WorldWideScience

Sample records for disease mechanism relationships

  1. Molecular mechanisms involved in the bidirectional relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet Singh Grover

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Both diabetes and periodontitis are chronic diseases. Diabetes has many adverse effects on the periodontium, and conversely periodontitis may have deleterious effects further aggravating the condition in diabetics. The potential common pathophysiologic pathways include those associated with inflammation, altered host responses, altered tissue homeostasis, and insulin resistance. This review examines the relationship that exists between periodontal diseases and diabetes mellitus with a focus on potential common pathophysiologic mechanisms.

  2. Signal transduction mechanisms of K+-Cl- cotransport regulation and relationship to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adragna, N C; Ferrell, C M; Zhang, J; Di Fulvio, M; Temprana, C F; Sharma, A; Fyffe, R E W; Cool, D R; Lauf, P K

    2006-01-01

    The K+-Cl- cotransport (COT) regulatory pathways recently uncovered in our laboratory and their implication in disease state are reviewed. Three mechanisms of K+-Cl- COT regulation can be identified in vascular cells: (1) the Li+-sensitive pathway, (2) the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-sensitive pathway and (3) the nitric oxide (NO)-dependent pathway. Ion fluxes, Western blotting, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy were used. Li+, used in the treatment of manic depression, stimulates volume-sensitive K+-Cl- COT of low K+ sheep red blood cells at cellular concentrations 3 mM, causes cell swelling, and appears to regulate K+-Cl- COT through a protein kinase C-dependent pathway. PDGF, a potent serum mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), regulates membrane transport and is involved in atherosclerosis. PDGF stimulates VSM K+-Cl- COT in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, both acutely and chronically, through the PDGF receptor. The acute effect occurs at the post-translational level whereas the chronic effect may involve regulation through gene expression. Regulation by PDGF involves the signalling molecules phosphoinositides 3-kinase and protein phosphatase-1. Finally, the NO/cGMP/protein kinase G pathway, involved in vasodilation and hence cardiovascular disease, regulates K+-Cl- COT in VSMCs at the mRNA expression and transport levels. A complex and diverse array of mechanisms and effectors regulate K+-Cl- COT and thus cell volume homeostasis, setting the stage for abnormalities at the genetic and/or regulatory level thus effecting or being affected by various pathological conditions.

  3. Relationship between the mechanism of gastro-oesophageal reflux and oesophageal acid exposure in patients with reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, R. C. H.; Wassenaar, E. B.; Herwaarden, M. A.; Holloway, R. H.; Samsom, M.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Akkermans, L. M. A.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the oesophageal acid exposure time and the underlying manometric motor events in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). In 31 patients, 3-hour oesophageal motility and pH were measured after a test meal. Ten patients underwent 24-hour

  4. The Relationship between Mechanical Hyperalgesia Assessed by Manual Tender Point Examination and Disease Severity in Patients with Chronic Widespread Pain: A Cross-Sectional Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amris, Kirstine; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen; Jespersen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The clinical utility of tender point (TP) examination in patients reporting chronic widespread pain (CWP) is the subject of contemporary debate. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between mechanical hyperalgesia assessed by manual TP examination and clinical disease severity...

  5. Neuroepigenetic mechanisms in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Michael A; Kyle, Stephanie M; Katz, David J

    2017-10-16

    Epigenetics allows for the inheritance of information in cellular lineages during differentiation, independent of changes to the underlying genetic sequence. This raises the question of whether epigenetic mechanisms also function in post-mitotic neurons. During the long life of the neuron, fluctuations in gene expression allow the cell to pass through stages of differentiation, modulate synaptic activity in response to environmental cues, and fortify the cell through age-related neuroprotective pathways. Emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone modification permit these dynamic changes in gene expression throughout the life of a neuron. Accordingly, recent studies have revealed the vital importance of epigenetic players in the central nervous system and during neurodegeneration. Here, we provide a review of several of these recent findings, highlighting novel functions for epigenetics in the fields of Rett syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, and Alzheimer's disease research. Together, these discoveries underscore the vital importance of epigenetics in human neurological disorders.

  6. The Relationship Between Coronary Heart Disease (CHD and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD: Key Mechanisms and the Role of Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne O’Neil

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Various trials have been conducted evaluating depression management programs for patients with Coronary Heart Disease (CHD. However, to date, the most effective way to manage this co-morbidity in the real world setting remains unclear. To better understand the past successes and failures of previous trials and subsequently develop suitable interventions that target key components of health related quality of life (HRQOL such as mental, physical and vocational functioning, we first need to understand the mechanisms underpinning the relationship between the two conditions. This paper will draw on the key literature in this field as identified by psychiatric, medical and social sciences databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, OVID, Medline available up to January 2012, with the aim to conduct a narrative review which explores: the aetiological relationship between depression and CHD; its association with HRQOL; the relationship between CHD, depression and vocational functioning; and the impact of depression treatment on these outcomes. Key recommendations are made regarding the management of this prevalent co-morbidity in clinical settings.

  7. Nuclear Mechanics in Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwerger, Monika; Ho, Chin Yee; Lammerding, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the biomechanical properties of cells have emerged as key players in a broad range of cellular functions, including migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Although much of the attention has focused on the cytoskeletal networks and the cell’s microenvironment, relatively little is known about the contribution of the cell nucleus. Here, we present an overview of the structural elements that determine the physical properties of the nucleus and discuss how changes in the expression of nuclear components or mutations in nuclear proteins can affect not only nuclear mechanics but also modulate cytoskeletal organization and diverse cellular functions. These findings illustrate that the nucleus is tightly integrated into the surrounding cellular structure. Consequently, changes in nuclear structure and composition are highly relevant to normal development and physiology and can contribute to many human diseases, such as muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy, (premature) aging, and cancer. PMID:21756143

  8. Lamins, laminopathies and disease mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-07-08

    Jul 8, 2011 ... Lamins, laminopathies and disease mechanisms: Possible role for proteasomal degradation of ... Mutations in the human lamin genes lead to highly degenerative genetic diseases that affect a number of different ... June 2018.

  9. Relationship with BSE (Mad Cow Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease (CWD) Prion Diseases Relationship with BSE (Mad Cow Disease) Evidence Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... macaque monkeys inoculated with brain tissue obtained from cattle with BSE had clinical and neuropathological features strikingly ...

  10. Statistical Mechanics of Prion Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slepoy, A.; Singh, R. R. P.; Pazmandi, F.; Kulkarni, R. V.; Cox, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    We present a two-dimensional, lattice based, protein-level statistical mechanical model for prion diseases (e.g., mad cow disease) with concomitant prion protein misfolding and aggregation. Our studies lead us to the hypothesis that the observed broad incubation time distribution in epidemiological data reflect fluctuation dominated growth seeded by a few nanometer scale aggregates, while much narrower incubation time distributions for innoculated lab animals arise from statistical self-averaging. We model ''species barriers'' to prion infection and assess a related treatment protocol

  11. The diversity–disease relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Z.Y.X.; Langevelde, van F.; Estrada-Peña, A.; Suzán, G.; Boer, de W.F.

    2016-01-01

    The dilution effect, that high host species diversity can reduce disease risk, has attracted much attention in the context of global biodiversity decline and increasing disease emergence. Recent studies have criticized the generality of the dilution effect and argued that it only occurs under

  12. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovcevski, Mira; Akbarian, Schahram

    2012-08-01

    The exploration of brain epigenomes, which consist of various types of DNA methylation and covalent histone modifications, is providing new and unprecedented insights into the mechanisms of neural development, neurological disease and aging. Traditionally, chromatin defects in the brain were considered static lesions of early development that occurred in the context of rare genetic syndromes, but it is now clear that mutations and maladaptations of the epigenetic machinery cover a much wider continuum that includes adult-onset neurodegenerative disease. Here, we describe how recent advances in neuroepigenetics have contributed to an improved mechanistic understanding of developmental and degenerative brain disorders, and we discuss how they could influence the development of future therapies for these conditions.

  13. The Relationship Between Fatty Liver Disease and Periodontal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-22

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent and destructive chronic disease. Numerous studies support an association between periodontal disease and other...destruction seen in periodontal disease. The association between the two diseases has never been investigated. A reasonable mechanism in which periodontal ...disease may play a role in the destruction seen in NAFLD is the remote site infection of periodontal disease. Chewing and oral hygiene measures lead to

  14. Bi-directional relationship between pregnancy and periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Gary C

    2013-02-01

    During pregnancy profound perturbations in innate and adaptive immunity impact the clinical course of a number of infectious diseases, including those affecting periodontal tissues. Conversely, it has been suggested that periodontal infections may increase the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. In this review, a summary of the literature associated with the bidirectional relationship between pregnancy and periodontal disease as well as the possible mechanisms behind this interaction were examined. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Governance mechanisms in transnational business relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Homburg, Christian; Kiedaisch, Ingo; Cannon, Joseph P.

    1999-01-01

    Empirical research on buyer-supplier relationships has almost exclusively examined domestic (both firms from the same country) exchange. The growing importance of international marketing and global sourcing suggest a need to understand relationships across national boundaries -- transnational business relationships. Drawing on theories of governance, the authors hypothesize differences in governance between domestic and transnational business relationships. They examine the use...

  16. Association of Relationship between Periodontal Disease and Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, N; Dhodapkar, S V; Kumar, R; Verma, T; Jajoo, A

    2017-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the relationship between periodontal and cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have shown some co-relation between the two conditions. We included 186 patients divided into four groups. First two Groups (A1 & A2) were the patients with cardiac disease (100 in numbers) whilst Groups (B1 & B2) (86 in numbers) were treated as controls (without cardiac disease). Following markers of periodontal disease were assessed - plaque index, calculus index, gingival and periodontal index. Markers of cardiovascular disease included were LDL, HDL, total cholesterol and CRP. Ramfjords periodontal index was used to assess the extent of periodontal disease. In the present study there was a significant increase in CRP levels in Group A1 (CVD + PD) compared to controls and overall the two cardiac groups showed a significant increase in CRP compared to controls. There was a non-significant change in lipid profile markers (LDL, HDL and total cholesterol). Periodontal Disease Index (PDI) was also increased in Group A1 compared to other groups except Group B1 and overall in cardiac groups compared to non-cardiac (PD) groups. In this study no correlation between periodontal and cardiovascular disease was found. This may be due intake of statins by few patients in Group A with a confirmed diagnosis of cardiovascular disease.

  17. Inflammatory mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Zhan, S. S.; van Gool, W. A.; Allsop, D.

    1994-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is aetiologically heterogeneous, but the pathogenesis is often considered to be initiated by the deposition of amyloid fibrils, followed by neuritic tau pathology and neuronal death. A variety of inflammatory proteins has been identified in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's

  18. Relationship between aortic diseases and renal cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Toshikazu

    2009-01-01

    Based on empirical observations, patients with aortic diseases (AoD) (abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) and aortic dissection (AD)) appeared to present with an increased incidence of renal cysts (RC) observed on computed tomography (CT). To clarify any potential relationship, I compared incidence of RC on CT scans in patients with and without AoD. A comparison was conducted on the incidence of RC on CT scans in 107 patients (74.6 years old; n=71 males, n=36 females) with AoD (57 AAA, 36 TAA, 14 AD) versus 332 control patients (73.6 years old; n=193 males, n=139 females) without AoD. Univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression were performed to evaluate the relationship between AoD and RC incidence. In patients with AoD, 65.0% presented with RC compared to only 28.6% in the control group (p<0.0001). In comparison, the AoD group presented with a higher frequency of hypertension (63.6% vs. 33.4%, p<0.0001), coronary artery disease (26.2% vs. 13.6%, p<0.0001), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (10.3% vs. 4.2%, p<0.0001), but no significant frequency of dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus was observed between the 2 groups. Multivariate analysis indicated three independent predictors of AoD: hypertension (p=0.013; odds ratio=2.32), COPD (p=0.015; odds ratio=5.62) and RC (p<0.0001; odds ratio=4.88). These results indicate a significantly higher incidence of RC in patients with versus without AoD. A close relationship between AoD and RC may exist, and coincidental RC could be a potential indicator for AoD screening. (author)

  19. Relationship between aortic diseases and renal cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, Toshikazu [Minami Wakayama Medical Center, Tanabe, Wakayama (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    Based on empirical observations, patients with aortic diseases (AoD) (abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) and aortic dissection (AD)) appeared to present with an increased incidence of renal cysts (RC) observed on computed tomography (CT). To clarify any potential relationship, I compared incidence of RC on CT scans in patients with and without AoD. A comparison was conducted on the incidence of RC on CT scans in 107 patients (74.6 years old; n=71 males, n=36 females) with AoD (57 AAA, 36 TAA, 14 AD) versus 332 control patients (73.6 years old; n=193 males, n=139 females) without AoD. Univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression were performed to evaluate the relationship between AoD and RC incidence. In patients with AoD, 65.0% presented with RC compared to only 28.6% in the control group (p<0.0001). In comparison, the AoD group presented with a higher frequency of hypertension (63.6% vs. 33.4%, p<0.0001), coronary artery disease (26.2% vs. 13.6%, p<0.0001), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (10.3% vs. 4.2%, p<0.0001), but no significant frequency of dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus was observed between the 2 groups. Multivariate analysis indicated three independent predictors of AoD: hypertension (p=0.013; odds ratio=2.32), COPD (p=0.015; odds ratio=5.62) and RC (p<0.0001; odds ratio=4.88). These results indicate a significantly higher incidence of RC in patients with versus without AoD. A close relationship between AoD and RC may exist, and coincidental RC could be a potential indicator for AoD screening. (author)

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Disease Pathogenesis Differ in Krabbe Disease Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spratley, Samantha J; Hill, Chris H; Viuff, Agnete H

    2016-01-01

    different mutations have been identified in GALC that cause Krabbe disease but the mechanisms by which they cause disease remain unclear. We have generated monoclonal antibodies against full-length human GALC and used these to monitor the trafficking and processing of GALC variants in cell-based assays...

  1. Solid Waste/Disease Relationships, A Literature Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, Thrift G.

    Presented is a comprehensive survey of the literature on the relationships between disease and solid wastes. Diseases are grouped on the basis of waste type or disease vector, such as chemical waste, human fecal waste, animal fecal waste, rodent-borne disease, mosquito-borne disease and miscellaneous communicable disease. The following format is…

  2. Microstructure mechanical properties relationship in bainitic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altuna, M. A.; Gutierrez, I.

    2005-01-01

    In the present work, the microstructures and their mechanical properties have been studies in different bainitic structures. therefore, different bainitic morphologies have been produced by isothermal treatments carried out at different temperatures. For these steels, 400-450 degree centigree is the optimum range of temperatures in order to obtain bainitic structures. If the Temperature is higher, perlite is also formed and if it is lower, martensite is obtained during quenching. SEM and EBSD/OIM techniques were applied in order to study the microstructure. Tensile tests were carried out for mechanical characterization. (Author) 20 refs

  3. Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameille, Jacques; Rosenberg, Nicole; Matrat, Mireille; Descatha, Alexis; Mompoint, Dominique; Hamzi, Lounis; Atassi, Catherine; Vasile, Manuela; Garnier, Robert; Pairon, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Automobile mechanics have been exposed to asbestos in the past, mainly due to the presence of chrysotile asbestos in brakes and clutches. Despite the large number of automobile mechanics, little is known about the non-malignant respiratory diseases observed in this population. The aim of this retrospective multicenter study was to analyse the frequency of pleural and parenchymal abnormalities on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in a population of automobile mechanics. The study population consisted of 103 automobile mechanics with no other source of occupational exposure to asbestos, referred to three occupational health departments in the Paris area for systematic screening of asbestos-related diseases. All subjects were examined by HRCT and all images were reviewed separately by two independent readers; who in the case of disagreement discussed until they reached agreement. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed to investigate factors associated with pleural plaques. Pleural plaques were observed in five cases (4.9%) and interstitial abnormalities consistent with asbestosis were observed in one case. After adjustment for age, smoking status, and a history of non-asbestos-related respiratory diseases, multiple logistic regression models showed a significant association between the duration of exposure to asbestos and pleural plaques. The asbestos exposure experienced by automobile mechanics may lead to pleural plaques. The low prevalence of non-malignant asbestos-related diseases, using a very sensitive diagnostic tool, is in favor of a low cumulative exposure to asbestos in this population of workers.

  4. Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameille, Jacques; Rosenberg, Nicole; Matrat, Mireille; Descatha, Alexis; Mompoint, Dominique; Hamzi, Lounis; Atassi, Catherine; Vasile, Manuela; Garnier, Robert; Pairon, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Automobile mechanics have been exposed to asbestos in the past, mainly due to the presence of chrysotile asbestos in brakes and clutches. Despite the large number of automobile mechanics, little is known about the non-malignant respiratory diseases observed in this population. The aim of this retrospective multicenter study was to analyze the frequency of pleural and parenchymal abnormalities on HRCT in a population of automobile mechanics. Methods The study population consisted of 103 automobile mechanics with no other source of occupational exposure to asbestos, referred to three occupational health departments in the Paris area for systematic screening of asbestos–related diseases. All subjects were examined by HRCT and all images were reviewed separately by two independent readers, with further consensus in the case of disagreement. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed to investigate factors associated with pleural plaques. Results Pleural plaques were observed in 5 cases (4.9%) and interstitial abnormalities consistent with asbestosis were observed in 1 case. After adjustment for age, smoking status, and a history of non-asbestos-related respiratory diseases, multiple logistic regression models showed a significant association between the duration of exposure to asbestos and pleural plaques. Conclusions The asbestos exposure experienced by automobile mechanics may lead to pleural plaques. The low prevalence of non-malignant asbestos-related diseases, using a very sensitive diagnostic tool, is in favor of a low cumulative exposure to asbestos in this population of workers. PMID:21965465

  5. Basic mechanisms of rTMS: Implications in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arias-Carrión Oscar

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Basic and clinical research suggests a potential role for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, compared to the growing number of clinical studies on its putative therapeutic properties, the studies on the basic mechanisms of rTMS are surprisingly scarce. Results Animal studies have broadened our understanding of how rTMS affects brain circuits and the causal chain in brain-behavior relationships. The observed changes are thought to be to neurotransmitter release, transsynaptic efficiency, signaling pathways and gene transcription. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that rTMS induces neurogenesis, neuronal viability and secretion of neuroprotective molecules. Conclusion The mechanisms underlying the disease-modifying effects of these and related rTMS in animals are the principle subject of the current review. The possible applications for treatment of Parkinson's disease are discussed.

  6. Gaucher disease and the synucleinopathies: refining the relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Tessa N

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gaucher disease (OMIM 230800, 230900, 231000, the most common lysosomal storage disorder, is due to a deficiency in the enzyme glucocerebrosidase. Gaucher patients display a wide spectrum of clinical presentation, with hepatosplenomegaly, haematological changes, and orthopaedic complications being the predominant symptoms. Gaucher disease is classified into three broad phenotypes based upon the presence or absence of neurological involvement: Type 1 (non-neuronopathic, Type 2 (acute neuronopathic, and Type 3 (subacute neuronopathic. Nearly 300 mutations have been identified in Gaucher patients, with the majority being missense mutations. Though studies of genotype-to-phenotype correlations have revealed significant heterogeneity, some consistent patterns have emerged to inform prognostic and therapeutic decisions. Recent research has highlighted a potential role for Gaucher disease in other comorbidities such as cancer and Parkinson's Disease. In this review, we will examine the potential relationship between Gaucher disease and the synucleinopathies, a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the development of intracellular aggregates of α-synuclein. Possible mechanisms of interaction will be discussed.

  7. Pesticides and human chronic diseases: Evidences, mechanisms, and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafalou, Sara; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Along with the wide use of pesticides in the world, the concerns over their health impacts are rapidly growing. There is a huge body of evidence on the relation between exposure to pesticides and elevated rate of chronic diseases such as different types of cancers, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson, Alzheimer, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), birth defects, and reproductive disorders. There is also circumstantial evidence on the association of exposure to pesticides with some other chronic diseases like respiratory problems, particularly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular disease such as atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, chronic nephropathies, autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematous and rheumatoid arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, and aging. The common feature of chronic disorders is a disturbance in cellular homeostasis, which can be induced via pesticides' primary action like perturbation of ion channels, enzymes, receptors, etc., or can as well be mediated via pathways other than the main mechanism. In this review, we present the highlighted evidence on the association of pesticide's exposure with the incidence of chronic diseases and introduce genetic damages, epigenetic modifications, endocrine disruption, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), impairment of ubiquitin proteasome system, and defective autophagy as the effective mechanisms of action. - Highlights: ► There is a link between exposure to pesticides and incidence of chronic diseases. ► Genotoxicity and proteotoxicity are two main involved mechanisms. ► Epigenetic knowledge may help diagnose the relationships. ► Efficient policies on safe use of pesticides should be set up

  8. Pesticides and human chronic diseases: Evidences, mechanisms, and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostafalou, Sara; Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Abdollahi@UToronto.Ca

    2013-04-15

    Along with the wide use of pesticides in the world, the concerns over their health impacts are rapidly growing. There is a huge body of evidence on the relation between exposure to pesticides and elevated rate of chronic diseases such as different types of cancers, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson, Alzheimer, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), birth defects, and reproductive disorders. There is also circumstantial evidence on the association of exposure to pesticides with some other chronic diseases like respiratory problems, particularly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular disease such as atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, chronic nephropathies, autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematous and rheumatoid arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, and aging. The common feature of chronic disorders is a disturbance in cellular homeostasis, which can be induced via pesticides' primary action like perturbation of ion channels, enzymes, receptors, etc., or can as well be mediated via pathways other than the main mechanism. In this review, we present the highlighted evidence on the association of pesticide's exposure with the incidence of chronic diseases and introduce genetic damages, epigenetic modifications, endocrine disruption, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), impairment of ubiquitin proteasome system, and defective autophagy as the effective mechanisms of action. - Highlights: ► There is a link between exposure to pesticides and incidence of chronic diseases. ► Genotoxicity and proteotoxicity are two main involved mechanisms. ► Epigenetic knowledge may help diagnose the relationships. ► Efficient policies on safe use of pesticides should be set up.

  9. The relationship between stress and Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Justice

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Stress is critically involved in the development and progression of disease. From the stress of undergoing treatments to facing your own mortality, the physiological processes that stress drives have a serious detrimental effect on the ability to heal, cope and maintain a positive quality of life. This is becoming increasingly clear in the case of neurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases involve the devastating loss of cognitive and motor function which is stressful in itself, but can also disrupt neural circuits that mediate stress responses. Disrupting these circuits produces aberrant emotional and aggressive behavior that causes long-term care to be especially difficult. In addition, added stress drives progression of the disease and can exacerbate symptoms. In this review, I describe how neural and endocrine pathways activated by stress interact with ongoing neurodegenerative disease from both a clinical and experimental perspective. Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Stress, Cortisol, Corticosteroids, CRF, CRH

  10. The relationship between stress and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Nicholas J

    2018-02-01

    Stress is critically involved in the development and progression of disease. From the stress of undergoing treatments to facing your own mortality, the physiological processes that stress drives have a serious detrimental effect on the ability to heal, cope and maintain a positive quality of life. This is becoming increasingly clear in the case of neurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases involve the devastating loss of cognitive and motor function which is stressful in itself, but can also disrupt neural circuits that mediate stress responses. Disrupting these circuits produces aberrant emotional and aggressive behavior that causes long-term care to be especially difficult. In addition, added stress drives progression of the disease and can exacerbate symptoms. In this review, I describe how neural and endocrine pathways activated by stress interact with ongoing neurodegenerative disease from both a clinical and experimental perspective.

  11. Relationship between mechanical sensitivity and postamputation pain: A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Lone; IlKjær, Susanne; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2000-01-01

    of the limb and early (after 1 week) and late (after 6 months) phantom pain. Thirty-five patients scheduled for amputation of the lower limb were examined before, 1 week and 6 months after amputation. On all three examination days pressure-pain thresholds were measured and compared with the simultaneous...... recording of ongoing pain intensity assessed on a visual analogue scale (VAS). There was a weak but significant inverse relationship between preamputation thresholds and early stump and phantom pain. There was no relationship between preamputation thresholds and late stump and phantom pain. One week after...... amputation there was a significant and inverse relationship between mechanical thresholds and phantom pain but no relationship was found after 6 months. The findings suggest that although tenderness of the limb before and after amputation is related to early stump and phantom pain, the relationship is weak...

  12. The relationship between depression and periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, S H; Park, S G

    2018-03-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate whether depression is associated with periodontal diseases in a representative sample of South Korean adults Methods: We used data from the sixth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES VI), conducted in 2014. We included in this study 4328 participants aged over 20 years (1768 males and 2560 females). Depression was assessed with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and history of physician-diagnosed depression. Periodontal diseases were assessed a gingival bleeding, calculus and periodontal pockets. The data were analyzed using the chi-square test and multiple logistic regression. People with any periodontal diseases tended to be old, male, married, low income, poor education, blue-collar occupation, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, overweight, smoking, not using dental floss or interdental brush in univariate analysis. Neither self-reported nor diagnosed depression was associated with the presence of any or severe periodontal disease in the total sample. In participants aged 20-29 years only, the presence of any periodontal disease was associated with self-reported depression (OR, 2.031; 95% CI, 1.011-4.078). In the same age group, the presence of severe periodontal disease was associated with both self-reported depression (OR, 6.532; 95% CI, 2.190-19.483) and diagnosed depression (OR, 7.729; 95% CI, 1.966-30.389). Self-reported depression was significantly associated with the presence of any or severe periodontal disease, and diagnosed depression was significantly associated with severe periodontal diseases only in participants aged 20-29 years. Copyright© 2018 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  13. Relationship between Inflammation and Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Riddhi Patel; Henish Patel; Rachana Sarawade

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is a part of complex biological response of vascular tissue to harmful stimuli such as pathogens, damaged cells or irritants. Recent advance in basic science have established a fundamental role for inflammation immediating all stages of cardiovascular diseases from initiation, progression and complications. Inflammation is thread linking to cardiovascular diseases. Clinical studies have shown that this emerging biology of inflammation play important role in pathogenesis of acute ...

  14. A mechanism to assess the relationship between socio-technical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A mechanism to assess the relationship between socio-technical congruence and project performance in incremental model. W.A.W.M. Sobri, S.S.M. Fauzi, M.H.N.M. Nasir, R Ahmad, A.J. Suali. Abstract. No Abstract. Keywords: coordination; software development; software project; software engineering project; ...

  15. Relationship between Postural Deformities and Frontal Function in Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ninomiya, Satoko; Morita, Akihiko; Teramoto, Hiroko; Akimoto, Takayoshi; Shiota, Hiroshi; Kamei, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Postural deformities and executive dysfunction (ED) are common symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD); however, the relationship between postural deformities and ED in patients with PD remains unclear. This study assessed the relationship between postural deformities and ED in patients with PD. Sixty-five patients with sporadic PD were assessed for the severity of postural deformities and executive function. The severity of postural deformities was scored using the United Parkinson's Disease Ra...

  16. A review of the relationship between tooth loss, periodontal disease, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Mara S; Joshipura, Kaumudi; Giovannucci, Edward; Michaud, Dominique S

    2008-11-01

    Recent studies have investigated the association between periodontal disease, tooth loss, and several systemic diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and preterm birth. Periodontal disease, a chronic inflammatory condition, is highly prevalent in adult populations around the world, and may be preventable. Estimates of prevalence vary between races and geographic regions, with a marked increase in the occurrence of periodontal disease with advancing age. Worldwide estimates for the prevalence of severe periodontal disease generally range from 10 to 15%. The relationship between oral health and cancer has been examined for a number of specific cancer sites. Several studies have reported associations between periodontal disease or tooth loss and risk of oral, upper gastrointestinal, lung, and pancreatic cancer in different populations. In a number of studies, these associations persisted after adjustment for major risk factors, including cigarette smoking and socioeconomic status. This review provides a summary of these findings, discusses possible biological mechanisms involved, and raises methodological issues related to studying these relationships.

  17. Relationship between Apolipoprotein Superfamily and Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The Apo superfamily has been proved to be closely involved in the initiation, progression, and prognosis of PD. Apos and their genes are of great value in predicting the susceptibility of PD and hopeful to become the target of medical intervention to prevent the onset of PD or slow down the progress. Therefore, further large-scale studies are warranted to elucidate the precise mechanisms of Apos in PD.

  18. Addictive drugs and their relationship with infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Herman; Pross, Susan; Klein, Thomas W

    2006-08-01

    The use of drugs of abuse, both recreationally and medicinally, may be related to serious public health concerns. There is a relationship between addictive drugs of abuse such as alcohol and nicotine in cigarette smoke, as well as illegal drugs such as opiates, cocaine and marijuana, and increased susceptibility to infections. The nature and mechanisms of immunomodulation induced by such drugs of abuse are described in this review. The effects of opiates and marijuana, using animal models as well as in vitro studies with immune cells from experimental animals and humans, have shown that immunomodulation induced by these drugs is mainly receptor-mediated, either directly by interaction with specific receptors on immune cells or indirectly by reaction with similar receptors on cells of the nervous system. Similar studies also show that cocaine and nicotine have marked immunomodulatory effects, which are mainly receptor-mediated. Both cocaine, an illegal drug, and nicotine, a widely used legal addictive component of cigarettes, are markedly immunomodulatory and increase susceptibility to infection. The nature and mechanism of immunomodulation induced by alcohol, the most widely used addictive substance of abuse, are similar but immunomodulatory effects, although not receptor-mediated. The many research studies on the effects of these drugs on immunity and increased susceptibility to infectious diseases, including AIDS, are providing a better understanding of the complex interactions between immunity, infections and substance abuse.

  19. Relationship between periodontal disease and preterm low birth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Periodontal disease is a neglected bacterial infection that causes destruction of the periodontium in pregnant women. Yet its impact on the occurrence of adverse pregnancy outcomes has not systematically evaluated and there is no clear statement on the relationship between periodontal disease and preterm ...

  20. Pathogenesis of thyroid autoimmune disease: the role of cellular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Leví, Ana Maria; Marazuela, Mónica

    2016-10-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and Graves' disease (GD) are two very common organ-specific autoimmune diseases which are characterized by circulating antibodies and lymphocyte infiltration. Although humoral and cellular mechanisms have been classically considered separately in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), recent research suggests a close reciprocal relationship between these two immune pathways. Several B- and T-cell activation pathways through antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and cytokine production lead to specific differentiation of T helper (Th) and T regulatory (Treg) cells. This review will focus on the cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AITD. Specifically, it will provide reasons for discarding the traditional simplistic dichotomous view of the T helper type 1 and 2 pathways (Th1/Th2) and will focus on the role of the recently characterized T cells, Treg and Th17 lymphocytes, as well as B lymphocytes and APCs, especially dendritic cells (DCs). Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Pathogenic mechanisms linking periodontal diseases with adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, I; Pileri, P; Villa, A; Calabrese, S; Ottolenghi, L; Abati, S

    2012-06-01

    In the last 2 decades, a large proportion of studies have focused on the relationship between maternal periodontal disease and poor obstetric outcomes. The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge about human studies on the pathogenetic mechanisms linking periodontal diseases with adverse pregnancy outcomes. A search of the medical literature was conducted using NIH (National Institute of Health) Pubmed through April 2011. Articles were identified with the Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) and free text terms "small for gestational age (SGA)," "preeclampsia," "preterm labor," and "periodontal disease." Experimental human studies have shown that periodontal pathogens may disseminate toward placental and fetal tissues accompanied by an increase in inflammatory mediators in the placenta. As such, new inflammatory reactions within the placental tissues of the pregnant woman may occur, the physiological levels of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the amniotic fluid may increase and eventually lead to premature delivery. Although many data from clinical trials suggest that periodontal disease may increase the adverse pregnancy outcome, the exact pathogenetic mechanism involved remains controversial. The findings explain the potential link between periodontal infections and adverse pregnancy outcomes. First, periodontal bacteria can directly cause infections both of the uteroplacenta and the fetus; second, systemic inflammatory changes induced by periodontal diseases can activate responses at the maternal-fetal interface. Of note, associative studies have produced different results in different population groups and no conclusive evidence has still been produced for the potential role of preventive periodontal care to reduce the risk factors of preterm birth.

  2. Gene regulatory networks elucidating huanglongbing disease mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Martinelli

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing was exploited to gain deeper insight into the response to infection by Candidatus liberibacter asiaticus (CaLas, especially the immune disregulation and metabolic dysfunction caused by source-sink disruption. Previous fruit transcriptome data were compared with additional RNA-Seq data in three tissues: immature fruit, and young and mature leaves. Four categories of orchard trees were studied: symptomatic, asymptomatic, apparently healthy, and healthy. Principal component analysis found distinct expression patterns between immature and mature fruits and leaf samples for all four categories of trees. A predicted protein - protein interaction network identified HLB-regulated genes for sugar transporters playing key roles in the overall plant responses. Gene set and pathway enrichment analyses highlight the role of sucrose and starch metabolism in disease symptom development in all tissues. HLB-regulated genes (glucose-phosphate-transporter, invertase, starch-related genes would likely determine the source-sink relationship disruption. In infected leaves, transcriptomic changes were observed for light reactions genes (downregulation, sucrose metabolism (upregulation, and starch biosynthesis (upregulation. In parallel, symptomatic fruits over-expressed genes involved in photosynthesis, sucrose and raffinose metabolism, and downregulated starch biosynthesis. We visualized gene networks between tissues inducing a source-sink shift. CaLas alters the hormone crosstalk, resulting in weak and ineffective tissue-specific plant immune responses necessary for bacterial clearance. Accordingly, expression of WRKYs (including WRKY70 was higher in fruits than in leaves. Systemic acquired responses were inadequately activated in young leaves, generally considered the sites where most new infections occur.

  3. The impact of Parkinson disease on patients' sexuality and relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhmann, C; Dogac, S; Vettorazzi, E; Hidding, U; Gerloff, C; Jürgens, T P

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed at examining the impact of Parkinson disease (PD) on patients' sexuality and relationship and to evaluate gender-specific differences. Using a standardized questionnaire on sexual functioning in chronic diseases (SFCE), the impact of PD diagnosis on 38 domains of sexuality before and since PD diagnosis was evaluated retrospectively in 53 consecutive patients in a relationship. Changes in self-assessed ratings on a four-point Likert scale were determined for all patients. In addition, gender-specific differences and the influence of age, depression (BDI-II), medication, disease severity and disease duration on domains of the SFCE were calculated. The importance of non-sexual relational aspects, such as talking about feelings or tenderness increased for both genders after PD diagnosis, especially in women. Sexual function, such as frequency of intercourse, sexual arousal, subjective abnormal sexual fantasies or sexual satisfaction deteriorated in both genders, especially in men. Some sexual aspects improved in women but worsened in men after PD diagnosis. This includes frequency of orgasm dysfunction, fear not to fulfill sexual expectations of the partner, avoidance of sexual acts, withdrawal from relationship, increase of thoughts about divorce, or increase of dissatisfaction with sexuality and relationship. With age, thoughts about divorce declined. With disease duration, frequency of tenderness with the partner increased. Depression unexpectedly correlated with higher frequency of intercourse. Dopaminergic dosage influenced stability of the relationship negatively. PD influences patients' sexuality negatively, independently of age, disease duration or disease severity and men show greater sexual dysfunction and impairment of their sexual relationship than women.

  4. Mechanics of Disease Control in Production Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disease problems develop when the surfaces of susceptible plant tissue (part 1) are colonized by a virulent pathogen (part 2) at the time when conditions are conducive for infection and disease development (part 3). Negatively effect one or more of the three parts, then disease can be minimized or e...

  5. Relationship between Occupational Stress and Gastric Disease in Male Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihm, Ho-Seob; Park, Sang-Hyun; Gong, Eun-Hee; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kim, Jung-Won

    2012-09-01

    Physical and mental health of workers is threatened due to various events and chronic occupational stress. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between occupational stress and gastric disease in male workers of the shipbuilding industry. Occupational stress measured among a total of 498 workers of a shipbuilding firm who visited the hospital for health examination using the Korean Occupational Stress Scale (KOSS)-short form, and the relationship between sociodemographic factors, health-related behaviors, occupational stress, and gastric disease, and the distribution of occupational stress by sociodemographic factors in the gastric disease group was examined. There was no significant association between gastric disease and total occupational stress score and its seven sub-factors. The analysis showed that risk of gastric disease was significantly higher in the Q1 group in which the stress caused by occupational discomfort among seven sub-factors was lowest than that in the Q4 group (odds ratio, 2.819; 95% confidence interval, 1.151 to 6.908). Analysis only on the gastric disease group showed that the stress score of laborers was higher in the four sub-factors than that of office workers (P occupational stress in the low-educated and laborers. It is recommended for future studies to confirm the causal relationship between occupational stress and gastric disease by large scale studies using a KOSS which appropriately reflects workplace culture.

  6. Relationship between Occupational Stress and Gastric Disease in Male Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihm, Ho-Seob; Park, Sang-Hyun; Gong, Eun-Hee; Kim, Jung-Won

    2012-01-01

    Background Physical and mental health of workers is threatened due to various events and chronic occupational stress. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between occupational stress and gastric disease in male workers of the shipbuilding industry. Methods Occupational stress measured among a total of 498 workers of a shipbuilding firm who visited the hospital for health examination using the Korean Occupational Stress Scale (KOSS)-short form, and the relationship between sociodemographic factors, health-related behaviors, occupational stress, and gastric disease, and the distribution of occupational stress by sociodemographic factors in the gastric disease group was examined. Results There was no significant association between gastric disease and total occupational stress score and its seven sub-factors. The analysis showed that risk of gastric disease was significantly higher in the Q1 group in which the stress caused by occupational discomfort among seven sub-factors was lowest than that in the Q4 group (odds ratio, 2.819; 95% confidence interval, 1.151 to 6.908). Analysis only on the gastric disease group showed that the stress score of laborers was higher in the four sub-factors than that of office workers (P occupational stress in the low-educated and laborers. It is recommended for future studies to confirm the causal relationship between occupational stress and gastric disease by large scale studies using a KOSS which appropriately reflects workplace culture. PMID:23115706

  7. Relationship between Occupational Stress and Gastric Disease in Male Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Lihm, Ho-Seob; Park, Sang-Hyun; Gong, Eun-Hee; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kim, Jung-Won

    2012-01-01

    Background Physical and mental health of workers is threatened due to various events and chronic occupational stress. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between occupational stress and gastric disease in male workers of the shipbuilding industry. Methods Occupational stress measured among a total of 498 workers of a shipbuilding firm who visited the hospital for health examination using the Korean Occupational Stress Scale (KOSS)-short form, and the relationship between ...

  8. Depression and Chronic Liver Diseases: Are There Shared Underlying Mechanisms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqin Huang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of depression is higher in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD than that in the general population. The mechanism described in previous studies mainly focused on inflammation and stress, which not only exists in CLD, but also emerges in common chronic diseases, leaving the specific mechanism unknown. This review was to summarize the prevalence and risk factors of depression in CLD including chronic hepatitis B, chronic hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and to point out the possible underlying mechanism of this potential link. Clarifying the origins of this common comorbidity (depression and CLD may provide more information to understand both diseases.

  9. Thermostability in rubredoxin and its relationship to mechanical rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, A. J.

    2010-03-01

    The source of increased stability in proteins from organisms that thrive in extreme thermal environments is not well understood. Previous experimental and theoretical studies have suggested many different features possibly responsible for such thermostability. Many of these thermostabilizing mechanisms can be accounted for in terms of structural rigidity. Thus a plausible hypothesis accounting for this remarkable stability in thermophilic enzymes states that these enzymes have enhanced conformational rigidity at temperatures below their native, functioning temperature. Experimental evidence exists to both support and contradict this supposition. We computationally investigate the relationship between thermostability and rigidity using rubredoxin as a case study. The mechanical rigidity is calculated using atomic models of homologous rubredoxin structures from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus and mesophile Clostridium pasteurianum using the FIRST software. A global increase in structural rigidity (equivalently a decrease in flexibility) corresponds to an increase in thermostability. Locally, rigidity differences (between mesophilic and thermophilic structures) agree with differences in protection factors.

  10. Thermostability in rubredoxin and its relationship to mechanical rigidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rader, A J

    2010-01-01

    The source of increased stability in proteins from organisms that thrive in extreme thermal environments is not well understood. Previous experimental and theoretical studies have suggested many different features possibly responsible for such thermostability. Many of these thermostabilizing mechanisms can be accounted for in terms of structural rigidity. Thus a plausible hypothesis accounting for this remarkable stability in thermophilic enzymes states that these enzymes have enhanced conformational rigidity at temperatures below their native, functioning temperature. Experimental evidence exists to both support and contradict this supposition. We computationally investigate the relationship between thermostability and rigidity using rubredoxin as a case study. The mechanical rigidity is calculated using atomic models of homologous rubredoxin structures from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus and mesophile Clostridium pasteurianum using the FIRST software. A global increase in structural rigidity (equivalently a decrease in flexibility) corresponds to an increase in thermostability. Locally, rigidity differences (between mesophilic and thermophilic structures) agree with differences in protection factors

  11. Nutrition, epigenetic mechanisms, and human disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maulik, Nilanjana; Maulik, Gautam

    2011-01-01

    .... The text discusses the basics of nutrigenomics and epigenetic regulation, types of nutrition influencing genetic imprinting, and the role of nutrition in modulating an individual's predisposition to disease...

  12. Bidirectional relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease: Review of Evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, B.A.Q.; Syed, A.; Izhar, F.; Ali Khan, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Presently there are 170 million diabetic patients worldwide. Pakistan ranks sixth in the world with approximately 6.2 million in the 20-79 year age affected by the diabetes. 6-10% of the 35-44 year old diabetic patients have been reported to be affected by moderate form of periodontal disease in Pakistan. Periodontal disease is referred to as sixth complication of diabetes. The association between diabetes and periodontal disease has been reported for more than 40 years but reverse has not been the focus of researchers until recently. Studies have suggested a bidirectional relationship between periodontal disease and glycemic control with each disease having a potential impact on the other. (author)

  13. Understanding gene functions and disease mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Helmut; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Amarie, Oana V.

    2018-01-01

    Since decades, model organisms have provided an important approach for understanding the mechanistic basis of human diseases. The German Mouse Clinic (GMC) was the first phenotyping facility that established a collaboration-based platform for phenotype characterization of mouse lines. In order...... to address individual projects by a tailor-made phenotyping strategy, the GMC advanced in developing a series of pipelines with tests for the analysis of specific disease areas. For a general broad analysis, there is a screening pipeline that covers the key parameters for the most relevant disease areas...

  14. Disease Heritability Inferred from Familial Relationships Reported in Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polubriaginof, Fernanda C G; Vanguri, Rami; Quinnies, Kayla; Belbin, Gillian M; Yahi, Alexandre; Salmasian, Hojjat; Lorberbaum, Tal; Nwankwo, Victor; Li, Li; Shervey, Mark M; Glowe, Patricia; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Simmerling, Mary; Hripcsak, George; Bakken, Suzanne; Goldstein, David; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Kenny, Eimear E; Dudley, Joel; Vawdrey, David K; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2018-05-15

    Heritability is essential for understanding the biological causes of disease but requires laborious patient recruitment and phenotype ascertainment. Electronic health records (EHRs) passively capture a wide range of clinically relevant data and provide a resource for studying the heritability of traits that are not typically accessible. EHRs contain next-of-kin information collected via patient emergency contact forms, but until now, these data have gone unused in research. We mined emergency contact data at three academic medical centers and identified 7.4 million familial relationships while maintaining patient privacy. Identified relationships were consistent with genetically derived relatedness. We used EHR data to compute heritability estimates for 500 disease phenotypes. Overall, estimates were consistent with the literature and between sites. Inconsistencies were indicative of limitations and opportunities unique to EHR research. These analyses provide a validation of the use of EHRs for genetics and disease research. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Shared mechanisms among neurodegenerative diseases: from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    douglas arneson

    amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are pressing health concerns in modern societies for which ... subsets of diseases, and a systematic review of the most current information ... (vesicle-associated membrane protein)-associated protein B) for ...

  16. Relationship Between Voice and Motor Disabilities of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdinasab, Fatemeh; Karkheiran, Siamak; Soltani, Majid; Moradi, Negin; Shahidi, Gholamali

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate voice of Iranian patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and find any relationship between motor disabilities and acoustic voice parameters as speech motor components. We evaluated 27 Farsi-speaking PD patients and 21 age- and sex-matched healthy persons as control. Motor performance was assessed by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III and Hoehn and Yahr rating scale in the "on" state. Acoustic voice evaluation, including fundamental frequency (f0), standard deviation of f0, minimum of f0, maximum of f0, shimmer, jitter, and harmonic to noise ratio, was done using the Praat software via /a/ prolongation. No difference was seen between the voice of the patients and the voice of the controls. f0 and its variation had a significant correlation with the duration of the disease, but did not have any relationships with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III. Only limited relationship was observed between voice and motor disabilities. Tremor is an important main feature of PD that affects motor and phonation systems. Females had an older age at onset, more prolonged disease, and more severe motor disabilities (not statistically significant), but phonation disorders were more frequent in males and showed more relationship with severity of motor disabilities. Voice is affected by PD earlier than many other motor components and is more sensitive to disease progression. Tremor is the most effective part of PD that impacts voice. PD has more effect on voice of male versus female patients. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Close relationship processes and health: implications of attachment theory for health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietromonaco, Paula R; Uchino, Bert; Dunkel Schetter, Christine

    2013-05-01

    Health psychology has contributed significantly to understanding the link between psychological factors and health and well-being, but it has not often incorporated advances in relationship science into hypothesis generation and study design. We present one example of a theoretical model, following from a major relationship theory (attachment theory) that integrates relationship constructs and processes with biopsychosocial processes and health outcomes. We briefly describe attachment theory and present a general framework linking it to dyadic relationship processes (relationship behaviors, mediators, and outcomes) and health processes (physiology, affective states, health behavior, and health outcomes). We discuss the utility of the model for research in several health domains (e.g., self-regulation of health behavior, pain, chronic disease) and its implications for interventions and future research. This framework revealed important gaps in knowledge about relationships and health. Future work in this area will benefit from taking into account individual differences in attachment, adopting a more explicit dyadic approach, examining more integrated models that test for mediating processes, and incorporating a broader range of relationship constructs that have implications for health. A theoretical framework for studying health that is based in relationship science can accelerate progress by generating new research directions designed to pinpoint the mechanisms through which close relationships promote or undermine health. Furthermore, this knowledge can be applied to develop more effective interventions to help individuals and their relationship partners with health-related challenges. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Mechanisms of disease: Helicobacter pylori virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2010-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori plays an essential role in the development of various gastroduodenal diseases; however, only a small proportion of people infected with H. pylori develop these diseases. Some populations that have a high prevalence of H. pylori infection also have a high incidence of gastric cancer (for example, in East Asia), whereas others do not (for example, in Africa and South Asia). Even within East Asia, the incidence of gastric cancer varies (decreasing in the south). H. pylori is a highly heterogeneous bacterium and its virulence varies geographically. Geographic differences in the incidence of gastric cancer can be explained, at least in part, by the presence of different types of H. pylori virulence factor, especially CagA, VacA and OipA. However, it is still unclear why the pathogenicity of H. pylori increased as it migrated from Africa to East Asia during the course of evolution. H. pylori infection is also thought to be involved in the development of duodenal ulcer, which is at the opposite end of the disease spectrum to gastric cancer. This discrepancy can be explained in part by the presence of H. pylori virulence factor DupA. Despite advances in our understanding of the development of H. pylori-related diseases, further work is required to clarify the roles of H. pylori virulence factors.

  19. Discovering hidden relationships between renal diseases and regulated genes through 3D network visualizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavnani Suresh K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a recent study, two-dimensional (2D network layouts were used to visualize and quantitatively analyze the relationship between chronic renal diseases and regulated genes. The results revealed complex relationships between disease type, gene specificity, and gene regulation type, which led to important insights about the underlying biological pathways. Here we describe an attempt to extend our understanding of these complex relationships by reanalyzing the data using three-dimensional (3D network layouts, displayed through 2D and 3D viewing methods. Findings The 3D network layout (displayed through the 3D viewing method revealed that genes implicated in many diseases (non-specific genes tended to be predominantly down-regulated, whereas genes regulated in a few diseases (disease-specific genes tended to be up-regulated. This new global relationship was quantitatively validated through comparison to 1000 random permutations of networks of the same size and distribution. Our new finding appeared to be the result of using specific features of the 3D viewing method to analyze the 3D renal network. Conclusions The global relationship between gene regulation and gene specificity is the first clue from human studies that there exist common mechanisms across several renal diseases, which suggest hypotheses for the underlying mechanisms. Furthermore, the study suggests hypotheses for why the 3D visualization helped to make salient a new regularity that was difficult to detect in 2D. Future research that tests these hypotheses should enable a more systematic understanding of when and how to use 3D network visualizations to reveal complex regularities in biological networks.

  20. Retinitis pigmentosa: genes and disease mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Stefano; Di Iorio, Enzo; Barbaro, Vanessa; Ponzin, Diego; Sorrentino, Francesco S; Parmeggiani, Francesco

    2011-06-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited disorders affecting 1 in 3000-7000 people and characterized by abnormalities of the photoreceptors (rods and cones) or the retinal pigment epithelium of the retina which lead to progressive visual loss. RP can be inherited in an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked manner. While usually limited to the eye, RP may also occur as part of a syndrome as in the Usher syndrome and Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Over 40 genes have been associated with RP so far, with the majority of them expressed in either the photoreceptors or the retinal pigment epithelium. The tremendous heterogeneity of the disease makes the genetics of RP complicated, thus rendering genotype-phenotype correlations not fully applicable yet. In addition to the multiplicity of mutations, in fact, different mutations in the same gene may cause different diseases. We will here review which genes are involved in the genesis of RP and how mutations can lead to retinal degeneration. In the future, a more thorough analysis of genetic and clinical data together with a better understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation might allow to reveal important information with respect to the likelihood of disease development and choices of therapy.

  1. The Relationship between Ischemic Heart Disease and Diabete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, Mette Lykke

    2012-01-01

    THE FOLLOWING OBJECTIVES ON THE SUBJECT: The relationship between ischemic heart disease and diabetes: 1. To examine the short- and long-term risk of death and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with incident diabetes and in patients with first-time MI during a 10 year period in Denmark, using the general...... diabetes increases with increasing severity of heart failure. Focus on the development of diabetes in patients with ischemic heart disease with or without the presence of heart failure still compose a public health matter, because early and aggressive evidence-based therapy is thought to reduce......Diabetes is a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is common among patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), where the prevalence is as high as 20%. Patients with diabetes requiring glucose-lowering medication (GLM) have been reported as having the same long-term risk...

  2. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbell, John M; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow-induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial) cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid me chanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs.

  3. Host response mechanisms in periodontal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora SILVA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal diseases usually refer to common inflammatory disorders known as gingivitis and periodontitis, which are caused by a pathogenic microbiota in the subgingival biofilm, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola that trigger innate, inflammatory, and adaptive immune responses. These processes result in the destruction of the tissues surrounding and supporting the teeth, and eventually in tissue, bone and finally, tooth loss. The innate immune response constitutes a homeostatic system, which is the first line of defense, and is able to recognize invading microorganisms as non-self, triggering immune responses to eliminate them. In addition to the innate immunity, adaptive immunity cells and characteristic cytokines have been described as important players in the periodontal disease pathogenesis scenario, with a special attention to CD4+ T-cells (T-helper cells. Interestingly, the T cell-mediated adaptive immunity development is highly dependent on innate immunity-associated antigen presenting cells, which after antigen capture undergo into a maturation process and migrate towards the lymph nodes, where they produce distinct patterns of cytokines that will contribute to the subsequent polarization and activation of specific T CD4+ lymphocytes. Skeletal homeostasis depends on a dynamic balance between the activities of the bone-forming osteoblasts (OBLs and bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCLs. This balance is tightly controlled by various regulatory systems, such as the endocrine system, and is influenced by the immune system, an osteoimmunological regulation depending on lymphocyte- and macrophage-derived cytokines. All these cytokines and inflammatory mediators are capable of acting alone or in concert, to stimulate periodontal breakdown and collagen destruction via tissue-derived matrix metalloproteinases, a characterization of the progression of periodontitis as

  4. Host response mechanisms in periodontal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    SILVA, Nora; ABUSLEME, Loreto; BRAVO, Denisse; DUTZAN, Nicolás; GARCIA-SESNICH, Jocelyn; VERNAL, Rolando; HERNÁNDEZ, Marcela; GAMONAL, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal diseases usually refer to common inflammatory disorders known as gingivitis and periodontitis, which are caused by a pathogenic microbiota in the subgingival biofilm, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola that trigger innate, inflammatory, and adaptive immune responses. These processes result in the destruction of the tissues surrounding and supporting the teeth, and eventually in tissue, bone and finally, tooth loss. The innate immune response constitutes a homeostatic system, which is the first line of defense, and is able to recognize invading microorganisms as non-self, triggering immune responses to eliminate them. In addition to the innate immunity, adaptive immunity cells and characteristic cytokines have been described as important players in the periodontal disease pathogenesis scenario, with a special attention to CD4+ T-cells (T-helper cells). Interestingly, the T cell-mediated adaptive immunity development is highly dependent on innate immunity-associated antigen presenting cells, which after antigen capture undergo into a maturation process and migrate towards the lymph nodes, where they produce distinct patterns of cytokines that will contribute to the subsequent polarization and activation of specific T CD4+ lymphocytes. Skeletal homeostasis depends on a dynamic balance between the activities of the bone-forming osteoblasts (OBLs) and bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCLs). This balance is tightly controlled by various regulatory systems, such as the endocrine system, and is influenced by the immune system, an osteoimmunological regulation depending on lymphocyte- and macrophage-derived cytokines. All these cytokines and inflammatory mediators are capable of acting alone or in concert, to stimulate periodontal breakdown and collagen destruction via tissue-derived matrix metalloproteinases, a characterization of the progression of periodontitis as a stage that

  5. Relationship between quantum walks and relativistic quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrashekar, C. M.; Banerjee, Subhashish; Srikanth, R.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum walk models have been used as an algorithmic tool for quantum computation and to describe various physical processes. This article revisits the relationship between relativistic quantum mechanics and the quantum walks. We show the similarities of the mathematical structure of the decoupled and coupled forms of the discrete-time quantum walk to that of the Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations, respectively. In the latter case, the coin emerges as an analog of the spinor degree of freedom. Discrete-time quantum walk as a coupled form of the continuous-time quantum walk is also shown by transforming the decoupled form of the discrete-time quantum walk to the Schroedinger form. By showing the coin to be a means to make the walk reversible and that the Dirac-like structure is a consequence of the coin use, our work suggests that the relativistic causal structure is a consequence of conservation of information. However, decoherence (modeled by projective measurements on position space) generates entropy that increases with time, making the walk irreversible and thereby producing an arrow of time. The Lieb-Robinson bound is used to highlight the causal structure of the quantum walk to put in perspective the relativistic structure of the quantum walk, the maximum speed of walk propagation, and earlier findings related to the finite spread of the walk probability distribution. We also present a two-dimensional quantum walk model on a two-state system to which the study can be extended.

  6. Biomarkers and mechanisms of natural disease resistance in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altena, van S.E.C.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to define and test biomarkers for disease resistance in dairy cows and to determine the underlying mechanism in natural disease resistance. The health status of the cows is an important issue in dairy farming. Due to the mandatory reduction in the use of antibiotics,

  7. Relationship Between Ischemic Heart Disease and Sexual Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari Afra, Leila; Taghadosi, Mohsen; Gilasi, Hamid Reza

    2015-06-10

    Ischemic heart disease is a life-threatening condition. Considerable doubts exist over the effects of this disease on patients' sexual activity and satisfaction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between ischemic heart disease and sexual satisfaction. In a retrospective cohort study, the convenience sample of 150 patients exposure with ischemic heart disease and 150 people without exposure it was drawn from Shahid Beheshti hospital, Kashan, Iran. Sampling was performed from March to September 2014. We employed the Larson's Sexual Satisfaction Questionnaire for gathering the data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi-square, t-test and linear regression analysis. The means of sexual satisfaction in patients exposure with ischemic heart disease and among the subjects without exposure it were 101.47±13.42 and 100.91±16.52, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding sexual satisfaction. However, sexual satisfaction was significantly correlated with gender and the use of cardiac medications (P valuepay closer attention to patient education about sexual issues.

  8. Sublethal RNA Oxidation as a Mechanism for Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Smith

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Although cellular RNA is subjected to the same oxidative insults as DNA and other cellular macromolecules, oxidative damage to RNA has not been a major focus in investigations of the biological consequences of free radical damage. In fact, because it is largely single-stranded and its bases lack the protection of hydrogen bonding and binding by specific proteins, RNA may be more susceptible to oxidative insults than is DNA. Oxidative damage to protein-coding RNA or non-coding RNA will, in turn, potentially cause errors in proteins and/or dysregulation of gene expression. While less lethal than mutations in the genome, such sublethal insults to cells might be associated with underlying mechanisms of several chronic diseases, including neurodegenerative disease. Recently, oxidative RNA damage has been described in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and prion diseases. Of particular interest, oxidative RNA damage can be demonstrated in vulnerable neurons early in disease, suggesting that RNA oxidation may actively contribute to the onset of the disease. An increasing body of evidence suggests that, mechanistically speaking, the detrimental effects of oxidative RNA damage to protein synthesis are attenuated, at least in part, by the existence of protective mechanisms that prevent the incorporation of the damaged ribonucleotides into the translational machinery. Further investigations aimed at understanding the processing mechanisms related to oxidative RNA damage and its consequences may provide significant insights into the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and other degenerative diseases and lead to better therapeutic strategies.

  9. Relationship between transit time and mechanical properties of a cell through a stenosed microchannel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ting; Shi, Huixin; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Lim, Chwee Teck; Li, Yu

    2018-01-24

    The changes in the mechanical properties of a cell are not only the cause of some diseases, but can also be a biomarker for some disease states. In recent times, microfluidic devices with built-in constrictions have been widely used to measure these changes. The transit time in such devices, defined as the time that a cell takes to pass through a constriction, has been found to be a crucial factor associated with the cell mechanical properties. Here, we use smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD), a particle-based numerical method, to explore the relationship between the transit time and mechanical properties of a cell. Three expressions of the transit time are developed from our simulation data, with respect to the stenosed size of constrictions, the shear modulus and bending modulus of cells, respectively. We show that a convergent constriction (the inlet is wider than the outlet), and a sharp-corner constriction (the constriction outlet is narrow) are better in identifying the differences in the transit time of cells. Moreover, the transit time increases and gradually approaches a constant as the shear modulus of cells increases, but increases first and then decreases as the bending modulus increases. These results suggest that the mechanical properties of cells can indeed be measured by analyzing their transit time, based on the recommended microfluidic device.

  10. Relationship among the repair mechanisms and the genetic recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcantara D, D.

    1987-12-01

    In accordance with the previous reports of the Project BZ87 of the Department of Radiobiology, a dependent stimulation of the system exists in E.coli SOS, of the recombination of the bacteriophage Lambda whose genetic material has not been damaged. This stimulation is not due to the increase of the cellular concentration of the protein RecA and the mechanism but probable for which we find that it is carried out, it is through a cooperation among the product of the gene rec N of E. coli and the system Net of recombination of Lambda. The gene recN belongs to the group of genes SOS and its expression is induced when damaging the bacterial DNA where it intervenes in the repair of breaks of the double helix of the molecule (Picksley et, 1984). If the repair of breaks of this type is a factor that limits the speed with which it happens the recombination among viral chromosomes, then the biggest readiness in the protein RecN, due to the induction of the functions SOS, would facilitate the repair of such ruptures. In this new project it is to enlarge the knowledge about this phenomenon, it was, on one hand of corroborating in a way but he/she specifies the relationship between the recombinogenic response of Lambda and the System SOS of E. coli and for the other one to determine the effect that has the inhibition of the duplication of the DNA on the stimulation of the viral recombination. Everything it with the idea of making it but evident and to be able to use it as a system of genotoxic agents detection in E. coli. (Author)

  11. Can mechanical ventilation strategies reduce chronic lung disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, Steven M; Sinha, Sunil K

    2003-12-01

    Chronic lung disease (CLD) continues to be a significant complication in newborn infants undergoing mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure. Although the aetiology of CLD is multifactorial, specific factors related to mechanical ventilation, including barotrauma, volutrauma and atelectrauma, have been implicated as important aetiologic mechanisms. This article discusses the ways in which these factors might be manipulated by various mechanical ventilatory strategies to reduce ventilator-induced lung injury. These include continuous positive airway pressure, permissive hypercapnia, patient-triggered ventilation, volume-targeted ventilation, proportional assist ventilation, high-frequency ventilation and real-time monitoring.

  12. Relationship Between Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Ali Seif-Rabiei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available There is some evidence indicating the role of Helicobacter pylori infection in pathogenesis of extragastrointestinal diseases including skin, vascular, and autoimmune disorders, as well as some respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between H. pylori and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. In a case-control study, 90 patients with COPD and 90 age- and sex- matched control subjects were included. Serum samples were tested for anti-H. pylori and anti-CagA IgG by ELISA. A physician completed a questionnaire including demographic characteristics, habitual history, and spirometric findings for each patient. Of 90 patients with COPD 66 (51% had mild, 31 (34.4% moderate, and 13 (14.4% sever disease. There was no significant association between H. pylori IgG seropositivity and COPD. Serum levels of anti-CagA IgG were significantly higher in patients with COPD than in the control subjects (P < 0.001. No association was observed between H. pylori infection and severity of COPD. The results suggest that there is an association between CagA-positive H. pylori infections and COPD. Further studies should be planned to investigate the potential pathogenic mechanisms that might underlie these associations.

  13. Gut microbiota, immunity and disease: a complex relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele M Kosiewicz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Our immune system has evolved to recognize and eradicate pathogenic microbes. However, we have a symbiotic relationship with multiple species of bacteria that occupy the gut and comprise the natural commensal flora or microbiota. The microbiota is critically important for the breakdown of nutrients, and also assists in preventing colonization by potentially pathogenic bacteria. In addition, the gut commensal bacteria appears to be critical for the development of an optimally functioning immune system. Various studies have shown that individual species of the microbiota can induce very different types of immune cells (e.g., Th17 cells, Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and responses, suggesting that the composition of the microbiota can have an important influence on the immune response. Although the microbiota resides in the gut, it appears to have a significant impact on the systemic immune response. Indeed, specific gut commensal bacteria have been shown to affect disease development in organs other than the gut, and depending on the species, have been found to have a wide range of effects on diseases from induction and exacerbation to inhibition and protection. In this review, we will focus on the role that the gut microbiota plays in the development and progression of inflammatory/autoimmune disease, and we will also touch upon its role in allergy and cancer.

  14. Air pollution: mechanisms of neuroinflammation and CNS disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michelle L; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian

    2009-09-01

    Air pollution has been implicated as a chronic source of neuroinflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that produce neuropathology and central nervous system (CNS) disease. Stroke incidence and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease pathology are linked to air pollution. Recent reports reveal that air pollution components reach the brain; systemic effects that impact lung and cardiovascular disease also impinge upon CNS health. While mechanisms driving air pollution-induced CNS pathology are poorly understood, new evidence suggests that microglial activation and changes in the blood-brain barrier are key components. Here we summarize recent findings detailing the mechanisms through which air pollution reaches the brain and activates the resident innate immune response to become a chronic source of pro-inflammatory factors and ROS, culminating in CNS disease.

