WorldWideScience

Sample records for disease modifying drugs

  1. Disease-modifying drugs in Alzheimer's disease

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    Ghezzi L

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Laura Ghezzi, Elio Scarpini, Daniela Galimberti Neurology Unit, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Fondazione Cà Granda, IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disorder and the most common cause of dementia. The early stages of AD are characterized by short-term memory loss. Once the disease progresses, patients experience difficulties in sense of direction, oral communication, calculation, ability to learn, and cognitive thinking. The median duration of the disease is 10 years. The pathology is characterized by deposition of amyloid beta peptide (so-called senile plaques and tau protein in the form of neurofibrillary tangles. Currently, two classes of drugs are licensed by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of AD, ie, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for mild to moderate AD, and memantine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, for moderate and severe AD. Treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors or memantine aims at slowing progression and controlling symptoms, whereas drugs under development are intended to modify the pathologic steps leading to AD. Herein, we review the clinical features, pharmacologic properties, and cost-effectiveness of the available acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, and focus on disease-modifying drugs aiming to interfere with the amyloid beta peptide, including vaccination, passive immunization, and tau deposition. Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, disease-modifying drugs, diagnosis, treatment

  2. [The trend of developing new disease-modifying drugs in Alzheimer's disease].

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    Arai, Hiroyuki; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Tomita, Naoki; Ishiki, Aiko; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka

    2016-03-01

    Development of symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer s disease by cholinesterase inhibitors like donepezil was successful. However, it is a disappointment that development of disease-modifying drugs such as anti-amyloid drug based on amyloid-cascade theory has been interrupted or unsuccessful. Therefore, we have to be more cautious regarding inclusion criteria for clinical trials of new drugs. We agree that potentially curative drugs should be started before symptoms begin as a preemptive therapy or prevention trial. The concept of personalized medicine also is important when ApoE4-related amyloid reducing therapy is considered. Unfortunately, Japanese-ADNI has suffered a setback since 2014. However, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare gave a final remark that there was nothing wrong in the data managing process in the J-ADNI data center. We should pay more attention to worldwide challenges of speeding up new drug development.

  3. Management of coccidioidomycosis in patients receiving biologic response modifiers or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

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    Taroumian, Sara; Knowles, Susan L; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Yanes, James; Ampel, Neil M; Vaz, Austin; Galgiani, John N; Hoover, Susan E

    2012-12-01

    Coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) is an endemic fungal infection of the American Southwest, an area with a large population of patients with rheumatic diseases. There are currently no guidelines for management of patients who develop coccidioidomycosis while under treatment with biologic response modifiers (BRMs) or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). We conducted a retrospective study of how both concurrent diseases were managed and the patient outcomes at 2 centers in Tucson, Arizona. A retrospective chart review identified patients who developed coccidioidomycosis during treatment with DMARDs or BRMs. Patients were seen at least once in a university-affiliated or Veterans Affairs outpatient rheumatology clinic in Tucson, Arizona, between 2007 and 2009. Forty-four patients were identified. Rheumatologic treatment included a BRM alone (n = 11), a DMARD alone (n = 8), or combination therapy (n = 25). Manifestations of coccidioidomycosis included pulmonary infection (n = 29), disseminated disease (n = 9), and asymptomatic positive coccidioidal serologies (n = 6). After the diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis, 26 patients had BRMs and DMARDs stopped, 8 patients had BRMs stopped but DMARD therapy continued, and 10 patients had no change in their immunosuppressive therapy. Forty-one patients had antifungal therapy initiated for 1 month or longer. Followup data were available for 38 patients. BRM and/or DMARD therapy was continued or resumed in 33 patients, only 16 of whom continued concurrent antifungal therapy. None of the patients have had subsequent dissemination or complications of coccidioidomycosis. Re-treating rheumatic disease patients with a BRM and/or a DMARD after coccidioidomycosis appears to be safe in some patients. We propose a management strategy based on coccidioidomycosis disease activity. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  4. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in pregnancy - Current status and implications for the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroom, Fokaline; de Walle, Hermien E. K.; van de Laar, Mart A. J. F.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.

    2006-01-01

    Drug use during pregnancy is sometimes unavoidable, especially in chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) often starts in the early stage of RA; therefore, women of reproductive age are at risk for exposure to a DMARD

  5. Cognitive enhancers (Nootropics). Part 3: drugs interacting with targets other than receptors or enzymes. Disease-modifying drugs. Update 2014.

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    Froestl, Wolfgang; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Scientists working in the field of Alzheimer's disease and, in particular, cognitive enhancers, are very productive. The review "Drugs interacting with Targets other than Receptors or Enzymes. Disease-modifying Drugs" was accepted in October 2012. In the last 20 months, new targets for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease were identified. Enormous progress was realized in the pharmacological characterization of natural products with cognitive enhancing properties. This review covers the evolution of research in this field through May 2014.

  6. Huperzine A: Is it an Effective Disease-Modifying Drug for Alzheimer's Disease?

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    Qian, Zhong Ming; Ke, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no cure. Huperzine A (HupA) is a natural inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) derived from the Chinese folk medicine Huperzia serrata (Qian Ceng Ta). It is a licensed anti-AD drug in China and is available as a nutraceutical in the US. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that HupA has multifaceted pharmacological effects. In addition to the symptomatic, cognitive-enhancing effect via inhibition of AChE, a number of recent studies have reported that this drug has "non-cholinergic" effects on AD. Most important among these is the protective effect of HupA on neurons against amyloid beta-induced oxidative injury and mitochondrial dysfunction as well as via the up-regulation of nerve growth factor and antagonizing N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. The most recent discovery that HupA may reduce brain iron accumulation lends further support to the argument that HupA could serve as a potential disease-modifying agent for AD and also other neurodegenerative disorders by significantly slowing down the course of neuronal death.

  7. Huperzine A: Is it an Effective Disease-Modifying Drug for Alzheimer’s Disease?

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    Qian, Zhong Ming; Ke, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no cure. Huperzine A (HupA) is a natural inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) derived from the Chinese folk medicine Huperzia serrata (Qian Ceng Ta). It is a licensed anti-AD drug in China and is available as a nutraceutical in the US. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that HupA has multifaceted pharmacological effects. In addition to the symptomatic, cognitive-enhancing effect via inhibition of AChE, a number of recent studies have reported that this drug has “non-cholinergic” effects on AD. Most important among these is the protective effect of HupA on neurons against amyloid beta-induced oxidative injury and mitochondrial dysfunction as well as via the up-regulation of nerve growth factor and antagonizing N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. The most recent discovery that HupA may reduce brain iron accumulation lends further support to the argument that HupA could serve as a potential disease-modifying agent for AD and also other neurodegenerative disorders by significantly slowing down the course of neuronal death. PMID:25191267

  8. Huperzine A: is it an effective disease-modifying drug for Alzheimer’s disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Ming eQian

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no cure. Huperzine A (HupA is a natural inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE derived from the Chinese folk medicine Huperzia serrata (Qian Ceng Ta. It is a licensed anti-AD drug in China and is available as a nutraceutical in the US. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that HupA has multifaceted pharmacological effects. In addition to the symptomatic, cognitive-enhancing effect via inhibition of AChE, a number of recent studies have reported that this drug has non-cholinergic effects on AD. Most important among these is the protective effect of HupA on neurons against amyloid beta-induced oxidative injury and mitochondrial dysfunction as well as via the up-regulation of nerve growth factor and antagonizing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. The most recent discovery that HupA may reduce brain iron accumulation lends further support to the argument that HupA could serve as a potential disease-modifying agent for AD and also other neurodegenerative disorders by significantly slowing down the course of neuronal death.

  9. Proposal for a new nomenclature of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolen, Josef S.; van der Heijde, Desiree; Machold, Klaus P.; Aletaha, Daniel; Landewe, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In light of the recent emergence of new therapeutics for rheumatoid arthritis, such as kinase inhibitors and biosimilars, a new nomenclature for disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), which are currently often classified as synthetic (or chemical) DMARDs (sDMARDS) and biological DMARDs

  10. Patients’ satisfaction with and views about treatment with disease-modifying drugs in multiple sclerosis

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    Caroline Vieira Spessotto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS with disease-modifying-drugs (DMDs is evolving and new drugs are reaching the market. Efficacy and safety aspects of the drugs are crucial, but the patients’ satisfaction with the treatment must be taken into consideration. Methods Individual interview with patients with MS regarding their satisfaction and points of view on the treatment with DMDs. Results One hundred and twenty eight patients attending specialized MS Units in five different cities were interviewed. Over 80% of patients were very satisfied with the drugs in use regarding convenience and perceived benefits. The only aspect scoring lesser values was tolerability. Conclusion Parameters for improving treatment in MS must include efficacy, safety, and patient satisfaction with the given DMD.

  11. ANALYSIS OF DISEASE MODIFYING DRUGS ADMINISTRATION FREGUENCY AND CAUSES OF THEIR WITHDRAWAL IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

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    E V Pavlova

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of studdy: To assess the frequency of practical application of different basic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Material and methods: Tlxe study was conducted basing of questionner of pts and analysis of ycases by randomized sampling among 103 consequent pts (M:F= 13:90 with reliable RA (ARA, 1987 in rheumatologic department of Clinical Hospital Nol in Ekaterinburg. 74% of pts under study demonstrated systemic manifestations: anemia (in 47 pts, lymphadenopathy (in 34, rheumatoid nodules (in 15, Sjogren s syndrome (in 4, nephropathy (in 4, vascular disturbances including Raynaud s phenomenon, capillarites (by 1 pt. Results: In the course of disease basic therapy was prescribed to 88 out of103 (85.4% pts and one and the same patient could take different basic drugs. Aminochinoline drugs prevailed, after them more frequent were immunodepressants and gold preparations. More rarely pts had sulfasalazin, cuprenil and wobenzym. In general, in 133 out of 184 cases of prescribing basic drugs they were canceled. The reason for cancellation were: prevalently absence of the drug in the pharmaceutical stores (in 48 cases averagely in 8 months of taking the drug; then they insufficient efficacy (44 cases averagely in 1.3 year. In 18 cases pts themselves stopped treatment averagely in 3.5 months of drug taking. Conclusion: In the majority of cases of basic drugs cancellation in RA the cause is their absence in sail especially on free of charge prescription. Cases ofself-cancellation of the drug demonstrate the need of explaining to pts the necessity> of long-term taking disease-modifying drugs.

  12. Cognitive enhancers (nootropics). Part 3: drugs interacting with targets other than receptors or enzymes. disease-modifying drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive enhancers (nootropics) are drugs to treat cognition deficits in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or aging. Cognition refers to a capacity for information processing, applying knowledge, and changing preferences. It involves memory, attention, executive functions, perception, language, and psychomotor functions. The term nootropics was coined in 1972 when memory enhancing properties of piracetam were observed in clinical trials. In the meantime, hundreds of drugs have been evaluated in clinical trials or in preclinical experiments. To classify the compounds, a concept is proposed assigning drugs to 19 categories according to their mechanism(s) of action, in particular drugs interacting with receptors, enzymes, ion channels, nerve growth factors, re-uptake transporters, antioxidants, metal chelators, and disease modifying drugs, meaning small molecules, vaccines, and monoclonal antibodies interacting with amyloid-β and tau. For drugs, whose mechanism of action is not known, they are either classified according to structure, e.g., peptides, or their origin, e.g., natural products. The review covers the evolution of research in this field over the last 25 years.

  13. Critical appraisal of the guidelines for the management of ankylosing spondylitis: disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

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    Soriano, Enrique R; Clegg, Daniel O; Lisse, Jeffrey R

    2012-05-01

    Surprisingly, little data are available for the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in ankylosing spondylitis. Sulfasalazine has been the best studied. Efficacy data for individual agents (including pamidronate) and combinations of agents are detailed in this review. Intriguingly, these agents continue to be used with some frequency, even in the absence of efficacy data. To answer these questions, additional systematic studies of these agents in ankylosing spondylitis are needed and will likely need to be done by interested collaborative groups such as SPARTAN.

  14. Needle-free and microneedle drug delivery in children: a case for disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs).

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    Shah, Utpal U; Roberts, Matthew; Orlu Gul, Mine; Tuleu, Catherine; Beresford, Michael W

    2011-09-15

    Parenteral routes of drug administration have poor acceptability and tolerability in children. Advances in transdermal drug delivery provide a potential alternative for improving drug administration in this patient group. Issues with parenteral delivery in children are highlighted and thus illustrate the scope for the application of needle-free and microneedle technologies. This mini-review discusses the opportunities and challenges for providing disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) currently prescribed to paediatric rheumatology patients using such technologies. The aim is to raise further awareness of the need for age-appropriate formulations and drug delivery systems and stimulate exploration of these options for DMARDs, and in particular, rapidly emerging biologics on the market. The ability of needle-free and microneedle technologies to deliver monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins still remains largely untested. Such an understanding is crucial for future drug design opportunities. The bioavailability, safety and tolerance of delivering biologics into the viable epidermis also need to be studied. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fertility, pregnancy and childbirth in patients with multiple sclerosis: impact of disease-modifying drugs.

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    Amato, Maria Pia; Portaccio, Emilio

    2015-03-01

    In recent decades, pregnancy-related issues in multiple sclerosis (MS) have received growing interest. MS is more frequent in women than in men and typically starts during child-bearing age. An increasing number of disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) for the treatment of MS are becoming available. Gathering information on their influences on pregnancy-related issues is of crucial importance for the counselling of MS patients. As for the immunomodulatory drugs (interferons and glatiramer acetate), accumulating evidence points to the relative safety of pregnancy exposure in terms of maternal and foetal outcomes. In case of higher clinical disease activity before pregnancy, these drugs could be continued until conception. As for the 'newer' drugs (fingolimod, natalizumab, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate and alemtuzumab), the information is more limited. Whereas fingolimod and teriflunomide are likely associated with an increased risk of foetal malformations, the effects of natalizumab, dimethyl fumarate and alemtuzumab still need to be ascertained. This article provides a review of the available information on the use of DMDs during pregnancy, with a specific focus on fertility, foetal development, delivery and breast-feeding.

  16. Adherence to Disease Modifying Drugs among Patients with Multiple Sclerosis in Germany: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

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    Kerstin Hansen

    Full Text Available Long-term therapies such as disease modifying therapy for Multiple Sclerosis (MS demand high levels of medication adherence in order to reach acceptable outcomes. The objective of this study was to describe adherence to four disease modifying drugs (DMDs among statutorily insured patients within two years following treatment initiation. These drugs were interferon beta-1a i.m. (Avonex, interferon beta-1a s.c. (Rebif, interferon beta-1b s.c. (Betaferon and glatiramer acetate s.c. (Copaxone.This retrospective cohort study used pharmacy claims data from the data warehouse of the German Institute for Drug Use Evaluation (DAPI from 2001 through 2009. New or renewed DMD prescriptions in the years 2002 to 2006 were identified and adherence was estimated during 730 days of follow-up by analyzing the medication possession ratio (MPR as proxy for compliance and persistence defined as number of days from initiation of DMD therapy until discontinuation or interruption.A total of 52,516 medication profiles or therapy cycles (11,891 Avonex, 14,060 Betaferon, 12,353 Copaxone and 14,212 Rebif from 50,057 patients were included into the analysis. Among the 4 cohorts, no clinically relevant differences were found in available covariates. The Medication Possession Ratio (MPR measured overall compliance, which was 39.9% with a threshold MPR≥0.8. There were small differences in the proportion of therapy cycles during which a patient was compliant for the following medications: Avonex (42.8%, Betaferon (40.6%, Rebif (39.2%, and Copaxone (37%. Overall persistence was 32.3% at the end of the 24 months observation period, i.e. during only one third of all included therapy cycles patients did not discontinue or interrupt DMD therapy. There were also small differences in the proportion of therapy cycles during which a patient was persistent as follows: Avonex (34.2%, Betaferon (33.4%, Rebif (31.7% and Copaxone (29.8%.Two years after initiating MS-modifying therapy, only

  17. [Therapeutic Concepts for Treatment of Patients with Non-infectious Uveitis Biologic Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs].

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    Walscheid, Karoline; Pleyer, Uwe; Heiligenhaus, Arnd

    2018-04-12

    Biologic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) can be highly efficient in the treatment of various non-infectious uveitis entities. Currently, the TNF-α-inhibitor Adalimumab is the only in-label therapeutic option, whereas, all other bDMARDs need to be given as an off-label therapy. bDMARDs are indicated in diseases refractory to conventional synthetic DMARD therapy and/or systemic steroids, or in patients in whom treatment with those is not possible due to side effects. Therapeutic mechanisms currently employed are cytokine-specific (interferons, inhibition of TNF-α or of interleukin [IL]-1-, IL-6- or IL-17-signalling), inhibit T cell costimulation (CTLA-4 fusion protein), or act via depletion of B cells (anti-CD20). All bDMARDs need to be administered parenterally, and therapy is initiated by the treating internal specialist only after interdisciplinary coordination of all treating subspecialties and after exclusion of contraindications. Regular clinical and laboratory monitoring is mandatory for all patients while under bDMARD therapy. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Patients' considerations in the decision-making process of initiating disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nota, Ingrid; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore what considerations patients have when deciding about disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and what information patients need to participate in the decision-making process. Methods In-depth face-to-face interviews were conducted with 32 inflammatory arthritis

  19. Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis : Impact of Disease-Modifying Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has a profound impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), a comprehensive subjective measure of the patient's health status. Assessment of HRQoL informs on the potential advantages and disadvantages of disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) beyond their effects on

  20. Biologic and oral disease-modifying antirheumatic drug monotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Paul; Sebba, Anthony; Huizinga, Tom W J

    2013-01-01

    Clinical evidence demonstrates coadministration of tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) agents and methotrexate (MTX) is more efficacious than administration of TNFi agents alone in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, leading to the perception that coadministration of MTX with all biologic agents or oral disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs is necessary for maximum efficacy. Real-life registry data reveal approximately one-third of patients taking biologic agents use them as monotherapy. Additionally, an analysis of healthcare claims data showed that when MTX was prescribed in conjunction with a biologic agent, as many as 58% of patients did not collect the MTX prescription. Given this discrepancy between perception and real life, we conducted a review of the peer-reviewed literature and rheumatology medical congress abstracts to determine whether data support biologic monotherapy as a treatment option for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Our analysis suggests only for tocilizumab is there evidence that the efficacy of biologic monotherapy is comparable with combination therapy with MTX. PMID:23918035

  1. Adherence to synthetic disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drugs in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results of the OBSERVAR Study.

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    Juan Mas, Antonio; Castañeda, Santos; Cantero Santamaría, José I; Baquero, José L; Del Toro Santos, Francisco J

    2017-12-27

    Treatment compliance with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) is essential to achieve the therapeutic goals in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, despite the need for good compliance, there is evidence that patients with RA frequently fail to use DMARD for the control of RA. Thus, the main objective of the OBSERVAR study is to evaluate the reasons for the lack of therapeutic adherence to synthetic DMARD in these patients. A Delphi process involving 18 randomly selected Spanish rheumatologists determined the level of agreement with 66 causes of noncompliance selected from the literature in relation to synthetic DMARD in RA. The reasons for noncompliance were consistent in 75.7%, although 3 reasons (4.5%) were highly consistent: 1) not knowing what to do in the case of an adverse event with DMARD; 2) not having undergone adherence screening by health personnel for early detection of "noncompliant patients"; and 3) not having undergone interventions or strategies that improve adherence. In order to improve adherence to RA treatment with synthetic DMARD, the patient should be adequately informed of each new treatment introduced, the patient's compliance profile should be incorporated into the clinical routine and the patient's motivation for therapeutic compliance be reinforced through the methods available to us. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessing the effectiveness of synthetic and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in psoriatic arthritis – a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsley GH

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gabrielle H Kingsley, David L Scott Rheumatology Unit, Kings College London, London, UK Background: Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory arthritis the primary manifestations of which are locomotor and skin disease. Although a number of guidelines have been published citing strategies for reducing disease progression, the evidence base for disease-modifying agents is unclear. This forms the focus of this systematic review. Methods: The systematic review was undertaken according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses 2009 checklist. We selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs that looked at the impact of interventions with disease-modifying agents, either synthetic drugs or biologics on musculoskeletal outcomes, notably American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders. Results were analyzed using Review Manager 5.1.6 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK. Whilst our primary focus was on published trials, we also looked at new trials presented in abstract form in 2013–2014 that were not yet published to avoid omitting important and up-to-date information on developing treatments. Results: Our in-depth analysis included 28 trials overall enrolling 5,177 patients published between the 1980s and now as well as limited analysis of some studies in abstract form as described earlier. The most frequently available locomotor outcome measure was the American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders. The risk ratio for achieving an American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders response was positive in favor of treatment (risk ratio 2.30; 95% confidence interval 1.78–2.96; however, there was evidence of considerable heterogeneity between trials. Overall randomized controlled trials of established synthetic disease-modifying agents were largely negative (methotrexate, ciclosporin and sulfasalazine though leflunomide showed a small positive effect. A new synthetic agent, apremilast, did show a

  3. Antidepressant Drug Treatment in Association with Multiple Sclerosis Disease-Modifying Therapy: Using Explorys in the MS Population.

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    Mirsky, Matthew M; Marrie, Ruth Ann; Rae-Grant, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Explorys Enterprise Performance Management (EPM) database contains de-identified clinical data for 50 million patients. Multiple sclerosis (MS) disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), specifically interferon beta (IFNβ) treatments, may potentiate depression. Conflicting data have emerged, and a large-scale claims-based study by Patten et al. did not support such an association. This study compares the results of Patten et al. with those using the EPM database. Methods: "Power searches" were built to test the relationship between antidepressant drug use and DMT in the MS population. Searches were built to produce a cohort of individuals diagnosed as having MS in the past 3 years taking a specific DMT who were then given any antidepressant drug. The antidepressant drug therapy prevalence was tested in the MS population on the following DMTs: IFNβ-1a, IFNβ-1b, combined IFNβ, glatiramer acetate, natalizumab, fingolimod, and dimethyl fumarate. Results: In patients with MS, the rate of antidepressant drug use in those receiving DMTs was 40.60% to 44.57%. The rate of antidepressant drug use for combined IFNβ DMTs was 41.61% (males: 31.25%-39.62%; females: 43.10%-47.33%). Antidepressant drug use peaked in the group aged 45 to 54 years for five of six DMTs. Conclusions: We found no association between IFNβ treatment and antidepressant drug use in the MS population compared with other DMTs. The EPM database has been validated against the Patten et al. data for future use in the MS population.

  4. The Impact of Conventional and Biological Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs on Bone Biology. Rheumatoid Arthritis as a Case Study.

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    Barreira, Sofia Carvalho; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2016-08-01

    The bone and the immune system have a very tight interaction. Systemic immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), induce bone loss, leading to a twofold increase in osteoporosis and an increase of fragility fracture risk of 1.35-2.13 times. This review focuses on the effects of conventional and biological disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) on bone biology, in the context of systemic inflammation, with a focus on RA. Published evidence supports a decrease in osteoclastic activity induced by DMARDs, which leads to positive effects on bone mineral density (BMD). It is unknown if this effect could be translated into fracture risk reduction. The combination with antiosteoclastic drugs can have an additional benefit.

  5. Clinical utility of therapeutic drug monitoring in biological disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug treatment of rheumatic disorders: a systematic narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herwaarden, Noortje; Van Den Bemt, Bart J F; Wientjes, Maike H M; Kramers, Cornelis; Den Broeder, Alfons A

    2017-08-01

    Biological Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (bDMARDs) have improved the treatment outcomes of inflammatory rheumatic diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis and spondyloarthropathies. Inter-individual variation exists in (maintenance of) response to bDMARDs. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) of bDMARDs could potentially help in optimizing treatment for the individual patient. Areas covered: Evidence of clinical utility of TDM in bDMARD treatment is reviewed. Different clinical scenarios will be discussed, including: prediction of response after start of treatment, prediction of response to a next bDMARD in case of treatment failure of the first, prediction of successful dose reduction or discontinuation in case of low disease activity, prediction of response to dose-escalation in case of active disease and prediction of response to bDMARD in case of flare in disease activity. Expert opinion: The limited available evidence does often not report important outcomes for diagnostic studies, such as sensitivity and specificity. In most clinical relevant scenarios, predictive value of serum (anti-) drug levels is absent, therefore the use of TDM of bDMARDs cannot be advocated. Well-designed prospective studies should be done to further investigate the promising scenarios to determine the place of TDM in clinical practice.

  6. Efficacy of VX-509 (decernotinib) in combination with a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genovese, Mark C.; Yang, Fang; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess early effects on joint structures of VX-509 in combination with stable disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy using MRI in adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods This phase II, placebo-controlled, double-blind, dose-ranging study randomised patients with RA......), and the RA MRI scoring (RAMRIS) system. Results ACR20 response at week 12 was 63.6%, 60.0% and 60.0% in the VX-509 100-mg, 200-mg and 300-mg groups, respectively, compared with 25.0% in the placebo group. DAS28-CRP scores decreased in a dose-dependent manner with increasing VX-509 doses. Decreases in RAMRIS...... to a DMARD alone. MRI responses were detected at week 12. Treatment was generally well tolerated. Trial registration number NCT01754935; results....

  7. Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs til behandling af ankyloserende spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Rintek; Egsmose, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an inflammatory disorder affecting the axial skeleton, peripheral joints, entheses and extra-articular sites. Patients with early disease, a higher level of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and/or peripheral arthritis might benefit from sulfasalazine. Otherwise...

  8. Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Enrique Machado-Alba

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the adverse drug reactions (ADRs and their incidence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated in the Colombian health system. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using information from all patients who were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and attended specialized health care centers in the cities of Bogotá, Cali, Manizales, Medellin, and Pereira between 1 December 2009 and 30 August 2013. The ADRs were obtained from medical records and the pharmacovigilance system registry and sorted by frequency and affected tissue according to World Health Organization Adverse Reaction Terminology (WHO-ART. A total of 949 reports of ADRs were obtained from 419 patients (32.8 ADRs per 100 patient-years; these patients were from a cohort of 1 364 patients being treated for rheumatoid arthritis and followed up for an average of 23.8 months (± 12.9. The cohort was mostly female (366, 87.4% and had a mean age of 52.7 years (± 13.1. The highest numbers of ADRs were reported following the use of tocilizumab, rituximab, and infliximab (28.8, 23.1, and 13.3 reports per 100 patient-years respectively. The most frequently reported ADRs were elevated transaminase levels and dyspepsia. Overall, 87.7% of ADRs were classified as type A, 36.6% as mild, 40.7% as moderate, and 22.7% as severe. As a result, 73.2% of patients who experienced an ADR stopped taking their drugs. The occurrence of ADRs in patients treated for rheumatoid arthritis is common, especially in those associated with the use of biotechnologically produced anti-rheumatic drugs. This outcome should be studied in future research and monitoring is needed to reduce the risks in these patients.

  9. The impact of adjusted work conditions and disease-modifying drugs on work ability in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickström, Anne; Fagerström, Maria; Wickström, Lucas; Granåsen, Gabriel; Dahle, Charlotte; Vrethem, Magnus; Sundström, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurological disorder that causes significantly reduced ability to work, and the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) is one of the main predictors for reduced work ability. To investigate how work requirements, flexible work conditions and disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) influence the work ability in relation to different EDSS grades in two MS populations. Work ability was studied in two MS populations: one in the southern and one in the northern part of Sweden, both demographically similar. In the latter population, more active work-promoting interventions have been practised and second-generation DMDs have been widely used from the onset of disease for several years. The proportion of MS patients who participated in the workforce or studied was significantly higher in the northern compared with the southern population ( p work conditions and were able to work more hours per week. Higher EDSS was associated with lower reduction in number of worked hours per week in the northern population ( p = 0.042). Our data indicated that treatment strategy and adjusted work conditions have impact on work ability in MS.

  10. Efficacy of biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs: a systematic literature review informing the 2013 update of the EULAR recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nam, Jackie L.; Ramiro, Sofia; Gaujoux-Viala, Cecile; Takase, Kaoru; Leon-Garcia, Mario; Emery, Paul; Gossec, Laure; Landewe, Robert; Smolen, Josef S.; Buch, Maya H.

    2014-01-01

    To update the evidence for the efficacy of biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to inform the European League Against Rheumatism(EULAR) Task Force treatment recommendations. Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for

  11. Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug use in pregnant women with rheumatic diseases: a systematic review of the risk of congenital malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Corisande; Avina-Zubieta, Antonio; Rai, Sharan K; Carruthers, Erin; De Vera, Mary A

    2016-01-01

    Despite the high incidence of rheumatic diseases during the reproductive years, little is known about the impact of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) use during pregnancy. Our objective was to systematically review and appraise evidence in women with rheumatic disease on the use of traditional and biologic DMARDs during pregnancy and the risk of congenital malformation outcomes. We conducted a systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and INTERNATIONAL PHARMACEUTICAL ABSTRACTS databases. Inclusion criteria were: 1) study sample including women with rheumatic disease; 2) use of traditional and/or biologic DMARDs during pregnancy; and 3) congenital malformation outcome(s) reported. We extracted information on study design, data source, number of exposed pregnancies, type of DMARD, number of live births, and number of congenital malformations. Altogether, we included 79 studies; the majority were based on designs that did not involve a comparison group, including 26 case reports, 17 case series, 20 cross-sectional studies, and 4 surveys. Studies that had a comparator group included 1 case control, 10 cohort studies, and 1 controlled trial. Hydroxychloroquine and azathioprine represent the most studied traditional DMARD exposures and, among biologics, most of the reports were on infliximab and etanercept. This is the first systematic review on the use of both traditional and biologic DMARDs during pregnancy among women with rheumatic diseases and congenital malformation outcomes, with a focus on study design and quality. Findings confirm the limited number of studies, as well as the need to improve study designs.

  12. [Acupuncture Therapy versus Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drugs for the Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis--a Meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zheng-tao; Zhou, Xiang; Chen, An-min

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis evaluating the efficacy and safety of acupuncture compared to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Four databases including Pubmed, EMBASE, Cochrane library, and ISI Web of Science were searched in December 2014, taking also the reference section into account. Randomized controlled trials that aimed to assess the efficacy of acupuncture therapy were identified. The inclusion criteria for the outcome measurements were the clinical effect, ESR, occipital wall test, chest expansion, CRP and finger ground distance. Finally, six studies met these inclusion criteria. Two reviewers screened each article independently and were blinded to the findings of each other. We analyzed data from 6 RCTs involving 541 participants. Acupuncture therapy could further improve the clinical effect (OR = 3.01; 95% CI, 1.48-6.13; P = 0.002) and reduce ESR level (SMD = -0.77; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.08; P = 0.03) compared to DMARDs; a combination of acupuncture and DMARDs could further improve clinical effect (OR = 3.20, 95% CI, 1.36-7.54; P = 0.008), occipital-wall distance (SMD = -0.84; 95% CI, -1.37 to -0.31; P = 0.002), chest expansion (SMD = 0.38; 95% CI, 0.16-0.60; P = 0.0009), and finger-ground distance (SMD = -0.48; 95% CI, -0.87 to -0.09; P = 0.02) as compared to DMARDs treatment alone. Our findings support that acupuncture therapy could be an option to relieve symptoms associated with AS. These results should be interpreted cautiously due to the generally poor methodological qualities of the included trials. © 2015 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  13. Identification and Prioritization of Important Attributes of Disease-Modifying Drugs in Decision Making among Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Nominal Group Technique and Best-Worst Scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Ingrid E H; Evers, Silvia M A A; Jongen, Peter J; van der Weijden, Trudy; van de Kolk, Ilona; Hiligsmann, Mickaël

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the preferences of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for disease-modifying drugs and involving these patients in clinical decision making can improve the concordance between medical decisions and patient values and may, subsequently, improve adherence to disease-modifying drugs. This study aims first to identify which characteristics-or attributes-of disease-modifying drugs influence patients´ decisions about these treatments and second to quantify the attributes' relative importance among patients. First, three focus groups of relapsing-remitting MS patients were formed to compile a preliminary list of attributes using a nominal group technique. Based on this qualitative research, a survey with several choice tasks (best-worst scaling) was developed to prioritize attributes, asking a larger patient group to choose the most and least important attributes. The attributes' mean relative importance scores (RIS) were calculated. Nineteen patients reported 34 attributes during the focus groups and 185 patients evaluated the importance of the attributes in the survey. The effect on disease progression received the highest RIS (RIS = 9.64, 95% confidence interval: [9.48-9.81]), followed by quality of life (RIS = 9.21 [9.00-9.42]), relapse rate (RIS = 7.76 [7.39-8.13]), severity of side effects (RIS = 7.63 [7.33-7.94]) and relapse severity (RIS = 7.39 [7.06-7.73]). Subgroup analyses showed heterogeneity in preference of patients. For example, side effect-related attributes were statistically more important for patients who had no experience in using disease-modifying drugs compared to experienced patients (p decision making would be needed and requires eliciting individual preferences.

  14. Efficacy and safety of tofacitinib following inadequate response to conventional synthetic or biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles-Schoeman, Christina; Burmester, Gerd; Nash, Peter; Zerbini, Cristiano A F; Soma, Koshika; Kwok, Kenneth; Hendrikx, Thijs; Bananis, Eustratios; Fleischmann, Roy

    2016-07-01

    Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) have shown diminished clinical response following an inadequate response (IR) to ≥1 previous bDMARD. Here, tofacitinib was compared with placebo in patients with an IR to conventional synthetic DMARDs (csDMARDs; bDMARD-naive) and in patients with an IR to bDMARDs (bDMARD-IR). Data were taken from phase II and phase III studies of tofacitinib in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients received tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg twice daily, or placebo, as monotherapy or with background methotrexate or other csDMARDs. Efficacy endpoints and incidence rates of adverse events (AEs) of special interest were assessed. 2812 bDMARD-naive and 705 bDMARD-IR patients were analysed. Baseline demographics and disease characteristics were generally similar between treatment groups within subpopulations. Across subpopulations, improvements in efficacy parameters at month 3 were generally significantly greater for both tofacitinib doses versus placebo. Clinical response was numerically greater with bDMARD-naive versus bDMARD-IR patients (overlapping 95% CIs). Rates of safety events of special interest were generally similar between tofacitinib doses and subpopulations; however, patients receiving glucocorticoids had more serious AEs, discontinuations due to AEs, serious infection events and herpes zoster. Numerically greater clinical responses and incidence rates of AEs of special interest were generally reported for tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily versus tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily (overlapping 95% CIs). Tofacitinib demonstrated efficacy in both bDMARD-naive and bDMARD-IR patients with RA. Clinical response to tofacitinib was generally numerically greater in bDMARD-naive than bDMARD-IR patients. The safety profile appeared similar between subpopulations. (NCT00413660, NCT00550446, NCT00603512, NCT00687193, NCT00960440, NCT00847613, NCT00814307, NCT00856544, NCT00853385). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited

  15. The Effect of Disease-Modifying Drugs on Brain Atrophy in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Branger

    Full Text Available The quantification of brain atrophy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS may serve as a marker of disease progression and treatment response. We compared the association between first-line (FL or second-line (SL disease-modifying drugs (DMDs and brain volume changes over time in RRMS.We reviewed clinical trials in RRMS between January 1, 1995 and June 1, 2014 that assessed the effect of DMDs and reported data on brain atrophy in Medline, Embase, the Cochrane database and meeting abstracts. First, we designed a meta-analysis to directly compare the percentage brain volume change (PBVC between FLDMDs and SLDMDs at 24 months. Second, we conducted an observational and longitudinal linear regression analysis of a 48-month follow-up period. Sensitivity analyses considering PBVC between 12 and 48 months were also performed.Among the 272 studies identified, 117 were analyzed and 35 (18,140 patients were included in the analysis. Based on the meta-analysis, atrophy was greater for the use of an FLDMD than that of an SLDMD at 24 months (primary endpoint mean difference, -0.86; 95% confidence interval: -1.57--0.15; P = 0.02. Based on the linear regression analysis, the annual PBVC significantly differed between SLDMDs and placebo (-0.27%/y and -0.50%/y, respectively, P = 0.046 but not between FLDMDs (-0.33%/y and placebo (P = 0.11 or between FLDMDs and SLDMDs (P = 0.49. Based on sensitivity analysis, the annual PBVC was reduced for SLDMDs compared with placebo (-0.14%/y and -0.56%/y, respectively, P<0.001 and FLDMDs (-0.46%/y, P<0.005, but no difference was detected between FLDMDs and placebo (P = 0.12.SLDMDs were associated with reduced PBVC slope over time in RRMS, regardless of the period considered. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying atrophy progression in RRMS.

  16. Radiographic assessment of disease progression in rheumatoid arthritis patients undergoing early disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wick, M.C.

    2002-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic disease predominantly involving the joints. Since the pathogenesis, etiology and pathophysiological mechanisms of RA have only been partially elucidated, a definitive therapy has not been established. Precise diagnosis and follow-up therapy requires objective quantification, and radiological analyses are considered to be the most appropriate method. The aim of this study was to retrospectively determine the time-dependent progression of joint damage in patients with pharmacologically-treated RA, and to determine which therapeutic agents demonstrate the highest efficacy. Outpatient records, laboratory values, therapy schemes and radiographs from hands and feet of 150 RA patients were collected, analyzed and statistically evaluated. Radiographs were quantified using the Larsen score and supportively using the 'RheumaCoach-Rheumatology' computer software. Our observations reveal that radiologically-detectable damage is most pronounced during the first year of disease, while mitigated and generally progressing linearly thereafter. Overall Larsen scores linearly increased from year 0 to 10 (r=0.853), during which the mean Larsen score increased 7.93 ± 0.76 per year. During the first year, RA progression was similar regardless of the medication administered (gold-compounds, AU; chloroquine, CQ; methotrexate, MTX; sulfasalazine SSZ). While MTX and CQ treatment showed no difference when examined as mean 5-year increment of Larsen score, AU and SSZ showed up to 3 fold higher RA progression compared with MTX. The Larsen score in year 1 did not correlate with that of years 2 to 5. In contrast, Larsen scores in year 2 were linearly related to each of the subsequent 3 years. Despite similar ESR values in various medication groups, cumulative ESR correlated with RA progression, and its reduction with therapeutic efficacy. In conclusion, this study found that, (i) early DMARD-treated RA progressed more rapidly during the first than

  17. Simultaneous Response in Several Domains in Patients with Psoriatic Disease Treated with Etanercept as Monotherapy or in Combination with Conventional Synthetic Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Frank; Meier, Lothar; Prinz, Jörg C; Jobst, Jürgen; Lippe, Ralph; Löschmann, Peter-Andreas; Lorenz, Hanns-Martin

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) receiving etanercept (ETN) monotherapy or ETN plus conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARD) to determine the proportion achieving a clinically meaningful response in arthritis, psoriasis, and quality of life simultaneously. A prospective, multicenter, 52-week observational study in patients with active PsA evaluated treatment with ETN in clinical practice (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00293722). This analysis assessed simultaneous achievement of 3 treatment targets: low disease activity (LDA) based on 28-joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS28); body surface area (BSA) involvement ≤ 3%; and a score > 45 on the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-12 (SF-12) physical component summary. Of 579 patients, 380 received ETN monotherapy and 199 received combination ETN plus csDMARD. At 52 weeks, data for all 3 disease domains were available for 251 patients receiving monotherapy and 151 receiving combination therapy. In the monotherapy and combination therapy groups, 61 (24.3%) and 37 (24.5%) patients, respectively, achieved all 3 treatment targets simultaneously. A significantly greater proportion of patients receiving monotherapy versus combination therapy achieved SF-12 > 45 (43.0% vs 31.8%; p < 0.05) and DAS28 LDA (72.5% vs 62.3%; p < 0.05). Conversely, BSA ≤ 3% was reached by a significantly greater proportion receiving combination therapy (75.5% vs 56.6%; p < 0.001). However, baseline BSA involvement was higher for the monotherapy group. While nearly half the patients achieved arthritis and psoriasis treatment targets simultaneously and one-fourth reached all 3 treatment targets, combining ETN and csDMARD did not substantially improve clinical response compared with ETN monotherapy in this real-world PsA patient population.

  18. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors versus combination intensive therapy with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in established rheumatoid arthritis: TACIT non-inferiority randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David L; Ibrahim, Fowzia; Farewell, Vern; O'Keeffe, Aidan G; Walker, David; Kelly, Clive; Birrell, Fraser; Chakravarty, Kuntal; Maddison, Peter; Heslin, Margaret; Patel, Anita; Kingsley, Gabrielle H

    2015-03-13

    To determine whether intensive combinations of synthetic disease modifying drugs can achieve similar clinical benefits at lower costs to high cost biologics such as tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis resistant to initial methotrexate and other synthetic disease modifying drugs. Open label pragmatic randomised multicentre two arm non-inferiority trial over 12 months. 24 rheumatology clinics in England. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were eligible for treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors according to current English guidance were randomised to either the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor strategy or the combined disease modifying drug strategy. Biologic strategy: start tumour necrosis factor inhibitor; second biologic in six month for non-responders. Alternative strategy: start combination of disease modifying drugs; start tumour necrosis factor inhibitors after six months in non-responders. reduction in disability at 12 months measured with patient recorded heath assessment questionnaire (range 0.00-3.00) with a 0.22 non-inferiority margin for combination treatment versus the biologic strategy. quality of life, joint damage, disease activity, adverse events, and costs. Intention to treat analysis used multiple imputation methods for missing data. 432 patients were screened: 107 were randomised to tumour necrosis factor inhibitors and 101 started taking; 107 were randomised to the combined drug strategy and 104 started taking the drugs. Initial assessments were similar; 16 patients were lost to follow-up (seven with the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor strategy, nine with the combined drug strategy); 42 discontinued the intervention but were followed-up (19 and 23, respectively). The primary outcome showed mean falls in scores on the health assessment questionnaire of -0.30 with the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor strategy and -0.45 with the alternative combined drug strategy. The difference between

  19. Barriers and facilitators to disease-modifying antirheumatic drug use in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases: a qualitative theory-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voshaar, Marieke; Vriezekolk, Johanna; van Dulmen, Sandra; van den Bemt, Bart; van de Laar, Mart

    2016-10-21

    Although disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are the cornerstone of treatment for inflammatory rheumatic diseases, medication adherence to DMARDs is often suboptimal. Effective interventions to improve adherence to DMARDs are lacking, and new targets are needed to improve adherence. The aim of the present study was to explore patients' barriers and facilitators of optimal DMARD use. These factors might be used as targets for adherence interventions. In a mixed method study design, patients (n = 120) with inflammatory arthritis (IA) completed a questionnaire based on an existing adapted Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) to identify facilitators and barriers of DMARD use. A subgroup of these patients (n = 21) participated in focus groups to provide insights into their facilitators and barriers. The answers to the questionnaires and responses of the focus groups were thematically coded by three researchers independently and subsequently categorized. The barriers and facilitators that were reported by IA patients presented large inter-individual variations. The identified barriers and facilitators could be captured in the following domains based on an adapted TDF: (i) knowledge, (ii) emotions, (iii) attention, memory, and decision processes, (iv) social influences, (v) beliefs about capability, (vi) beliefs about consequences, (vii) motivation and goals, (viii) goal conflict, (ix) environmental context and resources, and (x) skills. Patients with IA have a variety of barriers and facilitators with regard to their DMARD use. All of these barriers and facilitators could be categorized into adapted domains of the TDF. Interventions that address individual facilitators and barriers, based on capability, opportunity, and motivation, are needed to develop strategies for medication adherence that are tailored to individual patient needs.

  20. Biologics or tofacitinib for rheumatoid arthritis in incomplete responders to methotrexate or other traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Hossain, Alomgir; Tanjong Ghogomu, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    , tocilizumab) and small molecule tofacitinib, versus comparator (MTX, DMARD, placebo (PL), or a combination) in adults with rheumatoid arthritis who have failed to respond to methotrexate (MTX) or other disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), i.e., MTX/DMARD incomplete responders (MTX.......78)) were similarly inconclusive and downgraded to low quality for both imprecision and indirectness.Main results text shows the results for tofacitinib and differences between medications. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Based primarily on RCTs of 6 months' to 12 months' duration, there is moderate quality evidence...

  1. The effect of comedication with conventional synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs on TNF inhibitor drug survival in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and undifferentiated spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lie, Elisabeth; Kristensen, Lars Erik; Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena

    2015-01-01

    on patients with a clinical diagnosis of AS or uSpA starting treatment with adalimumab, etanercept or infliximab as their first TNFi during 2003-2010 were retrieved from the Swedish national biologics register and linked to national population based registers. Five-year drug survival was analysed by Cox......, and the associations were retained when adjusting for erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, patient global, swollen joints, uveitis, psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease. CONCLUSIONS: In this large register study of patients with AS and uSpA, use of csDMARD comedication was associated with better 5...

  2. MS Disease-Modifying Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease-modifying therapies Approval: 2014 US; 2014 CAN Pregnancy Category C (see footnote, page 11) Rash, headache, fever, nasal congestion, nausea, urinary tract infection, fatigue, insomnia, upper respiratory tract infection, herpes viral ...

  3. Drug induced lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Eisenhuber, Edith

    2010-01-01

    There is an ever increasing number of drugs that can cause lung disease. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis, since the clinical symptoms are mostly nonspecific. Various HRCT patterns can be correlated - though with overlaps - to lung changes caused by certain groups of drugs. Alternative diagnosis such as infection, edema or underlying lung disease has to be excluded by clinical-radiological means. Herefore is profound knowledge of the correlations of drug effects and imaging findings essential. History of drug exposure, suitable radiological findings and response to treatment (corticosteroids and stop of medication) mostly provide the base for the diagnosis. (orig.)

  4. Radiographic outcome in Hispanic early rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras-Yanez, Irazu; Rull-Gabayet, Marina; Vazquez-LaMadrid, Jorge; Pascual-Ramos, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine rates of incident erosive disease in early rheumatoid arthritis patients, to identify baseline predictors and to evaluate erosion's impact on patient-reported outcomes. Methods: 82 patients with ≤12 months of disease duration, ≥3 years of follow-up and conventional treatment were included. Consecutive evaluations assessed swollen and tender joint counts, treatment and comorbidity, acute reactant-phase determinations and patient-reported outcomes. Digitized radiographs of the hands and feet were obtained at baseline and yearly thereafter. RA was defined as erosive when at least one unequivocal cortical bone defect was detected. Descriptive statistics and Cox regression analysis were performed. Results: At baseline, 71 of the patients were Female Sign , population median (range) age was of 38.7 (16-78.2) years, 58 patients had antibodies and all the patients had active disease and substantial disability. Follow-up cohort was of 299.3 person-years. At last follow-up (49 ± 13.8 months), 28 patients developed erosions. Erosion's location was the feet, in 12 patients. Incident rates of erosive disease at one, two, three and four years were of 8.1, 12.8, 13.8 and 5.6 per 100 person-years, respectively. Higher C-reactive protein (HR: 1.20, 95%CI: 1.04-1.4, p = 0.01) and positive antibodies (HR: 5.09, 95%CI: 1.08-23.86, p = 0.04) were baseline predictors of incident erosive disease. Erosions had minor impact on patient-reported outcomes. Conclusion: Rheumatoid arthritis patients with antibodies and higher C reactive protein at baseline are at risk for incident erosions which appear most frequently at the feet. Up to 1/3 patients conventionally treated develop incident erosions, which minimally impact function.

  5. Radiographic outcome in Hispanic early rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras-Yanez, Irazu, E-mail: uzari02@hotmail.com.mx [Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Rull-Gabayet, Marina, E-mail: rull.marina@gmail.com [Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Vazquez-LaMadrid, Jorge, E-mail: docjvlradiologo@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Pascual-Ramos, Virginia, E-mail: virtichu@gmail.com.mx [Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-08-15

    Objectives: To determine rates of incident erosive disease in early rheumatoid arthritis patients, to identify baseline predictors and to evaluate erosion's impact on patient-reported outcomes. Methods: 82 patients with {<=}12 months of disease duration, {>=}3 years of follow-up and conventional treatment were included. Consecutive evaluations assessed swollen and tender joint counts, treatment and comorbidity, acute reactant-phase determinations and patient-reported outcomes. Digitized radiographs of the hands and feet were obtained at baseline and yearly thereafter. RA was defined as erosive when at least one unequivocal cortical bone defect was detected. Descriptive statistics and Cox regression analysis were performed. Results: At baseline, 71 of the patients were Female Sign , population median (range) age was of 38.7 (16-78.2) years, 58 patients had antibodies and all the patients had active disease and substantial disability. Follow-up cohort was of 299.3 person-years. At last follow-up (49 {+-} 13.8 months), 28 patients developed erosions. Erosion's location was the feet, in 12 patients. Incident rates of erosive disease at one, two, three and four years were of 8.1, 12.8, 13.8 and 5.6 per 100 person-years, respectively. Higher C-reactive protein (HR: 1.20, 95%CI: 1.04-1.4, p = 0.01) and positive antibodies (HR: 5.09, 95%CI: 1.08-23.86, p = 0.04) were baseline predictors of incident erosive disease. Erosions had minor impact on patient-reported outcomes. Conclusion: Rheumatoid arthritis patients with antibodies and higher C reactive protein at baseline are at risk for incident erosions which appear most frequently at the feet. Up to 1/3 patients conventionally treated develop incident erosions, which minimally impact function.

  6. Tofacitinib 5 mg Twice Daily in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Inadequate Response to Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs: A Comprehensive Review of Phase 3 Efficacy and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Paul; Bensen, William; El-Zorkany, Bassel; Kaine, Jeffrey; Manapat-Reyes, Bernadette Heizel; Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Witcombe, David; Soma, Koshika; Zhang, Richard; Thirunavukkarasu, Krishan

    2018-05-24

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We performed a comprehensive review of phase 3 studies of tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily (BID) (approved dose in many countries) in patients with moderate to severe RA and inadequate response to prior disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. A search of PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov identified 5 studies: ORAL Solo (NCT00814307), ORAL Sync (NCT00856544), ORAL Standard (included adalimumab 40 mg once every 2 weeks; NCT00853385), ORAL Scan (NCT00847613), and ORAL Step (NCT00960440). Efficacy and safety data for tofacitinib 5 mg BID, placebo, and adalimumab were analyzed. Across the 5 studies, 1216 patients received tofacitinib 5 mg BID, 681 received placebo, and 204 received adalimumab. At month 3, tofacitinib demonstrated significantly higher 20%, 50%, and 70% improvement in American College of Rheumatology response criteria (ACR20, ACR50, and ACR70, respectively) response rates, greater improvement in Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index, and a higher proportion of Disease Activity Score-defined remission than placebo. Frequencies of adverse events (AEs), serious AEs, and discontinuations due to AEs were similar for tofacitinib and placebo at month 3; serious infection events were more frequent for tofacitinib. In ORAL Standard, although not powered for formal comparisons, tofacitinib and adalimumab had numerically similar efficacy and AEs; serious AEs and serious infection events were more frequent with tofacitinib. Tofacitinib 5 mg BID reduced RA signs and symptoms and improved physical function versus placebo in patients with inadequate response to prior disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Tofacitinib 5 mg BID had a consistent, manageable safety profile across studies, with no new safety signals identified.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where

  7. Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease Updated:May 3,2018 Most illegal drugs can ... www.dea.gov/druginfo/factsheets.shtml Alcohol and Heart Disease Caffeine and Heart Disease Tobacco and Heart Disease ...

  8. Tofacitinib with conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in Chinese patients with rheumatoid arthritis: Patient-reported outcomes from a Phase 3 randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanguo; An, Yuan; Su, Houheng; Li, Xiangpei; Xu, Jianhua; Zheng, Yi; Li, Guiye; Kwok, Kenneth; Wang, Lisy; Wu, Qizhe

    2018-02-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We assess the effect of tofacitinib + conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti rheumatic drugs (csDMARDs) on patient-reported outcomes in Chinese patients with RA and inadequate response to DMARDs. This analysis of data from the Phase 3 study ORAL Sync included Chinese patients randomized 4 : 4 : 1 : 1 to receive tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily, tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily, placebo→tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily, or placebo→tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily, with csDMARDs. Placebo non-responders switched to tofacitinib at 3 months; the remaining placebo patients switched at 6 months. Least squares mean changes from baseline were reported for Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), patient assessment of arthritis pain (Pain), patient global assessment of disease activity (PtGA), physician global assessment of disease activity (PGA), Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F) scores, Short Form 36 (SF-36), and Work Limitations Questionnaire (WLQ), using a mixed-effects model for repeated measures. Overall, 216 patients were included (tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily, n = 86; tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily, n = 86; placebo→tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily, n = 22; placebo→tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily, n = 22). At month 3, tofacitinib elicited significant improvements in HAQ-DI, Pain, PtGA, PGA and SF-36 Physical Component Summary scores. Improvements were generally maintained through 12 months. Tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg twice daily + csDMARDs resulted in improvements in health-related quality of life, physical function and Pain through 12 months in Chinese patients with RA. © 2018 The Authors. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases published by Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Providing patients with information about disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs: Individually or in groups? A pilot randomized controlled trial comparing adherence and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Dawn; Nightingale, Peter; Jobanputra, Paresh

    2009-06-01

    Communicating information about disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) before patients start treatment is a key role for some rheumatology clinical nurse specialists. This is done in our unit to promote understanding of the risks and benefits of drug therapy and encourage timely and reliable use of DMARDs. Information is routinely provided individually but this can lead to delays in starting treatment because of limited nursing resources. In this randomized trial we tested the feasibility of giving patients, who were about to start on a DMARD, information about the drug in groups and compared this with information given individually. Adults with a clinical diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis who were referred to the nursing team for counselling about starting on methotrexate, sulfasalazine or leflunomide were included. Patients who had previously taken a DMARD were not excluded and those consenting were randomized to receive drug information individually or in groups (of three to six patients). We provided all patients with written materials about the relevant drug and discussed the risks and benefits of drug use verbally. Patients allocated to group counselling received this intervention in a teaching room, with a slide presentation. The primary outcome was adherence with medication use, ascertained by pill counts, self-report diaries and prescription dispensation. Secondary outcomes included satisfaction with information about medicines (SIMS) by questionnaire; time taken to provide information; adherence to scheduled hospital appointments and blood monitoring schedules; and DMARD continuation rates at four and twelve months. Of 127 eligible patients referred for counselling about DMARDs, 62 consented to take part: 32 were randomized to receive drug information individually and 30 to receiving it in groups. Patients allocated to the two different interventions were comparable for age and diagnoses at baseline but more patients

  10. An evaluation of adherence in patients with multiple sclerosis newly initiating treatment with a self-injectable or an oral disease-modifying drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munsell M

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Michael Munsell,1 Molly Frean,1 Joseph Menzin,1 Amy L Phillips2 1Boston Health Economics, Inc., Waltham, MA, USA; 2Health Economics & Outcomes Research, EMD Serono Inc., Rockland, MA, USA Objective: As the multiple sclerosis (MS disease-modifying drug (DMD treatment options have expanded to include oral therapies, it is important to understand whether route of administration is associated with DMD adherence. The objective of this study was to compare adherence to DMDs in patients with MS newly initiating treatment with a self-injectable versus an oral DMD. Methods: This retrospective database study used IMS Health Real World Data Adjudicated Claims – US data between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2014. Adherence was measured by medication possession ratio (MPR, calculated as the total number of treated days divided by the total number of days from the first treated day until the end of 12-month follow-up. A binary measure representing adherence (MPR ≥0.8 versus nonadherence (MPR <0.8 to therapy was used. Logistic regression evaluated the likelihood of adherence to index DMD type (self-injectable vs oral. Covariates included patient baseline characteristics (ie, age, sex, comorbidities and index DMD type. Results: The analysis included 7,207 self-injectable and 1,175 oral DMD-treated patients with MS. In unadjusted analyses, the proportion of patients adherent to therapy (MPR ≥0.8 did not differ significantly between the self-injectable (54.1% and the oral DMD cohorts (53.0%; P=0.5075. After controlling for covariates, index DMD type was not a significant predictor of adherence (odds ratio [OR] 1.062; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.937–1.202; P=0.3473. Higher likelihood of adherence was associated with male sex (OR 1.20; 95% CI: 1.085–1.335; P=0.0005 and age groups older than 18–34 years (ORs 1.220–1.331; P<0.01. Depression was associated with a lower likelihood of adherence (OR 0.618; 95% CI: 0.511–0.747; P<0.0001. Conclusion: Male

  11. An Evidence-Based Assessment of the Clinical Significance of Drug-Drug Interactions Between Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs and Non-Antirheumatic Drugs According to Rheumatologists and Pharmacists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roon, Eric N.; van den Bemt, Patricia M. L. A.; Jansen, Tim L. Th. A.; Houtman, Nella M.; van de Laar, Mart A. F. J.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.

    Background: Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) must be recognized in a timely manner and managed appropriately to prevent adverse drug reactions or therapeutic failure. Because the evidence for most DDIs is based on case reports or poorly documented clinical information, there is a

  12. Subclinical Synovitis Measured by Ultrasound in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients With Clinical Remission Induced by Synthetic and Biological Modifying Disease Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruces, Marcos; Al Snih, Soham; Serra-Bonett, Natalí; Rivas, Juan C

    2017-10-09

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with disease in clinical remission might show subclinical synovitis, which can be related to the progress of structural joint damage. To determine and compare the degree of synovial inflammation by ultrasound (US) in patients with RA in clinical remission, treated with DMARD or combination therapy with DMARD and anti-TNF. Hospital-based cross-sectional study of 58 patients with RA in sustained remission for at least 6 months by DAS28 <2.6, who attended the Rheumatology Service at the Hospital Universitario de Caracas. Patients underwent clinical, functional, and laboratory assessments. Ultrasound was performed in hands measuring synovial effusion, synovial hypertrophy and power Doppler signal; using a semiquantitative 4-point scale of 0=none to 3=severe. Chi-square and t-test were used to compare the clinical, functional, laboratory and US assessments between the DMARD (N=37) and combination therapy with DMARD and anti-TNF (N=21) groups. A p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Out of 58 patients, 25.9% had remission by US and 74.1% had synovial effusion or hypertrophy or positive power Doppler signal. Non-significant differences in US synovitis between the two groups were found. Persistent US activity was evident in a high percentage of rheumatoid arthritis patients in clinical remission by DAS28. No differences in subclinical synovitis measured by US were found between patients with DMARD and anti-TNF-induced clinical remission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  13. Baricitinib in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and an Inadequate Response to Conventional Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs in United States and Rest of World: A Subset Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Alvin F; Greenwald, Maria; Bradley, John D; Alam, Jahangir; Arora, Vipin; Kartman, Cynthia E

    2018-06-01

    This article evaluates the efficacy and safety of baricitinib 4 mg versus placebo in United States including Puerto Rico (US) and rest of the world (ROW) subpopulations using data pooled from RA-BEAM and RA-BUILD, which enrolled patients with moderate-to-severe adult-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In RA-BEAM, patients with an inadequate response (IR) to methotrexate, at least one X-ray erosion, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) ≥ 6 mg/L were randomized to placebo or orally administered baricitinib 4 mg daily or subcutaneously administered adalimumab 40 mg every other week. In RA-BUILD, patients with an IR to at least one conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (csDMARD) and with hsCRP ≥ 3.6 mg/L were randomized to placebo or baricitinib 2 or 4 mg daily. Patients in both trials were biologic naive. In this post hoc analysis, data from both studies were pooled (714 baricitinib 4 mg-treated, 716 placebo-treated patients). Overall, 188 US and 1242 ROW patients were included. Subgroups differed in baseline characteristics including race, weight, age, time since RA diagnosis, current corticosteroid use, and previous csDMARD use. At weeks 12 and 24, baricitinib-treated patients had larger responses compared to placebo-treated patients for multiple efficacy outcomes: American College of Rheumatology 20/50/70 response, low disease activity, remission, Disease Activity Score 28-C-reactive protein, and Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index. Overall, similar efficacy was observed in US and ROW subgroups with no notable safety differences between subgroups at weeks 12 or 24. Baricitinib 4 mg was efficacious compared to placebo in US and ROW subpopulations. Safety was similar between subgroups. Eli Lilly & Company and Incyte Corporation. ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers, NCT01721057; NCT01710358.

  14. Efficacy and safety of golimumab as add-on therapy to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis: results of the GO-MORE study in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Alberto; González, Carlos M; Ballina, Javier; García Vivar, María L; Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Marenco, Jose Luis; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Ordás, Carmen; Cea-Calvo, Luis; Arteaga, María J; Sanmartí, Raimon

    2015-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of golimumab in the 140 patients included in Spain as the first part of the GO-MORE trial, a multinational study involving patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) despite treatment with different disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). The patients received subcutaneous golimumab 50mg once a month during 6 months. The primary endpoint was the percentage of individuals with a good or moderate EULAR DAS28-ESR response after 6 months of treatment. A total of 140 patients were included. Of these, 76.4% had very active disease (DAS28-ESR>5.1). 76.4% were taking methotrexate, 40.0% other DMARDs in monotherapy or combined, and 65.0% received corticosteroids. After 6 months, 82.9% of the patients showed a good or moderate EULAR response, 41.4% had low disease activity, and 30.7% were in remission. The percentage of responders one month after the first dose was 69.3%. The efficacy was similar in patients treated with methotrexate or other DMARDs, with different methotrexate doses, with or without corticosteroids, or in subjects who had failed one or more DMARDs. The response to golimumab was observed from the first dose. Golimumab was well tolerated and its safety profile was consistent with the findings of previous studies. Serious adverse events were reported in 11 patients (7.9%). The addition of subcutaneous golimumab 50 mg once a month to different DMARDs in patients with active RA yielded a moderate or good response after 6 months in 82.9% of the cases. The response was observed early, from the start of the second month, after a single dose of golimumab. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Efficacy of conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, glucocorticoids and tofacitinib: a systematic literature review informing the 2013 update of the EULAR recommendations for management of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaujoux-Viala, Cécile; Nam, Jackie; Ramiro, Sofia; Landewé, Robert; Buch, Maya H.; Smolen, Josef S.; Gossec, Laure

    2014-01-01

    To update a previous systematic review assessing the efficacy of conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARDs) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Two systematic reviews of the literature using PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane library were performed from 2009 until January 2013 to

  16. Quantity and economic value of unused oral anti-cancer and biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs among outpatient pharmacy patients who discontinue therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, C L; Melis, E J; Egberts, A C G; Bouvy, M L; Gardarsdottir, H; van den Bemt, B J F

    2018-03-24

    Patients sometimes discontinue the use of expensive oral anti-cancer drug (OACD) or biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (bDMARD) therapies early, leading to medication waste if the patient has not used all dispensed medication. To determine the proportion of patients who have unused OACDs or bDMARDs after therapy discontinuation, and the quantity and economic value of these unused medications. Furthermore, patients' reasons for therapy discontinuation and their disposal method for unused medications were determined. In a retrospective follow-up study using a Dutch outpatient pharmacy database, patients (≥18 years) who did not refill an OACD or bDMARD prescription, dispensed between November 2015 and February 2016, within two weeks of the prescription end date were contacted by phone and asked about their unused medication and reasons thereof. The economic value was calculated using Dutch medication prices. Data were descriptively analyzed in STATA13. The database included 1173 patients, of whom 159 likely had discontinued therapy and were contacted. Of these, 88 patients were excluded (39 refilled, 47 missing, and 2 other). Of the 71 patients who had discontinued therapy, 39 (54.9%) had unused medications, comprising 22 OACD users (mean age 63.0 (SD ± 15.9) years, 50.0% female) and 17 bDMARD users (mean age 50.7 (SD ± 13.5) years, 47.1% female). A total of 59 packages were unused, with a total value of €60,341. Unused OACD packages and bDMARD packages had median values of €179 (IQR €24-2487) and €992 (IQR €681-1093), respectively. Patients primarily discontinued therapy due to adverse or insufficient effects. This study illustrates that more than half of patients discontinuing OACD or bDMARD therapies have unused medication. This emphasizes the need for waste-reducing interventions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A comparison of discontinuation rates of tofacitinib and biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review and Bayesian network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-Kyeong; Lee, Min-Young; Jang, Eun-Jin; Kim, Hye-Lin; Ha, Dong-Mun; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the discontinuation rates of tofacitinib and biologics (tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi), abatacept, rituximab, and tocilizumab) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients considering inadequate responses (IRs) to previous treatment(s). Randomised controlled trials of tofacitinib and biologics - reporting at least one total discontinuation, discontinuation due to lack of efficacy (LOE), and discontinuation due to adverse events (AEs) - were identified through systematic review. The analyses were conducted for patients with IRs to conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (cDMARDs) and for patients with biologics-IR, separately. Bayesian network meta-analysis was used to estimate rate ratio (RR) of a biologic relative to tofacitinib with 95% credible interval (CrI), and probability of RR being tofacitinib and biologics in the cDMARDs-IR group. In the biologics-IR group, however, TNFi (RR 0.17, 95% CrI 0.01-3.61, P[RRtofacitinib did. Despite the difference, discontinuation cases owing to LOE and AEs revealed that tofacitinib was comparable to the biologics. The comparability of discontinuation rate between tofacitinib and biologics was different based on previous treatments and discontinuation reasons: LOE, AEs, and total (due to other reasons). Therefore, those factors need to be considered to decide the optimal treatment strategy.

  18. Influence of Anti-TNF and Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs Therapy on Pulmonary Forced Vital Capacity Associated to Ankylosing Spondylitis: A 2-Year Follow-Up Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Daniel Rocha-Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effect of anti-TNF agents plus synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs versus DMARDs alone for ankylosing spondylitis (AS with reduced pulmonary function vital capacity (FVC%. Methods. In an observational study, we included AS who had FVC% <80% at baseline. Twenty patients were taking DMARDs and 16 received anti-TNF + DMARDs. Outcome measures: changes in FVC%, BASDAI, BASFI, 6-minute walk test (6MWT, Borg scale after 6MWT, and St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire at 24 months. Results. Both DMARDs and anti-TNF + DMARDs groups had similar baseline values in FVC%. Significant improvement was achieved with anti-TNF + DMARDs in FVC%, at 24 months, when compared to DMARDs alone (P=0.04. Similarly, patients in anti-TNF + DMARDs group had greater improvement in BASDAI, BASFI, Borg scale, and 6MWT when compared to DMARDs alone. After 2 years of follow-up, 14/16 (87.5% in the anti-TNF + DMARDs group achieved the primary outcome: FVC% ≥80%, compared with 11/20 (55% in the DMARDs group (P=0.04. Conclusions. Patients with anti-TNF + DMARDs had a greater improvement in FVC% and cardiopulmonary scales at 24 months compared with DMARDs. This preliminary study supports the fact that anti-TNF agents may offer additional benefits compared to DMARDs in patients with AS who have reduced FVC%.

