ventricular failure after stage III). To evaluate subjects of similar age and right ventricular volume loading, single ventricle disease with failure was compared with single ventricle without failure and stage III was compared with nonfailing right ventricular disease. Histologic fibrosis was assessed in all hearts. Mann-Whitney tests were performed to identify differences in gene expression. Collagen (Col1α, Col3) expression is decreased in single ventricle congenital heart disease with failure compared with nonfailing single ventricle congenital heart disease (P = .019 and P = .035, respectively), and is equivalent in stage III compared with nonfailing right ventricular heart disease. Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1, TIMP-3, and TIMP-4) are downregulated in stage III compared with nonfailing right ventricular heart disease (P = .0047, P = .013 and P = .013, respectively). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) are similar between nonfailing single ventricular heart disease and failing single ventricular heart disease, and between stage III heart disease and nonfailing right ventricular heart disease. There is no difference in the prevalence of right ventricular fibrosis by histology in subjects with single ventricular failure heart disease with right ventricular failure (18%) compared with those with normal right

  17. Prioritizing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) candidate genes in COPD-related networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yihua; Li, Wan; Feng, Yuyan; Guo, Shanshan; Zhao, Xilei; Wang, Yahui; He, Yuehan; He, Weiming; Chen, Lina

    2017-11-28

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multi-factor disease, which could be caused by many factors, including disturbances of metabolism and protein-protein interactions (PPIs). In this paper, a weighted COPD-related metabolic network and a weighted COPD-related PPI network were constructed base on COPD disease genes and functional information. Candidate genes in these weighted COPD-related networks were prioritized by making use of a gene prioritization method, respectively. Literature review and functional enrichment analysis of the top 100 genes in these two networks suggested the correlation of COPD and these genes. The performance of our gene prioritization method was superior to that of ToppGene and ToppNet for genes from the COPD-related metabolic network or the COPD-related PPI network after assessing using leave-one-out cross-validation, literature validation and functional enrichment analysis. The top-ranked genes prioritized from COPD-related metabolic and PPI networks could promote the better understanding about the molecular mechanism of this disease from different perspectives. The top 100 genes in COPD-related metabolic network or COPD-related PPI network might be potential markers for the diagnosis and treatment of COPD.

  18. Analysis of related risk factors for pancreatic fistula after pancreaticoduodenectomy

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    Qi-Song Yu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the related risk factors for pancreatic fistula after pancreaticoduodenectomy to provide a theoretical evidence for effectively preventing the occurrence of pancreatic fistula. Methods: A total of 100 patients who were admitted in our hospital from January, 2012 to January, 2015 and had performed pancreaticoduodenectomy were included in the study. The related risk factors for developing pancreatic fistula were collected for single factor and Logistic multi-factor analysis. Results: Among the included patients, 16 had pancreatic fistula, and the total occurrence rate was 16% (16/100. The single-factor analysis showed that the upper abdominal operation history, preoperative bilirubin, pancreatic texture, pancreatic duct diameter, intraoperative amount of bleeding, postoperative hemoglobin, and application of somatostatin after operation were the risk factors for developing pancreatic fistula (P<0.05. The multi-factor analysis showed that the upper abdominal operation history, the soft pancreatic texture, small pancreatic duct diameter, and low postoperative hemoglobin were the dependent risk factors for developing pancreatic fistula (OR=4.162, 6.104, 5.613, 4.034, P<0.05. Conclusions: The occurrence of pancreatic fistula after pancreaticoduodenectomy is closely associated with the upper abdominal operation history, the soft pancreatic texture, small pancreatic duct diameter, and low postoperative hemoglobin; therefore, effective measures should be taken to reduce the occurrence of pancreatic fistula according to the patients’ own conditions.

  19. Periodontal disease as a potential factor of migraine chronification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameijeira, Pablo; Leira, Yago; Blanco, Juan; Leira, Rogelio

    2017-05-01

    Migraine is a hereditary constitutional base disorder, which is characterized by recurrent episodes of headache pulsatile characteristics associated with photophobia/phonophobia, nausea and/or vomiting. The main complication in migraine is the chronicity of the process, now recognized as a chronic migraine. Although pathogenic mechanisms that may influence the pathophysiology of migraine and its possible chronicity are not fully understood, previous studies have shown in patients with migraine molecular alterations of systemic inflammation, neurogenic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, innate immunity, dysfunction of matrix proteases and blood-brain barrier. Periodontal disease is an inflammatory lesion caused by bacteria. After the bacterial infection begins, an immune response that will be responsible for individual susceptibility appears. More advanced forms of periodontitis have demonstrated molecular alterations of inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, dysfunction of matrix proteases and innate immunity, similar to those observed in migraine. Furthermore, the main molecular mediators of neurogenic inflammation related to activation of the trigeminovascular system, which are characteristic of migraine, are overexpressed in gingival crevicular fluid and mucosa in patients with periodontal disease. Hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, insulin resistance, stroke or coronary artery disease are comorbidities that periodontal disease and migraine could share. Therefore, several mechanisms and hypotheses could explain the possible association between both diseases. However, epidemiological and molecular studies will be necessary to provide a better understanding of this potential association, which could be implicated in the chronification of migraine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-01-01

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori ...

  1. Economic Burden of Human Papillomavirus-Related Diseases in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baio, Gianluca; Capone, Alessandro; Marcellusi, Andrea; Mennini, Francesco Saverio; Favato, Giampiero

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Human papilloma virus (HPV) genotypes 6, 11, 16, and 18 impose a substantial burden of direct costs on the Italian National Health Service that has never been quantified fully. The main objective of the present study was to address this gap: (1) by estimating the total direct medical costs associated with nine major HPV-related diseases, namely invasive cervical cancer, cervical dysplasia, cancer of the vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and head and neck, anogenital warts, and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, and (2) by providing an aggregate measure of the total economic burden attributable to HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 infection. Methods For each of the nine conditions, we used available Italian secondary data to estimate the lifetime cost per case, the number of incident cases of each disease, the total economic burden, and the relative prevalence of HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18, in order to estimate the aggregate fraction of the total economic burden attributable to HPV infection. Results The total direct costs (expressed in 2011 Euro) associated with the annual incident cases of the nine HPV-related conditions included in the analysis were estimated to be €528.6 million, with a plausible range of €480.1–686.2 million. The fraction attributable to HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 was €291.0 (range €274.5–315.7 million), accounting for approximately 55% of the total annual burden of HPV-related disease in Italy. Conclusions The results provided a plausible estimate of the significant economic burden imposed by the most prevalent HPV-related diseases on the Italian welfare system. The fraction of the total direct lifetime costs attributable to HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 infections, and the economic burden of noncervical HPV-related diseases carried by men, were found to be cost drivers relevant to the making of informed decisions about future investments in programmes of HPV prevention. PMID:23185412

  2. Heart Disease and Depression: Is Culture a Factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, Leila; Davidson, Patricia M; Heydari, Mehrdad; Salamonson, Yenna