  15. Advances in mechanism research of pain in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui LIU

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD, a neurodegenerative disease, is very common in middle aged and older people. There are two kinds of symptoms: motor symptoms and non - motor symptoms (NMS. Pain, a commonly reported NMS of PD, can significantly affect the quality of life, thus causing more attention. However, mechanisms of pain in PD is not clear, and need to be further researched. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.08.006

  16. Kidney disease and obesity: epidemiology, mechanisms and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Kramer, Holly; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Sharma, Kumar

    2017-03-01

    The theme of World Kidney Day 2017 is 'kidney disease and obesity: healthy lifestyle for healthy kidneys'. To mark this event, Nature Reviews Nephrology invited five leading researchers to describe changes in the epidemiology of obesity-related kidney disease, advances in current understanding of the mechanisms and current approaches to the management of affected patients. The researchers also highlight new advances that could lead to the development of novel treatments and identify areas in which further basic and clinical studies are needed.

  17. The potential mechanisms for motor complications of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN Sheng-gang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a common neurodegenerative disease. Dopaminergic replacement therapy is still considered as a major treatment for PD. However, long-term dopaminergic replacement therapy for PD patients is frequently associated with the development of motor complications. To date, the mechanisms underlying motor complications have not been completely understood yet. Moreover, parts of motor complications are lack of therapeutic alternatives. All these characters make this disorder difficult and challenging to manage. Increasing number of researches have been proposed in recent years for elucidating the underlying mechanisms of levodopa-related motor complications, resulting in much progression. For better understanding the management of motor complications, here we provide an overview of the current knowledge of the potential mechanisms, including the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic mechanisms of levodopa and levodopa-associated neurotransmitter systems.

  18. Understanding Neurological Disease Mechanisms in the Era of Epigenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Irfan A.; Mehler, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    The burgeoning field of epigenetics is making a significant impact on our understanding of brain evolution, development, and function. In fact, it is now clear that epigenetic mechanisms promote seminal neurobiological processes, ranging from neural stem cell maintenance and differentiation to learning and memory. At the molecular level, epigenetic mechanisms regulate the structure and activity of the genome in response to intracellular and environmental cues, including the deployment of cell type–specific gene networks and those underlying synaptic plasticity. Pharmacological and genetic manipulation of epigenetic factors can, in turn, induce remarkable changes in neural cell identity and cognitive and behavioral phenotypes. Not surprisingly, it is also becoming apparent that epigenetics is intimately involved in neurological disease pathogenesis. Herein, we highlight emerging paradigms for linking epigenetic machinery and processes with neurological disease states, including how (1) mutations in genes encoding epigenetic factors cause disease, (2) genetic variation in genes encoding epigenetic factors modify disease risk, (3) abnormalities in epigenetic factor expression, localization, or function are involved in disease pathophysiology, (4) epigenetic mechanisms regulate disease-associated genomic loci, gene products, and cellular pathways, and (5) differential epigenetic profiles are present in patient-derived central and peripheral tissues. PMID:23571666

  19. Fibromyalgia in patients with other rheumatic diseases: prevalence and relationship with disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliloglu, Sema; Carlioglu, Ayse; Akdeniz, Derya; Karaaslan, Yasar; Kosar, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome characterized by chronic widespread pain and the presence of specific tender points. The prevalence of FM has been estimated at 2-7 % of the general global population. The presence of FM in several rheumatic diseases with a structural pathology has been reported as 11-30 %. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of FM and to evaluate the possible relationship between FM existence and disease activity among rheumatic diseases. The study group included 835 patients--197 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 67 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 119 ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 238 osteoarthritis (OA), 14 familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), 53 Behçet's disease (BD), 71 gout, 25 Sjögren's syndrome (SS), 20 vasculitis, 29 polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), and two polymyositis (PM)--with or without FM. Recorded information included age, gender, laboratory parameters, presence of fatigue, and disease activity indexes. The prevalence of FM in patients with rheumatologic diseases was found to be 6.6 % for RA, 13.4 % for SLE, 12.6 % for AS, 10.1 % for OA, 5.7 % for BD, 7.1 % for FMF, 12 % for SS, 25 % for vasculitis, 1.4 % for gout, and 6.9 % for PMR. One out of two patients with PM was diagnosed with FM. Some rheumatologic cases (AS, OA) with FM were observed mostly in female patients (p = 0.000). Also, there were significant correlations between disease activity indexes and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire scores for most rheumatologic patients (RA, AS, OA, and BD) (p diseases, and its recognition is important for the optimal management of these diseases. Increased pain, physical limitations, and fatigue may be interpreted as increased activity of these diseases, and a common treatment option is the prescription of higher doses of biologic agents or corticosteroids. Considerations of the FM component in the management of rheumatologic diseases increase the likelihood of the success of the treatment.

  20. Relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and subclinical coronary artery disease in long-term smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas; Køber, Lars; Pedersen, Jesper Holst

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular conditions are reported to be the most frequent cause of death in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, it remains unsettled whether severity of COPD per se is associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) independent of traditional cardiovascular risk...... factors. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between the presence and severity of COPD and the amount of coronary artery calcium deposit, an indicator of CAD and cardiac risk, in a large population of current and former long-term smokers....

  1. Exploring the relationship between periodontal disease and pregnancy complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobetsis, Yiorgos A; Barros, Silvana P; Offenbacher, Steven

    2006-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that maternal gingivitis and periodontitis may be a risk factor for preterm birth and other adverse pregnancy outcomes. To clarify the possible mechanisms behind the association between periodontal disease and preterm delivery, the authors reviewed studies of the effect of infection with periodontal pathogens in animal models on pregnancy outcomes including fetal growth, placental structural abnormalities and neonatal health. After the first report, in 1996, of a potential association between maternal periodontal disease and delivery of a preterm/low-birth-weight infant in humans, many case control and prospective studies were published. This review summarizes these, as well as early studies involving periodontal intervention to reduce risk. Although there are some conflicting findings and potential problems regarding uncontrolled underlying risk factors, most of the clinical studies indicate a positive correlation between periodontal disease and preterm birth. Recent studies also have shown that there are microbiologic and immunological findings that strongly support the association. The studies indicate that periodontal infection can lead to placental-fetal exposure and, when coupled with a fetal inflammatory response, can lead to preterm delivery. Data from animal studies raise the possibility that maternal periodontal infections also may have adverse long-term effects on the infant's development. Education for patients and health care providers regarding the biological plausibility of the association and the potential risks is indicated, but there is insufficient evidence at this time for health care policy recommendations to provide maternal periodontal treatments for the purpose of reducing the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  2. Constraints on Biological Mechanism from Disease Comorbidity Using Electronic Medical Records and Database of Genetic Variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven C Bagley

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of disease co-occurrence that deviate from statistical independence may represent important constraints on biological mechanism, which sometimes can be explained by shared genetics. In this work we study the relationship between disease co-occurrence and commonly shared genetic architecture of disease. Records of pairs of diseases were combined from two different electronic medical systems (Columbia, Stanford, and compared to a large database of published disease-associated genetic variants (VARIMED; data on 35 disorders were available across all three sources, which include medical records for over 1.2 million patients and variants from over 17,000 publications. Based on the sources in which they appeared, disease pairs were categorized as having predominant clinical, genetic, or both kinds of manifestations. Confounding effects of age on disease incidence were controlled for by only comparing diseases when they fall in the same cluster of similarly shaped incidence patterns. We find that disease pairs that are overrepresented in both electronic medical record systems and in VARIMED come from two main disease classes, autoimmune and neuropsychiatric. We furthermore identify specific genes that are shared within these disease groups.

  3. Relationship of Inflammatory Biomarkers with Severity of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimihiro Igari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The pentraxin family, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, serum amyloid P (SAP, and pentraxin 3 (PTX3, has been identified as playing a key role in inflammatory reactions such as in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we examined the relationship between peripheral arterial disease (PAD and serum levels of pentraxins. Methods. This study was undertaken via a retrospective review of PAD patients with surgical intervention for lesions of the common femoral artery. We evaluated the preoperative patient conditions, hemodynamic status, such as ankle brachial index (ABI, and clinical ischemic conditions according to Rutherford classification. Preoperatively, we collected blood samples for determining the serum levels of hs-CRP, SAP, and PTX3. Results. Twelve PAD patients with common femoral arterial lesions were treated and examined. The hemodynamic severity of PAD was not negatively correlated with hs-CRP, SAP, or PTX3. The clinical severity evaluated by Rutherford classification was significantly positively correlated with the serum level of PTX3 (p=0.019. Conclusion. We demonstrated that PTX3 might be a better marker of PAD than hs-CRP and SAP. Furthermore, PTX3 might be a prognostic marker to evaluate the severity of PAD.

  4. Relationship between maternal periodontal disease and low birth weight babies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Haerian-Ardakani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontal infections, which serve as a reservoir of inflammatory mediators, may pose a threat to the fetal-placental unit and cause adverse pregnancy outcomes. Objective: The aim of this study was assessing the periodontal status of women during puerperium and determining the possible relationship between their periodontal disease and low birth weight delivery. Materials and Methods: This was a case-control study. The sample included 88 ex-pregnant women were seen at maternity hospitals of Yazd, Iran. Half of the mothers had low birth babies (LBW (birth weight below 2500g- case group and the others had normal weight babies (>2500g- control group. The mothers’ data were obtained from medical files, interview and periodontal clinical examination carried out up to 3 days after delivery. Bleeding on probing, presence of supra-gingival calculus and CPITN (Community Periodontal Index for Treatment Needs were used for periodontal assessment Results: Among the known risk factors of LBW babies, history of previous LBW infant among case mothers reached statistical significance (p=0.0081, Student t-test. Mothers of LBW infants had less healthy areas of gingiva (p=0.042, and more deep pockets (p=0.0006, Mann-Whitney test. Conclusion: The maternal periodontal disease can be a potential independent risk factor for LBW.

  5. Relationships among alcoholic liver disease, antioxidants, and antioxidant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyu-Ho; Hashimoto, Naoto; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2016-01-07

    Excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages is a serious cause of liver disease worldwide. The metabolism of ethanol generates reactive oxygen species, which play a significant role in the deterioration of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Antioxidant phytochemicals, such as polyphenols, regulate the expression of ALD-associated proteins and peptides, namely, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase. These plant antioxidants have electrophilic activity and may induce antioxidant enzymes via the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-NF-E2-related factor-2 pathway and antioxidant responsive elements. Furthermore, these antioxidants are reported to alleviate cell injury caused by oxidants or inflammatory cytokines. These phenomena are likely induced via the regulation of mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK) pathways by plant antioxidants, similar to preconditioning in ischemia-reperfusion models. Although the relationship between plant antioxidants and ALD has not been adequately investigated, plant antioxidants may be preventive for ALD because of their electrophilic and regulatory activities in the MAPK pathway.

  6. Review of the Relationship of Restless Legs Syndrome and Periodic Limb Movements in Sleep to Hypertension, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Walters, Arthur S.; Rye, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed documenting an intimate relationship among restless legs syndrome (RLS) / periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) and hypertension and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. Sympathetic overactivity is associated with RLS/PLMS, as manifested by increased pulse rate and blood pressure coincident with PLMS. Causality is far from definitive. Mechanisms are explored as to how RLS/PLMS may lead to high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke: (a) the sympathetic hyperac...

  7. Structure–mechanics property relationship of waste derived biochars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Oisik; Sarmah, Ajit K.; Bhattacharyya, Debes

    2015-01-01

    The widespread applications of biochar in agriculture and environmental remediation made the scientific community ignore its mechanical properties. Hence, to examine the scope of biochar's structural applications, its mechanical properties have been investigated in this paper through nanoindentation technique. Seven waste derived biochars, made under different pyrolysis conditions and from diverse feedstocks, were studied via nanoindentation, infrared spectroscopy, X–ray crystallography, thermogravimetry, and electron microscopy. Following this, an attempt was made to correlate the biochars' hardness/modulus with reaction conditions and their chemical properties. The pine wood biochar made at 900 °C and 60 min residence time was found to have the highest hardness and elastic modulus of 4.29 and 25.01 GPa, respectively. It was shown that a combination of higher heat treatment (≥ 500 °C) temperature and longer residence time (~ 60 min) increases the values of hardness and modulus. It was further realized that pyrolysis temperature was a more dominant factor than residence time in determining the final mechanical properties of biochar particles. The degree of aromaticity and crystallinity of the biochar were also correlated with higher values of hardness and modulus. - Highlights: • Characterization was done on waste based biochars which included nanoindentation. • Pine saw dust biochar made at 900 °C for 60 min had highest hardness/modulus. • Combination of temperature/residence time affect biochar's mechanical propertie.s • Aromaticity and crystallinity positively affected biochar's mechanical properties.

  8. Corino de Andrade disease: mechanisms and impact on reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Rita A; Coelho, Teresa; Barros, Alberto; Sousa, Mário

    2017-01-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy was first described by Corino de Andrade in 1952 in Northern Portugal. It is a fatal autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progression of neurologic symptoms, beginning early in the reproductive life. The Transthyretin gene mutation originates a mutated protein that precipitates in the connective tissue as amyloid deposits. This disease is presently named Transthyretin-related hereditary amyloidosis. We performed an extensive review on this disease based on searches in Medical databases and in paper references. In this review, we briefly summarize the epidemiology and the mechanisms involved on amyloid deposition; we detailed how to evaluate the mechanisms implicated on the development of the major signs and symptoms associated with reproductive dysfunction; and we discuss the mechanisms involved in secondary sexual dysfunction after psychological treatments. Treatment of the disease is directed towards relieving specific symptoms in association with liver transplant, and molecular and genetic therapeutics. Although the current clinical trials indicate symptoms relief, no data on the reproductive function was reported. Thus, preimplantation genetic diagnosis is presently the only available technique that eradicates the disease as it avoids the birth of new patients. PMID:28609277

  9. ODS steel fabrication: relationships between process, microstructure and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couvrat, M.

    2011-01-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels are promising candidate materials for generation IV and fusion nuclear energy systems thanks to their excellent thermal stability, high-temperature creep strength and good irradiation resistance. Their superior properties are attributed both to their nano-structured matrix and to a high density of Y-Ti-O nano-scale clusters (NCs). ODS steels are generally prepared by Mechanical Alloying of a pre-alloyed Fe-Cr-W-Ti powder with Y 2 O 3 powder. A fully dense bar or tube is then produced from this nano-structured powder by the mean of hot extrusion. The aim of this work was to determine the main parameters of the process of hot extrusion and to understand the link between the fabrication process, the microstructure and the mechanical properties. The material microstructure was characterized at each step of the process and bars were extruded with varying hot extrusion parameters so as to identify the impact of these parameters. Temperature then appeared to be the main parameter having a great impact on microstructure and mechanical properties of the extruded material. We then proposed a cartography giving the microstructure versus the process parameters. Based on these results, it is possible to control very accurately the obtained material microstructure and mechanical properties setting the extrusion parameters. (author) [fr

  10. Immune evasion mechanisms of Entamoeba histolytica: progression to disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmin eBegum

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica (Eh is a protozoan parasite that infects 10% of the world’s population and results in 100,000 deaths/year from amebic dysentery and/or liver abscess. In most cases, this extracellular parasite colonizes the colon by high affinity binding to MUC2 mucin without disease symptoms, whereas in some cases, Eh triggers an aggressive inflammatory response upon invasion of the colonic mucosa. The specific host-parasite factors critical for disease pathogenesis are still not well characterized. From the parasite, the signature events that lead to disease progression are cysteine protease cleavage of the C-terminus of MUC2 that dissolves the mucus layer followed by Eh binding and cytotoxicity of the mucosal epithelium. The host mounts an ineffective excessive host pro-inflammatory response following contact with host cells that causes tissue damage and participates in disease pathogenesis as Eh escapes host immune clearance by mechanisms that are not completely understood. Ameba can modulate or destroy effector immune cells by inducing neutrophil apoptosis and suppressing respiratory burst or nitric oxide (NO production from macrophages. Eh adherence to the host cells also induce multiple cytotoxic effects that can promote cell death through phagocytosis, apoptosis or by trogocytosis (ingestion of living cells that might play critical roles in immune evasion. This review focuses on the immune evasion mechanisms that Eh uses to survive and induce disease manifestation in the host.

  11. Immune Evasion Mechanisms of Entamoeba histolytica: Progression to Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Sharmin; Quach, Jeanie; Chadee, Kris

    2015-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica (Eh) is a protozoan parasite that infects 10% of the world's population and results in 100,000 deaths/year from amebic dysentery and/or liver abscess. In most cases, this extracellular parasite colonizes the colon by high affinity binding to MUC2 mucin without disease symptoms, whereas in some cases, Eh triggers an aggressive inflammatory response upon invasion of the colonic mucosa. The specific host-parasite factors critical for disease pathogenesis are still not well characterized. From the parasite, the signature events that lead to disease progression are cysteine protease cleavage of the C-terminus of MUC2 that dissolves the mucus layer followed by Eh binding and cytotoxicity of the mucosal epithelium. The host mounts an ineffective excessive host pro-inflammatory response following contact with host cells that causes tissue damage and participates in disease pathogenesis as Eh escapes host immune clearance by mechanisms that are not completely understood. Ameba can modulate or destroy effector immune cells by inducing neutrophil apoptosis and suppressing respiratory burst or nitric oxide (NO) production from macrophages. Eh adherence to the host cells also induce multiple cytotoxic effects that can promote cell death through phagocytosis, apoptosis or by trogocytosis (ingestion of living cells) that might play critical roles in immune evasion. This review focuses on the immune evasion mechanisms that Eh uses to survive and induce disease manifestation in the host.

  12. Structure–mechanics property relationship of waste derived biochars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Oisik, E-mail: odas566@aucklanduni.ac.nz [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Sarmah, Ajit K., E-mail: a.sarmah@auckland.ac.nz [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Bhattacharyya, Debes, E-mail: d.bhattacharyya@auckland.ac.nz [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Center for Advanced Composite Materials, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand)

    2015-12-15

    The widespread applications of biochar in agriculture and environmental remediation made the scientific community ignore its mechanical properties. Hence, to examine the scope of biochar's structural applications, its mechanical properties have been investigated in this paper through nanoindentation technique. Seven waste derived biochars, made under different pyrolysis conditions and from diverse feedstocks, were studied via nanoindentation, infrared spectroscopy, X–ray crystallography, thermogravimetry, and electron microscopy. Following this, an attempt was made to correlate the biochars' hardness/modulus with reaction conditions and their chemical properties. The pine wood biochar made at 900 °C and 60 min residence time was found to have the highest hardness and elastic modulus of 4.29 and 25.01 GPa, respectively. It was shown that a combination of higher heat treatment (≥ 500 °C) temperature and longer residence time (~ 60 min) increases the values of hardness and modulus. It was further realized that pyrolysis temperature was a more dominant factor than residence time in determining the final mechanical properties of biochar particles. The degree of aromaticity and crystallinity of the biochar were also correlated with higher values of hardness and modulus. - Highlights: • Characterization was done on waste based biochars which included nanoindentation. • Pine saw dust biochar made at 900 °C for 60 min had highest hardness/modulus. • Combination of temperature/residence time affect biochar's mechanical propertie.s • Aromaticity and crystallinity positively affected biochar's mechanical properties.

  13. Relationship between quantum-mechanical systems with and without monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardoyan, Levon; Nersessian, Armen; Yeranyan, Armen

    2007-01-01

    It is shown that the inclusion of the monopole field in the three- and five-dimensional spherically symmetric quantum-mechanical systems, with the addition of the special centrifugal term, leads to the lift of the range of the total and azimuth quantum numbers only. Meanwhile the functional dependence of the energy spectra on quantum numbers does not undergo any changes. We also present a new integrable model of the spherical oscillator

  14. The independent relationship between triglycerides and coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Alan; Hokanson, John E

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The aim was to review epidemiologic studies to reassess whether serum levels of triglycerides should be considered independently of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) as a predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods and results: We systematically reviewed population-based cohort studies in which baseline serum levels of triglycerides and HDL-C were included as explanatory variables in multivariate analyses with the development of CHD (coronary events or coronary death) as dependent variable. A total of 32 unique reports describing 38 cohorts were included. The independent association between elevated triglycerides and risk of CHD was statistically significant in 16 of 30 populations without pre-existing CHD. Among populations with diabetes mellitus or pre-existing CHD, or the elderly, triglycerides were not significantly independently associated with CHD in any of 8 cohorts. Triglycerides and HDL-C were mutually exclusive predictors of coronary events in 12 of 20 analyses of patients without pre-existing CHD. Conclusions: Epidemiologic studies provide evidence of an association between triglycerides and the development of primary CHD independently of HDL-C. Evidence of an inverse relationship between triglycerides and HDL-C suggests that both should be considered in CHD risk estimation and as targets for intervention. PMID:19436658

  15. The independent relationship between triglycerides and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Alan; Hokanson, John E

    2009-01-01

    The aim was to review epidemiologic studies to reassess whether serum levels of triglycerides should be considered independently of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) as a predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD). We systematically reviewed population-based cohort studies in which baseline serum levels of triglycerides and HDL-C were included as explanatory variables in multivariate analyses with the development of CHD (coronary events or coronary death) as dependent variable. A total of 32 unique reports describing 38 cohorts were included. The independent association between elevated triglycerides and risk of CHD was statistically significant in 16 of 30 populations without pre-existing CHD. Among populations with diabetes mellitus or pre-existing CHD, or the elderly, triglycerides were not significantly independently associated with CHD in any of 8 cohorts. Triglycerides and HDL-C were mutually exclusive predictors of coronary events in 12 of 20 analyses of patients without pre-existing CHD. Epidemiologic studies provide evidence of an association between triglycerides and the development of primary CHD independently of HDL-C. Evidence of an inverse relationship between triglycerides and HDL-C suggests that both should be considered in CHD risk estimation and as targets for intervention.

  16. Relationship between regional severity of emphysema and coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Michinobu; Sakai, Shinya; Yasuhara, Yoshifumi; Ikezoe, Junpei; Murase, Kenya; Ichiki, Taku

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed the relationship between regional severity of emphysema, which was evaluated by three-dimensional fractal analysis (3D-FA) of Technegas SPECT images, and coronary heart disease (CHD). For 22 patients with emphysema who underwent Technegas SPECT, we followed up CHD events. The follow-up period was 5.4±0.5 (mean ±SD) years. We defined the upper-lung fractal dimension (U-FD) and lower-lung fractal dimension (L-FD) obtained with 3D-FA of Technegas SPECT images as the regional severity of emphysema. FD became greater with the progression of emphysematous change. During the follow-up period, CHD events occurred in 6 (27%) of the 22 patients. The ratio of U-FD to L-FD for patients with CHD events (0.87±0.22) was significantly smaller than for patients without CHD events (1.52±0.38) (p=0.0015). These findings suggest that severer emphysema in the lower lung indicates a higher risk of CHD than that in the upper lung. (author)

  17. From genome-wide association studies to disease mechanisms : celiac disease as a model for autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Vinod; Wijmenga, Cisca; Withoff, Sebo

    Celiac disease is characterized by a chronic inflammatory reaction in the intestine and is triggered by gluten, a constituent derived from grains which is present in the common daily diet in the Western world. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms behind celiac disease etiology are still not

  18. Cellular Reparative Mechanisms of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Retinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Suet Lee Shirley; Kumar, Suresh; Mok, Pooi Ling

    2017-07-28

    The use of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been reported as promising for the treatment of numerous degenerative disorders including the eye. In retinal degenerative diseases, MSCs exhibit the potential to regenerate into retinal neurons and retinal pigmented epithelial cells in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Delivery of MSCs was found to improve retinal morphology and function and delay retinal degeneration. In this review, we revisit the therapeutic role of MSCs in the diseased eye. Furthermore, we reveal the possible cellular mechanisms and identify the associated signaling pathways of MSCs in reversing the pathological conditions of various ocular disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Current stem cell treatment can be dispensed as an independent cell treatment format or with the combination of other approaches. Hence, the improvement of the treatment strategy is largely subjected by our understanding of MSCs mechanism of action.

  19. Elucidation of Molecular Pathogenic Mechanisms of Norrie Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Luhmann, Ulrich F.O.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Norrie disease (ND) is a rare X-linked recessive congenital blindness, sometimes associated with deafness and mental retardation. In this thesis the molecular pathogenic mechanisms of this syndrome should be elucidated using the Ndph knockout mouse model. Gene expression studies but also histology and protein biochemistry were used to characterize the affected organs, eye and brain. Gene expression analyses of eyes at p21 using cDNA subtrac...

  20. Relationship between cynicism and job satisfaction: exploration of mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abhishek; Adams, John W

    2011-02-01

    Personality traits related to evaluation of other people and the world are important to study in relation to job satisfaction, which itself is an evaluation of various facets of a job, including the social dimensions. Accordingly, the relationship between cynicism and job satisfaction was studied. Cynicism was expected to be negatively related to job satisfaction, employees' perceptions of job enrichment, quality of leader-member exchange, and support from coworkers. Survey data from 105 employees in a diverse set of organizations (M age = 48 yr.; 50% women; M work experience = 28 yr.; 73% had >16 yr. education) were subjected to hierarchical regression. Individuals high in Cynicism were likely to have lower job satisfaction, job enrichment, quality of leader-member exchange, and perceptions of co-worker support.

  1. Cardiorespiratory interactions: the relationship between mechanical ventilation and hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheifetz, Ira M

    2014-12-01

    The overall goal of the cardiorespiratory system is to provide the organs and tissues of the body with an adequate supply of oxygen in relation to oxygen consumption. An understanding of the complex physiologic interactions between the respiratory and cardiac systems is essential to optimal patient management. Alterations in intrathoracic pressure are transmitted to the heart and lungs and can dramatically alter cardiovascular performance, with significant differences existing between the physiologic response of the right and left ventricles to changes in intrathoracic pressure. In terms of cardiorespiratory interactions, the clinician should titrate the mean airway pressure to optimize the balance between mean lung volume (ie, arterial oxygenation) and ventricular function (ie, global cardiac output), minimize pulmonary vascular resistance, and routinely monitor cardiorespiratory parameters closely. Oxygen delivery to all organs and tissues of the body should be optimized, but not necessarily maximized. The heart and lungs are, obviously, connected anatomically but also physiologically in a complex relationship. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  2. Reflex reticular myoclonus: relationship to some brainstem pathophysiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rektor, I; Kadanka, Z; Bednarik, J

    1991-04-01

    Two patients with reflex reticular myoclonus [RRM] were tested electrophysiologically and pharmacologically. In one of the cases the underlying disease was chronic Lyme borreliosis. In the other, the RRM attacks may have been associated with procarbazine therapy applied for Hodgkin's disease. No cortical lesion could be demonstrated either clinically or electrophysiologically [EEG, averaged EEg preceeding the jerks, SSEP]. An EMG analysis of the jerks revealed the shortest latency in the muscles innervated by the accessory nerve. The latencies became longer in a more rostral muscle [masseter], as well as in a more caudal one, the muscles innervated by the facial nerve were spared. it is presumed that the complete movement pattern of the myoclonus residues in the jerk generating structure. RRM in the described cases differs from the startle by sparing the facial nerve and from the Papio papio baboon non-epileptic myoclonus by the activating effect of physostigmine. A partial therapeutic effect was achieved with a serotonine precursor, but a GABAergic therapy proved to be the most effective.

  3. Relationship between mechanical characteristics and thermal shock stability of refractories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov-Husovic, T.; Raic, K.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stability of the refractory material with the content of 60 % Al 2 O 3 was investigated. Water quench test (JUS.B.D8.319) was applied as experimental method for thermal stability testing. Damage of porous materials is commonly related to a modification of strength that is mostly a reduction. This is linked with characteristics related to pore space. Mechanical characteristics are considered such as compressive strength, dynamic modulus of elasticity and resistance parameters resulting from resonance frequency measurements, as well as ultrasonic velocity. (Original)

  4. Probiotics and Alcoholic Liver Disease: Treatment and Potential Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengyuan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive research, alcohol remains one of the most common causes of liver disease in the United States. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders, including steatosis, steatohepatitis, and cirrhosis. Although many agents and approaches have been tested in patients with ALD and in animals with experimental ALD in the past, there is still no FDA (Food and Drug Administration approved therapy for any stage of ALD. With the increasing recognition of the importance of gut microbiota in the onset and development of a variety of diseases, the potential use of probiotics in ALD is receiving increasing investigative and clinical attention. In this review, we summarize recent studies on probiotic intervention in the prevention and treatment of ALD in experimental animal models and patients. Potential mechanisms underlying the probiotic function are also discussed.

  5. Developmental plasticity and epigenetic mechanisms underpinning metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Felicia M; Gluckman, Peter D; Hanson, Mark A

    2011-06-01

    The importance of developmental factors in influencing the risk of later-life disease has a strong evidence base derived from multiple epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies in animals and humans. During early life, an organism is able to adjust its phenotypic development in response to environmental cues. Such developmentally plastic responses evolved as a fitness-maximizing strategy to cope with variable environments. There are now increasing data that these responses are, at least partially, underpinned by epigenetic mechanisms. A mismatch between the early and later-life environments may lead to inappropriate early life-course epigenomic changes that manifest in later life as increased vulnerability to disease. There is also growing evidence for the transgenerational transmission of epigenetic marks. This article reviews the evidence that susceptibility to metabolic and cardiovascular disease in humans is linked to changes in epigenetic marks induced by early-life environmental cues, and discusses the clinical, public health and therapeutic implications that arise.

  6. Relationship between Magnetic and Mechanical Properties of Cermet Tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Dong Gil; Lee, Jeong Hee

    2000-01-01

    The commercial cermet cutting tools consist of multi-carbide and a binder metal of iron group, such as cobalt and nickel which are ferromagnetic. In this paper, a new approach to evaluate the mechanical properties of TiCN based cermet by magnetic properties were studied in relation to binder content and sintering conditions. The experimental cermet was prepared using commercial composition with the other binder contents by PM process. It was found that the magnetic properties of the sintered cermets remarkably depended on the microstructure and the total carbon content. The magnetic saturation was proportional to increment of coercive force. At high carbon content in sintered cermet, the magnetic saturation was increased by decreasing the concentration of solutes such as W, Mo, Ti in Co-Ni binder. As the coercive force increases, the hardness usually increases. The strength and toughness of the cermet also increased with increasing the magnetic saturation. The measurement of magnetic properties made it possible to evaluate the mechanical properties in the cermet cutting tools

  7. Understanding the mechanisms behind coking pressure: Relationship to pore structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Duffy; M. Castro Diaz; Colin E. Snape; Karen M. Steel; Merrick R. Mahoney [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

    2007-09-15

    Three low volatile coals A, B and C with oven wall pressures of 100 kPa, 60 kPa and 20 kPa respectively were investigated using high-temperature rheometry, {sup 1}H NMR, thermogravimetric analysis and SEM, with the primary aim to better understand the mechanisms behind the coking pressure phenomenon. Rheometer plate displacement measurements ({Delta}L) have shown differences in the expansion and contraction behaviour of the three coals, which seem to correlate with changes in rheological properties; while SEM images have shown that the expansion process coincides with development of pore structure. It is considered that the point of maximum plate height ({Delta}L{sub max}) prior to contraction may be indicative of a cell opening or pore network forming process, based on analogies with other foam systems. Such a process may be considered important for coking pressure since it provides a potential mechanism for volatile escape, relieving internal gas pressure and inducing charge contraction. For coal C, which has the highest fluidity {delta}L{sub max} occurs quite early in the softening process and consequently a large degree of contraction is observed; while for the lower fluidity coal B, the process is delayed since pore development and consequently wall thinning progress at a slower rate. When {Delta}L{sub max} is attained, a lower degree of contraction is observed because the event occurs closer to resolidification where the increasing viscosity/elasticity can stabilise the expanded pore structure. For coal A which is relatively high fluidity, but also high coking pressure, a greater degree of swelling is observed prior to cell rupture, which may be due to greater fluid elasticity during the expansion process. This excessive expansion is considered to be a potential reason for its high coking pressure. 58 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Smoking and atherosclerosis: mechanisms of disease and new therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siasos, Gerasimos; Tsigkou, Vasiliki; Kokkou, Eleni; Oikonomou, Evangelos; Vavuranakis, Manolis; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Verveniotis, Alexis; Limperi, Maria; Genimata, Vasiliki; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    It has been clear that at least 1 billion adults worldwide are smokers and at least 700 million children are passive smokers at home. Smoking exerts a detrimental effect to many organ systems and is responsible for illnesses such as lung cancer, pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cancer of head and neck, cancer of the urinary and gastrointestinal tract, periodontal disease, cataract and arthritis. Additionally, smoking is an important modifiable risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease such as coronary artery disease, stable angina, acute coronary syndromes, sudden death, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, congestive heart failure, erectile dysfunction and aortic aneurysms via initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. A variety of studies has proved that cigarette smoking induces oxidative stress, vascular inflammation, platelet coagulation, vascular dysfunction and impairs serum lipid pro-file in both current and chronic smokers, active and passive smokers and results in detrimental effects on the cardiovascular system. The aim of this review is to depict the physical and biochemical properties of cigarette smoke and, furthermore, elucidate the main pathophysiological mechanisms of cigarette-induced atherosclerosis and overview the new therapeutic approaches for smoking cessation and augmentation of cardiovascular health.

  9. Dissecting the Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegenerative Diseases through Network Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A. Santiago

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are rarely caused by a mutation in a single gene but rather influenced by a combination of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. Emerging high-throughput technologies such as RNA sequencing have been instrumental in deciphering the molecular landscape of neurodegenerative diseases, however, the interpretation of such large amounts of data remains a challenge. Network biology has become a powerful platform to integrate multiple omics data to comprehensively explore the molecular networks in the context of health and disease. In this review article, we highlight recent advances in network biology approaches with an emphasis in brain-networks that have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms leading to the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s (AD, Parkinson’s (PD and Huntington’s diseases (HD. We discuss how integrative approaches using multi-omics data from different tissues have been valuable for identifying biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In addition, we discuss the challenges the field of network medicine faces toward the translation of network-based findings into clinically actionable tools for personalized medicine applications.

  10. Mitochondrial and Cell Death Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee J. Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS are the most common human adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. They are characterized by prominent age-related neurodegeneration in selectively vulnerable neural systems. Some forms of AD, PD, and ALS are inherited, and genes causing these diseases have been identified. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of the neuronal cell death are unresolved. Morphological, biochemical, genetic, as well as cell and animal model studies reveal that mitochondria could have roles in this neurodegeneration. The functions and properties of mitochondria might render subsets of selectively vulnerable neurons intrinsically susceptible to cellular aging and stress and overlying genetic variations, triggering neurodegeneration according to a cell death matrix theory. In AD, alterations in enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative damage, and mitochondrial binding of Aβ and amyloid precursor protein have been reported. In PD, mutations in putative mitochondrial proteins have been identified and mitochondrial DNA mutations have been found in neurons in the substantia nigra. In ALS, changes occur in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes and mitochondrial cell death proteins. Transgenic mouse models of human neurodegenerative disease are beginning to reveal possible principles governing the biology of selective neuronal vulnerability that implicate mitochondria and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This review summarizes how mitochondrial pathobiology might contribute to neuronal death in AD, PD, and ALS and could serve as a target for drug therapy.

  11. Effect of communication style and physician-family relationships on satisfaction with pediatric chronic disease care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedlund, Matthew P; Schumacher, Jayna B; Young, Henry N; Cox, Elizabeth D

    2012-01-01

    Over 8% of children have a chronic disease and many are unable to adhere to treatment. Satisfaction with chronic disease care can impact adherence. We examine how visit satisfaction is associated with physician communication style and ongoing physician-family relationships. We collected surveys and visit videos for 75 children ages 9-16 years visiting for asthma, diabetes, or sickle cell disease management. Raters assessed physician communication style (friendliness, interest, responsiveness, and dominance) from visit videos. Quality of the ongoing relationship was measured with four survey items (parent-physician relationship, child-physician relationship, comfort asking questions, and trust in the physician), while a single item assessed satisfaction. Correlations and chi square were used to assess association of satisfaction with communication style or quality of the ongoing relationship. Satisfaction was positively associated with physician to parent (p relationships (p communication style and the quality of the ongoing relationship contribute to pediatric chronic disease visit satisfaction.

  12. Effect and Mechanism of Chinese Herbal Medicine on Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bai-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Although both genetic and environmental factors are implicated in the development of Parkinson's disease, the cause of the disease is still unclear. So far conventional treatments to Parkinson's are symptomatic relief and focused mainly on motor symptoms. Chinese herbal medicine has been used to treat many conditions in China, Korea, Japan, and many Southeast Asian countries for 1000 years. During past a few decades, Chinese herbal medicine has gained wider and increasing acceptance within both public and medical profession due to its effectiveness on many conditions in western countries. In this chapter, mechanisms of action of many Chinese herbal compounds/extracts and Chinese herb formulas on the models of Parkinson's were reviewed. Further, reports of effectiveness of Chinese herb formulas on patients with Parkinson's were summarized. It was shown that both Chinese herbal compounds/extracts and herb formulas have either specific target mechanisms of action or multitargets mechanisms of action, as antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and antiapoptosis agents. Clinical studies showed that Chinese herb formulas as an adjunct improved both motor and nonmotor symptoms, and reduced dose of dopaminergic drugs and occurrence of dyskinesia. The evidence from the studies suggests that Chinese herb medicine has potential, acting as neuroprotective to slow down the progression of Parkinson's, and it is able to simultaneously treat both motor and nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson's. More studies are needed to explore the new compounds/extracts derived from Chinese herbs, in particular, their mechanisms of action. It is hopeful that new drugs developed from Chinese herb compounds/extracts and Chinese herb formulas will lead to better and complimentary therapy to PD. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Relationship between mechanical factors and incidence of low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourbakhsh, Mohammad Reza; Arab, Amir Massoud

    2002-09-01

    A multifactorial cross-sectional nonexperimental design. To collectively investigate the association among 17 mechanical factors and occurrence of low back pain (LBP). Several physical characteristics, based on assumptions, clinical findings, and scientific experiments, have been associated with the development of LBP Controversy exists regarding the degree of association between some of these physical characteristics and LBP. Information regarding the degree of association of each factor to LBP is needed for effective prevention and appropriate treatment strategies. A total of 600 subjects participated in this study. Subjects were categorized into 4 groups: asymptomatic men (n = 150, age [mean +/- SD] = 43 +/- 15 years), asymptomatic women (n = 150, age [mean +/- SD] = 43 +/- 13 years), men with LBP (n = 150, age [mean +/- SD] = 43 +/- 14 years), and women with LBP (n = 150, age [mean +/- SD] = 43 +/- 13 years). Seventeen physical characteristics were measured in each group and the relative association of each characteristic with LBP was assessed. Among all the factors tested, endurance of the back extensor muscles had the highest association with LBP Other factors such as the length of the back extensor muscles, and the strength of the hip flexor, hip adductor, and abdominal muscles also had a significant association with LBP. It appears that muscle endurance and weakness are associated with LBP and that structural factors such as the size of the lumbar lordosis, pelvic tilt, leg length discrepancy, and the length of abdominal, hamstring, and iliopsoas muscles are not associated with the occurrence of LBP.

  14. Dysphagia and sialorrhea: the relationship to Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicaretta, Denise Hack; Rosso, Ana Lucia; Mattos, James Pitágoras de; Maliska, Carmelindo; Costa, Milton M B

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia and sialorrhea in patients with Parkinson's disease are both automatically accepted as dependent on this neurological disease. The aim were to establish if these two complaints are a consequence or associated manifestations of Parkinson's disease. Two Parkinson's diseases groups from the same outpatients' population were studied. Patients in the first group, with dysphagia, were studied by videofluoroscopy. The second, with sialorrhea, were studied by the scintigraphic method, Videofluoroscopic examination of the oral, pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing showed that 94% of Parkinson's diseases patients present, structural causes, not related to Parkinson's diseases, able to produce or intensify the observed disphagia. The scintigraphic examination of Parkinson's diseases patients with sialorrhea showed that there is no increase of serous saliva production. Nevertheless, showed a significantly higher velocity of saliva excretion in the Parkinson's diseases patients. Dysphagia can be due to the muscular rigidity often present in the Parkinson's diseases patient, or more usually by non Parkinson's disease associated causes. In Parkinson's diseases patients, sialorrhea is produced by saliva retention. Nevertheless, sialorrhea can produce discomfort in swallowing, although without a formal complaint of dysphagia. In this case, subclinical dysphagia must be considered. Sialorrhea is indicative of dysphagia or at least of subclinical dysphagia. As final conclusion, Parkinson's diseases can be an isolated cause of dysphagia and/or sialorrhea, but frequently, a factor unrelated to Parkinson's diseases is the main cause of or at least aggravates the dysphagia.

  15. Plausible mechanisms explaining the association of periodontitis with cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loos, B.G.; Teeuw, W.J.; Nicu, E.A.; Lynge Petersen, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The association between periodontitis and cardiovascular diseases is now well established. Cardiovascular diseases include atherosclerosis, coronary heart (artery) disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral artery disease. Atherosclerosis is the underlying pathology of cardiovascular diseases.

  16. Additional mechanisms conferring genetic susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel eCalero

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Familial Alzheimer's disease (AD, mostly associated with early onset, is caused by mutations in three genes (APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 involved in the production of the amyloid  peptide. In contrast, the molecular mechanisms that trigger the most common late onset sporadic AD remain largely unknown. With the implementation of an increasing number of case-control studies and the upcoming of large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS there is a mounting list of genetic risk factors associated to common genetic variants that have been associated to sporadic AD. Besides APOE, that presents a strong association with the disease (OR~4, the rest of these genes have moderate or low degrees of association, with OR ranging from 0.88 to 1.23. Taking together, these genes may account only for a fraction of the attributable AD risk and therefore, rare variants and epistastic gene interactions should be taken into account in order to get the full picture of the genetic risks associated to AD. Here, we review recent whole-exome studies looking for rare variants, somatic brain mutations with a strong association to the disease, and several studies dealing with epistasis as additional mechanisms conferring genetic susceptibility to AD. Altogether, recent evidence underlines the importance of defining molecular and genetic pathways and networks rather than the contribution of specific genes.

  17. Relationship between alcohol-attributable disease and socioeconomic status, and the role of alcohol consumption in this relationship: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lisa; Bates, Geoff; McCoy, Ellie; Bellis, Mark A

    2015-04-18

    Studies show that alcohol consumption appears to have a disproportionate impact on people of low socioeconomic status. Further exploration of the relationship between alcohol consumption, socioeconomic status and the development of chronic alcohol-attributable diseases is therefore important to inform the development of effective public health programmes. We used systematic review methodology to identify published studies of the association between socioeconomic factors and mortality and morbidity for alcohol-attributable conditions. To attempt to quantify differences in the impact of alcohol consumption for each condition, stratified by SES, we (i) investigated the relationship between SES and risk of mortality or morbidity for each alcohol-attributable condition, and (ii) where, feasible explored alcohol consumption as a mediating or interacting variable in this relationship. We identified differing relationships between a range of alcohol-attributable conditions and socioeconomic indicators. Pooled analyses showed that low, relative to high socioeconomic status, was associated with an increased risk of head and neck cancer and stroke, and in individual studies, with hypertension and liver disease. Conversely, risk of female breast cancer tended to be associated with higher socioeconomic status. These findings were attenuated but held when adjusted for a number of known risk factors and other potential confounding factors. A key finding was the lack of studies that have explored the interaction between alcohol-attributable disease, socioeconomic status and alcohol use. Despite some limitations to our review, we have described relationships between socioeconomic status and a range of alcohol-attributable conditions, and explored the mediating and interacting effects of alcohol consumption where feasible. However, further research is needed to better characterise the relationship between socioeconomic status alcohol consumption and alcohol-attributable disease risk

  18. DYSPHAGIA AND SIALORRHEA: the relationship to Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Denise Hack NICARETTA; Ana Lucia ROSSO; James Pitagoras de MATTOS; Carmelindo MALISKA; Milton M. B. COSTA

    2013-01-01

    Context Dysphagia and sialorrhea in patients with Parkinson's disease are both automatically accepted as dependent on this neurological disease. Objective The aim were to establish if these two complaints are a consequence or associated manifestations of Parkinson's disease. Method Two Parkinson's diseases groups from the same outpatients' population were studied. Patients in the first group, with dysphagia, were studied by videofluoroscopy. The second, with sialorrhea, were studied by th...

  19. Molecular mechanisms of acrolein toxicity: relevance to human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghe, Akshata; Ghare, Smita; Lamoreau, Bryan; Mohammad, Mohammad; Barve, Shirish; McClain, Craig; Joshi-Barve, Swati

    2015-02-01

    Acrolein, a highly reactive unsaturated aldehyde, is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and its potential as a serious environmental health threat is beginning to be recognized. Humans are exposed to acrolein per oral (food and water), respiratory (cigarette smoke, automobile exhaust, and biocide use) and dermal routes, in addition to endogenous generation (metabolism and lipid peroxidation). Acrolein has been suggested to play a role in several disease states including spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and neuro-, hepato-, and nephro-toxicity. On the cellular level, acrolein exposure has diverse toxic effects, including DNA and protein adduction, oxidative stress, mitochondrial disruption, membrane damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and immune dysfunction. This review addresses our current understanding of each pathogenic mechanism of acrolein toxicity, with emphasis on the known and anticipated contribution to clinical disease, and potential therapies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. DNA replication stress: from molecular mechanisms to human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Sergio; Méndez, Juan

    2017-02-01

    The genome of proliferating cells must be precisely duplicated in each cell division cycle. Chromosomal replication entails risks such as the possibility of introducing breaks and/or mutations in the genome. Hence, DNA replication requires the coordinated action of multiple proteins and regulatory factors, whose deregulation causes severe developmental diseases and predisposes to cancer. In recent years, the concept of "replicative stress" (RS) has attracted much attention as it impinges directly on genomic stability and offers a promising new avenue to design anticancer therapies. In this review, we summarize recent progress in three areas: (1) endogenous and exogenous factors that contribute to RS, (2) molecular mechanisms that mediate the cellular responses to RS, and (3) the large list of diseases that are directly or indirectly linked to RS.

  1. Mechanisms of renal NaCl retention in proteinuric disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Per; Friis, Ulla G; Versland, Jostein B

    2013-01-01

    In diseases with proteinuria, for example nephrotic syndrome and pre-eclampsia, there often are suppression of plasma renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system components, expansion of extracellular volume and avid renal sodium retention. Mechanisms of sodium retention in proteinuria are reviewed...... of proteolytic activation of ENaC has been explored. Proteolysis leads to putative release of an inhibitory peptide from the extracellular domain of the gamma ENaC subunit. This leads to full activation of the channel. Plasminogen has been demonstrated in urine from patients with nephrotic syndrome and pre-eclampsia...

  2. Possible mechanisms for arsenic-induced proliferative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetterhahn, K.E.; Dudek, E.J.; Shumilla, J.A. [Dartmouth College and Medical School, Hanover, NH (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Possible mechanisms for cardiovascular diseases and cancers which have been observed on chronic exposure to arsenic have been investigated. We tested the hypothesis that nonlethal levels of arsenic are mitogenic, cause oxidative stress, increase nuclear translocation of trans-acting factors, and increase expression of genes involved in proliferation. Cultured porcine vascular (from aorta) endothelial cells were used as a model cell system to study the effects of arsenic on the target cells for cardiovascular diseases. Treatment of postconfluent cell cultures with nonovertly toxic concentrations of arsenite increased DNA synthesis, similar to the mitogenic response observed with hydrogen peroxide. Within 1 hour of adding noncytotoxic concentrations of arsenite, cellular levels of oxidants increased relative to control levels, indicating that arsenite promotes cellular oxidations. Arsenite treatment increased nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, an oxidative stress-responsive transcription factor, in a manner similar to that observed with hydrogen peroxide. Pretreatment of intact cells with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and dimethylfumarate prevented the arsenite-induced increases in cellular oxidant formation and NF-KB translocation. Arsenite had little or no effect on binding of NF-KB to its DNA recognition sequence in vitro, indicating that it is unlikely that arsenite directly affects NF-KB. The steady-state mRNA levels of intracellular adhesion molecule and urokinase-like plasminogen activator, genes associated with the active endothelial phenotype in arteriosclerosis and cancer metastasis, were increased by nontoxic concentrations of arsenite. These data suggest that arsenite promotes proliferative diseases like heart disease and cancer by activating oxidant-sensitive endothelial cell signaling and gene expression. It is possible that antioxidant therapy would be useful in preventing arsenic-induced cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  3. Insecticide resistance in vector Chagas disease: evolution, mechanisms and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón; Picollo, María Inés

    2015-09-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic parasitic infection restricted to America. The disease is caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to human through the feces of infected triatomine insects. Because no treatment is available for the chronic forms of the disease, vector chemical control represents the best way to reduce the incidence of the disease. Chemical control has been based principally on spraying dwellings with insecticide formulations and led to the reduction of triatomine distribution and consequent interruption of disease transmission in several areas from endemic region. However, in the last decade it has been repeatedly reported the presence triatomnes, mainly Triatoma infestans, after spraying with pyrethroid insecticides, which was associated to evolution to insecticide resistance. In this paper the evolution of insecticide resistance in triatomines is reviewed. The insecticide resistance was detected in 1970s in Rhodnius prolixus and 1990s in R. prolixus and T. infestans, but not until the 2000s resistance to pyrthroids in T. infestans associated to control failures was described in Argentina and Bolivia. The main resistance mechanisms (i.e. enhanced metabolism, altered site of action and reduced penetration) were described in the T. infestans resistant to pyrethrods. Different resistant profiles were demonstrated suggesting independent origin of the different resistant foci of Argentina and Bolivia. The deltamethrin resistance in T. infestans was showed to be controlled by semi-dominant, autosomally inherited factors. Reproductive and developmental costs were also demonstrated for the resistant T. infestans. A discussion about resistance and tolerance concepts and the persistence of T. infestans in Gran Chaco region are presented. In addition, theoretical concepts related to toxicological, evolutionary and ecological aspects of insecticide resistance are discussed in order to understand the particular scenario of pyrethroid

  4. [Disease concept, etiology and mechanisms of multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2014-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system(CNS). MS is assumed to be caused by a complex interplay between genes and environments. Autoimmune mechanisms targeting CNS myelin has long been proposed, yet it has not been proved. Th17 cells producing interleukin-17 and Th1 cells producing interferon-gamma are postulated to play major roles in initiating inflammation while regulatory T cell functions are dampened. The forth nationwide survey of MS in Japan revealed that MS prevalence showed four-folds increase over 30 years and the increase was especially prominent in female. Thus, westernized life style and improved sanitation are suspected to increase MS susceptibility. Genome-wide association studies in Western MS patients disclosed more than 100 disease-susceptibility genes, most of which are immune-related genes. It therefore supports immune-mediated mechanisms to be operative. Detailed magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed an early atrophy of the cerebral gray matter where T cell infiltration is pathologically scarce. Therefore, neurodegenerative process also takes place in the early course beside neuroinflammation.

  5. Yogurt and Cardiometabolic Diseases: A Critical Review of Potential Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Melissa Anne; Panahi, Shirin; Daniel, Noémie; Tremblay, Angelo; Marette, André

    2017-11-01

    Associations between yogurt intake and risk of diet-related cardiometabolic diseases (CMDs) have been the subject of recent research in epidemiologic nutrition. A healthy dietary pattern has been identified as a pillar for the prevention of weight gain and CMDs. Epidemiologic studies suggest that yogurt consumption is linked to healthy dietary patterns, lifestyles, and reduced risk of CMDs, particularly type 2 diabetes. However, to our knowledge, few to no randomized controlled trials have investigated yogurt intake in relation to cardiometabolic clinical outcomes. Furthermore, there has been little attempt to clarify the mechanisms that underlie the potential beneficial effects of yogurt consumption on CMDs. Yogurt is a nutrient-dense dairy food and has been suggested to reduce weight gain and prevent CMDs by contributing to intakes of protein, calcium, bioactive lipids, and several other micronutrients. In addition, fermentation with bacterial strains generates bioactive peptides, resulting in a potentially greater beneficial effect of yogurt on metabolic health than nonfermented dairy products such as milk. To date, there is little concrete evidence that the mechanisms proposed in observational studies to explain positive results of yogurt on CMDs or parameters are valid. Many proposed mechanisms are based on assumptions that commercial yogurts contain strain-specific probiotics, that viable yogurt cultures are present in adequate quantities, and that yogurt provides a minimum threshold dose of nutrients or bioactive components capable of exerting a physiologic effect. Therefore, the primary objective of this review is to investigate the plausibility of potential mechanisms commonly cited in the literature in order to shed light on the inverse associations reported between yogurt intake and various cardiometabolic health parameters that are related to its nutrient profile, bacterial constituents, and food matrix. This article reviews current gaps and challenges

  6. Abundant genetic overlap between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases indicates shared molecular genetic mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole A Andreassen

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest a relationship between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases, but the nature of these associations is not well understood. We used genome-wide association studies (GWAS to investigate shared single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases. We analyzed data from GWAS (n~200,000 individuals, applying new False Discovery Rate (FDR methods, to investigate genetic overlap between blood lipid levels [triglycerides (TG, low density lipoproteins (LDL, high density lipoproteins (HDL] and a selection of archetypal immune-mediated diseases (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, psoriasis and sarcoidosis. We found significant polygenic pleiotropy between the blood lipids and all the investigated immune-mediated diseases. We discovered several shared risk loci between the immune-mediated diseases and TG (n = 88, LDL (n = 87 and HDL (n = 52. Three-way analyses differentiated the pattern of pleiotropy among the immune-mediated diseases. The new pleiotropic loci increased the number of functional gene network nodes representing blood lipid loci by 40%. Pathway analyses implicated several novel shared mechanisms for immune pathogenesis and lipid biology, including glycosphingolipid synthesis (e.g. FUT2 and intestinal host-microbe interactions (e.g. ATG16L1. We demonstrate a shared genetic basis for blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases independent of environmental factors. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insights into dyslipidemia and immune-mediated diseases and may have implications for therapeutic trials involving lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory agents.

  7. [Underlying Mechanisms and Management of Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in South Korea has increased over the past 10 years. Patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD) shows better response to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) than those with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). NERD is a heterogeneous condition, showing pathological gastroesophageal reflux or esophageal hypersensitivity to reflux contents. NERD patients with pathological gastroesophageal reflux or hypersensitivity to acid may respond to PPIs. However, many patients with esophageal hypersensitivity to nonacid or functional heartburn do not respond to PPIs. Therefore, careful history and investigations are required when managing patients with refractory GERD who show poor response to conventional dose PPIs. Combined pH-impedance studies and a PPI diagnostic trial are recommended to reveal underlying mechanisms of refractory symptoms. For those with ongoing reflux-related symptoms, split dose administration, change to long-acting PPIs or PPIs less influenced by CYP2C19 genotypes, increasing dose of PPIs, and the addition of alginate preparations, prokinetics, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or tricyclic antidepressants can be considered. Pain modulators, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or tricyclic antidepressants are more likely to be effective for those with reflux-unrelated symptoms. Surgery or endoscopic per oral fundoplication may be effective in selected patients.

  8. Mechanisms of Physical Activity Limitation in Chronic Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Vogiatzis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In chronic lung diseases physical activity limitation is multifactorial involving respiratory, hemodynamic, and peripheral muscle abnormalities. The mechanisms of limitation discussed in this paper relate to (i the imbalance between ventilatory capacity and demand, (ii the imbalance between energy demand and supply to working respiratory and peripheral muscles, and (iii the factors that induce peripheral muscle dysfunction. In practice, intolerable exertional symptoms (i.e., dyspnea and/or leg discomfort are the main symptoms that limit physical performance in patients with chronic lung diseases. Furthermore, the reduced capacity for physical work and the adoption of a sedentary lifestyle, in an attempt to avoid breathlessness upon physical exertion, cause profound muscle deconditioning which in turn leads to disability and loss of functional independence. Accordingly, physical inactivity is an important component of worsening the patients’ quality of life and contributes importantly to poor prognosis. Identifying the factors which prevent a patient with lung disease to easily carry out activities of daily living provides a unique as well as important perspective for the choice of the appropriate therapeutic strategy.

  9. Mechanisms of physical activity limitation in chronic lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Zakynthinos, George; Andrianopoulos, Vasileios

    2012-01-01

    In chronic lung diseases physical activity limitation is multifactorial involving respiratory, hemodynamic, and peripheral muscle abnormalities. The mechanisms of limitation discussed in this paper relate to (i) the imbalance between ventilatory capacity and demand, (ii) the imbalance between energy demand and supply to working respiratory and peripheral muscles, and (iii) the factors that induce peripheral muscle dysfunction. In practice, intolerable exertional symptoms (i.e., dyspnea) and/or leg discomfort are the main symptoms that limit physical performance in patients with chronic lung diseases. Furthermore, the reduced capacity for physical work and the adoption of a sedentary lifestyle, in an attempt to avoid breathlessness upon physical exertion, cause profound muscle deconditioning which in turn leads to disability and loss of functional independence. Accordingly, physical inactivity is an important component of worsening the patients' quality of life and contributes importantly to poor prognosis. Identifying the factors which prevent a patient with lung disease to easily carry out activities of daily living provides a unique as well as important perspective for the choice of the appropriate therapeutic strategy.

  10. Mechanical Energy Recovery during Walking in Patients with Parkinson Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Dipaola

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of mechanical energy recovery during gait have been thoroughly investigated in healthy subjects, but never described in patients with Parkinson disease (PD. The aim of this study was to investigate whether such mechanisms are preserved in PD patients despite an altered pattern of locomotion. We consecutively enrolled 23 PD patients (mean age 64±9 years with bilateral symptoms (H&Y ≥II if able to walk unassisted in medication-off condition (overnight suspension of all dopaminergic drugs. Ten healthy subjects (mean age 62±3 years walked both at their 'preferred' and 'slow' speeds, to match the whole range of PD velocities. Kinematic data were recorded by means of an optoelectronic motion analyzer. For each stride we computed spatio-temporal parameters, time-course and range of motion (ROM of hip, knee and ankle joint angles. We also measured kinetic (Wk, potential (Wp, total (WtotCM energy variations and the energy recovery index (ER. Along with PD progression, we found a significant correlation of WtotCM and Wp with knee ROM and in particular with knee extension in terminal stance phase. Wk and ER were instead mainly related to gait velocity. In PD subjects, the reduction of knee ROM significantly diminished both Wp and WtotCM. Rehabilitation treatments should possibly integrate passive and active mobilization of knee to prevent a reduction of gait-related energetic components.

  11. The overdiagnosis of what? On the relationship between the concepts of overdiagnosis, disease, and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Bjørn

    2017-12-01

    Overdiagnosis and disease are related concepts. Widened conceptions of disease increase overdiagnosis and vice versa. This is partly because there is a close and complex relationship between disease and overdiagnosis. In order to address the problems with overdiagnosis, we may benefit from a closer understanding this relationship. Accordingly, the objective of this article is to elucidate the relationship between disease and overdiagnosis. To do so, the article starts with scrutinizing how overdiagnosis can explain the expansion of the concept of disease. Then it investigates how definitions of disease address various challenges of overdiagnosis. The article specifically investigates recent attempts to clarify the relationship between the concepts of disease and overdiagnosis. Several shortcomings are identified and lead to a closer analysis of overdiagnosis in the diagnostic process. Contrary to recent contributions to the field, it is argued that cases of overdiagnosis are not cases of disease. They are non-verified labelling of disease. It is revealed how overdiagnosis establishes an unwarranted link between indicative phenomena, such as polyps or cell changes, and harm, and thereby generates a link to disease. One implication of this study is that we should stop attributing disease language to indicative phenomena. That is, we should stop calling it "cancer screening" when we are actually searching for polyps. Another implications is that we should strive for scientific progress in differentiating phenomena that are of negative value to us from those that are not. In overdiagnosis we diagnose something that is not disease: it is over-diagnosis.

  12. An Investigation into the Relationship between Cigarette Smoking and Diverticular Disease of the Colon

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher G Jamieson; Michael J Weinberg; Joanne Lorraine

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to determine the relationship between cigarette smoking and diverticular disease of the colon. One hundred and two patients undergoing barium enema were assessed for diverticular disease and smoking history. No significant positive association between smoking and diverticular disease was found.

  13. Effect and mechanism of acupuncture on Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bai-Yun; Salvage, Sarah; Jenner, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia diagnosed in the aging population worldwide. The cause of Alzheimer's is still not clear. There is no cure for the disease and current treatments are only symptomatic relieve. The search for new treatment is made ever more urgent due to increasing population aging. Acupuncture has been in practice in China for more than 3000 years and used to treat a wide variety of conditions including cardiovascular and psychiatric diseases, acute, and chronic pain. In this chapter, we review recent development on the effects and mechanisms of acupuncture on Alzheimer's disease. In Alzheimer's animal models, acupuncture stimulation at acupoints enhances cholinergic neurotransmission, trophic factor releasing, reduces apoptotic and oxidative damages, improves synaptic plasticity and decreases the levels of Aβ proteins in the hippocampus and relevant brain regions. The biochemical modulations by acupuncture in the brains of Alzheimer's models are correlated with the cognitive improvement. In Alzheimer's patients, functional brain images demonstrated that acupuncture increased in the activity in the temporal lobe and prefrontal lobe which are related to the memory and cognitive function. Although only a few acupuncture clinical studies with a small number of participants are reported, they represent an important step forward in the research of both acupuncture and Alzheimer's. Translation of acupuncture research in animal model studies into the human subjects will undoubtedly enhance acupuncture efficacy in clinical study and treatment which could eventually lead to a safer, well-tolerated and inexpensive form of care for Alzheimer's patients. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evolution of Evidence for Selected Nutrient and Disease Relationships

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    ...: Implications for Chronic Disease Risk (D&H) (NRC, 1989). It was then to determine the extent to which subsequent scientific evidence from the peerreviewed literature used in published reports from the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) series...

  15. Relationship between overweight-obesity and periodontal disease in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Zermeño-Ibarra, Jorge A; Delgado-Pastrana, Soledad; Patiño-Marín, Nuria; Loyola-Rodríguez, Juan P

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between overweight-obesity and periodontal disease in subjects who attended the clinic of Periodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, San Luis de Potosi, Mexico. This was cross-sectional study involving 88 subjects - 60 without overweight-obesity and 28 with overweight-obesity. The following clinical parameters were evaluated: dental bacterial plaque, index of calculus, gingivitis, probing depth and periodontal disease index (PDI). When comparing t...

  16. Myocardial Architecture, Mechanics, and Fibrosis in Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Ghonim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is the most common category of birth defect, affecting 1% of the population and requiring cardiovascular surgery in the first months of life in many patients. Due to advances in congenital cardiovascular surgery and patient management, most children with CHD now survive into adulthood. However, residual and postoperative defects are common resulting in abnormal hemodynamics, which may interact further with scar formation related to surgical procedures. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR has become an important diagnostic imaging modality in the long-term management of CHD patients. It is the gold standard technique to assess ventricular volumes and systolic function. Besides this, advanced CMR techniques allow the acquisition of more detailed information about myocardial architecture, ventricular mechanics, and fibrosis. The left ventricle (LV and right ventricle have unique myocardial architecture that underpins their mechanics; however, this becomes disorganized under conditions of volume and pressure overload. CMR diffusion tensor imaging is able to interrogate non-invasively the principal alignments of microstructures in the left ventricular wall. Myocardial tissue tagging (displacement encoding using stimulated echoes and feature tracking are CMR techniques that can be used to examine the deformation and strain of the myocardium in CHD, whereas 3D feature tracking can assess the twisting motion of the LV chamber. Late gadolinium enhancement imaging and more recently T1 mapping can help in detecting fibrotic myocardial changes and evolve our understanding of the pathophysiology of CHD patients. This review not only gives an overview about available or emerging CMR techniques for assessing myocardial mechanics and fibrosis but it also describes their clinical value and how they can be used to detect abnormalities in myocardial architecture and mechanics in CHD patients.