  19. Delayed wound healing and postoperative surgical site infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with or without biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Masahiro; Inui, Kentaro; Sugioka, Yuko; Mamoto, Kenji; Okano, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Takuya; Hidaka, Noriaki; Koike, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) have become more popular for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Whether or not bDMARDs increase the postoperative risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has remained controversial. We aimed to clarify the effects of bDMARDs on the outcomes of elective orthopedic surgery. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to analyze risk factors for SSI and delayed wound healing among 227 patients with RA (mean age, 65.0 years; disease duration, 16.9 years) after 332 elective orthopedic surgeries. We also attempted to evaluate the effects of individual medications on infection. Rates of bDMARD and conventional synthetic DMARD (csDMARD) administration were 30.4 and 91.0 %, respectively. Risk factors for SSI were advanced age (odds ratio [OR], 1.11; P = 0.045), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.03), and preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 3.66; P = 0.003). Those for delayed wound healing were advanced age (OR, 1.16; P = 0.001), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.007), preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 4.56; P = 0.02), and foot surgery (OR, 6.60; P = 0.001). Risk factors for SSI and medications did not significantly differ. No DMARDs were risk factors for any outcome examined. Biological DMARDs were not risk factors for postoperative SSI. Foot surgery was a risk factor for delayed wound healing.

  20. Biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and the risk of non-vertebral osteoporotic fractures in patients with rheumatoid arthritis aged 50 years and over.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussy, J-P; Bessette, L; Bernatsky, S; Rahme, E; Lachaine, J

    2013-09-01

    Prevention of bone mineral density loss in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been associated with use of biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). However, in this study, we could not demonstrate a reduction in the risk of non-vertebral fractures. Additional research is required to clarify the impact of biologic DMARDs on fracture risk in RA. Small studies have suggested biologic DMARDs preserve bone mineral density at 6-12 months. Our objective was to determine the association between biologic DMARD use and the risk of non-vertebral osteoporotic fractures in RA subjects aged ≥50 years. A nested case-control study was conducted using Quebec physician billing and hospital discharge data. RA subjects were identified from International Classification of Disease-9/10 codes in billing and hospitalisation data and followed from cohort entry until the earliest of non-vertebral osteoporotic fracture, death, or end of study period. Controls were matched to cases (4:1 ratio) on age, sex, and date of cohort entry. Biologic DMARD exposure was defined as being on treatment for ≥180 days pre-fracture (index). Conditional logistic regression was used, adjusting for indicators of RA severity, comorbidity, drugs influencing fracture risk, and measures of health care utilisation. Over the study period, 1,515 cases were identified (6,023 controls). The most frequent fracture site was hip/femur (42.3%). In total, 172 subjects (49 cases and 123 controls) were exposed to biologic DMARDs. The median duration of exposure was 735 (interquartile range (IQR), 564) and 645 (IQR, 903) days in cases and controls, respectively. We were unable to demonstrate an association between biologic DMARDs and fracture risk (odds ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 0.42-2.53). RA duration significantly increased the fracture risk. Despite the positive impact of biologic DMARDs on bone remodelling observed in small studies, we were unable to demonstrate a reduction in the risk of non

  1. Comparison of preferences of healthcare professionals and MS patients for attributes of disease-modifying drugs: A best-worst scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Ingrid E H; Evers, Silvia M A A; Jongen, Peter J; Hiligsmann, Mickaël

    2018-02-01

    The choice between disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) becomes more often a shared decision between the patient and the neurologist and MS nurse. This study aimed to assess which DMD attributes are most important for the healthcare professionals in selecting a DMD for a patient. Subsequently, within this perspective, the neurologists' and nurses' perspectives were compared. Lastly, the healthcare professionals' perspective was compared with the patients' perspective to detect any differences that may need attention in the communication about DMDs. A best-worst scaling (BWS) was conducted among 27 neurologists and 33 MS nurses treating patients with MS to determine the importance of 27 DMD attributes. These attributes were identified through three focus groups with MS patients in a previous study (N=19). Relative importance scores (RISs) were estimated for each attribute. Multivariable linear regression analyses were used to compare the different perspectives. According to the neurologists and nurses, safety of the DMD was the most important DMD attribute in the treatment decision, closely followed by effect on disability progression, quality of life and relapse rate. Patients with MS agreed with the importance of the last three attributes, but valued safety significantly lower (b=-2.59, P<.001). This study suggests that, overall, neurologists and nurses regard the same DMD attributes as important as MS patients with the notable exception of safety. This study provides valuable information for the development of interventions to support shared decision making and highlights which attributes of DMDs may need additional attention. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The Cost-effectiveness of Sequences of Biological Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drug Treatment in England for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Who Can Tolerate Methotrexate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Matt D; Wailoo, Allan J; Tosh, Jonathan C; Hernandez-Alava, Monica; Gibson, Laura A; Stevens, John W; Archer, Rachel J; Simpson, Emma L; Hock, Emma S; Young, Adam; Scott, David L

    2017-07-01

    To ascertain whether strategies of treatment with a biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (bDMARD) are cost-effective in an English setting. Results are presented for those patients with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and those with severe RA. An economic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of 7 bDMARD was developed. A systematic literature review and network metaanalysis was undertaken to establish relative clinical effectiveness. The results were used to populate the model, together with estimates of Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) score following European League Against Rheumatism response; annual costs, and utility, per HAQ band; trajectory of HAQ for patients taking bDMARD; and trajectory of HAQ for patients using nonbiologic therapy (NBT). Results were presented as those associated with the strategy with the median cost-effectiveness. Supplementary analyses were undertaken assessing the change in cost-effectiveness when only patients with the most severe prognoses taking NBT were provided with bDMARD treatment. The costs per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) values were compared with reported thresholds from the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence of £20,000 to £30,000 (US$24,700 to US$37,000). In the primary analyses, the cost per QALY of a bDMARD strategy was £41,600 for patients with severe RA and £51,100 for those with moderate to severe RA. Under the supplementary analyses, the cost per QALY fell to £25,300 for those with severe RA and to £28,500 for those with moderate to severe RA. The cost-effectiveness of bDMARD in RA in England is questionable and only meets current accepted levels in subsets of patients with the worst prognoses.

  3. Distribution of Podoplanin in Synovial Tissues in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Using Biologic or Conventional Disease-Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakubo, Yuya; Oki, Hiroharu; Naganuma, Yasushi; Saski, Kan; Sasaki, Akiko; Tamaki, Yasunobu; Suran, Yang; Konta, Tsuneo; Takagi, Michiaki

    2017-01-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN) mediates tumor cell migration and invasion, which phenomena might also play a role in severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, the precise cellular distribution of PDPN and it's relationships with inflammation was studied in RA treated with biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) or conventional DMARDs (cDMARD). PDPN+ cells were immunostained by NZ-1 mAb, and scored (3+; >50%/ area, 2+; 20%- 50%, 1+; 5%-20%, 0: <5%) in synovial tissues from RA treated with biologic DMARDs (BIO, n=20) or cDMARD (n=20) for comparison with osteoarthritis (OA, n=5), followed by cell grading of inflammation and cell-typing. Inflammatory synovitis score was 1.4 in both BIO and cDMARD, compared to only 0.2 in OA. PDPN+ cells were found in the lining layer (BIO 1.6, cDMARD 1.3, OA 0.2) and lymphoid aggregates (BIO 0.6, cDMRD 0.7, OA 0.2), and correlated with RA-inflammation in BIO- and cDMARD-groups in both area (r=0.7/0.9, r=0.6/0.7, respectively p<0.05). PDPN was expressed in CD68+ type A macrophage-like and 5B5+ type B fibroblast-like cells in the lining layer, and in IL- 17+ cells in lymphoid aggregates in RA. PDPN was markedly increased in the immunologically inflamed RA synovitis, which was surgically treated due to BIO- and cDMARD-resistant RA. PDPN may have potential of a new marker of residual arthritis in local joints for inflammation-associated severe RA. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Tofacitinib in Combination With Conventional Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs in Patients With Active Rheumatoid Arthritis: Patient-Reported Outcomes From a Phase III Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Vibeke; Kremer, Joel M; Gruben, David; Krishnaswami, Sriram; Zwillich, Samuel H; Wallenstein, Gene V

    2017-04-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We compared patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with RA treated with tofacitinib or placebo in combination with conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). In a 12-month, phase III randomized controlled trial (ORAL Sync), patients (n = 795) with active RA and previous inadequate response to therapy with ≥1 conventional or biologic DMARD were randomized 4:4:1:1 to tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily (BID), tofacitinib 10 mg BID, placebo advanced to 5 mg BID, or placebo to 10 mg BID, in combination with stable background DMARD therapy. PROs included patient global assessment of arthritis (PtGA), patient assessment of arthritis pain (Pain), physical function (Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index [HAQ DI]), health-related quality of life (Short Form 36 health survey [SF-36]), fatigue (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue [FACIT-F]), and sleep (Medical Outcomes Study Sleep [MOS Sleep]). At month 3, statistically significant improvements from baseline versus placebo were reported in PtGA, Pain, HAQ DI, all 8 SF-36 domains, FACIT-F, and MOS Sleep with tofacitinib 10 mg BID, and in PtGA, Pain, HAQ DI, 7 SF-36 domains, FACIT-F, and MOS Sleep with tofacitinib 5 mg BID. Improvements were sustained to month 12. Significantly more tofacitinib-treated patients reported improvements of greater than or equal to the minimum clinically important differences at month 3 versus placebo in all PROs, except the SF-36 role-emotional domain (significant for tofacitinib 10 mg BID). Patients with active RA treated with tofacitinib combined with background conventional DMARD therapy reported sustained, significant, and clinically meaningful improvements in PROs versus placebo. © 2016, The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Rheumatology.

  5. The marked and rapid therapeutic effect of tofacitinib in combination with subcutaneous methotrexate in a rheumatoid arthritis patient with poor prognostic factors who is resistant to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologicals: A clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Demidova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, it is generally accepted that it is necessary to achieve clinical remission in rheumatoid arthritis (RA or as minimum a low disease activity. The paper describes a clinical case of a female patient diagnosed with RA who was observed to have inefficiency of standard disease-modifying antirheumatic therapy with methotrexate 25 mg/week, secondary inefficiency of tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors (adalimumab, and inefficiency/poor tolerance of the interlukin-6 receptor antagonist tocilizumab. This determined the need to use fofacitinib (TOFA, a drug with another mechanism of action. TOFA is the first agent from a new group of immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory drugs, intracellular kinase inhibitors. Disease remission could be achieved during therapy with TOFA, which enables one to consider this synthetic drug as a therapy option that potentially competes with therapy with biologicals.

  6. Ofatumumab, a human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with an inadequate response to one or more disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs: results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase I/II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Baslund, Bo; Rigby, William

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the safety and efficacy of ofatumumab, a novel human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb), in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) whose disease did not respond to > or = 1 disease-modifying antirheumatic drug....

  7. Ultrasound-detected bone erosion is a relapse risk factor after discontinuation of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis whose ultrasound power Doppler synovitis activity and clinical disease activity are well controlled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Fujikawa, Keita; Nishino, Ayako; Okada, Akitomo; Aramaki, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Toshimasa; Umeda, Masataka; Fukui, Shoichi; Suzuki, Takahisa; Koga, Tomohiro; Iwamoto, Naoki; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Tamai, Mami; Mizokami, Akinari; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Ueki, Yukitaka; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Maeda, Takahiro; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2017-05-25

    In the present study, we explored the risk factors for relapse after discontinuation of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (bDMARD) therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) whose ultrasound power Doppler (PD) synovitis activity and clinical disease activity were well controlled. In this observational study in clinical practice, the inclusion criteria were based on ultrasound disease activity and clinical disease activity, set as low or remission (Disease Activity Score in 28 joints based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate Ultrasound was performed in 22 joints of bilateral hands at discontinuation for evaluating synovitis severity and presence of bone erosion. Patients with a maximum PD score ≤1 in each joint were enrolled. Forty patients with RA were consecutively recruited (November 2010-March 2015) and discontinued bDMARD therapy. Variables at the initiation and discontinuation of bDMARD therapy that were predictive of relapse during the 12 months after discontinuation were assessed. The median patient age was 54.5 years, and the median disease duration was 3.5 years. Nineteen (47.5%) patients relapsed during the 12 months after the discontinuation of bDMARD therapy. Logistic regression analysis revealed that only the presence of bone erosion detected by ultrasound at discontinuation was predictive of relapse (OR 8.35, 95% CI 1.78-53.2, p = 0.006). No clinical characteristics or serologic biomarkers were significantly different between the relapse and nonrelapse patients. The ultrasound synovitis scores did not differ significantly between the groups. Our findings are the first evidence that ultrasound bone erosion may be a relapse risk factor after the discontinuation of bDMARD therapy in patients with RA whose PD synovitis activity and clinical disease activity are well controlled.

  8. Systematic review and meta-analysis of serious infections with tofacitinib and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug treatment in rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Vibeke; Ahadieh, Sima; French, Jonathan; Geier, Jamie; Krishnaswami, Sriram; Menon, Sujatha; Checchio, Tina; Tensfeldt, Thomas G; Hoffman, Elaine; Riese, Richard; Boy, Mary; Gómez-Reino, Juan J

    2015-12-15

    were 2.21 (0.60, 8.14) and 2.02 (0.56, 7.28), respectively. Risk differences (95% CIs) versus placebo for tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg BID were 0.38% (-0.24%, 0.99%) and 0.40% (-0.22%, 1.02%), respectively. In interventional studies, the risk of serious infections with tofacitinib is comparable to published rates for biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with moderate to severely active RA.

  9. EFFECTS OF SYNTHETIC DISEASE-MODIFYING ANTIRHEUMATIC DRUGS, BIOLOGICAL AGENTS, AND PSYCHOPHARMACOTHERAPY ON THE MENTAL DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Abramkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental disorders (MDs of the anxiety-depressive spectrum (ADS and cognitive impairment (CI are characteristic of the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; however, the effects of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, biological agents (BAs, and their combinations with psychopharmacological drugs (PPDs on these abnormalities have been insufficiently studied. Objective: to investigate trends in the incidence of MDs in RA patients receiving different treatment regimens.Subjects and methods. The investigation included 128 RA patients (13% men and 87% women who fulfilled the 1987 American College of Rheumatology criteria; their mean age was 47.4±0.9 years; the median duration of RA was 96 [48; 228] months. RA activity was found to be high, moderate, and low in 48, 56, and 24 patients, respectively. DAS28 averaged 5.34±0.17. 80% of the patients received DMARDs. MDs were diagnosed based on ICD-10 coding, by using a semi-structured interview and scales, such as the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale, and the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale. Clinical and psychological procedures were used to diagnose CI. At the study inclusion stage, ADS disorders were detected in 123 (96.1% patients; CI was found in 88 (68.7%. Forty-one (32.1% patients were diagnosed with major depression (an obvious or moderate depressive episode, 53 (41.4% patients had minor depression (a mild depressive episode and dysthymia, and 29 (22.6% had anxiety disorders (ADs (adjustment disorders with anxiety symptoms, as well as generalized anxiety disorder. The dynamics of MDs was estimated in 112 (87.5% of the 128 patients and in 83 (64.8% at one- and five-year follow-ups, respectively. The following groups were identified according to the performed therapy: 1 synthetic DMARDs (n = 39; 2 synthetic DMARDs + PPDs (n = 43; 3 BAs + DMARDs (n = 32; 4 BAs + DMARDs + PPDs (n = 9.Results and discussion. In Group 1, the

  10. Long term effectiveness of RA-1, a standardized Ayurvedic medicine as a monotherapy and in combination with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Arvind; Saluja, Manjit; Kianifard, Toktam; Chitre, Deepa; Venugopalan, Anuradha

    2018-03-08

    Data on long term use of Ayurvedic drugs is sparse. They may prove useful if combined with modern medicine in certain clinical situations (integrative medicine). We present the results of a long term observational study of RA-1 (Ayurvedic drug) used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). On completion of a 16 week randomized controlled study, 165 consenting volunteer patients were enrolled into a three year open label phase (OLP) study. Patients were symptomatic with persistent active disease and naïve for disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD). 57 patients were on fixed low dose prednisone. Patients were examined every 10-14 weeks in a routine rheumatology practice using standard care norms. They continued RA-1 (Artrex ™, 2 tablets twice daily) throughout the study period and were generally advised to lead a healthy life style. Based on clinical judgment, rheumatologist added DMARD and/or steroids (modified if already in use) to patients with inadequate response; chloroquine and/or methotrexate commonly used. Treatment response was assessed using American College of Rheumatology (ACR) efficacy measures and ACR 20% improvement index standard update statistical software (SAS and SPSS) were used; significant at p Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Unexpected exacerbations following initiation of disease-modifying drugs in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: Which factor is responsible, anti-aquaporin 4 antibodies, B cells, Th1 cells, Th2 cells, Th17 cells, or others?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2017-08-01

    Some disease-modifying drugs for multiple sclerosis, which mainly act on T cells, are ineffective for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder and induce unexpected relapses. These include interferon beta, glatiramer acetate, fingolimod, natalizumab, and alemtuzumab. The cases reported here suggest that dimethyl fumarate, which reduces the number of Th1 and Th17 cells and induces IL-4-producing Th2 cells, is also unsuitable for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, irrespective of anti-aquaporin 4 IgG serostatus. Although oral dimethyl fumarate with manageable adverse effects is easy to initiate in the early course of multiple sclerosis, special attention should be paid for atypical demyelinating cases.

  12. Classifying PML risk with disease modifying therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joseph R

    2017-02-01

    To catalogue the risk of PML with the currently available disease modifying therapies (DMTs) for multiple sclerosis (MS). All DMTs perturb the immune system in some fashion. Natalizumab, a highly effective DMT, has been associated with a significant risk of PML. Fingolimod and dimethyl fumarate have also been unquestionably associated with a risk of PML in the MS population. Concerns about PML risk with other DMTs have arisen due to their mechanism of action and pharmacological parallel to other agents with known PML risk. A method of contextualizing PML risk for DMTs is warranted. Classification of PML risk was predicated on three criteria:: 1) whether the underlying condition being treated predisposes to PML in the absence of the drug; 2) the latency from initiation of the drug to the development of PML; and 3) the frequency with which PML is observed. Among the DMTs, natalizumab occupies a place of its own with respect to PML risk. Significantly lesser degrees of risk exist for fingolimod and dimethyl fumarate. Whether PML will be observed with other DMTs in use for MS, such as, rituximab, teriflunomide, and alemtuzumab, remains uncertain. A logical classification for stratifying DMT PML risk is important for both the physician and patient in contextualizing risk/benefit ratios. As additional experience accumulates regarding PML and the DMTs, this early effort will undoubtedly require revisiting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Safety and effectiveness of tacrolimus add-on therapy for rheumatoid arthritis patients without an adequate response to biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs): Post-marketing surveillance in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Ishida, Kota; Shiraki, Katsuhisa; Yoshiyasu, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Post-marketing surveillance (PMS) was conducted to assess the safety and effectiveness of tacrolimus (TAC) add-on therapy for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and an inadequate response to biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Patients with RA from 180 medical sites across Japan were registered centrally with an electronic investigation system. The observational period was 24 weeks from the first day of TAC administration concomitantly with biological DMARDs. Safety and effectiveness populations included 624 and 566 patients, respectively. Patients were predominantly female (81.1%), with a mean age of 61.9 years. Overall, 125 adverse drug reactions (ADRs) occurred in 94 patients (15.1%), and 15 serious ADRs occurred in 11 patients (1.8%). These incidences were lower compared with previously reported incidences after TAC treatment in PMS, and all of the observed ADRs were already known. A statistically significant improvement was observed in the primary effectiveness variable of Simplified Disease Activity Index after TAC treatment; 62.7% of patients achieved remission or low disease activity at week 24. TAC is well tolerated and effective when used as an add-on to biological DMARDs in Japanese patients with RA who do not achieve an adequate response to biological DMARDs in a real-world clinical setting.

  14. The effect of tofacitinib on function and quality of life indicators in patients with rheumatoid arthritis resistant to synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in real clinical practice: Results of a multicenter observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Karateev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tofacitinib (TOFA, a representative of a new class of targeted synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (s-DMARD, is a promising drug for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA and other immune inflammatory diseases.Objective: to evaluate the efficiency and safety of therapy with TOFA in combination with methotrexate (MTX and other s-DMARDs in real clinical practice in patients with active RA and previous ineffective therapy.Patients and methods. A 6-month Russian multicenter study of function and quality of life enrolled 101 patients with resistant RA: 18 men and 83 women; mean age, 51.03±11.28 years; mean disease duration, 105.4±81.43 months; rheumatoid factor-positive individuals (89.1%; and anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibody-positive ones (74.7%. 93 (92,1% of these patients completed a 24-week study. TOFA was used as both second-line drug (after failure of therapy with s-DMARD (n=74 and as a third-line drug (after failure of therapy with s-DMARDs and biological agents (BAs (n=74. The tools RAPID3, HAQ, and EQ-5D were used to determine disease outcomes from a patient's assessment.Results. All the three tools demonstrated significant positive changes at 3–6 months following therapy initiation. RAPID3 scores for the status of a patient achieving a low disease activity or remission coincided with the mean DAS28-ESR and SDAI scores in 60% and 68% of cases, respectively. The achievement rates of the minimally clinically significant improvement (ΔHAQ≥0.22 and functional remission (HAQ≤0.5 at 6 months of TOFA therapy were 79.6 and 30.1%, respectively. The mean change value in EQ-5D scores over 6 months was -0.162±0.21. There were no significant between the groups of patients who used TOFA as a second- or third-line agent in the majority of indicators, except EQ-5D scores at 6 months.Conclusions. The results of our multicenter study using considerable Russian material confirmed the pronounced positive effect of TOFA used

  15. Drugs Approved for Gestational Trophoblastic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for gestational trophoblastic disease. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  16. Long-Term Outcomes in Puerto Ricans with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Receiving Early Treatment with Disease-Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs using the American College of Rheumatology Definition of Early RA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Rosario, Noemí; Arroyo-Ávila, Mariangelí; Fred-Jiménez, Ruth M; Díaz-Correa, Leyda M; Pérez-Ríos, Naydi; Rodríguez, Noelia; Ríos, Grissel; Vilá, Luis M

    2017-01-01

    Early treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) results in better long-term outcomes. However, the optimal therapeutic window has not been clearly established. To determine the clinical outcome of Puerto Ricans with RA receiving early treatment with conventional and/or biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) based on the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) definition of early RA. A cross-sectional study was performed in a cohort of Puerto Ricans with RA. Demographic features, clinical manifestations, disease activity, functional status, and pharmacotherapy were determined. Early treatment was defined as the initiation of DMARDs (conventional and/or biologic) in less than 6 months from the onset of symptoms attributable to RA. Patients who received early (disease duration was 14.9 years and 337 (87.0%) patients were women. One hundred and twenty one (31.3%) patients received early treatment. In the multivariate analysis adjusted for age and sex, early treatment was associated with better functional status, lower probability of joint deformities, intra-articular injections and joint replacement surgeries, and lower scores in the physician's assessments of global health, functional impairment and physical damage of patients. Using the ACR definition of early RA, this group of patients treated with DMARDs within 6 months of disease had better long-term outcomes with less physical damage and functional impairment.

  17. Genetic Modifiers of Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Martin H.; Sebastiani, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is associated with unusual clinical heterogeneity for a Mendelian disorder. Fetal hemoglobin concentration and coincident ∝ thalassemia, both which directly affect the sickle erythrocyte, are the major modulators of the phenotype of disease. Understanding the genetics underlying the heritable subphenotypes of sickle cell anemia would be prognostically useful, could inform personalized therapeutics, and might help the discovery of new “druggable” pathophysiologic targets. Genotype-phenotype association studies have been used to identify novel genetic modifiers. In the future, whole genome sequencing with its promise of discovering hitherto unsuspected variants could add to our understanding of the genetic modifiers of this disease. PMID:22641398

  18. The Impact of Low-Dose Disease-modifying Anti-rheumatics Drugs (DMARDs) on Bone Mineral Density of Premenopausal Women in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexhepi, Sylejman; Rexhepi, Mjellma; Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Mahmutaj, Vigan; Boshnjaku, Shkumbin

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by symmetrical polyarthritis and multisystemic involvement. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of low dose of methotrexate on bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This paper follows a retrospective study, which involves 60 female patients with early onset RA diagnosed according to the American Rheumatism Association Criteria (ACR/EULAR 2010). The patients were divided into two groups group I was composed of thirty patients treated with dose of 7.5 mg/weekly methotrexate (MTX), while group II included thirty patients treated with dose of 2 g/daily sulfasalazine (SSZ). The Disease Activity was measured by a combination of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) and Disease Activity Score (DAS-28). Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (L2-4), and femoral neck, was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) (Stratos 800). Laboratory findings included: In this study, we found no negative effect on BMD in RA patients treated with low dose MTX in comparison to patients treated with SSZ. There was not observed significant difference in BMD of the lumbar spine, femur neck or trochanter, of MTX and SSZ patients in the pretreatment phase, nor after 12 months of treatment. No significant change in the biochemical parameters of the both groups. Based on the results of our study, low dose of methotrexate has no negative effect on BMD in premenopausal RA patients. We believe that these results might provide new insights and that further longitudinal studies with larger groups of premenopausal RA patients are required.

  19. Increased baseline RUNX2, caspase 3 and p21 gene expressions in the peripheral blood of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug-naïve rheumatoid arthritis patients are associated with improved clinical response to methotrexate therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchetina, Elena V; Demidova, Natalia V; Markova, Galina A; Taskina, Elena A; Glukhova, Svetlana I; Karateev, Dmitry E

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the potential of the baseline gene expression in the whole blood of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug-naïve rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients for predicting the response to methotrexate (MTX) treatment. Twenty-six control subjects and 40 RA patients were examined. Clinical, immunological and radiographic parameters were assessed before and after 24 months of follow-up. The gene expressions in the whole blood were measured using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The protein concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were used to suggest thresholds that were associated with the prediction of the response. Decreases in the disease activity at the end of the study were accompanied by significant increases in joint space narrowing score (JSN). Positive correlations between the expressions of the Unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) genes with the level of C-reactive protein and MMP-9 expression with Disease Activity Score of 28 joints (DAS28) and swollen joint count were noted at baseline. The baseline tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α gene expression was positively correlated with JSN at the end of the follow-up, whereas p21, caspase 3, and runt-related transcription factor (RUNX)2 were correlated with the ΔDAS28 values. Our results suggest that the expressions of MMP-9 and ULK1 might be associated with disease activity. Increased baseline gene expressions of RUNX2, p21 and caspase 3 in the peripheral blood might predict better responses to MTX therapy. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Fungal endophytes: modifiers of plant disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Posy E; Ridout, Mary; Newcombe, George

    2016-04-01

    Many recent studies have demonstrated that non-pathogenic fungi within plant microbiomes, i.e., endophytes ("endo" = within, "phyte" = plant), can significantly modify the expression of host plant disease. The rapid pace of advancement in endophyte ecology warrants a pause to synthesize our understanding of endophyte disease modification and to discuss future research directions. We reviewed recent literature on fungal endophyte disease modification, and here report on several emergent themes: (1) Fungal endophyte effects on plant disease span the full spectrum from pathogen antagonism to pathogen facilitation, with pathogen antagonism most commonly reported. (2) Agricultural plant pathosystems are the focus of research on endophyte disease modification. (3) A taxonomically diverse group of fungal endophytes can influence plant disease severity. And (4) Fungal endophyte effects on plant disease severity are context-dependent. Our review highlights the importance of fungal endophytes for plant disease across a broad range of plant pathosystems, yet simultaneously reveals that complexity within plant microbiomes presents a significant challenge to disentangling the biotic environmental factors affecting plant disease severity. Manipulative studies integrating eco-evolutionary approaches with emerging molecular tools will be poised to elucidate the functional importance of endophytes in natural plant pathosystems that are fundamental to biodiversity and conservation.

  1. Rare diseases and orphan drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica Taruscio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the Regulation (EC N. 141/2000 of the European Parliament and of the Council, rare diseases are life-threatening or chronically debilitating conditions, affecting no more than 5 in 10 000 persons in the European Community. It is estimated that between 6000 to 8000 distinct rare diseases affect up to 6% of the total EU population. Therefore, these conditions can be considered rare if taken individually but they affect a significant proportion of the European population when considered as a single group. Several initiatives have been undertaken at international, European and national level to tackle public health as well as research issues related to the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and surveillance of these diseases. The development of innovative and effective medical products for their diagnosis and treatment is frequently hampered by several factors, including the limited knowledge of their natural history, the difficulties in setting up clinical studies due to the limited numbers of patients affected by a specific disease, the weak interest of sponsors due to the restricted market opportunities. Therefore, incentives and other facilitations have been adopted in many parts of the world, including in the EU, in order to facilitate the development and commercialization of diagnostic tools and treatments devoted to rare diseases. This paper illustrates mainly the European initiatives and will discuss the problematic and controversial aspects surrounding orphan drugs. Finally, activities and measures adopted in Italy are presented.

  2. The expert meeting dedicated to the discussion of results of a local open-label multicenter observational study of the efficiency and safety of tofacitinib in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis with the inefficiency of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and to the elaboration of recommendations for the use for tofacitinib in the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The expert meeting dedicated to the discussion of results of a local open-label multicenter observational study of the efficiency and safety of tofacitinib in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis with the inefficiency of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and to the elaboration of recommendations for the use for tofacitinib in the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Drug delivery systems with modified release for systemic and biophase bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leucuta, Sorin E

    2012-11-01

    This review describes the most important new generations of pharmaceutical systems: medicines with extended release, controlled release pharmaceutical systems, pharmaceutical systems for the targeted delivery of drug substances. The latest advances and approaches for delivering small molecular weight drugs and other biologically active agents such as proteins and nucleic acids require novel delivery technologies, the success of a drug being many times dependent on the delivery method. All these dosage forms are qualitatively superior to medicines with immediate release, in that they ensure optimal drug concentrations depending on specific demands of different disease particularities of the body. Drug delivery of these pharmaceutical formulations has the benefit of improving product efficacy and safety, as well as patient convenience and compliance. This paper describes the biopharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, pharmacologic and technological principles in the design of drug delivery systems with modified release as well as the formulation criteria of prolonged and controlled release drug delivery systems. The paper presents pharmaceutical prolonged and controlled release dosage forms intended for different routes of administration: oral, ocular, transdermal, parenteral, pulmonary, mucoadhesive, but also orally fast dissolving tablets, gastroretentive drug delivery systems, colon-specific drug delivery systems, pulsatile drug delivery systems and carrier or ligand mediated transport for site specific or receptor drug targeting. Specific technologies are given on the dosage forms with modified release as well as examples of marketed products, and current research in these areas.

  4. The disease modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Per; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Christiansen, Claus

    2008-01-01

    and with DMOADs in particular, and we advance the need for a new development paradigm for DMOADs. Two central elements in this paradigm are a stronger focus on the biology of the joint and the application of new and more sensitive biomarkers allowing redesign of clinical trials in osteoarthritis....

  5. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NG Hoi-Yan Alexandra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal of treating rheumatic disease is to achieve rapid suppression of inflammation, while at the same time minimizing the toxicities from rheumatic drugs. Different patients have different individual pharmacokinetics that can affect the drug level. Moreover, different factors, such as renal function, age or even different underlying diseases, can affect the drug level. Therefore, giving the same dosage of drugs to different patients may result in different drug levels. This article will review the usefulness of therapeutic drug monitoring in maximizing drug efficacy, while reducing the risk of toxicities in Hydroxychloroquine, Mycophenolate Mofetil, Tacrolimus and Tumor Necrosis Factor inhibitors (TNF Inhibitors.

  6. Tocilizumab in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis and inadequate response to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs or tumor necrosis factor inhibitors: subanalysis of Spanish results of an open-label study close to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvaro-Gracia, José M; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; García-López, Alicia; Guzmán, Manuel; Blanco, Francisco J; Navarro, Francisco J; Bustabad, Sagrario; Armendáriz, Yolanda; Román-Ivorra, José A

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the Spanish experience in an international study which evaluated tocilizumab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and an inadequate response to conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) or tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFis) in a clinical practice setting. Subanalysis of 170 patients with RA from Spain who participated in a phase IIIb, open-label, international clinical trial. Patients presented inadequate response to DMARDs or TNFis. They received 8mg/kg of tocilizumab every 4 weeks in combination with a DMARD or as monotherapy during 20 weeks. Safety and efficacy of tocilizumab were analyzed. Special emphasis was placed on differences between failure to a DMARD or to a TNFi and the need to switch to tocilizumab with or without a washout period in patients who had previously received TNFi. The most common adverse events were infections (25%), increased total cholesterol (38%) and transaminases (15%). Five patients discontinued the study due to an adverse event. After six months of tocilizumab treatment, 71/50/30% of patients had ACR 20/50/70 responses, respectively. A higher proportion of TNFi-naive patients presented an ACR20 response: 76% compared to 64% in the TNFi group with previous washout and 66% in the TNFi group without previous washout. Safety results were consistent with previous results in patients with RA and an inadequate response to DMARDs or TNFis. Tocilizumab is more effective in patients who did not respond to conventional DMARDs than in patients who did not respond to TNFis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy and safety of tofacitinib for active rheumatoid arthritis with an inadequate response to methotrexate or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gwan Gyu; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of tofacitinib (5 and 10 mg twice daily) in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that examined the efficacy and safety of tofacitinib in patients with active RA was performed using the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register databases as well as manual searches. Results Five RCTs, including three phase-II and two phase-III trials involving 1,590 patients, met the inclusion criteria. The three phase-II RCTs included 452 patients with RA (144 patients randomized to 5 mg of tofacitinib twice daily, 156 patients randomized to 10 mg of tofacitinib twice daily, and 152 patients randomized to placebo) who were included in this meta-analysis. The American College of Rheumatology 20% response rate was significantly higher in the tofacitinib 5- and 10-mg groups than in the control group (relative risk [RR], 2.445; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.229 to 4.861; p = 0.011; and RR, 2.597; 95% CI, 1.514 to 4.455; p = 0.001, respectively). The safety outcomes did not differ between the tofacitinib 5- and 10-mg groups and placebo groups with the exception of infection in the tofacitinib 10-mg group (RR, 2.133; 95% CI, 1.268 to 3.590; p = 0.004). The results of two phase-III trials (1,123 patients) confirmed the findings in the phase-II studies. Conclusions Tofacitinib at dosages of 5 and 10 mg twice daily was found to be effective in patients with active RA that inadequately responded to methotrexate or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, and showed a manageable safety profile. PMID:25228842

  8. Use of tofacitinib in real clinical practice to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis resistant to synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs: Results of a multicenter observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Karateev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tofacitinib (TOFA, a member of a new class of targeted synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, is a promising medication for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and other immunoinflammatory diseases. The paper describes the Russian experi-ence with TOFA used to treat severe RA.Patients and methods. 101 RA patients (18 men and 83 women; mean age, 51.03±11.28 years; mean disease duration, 105.4±81.43 months who were positive for rheumatoid factor (89.1% and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (74.7% and resistant to therapy with synthetic DMARDs (sDMARDs (80.2% and biological agents (19.8% were given TOFA at a dose of 5 mg twice daily, which could be doubled if necessary. TOFA was used alone (n=9 or in combination with methotrexate (MT (n=75 or other sDMARDs (n=17. The achievement of low disease activity (LDA and clinical remission at 3 and 6 months of treatment by DAS28-ESR SDAI, and CDAI scores, and the indices of safety and tolerability were assessed.Results. A total of 93 (92.1% of the 101 patients completed a 24-week period of the investigation. 8 (7.9% patients prematurely discontinued TOFA after an average of 2.75±0.71 months. At the end of the study, the patients achieved the primary endpoint (LDA including remission in terms of DAS28-ESR ≤3.2 (34.7%, SDAI ≤11 (47.5%, and CDAI ≤10 (48.5% and the secondary endpoints (clinical remission in terms of DAS28-ESR ≤2.6 (17.8%, SDAI ≤3.3 (8.9%, and CDAI ≤2.8 (6.9%. When TOFA was combined with MT, the discontinuation rate for the former was significantly lower (2.7% than when TOFA was used in combination with other sDMARDs (29.4% or alone (11.1%; p<0.01. At 3 and 6 months of follow-up, LDA was achieved more frequently when TOFA was combined with MT than when other treatment regimens were used. Fatal outcomes and serious adverse events (AEs, as AEs previously undescribed in the literature, were not seen during a follow-up within

  9. Gelatin modified lipid nanoparticles for anti- viral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K S, Joshy; S, Snigdha; Kalarikkal, Nandakumar; Pothen, Laly A; Thomas, Sabu

    2017-10-01

    The major challenges to clinical application of zidovudine are its moderate aqueous solubility and relative short half-life and serious side effects due to frequent administrations. We investigated the preparation of zidovudine-loaded nanoparticles based on lipids which were further modified with the polymer gelatin. Formulation and stability of the modified nanoparticles were analysed from the physico-chemical characterizations. The interactions of nanoparticles with blood components were tested by haemolysis and aggregation studies. The drug content and entrapment efficiencies were assessed by UV analysis. The effect of nanoparticles on protein adsorption was assessed by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). In vitro release studies showed a sustained release profile of zidovudine. In vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of the zidovudine-loaded nanoparticles were performed in MCF-7 and neuro 2a brain cells. The enhanced cellular internalization of drug loaded modified nanoparticles in both the cell lines were revealed by fluorescence microscopy. Hence the present study focuses on the feasibility of zidovudine-loaded polymer modified lipid nanoparticles as carriers for safe and efficient HIV/AIDS therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficacy of glucocorticoids, conventional and targeted synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs: a systematic literature review informing the 2016 update of the EULAR recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatzidionysiou, Katerina; Emamikia, Sharzad; Nam, Jackie; Ramiro, Sofia; Smolen, Josef; van der Heijde, Désirée; Dougados, Maxime; Bijlsma, Johannes; Burmester, Gerd; Scholte, Marieke; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; Landewé, Robert

    2017-01-01

    To perform a systematic literature review (SLR) informing the 2016 update of the recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). An SLR for the period between 2013 and 2016 was undertaken to assess the efficacy of glucocorticoids (GCs), conventional synthetic disease-modifying

  11. Association between use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and diabetes in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis, or psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis: a nationwide, population-based cohort study of 84,989 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen HH

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hsin-Hua Chen,1–7 Der-Yuan Chen,1–6 Chi-Chen Lin,1,2 Yi-Ming Chen,1–4 Kuo-Lung Lai,3,4 Ching-Heng Lin1 1Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 2Institute of Biomedical Science and Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, 3School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, 4Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 5School of Medicine, Chung-Shan Medical University, 6Department of Medical Education, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, 7Institute of Public Health and Community Medicine Research Center, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate the association between the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs and diabetes mellitus (DM in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, or psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis (PS/PSA.Patients and methods: This retrospective cohort study used a nationwide, population-based administrative database to enroll 84,989 cases with AS, RA, or PS/PSA who initiated treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF drugs or nonbiologic DMARDs. Multivariable analysis was used to estimate the effect of different therapies on the risk of DM.Results: The incidence rates of DM per 1,000 person-years were 8.3 for users of anti-TNF drugs, 13.3 for users of cyclosporine (CSA, 8.4 for users of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ, and 8.1 for users of other nonbiologic DMARDs. Compared with the users of nonbiologic DMARDs, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs for DM were significantly lower for those who used anti-TNF drugs with HCQ (aHR: 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.36–0.66 and those who used HCQ alone (aHR: 0.70, 95% CI: 0.63–0.78, but not for those who used anti-TNFs without HCQ (aHR: 1.23, 95% CI: 0.94–1.60 or CSA (aHR: 1.14, 95% CI: 0.77–1

  12. Drug development for airway diseases: looking forward

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holgate, Stephen; Agusti, Alvar; Strieter, Robert M.; Anderson, Gary P.; Fogel, Robert; Bel, Elisabeth; Martin, Thomas R.; Reiss, Theodore F.

    2015-01-01

    Advancing drug development for airway diseases beyond the established mechanisms and symptomatic therapies requires redefining the classifications of airway diseases, considering systemic manifestations, developing new tools and encouraging collaborations

  13. The modified nanocrystalline cellulose for hydrophobic drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qing, Weixia [Institute of Environmental and Analytical Sciences, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Medical College, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Wang, Yong [Institute of Environmental and Analytical Sciences, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Wang, Youyou [Institute of Environmental and Analytical Sciences, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Key Lab of Natural Medicine and Immun-engineering of Henan Province, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Zhao, Dongbao [Institute of Environmental and Analytical Sciences, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Liu, Xiuhua, E-mail: ll514527@163.com [Institute of Environmental and Analytical Sciences, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Key Lab of Natural Medicine and Immun-engineering of Henan Province, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Zhu, Jinhua [Institute of Environmental and Analytical Sciences, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Torispherical NCC was synthesized through the improvements on the hydrolysis method. • NCC was firstly modified with CTMAB as a drug carrier. • Luteolin and luteoloside loading CTMAB-coated NCC were studied. - Abstract: In this work, torispherical nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) was synthesized, and firstly modified with a cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB). It was proved that the kinetics of NCC adsorbing CTMAB followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics equation, and the adsorption isotherm model followed Freundlich which was multi molecular layer adsorption model. The morphology and structure of NCC and CTMAB-coated NCC were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Stabilities of NCC and CTMAB-coated NCC were assayed by zeta potential. The results showed that NCC in CTMAB solution was well-dispersed and stable. Moreover, the drug loading and release performance of CTMAB-coated NCC were studied using luteolin (LUT) and luteoloside (LUS) as model drugs.

  14. The modified nanocrystalline cellulose for hydrophobic drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qing, Weixia; Wang, Yong; Wang, Youyou; Zhao, Dongbao; Liu, Xiuhua; Zhu, Jinhua

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Torispherical NCC was synthesized through the improvements on the hydrolysis method. • NCC was firstly modified with CTMAB as a drug carrier. • Luteolin and luteoloside loading CTMAB-coated NCC were studied. - Abstract: In this work, torispherical nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) was synthesized, and firstly modified with a cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB). It was proved that the kinetics of NCC adsorbing CTMAB followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics equation, and the adsorption isotherm model followed Freundlich which was multi molecular layer adsorption model. The morphology and structure of NCC and CTMAB-coated NCC were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Stabilities of NCC and CTMAB-coated NCC were assayed by zeta potential. The results showed that NCC in CTMAB solution was well-dispersed and stable. Moreover, the drug loading and release performance of CTMAB-coated NCC were studied using luteolin (LUT) and luteoloside (LUS) as model drugs.

  15. A novel fluoride anion modified gelatin nanogel system for ultrasound-triggered drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Daocheng; Wan, Mingxi

    2008-01-01

    Controlled drug release, especially tumor-targeted drug release, remains a great challenge. Here, we prepare a novel fluoride anion-modified gelatin nanogel system and investigate its characteristics of ultrasound-triggered drug release. Adriamycin gelatin nanogel modified with fluoride anion (ADM-GNMF) was prepared by a modified co-precipitation method with fluoride anion and sodium sulfate. The loading and encapsulation efficiency of the anti-neoplastic agent adriamycin (ADM) were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The size and shape of ADM-GNMF were determined by electron microscopy and photo-correlation spectroscopy. The size distribution and drug release efficiency of ADM-GNMF, before and after sonication, were measured by two designed measuring devices that consisted of either a submicron particle size analyzer and an ultrasound generator as well as an ultrasound generator, automatic sampler, and HPLC. The ADM-GNMF was stable in solution with an average diameter of 46+/-12 nm; the encapsulation and loading efficiency of adriamycin were 87.2% and 6.38%, respectively. The ultrasound-triggered drug release and size change were most efficient at a frequency of 20 kHz, power density of 0.4w/cm2, and a 1~2 min duration. Under this ultrasound-triggered condition, 51.5% of drug in ADM-GNMF was released within 1~2 min, while the size of ADM-GNMF changed from 46 +/- 12 nm to 1212 +/- 35 nm within 1~2 min of sonication and restored to its previous size in 2~3 min after the ultrasound stopped. In contrast, 8.2% of drug in ADM-GNMF was released within 2~3 min without sonication, and only negligible size changes were found. The ADM-GNMF system efficiently released the encompassed drug in response to ultrasound, offering a novel and promising controlled drug release system for targeted therapy for cancer or other diseases.

  16. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of combination and monotherapy treatments in disease-modifying antirheumatic drug-experienced patients with rheumatoid arthritis: analysis of American College of Rheumatology criteria scores 20, 50, and 70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Michelle E; MacGilchrist, Katherine S; Mitchell, Stephen; Spurden, Dean; Bird, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Background Biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) extend the treatment choices for rheumatoid arthritis patients with suboptimal response or intolerance to conventional DMARDs. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare the relative efficacy of EU-licensed bDMARD combination therapy or monotherapy for patients intolerant of or contraindicated to continued methotrexate. Methods Comprehensive, structured literature searches were conducted in Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library, as well as hand-searching of conference proceedings and reference lists. Phase II or III randomized controlled trials reporting American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria scores of 20, 50, and 70 between 12 and 30 weeks’ follow-up and enrolling adult patients meeting ACR classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis previously treated with and with an inadequate response to conventional DMARDs were eligible. To estimate the relative efficacy of treatments whilst preserving the randomized comparisons within each trial, a Bayesian network meta-analysis was conducted in WinBUGS using fixed and random-effects, logit-link models fitted to the binomial ACR 20/50/70 trial data. Results The systematic review identified 10,625 citations, and after a review of 2450 full-text papers, there were 29 and 14 eligible studies for the combination and monotherapy meta-analyses, respectively. In the combination analysis, all licensed bDMARD combinations had significantly higher odds of ACR 20/50/70 compared to DMARDs alone, except for the rituximab comparison, which did not reach significance for the ACR 70 outcome (based on the 95% credible interval). The etanercept combination was significantly better than the tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors adalimumab and infliximab in improving ACR 20/50/70 outcomes, with no significant differences between the etanercept combination and certolizumab pegol or tocilizumab. Licensed-dose etanercept, adalimumab

  17. Drug Delivery Systems for Imaging and Therapy of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunay, Mine Silindir; Ozer, A Yekta; Chalon, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Although a variety of therapeutic approaches are available for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, challenges limit effective therapy. Among these challenges are delivery of drugs through the blood brain barier to the target brain tissue and the side effects observed during long term administration of antiparkinsonian drugs. The use of drug delivery systems such as liposomes, niosomes, micelles, nanoparticles, nanocapsules, gold nanoparticles, microspheres, microcapsules, nanobubbles, microbubbles and dendrimers is being investigated for diagnosis and therapy. This review focuses on formulation, development and advantages of nanosized drug delivery systems which can penetrate the central nervous system for the therapy and/or diagnosis of PD, and highlights future nanotechnological approaches. It is esential to deliver a sufficient amount of either therapeutic or radiocontrast agents to the brain in order to provide the best possible efficacy or imaging without undesired degradation of the agent. Current treatments focus on motor symptoms, but these treatments generally do not deal with modifying the course of Parkinson's disease. Beyond pharmacological therapy, the identification of abnormal proteins such as α -synuclein, parkin or leucine-rich repeat serine/threonine protein kinase 2 could represent promising alternative targets for molecular imaging and therapy of Parkinson's disease. Nanotechnology and nanosized drug delivery systems are being investigated intensely and could have potential effect for Parkinson's disease. The improvement of drug delivery systems could dramatically enhance the effectiveness of Parkinson's Disease therapy and reduce its side effects.

  18. Drug development in Parkinson's disease: from emerging molecules to innovative drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbayo, E; Ansorena, E; Blanco-Prieto, M J

    2013-11-01

    Current treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD) are aimed at addressing motor symptoms but there is no therapy focused on modifying the course of the disease. Successful treatment strategies have been so far limited and brain drug delivery remains a major challenge that restricts its treatment. This review provides an overview of the most promising emerging agents in the field of PD drug discovery, discussing improvements that have been made in brain drug delivery for PD. It will be shown that new approaches able to extend the length of the treatment, to release the drug in a continuous manner or to cross the blood-brain barrier and target a specific region are still needed. Overall, the results reviewed here show that there is an urgent need to develop both symptomatic and disease-modifying treatments, giving priority to neuroprotective treatments. Promising perspectives are being provided in this field by rasagiline and by neurotrophic factors like glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The identification of disease-relevant genes has also encouraged the search for disease-modifying therapies that function by identifying molecularly targeted drugs. The advent of new molecular and cellular targets like α-synuclein, leucine-rich repeat serine/threonine protein kinase 2 or parkin, among others, will require innovative delivery therapies. In this regard, drug delivery systems (DDS) have shown great potential for improving the efficacy of conventional and new PD therapy and reducing its side effects. The new DDS discussed here, which include microparticles, nanoparticles and hydrogels among others, will probably open up possibilities that extend beyond symptomatic relief. However, further work needs to be done before DDS become a therapeutic option for PD patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Drugs of abuse and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mursaleen, Leah R; Stamford, Jonathan A

    2016-01-04

    The term "drug of abuse" is highly contextual. What constitutes a drug of abuse for one population of patients does not for another. It is therefore important to examine the needs of the patient population to properly assess the status of drugs of abuse. The focus of this article is on the bidirectional relationship between patients and drug abuse. In this paper we will introduce the dopaminergic systems of the brain in Parkinson's and the influence of antiparkinsonian drugs upon them before discussing this synergy of condition and medication as fertile ground for drug abuse. We will then examine the relationship between drugs of abuse and Parkinson's, both beneficial and deleterious. In summary we will draw the different strands together and speculate on the future merit of current drugs of abuse as treatments for Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. EDITORIAL Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr.Kofi-Tsekpo

    disease, and malaria have a devastating impact on humanity, yet R&D for new drugs for these diseases has been progressively marginalised because they are not considered a lucrative investment. DNDi, a needs-driven initiative, keeps the needs of patients suffering from neglected diseases paramount in its search for.

  1. Multimodal drugs and their future for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Schyf, Cornelis J; Geldenhuys, Werner J

    2011-01-01

    This chapter discusses the rationale for developing multimodal or multifunctional drugs (also called designed multiple ligands or DMLs) aimed at disease-modifying treatment strategies for the most common neurodegenerative diseases Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease (AD and PD). Both the prevalence and incidence of AD and PD have seen consistent and dramatic increases, a disconcerting phenomenon which, ironically, has been attributed to extended life expectancy brought about by better health care globally. In spite of these statistics, the development and introduction to the clinic of new therapies proven to prevent or delay the onset of AD and PD have been disappointing. Evidence has accumulated to suggest that the etiopathology of these diseases is extremely complex, with an array of potential drug targets located within a number of deleterious biochemical pathways. Therefore, in these diseases, it is unlikely that the complex pathoetiological cascade leading to disease initiation or progression will be mitigated by any one drug acting on a single pathway or target. The pursuit of novel DMLs may offer far better outcomes. Although certainly not the only, and perhaps not even the best, approach but farthest along the drug development pipeline in the DML paradigm are drugs that combine inhibition of monoamine oxidase with associated etiological targets unique to either AD or PD. These compounds will constitute the major focus of this chapter, which will also explore radically new paradigms that seek to combine cognitive enhancers with proneurogenesis compounds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Financing drug discovery for orphan diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Fagnan, David Erik; Gromatzky, Austin A.; Stein, Roger Mark; Fernandez, Jose-Maria; Lo, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Recently proposed ‘megafund’ financing methods for funding translational medicine and drug development require billions of dollars in capital per megafund to de-risk the drug discovery process enough to issue long-term bonds. Here, we demonstrate that the same financing methods can be applied to orphan drug development but, because of the unique nature of orphan diseases and therapeutics (lower development costs, faster FDA approval times, lower failure rates and lower correlation of failures...

  3. Older Americans' risk-benefit preferences for modifying the course of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauber, A Brett; Johnson, F Reed; Fillit, Howard; Mohamed, Ateesha F; Leibman, Christopher; Arrighi, H Michael; Grundman, Michael; Townsend, Raymond J

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive, ultimately fatal neurodegenerative illness affecting millions of patients, families, and caregivers. Effective disease-modifying therapies for AD are desperately needed, but none currently exist on the market. Thus, accelerating the discovery, development, and approval of new disease-modifying drugs for AD is a high priority for individuals, physicians, and medical decision makers. Potentially disease-modifying drugs likely will have significant therapeutic benefits but also may have treatment-related risks. We quantified older Americans' treatment-related risk tolerance by eliciting their willingness to accept the risk of treatment-related death or permanent severe disability in exchange for modifying the course of AD. A stated-choice survey instrument was administered to 2146 American residents 60 years of age and older. On average, subjects were willing to accept a 1-year risk of treatment-related death or permanent severe disability from stroke of over 30% for a treatment that prevents AD from progressing beyond the mild stage. Thus, most people in this age cohort are willing to accept considerable risks in return for disease-modifying benefits of new AD drugs. These results are consistent with other studies indicating that individuals view AD as a serious, life threatening illness that imposes heavy burdens on both patients and caregivers.

  4. Emerging drugs for coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Peter D; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Sanders, David S

    2014-12-01

    Coeliac disease is an autoimmune gluten sensitive enteropathy and is now known to affect 1% of the adult population. A gluten-free diet (GFD) should be curative; however, up to 30% of patients have persistent symptoms and many patients find the diet difficult to fully adhere to. Currently, there are no licensed therapeutic options for patients with coeliac disease outside of a GFD. This review will outline the case for alternative treatments and discuss the potential therapeutic targets. The products in the most advanced stage of development will be discussed in detail. There is clearly an unmet need for alternatives to a GFD for the treatment of coeliac disease. Oral glutenase supplements to improve the degradation of gluten into non-toxic peptides appear to be the most likely to provide a breakthrough in the treatment of coeliac disease; however, other modalities such as a therapeutic vaccine or zonulin inhibitors to reduce intestinal permeability have shown promising results.

  5. Mitochondrial Drugs for Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiongwei Zhu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer disease (AD have yet to offer a diseasemodifying effect to stop the debilitating progression of neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. Rather, treatments thus far are limited to agents that slow disease progression without halting it, and although much work towards a cure is underway, a greater understanding of disease etiology is certainly necessary for any such achievement. Mitochondria, as the centers of cellular metabolic activity and the primary generators of reactive oxidative species in the cell, received particular attention especially given that mitochondrial defects are known to contribute to cellular damage. Furthermore, as oxidative stress has come to the forefront of AD as a causal theory, and as mitochondrial damage is known to precede much of the hallmark pathologies of AD, it seems increasingly apparent that this metabolic organelle is ultimately responsible for much, if not all of disease pathogenesis. In this review, we review the role of neuronal mitochondria in the pathogenesis of AD and critically assess treatment strategies that utilize this upstream access point as a method for disease prevention. We suspect that, with a revived focus on mitochondrial repair and protection, an effective and realistic therapeutic agent can be successfully developed.

  6. Chitosan nanoparticles as a modified diclofenac drug release system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Junior, Anivaldo Pereira; Tavares, Eraldo José Madureira; Alves, Taís Vanessa Gabbay; de Moura, Márcia Regina; da Costa, Carlos Emmerson Ferreira; Silva Júnior, José Otávio Carréra; Ribeiro Costa, Roseane Maria

    2017-08-01

    This study evaluated a modified nanostructured release system employing diclofenac as a drug model. Biodegradable chitosan nanoparticles were prepared with chitosan concentrations between 0.5 and 0.8% ( w/ v) by template polymerization method using methacrylic acid in aqueous solution. Chitosan-poly(methacrylic acid) (CS-PMAA) nanoparticles showed uniform size around 50-100 nm, homogeneous morphology, and spherical shape. Raw material and chitosan nanoparticles were characterized by thermal analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), confirming the interaction between chitosan and methacrylic acid during nanoparticles preparation. Diclofenac sorption on the chitosan nanoparticles surface was achieved by incubation in water/ethanol (1:1) drug solution in concentrations of 0.5 and 0.8 mg/mL. The diclofenac amount sorbed per gram of CS-PMAA nanoparticles, when in a 0.5 mg/mL sodium diclofenac solution, was as follows: 12.93, 15, 20.87, and 29.63 mg/g for CS-PMAA nanoparticles 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, and 0.8% ( w/ v), respectively. When a 0.8 mg/mL sodium diclofenac solution was used, higher sorption efficiencies were obtained: For CS-PMAA nanoparticles with chitosan concentrations of 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, and 0.8% ( w/ v), the sorption efficiencies were 33.39, 49.58, 55.23, and 67.2 mg/g, respectively. Diclofenac sorption kinetics followed a second-order kinetics. Drug release from nanoparticles occurred in a period of up to 48 h and obeyed Korsmeyer-Peppas model, which was characterized mainly by Fickian diffusion transport. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Randomised controlled trial of tumour necrosis factor inhibitors against combination intensive therapy with conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in established rheumatoid arthritis: the TACIT trial and associated systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David L; Ibrahim, Fowzia; Farewell, Vern; O'Keeffe, Aidan G; Ma, Margaret; Walker, David; Heslin, Margaret; Patel, Anita; Kingsley, Gabrielle

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is initially treated with methotrexate and other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Active RA patients who fail such treatments can receive tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFis), which are effective but expensive. We assessed whether or not combination DMARDs (cDMARDs) give equivalent clinical benefits at lower costs in RA patients eligible for TNFis. An open-label, 12-month, pragmatic, randomised, multicentre, two-arm trial [Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors Against Combination Intensive Therapy (TACIT)] compared these treatment strategies. We then systematically reviewed all comparable published trials. The TACIT trial involved 24 English rheumatology clinics. Active RA patients eligible for TNFis. The TACIT trial compared cDMARDs with TNFis plus methotrexate or another DMARD; 6-month non-responders received (a) TNFis if in the cDMARD group; and (b) a second TNFi if in the TNFi group. The Heath Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) was the primary outcome measure. The European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), joint damage, Disease Activity Score for 28 Joints (DAS28), withdrawals and adverse effects were secondary outcome measures. Economic evaluation linked costs, HAQ changes and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). In total, 432 patients were screened; 104 started on cDMARDs and 101 started on TNFis. The initial demographic and disease assessments were similar between the groups. In total, 16 patients were lost to follow-up (nine in the cDMARD group, seven in the TNFi group) and 42 discontinued their intervention but were followed up (23 in the cDMARD group and 19 in the TNFi group). Intention-to-treat analysis with multiple imputation methods used for missing data showed greater 12-month HAQ score reductions with initial cDMARDs than with initial TNFis [adjusted linear regression coefficient 0.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.003 to 0.31; p = 0.046]. Increases in 12-month EQ-5D scores were greater with initial c

  8. Financing drug discovery for orphan diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagnan, David E; Gromatzky, Austin A; Stein, Roger M; Fernandez, Jose-Maria; Lo, Andrew W

    2014-05-01

    Recently proposed 'megafund' financing methods for funding translational medicine and drug development require billions of dollars in capital per megafund to de-risk the drug discovery process enough to issue long-term bonds. Here, we demonstrate that the same financing methods can be applied to orphan drug development but, because of the unique nature of orphan diseases and therapeutics (lower development costs, faster FDA approval times, lower failure rates and lower correlation of failures among disease targets) the amount of capital needed to de-risk such portfolios is much lower in this field. Numerical simulations suggest that an orphan disease megafund of only US$575 million can yield double-digit expected rates of return with only 10-20 projects in the portfolio. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Drug dosing in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, Steven; Abramson, Stuart

    2005-05-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at high risk for adverse drug reactions and drug-drug interactions. Drug dosing in these patients often proves to be a difficult task. Renal dysfunction-induced changes in human pathophysiology regularly results may alter medication pharmacodynamics and handling. Several pharmacokinetic parameters are adversely affected by CKD, secondary to a reduced oral absorption and glomerular filtration; altered tubular secretion; and reabsorption and changes in intestinal, hepatic, and renal metabolism. In general, drug dosing can be accomplished by multiple methods; however, the most common recommendations are often to reduce the dose or expand the dosing interval, or use both methods simultaneously. Some medications need to be avoided all together in CKD either because of lack of efficacy or increased risk of toxicity. Nevertheless, specific recommendations are available for dosing of certain medications and are an important resource, because most are based on clinical or pharmacokinetic trials.

  10. Safety and effectiveness of 24-week treatment with iguratimod, a new oral disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: interim analysis of a post-marketing surveillance study of 2679 patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimori, Tsuneyo; Harigai, Masayoshi; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Fujii, Takao; Kuwana, Masataka; Matsuno, Hiroaki; Momohara, Shigeki; Takei, Syuji; Tamura, Naoto; Takasaki, Yoshinari; Ikeuchi, Satoshi; Kushimoto, Satoru; Koike, Takao

    2017-09-01

    To determine the real-world safety and effectiveness of iguratimod (IGU) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a 52-week, Japanese, post-marketing surveillance study was conducted. An interim analysis at week 24 was performed. This study included all RA patients who received IGU following its introduction to the market. All adverse events (AEs) and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were collected. Effectiveness was evaluated by the change in Disease Activity Score 28-C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) from baseline to week 24. Safety was analyzed in 2679 patients. The overall incidences of AEs, ADRs, and serious ADRs were 38.41, 31.65, and 3.21%, respectively; the most commonly reported serious ADRs were pneumonia/bacterial pneumonia, interstitial lung disease, and Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. Concomitant glucocorticoid use and comorbid conditions associated with respiratory disease were identified as risk factors for serious infections. Pulmonary alveolar hemorrhage and increased international normalized ratio of prothrombin time were observed with concomitant use of IGU and warfarin. The DAS28-CRP decreased from baseline to week 24. Although a safety concern was identified with concomitant use of IGU and warfarin, this real-world study showed no other new safety concerns and similar effectiveness to clinical trials. IGU is a new therapeutic option for RA patients.

  11. Scleroglucan: A Versatile Polysaccharide for Modified Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Alhaique

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Scleroglucan is a natural polysaccharide, produced by fungi of the genus Sclerotium, that has been extensively studied for various commercial applications (secondary oil recovery, ceramic glazes, food, paints, etc. and also shows several interesting pharmacological properties. This review focuses its attention on the use of scleroglucan, and some derivatives, in the field of pharmaceutics and in particular for the formulation of modified-release dosage forms. The reported investigations refer mainly to the following topics: natural scleroglucan suitable for the preparation of sustained release tablets and ocular formulations; oxidized and crosslinked scleroglucan used as a matrix for dosage forms sensitive to environmental conditions; co-crosslinked scleroglucan/gellan whose delivery rate can be affected by calcium ions. Furthermore, a novel hydrogel obtained with this polysaccharide and borate ions is described, and the particular structure of this hydrogel network has been interpreted in terms of conformational analysis and molecular dynamics. Profound attention is devoted to the mechanisms involved in drug release from the tested dosage forms that depend, according to the specific preparation, on swelling and/or diffusion. Experimental data are also discussed on the basis of a mathematical approach that allows a better understanding of the behavior of the tested polymeric materials.

  12. Emerging drugs for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are very effective and safe drugs for the treatment of erosive and non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Nevertheless, a significant proportion of GERD patients (30 - 40%) continue to suffer from symptoms during PPI treatment, which has stimulated the

  13. Meningococcal disease and future drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, L K; Colding, H; Hartzen, S H

    2011-01-01

    recent data and current knowledge on molecular mechanisms of meningococcal disease and explains how host immune responses ultimately may aggravate neuropathology and the clinical prognosis. Within this context, particular importance is paid to the endotoxic components that provide potential drug targets...... for novel neuroprotective adjuvants, which are needed in order to improve the clinical management of meningoencephalitis and patient prognosis....

  14. Established and novel disease-modifying treatments in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, A H; Naismith, R T

    2014-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a presumed autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system, resulting in inflammatory demyelination and axonal and neuronal injury. New diagnostic criteria that incorporate magnetic resonance imaging have resulted in earlier and more accurate diagnosis of MS. Several immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive therapeutic agents are available for relapsing forms of MS, which allow individualized treatment based upon the benefits and risks. Disease-modifying therapies introduced in the 1990s, the beta-interferons and glatiramer acetate, have an established track record of efficacy and safety, although they require administration via injection. More recently, monoclonal antibodies have been engineered to act through specific mechanisms such as blocking alpha-4 integrin interactions (natalizumab) or lysing cells bearing specific markers, for example CD52 (alemtuzumab) or CD20 (ocrelizumab and ofatumumab). These agents can be highly efficacious, but sometimes have serious potential complications (natalizumab is associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy; alemtuzumab is associated with the development of new autoimmune disorders). Three new oral therapies (fingolimod, teriflunomide and dimethyl fumarate, approved for MS treatment from 2010 onwards) provide efficacy, tolerability and convenience; however, as yet, there are no long-term postmarketing efficacy and safety data in a general MS population. Because of this lack of long-term data, in some cases, therapy is currently initiated with the older, safer injectable medications, but patients are monitored closely with the plan to switch therapies if there is any indication of a suboptimal response or intolerance or lack of adherence to the initial therapy. For patients with MS who present with highly inflammatory and potentially aggressive disease, the benefit-to-risk ratio may support initiating therapy using a drug with greater potential efficacy despite greater risks (e

  15. Leukotrienes and leukotriene modifiers in pediatric allergic diseases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    ... 12(1):3-12. 3. Leukotrienes and leukotriene modifiers in pediatric allergic diseases ... childhood allergic diseases. This review ... produce cysteinyl-LTs and LTB4 spontaneously in vitro.8. Although nonleukocyte cells generally do not have sufficient 5-LO and FLAP to synthesize .... uninterrupted sleep in these patients.55.