    2014-07-01

    This article seeks to review and discuss the evidence linking depression, coronary heart disease (CHD), and culture. PsychInfo, CINAHL, PubMed, and Google were searched for pertinent evidence linking depression, culture, and CHD, and retrieved articles were analyzed using thematic content analysis. Identified themes were the followings: depression is a factor in development and prognosis of CHD and affects the capacity to self-manage and adhere to treatment recommendations; culture mediates mental health/illness representations and treatment-seeking behaviors; screening and assessment of depression can be affected by cultural factors; and there is a need for culturally appropriate screening and therapeutic strategies. As depression is a predictor and moderating variable in the genesis and progression of CHD, understanding how factors such as culture affect screening and management of the disease is important to inform the development of culturally and linguistically competent strategies that ensure accurate screening, detection, and treatment of depression in cardiac patients in clinical practice. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Urinary symptoms in Parkinson's disease: prevalence and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campos-Sousa Raimundo Nonato

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a cross-sectional study involving 61 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD who were consecutively examined and compared to a control group with 74 subjects. Only patients who fulfilled the standard diagnostic criteria for PD and whose brain magnetic resonance imaging was normal were included. The objective of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of inferior urinary tract symptoms in PD and to study the possible association between clinical factors to urinary dysfunction. ln the patient group, 39.3% presented urinary symptoms when compared to 10.8% in the control group. All symptomatic patients presented irritative symptoms. The most common irritative symptom PD was nocturia, followed by frequency and urinary incontinence. Around 25% of the patients presented functional obstructive symptoms determined by the disease. The most frequent obstructive symptom was incomplete emptying of the bladder. Only the age of the patients and control group were correlated with urinary dysfunction.

  4. PLACENTAL GROWTH FACTOR AND CORONARY NEOANGIOGENESIS IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE

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    M. V. Tulikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoangiogenesis in coronary heart disease is a protective reaction aimed to improve ischemic myocardial perfusion, by increasing the number and size of arterial collaterals. Placental growth factor (PlGF is one of the key peptides regulating angiogenic processes in atherosclerosis. In particular, a number of investigators have shown that injection of recombinant PlGF into the system or regional blood flow can stimulate neoangiogenesis. On the other hand, there is evidence confirming the involvement of PlGF in the progression of atherosclerosis and in the development of acute coronary syndrome. In this connection, the problem of investigating the efficiency and safety of possible use of PlGF preparations, as well as its place in the diagnosis of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome remains urgent

  5. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Prebiotics as functional food ingredients preventing diet-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florowska, A; Krygier, K; Florowski, T; Dłużewska, E

    2016-05-18

    This paper reviews the potential of prebiotic-containing foods in the prevention or postponement of certain diet-related diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases with hypercholesterolemia, osteoporosis, diabetes, gastrointestinal infections and gut inflammation. Also the data on prebiotics as food ingredients and their impact on food product quality are presented. Prebiotics are short chain carbohydrates that are resistant to the digestion process in the upper part of the digestive system, are not absorbed in any segment of the gastrointestinal system, and finally are selectively fermented by specific genera of colonic bacteria. The mechanisms of the beneficial impacts of prebiotics on human health are very difficult to specify directly, because their health-promoting functions are related to fermentation by intestinal microflora. The impact of prebiotics on diet-related diseases in many ways also depends on the products of their fermentation. Prebiotics as functional food ingredients also have an impact on the quality of food products, due to their textural and gelling properties. Prebiotics as food additives can be very valuable in the creation of functional food aimed at preventing or postponing many diet-related diseases. They additionally have beneficial technological properties which improve the quality of food products.

  7. Nutritional influences on epigenetics and age-related disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutritional epigenetics has emerged as a novel mechanism underlying gene–diet interactions, further elucidating the modulatory role of nutrition in aging and age-related disease development. Epigenetics is defined as a heritable modification to the DNA that regulates chromosome architecture and modu...

  8. Molecular mechanisms of the genetic risk factors in pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanatsu, Kunihiko; Tomita, Taisuke

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the extensive deposition of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Until recently, only the APOE gene had been known as a genetic risk factor for late-onset AD (LOAD), which accounts for more than 95% of all AD cases. However, in addition to this well-established genetic risk factor, genome-wide association studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms as genetic risk factors of LOAD, such as PICALM and BIN1 . In addition, whole genome sequencing and exome sequencing have identified rare variants associated with LOAD, including TREM2 . We review the recent findings related to the molecular mechanisms by which these genetic risk factors contribute to AD, and our perspectives regarding the etiology of AD for the development of therapeutic agents.

  9. Molecular modelling of the Norrie disease protein predicts a cystine knot growth factor tertiary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitinger, T; Meindl, A; Bork, P; Rost, B; Sander, C; Haasemann, M; Murken, J

    1993-12-01

    The X-lined gene for Norrie disease, which is characterized by blindness, deafness and mental retardation has been cloned recently. This gene has been thought to code for a putative extracellular factor; its predicted amino acid sequence is homologous to the C-terminal domain of diverse extracellular proteins. Sequence pattern searches and three-dimensional modelling now suggest that the Norrie disease protein (NDP) has a tertiary structure similar to that of transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta). Our model identifies NDP as a member of an emerging family of growth factors containing a cystine knot motif, with direct implications for the physiological role of NDP. The model also sheds light on sequence related domains such as the C-terminal domain of mucins and of von Willebrand factor.

  10. Impact of environmental factors on neglected emerging arboviral diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Lorenz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Brazil is a tropical country that is largely covered by rainforests and other natural ecosystems, which provide ideal conditions for the existence of many arboviruses. However, few analyses have examined the associations between environmental factors and arboviral diseases. Thus, based on the hypothesis of correlation between environment and epidemiology, the proposals of this study were (1 to obtain the probability of occurrence of Oropouche, Mayaro, Saint Louis and Rocio fevers in Brazil based on environmental conditions corresponding to the periods of occurrence of the outbreaks; (2 to describe the macroclimatic scenario in Brazil in the last 50 years, evaluating if there was any detectable tendency to increase temperatures and (3 to model future expansion of those arboviruses in Brazil based on future temperature projections.Our model assessed seven environmental factors (annual rainfall, annual temperature, elevation, seasonality of temperature, seasonality of precipitation, thermal amplitude, and daytime temperature variation for their association with the occurrence of outbreaks in the last 50 years. Our results suggest that various environmental factors distinctly influence the distribution of each arbovirus, with temperature being the central determinant of disease distribution in all high-risk areas. These areas are subject to change, since the average temperature of some areas has increased significantly over the time.This is the first spatio-temporal study of the Oropouche, Mayaro, Saint Louis, and Rocio arboviruses, and our results indicate that they may become increasingly important public health problems in Brazil. Thus, next studies and control programs should include these diseases and also take into consideration key environmental elements.