  17. Relationship between overweight-obesity and periodontal disease in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zermeño-Ibarra, Jorge A; Delgado-Pastrana, Soledad; Patiño-Marín, Nuria; Loyola-Rodríguez, Juan P

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between overweight-obesity and periodontal disease in subjects who attended the clinic of Periodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, San Luis de Potosi, México. This was cross-sectional study involving 88 subjects--60 without overweight-obesity and 28 with overweight-obesity. The following clinical parameters were evaluated: dental bacterial plaque, index of calculus, gingivitis, probing depth and periodontal disease index (PDI). When comparing the group of subjects with overweight-obesity to the control, there were statistically significant differences in the variables calculus (p = 0.0015), gingivitis (p = 0.0050) and periodontal disease (p = 0.0154). Regarding the logistic regression analysis, the dependent variable was subjects with and without overweight-obesity and the independent variables were sex, age and periodontal disease. We found statistically significant differences (p = 0.0162) with OR = 3.16 in periodontal disease. Periodontal disease showed statistically significant differences in the group of subjects with overweight-obesity. The oral health of subjects with overweight-obesity should be supervised and checked in order to prevent oral alterations.

  18. Is Communication a Mechanism of Relationship Education Effects among Rural African Americans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Allen W; Beach, Steven R H; Lavner, Justin A; Bryant, Chalandra M; Kogan, Steven M; Brody, Gene H

    2017-10-01

    Enhancing communication as a means of promoting relationship quality has been increasingly questioned, particularly for couples at elevated sociodemographic risk. In response, the current study investigated communication change as a mechanism accounting for changes in relationship satisfaction and confidence among 344 rural, predominantly low-income African American couples with an early adolescent child who participated in a randomized controlled trial of the Protecting Strong African American Families (ProSAAF) program. Approximately 9 months after baseline assessment, intent-to-treat analyses indicated ProSAAF couples demonstrated improved communication, satisfaction, and confidence compared with couples in the control condition. Improvements in communication mediated ProSAAF effects on relationship satisfaction and confidence; conversely, neither satisfaction nor confidence mediated intervention effects on changes in communication. These results underscore the short-term efficacy of a communication-focused, culturally sensitive prevention program and suggest that communication is a possible mechanism of change in relationship quality among low-income African American couples.

  19. Relationship between obesity and oral diseases | Sede | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between obesity and periodontal status and dental caries experience of a group of Nigerian dental patients. Materials and Methods: Participants were selected from patients attending dental outpatient clinics of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin ...

  20. Substitution Relationship Between The Agency Problem Control Mechanisms in Malaysia: Simultaneous Equation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Agus Harjito

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the substitution relationship (substitutability between debt policy, insider ownership, and dividend policy as the agency problem control mechanism in Malaysia. If the substitution relationship exists between the agency control mechanisms, the agency problem can be reduced through this relationship. Reducing the agency problem as a result can increase the firm value proxied by Tobin’s Q. This study employs 396 firms sample listed on Malaysian Bourse from 2001 to 2004. To achieves the objectives, this study uses two-stage least square method. The results of this study indicate that the substitutability between debt policy, insider ownership, and dividend policy as agency problem control mechanism does not fully exist in Malaysia. Apparently the substitutability only exists for debt policy and dividend. There is no substitution between debt policy and insider ownership as well as between dividend policy and insider ownership. Key words: debt policy, insider ownership, dividend policy, agency problem, firm value

  1. Unraveling the Mechanisms of Cutaneous Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Santos e Sousa

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The skin is the most common target organ affected by graft-versus-host disease (GVHD, with severity and response to therapy representing important predictors of patient survival. Although many of the initiating events in GVHD pathogenesis have been defined, less is known about why treatment resistance occurs or why there is often a permanent failure to restore tissue homeostasis. Emerging data suggest that the unique immune microenvironment in the skin is responsible for defining location- and context-specific mechanisms of injury that are distinct from those involved in other target organs. In this review, we address recent advances in our understanding of GVHD biology in the skin and outline the new research themes that will ultimately enable design of precision therapies.

  2. Mechanisms of body weight fluctuations in Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eKistner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Typical body weight changes are known to occur in PD. Weight loss has been reported in early stages as well as in advanced disease and malnutrition may worsen the clinical state of the patient. On the other hand an increasing number of patients show weight gain under dopamine replacement therapy or after surgery. These weight changes are multifactorial and involve changes in energy expenditure, perturbation of homeostatic control, and eating behavior modulated by dopaminergic treatment. Comprehension of the different mechanisms contributing to body weight is a prerequisite for the management of body weight and nutritional state of an individual PD patient. This review summarizes the present knowledge and highlights the necessity of evaluation of body weight and related factors, as eating behavior, energy intake and expenditure in PD.

  3. Hatchery Vaccination Against Poultry Viral Diseases: Potential Mechanisms and Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Cader, Mohamed Sarjoon; Palomino-Tapia, Victor; Amarasinghe, Aruna; Ahmed-Hassan, Hanaa; De Silva Senapathi, Upasama; Abdul-Careem, Mohamed Faizal

    Commercial broiler and layer chickens are heavily vaccinated against economically important viral diseases with a view of preventing morbidity, mortality, and production impacts encountered during short production cycles. Hatchery vaccination is performed through in ovo embryo vaccination prehatch or spray and subcutaneous vaccinations performed at the day of hatch before the day-old chickens are being placed in barns with potentially contaminated environments. Commercially, multiple vaccines (e.g., live, live attenuated, and viral vectored vaccines) are available to administer through these routes within a short period (embryo day 18 prehatch to day 1 posthatch). Although the ability to mount immune response, especially the adaptive immune response, is not optimal around the hatch, it is possible that the efficacy of these vaccines depends partly on innate host responses elicited in response to replicating vaccine viruses. This review focuses on the current knowledge of hatchery vaccination in poultry and potential mechanisms of hatchery vaccine-mediated protective responses and limitations.

  4. Making partner relationship management systems work: The role of partnership governance mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Storey, C.; Kocabasoglu-Hillmer, C.

    2013-01-01

    While the adoption of Partner Relationship Management (PRM) systems by suppliers to manage and monitor its network of partners (i.e. resellers) has been on the rise, the performance improvements have not been consistently realized. Governance theory suggests this may be due to how the PRM system builds on the mechanisms employed by the supplier to oversee their partners. This study investigates how the two capabilities of PRM systems (relationship and fulfillment capabilities) and two partner...

  5. DYSPHAGIA AND SIALORRHEA: the relationship to Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Hack NICARETTA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Dysphagia and sialorrhea in patients with Parkinson's disease are both automatically accepted as dependent on this neurological disease. Objective The aim were to establish if these two complaints are a consequence or associated manifestations of Parkinson's disease. Method Two Parkinson's diseases groups from the same outpatients' population were studied. Patients in the first group, with dysphagia, were studied by videofluoroscopy. The second, with sialorrhea, were studied by the scintigraphic method, Results Videofluoroscopic examination of the oral, pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing showed that 94% of Parkinson's diseases patients present, structural causes, not related to Parkinson's diseases, able to produce or intensify the observed disphagia. The scintigraphic examination of Parkinson's diseases patients with sialorrhea showed that there is no increase of serous saliva production. Nevertheless, showed a significantly higher velocity of saliva excretion in the Parkinson's diseases patients. Conclusions Dysphagia can be due to the muscular rigidity often present in the Parkinson's diseases patient, or more usually by non Parkinson's disease associated causes. In Parkinson's diseases patients, sialorrhea is produced by saliva retention. Nevertheless, sialorrhea can produce discomfort in swallowing, although without a formal complaint of dysphagia. In this case, subclinical dysphagia must be considered. Sialorrhea is indicative of dysphagia or at least of subclinical dysphagia. As final conclusion, Parkinson's diseases can be an isolated cause of dysphagia and/or sialorrhea, but frequently, a factor unrelated to Parkinson's diseases is the main cause of or at least aggravates the dysphagia. Contexto Disfagia e sialorreia em pacientes com doença de Parkinson são automaticamente entendidos como decorrentes do comprometimento neurológico produzido pela doença de Parkinson. Objetivo Estabelecer se estas duas queixas s

  6. Sirtuins and renal diseases: relationship with aging and diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Munehiro; Kume, Shinji; Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2013-02-01

    Sirtuins are members of the Sir2 (silent information regulator 2) family, a group of class III deacetylases. Mammals have seven different sirtuins, SIRT1-SIRT7. Among them, SIRT1, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are induced by calorie restriction conditions and are considered anti-aging molecules. SIRT1 has been the most extensively studied. SIRT1 deacetylates target proteins using the coenzyme NAD+ and is therefore linked to cellular energy metabolism and the redox state through multiple signalling and survival pathways. SIRT1 deficiency under various stress conditions, such as metabolic or oxidative stress or hypoxia, is implicated in the pathophysiologies of age-related diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disorders and renal diseases. In the kidneys, SIRT1 may inhibit renal cell apoptosis, inflammation and fibrosis, and may regulate lipid metabolism, autophagy, blood pressure and sodium balance. Therefore the activation of SIRT1 in the kidney may be a new therapeutic target to increase resistance to many causal factors in the development of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. In addition, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are implicated in age-related disorders or longevity. In the present review, we discuss the protective functions of sirtuins and the association of sirtuins with the pathophysiology of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy.

  7. Early Family Relationships Predict Children’s Emotion Regulation and Defense Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jallu Lindblom

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Early family relationships have been suggested to influence the development of children’s affect regulation, involving both emotion regulation and defense mechanisms. However, we lack research on the specific family predictors for these two forms of affect regulation, which have been conceptualized to differ in their functions and accessibility to consciousness. Accordingly, we examine how the (a quality and (b timing of family relationships during infancy predict child’s later emotion regulation and defense mechanisms. Parents (N = 703 reported autonomy and intimacy in marital and parenting relationships at the child’s ages of 2 and 12 months, and the child’s use of emotion regulation and immature and neurotic defenses at 7 to 8 years. As hypothesized, the results showed that functional early family relationships predicted children’s efficient emotion regulation, whereas dysfunctional relationships predicted reliance on defense mechanisms in middle childhood. Further, results showed a timing effect for neurotic defenses, partially confirming our hypothesis of early infancy being an especially important period for the development of defense mechanisms. The findings are discussed from the viewpoints of attachment and family dynamics, emotional self-awareness, and sense of security.

  8. Mechanisms Underlying HIV-Associated Noninfectious Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presti, Rachel M; Flores, Sonia C; Palmer, Brent E; Atkinson, Jeffrey J; Lesko, Catherine R; Lau, Bryan; Fontenot, Andrew P; Roman, Jesse; McDyer, John F; Twigg, Homer L

    2017-11-01

    Pulmonary disease remains a primary source of morbidity and mortality in persons living with HIV (PLWH), although the advent of potent combination antiretroviral therapy has resulted in a shift from predominantly infectious to noninfectious pulmonary complications. PLWH are at high risk for COPD, pulmonary hypertension, and lung cancer even in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy. The underlying mechanisms of this are incompletely understood, but recent research in both human and animal models suggests that oxidative stress, expression of matrix metalloproteinases, and genetic instability may result in lung damage, which predisposes PLWH to these conditions. Some of the factors that drive these processes include tobacco and other substance use, direct HIV infection and expression of specific HIV proteins, inflammation, and shifts in the microbiome toward pathogenic and opportunistic organisms. Further studies are needed to understand the relative importance of these factors to the development of lung disease in PLWH. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Adipokines and the cardiovascular system: mechanisms mediating health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Josette M; Yeganeh, Azadeh; Taylor, Carla G; Zahradka, Peter; Wigle, Jeffrey T

    2012-08-01

    This review focuses on the role of adipokines in the maintenance of a healthy cardiovascular system, and the mechanisms by which these factors mediate the development of cardiovascular disease in obesity. Adipocytes are the major cell type comprising the adipose tissue. These cells secrete numerous factors, termed adipokines, into the blood, including adiponectin, leptin, resistin, chemerin, omentin, vaspin, and visfatin. Adipose tissue is a highly vascularised endocrine organ, and different adipose depots have distinct adipokine secretion profiles, which are altered with obesity. The ability of many adipokines to stimulate angiogenesis is crucial for adipose tissue expansion; however, excessive blood vessel growth is deleterious. As well, some adipokines induce inflammation, which promotes cardiovascular disease progression. We discuss how these 7 aforementioned adipokines act upon the various cardiovascular cell types (endothelial progenitor cells, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, cardiomyocytes, and cardiac fibroblasts), the direct effects of these actions, and their overall impact on the cardiovascular system. These were chosen, as these adipokines are secreted predominantly from adipocytes and have known effects on cardiovascular cells.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Resistance in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sandhya S.; Zhang, Liping; Mitch, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance refers to reduced sensitivity of organs to insulin-initiated biologic processes that result in metabolic defects. Insulin resistance is common in patients with end-stage renal disease but also occurs in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), even when the serum creatinine is minimally increased. Following insulin binding to its receptor, auto-phosphorylation of the insulin receptor is followed by kinase reactions that phosphorylate insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt. In fact, low levels of Akt phosphorylation (p-Akt) identifies the presence of the insulin resistance that leads to metabolic defects in insulin-initiated metabolism of glucose, lipids and muscle proteins. Besides CKD, other complex conditions (e.g., inflammation, oxidative stress, metabolic acidosis, aging and excess angiotensin II) reduce p-Akt resulting in insulin resistance. Insulin resistance in each of these conditions is due to activation of different, E3 ubiquitin ligases which specifically conjugate ubiquitin to IRS-1 marking it for degradation in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Consequently, IRS-1 degradation suppresses insulin-induced intracellular signaling, causing insulin resistance. Understanding mechanisms of insulin resistance could lead to therapeutic strategies that improve the metabolism of patients with CKD. PMID:26444029

  11. Percutaneous mechanical atherectomy for treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buecker, A.; Minko, P.; Massmann, A.; Katoh, M.

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is still an extremely important politico-economic disease. Diverse treatment procedures exist but the pillars of therapy are changes in lifestyle, such as nicotine abstinence and walking exercise as well as drug therapy. Further therapy options are considered after conventional procedures have been exhausted. These further options consist of improvement of the blood supply by surgical or minimally invasive procedures. The latter therapy options include balloon dilatation and stenting as the most widely used techniques. More recent techniques also used are cryoplasty, laser angioplasty, drug-coated stents or balloons as well as brachytherapy or atherectomy, whereby this list makes no claims to completeness. The multitude of different treatment methods emphatically underlines the fact that no resounding success can be achieved with one single method. The long-term results of both balloon dilatation and stenting techniques show a need for improvement, which elicited the search for additional methods for the treatment of PAOD. Atherectomy represents such an alternative method for treatment of PAOD. Basically, the term atherectomy means the removal of atheroma tissue. For percutaneous atherectomy, in contrast to surgical procedures, it is not necessary to create surgically access to the vessel but accomplishes the atherectomy by means of dedicated systems via a minimally invasive access. There are two basic forms of mechanical atherectomy: directional and rotational systems. (orig.) [de

  12. Mechanisms by Which Dehydration May Lead to Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncal-Jimenez, C; Lanaspa, M A; Jensen, T; Sanchez-Lozada, L G; Johnson, R J

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration, a condition that characterizes excessive loss of body water, is well known to be associated with acute renal dysfunction; however, it has largely been considered reversible and to be associated with no long-term effects on the kidney. Recently, an epidemic of chronic kidney disease has emerged in Central America in which the major risk factor seems to be recurrent heat-associated dehydration. This has led to studies investigating whether recurrent dehydration may lead to permanent kidney damage. Three major potential mechanisms have been identified, including the effects of vasopressin on the kidney, the activation of the aldose reductase-fructokinase pathway, and the effects of chronic hyperuricemia. The discovery of these pathways has also led to the recognition that mild dehydration may be a risk factor in progression of all types of chronic kidney diseases. Furthermore, there is some evidence that increasing hydration, particularly with water, may actually prevent CKD. Thus, a whole new area of investigation is developing that focuses on the role of water and osmolarity and their influence on kidney function and health. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Genetic characterization and disease mechanism of retinitis pigmentosa; current scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad Umar; Rahman, Muhammad Saif Ur; Cao, Jiang; Yuan, Ping Xi

    2017-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of genetically transmitted disorders affecting 1 in 3000-8000 individual people worldwide ultimately affecting the quality of life. Retinitis pigmentosa is characterized as a heterogeneous genetic disorder which leads by progressive devolution of the retina leading to a progressive visual loss. It can occur in syndromic (with Usher syndrome and Bardet-Biedl syndrome) as well as non-syndromic nature. The mode of inheritance can be X-linked, autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive manner. To date 58 genes have been reported to associate with retinitis pigmentosa most of them are either expressed in photoreceptors or the retinal pigment epithelium. This review focuses on the disease mechanisms and genetics of retinitis pigmentosa. As retinitis pigmentosa is tremendously heterogeneous disorder expressing a multiplicity of mutations; different variations in the same gene might induce different disorders. In recent years, latest technologies including whole-exome sequencing contributing effectively to uncover the hidden genesis of retinitis pigmentosa by reporting new genetic mutations. In future, these advancements will help in better understanding the genotype-phenotype correlations of disease and likely to develop new therapies.

  14. Mechanisms linking brain insulin resistance to Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matioli, Maria Niures P.S.; Nitrini, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that Diabetes Mellitus (DM) can increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review briefly describes current concepts in mechanisms linking DM and insulin resistance/deficiency to AD. Insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) resistance can contribute to neurodegeneration by several mechanisms which involve: energy and metabolism deficits, impairment of Glucose transporter-4 function, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of AGEs, ROS and RNS with increased production of neuro-inflammation and activation of pro-apoptosis cascade. Impairment in insulin receptor function and increased expression and activation of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) have also been described. These processes compromise neuronal and glial function, with a reduction in neurotransmitter homeostasis. Insulin/IGF resistance causes the accumulation of AβPP-Aβ oligomeric fibrils or insoluble larger aggregated fibrils in the form of plaques that are neurotoxic. Additionally, there is production and accumulation of hyper-phosphorylated insoluble fibrillar tau which can exacerbate cytoskeletal collapse and synaptic disconnection. PMID:29213950

  15. Sympathetic Overactivity in Chronic Kidney Disease: Consequences and Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasdeep Kaur

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD is increasing worldwide, with more than 26 million people suffering from CKD in the United States alone. More patients with CKD die of cardiovascular complications than progress to dialysis. Over 80% of CKD patients have hypertension, which is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Another common, perhaps underappreciated, feature of CKD is an overactive sympathetic nervous system. This elevation in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA not only contributes to hypertension but also plays a detrimental role in the progression of CKD independent of any increase in blood pressure. Indeed, high SNA is associated with poor prognosis and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality independent of its effect on blood pressure. This brief review will discuss some of the consequences of sympathetic overactivity and highlight some of the potential pathways contributing to chronically elevated SNA in CKD. Mechanisms leading to chronic sympathoexcitation in CKD are complex, multifactorial and to date, not completely understood. Identification of the mechanisms and/or signals leading to sympathetic overactivity in CKD are crucial for development of effective therapeutic targets to reduce the increased cardiovascular risk in this patient group.

  16. Mechanisms linking brain insulin resistance to Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Niures P.S. Matioli

    Full Text Available Several studies have indicated that Diabetes Mellitus (DM can increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD. This review briefly describes current concepts in mechanisms linking DM and insulin resistance/deficiency to AD. Insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF resistance can contribute to neurodegeneration by several mechanisms which involve: energy and metabolism deficits, impairment of Glucose transporter-4 function, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of AGEs, ROS and RNS with increased production of neuro-inflammation and activation of pro-apoptosis cascade. Impairment in insulin receptor function and increased expression and activation of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE have also been described. These processes compromise neuronal and glial function, with a reduction in neurotransmitter homeostasis. Insulin/IGF resistance causes the accumulation of AβPP-Aβ oligomeric fibrils or insoluble larger aggregated fibrils in the form of plaques that are neurotoxic. Additionally, there is production and accumulation of hyper-phosphorylated insoluble fibrillar tau which can exacerbate cytoskeletal collapse and synaptic disconnection.

  17. Mechanisms of protein misfolding in conformational lung diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McElvaney, N G

    2012-08-01

    Genetic or environmentally-induced alterations in protein structure interfere with the correct folding, assembly and trafficking of proteins. In the lung the expression of misfolded proteins can induce a variety of pathogenetic effects. Cystic fibrosis (CF) and alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency are two major clinically relevant pulmonary disorders associated with protein misfolding. Both are genetic diseases the primary causes of which are expression of mutant alleles of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and SERPINA1, respectively. The most common and best studied mutant forms of CFTR and AAT are ΔF508 CFTR and the Glu342Lys mutant of AAT called ZAAT, respectively. Non-genetic mechanisms can also damage protein structure and induce protein misfolding in the lung. Cigarette-smoke contains oxidants and other factors that can modify a protein\\'s structure, and is one of the most significant environmental causes of protein damage within the lung. Herein we describe the mechanisms controlling the folding of wild type and mutant versions of CFTR and AAT proteins, and explore the consequences of cigarette-smoke-induced effects on the protein folding machinery in the lung.

  18. Evidence summary: The relationship between oral diseases and diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    D Aiuto, F.; Gable, D.; Syed, Z.; Allen, Y.; Wanyonyi, K. L.; White, S.; Gallagher, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction This paper is the third of four rapid reviews undertaken to explore the relationships between oral health and general medical conditions in order to support teams within Public Health England, health practitioners and policymakers.Aims This review aimed to explore the nature of the association between poor oral health and diabetes when found in the same individuals or populations, having reviewed the most contemporary evidence in the field.Methods The reviews were undertaken by f...

  19. Study the relationship of erythropoietin and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.I. El-Korashy

    2012-07-01

    It also appeared that response to erythropoietin in COPD is probably blunted especially with increased severity of the condition. This might be considered as a contributing factor in the development of anemia in COPD which is considered as anemia of chronic disease.

  20. [Analysis of the Injury-disease Relationship between Spondylolysis and Trauma in 26 Forensic Identifications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L X; Zhu, G L; Qi, L Q; Sheng, Y Y

    2016-12-01

    To expound the injury-disease relationship between spondylolysis and trauma for the points of forensic identification. Total 26 cases of spondylolysis were collected and the characteristics of this disease such as age, accompanied symptoms, treatment and injury manner were discussed. The causal relationship existed between trauma and injury consequence in 2 appraised individuals and both of them aged less than 50 years old. The injury manners of both were high-energy injury with combined injury and these 2 patients were treated by operation. The analysis of injury-disease relationship between spondylolysis and trauma should be paid attention in the middle-young age under 50 years old. More importantly, the injury-disease relationship should be analyzed in the patients who chose operative treatment. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine

  1. Altered brain mechanisms of emotion processing in pre-manifest Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Marianne J U; Warren, Jason D; Henley, Susie M D; Draganski, Bogdan; Frackowiak, Richard S; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2012-04-01

    Huntington's disease is an inherited neurodegenerative disease that causes motor, cognitive and psychiatric impairment, including an early decline in ability to recognize emotional states in others. The pathophysiology underlying the earliest manifestations of the disease is not fully understood; the objective of our study was to clarify this. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate changes in brain mechanisms of emotion recognition in pre-manifest carriers of the abnormal Huntington's disease gene (subjects with pre-manifest Huntington's disease): 16 subjects with pre-manifest Huntington's disease and 14 control subjects underwent 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance scanning while viewing pictures of facial expressions from the Ekman and Friesen series. Disgust, anger and happiness were chosen as emotions of interest. Disgust is the emotion in which recognition deficits have most commonly been detected in Huntington's disease; anger is the emotion in which impaired recognition was detected in the largest behavioural study of emotion recognition in pre-manifest Huntington's disease to date; and happiness is a positive emotion to contrast with disgust and anger. Ekman facial expressions were also used to quantify emotion recognition accuracy outside the scanner and structural magnetic resonance imaging with voxel-based morphometry was used to assess the relationship between emotion recognition accuracy and regional grey matter volume. Emotion processing in pre-manifest Huntington's disease was associated with reduced neural activity for all three emotions in partially separable functional networks. Furthermore, the Huntington's disease-associated modulation of disgust and happiness processing was negatively correlated with genetic markers of pre-manifest disease progression in distributed, largely extrastriatal networks. The modulated disgust network included insulae, cingulate cortices, pre- and postcentral gyri, precunei, cunei, bilateral putamena

  2. The independent relationship between triglycerides and coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Alan Morrison, John E Hokanson

    2008-01-01

    Alan Morrison1, John E Hokanson21SCRIBCO, Blue Bell, PA, USA; 2Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado at Denver Denver, CO, USAAims: The aim was to review epidemiologic studies to reassess whether serum levels of triglycerides should be considered independently of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) as a predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD).Methods and results: We systematically reviewed population-based cohort studies in which basel...

  3. The relationship of microstructure and temperature to fracture mechanics parameters in reaction bonded silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, H.M.; Dalgleish, B.J.; Pratt, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The development of physical properties in reaction bonded silicon nitride has been investigated over a range of temperatures and correlated with microstructure. Fracture mechanics parameters, elastic moduli, strength and critical defect size have been determined. The nitrided microstructure is shown to be directly related to these observed properties and these basic relationships can be used to produce material with improved properties. (orig.) [de

  4. Mechanisms of atherothrombosis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Luca Fimognari

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Filippo Luca Fimognari1,2, Simone Scarlata1, Maria Elisabetta Conte1, Raffaele Antonelli Incalzi11Health Centre for Elderly, Chair of Geriatrics, University Campus Bio Medico, Rome, Italy; 2Internal Medicine; ASL Roma G, Leopoldo Parodi-Delfino Hospital; Colleferro, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Patients affected by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD have an increased risk of atherothrombotic acute events, independent of smoking and other cardiovascular risk factors. As a consequence, myocardial ischemia is a relevant cause of death in these patients. We reviewed studies concerning the potential mechanisms of atherothrombosis in COPD. Bronchial inflammation spreads to the systemic circulation and is known to play a key role in plaque formation and rupture. In fact, C-reactive protein blood levels increase in COPD and provide independent prognostic information. Systemic inflammation is the first cause of the hypercoagulable state commonly observed in COPD. Furthermore, hypoxia is supposed to activate platelets, thus accounting for the increased urinary excretion of platelet-derived thromboxane in COPD. The potential metabolic risk in COPD is still debated, in that recent studies do not support an association between COPD and diabetes mellitus. Finally, oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of COPD and may promote oxidation of low-density-lipoproteins with foam cells formation. Retrospective observations suggest that inhaled corticosteroids may reduce atherothrombotic mortality by attenuating systemic inflammation, but this benefit needs confirmation in ongoing randomized controlled trials. Physicians approaching COPD patients should always be aware of the systemic vascular implications of this disease.Keywords: COPD, atherothrombosis, cardiovascular risk, mortality

  5. Sex-specific relationships between adverse childhood experiences and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in five states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunningham TJ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Timothy J Cunningham,1 Earl S Ford,1 Janet B Croft,1 Melissa T Merrick,2 Italia V Rolle,3 Wayne H Giles1 1Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Division of Violence Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA Purpose: Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs before age 18 have been repeatedly associated with several chronic diseases in adulthood such as depression, heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and stroke. We examined sex-specific relationships between individual ACEs and the number of ACEs with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in the general population. Materials and methods: Data from 26,546 women and 19,015 men aged ≥18 years in five states of the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were analyzed. We used log-linear regression to estimate prevalence ratios (PRs and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs for the relationship of eight ACEs with COPD after adjustment for age group, race/ethnicity, marital status, educational attainment, employment, asthma history, health insurance coverage, and smoking status. Results: Some 63.8% of women and 62.2% of men reported ≥1 ACE. COPD was reported by 4.9% of women and 4.0% of men. In women, but not in men, there was a higher likelihood of COPD associated with verbal abuse (PR =1.30, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.61, sexual abuse (PR =1.69, 95% CI: 1.36, 2.10, living with a substance abusing household member (PR =1.49, 95% CI: 1.23, 1.81, witnessing domestic violence (PR =1.40, 95% CI: 1.14, 1.72, and parental separation/divorce (PR =1.47, 95% CI: 1.21, 1.80 during childhood compared to those with no individual ACEs

  6. Breast cancer as heterogeneous disease: contributing factors and carcinogenesis mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Julia; Akushevich, Igor; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Abernethy, Amy P; Lyerly, H Kim

    2011-07-01

    The observed bimodal patterns of breast cancer incidence in the U.S. suggested that breast cancer may be viewed as more than one biological entity. We studied the factors potentially contributing to this phenomenon, specifically focusing on how disease heterogeneity could be linked to breast carcinogenesis mechanisms. Using empirical analyses and population-based biologically motivated modeling, age-specific patterns of incidence of ductal and lobular breast carcinomas from the SEER registry (1990-2003) were analyzed for heterogeneity and characteristics of carcinogenesis, stratified by race, stage, grade, and estrogen (ER)/progesterone (PR) receptor status. The heterogeneity of breast carcinoma age patterns decreased after stratification by grade, especially for grade I and III tumors. Stratification by ER/PR status further reduced the heterogeneity, especially for ER(+)/PR(-) and ER(-)/(-) tumors; however, the residual heterogeneity was still observed. The number of rate-limiting events of carcinogenesis and the latency of ductal and lobular carcinomas differed, decreasing from grade I to III, with poorly differentiated tumors associated with the least number of carcinogenesis stages and the shortest latency. Tumor grades play important role in bimodal incidence of breast carcinoma and have distinct mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Race and cancer subtype could play modifying role. ER/PR status contributes to the observed heterogeneity, but is subdominant to tumor grade. Further studies on sources of "remaining" heterogeneity of population with breast cancer (such as genetic/epigenetic characteristics) are necessary. The results of this study could suggest stratification rather than unification of breast cancer prevention strategies, risk assessment, and treatment.

  7. A study on periodontal disease and systemic disease relationship a hospital based study in Bangalore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhvinder Singh Oberoi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontal deterioration has been reported to be associated with various systemic conditions like Cardiovascular disease, Diabetes, Respiratory disease, Liver cirrhosis, Bacterial Pneumonia, Nutritional deficiencies and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Aim: To assess the periodontal disease among patients with systemic disease/conditions. Materials and Method: A total of 500 patients with systemic disease/conditions (Diabetes, Cardiovascular disease, Respiratory disease and Renal disease and 500-age and gender matched controls without systemic disease/conditions were selected from the Government Hospitals in Bangalore City. The medical conditions were recorded and the periodontal status of the study population was assessed using the CPITN index. Results: The prevalence of CPITN Code 4 was found to be more among the patients with systemic disease/conditions (46.2%. The mean number of sextants with CPITN code 3 and 4 were more among the patients with systemic disease/conditions. The prevalence of CPITN code was found to be more among the patients with Respiratory disease whereas the mean number of sextants was found to be more among the patients with Diabetes, Cardiovascular and Renal disease. Conclusion: It may be concluded that the systemic diseases/conditions are associated with higher severity of periodontal disease.

  8. Mitochondrial optic neuropathies – Disease mechanisms and therapeutic strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Griffiths, Philip G.; Chinnery, Patrick F.

    2011-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal-dominant optic atrophy (DOA) are the two most common inherited optic neuropathies in the general population. Both disorders share striking pathological similarities, marked by the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and the early involvement of the papillomacular bundle. Three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations; m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C account for over 90% of LHON cases, and in DOA, the majority of affected families harbour mutations in the OPA1 gene, which codes for a mitochondrial inner membrane protein. Optic nerve degeneration in LHON and DOA is therefore due to disturbed mitochondrial function and a predominantly complex I respiratory chain defect has been identified using both in vitro and in vivo biochemical assays. However, the trigger for RGC loss is much more complex than a simple bioenergetic crisis and other important disease mechanisms have emerged relating to mitochondrial network dynamics, mtDNA maintenance, axonal transport, and the involvement of the cytoskeleton in maintaining a differential mitochondrial gradient at sites such as the lamina cribosa. The downstream consequences of these mitochondrial disturbances are likely to be influenced by the local cellular milieu. The vulnerability of RGCs in LHON and DOA could derive not only from tissue-specific, genetically-determined biological factors, but also from an increased susceptibility to exogenous influences such as light exposure, smoking, and pharmacological agents with putative mitochondrial toxic effects. Our concept of inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies has evolved over the past decade, with the observation that patients with LHON and DOA can manifest a much broader phenotypic spectrum than pure optic nerve involvement. Interestingly, these phenotypes are sometimes clinically indistinguishable from other neurodegenerative disorders such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, hereditary spastic

  9. Analysis of relationship between blood lipid metabolism levels and hs-CRP levels in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You Fengjian

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between blood lipid metabolism levels and hs-CRP levels in the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Methods: The levels of plasma blood lipid (with biochemistry) and serum hs-CRP(with high-sensitive immuno turbidimetry) were determined in 96 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as 68 normal controls. Results: The plasma blood lipid levels in 96 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were significantly lower than those in 68 controls, plasma TC and LDL-C levels were not much difference (P>0.05), plasma HDL-C level was significantly difference (P<0.05), but TG and Lp (a) levels were very prominently difference (P<0.01). And the plasma hs-CRP level was significantly increased also (P<0.01). The close relationship was between blood lipid and hs-CRP levels. Conclusion: The study of relationship between blood lipid levels and hs-CRP levels in patients with COPD was helpful for understand the disease process as well as possible mechanisms. (authors)

  10. Issues in the use of costume and its relationship to skin diseases in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article focuses on the fundamental issues in the use of costumes and its relationship to skin diseases in the Nigerian theatre. It examines skin diseases that can be contracted through the use of contaminated costumes which can bring infections to the human skin. In the Nigerian theatre, like other theatre traditions ...

  11. Temporal relationship between onset of Graves' ophthalmopathy and onset of thyroidal Graves' disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W. M.; Smit, T.; van der Gaag, R.; Koornneef, L.

    1988-01-01

    The temporal relationship between the onset of Graves' ophthalmopathy and the onset of thyroidal Graves' disease was evaluated in 125 consecutive patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. Thyroidal Graves' disease--past or present--was clinically evident in 99 patients (79%): hyperthyroidism in 3 cases.

  12. Review of the relationship of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movements in sleep to hypertension, heart disease, and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Arthur S; Rye, David B

    2009-05-01

    Evidence is reviewed documenting an intimate relationship among restless legs syndrome (RLS) / periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) and hypertension and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. Sympathetic overactivity is associated with RLS/PLMS, as manifested by increased pulse rate and blood pressure coincident with PLMS. Causality is far from definitive. Mechanisms are explored as to how RLS/PLMS may lead to high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke: (a) the sympathetic hyperactivity associated with RLS/PLMS may lead to daytime hypertension that in turn leads to heart disease and stroke; (b) in the absence of daytime hypertension, this sympathetic hyperactivity may predispose to heart disease and stroke either directly or indirectly via atherosclerotic plaque formation and rupture; and (c) comorbidities associated with RLS/PLMS, such as renal failure, diabetes, iron deficiency, and insomnia, may predispose to heart disease and stroke. One theoretical cause for sympathetic hyperactivity is insufficient All diencephalospinal dopaminergic neuron inhibition of sympathetic preganglionic neurons residing in the intermediolateral cell columns of the spinal cord. We cannot exclude the possibility that peripheral vascular, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular disease may also contribute to RLS/PLMS, and mechanisms for these possibilities are also discussed.

  13. Apolipoprotein E and Alzheimer disease: risk, mechanisms and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Chen; Liu, Chia-Chan; Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Xu, Huaxi; Bu, Guojun

    2013-02-01

    Apolipoprotein E (Apo-E) is a major cholesterol carrier that supports lipid transport and injury repair in the brain. APOE polymorphic alleles are the main genetic determinants of Alzheimer disease (AD) risk: individuals carrying the ε4 allele are at increased risk of AD compared with those carrying the more common ε3 allele, whereas the ε2 allele decreases risk. Presence of the APOE ε4 allele is also associated with increased risk of cerebral amyloid angiopathy and age-related cognitive decline during normal ageing. Apo-E-lipoproteins bind to several cell-surface receptors to deliver lipids, and also to hydrophobic amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, which is thought to initiate toxic events that lead to synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in AD. Apo-E isoforms differentially regulate Aβ aggregation and clearance in the brain, and have distinct functions in regulating brain lipid transport, glucose metabolism, neuronal signalling, neuroinflammation, and mitochondrial function. In this Review, we describe current knowledge on Apo-E in the CNS, with a particular emphasis on the clinical and pathological features associated with carriers of different Apo-E isoforms. We also discuss Aβ-dependent and Aβ-independent mechanisms that link Apo-E4 status with AD risk, and consider how to design effective strategies for AD therapy by targeting Apo-E.

  14. Pathogenic mechanisms of Acute Graft versus Host Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrara James L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD is the major complication of allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT. Older BMT recipients are a greater risk for acute GVHD after allogeneic BMT, but the causes of this association are poorly understood. Using well-characterized murine BMT models we have explored the mechanisms of increased GVHD in older mice. GVHD mortality and morbidity, and pathologic and biochemical indices were all worse in old recipients. Donor T cell responses were significantly increased in old recipients both in vivo and in vitro when stimulated by antigen-presenting cells (APCs from old mice. In a haploidential GVHD model, CD4+ donor T cells mediated more severe GVHD in old mice. We confirmed the role of aged APCs in GVHD using bone marrow chimera recipient created with either old or young bone marrow. APCs from these mice also stimulated greater responses from allogeneic cells in vitro. In a separate set of experiments we evaluated whether alloantigen expression on host target epithelium is essential for tissue damage induced by GVHD. Using bone marrow chimeras recipients in which either MHC II or MHC I alloantigen was expressed only on APCs, we found that acute GVHD does not require alloantigen expression on host target epithelium and that neutralization of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 prevents acute GVHD. These results pertain to CD4-mediated GVHD and to a lesser extent in CD8-mediated GVHD, and confirm the central role of most APCs as well as inflammatory cytokines.

  15. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailton Melo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases (ND increase with life expectancy. This paper reviews the role of oxidative stress (OS in ND and pharmacological attempts to fight against reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced neurodegeneration. Several mechanisms involved in ROS generation in neurodegeneration have been proposed. Recent articles about molecular pathways involved in ROS generation were reviewed. The progress in the development of neuroprotective therapies has been hampered because it is difficult to define targets for treatment and determine what should be considered as neuroprotective. Therefore, the attention was focused on researches about pharmacological targets that could protect neurons against OS. Since it is necessary to look for genes as the ultimate controllers of all biological processes, this paper also tried to identify gerontogenes involved in OS and neurodegeneration. Since neurons depend on glial cells to survive, recent articles about the functioning of these cells in aging and ND were also reviewed. Finally, clinical trials testing potential neuroprotective agents were critically reviewed. Although several potential drugs have been screened in in vitro and in vivo models of ND, these results were not translated in benefit of patients, and disappointing results were obtained in the majority of clinical trials.

  16. Depression and cardiovascular disease: Epidemiological evidence on their linking mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2017-03-01

    Depression's burden of disease goes beyond functioning and quality of life and extends to somatic health. Results from longitudinal cohort studies converge in illustrating that major depressive disorder (MDD) subsequently increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality with about 80%. The impact of MDD on cardiovascular health may be partly explained by mediating mechanisms such as unhealthy lifestyle (smoking, excessive alcohol use, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, therapy non-compliance) and unfavorable pathophysiological disturbances (autonomic, HPA-axis, metabolic and immuno-inflammatory dysregulations). A summary of the literature findings as well as relevant results from the large-scale Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (N=2981) are presented. Persons with MDD have significantly worse lifestyles as well as more pathophysiological disturbances as compared to healthy controls. Some of these differences seem to be specific for (typical versus 'atypical', or antidepressant treated versus drug-naive) subgroups of MDD patients. Alternative explanations are also present, namely undetected confounding, iatrogenic effects or 'third factors' such as genetics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. BLAT2DOLite: An Online System for Identifying Significant Relationships between Genetic Sequences and Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Cheng

    Full Text Available The significantly related diseases of sequences could play an important role in understanding the functions of these sequences. In this paper, we introduced BLAT2DOLite, an online system for annotating human genes and diseases and identifying the significant relationships between sequences and diseases. Currently, BLAT2DOLite integrates Entrez Gene database and Disease Ontology Lite (DOLite, which contain loci of gene and relationships between genes and diseases. It utilizes hypergeometric test to calculate P-values between genes and diseases of DOLite. The system can be accessed from: http://123.59.132.21:8080/BLAT2DOLite. The corresponding web service is described in: http://123.59.132.21:8080/BLAT2DOLite/BLAT2DOLiteIDMappingPort?wsdl.

  18. Endangered species: mitochondrial DNA loss as a mechanism of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Alan; Garcia, Iraselia; Gaytan, Norma; Jones, Edith; Maldonado, Alicia; Gilkerson, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a small maternally inherited DNA, typically present in hundreds of copies in a single human cell. Thus, despite its small size, the mitochondrial genome plays a crucial role in the metabolic homeostasis of the cell. Our understanding of mtDNA genotype-phenotype relationships is derived largely from studies of the classical mitochondrial neuromuscular diseases, in which mutations of mtDNA lead to compromised mitochondrial bioenergetic function, with devastating pathological consequences. Emerging research suggests that loss, rather than mutation, of mtDNA plays a major role across a range of prevalent human diseases, including diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and aging. Here, we examine the 'rules' of mitochondrial genetics and function, the clinical settings in which loss of mtDNA is an emerging pathogenic mechanism, and explore mtDNA damage and its consequences for the organellar network and cell at large. As extranuclear genetic material arrayed throughout the cell to support metabolism, mtDNA is increasingly implicated in a host of disease conditions, opening a range of exciting questions regarding mtDNA and its role in cellular homeostasis.

  19. The relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and gastro-esophageal reflux disease

    OpenAIRE

    Batool M Mahdi

    2011-01-01

    Background : Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a common condition, affecting 25%-40% of the population. Increasing attention has been paid to the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and reflux esophagitis. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between CagA+ H. pylori and endoscopically proven gastro-esophageal reflux disease. Patients and Methods: The study group included 60 hospital patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease between 2007 and 2009 ...

  20. Relationships among the structural topology, bond strength, and mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kai-Hsin; Tsou, Nien-Ti; Kang, Dun-Yen

    2015-10-21

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (AlSiNTs) using a multiscale computational method and then conducted a comparison with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). By comparing the potential energy estimated from molecular and macroscopic material mechanics, we were able to model the chemical bonds as beam elements for the nanoscale continuum modeling. This method allowed for simulated mechanical tests (tensile, bending, and torsion) with minimum computational resources for deducing their Young's modulus and shear modulus. The proposed approach also enabled the creation of hypothetical nanotubes to elucidate the relative contributions of bond strength and nanotube structural topology to overall nanotube mechanical strength. Our results indicated that it is the structural topology rather than bond strength that dominates the mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Finally, we investigated the relationship between the structural topology and the mechanical properties by analyzing the von Mises stress distribution in the nanotubes. The proposed methodology proved effective in rationalizing differences in the mechanical properties of AlSiNTs and SWCNTs. Furthermore, this approach could be applied to the exploration of new high-strength nanotube materials.

  1. Analysis of pramipexole dose–response relationships in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ying Wang,1 Sheng-Gang Sun,2 Sui-Qiang Zhu,3 Chun-Feng Liu,4 Yi-Ming Liu,5 Qing Di,6 Hui-Fang Shang,7 Yan Ren,8 Wei Xiang,9 Sheng-Di Chen1 1Department of Neurology, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 2Department of Neurology, Union Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 3Department of Neurology, Tongji Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 4Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 5Department of Neurology, Qilu Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, 6Department of Neurology, Nanjing Brain Hospital, Nanjing, 7Department of Neurology, West China Hospital Affiliated to Sichuan University, Chengdu, 8Department of Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, 9Medical Department, Boehringer Ingelheim (China Investment Co., Ltd., Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Pramipexole (PPX, a non-ergot dopamine receptor agonist, is a first-line treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD. A critical dose level above which a better benefit-to-harm ratio exists has not been examined.Methods: Chinese PD patients (n=464 were retrospectively analyzed by PPX maintenance dose, PD stage, combined levodopa dose, and baseline tremor contribution. The sum score of Baseline Activities of Daily Living (part II and Motor Examination (III of the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS II+III was used as a covariate for final score adjustment.Results: Sustained-release (SR and immediate-release (IR PPX showed similar efficacy based on score changes at 18 weeks, with comparable tolerability. Approximately two-third of patients received PPX at ≥1.5 mg/d, and one fourth of patients had ≥20% tremor contribution to UPDRS II+III. After treatment, patients receiving PPX ≥1.5 mg/d showed

  2. Insight Into the Relationship Between Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezi, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common condition that presents with symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation. Asthma is an equally common medical condition that often coexists with GERD. The clinical scenario of difficult-to-treat asthma in the setting of concomitant GERD leads to the possibility of GERD-induced asthma. However, asthma may also induce GERD, so confusion has developed about the role of GERD in patients with moderate to severe asthma. Acid-suppressive therapy may be initiated in patients with asthma, but controlled studies have recently questioned the role of such therapy and, thus, have caused further confusion in this field. Recent advancements in the field of esophageal physiologic testing in GERD have introduced the concept of impedance–pH monitoring, which suggests a possible role of nonacid reflux in those who continue to be symptomatic despite acid-suppressive therapy. However, recent data caution about the role of surgical fundoplication based solely on the results of impedance monitoring. This article reviews current knowledge in the fields of GERD and asthma and suggests a possible treatment option for this group of patients. PMID:28435409

  3. Connective Tissue Degeneration: Mechanisms of Palmar Fascia Degeneration (Dupuytren's Disease)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karkampouna, S.; Kreulen, M.; Obdeijn, M. C.; Kloen, P.; Dorjée, A. L.; Rivellese, F.; Chojnowski, A.; Clark, I.; Kruithof-de Julio, Marianna

    2016-01-01

    Dupuytren's disease is a connective tissue disorder of the hand causing excessive palmar fascial fibrosis with associated finger contracture and disability. The aetiology of the disease is heterogeneous, with both genetic and environmental components. The connective tissue is abnormally infiltrated

  4. Mechanisms of Quality of Life and Social Support in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Laura; Tripp, Dean A; Ropeleski, Mark; Depew, William; Curtis Nickel, J; Vanner, Stephen; Beyak, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive and social factors are essential considerations in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patient management, but existing research is limited. This study aims to expand the IBD literature by examining the relationship between social supports and QoL, while examining mechanisms in these relationships. Consenting patients attending an IBD outpatient clinic were provided a survey package (N = 164). Regressions evaluated predictors of IBD-QoL, and catastrophizing and optimism were examined as mediators between social support and IBD-QoL. Diminished IBD-QoL was predicted by younger age, greater negative spousal responses, and less perceived spousal support. Mediation models showed helplessness catastrophizing to be the lone mediator, acting as a mechanism between both negative spousal responses and perceived spousal support with IBD-QoL. Social interaction variables are associated with IBD-QoL, but patients' experience of helplessness acts to reduce their ability to benefit from social support. Patient care should consider supportive social and cognitive factors to improve IBD-QoL.

  5. Relationship between Plasma Leptin Level and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Shankar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Leptin is an adipose tissue-derived hormone shown to be related to several metabolic, inflammatory, and hemostatic factors related to chronic kidney disease. Recent animal studies have reported that infusion of recombinant leptin into normal rats for 3 weeks fosters the development of glomerulosclerosis. However, few studies have examined the association between leptin and CKD in humans. Therefore, we examined the association between plasma leptin levels and CKD in a representative sample of US adults. Methods. We examined the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey participants >20 years of age (n=5820, 53.6% women. Plasma leptin levels were categorized into quartiles (≤4.3 Fg/L, 4.4–8.7 Fg/L, 8.8–16.9 Fg/L, >16.9 Fg/L. CKD was defined as a glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 estimated from serum creatinine. Results. Higher plasma leptin levels were associated with CKD after adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, smoking, alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI, diabetes, hypertension, and serum cholesterol. Compared to quartile 1 of leptin (referent, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval of CKD associated with quartile 4 was 3.31 (1.41 to 7.78; P-trend = 0.0135. Subgroup analyses examining the relation between leptin and CKD by gender, BMI categories, diabetes, and hypertension status also showed a consistent positive association. Conclusion. Higher plasma leptin levels are associated with CKD in a representative sample of US adults.

  6. Transcriptional Profiling of Egg Allergy and Relationship to Disease Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Kosoy

    Full Text Available Egg allergy is one of the most common food allergies of childhood. There is a lack of information on the immunologic basis of egg allergy beyond the role of IgE.To use transcriptional profiling as a novel approach to uncover immunologic processes associated with different phenotypes of egg allergy.Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were obtained from egg-allergic children who were defined as reactive (BER or tolerant (BET to baked egg, and from food allergic controls (AC who were egg non-allergic. PBMCs were stimulated with egg white protein. Gene transcription was measured by microarray after 24 h, and cytokine secretion by multiplex assay after 5 days.The transcriptional response of PBMCs to egg protein differed between BER and BET versus AC subjects. Compared to the AC group, the BER group displayed increased expression of genes associated with allergic inflammation as well as corresponding increased secretion of IL-5, IL-9 and TNF-α. A similar pattern was observed for the BET group. Further similarities in gene expression patterns between BER and BET groups, as well as some important differences, were revealed using a novel Immune Annotation resource developed for this project. This approach identified several novel processes not previously associated with egg allergy, including positive associations with TLR4-stimulated myeloid cells and activated NK cells, and negative associations with an induced Treg signature. Further pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes comparing BER to BET subjects showed significant enrichment of IFN-α and IFN-γ response genes, as well as genes associated with virally-infected DCs.Transcriptional profiling identified several novel pathways and processes that differed when comparing the response to egg allergen in BET, BER, and AC groups. We conclude that this approach is a useful hypothesis-generating mechanism to identify novel immune processes associated with allergy and tolerance to forms

  7. Epigenetics and genetics in endometrial cancer: new carcinogenic mechanisms and relationship with clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, Kouji; Kisu, Iori; Yanokura, Megumi; Masuda, Kenta; Ueki, Arisa; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2012-04-01

    Endometrial cancer is the seventh most common cancer worldwide among females. An increased incidence and a younger age of patients are also predicted to occur, and therefore elucidation of the pathological mechanisms is important. However, several aspects of the mechanism of carcinogenesis in the endometrium remain unclear. Associations with genetic mutations of cancer-related genes have been shown, but these do not provide a complete explanation. Therefore, epigenetic mechanisms have been examined. Silencing of genes by DNA hypermethylation, hereditary epimutation of DNA mismatch repair genes and regulation of gene expression by miRNAs may underlie carcinogenesis in endometrial cancer. New therapies include targeting epigenetic changes using histone deacetylase inhibitors. Some cases of endometrial cancer may also be hereditary. Thus, patients with Lynch syndrome which is a hereditary disease, have a higher risk for developing endometrial cancer than the general population. Identification of such disease-related genes may contribute to early detection and prevention of endometrial cancer.

  8. Progress of the relationship between serum uric acid and neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang FU

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Serum uric acid (sUA, a natural antioxidant in human body, has been found to be related to the occurrence and development of various neurodegenerative diseases in recent years, including Parkinson's disease (PD, multiple system atrophy (MSA, Alzheimer's disease (AD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Increasing of sUA level has been found to reduce the incidence of PD and ALS, but the relationship between sUA and AD, MSA remains largely unknown. The in vitro studies and animal experiments revealed that sUA can enhance the antioxidant capacity of neurons and delay neurodegeneration and apoptosis. This paper mainly reviews the progress in epidemiological and basic studies of the relationship between sUA and neurodegenerative diseases in recent years, and aims to provide a reference for future novel prevention and treatment strategies for neurodegenerative diseases. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2018.03.010

  9. Mechanical ventilation for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radunovic, Aleksandar; Annane, Djillali; Rafiq, Muhammad K; Brassington, Ruth; Mustfa, Naveed

    2017-10-06

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease, is a fatal neurodegenerative disease. Neuromuscular respiratory failure is the most common cause of death, which usually occurs within two to five years of the disease onset. Supporting respiratory function with mechanical ventilation may improve survival and quality of life. This is the second update of a review first published in 2009. To assess the effects of mechanical ventilation (tracheostomy-assisted ventilation and non-invasive ventilation (NIV)) on survival, functional measures of disease progression, and quality of life in ALS, and to evaluate adverse events related to the intervention. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL Plus, and AMED on 30 January 2017. We also searched two clinical trials registries for ongoing studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs involving non-invasive or tracheostomy-assisted ventilation in participants with a clinical diagnosis of ALS, independent of the reported outcomes. We included comparisons with no intervention or the best standard care. For the original review, four review authors independently selected studies for assessment. Two review authors reviewed searches for this update. All review authors independently extracted data from the full text of selected studies and assessed the risk of bias in studies that met the inclusion criteria. We attempted to obtain missing data where possible. We planned to collect adverse event data from the included studies. For the original Cochrane Review, the review authors identified two RCTs involving 54 participants with ALS receiving NIV. There were no new RCTs or quasi-RCTs at the first update. One new RCT was identified in the second update but was excluded for the reasons outlined below.Incomplete data were available for one published study comparing early and late initiation of

  10. Relationship between manual dexterity and the unified parkinson's disease rating scale-motor exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sujin; Song, Chiang-Soon

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between manual dexterity and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Exam as a clinical tool for quantifying upper extremity function in persons with Parkinson's disease. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-two persons with idiopathic Parkinson's disease participated in this study. This study measured two clinical outcomes, the box-and-block test and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Exam, to investigate the relationships between manual dexterity and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Exam. [Results] The box-and-block test on the more affected side was positive relationship with the box-and-block test on the less affected side. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-motor exam score had a negative correlation with the box-and-block test results for both sides. [Conclusion] A positive association was noted between manual dexterity and motor function in patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease. The results of this study suggest that the box-and-block test and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Exam are good clinical measures that quantify upper extremity function and are necessary for the accurate evaluation of patients and to plan intervention strategies.

  11. Sex-specific relationships between adverse childhood experiences and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in five states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Timothy J; Ford, Earl S; Croft, Janet B; Merrick, Melissa T; Rolle, Italia V; Giles, Wayne H

    2014-01-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) before age 18 have been repeatedly associated with several chronic diseases in adulthood such as depression, heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and stroke. We examined sex-specific relationships between individual ACEs and the number of ACEs with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the general population. Data from 26,546 women and 19,015 men aged ≥18 years in five states of the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were analyzed. We used log-linear regression to estimate prevalence ratios (PRs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the relationship of eight ACEs with COPD after adjustment for age group, race/ethnicity, marital status, educational attainment, employment, asthma history, health insurance coverage, and smoking status. Some 63.8% of women and 62.2% of men reported ≥1 ACE. COPD was reported by 4.9% of women and 4.0% of men. In women, but not in men, there was a higher likelihood of COPD associated with verbal abuse (PR =1.30, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.61), sexual abuse (PR =1.69, 95% CI: 1.36, 2.10), living with a substance abusing household member (PR =1.49, 95% CI: 1.23, 1.81), witnessing domestic violence (PR =1.40, 95% CI: 1.14, 1.72), and parental separation/divorce (PR =1.47, 95% CI: 1.21, 1.80) during childhood compared to those with no individual ACEs. Reporting ≥5 ACEs (PR =2.08, 95% CI: 1.55, 2.80) compared to none was associated with a higher likelihood of COPD among women only. ACEs are related to COPD, especially among women. These findings underscore the need for further research that examines sex-specific differences and the possible mechanisms linking ACEs and COPD. This work adds to a growing body of research suggesting that ACEs may contribute to health problems later in life and suggesting a need for program and policy solutions.

  12. Dissecting diabetes/metabolic disease mechanisms using pluripotent stem cells and genome editing tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Kee Keong Teo

    2015-09-01

    Major conclusions: hPSCs and the advancing genome editing tools appear to be a timely and potent combination for probing molecular mechanism(s underlying diseases such as diabetes and metabolic syndromes. The knowledge gained from these hiPSC-based disease modeling studies can potentially be translated into the clinics by guiding clinicians on the appropriate type of medication to use for each condition based on the mechanism of action of the disease.

  13. Cytotoxicity of polycations: Relationship of molecular weight and the hydrolytic theory of the mechanism of toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnery, Bryn D; Wright, Michael; Cavill, Rachel; Hoogenboom, Richard; Shaunak, Sunil; Steinke, Joachim H G; Thanou, Maya

    2017-04-15

    The mechanism of polycation cytotoxicity and the relationship to polymer molecular weight is poorly understood. To gain an insight into this important phenomenon a range of newly synthesised uniform (near monodisperse) linear polyethylenimines, commercially available poly(l-lysine)s and two commonly used PEI-based transfectants (broad 22kDa linear and 25kDa branched) were tested for their cytotoxicity against the A549 human lung carcinoma cell line. Cell membrane damage assays (LDH release) and cell viability assays (MTT) showed a strong relationship to dose and polymer molecular weight, and increasing incubation times revealed that even supposedly "non-toxic" low molecular weight polymers still damage cell membranes. The newly proposed mechanism of cell membrane damage is acid catalysed hydrolysis of lipidic phosphoester bonds, which was supported by observations of the hydrolysis of DOPC liposomes. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanisms of Disease: Host-Pathogen Interactions between Burkholderia Species and Lung Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Jonathan; Bell, Rachel E.; Clark, Graeme C.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Burkholderia species can cause a range of severe, often fatal, respiratory diseases. A variety of in vitro models of infection have been developed in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism by which Burkholderia spp. gain entry to and interact with the body. The majority of studies have tended to focus on the interaction of bacteria with phagocytic cells with a paucity of information available with regard to the lung epithelium. However, the lung epithelium is becoming more widely recognized as an important player in innate immunity and the early response to infections. Here we review the complex relationship between Burkholderia species and epithelial cells with an emphasis on the most pathogenic species, Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei. The current gaps in knowledge in our understanding are highlighted along with the epithelial host-pathogen interactions that offer potential opportunities for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26636042

  15. Attentional Biases toward Attractive Alternatives and Rivals: Mechanisms Involved in Relationship Maintenance among Chinese Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidan Ma

    Full Text Available A long-term romantic relationship can offer many benefits to committed individuals. Thus, humans possess relationship maintenance mechanisms to protect against threats from those who serve as attractive alternatives or intrasexual rivals. Many studies have indicated that romantic love can act as a commitment device to activate these mechanisms. To examine the attentional bias associated with relationship maintenance among 108 college students (49 single and 59 committed females in China, we used a semantic priming procedure to activate mental representations associated with romantic love and then asked participants to complete a dot-probe task for the purpose of making a distinction between the engage and disengage components of attention. No significant engaging effects toward attractive faces were observed among committed females, but the following significant disengaging effects were found: when primed with romantic love, single females showed increased attention toward and difficulty in disengaging from attractive male faces, whereas females already in a committed relationship did not alter their attention, remaining as inattentive to attractive alternatives as they were in the baseline condition. In addition, committed females responded to love priming by exhibiting difficulty in disengaging from attractive rivals. The present findings provide evidence in the Chinese cultural context for the existence of early-stage attentional processes in the domain of relationship maintenance that committed Chinese females protected an ongoing relationship by not only being inattentive to attractive males who could serve as attractive alternatives, but also being more attentive to attractive females who could be potential rivals when mental representations associated with romantic love were primed.

  16. Attentional Biases toward Attractive Alternatives and Rivals: Mechanisms Involved in Relationship Maintenance among Chinese Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yidan; Zhao, Guang; Tu, Shen; Zheng, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A long-term romantic relationship can offer many benefits to committed individuals. Thus, humans possess relationship maintenance mechanisms to protect against threats from those who serve as attractive alternatives or intrasexual rivals. Many studies have indicated that romantic love can act as a commitment device to activate these mechanisms. To examine the attentional bias associated with relationship maintenance among 108 college students (49 single and 59 committed females) in China, we used a semantic priming procedure to activate mental representations associated with romantic love and then asked participants to complete a dot-probe task for the purpose of making a distinction between the engage and disengage components of attention. No significant engaging effects toward attractive faces were observed among committed females, but the following significant disengaging effects were found: when primed with romantic love, single females showed increased attention toward and difficulty in disengaging from attractive male faces, whereas females already in a committed relationship did not alter their attention, remaining as inattentive to attractive alternatives as they were in the baseline condition. In addition, committed females responded to love priming by exhibiting difficulty in disengaging from attractive rivals. The present findings provide evidence in the Chinese cultural context for the existence of early-stage attentional processes in the domain of relationship maintenance that committed Chinese females protected an ongoing relationship by not only being inattentive to attractive males who could serve as attractive alternatives, but also being more attentive to attractive females who could be potential rivals when mental representations associated with romantic love were primed.

  17. Attentional Biases toward Attractive Alternatives and Rivals: Mechanisms Involved in Relationship Maintenance among Chinese Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yidan; Zhao, Guang; Tu, Shen; Zheng, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A long-term romantic relationship can offer many benefits to committed individuals. Thus, humans possess relationship maintenance mechanisms to protect against threats from those who serve as attractive alternatives or intrasexual rivals. Many studies have indicated that romantic love can act as a commitment device to activate these mechanisms. To examine the attentional bias associated with relationship maintenance among 108 college students (49 single and 59 committed females) in China, we used a semantic priming procedure to activate mental representations associated with romantic love and then asked participants to complete a dot-probe task for the purpose of making a distinction between the engage and disengage components of attention. No significant engaging effects toward attractive faces were observed among committed females, but the following significant disengaging effects were found: when primed with romantic love, single females showed increased attention toward and difficulty in disengaging from attractive male faces, whereas females already in a committed relationship did not alter their attention, remaining as inattentive to attractive alternatives as they were in the baseline condition. In addition, committed females responded to love priming by exhibiting difficulty in disengaging from attractive rivals. The present findings provide evidence in the Chinese cultural context for the existence of early-stage attentional processes in the domain of relationship maintenance that committed Chinese females protected an ongoing relationship by not only being inattentive to attractive males who could serve as attractive alternatives, but also being more attentive to attractive females who could be potential rivals when mental representations associated with romantic love were primed. PMID:26309232

  18. Effects of Vegetables on Cardiovascular Diseases and Related Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Yi Tang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown that vegetable consumption is inversely related to the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, research has indicated that many vegetables like potatoes, soybeans, sesame, tomatoes, dioscorea, onions, celery, broccoli, lettuce and asparagus showed great potential in preventing and treating cardiovascular diseases, and vitamins, essential elements, dietary fibers, botanic proteins and phytochemicals were bioactive components. The cardioprotective effects of vegetables might involve antioxidation; anti-inflammation; anti-platelet; regulating blood pressure, blood glucose, and lipid profile; attenuating myocardial damage; and modulating relevant enzyme activities, gene expression, and signaling pathways as well as some other biomarkers associated to cardiovascular diseases. In addition, several vegetables and their bioactive components have been proven to protect against cardiovascular diseases in clinical trials. In this review, we analyze and summarize the effects of vegetables on cardiovascular diseases based on epidemiological studies, experimental research, and clinical trials, which are significant to the application of vegetables in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Relationships between surface coverage ratio and powder mechanics of binary adhesive mixtures for dry powder inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudén, Jonas; Frenning, Göran; Bramer, Tobias; Thalberg, Kyrre; Alderborn, Göran

    2018-04-25

    The aim of this paper was to study relationships between the content of fine particles and the powder mechanics of binary adhesive mixtures and link these relationships to the blend state. Mixtures with increasing amounts of fine particles (increasing surface coverage ratios (SCR)) were prepared using Lactopress SD as carrier and micro particles of lactose as fines (2.7 µm). Indicators of unsettled bulk density, compressibility and flowability were derived and the blend state was visually examined by imaging. The powder properties studied showed relationships to the SCR characterised by stages. At low SCR, the fine particles predominantly gathered in cavities of the carriers, giving increased bulk density and unchanged or improved flow. Thereafter, increased SCR gave a deposition of particles at the enveloped carrier surface with a gradually more irregular adhesion layer leading to a reduced bulk density and a step-wise reduced flowability. The mechanics of the mixtures at a certain stage were dependent on the structure and the dynamics of the adhesion layer and transitions between the stages were controlled by the evolution of the adhesion layer. It is advisable to use techniques based on different types of flow in order to comprehensively study the mechanics of adhesive mixtures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Relationship between IL1 gene polymorphisms and periodontal disease in Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Keiko; Miyake, Yoshihiro; Hanioka, Takashi; Arakawa, Masashi

    2014-04-01

    Epidemiological evidence on the relationship between IL1A and/or IL1B polymorphisms and periodontal disease is inconsistent. We investigated associations between three IL1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding interleukin (IL) -1α (rs1800587) and IL-1β (rs1143634 and rs16944) and the risk of periodontal disease among young Japanese women. A case-control study was performed with a total of 1150 women, including 131 subjects who had at least one tooth with a probing pocket depth of 4 mm or deeper and 1019 periodontally healthy controls. Compared with a reference group of women with the GG genotype of SNP rs16944, those with the GA genotype had a significantly reduced risk of periodontal disease, while there was no significant relationship between the AA genotype and periodontal disease. No evident relationships were observed between SNP rs1800587 or rs1143634 and periodontal disease. Our study did not reveal any evidence of interaction between the IL1 polymorphisms and smoking. The results of this study showed that the heterozygous variant genotype of the IL1 rs16944 was significantly associated with a reduced risk of periodontal disease in young Japanese women. Smoking did not significantly modify the gene-disease associations under study.