  16. A new proposal for randomized start design to investigate disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Richard Y; Leon, Andrew C; Chuang-Stein, Christy; Romano, Steven J

    2011-02-01

    The increasing prevalence of Alzheimer disease (AD) and lack of effective agents to attenuate progression have accelerated research and development of disease modifying (DM) therapies. The traditional parallel group design and single time point analysis used in the support of past AD drug approvals address symptomatic benefit over relatively short treatment durations. More recent trials investigating disease modification are by necessity longer in duration and require larger sample sizes. Nevertheless, trial design and analysis remain mostly unchanged and may not be adequate to meet the objective of demonstrating disease modification. Randomized start design (RSD) has been proposed as an option to study DM effects, but its application in AD trials may have been hampered by certain methodological challenges. To address the methodological issues that have impeded more extensive use of RSD in AD trial and to encourage other researchers to develop novel design and analysis methodologies to better ascertain DM effects for the next generation of AD therapies, we propose a stepwise testing procedure to evaluate potential DM effects of novel AD therapies. Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-cog) is used for illustration. We propose to test three hypotheses in a stepwise sequence. The three tests pertain to treatment difference at two separate time points and a difference in the rate of change. Estimation is facilitated by the Mixed-effects Model for Repeated Measures approach. The required sample size is estimated using Monte Carlo simulations and by modeling ADAS-cog data from prior longitudinal AD studies. The greatest advantage of the RSD proposed in this article is its ability to critically address the question on a DM effect. The AD trial using the new approach would be longer (12-month placebo period plus 12-month delay-start period; total 24-month duration) and require more subjects (about 1000 subjects per arm for the non-inferiority margin

  17. The Neuroprotective Disease-Modifying Potential of Psychotropics in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward C. Lauterbach

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprotective treatments in Parkinson's disease (PD have remained elusive. Psychotropics are commonly prescribed in PD without regard to their pathobiological effects. The authors investigated the effects of psychotropics on pathobiological proteins, proteasomal activity, mitochondrial functions, apoptosis, neuroinflammation, trophic factors, stem cells, and neurogenesis. Only findings replicated in at least 2 studies were considered for these actions. Additionally, PD-related gene transcription, animal model, and human neuroprotective clinical trial data were reviewed. Results indicate that, from a PD pathobiology perspective, the safest drugs (i.e., drugs least likely to promote cellular neurodegenerative mechanisms balanced against their likelihood of promoting neuroprotective mechanisms include pramipexole, valproate, lithium, desipramine, escitalopram, and dextromethorphan. Fluoxetine favorably affects transcription of multiple genes (e.g., MAPT, GBA, CCDC62, HIP1R, although it and desipramine reduced MPTP mouse survival. Haloperidol is best avoided. The most promising neuroprotective investigative priorities will involve disease-modifying trials of the safest agents alone or in combination to capture salutary effects on H3 histone deacetylase, gene transcription, glycogen synthase kinase-3, α-synuclein, reactive oxygen species (ROS, reactive nitrogen species (RNS, apoptosis, inflammation, and trophic factors including GDNF and BDNF.

  18. RGD-modified lipid disks as drug carriers for tumor targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Xie, Cao; Zhang, Mingfei; Wei, Xiaoli; Yan, Zhiqiang; Ren, Yachao; Ying, Man; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-03-01

    Melittin, the major component of the European bee venom, is a potential anticancer candidate due to its lytic properties. However, in vivo applications of melittin are limited due to its main side effect, hemolysis, especially when applied through intravenous administration. The polyethylene glycol-stabilized lipid disk is a novel type of nanocarrier, and the rim of lipid disks has a high affinity to amphiphilic peptides. In our study, a c(RGDyK) modified lipid disk was developed as a tumor targeted drug delivery system for melittin. Cryo-TEM was used to confirm the shape and size of lipid disks with or without c(RGDyK) modification. In vitro and in vivo hemolysis analyses revealed that the hemolysis effect significantly decreased after melittin associated with lipid disks. Importantly, the results of our in vivo biodistribution and tumor growth inhibitory experiments showed that c(RGDyK) modification increased the distribution of lipid disks in the tumor and the anticancer efficacy of melittin loaded lipid disks. Thus, we successfully achieved a targeted drug delivery system for melittin and other amphiphilic peptides with a good therapeutic effect and low side effects.

  19. Advanced and controlled drug delivery systems in clinical disease management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, JRBJ

    1996-01-01

    Advanced and controlled drug delivery systems are important for clinical disease management. In this review the most important new systems which have reached clinical application are highlighted. Microbiologically controlled drug delivery is important for gastrointestinal diseases like ulcerative

  20. Modified Transdermal Technologies: Breaking the Barriers of Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In-depth analysis, formulation approaches, applications, advantages and disadvantages of these newer technologies are discussed. Keywords: Transdermal drug delivery, microneedles, macroflux, iontophoresis, ultrasound, powderject, skin abrasion. > Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research Vol. 6 (1) 2007: pp. 633- ...

  1. Demographic, genetic, and environmental factors that modify disease course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrie, Ruth Ann

    2011-05-01

    As with susceptibility to disease, it is likely that multiple factors interact to influence the phenotype of multiple sclerosis and long-term disease outcomes. Such factors may include genetic factors, socioeconomic status, comorbid diseases, and health behaviors, as well as environmental exposures. An improved understanding of the influence of these factors on disease course may reap several benefits, such as improved prognostication, allowing us to tailor disease management with respect to intensity of disease-modifying therapies and changes in specific health behaviors, in the broad context of coexisting health issues. Such information can facilitate appropriately adjusted comparisons within and between populations. Elucidation of these factors will require careful study of well-characterized populations in which the roles of multiple factors are considered simultaneously. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Infections in patients with multiple sclerosis: Implications for disease-modifying therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celius, E G

    2017-11-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis have an increased risk of infections compared to the general population. The increased risk has been described for decades and is not alone attributed to the use of disease-modifying drugs, but secondary to the disability. The introduction of more potent immunomodulatory drugs may cause an additional challenge, and depending on the mechanism of action, a treatment-induced increased risk of bacterial, viral, fungal or parasitic infections is observed. The choice of treatment in the individual patient with infections and multiple sclerosis must be guided by the drugs' specific mechanism of action, the drug-specific risk of infection and comorbidities. Increased monitoring and follow-up through treatment registries is warranted to increase our understanding and thereby improve management. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Inorganically modified diatomite as a potential prolonged-release drug carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janićijević, Jelena; Krajišnik, Danina; Calija, Bojan; Dobričić, Vladimir; Daković, Aleksandra; Krstić, Jugoslav; Marković, Marija; Milić, Jela

    2014-09-01

    Inorganic modification of diatomite was performed with the precipitation product of partially neutralized aluminum sulfate solution at three different mass ratios. The starting and the modified diatomites were characterized by SEM-EDS, FTIR, thermal analysis and zeta potential measurements and evaluated for drug loading capacity in adsorption batch experiments using diclofenac sodium (DS) as a model drug. In vitro drug release studies were performed in phosphate buffer pH6.8 from comprimates containing: the drug adsorbed onto the selected modified diatomite sample (DAMD), physical mixture of the drug with the selected modified diatomite sample (PMDMD) and physical mixture of the drug with the starting diatomite (PMDD). In vivo acute toxicity testing of the modified diatomite samples was performed on mice. High adsorbent loading of the selected modified diatomite sample (~250mg/g in 2h) enabled the preparation of comprimates containing adsorbed DS in the amount near to its therapeutic dose. Drug release studies demonstrated prolonged release of DS over a period of 8h from both DAMD comprimates (18% after 8h) and PMDMD comprimates (45% after 8h). The release kinetics for DAMD and PMDMD comprimates fitted well with Korsmeyer-Peppas and Bhaskar models, indicating that the release mechanism was a combination of non-Fickian diffusion and ion exchange process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Wildlife disease prevalence in human-modified landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brearley, Grant; Rhodes, Jonathan; Bradley, Adrian; Baxter, Greg; Seabrook, Leonie; Lunney, Daniel; Liu, Yan; McAlpine, Clive

    2013-05-01

    Human-induced landscape change associated with habitat loss and fragmentation places wildlife populations at risk. One issue in these landscapes is a change in the prevalence of disease which may result in increased mortality and reduced fecundity. Our understanding of the influence of habitat loss and fragmentation on the prevalence of wildlife diseases is still in its infancy. What is evident is that changes in disease prevalence as a result of human-induced landscape modification are highly variable. The importance of infectious diseases for the conservation of wildlife will increase as the amount and quality of suitable habitat decreases due to human land-use pressures. We review the experimental and observational literature of the influence of human-induced landscape change on wildlife disease prevalence, and discuss disease transmission types and host responses as mechanisms that are likely to determine the extent of change in disease prevalence. It is likely that transmission dynamics will be the key process in determining a pathogen's impact on a host population, while the host response may ultimately determine the extent of disease prevalence. Finally, we conceptualize mechanisms and identify future research directions to increase our understanding of the relationship between human-modified landscapes and wildlife disease prevalence. This review highlights that there are rarely consistent relationships between wildlife diseases and human-modified landscapes. In addition, variation is evident between transmission types and landscape types, with the greatest positive influence on disease prevalence being in urban landscapes and directly transmitted disease systems. While we have a limited understanding of the potential influence of habitat loss and fragmentation on wildlife disease, there are a number of important areas to address in future research, particularly to account for the variability in increased and decreased disease prevalence. Previous studies

  5. Antithyroid Drug Therapy for Graves' Disease and Implications for Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jing; Xu, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism worldwide. Current therapeutic options for GD include antithyroid drugs (ATD), radioactive iodine, and thyroidectomy. ATD treatment is generally well accepted by patients and clinicians due to some advantages including normalizing thyroid function in a short time, hardly causing hypothyroidism, and ameliorating immune disorder while avoiding radiation exposure and invasive procedures. However, the relatively high recurrence rate is a major concern for ATD treatment, which is associated with multiple influencing factors like clinical characteristics, treatment strategies, and genetic and environmental factors. Of these influencing factors, some are modifiable but some are nonmodifiable. The recurrence risk can be reduced by adjusting the modifiable factors as much as possible. The titration regimen for 12–18 months is the optimal strategy of ATD. Levothyroxine administration after successful ATD treatment was not recommended. The addition of immunosuppressive drugs might be helpful to decrease the recurrence rate of GD patients after ATD withdrawal, whereas further studies are needed to address the safety and efficacy. This paper reviewed the current knowledge of ATD treatment and mainly focused on influencing factors for recurrence in GD patients with ATD treatment. PMID:28529524

  6. Disease-threat model explains acceptance of genetically modified products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokop Pavol

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural selection favoured survival of individuals who were able to avoid disease. The behavioural immune system is activated especially when our sensory system comes into contact with disease-connoting cues and/or when these cues resemble disease threat. We investigated whether or not perception of modern risky technologies, risky behaviour, expected reproductive goals and food neophobia are associated with the behavioural immune system related to specific attitudes toward genetically modified (GM products. We found that respondents who felt themselves more vulnerable to infectious diseases had significantly more negative attitudes toward GM products. Females had less positive attitudes toward GM products, but engaging in risky behaviours, the expected reproductive goals of females and food neophobia did not predict attitudes toward GM products. Our results suggest that evolved psychological mechanisms primarily designed to protect us against pathogen threat are activated by modern technologies possessing potential health risks.

  7. Potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions in well-functioning community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, J T; Perera, S; Newman, A B; Thorpe, J M; Donohue, J M; Simonsick, E M; Shorr, R I; Bauer, D C; Marcum, Z A

    2017-04-01

    There are few studies examining both drug-drug and drug-disease interactions in older adults. Therefore, the objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions and associated factors in community-dwelling older adults. This cross-sectional study included 3055 adults aged 70-79 without mobility limitations at their baseline visit in the Health Aging and Body Composition Study conducted in the communities of Pittsburgh PA and Memphis TN, USA. The outcome factors were potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions as per the application of explicit criteria drawn from a number of sources to self-reported prescription and non-prescription medication use. Over one-third of participants had at least one type of interaction. Approximately one quarter (25·1%) had evidence of had one or more drug-drug interactions. Nearly 10·7% of the participants had a drug-drug interaction that involved a non-prescription medication. % The most common drug-drug interaction was non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) affecting antihypertensives. Additionally, 16·0% had a potential drug-disease interaction with 3·7% participants having one involving non-prescription medications. The most common drug-disease interaction was aspirin/NSAID use in those with history of peptic ulcer disease without gastroprotection. Over one-third (34·0%) had at least one type of drug interaction. Each prescription medication increased the odds of having at least one type of drug interaction by 35-40% [drug-drug interaction adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1·35, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1·27-1·42; drug-disease interaction AOR = 1·30; CI = 1·21-1·40; and both AOR = 1·45; CI = 1·34-1·57]. A prior hospitalization increased the odds of having at least one type of drug interaction by 49-84% compared with those not hospitalized (drug-drug interaction AOR = 1·49, 95% CI = 1·11-2·01; drug-disease interaction AOR = 1·69, CI = 1·15-2

  8. Perspectives and experiences of Dutch multiple sclerosis patients and multiple sclerosis-specialized neurologists on injectable disease-modifying treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Leo H.; Heerings, Marco A.; Jongen, Peter J.; van der Hiele, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The adherence to treatment with injectable disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) in multiple sclerosis (MS) may benefit from adequate information provision and management of expectations. The communication between patients and physicians is very important in this respect. The current study

  9. [Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossermelli, W; Pastor, E H

    1995-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) comprise an important class of medicaments that reduced the symptoms of inflamation in rheumatic disease. This article emphasizes similarities and class characteristics of the NSAID, mechanisms of action, and drug-interactions.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of modified starch/polybutadiene as novel transdermal drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboktakin, Mohammad Reza; Akhyari, Shahab; Nasirov, Fizuli A

    2014-08-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems are topically administered medicaments in the form of patches that deliver drugs for systemic effects at a predetermined and controlled rate. It works very simply in which drug is applied inside the patch and it is worn on skin for long period of time. Polymer matrix, drug, permeation enhancers are the main components of transdermal drug delivery systems. The objective of the present study was to develop the modified starch and 1,4-cis polybutadiene nanoparticles as novel polymer matrix system. We have been studied the properties of a novel transdermal drug delivery system with clonidine as drug model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Hybrid Nanostructures Containing Sulfadiazine Modified Chitosan as Antimicrobial Drug Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanel Silvestru Munteanu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan (CH nanofibrous structures containing sulfadiazine (SDZ or sulfadiazine modified chitosan (SCH in the form of functional nanoparticles attached to nanofibers (hybrid nanostructures were obtained by mono-axial and coaxial electrospinning. The mono-axial design consisted of a SDZ/CH mixture solution fed through a single nozzle while the coaxial design consisted of SCH and CH solutions separately supplied to the inner and outer nozzle (or in reverse order. The CH ability to form nanofibers assured the formation of a nanofiber mesh, while SDZ and SCH, both in form of suspensions in the electrospun solution, assured the formation of active nanoparticles which remained attached to the CH nanofiber mesh after the electrospinning process. The obtained nanostructures were morphologically characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The SDZ release profiles and kinetics were analyzed. The SDZ or SCH nanoparticles loosely attached at the surface of the nanofibers, provide a burst release in the first 20 min, which is important to stop the possible initial infection in a wound, while the SDZ and SCH from the nanoparticles which are better confined (or even encapsulated into the CH nanofibers would be slowly released with the erosion/disruption of the CH nanofiber mesh.

  12. Systematic evaluation of drug-disease relationships to identify leads for novel drug uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, A P; Butte, A J

    2009-11-01

    Drug repositioning refers to the discovery of alternative uses for drugs--uses that are different from that for which the drugs were originally intended. One challenge in this effort lies in choosing the indication for which a drug of interest could be prospectively tested. We systematically evaluated a drug treatment-based view of diseases in order to address this challenge. Suggestions for novel drug uses were generated using a "guilt by association" approach. When compared with a control group of drug uses, the suggested novel drug uses generated by this approach were significantly enriched with respect to previous and ongoing clinical trials.

  13. Issues surrounding orphan disease and orphan drug policies in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Alain; Mergaert, Lut; Fostier, Christel; Cleemput, Irina; Simoens, Steven

    2010-01-01

    An orphan disease is a disease with a very low prevalence. Although there are 5000-7000 orphan diseases, only 50 orphan drugs (i.e. drugs developed to treat orphan diseases) were marketed in the EU by the end of 2008. In 2000, the EU implemented policies specifically designed to stimulate the development of orphan drugs. While decisions on orphan designation and the marketing authorization of orphan drugs are made at the EU level, decisions on drug reimbursement are made at the member state level. The specific features of orphan diseases and orphan drugs make them a high-priority issue for policy makers. The aim of this article is to identify and discuss several issues surrounding orphan disease and drug policies in Europe. The present system of orphan designation allows for drugs for non-orphan diseases to be designated as orphan drugs. The economic factors underlying orphan designation can be questioned in some cases, as a low prevalence of a certain indication does not equal a low return on investment for the drug across its indications. High-quality evidence about the clinical added value of orphan drugs is rarely available at the time of marketing authorization, due to the low number of patients. A balance must be struck between ethical and economic concerns. To this effect, there is a need to initiate a societal dialogue on this issue, to clarify what society wants and accepts in terms of ethical and economic consequences. The growing budgetary impact of orphan drugs puts pressure on drug expenditure. Indications can be extended for an orphan drug and the total prevalence across indications is not considered. Finally, cooperation needs to be fostered in the EU, particularly through a standardized approach to the creation and use of registries. These issues require further attention from researchers, policy makers, health professionals, patients, pharmaceutical companies and other stakeholders with a view to optimizing orphan disease and drug policies in

  14. Orphan diseases: state of the drug discovery art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volmar, Claude-Henry; Wahlestedt, Claes; Brothers, Shaun P

    2017-06-01

    Since 1983 more than 300 drugs have been developed and approved for orphan diseases. However, considering the development of novel diagnosis tools, the number of rare diseases vastly outpaces therapeutic discovery. Academic centers and nonprofit institutes are now at the forefront of rare disease R&D, partnering with pharmaceutical companies when academic researchers discover novel drugs or targets for specific diseases, thus reducing the failure risk and cost for pharmaceutical companies. Considerable progress has occurred in the art of orphan drug discovery, and a symbiotic relationship now exists between pharmaceutical industry, academia, and philanthropists that provides a useful framework for orphan disease therapeutic discovery. Here, the current state-of-the-art of drug discovery for orphan diseases is reviewed. Current technological approaches and challenges for drug discovery are considered, some of which can present somewhat unique challenges and opportunities in orphan diseases, including the potential for personalized medicine, gene therapy, and phenotypic screening.

  15. Epidemiology, classification, and modifiable risk factors of peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas W Shammas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas W ShammasMidwest Cardiovascular Research Foundation, Cardiovascular Medicine, PC, Davenport, IA, USAAbstract: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is part of a global vascular problem of diffuse atherosclerosis. PAD patients die mostly of cardiac and cerebrovascular-related events and much less frequently due to obstructive disease of the lower extremities. Aggressive risk factors modification is needed to reduce cardiac mortality in PAD patients. These include smoking cessation, reduction of blood pressure to current guidelines, aggressive low density lipoprotein lowering, losing weight, controlling diabetes and the use of oral antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin or clopidogrel. In addition to quitting smoking and exercise, cilostazol and statins have been shown to reduce claudication in patients with PAD. Patients with critical rest limb ischemia or severe progressive claudication need to be treated with revascularization to minimize the chance of limb loss, reduce symptoms, and improve quality of life.Keywords: peripheral arterial disease, epidemiology, risk factors, classification

  16. Guidance for Modifying the Definition of Diseases: A Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doust, Jenny; Vandvik, Per O; Qaseem, Amir; Mustafa, Reem A; Horvath, Andrea R; Frances, Allen; Al-Ansary, Lubna; Bossuyt, Patrick; Ward, Robyn L; Kopp, Ina; Gollogly, Laragh; Schunemann, Holger; Glasziou, Paul

    2017-07-01

    No guidelines exist currently for guideline panels and others considering changes to disease definitions. Panels frequently widen disease definitions, increasing the proportion of the population labeled as unwell and potentially causing harm to patients. We set out to develop a checklist of issues, with guidance, for panels to consider prior to modifying a disease definition. We assembled a multidisciplinary, multicontinent working group of 13 members, including members from the Guidelines International Network, Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation working group, and the World Health Organisation. We used a 5-step process to develop the checklist: (1) a literature review of issues, (2) a draft outline document, (3) a Delphi process of feedback on the list of issues, (4) a 1-day face-to-face meeting, and (5) further refinement of the checklist. The literature review identified 12 potential issues. From these, the group developed an 8-item checklist that consisted of definition changes, number of people affected, trigger, prognostic ability, disease definition precision and accuracy, potential benefits, potential harms, and the balance between potential harms and benefits. The checklist is accompanied by an explanation of each item and the types of evidence to assess each one. We used a panel's recent consideration of a proposed change in the definition of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) to illustrate use of the checklist. We propose that the checklist be piloted and validated by groups developing new guidelines. We anticipate that the use of the checklist will be a first step to guidance and better documentation of definition changes prior to introducing modified disease definitions.

  17. [Application of fuzzy mathematics on modifying taste of oral solution of traditional Chinese drug].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youjie; Feng, Yi; Zhang, Bo

    2009-01-01

    To apply Fuzzy mathematical methods to choose the best taste modifying prescription of oral solution of traditional Chinese drug. Jin-Fukang oral solution was used as a model drug. The oral solution was prepared in different taste modifying prescriptions, whose tastes were evaluated by the fuzzy quality synthetic evaluation system. Compound-sweeteners with Sucralose and Erythritol was the best choice. Fuzzy integrated evaluation can be used to evaluate the taste of traditional Chinese medicinal pharmaceuticals, which overcame the artificial factors and achieve more objective conclusion.

  18. Modified local diatomite as potential functional drug carrier--A model study for diclofenac sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janićijević, Jelena; Krajišnik, Danina; Čalija, Bojan; Vasiljević, Bojana Nedić; Dobričić, Vladimir; Daković, Aleksandra; Antonijević, Milan D; Milić, Jela

    2015-12-30

    Diatomite makes a promising candidate for a drug carrier because of its high porosity, large surface area, modifiable surface chemistry and biocompatibility. Herein, refined diatomite from Kolubara coal basin, which complied with the pharmacopoeial requirements for heavy metals content and microbiological quality, was used as a starting material. Inorganic modification of the starting material was performed through a simple, one-step procedure. Significant increase in adsorbent loading with diclofenac sodium (DS) was achieved after the modification process (∼373mg/g) which enabled the preparation of comprimates containing therapeutic dose of the adsorbed drug. Adsorption of DS onto modified diatomite resulted in the alteration of the drug's XRD pattern and FTIR spectrum. In vitro drug release studies in phosphate buffer pH 7.5 demonstrated prolonged DS release over 8h from comprimates containing DS adsorbed on modified diatomite (up to 37% after 8h) and those containing physical mixture of the same composition (up to 45% after 8h). The results of in vivo toxicity testing on mice pointed on potential safety of both unmodified (starting) and modified diatomite. All these findings favor the application of diatomite as a potential functional drug carrier. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Drug Repositioning: An Opportunity to Develop Novel Treatments for Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive Ballard

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s Disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia, affecting approximately two thirds of the 35 million people worldwide with the condition. Despite this, effective treatments are lacking, and there are no drugs that elicit disease modifying effects to improve outcome. There is an urgent need to develop and evaluate more effective pharmacological treatments. Drug repositioning offers an exciting opportunity to repurpose existing licensed treatments for use in AD, with the benefit of providing a far more rapid route to the clinic than through novel drug discovery approaches. This review outlines the current most promising candidates for repositioning in AD, their supporting evidence and their progress through trials to date. Furthermore, it begins to explore the potential of new transcriptomic and microarray techniques to consider the future of drug repositioning as a viable approach to drug discovery.

  20. Modifiable Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Indigenous Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam A. Lucero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify modifiable cardio-metabolic and lifestyle risk factors among indigenous populations from Australia (Aboriginal Australians/Torres Strait Islanders, New Zealand (Māori, and the United States (American Indians and Alaska Natives that contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD. Methods. National health surveys were identified where available. Electronic databases identified sources for filling missing data. The most relevant data were identified, organized, and synthesized. Results. Compared to their non-indigenous counterparts, indigenous populations exhibit lower life expectancies and a greater prevalence of CVD. All indigenous populations have higher rates of obesity and diabetes, hypertension is greater for Māori and Aboriginal Australians, and high cholesterol is greater only among American Indians/Alaska Natives. In turn, all indigenous groups exhibit higher rates of smoking and dangerous alcohol behaviour as well as consuming less fruits and vegetables. Aboriginal Australians and American Indians/Alaska Natives also exhibit greater rates of sedentary behaviour. Conclusion. Indigenous groups from Australia, New Zealand, and the United States have a lower life expectancy then their respective non-indigenous counterparts. A higher prevalence of CVD is a major driving force behind this discrepancy. A cluster of modifiable cardio-metabolic risk factors precede CVD, which, in turn, is linked to modifiable lifestyle risk factors.

  1. 77 FR 59930 - Clinical Development Programs for Disease-Modifying Agents for Peripheral Neuropathy; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ...] Clinical Development Programs for Disease-Modifying Agents for Peripheral Neuropathy; Public Workshop... to the clinical development of disease-modifying agents for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy... disease-modifying products for the management of peripheral neuropathy. Date and Time: The public workshop...

  2. Applying genetics in inflammatory disease drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkersen, Lasse; Biswas, Shameek; Frederiksen, Klaus Stensgaard

    2015-01-01

    , with several notable exceptions, the journey from a small-effect genetic variant to a functional drug has proven arduous, and few examples of actual contributions to drug discovery exist. Here, we discuss novel approaches of overcoming this hurdle by using instead public genetics resources as a pragmatic guide...... alongside existing drug discovery methods. Our aim is to evaluate human genetic confidence as a rationale for drug target selection....

  3. Modeling the modified drug release from curved shape drug delivery systems - Dome Matrix®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccavo, D; Barba, A A; d'Amore, M; De Piano, R; Lamberti, G; Rossi, A; Colombo, P

    2017-12-01

    The controlled drug release from hydrogel-based drug delivery systems is a topic of large interest for research in pharmacology. The mathematical modeling of the behavior of these systems is a tool of emerging relevance, since the simulations can be of use in the design of novel systems, in particular for complex shaped tablets. In this work a model, previously developed, was applied to complex-shaped oral drug delivery systems based on hydrogels (Dome Matrix®). Furthermore, the model was successfully adopted in the description of drug release from partially accessible Dome Matrix® systems (systems with some surfaces coated). In these simulations, the erosion rate was used asa fitting parameter, and its dependence upon the surface area/volume ratio and upon the local fluid dynamics was discussed. The model parameters were determined by comparison with the drug release profile from a cylindrical tablet, then the model was successfully used for the prediction of the drug release from a Dome Matrix® system, for simple module configuration and for module assembled (void and piled) configurations. It was also demonstrated that, given the same initial S/V ratio, the drug release is independent upon the shape of the tablets but it is only influenced by the S/V evolution. The model reveals itself able to describe the observed phenomena, and thus it can be of use for the design of oral drug delivery systems, even if complex shaped. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. New FDA-Approved Disease-Modifying Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Clayton; Aloi, Joseph J

    2015-04-01

    Interferon injectables and glatiramer acetate have served as the primary disease-modifying treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS) since their introduction in the 1990s and are first-line treatments for relapsing-remitting forms of MS (RRMS). Many new drug therapies were launched since early 2010, expanding the drug treatment options considerably in a disease state that once had a limited treatment portfolio. The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate the safety profile and efficacy data of disease-modifying agents for MS approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) from 2010 to the present and provide cost and available pharmacoeconomic data about each new treatment. Peer-reviewed clinical trials, pharmacoeconomic studies, and relevant pharmacokinetic/pharmacologic studies were identified from MEDLINE (January 2000-December 2014) by using the search terms multiple sclerosis, fingolimod, teriflunomide, alemtuzumab, dimethyl fumarate, pegylated interferon, peginterferon beta-1a, glatiramer 3 times weekly, and pharmacoeconomics. Citations from available articles were also reviewed for additional references. The databases publically available at www.clinicaltrials.gov and www.fda.gov were searched for unpublished studies or studies currently in progress. A total of 5 new agents and 1 new dosage formulation were approved by the FDA for the treatment of RRMS since 2010. Peginterferon beta-1a and high-dose glatiramer acetate represent 2 new effective injectable options for MS that reduce burden of administration seen with traditional interferon and low-dose glatiramer acetate. Fingolimod, teriflunomide, and dimethyl fumarate represent new oral agents available for MS, and their efficacy in reducing annualized relapse rates is 48% to 55%, 22% to 36.3%, and 44% to 53%, respectively, compared with placebo. Alemtuzumab is a biologic given over a 2-year span that reduced annualized relapse rates by 55% in treatment-naive patients and by 49% in patients

  5. Clinical Trials for Disease-Modifying Therapies in Alzheimer's Disease: A Primer, Lessons Learned, and a Blueprint for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Ritter, Aaron; Zhong, Kate

    2018-03-16

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has no currently approved disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), and treatments to prevent, delay the onset, or slow the progression are urgently needed. A delay of 5 years if available by 2025 would decrease the total number of patients with AD by 50% in 2050. To meet the definition of DMT, an agent must produce an enduring change in the course of AD; clinical trials of DMTs have the goal of demonstrating this effect. AD drug discovery entails target identification followed by high throughput screening and lead optimization of drug-like compounds. Once an optimized agent is available and has been assessed for efficacy and toxicity in animals, it progresses through Phase I testing with healthy volunteers, Phase II learning trials to establish proof-of-mechanism and dose, and Phase III confirmatory trials to demonstrate efficacy and safety in larger populations. Phase III is followed by Food and Drug Administration review and, if appropriate, market access. Trial populations include cognitively normal at-risk participants in prevention trials, mildly impaired participants with biomarker evidence of AD in prodromal AD trials, and subjects with cognitive and functional impairment in AD dementia trials. Biomarkers are critical in trials of DMTs, assisting in participant characterization and diagnosis, target engagement and proof-of-pharmacology, demonstration of disease-modification, and monitoring side effects. Clinical trial designs include randomized, parallel group; delayed start; staggered withdrawal; and adaptive. Lessons learned from completed trials inform future trials and increase the likelihood of success.

  6. Pharmaceutical cocrystals as an opportunity to modify drug properties: From the idea to application. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, Agnieszka; Pindelska, Edyta

    2017-12-26

    The properties of many drugs which have been available on the pharmaceutical market for a long time still need to be improved. Cocrystals are the solid state drug modification which can improve such properties as low solubility, stability and mechanical properties (e.g. compressibility). In this paper examples how to use cocrystals to modify properties of API (Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient) will be reported. Additionally, in this review the way from an idea of the new cocrystal to drug dosage form registration will be shortly described. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Temperament and character modify risk of drug addiction and influence choice of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milivojevic, Dragan; Milovanovic, Srdjan D; Jovanovic, Minja; Svrakic, Dragan M; Svrakic, Nenad M; Svrakic, Slobodan M; Cloninger, C Robert

    2012-01-01

    Drug addiction and alcoholism involve a complex etiopathogenesis with a variable degree of risk contributions from the host (person), environment, and addictive substances. In this work, temperament and character features of individuals addicted to opiates or alcohol are compared with normal controls to study personality factors in the overall risk for drug addiction. The study was done in a permissive environment, with easy access to alcohol and heroin, which facilitated analyses of personality factors in drug choice. Participants included 412 consecutive patients (312 opiate addicts, 100 alcohol addicts) treated at the Specialized Hospital for Chemical Dependency in Belgrade, Serbia, and a community sample of 346 controls. Opiate addicts manifested antisocial temperament configuration (high Novelty Seeking, low Reward Dependence) coupled with high Self-transcendence (ie, susceptibility to fantasy and imagination). Alcohol addicts manifested sensitive temperament configuration (high Novelty Seeking coexisting with high Harm Avoidance). Immature personality was observed far more frequently in opiate addicts than in alcoholics or normals. Novelty Seeking appears to be a general risk factor for drug addiction. High Harm Avoidance appears to channel individuals with high Novelty Seeking towards alcoholism. Immature character traits and probable Personality Disorder increase the risk of illegal drugs. Based on equivalent research in nonpermissive environments, at least a portion of our opiate addicts could have developed alcoholism instead in environments with more limited access to opiates. Personality factors provide useful guidelines for preventive work with young individuals with personality risk factors for drug addiction. Copyright © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  8. Electrochemical determination of xanthine oxidase inhibitor drug in urate lowering therapy using graphene nanosheets modified electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, M. Amal; John, S. Abraham

    2014-01-01

    We report the electrochemical determination of urate lowering therapeutic drug, allopurinol (AP) using the electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The ERGO modified GCE was fabricated by self–assembling graphene oxide (GO) on 1,6-hexadiamine (HDA) modified GCE by the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged amine group and the negatively charged GO layers followed by the electrochemical reduction of GO layers at negative potential. XPS results confirmed the attachment of GO and its electrochemical reduction. The electrochemical behavior of AP was examined at ERGO modified electrode in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA). It was found that ERGO modified electrode not only enhanced the oxidation currents of AP, AA and UA but also showed stable signals for them for repetitive potential cycles. The present modified electrode was successfully used to determine these analytes simultaneously in a mixture. Selective determination of AP in the presence of high concentrations of AA and UA was also demonstrated at ERGO modified GCE. Using amperometry, detections of 40 and 200 nM of UA and AP were achieved and the detection limits were found to be 9.0 × 10 −9 M and 1.1 × 10 −7 M, respectively (S/N = 3). Further, the practical application of the present modified electrode was demonstrated by simultaneously determining the concentrations of AA, UA and AP in human blood serum and urine samples

  9. Piezosurgery in Modified Pterional Orbital Decompression Surgery in Graves Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauvogel, Juergen; Scheiwe, Christian; Masalha, Waseem; Jarc, Nadja; Grauvogel, Tanja; Beringer, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Piezosurgery uses microvibrations to selectively cut bone, preserving the adjacent soft tissue. The present study evaluated the use of piezosurgery for bone removal in orbital decompression surgery in Graves disease via a modified pterional approach. A piezosurgical device (Piezosurgery medical) was used in 14 patients (20 orbits) with Graves disease who underwent orbital decompression surgery in additional to drills and rongeurs for bone removal of the lateral orbital wall and orbital roof. The practicability, benefits, and drawbacks of this technique in orbital decompression surgery were recorded. Piezosurgery was evaluated with respect to safety, preciseness of bone cutting, and preservation of the adjacent dura and periorbita. Preoperative and postoperative clinical outcome data were assessed. The orbital decompression surgery was successful in all 20 orbits, with good clinical outcomes and no postoperative complications. Piezosurgery proved to be a safe tool, allowing selective bone cutting with no damage to the surrounding soft tissue structures. However, there were disadvantages concerning the intraoperative handling in the narrow space and the efficiency of bone removal was limited in the orbital decompression surgery compared with drills. Piezosurgery proved to be a useful tool in bone removal for orbital decompression in Graves disease. It is safe and easy to perform, without any danger of damage to adjacent tissue because of its selective bone-cutting properties. Nonetheless, further development of the device is necessary to overcome the disadvantages in intraoperative handling and the reduced bone removal rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. One For All? Hitting multiple Alzheimer’s Disease targets with one drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Ellen Hughes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease is a complex and multifactorial disease for which the mechanism is still not fully understood. As new insights into disease progression are discovered, new drugs must be designed to target those aspects of the disease that cause neuronal damage rather than just the symptoms currently addressed by single target drugs. It is becoming possible to target several aspects of the disease pathology at once using multi-target drugs. Intended as a introduction for non-experts, this review describes the key multi-target drug design approaches, namely structure-based, in silico, and data-mining, to evaluate what is preventing compounds progressing through the clinic to the market. Repurposing current drugs using their off-target effects reduces the cost of development, time to launch and also the uncertainty associated with safety and pharmacokinetics. The most promising drugs currently being investigated for repurposing to Alzheimer’s Disease are rasagiline, originally developed for the treatment of Parkinson’s Disease, and liraglutide, an antidiabetic. Rational drug design can combine pharmacophores of multiple drugs, systematically change functional groups, and rank them by virtual screening. Hits confirmed experimentally are rationally modified to generate an effective multi-potent lead compound. Examples from this approach are ASS234 with properties similar to rasagiline, and donecopride, a hybrid of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and a 5-HT4 receptor agonist with pro-cognitive effects. Exploiting these interdisciplinary approaches, public-private collaborative lead factories promise faster delivery of new drugs to the clinic.

  11. Pharmacogenomics to Revive Drug Development in Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Marie-Pierre; de Denus, Simon; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2016-02-01

    Investment in cardiovascular drug development is on the decline as large cardiovascular outcomes trials require considerable investments in time, efforts and financial resources. Pharmacogenomics has the potential to help revive the cardiovascular drug development pipeline by providing new and better drug targets at an earlier stage and by enabling more efficient outcomes trials. This article will review some of the recent developments highlighting the value of pharmacogenomics for drug development. We discuss how genetic biomarkers can enable the conduct of more efficient clinical outcomes trials by enriching patient populations for good responders to the medication. In addition, we assess past drug development programs which support the added value of selecting drug targets that have established genetic evidence supporting the targeted mechanism of disease. Finally, we discuss how pharmacogenomics can provide valuable evidence linking a drug target to clinically relevant outcomes, enabling novel drug discovery and drug repositioning opportunities.

  12. An overview of the biological disease modifying drugs available for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    transcription factors AP-1 and NF-κB to the cell nucleus, as shown in Figure ... of naïve T cells requires the CD80/86 costimulatory molecules on .... arthritis: abridged Cochrane systematic review and network meta-analysis. Br ... N. Engl J Med.

  13. Real-life experience of using conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Retrospective analysis of the efficacy of methotrexate, sulfasalazine, and leflunomide in PsA in comparison to spondyloarthritides other than PsA and literature review of the use of conventional DMARDs in PsA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussou, Euthalia; Bouraoui, Aicha

    2017-01-01

    Objective With the aim of assessing the response to treatment with conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) used in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), data on methotrexate, sulfasalazine (SSZ), and leflunomide were analyzed from baseline and subsequent follow-up (FU) questionnaires completed by patients with either PsA or other spondyloarthritides (SpAs). Material and Methods A single-center real-life retrospective analysis was performed by obtaining clinical data via questionnaires administered before and after treatment. The indices used were erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP) level, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Function Index (BASFI), wellbeing (WB), and treatment effect (TxE). The indices measured at baseline were compared with those measured on one occasion in a FU visit at least 1 year later. Results A total of 73 patients, 51 with PsA (mean age 49.8±12.8 years; male-to-female ratio [M:F]=18:33) and 22 with other SpAs (mean age 50.6±16 years; M:F=2:20), were studied. BASDAI, BASFI, and WB displayed consistent improvements during FU assessments in both PsA patients and controls in comparison to baseline values. SSZ exhibited better efficacy as confirmed by TxE in both PsA patients and controls. ESR and CRP displayed no differences in either the PsA or the SpA group between the cases before and after treatment. Conclusion Real-life retrospective analysis of three DMARDs used in PsA (and SpAs other than PsA) demonstrated that all three DMARDs that were used brought about improvements in BASDAI, BASFI, TxE, and WB. However, the greatest improvements at FU were seen with SSZ use in both PsA and control cohorts. PMID:28293446

  14. Development of Drug Loaded Nanoparticles Binding to Hydroxyapatite Based on a Bisphosphonate Modified Nonionic Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiabin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at development of drug loaded nanoparticles which could bind to hydroxyapatite (HA to construct drug or growth factor releasing bone graft substitutes. To this end, the terminal hydroxyl group of a nonionic surfactant Brij 78 (polyoxyethylene (20 stearyl ether was first modified with pamidronate (Pa. Using Pa-Brij 78 as both a surfactant and an affinity ligand to HA, three different Pa surface functionalized nanoparticles were prepared, named as solid lipid nanoparticles (Pa-SNPs, nanoemulsions (Pa-NEMs, and PLGA nanoparticles (Pa-PNPs. A model drug curcumin was successfully encapsulated in the three nanoparticles. The sizes of Pa-NEM and Pa-PNP were around 150 nm and the size of Pa-SNP was around 90 nm with polydispersity indexes (PDIs less than 0.20. Drug encapsulation efficiencies of the three nanoparticles were all greater than 85%. Furthermore, the order of binding affinity of the nanoparticles to HA was Pa-PNP>Pa-NEM=Pa-SNP. After lyophilization, the sizes of the three nanoparticles were increased about 0.5–2.0-fold but their binding affinities to HA were almost the same as the fresh prepared nanoparticles. In conclusion, a Pa-modified Brij 78 was synthesized and used for fabrication of a series of drug loaded nanoparticles to construct drug-eluting HA-based bone graft substitutes.

  15. Reduced or modified dietary fat for preventing cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Hooper

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Reduction and modification of dietary fats have differing effects on cardiovascular risk factors (such as serum cholesterol, but their effects on important health outcomes are less clear. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of reduction and/or modification of dietary fats on mortality, cardiovascular mortality, cardiovascular morbidity and individual outcomes including myocardial infarction, stroke and cancer diagnoses in randomised clinical trials of at least 6 months duration. METHODS: Search methods: For this review update, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Medline and Embase, were searched through to June 2010. References of Included studies and reviews were also checked. Selection criteria: Trials fulfilled the following criteria: 1 randomized with appropriate control group, 2 intention to reduce or modify fat or cholesterol intake (excluding exclusively omega-3 fat interventions, 3 not multi factorial, 4 adult humans with or without cardiovascular disease, 5 intervention at least six months, 6 mortality or cardiovascular morbidity data available. Data collection and analysis: Participant numbers experiencing health outcomes in each arm were extracted independently in duplicate and random effects meta-analyses, meta-regression, sub-grouping, sensitivity analyses and funnel plots were performed. MAIN RESULTS: This updated review suggested that reducing saturated fat by reducing and/or modifying dietary fat reduced the risk of cardiovascular events by 14% (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.77 to 0.96, 24 comparisons, 65,508 participants of whom 7% had a cardiovascular event, I2 50%. Subgrouping suggested that this reduction in cardiovascular events was seen in studies of fat modification (not reduction - which related directly to the degree of effect on serum total and LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, of at least two years duration and in studies of men (not of women. There were no clear effects of dietary fat

  16. Reduced or modified dietary fat for preventing cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Lee; Summerbell, Carolyn D; Thompson, Rachel; Sills, Deirdre; Roberts, Felicia G; Moore, Helen; Smith, George Davey

    2014-01-01

    Background Reduction and modification of dietary fats have differing effects on cardiovascular risk factors (such as serum cholesterol), but their effects on important health outcomes are less clear. Objectives To assess the effect of reduction and/or modification of dietary fats on mortality, cardiovascular mortality, cardiovascular morbidity and individual outcomes including myocardial infarction, stroke and cancer diagnoses in randomised clinical trials of at least 6 months duration. Search methods For this review update, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE, were searched through to June 2010. References of Included studies and reviews were also checked. Selection criteria Trials fulfilled the following criteria: 1) randomised with appropriate control group, 2) intention to reduce or modify fat or cholesterol intake (excluding exclusively omega-3 fat interventions), 3) not multi factorial, 4) adult humans with or without cardiovascular disease, 5) intervention at least six months, 6) mortality or cardiovascular morbidity data available. Data collection and analysis Participant numbers experiencing health outcomes in each arm were extracted independently in duplicate and random effects meta-analyses, meta-regression, sub-grouping, sensitivity analyses and funnel plots were performed. Main results This updated review suggested that reducing saturated fat by reducing and/or modifying dietary fat reduced the risk of cardiovascular events by 14% (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.77 to 0.96, 24 comparisons, 65,508 participants of whom 7% had a cardiovascular event, I2 50%). Subgrouping suggested that this reduction in cardiovascular events was seen in studies of fat modification (not reduction - which related directly to the degree of effect on serum total and LDL cholesterol and triglycerides), of at least two years duration and in studies of men (not of women). There were no clear effects of dietary fat changes on total mortality (RR 0

  17. Public acceptance of drug use for non-disease conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Claus; Hansen, Rikke Rie

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article deals with the issue of ordinary healthy people using drugs to improve or enhance non-disease conditions. The objective is to illuminate the extent of public acceptance of this practice. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The results are based on two studies: a classically...... of drugs for non-disease conditions. Men in particular look favourably on the use of drugs by healthy individuals. People with less education find this type of drug use unacceptable to a greater extent than those with more education, who are more positive. If we look at political affiliation, a pattern...

  18. Determination of drug lipophilicity by phosphatidylcholine-modified microemulsion high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Xueyi; Xu, Liyuan; Li, Liangxing; Gao, Chongkai; Li, Ning

    2015-07-25

    A new biomembrane-mimetic liquid chromatographic method using a C8 stationary phase and phosphatidylcholine-modified (PC-modified) microemulsion mobile phase was used to estimate unionized and ionized drugs lipophilicity expressed as an n-octanol/water partition coefficient (logP and logD). The introduction of PC into sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) microemulsion yielded a good correlation between logk and logD (R(2)=0.8). The optimal composition of the PC-modified microemulsion liquid chromatography (PC-modified MELC) mobile phase was 0.2% PC-3.0% SDS-6.0% n-butanol-0.8% ethyl acetate-90.0% water (pH 7.0) for neutral and ionized molecules. The interactions between the analytes and system described by this chromatographic method is more similar to biological membrane than the n-octanol/water partition system. The result in this paper suggests that PC-modified MELC can serve as a possible alternative to the shake-flask method for high-throughput unionized and ionized drugs lipophilicity determination and simulation of biological processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Drug therapy for gastrointestinal and liver diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ballinger, Anne; Farthing, M. J. G. (Michael J. G.)

    2001-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Peptic ulcer disease Erik AJ Rauws, Guido NJ Tytgat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Emesis Gareth J Sanger, Paul LR Andrews...

  20. Microbiome and metabolome modifying effects of several cardiovascular disease interventions in apo-E-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Paul M; London, Lis E E; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Mandal, Rupasri; Murphy, Kiera; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Shanahan, Fergus; Ross, R Paul; Wishart, David S; Caplice, Noel M; Stanton, Catherine

    2017-03-13

    There is strong evidence indicating that gut microbiota have the potential to modify, or be modified by the drugs and nutritional interventions that we rely upon. This study aims to characterize the compositional and functional effects of several nutritional, neutraceutical, and pharmaceutical cardiovascular disease interventions on the gut microbiome, through metagenomic and metabolomic approaches. Apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice were fed for 24 weeks either high-fat/cholesterol diet alone (control, HFC) or high-fat/cholesterol in conjunction with one of three dietary interventions, as follows: plant sterol ester (PSE), oat β-glucan (OBG) and bile salt hydrolase-active Lactobacillus reuteri APC 2587 (BSH), or the drug atorvastatin (STAT). The gut microbiome composition was then investigated, in addition to the host fecal and serum metabolome. We observed major shifts in the composition of the gut microbiome of PSE mice, while OBG and BSH mice displayed more modest fluctuations, and STAT showed relatively few alterations. Interestingly, these compositional effects imparted by PSE were coupled with an increase in acetate and reduction in isovalerate (p metabolome, including alterations in several acylcarnitines previously associated with a state of metabolic dysfunction (p < 0.05). We observed functional alterations in microbial and host-derived metabolites, which may have important implications for systemic metabolic health, suggesting that cardiovascular disease interventions may have a significant impact on the microbiome composition and functionality. This study indicates that the gut microbiome-modifying effects of novel therapeutics should be considered, in addition to the direct host effects.

  1. Glycogen storage disease type III: modified Atkins diet improves myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorandan, Sebene; Meyer, Uta; Hartmann, Hans; Das, Anibh Martin

    2014-11-28

    Frequent feeds with carbohydrate-rich meals or continuous enteral feeding has been the therapy of choice in glycogen storage disease (Glycogenosis) type III. Recent guidelines on diagnosis and management recommend frequent feedings with high complex carbohydrates or cornstarch avoiding fasting in children, while in adults a low-carb-high-protein-diet is recommended. While this regimen can prevent hypoglycaemia in children it does not improve skeletal and heart muscle function, which are compromised in patients with glycogenosis IIIa. Administration of carbohydrates may elicit reactive hyperinsulinism, resulting in suppression of lipolysis, ketogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and activation of glycogen synthesis. Thus, heart and skeletal muscle are depleted of energy substrates. Modified Atkins diet leads to increased blood levels of ketone bodies and fatty acids. We hypothesize that this health care intervention improves the energetic balance of muscles. We treated 2 boys with glycogenosis IIIa aged 9 and 11 years with a modified Atkins diet (10 g carbohydrate per day, protein and fatty acids ad libitum) over a period of 32 and 26 months, respectively. In both patients, creatine kinase levels in blood dropped in response to Atkins diet. When diet was withdrawn in one of the patients he complained of chest pain, reduced physical strength and creatine kinase levels rapidly increased. This was reversed when Atkins diet was reintroduced. One patient suffered from severe cardiomyopathy which significantly improved under diet. Patients with glycogenosis IIIa benefit from an improved energetic state of heart and skeletal muscle by introduction of Atkins diet both on a biochemical and clinical level. Apart from transient hypoglycaemia no serious adverse effects were observed.

  2. Can Patients with Cardiovascular Disease Take Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Can Patients With Cardiovascular Disease Take Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs? ... It also does not upset the gastrointestinal tract. Can People With CVD Take an NSAID? If you ...

  3. Investigation of Fatty Acid Ketohydrazone Modified Liposome’s Properties as a Drug Carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Hayashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available pH-responsive liposomes were prepared by modifying the liposome with acid-cleaving amphiphiles. Palmitic ketohydrazone (P-KH or stearic ketohydrazone (S-KH, composed of hydrophilic sugar headgroup and hydrophobic acyl chain, was used as a modifier of the DMPC liposome. Because the ketohydrazone group of P-KH or S-KH was cleaved at low pH conditions (modified liposomes was observed probably via an endocytic pathway. The membrane properties of these liposomes were characterized, focusing on the variation of both polarity (measured by Laurdan and membrane fluidity (measured by DPH at low pH condition. The interface of the P-KH modified liposome at acidic pH was found to become more hydrophobic and less fluidic as compared with that at neutral pH; that is, P-KH modified liposome became more rigid structure. Therefore, it seems that the P-KH modified liposome could protect encapsulated drugs from the enzymes in the lysosome. This study shows the novel approach about design of pH-responsive liposomes based on the membrane properties.

  4. Electrochemical studies of ropinirole, an anti-Parkinson's disease drug

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The oxidation behaviour of a potent anti-Parkinson's disease drug ropinirole hydrochloride was investigated over a wide pH range in aqueous solution at glassy carbon electrode using cyclic and square-wave voltammetry. The oxidation of drug is a pH dependent irreversible process and occurs in two steps.

  5. Hemostimulating efficiency of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs under modified irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhvoronkov, L.P.; Sklobovskaya, I.Eh.

    1988-01-01

    Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) were found to have hemostimulating effect in mice after irradiation. This effect was rather definite under irradiation conditions modified by dose fractioning or radioprotective chemicals. NSAID application during fractionated irradiation with midlethal integral dose leads to almost complete recovery of bone marrow hemopoiesis by the 9th day of radiation illness. NSAID usage combined with chemical radioprotectors provides effective hemopoiesis stimulation leading to survival increase in animals, irradiated with absolutely lethal doses. (author)

  6. Magnetic silica hybrids modified with guanidine containing co-polymers for drug delivery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timin, Alexander S., E-mail: a_timin@mail.ru [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Ivanovo State University of Chemistry and Technology (ISUCT), 7, Sheremetevsky prosp., 153000 Ivanovo (Russian Federation); RASA Center in Tomsk, Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Avenue, 634500 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Khashirova, Svetlana Yu. [Kabardino-Balkar State University, ul. Chernyshevskogo 173, Nal' chik, 360004 Kabardino-Balkaria (Russian Federation); Rumyantsev, Evgeniy V.; Goncharenko, Alexander A. [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Ivanovo State University of Chemistry and Technology (ISUCT), 7, Sheremetevsky prosp., 153000 Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    Guanidine containing co-polymers grafted onto silica nanoparticles to form core-shell structure were prepared by sol-gel method in the presence of γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. The morphological features for uncoated and coated silica particles have been characterized with scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the polymer coated silicas exhibit spherical morphology with rough polymeric surface covered by γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. The grafting amount of guanidine containing co-polymers evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis was in the range from 17 to 30%. Then, the drug loading properties and cumulative release of silica hybrids modified with guanidine containing co-polymers were evaluated using molsidomine as a model drug. It was shown that after polymer grafting the loading content of molsidomine could reach up to 3.42 ± 0.21 and 2.34 ± 0.14 mg/g respectively. The maximum drug release of molsidomine is achieved at pH 1.6 (approximately 71–75% release at 37 °C), whereas at pH 7.4 drug release is lower (50.4–59.6% release at 37 °C). These results have an important implication that our magneto-controlled silica hybrids modified with guanidine containing co-polymers are promising as drug carriers with controlled behaviour under influence of magnetic field. - Highlights: • Polymer coated silica hybrids containing γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared via sol–gel method. • Polymer grafting influences pH-response and surface properties of final products. • Molsidomine as a model drug was effectively loaded into polymer coated silicas. • The drug loading depends on the nature of grafted polymer and its content.

  7. Electrochemical and DFT study of an anticancer and active anthelmintic drug at carbon nanostructured modified electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghalkhani, Masoumeh; Beheshtian, Javad; Salehi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical response of mebendazole (Meb), an anticancer and effective anthelmintic drug, was investigated using two different carbon nanostructured modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCE). Although, compared to unmodified GCE, both prepared modified electrodes improved the voltammetric response of Meb, the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) modified GCE showed higher sensitivity and stability. Therefore, the CNTs-GCE was chosen as a promising candidate for the further studies. At first, the electrochemical behavior of Meb was studied by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse and square wave voltammetry. A one step reversible, pH-dependent and adsorption-controlled process was revealed for electro-oxidation of Meb. A possible mechanism for the electrochemical oxidation of Meb was proposed. In addition, electronic structure, adsorption energy, band gap, type of interaction and stable configuration of Meb on the surface of functionalized carbon nanotubes were studied by using density functional theory (DFT). Obtained results revealed that Meb is weakly physisorbed on the CNTs and that the electronic properties of the CNTs are not significantly changed. Notably, CNTs could be considered as a suitable modifier for preparation of the modified electrode for Meb analysis. Then, the experimental parameters affecting the electrochemical response of Meb were optimized. Under optimal conditions, high sensitivity (b(Meb) = dI p,a (Meb) / d[Meb] = 19.65 μA μM −1 ), a low detection limit (LOD (Meb) = 19 nM) and a wide linear dynamic range (0.06–3 μM) was resulted for the voltammetric quantification of Meb. - Highlights: • Electrochemical oxidation mechanism of Meb was investigated. • A carbon nanostructure modified electrode was developed for the determination of Meb. • The modified electrode surface was characterized by SEM and impedance studies. • This study provides an effective chemically modified electrode with satisfactory repeatability and reproducibility

  8. Analysis of recent failures of disease modifying therapies in Alzheimer's disease suggesting a new methodology for future studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanatkar, Hamid Reza; Papagiannopoulos, Bill; Grossberg, George Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies and the NIH have invested heavily in a variety of potential disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) but unfortunately all double-blind placebo-controlled Phase III studies of these drugs have failed to show statistically significant results supporting their clinical efficacy on cognitive measures. These negative results are surprising as most of these medications have the capability to impact the biomarkers which are associated with progression of Alzheimer's disease. Areas covered: This contradiction prompted us to review all study phases of Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG), Bapineuzumab, Solanezumab, Avagacestat and Dimebolin to shed more light on these recent failures. We critically analyzed these studies, recommending seven lessons from these failures which should not be overlooked. Expert commentary: We suggest a new methodology for future treatment research in Alzheimer's disease considering early intervention with more focus on cognitive decline as a screening tool, more sophisticated exclusion criteria with more reliance on biomarkers, stratification of subjects based on the rate of cognitive decline aiming less heterogeneity, and a longer study duration with periodic assessment of cognition and activities of daily living during the study and also after a washout period.

  9. Mucoadhesive Cyclodextrin-Modified Thiolated Poly(aspartic acid as a Potential Ophthalmic Drug Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Budai-Szűcs

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Thiolated poly(aspartic acid is known as a good mucoadhesive polymer in aqueous ophthalmic formulations. In this paper, cyclodextrin-modified thiolated poly(aspartic acid was synthesized for the incorporation of prednisolone, a lipophilic ophthalmic drug, in an aqueous in situ gellable mucoadhesive solution. This polymer combines the advantages of cyclodextrins and thiolated polymers. The formation of the cyclodextrin-drug complex in the gels was analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction. The ocular applicability of the polymer was characterized by means of physicochemical, rheological and drug diffusion tests. It was established that the chemical bonding of the cyclodextrin molecule did not affect the complexation of prednisolone, while the polymer solution preserved its in situ gellable and good mucoadhesive characteristics. The chemical immobilization of cyclodextrin modified the diffusion profile of prednisolone and prolonged drug release was observed. The combination of free and immobilized cyclodextrins provided the best release profile because the free complex can diffuse rapidly, while the bonded complex ensures a prolonged action.

  10. Electrocatalytic oxidation of some anti-inflammatory drugs on a nickel hydroxide-modified nickel electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajjizadeh, M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 16315-1618, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jabbari, A. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 16315-1618, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: jabbari@kntu.ac.ir; Heli, H.; Moosavi-Movahedi, A.A. [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haghgoo, S. [Center of Quality Control of Drug, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-12-31

    The electrocatalytic oxidation of several anti-inflammatory drugs (mefenamic acid, diclofenac and indomethacin) was investigated on a nickel hydroxide-modified nickel (NHMN) electrode in alkaline solution. This oxidation process and its kinetics were studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. Voltammetric studies indicated that in the presence of drugs, the anodic peak current of low-valence nickel species increases, followed by a decrease in the corresponding cathodic current. This pattern indicates that drugs were oxidized on the redox mediator immobilized on the electrode surface via an electrocatalytic mechanism. A mechanism based on the electrochemical generation of Ni(III) active sites and their subsequent consumption by drugs was also investigated. The corresponding rate law under the control of charge transfer was developed and kinetic parameters were derived. In this context, the charge-transfer resistance accessible both theoretically and through impedancemetry was used as a criterion. The rate constants of the catalytic oxidation of drugs and the electron-transfer coefficients are reported. A sensitive, simple and time-saving amperometric procedure was developed for the analysis of these drugs in bulk form and for the direct assay of tablets, using the NHMN electrode.

  11. Electrocatalytic oxidation of some anti-inflammatory drugs on a nickel hydroxide-modified nickel electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajjizadeh, M.; Jabbari, A.; Heli, H.; Moosavi-Movahedi, A.A.; Haghgoo, S.

    2007-01-01

    The electrocatalytic oxidation of several anti-inflammatory drugs (mefenamic acid, diclofenac and indomethacin) was investigated on a nickel hydroxide-modified nickel (NHMN) electrode in alkaline solution. This oxidation process and its kinetics were studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. Voltammetric studies indicated that in the presence of drugs, the anodic peak current of low-valence nickel species increases, followed by a decrease in the corresponding cathodic current. This pattern indicates that drugs were oxidized on the redox mediator immobilized on the electrode surface via an electrocatalytic mechanism. A mechanism based on the electrochemical generation of Ni(III) active sites and their subsequent consumption by drugs was also investigated. The corresponding rate law under the control of charge transfer was developed and kinetic parameters were derived. In this context, the charge-transfer resistance accessible both theoretically and through impedancemetry was used as a criterion. The rate constants of the catalytic oxidation of drugs and the electron-transfer coefficients are reported. A sensitive, simple and time-saving amperometric procedure was developed for the analysis of these drugs in bulk form and for the direct assay of tablets, using the NHMN electrode

  12. The systems containing clays and clay minerals from modified drug release: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Luís Alberto de Sousa; Figueiras, Ana; Veiga, Francisco; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; da Silva Filho, Edson Cavalcanti; da Silva Leite, Cleide Maria

    2013-03-01

    Clays are materials commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry, either as ingredients or as active ingredients. It was observed that when they are administered concurrently, they may interact with drugs reducing their absorption. Therefore, such interactions can be used to achieve technological and biopharmaceutical advantages, regarding the control of release. This review summarizes bibliographic (articles) and technological (patents) information on the use of systems containing clays and clay minerals in modified drug delivery. In this area, formulations such natural clay, commercial clay, synthetic clay, composites clay-polymers, nanocomposites clay-polymers, films and hidrogels composites clay-polymers are used to slow/extend or vectorize the release of drugs and consequently they increase their bioavailability. Finally, this review summarizes the fields of technology and biopharmaceutical applications, where clays are applied. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel approach to delayed-start analyses for demonstrating disease-modifying effects in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu-Seifert

    Full Text Available One method for demonstrating disease modification is a delayed-start design, consisting of a placebo-controlled period followed by a delayed-start period wherein all patients receive active treatment. To address methodological issues in previous delayed-start approaches, we propose a new method that is robust across conditions of drug effect, discontinuation rates, and missing data mechanisms. We propose a modeling approach and test procedure to test the hypothesis of noninferiority, comparing the treatment difference at the end of the delayed-start period with that at the end of the placebo-controlled period. We conducted simulations to identify the optimal noninferiority testing procedure to ensure the method was robust across scenarios and assumptions, and to evaluate the appropriate modeling approach for analyzing the delayed-start period. We then applied this methodology to Phase 3 solanezumab clinical trial data for mild Alzheimer's disease patients. Simulation results showed a testing procedure using a proportional noninferiority margin was robust for detecting disease-modifying effects; conditions of high and moderate discontinuations; and with various missing data mechanisms. Using all data from all randomized patients in a single model over both the placebo-controlled and delayed-start study periods demonstrated good statistical performance. In analysis of solanezumab data using this methodology, the noninferiority criterion was met, indicating the treatment difference at the end of the placebo-controlled studies was preserved at the end of the delayed-start period within a pre-defined margin. The proposed noninferiority method for delayed-start analysis controls Type I error rate well and addresses many challenges posed by previous approaches. Delayed-start studies employing the proposed analysis approach could be used to provide evidence of a disease-modifying effect. This method has been communicated with FDA and has been

  14. Pharmacological approaches for Alzheimer's disease: neurotransmitter as drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Atish; Kalra, Jaspreet; Mani, Vasudevan; Ramasamy, Kalavathy; Majeed, Abu Bakar Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common CNS disorder occurring worldwide. There is neither proven effective prevention for AD nor a cure for patients with this disorder. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop safer and more efficacious drugs to help combat the tremendous increase in disease progression. The present review is an attempt at discussing the treatment strategies and drugs under clinical trials governing the modulation of neurotransmitter. Therefore, looking at neurotransmitter abnormalities, there is an urge for developing the pharmacological approaches aimed at correcting those abnormalities and dysfunctioning. In addition, this review also discusses the drugs that are in Phase III trials for the treatment of AD. Despite advances in treatment strategies aimed at correcting neurotransmitter abnormalities, there exists a need for the development of drug therapies focusing on the attempts to remove the pathogenomic protein deposits, thus combating the disease progression.

  15. From research on rare diseases to new orphan drug development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemstra, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Rare diseases have a prevalence of lower than 5 in 10,000 inhabitants and are life-threatening or chronically debilitating. It is estimated that worldwide more than 5000 rare diseases exist, which account for over 55 million patients in the EU and the US together. However, the development of drugs

  16. Serotonergic Drugs and Valvular Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Richard B.; Baumann, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Background The serotonin (5-HT) releasers (±)-fenfluramine and (+)-fenfluramine were withdrawn from clinical use due to increased risk of valvular heart disease. One prevailing hypothesis (i.e., the “5-HT hypothesis”) suggests that fenfluramine-induced increases in plasma 5-HT underlie the disease. Objective Here we critically evaluate the possible mechanisms responsible for fenfluramine-associated valve disease. Methods Findings from in vitro and in vivo experiments performed in our laboratory are reviewed. The data are integrated with existing literature to address the validity of the 5-HT hypothesis and suggest alternative explanations. Conclusions The overwhelming majority of evidence refutes the 5-HT hypothesis. A more likely cause of fenfluramine-induced valvulopathy is activation of 5-HT2B receptors on heart valves by the metabolite norfenfluramine. Future serotonergic medications should be designed to lack 5-HT2B agonist activity. PMID:19505264

  17. Fragment-based drug discovery as alternative strategy to the drug development for neglected diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Juliana da Fonseca Rezende E; Gomes, Renan Augusto; Vital-Fujii, Drielli Gomes; Ferreira, Glaucio Monteiro; Trossini, Gustavo Henrique Goulart

    2017-12-01

    Neglected diseases (NDs) affect large populations and almost whole continents, representing 12% of the global health burden. In contrast, the treatment available today is limited and sometimes ineffective. Under this scenery, the Fragment-Based Drug Discovery emerged as one of the most promising alternatives to the traditional methods of drug development. This method allows achieving new lead compounds with smaller size of fragment libraries. Even with the wide Fragment-Based Drug Discovery success resulting in new effective therapeutic agents against different diseases, until this moment few studies have been applied this approach for NDs area. In this article, we discuss the basic Fragment-Based Drug Discovery process, brief successful ideas of general applications and show a landscape of its use in NDs, encouraging the implementation of this strategy as an interesting way to optimize the development of new drugs to NDs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Structural genomics of infectious disease drug targets: the SSGCID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacy, Robin; Begley, Darren W.; Phan, Isabelle; Staker, Bart L.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Varani, Gabriele; Buchko, Garry W.; Stewart, Lance J.; Myler, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    An introduction and overview of the focus, goals and overall mission of the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) is given. The Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) is a consortium of researchers at Seattle BioMed, Emerald BioStructures, the University of Washington and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory that was established to apply structural genomics approaches to drug targets from infectious disease organisms. The SSGCID is currently funded over a five-year period by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to determine the three-dimensional structures of 400 proteins from a variety of Category A, B and C pathogens. Target selection engages the infectious disease research and drug-therapy communities to identify drug targets, essential enzymes, virulence factors and vaccine candidates of biomedical relevance to combat infectious diseases. The protein-expression systems, purified proteins, ligand screens and three-dimensional structures produced by SSGCID constitute a valuable resource for drug-discovery research, all of which is made freely available to the greater scientific community. This issue of Acta Crystallographica Section F, entirely devoted to the work of the SSGCID, covers the details of the high-throughput pipeline and presents a series of structures from a broad array of pathogenic organisms. Here, a background is provided on the structural genomics of infectious disease, the essential components of the SSGCID pipeline are discussed and a survey of progress to date is presented

  19. Drug Induced Steatohepatitis: An Uncommon Culprit of a Common Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liane Rabinowich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a leading cause of liver disease in developed countries. Its frequency is increasing in the general population mostly due to the widespread occurrence of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Although drugs and dietary supplements are viewed as a major cause of acute liver injury, drug induced steatosis and steatohepatitis are considered a rare form of drug induced liver injury (DILI. The complex mechanism leading to hepatic steatosis caused by commonly used drugs such as amiodarone, methotrexate, tamoxifen, valproic acid, glucocorticoids, and others is not fully understood. It relates not only to induction of the metabolic syndrome by some drugs but also to their impact on important molecular pathways including increased hepatocytes lipogenesis, decreased secretion of fatty acids, and interruption of mitochondrial β-oxidation as well as altered expression of genes responsible for drug metabolism. Better familiarity with this type of liver injury is important for early recognition of drug hepatotoxicity and crucial for preventing severe forms of liver injury and cirrhosis. Moreover, understanding the mechanisms leading to drug induced hepatic steatosis may provide much needed clues to the mechanism and potential prevention of the more common form of metabolic steatohepatitis.