  11. Quantifying urbanization as a risk factor for noncommunicable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allender, Steven; Wickramasinghe, Kremlin; Goldacre, Michael; Matthews, David; Katulanda, Prasad

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the poorly understood relationship between the process of urbanization and noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) in Sri Lanka using a multicomponent, quantitative measure of urbanicity. NCD prevalence data were taken from the Sri Lankan Diabetes and Cardiovascular Study, comprising a representative sample of people from seven of the nine provinces in Sri Lanka (n = 4,485/5,000; response rate = 89.7%). We constructed a measure of the urban environment for seven areas using a 7-item scale based on data from study clusters to develop an "urbanicity" scale. The items were population size, population density, and access to markets, transportation, communications/media, economic factors, environment/sanitation, health, education, and housing quality. Linear and logistic regression models were constructed to examine the relationship between urbanicity and chronic disease risk factors. Among men, urbanicity was positively associated with physical inactivity (odds ratio [OR] = 3.22; 2.27-4.57), high body mass index (OR = 2.45; 95% CI, 1.88-3.20) and diabetes mellitus (OR = 2.44; 95% CI, 1.66-3.57). Among women, too, urbanicity was positively associated with physical inactivity (OR = 2.29; 95% CI, 1.64-3.21), high body mass index (OR = 2.92; 95% CI, 2.41-3.55), and diabetes mellitus (OR = 2.10; 95% CI, 1.58 - 2.80). There is a clear relationship between urbanicity and common modifiable risk factors for chronic disease in a representative sample of Sri Lankan adults.

  12. Metabolic syndrome and risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

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    Mônica Rodrigues de Araújo Souza

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, has been considered the most common liver disease nowadays, which is also the most frequent cause of elevated transaminases and cryptogenic cirrhosis. The greatest input of fatty acids into the liver and consequent increased beta-oxidation contribute to the formation of free radicals, release of inflammatory cytokines and varying degrees of hepatocytic aggression, whose histological expression may vary from steatosis (HS to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. The differentiation of these forms is required by the potential risk of progression to cirrhosis and development of hepatocellular carcinoma. OBJECTIVE: To review the literature about the major risk factors for NAFLD in the context of metabolic syndrome, focusing on underlying mechanisms and prevention. METHOD: PubMed, MEDLINE and SciELO data basis analysis was performed to identify studies describing the link between risk factors for metabolic syndrome and NAFLD. A combination of descriptors was used, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, metabolic syndrome and risk factors. At the end, 96 clinical and experimental studies, cohorts, meta-analysis and systematic reviews of great impact and scientific relevance to the topic, were selected. RESULTS: The final analysis of all these data, pointed out the central obesity, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension as the best risk factors related to NAFLD. However, other factors were highlighted, such as gender differences, ethnicity, genetic factors and the role of innate immunity system. How these additional factors may be involved in the installation, progression and disease prognosis is discussed. CONCLUSION: Risk factors for NAFLD in the context of metabolic syndrome expands the prospects to 1 recognize patients with metabolic syndrome at high risk for NAFLD, 2 elucidate pathways common to other co-morbidities, 3

  13. Haematuria as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease progression in glomerular diseases: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Juan Antonio; Yuste, Claudia; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Sevillano, Ángel M; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Amaro-Villalobos, Juan Manuel; Praga, Manuel; Egido, Jesús

    2016-04-01

    Haematuria has long been considered to be a benign condition associated with glomerular diseases. However, new evidences suggest that haematuria has a pathogenic role in promoting kidney disease progression. An increased risk for end-stage renal disease has been reported in adolescents and young adults with persistent microscopic haematuria. A persistent impairment of renal function has been also reported following macroscopic haematuria-associated acute kidney injury in immunoglobulin A nephropathy. Haematuria-induced renal damage has been related to oxidant, cytotoxic and inflammatory effects induced by haemoglobin or haem released from red blood cells. The pathophysiological origin of haematuria may be due to a more fragile and easily ruptured glomerular filtration barrier, as reported in several glomerular diseases. In this review we describe a number of the key issues associated with the epidemiology and pathogenesis of haematuria-associated diseases, provide an update of recent knowledge on the role of haematuria on renal function outcome and discuss specific therapeutic approaches in this setting. KEY SUMMARY POINTS: 1. Glomerular haematuria is a common observation in a number of renal diseases that may lead to persistent renal injury. 2. Haematuria in children differs from that in adults in specific aspects, particularly in the frequency of glomerular diseases and renal disease outcome. 3. Regular follow-up of renal function in children with isolated microhaematuria may be recommended.

  14. Work Stress as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2015-09-01

    The role of psychosocial work stress as a risk factor for chronic disease has been the subject of considerable debate. Many researchers argue in support of a causal connection while others remain skeptical and have argued that the effect on specific health conditions is either negligible or confounded. This review of evidence from over 600,000 men and women from 27 cohort studies in Europe, the USA and Japan suggests that work stressors, such as job strain and long working hours, are associated with a moderately elevated risk of incident coronary heart disease and stroke. The excess risk for exposed individuals is 10-40 % compared with those free of such stressors. Differences between men and women, younger versus older employees and workers from different socioeconomic backgrounds appear to be small, indicating that the association is robust. Meta-analyses of a wider range of health outcomes show additionally an association between work stress and type 2 diabetes, though not with common cancers or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, suggesting outcome specificity. Few studies have addressed whether mitigation of work stressors would reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. In view of the limited interventional evidence on benefits, harms and cost-effectiveness, definitive recommendations have not been made (e.g. by the US Preventive Services Taskforce) for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease via workplace stress reduction. Nevertheless, governments are already launching healthy workplace campaigns, and preventing excessive work stress is a legal obligation in several countries. Promoting awareness of the link between stress and health among both employers and workers is an important component of workplace health promotion.

  15. Chlorinative stress in age-related diseases: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciaro, Marco; Di Salvo, Eleonora; Pace, Elisabetta; Ventura-Spagnolo, Elvira; Navarra, Michele; Gangemi, Sebastiano

    2017-01-01

    Aging is an agglomerate of biological long-lasting processes that result being inevitable. Main actors in this scenario are both long-term inflammation and oxidative stress. It has been proved that oxidative stress induce alteration in proteins and this fact itself is critically important in the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to diseases typical of aging. Among reactive species, chlorine ones such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl) are cytotoxic oxidants produced by activated neutrophils during chronic inflammation processes. HOCl can also cause damages by reacting with biological molecules. HOCl is generated by myeloperoxidase (MPO) and augmented serum levels of MPO have been described in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions in cardiovascular patients and has been implicated in many inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative conditions, and some cancers. Due to these data, we decided to conduct an up-to-date review evaluating chlorinative stress effects on every age-related disease linked; potential anti-oxidant countermeasures were also assessed. Results obtained associated HOCl generation to the aging processes and confirmed its connection with diseases like neurodegenerative and cardiovascular pathologies, atherosclerosis and cancer; chlorination was mainly linked to diseases where molecular (protein) alteration constitute the major suspected cause: i.e. inflammation, tissue lesions, DNA damages, apoptosis and oxidative stress itself. According data collected, a healthy lifestyle together with some dietary suggestion and/or the administration of nutracetical antioxidant integrators could balance the effects of chlorinative stress and, in some cases, slow down or prevent the onset of age-releated diseases.