  1. Efficient chemical-disease identification and relationship extraction using Wikipedia to improve recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Daniel M; O'Boyle, Noel M; Sayle, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of the adverse effects of chemicals is important in biomedical research and healthcare. Text mining can allow timely and low-cost extraction of this knowledge from the biomedical literature. We extended our text mining solution, LeadMine, to identify diseases and chemical-induced disease relationships (CIDs). LeadMine is a dictionary/grammar-based entity recognizer and was used to recognize and normalize both chemicals and diseases to Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) IDs. The disease lexicon was obtained from three sources: MeSH, the Disease Ontology and Wikipedia. The Wikipedia dictionary was derived from pages with a disease/symptom box, or those where the page title appeared in the lexicon. Composite entities (e.g. heart and lung disease) were detected and mapped to their composite MeSH IDs. For CIDs, we developed a simple pattern-based system to find relationships within the same sentence. Our system was evaluated in the BioCreative V Chemical-Disease Relation task and achieved very good results for both disease concept ID recognition (F1-score: 86.12%) and CIDs (F1-score: 52.20%) on the test set. As our system was over an order of magnitude faster than other solutions evaluated on the task, we were able to apply the same system to the entirety of MEDLINE allowing us to extract a collection of over 250 000 distinct CIDs. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Neurodevelopment and Chronic Illness: Mechanisms of Disease and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, F. Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Successful treatment of many childhood diseases once considered terminal has resulted in the emergence of long-term effects of the disease or consequences of treatment that were previously unrecognized. Many of these long-term effects involve the central nervous system (CNS) and are developmental in the way that they emerge over time. Because we…

  3. Relationship between biochemical factors and skin symptoms in chronic venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Yasushi; Hiramoto, Keiichi; Nishimura, Yoshiyuki; Ooi, Kazuya

    2017-05-01

    Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a common venous disease of the lower extremities and patients often develop symptoms of itching and skin roughness. An easy to use and objective skin examination was recently developed that allows measurement of the level of stratum corneum content and transepidermal water loss (TEWL), which can indicate the status of the barrier function of the stratum corneum. Previous studies demonstrated that histamine production from mast cells, and tryptase and matrix metalloprotease-9 levels were associated with skin inflammation. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between dry skin and inflammatory mediators that mediate the skin symptoms of CVD subjects. The study enrolled 27 subjects with CVD and a control group consisting of 9 volunteers. The itching onset frequency was higher in women (70.4%) compared with men (50.0%). To analyze the mechanisms involved in itching we measured blood inflammatory mediators pre- and post-sclerotherapy. There was a significant decrease in Substance P, histamine, IgE, and tryptase levels post-sclerotherapy compared with those at pre-sclerotherapy. These levels were associated with the severity of itching. In addition, compared with the control subjects, there was a significant increase in the stratum corneum water content and a decrease in the TEWL in the 27 patients with CVD. This was associated with a decrease in the itching symptoms. Our findings indicate that sclerotherapy decreased levels of inflammatory mediators, increased stratum corneum water content and decreased TEWL, which coincided with reduced itching in CVD patients, indicating they might be therapeutic targets.

  4. Relationship between neural rhythm generation disorders and physical disabilities in Parkinson's disease patients' walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Leo; Uchitomi, Hirotaka; Ogawa, Ken-ichiro; Orimo, Satoshi; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Walking is generated by the interaction between neural rhythmic and physical activities. In fact, Parkinson's disease (PD), which is an example of disease, causes not only neural rhythm generation disorders but also physical disabilities. However, the relationship between neural rhythm generation disorders and physical disabilities has not been determined. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism of gait rhythm generation. In former research, neural rhythm generation disorders in PD patients' walking were characterized by stride intervals, which are more variable and fluctuate randomly. The variability and fluctuation property were quantified using the coefficient of variation (CV) and scaling exponent α. Conversely, because walking is a dynamic process, postural reflex disorder (PRD) is considered the best way to estimate physical disabilities in walking. Therefore, we classified the severity of PRD using CV and α. Specifically, PD patients and healthy elderly were classified into three groups: no-PRD, mild-PRD, and obvious-PRD. We compared the contributions of CV and α to the accuracy of this classification. In this study, 45 PD patients and 17 healthy elderly people walked 200 m. The severity of PRD was determined using the modified Hoehn-Yahr scale (mH-Y). People with mH-Y scores of 2.5 and 3 had mild-PRD and obvious-PRD, respectively. As a result, CV differentiated no-PRD from PRD, indicating the correlation between CV and PRD. Considering that PRD is independent of neural rhythm generation, this result suggests the existence of feedback process from physical activities to neural rhythmic activities. Moreover, α differentiated obvious-PRD from mild-PRD. Considering α reflects the intensity of interaction between factors, this result suggests the change of the interaction. Therefore, the interaction between neural rhythmic and physical activities is thought to plays an important role for gait rhythm generation. These characteristics have

  5. Relationship between free volume and mechanical properties of polyurethane irradiated by gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heliang Sui; Xin Ju; Xueyong Liu; Fachun Zhong; Xiaoyan Li; Baoyi Wang

    2014-01-01

    Polyurethane was irradiated at various gamma radiation doses up to 1,000 kGy at room temperature in nitrogen. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, tensile test and dynamic mechanical analysis were used to find the relationship between free volume and mechanical properties. An increase of the free volume fraction in soft segments (SS) and a decrease of the free volume fraction in hard segments (HS) during gamma radiation was observed and analyzed. The results showed that HS in polyurethane had the excellent resistance to gamma radiation, whereas SS had a tendency to degrade. The reason for the decrease of the strain at break and the ultimate tensile strength was analyzed, which showed the changes in the mechanical properties of polyurethane irradiated by gamma rays were mainly determined by the changes of free volume in SS. If the resistance properties of polyurethanes exposed to radiations need to be improved, SS should be paid more attention to. (author)

  6. [A study of relationship between occupational stress and diseases in secondary school teachers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Tao; Tang, Liu; Li, Jian; Lan, Yajia

    2015-10-01

    To analyze the relationship between occupational stress and diseases in secondary school teachers in a city of Sichuan Province, and to provide a basis for the evaluation of the long-term effects of occupational stress in teachers. With secondary school teachers as the target population, the stratified cluster sampling was adopted to conduct three studies among 780, 119, and 689 secondary school teachers in a city of Sichuan Province in 1999, 2005, and 2009, respectively. The Occupational Stress Inventory-Revised Edition (OSI-R) and working ability index (WAI) were used to investigate occupational stress and diseases in secondary school teachers. The variation of occupational stress in secondary school teachers was compared between different periods and the relationship between the intensity of stress and diseases was evaluated, on the basis of which the variation of the relationship over time was analyzed. There were significant differences in occupational stress in secondary school teachers between different periods (Pstress and psychological stress were significantly higher in 2009 than in 1999 (Poccupational stress in 2009 changed with cardiovascular, respiratory, and mental diseases. The incidence of abnormal psychological stress was a risk factor for all chronic, respiratory, and mental diseases (OR: 1.88, 2.25, and 5.91). The time dependence of odds ratio was only found in the risk of respiratory diseases: occupational stress resulted in a significant increase in the risk of respiratory diseases over time (Pstress was a risk factor for mental diseases (OR=2.31). The intensity of occupational stress in secondary school teachers changes over time. Occupational stress elevates the risks of certain diseases and has a time-dependent effect on the risk of respiratory diseases. Occupational stress in secondary school teachers needs more attention and effective prevention.

  7. Disease Manifestations and Pathogenic Mechanisms of Group A Streptococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Timothy C.; McArthur, Jason D.; Cole, Jason N.; Gillen, Christine M.; Henningham, Anna; Sriprakash, K. S.; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L.; Nizet, Victor

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), causes mild human infections such as pharyngitis and impetigo and serious infections such as necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Furthermore, repeated GAS infections may trigger autoimmune diseases, including acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, acute rheumatic fever, and rheumatic heart disease. Combined, these diseases account for over half a million deaths per year globally. Genomic and molecular analyses have now characterized a large number of GAS virulence determinants, many of which exhibit overlap and redundancy in the processes of adhesion and colonization, innate immune resistance, and the capacity to facilitate tissue barrier degradation and spread within the human host. This improved understanding of the contribution of individual virulence determinants to the disease process has led to the formulation of models of GAS disease progression, which may lead to better treatment and intervention strategies. While GAS remains sensitive to all penicillins and cephalosporins, rising resistance to other antibiotics used in disease treatment is an increasing worldwide concern. Several GAS vaccine formulations that elicit protective immunity in animal models have shown promise in nonhuman primate and early-stage human trials. The development of a safe and efficacious commercial human vaccine for the prophylaxis of GAS disease remains a high priority. PMID:24696436

  8. Relationship between stress factor and periodontal disease in a rural area population in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Akhter, Rahena; Hannan, MA; Okhubo, R; Morita, M

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Several studies conducted in Western countries have shown significant associations between stress factors and periodontal disease. However, there have been only a few studies conducted in Asian countries. The present study was designed to identify possible relationship between stress and periodontal disease in residents of a rural area in Japan. Material and Methods: Data were collected from 1,089 adults with at least six natural teeth in a typical farming district of Japan. S...

  9. A study on a relationship between prevalence of respiratory disease and air pollution in two areas

    OpenAIRE

    五島,正規

    2000-01-01

    There have been many studies on the relationship between prevalence and incidence of respiratory disease and air pollution. This study was conducted by organized efforts of a regional medical association. Every member of the association reported the numbers of patients with respiratory diseases such as asthmatic bronchitis, chronic bronchitis, and bronchial asthma, and the total number of patients who consulted him/her. The former report was conducted in K city, and this study was of the Y ar...

  10. Genetic factors and molecular mechanisms in dry eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ling; Garrett, Qian; Flanagan, Judith; Chakrabarti, Subhabrata; Papas, Eric

    2018-04-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a complex condition with a multifactorial etiology that can be difficult to manage successfully. While external factors are modifiable, treatment success is limited if genetic factors contribute to the disease. The purpose of this review is to compile research describing normal and abnormal ocular surface function on a molecular level, appraise genetic studies involving DED or DED-associated diseases, and introduce the basic methods used for conducting genetic epidemiology studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Chemical Relationship On Detection Of Ganoderma Disease On Oil Palm Tree System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, S. N. M.; Baharudin, F.; Ali, M. F.; Rahiman, M. H. F.

    2018-04-01

    Detection of fungal disease is the major issues in agricultural management and production. This disease would attack the plantation area and damaging the based root or the stem tissue of the trees. In oil palm industry, Basal Stem Rot (BSR) is the major disease in Malaysia that caused by a fungal named Ganoderma Boninense species. Since agricultural areas in Malaysia are the great factors that contribute in the economic sector, therefore the prevention and controlling this disease situation are needed to reduce the extent of the infection. These plant diseases are mostly being caused by the inflectional disease form such as viruses, viroids, bacteria, protozoa and even parasitic plants. It also could included mites and vertebrate or small insects that consume the plant tissues. Studies focused more on the breeding and relationship of the disease in the stumps, roots and soil system if oil palm trees by identifying the heavy metal; Phosphorus, copper, Iron, Manganese, Potassium and Zinc characteristic. Samples were taken from various types of physical appearance of the trees. It shows the relationship of the fungal disease breeding between oil palm trees and the heavy metals does affect the tree’s system.

  12. Relationship between health behaviors and self-reported diseases by public employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Maria Setto

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Life habits such as physical activity, leisure, eating habits, stress, smoking, and alcohol consumption can directly affect individuals' health. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between health behaviors and diseases self-reported by employees of a federal public university in southeastern Brazil. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 815 employees, of whom 347 were teachers and 468 were technical-administrative staff, aged between 20 and 65 years old. Data from this study were collected from a secondary database, from the Health Questionnaire (self-reported health conditions by teachers and technical-administrative employees, and from the institution's Vice Dean of Community Affairs. Among the variables assessed, the relationship between eating habits, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, and self-reported illnesses (chronic diseases and infectious and parasitic diseases diagnosed by a doctor within the last 12 months was analyzed. Results: The mean prevalence of these diseases among teachers and technical-administrative staff was 3.1 and 2.9, respectively. This study showed a statistically significant association between unhealthy diet and cerebrovascular accidents; between irregular performance of physical activity/sedentary lifestyle and endocrine/nutritional/metabolic and digestive diseases; between overweight and cardiovascular diseases, endocrine/nutritional/metabolic diseases, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension; and between smoking and musculoskeletal diseases. Conclusion: We suggest the adoption of preventative measures and the control of risk behaviors among these employees.

  13. A cross-sectional survey to study the relationship of periodontal disease with cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Harish, Yashoda; Hiremath, Shivalingaswamy; Puranik, Manjunath

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal deterioration has been reported to be associated with systemic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus, respiratory disease, liver cirrhosis, bacterial pneumonia, nutritional deficiencies, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The present study assessed the periodontal disease among patients with systemic conditions such as diabetes, CVD, and respiratory disease. The study population consisted of 220 patients each of CVD, respiratory disease, and diabetes mellitus, making a total of 660 patients in the systemic disease group. A control group of 340 subjects were also included in the study for comparison purpose. The periodontal status of the patients with these confirmed medical conditions was assessed using the community periodontal index of treatment needs (CPITNs) index. The prevalence of CPITN code 4 was found to be greater among the patients with respiratory disease whereas the mean number of sextants with score 4 was found to be greater among the patients with diabetes mellitus and CVD. The treatment need 0 was found to be more among the controls (1.18%) whereas the treatment need 1, 2, and 3 were more among the patients with respiratory disease (100%, 97.73%, and 54.8%), diabetes mellitus (100%, 100% and 46.4%), and CVD (100%, 97.73%, and 38.1%), in comparison to the controls (6.18%). From the findings of the present study, it can be concluded that diabetes mellitus, CVD, and respiratory disease are associated with a higher severity of periodontal disease.

  14. A cross-sectional survey to study the relationship of periodontal disease with cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, and diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhvinder Singh Oberoi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontal deterioration has been reported to be associated with systemic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD, diabetes mellitus, respiratory disease, liver cirrhosis, bacterial pneumonia, nutritional deficiencies, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Aim: The present study assessed the periodontal disease among patients with systemic conditions such as diabetes, CVD, and respiratory disease. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 220 patients each of CVD, respiratory disease, and diabetes mellitus, making a total of 660 patients in the systemic disease group. A control group of 340 subjects were also included in the study for comparison purpose. The periodontal status of the patients with these confirmed medical conditions was assessed using the community periodontal index of treatment needs (CPITNs index. Results: The prevalence of CPITN code 4 was found to be greater among the patients with respiratory disease whereas the mean number of sextants with score 4 was found to be greater among the patients with diabetes mellitus and CVD. The treatment need 0 was found to be more among the controls (1.18% whereas the treatment need 1, 2, and 3 were more among the patients with respiratory disease (100%, 97.73%, and 54.8%, diabetes mellitus (100%, 100% and 46.4%, and CVD (100%, 97.73%, and 38.1%, in comparison to the controls (6.18%. Conclusion: From the findings of the present study, it can be concluded that diabetes mellitus, CVD, and respiratory disease are associated with a higher severity of periodontal disease.

  15. Impaired folding and subunit assembly as disease mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bross, P; Andresen, B S; Gregersen, N

    1998-01-01

    folding is a common effect of missense mutations occurring in genetic diseases, (ii) increasing the level of available chaperones may augment the level of functional mutant protein in vivo, and (iii) one mutation may have multiple effects. The interplay between the chaperones assisting folding......Rapid progress in DNA technology has entailed the possibility of readily detecting mutations in disease genes. In contrast to this, techniques to characterize the effects of mutations are still very time consuming. It has turned out that many of the mutations detected in disease genes are missense...... mutations. Characterization of the effect of these mutations is particularly important in order to establish that they are disease causing and to estimate their severity. We use the experiences with investigation of medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency as an example to illustrate that (i) impaired...

  16. Evidence of salicylic acid regulatory mechanisms of disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-23

    Jul 23, 2014 ... disease resistance against banana vascular wilt. Fusarium oxysporium f.sp. ... prominent in that Central American country early last century. Cavendish ... Foc is thought to have originated in Asia, and then spread during the ...

  17. Relationship between Marketing Strategies and Governance Mechanisms: A Study in Exploration Chain Beef Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Quevedo-Silva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between actors has been unspoilt by marketing through the bias of Transaction Costs Economics. Some authors suggest that a marketing strategy can directly impact the transactional characteristics and hence the governance mechanisms chosen to coordinate transactions. Studies suggest that future work in the field of marketing include, among other factors, aspects related to the relationship between the actors. In this context, this article aims to analyze how marketing strategies can affect the choice of governance mechanisms. The study object is the chain of beef, view their representation to the national economy. To this end, we conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with various actors in the chain. It was possible to verify the existence of the relationship between marketing strategy and governance structure. In one of the cases, product differentiation, translated into more specific assets, led the producer to perform a relational contract with the fridge and to distribute your product, make an integration with retailers, through the opening of a boutique of meat. Factor that was not observed in transactions involving producers on products without distinction, for which the transactions via spot market are prevalent.  

  18. The Continuum of Aging and Age-Related Diseases: Common Mechanisms but Different Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Franceschi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Geroscience, the new interdisciplinary field that aims to understand the relationship between aging and chronic age-related diseases (ARDs and geriatric syndromes (GSs, is based on epidemiological evidence and experimental data that aging is the major risk factor for such pathologies and assumes that aging and ARDs/GSs share a common set of basic biological mechanisms. A consequence is that the primary target of medicine is to combat aging instead of any single ARD/GSs one by one, as favored by the fragmentation into hundreds of specialties and sub-specialties. If the same molecular and cellular mechanisms underpin both aging and ARDs/GSs, a major question emerges: which is the difference, if any, between aging and ARDs/GSs? The hypothesis that ARDs and GSs such as frailty can be conceptualized as accelerated aging will be discussed by analyzing in particular frailty, sarcopenia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson as well as Down syndrome as an example of progeroid syndrome. According to this integrated view, aging and ARDs/GSs become part of a continuum where precise boundaries do not exist and the two extremes are represented by centenarians, who largely avoided or postponed most ARDs/GSs and are characterized by decelerated aging, and patients who suffered one or more severe ARDs in their 60s, 70s, and 80s and show signs of accelerated aging, respectively. In between these two extremes, there is a continuum of intermediate trajectories representing a sort of gray area. Thus, clinically different, classical ARDs/GSs are, indeed, the result of peculiar combinations of alterations regarding the same, limited set of basic mechanisms shared with the aging process. Whether an individual will follow a trajectory of accelerated or decelerated aging will depend on his/her genetic background interacting lifelong with environmental and lifestyle factors. If ARDs and GSs are

  19. THE CLINICAL AND PATHOGENETIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BEHCET'S DISEASE AND MENTAL DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Anatolyevna Ishchenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the results of an investigation into the relationship between Behcet's disease (BB and mental disorders. It establishes the importance of an emotional stress factor for developing the clinical symptoms and disease. In its turn, the systemic immune inflammatory disease and its complications become a source of mental disorders. The literature describes different variants of BB, but anxiety-depressive spectrum disorders and moderate cognitive impairments are most common. The presence of depression contributes significantly to lower quality of life in patients with BB.

  20. Investigating the genetic relationship between Alzheimer’s disease and cancer using GWAS summary statistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Yen Chen Anne; Cho, Kelly; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Cormack, Jean; Blalock, Kendra; Campbell, Peter T.; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Figueiredo, Jane; James Gauderman, W.; Gong, Jian; Green, Roger C.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Harju, John F.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Jacobs, Eric J; Jenkins, Mark A.; Jiao, Shuo; Li, Li; Lin, Yi; Manion, Frank J.; Moreno, Victor; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Peters, Ulrike; Raskin, Leon; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Severi, Gianluca; Stenzel, Stephanie L.; Thomas, Duncan C.; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Hunter, David J.; Lindström, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Ahsan, Habib; Whittemore, Alice S.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel A.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckman, Lars; Crisponi, Laura; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Easton, Douglas F.; Turnbull, Clare A.; Rahman, Nazneen; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Muir, Kenneth; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher; Schumacher, Fred; Travis, Ruth C.; Riboli, Elio; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Han, Younghun; Su, Li; Wei, Yongyue; Hung, Rayjean J.; Brhane, Yonathan; McLaughlin, John; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D.; Bickeböller, Heike; Rosenberger, Albert; Houlston, Richard S.; Caporaso, Neil E; Landi, Maria Teresa; Heinrich, Joachim; Risch, Angela; Wu, Xifeng; Ye, Yuanqing; Christiani, David C.; Amos, Christopher I; Liang, Liming; Driver, Jane A.; IGAP Consortium, Colorectal Transdisciplinary Study (CORECT); Discovery, Biology, and Risk of Inherited Variants in Breast Cancer (DRIVE)

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence from both epidemiology and basic science suggest an inverse association between Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cancer. We examined the genetic relationship between AD and various cancer types using GWAS summary statistics from the IGAP and GAME-ON consortia. Sample size ranged from

  1. The Relationship between Speech Production and Speech Perception Deficits in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Keyser, Kim; Santens, Patrick; Bockstael, Annelies; Botteldooren, Dick; Talsma, Durk; De Vos, Stefanie; Van Cauwenberghe, Mieke; Verheugen, Femke; Corthals, Paul; De Letter, Miet

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the possible relationship between hypokinetic speech production and speech intensity perception in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Method: Participants included 14 patients with idiopathic PD and 14 matched healthy controls (HCs) with normal hearing and cognition. First, speech production was objectified…

  2. Impact of Typical Aging and Parkinson's Disease on the Relationship among Breath Pausing, Syntax, and Punctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Jessica E.; Darling, Meghan; Francis, Elaine J.; Zhang, Dabao

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The present study examines the impact of typical aging and Parkinson's disease (PD) on the relationship among breath pausing, syntax, and punctuation. Method: Thirty young adults, 25 typically aging older adults, and 15 individuals with PD participated. Fifteen participants were age- and sex-matched to the individuals with PD.…

  3. Gender differences in the relationship between built environment and non-communicable diseases: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valson, Joanna Sara; Kutty, V Raman

    2018-02-05

    Non-communicable diseases are on the rise globally. Risk factors of non-communicable diseases continue to be a growing concern in both developed and developing countries. With significant rise in population and establishment of buildings, rapid changes have taken place in the built environment. Relationship between health and place, particularly with non-communicable diseases has been established in previous literature. This systematic review assesses the current evidence on influence of gender in the relationship between built environment and non-communicable diseases. A systematic literature search using PubMed was done to identify all studies that reported relationship between gender and built environment. All titles and abstracts were scrutinised to include only articles based on risk factors, prevention, treatment and outcome of non-communicable diseases. The Gender Analysis Matrix developed by the World Health Organization was used to describe the findings of gender differences. Sex differences, biological susceptibility, gender norms/ values, roles and activities related to gender and access to/control over resources were themes for the differences in the relationship. A total of 15 out of 214 articles met the inclusion criteria. Majority of the studies were on risk factors of non-communicable diseases, particularly cardiovascular diseases. Gender differences in physical access to recreational facilities, neighbourhood perceptions of safety and walkability have been documented. Men and women showed differential preferences to walking, engaging in physical activity and in perceiving safety of the neighbourhood. Girls and boys showed differences in play activities at school and in their own neighbourhood environment. Safety from crime and safety from traffic were also perceived important to engage in physical activity. Gender norms and gender roles and activities have shown basis for the differences in the prevalence of non-communicable diseases. Sparse

  4. Commentary: research on the mechanisms of the occupational lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rom, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    In this commentary, the pathogenesis of alveolitis is examined and elucidated by animal models. The use of broncho alveolar lavage (BAL) and Ga-67 citrate whole-body scanning as a measure of the activity of alveolar inflammation in workers is discussed. Gallium scan indices have been reported to be elevated in asbestosis, silicosis, and coal workers' pneumoconiosis; diseases which may now be evaluated at earlier, potentially reversible stages. Research in emphysema and other lung diseases associated with α 1 antitrypsin deficiency may help explain why coal miners develop focal emphysema. Furthermore, investigation of genetic factors may reveal why workers with similar exposures have a different susceptibility for the development of pneumoconiosis or lung cancer. Occupational asthma may not respond to removal of the worker from exposure because reactive airways may be a predisposing factor for chronic ashthma and chronic obstructive lung disease. A continuing challenge will be disease risk in new industries such as electronics and alternate energy industries and new diseases in worker groups not previously studied, such as the variety of pneumoconioses among dental laboratory technicians who work with exotic metal alloys. 52 references

  5. The temporal relationship between reduction of early imitative responses and the development of attention mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benga Oana

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine whether early imitative responses fade out following the maturation of attentional mechanisms, the relationship between primitive imitation behaviors and the development of attention was examined in 4-month-old infants. They were divided into high and low imitators, based on an index of imitation. The status of attention was assessed by studying inhibition of return (IOR. Nine-month-old infants were also tested to confirm the hypothesis. Results The IOR latency data replicate previous results that infants get faster to produce a covert shift of attention with increasing age. However, those 4-month-olds who showed less imitation had more rapid saccades to the cue before target presentation. Conclusion The cortical control of saccade planning appears to be related to an apparent drop in early imitation. We interpret the results as suggesting a relationship between the status of imitation and the neural development of attention-related eye movement.

  6. Shared molecular and cellular mechanisms of premature ageing and ageing-associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubben, Nard; Misteli, Tom

    2017-10-01

    Ageing is the predominant risk factor for many common diseases. Human premature ageing diseases are powerful model systems to identify and characterize cellular mechanisms that underpin physiological ageing. Their study also leads to a better understanding of the causes, drivers and potential therapeutic strategies of common diseases associated with ageing, including neurological disorders, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Using the rare premature ageing disorder Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome as a paradigm, we discuss here the shared mechanisms between premature ageing and ageing-associated diseases, including defects in genetic, epigenetic and metabolic pathways; mitochondrial and protein homeostasis; cell cycle; and stem cell-regenerative capacity.

  7. Bidirectional relationship between renal function and periodontal disease in older Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Akihiro; Iwasaki, Masanori; Miyazaki, Hideo; Nakamura, Kazutoshi

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reciprocal effects of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and periodontal disease. A total of 332 postmenopausal never smoking women were enrolled, and their serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, serum osteocalcin and serum cystatin C levels were measured. Poor renal function was defined as serum cystatin C > 0.91 mg/l. Periodontal disease markers, including clinical attachment level and the periodontal inflamed surface area (PISA), were also evaluated. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the relationships between renal function and periodontal disease markers, serum osteocalcin level and hsCRP level. The prevalence-rate ratios (PRRs) on multiple Poisson regression analyses were determined to evaluate the relationships between periodontal disease markers and serum osteocalcin, serum cystatin C and serum hsCRP levels. On logistic regression analysis, PISA was significantly associated with serum cystatin C level. The odds ratio for serum cystatin C level was 2.44 (p = 0.011). The PRR between serum cystatin C level and periodontal disease markers such as number of sites with clinical attachment level ≥6 mm was significantly positive (3.12, p periodontal disease can have reciprocal effects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Relationships between chemical structure, mechanical properties and materials processing in nanopatterned organosilicate fins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Stan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The exploitation of nanoscale size effects to create new nanostructured materials necessitates the development of an understanding of relationships between molecular structure, physical properties and material processing at the nanoscale. Numerous metrologies capable of thermal, mechanical, and electrical characterization at the nanoscale have been demonstrated over the past two decades. However, the ability to perform nanoscale molecular/chemical structure characterization has only been recently demonstrated with the advent of atomic-force-microscopy-based infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR and related techniques. Therefore, we have combined measurements of chemical structures with AFM-IR and of mechanical properties with contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM to investigate the fabrication of 20–500 nm wide fin structures in a nanoporous organosilicate material. We show that by combining these two techniques, one can clearly observe variations of chemical structure and mechanical properties that correlate with the fabrication process and the feature size of the organosilicate fins. Specifically, we have observed an inverse correlation between the concentration of terminal organic groups and the stiffness of nanopatterned organosilicate fins. The selective removal of the organic component during etching results in a stiffness increase and reinsertion via chemical silylation results in a stiffness decrease. Examination of this effect as a function of fin width indicates that the loss of terminal organic groups and stiffness increase occur primarily at the exposed surfaces of the fins over a length scale of 10–20 nm. While the observed structure–property relationships are specific to organosilicates, we believe the combined demonstration of AFM-IR with CR-AFM should pave the way for a similar nanoscale characterization of other materials where the understanding of such relationships is essential.

  9. A review of the relationship between leg power and selected chronic disease in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strollo, S. E.; Caserotti, Paolo; Ward, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    characterized. Importantly, individuals with these conditions have shown improved leg power with training. METHODS: A search was performed using PubMed to identify original studies published in English from January 1998 to August 2013. Leg power studies, among older adults ≥ 50 years of age, which assessed......OBJECTIVE: This review investigates the relationship between leg muscle power and the chronic conditions of osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease among older adults. Current literature assessing the impact of chronic disease on leg power has not yet been comprehensively......), diabetes mellitus (n=5), and cardiovascular disease (n=6). Studies generally supported associations of lower leg power among older adults with chronic disease, although small sample sizes, cross-sectional data, homogenous populations, varied disease definitions, and inconsistent leg power methods limited...

  10. RELATIONSHIP OF SOME MARKERS OF PSYCHO-EMOTIONAL STATE AND DEVELOPMENT OF SOMATIC PATHOLOGY IN THE PATIENTS WITH OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Игорь Петрович Данилов

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions. The relationship between the emotional and personal attitude to health and a healthy lifestyle and the development of somatic diseases in the patients with occupational diseases has been revealed.

  11. Mechanisms of action of brain insulin against neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Mahesh; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2014-06-01

    Insulin, a pancreatic hormone, is best known for its peripheral effects on the metabolism of glucose, fats and proteins. There is a growing body of evidence linking insulin action in the brain to neurodegenerative diseases. Insulin present in central nervous system is a regulator of central glucose metabolism nevertheless this glucoregulation is not the main function of insulin in the brain. Brain is known to be specifically vulnerable to oxidative products relative to other organs and altered brain insulin signaling may cause or promote neurodegenerative diseases which invalidates and reduces the quality of life. Insulin located within the brain is mostly of pancreatic origin or is produced in the brain itself crosses the blood-brain barrier and enters the brain via a receptor-mediated active transport system. Brain Insulin, insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-mediated signaling pathways play important roles in the regulation of peripheral metabolism, feeding behavior, memory and maintenance of neural functions such as neuronal growth and differentiation, neuromodulation and neuroprotection. In the present review, we would like to summarize the novel biological and pathophysiological roles of neuronal insulin in neurodegenerative diseases and describe the main signaling pathways in use for therapeutic strategies in the use of insulin to the cerebral tissues and their biological applications to neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Neuropeptides in Alzheimer's Disease : From Pathophysiological Mechanisms to Therapeutic Opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, Debby; Van Dijck, Annemie; Janssen, Leen; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    Neuropeptides are found throughout the entire nervous system where they can act as neurotransmitter, neuromodulator or neurohormone. In those functions, they play important roles in the regulation of cognition and behavior. In brain disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD), where abnormal cognition

  13. Escherichia coli Shiga Toxin Mechanisms of Action in Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom G. Obrig

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli is a contaminant of food and water that in humans causes a diarrheal prodrome followed by more severe disease of the kidneys and an array of symptoms of the central nervous system. The systemic disease is a complex referred to as diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS. D+HUS is characterized by thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. This review focuses on the renal aspects of D+HUS. Current knowledge of this renal disease is derived from a combination of human samples, animal models of D+HUS, and interaction of Shiga toxin with isolated renal cell types. Shiga toxin is a multi-subunit protein complex that binds to a glycosphingolipid receptor, Gb3, on select eukaryotic cell types. Location of Gb3 in the kidney is predictive of the sites of action of Shiga toxin. However, the toxin is cytotoxic to some, but not all cell types that express Gb3. It also can cause apoptosis or generate an inflammatory response in some cells. Together, this myriad of results is responsible for D+HUS disease.

  14. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY Autoimmune thyroid disease: old and new players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effraimidis, Grigoris; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2014-01-01

    The last 10 years have seen some progress in understanding the etiology of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). The female preponderance can now be explained - at least in part - by fetal microchimerism and X-chromosome inactivation. The number of identified susceptibility genes for AITD is increasing

  15. Relationships between the curing conditions and some mechanical properties of hybrid thermosetting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias Filho, Newton L.; Aquino, Hermes A. de; Cardoso, Celso X.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between the heat of polymerization (ΑH) and activation energy (E a ) parameters, obtained by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the ratio of epoxy resin to hardener of the thermosetting materials based on an organic-inorganic hybrid epoxy resin (OG) was investigated. Activation energy (E a ) and heat of polymerization (ΑH) increased with an increasing OG content, up to 70 wt %. Further increase in OG content to 80 wt % reduced E a and ΑH. Dynamic mechanical analysis indicates that the maximum cross-link density is obtained at 83 wt % OG, whereas fracture toughness and tensile modulus mechanical properties are maximized at 70 wt % OG. (author)

  16. Relationships between the curing conditions and some mechanical properties of hybrid thermosetting materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias Filho, Newton L.; Aquino, Hermes A. de [UNESP, Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica e Quimica]. E-mail: nldias@dfq.feis.unesp.br; Cardoso, Celso X. [UNESP, Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica, Quimica e Biologia

    2006-09-15

    The relationship between the heat of polymerization ({alpha}H) and activation energy (E{sub a}) parameters, obtained by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the ratio of epoxy resin to hardener of the thermosetting materials based on an organic-inorganic hybrid epoxy resin (OG) was investigated. Activation energy (E{sub a}) and heat of polymerization ({alpha}H) increased with an increasing OG content, up to 70 wt %. Further increase in OG content to 80 wt % reduced E{sub a} and {alpha}H. Dynamic mechanical analysis indicates that the maximum cross-link density is obtained at 83 wt % OG, whereas fracture toughness and tensile modulus mechanical properties are maximized at 70 wt % OG. (author)

  17. Heterocyclic Schiff bases as non toxic antioxidants: Solvent effect, structure activity relationship and mechanism of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanty, Angamaly Antony; Mohanan, Puzhavoorparambil Velayudhan

    2018-03-01

    Phenolic heterocyclic imine based Schiff bases from Thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde and Pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde were synthesized and characterized as novel antioxidants. The solvent effects of these Schiff bases were determined and compared with standard antioxidants, BHA employing DPPH assay and ABTS assay. Fixed reaction time and Steady state measurement were used for study. IC50 and EC50 were calculated. Structure-activity relationship revealed that the electron donating group in the phenolic ring increases the activity where as the electron withdrawing moiety decreases the activity. The Schiff base derivatives showed antioxidant property by two different pathways namely SPLET and HAT mechanisms in DPPH assay. While in ABTS method, the reaction between ABTS radical and Schiff bases involves electron transfer followed by proton transfer (ET-PT) mechanism. The cytotoxicity of these compounds has been evaluated by MTT assay. The results showed that all these compounds are non toxic in nature.

  18. The Relationship Between Periodontal Disease and Neoplasms of the Oral Cavity: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourelahi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Context Oral cavity is one of the most common sites for neoplasms with a multifactorial etiology. Tobacco and alcohol are the main risk factors. Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease affecting periodontal tissues such as gingiva, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Periodontal disease is linked to many systemic diseases. Recently a link between periodontal disease and cancer is suggested. The current review article aimed to evaluate the association between periodontal disease and risk of cancer in the oral cavity and some related factors. Evidence Acquisition Evidence suggests that oral cavity cancer is significantly more prevalent in patients with periodontal disease, poor oral hygiene or more missing teeth. Clinically, gingival squamous cell carcinoma (GSCC usually appears as an exophytic mass with a granular, papillary or verrucous surface or presents as an ulcerative lesion. Some reported cases of GSCC mimicking periodontal disease include gingival enlargement with no bone invasion, dentoalveolar abscess, erosive erythematosus lesion with keratotic papules, root exposure and tooth mobility, verrucous leukoplakia, verruciform xanthoma and development of hyperplastic granulation tissue after tooth extraction. Greater burden of oral flora that produce carcinogenic metabolites, human papilloma virus (HPV and other viruses that are residents of periodontal pocket, increased amount of inflammatory mediators and markers and some periodontal pathogens affecting cell cycle leading to mutation and dysplasia are considered as the rational for the relationship between malignant lesions of oral cavity and periodontal disease. Results Cancer of the oral cavity and periodontal disease are related from different aspects. Periodontal disease and tooth loss are considered as independent risk factors for cancer. Gingival squamous cell carcinoma can also mimic periodontal disease leading to misdiagnosis and delayed commencement of appropriate

  19. Molecular mechanisms underlying the potential antiobesity-related diseases effect of cocoa polyphenols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, F.; Ismail, A.; Kersten, A.H.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and related metabolic diseases (e.g., type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and hypertension) are the most prevailing nutrition-related issues in the world. An emerging feature of obesity is their relationship with chronic inflammation that begins in white adipose tissue and eventually

  20. Understanding the biological mechanisms of Zika virus disease ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project will use advanced biomolecular, genomics and proteomics techniques to explain the molecular mechanisms by which the Zika virus infects and persists in the human body, how it affects the human reproductive and central nervous system, and how the risk of fetal abnormalities can be better predicted in infected ...

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Shared Mechanistic and Phenotypic Traits Suggest Overlapping Disease Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulin, Francisco; Doyle, Tracy J; Fletcher, Elaine A; Ascherman, Dana P; Rosas, Ivan O

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of clinically evident interstitial lung disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is approximately 10%. An additional 33% of undiagnosed patients have interstitial lung abnormalities that can be detected with high-resolution computed tomography. Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease patients have three times the risk of death compared to those with rheumatoid arthritis occurring in the absence of interstitial lung disease, and the mortality related to interstitial lung disease is rising. Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease is most commonly classified as the usual interstitial pneumonia pattern, overlapping mechanistically and phenotypically with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but can occur in a non-usual interstitial pneumonia pattern, mainly nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Based on this, we propose two possible pathways to explain the coexistence of rheumatoid arthritis and interstitial lung disease: (i) Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease with a non-usual interstitial pneumonia pattern may come about when an immune response against citrullinated peptides taking place in another site (e.g. the joints) subsequently affects the lungs; (ii) Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease with a usual interstitial pneumonia pattern may represent a disease process in which idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis-like pathology triggers an immune response against citrullinated proteins that promotes articular disease indicative of rheumatoid arthritis. More studies focused on elucidating the basic mechanisms leading to different sub-phenotypes of rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease and the overlap with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are necessary to improve our understanding of the disease process and to define new therapeutic targets.

  2. The Influence of Corporate Governance Mechanism on the Relationship between Related Party Transactions and Earnings Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aria Farah Mita

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between related party transactions (RPT and earnings management. This study argues there is a different influence between RPT a priori likely to result in expropriation and RPT a priori not likely to result in expropriation. RPT a priori likely to result in expropriation creates an incentive to management or controlling shareholder to overstate income to cover or mask their expropriation. This study uses non-absolute discretionary accruals based on Kazsnik model to proxy earnings management. Corporate governance mechanism should reduce the incentive to overstate income in a company that involves in RPT a priori likely to result in expropriation. The results of this study show that the earnings management (income increasing is affected by the existence of RPT a priori likely to result in expropriation and corporate governance mechanism, but it is not affected by the size/value of the transactions. As expected, companies involving in RPT a priori likely to result in expropriation with weak corporate governance mechanism, tend to manage earnings that increase income. We find that strong corporate governance mechanism decreases the discretionary accruals in companies which have RPT a priori likely to result in expropriation.

  3. [Relationship between disease burden and research funding through the Health Research Foundation in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-García, Teresa; Moreno-Casbas, Teresa; González-María, Esther; Fuentelsaz-Gallego, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the relationship between burden of disease during 2007-2009 and public funding of research in health in Spain during 2008-2010. Descriptive cross-sectional study of burden of disease and funding allocated for research in diseases in the Spanish National Health System. A review was made of a total of 6,573 project titles funded for the years 2008, 2009 and 2010. During this period, a total of 472.7 million Euros were assigned as grants for research projects. Malignant tumors and neuropsychiatric diseases were the illnesses with greatest funding support. During the study period, it was estimated that there was a total of 15,253,331.3 disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) in Spain, with neuropsychiatric diseases being the category representing most DALYs with 4,396,900 (28.8%). The relationship between funding and DALYs was obtained with a Pearson r equal to 0.759 (p<0.001). The study of congenital diseases had higher funding per DALY than any other disease with an investment of 290.4€/DALY. Among these, the study of cleft palate and esophageal atresia, with ratios of 3,432.7€/DALY and 3,387.6€/DALY respectively, obtained the greatest funding. The study shows that the relative distribution of economic resources in the study period is consistent with the burden suffered by the Spanish population. This relationship is altered by the funding of the study of congenital anomalies, because of the low number of projects in this area. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: molecular mechanisms for the hepatic steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Seung-Hoi

    2013-09-01

    Liver plays a central role in the biogenesis of major metabolites including glucose, fatty acids, and cholesterol. Increased incidence of obesity in the modern society promotes insulin resistance in the peripheral tissues in humans, and could cause severe metabolic disorders by inducing accumulation of lipid in the liver, resulting in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD, which is characterized by increased fat depots in the liver, could precede more severe diseases such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and in some cases hepatocellular carcinoma. Accumulation of lipid in the liver can be traced by increased uptake of free fatty acids into the liver, impaired fatty acid beta oxidation, or the increased incidence of de novo lipogenesis. In this review, I would like to focus on the roles of individual pathways that contribute to the hepatic steatosis as a precursor for the NAFLD.

  5. Alzheimer's Disease: Mechanism and Approach to Cell Therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Amemori, Takashi; Jendelová, Pavla; Růžička, Jiří; Machová-Urdzíková, Lucia; Syková, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 11 (2015), s. 26417-26451 E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : alzheimer’s disease * tau * amyloid-β * mesenchymal stem cell s * neural stem cell s Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.257, year: 2015

  6. The relationship between different dimensions of alcohol use and the burden of disease-an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Jürgen; Gmel, Gerhard E; Gmel, Gerrit; Hasan, Omer S M; Imtiaz, Sameer; Popova, Svetlana; Probst, Charlotte; Roerecke, Michael; Room, Robin; Samokhvalov, Andriy V; Shield, Kevin D; Shuper, Paul A

    2017-06-01

    Alcohol use is a major contributor to injuries, mortality and the burden of disease. This review updates knowledge on risk relations between dimensions of alcohol use and health outcomes to be used in global and national Comparative Risk Assessments (CRAs). Systematic review of reviews and meta-analyses on alcohol consumption and health outcomes attributable to alcohol use. For dimensions of exposure: volume of alcohol use, blood alcohol concentration and patterns of drinking, in particular heavy drinking occasions were studied. For liver cirrhosis, quality of alcohol was additionally considered. For all outcomes (mortality and/or morbidity): cause of death and disease/injury categories based on International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes used in global CRAs; harm to others. In total, 255 reviews and meta-analyses were identified. Alcohol use was found to be linked causally to many disease and injury categories, with more than 40 ICD-10 three-digit categories being fully attributable to alcohol. Most partially attributable disease categories showed monotonic relationships with volume of alcohol use: the more alcohol consumed, the higher the risk of disease or death. Exceptions were ischaemic diseases and diabetes, with curvilinear relationships, and with beneficial effects of light to moderate drinking in people without heavy irregular drinking occasions. Biological pathways suggest an impact of heavy drinking occasions on additional diseases; however, the lack of medical epidemiological studies measuring this dimension of alcohol use precluded an in-depth analysis. For injuries, except suicide, blood alcohol concentration was the most important dimension of alcohol use. Alcohol use caused marked harm to others, which has not yet been researched sufficiently. Research since 2010 confirms the importance of alcohol use as a risk factor for disease and injuries; for some health outcomes, more than one dimension of use needs to be considered. Epidemiological

  7. Inflammatory mechanisms linking periodontal diseases to cardiovascular diseases (also published in Journal of Periodontology 2013 Apr 84 (4 Suppl): S51-69)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenkein, H.A.; Loos, B.G.

    2013-01-01

    Aims In this article, inflammatory mechanisms that link periodontal diseases to cardiovascular diseases are reviewed. Methods This article is a literature review. Results Studies in the literature implicate a number of possible mechanisms that could be responsible for increased inflammatory

  8. The relationship between different information sources and disease-related patient knowledge and anxiety in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinger, C P; Carbery, I; Warren, V; Rehman, A F; Williams, C J; Mumtaz, S; Bholah, H; Sood, R; Gracie, D J; Hamlin, P J; Ford, A C

    2017-01-01

    Patient education forms a cornerstone of management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The Internet has opened new avenues for information gathering. To determine the relationship between different information sources and patient knowledge and anxiety in patients with IBD. The use of information sources in patients with IBD was examined via questionnaire. Anxiety was assessed with the hospital anxiety and depression scale and disease-related patient knowledge with the Crohn's and colitis knowledge score questionnaires. Associations between these outcomes and demographics, disease-related factors, and use of different information sources were analysed using linear regression analysis. Of 307 patients (165 Crohn's disease, 142 ulcerative colitis) 60.6% were female. Participants used the hospital IBD team (82.3%), official leaflets (59.5%), and official websites (53.5%) most frequently in contrast to alternative health websites (9%). University education (P sex (P = 0.004), clinically active disease (P sources are associated with better knowledge or worse anxiety levels. Face-to-face education and written information materials remain the first line of patient education. Patients should be guided towards official information websites and warned about the association between the use of alternative health websites or random links and anxiety. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Relationship between occupational stress and cardiovascular diseases risk factors in drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglari, Hamed; Ebrahimi, Mohammad Hossein; Salehi, Maryam; Poursadeghiyan, Mohsen; Ahmadnezhad, Iman; Abbasi, Milad

    2016-11-18

    Of all work stressors, occupational stress is the leading cause of many disorders among workers. Drivers are classified as a high risk group for work related stress. This study set out to determine the relationship between risk factors of cardiovascular diseases and occupational stress among drivers. Two hundred and twenty two Ilam's intercity drivers were selected for the study. For measuring work stress, the Osipow work stress questionnaire was used. After a 10-h fasting period, systolic and diastolic blood pressure was recorded. Intravenous blood samples were taken to determine cholesterol, triglyceride and blood glucose levels. The independent samples t-test and Pearson's correlation test were used to assess the relationship between variables and occupational stress. Seventy-one percent of the intercity drivers suffered from average to acute stress, and 3.1% of them suffered from acute stress. There was no significant relationship between occupational stress and diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.254) among the drivers. Nevertheless, the Pearson's correlation test demonstrated a strong relationship between work stress and blood glucose (p stress were observed in the Ilam's intercity drivers. Occupational stress may have effect on blood glucose levels but the results did not suggest a considerable relationship between risk factors of cardiovascular diseases and occupational stress among intercity drivers. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2016;29(6):895-901. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  10. Knowledge of medical doctors in Turkey about the relationship between periodontal disease and systemic health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşdemir, Zekeriya; Alkan, Banu Arzu

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between periodontal disease (PD) and systemic health (SH) is necessary for the accurate diagnosis and treatment of both. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge of medical doctors in Turkey with regard to the association between PD and SH. This study was carried out using self-reported questionnaires that were sent to medical doctors who work at various universities and public and private hospitals in different cities in Turkey. The questionnaires consisted of questions about the demographic information of the medical doctors, as well as the knowledge of those doctors about the relationship between PD and SH. In total, 1,766 responses were received and 90.8% of the participants agreed that there was a relationship between PD and SH. Diabetes mellitus was the most frequent systemic disease (66.8%) known to be related to PD. Of the participants, 56.5% of the medical doctors referred their patients to periodontists for different reasons. Gingival bleeding was the most frequent reason for patient referrals, with 44% of doctors giving such referrals. Doctors who worked in basic medical sciences were significantly less aware of the relationship between PD and SH than the doctors in other specialties. Although the vast majority of the medical doctors reported that they knew the relationship between PD and SH, the findings of this study showed that this awareness was not supported by precise knowledge, and often failed to translate into appropriate clinical practice.

  11. Relationships between Mechanical Variables in the Traditional and Close-Grip Bench Press

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockie Robert G.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aim was to determine relationships between mechanical variables in the one-repetition maximum (1RM traditional bench press (TBP and close-grip bench press (CGBP. Twenty resistance-trained men completed a TBP and CGBP 1RM. The TBP was performed with the preferred grip; the CGBP with a grip width of 95% biacromial distance. A linear position transducer measured: lift distance and duration; work; and peak and mean power, velocity, and force. Paired samples t-tests (p < 0.05 compared the 1RM and mechanical variables for the TBP and CGBP; effect sizes (d were also calculated. Pearson’s correlations (r; p < 0.05 computed relationships between the TBP and CGBP. 1RM, lift duration, and mean force were greater in the TBP (d = 0.30-3.20. Peak power and velocity was greater for the CGBP (d = 0.50-1.29. The 1RM TBP correlated with CGBP 1RM, power, and force (r = 0.685-0.982. TBP work correlated with CGBP 1RM, lift distance, power, force, and work (r = 0.542-0.931. TBP power correlated with CGBP 1RM, power, force, velocity, and work (r = 0.484-0.704. TBP peak and mean force related to CGBP 1RM, power, and force (r = 0.596-0.980. Due to relationships between the load, work, power, and force for the TBP and CGBP, the CGBP could provide similar strength adaptations to the TBP with long-term use. The velocity profile for the CGBP was different to that of the TBP. The CGBP could be used specifically to improve high-velocity, upper-body pushing movements.

  12. Understanding The Relationships Between Noncommunicable Diseases, Unhealthy Lifestyles, And Country Wealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollyky, Thomas J; Templin, Tara; Andridge, Caroline; Dieleman, Joseph L

    2015-09-01

    The amount of international aid given to address noncommunicable diseases is minimal. Most of it is directed to wealthier countries and focuses on the prevention of unhealthy lifestyles. Explanations for the current direction of noncommunicable disease aid include that these are diseases of affluence that benefit from substantial research and development into their treatment in high-income countries and are better addressed through domestic tax and policy measures to reduce risk-factor prevalence than through aid programs. This study assessed these justifications. First, we examined the relationships among premature adult mortality, defined as the probability that a person who has lived to the age of fifteen will die before the age of sixty from noncommunicable diseases; the major risk factors for these diseases; and country wealth. Second, we compared noncommunicable and communicable diseases prevalent in poor and wealthy countries alike, and their respective links to economic development. Last, we examined the respective roles that wealth and risk prevention have played in countries that achieved substantial reductions in premature mortality from noncommunicable diseases. Our results support greater investment in cost-effective noncommunicable disease preventive care and treatment in poorer countries and a higher priority for reducing key risk factors, particularly tobacco use. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  13. The Relationship Between Child Mortality Rates and Prevalence of Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Federico; Raiteri, Alberto; Schiepatti, Annalisa; Klersy, Catherine; Corazza, Gino R

    2018-02-01

    Some evidence suggests that prevalence of celiac disease in the general population is increasing over time. Because the prognosis of celiac disease was a dismal one before discovering the role of gluten, our aim was to investigate a possible relationship between children under-5 mortality rates and prevalence rates of celiac disease. Thanks to a literature review, we found 27 studies performed in 17 different countries describing the prevalence of celiac disease in schoolchildren; between 1995 and 2011, 4 studies were performed in Italy. A meta-analysis of prevalence rates was performed. Prevalence was compared between specific country under-5 mortality groups, publication year, and age. In the last decades, under-5 mortality rates have been decreasing all over the world. This reduction is paralleled by an increase of the prevalence of celiac disease. The Spearman correlation coefficient was -63%, 95% confidence interval -82% to -33% (P celiac disease in the general population. In the near future, the number of patients with celiac disease will increase, thanks to the better environmental conditions that nowadays allow a better survival of children with celiac disease.

  14. The relationship between cerebrovascular disease and homocysteine, folate and vitamin B12 in serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Yang Chen; Shi Yizhen; Liu Zengli

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between cerebrovascular disease and the serum levels of homocysteine(Hcy), folate and vitamin B 12 , the serum levels of Hcy, folate and vitamin B 12 in 148 patients with cerebrovascular disease were measured by fluorescence polarization immuno- assay and chemiluminescence and were compared with those in healthy controls. The result showed that the serum Hcy levels in patients with cerebral infarction, cerebral hemorrhage and vertebrobasilar ischemiay were significantly higher than those in healthy controls (P 12 levels were signifieantly lower (P 0.05). No significantly higher ratio of increased Hcy levels was observed in patient with complications (P> 0.05). Our conclusion is that hyperhomocysteinemia may be a new and an independent risk factor for cerebrovascular disease. The serum Hcy level is correlated with decreased levels of folate and vitamin B 12 but not obviously correlated with hypertension, diabetes and coronary heart disease. (authors)

  15. The relationship between coping, health competence and patient participation among patients with inactive inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Seema; Jedel, S; Hood, M M; Mutlu, E; Swanson, G; Keshavarzian, A

    2014-05-01

    Coping is an integral part of adjustment for patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease but has not been well described in the literature. This study explored the relationship between coping, perceived health competence, patient preference for involvement in their treatment, depression and quality of life, particularly among patients with inactive disease (in remission). Subjects (n=70) with active and inactive IBD completed questionnaires, including the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, Perceived Health Competence Scale and the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations. The Harvey Bradshaw Index measured disease activity. Patients with inactive IBD demonstrated significantly more interest in participating in their treatment (pperceived health competence (p=.001), less depressive symptoms (pperceived control of their health, and exhibit less depression symptoms. Our findings may increase awareness of the importance of identifying coping strategies for IBD patients, including those in remission. © 2013.

  16. [Psychological and psychiatric problems in cancer patients: relationship to the localization of the disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussas, G I; Papadopoulou, A G; Christodoulaki, A G; Karkanias, A P

    2012-01-01

    Cancer may be localized in a variety of areas in the human body. This localization is associated with significant issues concerning not only therapy and prognosis but also psychological and psychiatric problems that the patient may be confronted with. The psychic impact on the patient is determined to a significant degree by the symbolism the affected organ carries. The symbolic significance of a sick body area triggers emotions and sets in motion self-defence mechanisms. In this way, patients deal with the new psychic reality that cancer creates. Therapeutic choices may include interventions, involving mutilation, which cause disfigurement and major consequences in the body image which result in narcissistic injuries. The phenomenology of anxiety and depressive disorders is connected to the affected body area. The appearance of cancer not only in sexual organs but also in other body areas, may disturb sexual function and therefore lead to sexual disorders. Especially, head and neck are connected with vital functions. This area of the body has had a major impact on psychic reality since early life. Complicated psychic functions have developed in relation to organs of the head and neck. Therefore, localization of cancer in this area leads to individual psychological and psychiatric problems, since eating and breathing are harmed, verbal communication becomes difficult and body image alters. Also, increased incidence of alcohol and nicotine abuse in these patients reflects special aspects of psychic structure and personality. Because of severe somatic symptoms and poor prognosis, lung cancer patients feel hopelessness and helplessness. Patients with gynaecological cancer are confronted with a disease that affects organs like breast and internal female sexual organs associated with femininity, attractiveness and fertility. Dietary habits are often a source of guilt for patients who suffer from cancer of the gastrointestinal tract. Additionally, stomas, as colostomy

  17. New mechanisms of disease and parasite-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Tiago Alves Jorge; de Carli, Gabriel Jose; Pereira, Tiago Campos

    2016-09-01

    An unconventional interaction between a patient and parasites was recently reported, in which parasitic cells invaded host's tissues, establishing several tumors. This finding raises various intriguing hypotheses on unpredicted forms of interplay between a patient and infecting parasites. Here we present four unusual hypothetical host-parasite scenarios with intriguing medical consequences. Relatively simple experimental designs are described in order to evaluate such hypotheses. The first one refers to the possibility of metabolic disorders in parasites intoxicating the host. The second one is on possibility of patients with inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) being more resistant to parasites (due to accumulation of toxic compounds in the bloodstream). The third one refers to a mirrored scenario: development of tumors in parasites due to ingestion of host's circulating cancer cells. The last one describes a complex relationship between parasites accumulating a metabolite and supplying it to a patient with an IEM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Oxidative stress as a mechanism of added sugar-induced cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kailash; Dhar, Indu

    2014-12-01

    Added sugars comprising of table sugar, brown sugar, corn syrup, maple syrup, honey, molasses, and other sweeteners in the prepared processed foods and beverages have been implicated in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. This article deals with the reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a mechanism of sugar-induced cardiovascular diseases. There is an association between the consumption of high levels of serum glucose with cardiovascular diseases. Various sources of sugar-induced generation of ROS, including mitochondria, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase, advanced glycation end products, insulin, and uric acid have been discussed. The mechanism by which ROS induce the development of atherosclerosis, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias have been discussed in detail. In conclusion, the data suggest that added sugars induce atherosclerosis, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias and that these effects of added sugars are mediated through ROS.

  19. Adult Scheuermann’s disease as cause of mechanic dorsalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.P. Cantatore

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Scheuermann’s disease (SD or vertebral osteochondrosis is the most frequent cause of non postural kyphosis and one of more frequent cause of adolescent’s dorsalgia. The criteria for the diagnosis are: more than 5° of wedging of at least three adjacent vertebrae at the apex of the kyphosis; a toracic kyphosis of more than 45° of Cobb’s degree; Schmorl’s nodes and endplates irregularities. In addition to classic SD, there are radiological alterations that remain asintomatic for a long time to reveal in adult age: in that case it speaks of adult Scheuermann’s disease (ASD. We considered the diagnosis of patients came from April 2006 to April 2007 on Day Hospital in our Clinic. ASD was diagnosed, besides, in 10 of these patients. 7 patients had previous diagnosis such as: dorsal Spondiloarthrosis (4 subjects; Osteoporosis with vertebral fractures (3 subjects. All these diagnosis was not confirmed by us. In case of chronic dorsalgia of adult, ASD is rarely considered as differential diagnosis. Besides, the vertebral dorsalgia, even in absence of red flags as fever, astenia, ipersedimetry, functional loss and aching spinal processes to tapping, could hide a serious scene that lead us to be careful in the differential diagnosis, because of similar radiological pictures of the MSA to other pathology as spondylodiscitis, primitive or metastasic spinal tumors, and brittleness vertebral fractures

  20. Metal Pollutants and Cardiovascular Disease: Mechanisms and Consequences of Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solenkova, Natalia V.; Newman, Jonathan D.; Berger, Jeffrey S.; Thurston, George; Hochman, Judith S.; Lamas, Gervasio A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There is epidemiological evidence that metal contaminants may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis and its complications. Moreover, a recent clinical trial of a metal chelator had a surprisingly positive result in reducing cardiovascular events in a secondary prevention population, strengthening the link between metal exposure and cardiovascular disease (CVD). This is, therefore, an opportune moment to review evidence that exposure to metal pollutants, such as arsenic, lead, cadmium, and mercury, are significant risk factors for CVD. Methods We reviewed the English-speaking medical literature to assess and present the epidemiological evidence that 4 metals having no role in the human body (xenobiotic), mercury, lead, cadmium, and arsenic, have epidemiologic and mechanistic links to atherosclerosis and CVD. Moreover, we briefly review how the results of the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy strengthen the link between atherosclerosis and xenobiotic metal contamination in humans. Conclusions There is strong evidence that xenobiotic metal contamination is linked to atherosclerotic disease and is a modifiable risk factor. PMID:25458643

  1. Relationship Between IL1 Gene Polymorphisms and Periodontal Disease in Japanese Women

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Keiko; Miyake, Yoshihiro; Hanioka, Takashi; Arakawa, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence on the relationship between IL1A and/or IL1B polymorphisms and periodontal disease is inconsistent. We investigated associations between three IL1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding interleukin (IL) -1α (rs1800587) and IL-1β (rs1143634 and rs16944) and the risk of periodontal disease among young Japanese women. A case–control study was performed with a total of 1150 women, including 131 subjects who had at least one tooth with a probing pocket de...

  2. Mechanical power, thrust power and propelling efficiency: relationships with elite sprint swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatta, Giorgio; Cortesi, Matteo; Swaine, Ian; Zamparo, Paola

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between mechanical power, thrust power, propelling efficiency and sprint performance in elite swimmers. Mechanical power was measured in 12 elite sprint male swimmers: (1) in the laboratory, by using a whole-body swimming ergometer (W' TOT ) and (2) in the pool, by measuring full tethered swimming force (F T ) and maximal swimming velocity (V max ): W' T  = F T  · V max . Propelling efficiency (η P ) was estimated based on the "paddle wheel model" at V max . V max was 2.17 ± 0.06 m · s -1 , η P was 0.39 ± 0.02, W' T was 374 ± 62 W and W' TOT was 941 ± 92 W. V max was better related to W' T (useful power output: R = 0.943, P swimming performance. The ratio W' T /W' TOT (0.40 ± 0.04) represents the fraction of total mechanical power that can be utilised in water (e.g., η P ) and was indeed the same as that estimated based on the "paddle wheel model"; this supports the use of this model to estimate η P in swimming.

  3. Mechanisms of α-Synuclein Induced Synaptopathy in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessika C. Bridi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is characterized by intracellular inclusions of aggregated and misfolded α-Synuclein (α-Syn, and the loss of dopaminergic (DA neurons in the brain. The resulting motor abnormalities mark the progression of PD, while non-motor symptoms can already be identified during early, prodromal stages of disease. Recent studies provide evidence that during this early prodromal phase, synaptic and axonal abnormalities occur before the degenerative loss of neuronal cell bodies. These early phenotypes can be attributed to synaptic accumulation of toxic α-Syn. Under physiological conditions, α-Syn functions in its native conformation as a soluble monomer. However, PD patient brains are characterized by intracellular inclusions of insoluble fibrils. Yet, oligomers and protofibrils of α-Syn have been identified to be the most toxic species, with their accumulation at presynaptic terminals affecting several steps of neurotransmitter release. First, high levels of α-Syn alter the size of synaptic vesicle pools and impair their trafficking. Second, α-Syn overexpression can either misregulate or redistribute proteins of the presynaptic SNARE complex. This leads to deficient tethering, docking, priming and fusion of synaptic vesicles at the active zone (AZ. Third, α-Syn inclusions are found within the presynaptic AZ, accompanied by a decrease in AZ protein levels. Furthermore, α-Syn overexpression reduces the endocytic retrieval of synaptic vesicle membranes during vesicle recycling. These presynaptic alterations mediated by accumulation of α-Syn, together impair neurotransmitter exocytosis and neuronal communication. Although α-Syn is expressed throughout the brain and enriched at presynaptic terminals, DA neurons are the most vulnerable in PD, likely because α-Syn directly regulates dopamine levels. Indeed, evidence suggests that α-Syn is a negative modulator of dopamine by inhibiting enzymes responsible for its synthesis. In

  4. Celiac disease: progress towards diagnosis and definition of pathogenic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Mauro; Bot, Adrian

    2011-08-01

    The current issue of the International Reviews of Immunology is dedicated entirely to Celiac Disease (CD). Recent development of additional biomarkers and diagnostics resulted in a sharp revision of the prevalence of this condition, with a previously unrecognized subclinical occurrence in the adult population. This was paralleled by groundbreaking progress in understanding its molecular pathogenesis: while gluten-derived peptides activate the innate immunity, post-translationally modified gluten elicits an adaptive immunity. These arms amplify each other, resulting in a self- perpetuating autoimmune condition, influenced by disturbances of the gut flora and mucus chemistry. The process evolves dramatically in a subset of patients with vulnerable immune homeostasis (eg. Treg cells) explaining the progressive, aggravating syndrome in the clinically overt version of CD. In depth understanding of the pathogenesis of CD thus creates the premises of developing novel, more accurate animal models that should support a rationale development of new prophylactic and therapeutic interventions.