  20. In Silico Chemogenomics Drug Repositioning Strategies for Neglected Tropical Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Carolina Horta; Neves, Bruno Junior; Melo-Filho, Cleber Camilo; Rodrigues, Juliana; Silva, Diego Cabral; Braga, Rodolpho Campos; Cravo, Pedro Vitor Lemos

    2018-03-08

    Only ~1% of all drug candidates against Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) have reached clinical trials in the last decades, underscoring the need for new, safe and effective treatments. In such context, drug repositioning, which allows finding novel indications for approved drugs whose pharmacokinetic and safety profiles are already known, is emerging as a promising strategy for tackling NTDs. Chemogenomics is a direct descendent of the typical drug discovery process that involves the systematic screening of chemical compounds against drug targets in high-throughput screening (HTS) efforts, for the identification of lead compounds. However, different to the one-drug-one-target paradigm, chemogenomics attempts to identify all potential ligands for all possible targets and diseases. In this review, we summarize current methodological development efforts in drug repositioning that use state-of-the-art computational ligand- and structure-based chemogenomics approaches. Furthermore, we highlighted the recent progress in computational drug repositioning for some NTDs, based on curation and modeling of genomic, biological, and chemical data. Additionally, we also present in-house and other successful examples and suggest possible solutions to existing pitfalls. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Triple-Component Drug-Loaded Nanocomposites Prepared Using a Modified Coaxial Electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Qian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple-component nanocomposites for improved sustained drug release profiles are successfully fabricated through a modified coaxial electrospinning process, in which only organic solvent N,N-dimethylacetamide was used as sheath fluid. Using polyacrylonitrile (PAN as filament-forming matrix, ibuprofen (IBU as functional ingredient, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP as the additional component, the IBU/PVP/PAN triple-component nanocomposites had uniform structure and an average diameter of 620±120 nm and 650±120 nm when the contents of PVP in the nanofibers were 10.5% and 22.7%, respectively. The optimal sheath-to-core flow rate ratio was 0.11 under a total sheath and core fluid flow rate of 1.0 mL/h. Compared with the IBU/PAN composite nanofibers, the triple-component composites could release 92.1% and 97.8% of the contained IBU, significantly larger than a value of 73.4% from the former. The inclusion of PVP in the IBU/PAN could effectively avoid the entrapment of IBU in the insoluble PAN molecules, facilitating the in vitro release of IBU. The modified coaxial process and the resulted multiple component nanocomposites would provide new way for developing novel drug sustained materials and transdermal drug delivery systems.

  2. The Impact of Disease and Drugs on Hip Fracture Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavy, Breiffni; Michaëlsson, Karl; Åberg, Anna Cristina; Melhus, Håkan; Byberg, Liisa

    2017-01-01

    We report the risks of a comprehensive range of disease and drug categories on hip fracture occurrence using a strict population-based cohort design. Participants included the source population of a Swedish county, aged ≥50 years (n = 117,494) including all incident hip fractures during 1 year (n = 477). The outcome was hospitalization for hip fracture (ICD-10 codes S72.0-S72.2) during 1 year (2009-2010). Exposures included: prevalence of (1) inpatient diseases [International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes A00-T98 in the National Patient Register 1987-2010] and (2) prescribed drugs dispensed in 2010 or the year prior to fracture. We present age- and sex-standardized risk ratios (RRs), risk differences (RDs) and population attributable risks (PARs) of disease and drug categories in relation to hip fracture risk. All disease categories were associated with increased risk of hip fracture. Largest risk ratios and differences were for mental and behavioral disorders, diseases of the blood and previous fracture (RRs between 2.44 and 3.00; RDs (per 1000 person-years) between 5.0 and 6.9). For specific drugs, strongest associations were seen for antiparkinson (RR 2.32 [95 % CI 1.48-1.65]; RD 5.2 [1.1-9.4]) and antidepressive drugs (RR 1.90 [1.55-2.32]; RD 3.1 [2.0-4.3]). Being prescribed ≥10 drugs during 1 year incurred an increased risk of hip fracture, whereas prescription of cardiovascular drugs or ≤5 drugs did not appear to increase risk. Diseases inferring the greatest PARs included: cardiovascular diseases PAR 22 % (95 % CI 14-29) and previous injuries (PAR 21 % [95 % CI 16-25]; for specific drugs, antidepressants posed the greatest risk (PAR 16 % [95 % CI 12.0-19.3]).

  3. Structural Genomics and Drug Discovery for Infectious Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, W.F.

    2009-01-01

    The application of structural genomics methods and approaches to proteins from organisms causing infectious diseases is making available the three dimensional structures of many proteins that are potential drug targets and laying the groundwork for structure aided drug discovery efforts. There are a number of structural genomics projects with a focus on pathogens that have been initiated worldwide. The Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID) was recently established to apply state-of-the-art high throughput structural biology technologies to the characterization of proteins from the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) category A-C pathogens and organisms causing emerging, or re-emerging infectious diseases. The target selection process emphasizes potential biomedical benefits. Selected proteins include known drug targets and their homologs, essential enzymes, virulence factors and vaccine candidates. The Center also provides a structure determination service for the infectious disease scientific community. The ultimate goal is to generate a library of structures that are available to the scientific community and can serve as a starting point for further research and structure aided drug discovery for infectious diseases. To achieve this goal, the CSGID will determine protein crystal structures of 400 proteins and protein-ligand complexes using proven, rapid, highly integrated, and cost-effective methods for such determination, primarily by X-ray crystallography. High throughput crystallographic structure determination is greatly aided by frequent, convenient access to high-performance beamlines at third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources.

  4. In silico studies in drug research against neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhouri, Farahnaz Rezaei; Ghasemi, Jahan B

    2017-08-22

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive neurodegenerative forms of Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cerebellar ataxias, and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy are described by slow and selective dysfunction and degeneration of neurons and axons in the central nervous system (CNS). Computer-aided or in silico design methods have matured into powerful tools for reducing the number of ligands that should be screened in experimental assays. In the present review, the authors provide a basic background about neurodegenerative diseases and in silico techniques in the drug research. Furthermore, they review the various in silico studies reported against various targets in neurodegenerative diseases, including homology modeling, molecular docking, virtual high-throughput screening, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR), hologram quantitative structure activity relationship (HQSAR), 3D pharmacophore mapping, proteochemometrics modeling (PCM), fingerprints, fragment-based drug discovery, Monte Carlo simulation, molecular dynamic (MD) simulation, quantum-mechanical methods for drug design, support vector machines, and machine learning approaches. Neurodegenerative diseases have a multifactorial pathoetiological origin, so scientists have become persuaded that a multi-target therapeutic strategy aimed at the simultaneous targeting of multiple proteins (and therefore etiologies) involved in the development of a disease is recommended in future. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Discontinuing disease-modifying therapy in progressive multiple sclerosis: can we stop what we have started?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lonergan, Roisin

    2012-02-01

    Disease-modifying therapy is ineffective in disabled patients (Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS] > 6.5) with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) without relapses, or in primary progressive MS. Many patients with secondary progressive MS who initially had relapsing MS continue to use disease-modifying therapies. The enormous associated costs are a burden to health services. Regular assessment is recommended to guide discontinuation of disease-modifying therapies when no longer beneficial, but this is unavailable to many patients, particularly in rural areas. The objectives of this study are as follows: 1. To observe use of disease-modifying therapies in patients with progressive multiple sclerosis and EDSS > 6.5. 2. To examine approaches used by a group of international MS experts to stopping-disease modifying therapies in patients with secondary progressive MS without relapses. During an epidemiological study in three regions of Ireland (southeast Dublin city, and Wexford and Donegal Counties), we recorded details of disease-modifying therapies in patients with progressive MS and EDSS > 6.5. An e-questionnaire was sent to 26 neurologists with expert knowledge of MS, asking them to share their approach to stopping disease-modifying therapies in patients with secondary progressive MS. Three hundred and thirty-six patients were studied: 88 from southeast Dublin, 99 from Wexford and 149 from Donegal. Forty-four had EDSS > 6.5: 12 were still using disease-modifying therapies. Of the surveyed neurologists, 15 made efforts to stop disease-modifying therapies in progressive multiple sclerosis, but most did not insist. A significant proportion (12 of 44 patients with progressive MS and EDSS > 6.5) was considered to be receiving therapy without benefit. Eleven of the 12 were from rural counties, reflecting poorer access to neurology services. The costs of disease-modifying therapies in this group (>170,000 euro yearly) could be re-directed towards development

  6. Scientific and Regulatory Considerations in Solid Oral Modified Release Drug Product Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Sander, Sanna; Duan, John; Rosencrance, Susan; Miksinski, Sarah Pope; Yu, Lawrence; Seo, Paul; Rege, Bhagwant

    2016-11-01

    This review presents scientific and regulatory considerations for the development of solid oral modified release (MR) drug products. It includes a rationale for patient-focused development based on Quality-by-Design (QbD) principles. Product and process understanding of MR products includes identification and risk-based evaluation of critical material attributes (CMAs), critical process parameters (CPPs), and their impact on critical quality attributes (CQAs) that affect the clinical performance. The use of various biopharmaceutics tools that link the CQAs to a predictable and reproducible clinical performance for patient benefit is emphasized. Product and process understanding lead to a more comprehensive control strategy that can maintain product quality through the shelf life and the lifecycle of the drug product. The overall goal is to develop MR products that consistently meet the clinical objectives while mitigating the risks to patients by reducing the probability and increasing the detectability of CQA failures.

  7. Multi-Drug-Loaded Microcapsules with Controlled Release for Management of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jong-Suep; Choo, Chee Chong; Qian, Cheng; Tan, Nguan Soon; Shen, Zexiang; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive disease of the nervous system, and is currently managed through commercial tablets that do not sufficiently enable controlled, sustained release capabilities. It is hypothesized that a drug delivery system that provides controlled and sustained release of PD drugs would afford better management of PD. Hollow microcapsules composed of poly-l-lactide (PLLA) and poly (caprolactone) (PCL) are prepared through a modified double-emulsion technique. They are loaded with three PD drugs, i.e., levodopa (LD), carbidopa (CD), and entacapone (ENT), at a ratio of 4:1:8, similar to commercial PD tablets. LD and CD are localized in both the hollow cavity and PLLA/PCL shell, while ENT is localized in the PLLA/PCL shell. Release kinetics of hydrophobic ENT is observed to be relatively slow as compared to the other hydrophilic drugs. It is further hypothesized that encapsulating ENT into PCL as a surface coating onto these microcapsules can aid in accelerating its release. Now, these spray-coated hollow microcapsules exhibit similar release kinetics, according to Higuchi's rate, for all three drugs. The results suggest that multiple drug encapsulation of LD, CD, and ENT in gastric floating microcapsules could be further developed for in vivo evaluation for the management of PD. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Cardiovascular disease among people with drug use disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thylstrup, Birgitte; Clausen, Thomas; Hesse, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To present the prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a national cohort of patients seeking treatment for drug use disorders (DUD). Methods This is a longitudinal record linkage study of consecutive DUD treatment admissions between 2000 and 2006 from Denmark. Results...... treatment (SHR = 1.15, p = 0.022). The use of amphetamines was negatively associated with the risk of CVD within this cohort (SHR = 0.75, p = 0.001). Conclusions Patients injecting drugs using prescribed methadone were at elevated risk for cardiovascular disease and should be monitored for CVD. Opioid...... medications should be evaluated in terms of their cardiovascular sequelae....

  9. Electrochemical and DFT study of an anticancer and active anthelmintic drug at carbon nanostructured modified electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalkhani, Masoumeh; Beheshtian, Javad; Salehi, Maryam

    2016-12-01

    The electrochemical response of mebendazole (Meb), an anticancer and effective anthelmintic drug, was investigated using two different carbon nanostructured modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCE). Although, compared to unmodified GCE, both prepared modified electrodes improved the voltammetric response of Meb, the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) modified GCE showed higher sensitivity and stability. Therefore, the CNTs-GCE was chosen as a promising candidate for the further studies. At first, the electrochemical behavior of Meb was studied by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse and square wave voltammetry. A one step reversible, pH-dependent and adsorption-controlled process was revealed for electro-oxidation of Meb. A possible mechanism for the electrochemical oxidation of Meb was proposed. In addition, electronic structure, adsorption energy, band gap, type of interaction and stable configuration of Meb on the surface of functionalized carbon nanotubes were studied by using density functional theory (DFT). Obtained results revealed that Meb is weakly physisorbed on the CNTs and that the electronic properties of the CNTs are not significantly changed. Notably, CNTs could be considered as a suitable modifier for preparation of the modified electrode for Meb analysis. Then, the experimental parameters affecting the electrochemical response of Meb were optimized. Under optimal conditions, high sensitivity (b(Meb)=dIp,a(Meb)/d[Meb]=19.65μAμM(-1)), a low detection limit (LOD (Meb)=19nM) and a wide linear dynamic range (0.06-3μM) was resulted for the voltammetric quantification of Meb. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Emerging analgesic drugs for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Rey, María Verónica; Dellapina, Estelle; Pellaprat, Jean; Brefel-Courbon, Christine; Rascol, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    Pain affects between 40 and 85% of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. It is a frequently disabling and overlooked feature, which can significantly reduce health-related quality of life. Unfortunately, there are no universally recommended treatments for this condition. Evidence about the efficacy and safety of available analgesic treatments is summarized in this review. Potential targets for upcoming therapies are then discussed in light of what is currently known about the physiopathology of pain in PD. Protocols for efficacy and safety assessment of novel analgesic therapies are discussed. Finally, critical aspects of study protocol design such as patient selection or outcomes to be evaluated are discussed. Preliminary results indicate that duloxetine, cranial electrotherapy stimulation, rotigotine, subthalamic or pallidum nuclei stimulation or lesion or levodopa could be effective for treating pain in PD. Similarly, some case reports indicate that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or apomorphine could be effective for relieving painful off-period dystonia. Clinical trials with rTMS or oxycodone/naloxone prolonged-release tablets for neuropathic pain or botulinum toxin for off-period dystonia are underway. Success of clinical trials about analgesic strategies in PD will depend on the selection of the right PD population to be treated, according to the type of pain, and the proper selection of study outcomes and follow-up of international recommendations.

  11. Developing Disease-Modifying Treatments in Alzheimer's Disease - A Perspective from Roche and Genentech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, R

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease for which no preventative or disease-modifying treatments currently exist. Pathological hallmarks include amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyper-phosphorylated tau protein. Evidence suggests that both pathologies are self-propagating once established. However, the lag time between neuropathological changes in the brain and the onset of even subtle clinical symptomatology means that patients are often diagnosed late when pathology, and neurodegeneration secondary to these changes, may have been established for several years. Complex pathological pathways associated with susceptibility to AD and changes that occur downstream of the neuropathologic process further contribute to the challenging endeavour of developing novel disease-modifying therapy. Recognising this complexity, effective management of AD must include reliable screening and early diagnosis in combination with effective therapeutic management of the pathological processes. Roche and Genentech are committed to addressing these unmet needs through developing a comprehensive portfolio of diagnostics and novel therapies. Beginning with the most scientifically supported targets, this approach includes two targeted amyloid-β monoclonal antibody therapies, crenezumab and gantenerumab, and an anti-tau monoclonal antibody, RO7105705, as well as a robust biomarker platform to aid in the early identification of people at risk or in the early stages of AD. Identification and implementation of diagnostic tools will support the enrolment of patients into clinical trials; furthermore, these tools should also support evaluation of the clinical efficacy and safety profile of the novel therapeutic agents tested in these trials. This review discusses the therapeutic agents currently under clinical development.

  12. A novel neurotrophic drug for cognitive enhancement and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Chen

    Full Text Available Currently, the major drug discovery paradigm for neurodegenerative diseases is based upon high affinity ligands for single disease-specific targets. For Alzheimer's disease (AD, the focus is the amyloid beta peptide (Aß that mediates familial Alzheimer's disease pathology. However, given that age is the greatest risk factor for AD, we explored an alternative drug discovery scheme that is based upon efficacy in multiple cell culture models of age-associated pathologies rather than exclusively amyloid metabolism. Using this approach, we identified an exceptionally potent, orally active, neurotrophic molecule that facilitates memory in normal rodents, and prevents the loss of synaptic proteins and cognitive decline in a transgenic AD mouse model.

  13. Ultrasound-mediated drug delivery using liposomes modified with a thermosensitive polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Kazuaki; Kawabata, Shinya; Tashita, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Nobuaki

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-mediated drug delivery was established using liposomes that were modified with the thermosensitive polymer (TSP) poly(NIPMAM-co-NIPAM), which sensitized the liposomes to high temperatures. TSP-modified liposomes (TSP liposomes) released encapsulated calcein under 1 MHz ultrasound irradiation at 0.5 W/cm(2) for 120 s as well as the case under incubation at 42 °C for 15 min. In addition, uptake of the drug released from TSP liposomes by cancer cells was enhanced by ultrasound irradiation. In a cell injury assay using doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded TSP liposomes and ultrasound irradiation, cell viability of HepG2 cells at 6 h after ultrasound irradiation (1 MHz, 0.5 W/cm(2) for 30 s) with DOX-loaded TSP liposomes (TSP/lipid ratio=1) was 60%, which was significantly lower than that of the control conditions such as DOX-loaded TSP liposomes alone and DOX-loaded intact liposomes under ultrasound irradiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Anakinra as first-line disease-modifying therapy in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis: report of forty-six patients from an international multicenter series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nigrovic, Peter A.; Mannion, Melissa; Prince, Femke H. M.; Zeft, Andrew; Rabinovich, C. Egla; van Rossum, Marion A. J.; Cortis, Elisabetta; Pardeo, Manuela; Miettunen, Paivi M.; Janow, Ginger; Birmingham, James; Eggebeen, Aaron; Janssen, Erin; Shulman, Andrew I.; Son, Mary Beth; Hong, Sandy; Jones, Karla; Ilowite, Norman T.; Cron, Randy Q.; Higgins, Gloria C.

    2011-01-01

    To examine the safety and efficacy of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist anakinra as first-line therapy for systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Patients with systemic JIA receiving anakinra as part of initial disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy were identified

  15. Chronotherapeutic drug delivery systems: an approach to circadian rhythms diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, S A; Srikanth, M V; Rao, N Sreenivasa; Uhumwangho, M U; Latha, K; Murthy, K V Ramana

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of writing this review on chronotherapeutic drug delivery systems (ChrDDs) is to review the literatures with special focus on ChrDDs and the various dosage forms, techniques that are used to target the circadian rhythms (CR) of various diseases. Many functions of the human body vary considerably in a day. ChrDDs refers to a treatment method in which in vivo drug availability is timed to match circadian rhythms of disease in order to optimize therapeutic outcomes and minimize side effects. Several techniques have been developed but not many dosage forms for all the diseases are available in the market. ChrDDs are gaining importance in the field of pharmaceutical technology as these systems reduce dosing frequency, toxicity and deliver the drug that matches the CR of that particular disease when the symptoms are maximum to worse. Finally, the ultimate benefit goes to the patient due the compliance and convenience of the dosage form. Some diseases that follow circadian rhythms include cardiovascular diseases, asthma, arthritis, ulcers, diabetes etc. ChrDDs in the market were also discussed and the current technologies used to formulate were also stated. These technologies include Contin® , Chronotopic®, Pulsincaps®, Ceform®, Timerx®, Oros®, Codas®, Diffucaps®, Egalet®, Tablet in capsule device, Core-in-cup tablet technology. A coated drug-core tablet matrix, A bi-layered tablet, Multiparticulate-based chronotherapeutic drug delivery systems, Chronoset and Controlled release microchips.

  16. Gender and images of heart disease in Scandinavian drug advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riska, Elianne; Heikell, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the construction of the "heart disease candidate" in advertisements for cardiovascular drugs in Scandinavian medical journals. All advertisements for cardiovascular drugs (n = 603) in Scandinavian medical journals (Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden) in 2005 were collected. Only advertisements that portray users (n = 289, 48% of the advertisements) were analyzed. The results show that coronary candidacy is constructed as a male condition in half of the advertisements for cardiovascular drugs. The advertisements suggest a gendering of heart disease: men are the major victims of heart failure and cardiac insufficiency, and women are in need of cholesterol-lowering drugs. The cardiovascular drug advertisements portray a restoration of men's hyperactive agency, valorized by means of sporty images, by drawing on masculinity as a fixed trait and behavior. Hypercholesterolemia as a woman's disease reproduces the tyranny of slimness for women: Only women's stoutness is medicalized, and there are no pictures of heavy men. The findings point to the public health implications of gendered images of coronary candidacy in medical advertising.

  17. CT study of pancreatic diseases with modified dynamic scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Minghui; Zhu Guangying

    1990-01-01

    Experience of 20 cases modified dynamic CT scanning is presented. With a slight increased X-ray tube burden, it is possible to investigate tumor blood supply and find small pancreatic insulinoma with this method. The capsular sign typical for chronic traumatic pancreatic hematoma on CT is presented

  18. RGD peptide-modified multifunctional dendrimer platform for drug encapsulation and targeted inhibition of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuedan; Alves, Carla S; Oliveira, Nilsa; Rodrigues, João; Zhu, Jingyi; Bányai, István; Tomás, Helena; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Development of multifunctional nanoscale drug-delivery systems for targeted cancer therapy still remains a great challenge. Here, we report the synthesis of cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide-conjugated generation 5 (G5) poly(amidoamine) dendrimers for anticancer drug encapsulation and targeted therapy of cancer cells overexpressing αvβ3 integrins. In this study, amine-terminated G5 dendrimers were used as a platform to be sequentially modified with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) via a thiourea linkage and RGD peptide via a polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacer, followed by acetylation of the remaining dendrimer terminal amines. The developed multifunctional dendrimer platform (G5.NHAc-FI-PEG-RGD) was then used to encapsulate an anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). We show that approximately six DOX molecules are able to be encapsulated within each dendrimer platform. The formed complexes are water-soluble, stable, and able to release DOX in a sustained manner. One- and two-dimensional NMR techniques were applied to investigate the interaction between dendrimers and DOX, and the impact of the environmental pH on the release rate of DOX from the dendrimer/DOX complexes was also explored. Furthermore, cell biological studies demonstrate that the encapsulation of DOX within the G5.NHAc-FI-PEG-RGD dendrimers does not compromise the anticancer activity of DOX and that the therapeutic efficacy of the dendrimer/DOX complexes is solely related to the encapsulated DOX drug. Importantly, thanks to the role played by RGD-mediated targeting, the developed dendrimer/drug complexes are able to specifically target αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells and display specific therapeutic efficacy to the target cells. The developed RGD peptide-targeted multifunctional dendrimers may thus be used as a versatile platform for targeted therapy of different types of αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Orphan drugs in development for Huntington's disease: challenges and progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgunder JM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Marc Burgunder1–4 1Swiss Huntington’s Disease Centre, Department of Neurology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; 2Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 3Department of Neurology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 4Department of Neurology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Huntington’s disease is a monogenic disorder encompassing a variable phenotype with progressive cognitive, psychiatric, and movement disorders. Knowledge of the mechanisms involved in this disorder has made substantial advances since the discovery of the gene mutation. The dynamic mutation is the expansion of a CAG (cytosine-adenine-guanine repeat in the huntingtin (HTT gene, which is transcribed into an abnormal protein with an elongated polyglutamine tract. Polyglutamine HTT accumulates and is changed in its function in multifaceted ways related to the numerous roles of the normal protein. The protein is expressed in numerous areas of the brain and also in other organs. The major brain region involved in the disease process is the striatum, but it is clear that other systems are involved as well. This accumulated knowledge has now led to the development of treatment strategies based on specific molecular pathways for symptomatic and disease course-modifying treatment. The most proximal way to handle the disturbed protein is to hinder the gene transcription, translation, and/or to increase protein clearance. Other mechanisms now being approached include modulation of energy and intracellular signaling, induction of factors potentially leading to neuroprotection, as well as modulation of glial function. Several clinical trials based on these approaches are now under way, and it is becoming clear that a future disease-modifying therapy will be a combination of several approaches harmonized with symptomatic treatments. In this review, some of the most promising and

  20. Targeting cysteine proteases in trypanosomatid disease drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Leonardo G; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2017-12-01

    Chagas disease and human African trypanosomiasis are endemic conditions in Latin America and Africa, respectively, for which no effective and safe therapy is available. Efforts in drug discovery have focused on several enzymes from these protozoans, among which cysteine proteases have been validated as molecular targets for pharmacological intervention. These enzymes are expressed during the entire life cycle of trypanosomatid parasites and are essential to many biological processes, including infectivity to the human host. As a result of advances in the knowledge of the structural aspects of cysteine proteases and their role in disease physiopathology, inhibition of these enzymes by small molecules has been demonstrated to be a worthwhile approach to trypanosomatid drug research. This review provides an update on drug discovery strategies targeting the cysteine peptidases cruzain from Trypanosoma cruzi and rhodesain and cathepsin B from Trypanosoma brucei. Given that current chemotherapy for Chagas disease and human African trypanosomiasis has several drawbacks, cysteine proteases will continue to be actively pursued as valuable molecular targets in trypanosomatid disease drug discovery efforts. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. [Guideline for the treatment of Graves' disease with antithyroid drug].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2006-12-01

    We have published "Guideline for the Treatment of Graves' Disease with Antithyroid Drug in Japan 2006" in the middle of May from the Japan Thyroid Association. The background, working process, composition, aim and significance of this guideline are described. The most remarkable feature of this guideline is "evidence based".

  2. Addictive drugs and their relationship with infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Herman; Pross, Susan; Klein, Thomas W

    2006-08-01

    The use of drugs of abuse, both recreationally and medicinally, may be related to serious public health concerns. There is a relationship between addictive drugs of abuse such as alcohol and nicotine in cigarette smoke, as well as illegal drugs such as opiates, cocaine and marijuana, and increased susceptibility to infections. The nature and mechanisms of immunomodulation induced by such drugs of abuse are described in this review. The effects of opiates and marijuana, using animal models as well as in vitro studies with immune cells from experimental animals and humans, have shown that immunomodulation induced by these drugs is mainly receptor-mediated, either directly by interaction with specific receptors on immune cells or indirectly by reaction with similar receptors on cells of the nervous system. Similar studies also show that cocaine and nicotine have marked immunomodulatory effects, which are mainly receptor-mediated. Both cocaine, an illegal drug, and nicotine, a widely used legal addictive component of cigarettes, are markedly immunomodulatory and increase susceptibility to infection. The nature and mechanism of immunomodulation induced by alcohol, the most widely used addictive substance of abuse, are similar but immunomodulatory effects, although not receptor-mediated. The many research studies on the effects of these drugs on immunity and increased susceptibility to infectious diseases, including AIDS, are providing a better understanding of the complex interactions between immunity, infections and substance abuse.

  3. Surveillance of gastrointestinal disease in France using drug sales data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivette, Mathilde; Mueller, Judith E; Crépey, Pascal; Bar-Hen, Avner

    2014-09-01

    Drug sales data have increasingly been used for disease surveillance during recent years. Our objective was to assess the value of drug sales data as an operational early detection tool for gastroenteritis epidemics at national and regional level in France. For the period 2008-2013, we compared temporal trends of drug sales for the treatment of gastroenteritis with trends of cases reported by a Sentinel Network of general practitioners. We benchmarked detection models to select the one with the best sensitivity, false alert proportion and timeliness, and developed a prospective framework to assess the operational performance of the system. Drug sales data allowed the detection of seasonal gastrointestinal epidemics occurring in winter with a distinction between prescribed and non-prescribed drugs. Sales of non-prescribed drugs allowed epidemic detection on average 2.25 weeks earlier than Sentinel data. These results confirm the value of drug sales data for real-time monitoring of gastroenteritis epidemic activity. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A New Strategy for Deleting Animal drugs from Traditional Chinese Medicines based on Modified Yimusake Formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinghui; Li, Yan; Yang, Yinfeng; Chen, Xuetong; Du, Jian; Zheng, Qiusheng; Liang, Zongsuo; Wang, Yonghua

    2017-05-04

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), such as Uyghur Medicine (UM) has been used in clinical treatment for many years. TCM is featured as multiple targets and complex mechanisms of action, which is normally a combination of medicinal herbs and sometimes even contains certain rare animal medicinal ingredients. A question arises as to whether these animal materials can be removed replaced from TCM applications due to their valuable rare resources or animal ethics. Here, we select a classical UM Yimusake formula, which contains 3 animal drugs and other 8 herbs, and has got wealthy experience and remarkable achievements in treating erectile dysfunction (ED) in China. The active components, drug targets and therapeutic mechanisms have been comprehensively analyzed by systems-pharmacology methods. Additionally, to validate the inhibitory effects of all candidate compounds on their related targets, in vitro experiments, computational analysis and molecular dynamics simulations were performed. The results show that the modified, original and three animal materials display very similar mechanisms for an effective treatment of ED, indicating that it is quite possible to remove these three animal drugs from the original formula while still keep its efficiency. This work provides a new attempt for deleting animal materials from TCM, which should be important for optimization of traditional medicines.

  5. [Drug treatment of early-stage (de novo and "honeymoon") Parkinson disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, P; Defebvre, L

    2014-04-01

    In this article, we discuss the management of motor symptoms during the early phases of Parkinson's disease, excluding that of any other clinical manifestation. We relied primarily upon recently published data and do not describe older publications relating to anticholinergic drugs or amantadine. The initial pharmacological treatment of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is symptomatic and remains based upon dopaminergic drugs. However, the development of new drugs has broadened the range of strategic options and improved overall patient management. Announcing the diagnosis is a critical moment, as pointed out by patients' associations. Patients should be advised to maintain personal, professional, social and physical activities as long as possible. The potential benefit of early pharmacological treatment should be explained, focusing on the possible disease-modifying effect of drugs such as rasagiline. According to current guidelines, L-Dopa is preferred in patients above 65years of age, while those below 65 should be treated with dopamine agonists. Like monoamine oxidase inhibitors B (MAOI-B), synthetic dopamine agonists exhibit several advantages: easy-to-use treatment with a once-daily administration, delayed L-Dopa initiation, significant efficacy on motor symptoms (although lower than that of L-Dopa). MOAI can be prescribed in association with L-Dopa or dopamine agonists. Rasagiline also delays L-Dopa initiation, and consequently motor complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Clustering of modifiable biobehavioral risk factors for chronic disease in US adults: a latent class analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Adam M; Huh, Jimi; Dunton, Genevieve F

    2014-11-01

    Examining the co-occurrence patterns of modifiable biobehavioral risk factors for deadly chronic diseases (e.g. cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes) can elucidate the etiology of risk factors and guide disease-prevention programming. The aims of this study were to (1) identify latent classes based on the clustering of five key biobehavioral risk factors among US adults who reported at least one risk factor and (2) explore the demographic correlates of the identified latent classes. Participants were respondents of the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (2004-2005) with at least one of the following disease risk factors in the past year (N = 22,789), which were also the latent class indicators: (1) alcohol abuse/dependence, (2) drug abuse/dependence, (3) nicotine dependence, (4) obesity, and (5) physical inactivity. Housing sample units were selected to match the US National Census in location and demographic characteristics, with young adults oversampled. Participants were administered surveys by trained interviewers. Five latent classes were yielded: 'obese, active non-substance abusers' (23%); 'nicotine-dependent, active, and non-obese' (19%); 'active, non-obese alcohol abusers' (6%); 'inactive, non-substance abusers' (50%); and 'active, polysubstance abusers' (3.7%). Four classes were characterized by a 100% likelihood of having one risk factor coupled with a low or moderate likelihood of having the other four risk factors. The five classes exhibited unique demographic profiles. Risk factors may cluster together in a non-monotonic fashion, with the majority of the at-risk population of US adults expected to have a high likelihood of endorsing only one of these five risk factors. © Royal Society for Public Health 2013.

  7. Drug therapy in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Parkinson`s disease (PD is a progressive, disabling neurodegenerative disorder with onset of motor and non-motor features. Both reduce quality of life of PD patients and cause caregiver burden. This review aims to provide a survey of possible therapeutic options for treatment of motor and non motor symptoms of PD and to discuss their relation to each other. MAO-B-Inhibitors, NMDA antagonists, dopamine agonists and levodopa with its various application modes mainly improve the dopamine associated motor symptoms in PD. This armentarium of PD drugs only partially influences the onset and occurrence of non motor symptoms. These PD features predominantly result from non dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Autonomic features, such as seborrhea, hyperhidrosis, orthostatic syndrome, salivation, bladder dysfunction, gastrointestinal disturbances, and neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as depression, sleep disorders, psychosis, cognitive dysfunction with impaired execution and impulse control may appear. Drug therapy of these non motor symptoms complicates long-term PD drug therapy due to possible occurrence of drug interactions, - side effects, and altered pharmacokinetic behaviour of applied compounds. Dopamine substituting compounds themselves may contribute to onset of these non motor symptoms. This complicates the differentiation from the disease process itself and influences therapeutic options, which are often limited because of additional morbidity with necessary concomitant drug therapy.

  8. Electrochemically controlled release of anticancer drug methotrexate using nanostructured polypyrrole modified with cetylpyridinium: Release kinetics investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, Naader; Shamaeli, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    A new simple strategy for direct electrochemical incorporation of chemotherapeutic methotrexate (MTX) into conductive polypyrrole (PPy) has been suggested for an electrochemically controlled loading and release system. Electropolymerization of MTX doped polypyrrole yielded poor quality with low efficiency of doping, but a well-doped, nanostructure and increased capacity of drug loading (24.5 mg g −1 ) has been obtained in the presence of cetylpyridinium (CP) as a modifier. When CP was preloaded onto PPy, the hydrophobic surface of the PPy serves as a backbone to which the hydrophobic chain of the CP can be attached. Electrostatic interaction between cationic CP with anionic MTX and aromatic interaction between pyridinium head of CP with pyrimidine and pyrazine rings of MTX increases drug doping. Then release kinetics were investigated at various applied potentials and temperatures. Kinetics analysis based on Avrami's equation showed that the drug release was controlled and accelerated by increasing temperature and negative potential and sustained by increasing positive potential. At open circuit condition, the release parameter (n) represented a diffusive mechanism and at applying electrochemical potentials, a first-order mode. Activation energy parameters (E a , ΔG ≠ , ΔH ≠ and ΔS ≠ ) and half-life time (t 1/2 ) of drug release are also analyzed as a function of applied potential. The nanostructured polymer films (PPy/CP/MTX) were characterized by several techniques: scanning electron microscopy, Furrier transforms Infrared, UV-vis spectroscopy. Overall, our results demonstrate that the PPy/CP/MTX films, combined with electrical stimulation, permit a programmable release of MTX by altering the interaction strength between the PPy/CP and MTX

  9. Improving drug delivery technology for treating neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; Modi, Girish; Pillay, Viness

    2016-07-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) represent intricate challenges for efficient uptake and transport of drugs to the brain mainly due to the restrictive blood-brain barrier (BBB). NDs are characterized by the loss of neuronal subtypes as sporadic and/or familial and several mechanisms of neurodegeneration have been identified. This review attempts to recap, organize and concisely evaluate the advanced drug delivery systems designed for treating common NDs. It highlights key research gaps and opinionates on new neurotherapies to overcome the BBB as an addition to the current treatments of countering oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptotic mechanisms. Current treatments do not fully address the biological, drug and therapeutic factors faced. This has led to the development of vogue treatments such as nose-to-brain technologies, bio-engineered systems, fusion protein chaperones, stem cells, gene therapy, use of natural compounds, neuroprotectants and even vaccines. However, failure of these treatments is mainly due to the BBB and non-specific delivery in the brain. In order to increase neuroavailability various advanced drug delivery systems provide promising alternatives that are able to augment the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, much work is still required in this field beyond the preclinical testing phase.

  10. Associations between Potentially Modifiable Risk Factors and Alzheimer Disease : A Mendelian Randomization Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostergaard, Soren D.; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Sharp, Stephen J.; Proitsi, Petroula; Lotta, Luca A.; Day, Felix; Perry, John R. B.; Boehme, Kevin L.; Walter, Stefan; Kauwe, John S.; Gibbons, Laura E.; Larson, Eric B.; Powell, John F.; Langenberg, Claudia; Crane, Paul K.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Scott, Robert A.; van der Schouw, YT

    Background Potentially modifiable risk factors including obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and smoking are associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) and represent promising targets for intervention. However, the causality of these associations is unclear. We sought to assess the causal nature of these

  11. Surface Modified Multifunctional and Stimuli Responsive Nanoparticles for Drug Targeting: Current Status and Uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panoraia I. Siafaka

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanocarriers, due to their unique features, are of increased interest among researchers working with pharmaceutical formulations. Polymeric nanoparticles and nanocapsules, involving non-toxic biodegradable polymers, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, and inorganic–organic nanomaterials, are among the most used carriers for drugs for a broad spectrum of targeted diseases. In fact, oral, injectable, transdermal-dermal and ocular formulations mainly consist of the aforementioned nanomaterials demonstrating promising characteristics such as long circulation, specific targeting, high drug loading capacity, enhanced intracellular penetration, and so on. Over the last decade, huge advances in the development of novel, safer and less toxic nanocarriers with amended properties have been made. In addition, multifunctional nanocarriers combining chemical substances, vitamins and peptides via coupling chemistry, inorganic particles coated by biocompatible materials seem to play a key role considering that functionalization can enhance characteristics such as biocompatibility, targetability, environmental friendliness, and intracellular penetration while also have limited side effects. This review aims to summarize the “state of the art” of drug delivery carriers in nanosize, paying attention to their surface functionalization with ligands and other small or polymeric compounds so as to upgrade active and passive targeting, different release patterns as well as cell targeting and stimuli responsibility. Lastly, future aspects and potential uses of nanoparticulated drug systems are outlined.

  12. New drugs for the treatment of dry eye disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ridder, III, William; Karsolia,Apoorva

    2015-01-01

    William H Ridder III, Apoorva Karsolia Southern California College of Optometry, Marshall B Ketchum University, Fullerton, CA, USA Abstract: Dry eye disease (DED) is one of the most commonly encountered conditions for eye care practitioners. The prevalence of DED can be as high as 30% of the population. In the past decade, only one drug has been approved for the treatment of DED by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the USA (ie, Restasis® by Allergan, Inc.). The total annua...

  13. Modifying release characteristics from 3D printed drug-eluting products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boetker, Johan; Water, Jorrit; Aho, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This work describes an approach to modify the release of active compound from a 3D printed model drug product geometry intended for flexible dosing and precision medication. The production of novel polylactic acid and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose based feed materials containing...... nitrofurantoin for 3D printing purposes is demonstrated. Nitrofurantoin, Metolose® and polylactic acid were successfully co-extruded with up to 40% Metolose® content, and subsequently 3D printed into model disk geometries (ø10 mm, h = 2 mm). Thermal analysis with differential scanning calorimetry and solid phase...... identification with Raman spectroscopy showed that nitrofurantoin remained in its original solid form during both hot-melt extrusion and subsequent 3D printing. Rheological measurements of the different compositions showed that the flow properties were sensitive to the amount of undissolved particles present...

  14. Nanocarrier mediated retinal drug delivery: overcoming ocular barriers to treat posterior eye diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Rohit; Mandal, Abhirup; Jaiswal, Jagdish K; Rupenthal, Ilva D

    2018-03-01

    Effective drug delivery to the retina still remains a challenge due to ocular elimination mechanisms and complex barriers that selectively limit the entry of drugs into the eye. To overcome these barriers, frequent intravitreal injections are currently used to achieve high drug concentrations in vitreous and retina. However, these repetitive injections may result in several side effects. Recent advancements in the field of nanoparticle-based drug delivery could overcome some of these unmet needs and various preclinical studies conducted to date have demonstrated promising results of nanotherapies in the treatment of retinal diseases. Compared to the majority of commercially available ocular implants, the biodegradable nature of most nanoparticles (NPs) avoids the need for surgical implantation and removal after the release of the payload. In addition, the sustained drug release from NPs over an extended period of time reduces the need for frequent intravitreal injections and the risk of associated side effects. The nanometer size and highly modifiable surface properties make NPs excellent candidates for targeted ocular drug delivery. Studies have shown that nanocarriers enhance the intravitreal half-life and thus bioavailability of a number of drugs including proteins and peptides. In addition, they have shown promising results in delivering genetic material to the retinal tissues by protecting it from possible intravitreal degradation. This review covers the various challenges associated with drug delivery to the posterior segment of the eye, particularly the retina, and highlights the application of nanocarriers to overcome these challenges in context with recent advances in preclinical studies. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2018, 10:e1473. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1473 This article is categorized under: Therapeutic Approaches and Drug Discovery > Emerging Technologies Implantable Materials and Surgical Technologies > Nanomaterials and Implants. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals

  15. A kernel for open source drug discovery in tropical diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortí, Leticia; Carbajo, Rodrigo J; Pieper, Ursula; Eswar, Narayanan; Maurer, Stephen M; Rai, Arti K; Taylor, Ginger; Todd, Matthew H; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Sali, Andrej; Marti-Renom, Marc A

    2009-01-01

    Conventional patent-based drug development incentives work badly for the developing world, where commercial markets are usually small to non-existent. For this reason, the past decade has seen extensive experimentation with alternative R&D institutions ranging from private-public partnerships to development prizes. Despite extensive discussion, however, one of the most promising avenues-open source drug discovery-has remained elusive. We argue that the stumbling block has been the absence of a critical mass of preexisting work that volunteers can improve through a series of granular contributions. Historically, open source software collaborations have almost never succeeded without such "kernels". HERE, WE USE A COMPUTATIONAL PIPELINE FOR: (i) comparative structure modeling of target proteins, (ii) predicting the localization of ligand binding sites on their surfaces, and (iii) assessing the similarity of the predicted ligands to known drugs. Our kernel currently contains 143 and 297 protein targets from ten pathogen genomes that are predicted to bind a known drug or a molecule similar to a known drug, respectively. The kernel provides a source of potential drug targets and drug candidates around which an online open source community can nucleate. Using NMR spectroscopy, we have experimentally tested our predictions for two of these targets, confirming one and invalidating the other. The TDI kernel, which is being offered under the Creative Commons attribution share-alike license for free and unrestricted use, can be accessed on the World Wide Web at http://www.tropicaldisease.org. We hope that the kernel will facilitate collaborative efforts towards the discovery of new drugs against parasites that cause tropical diseases.

  16. Multifunctional Amine Mesoporous Silica Spheres Modified with Multiple Amine as Carriers for Drug Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous silica spheres were synthesized by using Stöber theory (MSN-40. Calcination of the mesostructured phase resulted in the starting solid. Organic modification with aminopropyl groups resulted in two MSN-40 materials: named MSN-NH2 and MSN-DQ-40, respectively. These two kinds of samples with different pore sizes (obtained from 3-[2-(2-aminoethylaminoethylamino]propyl-trimethox-ysilane (NQ-62 and modified NQ-62 showed control of the delivery rate of ibuprofen (IBU from the siliceous matrix. The obtained sample from modified NQ-62 has an increased loading rate and shows better control of the delivery rate of IBU than the obtained sample from NQ-62. These three solids were characterized using standard solid state procedures. During tests of in vitro drug release, an interesting phenomenon was observed: at high pH (pH 7.45, IBU in all carriers was released slowly; at low pH (pH 4.5, only a part of the IBU was slowly released from this carrier within 25 hours; most IBU was effectively confined in mesoporous material, but the remaining IBU was released rapidly and completely after 25 hours.

  17. Drugs and drug delivery systems targeting amyloid-β in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Robinson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder with no cure and limited treatment solutions that are unable to target any of the suspected causes. Increasing evidence suggests that one of the causes of neurodegeneration is the overproduction of amyloid beta (Aβ and the inability of Aβ peptides to be cleared from the brain, resulting in self-aggregation to form toxic oligomers, fibrils and plaques. One of the potential treatment options is to target Aβ and prevent self-aggregation to allow for a natural clearing of the brain. In this paper, we review the drugs and drug delivery systems that target Aβ in relation to Alzheimer's disease. Many attempts have been made to use anti-Aβ targeting molecules capable of targeting Aβ (with much success in vitro and in vivo animal models, but the major obstacle to this technique is the challenge posed by the blood brain barrier (BBB. This highly selective barrier protects the brain from toxic molecules and pathogens and prevents the delivery of most drugs. Therefore novel Aβ aggregation inhibitor drugs will require well thought-out drug delivery systems to deliver sufficient concentrations to the brain.

  18. Hyaluronic acid oligosaccharide modified redox-responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qinfu; Geng, Hongjian; Wang, Ying; Gao, Yikun; Huang, Jiahao; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jinghai; Wang, Siling

    2014-11-26

    A redox-responsive delivery system based on colloidal mesoporous silica (CMS) has been developed, in which 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) was conjugated to vehicles by cleavable disulfide bonds. The oligosaccharide of hyaluronic acid (oHA) was modified on the surface of CMS by disulfide bonds as a targeting ligand and was able to increase the stability and biocompatibility of CMS under physiological conditions. In vitro release studies indicated that the cumulative release of 6-MP was less than 3% in the absence of glutathione (GSH), and reached nearly 80% within 2 h in the presence of 3 mM GSH. Confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) methods were used to evaluate the cellular uptake performance of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled CMS, with and without oHA modification. The CMS-SS-oHA exhibited a higher cellular uptake performance via CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis in HCT-116 (CD44 receptor-positive) cells than in NIH-3T3 (CD44 receptor-negative) cells. 6-MP loaded CMS-SS-oHA exhibited greater cytotoxicity against HCT-116 cells than NIH-3T3 cells due to the enhanced cell uptake behavior of CMS-SS-oHA. This study provides a novel strategy to covalently link bioactive drug and targeting ligand to the interiors and exteriors of mesoporous silica to construct a stimulus-responsive targeted drug delivery system.

  19. The basics of preclinical drug development for neurodegenerative disease indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Karen L; Spack, Edward G

    2009-06-12

    Preclinical development encompasses the activities that link drug discovery in the laboratory to initiation of human clinical trials. Preclinical studies can be designed to identify a lead candidate from several hits; develop the best procedure for new drug scale-up; select the best formulation; determine the route, frequency, and duration of exposure; and ultimately support the intended clinical trial design. The details of each preclinical development package can vary, but all have some common features. Rodent and nonrodent mammalian models are used to delineate the pharmacokinetic profile and general safety, as well as to identify toxicity patterns. One or more species may be used to determine the drug's mean residence time in the body, which depends on inherent absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties. For drugs intended to treat Alzheimer's disease or other brain-targeted diseases, the ability of a drug to cross the blood brain barrier may be a key issue. Toxicology and safety studies identify potential target organs for adverse effects and define the Therapeutic Index to set the initial starting doses in clinical trials. Pivotal preclinical safety studies generally require regulatory oversight as defined by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Good Laboratory Practices and international guidelines, including the International Conference on Harmonization. Concurrent preclinical development activities include developing the Clinical Plan and preparing the new drug product, including the associated documentation to meet stringent FDA Good Manufacturing Practices regulatory guidelines. A wide range of commercial and government contract options are available for investigators seeking to advance their candidate(s). Government programs such as the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer grants and the National Institutes of Health Rapid Access to Interventional Development Pilot Program provide funding and

  20. The basics of preclinical drug development for neurodegenerative disease indications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spack Edward G

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Preclinical development encompasses the activities that link drug discovery in the laboratory to initiation of human clinical trials. Preclinical studies can be designed to identify a lead candidate from several hits; develop the best procedure for new drug scale-up; select the best formulation; determine the route, frequency, and duration of exposure; and ultimately support the intended clinical trial design. The details of each preclinical development package can vary, but all have some common features. Rodent and nonrodent mammalian models are used to delineate the pharmacokinetic profile and general safety, as well as to identify toxicity patterns. One or more species may be used to determine the drug's mean residence time in the body, which depends on inherent absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties. For drugs intended to treat Alzheimer's disease or other brain-targeted diseases, the ability of a drug to cross the blood brain barrier may be a key issue. Toxicology and safety studies identify potential target organs for adverse effects and define the Therapeutic Index to set the initial starting doses in clinical trials. Pivotal preclinical safety studies generally require regulatory oversight as defined by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA Good Laboratory Practices and international guidelines, including the International Conference on Harmonisation. Concurrent preclinical development activities include developing the Clinical Plan and preparing the new drug product, including the associated documentation to meet stringent FDA Good Manufacturing Practices regulatory guidelines. A wide range of commercial and government contract options are available for investigators seeking to advance their candidate(s. Government programs such as the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer grants and the National Institutes of Health Rapid Access to Interventional Development Pilot

  1. The Impact of Disease and Drugs on Hip Fracture Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Leavy, Breiffni; Michaëlsson, Karl; Åberg, Anna Cristina; Melhus, Håkan; Byberg, Liisa

    2017-01-01

    We report the risks of a comprehensive range of disease and drug categories on hip fracture occurrence using a strict population-based cohort design. Participants included the source population of a Swedish county, aged ?50?years (n?=?117,494) including all incident hip fractures during 1?year (n?=?477). The outcome was hospitalization for hip fracture (ICD-10 codes S72.0?S72.2) during 1?year (2009?2010). Exposures included: prevalence of (1) inpatient diseases [International Classification o...

  2. Drug-induced Liver Disease in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Iryna, Klyarytskaya; Helen, Maksymova; Elena, Stilidi

    2016-01-01

    The study presented here was accomplished to assess the course of drug-induced liver diseases in patient’s rheumatoid arthritis receiving long-term methotrexate therapy. Diabetes mellitus was revealed as the most significant risk factor. The combination of diabetes mellitus with other risk factors (female sex) resulted in increased hepatic fibrosis, degree of hepatic encephalopathy and reduction of hepatic functions. The effectiveness and safety of ursodeoxycholic acid and cytolytic type-with...

  3. Current advances in transdermal delivery of drugs for alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Thuy Trang Nguyen; Vo Van Giau; Tuong Kha Vo

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common, progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disorder, which will play an increasingly important role both socially and financially in the aging populations. Treatments for AD show modest improvements in cognition and global functioning among patients. Furthermore, the oral administration of treating AD has had some drawbacks that decrease the medication adherence and efficacy of the therapy. Transdermal drugs are proposed as an alternative remedy to overcome the...

  4. Modulation at Age of Onset in Tunisian Huntington Disease Patients: Implication of New Modifier Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorra Hmida-Ben Brahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder. The causative mutation is an expansion of more than 36 CAG repeats in the first exon of IT15 gene. Many studies have shown that the IT15 interacts with several modifier genes to regulate the age at onset (AO of HD. Our study aims to investigate the implication of CAG expansion and 9 modifiers in the age at onset variance of 15 HD Tunisian patients and to establish the correlation between these modifiers genes and the AO of this disease. Despite the small number of studied patients, this report consists of the first North African study in Huntington disease patients. Our results approve a specific effect of modifiers genes in each population.

  5. Polyethyleneimine-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for brain tumor drug delivery using magnetic targeting and intra-carotid administration

    OpenAIRE

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the applicability of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified magnetic nanoparticles (GPEI) as a potential vascular drug/gene carrier to brain tumors. In vitro, GPEI exhibited high cell association and low cell toxicity – properties which are highly desirable for intracellular drug/gene delivery. In addition, a high saturation magnetization of 93 emu/g Fe was expected to facilitate magnetic targeting of GPEI to brain tumor lesions. However, following intravenous administra...

  6. Modifiable risk factors in periodontitis: at the intersection of aging and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Mark A

    2014-02-01

    Chronic inflammation is a prominent feature of aging and of common age-related diseases, including atherosclerosis, cancer and periodontitis. This volume examines modifiable risk factors for periodontitis and other chronic inflammatory diseases. Oral bacterial communities and viral infections, particularly with cytomegalovirus and other herpesviruses, elicit distinct immune responses and are central in the initiation of periodontal diseases. Risk of disease is dynamic and changes in response to complex interactions of genetic, environmental and stochastic factors over the lifespan. Many modifiable risk factors, such as smoking and excess caloric intake, contribute to increases in systemic markers of inflammation and can modify gene regulation through a variety of biologic mechanisms (e.g. epigenetic modifications). Periodontitis and other common chronic inflammatory diseases share multiple modifiable risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, psychological stress and depression, alcohol consumption, obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and osteoporosis. Interventions that target modifiable risk factors have the potential to improve risk profiles for periodontitis as well as for other common chronic diseases. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Gold Finger: Metal Jewellery as a Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Therapy!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hlaing

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyarticular psoriatic arthritis is a chronic, progressive and disabling auto-immune disease often affecting the small joints of the hands in a symmetrical fashion. The disease can progress rapidly causing joint swelling and damaging cartilage and bone around the joints resulting in severe deformities. We report a very unusual case of a 49-year-old woman who presented with polyarticular psoriatic arthritis affecting all proximal interphalangeal (PIP joints of both hands except the left ring finger PIP joint. On clinical examination there was no evidence of arthritis in the left ring finger PIP joint. We confirmed the paucity of joint damage in the PIP joint of the left ring finger using more modern imaging modalities such as musculoskeletal ultrasound and MRI scan of the small joints of the hands. All other PIP joints in both hands demonstrated advanced degrees of joint damage secondary to chronic psoriatic inflammatory arthritis. We postulated that wearing a gold wedding ring has helped protecting the PIP joint of the left ring finger from the damaging effect of inflammatory arthritis. The possible mechanisms by which metal jewellery (gold ring confer protection to adjacent joints was discussed.

  8. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and the risk of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manthripragada, Angelika D; Schernhammer, Eva S; Qiu, Jiaheng

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence supports a preventative role for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD).......Experimental evidence supports a preventative role for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD)....

  9. [Technological and pharmacotherapeutic properties of selected drugs with modified release of diclofenac sodium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołodziejczyk, Michał Krzysztof; Kołodziejska, Justyna; Zgoda, Marian Mikołaj

    2012-01-01

    Diclofenac and its sodium salt is one of the best-known and popular therapeutic agents from the group of NSAIDs used in medicine in many various pharmaceutical forms. Therapeutic products containing diclofenac sodium salt in doses of 100 mg and 75 mg with a qualitatively and quantitatively diversified share of excipients and a variable dosage form of the drug (solid capsules, tablets with modified release) were subjected to technological and pharmaceutical analysis. The effect of solid formulation components of polymer character making the core and the coating of the pharmaceutical form of therapeutic products on the disintegration time and pharmaceutical availability in pharmacopoeial receptor fluids was estimated. Market therapeutic products with diclofenac sodium in doses of 75 mg and 100 mg, technological analysis of the drug dosage form was conducted, disintegration time of solid oral dosage forms of the drug with diclofenac sodium salt was examined and research on pharmaceutical availability of diclofenac sodium salt from tested therapeutic products was conducted using the acid phase and the buffer phase according to the FP standards for delayed release enteral dosage forms. The experimental data was supplemented with the statistical analysis. There are three formulations in the form of solid capsules and one formulation in the form of a coated tablet. All therapeutic products bear features of a dosage form of modified release of diclofenac sodium salt, frequently of a delayed release formula in the duodenum or the small intestine with regard to the limitation of typical undesirable effects after taking NSAIDs. Considerable diversity between solid capsules and the tablet with modified release during disintegration or hydration and swelling has been observed. In the environment of a receptor fluid--purified water (pH = 7) the capsule Dicloberl retard disintegrates at the fastest rate in 5,49 minutes, and then in the order: DicloDuo 75 mg--8,13 minutes and

  10. Macrophage models of Gaucher disease for evaluating disease pathogenesis and candidate drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflaki, Elma; Stubblefield, Barbara K; Maniwang, Emerson; Lopez, Grisel; Moaven, Nima; Goldin, Ehud; Marugan, Juan; Patnaik, Samarjit; Dutra, Amalia; Southall, Noel; Zheng, Wei; Tayebi, Nahid; Sidransky, Ellen

    2014-06-11

    Gaucher disease is caused by an inherited deficiency of glucocerebrosidase that manifests with storage of glycolipids in lysosomes, particularly in macrophages. Available cell lines modeling Gaucher disease do not demonstrate lysosomal storage of glycolipids; therefore, we set out to develop two macrophage models of Gaucher disease that exhibit appropriate substrate accumulation. We used these cellular models both to investigate altered macrophage biology in Gaucher disease and to evaluate candidate drugs for its treatment. We generated and characterized monocyte-derived macrophages from 20 patients carrying different Gaucher disease mutations. In addition, we created induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived macrophages from five fibroblast lines taken from patients with type 1 or type 2 Gaucher disease. Macrophages derived from patient monocytes or iPSCs showed reduced glucocerebrosidase activity and increased storage of glucocerebroside and glucosylsphingosine in lysosomes. These macrophages showed efficient phagocytosis of bacteria but reduced production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and impaired chemotaxis. The disease phenotype was reversed with a noninhibitory small-molecule chaperone drug that enhanced glucocerebrosidase activity in the macrophages, reduced glycolipid storage, and normalized chemotaxis and production of reactive oxygen species. Macrophages differentiated from patient monocytes or patient-derived iPSCs provide cellular models that can be used to investigate disease pathogenesis and facilitate drug development. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Drug targets in the cytokine universe for autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuebin; Fang, Lei; Guo, Taylor B; Mei, Hongkang; Zhang, Jingwu Z

    2013-03-01

    In autoimmune disease, a network of diverse cytokines is produced in association with disease susceptibility to constitute the 'cytokine milieu' that drives chronic inflammation. It remains elusive how cytokines interact in such a complex network to sustain inflammation in autoimmune disease. This has presented huge challenges for successful drug discovery because it has been difficult to predict how individual cytokine-targeted therapy would work. Here, we combine the principles of Chinese Taoism philosophy and modern bioinformatics tools to dissect multiple layers of arbitrary cytokine interactions into discernible interfaces and connectivity maps to predict movements in the cytokine network. The key principles presented here have important implications in our understanding of cytokine interactions and development of effective cytokine-targeted therapies for autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical trials and late-stage drug development for Alzheimer’s disease: an appraisal from 1984 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Lon S.; Mangialasche, Francesca; Andreasen, Niels; Feldman, Howard; Giacobini, Ezio; Jones, Roy; Mantua, Valentina; Mecocci, Patrizia; Pani, Luca; Winblad, Bengt; Kivipelto, Miia

    2014-01-01

    The modern era of drug development for Alzheimer’s disease began with the proposal of the cholinergic hypothesis of memory impairment and the 1984 research criteria for Alzheimer’s disease. Since then, despite the evaluation of numerous potential treatments in clinical trials, only four cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine have shown sufficient safety and efficacy to allow marketing approval at an international level. Although this is probably because the other drugs tested were ineffective, inadequate clinical development methods have also been blamed for the failures. Here we review the development of treatments for Alzheimer’s disease during the past 30 years, considering the drugs, potential targets, late-stage clinical trials, development methods, emerging use of biomarkers and evolution of regulatory considerations in order to summarize advances and anticipate future developments. We have considered late-stage Alzheimer’s disease drug development from 1984 to 2013, including individual clinical trials, systematic and qualitative reviews, meta-analyses, methods, commentaries, position papers and guidelines. We then review the evolution of drugs in late clinical development, methods, biomarkers and regulatory issues. Although a range of small molecules and biological products against many targets have been investigated in clinical trials, the predominant drug targets have been the cholinergic system and the amyloid cascade. Trial methods have evolved incrementally: inclusion criteria have largely remained focused on mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease criteria, recently extending to early or prodromal Alzheimer disease or ‘mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer’s disease’, for drugs considered to be disease modifying. The duration of trials has remained at 6 to 12 months for drugs intended to improve symptoms; 18- to 24-month trials have been established for drugs expected to attenuate clinical course. Cognitive performance, activities

  13. 78 FR 21613 - Prescription Drug User Fee Act Patient-Focused Drug Development; Announcement of Disease Areas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... Availability. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the selection of disease areas to... selection criteria, which were published in the September 24, 2012, Federal Register notice: Disease areas... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0967...

  14. Current advances in transdermal delivery of drugs for Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Giau, Vo Van; Vo, Tuong Kha

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common, progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disorder, which will play an increasingly important role both socially and financially in the aging populations. Treatments for AD show modest improvements in cognition and global functioning among patients. Furthermore, the oral administration of treating AD has had some drawbacks that decrease the medication adherence and efficacy of the therapy. Transdermal drugs are proposed as an alternative remedy to overcome the disadvantages of current pharmaceutical dosage options for this chronic disorder. They could have different strengths, such as offering a stable diffusion of active substance, avoiding the first pass metabolism, and reducing system adverse reactions. This article reviews the technical principles, novel techniques of transdermal delivery drug, and prospects for future development for the management of cognitive and behavioral dysfunctions in AD patients. PMID:28706327

  15. Print advertisements for Alzheimer's disease drugs: informational and transformational features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooblar, Jonathan; Carpenter, Brian D

    2013-06-01

    We examined print advertisements for Alzheimer's disease drugs published in journals and magazines between January 2008 and February 2012, using an informational versus transformational theoretical framework to identify objective and persuasive features. In 29 unique advertisements, we used qualitative methods to code and interpret identifying information, charts, benefit and side effect language, and persuasive appeals embedded in graphics and narratives. Most elements contained a mixture of informational and transformational features. Charts were used infrequently, but when they did appear the accompanying text often exaggerated the data. Benefit statements covered an array of symptoms, drug properties, and caregiver issues. Side effect statements often used positive persuasive appeals. Graphics and narrative features emphasized positive emotions and outcomes. We found subtle and sophisticated attempts both to educate and to persuade readers. It is important for consumers and prescribing physicians to read print advertisements critically so that they can make informed treatment choices.

  16. Current advances in transdermal delivery of drugs for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Giau, Vo Van; Vo, Tuong Kha

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common, progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disorder, which will play an increasingly important role both socially and financially in the aging populations. Treatments for AD show modest improvements in cognition and global functioning among patients. Furthermore, the oral administration of treating AD has had some drawbacks that decrease the medication adherence and efficacy of the therapy. Transdermal drugs are proposed as an alternative remedy to overcome the disadvantages of current pharmaceutical dosage options for this chronic disorder. They could have different strengths, such as offering a stable diffusion of active substance, avoiding the first pass metabolism, and reducing system adverse reactions. This article reviews the technical principles, novel techniques of transdermal delivery drug, and prospects for future development for the management of cognitive and behavioral dysfunctions in AD patients.

  17. FDM 3D printing of modified drug-delivery systems using hot melt extrusion: a new approach for individualized therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha-Filho, Marcilio; Araújo, Maísa Rp; Gelfuso, Guilherme M; Gratieri, Tais

    2017-11-01

    The production process of 3D-printed drugs offers unique advantages such as the possibility of individualizing the drug therapy and easily associating different drugs and release technologies in the same pharmaceutical unit. Fused deposition modeling, a 3D printing technique, seems especially interesting for pharmaceutical applications, due to its low cost, precise and reproducible control of the printed structures, and versatility for industrial and laboratory scale. This technique combined with another technology already adapted for the pharmaceutical industry, the hot melt extrusion, is able to incorporate various mechanisms of modified drug release. This special report aims to bring together data of the experimental progress achieved using the fused deposition modeling 3D printing combined with hot melt extrusion technique and its potential in drug delivery. [Formula: see text].

  18. Drug management in the elderly adult with chronic kidney disease: a review for the primary care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponticelli, Claudio; Sala, Gabriele; Glassock, Richard J

    2015-05-01

    With advancing age, the functional reserve of many organs tends to decrease. In particular, the lean body mass, the levels of serum albumin, the blood flow to the liver, and the glomerular filtration rate are reduced in elderly individuals and can be further impaired by the concomitant presence of acute or chronic kidney disease. Moreover, patients with kidney disease are often affected by comorbid processes and are prescribed multiple medications. The aging process also modifies some drug interactions, including the affinity of some drugs for their receptor, the number of receptors, and the cell responses upon receptor activation. Therefore, older patients with kidney disease are particularly susceptible to the risks of adverse drug reactions. Planning a pharmacological regimen in such patients is confounded by the paucity of information available on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of a large number of drugs commonly used in this group of patients. Finally, many aged patients suffer from unintentional poor compliance. In this review, the problems physicians face in designing safe and effective medication management in elderly individuals are discussed, paying attention to those more frequently used, which may be potentially harmful in patients with kidney disease. The risks of overdosing and underdosing are outlined, and some recommendations to reduce the risk of adverse drug reactions are provided. A review of the literature covering the field of drug management in older patients with kidney disease was performed by selecting those articles published between January 1, 1990, and December 1, 2014, using PubMed as a search engine with the keywords elderly, kidney disease, drugs, drug interaction, and renal function. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Anti-thyroid drugs in pediatric Graves′ disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew John

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves′ disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in children. Most children and adolescents are treated with anti-thyroid drugs as the initial modality. Studies have used Methimazole, Carbimazole and Propylthiouracil (PTU either as titration regimes or as block and replacement regimes. The various studies of anti-thyroid drug (ATD treatment of Graves′ disease in pediatric patients differ in terms of the regimes, remission rate, duration of therapy for adequate remission, follow up and adverse effects of ATD. Various studies show that lower thyroid hormone levels, prolonged duration of treatment, lower levels of TSH receptor antibodies, smaller goiter and increased age of child predicted higher chance of remission after ATD. A variable number of patients experience minor and major adverse effects limiting initial and long term treatment with ATD. The adverse effects of various ATD seem to more in children compared to that of adults. In view of liver injury including hepatocellular failure need of liver transplantation associated with PTU, the use has been restricted in children. The rate of persistent remission with ATD following discontinuation is about 30%. Radioactive iodine therapy is gaining more acceptance in older children with Graves′s disease in view of the limitations of ATD. For individual patients, risk-benefit ratio of ATD should be weighed against benefits of radioactive iodine therapy and patient preferences.