  16. Gender differences in risk factors for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yen Y; Gast, Gerrie-Cor M; van der Schouw, Yvonne T

    2010-02-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD), traditionally considered a male disease, is also a major threat to women. This review article addresses independent risk factors for CHD that are specific for women as well as non-gender-specific risk factors and how their effects differ between men and women. Although polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in women is associated with an adverse metabolic risk profile, current evidence regarding future risk of CHD is conflicting. Preeclampsia is consistently associated with higher risk of CHD later in life. Menopause is associated with an increased risk of CHD, and the earlier the onset of menopause, the larger the risk. Existing data on postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) was inconclusive with regard to possible protection when HT is initiated close to menopause in young peri- or postmenopausal women. Evidence on use of low-dose oral contraceptives strongly suggests no increased risk of CHD. Although levels of physical inactivity are similar for men and women, the higher prevalences of hypertension, diabetes, and obesity in older women portends a greater risk in women than in men. Additionally, risk factors like smoking, hypertriglyceridemia and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels have greater impact in women than in men. This review indicates that acknowledgement of non-gender-specific risk factors in addition to those that are unique to women would help optimize diagnosis, treatment and earlier prevention of CHD in women. Further research is needed to ascertain if incorporating these gender-specific risks into a clinically used risk stratification model would change outcome in women. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Protective role of the apolipoprotein E2 allele in age-related disease traits and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulminski, Alexander M; Raghavachari, Nalini; Arbeev, Konstantin G

    2016-01-01

    , which can link this allele with age-related phenotypes. We focused on age-related macular degeneration, bronchitis, asthma, pneumonia, stroke, creatinine, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, diseases of heart (HD), cancer, and survival. Our analysis......-related mechanism is also sensitive to gender. The LDL-C-related mechanism appears to be independent of these factors. Insights into mechanisms linking ε2 allele with age-related phenotypes given biodemographic structure of the population studied may benefit translation of genetic discoveries to health care...

  18. Oxidative Stress in Oral Diseases: Understanding Its Relation with Other Systemic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress occurs in diabetes, various cancers, liver diseases, stroke, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic inflammation, and other degenerative diseases related to the nervous system. The free radicals have deleterious effect on various organs of the body. This is due to lipid peroxidation and irreversible protein modification that leads to cellular apoptosis or programmed cell death. During recent years, there is a rise in the oral diseases related to oxidative stress. Oxidative stress in oral disease is related to other systemic diseases in the body such as periodontitis, cardiovascular, pancreatic, gastric, and liver diseases. In the present review, we discuss the various pathways that mediate oxidative cellular damage. Numerous pathways mediate oxidative cellular damage and these include caspase pathway, PERK/NRF2 pathway, NADPH oxidase 4 pathways and JNK/mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase pathway. We also discuss the role of inflammatory markers, lipid peroxidation, and role of oxygen species linked to oxidative stress. Knowledge of different pathways, role of inflammatory markers, and importance of low-density lipoprotein, fibrinogen, creatinine, nitric oxide, nitrates, and highly sensitive C-reactive proteins may be helpful in understanding the pathogenesis and plan better treatment for oral diseases which involve oxidative stress.

  19. Cardiovascular disease risk factors in persons with paraplegia: the Stockholm spinal cord injury study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahman, Kerstin; Nash, Mark S; Westgren, Ninni; Lewis, John E; Seiger, Ake; Levi, Richard

    2010-03-01

    To examine cardiovascular disease risk factors and risk clusters in Swedish persons with traumatic wheelchair-dependent paraplegia. Prospective examination. A total of 135 individuals aged 18-79 years with chronic (>or= 1 year) post-traumatic paraplegia. Cardiovascular disease risk factors; dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, hypertension, overweight, smoking, and medication usage for dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus, were analyzed according to authoritative guidelines. Stepwise regression tested the effects of age, gender, and injury characteristics on cardiovascular disease risks. High-prevalence risk factors were dyslipidemia (83.1%), hypertension (39.3%), and overweight (42.2%) with pervasive clustering of these risks. Being older was related to increased cardiovascular disease risk, except for dyslipidemia. Hypertension was more common in low-level paraplegia. Prevalence of impaired fasting glucose was lower than previously reported after paraplegia. A high percentage of persons being prescribed drug treatment for dyslipidemia and hypertension failed to reach authoritative targets for cardiovascular disease risk reduction. Swedish persons with paraplegia are at high risk for dyslipidemia, hypertension, and overweight. Impaired fasting glucose was not as common as reported in some previous studies. Pharmacotherapy for dyslipidemia and hypertension often failed to achieve recommended targets. Population-based screening and therapeutic countermeasures to these cardiovascular disease risks are indicated.

  20. Prevalence of ischemic heart disease and associated factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Kmiliauskis Santos Gomes

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To estimate the prevalence of ischemic heart disease and associated factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: A cross-sectional study using the American College of Rheumatology diagnostic criteria in order to select patients seen at primary or secondary health care units in Blumenau, Santa Catarina, Southern Brazil, in 2014. The presence of ischemic heart disease was defined as an acute myocardial infarction with percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass graft surgery that has occurred after diagnosis. Fischer's exact test, Wald's linear trend test, and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to test the associations. Results: Among 296 patients (83.1% female with a mean age of 56.6 years and a mean rheumatoid arthritis duration of 11.3 years, 13 reported having acute myocardial infarction requiring a percutaneous or surgical reperfusion procedure, a prevalence of 4.4% (95% CI 2.0-6.7. Diabetes Mellitus (odds ratio [OR] 4.9 [95% CI 1.6-13.8] and disease duration >10 years (OR 8.2 [95% CI 1.8-39.7] were the only factors associated with an ischemic disease that remained in the final model, after the multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The prevalence of acute myocardial infarction was similar to that observed in other studies. Among the traditional risk factors, Diabetes Mellitus, and among the factors related to rheumatoid arthritis, disease duration, were the variables associated with comorbidity.

  1. Factors related to gait and balance deficits in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Momani M

    2016-08-01

    disability, stroke, heart disease, arthritis, joint diseases, diabetes, and hypertension recorded higher risks of falls as measured by TAB test compared to those with low and moderate TAB scores. Also, impairment in cognitive abilities and psychiatric disorders was shown to be associated with gait and balance problems, with a higher risk of falls in 47.5% and 46.1% of the residents, respectively.Conclusion: This study revealed a significant impact of upper limb disability, stroke, heart disease, arthritis, joint diseases, diabetes, and hypertension as well as psychiatric disorders and cognitive disabilities on gait and balance deficits among home-resident older adults. Keywords: risk factors, gait and balance deficits, upper limb disability, arthritis

  2. Landscape epidemiology: An emerging perspective in the mapping and modelling of disease and disease risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnadi Nnaemeka Emmanuel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Landscape epidemiology describes how the temporal dynamics of host, vector, and pathogen populations interact spatially within a permissive environment to enable transmission. It also aims at understanding the vegetation and geologic conditions that are necessary for the maintenance and transmission of a particular pathogen. The current review describes the evolution of landscape epidemiology. As a science, it also highlights the various methods of mapping and modeling diseases and disease risk factors. The key tool to characterize landscape is satellite remote sensing and these data are used as inputs to drive spatial models of transmission risk.