  5. The relationship between pain and dynamic knee joint loading in knee osteoarthritis varies with radiographic disease severity. A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Marius; Aaboe, Jens; Bliddal, Henning

    2012-08-01

    In a cross sectional study, we investigated the relationships between knee pain and mechanical loading across the knee, as indicated by the external knee adduction moment (KAM) during walking in patients with symptomatic knee OA who were distinguished by different radiographic disease severities. Data from 137 symptomatic medial knee OA patients were used. Based on Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) grading, the patients were divided into radiographically less severe (K/L ≤ 2, n=68) or severe (K/L>2, n=69) medial knee OA. Overall knee pain was rated on a 10 cm visual analog scale, and peak KAM and KAM impulses were obtained from gait analyses. Mixed linear regression analyses were performed with KAM variables as the outcome, and pain and disease severity as independent variables, adjusting for age, gender, and walking speed. In adjusted analyses, less severe patients demonstrated negative relationships between pain intensities and dynamic loading. The severe patient group showed no relationship between pain intensity and peak KAM, and a positive relationship between pain intensity and KAM impulse. In radiographically less severe knee OA, the negative relationships between pain intensity and dynamic knee joint loading indicate a natural reaction to pain, which will limit the stress on the joint. In contrast, either absent or positive relationships between pain and dynamic loading in severe OA may lead to overuse and accelerated disease progression. These findings may have a large potential interest for strategies of treatment in knee OA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Case Report of the Use of Mechanical Ventilation Protective Modes in Werdnig-Hoffmann Disease Domiciliary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Gutsul

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article describes our own clinical observation of using mechanical ventilation protective modes in a child with Werdnig-Hoffmann disease and contracture of the upper and lower extremities.

  7. Ursodeoxycholic acid in cholestatic liver disease: mechanisms of action and therapeutic use revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paumgartner, Gustav; Beuers, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UCDA) is increasingly used for the treatment of cholestatic liver diseases. Experimental evidence suggests three major mechanisms of action: (1) protection of cholangiocytes against cytotoxicity of hydrophobic bile acids, resulting from modulation of the composition of mixed

  8. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartog, J P Den

    1961-01-01

    First published over 40 years ago, this work has achieved the status of a classic among introductory texts on mechanics. Den Hartog is known for his lively, discursive and often witty presentations of all the fundamental material of both statics and dynamics (and considerable more advanced material) in new, original ways that provide students with insights into mechanical relationships that other books do not always succeed in conveying. On the other hand, the work is so replete with engineering applications and actual design problems that it is as valuable as a reference to the practicing e

  9. Knowledge of medical doctors in Turkey about the relationship between periodontal disease and systemic health

    OpenAIRE

    TAŞDEMIR,Zekeriya; ALKAN,Banu Arzu

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between periodontal disease (PD) and systemic health (SH) is necessary for the accurate diagnosis and treatment of both. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge of medical doctors in Turkey with regard to the association between PD and SH. This study was carried out using self-reported questionnaires that were sent to medical doctors who work at various universities and public and private hospitals in different cities in Turkey. The questionnaires co...

  10. The relationship of periodontal disease to diseases and disorders at distant sites: communication to health care professionals and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamster, Ira B; DePaola, Dominick P; Oppermann, Rui V; Papapanou, Panos N; Wilder, Rebecca S

    2008-10-01

    The body of research defining relationships among periodontal disease and certain systemic diseases and disorders has been expanding, and questions have been raised regarding what information should be conveyed to health care professionals and patients. Representatives from dentistry, medicine, the academic community and the insurance industry convened a two-day workshop July 23 and 24, 2007. The workshop participants achieved general consensus on a number of issues, including the need for greater cooperation between the health care professions. This cooperation should translate into improved clinical care as physicians refer patients for dental care, and dentists are proactive in regard to the general health of their patients. Communication to health care professionals requires a multifaceted approach that includes publication of research findings in medical and dental journals, cooperation among professional organizations and initiatives at the local level such as presentations at medical grand rounds. Dental schools should play a role in their health science centers. Communication with patients may improve through the use of targeted informational brochures in the offices of medical specialists, appropriate media campaigns and efforts led by local dental organizations. It is too early to provide specific recommendations regarding the treatment of periodontal disease to improve specific health outcomes, but dentists can become advocates for a general health promotion and disease prevention message. The lifestyles approach includes an improved diet, smoking cessation, appropriate hygiene practices and stress reduction. These strategies can improve oral and general health outcomes.

  11. The relationship between urban sprawl and coronary heart disease in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Beth Ann; Eibner, Christine; Bird, Chloe E; Jewell, Adria; Margolis, Karen; Shih, Regina; Ellen Slaughter, Mary; Whitsel, Eric A; Allison, Matthew; Escarce, Jose J

    2013-03-01

    Studies have reported relationships between urban sprawl, physical activity, and obesity, but - to date - no studies have considered the relationship between sprawl and coronary heart disease (CHD) endpoints. In this analysis, we use longitudinal data on post-menopausal women from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Clinical Trial to analyze the relationship between metropolitan statistical area (MSA)-level urban compactness (the opposite of sprawl) and CHD endpoints including death, any CHD event, and myocardial infarction. Models control for individual and neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics. Women who lived in more compact communities at baseline had a lower probability of experiencing a CHD event and CHD death or MI during the study follow-up period. One component of compactness, high residential density, had a particularly noteworthy effect on outcomes. Finally, exploratory analyses showed evidence that the effects of compactness were moderated by race and region. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PERIODONTAL DISEASE INDEX AND LOW BIRTH WEIGHT BABIES IN PREGNANT WOMEN WITH PERIODONTITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Komara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the relationship between periodontitis in pregnant women through the periodontal disease index (PDI and low birth weight babies. Methods: A case-control study was conducted to determine the relationship between periodontitis in pregnant women through the periodontal disease index (PDI and the low birth weight babies (LBW. The participants were mothers with periodontitis and non-periodontitis mothers aged 20–35 years who gave birth in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology-Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung in the period of December to January 2005. Results: Based on the chisquare test results a highly significant relationship between periodontitis and low birth weight (p=0.002 was found. The Odd’s ratio showed that the risk of low birth weight in pregnant women with periodontitis was 15.58 times higher compared to those who did not suffer from periodontitis. The periodontal disease index has an accuracy of 88.6% in predicting the incidence of LBW. It strongly influenced the incidence of LBW with a high Odd’s ratio of 28.0. Pregnant women who suffer from periodontitis with a PDI > 3.25, have 19.2 times higher risk for delivering babies with LBW compared to the non-periodontitis mothers. Conclusions: The loss of attachment affects the possibility of delivering LBW babies.

  13. The Relationship Between the Gensini Score and Complete Blood Count Parameters in Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Raşit Sayın

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the extend andseverity of coronary artery disease (CAD determined by the Gensini score and complete bloodcount parameters (white blood cell, hemoglobin, platelet, mean platelet volume, lymphocyte,neutrophil.Patients and Methods: Ninety patients with CAD underwent coronary angiography (40 females,mean age 61 ± 1.2 years were included in this study. Patients with acute coronary syndrome andprior cardiovascular disease excluded from the study. The association between the extent andseverity of CAD, which were assessed by the Gensini score, and complete blood count parameterswas analyzed by a correlation analysis.Results: Coronary angiography revealed, 6 (6.7% patients had three, 16 (17.8% patients hadtwo, and 24 (26.7% patients had single-vessel disease; 44 (48.9% patients had non-criticalstenosis. The mean Gensini score was 19.1 ± 2.1. We found a relationship between white bloodcell and neutrophil counts and the Gensini score. There was no relationship between Gensiniscore and the mean platelet volume and other parameters.Conclusion: The present study supports the hypothesis that inflammation is one of the maincomponent in the pathogenesis of CAD.

  14. Relationship between morphologies and mechanical properties of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose/hydroxypropyl starch blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanfei; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Hongsheng; Yu, Long; Simon, George P; Zhang, Nuozi; Chen, Ling

    2016-11-20

    Edible films from the blending hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) with hydroxypropyl starch (HPS) have been developed. This work focuses on the relationship between morphologies and mechanical properties of such systems. To aid understanding of blend morphology, a new technique used to identify the two phases through dying of the HPS by iodine has been developed, which provided a simple and convenient way to clearly distinguish between HPMC and HPS phases. It was found that the blend system is immiscible and there is phase transition point depending on blending ratio and solution concentration. The lower transparency point of the blend and phase transition reign of HPMC from continuous phase to separated phase correspond with the variation of tensile modulus. The modulus and elongation decreased with increased solution concentration, which is correlatable with the morphologies present, where it was found that the HPMC gradually changed from a continuous phase to a distinct phase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs) and periodontal disease: pathogenic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madianos, Phoebus N; Bobetsis, Yiorgos A; Offenbacher, Steven

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the evidence on potential biological pathways underlying the possible association between periodontal disease (PD) and adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs). Human, experimental and in vitro studies were evaluated. Periodontal pathogens/byproducts may reach the placenta and spread to the foetal circulation and amniotic fluid. Their presence in the foeto-placental compartment can stimulate a foetal immune/inflammatory response characterized by the production of IgM antibodies against the pathogens and the secretion of elevated levels of inflammatory mediators, which in turn may cause miscarriage or premature birth. Moreover, infection/inflammation may cause placental structural changes leading to pre-eclampsia and impaired nutrient transport causing low birthweight. Foetal exposure may also result in tissue damage, increasing the risk for perinatal mortality/morbidity. Finally, the elicited systemic inflammatory response may exacerbate local inflammatory responses at the foeto-placental unit and further increase the risk for APOs. Further investigation is still necessary to fully translate the findings of basic research into clinical studies and practice. Understanding the systemic virulence potential of the individual's oral microbiome and immune response may be a distinctly different issue from categorizing the nature of the challenge using clinical signs of PD. Therefore, a more personalized targeted therapy could be a more predictive answer to the current "one-size-fits-all" interventions.

  16. Generating Gene Ontology-Disease Inferences to Explore Mechanisms of Human Disease at the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Peter Davis

    pharmaceutical drug makers in finding commonalities in disease mechanisms, which in turn could help identify new therapeutics, new indications for existing pharmaceuticals, potential disease comorbidities, and alerts for side effects.

  17. Examination of Mechanisms Responsible for Organic Dust-related Diseases: Mediator Release induced by Microorgansims. A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norn, Svend; Clementsen, Paul; Kristensen, K.S.

    1994-01-01

    Farmakologi, org. dust-related diseases, bacteria, pathogenic mechanisms, mediator release, entoxins - fungal spores......Farmakologi, org. dust-related diseases, bacteria, pathogenic mechanisms, mediator release, entoxins - fungal spores...

  18. Relationship of mechanical impact magnitude to neurologic dysfunction severity in a rat traumatic brain injury model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Hsun Hsieh

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major brain injury type commonly caused by traffic accidents, falls, violence, or sports injuries. To obtain mechanistic insights about TBI, experimental animal models such as weight-drop-induced TBI in rats have been developed to mimic closed-head injury in humans. However, the relationship between the mechanical impact level and neurological severity following weight-drop-induced TBI remains uncertain. In this study, we comprehensively investigated the relationship between physical impact and graded severity at various weight-drop heights.The acceleration, impact force, and displacement during the impact were accurately measured using an accelerometer, a pressure sensor, and a high-speed camera, respectively. In addition, the longitudinal changes in neurological deficits and balance function were investigated at 1, 4, and 7 days post TBI lesion. The inflammatory expression markers tested by Western blot analysis, including glial fibrillary acidic protein, beta-amyloid precursor protein, and bone marrow tyrosine kinase gene in chromosome X, in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and corpus callosum were investigated at 1 and 7 days post-lesion.Gradations in impact pressure produced progressive degrees of injury severity in the neurological score and balance function. Western blot analysis demonstrated that all inflammatory expression markers were increased at 1 and 7 days post-impact injury when compared to the sham control rats. The severity of neurologic dysfunction and induction in inflammatory markers strongly correlated with the graded mechanical impact levels.We conclude that the weight-drop-induced TBI model can produce graded brain injury and induction of neurobehavioral deficits and may have translational relevance to developing therapeutic strategies for TBI.

  19. Transcending the biomarker mindset: deciphering disease mechanisms at the single cell level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danna, Erika A; Nolan, Garry P

    2006-02-01

    The application of proteomics to disease research promises to enhance the understanding and treatment of many human maladies through the identification of molecular profiles associated with each disease. However, although much is made of the utility of molecular signatures as markers of disease state, insufficient emphasis is often placed on the simultaneous need for biological mechanism inquiry. Focused and detailed analyses of disease-associated signaling networks have the potential to be more mechanistically informative than large-scale proteomic profiling approaches, providing insight into the cellular processes involved in pathogenesis, disease progression and therapeutic resistance; while still providing diagnostic or clinical management direction. Phospho-specific flow cytometry provides a method for the analysis of pathological signaling networks, enabling the investigation of disease mechanisms at the single-cell level.

  20. Lipidomics: Novel insight into the biochemical mechanism of lipid metabolism and dysregulation-associated disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying-Yong; Miao, Hua; Cheng, Xian-Long; Wei, Feng

    2015-10-05

    The application of lipidomics, after genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, offered largely opportunities to illuminate the entire spectrum of lipidome based on a quantitative or semi-quantitative level in a biological system. When combined with advances in proteomics and metabolomics high-throughput platforms, lipidomics provided the opportunity for analyzing the unique roles of specific lipids in complex cellular processes. Abnormal lipid metabolism was demonstrated to be greatly implicated in many human lifestyle-related diseases. In this review, we focused on lipidomic applications in brain injury disease, cancer, metabolic disease, cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and infectious disease to discover disease biomarkers and illustrate biochemical metabolic pathways. We also discussed the analytical techniques, future perspectives and potential problems of lipidomic applications. The application of lipidomics in disease biomarker discovery provides the opportunity for gaining novel insights into biochemical mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationships between Mechanical Variables in the Traditional and Close-Grip Bench Press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockie, Robert G; Callaghan, Samuel J; Moreno, Matthew R; Risso, Fabrice G; Liu, Tricia M; Stage, Alyssa A; Birmingham-Babauta, Samantha A; Stokes, John J; Giuliano, Dominic V; Lazar, Adrina; Davis, DeShaun L; Orjalo, Ashley J

    2017-12-01

    The study aim was to determine relationships between mechanical variables in the one-repetition maximum (1RM) traditional bench press (TBP) and close-grip bench press (CGBP). Twenty resistance-trained men completed a TBP and CGBP 1RM. The TBP was performed with the preferred grip; the CGBP with a grip width of 95% biacromial distance. A linear position transducer measured: lift distance and duration; work; and peak and mean power, velocity, and force. Paired samples t-tests (p velocity was greater for the CGBP (d = 0.50-1.29). The 1RM TBP correlated with CGBP 1RM, power, and force (r = 0.685-0.982). TBP work correlated with CGBP 1RM, lift distance, power, force, and work (r = 0.542-0.931). TBP power correlated with CGBP 1RM, power, force, velocity, and work (r = 0.484-0.704). TBP peak and mean force related to CGBP 1RM, power, and force (r = 0.596-0.980). Due to relationships between the load, work, power, and force for the TBP and CGBP, the CGBP could provide similar strength adaptations to the TBP with long-term use. The velocity profile for the CGBP was different to that of the TBP. The CGBP could be used specifically to improve high-velocity, upper-body pushing movements.

  2. Multiple mechanisms of transmission of the Caribbean coral disease white plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, E.; Brandt, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    White plague is one of the most devastating coral diseases in the Caribbean, and yet important aspects of its epidemiology, including how the disease transmits, remain unknown. This study tested potential mechanisms and rates of transmission of white plague in a laboratory setting. Transmission mechanisms including the transport of water, contact with macroalgae, and predation via corallivorous worms and snails were tested on the host species Orbicella annularis. Two of the tested mechanisms were shown to transmit disease: water transport and the corallivorous snail Coralliophila abbreviata. Between these transmission mechanisms, transport of water between a diseased coral and a healthy coral resulted in disease incidence significantly more frequently in exposed healthy corals. Transmission via water transport also occurred more quickly and was associated with higher rates of tissue loss (up to 3.5 cm d-1) than with the corallivorous snail treatment. In addition, water that was in contact with diseased corals but was filtered with a 0.22-μm filter prior to being introduced to apparently healthy corals also resulted in the transmission of disease signs, but at a much lower rate than when water was not filtered. This study has provided important information on the transmission potential of Caribbean white plague disease and highlights the need for a greater understanding of how these processes operate in the natural environment.

  3. Neuroendocrine and oxidoreductive mechanisms of stress-induced cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajović, S B; Radojcić, M B; Kanazir, D T

    2008-01-01

    The review concerns a number of basic molecular pathways that play a crucial role in perception, transmission, and modulation of the stress signals, and mediate the adaptation of the vital processes in the cardiovascular system (CVS). These highly complex systems for intracellular transfer of information include stress hormones and their receptors, stress-activated phosphoprotein kinases, stress-activated heat shock proteins, and antioxidant enzymes maintaining oxidoreductive homeostasis of the CVS. Failure to compensate for the deleterious effects of stress may result in the development of different pathophysiological states of the CVS, such as ischemia, hypertension, atherosclerosis and infarction. Stress-induced dysbalance in each of the CVS molecular signaling systems and their contribution to the CVS malfunctioning is reviewed. The general picture of the molecular mechanisms of the stress-induced pathophysiology in the CVS pointed out the importance of stress duration and intensity as etiological factors, and suggested that future studies should be complemented by the careful insights into the individual factors of susceptibility to stress, prophylactic effects of 'healthy' life styles and beneficial action of antioxidant-rich nutrition.

  4. Relationship between Motor Symptoms, Cognition, and Demographic Characteristics in Treated Mild/Moderate Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay S Schneider

    Full Text Available Although Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized primarily by motor symptoms, PD patients, at all stages of the disease, can experience cognitive dysfunction. However, the relationships between cognitive and motor symptoms and specific demographic characteristics are not well defined, particularly for patients who have progressed to requiring dopaminergic medication.To examine relationships between motor and cognitive symptoms and various demographic factors in mild to moderate, PD patients requiring anti-PD medication.Cognitive function was assessed in 94 subjects with a variety of neuropsychological tests during baseline evaluations as part of an experimental treatment study. Data were analyzed in relation to Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor scores and demographic variables.Of the UPDRS subscores analyzed, posture/balance/gait was associated with the highest number of adverse cognitive outcomes followed by speech/facial expression, bradykinesia, and rigidity. No associations were detected between any of the cognitive performance measures and tremor. Motor functioning assessed in the "off" condition correlated primarily with disease duration; neuropsychological performance in general was primarily related to age.In PD patients who have advanced to requiring anti-PD therapies, there are salient associations between axial signs and cognitive performance and in particular, with different aspects of visuospatial function suggesting involvement of similar circuits in these functions. Associations between executive functions and bradykinesia also suggest involvement similar circuits in these functions.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Urea Transport in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Janet D.; Blount, Mitsi A.; Sands, Jeff M.

    2012-01-01

    In the late 1980s, urea permeability measurements produced values that could not be explained by paracellular transport or lipid phase diffusion. The existence of urea transport proteins were thus proposed and less than a decade later, the first urea transporter was cloned. The SLC14A family of urea transporters has two major subgroups, designated SLC14A1 (or UT-B) and Slc14A2 (or UT-A). UT-B and UT-A gene products are glycoproteins located in various extra-renal tissues however, a majority of the resulting isoforms are found in the kidney. The UT-B (Slc14A1) urea transporter was originally isolated from erythrocytes and two isoforms have been reported. In kidney, UT-B is located primarily in the descending vasa recta. The UT-A (Slc14A2) urea transporter yields 6 distinct isoforms, of which 3 are found chiefly in the kidney medulla. UT-A1 and UT-A3 are found in the inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD), while UT-A2 is located in the thin descending limb. These transporters are crucial to the kidney’s ability to concentrate urine. The regulation of urea transporter activity in the IMCD involves acute modification through phosphorylation and subsequent movement to the plasma membrane. UT-A1 and UT-A3 accumulate in the plasma membrane in response to stimulation by vasopressin or hypertonicity. Long term regulation of the urea transporters in the IMCD involves altering protein abundance in response to changes in hydration status, low protein diets, or adrenal steroids. Urea transporters have been studied using animal models of disease including diabetes mellitus, lithium intoxication, hypertension, and nephrotoxic drug responses. Exciting new genetically engineered mouse models are being developed to study these transporters. PMID:23007461

  6. ALLERGIC PATHOLOGY AND CELIAC DISEASEMECHANISM OF COMMUNITY AND DIFFERENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Revnova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the differentiation of allergic diseases and celiac in children. It covers in detail the mechanisms of the pathogenesis of immune inflammation in celiac disease, clinical picture with the main and additional symptoms and markers of this pathology. In the article the author shares data of her own experience and provides the own diagnostic algorithm.Key words: allergic pathology, celiac disease, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(1:76-80

  7. STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP STUDY OF DITERPENES FOR TREATMENT OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel F. dos Santos

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is an irreversible, degenerative and age-related disease which is growing more and more with the increase in life expectancy. Kaurane diterpenes are a class of natural products available in large amounts in nature and isolated from plants grown worldwide. In the present work¸ twenty-seven kaurane diterpenes of natural origin and some readily available derivatives were assayed for acetylcholinesterase inhibition and the structure-activity relationship was analyzed. The kaurenoic acid derivatives screened showed to be promising inhibitors of AChE, which could provide new leads for drugs to fight Alzheimer's disease symptoms. Among them, eleven compounds showed activities comparable or higher than the positive control galantamine. Existence of an allylic hydroxyl group showed to be an important structural feature for AChE inhibition. In addition, presence of free hydroxyl groups at C-17 and C-19, furnished a diol especially active, able to completely inhibit AChE.

  8. The relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Batool M

    2011-03-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a common condition, affecting 25%-40% of the population. Increasing attention has been paid to the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and reflux esophagitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between CagA+ H. pylori and endoscopically proven gastro-esophageal reflux disease. The study group included 60 hospital patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease between 2007 and 2009 as compared with 30 healthy patients from a control group that was age and sex matched. Helicobacter pylori CagA+ was identified by an immunological test (Immunochromatography test) (ACON, USA). Helicobacter pyloriCagA+ was present in 42/60 (70%) of the patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease and in 11/30 (36.6%) patients in the control group (p=0.002). The Odds ratio = 0.8004 with 95% Confidence Interval = from 0.3188 to 2.0094. The relative risk=1.35 that indicates an association between Helicobacter pylori and disease. The presence of Helicobacter pylori is significantly increased in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease as compared with the control group.

  9. Mechanisms of pollution-induced airway disease: in vivo studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peden, D.B. [Univ. of North Carolina School of Medicine, Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biology, North Carolina (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Several studies have investigated the effects of ozone, sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) on lung function in normal and asthmatic subjects. Decreased lung function has been observed with ozone levels as low as 0.15 ppm - this effect is concentration dependent and is exacerbated by exercise. A number of lines of evidence suggest that the effect on lung function is mediated, at lest in part, by neural mechanisms. In both normals and asthmatics, ozone has been shown to induce neutrophilic inflammation, with increased levels of several inflammatory mediators, including prostaglandin E{sub 2}. However, in normal subjects, none of the markers of inflammation correlate with changes in lung function. The lung function changes in asthmatics may be associated with inflammatory effects; alternatively, ozone may prime the airways for an increased response to subsequently inhaled allergen. Indeed, an influx of both polymorphonucleocytes and eosinophils has been observed in asthmatic patients after ozone exposure. It has been suggested that the effect of ozone on classic allergen-induced bronchoconstriction may be more significant than any direct effect of this pollutant in asthmatics. SO{sub 2} does not appear to affect lung function in normal subjects, but may induce bronchoconstriction in asthmatics. Nasal breathing, which is often impaired in asthmatics, reduces the pulmonary effects of SO{sub 2}, since this water-soluble gas is absorbed by the nasal mucosa. NO{sub 2} may also influence lung function in asthmatics, but further research is warranted. SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} alone do not seem to have a priming effect in asthmatics, but a combination of these two gases has resulted in a heightened sensitivity to subsequently inhaled allergen. (au)

  10. Quality of life and life satisfaction in patients with Behçet's disease: relationship with disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodur, Hatice; Borman, Pinar; Ozdemir, Yildiz; Atan, Ciğdem; Kural, Gülcan

    2006-05-01

    Quality of life (QoL) and life satisfaction (LS) are important outcome factors in chronic inflammatory conditions such as Behçet's disease (BD). The aim of this study was to investigate QoL and LS in patients with BD and determine the relationship with disease activity. Forty-one patients with BD and 40 control subjects were involved in the study. Demographic properties were obtained. Disease activity was assessed by Turkish version of BD Current Activity Form (BDCAF) in BD patients. QoL and psychological well-being were assessed by Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and Life Satisfaction Index (LSI), respectively, in both patients and control groups. The related disease activity measures of QoL and LS were determined. Twenty-two male and 19 female BD patients with a mean age of 33.3+/-9.3 years and 20 male and 20 female control subjects with a mean age of 33.3+/-4.1 years were involved. According to BDCAF, no patient had central nervous system involvement. Thirty-four patients had headache, 33 patients had fatigue, 30 patients had articular involvement, 29 had mucocutaneous lesions, 27 had gastrointestinal involvement, 21 patients had ocular involvement, and 7 patients had vascular involvement. The scores of all dimensions of NHP were significantly higher and the mean score of LSI was significantly lower in BD patients than in control subjects (pimpression of disease activity and joint involvement. In conclusion, patients with BD have impaired QoL and disturbed psychological well-being. Current management strategies focusing on fatigue, arthralgia, mucocutaneous lesions, and efforts to measure psychosocial aspects and symptoms of the patients by their point of view will help to improve QoL and raise the LS in patients suffering from BD.

  11. Deciphering deterioration mechanisms of complex diseases based on the construction of dynamic networks and systems analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Jin, Suoqin; Lei, Lei; Pan, Zishu; Zou, Xiufen

    2015-03-01

    The early diagnosis and investigation of the pathogenic mechanisms of complex diseases are the most challenging problems in the fields of biology and medicine. Network-based systems biology is an important technique for the study of complex diseases. The present study constructed dynamic protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks to identify dynamical network biomarkers (DNBs) and analyze the underlying mechanisms of complex diseases from a systems level. We developed a model-based framework for the construction of a series of time-sequenced networks by integrating high-throughput gene expression data into PPI data. By combining the dynamic networks and molecular modules, we identified significant DNBs for four complex diseases, including influenza caused by either H3N2 or H1N1, acute lung injury and type 2 diabetes mellitus, which can serve as warning signals for disease deterioration. Function and pathway analyses revealed that the identified DNBs were significantly enriched during key events in early disease development. Correlation and information flow analyses revealed that DNBs effectively discriminated between different disease processes and that dysfunctional regulation and disproportional information flow may contribute to the increased disease severity. This study provides a general paradigm for revealing the deterioration mechanisms of complex diseases and offers new insights into their early diagnoses.

  12. Relationship between Metabolic Syndrome Components and Periodontal Disease in a Japanese General Population: the Suita Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikui, Miki; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Ono, Takahiro; Kida, Momoyo; Kosaka, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Watanabe, Makoto; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro

    2017-05-01

    A positive association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and periodontal status has recently been noted. However, no study has evaluated the relationship by sex and in a general urban population using the uniform definition proposed in the 2009 Joint Interim Statement. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between MetS and periodontal status using the uniform definition in a general urban Japanese population. A total of 1,856 Japanese men and women (mean age: 66.4 years) were studied using data from the Suita study. Periodontal status was evaluated by the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). MetS was defined using the 2009 Joint Interim Statement. The associations of the MetS and its components with periodontal disease were investigated using multiple logistic regression analysis adjusting for age, drinking, and smoking. Among the components of the MetS, low HDL cholesterol level was significantly associated with periodontal disease in men and women [odds ratios (OR)=2.39 and 1.53; 95% confidence intervals=1.36-4.19 and 1.06-2.19]. Furthermore, the risk of periodontal disease showed 1.43-, 1.42-, and 1.89-fold increases in those with 2, 3, and ≥4 components, respectively, compared with those having no components (P trend <0.001). For the analysis by sex, the risk of periodontal disease was increased 2.27- and 1.76-fold in those with ≥4 components in men and women, respectively (both P trend =0.001). These findings suggest that MetS and lower HDL cholesterol are associated with periodontal disease. Subjects with two or more MetS components had a significantly higher prevalence of periodontal disease.

  13. Relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties in ODS materials for nuclear application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Carlan, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened ferritic/martensitic alloys are developed as prospective cladding materials for future Sodium-Cooled-Fast-Reactors (GEN IV) [1]. These advanced alloys present a good resistance to irradiation and a high creep rupture strength due to a reinforcement by the homogeneous dispersion of hard nano-sized particles (such as Y 2 O 3 or YTiO). ODS alloys are elaborated by powder metallurgy, consolidated by hot extrusion and manufactured into cladding tube using the Pilger cold-rolling process [2, 3]. ODS alloys present usually low ductility and high hardness. The aim of this talk is to present the specificity of the metallurgy of ODS materials in relationship with the main mechanical properties (tensile and creep properties, toughness, transition temperature). Two types of alloys will be presented: Fe-9Cr martensitic ODS and Fe-14Cr ferritic ODS alloys. Mechanical properties of the materials depend on the metallurgical state (fine grains, recrystallized, martensitic) and very different behaviors are observed as a function of final microstructure. For example, for a Fe-9Cr ODS alloy, tempered martensite lets obtaining material with high strength whereas softened ferrite see figure 1 [4] tolerates high deformation levels. (authors)

  14. Dose-response relationships for enzyme replacement therapy with imiglucerase/alglucerase in patients with Gaucher disease type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grabowski, Gregory A.; Kacena, Katherine; Cole, J. Alexander; Hollak, Carla E. M.; Zhang, Lin; Yee, John; Mistry, Pramod K.; Zimran, Ari; Charrow, Joel; vom Dahl, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether enzyme therapy with imiglucerase/ alglucerase demonstrates dose-response relationships with doses and disease parameters used in routine clinical practice for Gaucher disease type 1 patients. Methods: Analyses included all patients with Gaucher disease type 1 on enzyme

  15. Levels of interleukin-1β in gingival crevicular fluid in patients with coronary heart disease and its relationship to periodontal status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenggogeny, Putri; Masulili, Sri Lelyati C.; Tadjoedin, Fatimah M.; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Periodontitis is a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). Both diseases are an inflammatory diseases and have the same potential pathogenic mechanisms. Interleukin-1β as a pro-inflammatory main cytokine, can be found in this both diseases. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) derived from the serum of gingival sulcus, affected by inflammatory mechanism and the amount of this fluid will increase in that situation. Objective: To analyze the relationship of interleukin-1β levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of CHD and non-CHD patients with periodontal status. Methods: Oral clinical examination (plaque index, bleeding on probing, pocket depth and clinical attachment loss) for 35 subjects with CHD and 35 non CHD were checked, laboratory test to measure the levels of Interleukin-1β was checked with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: There was no significant differences between interleukin-1β levels in CHD and non-CHD patients (p>0.05); there was no significant difference between the level of Interleukin-1β with periodontal status in CHD and control (non CHD) patients (p>0.05). Conclusions: levels of Interleukin-1β in CHD patients do not have a relationships with plaque index, pocket depth and clinical attachment loss, but has a relationships with bleeding on probing.

  16. Trends in gluten research and its relationship to autoimmune and allergic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Ciaccio

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gluten is a protein found in certain grains, and causes an autoimmune response in celiac disease patients. Although the subject of considerable research, gluten research foci and future directions are largely unknown. Methods: The MEDLINE search tool was used to evaluate research trends. For perspective, yearly publications on gluten and other celiac disease reactive proteins were compared to food allergy proteins research. Then the relationship of gluten publications to affiliated keywords was determined. The affiliated keywords belonged to one of several groups: grains, vitamins and minerals, interaction, autoimmunity, genetics, or enzymes. The yearly number of publications in the peer-reviewed medical literature was determined for each relationship from years 1960–2013. The relationships were graphed, and linear regression analysis was used to determine the rate of change in publications per year, and the coefficient of determination. Results: Among celiac disease reactive proteins (gluten, gliadin, and glutenin and selected food allergy proteins (ovalbumin, lysozyme, ovomucoid, and Ara h, gluten showed the greatest rate of increase in published medical research (+20.01 studies/year since 1996, r2=0.97. Additionally, there were sharp increases in the rate of gluten research publications per year in association with keywords ‘autoimmunity’ (+7.69 studies/year since 1997, ‘wheat’ (+6.08 studies/year since 1999, and ‘transglutaminase’ enzyme (+5.05 studies/year since 1995. The longest running moderate trend was research on ‘gluten’ and ‘antibodies’ (+2.50 studies/year, r2=0.92 since 1971. Conclusions: Research on gluten as a reactive protein is of rapidly growing interest in the medical literature. MEDLINE is helpful to determine foci and future directions. Keywords: Celiac disease, Gluten, Gliadin, Medline, Transglutaminase

  17. Research progress of rehabilitation therapy in Parkinson's disease and its mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin LIU

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is characterized by the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta. Rehabilitation therapy can delay the development of disease, improve motor symptoms and non - motor symptoms (NMS, and consequently improve the activities of daily living (ADL in patients with PD. The mechanism of rehabilitation improving the symptoms of PD is very complex, involving a variety of molecular mechanisms. Thus, this review will focus on the effect of rehabilitation therapy on PD and the underlying molecular mechanism including neurotransmitters, trophic factors, synaptic plasticity and immune system. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.06.003

  18. Quality of life in people with Parkinson's disease: the relevance of social relationships and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kayoko; Kamide, Naoto; Suzuki, Makoto; Fukuda, Michinari

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Maintaining high quality of life is crucial for the rehabilitation of patients with Parkinson's disease. The quality of life scales currently in use do not assess all quality of life domains or their importance for each individual. Therefore, a new quality of life measure, the Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weighting, was used to investigate quality of life in people with Parkinson's disease. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen people with idiopathic Parkinson's disaese (average age = 80.0 years, standard deviation = 10.3 years, Hoehn & Yahr stages 1-4) were interviewed using the Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weighting. Its quality of life constructs were tested by comparing them against disease-specific quality of life (39-items Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire), motor functioning (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III), and activities of daily living (Barthel Index). [Results] Social connections such as "family" and "friends" were revealed as important constructs of life satisfaction. The Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weighting was not significantly correlated with the 39-items Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III, or Barthel Index but was significantly correlated with the "communication" dimension of the 39-items Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire. [Conclusion] The Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weighting detected various domains of quality of life, especially social relationships with family and friends. "Being heard" was also revealed as an essential component of life satisfaction, as it provides patients with a feeling of acceptance and assurance, possibly resulting in better quality of life.

  19. The relationship between disease and function and perceived health in very frail elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulrow, C D; Gerety, M B; Cornell, J E; Lawrence, V A; Kanten, D N

    1994-04-01

    To study associations between disease and observed function and self-perceived health in very frail elders. Cross-sectional survey of nine nursing homes in San Antonio, TX. 194 elderly long-stay nursing home residents dependent in at least two ADLs and without severe cognitive impairment. Burden of disease (BOD) was chart abstracted using a standardized protocol that assessed types and severities of 59 categorizations of chronic and acute medical conditions. Observed function and self-perceived health status were assessed independently by the Katz Activities of Daily Living scale (ADL) and the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP), respectively. Summary BOD scores had a low, but statistically significant, univariate correlation with ADL scores (r = 0.21, P = 0.003) and no significant correlation with SIP scores (R = -0.008). Multiple linear regression analyses, including the 24 most frequent disease categories, showed that disease explained significant amounts of ADL (r2 = 0.25, P = 0.001) and borderline significant amounts of SIP (r2 = 0.16, P = 0.11). Models including both disease and sociodemographic, cognitive, and affective variables showed disease added significant incremental explantation beyond the other factors to ADL (incremental r2 = 0.14, P = 0.04), but not to SIP (incremental r2 = 0.08, P > 0.10). Disease, observed function, and self-perceived health status are separate, but interrelated entities, with disease having a stronger relationship to observed function than self-perceived health. Comprehensive assessment of frail elders may need to include all three areas, and studies that focus on one area should take into account the other two as potential important covariates.

  20. [Relationship between quality of life and disability level in patients with occupational disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei; Lin, Mingjing; Zhang, Wenwen; Li, Jing; Zou, Jianfang

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the relationship between the quality of life (QOL) and disability level in patients with occupational disease and to investigate the influencing factors for QOL. A total of 255 patients with occupational disease were selected from three specialized hospitals dedicated to occupational disease and the department of occupational medicine of one comprehensive hospital using cluster sampling from December 2013 to May 2014. A survey was carried out using WHOQOL-BREF and general questionnaire (including disability level), and statistical analysis was also performed using t test, F test, analysis of variance, and multivariate stepwise regression analysis. The QOL scores of patients with occupational diseases, from high to low, were social domain (11.48 ± 2.86), psychological domain (10.60 ± 2.28), physiological domain (10.54 ± 1.65), and environmental domain (10.50 ± 2.55), scores of which were significantly lower than the normal levels (Poccupational diseases of different disability levels (P>0.05). Also, QOL showed no significant differences between stage I, II and III patients with pneumoconiosis (P>0.05). The patients with pneumoconiosis were divided into mild, moderate, and severe groups, and the QOL scores of patients with mild pneumoconiosis in psychological and environmental domains were significantly higher than those of the patients with moderate or severe pneumoconiosis (Poccupational poisoning was divided into mild, moderate and severe groups, and the three groups showed no significant differences in QOL score (P>0.05). Multivariate regression analysis showed that the QOL score of each domain was mainly influenced by the degree of lung injury, complications, course of disease, age of onset, income, and employment status. The QOL of patients with occupational disease is significantly reduced, and disability level cannot accurately reflect their QOL. The treatment of patients with occupational disease should focus on their complications, and at

  1. The relationship between performance on the Infectious Diseases In-Training and Certification Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabovsky, Irina; Hess, Brian J; Haist, Steven A; Lipner, Rebecca S; Hawley, Janine L; Woodward, Stephanie; Engleberg, N Cary

    2015-03-01

    The Infectious Diseases Society of America In-Training Examination (IDSA ITE) is a feedback tool used to help fellows track their knowledge acquisition during fellowship training. We determined whether the scores on the IDSA ITE and from other major medical knowledge assessments predict performance on the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Infectious Disease Certification Examination. The sample was 1021 second-year fellows who took the IDSA ITE and ABIM Infectious Disease Certification Examination from 2008 to 2012. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine if ABIM Infectious Disease Certification Examination scores were predicted by IDSA ITE scores, prior United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) scores, ABIM Internal Medicine Certification Examination scores, fellowship director ratings of medical knowledge, and demographic variables. Logistic regression was used to evaluate if these same assessments predicted a passing outcome on the certification examination. IDSA ITE scores were the strongest predictor of ABIM Infectious Disease Certification Examination scores (β = .319), followed by prior ABIM Internal Medicine Certification Examination scores (β = .258), USMLE Step 1 scores (β = .202), USMLE Step 3 scores (β = .130), and fellowship directors' medical knowledge ratings (β = .063). IDSA ITE scores were also a significant predictor of passing the Infectious Disease Certification Examination (odds ratio, 1.017 [95% confidence interval, 1.013-1.021]). The significant relationship between the IDSA ITE score and performance on the ABIM Infectious Disease Certification Examination supports the use of the ITE as a valid feedback tool in fellowship training. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Relationship between Postural Deformities and Frontal Function in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko Ninomiya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Postural deformities and executive dysfunction (ED are common symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD; however, the relationship between postural deformities and ED in patients with PD remains unclear. This study assessed the relationship between postural deformities and ED in patients with PD. Sixty-five patients with sporadic PD were assessed for the severity of postural deformities and executive function. The severity of postural deformities was scored using the United Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale item 28 score: no postural deformity (0, mild postural deformities (1, or severe postural deformities (2–4. Executive function was assessed using the Behavioral Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS and an age-controlled standardized BADS score <70 was defined as ED. Age-controlled standardized BADS scores were compared across the three groups using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Relationship between ED and the severity of postural deformities was assessed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Age-controlled standardized BADS score significantly differed among the three groups P=0.005. ED was significantly related to the severity of postural deformities P=0.0005. The severity of postural deformities was associated with a lower age-controlled standardized BADS score and ED, and these findings suggest that postural deformities were associated with frontal dysfunction in patients with PD.

  3. Parkinson Disease: The Relationship Between Non-motor Symptoms and Motor Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Fang; Obaid, Mona; Wieler, Marguerite; Camicioli, Richard; Martin, W R Wayne

    2016-03-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) presents with motor and non-motor symptoms (NMS). The NMS often precede the onset of motor symptoms, but may progress throughout the disease course. Tremor dominant, postural instability gait difficulty (PIGD), and indeterminate phenotypes can be distinguished using Unified PD Rating scales (UPDRS-III). We hypothesized that the PIGD phenotype would be more likely to develop NMS, and that the non-dopamine-responsive axial signs would correlate with NMS severity. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional chart review to assess the relationship between NMS and PD motor phenotypes. PD patients were administered the NMS Questionnaire, the UPDRS-III, and the Mini-Mental State Examination score. The relationship between NMS burden and PD subtypes was examined using linear regression models. The prevalence of each NMS among difference PD motor subtypes was analyzed using chi-square test. PD patients with more advanced disease based on their UPDRS-III had higher NMS Questionnaire scores. The axial component of UPDRS-III correlated with higher NMS. There was no correlation between NMS and tremor scores. There was a significant correlation between PIGD score and higher NMS burden. PIGD group had higher prevalence in most NMS domains when compared with tremor dominant and indeterminate groups independent of disease duration and severity. NMS profile and severity vary according to motor phenotype. We conclude that in the PD population, patients with a PIGD phenotype who have more axial involvement, associated with advanced disease and poor motor response, have a higher risk for a higher NMS burden.

  4. The Relationship between Parental Rearing Behavior, Resilience, and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents with Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Ryoung Moon

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesParental rearing behavior is one factor that influences the strength of resilience. In turn, resilience influences depression. However, it is unclear whether resilience has a mediating effect on the relationship between parental rearing and depression in adolescents with congenital heart disease (CHD. Therefore, the associations between parental rearing behavior and resilience and between rearing behavior and symptoms of depression were investigated with respect to age, gender and disease severity.Subjects and methodsPatients completed a parental rearing behavior questionnaire, a resilience scale and the Children’s Depression Inventory during a routine clinic visit. Structural equation modeling with maximum likelihood estimation was used to analyze the data.ResultsThe median age of the 180 patients included in the study was 17.8 years, and 64% were male. Lower resilience was found to be associated with overprotection, punishment, rejection, and control. There was a strong relationship between resilience and symptoms of depression. Resilience varied according to gender, age group, and disease severity.ConclusionParental rearing behaviors such as emotional warmth, rejection, punishment, control, and overprotection have a significant influence on adolescent’s resilience. When developing intervention programs to increase resilience and reduce depression in adolescents with CHD, parenting attitudes, gender, age, and CHD severity should be considered.

  5. The relationship between telomere length and mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee Lee

    Full Text Available Some have suggested that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a disease of accelerated aging. Aging is characterized by shortening of telomeres. The relationship of telomere length to important clinical outcomes such as mortality, disease progression and cancer in COPD is unknown. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, we measured telomere length of peripheral leukocytes in 4,271 subjects with mild to moderate COPD who participated in the Lung Health Study (LHS. The subjects were followed for approximately 7.5 years during which time their vital status, FEV(1 and smoking status were ascertained. Using multiple regression methods, we determined the relationship of telomere length to cancer and total mortality in these subjects. We also measured telomere length in healthy "mid-life" volunteers and patients with more severe COPD. The LHS subjects had significantly shorter telomeres than those of healthy "mid-life" volunteers (p<.001. Compared to individuals in the 4(th quartile of relative telomere length (i.e. longest telomere group, the remaining participants had significantly higher risk of cancer mortality (Hazard ratio, HR, 1.48; p = 0.0324 and total mortality (HR, 1.29; p = 0.0425. Smoking status did not make a significant difference in peripheral blood cells telomere length. In conclusion, COPD patients have short leukocyte telomeres, which are in turn associated increased risk of total and cancer mortality. Accelerated aging is of particular relevance to cancer mortality in COPD.

  6. Unstable relationship between the Arctic Oscillation and East Asian jet stream in winter and possible mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; He, Shengping; Li, Fei; Wang, Huijun; Zhu, Yali

    2017-12-01

    Based on long-term reanalysis datasets, this study revealed that the relationship between the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and the East Asian jet stream (EAJS) is significant negative during 1925-1945 and 1985-2005 (significant periods; hereafter SPs) whereas insignificant during 1900-1920 and 1955-1975 (insignificant periods; ISPs). The unstable AO-EAJS relationship might be related to the interdecadal change of AO's spatial structure. During SPs winters, anomalous positive AO events are characterized by atmospheric negative anomalies in the Arctic with two anomalous positive centers located in the extratropical Atlantic and Pacific, exhibiting a quasi-barotropic structure. By contrast, the anomalous center in the North Pacific is barely observed during ISPs winters. Further analysis indicated that such interdecadal change might be attributed to change of troposphere-stratosphere coupling and the North Pacific air-sea interaction. On the one hand, anomalous AO at surface is closely related to obvious planetary waves downward from the stratosphere during SPs, which favors the subtropics-Arctic teleconnection. On the other hand, the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) shows warm phase during SPs, which induces larger variance of the Aleutian Low and more intensive divergence anomalies at upper level troposphere. Due to the advection of vorticity induced by stronger divergence is favorable for stronger Rossby wave source, the Rossby wave activity is much stronger and could further propagate eastward to the North Atlantic during SPs, resulting in the Pacific-Atlantic teleconnection. Such a mechanism is supported by the numerical simulations from two individual models that are perturbed by warm/cold IPO sea surface temperature anomalies.

  7. The Relationships between Weight Functions, Geometric Functions,and Compliance Functions in Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Rong [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Linear elastic fracture mechanics is widely used in industry because it established simple and explicit relationships between the permissible loading conditions and the critical crack size that is allowed in a structure. Stress intensity factors are the above-mentioned functional expressions that relate load with crack size through geometric functions or weight functions. Compliance functions are to determine the crack/flaw size in a structure when optical inspection is inconvenient. As a result, geometric functions, weight functions and compliance functions have been intensively studied to determine the stress intensity factor expressions for different geometries. However, the relations between these functions have received less attention. This work is therefore to investigate the intrinsic relationships between these functions. Theoretical derivation was carried out and the results were verified on single-edge cracked plate under tension and bending. It is found out that the geometric function is essentially the non-dimensional weight function at the loading point. The compliance function is composed of two parts: a varying part due to crack extension and a constant part from the intact structure if no crack exists. The derivative of the compliance function at any location is the product of the geometric function and the weight function at the evaluation point. Inversely, the compliance function can be acquired by the integration of the product of the geometric function and the weight function with respect to the crack size. The integral constant is just the unchanging compliance from the intact structure. Consequently, a special application of the relations is to obtain the compliance functions along a crack once the geometric function and weight functions are known. Any of the three special functions can be derived once the other two functions are known. These relations may greatly simplify the numerical process in obtaining either geometric functions, weight

  8. A model of cardiovascular disease giving a plausible mechanism for the effect of fractionated low-dose ionizing radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P Little

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the main cause of coronary heart disease and stroke, the two major causes of death in developed society. There is emerging evidence of excess risk of cardiovascular disease at low radiation doses in various occupationally exposed groups receiving small daily radiation doses. Assuming that they are causal, the mechanisms for effects of chronic fractionated radiation exposures on cardiovascular disease are unclear. We outline a spatial reaction-diffusion model for atherosclerosis and perform stability analysis, based wherever possible on human data. We show that a predicted consequence of multiple small radiation doses is to cause mean chemo-attractant (MCP-1 concentration to increase linearly with cumulative dose. The main driver for the increase in MCP-1 is monocyte death, and consequent reduction in MCP-1 degradation. The radiation-induced risks predicted by the model are quantitatively consistent with those observed in a number of occupationally-exposed groups. The changes in equilibrium MCP-1 concentrations with low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration are also consistent with experimental and epidemiologic data. This proposed mechanism would be experimentally testable. If true, it also has substantive implications for radiological protection, which at present does not take cardiovascular disease into account. The Japanese A-bomb survivor data implies that cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality contribute similarly to radiogenic risk. The major uncertainty in assessing the low-dose risk of cardiovascular disease is the shape of the dose response relationship, which is unclear in the Japanese data. The analysis of the present paper suggests that linear extrapolation would be appropriate for this endpoint.

  9. Effect of transoral tracheal wash on respiratory mechanics in dogs with respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaught, Meghan E; Rozanski, Elizabeth A; deLaforcade, Armelle M

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a transoral tracheal wash (TOTW) on respiratory mechanics in dogs and to describe the use of a critical care ventilator (CCV) to determine respiratory mechanics. Fourteen client-owned dogs with respiratory diseases were enrolled. Respiratory mechanics, including static compliance (C stat ) and static resistance (R stat ), were determined before and after TOTW. Pre- and post-wash results were compared, with a P -value of mechanics, as observed by a reduction in C stat , presumably due to airway flooding and collapse. While no long-lasting effects were noted in these clinical patients, this effect should be considered when performing TOTW on dogs with respiratory diseases. Respiratory mechanics testing using a CCV was feasible and may be a useful clinical testing approach.

  10. Functional microRNAs in Alzheimer’s disease and cancer: differential regulation of common mechanisms and pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly N Holohan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two of the main research priorities in the United States are cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, which are attributed to abnormal patterns of cellular behavior. MicroRNAs (miRNA have been implicated as regulators of cellular metabolism, and thus are an active topic of investigation in both disease areas. There is presently a more extensive body of work on the role of miRNAs in cancer compared to neurodegenerative diseases, and therefore it may be useful to examine whether there is any concordance between the functional roles of miRNAs in these diseases. As a case study, the roles of miRNAs in Alzheimer’s disease (AD and their functions in various cancers will be compared. A number of miRNA expression patterns are altered in individuals with AD compared with healthy older adults. Among these, some have also been shown to correlate with neuropathological changes including plaque and tangle accumulation, as well as expression levels of other molecules known to be involved in disease pathology. Importantly, these miRNAs have also been shown to have differential expression and or functional roles in various types of cancer. To examine possible intersections between miRNA functions in cancer and AD, we review the current literature on eight of these miRNAs in cancer and AD, focusing on their roles in known biological pathways. We propose a pathway-driven model in which some molecular processes show an inverse relationship between cancer and neurodegenerative disease (e.g., proliferation and apoptosis whereas others are more parallel in their activity (e.g., immune activation and inflammation. A critical review of these and other molecular mechanisms in cancer may shed light on the pathophysiology of AD, and highlight key areas for future research. Conclusions from this work may be extended to other neurodegenerative diseases for which some molecular pathways have been identified but which have not yet been extensively researched for mi

  11. Defining the relationship between Plasmodium falciparum parasite rate and clinical disease: statistical models for disease burden estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snow Robert W

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical malaria has proven an elusive burden to enumerate. Many cases go undetected by routine disease recording systems. Epidemiologists have, therefore, frequently defaulted to actively measuring malaria in population cohorts through time. Measuring the clinical incidence of malaria longitudinally is labour-intensive and impossible to undertake universally. There is a need, therefore, to define a relationship between clinical incidence and the easier and more commonly measured index of infection prevalence: the "parasite rate". This relationship can help provide an informed basis to define malaria burdens in areas where health statistics are inadequate. Methods Formal literature searches were conducted for Plasmodium falciparum malaria incidence surveys undertaken prospectively through active case detection at least every 14 days. The data were abstracted, standardized and geo-referenced. Incidence surveys were time-space matched with modelled estimates of infection prevalence derived from a larger database of parasite prevalence surveys and modelling procedures developed for a global malaria endemicity map. Several potential relationships between clinical incidence and infection prevalence were then specified in a non-parametric Gaussian process model with minimal, biologically informed, prior constraints. Bayesian inference was then used to choose between the candidate models. Results The suggested relationships with credible intervals are shown for the Africa and a combined America and Central and South East Asia regions. In both regions clinical incidence increased slowly and smoothly as a function of infection prevalence. In Africa, when infection prevalence exceeded 40%, clinical incidence reached a plateau of 500 cases per thousand of the population per annum. In the combined America and Central and South East Asia regions, this plateau was reached at 250 cases per thousand of the population per annum. A temporal

  12. Microstructure evolution and microstructure/mechanical properties relationships in alpha+beta titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunha

    In this study, the microstructural evolution of Timetal 550 was investigated. Timetal 550 showed two types of phase transformations (martensitic and nucleation and growth) depending on the cooling rate from the beta region. The alpha phase initially precipitated at the prior beta grain boundaries, and it had a Burgers OR with one of the adjacent grains. It was found that colonies could grow, even in the fast-cooled Timetal 550 sample, from the grain boundary alpha into the prior beta grain with which it exhibited the Burgers OR. Three orientation relationships were also found between alpha laths in the basketweave microstructure. Microhardness testing demonstrated that fast-cooled Timetal 550 samples with basketweave microstructure were harder than slowly-cooled samples with colony microstructure. Orientation-dependent deformation was found in the colony microstructure. Specifically, when the surface normal is perpendicular to the [0001] of alpha, the material deforms easily in the direction perpendicular to the [0001] of alpha. Fuzzy logic and Bayesian neural network models were developed to predict the room temperature tensile properties of Timetal 550. This involved the development of a database relating microstructural features to mechanical properties. A Gleeble 3800 thermal-mechanical simulator was used to develop various microstructures. Microstructural features of tensile-tested samples were quantified using stereological procedures. The quantified microstructural features and the tensile properties were used as inputs and outputs, respectively, for modeling the relationships between them. The individual influence of five microstructural features on tensile properties was determined using the established models. The microstructural features having the greatest impact on UTS and YS were the thickness of alpha laths and the width of grain boundary alpha layer, and the microstructural features having the greatest impact on elongation were the thickness of

  13. Alzheimer's disease: relationship between cognitive aspects and power and coherence EEG measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lineu C. Fonseca

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between specific cognitive aspects and quantitative EEG measures, in patients with mild or moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD. METHOD: Thirty-eight AD patients and 31 controls were assessed by CERAD neuropsychological battery (Consortium to Establish a Registry for AD and the electroencephalogram (EEG. The absolute power and coherences EEG measures were calculated at rest. The correlations between the cognitive variables and the EEG were evaluated. RESULTS: In the AD group there were significant correlations between different coherence EEG measures and Mini-Mental State Examination, verbal fluency, modified Boston naming, word list memory with repetition, word list recall and recognition, and constructional praxis (p<0.01. These correlations were all negative for the delta and theta bands and positive for alpha and beta. There were no correlations between cognitive aspects and absolute EEG power. CONCLUSION: The coherence EEG measures reflect different forms in the relationship between regions related to various cognitive dysfunctions.

  14. Possible roles of transglutaminases in molecular mechanisms responsible for human neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Gaetano Gatta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Transglutaminases are a family of Ca2+-dependent enzymes which catalyze post-translational modifications of proteins. The main activity of these enzymes is the cross-linking of glutaminyl residues of a protein/peptide substrate to lysyl residues of a protein/peptide co-substrate. In addition to lysyl residues, other second nucleophilic co-substrates may include monoamines or polyamines (to form mono- or bi-substituted/crosslinked adducts or –OH groups (to form ester linkages. In absence of co-substrates, the nucleophile may be water, resulting in the net deamidation of the glutaminyl residue. Transglutaminase activity has been suggested to be involved in molecular mechanisms responsible for both physiological or pathological processes. In particular, transglutaminase activity has been shown to be responsible for human autoimmune diseases, Celiac Disease is just one of them. Interestingly, neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, supranuclear palsy, Huntington’s Disease and other polyglutamine diseases, are characterized in part by aberrant cerebral transglutaminase activity and by increased cross-linked proteins in affected brains. This review describes the possible molecular mechanisms by which these enzymes could be responsible for such diseases and the possible use of transglutaminase inhibitors for patients with diseases characterized by aberrant transglutaminase activity.

  15. Evaluation of the knowledge of pregnant women about the relationship between oral diseases and pregnancy complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmem Dolores de Sá Catão

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chronic persistent low-level infection in pregnant women, such as periodontal disease (PD may impair maternal-fetal unit, since the infectious process induces the release of chemical mediators involved in the process of prematurity. OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge of mothers as regards the relationship between oral diseases and pregnancy complications. METHOD: A cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted with 104 pregnant women indexed in the Primary Care Information System (SIAB, in the Family Health Strategies (FHS, using a structured questionnaire. Data were recorded in SPSS and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics, considering a significance level of 5%. RESULT: Most patients (64.4% were domestic workers, (48.1% aged 24 to 34 years, (55.8% showed complete the 2nd grade and incomplete high school education, and (49% were primiparous. Among the participants, 76% were unaware of the relationship between oral disease, prematurity and giving birth to low birth weight babies. Statistically significant association was found between: educational level and knowledge about prenatal dental care (p = 0.012; since it was shown that 90.4% ignored the existence of this activity and 65.4% had never received information about the care of baby's oral hygiene (p = 0.003. CONCLUSION: Most women were unaware of the relationship of PD with prematurity, and showed lack of information about the care of mother and baby oral hygiene, highlighting the need for greater integration between the dental surgeon and other primary care professionals to promote oral health care of pregnant women and reduce the ratio of PD with pregnancy complications.

  16. Relationship between diminution of small pulmonary vessels and emphysema in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashimo, Shuko; Chubachi, Shotaro; Tsutsumi, Akihiro; Kameyama, Naofumi; Sasaki, Mamoru; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Nakamura, Hidetoshi; Asano, Koichiro; Reilly, John J; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    To investigate the relationship between small pulmonary vessels and extent of emphysema on CT in individual lungs with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Forty-nine patients were included. The percentage of cross-sectional area of vessels emphysema were assessed. Less than half of the COPD patients demonstrated an inverse correlation between %CSA <5 and percentage of low attenuation area (LAA%). In the remaining patients, %CSA <5 was homogeneously distributed. Not all patients with COPD demonstrated an inverse correlation of the distributions between %CSA <5 and LAA% in individual lungs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Systems biology elucidates common pathogenic mechanisms between nonalcoholic and alcoholic-fatty liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Sookoian

    Full Text Available The abnormal accumulation of fat in the liver is often related either to metabolic risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in the absence of alcohol consumption (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, NAFLD or to chronic alcohol consumption (alcoholic fatty liver disease, AFLD. Clinical and histological studies suggest that NAFLD and AFLD share pathogenic mechanisms. Nevertheless, current data are still inconclusive as to whether the underlying biological process and disease pathways of NAFLD and AFLD are alike. Our primary aim was to integrate omics and physiological data to answer the question of whether NAFLD and AFLD share molecular processes that lead to disease development. We also explored the extent to which insulin resistance (IR is a distinctive feature of NAFLD. To answer these questions, we used systems biology approaches, such as gene enrichment analysis, protein-protein interaction networks, and gene prioritization, based on multi-level data extracted by computational data mining. We observed that the leading disease pathways associated with NAFLD did not significantly differ from those of AFLD. However, systems biology revealed the importance of each molecular process behind each of the two diseases, and dissected distinctive molecular NAFLD and AFLD-signatures. Comparative co-analysis of NAFLD and AFLD clarified the participation of NAFLD, but not AFLD, in cardiovascular disease, and showed that insulin signaling is impaired in fatty liver regardless of the noxa, but the putative regulatory mechanisms associated with NAFLD seem to encompass a complex network of genes and proteins, plausible of epigenetic modifications. Gene prioritization showed a cancer-related functional map that suggests that the fatty transformation of the liver tissue is regardless of the cause, an emerging mechanism of ubiquitous oncogenic activation. In conclusion, similar underlying disease mechanisms lead to NAFLD and AFLD, but specific ones depict a

  18. Chronic Wasting Disease: Transmission Mechanisms and the Possibility of Harvest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, Alex; Merrill, Evelyn; Pybus, Margo; Lewis, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    We develop a model of CWD management by nonselective deer harvest, currently the most feasible approach available for managing CWD in wild populations. We use the model to explore the effects of 6 common harvest strategies on disease prevalence and to identify potential optimal harvest policies for reducing disease prevalence without population collapse. The model includes 4 deer categories (juveniles, adult females, younger adult males, older adult males) that may be harvested at different rates, a food-based carrying capacity, which influences juvenile survival but not adult reproduction or survival, and seasonal force of infection terms for each deer category under differing frequency-dependent transmission dynamics resulting from environmental and direct contact mechanisms. Numerical experiments show that the interval of transmission coefficients β where the disease can be controlled is generally narrow and efficiency of a harvest policy to reduce disease prevalence depends crucially on the details of the disease transmission mechanism, in particular on the intensity of disease transmission to juveniles and the potential differences in the behavior of older and younger males that influence contact rates. Optimal harvest policy to minimize disease prevalence for each of the assumed transmission mechanisms is shown to depend on harvest intensity. Across mechanisms, a harvest that focuses on antlered deer, without distinguishing between age classes reduces disease prevalence most consistently, whereas distinguishing between young and older antlered deer produces higher uncertainty in the harvest effects on disease prevalence. Our results show that, despite uncertainties, a modelling approach can determine classes of harvest strategy that are most likely to be effective in combatting CWD. PMID:26963921

  19. Relationship between halitosis and periodontal disease - associated oral bacteria in tongue coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amou, T; Hinode, D; Yoshioka, M; Grenier, D

    2014-05-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate the relationship between halitosis and oral bacteria in tongue coating (TC) and saliva samples from patients with halitosis, and to evaluate the effect of tongue cleaning on halitosis. Ninety-four participants complaining of oral malodour were included in the study. Organoleptic (OR) values, volatile sulphur compound (VSC) concentrations determined by gas chromatography and TC scores were used as clinical parameters of halitosis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions were used to determine the numbers of periodontal disease-associated oral bacteria. There was a significant correlation between TC scores and OR values, methylmercaptan (CH3 SH) concentrations and VSC concentrations (Spearman's rank-correlation coefficient test, P periodontal disease-associated oral bacteria in TCs are closely related to halitosis and that tongue cleaning may be an effective method for improving halitosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The relationship between Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis or ulcer disease and gastric emptying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao Chiahung; Wang Shyhjen; Chen Granhum; Yeh Shinhwa

    1994-01-01

    Forty-five patients with Helicobacter pylori (HP)-associated gastritis or ulcer disease were included in this study. Radionuclide-labelled solid meals were used to calculate gastric emptying times (GETs) and carbon-14 urea breath tests ( 14 C UBTs) were used to measure the HP colonies quantitatively. The patients were assessed according to the following two criteria: (a) the HP colony number (i.e. high or low) and (b) the recorded duration of the GET (i.e. long or short). There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of abnormal GET between high and low 14 C UBT patients or in the incidence of abnormal 14 C UBT between long and short GET cases. In conclusion, no significant relationship between HP-associated gastritis or ulcer disease and GET was found in this study. (orig.)