  20. Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative model of drug development for neglected diseases: current status and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioset, Jean-Robert; Chang, Shing

    2011-09-01

    The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) is a patients' needs-driven organization committed to the development of new treatments for neglected diseases. Created in 2003, DNDi has delivered four improved treatments for malaria, sleeping sickness and visceral leishmaniasis. A main DNDi challenge is to build a solid R&D portfolio for neglected diseases and to deliver preclinical candidates in a timely manner using an original model based on partnership. To address this challenge DNDi has remodeled its discovery activities from a project-based academic-bound network to a fully integrated process-oriented platform in close collaboration with pharmaceutical companies. This discovery platform relies on dedicated screening capacity and lead-optimization consortia supported by a pragmatic, structured and pharmaceutical-focused compound sourcing strategy.

  1. Computer-Aided Drug Design Applied to Marine Drug Discovery: Meridianins as Alzheimer's Disease Therapeutic Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorach-Pares, Laura; Nonell-Canals, Alfons; Sanchez-Martinez, Melchor; Avila, Conxita

    2017-11-27

    Computer-aided drug discovery/design (CADD) techniques allow the identification of natural products that are capable of modulating protein functions in pathogenesis-related pathways, constituting one of the most promising lines followed in drug discovery. In this paper, we computationally evaluated and reported the inhibitory activity found in meridianins A-G, a group of marine indole alkaloids isolated from the marine tunicate Aplidium , against various protein kinases involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD), a neurodegenerative pathology characterized by the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). Balance splitting between tau kinase and phosphate activities caused tau hyperphosphorylation and, thereby, its aggregation and NTF formation. Inhibition of specific kinases involved in its phosphorylation pathway could be one of the key strategies to reverse tau hyperphosphorylation and would represent an approach to develop drugs to palliate AD symptoms. Meridianins bind to the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding site of certain protein kinases, acting as ATP competitive inhibitors. These compounds show very promising scaffolds to design new drugs against AD, which could act over tau protein kinases Glycogen synthetase kinase-3 Beta (GSK3β) and Casein kinase 1 delta (CK1δ, CK1D or KC1D), and dual specificity kinases as dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation regulated kinase 1 (DYRK1A) and cdc2-like kinases (CLK1). This work is aimed to highlight the role of CADD techniques in marine drug discovery and to provide precise information regarding the binding mode and strength of meridianins against several protein kinases that could help in the future development of anti-AD drugs.

  2. A Modified Murine Embryonic Stem Cell Test for Evaluating the Teratogenic Effects of Drugs on Early Embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxing Yu

    Full Text Available Mammalian fetal development is easily disrupted by exogenous agents, making it essential to test new drug candidates for embryotoxicity and teratogenicity. To standardize the testing of drugs that might be used to treat pregnant women, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA formulated special grade categories, labeled A, B, C, D and X, that define the level of risk associated with the use of a specific drug during pregnancy. Drugs in categories (Cat. D and X are those with embryotoxic and/or teratogenic effects on humans and animals. However, which stages of pregnancy are affected by these agents and their molecular mechanisms are unknown. We describe here an embryonic stem cell test (EST that classifies FDA pregnancy Cat.D and Cat.X drugs into 4 classes based on their differing effects on primitive streak formation. We show that ~84% of Cat.D and Cat.X drugs target this period of embryogenesis. Our results demonstrate that our modified EST can identify how a drug affects early embryogenesis, when it acts, and its molecular mechanism. Our test may thus be a useful addition to the drug safety testing armamentarium.

  3. In silico search for modifier genes associated with pancreatic and liver disease in Cystic Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Trouvé

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in the white population, affecting among other organs, the lung, the pancreas and the liver. Whereas Cystic Fibrosis is a monogenic disease, many studies reveal a very complex relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype. Indeed, the broad phenotypic spectrum observed in Cystic Fibrosis is far from being explained by obvious genotype-phenotype correlations and it is admitted that Cystic Fibrosis disease is the result of multiple factors, including effects of the environment as well as modifier genes. Our objective was to highlight new modifier genes with potential implications in the lung, pancreatic and liver outcomes of the disease. For this purpose we performed a system biology approach which combined, database mining, literature mining, gene expression study and network analysis as well as pathway enrichment analysis and protein-protein interactions. We found that IFI16, CCNE2 and IGFBP2 are potential modifiers in the altered lung function in Cystic Fibrosis. We also found that EPHX1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, DSP and SLC33A1, GPNMB, NCF2, RASGRP1, LGALS3 and PTPN13, are potential modifiers in pancreas and liver, respectively. Associated pathways indicate that immune system is likely involved and that Ubiquitin C is probably a central node, linking Cystic Fibrosis to liver and pancreatic disease. We highlight here new modifier genes with potential implications in Cystic Fibrosis. Nevertheless, our in silico analysis requires functional analysis to give our results a physiological relevance.

  4. Disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells: a platform for human disease modeling and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jiho; Yoo, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Dongjin R; Kim, Ji Young; Huh, Yong Jun; Kim, Dae-Sung; Park, Chul-Yong; Hwang, Dong-Youn; Kim, Han-Soo; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2012-03-31

    The generation of disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from patients with incurable diseases is a promising approach for studying disease mechanisms and drug screening. Such innovation enables to obtain autologous cell sources in regenerative medicine. Herein, we report the generation and characterization of iPSCs from fibroblasts of patients with sporadic or familial diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), juvenile-onset, type I diabetes mellitus (JDM), and Duchenne type muscular dystrophy (DMD), as well as from normal human fibroblasts (WT). As an example to modeling disease using disease-specific iPSCs, we also discuss the previously established childhood cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy (CCALD)- and adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN)-iPSCs by our group. Through DNA fingerprinting analysis, the origins of generated disease-specific iPSC lines were identified. Each iPSC line exhibited an intense alkaline phosphatase activity, expression of pluripotent markers, and the potential to differentiate into all three embryonic germ layers: the ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm. Expression of endogenous pluripotent markers and downregulation of retrovirus-delivered transgenes [OCT4 (POU5F1), SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC] were observed in the generated iPSCs. Collectively, our results demonstrated that disease-specific iPSC lines characteristically resembled hESC lines. Furthermore, we were able to differentiate PD-iPSCs, one of the disease-specific-iPSC lines we generated, into dopaminergic (DA) neurons, the cell type mostly affected by PD. These PD-specific DA neurons along with other examples of cell models derived from disease-specific iPSCs would provide a powerful platform for examining the pathophysiology of relevant diseases at the cellular and molecular levels and for developing new drugs and therapeutic regimens.

  5. A modifier of Huntington's disease onset at the MLH1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Min; Chao, Michael J; Harold, Denise; Abu Elneel, Kawther; Gillis, Tammy; Holmans, Peter; Jones, Lesley; Orth, Michael; Myers, Richard H; Kwak, Seung; Wheeler, Vanessa C; MacDonald, Marcy E; Gusella, James F

    2017-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by an expanded CAG repeat in HTT. Many clinical characteristics of HD such as age at motor onset are determined largely by the size of HTT CAG repeat. However, emerging evidence strongly supports a role for other genetic factors in modifying the disease pathogenesis driven by mutant huntingtin. A recent genome-wide association analysis to discover genetic modifiers of HD onset age provided initial evidence for modifier loci on chromosomes 8 and 15 and suggestive evidence for a locus on chromosome 3. Here, genotyping of candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms in a cohort of 3,314 additional HD subjects yields independent confirmation of the former two loci and moves the third to genome-wide significance at MLH1, a locus whose mouse orthologue modifies CAG length-dependent phenotypes in a Htt-knock-in mouse model of HD. Both quantitative and dichotomous association analyses implicate a functional variant on ∼32% of chromosomes with the beneficial modifier effect that delays HD motor onset by 0.7 years/allele. Genomic DNA capture and sequencing of a modifier haplotype localize the functional variation to a 78 kb region spanning the 3'end of MLH1 and the 5'end of the neighboring LRRFIP2, and marked by an isoleucine-valine missense variant in MLH1. Analysis of expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTLs) provides modest support for altered regulation of MLH1 and LRRFIP2, raising the possibility that the modifier affects regulation of both genes. Finally, polygenic modification score and heritability analyses suggest the existence of additional genetic modifiers, supporting expanded, comprehensive genetic analysis of larger HD datasets. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Labile conjugation of a hydrophilic drug to PLA oligomers to modify a drug delivery system: cephradin in a PLAGA matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustariz-Peyret, C; Coudane, J; Vert, M; Kaltsatos, V; Boisramené, B

    2000-01-01

    The physical entrapment of a hydrophilic drug within degradable microspheres is generally difficult because of poor entrapment yield and/or fast release, depending on the microsphere fabrication method. In order to counter the effects of drug hydrophilicity, it is proposed to covalently attach the drug to lactic acid oligomers, with the aim of achieving temporary hydrophobization and slower release controlled by the separation of the drug from the degradable link within the polymer matrix. This strategy was tested on microspheres of the antibiotic cephradin. As the prodrug form, the entrapment of the drug was almost quantitative. The prodrug did degrade in an aqueous medium, modelling body fluids, but cleavage did not occur at the drug-oligomer junction and drug molecules bearing two lactyl residual units were released. When the prodrug is entrapped within a PLAGA matrix, no release was observed within the experimental time period. However, data suggest that conjugation via a bond more sensitive to hydrolysis than the main chain PLA ester bonds should make the system work as desired.

  7. Drugs in development for Parkinson's disease: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Tom H; Brotchie, Jonathan M

    2006-01-01

    The current development of emerging pharmacological treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD), front preclinical to launch, is summarized. Advances over the past year are highlighted, including the significant progress of several drugs through various stages of development. Several agents have been discontinued from development, either because of adverse effects or lack of clinical efficacy. The methyl-esterified form of L-DOPA (melevodopa) and the monoamine oxidase type B inhibitor rasagiline have both been launched. With regard to the monoamine re-uptake inhibitors, many changes have been witnessed, with new agents reaching preclinical development and pre-existing ones being discontinued or having no development reported. Of the dopamine agonists, many continue to progress successfully through clinical trials. Others have struggled to demonstrate a significant advantage over currently available treatments and have been discontinued. The field of non-dopaminergic treatments remains dynamic. The alpha2 adrenergic receptor antagonists and the adenosine A2A receptor antagonists remain in clinical trials. Trials of the neuronal' synchronization modulator levetiracetam are at an advanced stage, and there has also been a new addition to the class (ie, seletracetam). There has been a change in the landscape of neuroprotective agents that modulate disease progression. Candidates from the classes of growth factors and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors have been discontinued, or no development has been reported, and the mixed lineage kinase inhibitor CEP-1347 has been discontinued for PD treatment. Other drugs in this field, such as neuroimmunophilins, estrogens and alpha-synuclein oligomerization inhibitors, remain in development.

  8. A novel folate-modified self-microemulsifying drug delivery system of curcumin for colon targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lin Zhang1*, Weiwei Zhu2*, Chunfen Yang1, Hongxia Guo1, Aihua Yu1, Jianbo Ji3, Yan Gao1, Min Sun1, Guangxi Zhai11Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, College of Pharmacy, Shandong University, Jinan; 2Department of Pharmacy, Yantai Yuhuangding Hospital, Yantai; 3Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Shandong University, Jinan, China*These authors contributed equally to the workBackground: The objective of this study was to prepare, characterize, and evaluate a folate-modified self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (FSMEDDS with the aim to improve the solubility of curcumin and its delivery to the colon, facilitating endocytosis of FSMEDDS mediated by folate receptors on colon cancer cells.Methods: Ternary phase diagrams were constructed in order to obtain the most efficient self-emulsification region, and the formulation of curcumin-loaded SMEDDS was optimized by a simplex lattice experiment design. Then, three lipophilic folate derivatives (folate-polyethylene glycol-distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine, folate-polyethylene glycol-cholesteryl hemisuccinate, and folate-polyethylene glycol-cholesterol used as a surfactant were added to curcumin-loaded SMEDDS formulations. An in situ colon perfusion method in rats was used to optimize the formulation of FSMEDDS. Curcumin-loaded FSMEDDS was then filled into colon-targeted capsules and the in vitro release was investigated. Cytotoxicity studies and cellular uptake studies was used in this research.Results: The optimal formulation of FSMEDDS obtained with the established in situ colon perfusion method in rats was comprised of 57.5% Cremophor® EL, 32.5% Transcutol® HP, 10% Capryol™ 90, and a small amount of folate-polyethylene glycol-cholesteryl hemisuccinate (the weight ratio of folate materials to Cremophor EL was 1:100. The in vitro release results indicated that the obtained formulation of curcumin could reach the colon efficiently and release the drug immediately. Cellular

  9. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  10. DR2DI: a powerful computational tool for predicting novel drug-disease associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Yu, Hua

    2018-05-01

    Finding the new related candidate diseases for known drugs provides an effective method for fast-speed and low-risk drug development. However, experimental identification of drug-disease associations is expensive and time-consuming. This motivates the need for developing in silico computational methods that can infer true drug-disease pairs with high confidence. In this study, we presented a novel and powerful computational tool, DR2DI, for accurately uncovering the potential associations between drugs and diseases using high-dimensional and heterogeneous omics data as information sources. Based on a unified and extended similarity kernel framework, DR2DI inferred the unknown relationships between drugs and diseases using Regularized Kernel Classifier. Importantly, DR2DI employed a semi-supervised and global learning algorithm which can be applied to uncover the diseases (drugs) associated with known and novel drugs (diseases). In silico global validation experiments showed that DR2DI significantly outperforms recent two approaches for predicting drug-disease associations. Detailed case studies further demonstrated that the therapeutic indications and side effects of drugs predicted by DR2DI could be validated by existing database records and literature, suggesting that DR2DI can be served as a useful bioinformatic tool for identifying the potential drug-disease associations and guiding drug repositioning. Our software and comparison codes are freely available at https://github.com/huayu1111/DR2DI.

  11. DR2DI: a powerful computational tool for predicting novel drug-disease associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Yu, Hua

    2018-04-01

    Finding the new related candidate diseases for known drugs provides an effective method for fast-speed and low-risk drug development. However, experimental identification of drug-disease associations is expensive and time-consuming. This motivates the need for developing in silico computational methods that can infer true drug-disease pairs with high confidence. In this study, we presented a novel and powerful computational tool, DR2DI, for accurately uncovering the potential associations between drugs and diseases using high-dimensional and heterogeneous omics data as information sources. Based on a unified and extended similarity kernel framework, DR2DI inferred the unknown relationships between drugs and diseases using Regularized Kernel Classifier. Importantly, DR2DI employed a semi-supervised and global learning algorithm which can be applied to uncover the diseases (drugs) associated with known and novel drugs (diseases). In silico global validation experiments showed that DR2DI significantly outperforms recent two approaches for predicting drug-disease associations. Detailed case studies further demonstrated that the therapeutic indications and side effects of drugs predicted by DR2DI could be validated by existing database records and literature, suggesting that DR2DI can be served as a useful bioinformatic tool for identifying the potential drug-disease associations and guiding drug repositioning. Our software and comparison codes are freely available at https://github.com/huayu1111/DR2DI.

  12. A modified physiological BCS for prediction of intestinal absorption in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Noha M; Artursson, Per; Bergström, Christel A S

    2010-10-04

    In this study, the influence of physiologically relevant media on the compound position in a biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) which resembled the intestinal absorption was investigated. Both solubility and permeability limited compounds (n = 22) were included to analyze the importance of each of these on the final absorption. Solubility was determined in three different dissolution media, phosphate buffer pH 6.5 (PhB 6.5), fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF), and fed state simulated intestinal fluid (FeSSIF) at 37 °C, and permeability values were determined using the 2/4/A1 cell line. The solubility data and membrane permeability values were used for sorting the compounds into a BCS modified to reflect the fasted and fed state. Three of the seven compounds sorted as BCS II in PhB 6.5 (high permeability, low solubility) changed their position to BCS I when dissolved in FaSSIF and/or FeSSIF (high permeability, high solubility). These were low dosed (20 mg or less) lipophilic molecules displaying solvation limited solubility. In contrast, compounds having solid-state limited solubility had a minor increase in solubility when dissolved in FaSSIF and/or FeSSIF. Although further studies are needed to enable general cutoff values, our study indicates that low dosed BCS Class II compounds which have solubility normally restricted by poor solvation may behave as BCS Class I compounds in vivo. The large series of compounds investigated herein reveals the importance of investigating solubility and dissolution under physiologically relevant conditions in all stages of the drug discovery process to push suitable compounds forward, to select proper formulations, and to reduce the risk of food effects.

  13. Neuroprotective Effects of Psychotropic Drugs in Huntington’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward C. Lauterbach

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Psychotropics (antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, antidepressants, anxiolytics, etc. are commonly prescribed to treat Huntington’s disease (HD. In HD preclinical models, while no psychotropic has convincingly affected huntingtin gene, HD modifying gene, or huntingtin protein expression, psychotropic neuroprotective effects include upregulated huntingtin autophagy (lithium, histone acetylation (lithium, valproate, lamotrigine, miR-222 (lithium-plus-valproate, mitochondrial protection (haloperidol, trifluoperazine, imipramine, desipramine, nortriptyline, maprotiline, trazodone, sertraline, venlafaxine, melatonin, neurogenesis (lithium, valproate, fluoxetine, sertraline, and BDNF (lithium, valproate, sertraline and downregulated AP-1 DNA binding (lithium, p53 (lithium, huntingtin aggregation (antipsychotics, lithium, and apoptosis (trifluoperazine, loxapine, lithium, desipramine, nortriptyline, maprotiline, cyproheptadine, melatonin. In HD live mouse models, delayed disease onset (nortriptyline, melatonin, striatal preservation (haloperidol, tetrabenazine, lithium, sertraline, memory preservation (imipramine, trazodone, fluoxetine, sertraline, venlafaxine, motor improvement (tetrabenazine, lithium, valproate, imipramine, nortriptyline, trazodone, sertraline, venlafaxine, and extended survival (lithium, valproate, sertraline, melatonin have been documented. Upregulated CREB binding protein (CBP; valproate, dextromethorphan and downregulated histone deacetylase (HDAC; valproate await demonstration in HD models. Most preclinical findings await replication and their limitations are reviewed. The most promising findings involve replicated striatal neuroprotection and phenotypic disease modification in transgenic mice for tetrabenazine and for sertraline. Clinical data consist of an uncontrolled lithium case series (n = 3 suggesting non-progression and a primarily negative double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of lamotrigine.

  14. An investigation of effects of modification processes on physical properties and mechanism of drug release for sustaining drug release from modified rice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, Vuong Duy; Luu, Thinh Duc; Van Vo, Toi [Pharmaceutical Engineering Laboratory, Biomedical Engineering Department, International University, Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Tran, Van-Thanh [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Duan, Wei [School of Medicine, Deakin University, Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Victoria (Australia); Tran, Phuong Ha-Lien, E-mail: phuong.tran1@deakin.edu.au [School of Medicine, Deakin University, Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Victoria (Australia); Tran, Thao Truong-Dinh, E-mail: ttdthao@hcmiu.edu.vn [Pharmaceutical Engineering Laboratory, Biomedical Engineering Department, International University, Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of modification processes on physical properties and explain the mechanism of sustained drug release from modified rice (MR). Various types of Vietnamese rice were introduced in the study as the matrices of sustained release dosage form. Rice was thermally modified in water for a determined temperature at different times with a simple process. Then tablets containing MR and isradipine, the model drug, were prepared to investigate the capability of sustained drug release. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to determine different morphologies between MR formulations. Flow property of MR was analyzed by Hausner ratio and Carr's indices. The dissolution rate and swelling/erosion behaviors of tablets were evaluated at pH 1.2 and pH 6.8 at 37 ± 0.5 °C. The matrix tablet containing MR showed a sustained release as compared to the control. The SEM analyses and swelling/erosion studies indicated that the morphology as well as swelling/erosion rate of MR were modulated by modification time, drying method and incubation. It was found that the modification process was crucial because it could highly affect the granule morphologies and hence, leading to the change of flowability and swelling/erosion capacity for sustained release of drug. - Highlights: • Modification process affected granule morphologies and flowability of modified rice. • Modification process affected swelling/erosion capacity for drug sustained release. • Freeze-drying could decrease the erosion as well as increase the swelling rate.

  15. An investigation of effects of modification processes on physical properties and mechanism of drug release for sustaining drug release from modified rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, Vuong Duy; Luu, Thinh Duc; Van Vo, Toi; Tran, Van-Thanh; Duan, Wei; Tran, Phuong Ha-Lien; Tran, Thao Truong-Dinh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of modification processes on physical properties and explain the mechanism of sustained drug release from modified rice (MR). Various types of Vietnamese rice were introduced in the study as the matrices of sustained release dosage form. Rice was thermally modified in water for a determined temperature at different times with a simple process. Then tablets containing MR and isradipine, the model drug, were prepared to investigate the capability of sustained drug release. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to determine different morphologies between MR formulations. Flow property of MR was analyzed by Hausner ratio and Carr's indices. The dissolution rate and swelling/erosion behaviors of tablets were evaluated at pH 1.2 and pH 6.8 at 37 ± 0.5 °C. The matrix tablet containing MR showed a sustained release as compared to the control. The SEM analyses and swelling/erosion studies indicated that the morphology as well as swelling/erosion rate of MR were modulated by modification time, drying method and incubation. It was found that the modification process was crucial because it could highly affect the granule morphologies and hence, leading to the change of flowability and swelling/erosion capacity for sustained release of drug. - Highlights: • Modification process affected granule morphologies and flowability of modified rice. • Modification process affected swelling/erosion capacity for drug sustained release. • Freeze-drying could decrease the erosion as well as increase the swelling rate.

  16. CLC-2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as potential modifiers of cystic fibrosis disease severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaisdell, Carol J; Howard, Timothy D; Stern, Augustus; Bamford, Penelope; Bleecker, Eugene R; Stine, O Colin

    2004-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease manifest by impaired chloride secretion leads to eventual respiratory failure. Candidate genes that may modify CF lung disease severity include alternative chloride channels. The objectives of this study are to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the airway epithelial chloride channel, CLC-2, and correlate these polymorphisms with CF lung disease. Methods The CLC-2 promoter, intron 1 and exon 20 were examined for SNPs in adult CF dF508/dF508 homozygotes with mild and severe lung disease (forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV1) > 70% and < 40%). Results PCR amplification of genomic CLC-2 and sequence analysis revealed 1 polymorphism in the hClC -2 promoter, 4 in intron 1, and none in exon 20. Fisher's analysis within this data set, did not demonstrate a significant relationship between the severity of lung disease and SNPs in the CLC-2 gene. Conclusions CLC-2 is not a key modifier gene of CF lung phenotype. Further studies evaluating other phenotypes associated with CF may be useful in the future to assess the ability of CLC-2 to modify CF disease severity. PMID:15507145

  17. CLC-2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs as potential modifiers of cystic fibrosis disease severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bleecker Eugene R

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis (CF lung disease manifest by impaired chloride secretion leads to eventual respiratory failure. Candidate genes that may modify CF lung disease severity include alternative chloride channels. The objectives of this study are to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the airway epithelial chloride channel, CLC-2, and correlate these polymorphisms with CF lung disease. Methods The CLC-2 promoter, intron 1 and exon 20 were examined for SNPs in adult CF dF508/dF508 homozygotes with mild and severe lung disease (forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV1 > 70% and Results PCR amplification of genomic CLC-2 and sequence analysis revealed 1 polymorphism in the hClC -2 promoter, 4 in intron 1, and none in exon 20. Fisher's analysis within this data set, did not demonstrate a significant relationship between the severity of lung disease and SNPs in the CLC-2 gene. Conclusions CLC-2 is not a key modifier gene of CF lung phenotype. Further studies evaluating other phenotypes associated with CF may be useful in the future to assess the ability of CLC-2 to modify CF disease severity.

  18. Use of modified cornstarch therapy to extend fasting in glycogen storage disease types Ia and Ib

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correia, Catherine E.; Bhattacharya, Kaustuv; Lee, Philip J.; Shuster, Jonathan J.; Theriaque, Douglas W.; Shankar, Meena N.; Smit, G. Peter A.; Weinstein, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Type I glycogen storage disease (GSD) is caused by a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase resulting in severe fasting hypoglycemia. Objective: We compared the efficacy of a new modified starch with the currently used cornstarch therapy in patients with type Ia and Ib GSD. Design: This was

  19. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A., E-mail: alashkov83@gmail.com; Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability (R{sub work} = 16.2, R{sub free} = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh.

  20. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability (R work = 16.2, R free = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh

  1. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability ( R work = 16.2, R free = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh.

  2. Health Technology Assessment Of Orphan Drugs : The example of Pompe disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Kanters (Tim A.)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn recent decades, the development of orphan drugs, i.e. drugs for rare diseases, is stimulated by regulations in various countries. However, the generally high prices of orphan drugs confront policy makers with difficult reimbursement decisions. The orphan disease investigated in

  3. Molecular property diagnostic suite (MPDS): Development of disease-specific open source web portals for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamani, S; Gaur, A S; Tanneeru, K; Muneeswaran, G; Madugula, S S; Consortium, Mpds; Druzhilovskiy, D; Poroikov, V V; Sastry, G N

    2017-11-01

    Molecular property diagnostic suite (MPDS) is a Galaxy-based open source drug discovery and development platform. MPDS web portals are designed for several diseases, such as tuberculosis, diabetes mellitus, and other metabolic disorders, specifically aimed to evaluate and estimate the drug-likeness of a given molecule. MPDS consists of three modules, namely data libraries, data processing, and data analysis tools which are configured and interconnected to assist drug discovery for specific diseases. The data library module encompasses vast information on chemical space, wherein the MPDS compound library comprises 110.31 million unique molecules generated from public domain databases. Every molecule is assigned with a unique ID and card, which provides complete information for the molecule. Some of the modules in the MPDS are specific to the diseases, while others are non-specific. Importantly, a suitably altered protocol can be effectively generated for another disease-specific MPDS web portal by modifying some of the modules. Thus, the MPDS suite of web portals shows great promise to emerge as disease-specific portals of great value, integrating chemoinformatics, bioinformatics, molecular modelling, and structure- and analogue-based drug discovery approaches.

  4. Micro RNA, A Review: Pharmacogenomic drug targets for complex diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Bawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Micro RNAs (miRNAs are non-coding RNAs that can regulate gene expression to target several mRNAs in a gene regulatory network. MiRNA related Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (S.N.P.s represent a newly identified type of genetic variability that can be of influence to the risk of certain human diseases and also affect how drugs can be activated and metabolized by patients. This will help in personalized medicines which are used for administrating the correct dosage of drug and drug efficacy. miRNA deregulated expression has been extensively described in a variety of diseases such as Cancer, Obesity , Diabetes, Schizophrenia and control and self renewal of stem cells. MiRNA can function as oncogenes and/or tumor suppressors. MiRNAs may act as key regulators of processes as diverse as early development, cell proliferation and cell death, apoptosis and fat metabolism and cell differentiation .miRNA expression have shown their role in brain development chronic lymphocytic leukemia, colonic adeno carcinoma, Burkiff’s lymphoma and viral infection. These show their links with viral disease, neurodevelopment and cancer. It has been shown that they play a key role in melanoma metastasis. These may be

  5. A comparative analysis of the impact of a positive list system on new chemical entity drugs and incrementally modified drugs in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, DongMun; Choi, Yong; Kim, Dae Up; Chung, Kyu Hyuck; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2011-07-01

    Medical costs in South Korea have risen, in part due to increased demand and consumption of pharmaceutical products by an aging population and also because of the introduction of newer, more expensive drugs. In an effort to stabilize the financing of health insurance and alleviate the financial burden on individuals, the government implemented a policy changing the national health insurance drug-listing system from a negative list system to a positive list system (PLS). The goal of this study was to compare differences in drug-listing rates for new chemical entities (NCEs) and incrementally modified drugs (IMDs) after South Korea introduced the PLS in December 2006. Parameters significantly affecting NCE and IMD listings were also identified. New drug-listing data for 2007 and 2008 were obtained from the databases of the Health Insurance Review Agency and the Ministry of Health and Welfare. Descriptive analyses on the reimbursement rate and logistic regression analysis were conducted. Statistical significance was tested for all results, and P system by decreasing the drug-listing rate and lengthening the period for reimbursement determinations. These effects were more pronounced for NCE listings than for IMD listings. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by EM Inc USA. All rights reserved.

  6. PML and rheumatology: the contribution of disease and drugs.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Molloy, Eamonn S

    2011-11-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a rare, typically fatal, opportunistic infection caused by the JC virus, is becoming relevant to physicians in multiple specialties, including those who prescribe biologic agents for the treatment of autoimmune disorders. Reports of PML have led to US Food and Drug Administration alerts and warning letters regarding four immunosuppressive agents in recent years (natalizumab, rituximab, efalizumab, and mycophenolate mofetil). Consequently, informed clinical decision-making requires understanding the risk of PML associated with these therapies. An estimate of the relative frequency of PML associated with specific rheumatic conditions has been generated. Systemic lupus erythematosus appears to be associated with susceptibility to PML that cannot be fully explained by the intensity of immunosuppressive therapy. Further, the use of rituximab in patients with rheumatic disease has raised concerns. However, definitive attribution of cause is precluded by the limitations of the currently available data. All patients with rheumatic disease, regardless of the intensity of their current immunosuppressive therapy, should be considered potentially at risk of PML. With an evolving understanding of a greater clinical heterogeneity of PML, advances in diagnostic methods, and significant implications for therapy, PML should be considered in the differential diagnosis of neurologic manifestations of rheumatic diseases.

  7. Identification of attractive drug targets in neglected-disease pathogens using an in silico approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J Crowther

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increased sequencing of pathogen genomes and the subsequent availability of genome-scale functional datasets are expected to guide the experimental work necessary for target-based drug discovery. However, a major bottleneck in this has been the difficulty of capturing and integrating relevant information in an easily accessible format for identifying and prioritizing potential targets. The open-access resource TDRtargets.org facilitates drug target prioritization for major tropical disease pathogens such as the mycobacteria Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis; the kinetoplastid protozoans Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi; the apicomplexan protozoans Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax, and Toxoplasma gondii; and the helminths Brugia malayi and Schistosoma mansoni. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present strategies to prioritize pathogen proteins based on whether their properties meet criteria considered desirable in a drug target. These criteria are based upon both sequence-derived information (e.g., molecular mass and functional data on expression, essentiality, phenotypes, metabolic pathways, assayability, and druggability. This approach also highlights the fact that data for many relevant criteria are lacking in less-studied pathogens (e.g., helminths, and we demonstrate how this can be partially overcome by mapping data from homologous genes in well-studied organisms. We also show how individual users can easily upload external datasets and integrate them with existing data in TDRtargets.org to generate highly customized ranked lists of potential targets. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using the datasets and the tools available in TDRtargets.org, we have generated illustrative lists of potential drug targets in seven tropical disease pathogens. While these lists are broadly consistent with the research community's current interest in certain specific proteins, and suggest

  8. HYDROXYCARBAMINE: FROM AN OLD DRUG USED IN MALIGNANT HEMOPATHIES TO A CURRENT STANDARD IN SICKLE CELL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Cannas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available While hydroxycarbamine (hydroxyurea, HU has less and less indications in malignant hemopathies, it represents the only widely used drug which modifies sickle cell disease pathogenesis. Clinical experience with HU for patients with sickle cell disease has been accumulated over the past 25 years in Western countries. The review of the literature provides increasing support of safety and efficacy in both children and adults for reducing acute vaso-occlusive events including pain episodes and acute chest syndrome. HU has become the standard-of-care for sickle cell anemia, but remains underused. Barriers to its use should be identified and overcome.

  9. Electrochemical studies of ropinirole, an anti-Parkinson's disease drug

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    trochemical techniques have application to drug-protein. ∗. For correspondence ... drug bioavailability and toxicity tests. ... analysis ranging from the assay of drugs in bulk form, ... stability-indicating assays.13,14 Separation and quantifi-.

  10. Development and validation of modified disease activity scores in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Joshua F; Conaghan, Philip G; Smolen, Josef S

    2014-01-01

    -CDAI) were generated for each subject in the validation cohort. The M-DAS28, M-SDAI, and M-CDAI scores were compared to conventional scores of disease activity with regard to associations with MRI measures of synovitis and radiographic progression, assessed using Pearson's and Spearman's correlations, linear......OBJECTIVE: To develop and validate composite disease activity scores, based on widely available clinical measures, that would demonstrate improved correlation with detection of synovitis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiographic progression, in comparison with conventional measures.......15 × SJC28 + 0.22 × EvGA + 1 and M-SDAI = CRP + SJC28 + EvGA. Both modified and conventional disease activity scores correlated significantly with MRI measures of synovitis. Modified scores showed superior correlation with synovitis, as compared to conventional scores, at all time points (P

  11. Sirtuins: Novel targets for metabolic disease in drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Weijian

    2008-01-01

    Calorie restriction extends lifespan and produces a metabolic profile desirable for treating diseases such as type 2 diabetes. SIRT1, an NAD + -dependent deacetylase, is a principal modulator of pathways downstream of calorie restriction that produces beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. Activation of SIRT1 leads to enhanced activity of multiple proteins, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and FOXO which helps to mediate some of the in vitro and in vivo effects of sirtuins. Resveratrol, a polyphenolic SIRT1 activator, mimics the effects of calorie restriction in lower organisms and in mice fed a high-fat diet ameliorates insulin resistance. In this review, we summarize recent research advances in unveiling the molecular mechanisms that underpin sirtuin as therapeutic candidates and discuss the possibility of using resveratrol as potential drug for treatment of diabetes

  12. Oral disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis in the Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) region: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleu, Dirk; Mesraoua, Boulenouar; Canibaño, Beatriz; Melikyan, Gayane; Al Hail, Hassan; El-Sheikh, Lubna; Ali, Musab; Al Hussein, Hassan; Ibrahim, Faiza; Hanssens, Yolande

    2018-06-18

    The introduction of new disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for remitting-relapsing multiple sclerosis (RRMS) has considerably transformed the landscape of therapeutic opportunities for this chronic disabling disease. Unlike injectable drugs, oral DMTs promote patient satisfaction and increase therapeutic adherence. This article reviews the salient features about the mode of action, efficacy, safety, and tolerability profile of approved oral DMTs in RRMS, and reviews their place in clinical algorithms in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. A systematic review was conducted using a comprehensive search of MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (period January 1, 1995-January 31, 2018). Additional searches of the American Academy of Neurology and European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis abstracts from 2012-2017 were performed, in addition to searches of the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency websites, to obtain relevant safety information on these DMTs. Four oral DMTs: fingolimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, and cladribine have been approved by the regulatory agencies. Based on the number needed to treat (NNT), the potential role of these DMTs in the management of active and highly active or rapidly evolving RRMS is assessed. Finally, the place of the oral DMTs in clinical algorithms in the MENA region is reviewed.

  13. Prevalence of infectious diseases and drug abuse among Bangladeshi workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumi, M A; Siddiqui, M A; Salam, M A; Iqbal, M R; Azam, M G; Chowdhury, A K; Khan AYM; Hasan, K N; Hassan, M S

    2000-09-01

    Individuals seeking jobs abroad need health fitness certificates before entering into those countries. Medical screening of 43,213 Bangladeshi job seekers (M/F: 42,290/923) was carried out in our reference center during the period August, 1994 to May, 1996. Albeit male predominance, they represented middle and lower middle socio-economic class of the population from all over the country. All were young adults (age: 27.05+/-3.56 years; mean+/-SD) applying for job visas to different Asian countries. Physical examination and laboratory investigations including markers for several infectious diseases and drugs of abuse were carried out as required by countries recruiting the workers. Serological tests revealed that 1,884 (4.4%) of individuals were positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), 737 (1.7%) for Treponema pallidum hemagglutination (TPHA) and only 83 (0.2%) for antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV). However, we could not confirm any case of infection with HIV. Chest X-ray suggestive of pulmonary tuberculosis was found in 162 (0.4%) and on blood film, malarial parasites could be observed only in 4 cases. Their urine analysis revealed the presence of opiates or cannabinoids in 471 (1.1%) individuals. HBsAg-positive cases (p = 0.003) and abuse of opiates (p = 0.024) or cannabinoids (p = 0.002) were significantly higher among males. TPHA reactivity and chest X-ray suggestive of tuberculosis were found to be higher among opiates (p = 0.002 and 0.027) and cannabinoids (p = 0.000 for both) abused as well as with increasing age (p = 0.000). These results may represent a cross-sectional view of the prevalence of different infectious diseases and abuse of drugs among the young adult population of Bangladesh.

  14. Potential of chromatin modifying compounds for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannis, Tom C; Ververis, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a very common progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting the learning and memory centers in the brain. The hallmarks of disease are the accumulation of β-amyloid neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles formed by abnormally phosphorylated tau protein. Alzheimer's disease is currently incurable and there is an intense interest in the development of new potential therapies. Chromatin modifying compounds such as sirtuin modulators and histone deacetylase inhibitors have been evaluated in models of Alzheimer's disease with some promising results. For example, the natural antioxidant and sirtuin 1 activator resveratrol has been shown to have beneficial effects in animal models of disease. Similarly, numerous histone deacetylase inhibitors including Trichostatin A, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, valproic acid and phenylbutyrate reduction have shown promising results in models of Alzheimer's disease. These beneficial effects include a reduction of β-amyloid production and stabilization of tau protein. In this review we provide an overview of the histone deacetylase enzymes, with a focus on enzymes that have been identified to have an important role in the pathobiology of Alzheimer's disease. Further, we discuss the potential for pharmacological intervention with chromatin modifying compounds that modulate histone deacetylase enzymes.

  15. Potential of chromatin modifying compounds for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom C. Karagiannis

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a very common progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting the learning and memory centers in the brain. The hallmarks of disease are the accumulation of β-amyloid neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles formed by abnormally phosphorylated tau protein. Alzheimer's disease is currently incurable and there is an intense interest in the development of new potential therapies. Chromatin modifying compounds such as sirtuin modulators and histone deacetylase inhibitors have been evaluated in models of Alzheimer's disease with some promising results. For example, the natural antioxidant and sirtuin 1 activator resveratrol has been shown to have beneficial effects in animal models of disease. Similarly, numerous histone deacetylase inhibitors including Trichostatin A, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, valproic acid and phenylbutyrate reduction have shown promising results in models of Alzheimer's disease. These beneficial effects include a reduction of β-amyloid production and stabilization of tau protein. In this review we provide an overview of the histone deacetylase enzymes, with a focus on enzymes that have been identified to have an important role in the pathobiology of Alzheimer's disease. Further, we discuss the potential for pharmacological intervention with chromatin modifying compounds that modulate histone deacetylase enzymes.

  16. Predicting relapse of Graves' disease following treatment with antithyroid drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, LIN; LU, HONGWEN; LIU, YANG; LIU, CHANGSHAN; XUN, CHU

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to monitor long term antithyroid drug treatments and to identify prognostic factors for Graves' disease (GD). A total of 306 patients with GD who were referred to the Endocrinology Clinic at Weifang People's Hospital (Weifang, China) between August 2005 and June 2009 and treated with methimazole were included in the present study. Following treatment, patients were divided into non-remission, including recurrence and constant treatment subgroups, and remission groups. Various prognosis factors were analyzed and compared, including: Patient age, gender, size of thyroid prior to and following treatment, thyroid hormone levels, disease relapse, hypothyroidism and drug side-effects, and states of thyrotropin suppression were observed at 3, 6 and 12 months post-treatment. Sixty-five patients (21.2%) were male, and 241 patients (78.8%) were female. The mean age was 42±11 years, and the follow-up was 31.5±6.8 months. Following long-term treatment, 141 patients (46%) demonstrated remission of hyperthyroidism with a mean duration of 18.7±1.9 months. The average age at diagnosis was 45.6±10.3 years in the remission group, as compared with 36.4±8.8 years in the non-remission group (t=3.152; P=0.002). Free thyroxine (FT)3 levels were demonstrated to be 25.2±8.9 and 18.7±9.4 pmol/l in the non-remission and remission groups, respectively (t=3.326, P=0.001). The FT3/FT4 ratio and thyrotrophin receptor antibody (TRAb) levels were both significantly higher in the non-remission group (t=3.331, 3.389, P=0.001), as compared with the remission group. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that elevated thyroid size, FT3/FT4 ratio and TRAb at diagnosis were associated with poor outcomes. The ratio of continued thyrotropin suppression in the recurrent subgroup was significantly increased, as compared with the remission group (P=0.001), as thyroid function reached euthyroid state at 3, 6 and 12 months post-treatment. Patients with GD exhibiting

  17. Lactoferrin-modified rotigotine nanoparticles for enhanced nose-to-brain delivery: LESA-MS/MS-based drug biodistribution, pharmacodynamics, and neuroprotective effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan X

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Xiuju Yan,1,* Lixiao Xu,1,* Chenchen Bi,1 Dongyu Duan,1 Liuxiang Chu,1 Xin Yu,1 Zimei Wu,1 Aiping Wang,1,2 Kaoxiang Sun1,2 1School of Pharmacy, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Drug Delivery System and Biotech Drugs in Universities of Shandong, Key Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology and Drug Evaluation (Yantai University, Ministry of Education, Yantai University, Yantai, Shandong Province, 2State Key Laboratory of Long-Acting and Targeting Drug Delivery System, Shandong Luye Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd, Yantai, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Introduction: Efficient delivery of rotigotine into the brain is crucial for obtaining maximum therapeutic efficacy for Parkinson’s disease (PD. Therefore, in the present study, we prepared lactoferrin-modified rotigotine nanoparticles (Lf-R-NPs and studied their biodistribution, pharmacodynamics, and neuroprotective effects following nose-to-brain delivery in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine model of PD.Materials and methods: The biodistribution of rotigotine nanoparticles (R-NPs and Lf-R-NPs after intranasal administration was assessed by liquid extraction surface analysis coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Contralateral rotations were quantified to evaluate pharmacodynamics. Tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter immunohistochemistry were performed to compare the neuroprotective effects of levodopa, R-NPs, and Lf-R-NPs.Results: Liquid extraction surface analysis coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analysis, used to examine rotigotine biodistribution, showed that Lf-R-NPs more efficiently supplied rotigotine to the brain (with a greater sustained amount of the drug delivered to this organ, and with more effective targeting to the striatum than R-NPs. The pharmacodynamic study revealed a significant difference (P<0.05 in contralateral rotations between rats treated with Lf-R-NPs and those treated with R-NPs. Furthermore, Lf

  18. Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases. Often forgotten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poschenrieder, F.; Stroszczynski, C.; Hamer, O.W.

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases (DILD) are probably more common than diagnosed. Due to their potential reversibility, increased vigilance towards DILD is appropriate also from the radiologist's point of view, particularly as these diseases regularly exhibit radiological correlates in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the lungs. Based on personal experience typical relatively common manifestations of DILD are diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), eosinophilic pneumonia (EP), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), organizing pneumonia (OP), non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) and usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). These patterns are presented based on case studies, whereby emphasis is placed on the clinical context. This is to highlight the relevance of interdisciplinary communication and discussion in the diagnostic field of DILD as it is a diagnosis of exclusion or of probability in most cases. Helpful differential diagnostic indications for the presence of DILD, such as an accompanying eosinophilia or increased attenuation of pulmonary consolidations in amiodarone-induced pneumopathy are mentioned and the freely available online database http://www.pneumotox.com is presented. (orig.) [de

  19. Respirable antisense oligonucleotides: a new drug class for respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Makoto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respirable antisense oligonucleotides (RASONs, which attenuate specific disease-associated mRNAs, represent a new class of respiratory therapeutics with considerable potential. RASONs overcome previous obstacles that have impeded the development of antisense therapeutics targeting diseases in other organ systems. RASONs are delivered directly to the target tissue via inhalation; their uptake seems to be enhanced by cationic properties inherent in pulmonary surfactant, and, because of the markedly different target properties of mRNA and proteins, they can have very long durations of effect compared with traditional drugs targeting the protein of the same gene. RASONs contain chemical modifications that decrease their degradation by cellular nucleases. However, total insensitivity to nucleases is probably not an optimal design criterion for RASONs, because moderate nuclease sensitivity can prevent their systemic delivery, decreasing the potential for systemic toxicity. EPI-2010 is a 21-mer phosphorothioate RASON that attenuates bronchoconstriction, inflammation and surfactant depletion in preclinical models of human asthma, has a duration of effect of seven days, and seems to undergo minimal systemic delivery.

  20. Developments on drug discovery and on new therapeutics: highly diluted tinctures act as biological response modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Carolina C; Abud, Ana Paula R; de Oliveira, Simone M; Guimarães, Fernando de S F; de Andrade, Lucas F; Di Bernardi, Raffaello P; Coletto, Ediely L de O; Kuczera, Diogo; Da Lozzo, Eneida J; Gonçalves, Jenifer P; Trindade, Edvaldo da S; Buchi, Dorly de F

    2011-10-26

    In the search for new therapies novel drugs and medications are being discovered, developed and tested in laboratories. Highly diluted substances are intended to enhance immune system responses resulting in reduced frequency of various diseases, and often present no risk of serious side-effects due to its low toxicity. Over the past years our research group has been investigating the action of highly diluted substances and tinctures on cells from the immune system. We have developed and tested several highly diluted tinctures and here we describe the biological activity of M1, M2, and M8 both in vitro in immune cells from mice and human, and in vivo in mice. Cytotoxicity, cytokines released and NF-κB activation were determined after in vitro treatment. Cell viability, oxidative response, lipid peroxidation, bone marrow and lymph node cells immunophenotyping were accessed after mice in vivo treatment. None of the highly diluted tinctures tested were cytotoxic to macrophages or K562. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages treated with all highly diluted tinctures decreased tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) release and M1, and M8 decreased IFN-γ production. M1 has decreased NF-κB activity on TNF-α stimulated reporter cell line. In vivo treatment lead to a decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) production was increased by M1, and M8, and lipid peroxidation was induced by M1, and M2. All compounds enhanced the innate immunity, but M1 also augmented acquired immunity and M2 diminished B lymphocytes, responsible to acquired immunity. Based on the results presented here, these highly diluted tinctures were shown to modulate immune responses. Even though further investigation is needed there is an indication that these highly diluted tinctures could be used as therapeutic interventions in disorders where the immune system is compromised.

    1. Developments on drug discovery and on new therapeutics: highly diluted tinctures act as biological response modifiers

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      de Oliveira Carolina C

      2011-10-01

      Full Text Available Abstract Background In the search for new therapies novel drugs and medications are being discovered, developed and tested in laboratories. Highly diluted substances are intended to enhance immune system responses resulting in reduced frequency of various diseases, and often present no risk of serious side-effects due to its low toxicity. Over the past years our research group has been investigating the action of highly diluted substances and tinctures on cells from the immune system. Methods We have developed and tested several highly diluted tinctures and here we describe the biological activity of M1, M2, and M8 both in vitro in immune cells from mice and human, and in vivo in mice. Cytotoxicity, cytokines released and NF-κB activation were determined after in vitro treatment. Cell viability, oxidative response, lipid peroxidation, bone marrow and lymph node cells immunophenotyping were accessed after mice in vivo treatment. Results None of the highly diluted tinctures tested were cytotoxic to macrophages or K562. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated macrophages treated with all highly diluted tinctures decreased tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α release and M1, and M8 decreased IFN-γ production. M1 has decreased NF-κB activity on TNF-α stimulated reporter cell line. In vivo treatment lead to a decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS, nitric oxide (NO production was increased by M1, and M8, and lipid peroxidation was induced by M1, and M2. All compounds enhanced the innate immunity, but M1 also augmented acquired immunity and M2 diminished B lymphocytes, responsible to acquired immunity. Conclusions Based on the results presented here, these highly diluted tinctures were shown to modulate immune responses. Even though further investigation is needed there is an indication that these highly diluted tinctures could be used as therapeutic interventions in disorders where the immune system is compromised.

    2. Increased Loading, Efficacy and Sustained Release of Silibinin, a Poorly Soluble Drug Using Hydrophobically-Modified Chitosan Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Anticancer Drug Delivery Systems

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Cha Yee Kuen

      2017-11-01

      Full Text Available Conventional delivery of anticancer drugs is less effective due to pharmacological drawbacks such as lack of aqueous solubility and poor cellular accumulation. This study reports the increased drug loading, therapeutic delivery, and cellular accumulation of silibinin (SLB, a poorly water-soluble phenolic compound using a hydrophobically-modified chitosan nanoparticle (pCNP system. In this study, chitosan nanoparticles were hydrophobically-modified to confer a palmitoyl group as confirmed by 2,4,6-Trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS assay. Physicochemical features of the nanoparticles were studied using the TNBS assay, and Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR analyses. The FTIR profile and electron microscopy correlated the successful formation of pCNP and pCNP-SLB as nano-sized particles, while Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS and Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM results exhibited an expansion in size between pCNP and pCNP-SLB to accommodate the drug within its particle core. To evaluate the cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles, a Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT cytotoxicity assay was subsequently performed using the A549 lung cancer cell line. Cytotoxicity assays exhibited an enhanced efficacy of SLB when delivered by CNP and pCNP. Interestingly, controlled release delivery of SLB was achieved using the pCNP-SLB system, conferring higher cytotoxic effects and lower IC50 values in 72-h treatments compared to CNP-SLB, which was attributed to the hydrophobic modification of the CNP system.

    3. Orphan drugs, orphan diseases. The first decade of orphan drug legislation in the EU.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Joppi, Roberta; Bertele', Vittorio; Garattini, Silvio

      2013-04-01

      To assess the methodological quality of Orphan Medicinal Product (OMP) dossiers and discuss possible reasons for the small number of products licensed. Information about orphan drug designation, approval, refusal or withdrawal was obtained from the website of the European Medicines Agency and from the European Public Assessment Reports. From 2000 up to 2010, 80.9 % of the 845 candidate orphan drug designations received a positive opinion from the European Medicines Agency (EMA)'s Committee on Orphan Medicinal Products. Of the 108 OMP marketing authorizations applied for, 63 were granted. Randomised clinical trials were done for 38 OMPs and placebo was used as comparator for nearly half the licensed drugs. One third of the OMPs were tested in trials involving fewer than 100 patients and more than half in trials with 100-200 cases. The clinical trials lasted less than one year for 42.9 % of the approved OMPs. Although there may have been some small improvements over time in the methods for developing OMPs, in our opinion, the number of patients studied, the use of placebo as control, the type of outcome measure and the follow-up have often been inadequate. The present system should be changed to find better ways of fostering the development of effective and sustainable treatments for patients with orphan diseases. Public funds supporting independent clinical research on OMPs could bridge the gap between designation and approval. More stringent criteria to assess OMPs' efficacy and cost/effectiveness would improve the clinical value and the affordability of products allowed onto the market.

    4. Large-scale computational drug repositioning to find treatments for rare diseases.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Govindaraj, Rajiv Gandhi; Naderi, Misagh; Singha, Manali; Lemoine, Jeffrey; Brylinski, Michal

      2018-01-01

      Rare, or orphan, diseases are conditions afflicting a small subset of people in a population. Although these disorders collectively pose significant health care problems, drug companies require government incentives to develop drugs for rare diseases due to extremely limited individual markets. Computer-aided drug repositioning, i.e., finding new indications for existing drugs, is a cheaper and faster alternative to traditional drug discovery offering a promising venue for orphan drug research. Structure-based matching of drug-binding pockets is among the most promising computational techniques to inform drug repositioning. In order to find new targets for known drugs ultimately leading to drug repositioning, we recently developed e MatchSite, a new computer program to compare drug-binding sites. In this study, e MatchSite is combined with virtual screening to systematically explore opportunities to reposition known drugs to proteins associated with rare diseases. The effectiveness of this integrated approach is demonstrated for a kinase inhibitor, which is a confirmed candidate for repositioning to synapsin Ia. The resulting dataset comprises 31,142 putative drug-target complexes linked to 980 orphan diseases. The modeling accuracy is evaluated against the structural data recently released for tyrosine-protein kinase HCK. To illustrate how potential therapeutics for rare diseases can be identified, we discuss a possibility to repurpose a steroidal aromatase inhibitor to treat Niemann-Pick disease type C. Overall, the exhaustive exploration of the drug repositioning space exposes new opportunities to combat orphan diseases with existing drugs. DrugBank/Orphanet repositioning data are freely available to research community at https://osf.io/qdjup/.

    5. Drug delivery from hydrophobic-modified mesoporous silicas: Control via modification level and site-selective modification

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Tang Qunli; Chen Yuxi; Chen Jianghua; Li Jin; Xu Yao; Wu Dong; Sun Yuhan

      2010-01-01

      Dimethylsilyl (DMS) modified mesoporous silicas were successfully prepared via co-condensation and post-grafting modification methods. The post-grafting modification was carried out by the reaction of the as-synthesized MCM-41 material (before CTAB removal) with diethoxydimethylsinale (DEDMS). N 2 adsorption-desorption and 29 Si MAS NMR characterization demonstrated that different amount of DMS groups were successfully incorporated into the co-condensation modified samples, and the functional DMS groups were placed selectively on the pore openings and external pore surfaces in the post-grafting modified samples. Subsequently, the controlled drug delivery properties from the resulting DMS-modified mesoporous silicas were investigated in detail. The drug adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption capacities were mainly depended on the content of silanol group (CSG) in the corresponding carriers. The in vitro tests exhibited that the incorporation of DMS groups greatly retarded the ibuprofen release rate. Moreover, the ibuprofen release profiles could be well modulated by varying DMS modification levels and site-selective distribution of functional groups in mesoporous carriers. - The distribution of DMS groups on the pore surfaces of the mesostructures strongly affects the drug release rate. The P-M41-1 and the P-M41-2 possess the close DMS modification levels as the C-M41-10, but the ibuprofen release rates from the P-M41-1 and P-M41-2 are much slower than that from the C-M41-10.

    6. Modified human serum albumins as carriers for the specific delivery of antiviral drugs to liver- and blood cells

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Jansen, Robert Walter

      1992-01-01

      The general goal of this study, was to determine the possibility of a targeted delivery of antiviral drugs to their site of action. We decided to focus on two viral diseases; HIV and Hepatitis B, that replicate in T,-lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages and hepatocytes respectively. The specific aims

    7. Modified Harrington Procedure for Acetabular Insuficiency Due to Metastatic Malignant Disease

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      WI Faisham

      2009-05-01

      Full Text Available Extensive peri-acetabular osteolysis caused by malignant disease process is a major surgical challenge as conventional hip arthroplasty is not adequate. We describe a modified use of the Harrington procedure for acetabular insufficiency secondary to metastatic disease in twelve patients. The procedures include application of multiple threaded pins to bridge the acetabular columns, anti-protrusio cage and cemented acetabular cup. Eleven patients were able to walk pain free and achieved a mean Musculoskeletal Tumour Society Functional Score of 80 (range, 68 to 86.

    8. Regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes in infectious and inflammatory disease: implications for biologics-small molecule drug interactions.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Mallick, Pankajini; Taneja, Guncha; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Ghose, Romi

      2017-06-01

      Drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) are primarily down-regulated during infectious and inflammatory diseases, leading to disruption in the metabolism of small molecule drugs (smds), which are increasingly being prescribed therapeutically in combination with biologics for a number of chronic diseases. The biologics may exert pro- or anti-inflammatory effect, which may in turn affect the expression/activity of DMEs. Thus, patients with infectious/inflammatory diseases undergoing biologic/smd treatment can have complex changes in DMEs due to combined effects of the disease and treatment. Areas covered: We will discuss clinical biologics-SMD interaction and regulation of DMEs during infection and inflammatory diseases. Mechanistic studies will be discussed and consequences on biologic-small molecule combination therapy on disease outcome due to changes in drug metabolism will be highlighted. Expert opinion: The involvement of immunomodulatory mediators in biologic-SMDs is well known. Regulatory guidelines recommend appropriate in vitro or in vivo assessments for possible interactions. The role of cytokines in biologic-SMDs has been documented. However, the mechanisms of drug-drug interactions is much more complex, and is probably multi-factorial. Studies aimed at understanding the mechanism by which biologics effect the DMEs during inflammation/infection are clinically important.

    9. Modified vegetation indices for Ganoderma disease detection in oil palm from field spectroradiometer data

      Science.gov (United States)

      Shafri, Helmi Z. M.; Anuar, M. Izzuddin; Saripan, M. Iqbal

      2009-10-01

      High resolution field spectroradiometers are important for spectral analysis and mobile inspection of vegetation disease. The biggest challenges in using this technology for automated vegetation disease detection are in spectral signatures pre-processing, band selection and generating reflectance indices to improve the ability of hyperspectral data for early detection of disease. In this paper, new indices for oil palm Ganoderma disease detection were generated using band ratio and different band combination techniques. Unsupervised clustering method was used to cluster the values of each class resultant from each index. The wellness of band combinations was assessed by using Optimum Index Factor (OIF) while cluster validation was executed using Average Silhouette Width (ASW). 11 modified reflectance indices were generated in this study and the indices were ranked according to the values of their ASW. These modified indices were also compared to several existing and new indices. The results showed that the combination of spectral values at 610.5nm and 738nm was the best for clustering the three classes of infection levels in the determination of the best spectral index for early detection of Ganoderma disease.

    10. Cyclodextrin-Modified Porous Silicon Nanoparticles for Efficient Sustained Drug Delivery and Proliferation Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cells.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Correia, Alexandra; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Mäkilä, Ermei; Almeida, Sérgio; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A

      2015-10-21

      Over the past decade, the potential of polymeric structures has been investigated to overcome many limitations related to nanosized drug carriers by modulating their toxicity, cellular interactions, stability, and drug-release kinetics. In this study, we have developed a successful nanocomposite consisting of undecylenic acid modified thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon nanoparticles (UnTHCPSi NPs) loaded with an anticancer drug, sorafenib, and surface-conjugated with heptakis(6-amino-6-deoxy)-β-cyclodextrin (HABCD) to show the impact of the surface polymeric functionalization on the physical and biological properties of the drug-loaded nanoparticles. Cytocompatibility studies showed that the UnTHCPSi-HABCD NPs were not toxic to breast cancer cells. HABCD also enhanced the suspensibility and both the colloidal and plasma stabilities of the UnTHCPSi NPs. UnTHCPSi-HABCD NPs showed a significantly increased interaction with breast cancer cells compared to bare NPs and also sustained the drug release. Furthermore, the sorafenib-loaded UnTHCPSi-HABCD NPs efficiently inhibited cell proliferation of the breast cancer cells.

    11. Orphan drugs for rare diseases: is it time to revisit their special market access status?

      Science.gov (United States)

      Simoens, Steven; Cassiman, David; Dooms, Marc; Picavet, Eline

      2012-07-30

      Orphan drugs are intended for diseases with a very low prevalence, and many countries have implemented legislation to support market access of orphan drugs. We argue that it is time to revisit the special market access status of orphan drugs. Indeed, evidence suggests that there is no societal preference for treating rare diseases. Although society appears to assign a greater value to severity of disease, this criterion is equally relevant to many common diseases. Furthermore, the criterion of equity in access to treatment, which underpins orphan drug legislation, puts more value on health improvement in rare diseases than in common diseases and implies that population health is not maximized. Finally, incentives for the development, pricing and reimbursement of orphan drugs have created market failures, including monopolistic prices and the artificial creation of rare diseases. We argue that, instead of awarding special market access status to orphan drugs, there is scope to optimize research and development (R&D) of orphan drugs and to control prices of orphan drugs by means of, for example, patent auctions, advance purchase commitments, pay-as-you-go schemes and dose-modification studies. Governments should consider carefully the right incentive strategy for R&D of orphan drugs in rare diseases.

    12. Amperometric sensing of anti-HIV drug zidovudine on Ag nanofilm-multiwalled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Rafati, Amir Abbas, E-mail: aa_rafati@basu.ac.ir; Afraz, Ahmadreza

      2014-06-01

      The zidovudine (ZDV) is the first drug approved for the treatment of HIV virus infection. The detection and determination of this drug are very importance in human serum because of its undesirable effects. A new ZDV sensor was fabricated on the basis of nanocomposite of silver nanofilm (Ag-NF) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) immobilized on glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The modified electrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) techniques. Results showed that the electrodeposited silver has a nanofilm structure and further electrochemical studies showed that the prepared nanocomposite has high electrocatalytic activity and is appropriate for using in sensors. The amperometric technique under optimal conditions is used for the determination of ZDV ranging from 0.1 to 400 ppm (0.37 μM–1.5 mM) with a low detection limit of 0.04 ppm (0.15 μM) (S/N = 3) and good sensitivity. The prepared sensor possessed accurate and rapid response to ZDV and shows an average recovery of 98.6% in real samples. - Highlights: • New anti-HIV drug sensor was fabricated on the basis of nanomaterials composite. • The GCE modified by prepared hydrophilic MWCNT silver nanoparticles. • Silver nanofilm electrodeposited on MWCNT/GCE and characterized by SEM, EDX, CV and LSV • Response of electrode to ZDV was thoroughly investigated by electrochemical techniques.

    13. Synthesis of a novel thermo/pH sensitive nanogel based on salep modified graphene oxide for drug release

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Bardajee, Ghasem Rezanejade, E-mail: rezanejad@pnu.ac.ir; Hooshyar, Zari; Farsi, Maryam; Mobini, Akram; Sang, Golnaz

      2017-03-01

      Nanogels (NGs) are three-dimensional water soluble cross-linked hydrogel materials in the nanoscale size range with a high loading capacity for guest molecules and act as drug carrier systems. In the present work, a new type of thermo/pH sensitive NG comprising salep modified graphene oxide (SMGO) with branched N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) and acrylic acid (AA) was prepared. The SMGO/P(NIPAM-co-AA) NGs exhibited nanoporous structure and spherical particles with diameters about 82 nm as characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The samples were also characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) to further confirm about the formation of NGs. Doxorubicin (DOX) loaded SMGO/P(NIPAM-co-AA) NGs showed thermo/pH dependent releasing behavior: slow drug release at neutral pH and lower temperature but increased significantly in acidic pH and higher temperature, without any burst release. In addition, the NGs exhibited no effect on the cell viability in the tested concentration range up to 410 μg/mL and drug release systems enhanced toxicity to HeLa cells when compared to the equivalent dose of the free drug. Overall, our results put forth NGs as potential candidates in the development of a new nanocarrier for anti-cancer drug delivery. - Highlights: • A novel thermo/pH sensitive nanogels (NGs) was successfully synthesized. • NGs showed high loading capacity for DOX drug and slow drug release at neutral pH. • NGs exhibited no effect on the cell viability in the tested concentration range.

    14. Synthesis of a novel thermo/pH sensitive nanogel based on salep modified graphene oxide for drug release

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Bardajee, Ghasem Rezanejade; Hooshyar, Zari; Farsi, Maryam; Mobini, Akram; Sang, Golnaz

      2017-01-01

      Nanogels (NGs) are three-dimensional water soluble cross-linked hydrogel materials in the nanoscale size range with a high loading capacity for guest molecules and act as drug carrier systems. In the present work, a new type of thermo/pH sensitive NG comprising salep modified graphene oxide (SMGO) with branched N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) and acrylic acid (AA) was prepared. The SMGO/P(NIPAM-co-AA) NGs exhibited nanoporous structure and spherical particles with diameters about 82 nm as characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The samples were also characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) to further confirm about the formation of NGs. Doxorubicin (DOX) loaded SMGO/P(NIPAM-co-AA) NGs showed thermo/pH dependent releasing behavior: slow drug release at neutral pH and lower temperature but increased significantly in acidic pH and higher temperature, without any burst release. In addition, the NGs exhibited no effect on the cell viability in the tested concentration range up to 410 μg/mL and drug release systems enhanced toxicity to HeLa cells when compared to the equivalent dose of the free drug. Overall, our results put forth NGs as potential candidates in the development of a new nanocarrier for anti-cancer drug delivery. - Highlights: • A novel thermo/pH sensitive nanogels (NGs) was successfully synthesized. • NGs showed high loading capacity for DOX drug and slow drug release at neutral pH. • NGs exhibited no effect on the cell viability in the tested concentration range.

    15. Development of Bilayer Tablets with Modified Release of Selected Incompatible Drugs.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Dhiman, Neha; Awasthi, Rajendra; Jindal, Shammy; Khatri, Smriti; Dua, Kamal

      2016-01-01

      The oral route is considered to be the most convenient and commonly-employed route for drug delivery. When two incompatible drugs need to be administered at the same time and in a single formulation, bilayer tablets are the most appropriate dosage form to administer such incompatible drugs in a single dose. The aim of the present investigation was to develop bilayered tablets of two incompatible drugs; telmisartan and simvastatin. The bilayer tablets were prepared containing telmisartan in a conventional release layer using croscarmellose sodium as a super disintegrant and simvastatin in a slow-release layer using HPMC K15M, Carbopol 934P and PVP K 30 as matrix forming polymers. The tablets were evaluated for various physical properties, drug-excipient interactions using FTIR spectroscopy and in vitro drug release using 0.1M HCl (pH 1.2) for the first hour and phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) for the remaining period of time. The release kinetics of simvastatin from the slow release layer were evaluated using the zero order, first order, Higuchi equation and Peppas equation. All the physical parameters (such as hardness, thickness, disintegration, friability and layer separation tests) were found to be satisfactory. The FTIR studies indicated the absence of interactions between the components within the individual layers, suggesting drug-excipient compatibility in all the formulations. No drug release from the slow-release layer was observed during the first hour of the dissolution study in 0.1M HCl. The release-controlling polymers had a significant effect on the release of simvastatin from the slow-release layer. Thus, the formulated bilayer tablets avoided incompatibility issues and proved the conventional release of telmisartan (85% in 45 min) and slow release of simvastatin (80% in 8 h). Stable and compatible bilayer tablets containing telmisartan and simvastatin were developed with better patient compliance as an alternative to existing conventional dosage forms.