  3. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: radiologic-pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, Alberto; Franquet, Tomas; Gimenez, Ana; Pineda, Rosa; Madrid, Marta; Bordes, Ramon

    2006-01-01

    Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) are a heterogeneous group of entities of unknown cause. These diseases include desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP), respiratory-bronchiolitis-related interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD), pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). High-resolution CT is highly sensitive in the detection of abnormalities in the lung parenchyma and airways. Ground-glass attenuation can occur in DIP and RB-ILD. Whereas DIP is histologically characterized by intra-alveolar pigmented macrophages, RB-ILD shows alveolar macrophages in a patchy peribronchiolar distribution. LCH shows nodular infiltrates on histopathological examination containing varying amounts of characteristic Langerhans' histiocytes. The HRCT findings are characteristically bilateral, symmetrical and diffuse, involving the upper lobe zones with sparing of the costophrenic angles. The most prominent CT features are nodules (sometimes cavitary) measuring 1 to 10 mm in diameter, cysts and areas of ground-glass attenuation. Pathologically, IPF is characterized by its heterogeneity with areas of normal clung, alveolitis and end-stage fibrosis shown in the same biopsy specimen. High-resolution CT findings consist of honeycombing, traction bronchiectasis and intralobular interstitial thickening with subpleural and lower lung predominance. Since coexisting lesions in the same cases have been observed, a better understanding of the different smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) allows a more confident and specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  4. Intrathoracic Manifestations of IgG4-Related Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sian Yik Lim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Intrathoracic involvement with IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD is frequently overlooked in IgG4-related disease patients. In this article we review the intrathoracic findings of IgG4-RD which are variable and protean. IgG4-related disease has been reported to affect the lung parenchyma, pleura, mediastinal/hilar lymph nodes, vasculature, and pericardium within the thorax. Mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy is the most common intrathoracic manifestation of IgG4-RD. Four main patterns of pulmonary disease have been described, including the solid nodular type, the bronchovascular type, the alveolar interstitial type, and the round shaped ground glass type. When feasible, a biopsy should be obtained to confirm the diagnosis. Most lesions show characteristic pathologic findings of IgG4-RD: dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. While this helps establish the diagnosis, the interpretation of pathology findings in the clinical context is key in making an accurate diagnosis. Mimickers of IgG4-RD should be ruled out, before making a diagnosis. The intrathoracic findings of IgG4-RD can be treated effectively with prednisone, but may require additional immunosuppressive therapies, including rituximab.

  5. [Work-related rhinitis - Is it always an occupational disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salski, Witold; Wiszniewska, Marta; Salska, Agata; Tymoszuk, Diana; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2016-12-22

    Rhinitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the upper respiratory tract, characterized by a high prevalence and a complex pathogenesis. Work-related rhinitis (WRR) can be divided into occupational rhinitis (OR) and work-exacerbated rhinitis (WER). It is not only considered as a disease entity but also in the context of medical certification as the allergic disease associated with occupational exposure. Epidemiology of work-related rhinitis has been found to vary depending on the occupation and specific exposure, on the other hand the prevalence data may be underestimated due to the lack of uniform diagnostic criteria. This paper reviews the issues comprising the pathogenesis, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of patients with work-related rhinitis. It also discusses the significance of the disease in occupational medicine, particularly in terms of preventive worker care, general principles of good practice in primary and secondary WRR prevention and the necessary directions of changes in medical certification in the cases of occupational rhinitis. Med Pr 2016;67(6):801-815. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  6. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: radiologic-pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo, Alberto [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Thoracic Radiology, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Franquet, Tomas; Gimenez, Ana; Pineda, Rosa; Madrid, Marta [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Bordes, Ramon [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Pathology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-11-15

    Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) are a heterogeneous group of entities of unknown cause. These diseases include desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP), respiratory-bronchiolitis-related interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD), pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). High-resolution CT is highly sensitive in the detection of abnormalities in the lung parenchyma and airways. Ground-glass attenuation can occur in DIP and RB-ILD. Whereas DIP is histologically characterized by intra-alveolar pigmented macrophages, RB-ILD shows alveolar macrophages in a patchy peribronchiolar distribution. LCH shows nodular infiltrates on histopathological examination containing varying amounts of characteristic Langerhans' histiocytes. The HRCT findings are characteristically bilateral, symmetrical and diffuse, involving the upper lobe zones with sparing of the costophrenic angles. The most prominent CT features are nodules (sometimes cavitary) measuring 1 to 10 mm in diameter, cysts and areas of ground-glass attenuation. Pathologically, IPF is characterized by its heterogeneity with areas of normal clung, alveolitis and end-stage fibrosis shown in the same biopsy specimen. High-resolution CT findings consist of honeycombing, traction bronchiectasis and intralobular interstitial thickening with subpleural and lower lung predominance. Since coexisting lesions in the same cases have been observed, a better understanding of the different smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) allows a more confident and specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. Hepatocellular carcinoma complicating cystic fibrosis related liver disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, D H

    2012-02-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of the respiratory and gastrointestinal complications of cystic fibrosis (CF) have led to improved survival with many patients living beyond the fourth decade. Along with this increased life expectancy is the risk of further disease associated with the chronic manifestations of their condition. We report a patient with documented CF related liver disease for which he was under routine surveillance that presented with histologically proven hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It is important that physicians are aware of this association as increased vigilance may lead to earlier diagnosis and perhaps, a better outcome.

  8. Physical Activity and Telomere Biology: Exploring the Link with Aging-Related Disease Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T. Ludlow

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity is associated with reduced risk of several age-related diseases as well as with increased longevity in both rodents and humans. Though these associations are well established, evidence of the molecular and cellular factors associated with reduced disease risk and increased longevity resulting from physical activity is sparse. A long-standing hypothesis of aging is the telomere hypothesis: as a cell divides, telomeres shorten resulting eventually in replicative senescence and an aged phenotype. Several reports have recently associated telomeres and telomere-related proteins to diseases associated with physical inactivity and aging including cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance, and hypertension. Interestingly several reports have also shown that longer telomeres are associated with higher physical activity levels, indicating a potential mechanistic link between physical activity, reduced age-related disease risk, and longevity. The primary purpose of this review is to discuss the potential importance of physical activity in telomere biology in the context of inactivity- and age-related diseases. A secondary purpose is to explore potential mechanisms and important avenues for future research in the field of telomeres and diseases associated with physical inactivity and aging.