  1. The relationship between Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis or ulcer disease and gastric emptying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao Chiahung (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Wang Shyhjen (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Chen Granhum (Div. of Gastroenterology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Yeh Shinhwa (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China))

    1994-03-01

    Forty-five patients with Helicobacter pylori (HP)-associated gastritis or ulcer disease were included in this study. Radionuclide-labelled solid meals were used to calculate gastric emptying times (GETs) and carbon-14 urea breath tests ([sup 14]C UBTs) were used to measure the HP colonies quantitatively. The patients were assessed according to the following two criteria: (a) the HP colony number (i.e. high or low) and (b) the recorded duration of the GET (i.e. long or short). There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of abnormal GET between high and low [sup 14]C UBT patients or in the incidence of abnormal [sup 14]C UBT between long and short GET cases. In conclusion, no significant relationship between HP-associated gastritis or ulcer disease and GET was found in this study. (orig.)

  2. Relationship between serum thyroid hormones levels and heart failure in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Fuman; Liu Tongmei; Wang Weimin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between serum thyroid hormones levels and severity of heart failure in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods: Serum thyroid hormones (FT 3 , FT 4 , TSH) levels were measured with RIA in 38 patients with CHD but no cardiac failure, 40 CHD patients with heat failure and 37 controls. Results: The serum FT 3 levels in patients with heart failure were significantly lower than those in the other two groups (P 4 and TSH in all these three groups of subjects. Moreover, the serum FT 3 levels in the patients with heart fail- ure were significantly positively correlated with the ejection fractions (EF) in these patients. Conclusion: Serum FT 3 levels dropped markedly in CHD patients with heart failure and the magnitude of decrease was positively correlated with the severity of the disease. (authors)

  3. Relationship of adiponectin level with lipid profile in type-2 diabetic men with coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrani, S.; Jan, M.R.; Shah, J.; Khan, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebro-vascular disease is a commonest long term complication of type-2 diabetes mellitus. The study was done to determine concentration of serum adiponectin and lipid profile in type-2 diabetic men with coronary heart disease (CHD) in the region of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK), and to find possible relationship between them. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study comprising of randomly selected thirty six healthy adult males and thirty six type-2 diabetic males with coronary heart disease. Their fasting blood samples were analysed for serum adiponectin, fasting blood glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin and lipid profile which included total cholesterol (T-C), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). The relationship of adiponectin with other variables in type-2 diabetic men with coronary heart disease was determined with Pearson correlations coefficient (r). Results: Type-2 diabetic males with coronary heart disease when compared to healthy males showed significantly low levels of serum adiponectin (p=<0.001) and HDL-C (p=<0.001) and significantly high level of FBG (p=<0.001), HbA1c (p=<0.001), TC (p=<0.05), TG (p=<0.05) and LDL-C (p=<0.05). Serum adiponectin level showed a significant negative correlation with FBG (r = -0.332; p= 0.04), HbA1c (r = -0.818; p=<0.01) and TG (r = -0.640; p=<0.01) in type-2 diabetic men with coronary heart disease. Adiponectin showed a significant positive association with HDL-C in controls (r = 0.948; p=<0.01) and patients of type-2 diabetes with CHD (r = 0.650; p=<0.01). Conclusion: Serum adiponectin concentration is markedly decreased in patients of type-2 diabetes with coronary heart disease. Hypoadiponectinemia is related with deranged lipid profile, i.e., high TG and low HDL-C levels in type-2 diabetic men with CHD. Moreover, adiponectin is associated positively with HDL-C and negatively with HbA1c and TG levels in the studied population. (author)

  4. Fe++/Fe+++ concentration relationship and mechanical properties of phosphate glasses useful for wastes immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, D.A.; Prado, Miguel O.

    2007-01-01

    Under different melting conditions, glasses with different Fe(II)/Fe(III) concentration relationship were prepared within each type of glass 43Fe 2 O 3 -57P 2 O 5 and 33,33Fe 2 O 3 - 66,67P 2 O 5 . Using Moessbauer spectroscopy Fe(II)/Fe(III) concentration values were determined. Vickers and Knoop indentations were used for determining their hardness, toughness, Young modulus and brittleness. The same measurements were carried on some silicate and aluminosilicate glasses. Also Weibull statistics was done to determine the characteristics (Weibull modulus and and fracture probability) of glass fracture. We found that silicate glasses (SG) are harder than phosphate glasses (PG). Toughness values for PG, are in the same range than for SG, although for the same density exhibit larger values or smaller brittleness than silicate glasses. For one of the glasses it was found that the mechanical load P 0 needed for a fracture probability of 63% increases with the Fe(II) content. (author)

  5. The relationship between leg preference and knee mechanics during sidestepping in collegiate female footballers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott R; Wang, Henry; Dickin, D Clark; Weiss, Kaitlyn J

    2014-11-01

    This study examined the relationship between leg preference and knee mechanics in females during sidestepping. Three-dimensional data were recorded on 16 female collegiate footballers during a planned 45° sidestep manoeuvre with their preferred and non-preferred kicking leg. Knee kinematics and kinetics during initial contact, weight acceptance, peak push-off, and final push-off phases of sidestepping were analysed in both legs. The preferred leg showed trivial to small increases (ES = 0.19-0.36) in knee flexion angle at initial contact, weight acceptance, and peak push-off, and small increases (ES = 0.21-0.34) in peak power production and peak knee extension velocity. The non-preferred leg showed a trivial increase (ES = 0.10) in knee abduction angle during weight acceptance; small to moderate increases (ES = 0.22-0.64) in knee internal rotation angle at weight acceptance, peak push-off, and final push-off; a small increase (ES = 0.22) in knee abductor moment; and trivial increases (ES = 0.09-0.14) in peak power absorption and peak knee flexion velocity. The results of this study show that differences do exist between the preferred and non-preferred leg in females. The findings of this study will increase the knowledge base of anterior cruciate ligament injury in females and can aid in the design of more appropriate neuromuscular, plyometric, and strength training protocols for injury prevention.

  6. Perceived genetic knowledge, attitudes towards genetic testing, and the relationship between these among patients with a chronic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morren, M.; Rijken, M.; Baanders, A.N.; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Genetics increasingly permeate everyday medicine. When patients want to make informed decisions about genetic testing, they require genetic knowledge. This study examined the genetic knowledge and attitudes of patients with chronic diseases, and the relationship between both. In addition,

  7. Perceived genetic knowledge, attitudes toward genetic testing, and the relationship between these among patients with a chronic disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morren, M.; Rijken, M.; Baanders, A.N.; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Genetics increasingly permeate everyday medicine. When patients want to make informed decisions about genetic testing, they require genetic knowledge. This study examined the genetic knowledge and attitudes of patients with chronic diseases, and the relationship between both. In addition,

  8. The Relationship Between Air Particulate Levels and Upper Respiratory Disease in Soldiers Deployed to Bosnia (1997-1998)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hastings, Deborah

    2001-01-01

    This study had three objectives: to determine if there is a relationship between air particulate levels and upper respiratory disease in soldiers deployed to Bosnia between 1997-98, to establish a method for linking environmental...

  9. The relationship between the particle properties, mechanical behavior, and surface roughness of some pharmaceutical excipient compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Padma; Hancock, Bruno C.

    2003-01-01

    Several common pharmaceutical excipient powders were compacted at a constant solid fraction (SF) in order to study the relationship between powder properties, compact surface roughness, and compact mechanical properties such as hardness, elasticity, and brittleness. The materials used in this study included microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), fumaric acid, mannitol, lactose monohydrate, spray dried lactose, sucrose, and dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate. A slow consolidation process was used to make compacts at a SF of 0.85 (typical for most pharmaceutical tablets) from single excipient components. A model was proposed to describe the surface roughness of compacts based on the brittle or ductile deformation tendencies of the powder materials. The roughness profile would also be dependent upon the magnitude of the compression stress in relation to the yield stress (onset of irreversible deformation) values of the excipients. It was hypothesized that brittle materials would produce smooth compacts with high surface variability due to particle fracture, and the converse would apply for ductile materials. Compact surfaces should be smoother if the materials were compressed above their yield pressure values. Non-contact optical profilometry was used along with scanning electron microscopy to quantify and characterize the surface morphology of the excipient compacts. The roughness parameters R a (average roughness), R q (RMS roughness), R q /R a (ratio describing surface variability), and R sk (skewness) were found to correlate with the deformation properties of the excipients. Brittle materials such as lactose, sucrose, and calcium phosphate produced compacts with low values of R a and R q , high variability, and negative R sk . The opposite was found with plastic materials such as MCC, mannitol, and fumaric acid. The highly negative skewness values for brittle material compacts may indicate their propensity to be vulnerable to cracks or surface defects. These findings

  10. The relationship between the particle properties, mechanical behavior, and surface roughness of some pharmaceutical excipient compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Padma; Hancock, Bruno C

    2003-08-25

    Several common pharmaceutical excipient powders were compacted at a constant solid fraction (SF) in order to study the relationship between powder properties, compact surface roughness, and compact mechanical properties such as hardness, elasticity, and brittleness. The materials used in this study included microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), fumaric acid, mannitol, lactose monohydrate, spray dried lactose, sucrose, and dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate. A slow consolidation process was used to make compacts at a SF of 0.85 (typical for most pharmaceutical tablets) from single excipient components. A model was proposed to describe the surface roughness of compacts based on the brittle or ductile deformation tendencies of the powder materials. The roughness profile would also be dependent upon the magnitude of the compression stress in relation to the yield stress (onset of irreversible deformation) values of the excipients. It was hypothesized that brittle materials would produce smooth compacts with high surface variability due to particle fracture, and the converse would apply for ductile materials. Compact surfaces should be smoother if the materials were compressed above their yield pressure values. Non-contact optical profilometry was used along with scanning electron microscopy to quantify and characterize the surface morphology of the excipient compacts. The roughness parameters R{sub a} (average roughness), R{sub q} (RMS roughness), R{sub q}/R{sub a} (ratio describing surface variability), and R{sub sk} (skewness) were found to correlate with the deformation properties of the excipients. Brittle materials such as lactose, sucrose, and calcium phosphate produced compacts with low values of R{sub a} and R{sub q}, high variability, and negative R{sub sk}. The opposite was found with plastic materials such as MCC, mannitol, and fumaric acid. The highly negative skewness values for brittle material compacts may indicate their propensity to be vulnerable to

  11. Contentious host-microbiota relationship in inflammatory bowel disease--can foes become friends again?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satokari, Reetta

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic debilitating disorders of unknown etiology, consisting of two main conditions, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Major advances have recently taken place in human genetic studies of IBD and over 160 risk loci for these two diseases have been uncovered. These genetic data highlight a key role for genes that code for immunological and epithelial barrier functions. Environmental factors also make substantial contributions to the pathogenesis of IBD and account for the growing incidence of the diseases around the world. Intestinal microbiota creates resistance to infection, provides nutrients, and educates the immune system and in many ways has a significant impact on human health. Aberrant microbiota composition and decreased diversity (dysbiotic microbiota) are key etiopathological events in IBD. Dysbiotic microbiota can lead to loss of normal, regulatory immune effects in the gut mucosa. This may play a central role in the development and perpetuation of chronic inflammation. Further, the expression of specific innate immune receptors that recognize microbes is altered in the IBD epithelium. Therefore, the combination of host side epithelial barrier functions and the presence of dysbiotic microbiota in the gut together promote inflammation. New therapeutic options targeting microbiota are currently considered for IBD and they may, in the future, provide means to reverse the pathogenic host-microbiota relationship into a symbiotic one. In this review, the focus is on the intestinal microbiota and host-microbe interactions in IBD.

  12. Sensitivity analysis of the relationship between disease occurrence and distance from a putative source of pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Dreassi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The relation between disease risk and a point source of pollution is usually investigated using distance from the source as a proxy of exposure. The analysis may be based on case-control data or on aggregated data. The definition of the function relating risk of disease and distance is critical, both in a classical and in a Bayesian framework, because the likelihood is usually very flat, even with large amounts of data. In this paper we investigate how the specification of the function relating risk of disease with distance from the source and of the prior distributions on the parameters of the function affects the results when case-control data and Bayesian methods are used. We consider different popular parametric models for the risk distance function in a Bayesian approach, comparing estimates with those derived by maximum likelihood. As an example we have analyzed the relationship between a putative source of environmental pollution (an asbestos cement plant and the occurrence of pleural malignant mesothelioma in the area of Casale Monferrato (Italy in 1987-1993. Risk of pleural malignant mesothelioma turns out to be strongly related to distance from the asbestos cement plant. However, as the models appeared to be sensitive to modeling choices, we suggest that any analysis of disease risk around a putative source should be integrated with a careful sensitivity analysis and possibly with prior knowledge. The choice of prior distribution is extremely important and should be based on epidemiological considerations.

  13. Relationship Between Prehypertension/Hypertension and Periodontal Disease: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Yuya; Ekuni, Daisuke; Miyai, Hisataka; Kataoka, Kota; Yamane, Mayu; Mizutani, Shinsuke; Irie, Koichiro; Azuma, Tetsuji; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Morita, Manabu

    2016-03-01

    Most cross-sectional studies have found a significant positive relationship between periodontal disease and prehypertension/hypertension. However, these studies had limitations and there are few prospective cohort studies in young adults. The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to investigate whether periodontal disease was related to prehypertension/hypertension in Japanese university students. Students (n = 2,588), who underwent health examinations before entering university and before graduation, were included in the analysis. The association between periodontal disease such as the percentage of bleeding on probing (BOP) and community periodontal index (CPI) scores, and change in blood pressure status was determined. At the reexamination, the numbers of participants with prehypertension (systolic blood pressure 120-139mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure 80-89mm Hg) and hypertension (≥140/90mm Hg) were 882 (34.1%) and 109 (4.2%), respectively. In a logistic regression model, the risk of hypertension was significantly associated with male (odds ratio (OR): 6.31; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.63-15.13; P periodontal disease defined as the presence of both probing pocket depth (PPD) ≥ 4mm and BOP ≥ 30% at baseline (OR: 2.74; 95% CI: 1.19-6.29; P = 0.02) in participants with prehypertension at baseline. On the other hand, the risk of prehypertension was not associated with presence of periodontal disease (OR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.51-1.70; P = 0.82). In the short-term prospective cohort study, a significant association between presence of periodontal disease and hypertension was observed in Japanese university students. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Molecular insights into the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and its relationship to normal aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei A Podtelezhnikov

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a complex neurodegenerative disorder that diverges from the process of normal brain aging by unknown mechanisms. We analyzed the global structure of age- and disease-dependent gene expression patterns in three regions from more than 600 brains. Gene expression variation could be almost completely explained by four transcriptional biomarkers that we named BioAge (biological age, Alz (Alzheimer, Inflame (inflammation, and NdStress (neurodegenerative stress. BioAge captures the first principal component of variation and includes genes statistically associated with neuronal loss, glial activation, and lipid metabolism. Normally BioAge increases with chronological age, but in AD it is prematurely expressed as if some of the subjects were 140 years old. A component of BioAge, Lipa, contains the AD risk factor APOE and reflects an apparent early disturbance in lipid metabolism. The rate of biological aging in AD patients, which cannot be explained by BioAge, is associated instead with NdStress, which includes genes related to protein folding and metabolism. Inflame, comprised of inflammatory cytokines and microglial genes, is broadly activated and appears early in the disease process. In contrast, the disease-specific biomarker Alz was selectively present only in the affected areas of the AD brain, appears later in pathogenesis, and is enriched in genes associated with the signaling and cell adhesion changes during the epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT transition. Together these biomarkers provide detailed description of the aging process and its contribution to Alzheimer's disease progression.

  15. Relationship between Retinal Vascular Caliber and Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marmor Alon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the relationship between retinal vascular caliber and cardiovascular disease in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD patients without diabetes and hypertension. Methods: Intention to treat study of individuals who underwent cardiac computed tomography (CT during a two year period. Coronary artery disease (CAD was defined as stenosis of >50% in at least one major coronary artery. Liver and spleen density were measured by abdominal (CT; intima-media thickness (IMT by Doppler ultrasound; retinal artery and vein diameter by colored-retinal angiography; and metabolic syndrome by ATP III guidelines. Serum biomarkers of insulin resistance, inflammation, and oxidant-antioxidant status were assessed. Results: Compared with 22 gender and age matched controls, the 29 NAFLD patients showed higher prevalence of coronary plaques (70% vs. 30%, p < 0.001, higher prevalence of coronary stenosis (30% vs. 15%, p < 0.001, lower retinal arteriole-to-venule ratio (AVR (0.66 ± 0.06 vs. 0.71 ± 0.02, p < 0.01, higher IMT (0.98 ± 0.3 vs. 0.83 ± 0.1, p < 0.04, higher carotid plaques (60% vs. 40%, p < 0.001, higher homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA (4.0 ± 3.4 vs. 2.0 ± 1.0, p < 0.005, and higher triglyceride levels (200 ± 80 vs. 150 ± 60, p < 0.005 than controls. Multivariate analysis showed fatty liver (OR 2.5; p < 0.01, IMT (OR 2.3 p < 0.001, and retinal AVR ratio (OR 1.5, p < 0.01 to be strongly associated with CAD independent of metabolic syndrome (OR 1.2, p < 0.05. Conclusions: Patients with smaller retinal AVR (<0.7 are likely to be at increased risk for CAD and carotid atherosclerosis in patients with NAFLD even without hypertension or diabetes.

  16. Detection of mechanical and disease stresses in citrus plants by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belasque, J., Jr.; Gasparoto, M. C. G.; Marcassa, L. G.

    2008-04-01

    We have investigated the detection of mechanical and disease stresses in citrus plants (Citrus limonia [L.] Osbeck) using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Due to its economic importance we have chosen to investigate the citrus canker disease, which is caused by the Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri bacteria. Mechanical stress was also studied because it plays an important role in the plant's infection by such bacteria. A laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy system, composed of a spectrometer and a 532 nm10 mW excitation laser was used to perform fluorescence spectroscopy. The ratio of two chlorophyll fluorescence bands allows us to detect and discriminate between mechanical and disease stresses. This ability to discriminate may have an important application in the field to detect citrus canker infected trees.

  17. Mechanisms of protein misfolding: Novel therapeutic approaches to protein-misfolding diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahuddin, Parveen; Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Khan, Sanaullah; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-11-01

    In protein misfolding, protein molecule acquires wrong tertiary structure, thereby induces protein misfolding diseases. Protein misfolding can occur through various mechanisms. For instance, changes in environmental conditions, oxidative stress, dominant negative mutations, error in post-translational modifications, increase in degradation rate and trafficking error. All of these factors cause protein misfolding thereby leading to diseases conditions. Both in vitro and in vivo observations suggest that partially unfolded or misfolded intermediates are particularly prone to aggregation. These partially misfolded intermediates aggregate via the interaction with the complementary intermediates and consequently enhance oligomers formation that grows into fibrils and proto-fibrils. The amyloid fibrils for example, accumulate in the brain and central nervous system (CNS) as amyloid deposits in the Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Prion disease and Amylo lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Furthermore, tau protein shows intrinsically disorder conformation; therefore its interaction with microtubule is impaired and this protein undergoes aggregation. This is also underlying cause of Alzheimers and other neurodegenerative diseases. Treatment of such misfolding maladies is considered as one of the most important challenges of the 21st century. Currently, several treatments strategies have been and are being discovered. These therapeutic interventions partly reversed or prevented the pathological state. More recently, a new approach was discovered, which employs nanobodies that targets multisteps in fibril formation pathway that may possibly completely cure these misfolding diseases. Keeping the above views in mind in the current review, we have comprehensively discussed the different mechanisms underlying protein misfolding thereby leading to diseases conditions and their therapeutic interventions.

  18. Exercise training on cardiovascular diseases: Role of animal models in the elucidation of the mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Rodrigues

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiovascular diseases, which include hypertension, coronary artery disease/myocardial infarction and heart failure, are one of the major causes of disability and death worldwide. On the other hand, physical exercise acts in the preventionand treatment of these conditions. In fact, several experiments performed in human beings have demonstrated the efficiency of physical exercise to alter clinical signals observed in these diseases, such as high blood pressure and exercise intolerance. However, even if human studies demonstrated the clinical efficiency of physical exercise, most extensive mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon still have to be elucidated. In this sense, studies using animal models seem to be a good option to demonstrate such mechanisms. Therefore, the aims of the present study are describing the main pathophysiological characteristics of the animal models used in the study of cardiovascular diseases, as well as the main mechanismsassociated with the benefits of physical exercise.

  19. PDMS Network Structure-Property Relationships: Influence of Molecular Architecture on Mechanical and Wetting Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, Matthew Joseph

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is one of the most common elastomers, with applications ranging from sealants and marine-antifouling coatings to medical devices and absorbents for water treatment. Fundamental understanding of how liquids spread on the surface of and absorb into and leach out of PDMS networks is of critical importance for the design and use in another application - microfluidic devices. The growing use of PDMS in microfluidic devices raises the concern that some researchers may use this material without fully understanding all of its advantages, drawbacks, and intricacies. The primary goal of this Ph.D. dissertation is to elucidate PDMS network molecular structure to macroscopic property relationships and to demonstrate how molecular architecture can alter dynamic mechanical and wetting characteristics. We prepare PDMS materials by using vinyl/ tetrakis(dimethylsiloxy)silane (TDSS) and silanol/ tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) combinations of PDMS end-groups and crosslinkers as two model systems. Under constant curing conditions, we systematically study the effects of polymer molecular weight, loading of crosslinker, and end-group chemical functionality on the extent of gelation and the dynamic mechanical and water wetting properties of end-linked PDMS networks. The extent of the gelation reaction is determined using the Soxhlet extraction to quantify the amount of material that did and did not participate in the crosslinking reactions, termed the gel and sol fractions, respectively. We use the Miller-Macosko model in conjunction with the gel fraction and precise chemical composition (i.e., stoichiometric ratio and molecular weight) to determine the fractions of elastic and pendant material, the molecular weight between chemical crosslinks, and the average effective functionality of the crosslinker molecule. Based on dynamic mechanical testing, we find that the maximum storage moduli are achieved at optimal stoichiometric conditions in the vinyl

  20. A Systems Biology Approach Reveals Converging Molecular Mechanisms that Link Different POPs to Common Metabolic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Patricia; Perlina, Ally; Mumtaz, Moiz; Fowler, Bruce A

    2016-07-01

    A number of epidemiological studies have identified statistical associations between persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and metabolic diseases, but testable hypotheses regarding underlying molecular mechanisms to explain these linkages have not been published. We assessed the underlying mechanisms of POPs that have been associated with metabolic diseases; three well-known POPs [2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD), 2,2´,4,4´,5,5´-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), and 4,4´-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p´-DDE)] were studied. We used advanced database search tools to delineate testable hypotheses and to guide laboratory-based research studies into underlying mechanisms by which this POP mixture could produce or exacerbate metabolic diseases. For our searches, we used proprietary systems biology software (MetaCore™/MetaDrug™) to conduct advanced search queries for the underlying interactions database, followed by directional network construction to identify common mechanisms for these POPs within two or fewer interaction steps downstream of their primary targets. These common downstream pathways belong to various cytokine and chemokine families with experimentally well-documented causal associations with type 2 diabetes. Our systems biology approach allowed identification of converging pathways leading to activation of common downstream targets. To our knowledge, this is the first study to propose an integrated global set of step-by-step molecular mechanisms for a combination of three common POPs using a systems biology approach, which may link POP exposure to diseases. Experimental evaluation of the proposed pathways may lead to development of predictive biomarkers of the effects of POPs, which could translate into disease prevention and effective clinical treatment strategies. Ruiz P, Perlina A, Mumtaz M, Fowler BA. 2016. A systems biology approach reveals converging molecular mechanisms that link different POPs to common metabolic diseases. Environ

  1. Rac1 in human diseases: The therapeutic potential of targeting Rac1 signaling regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marei, Hadir; Malliri, Angeliki

    2017-07-03

    Abnormal Rac1 signaling is linked to a number of debilitating human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases and neurodegenerative disorders. As such, Rac1 represents an attractive therapeutic target, yet the search for effective Rac1 inhibitors is still underway. Given the adverse effects associated with Rac1 signaling perturbation, cells have evolved several mechanisms to ensure the tight regulation of Rac1 signaling. Thus, characterizing these mechanisms can provide invaluable information regarding major cellular events that lead to aberrant Rac1 signaling. Importantly, this information can be utilized to further facilitate the development of effective pharmacological modulators that can restore normal Rac1 signaling. In this review, we focus on the pathological role of Rac1 signaling, highlighting the benefits and potential drawbacks of targeting Rac1 in a clinical setting. Additionally, we provide an overview of available compounds that target key Rac1 regulatory mechanisms and discuss future therapeutic avenues arising from our understanding of these mechanisms.

  2. The Progress of Mitophagy and Related Pathogenic Mechanisms of the Neurodegenerative Diseases and Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrion, an organelle with two layers of membrane, is extremely vital to eukaryotic cell. Its major functions are energy center and apoptosis censor inside cell. The intactness of mitochondrial membrane is important to maintain its structure and function. Mitophagy is one kind of autophagy. In recent years, studies of mitochondria have shown that mitophagy is regulated by various factors and is an important regulation mechanism for organisms to maintain their normal state. In addition, abnormal mitophagy is closely related to several neurodegenerative diseases and tumor. However, the related signal pathway and its regulation mechanism still remain unclear. As a result, summarizing the progress of mitophagy and its related pathogenic mechanism not only helps to reveal the complicated molecular mechanism, but also helps to find a new target to treat the related diseases.

  3. Study on the relationship between serum leptin level and ischemic cerebrovascular disease (ICVD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Nanping; Hu Chengjing; Wang Ruishan; Yin Qiuxia; Niu Aijun; Xue Lian; Xue Shenwu; Chen Qing

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the inter-relationship among serum leptin insulin resistance and blood lipids, and to explore the role of leptin in the pathogenesis of ischemic cerebrovascular diseases (ICVD). Methods: Levels of serum leptin, insulin and blood lipids were determined with RIA in 131 patients with different types of ICVD and 36 controls. Results: The levels of serum leptin in ICVD patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P<0.01). Changes of blood lipids and insulin paralleled those of leptin (cxcept with HDL-C). The serum leptin were positively correlated to cholesterol, TG and insulin levels (r=0.45, P<0.05; r=0.31, P<0.05, r=0.55, P<0.01), but negatively correlated to HDL-C (r=-0.88, P<0.05). Conclusion: The high expression of leptin in ICVD patients is associated with high lipid and insulin levels. The close relationship among them indicates that high leptin levels play an important role in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome as well as atheromatous cerebrovascular diseases. (authors)

  4. Relationship between dysphagia and depressive states in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Meng; Ohnishi, Hirofumi; Nonaka, Michio; Yamauchi, Rika; Hozuki, Takayoshi; Hayashi, Takashi; Saitoh, Masaki; Hisahara, Shin; Imai, Tomihiro; Shimohama, Shun; Mori, Mitsuru

    2011-07-01

    Aspiration pneumonia related to dysphagia is known to be the leading cause of death in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigated the relationship between depressive states and dysphagia in patients with PD. A hundred and twenty-seven PD patients gave their informed consent and were enrolled in this study. We used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) questionnaire to determine the participants' depressive states, and also used a questionnaire to assess participants' state of dysphagia. Participants were divided into four groups according to their BDI score. We compared the PD patients with Swallowing Disturbances Questionnaire (SDQ) scores of more than or equal to 11 with the SDQ scores of less than 11 regarding depressive categories. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) adjusting for age, sex, disease duration, wearing-off phenomenon and severity of movement disorder. OR (95%CI) of depressive categories, in which the trivial class was set as a reference group, were 3.28 (0.93-11.55), 13.44 (3.10-58.16), 30.35 (5.65-162.97) in the mild class, the moderate class and the severe class, respectively. This study suggests that there may be a strong relationship between depressive states and dysphagia in patients with PD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Unraveling Alzheimer's: Making Sense of the Relationship between Diabetes and Alzheimer's Disease1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented a strong association between diabetes and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The nature of the relationship, however, has remained a puzzle, in part because of seemingly incongruent findings. For example, some studies have concluded that insulin deficiency is primarily at fault, suggesting that intranasal insulin or inhibiting the insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) could be beneficial. Other research has concluded that hyperinsulinemia is to blame, which implies that intranasal insulin or the inhibition of IDE would exacerbate the disease. Such antithetical conclusions pose a serious obstacle to making progress on treatments. However, careful integration of multiple strands of research, with attention to the methods used in different studies, makes it possible to disentangle the research on AD. This integration suggests that there is an important relationship between insulin, IDE, and AD that yields multiple pathways to AD depending on the where deficiency or excess in the cycle occurs. I review evidence for each of these pathways here. The results suggest that avoiding excess insulin, and supporting robust IDE levels, could be important ways of preventing and lessening the impact of AD. I also describe what further tests need to be conducted to verify the arguments made in the paper, and their implications for treating AD.

  6. Infectivity versus Seeding in Neurodegenerative Diseases Sharing a Prion-Like Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Fernández-Borges

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prions are considered the best example to prove that the biological information can be transferred protein to protein through a conformational change. The term “prion-like” is used to describe molecular mechanisms that share similarities with the mammalian prion protein self-perpetuating aggregation and spreading characteristics. Since prions are presumably composed only of protein and are infectious, the more similar the mechanisms that occur in the different neurodegenerative diseases, the more these processes will resemble an infection. In vitro and in vivo experiments carried out during the last decade in different neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's diseases (PD, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS have shown a convergence toward a unique mechanism of misfolded protein propagation. In spite of the term “infection” that could be used to explain the mechanism governing the diversity of the pathological processes, other concepts as “seeding” or “de novo induction” are being used to describe the in vivo propagation and transmissibility of misfolded proteins. The current studies are demanding an extended definition of “disease-causing agents” to include those already accepted as well as other misfolded proteins. In this new scenario, “seeding” would be a type of mechanism by which an infectious agent can be transmitted but should not be used to define a whole “infection” process.

  7. Physiological Dynamics in Demyelinating Diseases: Unraveling Complex Relationships through Computer Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay S. Coggan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intense research, few treatments are available for most neurological disorders. Demyelinating diseases are no exception. This is perhaps not surprising considering the multifactorial nature of these diseases, which involve complex interactions between immune system cells, glia and neurons. In the case of multiple sclerosis, for example, there is no unanimity among researchers about the cause or even which system or cell type could be ground zero. This situation precludes the development and strategic application of mechanism-based therapies. We will discuss how computational modeling applied to questions at different biological levels can help link together disparate observations and decipher complex mechanisms whose solutions are not amenable to simple reductionism. By making testable predictions and revealing critical gaps in existing knowledge, such models can help direct research and will provide a rigorous framework in which to integrate new data as they are collected. Nowadays, there is no shortage of data; the challenge is to make sense of it all. In that respect, computational modeling is an invaluable tool that could, ultimately, transform how we understand, diagnose, and treat demyelinating diseases.

  8. Verbal Memory Decline following DBS for Parkinson's Disease: Structural Volumetric MRI Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geevarghese, Ruben; Lumsden, Daniel E; Costello, Angela; Hulse, Natasha; Ayis, Salma; Samuel, Michael; Ashkan, Keyoumars

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic degenerative movement disorder. The mainstay of treatment is medical. In certain patients Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) may be offered. However, DBS has been associated with post-operative neuropsychology changes, especially in verbal memory. Firstly, to determine if pre-surgical thalamic and hippocampal volumes were related to verbal memory changes following DBS. Secondly, to determine if clinical factors such as age, duration of symptoms or motor severity (UPDRS Part III score) were related to verbal memory changes. A consecutive group of 40 patients undergoing bilateral Subthalamic Nucleus (STN)-DBS for PD were selected. Brain MRI data was acquired, pre-processed and structural volumetric data was extracted using FSL. Verbal memory test scores for pre- and post-STN-DBS surgery were recorded. Linear regression was used to investigate the relationship between score change and structural volumetric data. A significant relationship was demonstrated between change in List Learning test score and thalamic (left, p = 0.02) and hippocampal (left, p = 0.02 and right p = 0.03) volumes. Duration of symptoms was also associated with List Learning score change (p = 0.02 to 0.03). Verbal memory score changes appear to have a relationship to pre-surgical MRI structural volumetric data. The findings of this study provide a basis for further research into the use of pre-surgical MRI to counsel PD patients regarding post-surgical verbal memory changes.

  9. An Integrated Insight into the Relationship between Soil Microbial Community and Tobacco Bacterial Wilt Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongwu; Li, Juan; Xiao, Yunhua; Gu, Yabing; Liu, Hongwei; Liang, Yili; Liu, Xueduan; Hu, Jin; Meng, Delong; Yin, Huaqun

    2017-01-01

    The soil microbial communities play an important role in plant health, however, the relationship between the below-ground microbiome and above-ground plant health remains unclear. To reveal such a relationship, we analyzed soil microbial communities through sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from 15 different tobacco fields with different levels of wilt disease in the central south part of China. We found that plant health was related to the soil microbial diversity as plants may benefit from the diverse microbial communities. Also, those 15 fields were grouped into ‘healthy’ and ‘infected’ samples based upon soil microbial community composition analyses such as unweighted paired-group method with arithmetic means (UPGMA) and principle component analysis, and furthermore, molecular ecological network analysis indicated that some potential plant-beneficial microbial groups, e.g., Bacillus and Actinobacteria could act as network key taxa, thus reducing the chance of plant soil-borne pathogen invasion. In addition, we propose that a more complex soil ecology network may help suppress tobacco wilt, which was also consistent with highly diversity and composition with plant-beneficial microbial groups. This study provides new insights into our understanding the relationship between the soil microbiome and plant health. PMID:29163453

  10. Bioinformatics Mining and Modeling Methods for the Identification of Disease Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hofmann-Apitius

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the decoding of the Human Genome, techniques from bioinformatics, statistics, and machine learning have been instrumental in uncovering patterns in increasing amounts and types of different data produced by technical profiling technologies applied to clinical samples, animal models, and cellular systems. Yet, progress on unravelling biological mechanisms, causally driving diseases, has been limited, in part due to the inherent complexity of biological systems. Whereas we have witnessed progress in the areas of cancer, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, the area of neurodegenerative diseases has proved to be very challenging. This is in part because the aetiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer´s disease or Parkinson´s disease is unknown, rendering it very difficult to discern early causal events. Here we describe a panel of bioinformatics and modeling approaches that have recently been developed to identify candidate mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases based on publicly available data and knowledge. We identify two complementary strategies—data mining techniques using genetic data as a starting point to be further enriched using other data-types, or alternatively to encode prior knowledge about disease mechanisms in a model based framework supporting reasoning and enrichment analysis. Our review illustrates the challenges entailed in integrating heterogeneous, multiscale and multimodal information in the area of neurology in general and neurodegeneration in particular. We conclude, that progress would be accelerated by increasing efforts on performing systematic collection of multiple data-types over time from each individual suffering from neurodegenerative disease. The work presented here has been driven by project AETIONOMY; a project funded in the course of the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI; which is a public-private partnership of the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industry Associations

  11. Dose-response relationships for environmentally mediated infectious disease transmission models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F Brouwer

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Environmentally mediated infectious disease transmission models provide a mechanistic approach to examining environmental interventions for outbreaks, such as water treatment or surface decontamination. The shift from the classical SIR framework to one incorporating the environment requires codifying the relationship between exposure to environmental pathogens and infection, i.e. the dose-response relationship. Much of the work characterizing the functional forms of dose-response relationships has used statistical fit to experimental data. However, there has been little research examining the consequences of the choice of functional form in the context of transmission dynamics. To this end, we identify four properties of dose-response functions that should be considered when selecting a functional form: low-dose linearity, scalability, concavity, and whether it is a single-hit model. We find that i middle- and high-dose data do not constrain the low-dose response, and different dose-response forms that are equally plausible given the data can lead to significant differences in simulated outbreak dynamics; ii the choice of how to aggregate continuous exposure into discrete doses can impact the modeled force of infection; iii low-dose linear, concave functions allow the basic reproduction number to control global dynamics; and iv identifiability analysis offers a way to manage multiple sources of uncertainty and leverage environmental monitoring to make inference about infectivity. By applying an environmentally mediated infectious disease model to the 1993 Milwaukee Cryptosporidium outbreak, we demonstrate that environmental monitoring allows for inference regarding the infectivity of the pathogen and thus improves our ability to identify outbreak characteristics such as pathogen strain.

  12. Self-reported impulsivity in Huntington's disease patients and relationship to executive dysfunction and reward responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Patricia L; Potts, Geoffrey F; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Cimino, Cynthia R

    2017-09-01

    Few studies have directly investigated impulsivity in Huntington's disease (HD) despite known changes in dopaminergic and frontal functioning, changes that have been associated with impulsivity in other disorders and in the normal population. This study sought to further categorize impulsivity in HD through examining differences in self-reported impulsivity between community controls and HD patients, the relationship between executive dysfunction and impulsivity, and the relationship of a reward/punishment behavioral inhibition task in relation to these self-report measures. It was expected that HD patients would report higher impulsivity and executive dysfunction and that these measures would relate to a reward/punishment behavioral inhibition task. The Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) and Behavioral Inhibition/Behavioral Activation Scale (BIS/BAS) were completed, and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and a reward-based flanker task with punishing and rewarding conditions were administered to 22 HD patients and 14 control participants. HD patients reported higher trait impulsivity (BIS-11) and executive dysfunction (Frontal Systems Behavior Scale, FrSBE) but not increased impulsivity on the BIS/BAS relative to controls. Higher BIS-11 scores were related to increased self-reported executive dysfunction and the attention/working memory factor of the MMSE. On a reward/punishment behavioral inhibition task, BAS was uniquely related to increased accuracy on rewarding trials of the flanker task, but was not related to punishing trials in HD patients. The relationships found suggest that trait impulsivity is reported higher in HD and may not be driven by altered reward evaluation and the appetitive nature of stimuli but rather by increased executive dysfunction and lack of sensitivity to punishment. Impulsivity in HD may represent a combination of trait impulsivity, altered dopaminergic circuitry, and executive dysfunction. Understanding impulsivity in HD is

  13. Relationship Between Cerebral Oxygenation and Hemodynamic and Oxygen Transport Parameters in Surgery for Acquired Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Lenkin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the relationship between cerebral oxygenation and hemodynamic and oxygen transport parameters in surgical correction of concomitant acquired heart diseases. Subjects and methods. Informed consent was received from 40 patients who required surgery because of concomitant (two or more acquired heart defects. During procedure, perioperative monitoring of oxygen transport and cerebral oxygenation was performed with the aid of PiCCO2 monitor (Pulsion Medical Systems, Germany and a Fore-Sight cerebral oximeter (CASMED, USA. Anesthesia was maintained with propofol and fen-tanyl, by monitoring the depth of anesthesia. Early postoperative intensive therapy was based on the protocol for early targeted correction of hemodynamic disorders. Oxygen transport and cerebral oxygenation parameters were estimated intraopera-tively and within 24 postoperative hours. A statistical analysis including evaluation of Spearman correlations was performed with the aid of SPSS 15.0. Results. During perfusion, there was a relationship between cerebral oximetry values and hemat-ocrit levels, and oxygen partial pressure in the venous blood. Furthermore, a negative correlation between cerebral oximetry values and blood lactate levels was found 30 minutes after initiation of extracorporeal circulation (EC. During the study, there was a positive correlation between cerebral oxygenation and values of cardiac index, central venous saturation, and oxygen delivery index. There was a negative relationship between cerebral oxygenation and extravascular lung water at the beginning of surgery and a correlation between cerebral oximetry values and oxygenation index by the end of the first 24 postoperative hours. Conclusion. The cerebral oxygenation values correlate -with the main determinants of oxygen transport during EC and after cardiac surgical procedures. Cerebral oximetry may be used in early targeted therapy for the surgical correction of acquired combined

  14. A GEOSPATIAL ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL DRIVERS AND VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA IOANA VLAD-ȘANDRU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A Geospatial Analysis of the Relationship between Environmental Drivers and Vector-Borne Diseases. Human health is profoundly affected by weather and climate. Environmental health is becoming a major preoccupation on a world-wide scale; there is a close correlation between a population’s state of health and the quality of its environment, considering many infectious diseases are at least partly dependent on environmental factors. When we talk about the environment, we realize that it includes and affects fields of action from our daily life. Earth observation from space, with validation from in situ observations, provide a greater understanding of the environment and enable us to monitor and predict key environmental phenomena and events that can affect our livelihoods and health. Even thought, the use of Earth observation is growing in usefulness for a wide variety of uses, it is extremely unlikely that Earth Observation will be able to detect infectious diseases directly. Instead, Earth observation can be used to detect high NDVI index (and possibly attribute the high surface chlorophyll concentration to a particular disease, and help predict the movement of the agents carrying vector-borne disease. Many diseases need certain temperature and moisture conditions to breed. The primary objective of analyzing environmental health risk and vulnerabilities is to support the Development Regions to strengthen their capacity to assess, visualize and analyze health risks and incorporate the results of this analysis in a health risk map for disaster risk reduction, emergency preparedness and response plans. At the same time, such an analysis applied in health, allows starting the collection and homogenization of baseline data, information and maps to help health authorities and decision makers to take informed decisions in times of crises. Informational Health Platform would be used for the integration of data coming from different sources in order to

  15. Benefits and complications of noninvasive mechanical ventilation for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Eduardo; Carneiro, Elida Mara

    2008-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is defined as a syndrome characterized by usually progressive chronic airflow limitation which is associated to a bronchial hyperresponsiveness and is partially reversible. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation is an alternative treatment for patients with COPD exacerbations. The objective of the literature reviews was to verify noninvasive mechanical ventilation benefits and complications in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients. This national and international's scientific literature review was developed according to criteria established for documentary research in the MedLine, LILACS, SciElo, PubMed and Cochrane, databases using the key words: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and noninvasive mechanical ventilation. Inclusion criteria were articles published from 1995 to 2007; in English, Spanish and Portuguese; studies in the human model and with no gender restriction. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation can reduce partial pressure of carbon dioxide, improve gas exchange, alleviate symptoms as dyspnea caused by fatigue of the respiratory muscles, reduce duration of hospitalization, decrease need for invasive mechanical ventilation, reduce number of complications and also lessen hospital mortality. The main complications found were: facial skin erythema, claustrophobia, nasal congestion, face pain, eye irritation, aspiration pneumonia, hypotension, pneumothorax, aerophagia, hypercapnia, gastric insufflation, vomit, bronchoaspiration, morning headaches, face injuries, air embolism and, last but not least, discomfort of the patient. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation can be more effective in patients with moderate-severe exacerbations of COPD and these complications can be minimized by an adequate interface also by the contribution of the physiotherapist experience.

  16. Mechanisms in endocrinology: vitamin D as a potential contributor in endocrine health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Mitri, Joanna; Mathieu, Chantal; Badenhoop, Klaus; Tamer, Gonca; Orio, Francesco; Mezza, Teresa; Vieth, Reinhold; Colao, Annamaria; Pittas, Anastassios

    2014-09-01

    It has been suggested that vitamin D may play a role in the pathogenesis of several endocrine diseases, such as hyperparathyroidism, type 1 diabetes (T1DM), type 2 diabetes (T2DM), autoimmune thyroid diseases, Addison's disease and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In this review, we debate the role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of endocrine diseases. Narrative overview of the literature synthesizing the current evidence retrieved from searches of computerized databases, hand searches and authoritative texts. Evidence from basic science supports a role for vitamin D in many endocrine conditions. In humans, inverse relationships have been reported not only between blood 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone concentrations but also with risk of T1DM, T2DM, and PCOS. There is less evidence for an association with Addison's disease or autoimmune thyroid disease. Vitamin D supplementation may have a role for prevention of T2DM, but the available evidence is not consistent. Although observational studies support a potential role of vitamin D in endocrine disease, high quality evidence from clinical trials does not exist to establish a place for vitamin D supplementation in optimizing endocrine health. Ongoing randomized controlled trials are expected to provide insights into the efficacy and safety of vitamin D in the management of endocrine disease. © 2014 European Society of Endocrinology.

  17. Relationship between periodontal disease and preterm low birth weight: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teshome, Amare; Yitayeh, Asmare

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a neglected bacterial infection that causes destruction of the periodontium in pregnant women. Yet its impact on the occurrence of adverse pregnancy outcomes has not systematically evaluated and there is no clear statement on the relationship between periodontal disease and preterm low birth weight. The objective of this study was to summarize the evidence on the impact of periodontal disease on preterm low birth weight. We searched the following data bases from January 2005 to December 2015: CINAHL (cumulative index to nursing and allied health literature), MEDLINE, AMED, EMBASE (excerpta medica database), Cochrane library and Google scholar. Only case-control studies with full text in English were eligible. Critical appraisal of the identified articles was done by two authors independently to provide the possible relevance of the papers for inclusion in the review process. The selected Case control studies were critically appraised with 12 items structured checklist adapted from national institute of health (NIH). Odds ratio (OR) or risk ratios (RR) were extracted from the selected studies. The two reviewers who selected the appropriate studies also extracted the data and evaluated the risk of bias. Of 229 articles, ten studies with a total of 2423 participants with a mean age ranged from 13 to 49 years were met the inclusion criteria. The studies focused on preterm birth, low birth weight and /or preterm low birth weight and periodontitis. Of the selected studies, 9 implied an association between periodontal disease and increased risk of preterm birth, low birth weight and /or preterm low birth weight outcome (ORs ranging from 2.04 to 4.19) and only one study found no evidence of association. Periodontal disease may be one of the possible risk factor for preterm low birth weight infant. However, more precise studies with randomized clinical trial with sufficient follow-up period must be done to confirm the association.

  18. Abnormal Base Excision Repair at Trinucleotide Repeats Associated with Diseases: A Tissue-Selective Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathi-Vasiliki Goula

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available More than fifteen genetic diseases, including Huntington’s disease, myotonic dystrophy 1, fragile X syndrome and Friedreich ataxia, are caused by the aberrant expansion of a trinucleotide repeat. The mutation is unstable and further expands in specific cells or tissues with time, which can accelerate disease progression. DNA damage and base excision repair (BER are involved in repeat instability and might contribute to the tissue selectivity of the process. In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms of trinucleotide repeat instability, focusing more specifically on the role of BER.

  19. Structural and functional measures of social relationships and quality of life among older adults: does chronic disease status matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jing; Brunner, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the relative importance of structural and functional social relationships for quality of life (QoL) and the extent to which diagnosed chronic disease modifies these associations. Multivariate linear regression was used to investigate time-lagged associations between structural and functional measures of social relationships and QoL assessed 5 years apart by CASP-19, in 5925 Whitehall II participants (mean age 61, SD 6.0). Chronic disease was clinically verified coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes or cancer. Social relationships-QoL associations were consistent across disease status (P-values for interaction: 0.15-0.99). Larger friend network (β = 1.9, 95% CI 1.5-2.3), having a partner (β = 1.2, 95% CI 0.5-1.7), higher confiding support (β = 2.2, 95% CI 1.8-2.7) and lower negative aspects of close relationships (β = 3.3, 95% CI 2.8-3.8) were independently related to improved QoL in old age. The estimated difference in QoL due to social relationships was equivalent to up to 0.5 SD of the CASP-19 score and was stronger than the effect of chronic disease (coronary heart disease β = 2.0, 95% CI 1.4-2.6). We found that beneficial aspects of social relationships in relation to QoL were, in order of importance: avoiding negative aspects of close relationships, having confiding support, having a wide network of friends and having a partner. These associations were not modified by chronic disease. Thus, despite inevitable physical deterioration, we may be able to enhance a satisfying late life by optimizing our social relationships.

  20. RELATIONSHIP OF SPIRITUAL-WELLBEING WITH ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION IN PATIENTS WITH CARDIAC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aan Nuraeni

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anxiety and depression are problems faced by patients with chronic diseases such as patients with Coronary Heart Disease (CHD. Both of these can also worsen the condition of CHD patients, thus needs to be prevented and handled. It is stated that spirituality can enhance constructive coping skills in patients with chronic diseases. But how it relates to anxiety and depression in patients with CHD in Indonesia was still unknown. Objective: The study purpose was to identify the relationship of spiritual wellbeing with the incidence of anxiety and depression in CHD patients. Methods: The research used descriptive correlative quantitative with cross sectional approach. The instruments used to measure the variabels were Zung Self-rating Anxiety Scale, Beck Depression Inventory II, and Spirituality Index of Well-Being scale. Data were taken on 100 respondents within 3 months in outpatient cardiac unit with the consecutive sampling technique and analyzed by spearman correlation test. Results: The results showed mean of the anxiety; depression; and spiritual well-being respectively were 47.66; 43; and 60. Based on spearman test, spiritual wellbeing correlated with anxiety significantly p= 0.000(r=-0.371 and so was depression p= 0.000 (r=-0.571. Conclusions: There was a significant relationship between spiritual well-being with anxiety and depression with a negative correlation direction. The higher the spiritual well-being will be the lower the level of anxiety and depression. Thus nurses need to strengthen the spiritual aspects of CHD patients to prevent psychosocial problems.

  1. Family health history communication networks of older adults: importance of social relationships and disease perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Sato; Kaphingst, Kimberly A; Goodman, Melody; Schafer, Ellen J

    2013-10-01

    Older individuals play a critical role in disseminating family health history (FHH) information that can facilitate disease prevention among younger family members. This study evaluated the characteristics of older adults and their familial networks associated with two types of communication (have shared and intend to share new FHH information with family members) to inform public health efforts to facilitate FHH dissemination. Information on 970 social network members enumerated by 99 seniors (aged 57 years and older) at 3 senior centers in Memphis, Tennessee, through face-to-face interviews was analyzed. Participants shared FHH information with 27.5% of the network members; 54.7% of children and 24.4% of siblings. Two-level logistic regression models showed that participants had shared FHH with those to whom they provided emotional support (odds ratio [OR] = 1.836) and felt close to (OR = 1.757). Network-members were more likely to have received FHH from participants with a cancer diagnosis (OR = 2.617) and higher familiarity with (OR = 1.380) and importance of sharing FHH with family (OR = 1.474). Participants intended to share new FHH with those who provide tangible support to (OR = 1.804) and were very close to them (OR = 2.112). Members with whom participants intend to share new FHH were more likely to belong to the network of participants with higher perceived severity if family members encountered heart disease (OR = 1.329). Many first-degree relatives were not informed of FHH. Perceptions about FHH and disease risk as well as quality of social relationships may play roles in whether seniors communicate FHH with their families. Future studies may consider influencing these perceptions and relationships.

  2. A 17 year-old girl with a demyelinating disease requiring mechanical ventilation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsenos Chrysostomos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demyelinating diseases cause destruction of the myelin sheath, while axons are relatively spared. Pathologically, demyelination can be the result of an inflammatory process, viral infection, acquired metabolic derangement and ischemic insult. Three diseases that can cause inflammatory demyelination of the CNS are: Multiple sclerosis (MS, Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM and Acute hemorrhagic leucoencephalitis. Differentiation is not always easy and there is considerable overlaping. Data about adults with acute demyelination requiring ICU admission is limited. Case presentation A 17 year old Greek female was hospitalised in the ICU because of acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. She had a history of febrile disease one month before, acute onset of paraplegia, diplopia, progressive arm weakness and dyspnea. Her consciousness was not impaired. A demyelinating central nervous system (CNS disease, possibly post infectious encephalomyelitis (ADEM was the underlying condition. The MRI of the brain disclosed diffused expanded cerebral lesions involving the optic nerve, basal ganglia cerebellum, pons and medulla oblongata. There was also extended involvement of the cervical and thoracic part of the spinal cord. CSF leukocyte count was elevated with lymphocyte predominance. The patient required mechanical ventilation for two months. Then she was transferred to a rehabilitation centre. Three years later she remains paraplegic. Since then she has not suffered any other demyelination attack. Conclusions Demyelinating diseases can cause acute respiratory failure when the spinal cord is affected. Severe forms of these diseases, making necessary ICU admission, is less frequently reported. Intensivists should be aware of the features of these rare diseases.

  3. Mechanisms of protein misfolding: Novel therapeutic approaches to protein-misfolding diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salahuddin, Parveen; Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Khan, Sanaullah

    2016-01-01

    ’s disease (PD), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Prion disease and Amylo lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Furthermore, tau protein shows intrinsically disorder conformation; therefore its interaction with microtubule is impaired and this protein undergoes aggregation. This is also underlying cause of Alzheimers and other......In protein misfolding, protein molecule acquires wrong tertiary structure, thereby induces protein misfolding diseases. Protein misfolding can occur through various mechanisms. For instance, changes in environmental conditions, oxidative stress, dominant negative mutations, error in post......-translational modifications, increase in degradation rate and trafficking error. All of these factors cause protein misfolding thereby leading to diseases conditions. Both in vitro and in vivo observations suggest that partially unfolded or misfolded intermediates are particularly prone to aggregation. These partially...

  4. Residential Arrangements and Children's School Engagement: The Role of the Parent-Child Relationship and Selection Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havermans, Nele; Sodermans, An Katrien; Matthijs, Koen

    2017-01-01

    The increase in shared residential arrangements is driven by the belief that it is in the best interest of the child. The maintenance of contact between child and parents can mitigate negative consequences of separation. However, selection mechanisms may account for a positive relationship between shared residential arrangements and child…

  5. Health-related behavior as a mechanism behind the relationship between neighborhood social capital and individual health: a multilevel analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohnen, S.M.; Völker, B.; Flap, H.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although various studies have found a positive association between neighborhood social capital and individual health, the mechanism explaining this direct effect is still unclear. Neighborhood social capital is the access to resources that are generated by relationships between people in

  6. Physical activity as a possible mechanism behind the relationship between green space and health: a multilevel analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.; Verheij, R.A.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate whether physical activity (in general, and more specifically, walking and cycling during leisure time and for commuting purposes, sports and gardening) is an underlying mechanism in the relationship between the amount of green space in people's

  7. A study of the relationship between infectious diseases and health economics: some evidences from Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Raj Adhikari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure the effectiveness of short term trainings in improving knowledge of health economics and application of economic way of thinking in policy research. Methods: The training focused to strengthen the capacity of public health practitioners to design and implement health policy and programmes especially for infectious diseases from health system and economic perspectives. We focused to measure the effects of gaining knowledge to understand the relationship between infectious diseases and poverty and to adopt a logical way of thinking to come up with a solution. This approach used in this paper to measure the “reflection” of the training is different from conventional way of evaluating training programmes. The effectiveness of the training was measured in three dimensions: (i general understanding of economics from health policy perspective; (ii application of economic analysis and appraisal tools and techniques; and (iii economic way of thinking for issues related to disease control and poverty. Results: There was a significant improvement in self-assessed knowledge after the training. Among seven knowledge related questions, in the pre-test, an average participant made 86% correct answers while in post-test, this figure increased to 100%. The results showed that there is a significant improvement in these three dimensions after the training intervention. Conclusions: The paper concluded that endogenizing knowledge of economics and way of thinking have important implications for designing alternative policy and resource utilization.

  8. Sleep and inflammatory bowel disease: exploring the relationship between sleep disturbances and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnucan, Jami A; Rubin, David T; Ali, Tauseef

    2013-11-01

    Sleep disturbances are associated with a greater risk of serious adverse health events, economic consequences, and, most importantly, increased all-cause mortality. Several studies support the associations among sleep, immune function, and inflammation. The relationship between sleep disturbances and inflammatory conditions is complex and not completely understood. Sleep deprivation can lead to increased levels of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and C-reactive protein, which can lead to further activation of the inflammatory cascade. The relevance of sleep in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract, has recently received more attention. Several studies have shown that patients with both inactive and active IBD have self-reported sleep disturbances. Here, we present a concise review of sleep and its association with the immune system and the process of inflammation. We discuss the studies that have evaluated sleep in patients with IBD as well as possible treatment options for those patients with sleep disturbances. An algorithm for evaluating sleep disturbances in the IBD population is also proposed. Further research is still needed to better characterize sleep disturbances in the IBD population as well as to assess the effects of various therapeutic interventions to improve sleep quality. It is possible that the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disturbances in this population may provide an opportunity to alter disease outcomes.

  9. Relationship Between Spiritual Well-Being and Hope in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghoobzadeh, Ameneh; Soleimani, Mohammad Ali; Allen, Kelly A; Chan, Yiong Huak; Herth, Kaye A

    2018-06-01

    Spirituality and hope have been identified as important constructs in health research, since both are thought to enhance a person's ability to cope with the consequences of serious illness. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between spiritual well-being and hope in patients with cardiovascular disease. Using descriptive, correlational methodology, the investigator gathered data on a convenience sample of 500 patients with cardiovascular disease who were hospitalized in a medical institution in Iran. The study was conducted over a four-month period. Participants completed a demographic questionnaire, the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS) and the Herth Hope Index (HHI). The mean score on the SWBS and HHI was 86.21 (SD 12.46) and 34.80 (SD 5.05), respectively. Multivariate predictors for spiritual well-being were female gender (p = 0.047), religiosity (p = 0.018), and hope (p spiritual well-being (p spiritual well-being and hope. Therefore, this study has implications for those providing care to patients with cardiovascular disease.

  10. Relationships Between Essential Manganese Biology and Manganese Toxicity in Neurological Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfalzer, Anna C; Bowman, Aaron B

    2017-06-01

    Manganese (Mn) is critical for neurodevelopment but also has been implicated in the pathophysiology of several neurological diseases. We discuss how Mn requirements intersect with Mn biology and toxicity, and how these requirements may be altered in neurological disease. Furthermore, we discuss the emerging evidence that the level of Mn associated with optimal overall efficiency for Mn biology does not necessarily coincide with optimal cognitive outcomes. Studies have linked Mn exposures with urea cycle metabolism and autophagy, with evidence that exposures typically neurotoxic may be able to correct deficiencies in these processes at least short term. The line between Mn-dependent biology and toxicity is thus blurred. Further, new work suggests that Mn exposures correlating to optimal cognitive scores in children are associated with cognitive decline in adults. This review explores relationships between Mn-dependent neurobiology and Mn-dependent neurotoxicity. We propose the hypothesis that Mn levels/exposures that are toxic to some biological processes are beneficial for other biological processes and influenced by developmental stage and disease state.

  11. Relationship between leptin concentrations and disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batún-Garrido, José Antonio de Jesús; Salas-Magaña, Marisol; Juárez-Rojop, Isela Esther; Hernández-Núñez, Eúfrates; Olán, Francisco

    2018-05-11

    Multiple studies have found a direct relationship between leptin concentrations and disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. We studied 77 patients with the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis; the leptin determination was through an enzyme immunoassay. Disease activity was assessed by the DAS-28 CRP. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to determine the association between significant variables and leptin concentrations. 40.3% of the patients were in remission, 41.6% were mildly active, 11.7% were moderately active and 6.5% were severely active. The results show an independent association between higher concentrations of leptin and disease activity (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.4-3.2; p .03), the number of swollen joints (OR 4.6; 95% CI 1.7-8.3; p .000), the number of painful joints (OR 3.4; 95% CI 1.6-4.6; p .000), and the presence of metabolic syndrome (OR 1.3; 95% IC 1.2-1,9; p .045). The data suggest that serum leptin is elevated in patients with active RA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Relationship between vacA Types and Development of Gastroduodenal Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Thi Huyen Trang, Tran; Thanh Binh, Tran; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) is a secreted pore-forming toxin and a major virulence factor in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. While VacA is present in almost all strains, only some forms are toxigenic and pathogenic. While vacA and its genotypes are considered as markers of H. pylori-related diseases or disorders, the pathophysiological mechanisms of VacA and its genotypes remain controversial. This review outlines key findings of publications regarding vacA w...

  13. Assessment of waist/hip ratio and its relationship with coronary heart disease in community hospital of district swat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, R.; Ahmad, A.; Jan, S.; Rehman, I.U.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between central obesity (Abdominal adiposity), measured by Waist/Hip ratio and the development of Coronary Heart Disease in adult population of district Swat. The study comprised of 100 subjects, 34 Control, 33 Hypertensive subjects and 33 subjects with Coronary Heart Disease. Weight, Height, Waist/Hip ratio and Blood Pressure of subjects with Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) were compared with Hypertensive subjects and Control subjects. Patients with Coronary Heart Disease had higher Waist/Hip ratio and Blood Pressure than Hypertensive subjects, which in turn had higher values than control subjects. Waist/hip ratio is the dominant risk factor predicting Coronary Heart Disease. (author)

  14. Relationship satisfaction reduces the risk of maternal infectious diseases in pregnancy: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Ekeberg Henriksen

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to explore the degree to which relationship satisfaction predicts the risk of infectious diseases during pregnancy and to examine whether relationship satisfaction moderates the association between stressful life events and the risk of infections.This was a prospective study based on data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Pregnant women (n = 67,244 completed questionnaires concerning relationship satisfaction and nine different categories of infectious diseases as well as socioeconomic characteristics and stressful life events. Associations between the predictor variables and the infectious diseases were assessed by logistic regression analyses. A multiple regression analysis was performed to assess a possible interaction of relationship satisfaction with stressful life events on the risk for infectious diseases.After controlling for marital status, age, education, income, and stressful life events, high levels of relationship satisfaction at week 15 of gestation were found to predict a significantly lower risk for eight categories of infectious diseases at gestational weeks 17-30. No significant interaction effect was found between relationship satisfaction and stressful life events on the risk for infections.

  15. Relationship satisfaction reduces the risk of maternal infectious diseases in pregnancy: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Roger Ekeberg; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Thuen, Frode

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to explore the degree to which relationship satisfaction predicts the risk of infectious diseases during pregnancy and to examine whether relationship satisfaction moderates the association between stressful life events and the risk of infections. This was a prospective study based on data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Pregnant women (n = 67,244) completed questionnaires concerning relationship satisfaction and nine different categories of infectious diseases as well as socioeconomic characteristics and stressful life events. Associations between the predictor variables and the infectious diseases were assessed by logistic regression analyses. A multiple regression analysis was performed to assess a possible interaction of relationship satisfaction with stressful life events on the risk for infectious diseases. After controlling for marital status, age, education, income, and stressful life events, high levels of relationship satisfaction at week 15 of gestation were found to predict a significantly lower risk for eight categories of infectious diseases at gestational weeks 17-30. No significant interaction effect was found between relationship satisfaction and stressful life events on the risk for infections.

  16. Epigenetic mechanisms in the development of memory and their involvement in certain neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Reynoso, M A; Ochoa-Hernández, A B; Juárez-Vázquez, C I; Barros-Núñez, P

    Today, scientists accept that the central nervous system of an adult possesses considerable morphological and functional flexibility, allowing it to perform structural remodelling processes even after the individual is fully developed and mature. In addition to the vast number of genes participating in the development of memory, different known epigenetic mechanisms are involved in normal and pathological modifications to neurons and therefore also affect the mechanisms of memory development. This study entailed a systematic review of biomedical article databases in search of genetic and epigenetic factors that participate in synaptic function and memory. The activation of gene expression in response to external stimuli also occurs in differentiated nerve cells. Neural activity induces specific forms of synaptic plasticity that permit the creation and storage of long-term memory. Epigenetic mechanisms play a key role in synaptic modification processes and in the creation and development of memory. Changes in these mechanisms result in the cognitive and memory impairment seen in neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer disease, Huntington disease) and in neurodevelopmental disorders (Rett syndrome, fragile X, and schizophrenia). Nevertheless, results obtained from different models are promising and point to potential treatments for some of these diseases. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying postural instability in Parkinson's disease using dynamic posturography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nonnekes, J.H.; Kam, D. de; Geurts, A.C.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    Postural instability, one of the cardinal symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), has devastating consequences for affected patients. Better strategies to prevent falls are needed, but this calls for an improved understanding of the complex mechanisms underlying postural instability. We must also

  18. Education and Coronary Heart Disease Risk: Potential Mechanisms Such as Literacy, Perceived Constraints, and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Eric B.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Howe, Chanelle J.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kubzansky, Laura D.; Rudd, Rima E.; Martin, Laurie T.; Nandi, Arijit; Wilhelm, Aude; Buka, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Education is inversely associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk; however the mechanisms are poorly understood. The study objectives were to evaluate the extent to which rarely measured factors (literacy, time preference, sense of control) and more commonly measured factors (income, depressive symptomatology, body mass index) in…

  19. Mechanical cough augmentation techniques in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rafiq, M.K.; Bradburn, M.; Mustfa, N.; Mcdermott, C.J.; Annane, D.