    16. Knowledge of modifiable risk factors of Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CASHD among a sample in India

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Ku Melvin

      2009-02-01

      Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CASHD is increasing in India. Several modifiable risk factors contribute directly to this disease burden. Public knowledge of such risk factors among the urban Indian population is largely unknown. This investigation attempts to quantify knowledge of modifiable risk factors of CASHD as sampled among an Indian population at a large metropolitan hospital. Methods A hospital-based, cross sectional study was conducted at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS, a major tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. Participants (n = 217 recruited from patient waiting areas in the emergency room were provided with standardized questionnaires to assess their knowledge of modifiable risk factors of CASHD. The risk factors specifically included smoking, hypertension, elevated cholesterol levels, diabetes mellitus and obesity. Identifying 3 or less risk factors was regarded as a poor knowledge level, whereas identifying 4 or more risk factors was regarded as a good knowledge level. A multiple logistic regression model was used to isolate independent demographic markers predictive of a participant's level of knowledge. Results 41% of the sample surveyed had a good level of knowledge. 68%, 72%, 73% and 57% of the population identified smoking, obesity, hypertension, and high cholesterol correctly, respectively. 30% identified diabetes mellitus as a modifiable risk factor of CASHD. In multiple logistic regression analysis independent demographic predictors of a good knowledge level with a statistically significant (p Conclusion An Indian population in a hospital setting shows a lack of knowledge pertaining to modifiable risk factors of CASHD. By isolating demographic predictors of poor knowledge, such as current smokers and persons who do not exercise regularly, educational interventions can be effectively targeted and implemented as primary and secondary prevention strategies

    17. Drug induced exocytosis of glycogen in Pompe disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Turner, Christopher T; Fuller, Maria; Hopwood, John J; Meikle, Peter J; Brooks, Doug A

      2016-10-28

      Pompe disease is caused by a deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme α-glucosidase, and this leads to glycogen accumulation in the autolysosomes of patient cells. Glycogen storage material is exocytosed at a basal rate in cultured Pompe cells, with one study showing up to 80% is released under specific culture conditions. Critically, exocytosis induction may reduce glycogen storage in Pompe patients, providing the basis for a therapeutic strategy whereby stored glycogen is redirected to an extracellular location and subsequently degraded by circulating amylases. The focus of the current study was to identify compounds capable of inducing rapid glycogen exocytosis in cultured Pompe cells. Here, calcimycin, lysophosphatidylcholine and α-l-iduronidase each significantly increased glycogen exocytosis compared to vehicle-treated controls. The most effective compound, calcimycin, induced exocytosis through a Ca 2+ -dependent mechanism, although was unable to release a pool of vesicular glycogen larger than the calcimycin-induced exocytic pore. There was reduced glycogen release from Pompe compared to unaffected cells, primarily due to increased granule size in Pompe cells. Drug induced exocytosis therefore shows promise as a therapeutic approach for Pompe patients but strategies are required to enhance the release of large molecular weight glycogen granules. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

    18. Modified Chitosan Nanoparticle by Radiation Synthesis: An Approach to Drug Delivery and Bio-Based Additive for Biomedical Applications

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Pasanphan, W.; Rimdusit, P.; Rattanawongwiboon, T.; Choofong, S.

      2010-01-01

      Self-assembly chitosan nanoparticle (CsNP) has been synthesized via radiolytic methodology using gamma irradiation. The systematic condition in preparation was studied. Chitosan nanoparticle was modified using hydrophobic core of deoxycholic acid (DC) and stearyl methacrylate (SMA) and the hydrophilic shell of polyethylene glycol monomethacrylate (PEG). The hydrophobic/hydrophilic CsNP was prepared for drug carrier molecule. The SMA-CsNP was also conjugated with pyperidine, hindered amine light stabilizer function, to achieve a bio-based additive for biomedical plastic. (author)

    19. Modified Chitosan Nanoparticle by Radiation Synthesis: An Approach to Drug Delivery and Bio-Based Additive for Biomedical Applications

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Pasanphan, W.; Rimdusit, P.; Rattanawongwiboon, T.; Choofong, S., E-mail: sciwvm@ku.ac.th, E-mail: pwanvimol@yahoo.com [Kasetsart University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Radiation and Isotopes, 50 Phahonyothin Road, Chatuchak, Bangkok 1090 (Thailand)

      2010-07-01

      Self-assembly chitosan nanoparticle (CsNP) has been synthesized via radiolytic methodology using gamma irradiation. The systematic condition in preparation was studied. Chitosan nanoparticle was modified using hydrophobic core of deoxycholic acid (DC) and stearyl methacrylate (SMA) and the hydrophilic shell of polyethylene glycol monomethacrylate (PEG). The hydrophobic/hydrophilic CsNP was prepared for drug carrier molecule. The SMA-CsNP was also conjugated with pyperidine, hindered amine light stabilizer function, to achieve a bio-based additive for biomedical plastic. (author)

    20. [Development of anti-Alzheimer's disease drug based on beta-amyloid hypothesis].

      Science.gov (United States)

      Sugimoto, Hachiro

      2010-04-01

      Currently, there are five anti-Alzheimer's disease drugs approved. These are tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine, and memantine. The mechanism of the first four drugs is acetylcholinesterase inhibition, while memantine is an NMDA-receptor antagonist. However, these drugs do not cure Alzheimer's, but are only symptomatic treatments. Therefore, a cure for Alzheimer's disease is truly needed. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by cognitive deficits. The cause of the disease is not well understood, but research indicates that the aggregation of beta-amyloid is the fundamental cause. This theory suggests that beta-amyloid aggregation causes neurotoxicity. Therefore, development of the next anti-Alzheimer's disease drug is based on the beta-amyloid theory. We are now studying natural products, such as mulberry leaf extracts and curcumin derivatives, as potential cure for Alzheimer's disease. In this report, we describe some data about these natural products and derivatives.

    1. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtypes as Potential Drug Targets for the Treatment of Schizophrenia, Drug Abuse and Parkinson's Disease

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Dencker, Ditte; Thomsen, Morgane; Wörtwein, Gitta

      2011-01-01

      's disease and drug abuse. Dopaminergic systems are regulated by cholinergic, especially muscarinic, input. Not surprisingly, increasing evidence implicates muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated pathways as potential targets for the treatment of these disorders classically viewed as "dopamine based...... site. Such agents may lead to the development of novel classes of drugs useful for the treatment of psychosis, drug abuse and Parkinson's disease. The present review highlights recent studies carried out using muscarinic receptor knock-out mice and new subtype-selective allosteric ligands to assess...... the roles of M(1), M(4), and M(5) receptors in various central processes that are under strong dopaminergic control. The outcome of these studies opens new perspectives for the use of novel muscarinic drugs for several severe disorders of the CNS....

    2. Dissolution-modulating mechanism of pH modifiers in solid dispersion containing weakly acidic or basic drugs with poor water solubility.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Tran, Phuong Ha-Lien; Tran, Thao Truong-Dinh; Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Dong-Jin; Lee, Beom-Jin

      2010-05-01

      Although the solid dispersion method has been known to increase the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs by dispersing them in hydrophilic carriers, one obstacle of the solid dispersion method is its limited solubilization capacity, especially for pH-dependent soluble drugs. pH-modified solid dispersion, in which pH modifiers are incorporated, may be a useful method for increasing the dissolution rate of weakly acidic or basic drugs. Sufficient research, including the most recent reports, was undertaken in this review. How could the inclusion of the pH the pH modifiers in the solid dispersion system change drug structural behaviors, molecular interactions, microenvironmental pH, and/or release rate of pH modifiers, relating with the enhanced dissolution of weakly acidic or weakly basic drugs with poor water solubility? These questions have been investigated to determine the dissolution-modulating mechanism of pH modifiers in solid dispersion containing weakly acidic or basic drugs. It is believed that step-by-step mechanistic approaches could provide the ultimate solution for solubilizing several poorly water-soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility from a solid dispersion system, as well as provide ideas for developing future dosage systems.

    3. Diabetes and modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease: the prospective Million Women Study

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Spencer, Elizabeth A.; Pirie, Kirstin L.; Stevens, Richard J.; Beral, Valerie; Brown, Anna; Liu, Bette; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian K.

      2008-01-01

      To compare the effect of potentially modifiable lifestyle factors on the incidence of vascular disease in women with and without diabetes. In 1996-2001 over one million middle-aged women in the UK joined a prospective study, providing medical history, lifestyle and socio-demographic information. All participants were followed for hospital admissions and deaths using electronic record-linkage. Adjusted relative risks (RRs) and incidence rates were calculated to compare the incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke in women with and without diabetes and by lifestyle factors. At recruitment 25,915 women (2.1% of 1,242,338) reported current treatment for diabetes. During a mean follow-up of 6.1 years per woman, 21,928 had a first hospital admission or death from coronary heart disease (RR for women with versus without diabetes = 3.30, 95% CI 3.14-3.47) and 7,087 had a first stroke (RR = 2.47, 95% CI 2.24-2.74). Adjusted incidence rates of these conditions in women with diabetes increased with duration of diabetes, obesity, inactivity and smoking. The 5-year adjusted incidence rates for cardiovascular disease were 4.6 (95% CI 4.4-4.9) per 100 women aged 50-69 in non-smokers with diabetes, 5.9 (95% CI 4.6-7.6) in smokers with diabetes not using insulin and 11.0 (95% CI 8.3-14.7) in smokers with diabetes using insulin. Non-smoking women with diabetes who were not overweight or inactive still had threefold increased rate for coronary disease or stroke compared with women without diabetes. Of the modifiable factors examined in middle aged women with diabetes, smoking causes the greatest increase in cardiovascular disease, especially in those with insulin treated diabetes

    4. Nuclear track microfilters in controlled drug delivery against chronic skin disease

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Gopalani, D.; Jodha, A.S.; Saravanan, S.; Kumar, S.

      2003-01-01

      Nuclear track microfilters have been developed for transdermal therapeutic system. The transdermal therapeutic method reduces the toxicity of the drug as compared to other conventional methods. For this purpose a slow drug release system containing the nuclear track microfilter was developed. This device was applied to the patients suffering from psoriasis and cellulites diseases. The delivery of the drug to the patient was confirmed through high performance liquid chromatography. The preliminary results have shown that patients are responding to drugs with minimum toxicity

    5. Nuclear track microfilters in controlled drug delivery against chronic skin disease

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Gopalani, D. E-mail: deflab@sancharnet.in; Jodha, A.S.; Saravanan, S.; Kumar, S

      2003-06-01

      Nuclear track microfilters have been developed for transdermal therapeutic system. The transdermal therapeutic method reduces the toxicity of the drug as compared to other conventional methods. For this purpose a slow drug release system containing the nuclear track microfilter was developed. This device was applied to the patients suffering from psoriasis and cellulites diseases. The delivery of the drug to the patient was confirmed through high performance liquid chromatography. The preliminary results have shown that patients are responding to drugs with minimum toxicity.

    6. SQ grass sublingual allergy immunotherapy tablet for disease-modifying treatment of grass pollen allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Dahl, Ronald; Roberts, Graham; de Blic, Jacques

      2016-01-01

      BACKGROUND: Allergy immunotherapy is a treatment option for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC). It is unique compared with pharmacotherapy in that it modifies the immunologic pathways that elicit an allergic response. The SQ Timothy grass sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) tablet is approved in North...... America and throughout Europe for the treatment of adults and children (≥5 years old) with grass pollen-induced ARC. OBJECTIVE: The clinical evidence for the use of SQ grass SLIT-tablet as a disease-modifying treatment for grass pollen ARC is discussed in this review. METHODS: The review included...... the suitability of SQ grass SLIT-tablet for patients with clinically relevant symptoms to multiple Pooideae grass species, single-season efficacy, safety, adherence, coseasonal initiation, and cost-effectiveness. The data from the long-term SQ grass SLIT-tablet clinical trial that evaluated a clinical effect 2...

    7. Mast cells are important modifiers of autoimmune disease: With so much evidence, why is there controversy?

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Melissa Ann Brown

      2012-06-01

      Full Text Available There is abundant evidence that mast cells are active participants in events that mediate tissue damage in autoimmune disease. Disease-associated increases in mast cell numbers accompanied by mast cell degranulation and elaboration of numerous mast cell mediators at sites of inflammation are commonly observed in many human autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and bullous pemphigoid. In animal models, treatment with mast cell stabilizing drugs or mast cell ablation can result in diminished disease. A variety of receptors including those engaged by antibody, complement, pathogens and intrinsic danger signals are implicated in mast cell activation in disease. Similar to their role as first responders in infection settings, mast cells likely orchestrate early recruitment of immune cells, including neutrophils, to the sites of autoimmune destruction. This co-localization promotes cellular crosstalk and activation and results in the amplification of the local inflammatory response thereby promoting and sustaining tissue damage. Despite the evidence, there is still a debate regarding the relative role of mast cells in these processes. However, by definition, mast cells can only act as accessory cells to the self-reactive T and/or antibody driven autoimmune responses. Thus, when evaluating mast cell involvement using existing and somewhat imperfect animal models of disease, their importance is sometimes obscured. However, these potent immune cells are undoubtedly major contributors to autoimmunity and should be considered as important targets for therapeutic disease intervention.

    8. Nanoporous materials modified with biodegradable polymers as models for drug delivery applications

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Gruber, Mathias F; Schulte, Lars; Ndoni, Sokol

      2013-01-01

      of principle for a system combining these two encapsulation methods and consisting of a nanoporous polymer (NP) with the pores filled with a degradable polymer mixed with a drug model. Rhodamine 6G (R6G) mixed with Poly(l-Lactic Acid) (PLLA) were confined within the 14nm pores of a NP with gyroid morphology...

    9. Validation of a modified fluorimetric assay for the screening of trichomonacidal drugs

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Alexandra Ibáñez Escribano

      2012-08-01

      Full Text Available A fluorimetric microassay that uses a redox dye to determine the viability of the flagellate Trichomonas vaginalis has been optimised to provide a more sensitive method to evaluate potential trichomonacidal compounds. Resazurin has been used in recent years to test drugs against different parasites, including trichomonadid protozoa; however, the reproducibility of these resazurin-based methods in our laboratory has been limited because the flagellate culture medium spontaneously reduces the resazurin. The objective of this work was to refine the fluorimetric microassay method previously developed by other research groups to reduce the fluorescence background generated by the media and increase the sensitivity of the screening assay. The experimental conditions, time of incubation, resazurin concentration and media used in the microtitre plates were adjusted. Different drug sensitivity studies against T. vaginalis were developed using the 5-nitroimidazole reference drugs, new 5-nitroindazolinones and 5-nitroindazole synthetic derivatives. Haemocytometer count results were compared with the resazurin assay using a 10% solution of 3 mM resazurin dissolved in phosphate buffered saline with glucose (1 mg/mL. The fluorimetric assay and the haemocytometer counts resulted in similar percentages of trichomonacidal activity in all the experiments, demonstrating that the fluorimetric microtitre assay has the necessary accuracy for high-throughput screening of new drugs against T. vaginalis.

    10. A Newly Improved Modified Method Development and Validation of Bromofenac Sodium Sesquihydrate in Bulk Drug Manufacturing

      OpenAIRE

      Sunil Kumar Yelamanchi V; Useni Reddy Mallu; I. V Kasi Viswanath; D. Balasubramanyam; G. Narshima Murthy

      2016-01-01

      The main objective of this study was to develop a simple, efficient, specific, precise and accurate newly improved modified Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatographic Purity (or) Related substance method for bromofenac sodium sesquihydrate active pharmaceuticals ingredient dosage form. Validation of analytical method is the confirmation by examination and the provision of objective evidence that the particular requirements for a specific intended use are fulfilled as per ICH, USP...

    11. Effect of penetration modifiers on the dermal and transdermal delivery of drugs and cosmetic active ingredients.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Otto, A; Wiechers, J W; Kelly, C L; Hadgraft, J; du Plessis, J

      2008-01-01

      In this study the effect of 2 penetration modifiers, dimethyl isosorbide (DMI) and diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (DGME) on the skin delivery of hydroquinone (HQ), salicylic acid (SA) and octadecenedioic acid (DIOIC) was investigated. Ten percent DMI and DGME were separately formulated into oil-in-water emulsions containing 1.8% HQ, SA and DIOIC, respectively. Skin delivery and the flux across split-thickness human skin of the active ingredients were determined using Franz diffusion cells. An emulsion with 10% water incorporated instead of the water-soluble penetration modifiers served as a control. The study showed that neither 10% DMI nor 10% DGME significantly enhanced the skin permeation of the various lipophilic active ingredients or the uptake into the skin. It was hypothesized that the addition of the penetration modifiers to the emulsions not only enhanced the solubility of the various active ingredients in the skin but also in the formulation, resulting in a reduced thermodynamic activity and hence a weaker driving force for penetration. Therefore, the effect of DMI and DGME on the solubility of the active ingredients in the skin was counteracted by a simultaneous reduction in the thermodynamic activity in the formulation. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

    12. Modifiable Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in the Population Aged 20-49 Years

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Francisco Carlos Valladares Mas

      2014-04-01

      Full Text Available Background: evidence provided by the Framingham Heart Study established the critical role of risk factors in the development of coronary heart disease. Over half a century later, current detection and control are still inadequate. Objective: to identify modifiable risk factors of coronary heart disease in individuals aged 20 to 49 years. Methods: a descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 276 individuals from the doctor’s office No. 1 of the Fabio di Celmo Community Teaching Polyclinic in Cienfuegos. Patients were examined in the clinic visit and/or whole family visit. The studied variables included age, sex, skin color, risk factors (excess weight/obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and psychosocial factors, which were obtained from the medical interview, physical examination, laboratory tests (total cholesterol and triglycerides and review of individual medical records and family history. Results: risk factors most frequently identified were excess weight/obesity (42.4 %, physical inactivity (34.4 % and smoking (20.3 %. Presence of these risk factors increased with age, showing differences in the distribution by sex and was associated with psychosocial factors. Their coexistence and progress with age was significant. Conclusion: prevalence of modifiable risk factors for coronary heart disease in a young population was high, with frequent association, predominating factors related to unhealthy lifestyles.

    13. Advanced Therapeutic Strategies for Chronic Lung Disease Using Nanoparticle-Based Drug Delivery

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Ji Young Yhee

      2016-09-01

      Full Text Available Chronic lung diseases include a variety of obstinate and fatal diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, cystic fibrosis (CF, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, and lung cancers. Pharmacotherapy is important for the treatment of chronic lung diseases, and current progress in nanoparticles offers great potential as an advanced strategy for drug delivery. Based on their biophysical properties, nanoparticles have shown improved pharmacokinetics of therapeutics and controlled drug delivery, gaining great attention. Herein, we will review the nanoparticle-based drug delivery system for the treatment of chronic lung diseases. Various types of nanoparticles will be introduced, and recent innovative efforts to utilize the nanoparticles as novel drug carriers for the effective treatment of chronic lung diseases will also be discussed.

    14. Psychiatric and cognitive symptoms in Huntington's disease are modified by polymorphisms in catecholamine regulating enzyme genes

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Vinther-Jensen, T; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup; Budtz-Jørgensen, E

      2016-01-01

      Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor, psychiatric, and cognitive manifestations. HD is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene but the exact pathogenesis remains unknown. Dopamine imbalance has......-described cohort of Danish HD gene-expansion carriers. We show that cognitive impairment and psychiatric symptoms in HD are modified by polymorphisms in the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genes and by the 4p16.3 B haplotype. These results support the theory of dopamine imbalance...

    15. Multidirectional vector pathways of vitamin D metabolism as modifiers of its interaction with drugs

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      O.M. Nikolova

      2018-02-01

      Full Text Available Background. The comorbid pathology characteristic of the elderly and senile people may lead to polypharmacy. The leading role in the metabolism of drugs is played by the cytochrome (CY P450 system. The use of vitamin D in geriatric patients is of particular importance taking into account their age-specific features of metabolism. The purpose of the review was to analyse the international contemporary information content on the interaction of vitamin D with the system of metabolism of the drugs. Materials and methods. Analysis of American and European scientific sources was performed. Results. More than 11,500 proteins of the CYP system are currently described. In the metabolism of medicines, the following six are involved: CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, which provide biotransformation of drugs through oxidation. CYP450 is a hemoprotein that provides binding of the substrate molecules with activation of oxygens, resulting in the formation of oxidation, a more hydrophilic product and water molecule. The insufficiency of hydroxylation capacity of the liver and kidneys can lead to D-hypovitaminosis in the body of patients. CYP11A1, СYР27А1, СYР27В1, СYР24А1 are responsible for vitamin D metabolism. Conducted studies have shown that these cytochromes metabolize a number of other drugs that can act as their inhibitors and inducers. Conclusions. The system of cytochrome P450 influences the formation of vitamin D metabolites. Taking into account the physiological ways of its metabolism, multidirectional results of interaction are formed.

    16. Poly methacrylic acid modified CDHA nanocomposites as potential pH responsive drug delivery vehicles.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Victor, Sunita Prem; Sharma, Chandra P

      2013-08-01

      The objective of this study was to prepare pH sensitive polymethacrylic acid-calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) nanocomposites. The CDHA nanoparticles were prepared by coprecipitation method. The modification of CDHA by methacrylic acid (MA) was achieved by AIBN initiated free radical polymerization with sodium bisulphite as catalyst followed by emulsion technique. These nanocomposites with a half life of 8h consisted of high aspect ratio, needle like particles and exhibited an increase in swelling behaviour with pH. The in vivo potential of the nanocomposites was evaluated in vitro by the results of cell aggregation, protein adsorption, MTT assay and haemolytic activity. The invitro loading and release studies using albumin as a model drug indicate that the nanocomposites gave better loading when compared to the CDHA nanoparticles and altered the drug release rates. The nanocomposites also exhibited good uptake on C6 glioma cells as studied by fluorescence microscopy. The results obtained suggest that these nanocomposites have great potential for oral controlled protein delivery and can be extended further for intracellular drug delivery applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    17. Alendronate-Loaded Modified Drug Delivery Lipid Particles Intended for Improved Oral and Topical Administration

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Lacramioara Ochiuz

      2016-06-01

      Full Text Available The present paper focuses on solid lipid particles (SLPs, described in the literature as the most effective lipid drug delivery systems that have been introduced in the last decades, as they actually combine the advantages of polymeric particles, hydrophilic/lipophilic emulsions and liposomes. In the current study, we present our most recent advances in the preparation of alendronate (AL-loaded SLPs prepared by hot homogenization and ultrasonication using various ratios of a self-emulsifying lipidic mixture of Compritol 888, Gelucire 44/14, and Cremophor A 25. The prepared AL-loaded SLPs were investigated for their physicochemical, morphological and structural characteristics by dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric and powder X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared spectroscopy, optical and scanning electron microscopy. Entrapment efficacy and actual drug content were assessed by a validated HPLC method. In vitro dissolution tests performed in simulated gastro-intestinal fluids and phosphate buffer solution pH 7.4 revealed a prolonged release of AL of 70 h. Additionally, release kinetics analysis showed that both in simulated gastrointestinal fluids and in phosphate buffer solution, AL is released from SLPs based on equal ratios of lipid excipients following zero-order kinetics, which characterizes prolonged-release drug systems.

    18. eRepo-ORP: Exploring the Opportunity Space to Combat Orphan Diseases with Existing Drugs.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Brylinski, Michal; Naderi, Misagh; Govindaraj, Rajiv Gandhi; Lemoine, Jeffrey

      2017-12-10

      About 7000 rare, or orphan, diseases affect more than 350 million people worldwide. Although these conditions collectively pose significant health care problems, drug companies seldom develop drugs for orphan diseases due to extremely limited individual markets. Consequently, developing new treatments for often life-threatening orphan diseases is primarily contingent on financial incentives from governments, special research grants, and private philanthropy. Computer-aided drug repositioning is a cheaper and faster alternative to traditional drug discovery offering a promising venue for orphan drug research. Here, we present eRepo-ORP, a comprehensive resource constructed by a large-scale repositioning of existing drugs to orphan diseases with a collection of structural bioinformatics tools, including eThread, eFindSite, and eMatchSite. Specifically, a systematic exploration of 320,856 possible links between known drugs in DrugBank and orphan proteins obtained from Orphanet reveals as many as 18,145 candidates for repurposing. In order to illustrate how potential therapeutics for rare diseases can be identified with eRepo-ORP, we discuss the repositioning of a kinase inhibitor for Ras-associated autoimmune leukoproliferative disease. The eRepo-ORP data set is available through the Open Science Framework at https://osf.io/qdjup/. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

    19. PNIPAAM modified mesoporous hydroxyapatite for sustained osteogenic drug release and promoting cell attachment

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Wu, Tao [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) & Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, School & Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); Tan, Lei [Key Laboratory of Biomedical Polymers of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Cheng, Ning; Yan, Qi; Zhang, Yu-Feng [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) & Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, School & Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); Liu, Chuan-Jun, E-mail: cjliu@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biomedical Polymers of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Shi, Bin, E-mail: shibin_dentist@126.com [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) & Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, School & Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China)

      2016-05-01

      This work presented a sustained release system of simvastatin (SIM) based on the mesoporous hydroxyapatite (MHA) capped with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAM). The MHA was prepared by using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a template and the modified PNIPAAM layer on the surface of MHA was fabricated through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). The SIM loaded MHA-PNIPAAM showed a sustained release of SIM at 37 °C over 16 days. The bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) proliferation was assessed by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, and the osteogenic differentiation was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and Alizarin Red staining. The release profile showed that the release of SIM from MHA-SIM-PNIPAAM lasted 16 days and the cumulative amount of released SIM was almost seven-fold than MHA-SIM. Besides, SIM loaded MHA-PNIPAAM exhibited better performance on cell proliferation, ALP activity, and calcium deposition than pure MHA due to the sustained release of SIM. The quantity of ALP in MHA-SIM-PNIPAAM group was more than two fold than pure MHA group at 7 days. Compared to pure MHA, better BMSC attachment on PNIPAAM modified MHA was observed using fluorescent microscopy, indicating the better biocompatibility of MHA-PNIPAAM. - Highlights: • PNIPAAM modified mesoporous hydroxyapatite (MHA) was fabricated by SI-ATRP. • SIM loaded MHA-PNIPAAM continually released SIM in effect concentration for 16 days. • MHA-SIM-PNIPAAM behaved well on cell proliferation, ALP activity and calcium deposition.

    20. Cerivastatin Nano-Liposome as a Potential Disease Modifying Approach for the Treatment of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Lee, Young; Pai, S Balakrishna; Bellamkonda, Ravi V; Thompson, David H; Singh, Jaipal

      2018-04-25

      In this study, we have investigated nano-liposome as an approach to tailor the pharmacology of cerivastatin as a disease modifying drug for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Cerivastatin encapsulated liposomes with an average diameter of 98±27 nm were generated by thin film and freeze-thaw process. The nano-liposomes demonstrated sustained drug release kinetics in vitro and inhibited proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells with significantly less cellular cytotoxicity as compared to free cerivastatin. When delivered by inhalation to a rat model of monocrotalin induced PAH, cerivastatin significantly reduced pulmonary artery pressure from 55.13±9.82 mmHg to 35.56±6.59 mmHg (P < 0.001) and diminished pulmonary artery wall thickening. Echocardiography showed that cerivastatin significantly reduced right ventricle thickening (0.34±0.02 cm monocrotalin vs. 0.26±0.02 cm cerivastatin; P < 0.001) and increased pulmonary artery acceleration time (13.98±1.14 ms monocrotalin vs. 21.07±2.80 ms cerivastatin; P < 0.001). Nano-liposomal cerivastatin was equally effective or slightly better than cerivastatin in reducing pulmonary artery pressure (67.06±13.64 mmHg monocrotalin; 46.31±7.64 mmHg cerivastatin vs. 37.32±9.50 mmHg liposomal cerivastatin) and improving parameters of right ventricular function as measured by increasing pulmonary artery acceleration time (24.68±3.92 ms monocrotalin; 32.59±6.10 ms cerivastatin vs. 34.96±7.51 ms liposomal cerivastatin). More importantly, the rate and magnitude of toxic cerivastatin metabolite lactone generation from the intratracheally administered nano-liposomes was significantly lower as compared to intravenously administered free cerivastatin. These studies show that nano-liposome encapsulation improved in vitro and in vivo pharmacological and safety profile of cerivastatin and may represent a safer approach as a disease modifying therapy for PAH. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental

    1. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of 2-(Benzylamino-2-HydroxyalkylIsoindoline-1,3-Diones Derivatives as Potential Disease-Modifying Multifunctional Anti-Alzheimer Agents

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Dawid Panek

      2018-02-01

      Full Text Available The complex nature of Alzheimer’s disease calls for multidirectional treatment. Consequently, the search for multi-target-directed ligands may lead to potential drug candidates. The aim of the present study is to seek multifunctional compounds with expected activity against disease-modifying and symptomatic targets. A series of 15 drug-like various substituted derivatives of 2-(benzylamino-2-hydroxyalkylisoindoline-1,3-diones was designed by modification of cholinesterase inhibitors toward β-secretase inhibition. All target compounds have been synthesized and tested against eel acetylcholinesterase (eeAChE, equine serum butyrylcholinesterase (eqBuChE, human β-secretase (hBACE-1, and β-amyloid (Aβ-aggregation. The most promising compound, 12 (2-(5-(benzylamino-4-hydroxypentylisoindoline-1,3-dione, displayed inhibitory potency against eeAChE (IC50 = 3.33 μM, hBACE-1 (43.7% at 50 μM, and Aβ-aggregation (24.9% at 10 μM. Molecular modeling studies have revealed possible interaction of compound 12 with the active sites of both enzymes—acetylcholinesterase and β-secretase. In conclusion: modifications of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors led to the discovery of a multipotent anti-Alzheimer’s agent, with moderate and balanced potency, capable of inhibiting acetylcholinesterase, a symptomatic target, and disease-modifying targets: β-secretase and Aβ-aggregation.

    2. Work-Family Conflict Modifies the Association of Smoking and Periodontal Disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Brennan, David S; Spencer, A John; Roberts-Thomson, Kaye F

      2017-02-01

      The aims of the study were to assess the association of periodontal loss of attachment with smoking and work-family conflict and assess whether work-family conflict modifies the association of smoking and periodontal disease. A random sample of 45-54 year olds from metropolitan Adelaide, South Australia, was surveyed by mailed self-complete questionnaire during 2004-2005. Oral examinations were performed on persons who responded to the questionnaire, providing an assessment of periodontal status. A total of 879 responded (participation rate = 43.8 %), with n = 709 oral examinations (completion rate = 80.7 %). Prevalence of periodontal loss of attachment (LOA) of 6+ mm was higher (p periodontal disease. Higher levels of work interfering with family were associated with higher levels of periodontal LOA for smokers compared with non-smokers.

    3. Development of criteria for evaluating clinical response in thyroid eye disease using a modified Delphi technique

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Douglas, Raymond S; Tsirbas, Angelo; Gordon, Mark

      2009-01-01

      OBJECTIVE: To identify components of a provisional clinical response index for thyroid eye disease using a modified Delphi technique. METHODS: The International Thyroid Eye Disease Society conducted a structured, 3-round Delphi exercise establishing consensus for a core set of measures for clinical...... parsed into 11 domains for the Delphi surveys. Eighty-four respondents participated in the Delphi 1 survey, providing 220 unique items. Ninety-two members (100% of the respondents from Delphi 1 plus 8 new participants) responded in Delphi 2 and rated the same 220 items. Sixty-four members (76......% of participants) rated 153 criteria in Delphi 3 (67 criteria were excluded because of redundancy). Criteria with a mean greater than 6 (1 = least appropriate to 9 = most appropriate) were further evaluated by the nominal group technique and provisional core measures were chosen. CONCLUSIONS: Using a Delphi...

    4. Drug discovery for Chagas disease should consider Trypanosoma cruzi strain diversity

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Bianca Zingales

      2014-09-01

      Full Text Available This opinion piece presents an approach to standardisation of an important aspect of Chagas disease drug discovery and development: selecting Trypanosoma cruzi strains for in vitro screening. We discuss the rationale for strain selection representing T. cruzi diversity and provide recommendations on the preferred parasite stage for drug discovery, T. cruzi discrete typing units to include in the panel of strains and the number of strains/clones for primary screens and lead compounds. We also consider experimental approaches for in vitro drug assays. The Figure illustrates the current Chagas disease drug-discovery and development landscape.

    5. Electrochemical behavior of an anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil at methylene blue modified carbon paste electrode

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Bukkitgar, Shikandar D.; Shetti, Nagaraj P.

      2016-01-01

      A novel sensor for the determination of 5-fluorouracil was constructed by electrochemical deposition of methylene blue on surface of carbon paste electrode. The electrode surface morphology was studied using Atomic force microscopy and XRD. The electrochemical activity of modified electrode was characterized using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse method. The developed sensor shows impressive enlargement in sensitivity of 5-fluorouracil determination. The peak currents obtained from differential pulse voltammetry was linear with concentration of 5-fluorouracil in the range 4 × 10 −5 –1 × 10 −7 M and detection limit and quantification limit were calculated to be 2.04 nM and 6.18 nM respectively. Further, the sensor was successfully applied in pharmaceutical and biological fluid sample analysis. - Highlights: • Electrochemical oxidation of 5-fluorouracil has been investigated for first time at methylene blue modified carbon paste electrode • The electrode process was irreversible and diffusion controlled • Probable electrochemical mechanism was proposed which involved two proton and two electron transfer reaction • The LOD and LOQ values were calculated to be 2.04 nM and 6.18 nM, respectively, with good selectivity and sensitivity. • Proposed method was applied to 5-Fluorouracil determination in pharmaceutical and spiked human urine samples

    6. Drug Hypersensitivity and Anaphylaxis in Cancer and Chronic Inflammatory Diseases: The Role of Desensitizations

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Mariana Castells

      2017-11-01

      Full Text Available Drug allergy is a rising problem in the twenty-first century which affects all populations and races, children, and adults, and for which the recognition, diagnosis, management, and treatment is still not well standardized. Classical and new chemotherapy drugs, monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs, and small molecules to treat cancer and chronic inflammatory diseases are aimed at improving quality of life and life expectancy of patients, but an increasing number of reactions including anaphylaxis precludes their use in targeted populations. Women are more affected by drug allergy and up to 27% of women with ovarian and breast cancer develop carboplatin allergy after multiple cycles of treatment. Carriers of BRCA genes develop drug allergy after fewer exposures and can present with severe reactions, including anaphylaxis. Atopic patients are at increased risk for chemotherapy and MoAbs drug allergy and the current patterns of treatment with recurrent and intermittent drug exposures may favor the development of drug allergies. To overcome drug allergy, desensitization has been developed, a novel approach which provides a unique opportunity to protect against anaphylaxis and to improve clinical outcomes. There is evidence that inhibitory mechanisms blocking IgE/antigen mast cell activation are active during desensitization, enhancing safety. Whether desensitization modulates drug allergic and anaphylactic responses facilitating tolerance is currently being investigated. This review provides insight into the current knowledge of drug allergy and anaphylaxis to cancer and chronic inflammatory diseases drugs, the mechanisms of drug desensitization and its applications to personalized medicine.

    7. Definition of drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to antituberculosis drugs in patients with multidrugresistant tuberculosis and TB with extremely drug resistant depending on the case of the disease

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Kryzhanovsky D.G.

      2014-11-01

      Full Text Available There was studied the profile of drug resistance to the main (I line and reserve (II line antituberculosis drugs in patients with MDR and XDR tuberculosis, depending of the case of the disease. According to the randomized retrospective research 200 patients with MDR and XDR tuberculosis, who received treatment in the clinic of hospital Municipal institution «Dnipropetrovsk rigional clinical association «Phthisiology» Dnipropetrovsk regional Council» during the period 2010 – 2012 were involved. Data about patients contained the data on a case of the disease and the results of the test of drug sensitivity to MBT. XDR – TB was revealed in 7.5% of patients with MDR tuberculosis. In patients with MDR tuberculosis as compared with patients with XDR tuberculosis «new cases» were diagnosed in 19.5% against 18.5% (p <0.05. In patients with MDR tuberculosis and with XDR tuberculosis resistance to the antituberculosis drug more commonly developed to S - 88.5%, E - 55% and Z - 24%. The presence of MDR-TB and XDR-TB prevails in patients, who underwent previous courses of treatment with anti-TB drugs in case history as compared with patients with «new cases» of treatment. The development of resistance to anti-TB drugs depends on the availability of these drugs in the previous treatment regimens.

    8. Albumin-based drug delivery: harnessing nature to cure disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Larsen, Maja Thim; Kuhlmann, Matthias; Hvam, Michael Lykke; Howard, Kenneth A

      2016-01-01

      The effectiveness of a drug is dependent on accumulation at the site of action at therapeutic levels, however, challenges such as rapid renal clearance, degradation or non-specific accumulation requires drug delivery enabling technologies. Albumin is a natural transport protein with multiple ligand binding sites, cellular receptor engagement, and a long circulatory half-life due to interaction with the recycling neonatal Fc receptor. Exploitation of these properties promotes albumin as an attractive candidate for half-life extension and targeted intracellular delivery of drugs attached by covalent conjugation, genetic fusions, association or ligand-mediated association. This review will give an overview of albumin-based products with focus on the natural biological properties and molecular interactions that can be harnessed for the design of a next-generation drug delivery platform.

    9. Release of a Poorly Soluble Drug from Hydrophobically Modified Poly (Acrylic Acid in Simulated Intestinal Fluids.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Patrik Knöös

      Full Text Available A large part of new pharmaceutical substances are characterized by a poor solubility and high hydrophobicity, which might lead to a difference in drug adsorption between fasted and fed patients. We have previously evaluated the release of hydrophobic drugs from tablets based on Pemulen TR2 and showed that the release can be manipulated by adding surfactants. Here we further evaluate the possibility to use Pemulen TR2 in controlled release tablet formulations containing a poorly soluble substance, griseofulvin. The release is evaluated in simulated intestinal media that model the fasted state (FaSSIF medium or fed state (FeSSIF. The rheology of polymer gels is studied in separate experiments, in order to gain more information on possible interactions. The release of griseofulvin in tablets without surfactant varied greatly and the slowest release were observed in FeSSIF. Addition of SDS to the tablets eliminated the differences and all tablets showed a slow linear release, which is of obvious relevance for robust drug delivery. Comparing the data from the release studies and the rheology experiment showed that the effects on the release from the different media could to a large extent be rationalised as a consequence of the interactions between the polymer and the surfactants in the media. The study shows that Pemulen TR2 is a candidate for controlled release formulations in which addition of surfactant provides a way to eliminate food effects on the release profile. However, the formulation used needs to be designed to give a faster release rate than the tablets currently investigated.

    10. Disease-modifying treatments for early and advanced multiple sclerosis: a new treatment paradigm.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Giovannoni, Gavin

      2018-06-01

      The treatment of multiple sclerosis is evolving rapidly with 11 classes of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs). This article provides an overview of a new classification system for DMTs and treatment paradigm for using these DMTs effectively and safely. A summary of research into the use of more active approaches to early and effective treatment of multiple sclerosis with defined treatment targets of no evident disease activity (NEDA). New insights are discussed that is allowing the field to begin to tackle more advanced multiple sclerosis, including people with multiple sclerosis using wheelchairs. However, the need to modify expectations of what can be achieved in more advanced multiple sclerosis are discussed; in particular, the focus on neuronal systems with reserve capacity, for example, upper limb, bulbar and visual function. The review describes a new more active way of managing multiple sclerosis and concludes with a call to action in solving the problem of slow adoption of innovations and the global problem of untreated, or undertreated, multiple sclerosis.

    11. Ocular Drug Delivery Barriers—Role of Nanocarriers in the Treatment of Anterior Segment Ocular Diseases

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bachu, Rinda Devi; Chowdhury, Pallabitha; Al-Saedi, Zahraa H. F.; Karla, Pradeep K.; Boddu, Sai H. S.

      2018-01-01

      Ocular drug delivery is challenging due to the presence of anatomical and physiological barriers. These barriers can affect drug entry into the eye following multiple routes of administration (e.g., topical, systemic, and injectable). Topical administration in the form of eye drops is preferred for treating anterior segment diseases, as it is convenient and provides local delivery of drugs. Major concerns with topical delivery include poor drug absorption and low bioavailability. To improve the bioavailability of topically administered drugs, novel drug delivery systems are being investigated. Nanocarrier delivery systems demonstrate enhanced drug permeation and prolonged drug release. This review provides an overview of ocular barriers to anterior segment delivery, along with ways to overcome these barriers using nanocarrier systems. The disposition of nanocarriers following topical administration, their safety, toxicity and clinical trials involving nanocarrier systems are also discussed. PMID:29495528

    12. Studying Disease Occurrence and Drug Effects in Children: A global approach

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      O.U. Osokogu (Osemeke)

      2017-01-01

      markdownabstractChildhood diseases result from different causes and exhibit different characteristics. The occurrence of such diseases can be estimated from electronic healthcare records but the characteristics of both the diseases and the databases should be considered. Licensed drugs have limited

    13. NSAIDs and cardiovascular drugs in neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular diseases

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      M.D.M. Haag (Mendel)

      2009-01-01

      textabstractNeurodegenerative and cerebrovascular diseases are frequent in elderly populations and comprise primarily of dementia (mainly Alzheimer disease (AD)), Parkinson disease (PD) and stroke. The prevalence of these neurological disorders rises with older age. From 55 years to 90 years and

    14. Dental implants modified with drug releasing titania nanotubes: therapeutic potential and developmental challenges.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Gulati, Karan; Ivanovski, Sašo

      2017-08-01

      The transmucosal nature of dental implants presents a unique therapeutic challenge, requiring not only rapid establishment and subsequent maintenance of osseointegration, but also the formation of resilient soft tissue integration. Key challenges in achieving long-term success are sub-optimal bone integration in compromised bone conditions and impaired trans-mucosal tissue integration in the presence of a persistent oral microbial biofilm. These challenges can be targeted by employing a drug-releasing implant modification such as TiO 2 nanotubes (TNTs), engineered on titanium surfaces via electrochemical anodization. Areas covered: This review focuses on applications of TNT-based dental implants towards achieving optimal therapeutic efficacy. Firstly, the functions of TNT implants will be explored in terms of their influence on osseointegration, soft tissue integration and immunomodulation. Secondly, the developmental challenges associated with such implants are reviewed including sterilization, stability and toxicity. Expert opinion: The potential of TNTs is yet to be fully explored in the context of the complex oral environment, including appropriate modulation of alveolar bone healing, immune-inflammatory processes, and soft tissue responses. Besides long-term in vivo assessment under masticatory loading conditions, investigating drug-release profiles in vivo and addressing various technical challenges are required to bridge the gap between research and clinical dentistry.

    15. Drug sales data analysis for outbreak detection of infectious diseases: a systematic literature review.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Pivette, Mathilde; Mueller, Judith E; Crépey, Pascal; Bar-Hen, Avner

      2014-11-18

      This systematic literature review aimed to summarize evidence for the added value of drug sales data analysis for the surveillance of infectious diseases. A search for relevant publications was conducted in Pubmed, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Library, African Index Medicus and Lilacs databases. Retrieved studies were evaluated in terms of objectives, diseases studied, data sources, methodologies and performance for real-time surveillance. Most studies compared drug sales data to reference surveillance data using correlation measurements or indicators of outbreak detection performance (sensitivity, specificity, timeliness of the detection). We screened 3266 articles and included 27 in the review. Most studies focused on acute respiratory and gastroenteritis infections. Nineteen studies retrospectively compared drug sales data to reference clinical data, and significant correlations were observed in 17 of them. Four studies found that over-the-counter drug sales preceded clinical data in terms of incidence increase. Five studies developed and evaluated statistical algorithms for selecting drug groups to monitor specific diseases. Another three studies developed models to predict incidence increase from drug sales. Drug sales data analyses appear to be a useful tool for surveillance of gastrointestinal and respiratory disease, and OTC drugs have the potential for early outbreak detection. Their utility remains to be investigated for other diseases, in particular those poorly surveyed.

    16. The use of random-effects models to identify health care center-related characteristics modifying the effect of antipsychotic drugs.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Nordon, Clementine; Battin, Constance; Verdoux, Helene; Haro, Josef Maria; Belger, Mark; Abenhaim, Lucien; van Staa, Tjeerd Pieter

      2017-01-01

      A case study was conducted, exploring methods to identify drugs effects modifiers, at a health care center level. Data were drawn from the Schizophrenia Outpatient Health Outcome cohort, including hierarchical information on 6641 patients, recruited from 899 health care centers from across ten European countries. Center-level characteristics included the following: psychiatrist's gender, age, length of practice experience, practice setting and type, countries' Healthcare System Efficiency score, and psychiatrist density in the country. Mixed multivariable linear regression models were used: 1) to estimate antipsychotic drugs' effectiveness (defined as the association between patients' outcome at 3 months - dependent variable, continuous - and antipsychotic drug initiation at baseline - drug A vs other antipsychotic drug); 2) to estimate the similarity between clustered data (using the intra-cluster correlation coefficient); and 3) to explore antipsychotic drug effects modification by center-related characteristics (using the addition of an interaction term). About 23% of the variance found for patients' outcome was explained by unmeasured confounding at a center level. Psychiatrists' practice experience was found to be associated with patient outcomes ( p =0.04) and modified the relative effect of "drug A" ( p <0.001), independent of center- or patient-related characteristics. Mixed models may be useful to explore how center-related characteristics modify drugs' effect estimates, but require numerous assumptions.

    17. Implementation of a Tool to Modify Behavior in a Chronic Disease Management Program

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Nicole D. Gillespie

      2011-01-01

      Full Text Available Chronic diseases like diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia continue to be a significant burden on the US health care system. As a result, many healthcare providers are implementing strategies to prevent the incidence of heart disease and other chronic conditions. Among these strategies are proper drug therapy and lifestyle modifications. Behavior change is often the rate-limiting step in the prevention and maintenance of lifestyle modifications. The purpose of this paper is to describe a tool used to guide the progression and assess the effectiveness of a cardiovascular risk reduction program. The tool uses the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change to determine the readiness and confidence to change specific lifestyle behaviors pertinent to cardiovascular health. The tool aids the practitioner in developing a patient-centered plan to implement and maintain lifestyle changes and can be tailored to use in any situation requiring a behavior change on the part of the patient.

    18. Is drug insurance status an effect modifier in epidemiologic database studies? The case of maternal asthma and major congenital malformations.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Blais, Lucie; Kettani, Fatima-Zohra; Forget, Amélie; Beauchesne, Marie-France; Lemière, Catherine

      2015-12-01

      Our previous work on the association between maternal asthma and congenital malformations was based on cohorts formed by women with public drug insurance, i.e., over-represented by women with lower socioeconomic status, questioning the generalizability of our findings. This study aimed to evaluate whether or not drug insurance status, as a proxy of socioeconomic status, is an effect modifier for the association between maternal asthma and major congenital malformations. A cohort of 36,587 pregnancies from asthmatic women and 198,935 pregnancies from nonasthmatic women selected independently of their drug insurance status was reconstructed with Québec administrative databases (1998-2009). Asthmatic women were identified using a validated case definition of asthma. Cases of major congenital malformations were identified using diagnostic codes recorded in the hospitalization database. Drug insurance status at the beginning of pregnancy was classified into three groups: publicly insured with social welfare, publicly insured without social welfare, and privately insured. Adjusted odds ratios were estimated with generalized estimation equations, including an interaction term between maternal asthma and drug insurance status. The prevalence of congenital malformations was 6.8% among asthmatic women and 5.8% among nonasthmatics. The impact of asthma on the prevalence of congenital malformations was significantly greater in women publicly insured with social welfare (odds ratio = 1.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-1.61) than in the other two groups ([odds ratio = 1.10; 1.00-1.21] in the publicly insured without social welfare and [odds ratio = 1.13; 1.07-1.20] in the privately insured group). The increased risk of major congenital malformation associated with asthma was significantly higher among pregnant women publicly insured with social welfare than among those privately insured. As a result of this effect modification by drug insurance status, findings

    19. Atopic Dermatitis: Drug Delivery Approaches in Disease Management.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Lalan, Manisha; Baweja, Jitendra; Misra, Ambikanandan

      2015-01-01

      In this review, we describe the very basic of atopic dermatitis (AD), the established management strategies, and the advances in drug delivery approaches for successful therapeutic outcomes. The multifactorial pathophysiology of AD has given rise to the clinician's paradigm of topical and systemic therapy and potential combinations. However, incomplete remission of skin disorders like AD is a major challenge to be overcome. Recurrence is thought to be due to genetic and immunological etiologies and shortcomings in drug delivery. This difficulty has sparked research in nanocarrier-based delivery approaches as well as molecular biology-inspired stratagems to deal with the immunological imbalance and to address insufficiencies of delivery propositions. In this review, we assess various novel drug delivery strategies in terms of their success and utility. We present a brief compilation and assessment of management modalities to sensitize the readers to therapeutic scenario in AD.

    20. Voltammetric Determination of Anti-Hypertensive Drug Hydrochlorothiazide Using Screen-Printed Electrodes Modified with L-Glutamic Acid

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Camilo González-Vargas

      2017-09-01

      Full Text Available This work deals with the development of screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with L-glutamic acid via two different approaches: electropolymerization (SPCE/PGA and aryl diazonium electrochemical grafting (SPCE/EGA. SPCE/PGA and SPCE/EGA were analytically compared in the determination of hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ by differential pulse voltammetry. Both electrochemical characterization and analytical performance indicate that SPCE/EGA is a much better sensor for HCTZ. The detection and quantification limits were at the level of μmol L−1 with a very good linearity in the studied concentration range. In addition, the proposed SPCE/EGA was successfully applied for the determination of HCTZ in an anti-hypertensive drug with high reproducibility and good trueness.

    1. Sonication-Based Improvement of the Physicochemical Properties of Guar Gum as a Potential Substrate for Modified Drug Delivery Systems

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Siddique Akber Ansari

      2013-01-01

      Full Text Available Guar Gum is a natural polysaccharide that, due to its physicochemical properties, is extensively investigated for biomedical applications as a matrix for modified drug delivery, but it is also used in the food industry as well as in cosmetics. A commercial sample of Guar Gum was sonicated for different periods of time, and the reduction in the average molecular weight was monitored by means of viscometric measurements. At the same time, the rheological behaviour was also followed, in terms of viscoelasticity range, flow curves, and mechanical spectra. Sonicated samples were used for the preparation of gels in the presence of borate ions. The effect of borax on the new samples was investigated by recording mechanical spectra, flow curves, and visible absorption spectra of complexes with Congo Red. The anisotropic elongation, observed in previous studies with tablets of Guar Gum and borax, was remarkably reduced when the sonicated samples were used for the preparation of the gels.

    2. The mechanism of lauric acid-modified protein nanocapsules escape from intercellular trafficking vesicles and its implication for drug delivery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Jiang, Lijuan; Liang, Xin; Liu, Gan; Zhou, Yun; Ye, Xinyu; Chen, Xiuli; Miao, Qianwei; Gao, Li; Zhang, Xudong; Mei, Lin

      2018-11-01

      Protein nanocapsules have exhibited promising potential applications in the field of protein drug delivery. A major issue with various promising nano-sized biotherapeutics including protein nanocapsules is that owing to their particle size they are subject to cellular uptake via endocytosis, and become entrapped and then degraded within endolysosomes, which can significantly impair their therapeutic efficacy. In addition, many nano-sized biotherapeutics could be also sequestered by autophagosomes and degraded through the autolysosomal pathway. Thus, a limiting step in achieving an effective protein therapy is to facilitate the endosomal escape and auto-lysosomal escape to ensure cytosolic delivery of the protein drugs. Here, we prepared a protein nanocapsule based on BSA (nBSA) and the BSA nanocapsules modified with a bilayer of lauric acid (LA-nBSA) to investigate the escape effects from the endosome and autophagosome. The size distribution of nBSA and LA-nBSA analyzed using DLS presents a uniform diameter centered at 10 nm and 16 nm. The data also showed that FITC-labeled nBSA and LA-nBSA were taken up by the cells mainly through Arf-6-dependent endocytosis and Rab34-mediated macropinocytosis. In addition, LA-nBSA could efficiently escape from endosomal before the degradation in endo-lysosomes. Autophagy could also sequester the LA-nBSA through p62 autophagosome vesicles. These two types of nanocapsules underwent different intracellular destinies and lauric acid (LA) coating played a vital role in intracellular particle retention. In conclusion, the protein nanocapsules modified with LA could enhance the protein nanocapsules escape from intercellular trafficking vesicles, and protect the protein from degradation by the lysosomes.

    3. Emerging drug targets for Aβ and tau in Alzheimer’s disease: a systematic review

      Science.gov (United States)

      West, Sophie; Bhugra, Praveen

      2015-01-01

      Aims Currently, treatment for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) focuses on the cholinergic hypothesis and provides limited symptomatic effects. Research currently focuses on other factors that are thought to contribute to AD development such as tau proteins and Aβ deposits, and how modification of the associated pathology affects outcomes in patients. This systematic review summarizes and appraises the evidence for the emerging drugs affecting Aβ and tau pathology in AD. Methods A comprehensive, systematic online database search was conducted using the databases ScienceDirect and PubMed to include original research articles. A systematic review was conducted following a minimum set of standards, as outlined by The PRISMA Group 1. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria were followed and studies fitting the criteria were selected. No human trials were included in this review. In vitro and in vivo AD models were used to assess efficacy to ensure studied agents were emerging targets without large bodies of evidence. Results The majority of studies showed statistically significant improvement (P < 0.05) of Aβ and/or tau pathology, or cognitive effects. Many studies conducted in AD animal models have shown a reduction in Aβ peptide burden and a reduction in tau phosphorylation post-intervention. This has the potential to reduce plaque formation and neuronal degeneration. Conclusions There are many emerging targets showing promising results in the effort to modify the pathological effects associated with AD. Many of the trials also provided evidence of the clinical effects of such drugs reducing pathological outcomes, which was often demonstrated as an improvement of cognition. PMID:25753046

    4. Novel Hydrogel-Advanced Modified Clay Nanocomposites as Possible Vehicles for Drug Delivery and Controlled Release

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Raluca Ianchis

      2017-12-01

      Full Text Available Present study refers to the synthesis of new advanced materials based on poly(methacrylic acid (PMAA with previously reported own advanced modified clays by edge covalent bonding. This will create the premises to obtain nanocomposite hydrogels with combined hydrophilic-hydrophobic behavior absolutely necessary for co-delivery of polar/nonpolar substances. For the synthesis, N,N’-methylenebisacrylamide was used as cross-linker and ammonium persulphate as initiator. As a consequence of the inclusion of clay into the polymer matrix and the intercalation of PMAA between the layers as well as the presence of hydrophobic interactions occurred between partners, the final hydrogel nanocomposites possessed greater swelling degrees, slower de-swelling process and enhanced mechanical properties depending on the clay type in comparison with pure hydrogel. In vitro MTS ([3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt] colorimetric assay showed that direct exposure with PMMA-clay-based constructs did not affect cell viability and proliferation in time (24 and 48 h on either normal or adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    5. Novel Hydrogel-Advanced Modified Clay Nanocomposites as Possible Vehicles for Drug Delivery and Controlled Release.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Ianchis, Raluca; Ninciuleanu, Claudia M; Gifu, Ioana C; Alexandrescu, Elvira; Somoghi, Raluca; Gabor, Augusta R; Preda, Silviu; Nistor, Cristina L; Nitu, Sabina; Petcu, Cristian; Icriverzi, Madalina; Florian, Paula E; Roseanu, Anca M

      2017-12-13

      Present study refers to the synthesis of new advanced materials based on poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) with previously reported own advanced modified clays by edge covalent bonding. This will create the premises to obtain nanocomposite hydrogels with combined hydrophilic-hydrophobic behavior absolutely necessary for co-delivery of polar/nonpolar substances. For the synthesis, N , N '-methylenebisacrylamide was used as cross-linker and ammonium persulphate as initiator. As a consequence of the inclusion of clay into the polymer matrix and the intercalation of PMAA between the layers as well as the presence of hydrophobic interactions occurred between partners, the final hydrogel nanocomposites possessed greater swelling degrees, slower de-swelling process and enhanced mechanical properties depending on the clay type in comparison with pure hydrogel. In vitro MTS ([3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2 H -tetrazolium, inner salt]) colorimetric assay showed that direct exposure with PMMA-clay-based constructs did not affect cell viability and proliferation in time (24 and 48 h) on either normal or adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    6. Sacro-iliac joint disease in drug abusers: The role of bone scintigraphy

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Lopez-Majano, V.; Miskew, D.B.W.; Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL

      1980-01-01

      Bone scintigrams demonstrated increased uptake in the sacroiliac joint in twenty drug addicts with low back pain and signs of localized sepsis. The localization of the disease was decisive for the orthopedist in the aspiration of the affected joint. (orig.)

    7. 76 FR 78931 - Food and Drug Administration Rare Disease Patient Advocacy Day; Notice of Meeting

      Science.gov (United States)

      2011-12-20

      ... Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Orphan Products... educate the rare disease community on the FDA regulatory processes. This educational meeting will consist...

    8. Antiepileptic drugs in pregnancy and hemorrhagic disease of the newborn: An update

      OpenAIRE

      Kazmin, Aleksey; Wong, Renee C.; Sermer, Mathew; Koren, Gideon

      2010-01-01

      QUESTION What is the current evidence regarding the association between hemorrhagic disease of the newborn and maternal use of hepatic enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (eg, carbamazepine, phenobarbitone, topiramate)?

    9. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and cyclooxygenase in Alzheimer's disease

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Hoozemans, Jeroen J. M.; Veerhuis, Robert; Rozemuller, Annemieke J. M.; Eikelenboom, Piet

      2003-01-01

      Epidemiological studies indicate that anti-inflammatory drugs, especially the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), decrease the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Their beneficial effects may be due to interference in the chronic inflammatory reaction, that takes place in AD.

    10. [Experience of rapid drug desensitization therapy in the treatment of mycobacterial disease].

      Science.gov (United States)

      Sasaki, Yuka; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Morimoto, Kozo; Okumura, Masao; Watanabe, Masato; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Ogata, Hideo; Gotoh, Hajime; Kudoh, Shoji; Suzuki, Hiroaki

      2014-11-01

      Drugs for tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis mycobacterial diseases are limited. In particular, no new drugs for non-tuberculosis mycobacterial disease have been developed in recent years. Antimycobacterial drugs have many adverse reactions, for which drug desensitization therapy has been used. Rapid drug desensitization (RDD) therapy, including antituberculosis drugs and clarithromycin, has been implemented in many regions in Europe and the United States. We investigated the validity of RDD therapy in Japan. We report our experience with RDD therapy in 13 patients who developed severe drug allergy to antimycobacterial treatment. The desensitization protocol reported by Holland and Cernandas was adapted. The underlying diseases were 7 cases of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex disease and 6 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. Isoniazid was readministered in 2 (100%) of 2 patients; rifampicin, in 8 (67.7%) of 12 patients; ethambutol, in 4 (67.7%) of 6 patients; and clarithromycin, in 2 (100%) of 2 patients. In Japan, the desensitization therapy recommended by the Treatment Committee of the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis have been implemented generally. We think RDD therapy is effective and safe as the other desensitization therapy. We will continue to investigate the efficiency of RDD therapy in patients who had discontinued antimycobacterial treatment because of the drug allergic reaction.

    11. Fabrication and characterization of drug-loaded nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 scaffolds modified with carbon nanotubes and silk fibroin

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Yao MZ

      2016-11-01

      Full Text Available Meng-Zhu Yao,1 Ming-Yi Huang-Fu,1 Hui-Na Liu,1 Xia-Rong Wang,1 Xiaoxia Sheng,2 Jian-Qing Gao1 1Institute of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, 2Hangzhou SoliPharma Co., Ltd, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 (nHA/PA66 porous scaffolds were fabricated by a phase inversion method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs and silk fibroin (SF were used to modify the surface of the nHA/PA66 scaffolds by freeze-drying and cross-linking. Dexamethasone was absorbed to the CNTs to promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs. The cell viability of BMSCs was investigated by changing the concentration of the CNT dispersion, and the most biocompatible scaffold was selected. In addition, the morphology and mechanical property of the scaffolds were investigated. The results showed that the nHA/PA66 scaffolds modified with CNTs and SF met the requirements of bone tissue engineering scaffolds. The dexamethasone-loaded CNT/SF-nHA/PA66 composite scaffold promoted the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs, and the drug-loaded scaffolds are expected to function as effective bone tissue engineering scaffolds. Keywords: BMSCs, tissue engineering, porous scaffold, carbon nanotubes, silk fibroin, surface modification, dexamethasone

    12. Si-modified BHA bioceramics as a drug delivery system: Effect of modification method on structure and Rifampicin release

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Olena Sych

      2015-09-01

      Full Text Available The work is devoted to the investigation of two different methods for introduction of silicon into ceramics, based on biogenic hydroxyapatite (BHA, on the structure and properties. Thus, porous samples of Si-modified BHA-based ceramics containing 2 or 5 wt.% Si were prepared by using two different precursors, i.e. polymethylsiloxane polyhydrate and fine silica (Aerosil® 200 powder. After the modification with silicon a marked change in the structure of material was observed. The use of Aerosil® 200 permits preparation of a more uniform structure as compared to that obtained by using polymethylsiloxane polyhydrate. However, the latter promotes an increase in both the porosity of samples (from 43 to 62.3% and their solubility in saline (from 0.18 to 1.20 wt.%/day as compared to the results obtained after the modification with Aerosil® 200, where maximal porosity and solubility were 48.5% and 0.23 wt.%/day, respectively. At the same time, the modification of hydroxyapatite ceramics with silicon using silica makes it possible to prolong release of a drug (e.g. Rifampicin out of sample pores for the first 24 h as compared to the ceramics modified with polymethylsiloxane polyhydrate.

    13. Biomarker-driven phenotyping in Parkinson disease: a translational missing link in disease-modifying clinical trials

      Science.gov (United States)

      Espay, Alberto J.; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Tanner, Caroline M.; Fernandez, Hubert H; Simon, David K.; Leverenz, James B.; Merola, Aristide; Chen-Plotkin, Alice; Brundin, Patrik; Kauffman, Marcelo A.; Erro, Roberto; Kieburtz, Karl; Woo, Daniel; Macklin, Eric A.; Standaert, David G.; Lang, Anthony E.

      2016-01-01

      Past clinical trials of putative neuroprotective therapies have targeted Parkinson disease (PD) as a single pathogenic disease entity. From an Oslerian clinico-pathologic perspective, the wide complexity of PD converges into Lewy bodies and justifies a reductionist approach to PD: a single-mechanism therapy can affect most of those sharing the classic pathologic hallmark. From a systems-biology perspective, PD is a group of disorders that, while related by sharing the feature of nigral dopamine-neuron degeneration, exhibit unique genetic, biological and molecular abnormalities, which probably respond differentially to a given therapeutic approach, particularly for strategies aimed at neuroprotection. Under this model, only biomarker-defined, homogenous subtypes of PD are likely to respond optimally to therapies proven to affect the biological processes within each subtype. Therefore, we suggest that precision medicine applied to PD requires a reevaluation of the biomarker-discovery effort. This effort is currently centered on correlating biological measures to clinical features of PD and on identifying factors that predict whether various prodromal states will convert into the classical movement disorder. We suggest, instead, that subtyping of PD requires the reverse view, where abnormal biological signals (i.e., biomarkers) rather than clinical definitions are used to define disease phenotypes. Successful development of disease-modifying strategies will depend on how relevant the specific biological processes addressed by an intervention are to the pathogenetic mechanisms in the subgroup of targeted patients. This precision-medicine approach will likely yield smaller but well-defined subsets of PD amenable to successful neuroprotection. PMID:28233927

    14. Rethinking the Food and Drug Administration's 2013 guidance on developing drugs for early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Schneider, Lon S

      2014-03-01

      The February 2013 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft guidance for developing drugs for early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) creates certain challenges as they guide toward the use of one cognitive outcome to gain accelerated marketing approval for preclinical AD drugs, and a composite clinical scale - the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale in particular - for the primary outcome for prodromal AD clinical trials. In light of the developing knowledge regarding early stage diagnoses and clinical trials outcomes, we recommend that FDA describe its requirements for validating preclinical AD diagnoses for drug development purposes, maintain the principle for requiring coprimary outcomes, and encourage the advancement of outcomes for early stage AD trials. The principles for drug development for early stage AD should not differ from those for clinical AD, especially as the diagnoses of prodromal and early AD impinge on each other. The FDA should not recommend that a composite scale be used as a sole primary efficacy outcome to support a marketing claim unless it requires that the cognitive and functional components of such a scale are demonstrated to be individually meaningful. The current draft guidelines may inadvertently constrain efforts to better assess the clinical effects of new drugs and inhibit innovation in an area where evidence-based clinical research practices are still evolving. Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    15. Low hanging fruit in infectious disease drug development.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kraus, Carl N

      2008-10-01

      Cost estimates for developing new molecular entities (NME) are reaching non-sustainable levels and coupled with increasing regulatory requirements and oversight have led many pharmaceutical sponsors to divest their anti-microbial development portfolios [Projan SJ: Why is big Pharma getting out of anti-bacterial drug discovery?Curr Opin Microbiol 2003, 6:427-430] [Spellberg B, Powers JH, Brass EP, Miller LG, Edwards JE, Jr: Trends in antimicrobial drug development: implications for the future.Clin Infect Dis 2004, 38:1279-1286]. Operational issues such as study planning and execution are significant contributors to the overall cost of drug development that can benefit from the leveraging of pre-randomization data in an evidence-based approach to protocol development, site selection and patient recruitment. For non-NME products there is even greater benefit from available data resources since these data may permit smaller and shorter study programs. There are now many available open source intelligence (OSINT) resources that are being integrated into drug development programs, permitting an evidence-based or 'operational epidemiology' approach to study planning and execution.