  9. [A Forensic Autopsy Case Applied for Asbestos-Related Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makihara, Kosuke; Hamada, Tetsuo; Kasai, Kentaro; Tanaka, Toshiko; Sato, Hiroaki

    2016-03-01

    We had a forensic autopsy case that required additive pathological examination for the asbestos-related lung disease compensatory application afterwards. A man in his sixties with a history of occupational asbestos inhalation who had neither visited a hospital nor received a physical examination received forensic autopsy because of his death from unknown cause. An inmate said, "He developed cough and dyspnea, and died in the progression of the symptoms." The autopsy revealed widespread pleural plaques on both sides of the parietal pleura and multiple tumors in both sides of the lungs. The cause of death was diagnosed as lung cancer. Additional pathological examination was asked by his family to certify that he had suffered from asbestos-related lung disease in order to apply to the Asbestos-related Damage Relief Law. The Japanese criteria of the compensation law of asbestos-related lung cancer is the detection of more than 5,000 asbestos bodies per gram of dry lung tissue, while his number of asbestos bodies was 4,860. Asbestos bodies were reported to be accumulated in the distal lung parenchyma with no pathological changes. The present lung samples were collected from proximal section around the tumor, which might have made the number of asbestos bodies less than the criteria. Both the number of patients suffering from asbestos-related lung disease and the number of forensic autopsy cases have increased in Japan. Collecting lung samples from the appropriate lung section is essential and should be noted when the lung cancer is suspected at forensic autopsy in order to apply for asbestos-related lung disease compensation.

  10. [Homocystein--an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and thrombotic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, B

    2005-09-01

    Over the last 20 years homocysteine has taken on increasing importance as an independent, potentially modifiable risk factor for various forms of vascular disease including peripheral and cerebral vascular disease, coronary heart disease and thrombosis. This association has been ascertained in many retrospective and prospective studies but the strength of risk is not yet firmly established although it is clearly dependent on several modifying factors such as other risk factors, nutrition and genetic polymorphisms. Generally it is estimated that hyperhomocysteinaemia is responsible for about 10% of all risks. Homocysteine is formed from the dietary amino acid methionine and plays a pivotal role in folate metabolism and methyl group transfer. Its concentrations in tissues and plasma are influenced by many genetic and environmental factors, especially vitamins such as folate, B12 and B6 as well as certain medications and even life style factors. Nowadays the measurement of plasma homocysteine is freely available although care has to be taken in sample handling and interpretation of results. Final proof that homocysteine is a causal agent and not just a marker for cardiovascular disease and that reduction of plasma homocysteine by vitamin treatment reduces risk of cardiovascular disease is still awaited. Therefore at the present time neither wide-scale screening for homocysteine levels nor general prophylaxis with high dose vitamins is justified. However most experts recommend homocysteine determination in individuals with existing or high risk for arterial or venous blood vessel disease and their relatives. Elevated homocysteine can be lowered in such cases with a combination of folic acid, vitamin B12 vitamin B6. The results of ongoing trials on the impact of such treatment on risk of vascular disease are awaited with great interest.

  11. The Importance of Behavioral Risk Factors for Prevention of Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Kilic

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2005, the cause for almost 60.0% of the deaths in the world is chronic diseases. In the word each year, due to die 5.1 million people from tobacco use, 3.2 million people from physical inactivity, 2.8 million people from overweight or obesity, and 2.7 million people from inadequate intake of fruit and vegetables. The relationships between environmental, socio-economic, cultural and individual characteristics of the risk factors were multi-dimensional and complex. Today, socio-economic burden of disease and risk factors they bring to society are calculated and determined according to this policy. According to World Health Organization (WHO Global Health Risks report, tobacco use, being overweight or obese, insufficient physical activity, alcohol consumption and inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption were responsible one-third of deaths (34.4%, and 19.3% (excluded inadequate e fruits and vegetables consumption of the burden of DALYs in middle-income countries. According to Turkey the National Burden of Disease (NBD and WHO is preparing the Global Burden of Disease 2005, which is fundamental in the prevention of chronic diseases is life style risks that can be prevented, controlled, and changed. According to the NBD 2004 study, 79% of deaths were due to non-communicable diseases in our country. The primary risk factor for DALY is high blood pressure, and following 6 risk factors were related to behavior in our country. Smoking, being overweight or obese, alcohol consumption, insufficient fruits and vegetables consumption, inactive life, and high dietary fat and salt intake which are considered to be significant risk factors for chronic diseases are lifestyle behaviors. When adults visited to health facilities for any reason, their risky behavior can be evaluated. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(6.000: 735-740

  12. African ancestry protects against Alzheimer's disease-related neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, D; Grinberg, L T; Alba, J G; Naslavsky, M S; Licinio, L; Farfel, J M; Suemoto, C K; de Lucena Ferretti, R E; Leite, R E P; de Andrade, M P; dos Santos, A C F; Brentani, H; Pasqualucci, C A; Nitrini, R; Jacob-Filho, W; Zatz, M

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies in dementia epidemiology have reported higher Alzheimer's disease rates in African-Americans when compared with White Americans. To determine whether genetically determined African ancestry is associated with neuropathological changes commonly associated with dementia, we analyzed a population-based brain bank in the highly admixed city of São Paulo, Brazil. African ancestry was estimated through the use of previously described ancestry-informative markers. Risk of presence of neuritic plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, small vessel disease, brain infarcts and Lewy bodies in subjects with significant African ancestry versus those without was determined. Results were adjusted for multiple environmental risk factors, demographic variables and apolipoprotein E genotype. African ancestry was inversely correlated with neuritic plaques (P=0.03). Subjects with significant African ancestry (n=112, 55.4%) showed lower prevalence of neuritic plaques in the univariate analysis (odds ratio (OR) 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.55-0.95, P=0.01) and when adjusted for age, sex, APOE genotype and environmental risk factors (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.21-0.89, P=0.02). There were no significant differences for the presence of other neuropathological alterations. We show for the first time, using genetically determined ancestry, that African ancestry may be highly protective of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology, functioning through either genetic variants or unknown environmental factors. Epidemiological studies correlating African-American race/ethnicity with increased Alzheimer's disease rates should not be interpreted as surrogates of genetic ancestry or considered to represent African-derived populations from the developing nations such as Brazil.

  13. Quality of life and Related Factors in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosharafeh Chaleshgar kordasiabi

    2016-12-01

    planners, and clinical specialists. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate QOL and the factors affecting it in patients with RA.Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was performed in 185 RA patients (2014 at Shariati Hospital. The participants were chosen through convenience sampling. The data collection tools included a form on demographic and clinical factors, health status (arthritis impact measurement scale2 [AIMS2], and SF20 QOL questionnaire. Data was analyzed in SPSS 16 using descriptive, univariate, and multivariate regression analysis.Results: The patients had a mean age of 46.97±11.47 years, and most of the patients were female (80.5%, 67.6% of whom were housewives. In general, 90% of the patients had diploma or lower education. Mean of physical dimension of QOL was lower and social and role dimensions were higher than other dimensions. Univariate analysis regression showed that QOL have significant negative relationship with age, disease duration, disease activity score (DAS and significant positive relationship with education and health status. In multivariate regression analysis, health status, DAS, and education explained 71.7% of QOL. Conclusion: Our results highlighted the influence of demographic and diseaserelated factors on QOL. Thus, they should be implemented in designing educational programs to increase QOL in RA patients.