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 The Cochrane Collaboration.This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of mechanical insufflator/exsufflator (MI-E) and the breath-stacking technique for reducing morbidity and mortality and enhancing quality of life in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)/motor neuron disease (MND).

  20. Chinese Herbal Medicine on Cardiovascular Diseases and the Mechanisms of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cuiqing; Huang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the principal cause of death worldwide. The potentially serious adverse effects of therapeutic drugs lead to growing awareness of the role of Chinese herbal medicine in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Chinese herbal medicine has been widely used in many countries especially in China from antiquity; however, the mechanisms by which herbal medicine acts in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases are far from clear. In this review, we briefly describe the characteristics of Chinese herbal medicine by comparing with western medicine. Then we summarize the formulae and herbs/natural products applied in the clinic and animal studies being sorted according to the specific cardiovascular diseases. Most importantly, we elaborate the existing investigations into mechanisms by which herbal compounds act at the cellular levels, including vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, cardiomyocytes and immune cells. Future research should focus on well-designed clinic trial, in-depth mechanic study, investigations on side effects of herbs and drug interactions. Studies on developing new agents with effectiveness and safety from traditional Chinese medicine is a promising way for prevention and treatment of patients with cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Recent advances in delivery mechanisms for aerosol therapy during pediatric respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue'E; Zhang, Chonglin; Zhen, Qing

    2018-04-01

    The treatment of pediatric surgery diseases via utilization of aerosol delivery mechanisms is in progress for the betterment of pediatric care. Over the years, aerosol therapy has come to play an integral role in the treatment of pediatric respiratory diseases. Inhaled aerosol agents such as bronchodilators, corticosteroids, antibiotics, and mucolytics are commonly delivered to spontaneously breathing pediatric patients with a tracheostomy. Administering therapeutic inhaled aerosols to pediatric patients is challenging. The pediatric population ranges in age, which means patients with different airway sizes, breathing patterns, and cooperation levels. These patient-related factors impact the deposition of aerosol drugs in the lungs. The present review article will discuss the recent advancements in the delivery mechanisms for aerosol therapy in pediatric patients with respiratory diseases.

  2. Mechanisms in cardiovascular diseases: how useful are medical textbooks, eMedicine, and YouTube?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azer, Samy A

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the contents of medical textbooks, eMedicine (Medscape) topics, and YouTube videos on cardiovascular mechanisms. Medical textbooks, eMedicine articles, and YouTube were searched for cardiovascular mechanisms. Using appraisal forms, copies of these resources and videos were evaluated independently by three assessors. Most textbooks were brief in explaining mechanisms. Although the overall average percentage committed to cardiovascular mechanisms in physiology textbooks (n=7) was 16.1% and pathology textbooks (n=4) was 17.5%, there was less emphasis on mechanisms in most internal medicine textbooks (n=6), with a total average of 6.9%. In addition, flow diagrams explaining mechanisms were lacking. However, eMedicine topics (n=48) discussed mechanisms adequately in 22.9% (11 of 48) topics, and the percentage of content allocated to cardiovascular mechanisms was higher (15.8%, 46.2 of 292) compared with that of any internal medicine textbooks. Only 29 YouTube videos fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Of these, 16 YouTube were educationally useful, scoring 14.1 ± 0.5 (mean ± SD). The remaining 13 videos were not educationally useful, scoring 6.1 ± 1.7. The concordance between the assessors on applying the criteria measured by κ score was in the range of 0.55–0.96. In conclusion, despite the importance of mechanisms, most textbooks and You-Tube videos were deficient in cardiovascular mechanisms. eMedicine topics discussed cardiovascular mechanisms for some diseases, but there were no flow diagrams or multimedia explaining mechanisms. These deficiencies in learning resources could add to the challenges faced by students in understanding cardiovascular mechanisms.

  3. Relationship between invasion of the periodontium by periodontal pathogens and periodontal disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Luzia; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Felino, António; Pinto, Miguel Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of the periodontal tissues has been suggested as a relevant step in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. However, its exact importance remains to be defined. The present systematic review assessed the scientific evidence concerning the relationship between the quality or quantity of periodontal microbiota in periodontal tissues and development of periodontal disease. The databases Medline-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, ISI Web of Knowledge and SCOPUS were searched, up to January 2014. Studies that reported evaluation of periodontal pathogens invasion on human tissues were selected. The screening of 440 title/abstracts elected 26 papers for full-text reading. Twenty three papers were subsequently excluded because of insufficient data or a study protocol not related to the objectives of this systematic review. All included studies were case-control studies that evaluated intracellular or adherent bacteria to epithelial cells from periodontal pockets versus healthy sulci. Study protocols presented heterogeneity regarding case and control definitions and methodological approaches for microbial identification. No consistent significant differences were found related to the presence/absence or proportion of specific periopathogens across the studies, as only one study found statistically significant differences regarding the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.043), T. forsythia (P periodontal pockets vs. healthy sulci. All studies reported a larger unspecific bacterial load in or on the epithelial cells taken from a diseased site compared to a healthy sulcus. The current available data is of low to moderate quality and inconsistent mainly due to study design, poor reporting and methodological diversity. As so, there is insufficient evidence to support or exclude the invasion by periodontal pathogens as a key step in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. Further research is needed.

  4. Alcohol consumption patterns in Thailand and their relationship with non-communicable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Mami; McKetin, Rebecca; Banwell, Cathy; Yiengprugsawan, Vasoontara; Kelly, Matthew; Seubsman, Sam-ang; Iso, Hiroyasu; Sleigh, Adrian

    2015-12-24

    Heavy alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for non-communicable diseases (NCDs) but few studies have investigated drinking and disease risk in middle income, non-western countries. We report on the relationship between alcohol consumption and NCDs in Thailand. A nationwide cross sectional survey was conducted of 87,151 Thai adult open university students aged 15 to 87 years (mean age 30.5 years) who were recruited into the Thai Cohort Study. Participants were categorized as never having drunk alcohol (n = 22,527), as being occasional drinkers who drank infrequently but heavily (4+ glasses/occasion - occasional heavy drinkers, n = 24,152) or drank infrequently and less heavily (migration and other recognized risks for NCDs (sedentary lifestyle and poor diet). After adjustment for these factors the odds ratios (ORs) for several NCDs outcomes - high cholesterol, hypertension, and liver disease - were significantly elevated among both occasional heavy drinkers (1.2 to 1.5) and regular heavy drinkers (1.5 to 2.0) relative to never drinkers. Heavy alcohol consumption of 4 or more glasses per occasion, even if the occasions were infrequent, was associated with elevated risk of NCDs in Thailand. These results highlight the need for strategies in Thailand to reduce the quantity of alcohol consumed to prevent alcohol-related disease. Thailand is fortunate that most of the female population is culturally protected from drinking and this national public good should be endorsed and supported.

  5. Relationship between invasion of the periodontium by periodontal pathogens and periodontal disease: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Luzia; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Felino, António; Pinto, Miguel Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of the periodontal tissues has been suggested as a relevant step in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. However, its exact importance remains to be defined. The present systematic review assessed the scientific evidence concerning the relationship between the quality or quantity of periodontal microbiota in periodontal tissues and development of periodontal disease. The databases Medline-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, ISI Web of Knowledge and SCOPUS were searched, up to January 2014. Studies that reported evaluation of periodontal pathogens invasion on human tissues were selected. The screening of 440 title/abstracts elected 26 papers for full-text reading. Twenty three papers were subsequently excluded because of insufficient data or a study protocol not related to the objectives of this systematic review. All included studies were case-control studies that evaluated intracellular or adherent bacteria to epithelial cells from periodontal pockets versus healthy sulci. Study protocols presented heterogeneity regarding case and control definitions and methodological approaches for microbial identification. No consistent significant differences were found related to the presence/absence or proportion of specific periopathogens across the studies, as only one study found statistically significant differences regarding the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.043), T. forsythia (P < 0.001), P. intermedia (P < 0.001), C. ochracea (P < 0.001) and C. rectus (P = 0.003) in epithelial cells from periodontal pockets vs. healthy sulci. All studies reported a larger unspecific bacterial load in or on the epithelial cells taken from a diseased site compared to a healthy sulcus. The current available data is of low to moderate quality and inconsistent mainly due to study design, poor reporting and methodological diversity. As so, there is insufficient evidence to support or exclude the invasion by periodontal pathogens as a key step in the

  6. Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease and Heart Failure in Type 2 Diabetes – Mechanisms, Management, and Clinical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low Wang, Cecilia C.; Hess, Connie N.; Hiatt, William R.; Goldfine, Allison B.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the principal cause of death and disability among patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes exacerbates mechanisms underlying atherosclerosis and heart failure. Unfortunately, these mechanisms are not adequately modulated by therapeutic strategies focusing solely on optimal glycemic control with currently available drugs or approaches. In the setting of multi-factorial risk reduction with statins and other lipid lowering agents, anti-hypertensive therapies, and anti-hyperglycemic treatment strategies, cardiovascular complication rates are falling, yet remain higher for patients with diabetes than for those without. This review considers the mechanisms, history, controversies, new pharmacologic agents, and recent evidence for current guidelines for cardiovascular management in the patient with diabetes mellitus to support evidence-based care in the patient with diabetes and heart disease outside of the acute care setting. PMID:27297342

  7. Unraveling the disease consequences and mechanisms of modular structure in animal social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Pratha; Leu, Stephan T.; Cross, Paul C.; Hudson, Peter J.; Bansal, Shweta

    2017-01-01

    Disease risk is a potential cost of group living. Although modular organization is thought to reduce this cost in animal societies, empirical evidence toward this hypothesis has been conflicting. We analyzed empirical social networks from 43 animal species to motivate our study of the epidemiological consequences of modular structure in animal societies. From these empirical studies, we identified the features of interaction patterns associated with network modularity and developed a theoretical network model to investigate when and how subdivisions in social networks influence disease dynamics. Contrary to prior work, we found that disease risk is largely unaffected by modular structure, although social networks beyond a modular threshold experience smaller disease burden and longer disease duration. Our results illustrate that the lowering of disease burden in highly modular social networks is driven by two mechanisms of modular organization: network fragmentation and subgroup cohesion. Highly fragmented social networks with cohesive subgroups are able to structurally trap infections within a few subgroups and also cause a structural delay to the spread of disease outbreaks. Finally, we show that network models incorporating modular structure are necessary only when prior knowledge suggests that interactions within the population are highly subdivided. Otherwise, null networks based on basic knowledge about group size and local contact heterogeneity may be sufficient when data-limited estimates of epidemic consequences are necessary. Overall, our work does not support the hypothesis that modular structure universally mitigates the disease impact of group living.

  8. [Relationship of Ghrelin gene polymorphism with congenital anorectal malformation and Hirschsprung disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong; Wang, Dajia; Zhao, Xiangxuan; Mi, Jie; Bai, Yuzuo; Wang, Weilin

    2015-07-01

    To explore the relationship of Ghrelin gene polymorphism with the occurrence of human anorectal malformations (ARMs) and Hirschsprung disease(HSCR). PCR and DNA sequencing were used to detect the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) of 3 loci (rs139684563, rs149447194, rs186599567) genotype of Ghrelin gene in 100 children with ARMs, 100 children with HSCR, and 100 healthy children (normal group). Genovariation and gene mutation were analyzed with case-control method. Three loci SNPs were in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg genetic equilibrium. No significant differences were found in rs139684563 allele and genotype frequencies between the cases and the normal groups (P>0.05). The allele and genotype frequencies of rs149447194 and rs186599567 were significantly different between cases and normal group (Ppolymorphism changes may be associated with the pathogenesis of ARMs and HSCR.

  9. Relationship between the level of essential metal elements in human hair and coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bor-Tsung Hsieh; Kai-Yuan Cheng; Ying-Chen Chang

    2011-01-01

    Studies on epidemics have demonstrated the relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD) and mineral substances, such as selenium, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, copper, zinc, iron, manganese, and vanadium, in human bodies. In this study, instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS) were applied to evaluate the levels of selenium, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, copper, zinc, and iron in healthy individuals and CHD patients. Hair samples were collected from 42 healthy participants and 28 diagnosed CHD patients. Calcium, magnesium, copper, and zinc levels in healthy individuals are significantly higher than the levels found in the patients (p < 0.01). Calcium/selenium ratio is also significantly higher in healthy individuals (p < 0.05). Based on the possible synergies and/or antagonisms of elements and their absorption and metabolism, magnesium/calcium, zinc/copper, and sodium/potassium ratios showed positive relevance (p < 0.01). (author)

  10. [Serum anticholinergic activity: relationship with clinical symptoms in Alzheimer's disease and proposal of new biological marker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Koji; Konishi, Kimiko; Hachisu, Mitsugu

    2011-06-01

    We reviewed the importance of measuring serum anticholinergic activity (SAA) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since Tune and Coyle reported a simple method for assessing SAA using radioreceptor-binding assay, SAA is assumed to be the cumulative activity of parent medications and their metabolites and its relationship with delirium and cognitive functions has been debated. However, we evaluated the SAA in AD patients and SAA was correlated with prescription of antipsychotic medications, cognitive dysfunctions, severity of AD and psychotic symptoms, especially, with delusion and diurnal rhythm disturbance. From these results, we should not only pay attention to avoiding the prescription of medications with anticholinergic activity but also we speculated that AA appeared endogenously in AD and accelerated AD pathology. Moreover, there might be the possibility that SAA has predictive value for assessing the progressiveness of AD and as a biological marker for AD.

  11. Knowledge and Attitude on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Their Relationship with Obesity and Biochemical Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Toupchian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to the high prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs in developing countries as well as high treatment expenses for patients and health-care systems, CVDs prevention in such societies has a great importance. One of the most effective strategies is improvement of knowledge and attitude towards the CVDs risk factors. This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge and attitude of females on CVDs risk factors and also the relationship between knowledge and attitude with obesity indices and biochemical parameters. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 89 women with the age range of 11 to 67 y old and body mass index (BMI of 24 to 51 kg/m2. Participants were interviewed face to face using a valid questionnaire in order to evaluate their knowledge and attitude on CVDs risk factors. Blood sampling was implemented after 12 h of overnight fasting. Fasting blood glucose (FBG and lipid profile were assessed by enzymatic methods. Anthropometric measurements were performed and obesity indices were calculated. Results: More than 70% of participants had moderate or good knowledge and attitude about CVDs risk factors. Participant's knowledge and attitude had a significant positive association with educational level and a significant reverse relationship with age, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and obesity indices. Conclusions: Results of this study indicated that knowledge and attitude levels on CVDs risk factors affect the obesity indices and metabolic profile. Hence, knowledge and attitude enhancement is the main target and initial step in improving life quality and preventing cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Relationship between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Xiaoli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the relationship between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and serum level of adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (AFABP. MethodsA total of 160 patients who underwent physical examination in the Affiliated Hospital of Ningxia Medical University from July to November 2010 were included in our study. These subjects were divided into two groups according to the diagnostic criteria for NAFLD formulated by the Chinese Medical Association: control group (n=71 and NAFLD group (n=89. The two groups were compared with respect to general condition, body mass index (BMI, blood pressure, AFABP, serum insulin, and other serological indices. The relationship of serum AFABP with NAFLD and other metabolic parameters was analyzed using the Spearman linear correlation coefficient. Comparison of measurement data was made by t test and rank sum test; comparison of enumeration data was made by chi-square test. ResultsThere were more males than females in the NAFLD group. Compared with the control group, the NAFLD group had higher BMI and levels of blood glucose, triglyceride (TG, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, and uric acid and lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL level; in addition, the NAFLD group had significantly higher serum AFABP and insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. The Spearman correlation analysis showed that serum AFABP was positively correlated with NAFLD, BMI, HOMA-IR, serum insulin, blood glucose, TG, ALT, AST, and uric acid but negatively correlated with HDL. After adjustment for sex, age, and BMI, serum AFABP was positively correlated with NAFLD, HOMA-IR, serum insulin, blood glucose, TG, ALT, and uric acid, but had no significant correlation with HDL and AST. ConclusionSerum AFABP is closely associated with NAFLD and may be an independent plasma marker of this disease. AFABP plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD.

  13. Relationships between the circadian system and Alzheimer's disease-like symptoms in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dani M Long

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks coordinate physiological, neurological, and behavioral functions into circa 24 hour rhythms, and the molecular mechanisms underlying circadian clock oscillations are conserved from Drosophila to humans. Clock oscillations and clock-controlled rhythms are known to dampen during aging; additionally, genetic or environmental clock disruption leads to accelerated aging and increased susceptibility to age-related pathologies. Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD, are associated with a decay of circadian rhythms, but it is not clear whether circadian disruption accelerates neuronal and motor decline associated with these diseases. To address this question, we utilized transgenic Drosophila expressing various Amyloid-β (Aβ peptides, which are prone to form aggregates characteristic of AD pathology in humans. We compared development of AD-like symptoms in adult flies expressing Aβ peptides in the wild type background and in flies with clocks disrupted via a null mutation in the clock gene period (per01. No significant differences were observed in longevity, climbing ability and brain neurodegeneration levels between control and clock-deficient flies, suggesting that loss of clock function does not exacerbate pathogenicity caused by human-derived Aβ peptides in flies. However, AD-like pathologies affected the circadian system in aging flies. We report that rest/activity rhythms were impaired in an age-dependent manner. Flies expressing the highly pathogenic arctic Aβ peptide showed a dramatic degradation of these rhythms in tune with their reduced longevity and impaired climbing ability. At the same time, the central pacemaker remained intact in these flies providing evidence that expression of Aβ peptides causes rhythm degradation downstream from the central clock mechanism.

  14. Historic evidence to support a causal relationship between spirochetal infections and Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith eMiklossy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Following previous observations a statistically significant association between various types of spirochetes and Alzheimer’s disease (AD fulfilled Hill’s criteria in favor of a causal relationship. If spirochetal infections can indeed cause AD, the pathological and biological hallmarks of AD should also occur in syphilitic dementia. To answer this question, observations and illustrations on the detection of spirochetes in the atrophic form of general paresis, which is known to be associated with slowly progressive dementia, were reviewed and compared with the characteristic pathology of AD. Historic observations and illustrations published in the first half of the 20th Century indeed confirm that the pathological hallmarks, which define AD, are also present in syphilitic dementia. Cortical spirochetal colonies are made up by innumerable tightly spiraled Treponema pallidum spirochetes, which are morphologically indistinguishable from senile plaques, using conventional light microscopy. Local brain amyloidosis also occurs in general paresis and, as in AD, corresponds to amyloid beta. These historic observations enable us to conclude that chronic spirochetal infections can cause dementia and reproduce the defining hallmarks of AD. They represent further evidence in support a causal relationship between various spirochetal infections and AD. They also indicate that local invasion of the brain by these helically shaped bacteria reproduce the filamentous pathology characteristic of AD. Chronic infection by spirochetes, and co-infection with other bacteria and viruses should be included in our current view on the etiology of AD. Prompt action is needed as AD might be prevented.

  15. The relationship between limit of Dysphagia and average volume per swallow in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belo, Luciana Rodrigues; Gomes, Nathália Angelina Costa; Coriolano, Maria das Graças Wanderley de Sales; de Souza, Elizabete Santos; Moura, Danielle Albuquerque Alves; Asano, Amdore Guescel; Lins, Otávio Gomes

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study was to obtain the limit of dysphagia and the average volume per swallow in patients with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease (PD) but without swallowing complaints and in normal subjects, and to investigate the relationship between them. We hypothesize there is a direct relationship between these two measurements. The study included 10 patients with idiopathic PD and 10 age-matched normal controls. Surface electromyography was recorded over the suprahyoid muscle group. The limit of dysphagia was obtained by offering increasing volumes of water until piecemeal deglutition occurred. The average volume per swallow was calculated by dividing the time taken by the number of swallows used to drink 100 ml of water. The PD group showed a significantly lower dysphagia limit and lower average volume per swallow. There was a significantly moderate direct correlation and association between the two measurements. About half of the PD patients had an abnormally low dysphagia limit and average volume per swallow, although none had spontaneously related swallowing problems. Both measurements may be used as a quick objective screening test for the early identification of swallowing alterations that may lead to dysphagia in PD patients, but the determination of the average volume per swallow is much quicker and simpler.

  16. Relationship between Delusion of Theft and Cognitive Functions in Patients with Mild Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hae-Ran; Kang, Dong Woo; Woo, Young-Sup; Bahk, Won-Myong; Lee, Chang-Uk; Lim, Hyun Kook

    2018-01-01

    Although delusion of theft (DT) is the most frequent type of delusion in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), its relationship to cognitive functions remains unclear. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the relationship between DT and cognitive functions in mild AD. Two hundred eighty-nine mild AD patients were enrolled in this study. These subjects were classified into three groups: patients with no delusions (ND, n=82), patients with paranoid delusions (PD, n=114) and patients with DT (n=93). Cognitive functions and their associations with the degree of delusion were compared among the three groups. The results showed that verbal Fluency scores were significantly lower in the PD group than in the DT and ND groups. Word List Recall scores were significantly lower in the DT group than in the PD and ND groups. Interestingly, delusion severity measured with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory delusion subscale correlated negatively with the Word List Recall scores in the DT group. In this study, we demonstrated that episodic memory functions in mild AD patients were associated with DT, but not with PD. Further studies might be needed to clarify the pathophysiology of delusions associated with AD. PMID:29669410

  17. Relationship between Delusion of Theft and Cognitive Functions in Patients with Mild Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hae-Ran; Kang, Dong Woo; Woo, Young-Sup; Bahk, Won-Myong; Lee, Chang-Uk; Lim, Hyun Kook

    2018-04-01

    Although delusion of theft (DT) is the most frequent type of delusion in Alzheimer's disease (AD), its relationship to cognitive functions remains unclear. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the relationship between DT and cognitive functions in mild AD. Two hundred eighty-nine mild AD patients were enrolled in this study. These subjects were classified into three groups: patients with no delusions (ND, n=82), patients with paranoid delusions (PD, n=114) and patients with DT (n=93). Cognitive functions and their associations with the degree of delusion were compared among the three groups. The results showed that verbal Fluency scores were significantly lower in the PD group than in the DT and ND groups. Word List Recall scores were significantly lower in the DT group than in the PD and ND groups. Interestingly, delusion severity measured with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory delusion subscale correlated negatively with the Word List Recall scores in the DT group. In this study, we demonstrated that episodic memory functions in mild AD patients were associated with DT, but not with PD. Further studies might be needed to clarify the pathophysiology of delusions associated with AD.

  18. Determining the structure-mechanics relationships of dense microtubule networks with confocal microscopy and magnetic tweezers-based microrheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yali; Valentine, Megan T

    2013-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is essential in maintaining the shape, strength, and organization of cells. Its spatiotemporal organization is fundamental for numerous dynamic biological processes, and mechanical stress within the MT cytoskeleton provides an important signaling mechanism in mitosis and neural development. This raises important questions about the relationships between structure and mechanics in complex MT structures. In vitro, reconstituted cytoskeletal networks provide a minimal model of cell mechanics while also providing a testing ground for the fundamental polymer physics of stiff polymer gels. Here, we describe our development and implementation of a broad tool kit to study structure-mechanics relationships in reconstituted MT networks, including protocols for the assembly of entangled and cross-linked MT networks, fluorescence imaging, microstructure characterization, construction and calibration of magnetic tweezers devices, and mechanical data collection and analysis. In particular, we present the design and assembly of three neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnetic tweezers devices optimized for use with MT networks: (1) high-force magnetic tweezers devices that enable the application of nano-Newton forces and possible meso- to macroscale materials characterization; (2) ring-shaped NdFeB-based magnetic tweezers devices that enable oscillatory microrheology measurements; and (3) portable magnetic tweezers devices that enable direct visualization of microscale deformation in soft materials under applied force. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The fundamental role of mechanical properties in the progression of cancer disease and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2014-07-01

    The role of mechanical properties in cancer disease and inflammation is still underinvestigated and even ignored in many oncological and immunological reviews. In particular, eight classical hallmarks of cancer have been proposed, but they still ignore the mechanics behind the processes that facilitate cancer progression. To define the malignant transformation of neoplasms and finally reveal the functional pathway that enables cancer cells to promote cancer progression, these classical hallmarks of cancer require the inclusion of specific mechanical properties of cancer cells and their microenvironment such as the extracellular matrix as well as embedded cells such as fibroblasts, macrophages or endothelial cells. Thus, this review will present current cancer research from a biophysical point of view and will therefore focus on novel physical aspects and biophysical methods to investigate the aggressiveness of cancer cells and the process of inflammation. As cancer or immune cells are embedded in a certain microenvironment such as the extracellular matrix, the mechanical properties of this microenvironment cannot be neglected, and alterations of the microenvironment may have an impact on the mechanical properties of the cancer or immune cells. Here, it is highlighted how biophysical approaches, both experimental and theoretical, have an impact on the classical hallmarks of cancer and inflammation. It is even pointed out how these biophysical approaches contribute to the understanding of the regulation of cancer disease and inflammatory responses after tissue injury through physical microenvironmental property sensing mechanisms. The recognized physical signals are transduced into biochemical signaling events that guide cellular responses, such as malignant tumor progression, after the transition of cancer cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype or an inflammatory response due to tissue injury. Moreover, cell adaptation to mechanical alterations, in

  20. The relationship between depression and executive function and the impact of vascular disease burden in younger and older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugtenburg, Astrid; Voshaar, Richard C. Oude; Van Zelst, Willeke; Schoevers, Robert A.; Enriquez-Geppert, Stefanie; Zuidersma, Marij

    2017-01-01

    Background: depression is associated with worse executive function, but underlying mechanisms might differ by age. Aims: to investigate whether vascular disease burden affects the association between depression and executive dysfunction differentially by age. Method: among 83,613 participants of

  1. [Psychiatry and occupational diseases act in Chile: historical and critical review of a complex relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonte, Juan C; Mena, Cristián; Ortiz, Sofía; Osorio, Juan P

    2016-12-01

    The Work Accidents and Occupational Diseases Act exists in Chile since 1968. It uses a single model for the understanding and management of both somatic diseases like silicosis and psychiatric disorders. During the last decade in Chile, the consultation rates due to psychiatric conditions of probable labor origin has rose over 1,000%, a factor that underscored the deficiencies of this model. The aim of this paper is to analyze the consequences of the application of this act in the psychiatric field for almost 50 years after its promulgation. This article contains an historical overview and an epistemological debate based on the authors’ experience dealing with clinical and administrative work both in occupational psychiatry departments and in regulatory entities. The development of occupational mental health in Chile is examined as part of an historical process that initially did not consider the relationship between work and mental suffering as relevant. The application of a single causality model in psychiatry, as well as the effects of building a psychiatric nosology upon legal rather than medical criteria is contested.

  2. Relationship among Periodontal Disease, Insulin Resistance, Salivary Cortisol, and Stress Levels during Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraphim, Ana Paula Castilho Garcia; Chiba, Fernando Yamamoto; Pereira, Renato Felipe; Mattera, Maria Sara de Lima Coutinho; Moimaz, Suzely Adas Saliba; Sumida, Doris Hissako

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is a period involving important metabolic changes that enable the maintenance of the mother's health and development of the fetus. This study aimed to assess the relationship among periodontal disease, insulin resistance, salivary cortisol concentration and level of perceived stress in pregnant women. This was a cross-sectional study. The sample comprised 96 pregnant women between the fifth and seventh month of pregnancy registered at the Basic Health Units of the Unified Health System (SUS). The periodontal condition was assessed after obtainment free and informed consent from the participants. Participants were divided into three groups: control subjects with a healthy periodontal condition (CN; n=46), patients with gingivitis (GI; n=26), and patients with periodontitis (PI; n=24). Saliva and blood samples were collected for evaluation of salivary cortisol concentration, glycemia, insulinemia and Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance index. A validated survey for the assessment of perceived stress levels was also performed. PI group showed significantly higher (pperiodontal disease during pregnancy. This study emphasizes the importance of preventing periodontitis in order to avoid insulin resistance and stress during pregnancy since these can cause systemic complications for the mother and the fetus.

  3. Relationship between oxygen free radicals, cytokines, cortisol and stress complications in patients with acute cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yingbin; Wang Bingjie; Li Yunchao

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between oxygen free radicals, cytokines, cortisol and stress complications in patients with acute cerebrovascular disease (ACVD). Methods: Serum levels of superoxide dismutases (SOD), malonaldehyde (MDA) (with biochemistry) interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and cortisol (with RIA) were measured in 32 patients with acute cerebrovascular disease (ACVD) plus stress complications and 48 patients without stress complications as well as 36 controls. Results: Serum SOD contents in non-stressed group were higher than those in stressed group (P<0.05) but lower than those of the controls (P<0.05). However the levels of MDA, IL-6, TNF-α and cortisol were highest in the stressed group and lowest in the controls (all P<0.05). Conclusion: Oxygen free radicals, IL-6, TNF-α and cortisol were involved in stress complications in patients with ACVD. Monitoring the levels of serum SOD, MDA, IL-6, TNF-α and cortisol could be useful for predicting stress complications and evaluating the therapeutic effect. (authors)

  4. Mechanical stress as the common denominator between chronic inflammation, cancer and Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel eLevy Nogueira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of common diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD and cancer are currently poorly understood. Inflammation is a common risk factor for cancer and AD. Recent data, provided by our group and from others, demonstrate that increased pressure and inflammation are synonymous. There is a continuous increase in pressure from inflammation to fibrosis and then cancer. This in line with the numerous papers reporting high interstitial pressure in cancer. But most authors focus on the role of pressure in the lack of delivery of chemotherapy in the center of the tumor. Pressure may also be a key factor in carcinogenesis. Increased pressure is responsible for oncogene activation and cytokine secretion. Accumulation of mechanical stress plays a key role in the development of diseases of old age such as cardiomyopathy, atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis. Growing evidence suggest also a possible link between mechanical stress in the pathogenesis of AD. The aim of this review is to describe environmental and endogenous mechanical factors possibly playing a pivotal role in the mechanism of chronic inflammation, AD and cancer.

  5. Insights into mechanisms of transmission and pathogenesis from transgenic mouse models of prion diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Julie A.; Telling, Glenn C.

    2018-01-01

    Prions represent a new paradigm of protein-mediated information transfer. In the case of mammals, prions are the cause of fatal, transmissible neurodegenerative diseases, sometimes referred to as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE’s), which frequently occur as epidemics. An increasing body of evidence indicates that the canonical mechanism of conformational corruption of cellular prion protein (PrPC) by the pathogenic isoform (PrPSc) that is the basis of prion formation in TSE’s, is common to a spectrum of proteins associated with various additional human neurodegenerative disorders, including the more common Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. The peerless infectious properties of TSE prions, and the unparalleled tools for their study, therefore enable elucidation of mechanisms of template-mediated conformational propagation that are generally applicable to these related disease states. Many unresolved issues remain including the exact molecular nature of the prion, the detailed cellular and molecular mechanisms of prion propagation, and the means by which prion diseases can be both genetic and infectious. In addition, we know little about the mechanism by which neurons degenerate during prion diseases. Tied to this, the physiological role of the normal form of the prion protein remains unclear and it is uncertain whether or not loss of this function contributes to prion pathogenesis. The factors governing the transmission of prions between species remain unclear, in particular the means by which prion strains and PrP primary structure interact to affect inter-species prion transmission. Despite all these unknowns, advances in our understanding of prions have occurred because of their transmissibility to experimental animals and the development of transgenic (Tg) mouse models has done much to further our understanding about various aspects of prion biology. In this review we will focus on advances in our understanding of prion biology that

  6. Drugs meeting the molecular basis of diabetic kidney disease: bridging from molecular mechanism to personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Oberbauer, Rainer; Perco, Paul; Heinzel, Andreas; Heinze, Georg; Mayer, Gert; Mayer, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is a complex, multifactorial disease and is associated with a high risk of renal and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Clinical practice guidelines for diabetes recommend essentially identical treatments for all patients without taking into account how the individual responds to the instituted therapy. Yet, individuals vary widely in how they respond to medications and therefore optimal therapy differs between individuals. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms of variability in drug response will help tailor optimal therapy. Polymorphisms in genes related to drug pharmacokinetics have been used to explore mechanisms of response variability in DKD, but with limited success. The complex interaction between genetic make-up and environmental factors on the abundance of proteins and metabolites renders pharmacogenomics alone insufficient to fully capture response variability. A complementary approach is to attribute drug response variability to individual variability in underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the progression of disease. The interplay of different processes (e.g. inflammation, fibrosis, angiogenesis, oxidative stress) appears to drive disease progression, but the individual contribution of each process varies. Drugs at the other hand address specific targets and thereby interfere in certain disease-associated processes. At this level, biomarkers may help to gain insight into which specific pathophysiological processes are involved in an individual followed by a rational assessment whether a specific drug's mode of action indeed targets the relevant process at hand. This article describes the conceptual background and data-driven workflow developed by the SysKid consortium aimed at improving characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying DKD at the interference of the molecular impact of individual drugs in order to tailor optimal therapy to individual patients. © The Author 2015. Published by

  7. Immunogenetic mechanisms for the coexistence of organ-specific and systemic autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridkis-Hareli, Masha

    2008-02-15

    Organ-specific autoimmune diseases affect particular targets in the body, whereas systemic diseases engage multiple organs. Both types of autoimmune diseases may coexist in the same patient, either sequentially or concurrently, sustained by the presence of autoantibodies directed against the corresponding autoantigens. Multiple factors, including those of immunological, genetic, endocrine and environmental origin, contribute to the above condition. Due to association of certain autoimmune disorders with HLA alleles, it has been intriguing to examine the immunogenetic basis for autoantigen presentation leading to the production of two or more autoantibodies, each distinctive of an organ-specific or systemic disease. This communication offers the explanation for shared autoimmunity as illustrated by organ-specific blistering diseases and the connective tissue disorders of systemic nature. Several hypothetical mechanisms implicating HLA determinants, autoantigenic peptides, T cells, and B cells have been proposed to elucidate the process by which two autoimmune diseases are induced in the same individual. One of these scenarios, based on the assumption that the patient carries two disease-susceptible HLA genes, arises when a single T cell epitope of each autoantigen recognizes its HLA protein, leading to the generation of two types of autoreactive B cells, which produce autoantibodies. Another mechanism functioning whilst an epitope derived from either autoantigen binds each of the HLA determinants, resulting in the induction of both diseases by cross-presentation. Finally, two discrete epitopes originating from the same autoantigen may interact with each of the HLA specificities, eliciting the production of both types of autoantibodies. Despite the lack of immediate or unequivocal experimental evidence supporting the present hypothesis, several approaches may secure a better understanding of shared autoimmunity. Among these are animal models expressing the transgenes

  8. Aberrant regulation of DNA methylation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a new target of disease mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lee J; Wong, Margaret

    2013-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the third most common adult-onset neurodegenerative disease. A diagnosis is fatal owing to degeneration of motor neurons in brain and spinal cord that control swallowing, breathing, and movement. ALS can be inherited, but most cases are not associated with a family history of the disease. The mechanisms causing motor neuron death in ALS are still unknown. Given the suspected complex interplay between multiple genes, the environment, metabolism, and lifestyle in the pathogenesis of ALS, we have hypothesized that the mechanisms of disease in ALS involve epigenetic contributions that can drive motor neuron degeneration. DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism for gene regulation engaged by DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt)-catalyzed methyl group transfer to carbon-5 in cytosine residues in gene regulatory promoter and nonpromoter regions. Recent genome-wide analyses have found differential gene methylation in human ALS. Neuropathologic assessments have revealed that motor neurons in human ALS show significant abnormalities in Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and 5-methylcytosine. Similar changes are seen in mice with motor neuron degeneration, and Dnmt3a was found abundantly at synapses and in mitochondria. During apoptosis of cultured motor neuron-like cells, Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a protein levels increase, and 5-methylcytosine accumulates. Enforced expression of Dnmt3a, but not Dnmt1, induces degeneration of cultured neurons. Truncation mutation of the Dnmt3a catalytic domain and Dnmt3a RNAi blocks apoptosis of cultured neurons. Inhibition of Dnmt catalytic activity with small molecules RG108 and procainamide protects motor neurons from excessive DNA methylation and apoptosis in cell culture and in a mouse model of ALS. Thus, motor neurons can engage epigenetic mechanisms to cause their degeneration, involving Dnmts and increased DNA methylation. Aberrant DNA methylation in vulnerable cells is a new direction for discovering mechanisms of ALS

  9. [Influencing factors of visual hallucinations in patients with Parkinson's disease and its relationship with sleep disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D D; Li, S H; Jin, L Y; Jin, Y; Cui, Y Y; Zhao, H; Liu, H J; Ma, X X; Su, W; Chen, H B

    2016-04-05

    To investigate the prevalence and influencing factors of visual hallucinations in patients with Parkinson's disease(PD), and to analyze the relationship between visual hallucinations and sleep disorders. We recruited 187 patients with PD(H-Y Ⅰ-Ⅲ) from outpatient department in Beijing Hospital. The patients were investigated for general information and the use of medicine. The patients were divided into visual hallucination(VH) group and non-hallucination(non-VH) group. A comparison study was conducted between two groups. We investigated the sleep disorders of PD patients according to Non Motor Symptom Quest(NMSquest) and Parkinson's disease sleep scale(PDSS). Logistic stepwise multiple regression procedures were used to determine the best predictive model of visual hallucinations in patients with PD. (1) 42 cases(22.5%) of PD patients were accompanied by visual hallucinations; (2) the VH group and non-VH group had no difference in age, sex, duration of illness, the scores of Minimum Mental State Examination(MMSE) and levodopa equivalent doses (LED). The scores of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale(UPDRS) Ⅰ, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety(HAMA) and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression(HAMD) in VH group were significantly higher than those in non-VH group[3.5(2, 5) vs 2 (1, 3); 10(6.75, 15) vs 8(5, 11); 11(7.75, 17) vs 9(5, 13); Psleep behavior disorder(RBD) in VH group were significantly higher than those in non-VH group(61.9% vs 40.7%, 71.4% vs 47.6%, P0.05). The score of PDSS in VH group was significantly lower than that in non-VH group[111(92.75, 128.25) vs 123(109, 135), Psleep disorder are independently associated with VH in PD.

  10. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis in nonhuman primates: studies on the relationship of immunoregulation and disease activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, R.H.; Calvanico, N.J.; Stevens, J.O.

    1982-01-01

    We investigated the relationship of immunoregulation to disease activity in a nonhuman primate model of pigeon breeder's disease. Two Macaca arctoides monkeys developed classical symptoms of hypersensitivity pneumonitis after sensitization and prolonged bronchial challenge, whereas 2 other monkeys remained asymptomatic after in vivo challenge. There were no differences in the percentages of T cells, B cells, monocytes, or FCγ-bearing T cells between symptomatic and asymptomatic animals. Nonetheless, we found a population of concanavalin A-induced, pigeon serum- (PS) induced, and spontaneous T cells that functioned as suppressor cells in autologous in vitro co-cultures in asymptomatic animals that were missing or nonfunctional in symptomatic animals. Monocyte suppressors functioned in both groups. We used low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) to inactivate T suppressor cells. Fifteen radiation units of TBI caused no change in the physical activity, routine chemistries, or blood counts of the 4 animals. After TBI, however, the previously asymptomatic animals developed fever, tachypnea, and signs of pulmonary congestion after in vivo challenge with PS. There was no change in the response to challenge in the symptomatic group. This altered response to in vivo challenge in the previously asymptomatic group persisted for 2 wk after TBI. During this period the difference in in vitro immunoregulatory activity between Con A-induced, PS-induced, and spontaneous T cells in symptomatic and asymptomatic animals disappeared. Monocyte suppressors, however, continued to function in both groups after TBI. these data suggest that the monkey is an appropriate model for studies of human HP and that T cell immunoregulation may be an important element in the pathogenesis and disease activity of HP

  11. Relationship between intracranial aneurysms and the severity of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroki; Higashihara, Eiji; Maruyama, Keisuke; Nutahara, Kikuo; Nitatori, Toshiaki; Miyazaki, Isao; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki

    2017-12-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary kidney disease characterized by the progressive enlargement of innumerable renal cysts. Although the association of intracranial aneurysms (ICANs) with ADPKD is well known, the relationship between the ICAN and the disease severity including total kidney volume (TKV) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is poorly understood. We screened 265 patients with ADPKD (mean age, 48.8 years; range, 14.9-88.3 years) with MR angiography. The patients with a past history related to ICANs were excluded from the study. The incidence and characteristics of ICAN in patients with ADPKD were evaluated. TKV was measured by volumetric analyses of MR imaging. We detected 65 ICANs in 49 patients (37 women and 12 men, mean age, 52.7 years; range, 20.4-86 years). The incidence of ICANs was 18.5% and female patients had was higher incidence (23.1%) than male patients (11.4%) (p = 0.02). An age of those with ICANs was significantly higher than those without (p = 0.006), and the cumulative risk of diagnosis of ICANs increased with age. TKV was significantly larger in those with ICANs than those without (p = 0.001), but eGFR was not different between two groups (p = 0.07). By multivariate analyses, only TKV was significantly related to the development of ICANs (p = 0.02). The incidence of ICANs increased with age, was higher in females, and correlated with kidney enlargement in patients with ADPKD. Necessity of screening ICANs would be particularly high in elderly women with large kidneys.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of disorders of lipid metabolism in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Hamid; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2018-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a progressive condition marked by protracted kidney damage which over time can lead to end stage renal disease (ESRD). CKD can be categorized into different stages based on the extent of renal damage and degree of renal dysfunction with ESRD requiring renal replacement therapy considered the final stage. It is important to note that CKD in all of its forms is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis, cardiovascular (CV) disease and poor CV outcomes. While a number of factors contribute to the high risk of CV mortality in this patient population, dyslipidemia is considered to be a key player in the pathogenesis of CV disease in CKD. Molecular mechanisms responsible for CKD-associated lipid disorders are unique and greatly influenced by the stage of renal disease, presence and degree of proteinuria and in patients with ESRD, modality of renal replacement therapy. This article provides a detailed overview of the molecular mechanisms which cause dyslipidemia and the nature of lipid disorders associated with CKD and ESRD.

  13. ROS, Cell Senescence, and Novel Molecular Mechanisms in Aging and Age-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierpaola Davalli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aging process worsens the human body functions at multiple levels, thus causing its gradual decrease to resist stress, damage, and disease. Besides changes in gene expression and metabolic control, the aging rate has been associated with the production of high levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS and/or Reactive Nitrosative Species (RNS. Specific increases of ROS level have been demonstrated as potentially critical for induction and maintenance of cell senescence process. Causal connection between ROS, aging, age-related pathologies, and cell senescence is studied intensely. Senescent cells have been proposed as a target for interventions to delay the aging and its related diseases or to improve the diseases treatment. Therapeutic interventions towards senescent cells might allow restoring the health and curing the diseases that share basal processes, rather than curing each disease in separate and symptomatic way. Here, we review observations on ROS ability of inducing cell senescence through novel mechanisms that underpin aging processes. Particular emphasis is addressed to the novel mechanisms of ROS involvement in epigenetic regulation of cell senescence and aging, with the aim to individuate specific pathways, which might promote healthy lifespan and improve aging.

  14. The importance of balanced pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms in diffuse lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strieter Robert

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The lung responds to a variety of insults in a remarkably consistent fashion but with inconsistent outcomes that vary from complete resolution and return to normal to the destruction of normal architecture and progressive fibrosis. Increasing evidence indicates that diffuse lung disease results from an imbalance between the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms, with a persistent imbalance that favors pro-inflammatory mediators dictating the development of chronic diffuse lung disease. This review focuses on the mediators that influence this imbalance.

  15. A novel mechanical lung model of pulmonary diseases to assist with teaching and training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Geoffrey M

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A design concept of low-cost, simple, fully mechanical model of a mechanically ventilated, passively breathing lung is developed. An example model is built to simulate a patient under mechanical ventilation with accurate volumes and compliances, while connected directly to a ventilator. Methods The lung is modelled with multiple units, represented by rubber bellows, with adjustable weights placed on bellows to simulate compartments of different superimposed pressure and compliance, as well as different levels of lung disease, such as Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. The model was directly connected to a ventilator and the resulting pressure volume curves recorded. Results The model effectively captures the fundamental lung dynamics for a variety of conditions, and showed the effects of different ventilator settings. It was particularly effective at showing the impact of Positive End Expiratory Pressure (PEEP therapy on lung recruitment to improve oxygenation, a particulary difficult dynamic to capture. Conclusion Application of PEEP therapy is difficult to teach and demonstrate clearly. Therefore, the model provide opportunity to train, teach, and aid further understanding of lung mechanics and the treatment of lung diseases in critical care, such as ARDS and asthma. Finally, the model's pure mechanical nature and accurate lung volumes mean that all results are both clearly visible and thus intuitively simple to grasp.

  16. Facial Emotion Recognition and Expression in Parkinson’s Disease: An Emotional Mirror Mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Lucia; Visco-Comandini, Federica; Erro, Roberto; Morgante, Francesca; Bologna, Matteo; Fasano, Alfonso; Ricciardi, Diego; Edwards, Mark J.; Kilner, James

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients have impairment of facial expressivity (hypomimia) and difficulties in interpreting the emotional facial expressions produced by others, especially for aversive emotions. We aimed to evaluate the ability to produce facial emotional expressions and to recognize facial emotional expressions produced by others in a group of PD patients and a group of healthy participants in order to explore the relationship between these two abilities and any differences between the two groups of participants. Methods Twenty non-demented, non-depressed PD patients and twenty healthy participants (HC) matched for demographic characteristics were studied. The ability of recognizing emotional facial expressions was assessed with the Ekman 60-faces test (Emotion recognition task). Participants were video-recorded while posing facial expressions of 6 primary emotions (happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, fear and anger). The most expressive pictures for each emotion were derived from the videos. Ten healthy raters were asked to look at the pictures displayed on a computer-screen in pseudo-random fashion and to identify the emotional label in a six-forced-choice response format (Emotion expressivity task). Reaction time (RT) and accuracy of responses were recorded. At the end of each trial the participant was asked to rate his/her confidence in his/her perceived accuracy of response. Results For emotion recognition, PD reported lower score than HC for Ekman total score (pemotions sub-scores happiness, fear, anger, sadness (pfacial emotion expressivity task, PD and HC significantly differed in the total score (p = 0.05) and in the sub-scores for happiness, sadness, anger (all pemotions. There was a significant positive correlation between the emotion facial recognition and expressivity in both groups; the correlation was even stronger when ranking emotions from the best recognized to the worst (R = 0.75, p = 0.004). Conclusions PD

  17. Facial Emotion Recognition and Expression in Parkinson's Disease: An Emotional Mirror Mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Lucia; Visco-Comandini, Federica; Erro, Roberto; Morgante, Francesca; Bologna, Matteo; Fasano, Alfonso; Ricciardi, Diego; Edwards, Mark J; Kilner, James

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients have impairment of facial expressivity (hypomimia) and difficulties in interpreting the emotional facial expressions produced by others, especially for aversive emotions. We aimed to evaluate the ability to produce facial emotional expressions and to recognize facial emotional expressions produced by others in a group of PD patients and a group of healthy participants in order to explore the relationship between these two abilities and any differences between the two groups of participants. Twenty non-demented, non-depressed PD patients and twenty healthy participants (HC) matched for demographic characteristics were studied. The ability of recognizing emotional facial expressions was assessed with the Ekman 60-faces test (Emotion recognition task). Participants were video-recorded while posing facial expressions of 6 primary emotions (happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, fear and anger). The most expressive pictures for each emotion were derived from the videos. Ten healthy raters were asked to look at the pictures displayed on a computer-screen in pseudo-random fashion and to identify the emotional label in a six-forced-choice response format (Emotion expressivity task). Reaction time (RT) and accuracy of responses were recorded. At the end of each trial the participant was asked to rate his/her confidence in his/her perceived accuracy of response. For emotion recognition, PD reported lower score than HC for Ekman total score (pemotions sub-scores happiness, fear, anger, sadness (pfacial emotion expressivity task, PD and HC significantly differed in the total score (p = 0.05) and in the sub-scores for happiness, sadness, anger (all pemotions. There was a significant positive correlation between the emotion facial recognition and expressivity in both groups; the correlation was even stronger when ranking emotions from the best recognized to the worst (R = 0.75, p = 0.004). PD patients showed difficulties in recognizing emotional

  18. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: What Is the Mechanism in Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Dunavin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available After more than a decade of preclinical and clinical development, therapeutic infusion of mesenchymal stromal cells is now a leading investigational strategy for the treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. While their clinical use continues to expand, it is still unknown which of their immunomodulatory properties contributes most to their therapeutic activity. Herein we describe the proposed mechanisms, focusing on the inhibitory activity of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs at immunologic checkpoints. A deeper understanding of the mechanism of action will allow us to design more effective treatment strategies.

  19. Does sleep disturbance affect the amyloid clearance mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulug, Burak; Hanoglu, Lutfu; Kilic, Ertugrul

    2017-10-01

    Sleep is an important factor that plays a key role in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. However, it is still unclear whether poor-quality sleep may overlap with sleep disturbances in the underlying dysfunctional mechanisms of amyloid beta (Aβ) clearance metabolism. Here, we aimed to evaluate the current evidence on the role of sleep deprivation in Aβ clearance metabolism. To that end, we discuss possible mechanisms underlying the bidirectional interaction between the sleep deprivation and Aβ clearance pathways. © 2017 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2017 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  20. Examination of the relationship between preservice science teachers' scientific reasoning and problem solving skills on basic mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Ibrahim; Ates, Salih

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine relationship between scientific reasoning and mechanics problem solving skills of students in science education program. Scientific Reasoning Skills Test (SRST) and Basic Mechanics Knowledge Test (BMKT) were applied to 90 second, third and fourth grade students who took Scientific Reasoning Skills course at science teaching program of Gazi Faculty of Education for three successive fall semesters of 2014, 2015 and 2016 academic years. It was found a statistically significant positive (p = 0.038 <0.05) but a low correlation (r = 0.219) between SRST and BMKT. There were no significant relationship among Conservation Laws, Proportional Thinking, Combinational Thinking, Correlational Thinking, Probabilistic Thinking subskills of reasoning and BMKT. There were significant and positive correlation among Hypothetical Thinking and Identifying and Controlling Variables subskills of reasoning and BMKT. The findings of the study were compared with other studies in the field and discussed.

  1. Pathogenic mechanisms in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease due to biomass smoke exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rafael; Oyarzún, Manuel; Olloquequi, Jordi

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality and morbidity have increased significantly worldwide in recent decades. Although cigarette smoke is still considered the main risk factor for the development of the disease, estimates suggest that between 25% and 33% of COPD patients are non-smokers. Among the factors that may increase the risk of developing COPD, biomass smoke has been proposed as one of the most important, affecting especially women and children in developing countries. Despite the epidemiological evidence linking exposure to biomass smoke with adverse health effects, the specific cellular and molecular mechanisms by which this pollutant can be harmful for the respiratory and cardiovascular systems remain unclear. In this article we review the main pathogenic mechanisms proposed to date that make biomass smoke one of the major risk factors for COPD. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural mechanism of laforin function in glycogen dephosphorylation and lafora disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raththagala, Madushi; Brewer, M Kathryn; Parker, Matthew W; Sherwood, Amanda R; Wong, Brian K; Hsu, Simon; Bridges, Travis M; Paasch, Bradley C; Hellman, Lance M; Husodo, Satrio; Meekins, David A; Taylor, Adam O; Turner, Benjamin D; Auger, Kyle D; Dukhande, Vikas V; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Sanz, Pascual; Woods, Virgil L; Li, Sheng; Vander Kooi, Craig W; Gentry, Matthew S

    2015-01-22

    Glycogen is the major mammalian glucose storage cache and is critical for energy homeostasis. Glycogen synthesis in neurons must be tightly controlled due to neuronal sensitivity to perturbations in glycogen metabolism. Lafora disease (LD) is a fatal, congenital, neurodegenerative epilepsy. Mutations in the gene encoding the glycogen phosphatase laforin result in hyperphosphorylated glycogen that forms water-insoluble inclusions called Lafora bodies (LBs). LBs induce neuronal apoptosis and are the causative agent of LD. The mechanism of glycogen dephosphorylation by laforin and dysfunction in LD is unknown. We report the crystal structure of laforin bound to phosphoglucan product, revealing its unique integrated tertiary and quaternary structure. Structure-guided mutagenesis combined with biophysical and biochemical analyses reveal the basis for normal function of laforin in glycogen metabolism. Analyses of LD patient mutations define the mechanism by which subsets of mutations disrupt laforin function. These data provide fundamental insights connecting glycogen metabolism to neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Protective influence of healthful nutrition on mechanisms of environmental pollutant toxicity and disease risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jessie B; Hennig, Bernhard

    2017-06-01

    Human exposures to environmental contaminants around the world contribute to the global burden of disease and thus require urgent attention. Exploring preventive measures against environmental exposure and disease risk is essential. While a sedentary lifestyle and/or poor dietary habits can exacerbate the deleterious effects resulting from exposure to toxic chemicals, much emerging evidence suggests that positive lifestyle changes (e.g., healthful nutrition) can modulate and/or reduce the toxicity of environmental pollutants. Our work has shown that diets high in anti-inflammatory bioactive food components (e.g., phytochemicals or polyphenols) are possible strategies for modulating and reducing the disease risks associated with exposure to toxic pollutants in the environment. Thus, consuming healthy diets rich in plant-derived bioactive nutrients may reduce the vulnerability to diseases linked to environmental toxic insults. This nutritional paradigm in environmental toxicology requires further study in order to improve our understanding of the relationships between nutrition and other lifestyle modifications and toxicant-induced diseases. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  4. Relationship of femoral artery ultrasound measures of atherosclerosis with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Simon; Rifkin, Dena E; Criqui, Michael H; Suder, Natalie C; Garimella, Pranav; Ginsberg, Charles; Marasco, Antoinette M; McQuaide, Belinda J; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma J; Allison, Matthew A; Wassel, Christina L; Ix, Joachim H

    2017-12-22

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is strongly associated with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Detection of subclinical PAD may allow early interventions for or prevention of PAD in persons with CKD. Whether the presence of atherosclerotic plaque and femoral intima-media thickness (IMT) are associated with kidney function is unknown. We performed a cross-sectional observational study of 1029 community-living adults. We measured superficial and common femoral artery IMT and atherosclerotic plaque presence by ultrasound. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; continuous) and eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 (binary) were evaluated as outcomes. Mean age was 70 ± 10 years, mean eGFR was 78 ± 17 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , and 156 (15%) individuals had eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ; 260 (25%) had femoral artery plaque. In models adjusted for demographics and cardiovascular risk factors, individuals with femoral artery plaque had mean eGFR approximately 3.0 (95% confidence interval, -5.3 to -0.8) mL/min/1.73 m 2 lower than those without plaque (P < .01). The presence of plaque was also associated with a 1.7-fold higher odds of eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-2.8; P < .02). Associations were similar in persons with normal ankle-brachial index. The directions of associations were similar for femoral IMT measures with eGFR and CKD but were rendered no longer statistically significant with adjustment for demographic variables and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Femoral artery plaque is significantly associated with CKD prevalence in community-living individuals, even among those with normal ankle-brachial index. Femoral artery ultrasound may allow evaluation of relationships and risk factors linking PAD and kidney disease earlier in its course. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanisms of Change in the Relationship between Self-Compassion, Emotion Regulation, and Mental Health: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inwood, Elisa; Ferrari, Madeleine

    2018-04-19

    Research suggests that self-compassion may improve mental health by promoting emotion regulation (Berking & Whitley, ). This review aimed to identify studies which investigated the relationship between self-compassion, emotion regulation, and mental health in order to examine the role of emotional regulation as a mechanism of change. Searches were conducted in PsycINFO, CINAHL, Medline complete, Web of Science and Scopus databases. Inclusion criteria required publications to be: peer reviewed, published in English, contain validated measures of self-compassion and emotion regulation, and report a direct analysis on the relationship between these constructs. The search yielded five studies which met inclusion criteria. Emotion regulation significantly mediated the relationship between self-compassion and mental health. This pattern was consistent across community and clinical samples, for a range of mental health symptoms including stress, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. A critical limitation of the review was that all included studies used cross-sectional data, limiting interpretations regarding causation. Results provide preliminary evidence that emotion regulation may be a mechanism of change in the relationship between self-compassion and mental health. Self-compassion may be a pertinent preliminary treatment target for individuals who avoid experiences of emotions. © 2018 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Protein Misfolding Mechanisms in Neurological Diseases: A Historical Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Felix; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Evans, Alan C

    2018-01-01

    Protein misfolding refers to a process where proteins become structurally abnormal and lose their specific 3-dimensional spatial configuration. The histopathological presence of misfolded protein (MP) aggregates has been associated as the primary evidence of multiple neurological diseases, including Prion diseases, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease. However, the exact mechanisms of MP aggregation and propagation, as well as their impact in the long-term patient's clinical condition are still not well understood. With this aim, a variety of mathematical models has been proposed for a better insight into the kinetic rate laws that govern the microscopic processes of protein aggregation. Complementary, another class of large-scale models rely on modern molecular imaging techniques for describing the phenomenological effects of MP propagation over the whole brain. Unfortunately, those neuroimaging-based studies do not take full advantage of the tremendous capabilities offered by the chemical kinetics modeling approach. Actually, it has been barely acknowledged that the vast majority of large-scale models have foundations on previous mathematical approaches that describe the chemical kinetics of protein replication and propagation. The purpose of the current manuscript is to present a historical review about the development of mathematical models for describing both microscopic processes that occur during the MP aggregation and large-scale events that characterize the progression of neurodegenerative MP-mediated diseases.

  7. Conflicting relationship between age-dependent disorders, valvular heart disease and coronary artery disease by covariance structure analysis: Possible contribution of natriuretic peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Jun; Inoue, Yasunori; Morimoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Toshikazu; Ogawa, Takayuki

    2017-01-01

    Background It is conceivable that contemporary valvular heart disease (VHD) is affected largely by an age-dependent atherosclerotic process, which is similar to that observed in coronary artery disease (CAD). However, a comorbid condition of VHD and CAD has not been precisely examined. The first objective of this study was to examine a possible comorbid condition. Provided that there is no comorbidity, the second objective was to search for the possible reasons by using conventional risk factors and plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) because BNP has a potentiality to suppress atherosclerotic development. Methods The study population consisted of 3,457 patients consecutively admitted to our institution. The possible comorbid condition of VHD and CAD and the factors that influence the comorbidity were examined by covariance structure analysis and multivariate analysis. Results The distribution of the patients with VHD and those with CAD in the histograms showed that the incidence of VHD and the severity of CAD rose with seniority in appearance. The real statistical analysis was planned by covariance structure analysis. The current path model revealed that aging was associated with VHD and CAD severity (P < 0.001 for each); however, as a notable result, there was an inverse association regarding the comorbid condition between VHD and CAD (Correlation coefficient [β]: -0.121, P < 0.001). As the second objective, to clarify the factors leading to this inverse association, the contribution of conventional risk factors, such as age, gender, hypertension, smoking, diabetes, obesity and dyslipidemia, to VHD and CAD were examined by multivariate analysis. However, these factors did not exert an opposing effect on VHD and CAD, and the inverse association defied explanation. Since different pathological mechanisms may contribute to the formation of VHD and CAD, a differentially proposed path model using plasma BNP revealed that an increase in plasma BNP being drawn by

  8. Conflicting relationship between age-dependent disorders, valvular heart disease and coronary artery disease by covariance structure analysis: Possible contribution of natriuretic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Risa; Kawai, Makoto; Minai, Kosuke; Ogawa, Kazuo; Yoshida, Jun; Inoue, Yasunori; Morimoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Toshikazu; Nagoshi, Tomohisa; Ogawa, Takayuki; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2017-01-01

    It is conceivable that contemporary valvular heart disease (VHD) is affected largely by an age-dependent atherosclerotic process, which is similar to that observed in coronary artery disease (CAD). However, a comorbid condition of VHD and CAD has not been precisely examined. The first objective of this study was to examine a possible comorbid condition. Provided that there is no comorbidity, the second objective was to search for the possible reasons by using conventional risk factors and plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) because BNP has a potentiality to suppress atherosclerotic development. The study population consisted of 3,457 patients consecutively admitted to our institution. The possible comorbid condition of VHD and CAD and the factors that influence the comorbidity were examined by covariance structure analysis and multivariate analysis. The distribution of the patients with VHD and those with CAD in the histograms showed that the incidence of VHD and the severity of CAD rose with seniority in appearance. The real statistical analysis was planned by covariance structure analysis. The current path model revealed that aging was associated with VHD and CAD severity (P < 0.001 for each); however, as a notable result, there was an inverse association regarding the comorbid condition between VHD and CAD (Correlation coefficient [β]: -0.121, P < 0.001). As the second objective, to clarify the factors leading to this inverse association, the contribution of conventional risk factors, such as age, gender, hypertension, smoking, diabetes, obesity and dyslipidemia, to VHD and CAD were examined by multivariate analysis. However, these factors did not exert an opposing effect on VHD and CAD, and the inverse association defied explanation. Since different pathological mechanisms may contribute to the formation of VHD and CAD, a differentially proposed path model using plasma BNP revealed that an increase in plasma BNP being drawn by VHD suppressed the

  9. Afferent nerves regulating the cough reflex: Mechanisms and Mediators of Cough in Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Brendan J.

    2010-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary C-fibers and acid-sensitive, capsaicin-insensitive mechanoreceptors innervating the larynx, trachea and large bronchi regulate the cough reflex. These vagal afferent nerves may interact centrally with sensory input arising from afferent nerves innervating the intrapulmonary airways or even extrapulmonary afferents such as those innervating the nasal mucosa and esophagus to produce chronic cough or enhanced cough responsiveness. The mechanisms of cough initiation in health and in disease are briefly described. PMID:20172253

  10. Relationship between Fibroblast Growth Factor-23 and Mineral Metabolism in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosaku Nitta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor- (FGF-23 is a recently discovered regulator of calcium-phosphate metabolism. FGF-23 appears to decrease in synthesis and accelerated degradation of 1,25(OH2D. Together with its cofactor Klotho, FGF-23 maintains serum phosphate levels within the normal range by increasing renal phosphate excretion. In chronic kidney disease (CKD, FGF-23 levels rise in parallel with the decline in renal function long before a significant increase in serum phosphate concentration occurs. Both Klotho and FGF-23, linked by a receptor mechanism, affect vitamin D synthesis and parathyroid hormone (PTH secretion. Previous studies have shown a close association between reduced FGF-23 or Klotho activities and vascular calcification. The possible association of FGF-23 and left ventricular hypertrophy or vascular dysfunction has been proposed. Finally, prospective studies have shown that high serum FGF-23 concentrations predict more rapid disease progression in CKD patients who were not on dialysis and increased mortality in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. FGF-23 may therefore prove to be an important therapeutic target for the management of CKD.