    16. Mini-tablets versus pellets as promising multiparticulate modified release delivery systems for highly soluble drugs.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Gaber, Dina M; Nafee, Noha; Abdallah, Osama Y

      2015-07-05

      Whether mini-tablets (tablets, diameters ≤6mm) belong to single- or multiple-unit dosage forms is still questionable. Accordingly, Pharmacopoeial evaluation procedures for mini-tablets are lacking. In this study, the aforementioned points were discussed. Moreover, their potential for oral controlled delivery was assessed. The antidepressant venlafaxine hydrochloride (Vx), a highly soluble drug undergoing first pass effect, low bioavailability and short half-life was selected as a challenging payload. In an attempt to weigh up mini-tablets versus pellets as multiparticulate carriers, Vx-loaded mini-tablets were compared to formulated pellets of the same composition and the innovator Effexor(®)XR pellets. Formulations were prepared using various polymer hydrogels in the core and ethyl cellulose film coating with increasing thickness. Mini-tablets (diameter 2mm) showed extended Vx release (<60%, 8h). Indeed, release profiles comparable to Effexor(®)XR pellets were obtained. Remarkably higher coating thickness was required for pellets to provide equivalent retardation. Ethyl cellulose in the core ensured faster release due to polymer migration to the surface and pore formation in the coat. mini-tablets showed higher stability to pellets upon storage. Industrially speaking, mini-tablets proved to be superior to pellets in terms of manufacturing, product quality and economical aspects. Results point out the urgent need for standardized evaluation procedures for mini-tablets. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

    17. Lactoferrin modified graphene oxide iron oxide nanocomposite for glioma-targeted drug delivery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Song, Meng-Meng; Xu, Huai-Liang; Liang, Jun-Xing; Xiang, Hui-Hui; Liu, Rui; Shen, Yu-Xian

      2017-08-01

      Targeting delivery of drugs in a specific manner represents a potential powerful technology in gliomas. Herein, we prepared a multifunctional targeted delivery system based on graphene oxide (GO) that contains a molecular bio-targeting ligand and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles on the surface of GO for magnetic targeting. Superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles was loaded on the surface of GO via chemical precipitation method to form GO@Fe 3 O 4 nanocomposites. Lactoferrin (Lf), an iron-transporting serum glycoprotein that binds to receptors overexpressed at the surface of glioma cells and vascular endothelial cell of the blood brain barrier, was chosen as the targeted ligand to construct the targeted delivery system Lf@GO@Fe 3 O 4 through EDC/NHS chemistry. With the confirmation of TEM, DLS and VSM, the resulting Lf@GO@Fe 3 O 4 had a size distribution of 200-1000nm and exhibited a superparamagnetic behavior. The nano delivery system had a high loading capacity and exhibited a pH-dependent release behavior. Compared with free DOX and DOX@GO@Fe 3 O 4 , Lf@GO@Fe 3 O 4 @DOX displayed greater intracellular delivery efficiency and stronger cytotoxicity against C6 glioma cells. The results demonstrated the potential utility of Lf conjugated GO@Fe 3 O 4 nanocomposites for therapeutic application in the treatment of gliomas. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

    18. A conceptual framework for managing modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in Fiji.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Witter, Trevor; Poudevigne, Melanie; Lambrick, Danielle M; Faulkner, James; Lucero, Adam A; Page, Rachel; Perry, Lane G; Tarrant, Michael A; Stoner, Lee

      2015-03-01

      The current review will look at modifiable lifestyle (physical inactivity, poor nutrition, risky alcohol behavior and cigarette smoking) and cardio-metabolic (obesity, diabetes mellitus, high cholesterol and high blood pressure) cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors among Indigenous-Fijian and Indo-Fijian subgroups. A framework for monitoring and managing these risk factors will be presented. National health surveys were identified where available. Electronic databases identified sources for filling missing data. The most relevant data were identified, organized and synthesized. Compared to Indo-Fijians, Indigenous-Fijians have higher rates of obesity (17% vs 11%) and hypertension (21% vs 16%), but lower rates of diabetes mellitus (12% vs 21%) and high cholesterol (33% vs 39%). Indigenous-Fijians report higher rates of prescribed physical activity (25% vs 21%), but poorer recommended vegetable intake (48% vs 56%), greater risky alcohol behavior (17% vs 15%) and a much greater prevalence of cigarette smoking (45% vs 24%). Both Indigenous-Fijians and Indo-Fijians report a low prevalence of recommended fruit intake (17% vs 15%). Fiji is progressing through demographic and epidemiological transitions, including a decline in infectious diseases and improved life expectancy. However, in concert with other developing nations, 'modernization' is accompanied by increased mortality from non-communicable diseases, with CVD being the most prevalent. This transition has been associated with changes to socio-cultural aspects of Fiji, including poor lifestyle choices that may contribute to a cluster of cardio-metabolic conditions which precede CVD. © Royal Society for Public Health 2013.

    19. Modified Hemocorrection in the Complex Treatment of Patients with Pyoinflammatory Lung Diseases

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      V. V. Gavrikov

      2007-01-01

      Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the efficiency of extracorporeal hemocorrection used in the complex therapy in patients with a pyoinflammatory process in the lung.Materials and methods: 62 patients, including 22 patients with lung abscess who underwent routine plasmapheresis and 40 patients with varying pyoinflammatory lung diseases who received modified hemocorrection — plasma exchange combined with laser extracorporeally washed-off cytomass irradiation, were examined and treated. The severity of their general condition was assessed by the SAPS scale and the severity of intoxication was evaluated by the content of low and medium-molecular weight substances (LMMWSs. The hemostatic system was studied by standardized studies.Results. Routine plasmapheresis was established to produce no impact on platelet functional activity within the first 24 hours and, three days later, promoted the progression of disseminated intravascular coagulation. A combination of plasma exchange and laser extracorporeally washed-off cytomass irradiation in patients with pyoinflam-matory lung diseases was attended by a lower blood coagulative activity and plasmin stabilization with attenuated throm-binemia. The plasma and erythrocytic levels of LMMWSs decreased and their urinary concentrations increased, which is indicative of the body’s detoxification block disorders irrespective of the severity of the disease.Conclusion. It is expedient to apply the plasma-exchanging technique in combination with laser extracorporeally washed-off cytomass irradiation to patients with the uncomplicated and complicated course of pulmonary pyoinflammatory processes without the signs of multiple organ dysfunction on admission to a specialized hospital. 

    20. [Application of Ischemia Modified Albumin for Acute Ischemic Heart Disease in Forensic Science].

      Science.gov (United States)

      Wang, P; Zhu, Z L; Zhu, N; Yu, H; Yue, Q; Wang, X L; Feng, C M; Wang, C L; Zhang, G H

      2017-10-01

      To explore the application value and forensic significance of ischemia modified albumin (IMA) in pericardial fluid to diagnose sudden cardiac death. IMA level in pericardial fluid was detected in acute ischemic heart disease group ( n =36), acute myocardial infarction group ( n =6), cardiomyopathy group ( n =4) and control group ( n =15) by albumin cobalt binding method. The levels of IMA were compared among these groups. The best cut-off IMA value was estimated and the sensitivity and specificity of acute myocardial ischemia group was distinguished from control group by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve. The IMA level in acute ischemic heart disease group was significantly higher than that of control group ( P 0.05). The cut-off value for the identification of acute myocardial ischemia which obtained by ROC analysis was 40.65 U/mL. And the sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing acute ischemia cardiac disease was 60.0% and 80.5%, respectively. The IMA value in pericardial fluid can be a reference marker for the diagnosis of acute myocardial ischemia, which also can provide objective basis for the forensic identification of sudden cardiac death. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine

    1. The Role of Ischemia Modified Albumin as a Biomarker in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kumar, Prashanth Ashok; Subramanian, Kavitha

      2016-03-01

      Chronic Liver Disease (CLD) is characterised by gradual destruction of liver tissue over time. Ischemia Modified Albumin (IMA) is an upcoming biomarker shown to be elevated in conditions associated with ischemia and oxidative stress. Albumin levels are greatly reduced in patients with CLD and studying its alterations will provide essential information regarding the molecular changes occurring to it. The study aims to estimate IMA and IMA/Albumin ratio in patients with CLD and to correlate it with parameters assessing liver function and the Model for End Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score. The study consisted of 43 CLD patients as test subjects and 28 apparently healthy individuals as controls. Multiple parameters assessing liver function like albumin, bilirubin, aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), Gamma Glutamyl Transpeptidase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Prothrombin Time (PT) INR and creatinine were estimated and the MELD score calculated. Serum IMA expressed as Absorbance Units (ABSU) was estimated using the Albumin Cobalt Binding test (ABT). Student's t-test and correlation coefficient was used for statistical analysis. Serum IMA was significantly higher in CLD patients (0.5320 ± 0.1677) as compared to the control group (0.3203 ± 0.1257) with a p-value of CLD compared to control group (0.0714 ± 0.0283) with a p-value of CLD could indicate a qualitative change and not merely a quantitative reduction of albumin. IMA can serve as a biomarker to assess the disease severity and prognosis of CLD patients.

    2. Effect of Surface-Modified Paclitaxel Nanowires on U937 Cells In Vitro: A Novel Drug Delivery Vehicle

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Mohamed H. Abumaree

      2012-01-01

      Full Text Available We have fabricated surface-modified paclitaxel nanowires (SM-PNs with a precise diameter and an average length of 50 μm. The surface of these nanowires is coated with a monolayer of octadecylsiloxane (ODS, which prevents aggregation and enhances dispersivity in aqueous media. This system constitutes a novel drug delivery vehicle based on one-dimensional (1D nanostructures with a large drug to vehicle ratio. We assayed the cytotoxicity of different diameter SM-PNs (200, 80, 35, and 18 nm with U937 cells and compared their activity to microcrystalline paclitaxel. SM-PNs reduced U937 cell proliferation in culture followed by cell death. For the same amount of paclitaxel, different diameter SM-PNs displayed different cytotoxic effect at the same incubation time period. SM-PNs with 35 nm diameters were the most efficient in completely halting cell proliferation following the first 24 hours of treatment, associated with 42% cell death. SM-PNs with 18 nm diameters were least effective. These SM-PNs can be tailored to fit a certain treatment protocol by simply choosing the appropriate diameter.

    3. Modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer disease and subjective memory impairment across age groups.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Stephen T Chen

      Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Previous research has identified modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD in older adults. Research is limited on the potential link between these risk factors and subjective memory impairment (SMI, which may precede AD and other dementias. Examination of these potential relationships may help identify those at risk for AD at a stage when interventions may delay or prevent further memory problems. The objective of this study was to determine whether risk factors for AD are associated with SMI among different age groups. METHOD: Trained interviewers conducted daily telephone surveys (Gallup-Healthways of a representative community sample of 18,614 U.S. respondents, including 4,425 younger (age 18 to 39 years, 6,365 middle-aged (40 to 59 years, and 7,824 older (60 to 99 years adults. The surveyors collected data on demographics, lifestyles, and medical information. Less education, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, less exercise, obesity and depression, and interactions among them, were examined for associations with SMI. Weighted logistic regressions and chi-square tests were used to calculate odds ratios and confidence intervals for SMI with each risk factor and pairwise interactions across age groups. RESULTS: Depression, less education, less exercise, and hypertension were significantly associated with SMI in all three age groups. Several interactions between risk factors were significant in younger and middle-aged adults and influenced their associations with SMI. Frequency of SMI increased with age and number of risk factors. Odds of having SMI increased significantly with just having one risk factor. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that modifiable risk factors for AD are also associated with SMI, suggesting that these relationships occur in a broad range of ages and may be targeted to mitigate further memory problems. Whether modifying these risk factors reduces SMI and the eventual incidence of AD and other

    4. Modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer disease and subjective memory impairment across age groups.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Chen, Stephen T; Siddarth, Prabha; Ercoli, Linda M; Merrill, David A; Torres-Gil, Fernando; Small, Gary W

      2014-01-01

      Previous research has identified modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD) in older adults. Research is limited on the potential link between these risk factors and subjective memory impairment (SMI), which may precede AD and other dementias. Examination of these potential relationships may help identify those at risk for AD at a stage when interventions may delay or prevent further memory problems. The objective of this study was to determine whether risk factors for AD are associated with SMI among different age groups. Trained interviewers conducted daily telephone surveys (Gallup-Healthways) of a representative community sample of 18,614 U.S. respondents, including 4,425 younger (age 18 to 39 years), 6,365 middle-aged (40 to 59 years), and 7,824 older (60 to 99 years) adults. The surveyors collected data on demographics, lifestyles, and medical information. Less education, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, less exercise, obesity and depression, and interactions among them, were examined for associations with SMI. Weighted logistic regressions and chi-square tests were used to calculate odds ratios and confidence intervals for SMI with each risk factor and pairwise interactions across age groups. Depression, less education, less exercise, and hypertension were significantly associated with SMI in all three age groups. Several interactions between risk factors were significant in younger and middle-aged adults and influenced their associations with SMI. Frequency of SMI increased with age and number of risk factors. Odds of having SMI increased significantly with just having one risk factor. These results indicate that modifiable risk factors for AD are also associated with SMI, suggesting that these relationships occur in a broad range of ages and may be targeted to mitigate further memory problems. Whether modifying these risk factors reduces SMI and the eventual incidence of AD and other dementias later in life remains to be determined.

    5. Single-stage Modified Duhamel procedure for Hirschsprung′s disease : Our experience

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Paras R Kothari

      2012-01-01

      Full Text Available Introduction: Primary single-stage pull-through for Hirschsprung′s disease (HD has been reported to give comparable surgical outcomes to staged operations with less morbidity. Herein, we present our experience with single-stage Modified Duhamel procedure for management of HD. Patients and Methods: This was a review of 48 cases of HD who underwent single-stage Modified Duhamel procedure without a protective colostomy. Results: The age at surgery ranged from 6 months to 10 years (median - 9 months, mean - 2.3 years. The average weight of the child was 7.2 kg (range, 4.9-22 kg. 38 (79.2% patients had classical rectosigmoid HD, the rest being long segment HD (the proximal most level being the splenic flexure. The average duration of surgery was 175 minutes (range, 130-245 minutes. The average blood loss was 45 ml. The average hospital stay was 7.2 days (range: 6-10 days. The major postoperative complications (n=3 included postoperative adhesive intestinal obstruction, anastomotic leak and persistent constipation due to residual aganglionosis. Each required a re-exploration. Minor complications included surgical site infection (n=3 and post-operative enterocolitis (n=3, which were managed conservatively. Six patients had constipation for a limited period post-operatively. All patients have a satisfactory functional outcome and normal development and growth. Conclusions: For HD, we recommend that single-stage Modified Duhamel procedure should be the preferred approach in view of its low morbidity, satisfactory functional outcome and avoidance of stoma, multiple surgeries and economic benefit in view of decreased hospital stay.

    6. Re-Inventing Infectious Disease: Antibiotic Resistance and Drug Development at the Bayer Company 1945-80.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Gradmann, Christoph

      2016-04-01

      This paper analyses how research on antibiotic resistance has been a driving force in the development of new antibiotics. Drug resistance, while being a problem for physicians and patients, offers attractive perspectives for those who research and develop new medicines. It imposes limits on the usability of older medicines and simultaneously modifies pathologies in a way that opens markets for new treatments. Studying resistance can thus be an important part of developing and marketing antibiotics. The chosen example is that of the German pharmaceutical company Bayer. Before World War Two, Bayer had pioneered the development of anti-infective chemotherapy, sulpha drugs in particular, but had missed the boat when it came to fungal antibiotics. Exacerbated by the effects of war, Bayer's world market presence, which had been considerable prior to the war, had plummeted. In this critical situation, the company opted for a development strategy that tried to capitalise on the problems created by the use of first-generation antibiotics. Part and parcel of this strategy was monitoring what can be called the structural change of infectious disease. In practice, this meant to focus on pathologies resulting from resistance and hospital infections. In addition, Bayer also focused on lifestyle pathologies such as athlete's foot. This paper will follow drug development and marketing at Bayer from 1945 to about 1980. In this period, Bayer managed to regain some of its previous standing in markets but could not escape from the overall crisis of anti-infective drug development from the 1970s on.

    7. Polyethyleneimine-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for brain tumor drug delivery using magnetic targeting and intra-carotid administration.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E; Yang, Victor C

      2010-08-01

      This study aimed to examine the applicability of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified magnetic nanoparticles (GPEI) as a potential vascular drug/gene carrier to brain tumors. In vitro, GPEI exhibited high cell association and low cell toxicity--properties which are highly desirable for intracellular drug/gene delivery. In addition, a high saturation magnetization of 93 emu/g Fe was expected to facilitate magnetic targeting of GPEI to brain tumor lesions. However, following intravenous administration, GPEI could not be magnetically accumulated in tumors of rats harboring orthotopic 9L-gliosarcomas due to its poor pharmacokinetic properties, reflected by a negligibly low plasma AUC of 12 +/- 3 microg Fe/ml min. To improve "passive" GPEI presentation to brain tumor vasculature for subsequent "active" magnetic capture, we examined the intra-carotid route as an alternative for nanoparticle administration. Intra-carotid administration in conjunction with magnetic targeting resulted in 30-fold (p=0.002) increase in tumor entrapment of GPEI compared to that seen with intravenous administration. In addition, magnetic accumulation of cationic GPEI (zeta-potential = + 37.2 mV) in tumor lesions was 5.2-fold higher (p=0.004) than that achieved with slightly anionic G100 (zeta-potential= -12 mV) following intra-carotid administration, while no significant accumulation difference was detected between the two types of nanoparticles in the contra-lateral brain (p=0.187). These promising results warrant further investigation of GPEI as a potential cell-permeable, magnetically-responsive platform for brain tumor delivery of drugs and genes. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    8. Modified hydrotalcite-like compounds as active fillers of biodegradable polymers for drug release and food packaging applications.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Costantino, Umberto; Nocchetti, Morena; Tammaro, Loredana; Vittoria, Vittoria

      2012-11-01

      This review treats the recent patents and related literature, mainly from the Authors laboratories, on biomedical and food packaging applications of nano-composites constituted of biodegradable polymers filled with micro or nano crystals of organically modified Layered Double Hydroxides of Hydrotalcite type. After a brief outline of the chemical and structural aspects of Hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlc) and of their manipulation via intercalation of functional molecular anions to obtain materials for numerous, sometime unexpected applications, the review approaches the theme in three separated parts. Part 1 deals with the synthetic method used to prepare the pristine Mg-Al and Zn-Al HTlc and with the procedures of their functionalization with anti-inflammatory (diclofenac), antibacterial (chloramphenicol hemisuccinate), antifibrinolytic (tranexamic acid) drugs and with benzoates with antimicrobial activity. Procedures used to form (nano) composites of polycaprolactone, used as an example of biodegradable polymer, and functionalized HTlc are also reported. Part 2 discusses a patent and related papers on the preparation and biomedical use of a controlled delivery system of the above mentioned pharmacologically active substances. After an introduction dealing with the recent progress in the field of local drug delivery systems, the chemical and structural aspects of the patented system constituted of a biodegradable polymer and HTlc loaded with the active substances will be presented together with an extensive discussion of the drug release in physiological medium. Part 3 deals with a recent patent and related papers on chemical, structural and release property of antimicrobial species of polymeric films containing antimicrobial loaded HTlc able to act as active packaging for food products prolonging their shelf life.

    9. Ceramic/polymer nanocomposites with tunable drug delivery capability at specific disease sites.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Liu, Huinan; Webster, Thomas J

      2010-06-01

      Pharmaceutical agents are often used to stimulate new bone formation for the treatment of bone injuries or diseases (such as osteoporosis). However, there are several problems associated with current orthopedic drug delivery methods. First, conventional systemic administration of pharmaceutical agents may not effectively reach targeted sites and, thus, they can cause nonspecific bone formation in areas not affected by injury or disease. Second, even if intentionally delivered or implanted locally to the damaged bone tissue, these agents tend to rapidly diffuse into adjacent tissues due to weak physical bonding to their drug carriers, which limits their potential to promote prolonged bone formation in targeted areas of bone disease. Therefore, in this study, biodegradable ceramic/polymer nanocomposites were explored as novel drug carriers for orthopedic applications to prolong local drug release and, thus, improve drug effectiveness at bone disease sites. Specifically, a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-7) derived peptide (DIF-7c) was used as a model drug in this study and was first loaded onto nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) by either covalent chemical attachment or physical adsorption. These drug-carrying nano-HA particles were then dispersed into a degradable polymer (poly-lactide-co-glycolide or PLGA) matrix to create an implantable system capable of long-term drug release. The aminophase silane covalent chemical immobilization process was utilized in this study. These nanocomposite-based drug delivery systems were then characterized for drug loading efficiency and in vitro drug release. Results demonstrated that DIF-7c was successfully immobilized onto nano-HA placed in PLGA. Moreover, a greater prolonged two-phase release profile (of more than 3 months) was achieved when using aminophase silane chemical immobilization to nano-HA particles. Since previous studies have demonstrated greater in vivo bone growth on nano- compared with micron-HA particles

    10. [Validation of the Russian version of the modified Addenbrooke's cognitive examination for Alzheimer's disease diagnosis].

      Science.gov (United States)

      Levin, O S; Lavrov, A Yu; Lyashenko, Е А; Vasenina, E E; Trusova, N A; Datieva, V K; Makotrova, T A; Pilipenko, A Yu

      2015-01-01

      To evaluate the validity of the Russian version of the modified Addenbrooke's cognitive examination (ACE-m) for Alzheimer's disease (AD) diagnosis. ACE-m and MMSE, as a comparison scale, were administered to 78 patients including 49 patients with AD and 29 healthy people. ACE-m demonstrated the high validity in the diagnosis of dementia in AD. Cronbach's alpha was 0.89. ACE-m is a brief and simple in use test that measures a wide spectrum of cognitive functions, gives a general impression about cognitive deficit and diagnoses dementia in AD with the greater validity compared to MMSE. This scale is useful not only in diagnosis of AD but also in differentiation with other causes of dementia.

    11. Generic versus brand-name drugs used in cardiovascular diseases.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Manzoli, Lamberto; Flacco, Maria Elena; Boccia, Stefania; D'Andrea, Elvira; Panic, Nikola; Marzuillo, Carolina; Siliquini, Roberta; Ricciardi, Walter; Villari, Paolo; Ioannidis, John P A

      2016-04-01

      This meta-analysis aimed to compare the efficacy and adverse events, either serious or mild/moderate, of all generic versus brand-name cardiovascular medicines. We searched randomized trials in MEDLINE, Scopus, EMBASE, Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trial Register, and ClinicalTrials.gov (last update December 1, 2014). Attempts were made to contact the investigators of all potentially eligible trials. Two investigators independently extracted and analyzed soft (including systolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, and others) and hard efficacy outcomes (including major cardiovascular adverse events and death), minor/moderate and serious adverse events. We included 74 randomized trials; 53 reported ≥1 efficacy outcome (overall sample 3051), 32 measured mild/moderate adverse events (n = 2407), and 51 evaluated serious adverse events (n = 2892). We included trials assessing ACE inhibitors (n = 12), anticoagulants (n = 5), antiplatelet agents (n = 17), beta-blockers (n = 11), calcium channel blockers (n = 7); diuretics (n = 13); statins (n = 6); and others (n = 3). For both soft and hard efficacy outcomes, 100 % of the trials showed non-significant differences between generic and brand-name drugs. The aggregate effect size was 0.01 (95 % CI -0.05; 0.08) for soft outcomes; -0.06 (-0.71; 0.59) for hard outcomes. All but two trials showed non-significant differences in mild/moderate adverse events, and aggregate effect size was 0.07 (-0.06; 0.20). Comparable results were observed for each drug class and in each stratified meta-analysis. Overall, 8 serious possibly drug-related adverse events were reported: 5/2074 subjects on generics; 3/2076 subjects on brand-name drugs (OR 1.69; 95 % CI 0.40-7.20). This meta-analysis strengthens the evidence for clinical equivalence between brand-name and generic cardiovascular drugs. Physicians could be reassured about prescribing generic cardiovascular drugs, and health care organization about endorsing their wider

    12. Early cost-utility analysis of general and cerebrospinal fluid-specific Alzheimer's disease biomarkers for hypothetical disease-modifying treatment decision in mild cognitive impairment

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Handels, Ron L. H.; Joore, Manuela A.; Tran-Duy, An; Wimo, Anders; Wolfs, Claire A. G.; Verhey, Frans R. J.; Severens, Johan L.

      Introduction: The study aimed to determine the room for improvement of a perfect cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker and the societal incremental net monetary benefit of CSF in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) assuming a hypothetical disease-modifying Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment.

    13. Determination of Residual Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Aqueous Sample Using Magnetic Nanoparticles Modified with Cetyltrimethylammonium Bromide by High Performance Liquid Chromatography

      OpenAIRE

      Khoeini Sharifabadi, Malihe; Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Waqif Husain, Syed; Mehdinia, Ali; Aberoomand-Azar, Parviz

      2014-01-01

      A simple and sensitive solid-phase extraction method for separation and preconcentration of trace amount of four nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (naproxen, indomethacin, diclofenac, and ibuprofen) using Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles modified with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide has been developed. For this purpose, the surface of MNPs was modified with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a cationic surfactant. Effects of different parameters influencing the extraction efficiency of dr...

    14. The availability and affordability of orphan drugs for rare diseases in China.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Gong, Shiwei; Wang, Yingxiao; Pan, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Liang; Huang, Rui; Chen, Xin; Hu, Juanjuan; Xu, Yi; Jin, Si

      2016-02-27

      Orphan drugs are intended to treat, prevent or diagnose rare diseases. In recent years, China healthcare policy makers and patients have become increasingly concerned about orphan drug issues. However, very few studies have assessed the availability and affordability of orphan drugs for rare diseases in China. The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the availability and affordability of orphan drugs in China and to make suggestions to improve patient access to orphan drugs. Two components of the availability of orphan drugs were examined. Market availability was assessed by the extent to which orphan drugs were marketed in China with a comparison to orphan drugs in international markets, such as the U.S., EU and Japan. We conducted surveys and collected data from 24 tertiary public hospitals in China to measure hospital-level availability of orphan drugs. The affordability of orphan drugs was calculated using hospital dispensary prices and was expressed as days of average daily income required for the cost of a course of treatment. Affordability was also analyzed under the Chinese basic medical insurance system. Orphan drugs approved in the U.S., EU and Japan had 37.8%, 24.6% and 52.4% market availability in China, respectively. Median availability of 31 orphan drugs surveyed at the 24 tertiary public hospitals was 20.8% (very low). Within a periodic treatment course, the average treatment cost of 23 orphan drugs is approximately 4, 843. 5 USD, which equates to 505.6 days of per capita net income for an urban resident with a middle income (187.4 days for a high-income urban resident) or 1,582.8 days's income for a rural resident with a middle income (657.2 days for a high-income rural resident). Except for homoharringtonine, 22 orphan drugs for 14 rare diseases were unaffordable for the most of residents in China. With 5% out-of-pocket expenses, only three generics could be afforded by middle-income residents, whereas seven drugs for high-income urban

    15. PDZD7 is a modifier of retinal disease and a contributor to digenic Usher syndrome

      Science.gov (United States)

      Ebermann, Inga; Phillips, Jennifer B.; Liebau, Max C.; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Schermer, Bernhard; Lopez, Irma; Schäfer, Ellen; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Dafinger, Claudia; Bernd, Antje; Zrenner, Eberhart; Claustres, Mireille; Blanco, Bernardo; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Ruland, Rebecca; Westerfield, Monte; Benzing, Thomas; Bolz, Hanno J.

      2010-01-01

      Usher syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous recessive disease characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). It frequently presents with unexplained, often intrafamilial, variability of the visual phenotype. Although 9 genes have been linked with Usher syndrome, many patients do not have mutations in any of these genes, suggesting that there are still unidentified genes involved in the syndrome. Here, we have determined that mutations in PDZ domain–containing 7 (PDZD7), which encodes a homolog of proteins mutated in Usher syndrome subtype 1C (USH1C) and USH2D, contribute to Usher syndrome. Mutations in PDZD7 were identified only in patients with mutations in other known Usher genes. In a set of sisters, each with a homozygous mutation in USH2A, a frame-shift mutation in PDZD7 was present in the sister with more severe RP and earlier disease onset. Further, heterozygous PDZD7 mutations were present in patients with truncating mutations in USH2A, G protein–coupled receptor 98 (GPR98; also known as USH2C), and an unidentified locus. We validated the human genotypes using zebrafish, and our findings were consistent with digenic inheritance of PDZD7 and GPR98, and with PDZD7 as a retinal disease modifier in patients with USH2A. Pdzd7 knockdown produced an Usher-like phenotype in zebrafish, exacerbated retinal cell death in combination with ush2a or gpr98, and reduced Gpr98 localization in the region of the photoreceptor connecting cilium. Our data challenge the view of Usher syndrome as a traditional Mendelian disorder and support the reclassification of Usher syndrome as an oligogenic disease. PMID:20440071

    16. PDZD7 is a modifier of retinal disease and a contributor to digenic Usher syndrome.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Ebermann, Inga; Phillips, Jennifer B; Liebau, Max C; Koenekoop, Robert K; Schermer, Bernhard; Lopez, Irma; Schäfer, Ellen; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Dafinger, Claudia; Bernd, Antje; Zrenner, Eberhart; Claustres, Mireille; Blanco, Bernardo; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Ruland, Rebecca; Westerfield, Monte; Benzing, Thomas; Bolz, Hanno J

      2010-06-01

      Usher syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous recessive disease characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). It frequently presents with unexplained, often intrafamilial, variability of the visual phenotype. Although 9 genes have been linked with Usher syndrome, many patients do not have mutations in any of these genes, suggesting that there are still unidentified genes involved in the syndrome. Here, we have determined that mutations in PDZ domain-containing 7 (PDZD7), which encodes a homolog of proteins mutated in Usher syndrome subtype 1C (USH1C) and USH2D, contribute to Usher syndrome. Mutations in PDZD7 were identified only in patients with mutations in other known Usher genes. In a set of sisters, each with a homozygous mutation in USH2A, a frame-shift mutation in PDZD7 was present in the sister with more severe RP and earlier disease onset. Further, heterozygous PDZD7 mutations were present in patients with truncating mutations in USH2A, G protein-coupled receptor 98 (GPR98; also known as USH2C), and an unidentified locus. We validated the human genotypes using zebrafish, and our findings were consistent with digenic inheritance of PDZD7 and GPR98, and with PDZD7 as a retinal disease modifier in patients with USH2A. Pdzd7 knockdown produced an Usher-like phenotype in zebrafish, exacerbated retinal cell death in combination with ush2a or gpr98, and reduced Gpr98 localization in the region of the photoreceptor connecting cilium. Our data challenge the view of Usher syndrome as a traditional Mendelian disorder and support the reclassification of Usher syndrome as an oligogenic disease.

    17. Patient perspectives on switching disease-modifying therapies in the NARCOMS registry.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Salter, Amber R; Marrie, Ruth Ann; Agashivala, Neetu; Belletti, Daniel A; Kim, Edward; Cutter, Gary R; Cofield, Stacey S; Tyry, Tuula

      2014-01-01

      The evolving landscape of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for multiple sclerosis raises important questions about why patients change DMTs. Physicians and patients could benefit from a better understanding of the reasons for switching therapy. To investigate the reasons patients switch DMTs and identify characteristics associated with the decision to switch. The North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) Registry conducted a supplemental survey among registry participants responding to the 2011 update survey. The supplemental survey investigated reasons for switching DMT, origin of the discussion of DMT change, and which factors influenced the decision. Chi-square tests, Fisher's exact tests, and logistic regression were used for the analyses. Of the 691 eligible candidates, 308 responded and met the inclusion criteria (relapsing disease course, switched DMT after September 2010). The responders were 83.4% female, on average 52 years old, with a median (interquartile range) Patient-Determined Disease Steps score of 4 (2-5). The most recent prior therapy included first-line injectables (74.5%), infusions (18.1%), an oral DMT (3.4%), and other DMTs (4.0%). The discussion to switch DMT was initiated almost equally by physicians and participants. The primary reason for choosing the new DMT was based most frequently on physician's recommendation (24.5%) and patient perception of efficacy (13.7%). Participants frequently initiated the discussion regarding changing DMT, although physician recommendations regarding the specific therapy were still weighed highly. Long-term follow-up of these participants will provide valuable information on their disease trajectory, satisfaction with, and effectiveness of their new medication.

    18. 78 FR 9396 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Alzheimer's Disease: Developing Drugs for the Treatment of Early...

      Science.gov (United States)

      2013-02-08

      ...] Draft Guidance for Industry on Alzheimer's Disease: Developing Drugs for the Treatment of Early Stage... ``Alzheimer's Disease: Developing Drugs for the Treatment of Early Stage Disease.'' This guidance outlines FDA... trials that are specifically focused on the treatment of patients with established Alzheimer's disease...

    19. Transporter-mediated natural product–drug interactions for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Weibin Zha

      2018-04-01

      Full Text Available The growing use of natural products in cardiovascular (CV patients has been greatly raising the concerns about potential natural product–CV drug interactions. Some of these may lead to unexpected cardiovascular adverse effects and it is, therefore, essential to identify or predict potential natural product–CV drug interactions, and to understand the underlying mechanisms. Drug transporters are important determinants for the pharmacokinetics of drugs and alterations of drug transport has been recognized as one of the major causes of natural product–drug interactions. In last two decades, many CV drugs (e.g., angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta-blockers and statins have been identified to be substrates and inhibitors of the solute carrier (SLC transporters and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters, which are two major transporter superfamilies. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that a growing number of natural products showed cardioprotective effects (e.g., gingko biloba, danshen and their active ingredients are also substrates and inhibitors of drug transporters. Thus, to understand transporter-mediated natural product–CV drug interactions is important and some transporter-mediated interactions have already shown to have clinical relevance. In this review, we review the current knowledge on the role of ABC and SLC transporters in CV therapy, as well as transporter modulation by natural products used in CV diseases and their induced natural product–CV drug interactions through alterations of drug transport. We hope our review will aid in a comprehensive summary of transporter-mediated natural product–CV drug interactions and help public and physicians understand these type of interactions. Keywords: Cardiovascular drugs, Natural products, Drug transporters, Natural product–drug interaction, Pharmacokinetics

    20. Repurposing of Copper(II)-chelating Drugs for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Diseases.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Lanza, Valeria; Milardi, Danilo; Di Natale, Giuseppe; Pappalardo, Giuseppe

      2018-02-12

      There is mounting urgency to find new drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. A large number of reviews have exhaustively described either the molecular or clinical aspects of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's (PD). Conversely, reports outlining how known drugs in use for other diseases can also be effective as therapeutic agents in neurodegenerative diseases are less reported. This review focuses on the current uses of some copper(II) chelating molecules as potential drug candidates in neurodegeneration. Starting from the well-known harmful relationships existing between the dyshomeostasis and mis-management of metals and AD onset, we surveyed the experimental work reported in the literature, which deals with the repositioning of metal-chelating drugs in the field of neurodegenerative diseases. The reviewed papers were retrieved from common literature and their selection was limited to those describing the biomolecular aspects associated with neuroprotection. In particular, we emphasized the copper(II) coordination abilities of the selected drugs. Copper, together with zinc and iron, are known to play a key role in regulating neuronal functions. Changes in copper homeostasis are crucial for several neurodegenerative disorders. The studies included in this review may provide an overview on the current strategies aimed at repurposing copper (II) chelating drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Starting from the exemplary case of clioquinol repurposing, we discuss the challenge and the opportunities that repurposing of other metal-chelating drugs may provide (e.g. PBT-2, metformin and cyclodipeptides) in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. In order to improve the success rate of drug repositioning, comprehensive studies on the molecular mechanism and therapeutic efficacy are still required. The present review upholds that drug repurposing makes significant advantages over drug discovery since

    1. Real-World Adherence and Persistence to Oral Disease-Modifying Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis Patients Over 1 Year.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Johnson, Kristen M; Zhou, Huanxue; Lin, Feng; Ko, John J; Herrera, Vivian

      2017-08-01

      Disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) are indicated to reduce relapse rates and slow disease progression for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) patients when taken as prescribed. Nonadherence or non-persistence in the real-world setting can lead to greater risk for negative clinical outcomes. Although previous research has demonstrated greater adherence and persistence to oral DMTs compared with injectable DMTs, comparisons among oral DMTs are lacking. To compare adherence, persistence, and time to discontinuation among MS patients newly prescribed the oral DMTs fingolimod, dimethyl fumarate, or teriflunomide. This retrospective study used MarketScan Commercial and Medicare Supplemental claims databases. MS patients with ≥ 1 claim for specified DMTs from April 1, 2013, to June 30, 2013, were identified. The index drug was defined as the first oral DMT within this period. To capture patients newly initiating index DMTs, patients could not have a claim for their index drugs in the previous 12 months. Baseline characteristics were described for patients in each treatment cohort. Adherence, as measured by medication possession ratio (MPR) and proportion of days covered (PDC); persistence (30-day gap allowed); and time to discontinuation over a 12-month follow-up period were compared across treatment cohorts. Adjusted logistic regression models were used to examine adherence, and Cox regression models estimated risk of discontinuation. 1,498 patients newly initiated oral DMTs and met study inclusion criteria: fingolimod (n = 185), dimethyl fumarate (n = 1,160), and teriflunomide (n = 143). Patients were similar across most baseline characteristics, including region, relapse history, and health care resource utilization. Statistically significant differences were observed across the treatment cohorts for age, gender, previous injectable/infused DMT use, and comorbidities. Adherence and time to discontinuation were adjusted for age, gender, region, previous oral

    2. Is aspirin still the drug of choice for management of patients with peripheral arterial disease?

      Science.gov (United States)

      Poredos, Pavel; Jezovnik, Mateja K

      2013-03-01

      Antiplatelet drugs represent one of the basic options for management of patients with different atherosclerotic diseases. Aspirin is the oldest and most often prescribed antiplatelet drug. The efficacy of aspirin depends on the clinical characteristics of the treated population and probably also on the type or location of atherosclerotic disease. It seems that it is most effective in coronary patients with clinically unstable disease, less effective in prevention of cerebrovascular incidents, and its efficacy is uncertain in peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients. One of the first meta-analyses (Antithrombotic Trialists' Collaboration - ATC) indicated that antiplatelet drugs also significantly reduce cardiovascular events in patients with PAD. However, only one third of the PAD patients included were treated with aspirin, while the rest received other anti-platelet drugs. The latest ATC meta-analysis of randomized control trials of aspirin therapy involving patients with diabetes and PAD demonstrated no benefit of aspirin in reducing cardiovascular events. Also in patients with preclinical PAD (pathological ankle brachial index) aspirin did not result in a significant reduction of vascular events. The new anti-platelet drugs prasugrel, ticagrelor and picotamide seem to be more effective than aspirin in PAD patients, particularly in diabetic patients with PAD. In conclusion, antiplatelet drugs are effective in prevention of cardiovascular events in different atherosclerotic diseases, including PAD. However, recent studies indicated that in PAD patients aspirin is less effective than in coronary artery disease. New anti-platelet drugs showed marginal superiority over aspirin without definite advantages. Aspirin thus remains the first line of antiplatelet drug for secondary prevention of cardiovascular events in PAD patients and clopidogrel as its effective alternative. Further, new studies on PAD patients are necessary to better define the role of anti

    3. Control of drug treatment of chronic coronary artery disease: possibilities of a regional registry

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Rachkova S.A.

      2016-03-01

      Full Text Available The article describes the results of the Register of hypertension, coronary artery disease, chronic heart failure (Register of AH, CAD, HF in the Ivanovo region in 2015. The frequency of prescribing of the main groups of drugs in patients with coronary artery disease was estimated.

    4. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs decrease the risk for Alzheimer's disease?

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Andersen, K; Launer, L J; Ott, A

      1995-01-01

      Based on reports that the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), we studied the cross-sectional relation between NSAID use and the risk for AD in a population-based study of disease and disability in older people. After controlling...

    5. Monitoring the efficacy of drugs for neglected tropical diseases controlled by preventive chemotherapy.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Albonico, M; Levecke, B; LoVerde, P T; Montresor, A; Prichard, R; Vercruysse, J; Webster, J P

      2015-12-01

      In the last decade, pharmaceutical companies, governments and global health organisations under the leadership of the World Health Organization (WHO) have pledged large-scale donations of anthelmintic drugs, including ivermectin (IVM), praziquantel (PZQ), albendazole (ALB) and mebendazole (MEB). This worldwide scale-up in drug donations calls for strong monitoring systems to detect any changes in anthelmintic drug efficacy. This review reports on the outcome of the WHO Global Working Group on Monitoring of Neglected Tropical Diseases Drug Efficacy, which consists of three subgroups: (i) soil-transmitted helminthiases (ALB and MEB); (ii) onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis (IVM); and (iii) schistosomiasis (PZQ). Progress of ongoing work, challenges and research needs for each of the four main drugs used in helminthic preventive chemotherapy (PC) are reported, laying the ground for appropriate implementation of drug efficacy monitoring programmes under the co-ordination and guidelines of the WHO. Best practices for monitoring drug efficacy should be made available and capacity built as an integral part of neglected tropical disease (NTD) programme monitoring. Development of a disease-specific model to predict the impact of PC programmes, to detect outliers and to solicit responses is essential. Research studies on genetic polymorphisms in relation to low-efficacy phenotypes should be carried out to identify markers of putative resistance against all NTD drugs and ultimately to develop diagnostic assays. Development of combination and co-administration of NTD drugs as well as of new drug entities to boost the armamentarium of the few drugs available for NTD control and elimination should be pursued in parallel. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    6. Cigarette use and cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease: an unappreciated modifiable lifestyle risk factor.

      LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

      Stack, Austin G

      2012-01-31

      Tobacco use is a major modifiable cardiovascular risk factor in the general population and contributes to excess cardiovascular risk. Emerging evidence from large-scale observational studies suggests that continued tobacco use is also an independent cardiovascular risk factor among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The benefits of smoking cessation programs on improving the heath status of patients and reducing mortality are unequivocal in the general population. Despite this, there has been little effort in pursuing tobacco cessation programs in dialysis cohorts or those with lesser degrees of kidney impairment. Most of our attention to date has focused on the development of "kidney-specific" interventions that reduce rates of renal disease progression and improve dialysis outcomes. The purpose of this current review is to describe the epidemiology of tobacco use among patients with CKD, draw attention to its negative impact on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and finally highlight potential strategies for successful intervention. We hope that this study heightens the importance of tobacco use in CKD, stimulates renewed interest in the barriers and challenges that exist in achieving smoking cessation, and endorses the efficacy of intervention strategies and the immeasurable benefits of quitting on cardiovascular and noncardiovascular outcomes.

    7. Total oxidant status, total antioxidant capacity and ischemia modified albumin levels in children with celiac disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Sayar, Ersin; Özdem, Sebahat; Uzun, Gülbahar; İşlek, Ali; Yılmaz, Aygen; Artan, Reha

      2015-01-01

      In our study, we aimed to investigate ischemia modified albumin (IMA) as an oxidative stress marker, as well as other oxidant and antioxidant markers that have not been evaluated in children with celiac disease. A total of 37 pediatric patients who were diagnosed with celiac disease (CD) and 29 healthy children were enrolled in this prospective study. We evaluated the IMA, total oxidant status, total antioxidant capacity, sulfhydryl, and advanced oxidation protein products in all of the subjects. We also compared the levels at the time of the diagnosis, and following a gluten-free diet (GFD) in the children with CD. While the IMA and the other oxidant marker levels were significantly higher in the patient group compared to the control group, the antioxidant marker levels were found to be significantly lower in the patient group, compared to the control group. We also determined that the tissue transglutaminase IgA showed a highly positive correlation, and that the IMA showed a moderately positive correlation with the Marsh-Oberhuber histopathological stage. Additionally, the IMA and other oxidant marker levels were significantly lower, while the antioxidant marker levels were significantly higher after the GFD, compared to the pre-diet period. We detected that oxidative stress played a role in the pathogenesis of CD, and that this could be evaluated using oxidative stress markers, which would regress after the GFD. We also detected that IMA is a marker that shows a correlation with the histopathological stage, and may be used in the diagnosis.

    8. Design of fuzzy classifier for diabetes disease using Modified Artificial Bee Colony algorithm.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Beloufa, Fayssal; Chikh, M A

      2013-10-01

      In this study, diagnosis of diabetes disease, which is one of the most important diseases, is conducted with artificial intelligence techniques. We have proposed a novel Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm in which a mutation operator is added to an Artificial Bee Colony for improving its performance. When the current best solution cannot be updated, a blended crossover operator (BLX-α) of genetic algorithm is applied, in order to enhance the diversity of ABC, without compromising with the solution quality. This modified version of ABC is used as a new tool to create and optimize automatically the membership functions and rules base directly from data. We take the diabetes dataset used in our work from the UCI machine learning repository. The performances of the proposed method are evaluated through classification rate, sensitivity and specificity values using 10-fold cross-validation method. The obtained classification rate of our method is 84.21% and it is very promising when compared with the previous research in the literature for the same problem. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

    9. The clinical implication of drug dependency in children and adults with inflammatory bowel disease: a review

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Duricova, Dana; Pedersen, Natalia; Lenicek, Martin

      2011-01-01

      Drug dependency in adult and paediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is described and the significance of this response pattern in clinical practice discussed in this review. Dependent patients maintain remission while on the treatment, but they relapse shortly after drug...... corticosteroid dependency. Infliximab dependency was described in 42-66% of children and 29% of adults with Crohn's disease. The risk of surgery 50 and 40 months after treatment start was 10% and 23% in infliximab dependent children and adults, respectively. Maintenance of infliximab in dependent patients...... was suggested to postpone if not avoid the need of surgery. Lastly, mesalazine dependency was identified in 23% of adults with Crohn's disease. These patients were characterized by mild disease course and lower surgical risk compared to non-responders to mesalazine (32 vs. 61%). Identification of drug...

    10. Review on potential phytocompounds in drug development for Parkinson disease: A pharmacoinformatic approach

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      S. Vijayakumar

      Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is caused by human physiological function and is ranked as the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. One of the prominent therapies currently available for PD is the use of dopamine agonists which mimic the natural action of dopamine in the brain and stimulate dopamine receptors directly. Currently, available pharmaceutical drugs provide only temporary relief of the disease. Phytocompounds have been identified as promising target of research in the quest for new pharmaceutical compounds as they can produce secondary metabolites with novel chemical structure. In this review the drug development of Parkinson disease has been analyzed using computational tools. Keywords: Parkinson disease, Phytocompounds, Computational methods, Drug development and design

    11. A network-based classification model for deriving novel drug-disease associations and assessing their molecular actions.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Min Oh

      Full Text Available The growing number and variety of genetic network datasets increases the feasibility of understanding how drugs and diseases are associated at the molecular level. Properly selected features of the network representations of existing drug-disease associations can be used to infer novel indications of existing drugs. To find new drug-disease associations, we generated an integrative genetic network using combinations of interactions, including protein-protein interactions and gene regulatory network datasets. Within this network, network adjacencies of drug-drug and disease-disease were quantified using a scored path between target sets of them. Furthermore, the common topological module of drugs or diseases was extracted, and thereby the distance between topological drug-module and disease (or disease-module and drug was quantified. These quantified scores were used as features for the prediction of novel drug-disease associations. Our classifiers using Random Forest, Multilayer Perceptron and C4.5 showed a high specificity and sensitivity (AUC score of 0.855, 0.828 and 0.797 respectively in predicting novel drug indications, and displayed a better performance than other methods with limited drug and disease properties. Our predictions and current clinical trials overlap significantly across the different phases of drug development. We also identified and visualized the topological modules of predicted drug indications for certain types of cancers, and for Alzheimer's disease. Within the network, those modules show potential pathways that illustrate the mechanisms of new drug indications, including propranolol as a potential anticancer agent and telmisartan as treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

    12. Drug-induced impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Reiff, J; Jost, W H

      2011-05-01

      Dopamine replacement treatment with excessive or aberrant dopamine receptor stimulation can cause behavioral disturbances in Parkinson's disease, comprising dopamine dysregulation syndrome, punding, and impulse control disorders. Common impulse control disorders are compulsive buying, pathological gambling, binge eating, hypersexuality, and compulsive reckless driving.

    13. Indigenous drugs in ischemic heart disease in patients with diabetes.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Dwivedi, Shridhar; Aggarwal, Amitesh

      2009-11-01

      India is currently facing the silent epidemic of ischemic heart disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hypertension, and stroke. Both diabetes and ischemic heart disease appear in Indian people a decade earlier compared to whites. The recent evidence that certain medicinal plants possess hypoglycemic, lipid-lowering, and immunomodulating properties on account of their rich flavonoid and/or other glucose-lowering active constituents merits scientific scrutiny in this regard. The present communication aims to give a brief review of those plants that could be useful in T2DM associated with hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and/or dyslipidemia. Aegle marmelos (bael), Allium sativum (garlic), Curcuma domestica (turmeric), Eugenia jambolana (jamun), Murraya koenigii (curry leaves), Trigonella foenum graecum (fenugreek), and Terminalia arjuna (arjun) have been found to be useful in diabetes associated with ischemic heart disease. Their active biomolecules have been identified. They have also been demonstrated to be safe in long-term use. Further clinical research regarding their potency and efficacy vis-à-vis oral hypoglycemics needs to done.

    14. [Drug treatment of erection disorders in patients with cardiovascular disease

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Meuleman, E.J.H.; Kingma, J.H.

      2001-01-01

      Erectile dysfunction is a frequent condition in cardiovascular patients. Since the arrival of oral erection-supporting medication, patients want to know how safe sexual activity is in cardiovascular disease in general and during use of erection-supporting medication in particular. Sexual intercourse

    15. Drug Repositioning in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Based on Genetic Information

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Collij, Valerie; Festen, Eleonora A. M.; Alberts, Rudi; Weersma, Rinse K.

      2016-01-01

      Background:Currently, 200 genetic risk loci have been identified for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Although these findings have significantly advanced our insight into IBD biology, there has been little progress in translating this knowledge toward clinical practice, like more cost-efficient

    16. Applications of Genetically Modified Immunobiotics with High Immunoregulatory Capacity for Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Shigemori, Suguru; Shimosato, Takeshi

      2017-01-01

      Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are chronic inflammatory diseases characterized by dysregulated immune responses of the gastrointestinal tract. In recent years, the incidence of IBDs has increased in developed nations, but their prophylaxis/treatment is not yet established. Site-directed delivery of molecules showing anti-inflammatory properties using genetically modified (gm)-probiotics shows promise as a new strategy for the prevention and treatment of IBD. Advantages of gm-probiotics include (1) the ability to use bacteria as a delivery vehicle, enabling safe and long-term use by humans, (2) decreased risks of side effects, and (3) reduced costs. The intestinal delivery of anti-inflammatory proteins such as cytokines and enzymes using Lactococcus lactis has been shown to regulate host intestinal homeostasis depending on the delivered protein-specific machinery. Additionally, clinical experience using interleukin 10-secreting Lc. lactis has been shown to be safe and to facilitate biological containment in IBD therapy. On the other hand, some preclinical studies have demonstrated that gm-strains of immunobiotics (probiotic strains able to beneficially regulate the mucosal immunity) provide beneficial effects on intestinal inflammation as a result of the synergy between the immunoregulatory effects of the bacterium itself and the anti-inflammatory effects of the delivered recombinant proteins. In this review, we discuss the rapid progression in the development of strategies for the prophylaxis and treatment of IBD using gm-probiotics that exhibit immune regulation effects (gm-immunobiotics). In particular, we discuss the type of strains used as delivery agents.

    17. The effect of anticholinergic drugs on 123I-IMP SPECT in Parkinson's disease

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Mizuno, Tomoyuki; Nishiyama, Kazutoshi; Hitoshi, Seiji; Takeda, Koichi; Sakuta, Manabu

      1992-01-01

      Anticholinergic drugs may be responsible for mental deterioration in Parkinson's disease (PD). This study was thus performed to examine effects of anticholinergic drugs on the brain by using N-isopropyl-p-[I-123] iodoamphetamine SPECT. The purpose of the study was twofold: (I) to compare regional cerebral uptake of tracer during treatment with anticholinergic drugs and one month after the discontinuation of the drugs in 7 PD patients given them for 6 months or more; and (II) to compare tracer uptake in 11 PD patients administered anticholinergic drugs and 25 PD patients not administered them. Each 16 regions in the bilateral cerebral cortexes and each one region in the bilateral basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum were assigned as regions of interest (ROI). The count ratio of each ROI in the cerebrum to ROI in the cerebellum was designated as regional cerebral uptake ratio (rCUR). A mean rCUR was lower during administration of anticholinergic drugs in all ROIs, except for two in Group I and one in Group II, than during the period not administered the drugs. The administration of anticholinergic drugs was sigificantly associated with decreased rCUR in 10 ROIs in Group I, and in 15 ROIs in Group II. The rCUR in the occipital, basal ganglia, and thalamus was independent of the administration of anticholinergic drugs. These results suggest that anticholinergic drugs may inhibit the cortical cholinergic system in PD patients. (N.K.)

    18. The effect of anticholinergic drugs on [sup 123]I-IMP SPECT in Parkinson's disease

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Mizuno, Tomoyuki; Nishiyama, Kazutoshi; Hitoshi, Seiji; Takeda, Koichi; Sakuta, Manabu [Japan Red Cross Central Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

      1992-04-01

      Anticholinergic drugs may be responsible for mental deterioration in Parkinson's disease (PD). This study was thus performed to examine effects of anticholinergic drugs on the brain by using N-isopropyl-p-[I-123] iodoamphetamine SPECT. The purpose of the study was twofold: (I) to compare regional cerebral uptake of tracer during treatment with anticholinergic drugs and one month after the discontinuation of the drugs in 7 PD patients given them for 6 months or more; and (II) to compare tracer uptake in 11 PD patients administered anticholinergic drugs and 25 PD patients not administered them. Each 16 regions in the bilateral cerebral cortexes and each one region in the bilateral basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum were assigned as regions of interest (ROI). The count ratio of each ROI in the cerebrum to ROI in the cerebellum was designated as regional cerebral uptake ratio (rCUR). A mean rCUR was lower during administration of anticholinergic drugs in all ROIs, except for two in Group I and one in Group II, than during the period not administered the drugs. The administration of anticholinergic drugs was sigificantly associated with decreased rCUR in 10 ROIs in Group I, and in 15 ROIs in Group II. The rCUR in the occipital, basal ganglia, and thalamus was independent of the administration of anticholinergic drugs. These results suggest that anticholinergic drugs may inhibit the cortical cholinergic system in PD patients. (N.K.).

    19. Subclinical chronic kidney disease modifies the diagnosis of experimental acute kidney injury.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Succar, Lena; Pianta, Timothy J; Davidson, Trent; Pickering, John W; Endre, Zoltán H

      2017-09-01

      Extensive structural damage within the kidney must be present before serum creatinine increases. However, a subclinical phase of chronic kidney disease (CKD) usually goes undetected. Here we tested whether experimental subclinical CKD would modify functional and damage biomarker profiles of acute kidney injury (AKI). Subclinical CKD was induced in rats by adenine or aristolochic acid models but without increasing serum creatinine. After prolonged recovery (three to six weeks), AKI was induced with a subnephrotoxic dose of cisplatin. Urinary levels of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), cytochrome C, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), clusterin, and interleukin-18 increased during CKD induction, without an increase in serum creatinine. After AKI in adenine-induced CKD, serum creatinine increased more rapidly, while increased urinary KIM-1, clusterin, and MCP-1 were delayed and reduced. Increased serum creatinine and biomarker excretion were associated with diffuse tubulointerstitial injury in the outer stripe of outer medulla coupled with over 50% cortical damage. Following AKI in aristolochic acid-induced CKD, increased serum creatinine, urinary KIM-1, clusterin, MCP-1, cytochrome C, and interleukin-18 concentrations and excretion were greater at day 21 than day 42 and inversely correlated with cortical injury. Subclinical CKD modified functional and damage biomarker profiles in diametrically opposite ways. Functional biomarker profiles were more sensitive, while damage biomarker diagnostic thresholds and increases were diminished and delayed. Damage biomarker concentrations and excretion were inversely linked to the extent of prior cortical damage. Thus, thresholds for AKI biomarkers may need to be lower or sampling delayed in the known presence of CKD. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    20. Role of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as risk factor for drug-induced hepatotoxicity

      Science.gov (United States)

      Massart, Julie; Begriche, Karima; Moreau, Caroline; Fromenty, Bernard

      2017-01-01

      Background Obesity is often associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which refers to a large spectrum of hepatic lesions including fatty liver, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. Different investigations showed or suggested that obesity and NAFLD are able to increase the risk of hepatotoxicity of different drugs. Some of these drugs could induce more frequently an acute hepatitis in obese individuals whereas others could worsen pre-existing NAFLD. Aim The main objective of the present review was to collect the available information regarding the role of NAFLD as risk factor for drug-induced hepatotoxicity. For this purpose, we performed a data-mining analysis using different queries including drug-induced liver injury (or DILI), drug-induced hepatotoxicity, fatty liver, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (or NAFLD), steatosis and obesity. The main data from the collected articles are reported in this review and when available, some pathophysiological hypotheses are put forward. Relevance for patients Drugs that could pose a potential risk in obese patients include compounds belonging to different pharmacological classes such as acetaminophen, halothane, methotrexate, rosiglitazone, stavudine and tamoxifen. For some of these drugs, experimental investigations in obese rodents confirmed the clinical observations and unveiled different pathophysiological mechanisms which could explain why these pharmaceuticals are particularly hepatotoxic in obesity and NAFLD. Other drugs such as pentoxifylline, phenobarbital and omeprazole might also pose a risk but more investigations are required to determine whether this risk is significant or not. Because obese people often take several drugs for the treatment of different obesity-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia and coronary heart disease, it is urgent to identify the main pharmaceuticals that can cause acute hepatitis on a fatty liver background or induce NAFLD worsening

    1. Current therapeutic molecules and targets in neurodegenerative diseases based on in silico drug design.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Sehgal, Sheikh Arslan; Hammad, Mirza A; Tahir, Rana Adnan; Akram, Hafiza Nisha; Ahmad, Faheem

      2018-03-15

      As the number of elderly persons increases, neurodegenerative diseases are becoming ubiquitous. There is currently a great need for knowledge concerning management of old-age neurodegenerative diseases; the most important of which are: Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, and Huntington's disease. To summarize the potential of computationally predicted molecules and targets against neurodegenerative diseases. Review of literature published since 1997 against neurodegenerative diseases, utilizing as keywords: in silico, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis ALS, and Huntington's disease. Due to the costs associated with experimentation and current ethical law, performing experiments directly on living organisms has become much more difficult. In this scenario, in silico techniques have been successful and have become powerful tools in the search to cure disease. Researchers use the Computer Aided Drug Design pipeline which: 1) generates 3-dimensional structures of target proteins through homology modeling 2) achieves stabilization through molecular dynamics simulation, and 3) exploits molecular docking through large compound libraries. Next generation sequencing is continually producing enormous amounts of raw sequence data while neuroimaging is producing a multitude of raw image data. To solve such pressing problems, these new tools and algorithms are required. This review elaborates precise in silico tools and techniques for drug targets, active molecules, and molecular docking studies, together with future prospects and challenges concerning possible breakthroughs in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, and Huntington's disease. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

    2. Budget impact analysis of drugs for ultra-orphan non-oncological diseases in Europe.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Schlander, Michael; Adarkwah, Charles Christian; Gandjour, Afschin

      2015-02-01

      Ultra-orphan diseases (UODs) have been defined by a prevalence of less than 1 per 50,000 persons. However, little is known about budget impact of ultra-orphan drugs. For analysis, the budget impact analysis (BIA) had a time horizon of 10 years (2012-2021) and a pan-European payer's perspective, based on prevalence data for UODs for which patented drugs are available and/or for which drugs are in clinical development. A total of 18 drugs under patent protection or orphan drug designation for non-oncological UODs were identified. Furthermore, 29 ultra-orphan drugs for non-oncological diseases under development that have the potential of reaching the market by 2021 were found. Total budget impact over 10 years was estimated to be €15,660 and €4965 million for approved and pipeline ultra-orphan drugs, respectively (total: €20,625 million). The analysis does not support concerns regarding an uncontrolled growth in expenditures for drugs for UODs.

    3. Global issues in drug development for Alzheimer's disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Doody, Rachelle S; Cole, Patricia E; Miller, David S; Siemers, Eric; Black, Ronald; Feldman, Howard; Schindler, Rachel; Graham, Stephen; Heath, Theresa; Khachaturian, Ara S; Evans, Rebecca; Carrillo, Maria C

      2011-03-01

      The number of clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease conducted outside the United States in a broad array of countries is increasing. As the number of compounds ready for clinical testing increases, and as trials become longer and more complex, this trend is expected to grow. The cultural and ethical context of global clinical trials, potential benefits for those involved, and practical approaches to obstacles generated by these global trials were discussed at a meeting of the Alzheimer's Association Research Roundtable. Regulatory issues, including regional differences in study registration procedures, rules for collecting and reporting serious adverse events, requirements for national identity of study populations, and regulatory audits were also discussed by individuals who are knowledgeable about global clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2011 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    4. [Affordability and availability of drugs for treatment of chronic diseases in the public health care system].

      Science.gov (United States)

      Helfer, Ana Paula; Camargo, Aline Lins; Tavares, Noemia Urruth Leão; Kanavos, Panos; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso

      2012-03-01

      To assess the affordability by workers of drugs used for treatment of chronic diseases, as well as the availability of the reference, similar, or generic forms of these drugs in the public health care system. We employed the methodology recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Action International (HAI) for the standardized collection of information on selling prices in the private sector and availability in the public health care system of drugs in six cities in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Data were collected from November 2008 to January 2009. Affordability was estimated as the number of salary days required for a worker receiving the national minimum wage to buy, in a private pharmacy, the amount of medication required for one month of treatment. Availability was assessed by the presence of these drugs in public health care system facilities. Twenty-two public facilities and 30 private pharmacies were studied. Of 21 drugs used for the treatment of seven chronic disorders, only nine were available free of charge in the six cities. Mean availability ranged from 83.3% (São Leopoldo) to 97.6% (Caxias do Sul). Affordability ranged from 0.4 to 10.5 salary days for reference drugs, 0.2 to 8.4 salary days for similar drugs, and 0.3 to 3.8 salary days for generic drugs. The overall availability of the drugs surveyed was higher than the 80% recommended by WHO. However, some treatments were not available, or had limited availability in the public system. Concerning affordability, the number of salary days required to buy these drugs may affect the continuation of drug treatments for chronic diseases.

    5. AND logic-like pH- and light-dual controlled drug delivery by surface modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Zhao, Junwei; He, Zhaoshuai; Li, Biao; Cheng, Tanyu, E-mail: tycheng@shnu.edu.cn; Liu, Guohua

      2017-04-01

      Recently, the controlled drug delivery system has become a potential platform for biomedical application. Herein, we developed a pH and light-dual controlled cargo release system exhibiting AND logic based on MCM-41 mesoporous silica nanoparticles, which was surface modified using β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) with imine bond and azobenzene derivative. The complex of β-CD and azobenzene derivative effectively blocked the cargo delivery in pH = 7.0 phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution without 365 nm UV light irradiation. The cargo was fully released when both factors of acidic environment (pH = 5.0 PBS) and 365 nm UV light irradiation were satisfied, meanwhile only very little cargo was delivered if one factor was satisfied. The result also demonstrates that the opening/closing of the gate and the release of the cargo in small portions can be controlled. - Highlights: • A pH and light-dual controlled cargo release system exhibiting AND logic is developed. • The delivery system can release the cargo in small potions by controlling the opening/closing of the gate. • The delivery system realizes the controlled release in zebrafish.

    6. Preparation of β-cyclodextrin-gold nanoparticles modified open tubular column for capillary electrochromatographic separation of chiral drugs.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Zhou, Li; Jiang, Shenmeng; Zhang, Xue; Fang, Linlin; Guo, Xingjie

      2018-04-01

      In this paper, β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) coated open tubular column (OT column) was prepared for capillary electrochromatography. The open tubular column was constructed through self-assembly of gold nanoparticles on 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) prederivatized capillary and subsequent modification of thiols β-cyclodextrin (SH-β-CD). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ultraviolet visible spectroscopy were carried out to characterize the prepared open tubular column and synthesized gold nanoparticles. By comparing different coating times of gold nanoparticles and thiols β-cyclodextrin, we got the optimal conditions for preparing the open tubular column. Also, the separation parameters were optimized including buffer pH, buffer concentration and applied voltage. Separation effectiveness of open tubular column was verified by the separation of four pairs of drug enantiomers including bifonazole, fexofenadine, omeprazole and lansoprazole, and satisfactory separation results were achieved for these analytes studied. In addition, the column showed good stability and repeatability. The relative standard deviation values less than 5% were obtained through intra-day, inter-day, and column-to-column investigations. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

    7. Combinatorial treatment of DNA and chromatin-modifying drugs cause cell death in human and canine osteosarcoma cell lines.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Venugopal Thayanithy

      Full Text Available Downregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs at the 14q32 locus stabilizes the expression of cMYC, thus significantly contributing to osteosarcoma (OS pathobiology. Here, we show that downregulation of 14q32 miRNAs is epigenetically regulated. The predicted promoter regions of miRNA clusters at 14q32 locus showed no recurrent patterns of differential methylation, but Saos2 cells showed elevated histone deacetylase (HDAC activity. Treatment with 4-phenylbutyrate increased acetylation of histones associated with 14q32 miRNAs, but interestingly, robust restoration of 14q32 miRNA expression, attenuation of cMYC expression, and induction of apoptosis required concomitant treatment with 5-Azacytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. These events were associated with genome-wide gene expression changes including induction of pro-apoptotic genes and downregulation of cell cycle genes. Comparable effects were achieved in human and canine OS cells using the HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA/Vorinostat and the DNA methylation inhibitor Zebularine (Zeb, with significantly more pronounced cytotoxicity in cells whose molecular phenotypes were indicative of aggressive biological behavior. These results suggested that the combination of these chromatin-modifying drugs may be a useful adjuvant in the treatment of rapidly progressive OS.

    8. Patient perspectives on switching disease-modifying therapies in the NARCOMS registry

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Salter AR

      2014-07-01

      Full Text Available Amber R Salter,1 Ruth Ann Marrie,2,3 Neetu Agashivala,4 Daniel A Belletti,4 Edward Kim,4 Gary R Cutter,1 Stacey S Cofield,1 Tuula Tyry51Department of Biostatistics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, 3Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada; 4Novartis Pharmaceutical Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA; 5Division of Neurology, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, USAIntroduction: The evolving landscape of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs for multiple sclerosis raises important questions about why patients change DMTs. Physicians and patients could benefit from a better understanding of the reasons for switching therapy. Purpose: To investigate the reasons patients switch DMTs and identify characteristics associated with the decision to switch.Method: The North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS Registry conducted a supplemental survey among registry participants responding to the 2011 update survey. The supplemental survey investigated reasons for switching DMT, origin of the discussion of DMT change, and which factors influenced the decision. Chi-square tests, Fisher’s exact tests, and logistic regression were used for the analyses. Results: Of the 691 eligible candidates, 308 responded and met the inclusion criteria (relapsing disease course, switched DMT after September 2010. The responders were 83.4% female, on average 52 years old, with a median (interquartile range Patient-Determined Disease Steps score of 4 (2–5. The most recent prior therapy included first-line injectables (74.5%, infusions (18.1%, an oral DMT (3.4%, and other DMTs (4.0%. The discussion to switch DMT was initiated almost equally by physicians and participants. The primary reason for choosing the new DMT was based most frequently on physician’s recommendation (24.5% and patient perception of efficacy (13.7%. Conclusion

    9. Reward Prediction Errors in Drug Addiction and Parkinson's Disease: from Neurophysiology to Neuroimaging.

      Science.gov (United States)

      García-García, Isabel; Zeighami, Yashar; Dagher, Alain

      2017-06-01

      Surprises are important sources of learning. Cognitive scientists often refer to surprises as "reward prediction errors," a parameter that captures discrepancies between expectations and actual outcomes. Here, we integrate neurophysiological and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results addressing the processing of reward prediction errors and how they might be altered in drug addiction and Parkinson's disease. By increasing phasic dopamine responses, drugs might accentuate prediction error signals, causing increases in fMRI activity in mesolimbic areas in response to drugs. Chronic substance dependence, by contrast, has been linked with compromised dopaminergic function, which might be associated with blunted fMRI responses to pleasant non-drug stimuli in mesocorticolimbic areas. In Parkinson's disease, dopamine replacement therapies seem to induce impairments in learning from negative outcomes. The present review provides a holistic overview of reward prediction errors across different pathologies and might inform future clinical strategies targeting impulsive/compulsive disorders.