  14. Costs in Relation to Disability, Disease Activity, and Health-related Quality of Life in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallman, Johan K; Eriksson, Jonas K; Nilsson, Jan-Åke

    2016-01-01

    between-patient associations) and by generalized estimating equations (GEE), using all observations to also account for within-patient associations of HAQ/DAS28/EQ-5D to costs. RESULTS: Regardless of the methodology (linear or GEE regression), HAQ was most closely related to both cost types, while work......OBJECTIVE: To compare how costs relate to disability, disease activity, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF)-treated patients with RA in southern Sweden (n = 2341) were monitored 2005-2010. Health Assessment...... Questionnaire (HAQ), 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28), and EQ-5D scores were linked to register-derived costs of antirheumatic drugs (excluding anti-TNF agents), patient care, and work loss from 30 days before to 30 days after each visit (n = 13,289). Associations of HAQ/DAS28/EQ-5D to healthcare...

  15. Anti-Factor V inhibitor in patients with autoimmune diseases: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imashuku S

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Shinsaku Imashuku1, Takeshi Hasegawa2, Kagekatsu Kubo2, Masaki Nakato2, Midori Shima31Division of Pediatrics and Hematology, 2Division of Internal Medicine, Takasago-Seibu Hospital, Takasago, Hyogo; 3Department of Pediatrics, Nara Medical University, Kashihara, Nara, JapanAbstract: Acquired anti-Factor V deficiency caused by inhibitor production is a rare coagulation disorder. Although this is a well known entity in the literature, choice of optimal treatment for an individual patient is difficult, given that no standard therapeutic measures are available because of rare incidence and various underlying diseases occurring in the elderly. An 88 year-old man treated for Hashimoto's disease was found to exhibit prolongation of both prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time. Detailed study of coagulation factors revealed a deficiency of Factor V. Our patient's coagulation disorder resolved in two weeks with intravenous administration of prednisolone 20 mg/day. Clinical features of autoimmune disease-related Factor V deficiency are discussed, along with eight previously reported cases over the past 20 years.Keywords: anti-Factor V inhibitor, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, autoimmune disease

  16. Health-Related Factors Associated with Mode of Travel to Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bopp

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Active commuting (AC to the workplace is a potential strategy for incorporating physical activity into daily life and is associated with health benefits. This study examined the association between health-related factors and mode of travel to the workplace. Methods. A volunteer convenience sample of employed adults completed an online survey regarding demographics, health-related factors, and the number of times/week walking, biking, driving, and using public transit to work (dichotomized as no walk/bike/drive/PT and walk/bike/drive/PT 1 + x/week. Logistic regression was used to predict the likelihood of each mode of transport and meeting PA recommendations from AC according to demographics and health-related factors. Results. The sample was aged 43.5 11.4 years and was primarily White (92.7% and female (67.9%. Respondents reported walking (7.3%, biking (14.4%, taking public transit (20.3%, and driving (78.3% to work at least one time/week. Among those reporting AC, 9.6% met PA recommendations from AC alone. Mode of travel to work was associated with several demographic and health-related factors, including age, number of chronic diseases, weight status, and AC beliefs. Discussion. Mode of transportation to the workplace and health-related factors such as disease or weight status should be considered in future interventions targeting AC.

  17. Health-related factors associated with mode of travel to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, Melissa; Kaczynski, Andrew T; Campbell, Matthew E

    2013-01-01

    Active commuting (AC) to the workplace is a potential strategy for incorporating physical activity into daily life and is associated with health benefits. This study examined the association between health-related factors and mode of travel to the workplace. Methods. A volunteer convenience sample of employed adults completed an online survey regarding demographics, health-related factors, and the number of times/week walking, biking, driving, and using public transit to work (dichotomized as no walk/bike/drive/PT and walk/bike/drive/PT 1 + x/week). Logistic regression was used to predict the likelihood of each mode of transport and meeting PA recommendations from AC according to demographics and health-related factors. Results. The sample (n = 1175) was aged 43.5 ± 11.4 years and was primarily White (92.7%) and female (67.9%). Respondents reported walking (7.3%), biking (14.4%), taking public transit (20.3%), and driving (78.3%) to work at least one time/week. Among those reporting AC, 9.6% met PA recommendations from AC alone. Mode of travel to work was associated with several demographic and health-related factors, including age, number of chronic diseases, weight status, and AC beliefs. Discussion. Mode of transportation to the workplace and health-related factors such as disease or weight status should be considered in future interventions targeting AC.

  18. Placental Induced Growth Factor (PIGf) in Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Carabello, Blaise; Mehta, Satish; Schlegel, Todd; Pellis, Neal; Ott, Mark; Pierson, Duane

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies on normal human lymphocytes have shown a five-fold increase (p less than 0.001) in angiogenic inducers such as Placental Induced Growth Factor (PIGf) in physiologically stressful environments such as modeled microgravity, a space analog. This suggests de-regulation of cardiovascular signalling pathways indicated by upregulation of PIGf. In the current study, we measured PIGf in the plasma of 33 patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD) to investigate whether such disease is associated with increased levels of PIGf. A control consisting of 31 sex matched apparently healthy subjects was also included in the study. We observed that the levels of PIGf in CAD patients were significantly increased compared to those in healthy control subjects (p less than 0.001) and usually increased beyond the clinical threshold level (greater than 27ng/L). The mechanisms leading to up-regulation of angiogenic factors and the adaptation of organisms to stressful environments such as isolation, high altitude, hypoxia, ischemia, microgravity, increased radiation, etc are presently unknown and require further investigation in spaceflight and these other physiologically stressed environments.

  19. Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF System in Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Adamek

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocyte differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis are affected by growth factors produced in liver. Insulin-like growth factor 1 and 2 (IGF1 and IGF2 act in response to growth hormone (GH. Other IGF family components include at least six binding proteins (IGFBP1 to 6, manifested by both IGFs develop due to interaction through the type 1 receptor (IGF1R. The data based on animal models and/or in vitro studies suggest the role of IGF system components in cellular aspects of hepatocarcinogenesis (cell cycle progression, uncontrolled proliferation, cell survival, migration, inhibition of apoptosis, protein synthesis and cell growth, and show that systemic IGF1 administration can reduce fibrosis and ameliorate general liver function. In epidemiologic and clinicopathological studies on chronic liver disease (CLD, lowered serum levels, decreased tissue expression of IGF1, elevated production of IGF1R and variable IGF2 expression has been noted, from the start of preneoplastic alterations up to the developed hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC stage. These changes result in well-known clinical symptoms of IGF1 deficiency. This review summarized the current data of the complex role of IGF system components in the most common CLD (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Better recognition and understanding of this system can contribute to discovery of new and improved versions of current preventive and therapeutic actions in CLD.