  11. Relationship between Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Psoriasis: A Novel Hepato-Dermal Axis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Alessandro; Gisondi, Paolo; Lonardo, Amedeo; Targher, Giovanni

    2016-02-05

    Over the past 10 years, it has become increasingly evident that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a multisystem disease that affects multiple extra-hepatic organ systems and interacts with the regulation of several metabolic and immunological pathways. In this review we discuss the rapidly expanding body of clinical and epidemiological evidence supporting a strong association between NAFLD and chronic plaque psoriasis. We also briefly discuss the possible biological mechanisms underlying this association, and discuss treatment options for psoriasis that may influence NAFLD development and progression. Recent observational studies have shown that the prevalence of NAFLD (as diagnosed either by imaging or by histology) is remarkably higher in psoriatic patients (occurring in up to 50% of these patients) than in matched control subjects. Notably, psoriasis is associated with NAFLD even after adjusting for metabolic syndrome traits and other potential confounding factors. Some studies have also suggested that psoriatic patients are more likely to have the more advanced forms of NAFLD than non-psoriatic controls, and that psoriatic patients with NAFLD have more severe psoriasis than those without NAFLD. In conclusion, the published evidence argues for more careful evaluation and surveillance of NAFLD among patients with psoriasis.

  12. Relationship between chronic disturbance of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate metabolism in erythrocytes and Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosenko, Elena A; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Kaminsky, Yury G

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders widely occurring among the elderly. The pathogenic mechanisms involved in the development of this disease are still unknown. In AD, in addition to brain, a number of peripheral tissues and cells are affected, including erythrocytes. In this study, we analyzed glycolytic energy metabolism, antioxidant status, glutathione, adenylate and proteolytic systems in erythrocytes from patients with AD and compared with those from age-matched controls and young adult controls. Glycolytic enzymes hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, bisphosphoglycerate mutase and bisphosphoglycerate phosphatase displayed lower activities in agematched controls, and higher activities in AD patients, as compared to those in young adult control subjects. In both aging and AD, oxidative stress is increased in erythrocytes whereas elevated concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and organic hydroperoxides as well as decreased glutathione/glutathione disulfide ratio and glutathione transferase activity can be detected. These oxidative disturbances are also accompanied by reductions in ATP levels, adenine nucleotide pool size and adenylate energy charge. Caspase-3 and calpain activities in age-matched controls and AD patients were about three times those of young adult controls. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels were significantly decreased in AD patients. Taken together these data suggest that AD patients are associated with chronic disturbance of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate metabolism in erythrocytes. These defects may play a central role in pathophysiological processes predisposing elderly subjects to dementia.

  13. Pathways and mechanisms linking dietary components to cardiometabolic disease: thinking beyond calories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhope, K L; Goran, M I; Bosy-Westphal, A; King, J C; Schmidt, L A; Schwarz, J-M; Stice, E; Sylvetsky, A C; Turnbaugh, P J; Bray, G A; Gardner, C D; Havel, P J; Malik, V; Mason, A E; Ravussin, E; Rosenbaum, M; Welsh, J A; Allister-Price, C; Sigala, D M; Greenwood, M R C; Astrup, A; Krauss, R M

    2018-05-14

    Calories from any food have the potential to increase risk for obesity and cardiometabolic disease because all calories can directly contribute to positive energy balance and fat gain. However, various dietary components or patterns may promote obesity and cardiometabolic disease by additional mechanisms that are not mediated solely by caloric content. Researchers explored this topic at the 2017 CrossFit Foundation Academic Conference 'Diet and Cardiometabolic Health - Beyond Calories', and this paper summarizes the presentations and follow-up discussions. Regarding the health effects of dietary fat, sugar and non-nutritive sweeteners, it is concluded that food-specific saturated fatty acids and sugar-sweetened beverages promote cardiometabolic diseases by mechanisms that are additional to their contribution of calories to positive energy balance and that aspartame does not promote weight gain. The challenges involved in conducting and interpreting clinical nutritional research, which preclude more extensive conclusions, are detailed. Emerging research is presented exploring the possibility that responses to certain dietary components/patterns are influenced by the metabolic status, developmental period or genotype of the individual; by the responsiveness of brain regions associated with reward to food cues; or by the microbiome. More research regarding these potential 'beyond calories' mechanisms may lead to new strategies for attenuating the obesity crisis. © 2018 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity Federation.

  14. Natural products as promising drug candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: molecular mechanism aspect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Niloufar; Khodagholi, Fariba

    2013-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder to date, with no curative or preventive therapy. Histopathological hallmarks of AD include deposition of β-amyloid plaques and formation of neurofibrillary tangles. Extent studies on pathology of the disease have made important discoveries regarding mechanism of disease and potential therapeutic targets. Many cellular changes including oxidative stress, disruption of Ca2+ homeostasis, inflammation, metabolic disturbances, and accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins can lead to programmed cell death in AD. Despite intensive research, only five approved drugs are available for the management of AD. Hence, there is a need to look at alternative therapies. Use of natural products and culinary herbs in medicine has gained popularity in recent years. Several natural substances with neuroprotective effects have been widely studied. Most of these compounds have remarkable antioxidant properties and act mainly by scavenging free radical species. Some of them increase cell survival and improve cognition by directly affecting amyloidogenesis and programmed cell death pathways. Further studies on these natural products and their mechanism of action, parallel with the use of novel pharmaceutical drug design and delivery techniques, enable us to offer an addition to conventional medicine. This review discussed some natural products with potential neuroprotective properties against Aβ with respect to their mechanism of action.

  15. Action mechanisms of transcranial direct current stimulation in Alzheimer´s disease and memory loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels eHansen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacological treatment of Alzheimer´s disease (AD is often limited and accompanied by drug side effects. Thus alternative therapeutic strategies such as non-invasive brain stimulation are needed. Few studies have demonstrated that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, a method of neuromodulation with consecutive robust excitability changes within the stimulated cortex area, is beneficial in AD. There is also evidence that tDCS enhances memory function in cognitive rehabilitation in depressive patients, Parkinson´s disease and stroke. TDCS improves working and visual recognition memory in humans and object-recognition learning in the elderly. Neurobiological mechanisms of AD comprise changes in neuronal activity and the cerebral blood flow caused by altered microvasculature, synaptic dysregulation from ß-amyloid peptide accumulation, altered neuromodulation by degeneration of modulatory amine transmitter systems, altered brain oscillations, and changes in network connectivity. tDCS alters (i neuronal activity and (ii human cerebral blood flow, (iii has synaptic and non-synaptic after-effects (iv, can modify neurotransmitters polarity-dependently, (v and alter oscillatory brain activity and (vi functional connectivity patterns in the brain. It thus is reasonable to use tDCS as a therapeutic instrument in AD as it improves cognitive function in manner based on a disease mechanism. Moreover, it might prove valuable in other types of dementia. Future large-scale clinical and mechanism-oriented studies may enable to identify its therapeutic validity in other types of demential disorders.

  16. Action mechanisms of transcranial direct current stimulation in Alzheimer's disease and memory loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Niels

    2012-01-01

    The pharmacological treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is often limited and accompanied by drug side effects. Thus alternative therapeutic strategies such as non-invasive brain stimulation are needed. Few studies have demonstrated that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a method of neuromodulation with consecutive robust excitability changes within the stimulated cortex area, is beneficial in AD. There is also evidence that tDCS enhances memory function in cognitive rehabilitation in depressive patients, Parkinson's disease, and stroke. tDCS improves working and visual recognition memory in humans and object-recognition learning in the elderly. AD's neurobiological mechanisms comprise changes in neuronal activity and the cerebral blood flow (CBF) caused by altered microvasculature, synaptic dysregulation from ß-amyloid peptide accumulation, altered neuromodulation via degenerated modulatory amine transmitter systems, altered brain oscillations, and changes in network connectivity. tDCS alters (i) neuronal activity and (ii) human CBF, (iii) has synaptic and non-synaptic after-effects (iv), can modify neurotransmitters polarity-dependently, (v) and alter oscillatory brain activity and (vi) functional connectivity patterns in the brain. It thus is reasonable to use tDCS as a therapeutic instrument in AD as it improves cognitive function in manner based on a disease mechanism. Moreover, it could prove valuable in other types of dementia. Future large-scale clinical and mechanism-oriented studies may enable us to identify its therapeutic validity in other types of demential disorders.

  17. Evaluation of the relationship and genetic overlap between Kashin-Beck disease and body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Y; Hao, J; Xiao, X; Guo, X; Wang, W; Yang, T; Shen, H; Tian, Q; Tan, L; Deng, H-W; Zhang, F

    2016-11-01

    Body mass index (BMI) is one of the major factors affecting the development of osteoarthritis (OA) but there is currently no information available regarding the relationship between BMI and Kashin-Beck disease (KBD). Our aim in this study was to investigate the relationship and genetic overlap between BMI and KBD. A total of 2050 Han Chinese subjects participated in this study. Using a cohort of 333 grade I KBD patients, logistic regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the correlation between BMI and KBD. Another independent sample of 1717 subjects was genotyped for a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using Affymetrix Human SNP 6.0 Arrays. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) effect concordance analysis (SECA) was applied to the GWAS summaries of KBD and BMI for pleiotropy analysis. Genome-wide bivariate association analysis (GWBAA) of KBD and BMI was carried out to identify the genes with pleiotropic effects on KBD and BMI. The relevance of identified genes with KBD was validated by gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry. BMI correlated positively with knee movement disorder in KBD (coefficient β = 0.068, p = 0.045). SECA identified a significant pleiotropic effect (empirical p = 0.021) between KBD and BMI. In the GWBAA, the rs1893577 of the ADAMTS1 gene achieved the most significant association signal (p = 7.38 × 10 -9 ). ADAMTS1 was also up-regulated in KBD vs. normal (ratio = 2.64 ± 2.80) and KBD vs. OA (ratio = 2.31 ± 2.01). The rate of ADAMTS1-positive chondrocytes in KBD was significantly higher than that in OA (p < 0.05) and healthy controls (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that ADAMTS1 is a novel susceptibility gene for KBD.

  18. Platelet oxidative stress and its relationship with cardiovascular diseases in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haouari, Mohammed

    2017-10-05

    Enhanced platelet activation and thrombosis are linked to various cardiovascular diseases. Among other mechanisms, oxidative stress seems to play a pivotal role in platelet hyperactivity. Indeed, upon stimulation by physiological agonists, human platelets generate and release several types of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O2-, H2O2 or OH- , further amplifying the platelet activation response via various signalling pathways, including, formation of isoprostanes, Ca2+ mobilization and NO inactivation. Furthermore, excessive platelet ROS generation, incorporation of free radicals from environment and/or depletion of antioxidants induce pro-oxidant, pro-inflammatory and platelet hyperaggregability effects, leading to the incidence of cardiovascular events. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the effect of oxidative stress on platelet signaling pathways and its implication in CVD such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. We also summarize the role of natural antioxidants included in vegetables, fruits and medicinal herbs in reducing platelet function via an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Relationship between epicardial adipose tissue, coronary artery disease and adiponectin in a Mexican population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yañez-Rivera, Teresa G; Baños-Gonzalez, Manuel A; Ble-Castillo, Jorge L; Torres-Hernandez, Manuel E; Torres-Lopez, Jorge E; Borrayo-Sanchez, Gabriela

    2014-09-08

    The amount of epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) around the heart has been identified as an independent predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD), potentially through local release of inflammatory cytokines. Ethnic differences have been observed, but no studies have investigated this relationship in the Mexican population. The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether a relationship exist between EAT thickness assessed via echocardiography with CAD and adiponectin levels in a Mexican population. We studied 153 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). EAT thickness on the free wall of the right ventricle was measured at the end of systole from parasternal long and short axis views of three consecutive cardiac cycles. Coronary angiograms were analyzed for the presence, extent and severity of CAD. Serum adiponectin, lipids, glucose, C-reactive protein and fibrinogen were determined. EAT thickness was greater in patients with CAD than in those without CAD from both parasternal long (5.39 ± 1.75 mm vs 4.00 ± 1.67 mm p<0.0001) and short-axis views (5.23 ± 1.67 vs 4.12 ± 1.77, p=0.001). EAT thickness measured from parasternal long and short-axis showed a statistically significant positive correlation with age (r=0.354, p<0.001; r=0.286, p<0.001 respectively), and waist circumference (r=0.189, p=0.019; r=0.217, p=0.007 respectively). A significant negative correlation between EAT thickness from the parasternal long axis with cholesterol-HDL was observed (r=-0.163, p=0.045). No significant correlation was found between epicardial fat thickness and serum adiponectin or with the severity of CAD. EAT thickness was greater in patients with CAD. However, no correlation was observed with the severity of the disease or with serum adiponectin levels. EAT thickness measured by echocardiography might provide additional information for risk assessment and prediction of CAD.

  20. Changes to the geometry and fluid mechanics of the carotid siphon in the pediatric Moyamoya disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Muhammad; Tan, Germaine Xin Yi; Huq, Mehnaz; Kang, Heidi; Lee, Zhi Rui; Tang, Phua Hwee; Hu, Xi Hong; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2016-12-01

    The Moyamoya disease is a cerebrovascular disease that causes occlusion of the distal end of the internal carotid artery, leading to the formation of multiple tiny collateral arteries. To date, the pathogenesis of Moyamoya is unknown. Improved understanding of the changes to vascular geometry and fluid mechanics of the carotid siphon during disease may improve understanding of the pathogenesis, prognosis techniques and disease management. A retrospective analysis of Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) images was performed for Moyamoya pediatric patients (MMD) (n = 23) and control (Ctrl) pediatric patients (n = 20). The Ctrl group was composed of patients who complained of headache and had normal MRA. We performed segmentation of MRA images to quantify geometric parameters of the artery. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was performed to quantify the hemodynamic parameters. MMD internal carotid and carotid siphons were smaller in cross-sectional areas, and shorter in curved vascular length. Vascular curvature remained constant over age and vascular size and did not change between Ctrl and MMD, but MMD carotid siphon had lower tortuosity in the posterior bend, and higher torsion in the anterior bend. Wall shear stress and secondary flows were significantly lower in MMD, but the ratio of secondary flow kinetic energy to primary flow kinetic energy were similar between MMD and Ctrl. There were alterations to both the geometry and the flow mechanics of the carotid siphons of Moyamoya patients but it is unclear whether hemodynamics is the cause or the effect of morphological changes observed.

  1. Regulation mechanisms of pituitary-thyroid axis in normal subjects and patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Shinko; Yamauchi, Kazuyuki; Mori, Yuichi

    1986-01-01

    The regulatory mechanism of the pituitary-thyroid axis in normal subjects and patients with Graves' disease was investigated using a highly sensitive TSH assay based on the immunoradiometric assay. All of the normal subjects had detectable TSH values within the range 0.35 to 6.0 μU/ml. No negative correlations between TSH and free thyroid hormones existed in normal subjects. Patients with thyroid carcinoma who seemed to have normal pituitary-thyroid function showed a rapid increase of TSH after total thyroidectomy. On the other hand, while untreated patients with Graves' disease all had undetectable TSH values, these patients took 1 to 3.5 months longer to normalize their TSH values than to normalize free thyroid hormones on antithyroid drug therapy. During the recovery phase by the treatment with decrease of antithyroid drug or supplement of T 4 from iatrogenic hypothyroid state after treatment for Graves' disease and thyroid carcinoma, normalization of TSH levels was delayed than that of free thyroid hormones. Patients with Graves' disease in remission showed an extremely positive correlation between basal and peak TSH levels in TRH test, and a negative correlation between basal TSH and FT 4 . In conclusion, an individual patient may have a different set point concerning the regulatory mechanism of the pituitary-thyroid axis, and the persistence of the hyperthyroid state would seem to have caused some reversible dysfunction of the pituitary gland. (author)

  2. DNA repair pathways underlie a common genetic mechanism modulating onset in polyglutamine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, Conceição; Hensman-Moss, Davina; Flower, Michael; Wiethoff, Sarah; Brice, Alexis; Goizet, Cyril; Stevanin, Giovanni; Koutsis, Georgios; Karadima, Georgia; Panas, Marios; Yescas-Gómez, Petra; García-Velázquez, Lizbeth Esmeralda; Alonso-Vilatela, María Elisa; Lima, Manuela; Raposo, Mafalda; Traynor, Bryan; Sweeney, Mary; Wood, Nicholas; Giunti, Paola; Durr, Alexandra; Holmans, Peter; Houlden, Henry; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Jones, Lesley

    2016-06-01

    The polyglutamine diseases, including Huntington's disease (HD) and multiple spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs), are among the commonest hereditary neurodegenerative diseases. They are caused by expanded CAG tracts, encoding glutamine, in different genes. Longer CAG repeat tracts are associated with earlier ages at onset, but this does not account for all of the difference, and the existence of additional genetic modifying factors has been suggested in these diseases. A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) in HD found association between age at onset and genetic variants in DNA repair pathways, and we therefore tested whether the modifying effects of variants in DNA repair genes have wider effects in the polyglutamine diseases. We assembled an independent cohort of 1,462 subjects with HD and polyglutamine SCAs, and genotyped single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected from the most significant hits in the HD study. In the analysis of DNA repair genes as a group, we found the most significant association with age at onset when grouping all polyglutamine diseases (HD+SCAs; p = 1.43 × 10(-5) ). In individual SNP analysis, we found significant associations for rs3512 in FAN1 with HD+SCAs (p = 1.52 × 10(-5) ) and all SCAs (p = 2.22 × 10(-4) ) and rs1805323 in PMS2 with HD+SCAs (p = 3.14 × 10(-5) ), all in the same direction as in the HD GWAS. We show that DNA repair genes significantly modify age at onset in HD and SCAs, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism, which could operate through the observed somatic expansion of repeats that can be modulated by genetic manipulation of DNA repair in disease models. This offers novel therapeutic opportunities in multiple diseases. Ann Neurol 2016;79:983-990. © 2016 The Authors. Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  3. Relationship Between Salivary Pepsin Concentration and Esophageal Mucosal Integrity in Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Wen; Sifrim, Daniel; Xie, Chenxi; Chen, Minhu; Xiao, Ying-Lian

    2017-10-30

    Increased salivary pepsin could indicate an increase in gastro-esophageal reflux, however, previous studies failed to demonstrate a correlation between salivary pepsin concentrations and 24-hour esophageal acid exposure. This study aims to detect the salivary pepsin and to evaluate the relationship between salivary pepsin concentrations and intercellular spaces (IS) in different gastroesophageal reflux disease phenotypes in patients. A total of 45 patients and 11 healthy volunteers were included in this study. All subjects underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, 24-hour ambulatory multichannel impedance-pH (MII-pH) monitoring, and salivary sampling at 3-time points during the 24-hour MII-pH monitoring. IS were measured by transmission electron microscopy, and salivary pepsin concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The IS measurements were greater in the esophagitis (EE), non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), and hypersensitive esophagus (HO) groups than in the functional heartburn (FH) and healthy volunteer groups, and significant differences were indicated. Patients with NERD and HO had higher average pepsin concentrations compared with FH patients. A weak correlation was determined between IS and salivary pepsin among patients with NERD ( r = 0.669, P = 0.035). We confirmed the presence of a higher level of salivary pepsin in patients with NERD than in patients with FH. Salivary pepsin concentrations correlated with severity of mucosal integrity impairment in the NERD group. We suggest that in patients with NERD, low levels of salivary pepsin can help identify patients with FH, in addition the higher the pepsin concentration, the more likely the severity of dilated IS.

  4. Pentosidine in synovial fluid in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: relationship with disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J R; Takahashi, M; Suzuki, M; Kushida, K; Miyamoto, S; Inoue, T

    1998-12-01

    Pentosidine is an advanced glycation endproduct formed by glycosylation and oxidation. Our aim was to develop a means to measure pentosidine in synovial fluid (SF), and to compare its concentration in SF in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to investigate the relationship between its concentration in SF and the disease activity of RA. SF was collected from knee joints in 31 patients with RA and 40 with OA, who had hydrarthrosis. One patient with RA and 7 with OA who had the complication of diabetes mellitus or chronic renal failure made up the DM/CRF group, and the remaining patients made up the RA group (n = 30) and the OA group (n = 33). Pentosidine was measured by the direct HPLC method with column switching after hydrolysis of SF. Pentosidine was detected in all SF and was greater in RA (83.9 +/- 46.0 nmol/l, mean +/- SD) than in OA (40.1 +/- 19.6 nmol/l). Three DM/CRF patients undergoing hemodialysis had markedly high pentosidine levels (482.5 +/- 280.8 nmol/l). There was a significant correlation between pentosidine and C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and Lansbury Index (p Patients with RA were divided into high and low activity groups according to the CRP and Lansbury Index. Pentosidine was significantly higher in the high activity group (CRP > or = 2.0 mg/dl and Lansbury Index > or = 50%) than in the low activity group (CRP < 2.0 and/or Lansbury Index < 50) (100.9 +/- 42.8 vs 58.5 +/- 39.6 nmol/; p = 0.0013). Pentosidine in synovial fluid was higher in RA than in OA. Pentosidine levels in SF were related to the disease activity in RA.

  5. Relationship between the arterial calcification detected in mammography and coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topal, Ugur [Department of Radiology, Uludag University, Medical School, Goeruekle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey)], E-mail: utopal@uludag.edu.tr; Kaderli, Aysel [Department of Cardiology, Uludag University, Medical School, Goeruekle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); Topal, Naile Bolca [Department of Radiology, Uludag University, Medical School, Goeruekle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); Ozdemir, Buelent; Yesilbursa, Dilek; Cordan, Jale [Department of Cardiology, Uludag University, Medical School, Goeruekle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); Ediz, Buelent [Department of Statistics, Uludag University, Medical School, Goeruekle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); Aydinlar, Ali [Department of Cardiology, Uludag University, Medical School, Goeruekle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey)

    2007-09-15

    Objective: Arterial calcification is frequently encountered in mammography. The frequency of breast arterial calcification (BAC) increases with increasing age. Studies have shown that BAC is seen more frequently among the people who are under the risk of coronary artery diseases (CAD) such as diabetes and hypertension. The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between the arterial calcification detected in mammography and the CAD. Material and methods: Screening mammography was performed in 123 women above the age of 40 years who had been examined with coronary angiography for the evaluation of CAD. The presence of BAC, number of affected vessels, and the distribution of calcification in the vessel wall were evaluated in the mammography. Subjects were questioned in terms of the cardiovasculary risk factors. The severity of CAD was evaluated according to the Gensini scoring. In addition, the number of blood vessels with stenosis of more than 50% was used as the vascular score. The correlation between Gensini and the vascular scores, and BAC was statistically evaluated using Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: Eighty (65%) of 123 patients had CAD. BAC was detected in the mammography of 49 (39.8%) subjects. The ages and duration of menopause of the cases with BAC were significantly higher than those without BAC (p < 0.001). There was an almost significant correlation between the BAC and Gensini scores (p = 0.059). There was a significant increase in the frequency of BAC among subjects with more than two vessels with stenosis (p = 0.033). Conclusion: Frequency of BAC increases with increasing age. BAC is also frequently seen in subjects having severe coronary artery disease. Although increasing age may be a factor increasing the frequency of BAC, BAC may also be an indicator of CAD. Therefore, the mentioning of arterial calcification in mammography reports may be important in warning the clinician in terms of CAD.

  6. Factors influencing turning and its relationship with falls in individuals with Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Yu Cheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Falls are a major problem for people with Parkinson's disease (PD. Many studies indicate that more than 50% of people with PD have difficulty in turning that may lead to falls during daily activities. The aims of this study were to identify the relationship between turning performance and falls, and to determine the factors that influence turning performance. METHODS: This study examined 45 patients with idiopathic PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage 1-3 using a battery of tests, including 180° turn time, balance, and muscle strength. The levels of disease severity and freezing of gait were also measured. The number of falls in the past 6 months was recorded. RESULTS: Sixteen out of forty-five participants experienced falls in the past 6 months. A receiver operating characteristic curve showed that turn time was highly related to falls [more affected side: sensitivity = 0.81, specificity = 0.79, area under the curve (AUC = 0.83; less affected side: sensitivity = 0.88, specificity = 0.76, AUC = 0.83]. The most important factor influencing turn time was balance ability (both sides: p = 0.000 according to the regression model. Correlations between turn time and dynamic balance were further established with reaction time, movement velocity, endpoint excursion, and maximal excursion of the LOS (limits of stability test. CONCLUSION: The time needed to complete a 180° turn during the SQT (step/quick turn test is a good index to differentiate fallers from non-fallers in persons with PD. Turn time is most influenced by balance. Furthermore, balance control, especially in an anterior or sideways direction, is important for turning performance.

  7. Computational Analysis of Pharyngeal Swallowing Mechanics in Patients with Motor Neuron Disease: A Pilot Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garand, K L; Schwertner, Ryan; Chen, Amy; Pearson, William G

    2018-04-01

    Swallowing impairment (dysphagia) is a common sequela in patients with motor neuron disease (MND). The purpose of this retrospective, observational pilot investigation was to characterize how pharyngeal swallowing mechanics are impacted in patients with MND using a comparison with healthy, non-dysphagic control group. Computational analysis of swallowing mechanics (CASM) was used to determine covariate biomechanics of pharyngeal swallowing from videofluoroscopic assessment in 15 patients with MND and 15 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Canonical variant analysis with post hoc discriminate function analysis (DFA) was performed on coordinate data mapping functional muscle groups underlying pharyngeal swallowing. Differences in swallowing mechanics associated with group (MND; control), motor neuron predominance (upper; lower), onset (bulbar; spinal), and swallow task (thin, pudding) were evaluated and visualized. Pharyngeal swallowing mechanics differed significantly in patients with MND compared with healthy controls (D = 2.01, p mechanics by motor neuron predominance (D = 5.03, p mechanics of patients with MND differ from and are more heterogeneous than healthy controls. These findings suggest patients with MND may compensate reductions in pharyngeal shortening and tongue base retraction by extending the head and neck and increasing hyolaryngeal excursion. This work and further CASM investigations will lead to further insights into development and evaluation of targeted clinical treatments designed to prolong safe and efficient swallowing function in patients with MND.

  8. Immune regulation of systemic hypertension, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and preeclampsia: shared disease mechanisms and translational opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafri, Salema; Ormiston, Mark L

    2017-12-01

    Systemic hypertension, preeclampsia, and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are diseases of high blood pressure in the systemic or pulmonary circulation. Beyond the well-defined contribution of more traditional pathophysiological mechanisms, such as changes in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, to the development of these hypertensive disorders, there is substantial clinical evidence supporting an important role for inflammation and immunity in the pathogenesis of each of these three conditions. Over the last decade, work in small animal models, bearing targeted deficiencies in specific cytokines or immune cell subsets, has begun to clarify the immune-mediated mechanisms that drive changes in vascular structure and tone in hypertensive disease. By summarizing the clinical and experimental evidence supporting a contribution of the immune system to systemic hypertension, preeclampsia, and PAH, the current review highlights the cellular and molecular pathways that are common to all three hypertensive disorders. These mechanisms are centered on an imbalance in CD4 + helper T cell populations, defined by excessive Th17 responses and impaired T reg activity, as well as the excessive activation or impairment of additional immune cell types, including macrophages, dendritic cells, CD8 + T cells, B cells, and natural killer cells. The identification of common immune mechanisms in systemic hypertension, preeclampsia, and PAH raises the possibility of new therapeutic strategies that target the immune component of hypertension across multiple disorders. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. The Potential Mechanisms of Berberine in the Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Zhu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a globally observed metabolic disease with high prevalence both in adults and children. However, there is no efficient medication available yet. Increased evidence indicates that berberine (BBR, a natural plant product, has beneficial effects on NAFLD, though the mechanisms are not completely known. In this review, we briefly summarize the pathogenesis of NAFLD and factors that influence the progression of NAFLD, and focus on the potential mechanisms of BBR in the treatment of NAFLD. Increase of insulin sensitivity, regulation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK pathway, improvement of mitochondrial function, alleviation of oxidative stress, LDLR mRNA stabilization, and regulation of gut microenvironment are the major targets of BBR in the treatment of NAFLD. Additionally, reduction of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9 expression and DNA methylation are also involved in pharmacological mechanisms of berberine in the treatment of NAFLD. The immunologic mechanism of BBR in the treatment of NAFLD, development of berberine derivative, drug combinations, delivery routes, and drug dose can be considered in the future research.

  10. Interactive relationship between the mechanical properties of food and the human response during the first bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Haruka; Kohyama, Kaoru

    2007-05-01

    Biting is an action that results from interplay between food properties and the masticatory system. The mechanical factors of food that cause biting adaptation and the recursive effects of modified biting on the mechanical phenomena of food are largely unknown. We examined the complex interaction between the bite system and the mechanical properties. Nine subjects were each given a cheese sample and instructed to bite it once with their molar teeth. An intra-oral bite force-time profile was measured using a tactile pressure-measurement system with a sheet sensor inserted between the molars. Time, force, and impulse for the first peak were specified as intra-oral parameters of the sample fracture. Mechanical properties of the samples were also examined using a universal testing machine at various test speeds. Besides fracture parameters, initial slope was also determined as a mechanical property possibly sensed shortly after bite onset. The bite profile was then examined based on the mechanical parameters. Sample-specific bite velocities were identified as characteristic responses of a human bite. A negative correlation was found between bite velocity and initial slope of the sample, suggesting that the initial slope is the mechanical factor that modifies the consequent bite velocity. The sample-specific bite velocity had recursive effects on the following fracture event, such that a slow velocity induced a low bite force and high impulse for the intra-oral fracture event. We demonstrated that examination of the physiological and mechanical factors during the first bite can provide valuable information about the food-oral interaction.

  11. The metabolic role of the gut microbiota in health and rheumatic disease: mechanisms and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Abramson, Steven B; Scher, Jose U

    2016-08-01

    The role of the gut microbiome in animal models of inflammatory and autoimmune disease is now well established. The human gut microbiome is currently being studied as a potential modulator of the immune response in rheumatic disorders. However, the vastness and complexity of this host-microorganism interaction is likely to go well beyond taxonomic, correlative observations. In fact, most advances in the field relate to the functional and metabolic capabilities of these microorganisms and their influence on mucosal immunity and systemic inflammation. An intricate relationship between the microbiome and the diet of the host is now fully recognized, with the microbiota having an important role in the degradation of polysaccharides into active metabolites. This Review summarizes the current knowledge on the metabolic role of the microbiota in health and rheumatic disease, including the advances in pharmacomicrobiomics and its potential use in diagnostics, therapeutics and personalized medicine.

  12. Relationships between serum MCP-1 and subclinical kidney disease: African American-Diabetes Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murea Mariana

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 plays important roles in kidney disease susceptibility and atherogenesis in experimental models. Relationships between serum MCP-1 concentration and early nephropathy and subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD were assessed in African Americans (AAs with type 2 diabetes (T2D. Methods Serum MCP-1 concentration, urine albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, and atherosclerotic calcified plaque (CP in the coronary and carotid arteries and infrarenal aorta were measured in 479 unrelated AAs with T2D. Generalized linear models were fitted to test for associations between MCP-1 and urine ACR, eGFR, and CP. Results Participants were 57% female, with mean ± SD (median age 55.6±9.5 (55.0 years, diabetes duration 10.3±8.2 (8.0 years, urine ACR 149.7±566.7 (14.0 mg/g, CKD-EPI eGFR 92.4±23.3 (92.0 ml/min/1.73m2, MCP-1 262.9±239.1 (224.4 pg/ml, coronary artery CP 280.1±633.8 (13.5, carotid artery CP 47.1±132.9 (0, and aorta CP 1616.0±2864.0 (319.0. Adjusting for age, sex, smoking, HbA1c, BMI, and LDL, serum MCP-1 was positively associated with albuminuria (parameter estimate 0.0021, P=0.04 and negatively associated with eGFR (parameter estimate −0.0003, P=0.001. MCP-1 remained associated with eGFR after adjustment for urine ACR. MCP-1 levels did not correlate with the extent of CP in any vascular bed, HbA1c or diabetes duration, but were positively associated with BMI. No interaction between BMI and MCP-1 was detected on nephropathy outcomes. Conclusions Serum MCP-1 levels are associated with eGFR and albuminuria in AAs with T2D. MCP-1 was not associated with subclinical CVD in this population. Inflammation appears to play important roles in development and/or progression of kidney disease in AAs.

  13. Relationship between Audiometric slope and tinnitus pitch in tinnitus patients: insights into the mechanisms of tinnitus generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Schecklmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Different mechanisms have been proposed to be involved in tinnitus generation, among them reduced lateral inhibition and homeostatic plasticity. On a perceptual level these different mechanisms should be reflected by the relationship between the individual audiometric slope and the perceived tinnitus pitch. Whereas some studies found the tinnitus pitch corresponding to the maximum hearing loss, others stressed the relevance of the edge frequency. This study investigates the relationship between tinnitus pitch and audiometric slope in a large sample. METHODOLOGY: This retrospective observational study analyzed 286 patients. The matched tinnitus pitch was compared to the frequency of maximum hearing loss and the edge of the audiogram (steepest hearing loss by t-tests and correlation coefficients. These analyses were performed for the whole group and for sub-groups (uni- vs. bilateral (117 vs. 338 ears, pure-tone vs. narrow-band (340 vs. 115 ears, and low and high audiometric slope (114 vs. 113 ears. FINDINGS: For the right ear, tinnitus pitch was in the same range and correlated significantly with the frequency of maximum hearing loss, but differed from and did not correlate with the edge frequency. For the left ear, similar results were found but the correlation between tinnitus pitch and maximum hearing loss did not reach significance. Sub-group analyses (bi- and unilateral, tinnitus character, slope steepness revealed identical results except for the sub-group with high audiometric slope which revealed a higher frequency of maximum hearing loss as compared to the tinnitus pitch. CONCLUSION: The study-results confirm a relationship between tinnitus pitch and maximum hearing loss but not to the edge frequency, suggesting that tinnitus is rather a fill-in-phenomenon resulting from homeostatic mechanisms, than the result of deficient lateral inhibition. Sub-group analyses suggest that audiometric steepness and the side of affected ear

  14. Relationship between Audiometric Slope and Tinnitus Pitch in Tinnitus Patients: Insights into the Mechanisms of Tinnitus Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schecklmann, Martin; Vielsmeier, Veronika; Steffens, Thomas; Landgrebe, Michael; Langguth, Berthold; Kleinjung, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Background Different mechanisms have been proposed to be involved in tinnitus generation, among them reduced lateral inhibition and homeostatic plasticity. On a perceptual level these different mechanisms should be reflected by the relationship between the individual audiometric slope and the perceived tinnitus pitch. Whereas some studies found the tinnitus pitch corresponding to the maximum hearing loss, others stressed the relevance of the edge frequency. This study investigates the relationship between tinnitus pitch and audiometric slope in a large sample. Methodology This retrospective observational study analyzed 286 patients. The matched tinnitus pitch was compared to the frequency of maximum hearing loss and the edge of the audiogram (steepest hearing loss) by t-tests and correlation coefficients. These analyses were performed for the whole group and for sub-groups (uni- vs. bilateral (117 vs. 338 ears), pure-tone vs. narrow-band (340 vs. 115 ears), and low and high audiometric slope (114 vs. 113 ears)). Findings For the right ear, tinnitus pitch was in the same range and correlated significantly with the frequency of maximum hearing loss, but differed from and did not correlate with the edge frequency. For the left ear, similar results were found but the correlation between tinnitus pitch and maximum hearing loss did not reach significance. Sub-group analyses (bi- and unilateral, tinnitus character, slope steepness) revealed identical results except for the sub-group with high audiometric slope which revealed a higher frequency of maximum hearing loss as compared to the tinnitus pitch. Conclusion The study-results confirm a relationship between tinnitus pitch and maximum hearing loss but not to the edge frequency, suggesting that tinnitus is rather a fill-in-phenomenon resulting from homeostatic mechanisms, than the result of deficient lateral inhibition. Sub-group analyses suggest that audiometric steepness and the side of affected ear affect this

  15. Relationship between the severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and asymptomatic cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishibayashi, Momoka

    2008-01-01

    In this study, examined were prevalence of asymptomatic cerebrovascular disease (ACD) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and relationship between its severity and ACD prevalence. Subjects were 192 cases (M 170/F 20, av. age 50.6 y) with chief complaint of snore, sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index/AHI 0-118.4/h), midday drowsiness and so on without CD history, who underwent the overnight polysomnographic recording, vascular risk assessment like life habits, blood pressure and impaired GT, and brain MRI. The last item was conducted with Siemence 1.5T machine to get T1-, T2-weighted and FLAIR images to evaluate asymptomatic lacunar infarction (ALI) and periventricular hyperintensity (PVH). Light (AHI<15/h), moderate (15≤AHI<30) and severe (AHI≥30) OSASs were found in 44, 35 and 61 cases, respectively. ALIs were found in 7 light, 17 moderate and 61 severe cases and PVH, in 9, 19 and 61 cases, respectively. Thus it was revealed that patients with moderate to severe OSAS had complication of ACD in a higher rate than those with light OSAS and that prevalence of ACD was higher in OSAS patients with AHI 15/h or more. (R.T.)

  16. Relationship between prognosis of Graves' disease treated with 131I and three kinds of cell factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Mingfeng; Wen Chijun; Qian Hong

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between prognosis of Graves' disease (GD) treated with 131 I and IL-2, IL-10 and TNF-α, the levels of IL-2, IL-10, TNF-α, T 3 , T 4 , FT 3 , FT 4 and s-TSH in serum of 158 patients with GD were measured before first 131 I treatment and after five months. The patients were divided into the transient hypothyroidism group, the hyperthyroidism group and the cure group according to the serum level of T 3 , T 4 , FT 3 , FT 4 and s-TSH after fives months of treatment. The results showed that the IL-2 and IL-10 levels in GD patient were remarkably higher (P 131 I treatment. The serum IL-2 level in each group after 131 I treatment was higher than that of before treatment (P the cure group >the transient hypothyroidism group. The levels of IL-10 in the hyperthyroidism group after treatment were higher than those in the cure and the transient hypothyroidism group (P the transient hypothyroidism group > the cure group. The results indicate that Th1 plays a predominant role in the pathogenesis of GD, in which the cytokines production is shifted toward the Th1 type. The patients with lower ratio of IL-2 to IL-10 and higher level of TNF-α occur hypothyroidism easily. (authors)

  17. Relationship between cardiac output and effective renal plasma flow in patients with cardiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGriffin, D; Tauxe, W N; Lewis, C; Karp, R; Mantle, J

    1984-12-01

    The relationship between effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and cardiac output was examined in 46 patients (22 with congestive heart failure and 24 following cardiac surgical procedures) by simultaneously measuring the global ERPF by the single-injection method and cardiac output by the thermodilution method. Of the patients in the heart-failure group, 21 also had pulmonary artery end diastolic pressure (PAEDP) recorded at the same time. ERPF and cardiac output were found to be related by the regression equations: cardiac output = 2.08 + 0.0065 ERPF (r, 080), with a SE of estimate of 0.81 l/min. ERPF and PAEDP were related by the regression equation: PAEDP = 42.02 - 0.0675 ERPF (r, 0.86), with a SE of estimate of 5.5 mm Hg. ERPF may be a useful noninvasive method of estimating cardiac output if it is known that no intrinsic kidney disease is present, and if the error of 0.81 l/min (1 SE of estimate) is within the range of clinical usefulness. The error is principally attributable to the determination of cardiac output by the thermodilution method.

  18. Relationship between depression with FEV1 percent predicted and BODE index in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, H.; Hanum, H.; Abidin, A.; Hanida, W.

    2018-03-01

    WHO reported more than 3 million people die from COPD in 2012 and are expected to rank third after cardiovascular and cancer diseases in the future. Recent studies reported the prevalence of depression in COPD patients was higher than in control group. So, it’s important for clinicians to understand the relationship of depression symptoms with clinical aspects of COPD. For determining the association of depression symptoms with lung function and BODE index in patients with stable COPD, a cross-sectional study was in 98 stable COPD outpatients from January to June 2017. Data were analyzed using Independent t-test, Mann-Whitney test, and Spearman’s rank correlation. COPD patients with depression had higher mMRC scores, and lower FEV1 percent predicted, and then 6-Minutes Walk Test compared to those without depression. There was a moderate strength of correlation (r=-0.43) between depression symptoms and FEV1 percent predicted, and strong correlation (r=0.614) between depression symptoms and BODE index. It indicates that BODE index is more accurate to describe symptoms of depression in COPD patients.

  19. Relationship between the management of Graves' disease and the course of Graves' ophthalmopathy: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Suping; Kuang Anren

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To perform literature search and review on the controversial relationship between therapies of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease (GD) and the course of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO). Methods: We searched the database of MEDLINE (1966-2006.3), EMBASE (1984-2005), Cochrane Library(2006 No. 1), CBMdisc (1978.1-2006.4) and CNKI (1994-2006). The methodological quality of the studies selected for review was assessed according to the quality assessment criteria suggested by the Cochrane systematic review guideline. Meta-analysis was performed by RevMan 4.2 software. Results: Eight studies were included in the systematic review. Meta-analysis showed that there was statistically significant difference between mi and other forms of therapy [surgery or antithyroid drugs (ATD)] (test value: 2.31, 5.97, 3.70, 5.55; all P 0.05). There were not yet any studies on the impact between early prevention of hypothyroidism after mi therapy and GO. Conclusions: Based on meta-analysis on literature data, if early measures are not performed to prevent hypothyroidism after mi therapy, it may induce or aggravate GO more frequently than ATD or surgical treatment. Symptomatic relief of GO after 131 I therapy is also less effective than the other 2 forms of therapy. Therefore, 131 I therapy should be delivered carefully in those patients with GO. (authors)

  20. Relationship between Adiponectin Gene Polymorphisms and Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available In recent years, researchers have found that adiponectin (ANP plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD, and low serum concentrations of ANP are associated with AD. Higher plasma ANP level have a protective effect against the development of cognitive decline, suggesting that ANP may affect AD onset. Meanwhile, accumulating evidence supports the crucial role of ANP in the pathogenesis of AD. To study the relationship between ANP gene polymorphisms (rs266729, -11377C>G and rs1501299, G276T and late-onset AD (LOAD, we carried out a case-control study that included 201 LOAD patients and 257 healthy control subjects. Statistically significant differences were detected in the genotype and allelotype frequency distributions of rs266729 and rs1501299 between the LOAD group and the control group, with a noticeable increase in the G and T allelotype frequency distributions in the LOAD group (P 0.05 between the LOAD group and control group, whereas the CG and GT haplotypes were significantly different (P < 0.05, suggesting a negative correlation between the CG haplotype and LOAD onset (OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.57-0.96, P = 0.022, and a positive correlation between the GT haplotype and LOAD onset (OR = 2.29, 95% CI = 1.42-3.68, P = 0.005. Therefore, we speculated that the rs266729 and rs1501299 of ANP gene polymorphisms and the GT and CG haplotypes were associated with LOAD.

  1. Relationships between coronary heart disease risk factors and serum ionized calcium in Kennedy Space Center Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Lisa Ann; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett; Merz, Marion P.; Alford, William R.

    1987-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) employees are reported to be at high risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). Risk factors for CHD include high serum total cholesterol levels, low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), elevated triglyceride, smoking, inactivity, high blood pressure, being male, and being older. Higher dietary and/or serum calcium Ca(++) may be related to a lower risk for CHD. Fifty men and 37 women participated. Subjects were tested in the morning after fasting 12 hours. Information relative to smoking and exercise habits was obtained; seated blood pressures were measured; and blood drawn. KCS men had higher risk values than KCS women as related to HDLC, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. Smoking and nonsmoking groups did not differ for other risk factors or for serum Ca(++) levels. Exercise and sedentary groups differed in total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Serum Ca(++) levels were related to age, increasing with age in the sedentary group and decreasing in the exercisers, equally for men and women. It is concluded that these relationships may be significant to the risk of CHD and/or the risk of bone demineralization in an aging population.

  2. Is there any relationship between coronary artery disease and postprandial triglyceride levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atar, Inci Aslı; Atar, Ilyas; Aydınalp, Alp; Ertan, Cağatay; Bozbaş, Hüseyin; Ozin, Bülent; Yıldırır, Aylin; Müderrisoğlu, Haldun

    2011-05-01

    We aimed to evaluate the relationship between postprandial triglyceride (PPTG) levels and coronary artery disease (CAD). A total of 80 patients were included in this prospective cohort study. Oral lipid loading was used in order to measure PPTG levels. In the fasting state and after the high fat breakfast, triglyceride levels were measured by enzymatic methods at 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th hours. We made subgroup analysis to show the effects of lipid loading on triglyceride levels in patients with and without fasting hypertriglyceridemia. We evaluated triglyceride levels and changes of triglyceride levels in percentages after lipid loading using a general linear model for repeated measures. Sample size analysis was performed. Baseline clinical, demographic and laboratory characteristics of both groups were similar. The peak triglyceride levels were seen at the 4th hour in both groups. Triglyceride levels were significantly increased after lipid-rich-breakfast loading compared to baseline levels in both groups (p<0.001) but these changes were not significant (p=0.279). In patients with elevated fasting triglyceride levels, the area under the plasma triglyceride concentration curve was significantly larger in CAD group than control group (334±103 vs. 233±58 mg/dl, p=0.02). Our data show that in patients who have a high fasting triglyceride level, high levels of PPTG may be related to CAD, however high PPTG levels are not related to CAD in patients with normal fasting levels of triglyceride.

  3. Relationship between nutritional risk and exercise capacity in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in male patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xizheng; Liu, Jinming; Luo, Yanrong; Xu, Xiaowen; Han, Zhiqing; Li, Hailing

    2015-01-01

    Objective The nutritional status of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is associated with their exercise capacity. In the present study, we have explored the relationship between nutritional risk and exercise capacity in severe male COPD patients. Methods A total of 58 severe COPD male patients were enrolled in this study. The patients were assigned to no nutritional risk group (n=33) and nutritional risk group (n=25) according to the Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS, 2002) criteria. Blood gas analysis, conventional pulmonary function testing, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing were performed on all the patients. Results Results showed that the weight and BMI of the patients in the nutritional risk group were significantly lower than in the no nutritional risk group (Pnutritional risk group was significantly higher than that of the nutritional risk group (Pnutritional risk group were significantly lower than those of the no nutritional risk group (Pnutritional risk based on NRS 2002 in severe COPD male patients is supported by these results of this study. PMID:26150712

  4. Mechanical problem-solving strategies in Alzheimer's disease and semantic dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesourd, Mathieu; Baumard, Josselin; Jarry, Christophe; Etcharry-Bouyx, Frédérique; Belliard, Serge; Moreaud, Olivier; Croisile, Bernard; Chauviré, Valérie; Granjon, Marine; Le Gall, Didier; Osiurak, François

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this study was to explore whether the tool-use disorders observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and semantic dementia (SD) are of the same nature as those observed in left brain-damaged (LBD) patients. Recent evidence indicates that LBD patients with apraxia of tool use encounter difficulties in solving mechanical problems, characterized by the absence of specific strategies. This pattern may show the presence of impaired mechanical knowledge, critical for both familiar and novel tool use. So, we explored the strategies followed by AD and SD patients in mechanical problem-solving tasks in order to determine whether mechanical knowledge is also impaired in these patients. We used a mechanical problem-solving task in both choice (i.e., several tools were proposed) and no-choice (i.e., only 1 tool was proposed) conditions. We analyzed quantitative data and strategy profiles. AD patients but not SD patients met difficulties in solving mechanical problem-solving tasks. However, the key finding is that AD patients, despite their difficulties, showed strategy profiles that are similar to that of SD patients or controls. Moreover, AD patients exhibited a strategy profile distinct from the one previously observed in LBD patients. Those observations lead us to consider that difficulties met by AD patients to solve mechanical problems or even to use familiar tools may not be caused by mechanical knowledge impairment per se. In broad terms, what we call apraxia of tool use in AD is certainly not the same as apraxia of tool use observed in LBD patients. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Late radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy. Clinical importance, radiobiological mechanisms and strategies of prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andratschke, Nicolaus; Maurer, Jean; Molls, Michael; Trott, Klaus-Ruediger

    2011-01-01

    The clinical importance of radiation-induced heart disease, in particular in post-operative radiotherapy of breast cancer patients, has been recognised only recently. There is general agreement, that a co-ordinated research effort would be needed to explore all the potential strategies of how to reduce the late risk of radiation-induced heart disease in radiotherapy. This approach would be based, on one hand, on a comprehensive understanding of the radiobiological mechanisms of radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy which would require large-scale long-term animal experiments with high precision local heart irradiation. On the other hand - in close co-operation with mechanistic in vivo research studies - clinical studies in patients need to determine the influence of dose distribution in the heart on the risk of radiation-induced heart disease. The aim of these clinical studies would be to identify the critical structures within the organ which need to be spared and their radiation sensitivity as well as a potential volume and dose effect. The results of the mechanistic studies might also provide concepts of how to modify the gradual progression of radiation damage in the heart by drugs or biological molecules. The results of the studies in patients would need to also incorporate detailed dosimetric and imaging studies in order to develop early indicators of impending radiation-induced heart disease which would be a pre-condition to develop sound criteria for treatment plan optimisation.

  6. Mechanisms of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease in antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus. New therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Pedrera, Chary; Aguirre-Zamorano, M Ángeles; Pérez-Sánchez, Carlos

    2017-08-22

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are 2 highly related autoimmune-rheumatic diseases associated with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular (CV) diseases. Despite the great progresses made in understanding the pathological mechanisms leading to CV diseases in those pathologies, there is still the unmet need to improve long term prognosis. CV diseases in SLE and APS is thought to happen as the result of a complex interaction between traditional CV risk factors, immune deregulation and disease activity, including the synergic effect of cytokines, chemokines, adipokines, proteases, autoantibodies, adhesion receptors, oxidative stress and a plethora of intracellular signalling molecules. Genomic and epigenomic analyses have further allowed the identification of specific signatures explaining the proathero-thrombotic profiles of APS and SLE patients. This review examines the complex role of these heterogeneous factors, and analyses new therapeutic approaches under study to reduce the CV risk in these autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Mechanisms in endocrinology: the crosstalk between thyroid gland and adipose tissue: signal integration in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Ferruccio; Marzullo, Paolo; Rotondi, Mario; Ceccarini, Giovanni; Pagano, Loredana; Ippolito, Serena; Chiovato, Luca; Biondi, Bernadette

    2014-10-01

    Obesity and thyroid diseases are common disorders in the general population and they frequently occur in single individuals. Alongside a chance association, a direct relationship between 'thyroid and obesity' has been hypothesized. Thyroid hormone is an important determinant of energy expenditure and contributes to appetite regulation, while hormones and cytokines from the adipose tissue act on the CNS to inform on the quantity of energy stores. A continuous interaction between the thyroid hormone and regulatory mechanisms localized in adipose tissue and brain is important for human body weight control and maintenance of optimal energy balance. Whether obesity has a pathogenic role in thyroid disease remains largely a matter of investigation. This review highlights the complexity in the identification of thyroid hormone deficiency in obese patients. Regardless of the importance of treating subclinical and overt hypothyroidism, at present there is no evidence to recommend pharmacological correction of the isolated hyperthyrotropinemia often encountered in obese patients. While thyroid hormones are not indicated as anti-obesity drugs, preclinical studies suggest that thyromimetic drugs, by targeting selected receptors, might be useful in the treatment of obesity and dyslipidemia. © 2014 European Society of Endocrinology.

  8. Bite of the cats: relationships between functional integration and mechanical performance as revealed by mandible geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Paolo; Maiorino, Leonardo; Teresi, Luciano; Meloro, Carlo; Lucci, Federico; Kotsakis, Tassos; Raia, Pasquale

    2013-11-01

    Cat-like carnivorous mammals represent a relatively homogeneous group of species whose morphology appears constrained by exclusive adaptations for meat eating. We present the most comprehensive data set of extant and extinct cat-like species to test for evolutionary transformations in size, shape and mechanical performance, that is, von Mises stress and surface traction, of the mandible. Size and shape were both quantified by means of geometric morphometrics, whereas mechanical performance was assessed applying finite element models to 2D geometry of the mandible. Additionally, we present the first almost complete composite phylogeny of cat-like carnivorans for which well-preserved mandibles are known, including representatives of 35 extant and 59 extinct species of Felidae, Nimravidae, and Barbourofelidae. This phylogeny was used to test morphological differentiation, allometry, and covariation of mandible parts within and among clades. After taking phylogeny into account, we found that both allometry and mechanical variables exhibit a significant impact on mandible shape. We also tested whether mechanical performance was linked to morphological integration. Mechanical stress at the coronoid process is higher in sabertoothed cats than in any other clade. This is strongly related to the high degree of covariation within modules of sabertooths mandibles. We found significant correlation between integration at the clade level and per-clade averaged stress values, on both original data and by partialling out interclade allometry from shapes when calculating integration. This suggests a strong interaction between natural selection and the evolution of developmental and functional modules at the clade level.

  9. Structure–mechanics relationships of collagen fibrils in the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriotis, O. G.; Chang, S. W.; Vanleene, M.; Howarth, P. H.; Davies, D. E.; Shefelbine, S. J.; Buehler, M. J.; Thurner, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    The collagen molecule, which is the building block of collagen fibrils, is a triple helix of two α1(I) chains and one α2(I) chain. However, in the severe mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (OIM), deletion of the COL1A2 gene results in the substitution of the α2(I) chain by one α1(I) chain. As this substitution severely impairs the structure and mechanics of collagen-rich tissues at the tissue and organ level, the main aim of this study was to investigate how the structure and mechanics are altered in OIM collagen fibrils. Comparing results from atomic force microscopy imaging and cantilever-based nanoindentation on collagen fibrils from OIM and wild-type (WT) animals, we found a 33% lower indentation modulus in OIM when air-dried (bound water present) and an almost fivefold higher indentation modulus in OIM collagen fibrils when fully hydrated (bound and unbound water present) in phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) compared with WT collagen fibrils. These mechanical changes were accompanied by an impaired swelling upon hydration within PBS. Our experimental and atomistic simulation results show how the structure and mechanics are altered at the individual collagen fibril level as a result of collagen gene mutation in OIM. We envisage that the combination of experimental and modelling approaches could allow mechanical phenotyping at the collagen fibril level of virtually any alteration of collagen structure or chemistry. PMID:26468064

  10. Relationship between mechanical factors and pelvic tilt in adults with and without low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Król, Anita; Polak, Maciej; Szczygieł, Elżbieta; Wójcik, Paweł; Gleb, Klaudia

    2017-01-01

    The assessment of the lumbo-pelvic complex parameters is the basic procedure during the examination of the patients with low back pain syndrome (LBP). The aim of the study was to define the relationship between pelvic tilt and following factors: age, BMI, ability to activate deep abdominal muscles, iliopsoas and hamstrings muscles length, lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis angle value, in adults with and without low back pain. The study covered a group of 60 female students aged 20-26. Average age was 22 years ± 1.83 (median = 22.5 years). In order to investigate the relationship between the anterior pelvic tilt and the analysed variables, simple linear regression and multiple linear regression were carried out. Individuals with and without pain differed significantly in terms of age, p pain differed significantly in terms of the anterior pelvic tilt. The risk of LBP incidence increased with age in the study group.

  11. The relationship between species richness and ecosystem variability is shaped by the mechanism of coexistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tredennick, Andrew T; Adler, Peter B; Adler, Frederick R

    2017-08-01

    Theory relating species richness to ecosystem variability typically ignores the potential for environmental variability to promote species coexistence. Failure to account for fluctuation-dependent coexistence may explain deviations from the expected negative diversity-ecosystem variability relationship, and limits our ability to predict the consequences of increases in environmental variability. We use a consumer-resource model to explore how coexistence via the temporal storage effect and relative nonlinearity affects ecosystem variability. We show that a positive, rather than negative, diversity-ecosystem variability relationship is possible when ecosystem function is sampled across a natural gradient in environmental variability and diversity. We also show how fluctuation-dependent coexistence can buffer ecosystem functioning against increasing environmental variability by promoting species richness and portfolio effects. Our work provides a general explanation for variation in observed diversity-ecosystem variability relationships and highlights the importance of conserving regional species pools to help buffer ecosystems against predicted increases in environmental variability. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  12. A nonalcoholic fatty liver disease cirrhosis model in gerbil : the dynamic relationship between hepatic lipid metabolism and cirrhosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Wei; Guan, Zheng; Brisset, Jean C.; Shi, Qiaojuan; Lou, Qi; Ma, Yue; Suriguga, Su; Ying, Huazhong; Sa, Xiaoying; Chen, Zhenwen; Quax, Wim J.; Chu, Xiaofeng

    2018-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) usually takes decades to develop into cirrhosis, which limits the longitudinal study of NAFLD. This work aims at developing a NAFLD-caused cirrhosis model in gerbil and examining the dynamic relationship between hepatic lipid metabolism and cirrhosis. We fed

  13. Evidence for a close phylogenetic relationship between Melissococcus pluton, the causative agent of European foulbrood disease, and the genus Enterococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, J; Collins, M D

    1994-04-01

    The 16S rRNA gene sequence of Melissococcus pluton, the causative agent of European foulbrood disease, was determined in order to investigate the phylogenetic relationships between this organism and other low-G + C-content gram-positive bacteria. A comparative sequence analysis revealed that M. pluton is a close phylogenetic relative of the genus Enterococcus.

  14. Relationship between common lipoprotein lipase gene sequence variants, hyperinsulinemia, and risk of ischemic heart disease: A population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jørgen; Hansen, Tine Willum; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemia and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) are important determinants of fasting and postprandial plasma triglyceride levels. High insulin and high triglyceride levels are associated with an increased risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD). This study aimed to find out whether common LPL gene se...... sequence variants could change the relationship between insulin and IHD....

  15. Do payers value rarity? : An analysis of the relationship between disease rarity and orphan drug prices in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medic, Goran; Korchagina, Daria; Young, Katherine Eve; Toumi, Mondher; Postma, Maarten Jacobus; Wille, Micheline; Hemels, Michiel

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Orphan drugs have been a highlight of discussions due to their higher prices than non-orphan drugs. There is currently no European consensus on the method of value assessment for orphan drugs. This study assessed the relationship between the prevalence of rare diseases and

  16. RELATIONSHIP OF AIRWAY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS TO RESPIRATORY SYMPTOMS AND DIURNAL PEAK FLOW VARIATION IN PATIENTS WITH OBSTRUCTIVE LUNG-DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRAND, PLP; POSTMA, DS; KERSTJENS, HAM; KOETER, GH

    This study reports on the relationship of airway hyperresponsiveness (AH) with respiratory symptoms and diurnal peak flow expiratory (PEF) variation in 221 hyperresponsive patients with moderately severe airways obstruction. The disease was in a stable phase in all patients. Closely adhering to the

  17. The Role of Various Stressors in the Trigger Mechanism of Raynaud's Disease (Hemorheological and Vascular Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantskava M.M.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of stress reactions are provided by the blood circulation system. In its turn, the adequacy of blood circulation depends on the hemorheological and vascular mechanisms. The changeability of their properties appears to be the basis of the increasing of stress stages. From the viewpoint of biophysical reactions, any change and movement occur with the expenditure and accumulation of energy. Higher level of adaptation energy waste and secondary level take place, when a small stressor entails a small expenditure. There is a maximum possible rate of adaptive energy consumption and at this maximum the organism cannot cope with any additional stimulus. At the same time adaptive and stress diseases develop. Let’s consider the duration and manifestation of Raynaud's disease from the perspective of adaptation diseases and diseases of the third grade, which appears to be the cause of the double stress effect - cold and emotional- physical and psychic. Total of 97 patients with Raynaud's disease were examined. For a new vision of the problem it was necessary to find out how the streessors of various nature impact the hemoreheological status and vascular resistance. For this purpose all the patients were examined for a resistance index of resistive arteries of the hand and the indices of erythrocyte aggregation and deformability. The patients were divided into four subgroups. The first subgroup – the patients after chilblain, the second subgroup – the patients with psychic strerssor, the third subgroup – the patients with prolonged chronic stress, and the fourth subgroup – the patients without the differentiation of the stressors. According to the obtained results, it is obvious that at cold and emotional stress (I and II subgroups the hemorheological and vascular parameters are changed. However, this change (hemorheological and vascular is more pronounced at chronic emotional stress (III subgroup as compared both to the

  18. Involvement of metabolites in early defense mechanism of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) against Ganoderma disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusaibah, S A; Siti Nor Akmar, A; Idris, A S; Sariah, M; Mohamad Pauzi, Z

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the mechanism of interaction between the oil palm and its key pathogen, Ganoderma spp. is crucial as the disease caused by this fungal pathogen leads to a major loss of revenue in leading palm oil producing countries in Southeast Asia. Here in this study, we assess the morphological and biochemical changes in Ganoderma disease infected oil palm seedling roots in both resistant and susceptible progenies. Rubber woodblocks fully colonized by G. boninense were applied as a source of inoculum to artificially infect the roots of resistant and susceptible oil palm progenies. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to measure an array of plant metabolites in 100 resistant and susceptible oil palm seedling roots treated with pathogenic Ganoderma boninense fungus. Statistical effects, univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify key-Ganoderma disease associated metabolic agitations in both resistant and susceptible oil palm root tissues. Ganoderma disease related defense shifts were characterized based on (i) increased antifungal activity in crude extracts, (ii) increased lipid levels, beta- and gamma-sitosterol particularly in the resistant progeny, (iii) detection of heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds, benzo [h] quinoline, pyridine, pyrimidine (iv) elevation in antioxidants, alpha- and beta-tocopherol (iv) degraded cortical cell wall layers, possibly resulting from fungal hydrolytic enzyme activity needed for initial penetration. The present study suggested that plant metabolites mainly lipids and heterocyclic aromatic organic metabolites could be potentially involved in early oil palm defense mechanism against G. boninense infection, which may also highlight biomarkers for disease detection, treatment, development of resistant variety and monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Parkinson's disease: Studies on the pathology of the disease and the mechanism of action of the neurotoxin MPTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amato, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    In humans and animals, exposure to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetra-hydropyridine (MPTP) causes certain clinical, pathological, and neurochemical features of Parkinson's disease (PD). MPTP is metabolized in the brain by monoamine oxidase (MAOb) to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP + ), which is selectively accumulated and concentrated by high affinity uptake mechanisms into catecholamine neurons. We have demonstrated high affinity binding of MPP + to neuromelanin which may result in a toxic intraneuronal sequestration of MPP + . The involvement of neuromelanin is further supported by the demonstration that monkeys pretreated with chloroquine prior to the administration of MPTP are protected from MPTP induced neurotoxicity. Decreases in serotonin levels have been reported in the brains and spinal fluid of patients with both Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. In an effort to investigate the pathology of serotonin neurons in postmortem brain tissue from Parkinson's and Alzheimer's patients, [ 3 H]citalopram was characterized as a means of labeling serotonin uptake sites present on serotonin terminals

  20. Relationship Between Beta Cell Dysfunction and Severity of Disease Among Critically Ill Children: A STROBE-Compliant Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping-Ping; Lu, Xiu-Lan; Xiao, Zheng-Hui; Qiu, Jun; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2016-05-01

    Although beta cell dysfunction has been proved to predict prognosis among humans and animals, its prediction on severity of disease remains unclear among children. The present study was aimed to examine the relationship between beta cell dysfunction and severity of disease among critically ill children.This prospective study included 1146 critically ill children, who were admitted to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of Hunan Children's Hospital from November 2011 to August 2013. Information on characteristics, laboratory tests, and prognostic outcomes was collected. Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-β, evaluating beta cell function, was used to divide all participants into 4 groups: HOMA-β = 100% (group I, n = 339), 80% ≤ HOMA-β multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), mechanical ventilation (MV) and mortality. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the risk of developing poor outcomes among patients in different HOMA-β groups, with group I as the reference group.Among 1146 children, incidence of HOMA-β decrement of HOMA-β (P < 0.01). C-reactive protein and procalcitonin levels, rather than white blood cell, were significantly different among 4 groups (P < 0.01). In addition, the worst SOFA score and the worst PRISMIII score increased with declined HOMA-β. For example, the worst SOFA score in group I, II, III, and IV was 1.55 ± 1.85, 1.71 ± 1.93, 1.92 ± 1.63, and 2.18 ± 1.77, respectively. Furthermore, patients with declined HOMA-β had higher risk of developing septic shock, MODS, MV, and mortality, even after adjusting age, gender, myocardial injury, and lung injury. For instance, compared with group I, t