    10. Creating New Economic Incentives for Repurposing Generic Drugs for Unsolved Diseases Using Social Finance.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bloom, Bruce E

      2015-12-01

      Repurposing research improves patient lives by taking drugs approved for one disease and clinically testing them to create a treatment for a different disease. Repurposing drugs that are generic, inexpensive, and widely available and that can be taken in their current dosage and formulation in the new indication provide a quick, affordable, and effective way to create "new" treatments. However, generic drug repurposing often provides no profit potential, and so there is no economic incentive for industry to pursue this, and philanthropy and government funds are often insufficient. One way to create new economic incentive for the repurposing of generic drugs is through social finance. This perspective describes how social finance can create a new economic incentive by using a social impact bond, or similar financial structure, to repay for-profit investors who fund the repurposing research from the proceeds of healthcare cost reductions generated when these affordable, effective, and widely available repurposed therapies improve healthcare outcomes.

    11. Drug repurposing by integrated literature mining and drug–gene–disease triangulation

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Sun, Peng; Guo, Jiong; Winnenburg, Rainer

      2017-01-01

      recent developments in computational drug repositioning and introduce the utilized data sources. Afterwards, we introduce a new data fusion model based on n-cluster editing as a novel multi-source triangulation strategy, which was further combined with semantic literature mining. Our evaluation suggests...... that utilizing drug–gene–disease triangulation coupled to sophisticated text analysis is a robust approach for identifying new drug candidates for repurposing....

    12. Treatment patterns in disease-modifying therapy for patients with multiple sclerosis in the United States.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bonafede, Machaon M; Johnson, Barbara H; Wenten, Madé; Watson, Crystal

      2013-10-01

      Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) whose disease activity is inadequately controlled with a platform therapy (interferon beta or glatiramer acetate [GA]) may switch to another platform therapy or escalate therapy to natalizumab or fingolimod, which were approved in the US in 2006 and 2010, respectively. The objective of this study was to describe treatment patterns in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) in the United States who were followed for 2 years after initiating a disease-modifying therapy (DMT). A retrospective observational cohort study was conducted to examine treatment patterns of initial DMT use (on initial therapy for 2 years with and without gaps of ≥ 60 days, medication switching, and discontinuation) among patients with MS who initiated a platform therapy (interferon-β or glatiramer acetate) or natalizumab between January 1, 2007, and September 30, 2009; the first DMT claim was the index. Eligible patients were identified in the MarketScan Commercial and Medicare Supplemental databases based on continuous enrollment for 6 months before (preindex period) and 24 months after their index date, with a diagnosis of MS and no claim for a previous DMT in the 6-month preindex period. Demographics at index and clinical characteristics during the preindex period were also analyzed. A total of 6181 MS patients were included, with 5735 (92.8%) starting on platform therapy. Natalizumab initiators were more likely to stay on index therapy (32.3% vs 16.9%, P treatment gaps of ≥ 60 days (44.8% vs 55.3%, P treatment (13.9% vs 19.1%, P = 0.007) and took longer to switch (400.9 days vs 330.7 days, P treatment gaps, and switch less than platform initiators in the 2 years after treatment initiation. Switching between platform therapies is common despite evidence that MS patients on platform therapy may benefit from switching to natalizumab. © 2013 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

    13. The current state of GPCR-based drug discovery to treat metabolic disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Sloop, Kyle W; Emmerson, Paul J; Statnick, Michael A; Willard, Francis S

      2018-02-02

      One approach of modern drug discovery is to identify agents that enhance or diminish signal transduction cascades in various cell types and tissues by modulating the activity of GPCRs. This strategy has resulted in the development of new medicines to treat many conditions, including cardiovascular disease, psychiatric disorders, HIV/AIDS, certain forms of cancer and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). These successes justify further pursuit of GPCRs as disease targets and provide key learning that should help guide identifying future therapeutic agents. This report reviews the current landscape of GPCR drug discovery with emphasis on efforts aimed at developing new molecules for treating T2DM and obesity. We analyse historical efforts to generate GPCR-based drugs to treat metabolic disease in terms of causal factors leading to success and failure in this endeavour. © 2018 The British Pharmacological Society.

    14. Nanoparticle system for the local delivery of disease modifying osteoarthritic drugs

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Periyasamy, P.C.; Wennink, J.W.H.; Wang, Rong; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Dijkstra, Pieter J.; Post, Janine Nicole

      2013-01-01

      Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop the nanoparticles that i) can be injected intra-articularly ii) target to cartilage due to an opposite charge difference with the extracellular cartilaginous matrix and iii) due to their small size can penetrate into the cartilage. In this way

    15. Scintimetric assessment of synovitis activity during treatment with disease modifying antirheumatic drugs

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Olsen, N; Halberg, P; Halskov, O

      1988-01-01

      In a double blind trial of 36 patients with rheumatoid arthritis a new scintimetric method was applied to three comparable patient groups before and after eight months' treatment with levamisole, penicillamine, or azathioprine. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate scintigraphy of both hands was performed...

    16. Modifying Health Behavior to Prevent Cardiovascular Diseases: A Nationwide Survey among German Primary Care Physicians

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Sven Schneider

      2014-04-01

      Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases (CVD are a major public health concern as they are the leading cause of death in developed countries. Primary care is considered to be the ideal setting for CVD prevention. Therefore, more than 4,000 German primary care physicians (PCPs were asked about their attitudes towards and their activities regarding the prevention of CVD in the nationwide ÄSP-kardio Study. The focus of the study was on health behavior modification. Two thirds of the participating PCPs stated that they routinely provided brief inventions to assist patients in reducing both their tobacco (72% and alcohol (61% consumption, to encourage them to increase their levels of physical activity (72%, and to assist them in adjusting to a more healthy diet (66%, and in achieving a healthy body weight (69%. However, only between 23% (quitting smoking and 49% (diet modification of PCPs felt that they had been successful in helping patients modify their lifestyles. Insufficient reimbursement, cultural diversity and a lack of time were reported to be the most problematic barriers to successful intervention in the primary care setting. Despite these obstacles, the majority of German PCPs was engaged in prevention and health behavior intervention to reduce the incidence and progression of CVD.

    17. Baseline predictors of persistence to first disease-modifying treatment in multiple sclerosis.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Zettl, U K; Schreiber, H; Bauer-Steinhusen, U; Glaser, T; Hechenbichler, K; Hecker, M

      2017-08-01

      Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) require lifelong therapy. However, success of disease-modifying therapies is dependent on patients' persistence and adherence to treatment schedules. In the setting of a large multicenter observational study, we aimed at assessing multiple parameters for their predictive power with respect to discontinuation of therapy. We analyzed 13 parameters to predict discontinuation of interferon beta-1b treatment during a 2-year follow-up period based on data from 395 patients with MS who were treatment-naïve at study onset. Besides clinical characteristics, patient-related psychosocial outcomes were assessed as well. Among patients without clinically relevant fatigue, males showed a higher persistence rate than females (80.3% vs 64.7%). Clinically relevant fatigue scores decreased the persistence rate in men and especially in women (71.4% and 51.2%). Besides gender and fatigue, univariable and multivariable analyses revealed further factors associated with interferon beta-1b therapy discontinuation, namely lower quality of life, depressiveness, and higher relapse rate before therapy initiation, while higher education, living without a partner, and higher age improved persistence. Patients with higher grades of fatigue and depressiveness are at higher risk to prematurely discontinue MS treatment; especially, women suffering from fatigue have an increased discontinuation rate. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

    18. 10-minute delayed recall from the modified mini-mental state test predicts Alzheimer's disease pathology.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Lyness, Scott A; Lee, Ae Young; Zarow, Chris; Teng, Evelyn L; Chui, Helena C

      2014-01-01

      We compared the sensitivity and specificity of two delayed recall scores from the Modified Mini-Mental State (3MS) test with consensus clinical diagnosis to differentiate cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease (AD) versus non-AD pathologies. At a memory disorders clinic, 117 cognitively impaired patients were administered a baseline 3MS test and received a contemporaneous consensus clinical diagnosis. Their brains were examined after death about 5 years later. Using logistic regression with forward selection to predict pathologically defined AD versus non-AD, 10-min delayed recall entered first (p = 0.001), followed by clinical diagnosis (p = 0.02); 1-min delayed recall did not enter. 10-min delayed recall scores ≤4 (score range = 0-9) were 87% sensitive and 47% specific in predicting AD pathology; consensus clinical diagnosis was 82% sensitive and 45% specific. For the 57 patients whose initial Mini-Mental State Examination scores were ≥19 (the median), 3MS 10-min delayed recall scores ≤4 showed some loss of sensitivity (80%) but a substantial gain in specificity (77%). In conclusion, 10-min delayed recall score on the brief 3MS test distinguished between AD versus non-AD pathology about 5 years before death at least as well as consensus clinical diagnosis that requires much more comprehensive information and complex deliberation.

    19. Transporter-mediated natural product-drug interactions for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Zha, Weibin

      2018-04-01

      The growing use of natural products in cardiovascular (CV) patients has been greatly raising the concerns about potential natural product-CV drug interactions. Some of these may lead to unexpected cardiovascular adverse effects and it is, therefore, essential to identify or predict potential natural product-CV drug interactions, and to understand the underlying mechanisms. Drug transporters are important determinants for the pharmacokinetics of drugs and alterations of drug transport has been recognized as one of the major causes of natural product-drug interactions. In last two decades, many CV drugs (e.g., angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta-blockers and statins) have been identified to be substrates and inhibitors of the solute carrier (SLC) transporters and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which are two major transporter superfamilies. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that a growing number of natural products showed cardioprotective effects (e.g., gingko biloba, danshen and their active ingredients) are also substrates and inhibitors of drug transporters. Thus, to understand transporter-mediated natural product-CV drug interactions is important and some transporter-mediated interactions have already shown to have clinical relevance. In this review, we review the current knowledge on the role of ABC and SLC transporters in CV therapy, as well as transporter modulation by natural products used in CV diseases and their induced natural product-CV drug interactions through alterations of drug transport. We hope our review will aid in a comprehensive summary of transporter-mediated natural product-CV drug interactions and help public and physicians understand these type of interactions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

    20. Spectrophotometric determination of dopaminergic drugs used for Parkinson's disease, cabergoline and ropinirole, in pharmaceutical preparations.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Onal, Armağan; Cağlar, Sena

      2007-04-01

      Simple and reproducible spectrophotometric methods have been developed for determination of dopaminergic drugs used for Parkinson's disease, cabergoline (CAB) and ropinirole hydrochloride (ROP), in pharmaceutical preparations. The methods are based on the reactions between the studied drug substances and ion-pair agents [methyl orange (MO), bromocresol green (BCG) and bromophenol blue (BPB)] producing yellow colored ion-pair complexes in acidic buffers, after extracting in dichloromethane, which are spectrophotometrically determined at the appropriate wavelength of ion-pair complexes. Beer's law was obeyed within the concentration range from 1.0 to 35 microg ml(-1). The developed methods were applied successfully for the determination of these drugs in tablets.

    1. Tobacco, illicit drugs use and risk of cardiovascular disease in patients living with HIV.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Abu-Assi, Emad; Iñiguez-Romo, Andrés

      2017-11-01

      There is a strong link between HIV, smoking and illicit drugs. This association could be clinically relevant as it may potentiate the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The purpose of this review is to bring readers up to date on issues concerning the cardiovascular risk associated with tobacco and illicit drugs in patients living with HIV (PLHIV), examining the studies related to this topic published in the last year. There is a strong association between smoking and atherosclerotic disease in PLHIV, reducing life expectancy secondary to CVD by up to 6 years. Illicit drugs were associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic problems but to a lesser extent than smoking. A significant association of drugs such as cocaine with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis been demonstrated. The relation of marijuana, heroin and amphetamines with atherosclerosis generates more controversy. However, those drugs are associated with cardiovascular morbidity, independently of smoking and other traditional risk factors. Tobacco and illicit drugs are linked to CVD in HIV patients. This leads to the need to create special programs to address the addiction to smoking and illicit drugs, in order to mitigate their consequences and reduce cardiovascular risk.

    2. World health dilemmas: Orphan and rare diseases, orphan drugs and orphan patients.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Andreou, Nicholas; Constantinou, Katerina; Kontoghiorghes, George J

      2014-09-26

      According to global annual estimates hunger/malnutrition is the major cause of death (36 of 62 million). Cardiovascular diseases and cancer (5.44 of 13.43 million) are the major causes of death in developed countries, while lower respiratory tract infections, human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, diarrhoeal disease, malaria and tuberculosis (10.88 of 27.12 million) are the major causes of death in developing countries with more than 70% of deaths occurring in children. The majority of approximately 800 million people with other rare diseases, including 100000 children born with thalassaemia annually receive no treatment. There are major ethical dilemmas in dealing with global health issues such as poverty and the treatment of orphan and rare diseases. Of approximately 50000 drugs about 10% are orphan drugs, with annual sales of the latter approaching 100 billion USD. In comparison, the annual revenue in 2009 from the top 12 pharmaceutical companies in Western countries was 445 billion USD and the top drug, atorvastatin, reached 100 billion USD. In the same year, the total government expenditure for health in the developing countries was 410 billion USD with only 6%-7% having been received as aid from developed countries. Drugs cost the National Health Service in the United Kingdom more than 20 billion USD or 10% of the annual health budget. Uncontrollable drug prices and marketing policies affect global health budgets, clinical practice, patient safety and survival. Fines of 5.3 billion USD were imposed on two pharmaceutical companies in the United States, the regulatory authority in France was replaced and clinicians were charged with bribery in order to overcome recent illegal practises affecting patient care. High expenditure for drug development is mainly related to marketing costs. However, only 2 million USD was spent developing the drug deferiprone (L1) for thalassaemia up to the stage of multicentre clinical trials. The

    3. World health dilemmas: Orphan and rare diseases, orphan drugs and orphan patients

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Andreou, Nicholas; Constantinou, Katerina; Kontoghiorghes, George J

      2014-01-01

      According to global annual estimates hunger/malnutrition is the major cause of death (36 of 62 million). Cardiovascular diseases and cancer (5.44 of 13.43 million) are the major causes of death in developed countries, while lower respiratory tract infections, human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, diarrhoeal disease, malaria and tuberculosis (10.88 of 27.12 million) are the major causes of death in developing countries with more than 70% of deaths occurring in children. The majority of approximately 800 million people with other rare diseases, including 100000 children born with thalassaemia annually receive no treatment. There are major ethical dilemmas in dealing with global health issues such as poverty and the treatment of orphan and rare diseases. Of approximately 50000 drugs about 10% are orphan drugs, with annual sales of the latter approaching 100 billion USD. In comparison, the annual revenue in 2009 from the top 12 pharmaceutical companies in Western countries was 445 billion USD and the top drug, atorvastatin, reached 100 billion USD. In the same year, the total government expenditure for health in the developing countries was 410 billion USD with only 6%-7% having been received as aid from developed countries. Drugs cost the National Health Service in the United Kingdom more than 20 billion USD or 10% of the annual health budget. Uncontrollable drug prices and marketing policies affect global health budgets, clinical practice, patient safety and survival. Fines of 5.3 billion USD were imposed on two pharmaceutical companies in the United States, the regulatory authority in France was replaced and clinicians were charged with bribery in order to overcome recent illegal practises affecting patient care. High expenditure for drug development is mainly related to marketing costs. However, only 2 million USD was spent developing the drug deferiprone (L1) for thalassaemia up to the stage of multicentre clinical trials. The

    4. Beyond the neurotransmitter-focused approach in treating Alzheimer's disease: drugs targeting beta-amyloid and tau protein.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Panza, Francesco; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Frisardi, Vincenza; Imbimbo, Bruno P; Capurso, Cristiano; D'Introno, Alessia; Colacicco, Anna M; Seripa, Davide; Vendemiale, Gianluigi; Capurso, Antonio; Pilotto, Alberto

      2009-12-01

      Drugs currently used to treat Alzheimer's Disease (AD) have limited therapeutic value and do not affect the main neuropathological hallmarks of the disease, i.e., senile plaques and neurofibrillar tangles. Senile plaques are mainly formed of beta-amyloid (Abeta), a 42-aminoacid peptide. Neurofibrillar tangles are composed of paired helical filaments of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. New, potentially disease-modifying, therapeutic approaches are targeting Abeta and tau protein. Drugs directed against Abeta include active and passive immunization, that have been found to accelerate Abeta clearance from the brain. The most developmentally advanced monoclonal antibody directly targeting Abeta is bapineuzumab, now being studied in a large Phase III clinical trial. Compounds that interfere with proteases regulating Abeta formation from amyloid precursor protein (APP) are also actively pursued. The discovery of inhibitors of beta-secretase, the enzyme that regulates the first step of the amyloidogenic metabolism of APP, has been revealed to be particularly difficult due to inherent medicinal chemistry problems, and only one compound (CTS-21166) has reached clinical testing. Conversely, several compounds that inhibit gamma-secretase, the pivotal enzyme that generates Abeta, have been identified, the most advanced being LY-450139 (semagacestat), now in Phase III clinical development. Compounds that stimulate alpha-secretase, the enzyme responsible for the non-amyloidogenic metabolism of APP, are also being developed, and one of them, EHT-0202, has recently entered Phase II testing. Potent inhibitors of Abeta aggregation have also been identified, and one of such compounds, PBT-2, has provided encouraging neuropsychological results in a recently completed Phase II study. Therapeutic approaches directed against tau protein include inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase- 3 (GSK-3), the enzyme responsible for tau phosphorylation and tau protein aggregation inhibitors. NP-12

    5. Towards the concept of disease-modifier in post-stroke or vascular cognitive impairment: a consensus report.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bordet, Régis; Ihl, Ralf; Korczyn, Amos D; Lanza, Giuseppe; Jansa, Jelka; Hoerr, Robert; Guekht, Alla

      2017-05-24

      Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) is a complex spectrum encompassing post-stroke cognitive impairment (PSCI) and small vessel disease-related cognitive impairment. Despite the growing health, social, and economic burden of VCI, to date, no specific treatment is available, prompting the introduction of the concept of a disease modifier. Within this clinical spectrum, VCI and PSCI remain advancing conditions as neurodegenerative diseases with progression of both vascular and degenerative lesions accounting for cognitive decline. Disease-modifying strategies should integrate both pharmacological and non-pharmacological multimodal approaches, with pleiotropic effects targeting (1) endothelial and brain-blood barrier dysfunction; (2) neuronal death and axonal loss; (3) cerebral plasticity and compensatory mechanisms; and (4) degenerative-related protein misfolding. Moreover, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment in PSCI or VCI requires valid study designs clearly stating the definition of basic methodological issues, such as the instruments that should be used to measure eventual changes, the biomarker-based stratification of participants to be investigated, and statistical tests, as well as the inclusion and exclusion criteria that should be applied. A consensus emerged to propose the development of a disease-modifying strategy in VCI and PSCI based on pleiotropic pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches.

    6. Hit and lead criteria in drug discovery for infectious diseases of the developing world.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Katsuno, Kei; Burrows, Jeremy N; Duncan, Ken; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob; Kaneko, Takushi; Kita, Kiyoshi; Mowbray, Charles E; Schmatz, Dennis; Warner, Peter; Slingsby, B T

      2015-11-01

      Reducing the burden of infectious diseases that affect people in the developing world requires sustained collaborative drug discovery efforts. The quality of the chemical starting points for such projects is a key factor in improving the likelihood of clinical success, and so it is important to set clear go/no-go criteria for the progression of hit and lead compounds. With this in mind, the Japanese Global Health Innovative Technology (GHIT) Fund convened with experts from the Medicines for Malaria Venture, the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative and the TB Alliance, together with representatives from the Bill &Melinda Gates Foundation, to set disease-specific criteria for hits and leads for malaria, tuberculosis, visceral leishmaniasis and Chagas disease. Here, we present the agreed criteria and discuss the underlying rationale.

    7. Remission of Grave's disease after oral anti-thyroid drug treatment.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Ishtiaq, Osama; Waseem, Sabiha; Haque, M Naeemul; Islam, Najmul; Jabbar, Abdul

      2009-11-01

      To evaluate remission rate of anti-thyroid drug treatment in patients with Grave's disease, and to study the factors associated with remission. A cross sectional study. The Endocrine Department of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi from 1999 to 2000. Seventy four patients of Grave's disease were recruited who were prescribed medical treatment. Grave's disease was diagnosed in the presence of clinical and biochemical hyperthyroidism along with anti-microsomal (AMA) and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (ATA) and thyroid scan. These patients were prescribed oral anti-thyroid drugs using titration regime and followed at 3, 6, 12 and 18 months. Patients were categorized into two groups: "remission group" and "treatment failure group" and results were compared using a chi-square test, t-test and logistic regression model with significance at p disease on initial presentation.

    8. Drugs meeting the molecular basis of diabetic kidney disease: bridging from molecular mechanism to personalized medicine.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Oberbauer, Rainer; Perco, Paul; Heinzel, Andreas; Heinze, Georg; Mayer, Gert; Mayer, Bernd

      2015-08-01

      Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is a complex, multifactorial disease and is associated with a high risk of renal and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Clinical practice guidelines for diabetes recommend essentially identical treatments for all patients without taking into account how the individual responds to the instituted therapy. Yet, individuals vary widely in how they respond to medications and therefore optimal therapy differs between individuals. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms of variability in drug response will help tailor optimal therapy. Polymorphisms in genes related to drug pharmacokinetics have been used to explore mechanisms of response variability in DKD, but with limited success. The complex interaction between genetic make-up and environmental factors on the abundance of proteins and metabolites renders pharmacogenomics alone insufficient to fully capture response variability. A complementary approach is to attribute drug response variability to individual variability in underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the progression of disease. The interplay of different processes (e.g. inflammation, fibrosis, angiogenesis, oxidative stress) appears to drive disease progression, but the individual contribution of each process varies. Drugs at the other hand address specific targets and thereby interfere in certain disease-associated processes. At this level, biomarkers may help to gain insight into which specific pathophysiological processes are involved in an individual followed by a rational assessment whether a specific drug's mode of action indeed targets the relevant process at hand. This article describes the conceptual background and data-driven workflow developed by the SysKid consortium aimed at improving characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying DKD at the interference of the molecular impact of individual drugs in order to tailor optimal therapy to individual patients. © The Author 2015. Published by

    9. Disease and drug-induced arrhythmias : the example of obstructive pulmonary disease

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Warnier, M.J.

      2014-01-01

      Notwithstanding the clinical importance of cardiac arrhythmias, relevant information about the background risk and the exact underlying mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with obstructive pulmonary disease (asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]) is still lacking. The

    10. 13-year overview of serious adverse drug reactions following subcutaneous specific immunotherapy with a chemically modified allergen preparation.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Distler, Andreas; Pappelendam, Debbie

      The Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (PEI) published an analysis of reports of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in 2001 with test and therapy allergens from the period from 1991 to 2000. Possible risk factors were evaluated for the ADR reports classified as "serious". During the analyzed period, modified semi-depot preparations (allergoids) induced between 0.01 % and 0.0005 % serious systemic reactions, i. e. one serious ADR occurred in 10,000 to 200,000 injections. No information was provided regarding the respective incidences in relation to the individual companies or preparations. Within the scope of a 13-year analysis (2001-2013), the serious ADRs were analysed at HAL for the allergoid preparations PURETHAL® Pollen and Mites. As in the analysis of PEI, the frequency of serious ADRs was based on the estimated number of administered injections. A total of 46 cases with serious ADRs were received. In 26 % of the cases, a serious ADR occurred during initial treatment after the first injection. In 82.6 % of the cases, the serious ADR occurred within the 30-minute observation period in the practice. Adrenaline was administered as emergency treatment in seven cases. Hospitalisations were initiated by the treating physician or by patients themselves in 45 cases. The duration of the hospital stay varied from a few hours up to three days for further monitoring. Serious ADRs occurred in 11 cases with mites and in 35 cases with pollen. If it is assumed that there are six injections in each vial, this yields an incidence of 0.00061 % (1 : 164,000). The frequency with mites (0.00093 %) was slightly higher than with pollen (0.00055 %). The allergoid preparations (pollen and mite allergens) showed a very low risk of serious ADRs, which was close to the lower level of incidence of 0.0005 % for allergoid preparations published by the PEI.

    11. Validating the Modified Drug Adherence Work-Up (M-DRAW) Tool to Identify and Address Barriers to Medication Adherence.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Lee, Sun; Bae, Yuna H; Worley, Marcia; Law, Anandi

      2017-09-08

      Barriers to medication adherence stem from multiple factors. An effective and convenient tool is needed to identify these barriers so that clinicians can provide a tailored, patient-centered consultation with patients. The Modified Drug Adherence Work-up Tool (M-DRAW) was developed as a 13-item checklist questionnaire to identify barriers to medication adherence. The response scale was a 4-point Likert scale of frequency of occurrence (1 = never to 4 = often). The checklist was accompanied by a GUIDE that provided corresponding motivational interview-based intervention strategies for each identified barrier. The current pilot study examined the psychometric properties of the M-DRAW checklist (reliability, responsiveness and discriminant validity) in patients taking one or more prescription medication(s) for chronic conditions. A cross-sectional sample of 26 patients was recruited between December 2015 and March 2016 at an academic medical center pharmacy in Southern California. A priming question that assessed self-reported adherence was used to separate participants into the control group of 17 "adherers" (65.4%), and into the intervention group of nine "unintentional and intentional non-adherers" (34.6%). Comparable baseline characteristics were observed between the two groups. The M-DRAW checklist showed acceptable reliability (13 item; alpha = 0.74) for identifying factors and barriers leading to medication non-adherence. Discriminant validity of the tool and the priming question was established by the four-fold number of barriers to adherence identified within the self-selected intervention group compared to the control group (4.4 versus 1.2 barriers, p tool will include construct validation.

    12. Validating the Modified Drug Adherence Work-Up (M-DRAW Tool to Identify and Address Barriers to Medication Adherence

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Sun Lee

      2017-09-01

      Full Text Available Barriers to medication adherence stem from multiple factors. An effective and convenient tool is needed to identify these barriers so that clinicians can provide a tailored, patient-centered consultation with patients. The Modified Drug Adherence Work-up Tool (M-DRAW was developed as a 13-item checklist questionnaire to identify barriers to medication adherence. The response scale was a 4-point Likert scale of frequency of occurrence (1 = never to 4 = often. The checklist was accompanied by a GUIDE that provided corresponding motivational interview-based intervention strategies for each identified barrier. The current pilot study examined the psychometric properties of the M-DRAW checklist (reliability, responsiveness and discriminant validity in patients taking one or more prescription medication(s for chronic conditions. A cross-sectional sample of 26 patients was recruited between December 2015 and March 2016 at an academic medical center pharmacy in Southern California. A priming question that assessed self-reported adherence was used to separate participants into the control group of 17 “adherers” (65.4%, and into the intervention group of nine “unintentional and intentional non-adherers” (34.6%. Comparable baseline characteristics were observed between the two groups. The M-DRAW checklist showed acceptable reliability (13 item; alpha = 0.74 for identifying factors and barriers leading to medication non-adherence. Discriminant validity of the tool and the priming question was established by the four-fold number of barriers to adherence identified within the self-selected intervention group compared to the control group (4.4 versus 1.2 barriers, p < 0.05. The current study did not investigate construct validity due to small sample size and challenges on follow-up with patients. Future testing of the tool will include construct validation.

    13. Fe3O4 nanoparticles modified by CD-containing star polymer for MRI and drug delivery.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Cha, Ruitao; Li, Juanjuan; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yifan; Xie, Qian; Zhang, Mingming

      2017-10-01

      Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles with ultrasmall sizes show good T 1 or T 1 +T 2 contrast abilities, and have attracted considerable interest in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. For effective biomedical applications, the colloidal stability and biocompatibility of the Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles need to be improved without reducing MRI relaxivity. In this paper, star polymers were used as coating materials to modify Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles in view of their dense molecular architecture with moderate flexibility. The star polymer was composed of a β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) core and poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) arms. Meanwhile, reduced glutathione (GSH), as a model drug, was also associated with the star polymer. Thus, a new platform for simultaneous diagnosis and treatment was achieved. Compared to the Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles coated with linear polymers, the Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles coated with star polymers (Fe 3 O 4 @GCP) possessed higher GSH association capacity and better stability in serum-containing solution. GSH could be released from Fe 3 O 4 @GCP nanoparticles in response to pH value of the solution. Since the sulfhydryl group on GSH is able to combine free radicals, Fe 3 O 4 @GCP nanoparticles exhibited less cytotoxicity compared to the Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles without including GSH. Furthermore, the nanoparticles could also serve as good T 1 MRI contrast agent, and the MRI relaxivity of Fe 3 O 4 @GCP nanoparticles did not decrease after coated with the star polymer. These results indicate that the precisely designed Fe 3 O 4 @GCP nanoparticles could be used as a versatile promising theranostic nano-platform. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    14. Fast Removal of Citalopram Drug from Waste Water Using Magnetic Nanoparticles Modified with Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Followed by UV-Spectrometry

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      M. Khoeini Sharifabadi

      2013-04-01

      Full Text Available A simple and sensitive, solid-phase extraction method for the removal of Citalopram drug from waste water has been developed by using magnetic nanoparticles modified with surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate. These magnetic nanoparticles have shown great adsorptive tendency towards Citalopram drug. The effect of different parameters influencing the extraction efficiency of this drug were investigated and optimized including the pH, amount of the surfactant, contact time and temperature. The extracts were analyzed by ultraviolet spectrophotometry at 239nm. Under these conditions, the related standard deviation (RSD % of the method at two concentrations (5 and 50µg.mL-1 was in the range of (3.14–3.75 % (n = 8. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 2-100 µg.mL-1 of Citalopram drug with a correlation coefficient of >0.99.

    15. Fast Removal of Citalopram Drug from Waste Water Using Magnetic Nanoparticles Modified with Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Followed by UV-Spectrometry

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      M. Khoeini Sharifabadi

      2014-02-01

      Full Text Available A simple and sensitive, solid-phase extraction method for the removal of Citalopram drug from waste water has been developed by using magnetic nanoparticles modified with surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate. These magnetic nanoparticles have shown great adsorptive tendency towards Citalopram drug. The effect of different parameters influencing the extraction efficiency of this drug were investigated and optimized including the pH, amount of the surfactant, contact time and temperature. The extracts were analyzed by ultraviolet spectrophotometry at 239nm. Under these conditions, the related standard deviation (RSD % of the method at two concentrations (5 and 50µg.mL-1 was in the range of (3.14–3.75 % (n = 8. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 2-100 µg.mL-1 of Citalopram drug with a correlation coefficient of >0.99.

    16. Association between falls in elderly women and chronic diseases and drug use: cross sectional study

      OpenAIRE

      Lawlor, Debbie A; Patel, Rita; Ebrahim, Shah

      2003-01-01

      OBJECTIVE: To assess the associations between having had a fall and chronic diseases and drug use in elderly women. DESIGN: Cross sectional survey, using data from the British women's heart and health study. SETTING: General practices in 23 towns in Great Britain. PARTICIPANTS: 4050 women aged 60-79 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Whether women had had falls in the previous 12 months. RESULTS: The prevalence of falling increased with increasing numbers of simultaneously occurring chronic disease...

    17. Colchicine in Pericardial Disease: from the Underlying Biology and Clinical Benefits to the Drug-Drug Interactions in Cardiovascular Medicine.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Schenone, Aldo L; Menon, Venu

      2018-06-14

      This is an in-depth review on the mechanism of action, clinical utility, and drug-drug interactions of colchicine in the management of pericardial disease. Recent evidence about therapeutic targets on pericarditis has demonstrated that NALP3 inflammasome blockade is the cornerstone in the clinical benefits of colchicine. Such benefits extend from acute and recurrent pericarditis to transient constriction and post-pericardiotomy syndrome. Despite the increased utilization of colchicine in cardiovascular medicine, safety concerns remains unsolved regarding the long-term use of colchicine in the cardiac patient. Moreover, recent evidence has demonstrated that numerous cardiovascular medications, ranging from antihypertensive medication to antiarrhythmics, are known to interact with the CYP3A4 and/or P-gp system increasing the toxicity potential of colchicine. The use of adjunctive colchicine in the management of inflammatory pericardial diseases is standard of care in current practice. It is advised that a careful medication reconciliation with emphasis on pharmacokinetic is completed before prescribing colchicine in order to avoid harmful interaction by finding an alternative regimen or adjusting colchicine dosing.

    18. Mast Cell Stabilizers as Host Modulatory Drugs to Prevent and Control Periodontal Disease

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Dhoom Singh Mehta

      2011-01-01

      Full Text Available Introduction: Mast cells are among the first cells to get in-volved in periodontal inflammation. Their numbers have been shown to be in-creased in cases of gingivitis and periodontal disease. The hypothesis: Since mast cell stabilizers like sodium cromogly-cate (SCG and nedocromil sodium (NS have been used in the prophylaxis of bronchial asthma without any significant adverse effects and also the fact that drugs like SCG show significant anti-inflammatory activities, it would be logical to use mast cell stabilizers as host modulating drugs for the treatment and prevention of peri-odontal disease. Evaluation of the hypothesis: Safety and efficacy of both SCG and NS are well documented. So, it will be systemically safe to use in humans. However, oral administration SCG or delivery of the drug by means local irrigation will not be very useful because SCG may not be secreted in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF(as in the case of oral administraion or the drug may get washed out from periodontal pocket due to the constant flow of GCF(as in the case of irrigation. A local or targeted drug delivery of mast cell stabilizers can be used in patients with periodontal disease. Role of mast cells in periodontal disease has been dealt in-depth in many studies and articles. However, limited amount of research has been done on using mast cell stabilizers in the prevention and control of periodontal diseases. More studies are needed to study the efficacy and effective-ness of mast cell stabilizers as an adjunct to phase I therapy in the control of periodontal disease.

    19. Do Genetic Markers of Inflammation Modify the Relationship between Periodontitis and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease? Findings from the SHIP Study.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Akinkugbe, A A; Avery, C L; Barritt, A S; Cole, S R; Lerch, M; Mayerle, J; Offenbacher, S; Petersmann, A; Nauck, M; Völzke, H; Slade, G D; Heiss, G; Kocher, T; Holtfreter, B

      2017-11-01

      An association between periodontitis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been reported by experimental animal and epidemiologic studies. This study investigated whether circulating levels of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and a weighted genetic CRP score representing markers of inflammatory burden modify the association between periodontitis and NAFLD. Data came from 2,481 participants of the Study of Health in Pomerania who attended baseline examination that occurred between 1997 and 2001. Periodontitis was defined as the percentage of sites (0%, 3 mg/L. Periodontitis was positively associated with higher prevalence odds of NAFLD, and this relationship was modified by serum CRP levels.

    20. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for Alzheimer's disease management: Technical, industrial, and clinical challenges.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Wen, Ming Ming; El-Salamouni, Noha S; El-Refaie, Wessam M; Hazzah, Heba A; Ali, Mai M; Tosi, Giovanni; Farid, Ragwa M; Blanco-Prieto, Maria J; Billa, Nashiru; Hanafy, Amira S

      2017-01-10

      Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease with high prevalence in the rapidly growing elderly population in the developing world. The currently FDA approved drugs for the management of symptomatology of AD are marketed mainly as conventional oral medications. Due to their gastrointestinal side effects and lack of brain targeting, these drugs and dosage regiments hinder patient compliance and lead to treatment discontinuation. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems (NTDDS) administered by different routes can be considered as promising tools to improve patient compliance and achieve better therapeutic outcomes. Despite extensive research, literature screening revealed that clinical activities involving NTDDS application in research for AD are lagging compared to NTDDS for other diseases such as cancers. The industrial perspectives, processability, and cost/benefit ratio of using NTDDS for AD treatment are usually overlooked. Moreover, active and passive immunization against AD are by far the mostly studied alternative AD therapies because conventional oral drug therapy is not yielding satisfactorily results. NTDDS of approved drugs appear promising to transform this research from 'paper to clinic' and raise hope for AD sufferers and their caretakers. This review summarizes the recent studies conducted on NTDDS for AD treatment, with a primary focus on the industrial perspectives and processability. Additionally, it highlights the ongoing clinical trials for AD management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    1. Therapeutic compliance of first line disease-modifying therapies in patients with multiple sclerosis. COMPLIANCE Study.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Saiz, A; Mora, S; Blanco, J

      2015-05-01

      Non-adherence to disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) in multiple sclerosis may be associated with reduced efficacy. We assessed compliance, the reasons for non-compliance, treatment satisfaction, and quality of life (QoL) of patients treated with first-line therapies. A cross-sectional, multicenter study was conducted that included relapsing multiple sclerosis patients. Compliance in the past month was assessed using Morisky-Green test. Seasonal compliance and reasons for non-compliance were assessed by an ad-hoc questionnaire. Treatment satisfaction and QoL were evaluated by means of TSQM and PRIMUS questionnaires. A total of 220 patients were evaluated (91% relapsing-remitting); the mean age was 39.1 years, 70% were female, and the average time under treatment was 5.4 years. Subcutaneous interferon (IFN) β-1b was used in 23% of the patients, intramuscular IFN β-1a in 21%, subcutaneous IFN β-1a in 37%, and with glatiramer acetate in 19%. The overall compliance was 75%, with no significant differences related to the therapy, and 81% did not report any seasonal variation. Compliant patients had significantly lower disability scores and time of diagnosis, and greater satisfaction with treatment and its effectiveness. Discomfort and flu-like symptoms were the most frequent reasons for non-compliance. The satisfaction and QoL were associated with less disability and number of therapeutic switches. The rate of compliance, satisfaction and QoL in multiple sclerosis patients under DMTs is high, especially for those newly diagnosed, less disabled, and with fewer therapeutic switches. Discomfort and flu-like symptoms associated with injected therapies significantly affect adherence. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

    2. Functional paraoxonase 1 variants modify the risk of Parkinson's disease due to organophosphate exposure.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Lee, Pei-Chen; Rhodes, Shannon L; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Bronstein, Jeff; Ritz, Beate

      2013-06-01

      We previously demonstrated that carriers of the "slower metabolizer" MM genotype of paraoxonase (PON1) who were also exposed to ambient organophosphate (OP) pesticides at their residences were at increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, with a larger sample size, we extend our previous investigation to consider additional sources of ambient exposure and examined two additional functional PON1 variants. From 2001 to 2011, we enrolled incident cases of idiopathic PD and population controls living in central California. We genotyped three well-known functional PON1 SNPs: two exonic polymorphisms (PON1L55M and PON1Q192R) and the promoter region variant (PON1C-108T). Ambient exposures to diazinon, chlorpyrifos, and parathion at residential and workplace addresses were assessed using a validated geographic information system-based model incorporating records of agricultural pesticide applications in California. The odds ratio (OR) for Caucasians exposed to OPs at either residential or workplace addresses varied by PON1 genotype; for exposed carriers of the "faster" metabolizer genotypes, ML or LL, we estimated lower odds ratios (range, 1.20-1.39) than for exposed carriers of the "slower" metabolizer genotype MM (range, 1.78-2.45) relative to unexposed carriers of the faster genotypes. We observed similarly increased ORs for exposure across PON1Q192R genotypes, but no differences across PON1C-108T genotypes. The largest ORs were estimated for exposed carriers of both PON1192QQ and PON155MM (OR range, 2.84-3.57). Several functional PON1 variants may act together to modify PD risk for ambient OP exposures. While either PON1L55M or PON1Q192R may be sufficient to identify increased susceptibility, carriers of both slow metabolizer variants seem most susceptible to OP exposures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    3. Environmental enrichment imparts disease-modifying and transgenerational effects on genetically-determined epilepsy and anxiety.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Dezsi, Gabi; Ozturk, Ezgi; Salzberg, Michael R; Morris, Margaret; O'Brien, Terence J; Jones, Nigel C

      2016-09-01

      The absence epilepsies are presumed to be caused by genetic factors, but the influence of environmental exposures on epilepsy development and severity, and whether this influence is transmitted to subsequent generations, is not well known. We assessed the effects of environmental enrichment on epilepsy and anxiety outcomes in multiple generations of GAERS - a genetic rat model of absence epilepsy that manifests comorbid elevated anxiety-like behaviour. GAERS were exposed to environmental enrichment or standard housing beginning either prior to, or after epilepsy onset, and underwent EEG recordings and anxiety testing. Then, we exposed male GAERS to early enrichment or standard housing and generated F1 progeny, which also underwent EEG recordings. Hippocampal CRH mRNA expression and DNA methylation were assessed using RT-PCR and pyrosequencing, respectively. Early environmental enrichment delayed the onset of epilepsy in GAERS, and resulted in fewer seizures in adulthood, compared with standard housed GAERS. Enrichment also reduced the frequency of seizures when initiated in adulthood. Anxiety levels were reduced by enrichment, and these anti-epileptogenic and anxiolytic effects were heritable into the next generation. We also found reduced expression of CRH mRNA in GAERS exposed to enrichment, but this was not due to changes in DNA methylation. Environmental enrichment produces disease-modifying effects on genetically determined absence epilepsy and anxiety, and these beneficial effects are transferable to the subsequent generation. Reduced CRH expression was associated with these phenotypic improvements. Environmental stimulation holds promise as a naturalistic therapy for genetically determined epilepsy which may benefit subsequent generations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    4. Does Caffeine Consumption Modify Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-β Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease?

      Science.gov (United States)

      Travassos, Maria; Santana, Isabel; Baldeiras, Inês; Tsolaki, Magda; Gkatzima, Olymbia; Sermin, Genc; Yener, Görsev G; Simonsen, Anja; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Mara, Bourbouli; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Agostinho, Paula; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mendes, Vera M; Manadas, Bruno; de Mendon, Alexandreça

      2015-01-01

      Caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer's disease (AD) by modulating amyloid-β (Aβ) metabolic pathways. The present work aimed to study a possible association of caffeine consumption with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, particularly Aβ. The study included 88 patients with AD or mild cognitive impairment. The consumption of caffeine and theobromine was evaluated using a validated food questionnaire. Quantification of caffeine and main active metabolites was performed with liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The levels of A(1-42), total tau, and phosphorylated tau in the CSF were determined using sandwich ELISA methods and other Aβ species, Aβ(X-38), Aβ(X-40), and Aβ(X-42), with the MSD Aβ Triplex assay. The concentration of caffeine was 0.79±1.15 μg/mL in the CSF and 1.20±1.88 μg/mL in the plasma. No correlation was found between caffeine consumption and Aβ42 in the CSF. However, a significant positive correlation was found between the concentrations of theobromine, both in the CSF and in the plasma, with Aβ42 in the CSF. Theobromine in the CSF was positively correlated with the levels of other xanthines in the CSF, but not in the plasma, suggesting that it may be formed by central metabolic pathways. In conclusion, caffeine consumption does not modify the levels of CSF biomarkers, and does not require to be controlled for when measuring CSF biomarkers in a clinical setting. Since theobromine is associated with a favorable Aβ profile in the CSF, the possibility that it might have a protective role in AD should be further investigated.

    5. The Burden of Cardiovascular Disease Attributable to Major Modifiable Risk Factors in Indonesia

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Mohammad Akhtar Hussain

      2016-10-01

      Full Text Available Background: In Indonesia, coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke are estimated to cause more than 470 000 deaths annually. In order to inform primary prevention policies, we estimated the sex- and age-specific burden of CHD and stroke attributable to five major and modifiable vascular risk factors: cigarette smoking, hypertension, diabetes, elevated total cholesterol, and excess body weight. Methods: Population attributable risks for CHD and stroke attributable to these risk factors individually were calculated using summary statistics obtained for prevalence of each risk factor specific to sex and to two age categories (<55 and ≥55 years from a national survey in Indonesia. Age- and sex-specific relative risks for CHD and stroke associated with each of the five risk factors were derived from prospective data from the Asia-Pacific region. Results: Hypertension was the leading vascular risk factor, explaining 20%–25% of all CHD and 36%–42% of all strokes in both sexes and approximately one-third of all CHD and half of all strokes across younger and older age groups alike. Smoking in men explained a substantial proportion of vascular events (25% of CHD and 17% of strokes. However, given that these risk factors are likely to be strongly correlated, these population attributable risk proportions are likely to be overestimates and require verification from future studies that are able to take into account correlation between risk factors. Conclusions: Implementation of effective population-based prevention strategies aimed at reducing levels of major cardiovascular risk factors, especially blood pressure, total cholesterol, and smoking prevalence among men, could reduce the growing burden of CVD in the Indonesian population.

    6. Drug-induced diseases (DIDs: An experience of a tertiary care teaching hospital from India

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Vishal R Tandon

      2015-01-01

      Full Text Available Background & objectives: Drug-induced diseases (DIDs are well known but least studied. Data on DIDs from India are not available. Hence, this retrospective cross-sectional study was undertaken using suspected adverse drug reaction (ADR data collected form Pharmacovigilance Programme of India (PvPI to evaluate profile of DIDs over two years, in a tertiary care teaching hospital from north India. Methods: The suspected ADRs in the form of DID were evaluated for drug and disease related variables and were classified in terms of causality. Results: DID rate was 38.80 per cent. Mean duration of developing DIDs was 26.05 ± 9.6 days; 25.16 per cent had more than one co-morbid condition. Geriatric population (53.99% accounted for maximum DIDs followed by adult (37.79% and paediatric (8.21%. Maximum events were probable (93.98% followed by possible (6.04%. All DIDs required intervention. Gastritis (7.43%, diarrhoea (5.92%, anaemia (4.79%, hypotension (2.77%, hepatic dysfunction (2.69%, hypertension (1.51%, myalgia (1.05%, and renal dysfunction (1.01% were some of the DIDs. Anti-tubercular treatment (ATT, anti- retroviral treatment (ART, ceftriaxone injection, steroids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antimicrobials and anticancer drugs were found as commonly offending drugs. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings show that DIDs are a significant health problem in our country, which need more attention.

    7. Nanotechnology in dentistry: drug delivery systems for the control of biofilm-dependent oral diseases.

      Science.gov (United States)

      de Sousa, Francisco Fabio Oliveira; Ferraz, Camila; Rodrigues, Lidiany K Arla de Azevedo; Nojosa, Jacqueline de Santiago; Yamauti, Monica

      2014-01-01

      Dental disorders, such as caries, periodontal and endodontic diseases are major public health issues worldwide. In common, they are biofilm-dependent oral diseases, and the specific conditions of oral cavity may develop infectious foci that could affect other physiological systems. Efforts have been made to develop new treatment routes for the treatment of oral diseases, and therefore, for the prevention of some systemic illnesses. New drugs and materials have been challenged to prevent and treat these conditions, especially by means of bacteria elimination. "Recent progresses in understanding the etiology, epidemiology and microbiology of the microbial flora in those circumstances have given insight and motivated the innovation on new therapeutic approaches for the management of the oral diseases progression". Some of the greatest advances in the medical field have been based in nanosized systems, ranging from the drug release with designed nanoparticles to tissue scaffolds based on nanotechnology. These systems offer new possibilities for specific and efficient therapies, been assayed successfully in preventive/curative therapies to the oral cavity, opening new challenges and opportunities to overcome common diseases based on bacterial biofilm development. The aim of this review is to summarize the recent nanotechnological developments in the drug delivery field related to the prevention and treatment of the major biofilm-dependent oral diseases and to identify those systems, which may have higher potential for clinical use.

    8. Disease modifying and antiangiogenic activity of 2-Methoxyestradiol in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Moore Elizabeth G

      2009-05-01

      study parameters and prevented neovascularization into the joint. Examination of gene expression on dissected hind limbs from mice treated for 5 or 14 days with 2ME2 showed inhibition of inflammatory cytokine message for IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-17, as well as the angiogenic cytokines, VEGF and FGF-2. Conclusion These data demonstrate that in the CAIA mouse model of RA, 2ME2 has disease modifying activity that is at least partially attributable to the inhibition of neovascular development. Further, the data suggests new mechanistic points of intervention for 2ME2 in RA, specifically inhibition of inflammatory mediators and osteoclast activity.

    9. Hemolytic Disease of the Fetus and Newborn due to Intravenous Drug Use.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Markham, Kara B; Scrape, Scott R; Prasad, Mona; Rossi, Karen Q; O'Shaughnessy, Richard W

      2016-03-01

      Objectives The objective is to present a pregnancy complication associated with intravenous drug use, namely, that of red blood cell alloimmunization and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Methods An observational case series is presented including women with red blood cell alloimmunization most likely secondary to intravenous drug abuse Results Five pregnancies were identified that were complicated by red blood cell alloimmunization and significant hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, necessitating intrauterine transfusion, an indicated preterm birth, or neonatal therapy. Conclusions As opioid abuse continues to increase in the United States, clinicians should be aware of the potential for alloimmunization to red blood cell antibodies as yet another negative outcome from intravenous drug abuse.

    10. Application of Several Multimedia Approaches to the Teaching of CNS Pharmacology: Parkinson's Disease and Antiparkinsonism Drugs.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Faulkner, Thomas P.; Sprague, Jon E.

      1996-01-01

      A multimedia approach to drug therapy for Parkinson's Disease, part of a pharmacy school central nervous system course, integrated use of lecture, textbook, video/graphic technology, the movie "Awakenings," Internet and World Wide Web, and an interactive animated movie. A followup questionnaire found generally positive student attitudes…

    11. Prospects for the control of neglected tropical diseases by mass drug administration

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Smits, Henk L.

      2009-01-01

      The prospects for the control of neglected tropical diseases, including soil-transmitted helminthiasis, shistosomiasis, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis and trachoma, through mass drug administration, are exemplified by the elimination of the trachoma as a public-health problem in Morocco. In

    12. Drug targeting systems for inflammatory disease: one for all, all for one

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Crielaard, B.J.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Schiffelers, R.M.; Storm, Gerrit

      2012-01-01

      Abstract In various systemic disorders, structural changes in the microenvironment of diseased tissues enable both passive and active targeting of therapeutic agents to these tissues. This has led to a number of targeting approaches that enhance the accumulation of drugs in the target tissues,

    13. Estimated glomerular filtration rate, chronic kidney disease and antiretroviral drug use in HIV-positive patients

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole; Reiss, Peter; de Wit, Stephane; Sedlacek, Dalibor; Beniowski, Marek; Gatell, Jose; Phillips, Andrew N.; Ledergerber, Bruno; Lundgren, Jens D.; Losso, M.; Elias, C.; Vetter, N.; Zangerle, R.; Karpov, I.; Vassilenko, A.; Mitsura, V. M.; Suetnov, O.; Clumeck, N.; Poll, B.; Colebunders, R.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Kostov, K.; Begovac, J.; Machala, L.; Rozsypal, H.; Sedlacek, D.; Nielsen, J.; Kronborg, G.; Benfield, T.; Larsen, M.; Gerstoft, J.; Katzenstein, T.; Hansen, A.-B. E.; Skinhøj, P.; Pedersen, C.; Oestergaard, L.; Zilmer, K.; Smidt, Jelena; Ristola, M.; Katlama, C.; Viard, J.-P.; Girard, P.-M.; Livrozet, J. M.; Vanhems, P.; Pradier, C.; Dabis, F.; Neau, D.; Rockstroh, J.

      2010-01-01

      Objectives: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in HIV-positive persons might be caused by both HIV and traditional or non-HIV-related factors. Our objective was to investigate long-term exposure to specific antiretroviral drugs and CKD. Design: A cohort study including 6843 HIV-positive persons with at

    14. Sex-dimorphic adverse drug reactions to immune suppressive agents in inflammatory bowel disease

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Z. Zelinkova (Zuzana); E. Bultman (Evelien); L. Vogelaar (Lauran); C. Bouziane (Cheima); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); C.J. van der Woude (Janneke)

      2012-01-01

      textabstractAIM: To analyze sex differences in adverse drug reactions (ADR) to the immune suppressive medication in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. METHODS: All IBD patients attending the IBD outpatient clinic of a referral hospital were identifed through the electronic diagnosis

    15. Bioethics of intervention and the case of drugs Bevacizumab and Ranibizumab for retinal diseases

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Flávio R. L. Paranhos

      2016-10-01

      Full Text Available From the year 2000, on a class of biological drugs, the anti-VEGF proved to be quite effective in the treatment of retinal diseases, which have in its pathophysiological mechanism an important vascular proliferation component that can lead to blindness. Two of these drugs, bevacizumab and ranibizumab, are quite similar and have the same efficacy and safety. They were developed by the same laboratory and are commercialized by two major pharmaceutical companies through an agreement made between them. However, there is a big difference in the price of the drugs. The aim of this article is to present the Bioethics of intervention as grounds for choosing the cheaper drug, even if forced to do so by regulatory entities.

    16. MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Arguments for the prolonged use of antithyroid drugs in children with Graves' disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Léger, Juliane; Carel, Jean-Claude

      2017-08-01

      Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder. It is the leading cause of hyperthyroidism, but is rare in children. Patients are initially managed with antithyroid drugs (ATDs), such as methimazole/carbimazole. A major disadvantage of treatment with ATD is the high risk of relapse, exceeding 70% of children treated for duration of 2 years, and the potential major side effects of the drug reported in exceptional cases. The major advantage of ATD treatment is that normal homeostasis of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis may be restored, with periods of drug treatment followed by freedom from medical intervention achieved in approximately 40-50% of cases after prolonged treatment with ATD, for several years, in recent studies. Alternative ablative treatments such as radioactive iodine and, less frequently and mostly in cases of very high volume goiters or in children under the age of 5 years, thyroidectomy, performed by pediatric surgeons with extensive experience should be proposed in cases of non-compliance, intolerance to medical treatment or relapse after prolonged medical treatment. Ablative treatments are effective against hyperthyroidism, but they require the subsequent administration of levothyroxine throughout the patient's life. This review considers data relating to the prognosis for Graves' disease remission in children and explores the limitations of study designs and results; and the emerging proposal for management through the prolonged use of ATD drugs. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

    17. MMP-2 is a disease-modifying gene in primary sclerosing cholangitis

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Korkmaz, Kerem Sebib; de Rooij, Bert-Jan F.; van Hoek, Bart; Janse, Marcel; Coenraad, Minneke J.; van der Reijden, Johan J.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Porte, Robert J.; Voorneveld, Philip W.; Baranski, Andrzej G.; Verspaget, Hein W.

      BackgroundPrimary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the bile ducts, frequently necessitating orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), often accompanied by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are associated with fibrotic diseases caused by

    18. Prescriptive Oriented Drug Analysis of Multiple Sclerosis Disease by LC-UV in Whole Human Blood.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Suneetha, A; Rajeswari, Raja K

      2016-02-01

      As a polytherapy treatment, multiple sclerosis disease demands prescriptions with more than one drug. Polytherapy is sometimes rational for drug combinations chosen to minimize adverse effects. Estimation of drugs that are concomitantly administered in polytherapy is acceptable as it shortens the analytical timepoints and also the usage of biological matrices. In clinical phase trials, the withdrawal of biofluids is a critical issue for each analysis. Estimating all the coadminsitered drugs in a single shot will be more effective and economical for pharmaceuticals. A single, simple, rapid and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography assay method has been developed with UV detection and fully validated for the quantification of 14 drugs (at random combinations) used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis disease. The set of combinations was based on prescriptions to patients. Separations were achieved on an X-Terra MS C18 (100 × 3.9 mm, 5 µm) column. The analytes were extracted from 50 µL aliquots of whole human blood with protein precipitation using acetonitrile. All the drugs were sufficiently stable during storage for 24 h at room temperature and for 23 days at 2-8°C. The percentage recoveries of all drugs were between 90 and 115%, with RSD values <10.6%. This method has been shown to be reproducible and sensitive and can be applied to clinical samples from pharmacokinetic studies and also a useful tool in studying the drug interaction studies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

    19. A SNP in the HTT promoter alters NF-κB binding and is a bidirectional genetic modifier of Huntington disease

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Bečanović, Kristina; Nørremølle, Anne; Neal, Scott J

      2015-01-01

      Cis-regulatory variants that alter gene expression can modify disease expressivity, but none have previously been identified in Huntington disease (HD). Here we provide in vivo evidence in HD patients that cis-regulatory variants in the HTT promoter are bidirectional modifiers of HD age of onset....

    20. COPD - control drugs

      Science.gov (United States)

      Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

    1. Stem cells as a novel tool for drug screening and treatment of degenerative diseases.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Zuba-Surma, Ewa K; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Madeja, Zbigniew; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

      2012-01-01

      Degenerative diseases similarly as acute tissue injuries lead to massive cell loss and may cause organ failure of vital organs (e.g., heart, central nervous system). Therefore, they belong to a group of disorders that may significantly benefit from stem cells (SCs)-based therapies. Several stem and progenitor cell populations have already been described as valuable tools for developing therapeutic strategies in regenerative medicine. In particular, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), including adult-tissue-derived PSCs, neonatal-tissue-derived SCs, embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and recently described induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), are the focus of particular attention because of their capacity to differentiate into all the cell lineages. Although PSCs are predominantly envisioned to be applied for organ regeneration, they may be also successfully employed in drug screening and disease modeling. In particular, adult PSCs and iPSCs derived from patient tissues may not only be a source of cells for autologous therapies but also for individual customized in vitro drug testing and studies on the molecular mechanisms of disease. In this review, we will focus on the potential applications of SCs, especially PSCs i) in regenerative medicine therapies, ii) in studying mechanisms of disease, as well as iii) in drug screening and toxicology tests that are crucial in new drug development. In particular, we will discuss the application of SCs in developing new therapeutic approaches to treat degenerative diseases of the neural system and heart. The advantage of adult PSCs in all the above-mentioned settings is that they can be directly harvested from patient tissues and used not only as a safe non-immunogenic source of cells for therapy but also as tools for personalized drug screening and pharmacological therapies.

    2. Tofacitinib with conventional synthetic disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs in Chinese patients with rheumatoid arthritis: Patient‐reported outcomes from a Phase 3 randomized controlled trial

      OpenAIRE

      Li, Zhanguo; An, Yuan; Su, Houheng; Li, Xiangpei; Xu, Jianhua; Zheng, Yi; Li, Guiye; Kwok, Kenneth; Wang, Lisy; Wu, Qizhe

      2018-01-01

      Abstract Aim Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We assess the effect of tofacitinib + conventional synthetic disease‐modifying anti rheumatic drugs (csDMARDs) on patient‐reported outcomes in Chinese patients with RA and inadequate response to DMARDs. Methods This analysis of data from the Phase 3 study ORAL Sync included Chinese patients randomized 4 : 4 : 1 : 1 to receive tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily, tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily, p...

    3. Do payers value rarity? : An analysis of the relationship between disease rarity and orphan drug prices in Europe

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Medic, Goran; Korchagina, Daria; Young, Katherine Eve; Toumi, Mondher; Postma, Maarten Jacobus; Wille, Micheline; Hemels, Michiel

      2017-01-01

      Background and Objective: Orphan drugs have been a highlight of discussions due to their higher prices than non-orphan drugs. There is currently no European consensus on the method of value assessment for orphan drugs. This study assessed the relationship between the prevalence of rare diseases and

    4. Comparison of renal dynamic imaging and modified MDRD equation in determining the stage of chronic kidney disease patients

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Xie Peng; Liu Xiaomei; Huang Jianmin; Zhang Fang; Pan Liping; Wu Weijie; Gao Jianqing

      2013-01-01

      Objective: To compare the accuracy of 99 Tc m -diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid ( 99 Tc m -DTPA) renal dynamic imaging and modified modification of diet in renal disease trail (MDRD) equation in determining the stage of the chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients in clinical practice. Methods: A total of 169 patients were enrolled whose glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were determined simultaneously by 3 methods: dual plasma sample clearance method, renal dynamic imaging and modified MDRD equation. The dual plasma sample clearance method was employed as the reference method. The accuracy of the other methods in determining the stage of CKD patients was compared and the comparison was repeated based on the different stages. Results: The accuracy of renal dynamic imaging and modified MDRD equation was 56.80% and 68.64%, respectively (P=0.019<0.05). And only in the stage of uremia, the difference of the above-mentioned two method reached statistical significance (P=0.012<0.05), while in other stages they showed similar performance (P=0.180, 0.424, 0.629 and 0.754, all P>0.05). Conclusion: Modified MDRD equation showed better performance than renal dynamic imaging or as good as the second one in determining the stage of CKD patients and the former one should be the first choice in clinical practice because of its simplicity and economy. (authors)

    5. Patient-derived stem cells: pathways to drug discovery for brain diseases

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Alan eMackay-Sim

      2013-03-01

      Full Text Available The concept of drug discovery through stem cell biology is based on technological developments whose genesis is now coincident. The first is automated cell microscopy with concurrent advances in image acquisition and analysis, known as high content screening (HCS. The second is patient-derived stem cells for modelling the cell biology of brain diseases. HCS has developed from the requirements of the pharmaceutical industry for high throughput assays to screen thousands of chemical compounds in the search for new drugs. HCS combines new fluorescent probes with automated microscopy and computational power to quantify the effects of compounds on cell functions. Stem cell biology has advanced greatly since the discovery of genetic reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. There is now a rush of papers describing their generation from patients with various diseases of the nervous system. Although the majority of these have been genetic diseases, iPSCs have been generated from patients with complex diseases (schizophrenia and sporadic Parkinson’s disease. Some genetic diseases are also modelled in embryonic stem cells generated from blastocysts rejected during in vitro fertilisation. Neural stem cells have been isolated from post-mortem brain of Alzheimer’s patients and neural stem cells generated from biopsies of the olfactory organ of patients is another approach. These olfactory neurosphere-derived cells demonstrate robust disease-specific phenotypes in patients with schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease. High content screening is already in use to find small molecules for the generation and differentiation of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. The challenges for using stem cells for drug discovery are to develop robust stem cell culture methods that meet the rigorous requirements for repeatable, consistent quantities of defined cell types at the industrial scale necessary for high

    6. Genetic Factors Interact With Tobacco Smoke to Modify Risk for Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Humans and Mice

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Yadav, Pankaj; Ellinghaus, David; Rémy, Gaëlle

      2017-01-01

      BACKGROUND & AIMS: The role of tobacco smoke in the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unclear. We investigated interactions between genes and smoking (gene-smoking interactions) that affect risk for Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) in a case-only study of patients...... chamber, or ambient air (controls). Intestines were collected and analyzed histologically and by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: We identified 64 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for which the association between the SNP and IBD were modified by smoking behavior (meta...... to smoke. CONCLUSIONS: In an analysis of 55 Immunochip-wide datasets, we identified 64 SNPs whose association with risk for IBD is modified by tobacco smoking. Gene-smoking interactions were confirmed in mice with disruption of Il10 and Nod2-variants of these genes have been associated with risk for IBD...

    7. Radioiodine therapy versus antithyroid drugs in Graves' disease: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

      Science.gov (United States)

      Qin, Lan

      2016-01-01

      Objective: This meta-analysis was performed to compare radioiodine therapy with antithyroid drugs in terms of clinical outcomes, including development or worsening of ophthalmopathy, hyperthyroid cure rate, hypothyroidism, relapse rate and adverse events. Methods: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, SinoMed and National Knowledge Infrastructure, China, were systematically reviewed to compare the effects of radioiodine therapy with antithyroid drugs in patients with Graves' disease. Results were expressed as risk ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and weighted mean differences with 95% CIs. Pooled estimates were performed using a fixed-effects model or random-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity among studies. Results: 17 RCTs involving 4024 patients met the inclusion criteria and were included. Results showed that radioiodine treatment has increased risk in new ophthalmopathy, development or worsening of ophthalmopathy and hypothyroidism. Whereas, compared with antithyroid drugs, radioiodine treatment seems to have a higher hyperthyroid cure rate, lower recurrence rate and lower incidence of adverse events. Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy is associated with a higher hyperthyroid cure rate and lower relapse rate compared with antithyroid drugs. However, it also increases the risk of ophthalmopathy and hypothyroidism. Advances in knowledge: Considering that antithyroid drug treatment can be associated with unsatisfactory control of hyperthyroidism, we would recommend radioiodine therapy as the treatment of choice for patients with Graves' disease. PMID:27266544

    8. Disease-modifying effect of atipamezole in a model of post-traumatic epilepsy.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Nissinen, Jari; Andrade, Pedro; Natunen, Teemu; Hiltunen, Mikko; Malm, Tarja; Kanninen, Katja; Soares, Joana I; Shatillo, Olena; Sallinen, Jukka; Ndode-Ekane, Xavier Ekolle; Pitkänen, Asla

      2017-10-01

      Treatment of TBI remains a major unmet medical need, with 2.5 million new cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year in Europe and 1.5 million in the USA. This single-center proof-of-concept preclinical study tested the hypothesis that pharmacologic neurostimulation with proconvulsants, either atipamezole, a selective α 2 -adrenoceptor antagonist, or the cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist SR141716A, as monotherapy would improve functional recovery after TBI. A total of 404 adult Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomized into two groups: sham-injured or lateral fluid-percussion-induced TBI. The rats were treated with atipamezole (started at 30min or 7 d after TBI) or SR141716A (2min or 30min post-TBI) for up to 9 wk. Total follow-up time was 14 wk after treatment initiation. Outcome measures included motor (composite neuroscore, beam-walking) and cognitive performance (Morris water-maze), seizure susceptibility, spontaneous seizures, and cortical and hippocampal pathology. All injured rats exhibited similar impairment in the neuroscore and beam-walking tests at 2 d post-TBI. Atipamezole treatment initiated at either 30min or 7 d post-TBI and continued for 9 wk via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps improved performance in both the neuroscore and beam-walking tests, but not in the Morris water-maze spatial learning and memory test. Atipamezole treatment initiated at 7 d post-TBI also reduced seizure su