  20. Clustering of modifiable biobehavioral risk factors for chronic disease in US adults: a latent class analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Adam M; Huh, Jimi; Dunton, Genevieve F

    2014-11-01

    Examining the co-occurrence patterns of modifiable biobehavioral risk factors for deadly chronic diseases (e.g. cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes) can elucidate the etiology of risk factors and guide disease-prevention programming. The aims of this study were to (1) identify latent classes based on the clustering of five key biobehavioral risk factors among US adults who reported at least one risk factor and (2) explore the demographic correlates of the identified latent classes. Participants were respondents of the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (2004-2005) with at least one of the following disease risk factors in the past year (N = 22,789), which were also the latent class indicators: (1) alcohol abuse/dependence, (2) drug abuse/dependence, (3) nicotine dependence, (4) obesity, and (5) physical inactivity. Housing sample units were selected to match the US National Census in location and demographic characteristics, with young adults oversampled. Participants were administered surveys by trained interviewers. Five latent classes were yielded: 'obese, active non-substance abusers' (23%); 'nicotine-dependent, active, and non-obese' (19%); 'active, non-obese alcohol abusers' (6%); 'inactive, non-substance abusers' (50%); and 'active, polysubstance abusers' (3.7%). Four classes were characterized by a 100% likelihood of having one risk factor coupled with a low or moderate likelihood of having the other four risk factors. The five classes exhibited unique demographic profiles. Risk factors may cluster together in a non-monotonic fashion, with the majority of the at-risk population of US adults expected to have a high likelihood of endorsing only one of these five risk factors. © Royal Society for Public Health 2013.

  1. Mercury in Hair Is Inversely Related to Disease Associated Damage in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Crowe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune inflammatory disease, and environmental factors are proposed to exacerbate existing symptoms. One such environmental factor is mercury. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between exposure to mercury (Hg and disease activity and disease associated damage in Total Hg concentrations in hair and urine were measured in 52 SLE patients. Dental amalgams were quantified. Disease activity was assessed using three indexes including the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group Index (BILAG. Disease associated damage was measured using the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology SLICC/ACR Damage Index. Pearson’s correlation identified a significant negative correlation between hair Hg and BILAG (r = −0.323, p = 0.029 and SLICC/ACR (r = −0.377, p = 0.038. Multiple regression analysis identified hair Hg as a significant predictor of disease associated damage as determined by SLICC/ACR (β = −0.366, 95% confidence interval (CI: −1.769, −0.155 p = 0.019. Urinary Hg was not related to disease activity or damage. Fish consumption is the primary route of MeHg exposure in humans and the inverse association of hair Hg with disease activity observed here might be explained by the anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids also found in fish.

  2. Endogenous factors that relate to the eating habits of adolescents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim in this research was to determine how endogenous factors such as gender, intelligence, self-concept, and personality relate to the eating habits of adolescents. An empirical investigation was conducted using 340 secondary school learners, 162 boys and 178 girls. From the results it appeared that girls tend to have ...

  3. Effects of Procurement Related Factors on Construction Project ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several Literatures in construction management support the view that procurements have impacts on project performance. Aim of this study is to investigate the effects of procurement related factors of procurement selection criteria, tendering methods and variation orders on project performance. Purpose of the study is to ...

  4. Expression of human soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR NJ TONUKARI

    2011-06-06

    Jun 6, 2011 ... bio-technique in bacterial (Lin et al., 2007), yeast (Xu et al., 2003) ... biological activity, such as human somatotropin (hST) .... sion way with chloroplast transit peptide (Wang et al., .... chloroplast protein synthesis capacity by massive expression of a ... necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand in vivo.

  5. The Relative Importance of Job Factors: A New Measurement Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealey, Stanley M.

    This paper reports on a new two-phase measurement technique that permits a direct comparison of the perceived relative importance of economic vs. non-economic factors in a job situation in accounting for personnel retention, the willingness to produce, and job satisfaction. The paired comparison method was used to measure the preferences of 91…

  6. School-Related Factors Affecting High School Seniors' Methamphetamine Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jarrod M.; Lo, Celia C.

    2009-01-01

    Data from the 2005 Monitoring the Future survey were used to examine relationships between school-related factors and high school seniors' lifetime methamphetamine use. The study applied logistic regression techniques to evaluate effects of social bonding variables and social learning variables on likelihood of lifetime methamphetamine use. The…

  7. Overstory removal: stand factors related to success and failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert J. Laacke; Gary O. Fiddler

    1986-01-01

    Overstory removal can offer economic and esthetic advantages over clearcutting and regeneration, but projecting success is difficult. Twenty-nine units on nine operational overstory removal cuts in northern California were studied to determine what factors are related to satisfactory or unsatisfactory stocking after harvest. Stocking determinations were based on number...

  8. Factors and Problems Related to Female Genital Mutilation as Seen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the aetiological factors and problems related to female genital mutilation as seen in children at St. Gaspar Hospital. Data source: Secondary data were obtained from St. Gaspar Hospital, records, registers and patients files or case notes from children ward were retrieved and reviewed, later a special ...

  9. Patient and social work factors related to successful placement of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patient and social work factors related to successful placement of long-term psychiatric in-patients from a specialist psychiatric hospital in South Africa. ... away; a low frequency of behavioural problems (especially of cannabis abuse, verbal or physical aggression, uncontrolled sexual activity), and agitation or restlessness.

  10. Factors Affecting Performance of Undergraduate Students in Construction Related Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Samuel Olusola; Aghimien, Douglas Omoregie; Oke, Ayodeji Emmanuel; Olushola, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Academic performance of students in Nigerian institutions has been of much concern to all and sundry hence the need to assess the factors affecting performance of undergraduate students in construction related discipline in Nigeria. A survey design was employed with questionnaires administered on students in the department of Quantity Surveying,…

  11. Evaluating medical and systemic factors related to maternal and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study examined maternal morbidity and mortality and neonatal mortality over a multi-year period from de-identified retrospective medical records at Nyakahanga Designated District Hospital in north-western Tanzania. The study aimed to examine factors related to maternal mortality (MMR) and morbidity in ...

  12. Work related injuries and associated factors among small scale ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study aims to assess the magnitude of work related injury and associated factors among small scale industrial workers in Mizan-Aman town, Bench Maji Zone, Southwest Ethiopia. Method: A cross-sectional study design was conducted from February to May, 2016. Data was collected using a structured face to ...

  13. Factors Related to Teenage Dating Violence Prevention Programming in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Beverly M.; Hawley, Alicia; Hoefer, Richard; Barnett, Tracey M.

    2017-01-01

    The Children's Safety Network has identified teenage dating violence (TDV) as a public health problem and called for effective prevention programs to address the issue. This study used resource dependence theory to examine factors that relate to domestic violence shelters' in-school efforts to prevent TDV. A national survey was sent to domestic…

  14. Relative contributions of individual, institutional and system factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the relative contributions of individual, institutional and system factors to utilisation of Research4Life databases by scientists in the National Agricultural Research Institutes (NARIs) in Nigeria. The study adopted the descriptive survey research design of the correlational type. Simple and stratified ...

  15. Community reintegration and related factors in a Nigerian stroke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The goal of stroke rehabilitation has shifted from mere survival of a victim to how well a survivor can be effectively reintegrated back into the community. Objectives: The present study determined the level of satisfaction with community reintegration (CR) and related factors among Nigerian community-dwelling ...

  16. Burnout in the working population: relations to psychosocial work factors.